The Band
Home

History
Members
Library
Discography
Videography
Filmography
Pictures
Audio files
Video clips
Tape archive
Concerts
Related artists
Merchandise
Guestbook
Chat Room
What's New?
Search

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, April 2015


Entered at Thu Apr 30 22:23:05 CEST 2015 from (84.215.225.138)

Posted by:

jh

hm. i guess it *is* Harrison... the photo confused me. in the pic he looks like a late-70s Rick, very skinny, clean-shaven and with the same hair. whereas Dylan looks like the 67-68-69 "hide-away" Woodstock period. Rick at that time would have had facial hair and look much younger. my mistake. note to self: time for a visit to the optician again.


Entered at Thu Apr 30 22:18:33 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: the photo

Any comments on the trees? Looks like winter.


Entered at Thu Apr 30 21:13:52 CEST 2015 from (32.216.255.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

My guess is that it was taken in Woodstock when George visited Dylan. There are other photos from that trip where George appears to be wearing the the same tennis shoes. My guess about the photographer would be Patti Boyd, as she was on that trip with Geortge, but I'm not 100% certain. I did a search for the image and I think that it may be in the book 'Behind That Locked Door'. I don't have the book, but perhaps there are photo credits in the book that someone could check.


Entered at Thu Apr 30 20:59:47 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: the photo

Chrissie Hynde & Chris Rea


Entered at Thu Apr 30 20:21:04 CEST 2015 from (32.216.255.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Photo

Don't know any details about the photo jan, but that looks like George Harrison and Bob to me.


Entered at Thu Apr 30 19:48:51 CEST 2015 from (84.215.225.138)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

This photo of Rick Danko and Bob Dylan, ca 1970(?) just appeared on Facebook. We haven't seen it before -- anyone know when and where this was taken and who took it?


Entered at Thu Apr 30 10:15:23 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: In A Station

Dan, thats a great version. thanks


Entered at Wed Apr 29 17:39:32 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Worth a listen.


Entered at Wed Apr 29 15:47:34 CEST 2015 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: In a Station (1976)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-s4QqSgh6k The Band - In A Station 1976 Palo Alto, on You Tube


Entered at Wed Apr 29 02:37:02 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: News inaccurate?

John D: Thanks for pointing out the joni mitchell site and what it said TODAY. Let us hope the media report is not accurate.


Entered at Wed Apr 29 02:36:13 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Inaccurate?'news'

John D: Thanks for pointing out the joni mitchell site and what it said TODAY. Let us hope the media report is not accurate.


Entered at Wed Apr 29 01:49:17 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joni Mitchell

From USA Today 10 minutes ago.

On Tuesday, TMZ reported Mitchell was unconscious and in a coma. Both TMZ and The Associated Press reported Mitchell's longtime friend, Leslie Morris, sought to be named Mitchell's conservator in a court filing on Tuesday.

"Contrary to rumors circulating on the Internet today, Joni is not in a coma," reads a statement on JoniMitchell.com. "Joni is still in the hospital - but she comprehends, she's alert, and she has her full senses. A full recovery is expected."


Entered at Wed Apr 29 01:15:12 CEST 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Joni Mitchell

It is perplexing to now read that Joni Mitchell is in a coma and unresponsive. The information about her illness has been obscure and unclear since her admission to hospital and now this! Great concern.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 22:25:00 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JQ: Remember that May 5, one short week from now, is the release date of a live album by four great guitaristas - Albert Lee, Amos Garrett, David Wilcox and a guy named James Burton. See link, top-right.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 21:30:38 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Garcia

Jerry could play pretty much any kind of music with anybody.His feel was terrific.Warren Haynes is another.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 21:28:33 CEST 2015 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Head Hands & Feet

Albert Lee lead the Everly Bros 1980s band and can indeed play anything. Like Steve Cropper he's a great sideman …I separate Ry because he's also a great solo artist. Having seen both Steve Cropper and Albert Lee as headliners, they're not great solo players.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 17:53:02 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Nashville Sidemen

The place is loaded with superb and largely unknown players. Albert Lee might lead that pack - a Brit that can play anything but excels at country!


Entered at Tue Apr 28 15:26:59 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "Last Waltz" signed by RR

I.m not sure if this is known or otherwise but I thought I'd mention it anyway. An inscription on a copy of "The Last Waltz" reads:

"To Badlands / The Bestest Little Record / Store in England / Robbie / Robertson".

It is shown in an advertisement for Badlands that appears in the latest issue of THE BRIDGE, a Dylan fanzine.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 15:06:23 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: I agree about Peter Green, all intense sustain - and pre-Santana. But he was no 'mere' sideman, in the early going he was, I believe, the frontish man of Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac (a name that must bear some relation to Viv Stanshall's Dark Brown Overcoat).


Entered at Tue Apr 28 14:25:54 CEST 2015 from (129.42.208.182)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: The Waterboys

JT, I saw the new Waterboys show at The Ridgefield Playhouse last night. Wonderful show. Mike Scott has assembled a great band for these shows. They did most of the new record, a bunch of Waterboys classics and a fun cover of Purple Rain. The sound was perfect. I think your going to enjoy it. If you can, get to your show early. I think you have Connor Kennedy and Minstrel opening. They're a very popular young Hudson Valley band well worth catching.


Entered at Tue Apr 28 10:25:53 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Fred - cheers mate. I'm simmering nicely thanks. I'd personally stick with Rodgers - partly out of old fashioned Liverpudlian solidarity and partly because he's young, vibrant and enthusiastic, flexible and nearly won us the league last time out. Sure he's made mistakes but his ability is unquestionable.

Carmen - superb that isn't it. As indulgent as guitar solos can be - and we Robbie fans know all about the magic of sparsity equating to real guitar genius - on that one the pay off once the song's piano intro finally kicks in more than legitimises every preceding Bruce lick.

Fascinating thread on the guitar 'feel'

Can I throw two into the mix. I agree re Steve Cropper pete. However, he does have something of a rival I believe in the form of the incredible Ry.

As for feel, I may be off beam with my interpretation of feel but I've always felt Peter Green back in the day had something that set him apart on that score. An exquisite touch that seemed to transcend most else you'd hear.


Entered at Mon Apr 27 20:19:08 CEST 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ron Casat

Ron Casat: an example of what is required! Too soon gone (again).

"Casat’s keyboard and vocal skills made him one of the area’s most in-demand session players, with him lending those gifts to work by such artists as Billy Cowsill, Tom Phillips, Maria Muldaur, Donald Ray Johnson, James Keelaghan and Diamond Joe White."


Entered at Mon Apr 27 17:04:51 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I'd add Amos Garrett. Though he has a good half-dozen albums under his own name, I think it's been his work as a sideman that sets him apart.

Bonk: Thanks for noting the recent passing of Amos's long-time colleague, Ron Casat - the sideman's sideman, I guess.


Entered at Mon Apr 27 09:40:20 CEST 2015 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Steve Cropper. Greatest studio sideman guitarist ever.


Entered at Mon Apr 27 08:20:16 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.213)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, i agree that Duane was a true feel player.


Entered at Mon Apr 27 06:02:33 CEST 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Adam,

Did any of The Meters play/sit in with The Neville Brothers this week? Some of Dr John's guys played with both outfits (as well as The Wild Tchoupitoulas) at and around Jazz Fest this year.


Entered at Mon Apr 27 01:49:09 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Last Night

Bill M, you missed an incredible tribute to Levon Helm last night. Mike McKenna was a special guest; as was Jimmy Bowskill and the Weber Brothers. The Webers doing an amazing version of King Harvest. 12 piece band led by Lance Anderson former producer of Garth. The place was completely sold out. A great tribute to Levon; whose third anniversary of his death was last weekend for those who didn't know.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 23:54:44 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Went to New Orleans this weekend to visit a friend. Had an awesome time! We met Dr. John walking down the street in the French Quarter. Saw two wonderful shows by the Dr. and the Meter Men (3/4ths of the original Meters). That was one incredible show... unbelievable musicians.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 22:15:37 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: My Favorite Feel Player

I proudly own the Duane Allman box set.It has all his varied session work,live work,work with the Allmans and The Dominos.Duane more than felt it,he fit in and uplifted every song he played.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 21:06:28 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jonathan Taplin is a great facebook follow.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 20:32:32 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Favorite Side Man

Danny Whitten


Entered at Sun Apr 26 20:28:27 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.215)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

One interesting interview with Kortchmar. There's a lot of em. Aside from seeing him play with big names, and in house bands for large events ( he & Keb Mo were the musical directors for the Salute the Blues event) , I got to see him perform with a few other native NYer names players in a small dive with amazing sound a few times. No cover, throw money in the bucket when it comes around a couple of times. Started at 9:30ish, one long break, went till about two in the morning each time.

A visit to his allmusic page would give you a far better list of credits than that interview supplies. Note, allmusic is not always complete, or accurate.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 18:54:30 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.215)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT, I'm pressed for time & will continue to be for a good while. You raised two separate issues entirely though.

Danny Kortchmar is a guitarist who has a distinctive feel of his own ( i will save my description of what he sounds like for when i wrote about him elsewhere. But while i would not necessarily define him as the typical feel player, he certainly can disappear into and compliment anyone's music on the highest level.

Kortchmar is also responsible for being instrumental and an an instrumentalist is many iconic and irreplaceable albums. James Taylor, Carole King, Jackson Browne, Don Henley..... Kortchmar has as much of an imprint on Henley's sound and songwriting as henley. The first 2 solo albums, Kooch co wrote many of the songs, and produced.i hav reasen to suspect the sonics were more him. the third he was uninvolved, it was the least successful. Then was brought back for the fourth.

Blues, feel players, other rock and roll, don't get me started. Quick- today's world, Jimmy Vivno, Arthur Neilson, Andy Falco, three great guitarist feel players. andy, though he makes his living in jamgrass, is one amazing rock, blues, jazz guitarist of the highest order. Always has been....Arthur Neilson- another bad man.... Arthur, Andy, both can run the gamut including country. Vivino is more limited on country but is more versed in jazz......Gotta run.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 18:07:15 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Guitar Sidemen

Jeff A and Carmen: The whole issue of 'feel' has brought to the forefront the sideman as vital. Who were the malleable sidemen who made the difference? Waddy Wachtel is one who comes to mind. There are so many others. Many were sometimes front-and-centre and other times felt comfortable making an album happen for someone else. Lets have a discussion about guitar sidemen. I look forward to the thoughts of everyone here and so I won't add any names for now.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 17:04:26 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.215)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Carmen, I can understand synapses involved in expression not firing as we wish. For a few years now, I've been dealing with it. For example, I might mean to say, that blue car just ran the light- but might say, that white car just ran the light.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 16:32:15 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.15)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: whatcha done with the gun hon?

Interesting posts, Norbert and sadavid. A less-learned take on ATGD is that the divide was the stage-lip. Does he follow his dream of stardom or does he not? As I said back in the days of Julie, who attended clubs in the Catskills back in the day, the song contains a number of lines that could have worked in Borsht Belt gags.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 16:20:29 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The Big Pink Food Truck

Subject: Food From Big Pink

As most of you already know I’m rebuilding a 1948 Ford pickup into a Big Pink food truck (Woodstock food niche).

The hydraulic Big Pink roof opens automatically; the backside rises 100% vertical with the menu and clip art foods painted on the inside, whereas the front side lowers a 100% horizontal, becoming a sort of table. Behind that Els and I are standing in the basement, cooking on Garth’s Lowrey organ. We’re currently going thru the archives here in the hunt for fast food and ice creams names.

Anyway the next time you visit Germany and see Big Pink, just stop and drop by .... there could be a Hamburger with your name on it .... (give your IP number and get 10% off).

.... endless opportunities .... that's what I like about capitalism.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 13:24:21 CEST 2015 from (58.104.23.162)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

On the linked page there is an alternate take of Going Going Gone with Dylan playing on his own. Is this on an official release? Does anybody know what else is available in terms of outtakes/alternate versions of stuff from Planet Waves?


Entered at Sun Apr 26 05:30:47 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: DAWES

I went out to dinner in Philly tonight - decide to just go to Manayunk instead of going all the way into the city. I see a bunch of people standing on sidewalk outside Main Street Records - Dawes is playing inside the store - I ended up grabbing a beer with my wife and took in the whole show. Spontaneous and great night - any body else in the Philly area catch this?


Entered at Sun Apr 26 05:23:16 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Subject: Bruce

Jeff- your right - Feel player in the technical is not what I wanted to say - your description is exactly really what I meant - its really the feeling you get when he plays - Neil Knoffler and David Gilmore do it for me too. RR is still my favorite. You know I once read that early on Bruce had a deep respect for Eddie Van Halen - but I was never a fan.


Entered at Sun Apr 26 02:04:10 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.13)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Carmen, I've always thought that Bruce is an excellent guitar player and musician. You are entitled to your opinion, but, imho, i have to say that it would take a whole helluva lot of experience contrary to what I've seen & heard over the last 40 or so years , to make me even consider him to be "one of the best feel players ever." To me, Bruce has a pretty specific sound and feel, and though he can jump in and play with people, and various kinds of people and music, his accompaniment, & solos, so far, from what I've seen, you'll always know it's him. He's always musically correct, he's never out of place, but that's very different. I'd be happy to learn that he's able to get lost , disappear into playing the perfect part, tone, feel for those other songs & musics, and not sound like he generally has sounded for 40 years. A feel player, a great feel player is some one who can come from nowhere, be presented with something new, and come up with the perfect part, be it rhythm, lead, bass, drums, keys, sax, the vocals, whatever, for the song, the music, or the music and the lyrics. Bruce certainly has great feel for his own songs, and when he plays covers, his parts & solos of the covers are wonderful too, but, they sound like him. A great feel player- that's the player you want to hire for your session, cAuse he or she will feel you and your song.And your other players. That's the player you want to hire to fill in for your band member who got hit with a bad flu. Cause they will give you what you need, and it isn't restricted.

Everything boils down to feel. For me, to consider some one of the greatest feel players ever, they gotta be exceptionally well rounded.....However, You can have a identifiable sound and still be one of the greatest feel players ever..... . Johnnie Johnson was one of the greatest feel musicians ever. And to a skilled set of ears, usually identifiable. Now jump to Neil Young.... from what i've seen, i'd have to say not one of the greatest feel players ever...... But he has a great feel....You want feel players, you search amongst the greatest of the great session rats...


Entered at Sat Apr 25 19:06:52 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Carmen, I had no idea that there was accompanying video to the brilliant "Piece de Resistance" boot.


Entered at Sat Apr 25 16:24:03 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject:

Sure Mike - Kinda puts to bed all criticism Bruce gets for not being a terrific guitar player. He is one of the best feel players ever IMHO.


Entered at Sat Apr 25 16:05:41 CEST 2015 from (65.93.116.167)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Prove it . . .

Carmen, don't know about Al but thanks.


Entered at Sat Apr 25 15:58:49 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Poverty in history

I'll second that, Sadavid thanks.

In the 16th century Dutch sailors had managed to find the way to the East (Indies), it made Holland rich (VOC).

The same time, in neighbor country Germany, the little farmers where desperately poor. Every year in spring those German farmers came to Holland to work the land. They started at 2am to mow the grass, (dew still on the grass), worked 16 hours a day and earned very little.

After the harvest season those “Johannes mowers” went back to Germany, for safety they traveled in groups. Never the less a lot of them were robbed and killed and never saw home again.

Only a few of them managed to start a trading business, some still exist today and have grown into big companies.


Entered at Sat Apr 25 12:59:34 CEST 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: “Across the Great Divide”

Enjoyed that mini-essay from sadavid.


Entered at Sat Apr 25 06:54:32 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: prove it

Al - one more for you


Entered at Sat Apr 25 05:40:43 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.145)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: interesting article/interview on Neville Brothers

From the "Wall Street Journal", no less.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 19:04:08 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Richard from the Spencer interview, 1985: It's amazing to play places like Chicago. One night we played the old Auditorium Theater and all our die-hard fans showed up. Chicago's always been real good to us. Two nights later, we played at the University of Chicago, in a 900 seat hall. It's real cozy, like a small Carnegie Hall, and it was all their kids ... our old fans' kids.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 18:28:19 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kerrin, that info is incorrect. I don't know how that wrong date got affixed to that show, but that recording is from the November show.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 14:42:03 CEST 2015 from (219.97.127.120)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: That Toddlin' Town

Pat B., you may well be correct, but I have that Mandel Hall recording (not the CD) and it's dated July 1st 1983, making it the second show on the comeback tour, or maybe the first if Joyous Lake was a kind of a warm up set.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 13:51:21 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Chaka

Chaka Khan with The CBS Late Show Orchestra. Elaine Caswell, Catherine Russell, Tawatha Agee, Vaneese Thomas (Rufus's daughter), & Curtis King on accompanying vocals.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 13:42:07 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: Herr Klopp at the Kop for next season? Whaddya think?

Best of luck with your health issues.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 11:53:15 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

Just realised Carmen.

As you were.

Put it down to the Palsy!!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 24 11:46:33 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Pulling rank on Carmen :-0)

Sorry Carmen but as the resident Bruce nut job I've got to raise you on that one. Great as your link is, the one I've linked surely has to be the ultimate Incident.

Hasn't it?

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 24 04:27:44 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Nothing but a link to an Earle interview..... i thought it worth reading...


Entered at Fri Apr 24 03:37:36 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Web: My link

Subject: Springsteen "New York City Serenade" at the Main Point Feb. 1975

Yea - this is just a great song. Enjoy.


Entered at Fri Apr 24 03:10:22 CEST 2015 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Ron Casat

RIP Mr. Casat. One of the best in the business!


Entered at Thu Apr 23 22:02:54 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Sexsmith

Not just one of the best writers around. Check out his Youtube file. Dude sings a lot of Dylan and a lot of everything else. All quite well.

Link is to a version of 'Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter'.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 21:37:32 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: drifters and rounders

The farmers, the sailor, the servant, even the thief – they’re all happy to identify their trades. The guy in “Across the Great Divide” is harder to pin down. Which isn’t surprising: if we call him anything, it might be “the wastrel” or “the black sheep.” He’s the restless, footloose one that didn’t finish school, can’t seem to hold a job, can’t keep his hands to himself.

All his life, folks have been pestering him to Do The Right Thing.
“They told me, get a job, and set yourself a goal,” he might say, but that’s never worked for him.
“I did have a goal once,” he deadpans, “I tried to cut my wrists.”
But he couldn’t see that through either, and just went on a bender instead.

Everyone tells him he needs to straighten out and Just Stick to It – take a ride to the right side and join the rest of us. Nine to five, nice wife, nice kids, chicken on Sunday after services at First Baptist. Well . . . Molly’s sweet, but the days are getting shorter . . . .

” But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory . . . . Sally she's going to . . . sivilize me, and I can't stand it.” –Mark Twain


Entered at Thu Apr 23 18:58:14 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Mandel Hall show at University of Chicago was 11/6/83. They had played the Auditorium in Chicago on Friday the 4th then played a student-only show two days later. It was recorded for WXRT by the estimable Tim Powell.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 14:06:52 CEST 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: And then there were four, or 8 if you count the Cate Brothers

Rod, The info for this cd on amazon is a little off. The show was recorded in 1983, not 1984. It was a radio broadcast, as most of these grey area cd's that are sprouting up are. The line up was the Band with the Cate brothers, so Jim Weider isn't on this.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 11:20:19 CEST 2015 from (58.104.15.75)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

This auction house had some of Rick and Levon's instruments up for sale.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 10:29:10 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: And Then There Were Four

Does anyone know anything about this release on Amazon - The Band In Chicago 1984. I'd be interested if it had Jim on guitar but maybe not if it's with the Cate Bros.

They also have the SNACK concert.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 09:01:18 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pioneer's Tale is the perfect one. That;s the lot then!


Entered at Thu Apr 23 05:36:01 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Congrats, Peter. btw, I vote for Pioneer's Tale.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 05:34:37 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm taking a moment from watching a total eclipse of the sun to inform all that I paid Carly a ton of money to tell me who that song was about. Perhaps someday I'll share.


Entered at Thu Apr 23 01:51:29 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.39)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Richie Furay interview linked.

His new record is doing well. I don't care for the "single" being promoted...We Were the Dreamers..... the riff is mostly his own riff from Just For Me & You.... the music & lyrics just dont grab me, or really do anything for me...but, I still enjoy his performances of his past work....And despite the fact that i disagree with his politics and can't relate to his religious beliefs at all....because he has found a way to tone it down...the guy still connects for me....he's okay. He's not a pompous ass who thinks he is the only right person, or only his views count....


Entered at Thu Apr 23 00:27:34 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Our first venture into fiction publishing is linked. "Foreign Affairs" by Dart Travis, set in 1972. Humorous novel. May be of interest … it'll look better in a couple of weeks when we get the iBooks version up. But if you have kindle, it's ready to go.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 23:16:32 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Digital audio broadcast radio

I have several DAB (digital audio broadcast) radios, including one in my car. Like so many things, there are pluses and minuses.

I can take my portable DAB radio with me on my travels and, when I arrive at wherever, just turn it on. If the radio was set to BBC Radio 4 when I left home, then BBC Radio 4 will just come on, as if I had not moved location at all. No need to retune at all.

There are, in Britain, radio channels that you can get on a DAB radio but not on an FM radio. These include the BBC World Service, BBC Radio 4 Extra and BBC Radio 6 Music. On the other hand, I do not believe that any of the BBC local radio stations yet broadcast on DAB, though I could be a bit out of date on this. Certainly, where I live, our local commercial station is not available on DAB.

Listening to the DAB radio in the car can be much the same as listening to a modern FM radio in the car - there is generally no break in reception. However, there are "dead spots" on our roads. In these places, the DAB radio just goes silent without any warning, whereas the FM tends to fade and waver first, so you have some warning and, in some cases, can ping around to continue listening.

In terms of broadcast quality, I believe that even the BBC varies the quality of its digital broadcasts. Its classical channel (BBC Radio Three) is, as I recall, broadcast at higher quality than its speech radio channels (BBC Radio 4 and the DAB-only BBC Radio 4 Extra) or its popular music channels (BBC Radio 1, BBC Radio 2 and the DAB-only BBC Radio 6 Music).

Another consideration is that the BBC was an early adopter of DAB and went for a particular technical specification of its own. And a different standard has been adopted elsewhere. Whereas an FM radio is universal (that is, it can be used pretty much across the whole world), this may not be the case in the future.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 21:39:48 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Bill, love ya, I knew it wasn’t Jagger! :-)

(Salvation time).


Entered at Wed Apr 22 19:58:57 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Yes, it certainly seems that Jack was based on Hamlet. But then Bob gave Hamlet away, so presumably he found him a bit too much to handle? And not just too much to feed?

Peter, I think the thing about chicken and bones is that they're referring to cooked chicken. Cooking makes the bones more brittle, and they can splinter when a dog eats them and cause a lot of damage. When people feed raw food diets the dog's system is supposed to be able to handle it. But personally I wouldn't take the chance. I use powdered egg shells for calcium rather than bones. Also I should say that we've had four dogs one at a time, not all at once!


Entered at Wed Apr 22 15:11:36 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Howlin' Wolf and his howlin' dog

Lisa: As I suspect you recall from your browsing through the archives, I believe that Jack the dog and Hamlet the dog were one and the same. This would make Crazy Chester Dylan, who gifted Hamlet to Rick (who was therefore tagged with singing that particular verse). Also, wouldn't that be Hamlet-Jack in John Simon's MFBP-era "My Name is Jack". The Greta Garbo reference would reflect Dylan's reason for upping sticks and moving to Woodstock, "I vaunt to be alone."

sadavid: while I prefer to see Chester as Mr Dylan, a case could be made for Mr Burnett. Or perhaps my boyhood barber (and likely Neil Young's too), the unfortunately named Chester Butt.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 14:56:24 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.10)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Norbert. In fact, I'm so vain that Carly wrote a song about me. And not about Pat B.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 14:46:21 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: wolf eat chicken

Bill M: Oops, I didn't mean that Chester . . . I meant this Chester . . . .


Entered at Wed Apr 22 12:46:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There has also been a long argument in the hifi mags that digital, in spite of the claims, is a lower quality audio signal than FM,


Entered at Wed Apr 22 12:44:46 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Digital radio

Quite a debate here, as 20 million cars don't have digital radio, and no one is desperate to go out and pay £200 plus fitting to get an adaptor. The government were trying to force through a digital switch, but people in their 80s and 90s don't want to go out and get a new radio with different controls.

A lot of digital radio was plain bad ideas like an audio books BBC channel. I think it's died. More audio books are listened to in cars, and a broadcast is crap because if you stop for petrol a pee or a coffee you lose the story. A CD or iPod stops with you.

We have digital radios at home, but after a day fiddling around, we confirmed our view that we only ever wanted BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 2. We don't even listen to local stations.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 12:36:46 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Well Jan are you ready for this?

Norway is to become the first country in the world to switch off its FM radio signal in 2017.

The government has announced there are currently 22 national digital radio stations broadcasting and there is space on the digital platform for a further 20.

However, there are only five national outlets broadcasting on FM, it added.

NRK, Norway’s public service broadcaster, will switch off its FM service before the commercial sector.

UK analyst James Cridland told the BBC it will be a “nervous time” for the global radio industry when the first FM transmitter is switched off in Norway on January 11 2017.

“I hope Norwegians have done enough to retain radio’s audience and make sure that those that haven’t made the switch will make that switch,” he said.

“I think while with television it is important for you to go out and buy a new set, radio listeners may think they’ll just play their CD collection.

“If it obliterates the radio audience it may mean we are even less keen to turn off FM and AM in the UK [and other countries].”


Entered at Wed Apr 22 10:48:10 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

p.s. Bill & Pat don't think that song is about you two (I know you're both vain)

ok, we're off for some shopping in Holland.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 10:10:04 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Dogs

Lisa, Dylan on Hamlet:

"That's really the way to do a recording: in a peaceful, relaxed setting. In somebody's basement. With the windows open ... and a dog lying on the floor."


Entered at Wed Apr 22 09:11:41 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Bill, Pat, Peter and you and me, for when we grow old (Dutch song Café Billiard by Toon Hermans, link):

Arie was about eighty

Willem was about the same age

They found life still beautiful

They still walked upright

They saw each other every day

In the village, in that small café

And they loved to tease and to rag

When they played billiard together, those two

Café billiard, café billiard….

Little green for the lonely heart

Score board says click, the ball says tick

That ball is you, the other is me….

Always a cigar and a drink

But they drank slower now

They didn’t look at their watch

Absorbed by their play

And above the green sheet

They just looked younger, yes

Trying to make each other in

But they couldn’t live without each other

Café billiard, café billiard

Little green for the lonely heart

(and then the door opens and there is you and me ;-)


Entered at Wed Apr 22 08:50:56 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’d forgotten Michael McLure reading The Canterbury Tales excerpt at The Last Waltz. S A David may be onto something here! A few tweaks to make it sound more Chaucerian (and let’s forget that the tale title reflects on the teller, not the content.) I think The Waggoner’s Tale sounds better than The Trucker’s Tale. Maybe The Busker’s Tale replaces The Hobo’s Tale. I’m worried about The Cowboy’s Tale too.

Molly’s got a gun, they’re in a one horse town, they’re crossing the Great Divide and bringing "children" down to the riverside (which sounds like crossing the River Jordan so a revival meeting, or just reaching a goal). Dunno. It sounds Western, but a “pinball machine” doesn’t sound 19th century. They were invented in the 1930s. But that’s the printed lyric and I never really noticed it. Not that Robbie would have Googled to check it in those days. Itinerant is good as in Itinerant Worker. It’s Fall and there’s a Harvest Moon. Sounds agricultural. They're not cowboys except in the sense of a "character in a cowboy movie" not people herding cattle. Don’t know.

Also how come you’re not supposed to feed chicken to dogs because of the small bones, but foxes appear to like them? The foxes take lots of pigeons round here and they have smaller bones, and all that’s left is feathers.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 04:54:22 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Tribute to Paul Butterfield

That was a whole lotta noise about nothing.Guitar shreddingly awful.Paul deserved better.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 04:16:29 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Feeding the dog

As a person who has made dog food for our own four dogs, I feel for Chester. It's a lot of work and $$$. But at least you know for sure what they're getting. Ours have always been on the smallish size though. Something tells me that Jack was big. Hamlet-sized?


Entered at Wed Apr 22 03:46:15 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That RRHOF Butterfield tribute- the guitarists shoulda been any combination of two out of Jimmy Vivino, Arthur Neilson and Andy Falco. It woulda tore the joint apart.... There's many others better suited than those two used ..... Harp, there's harp players more suited too. Jimmy woulda been a far more appropriate singer too.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 02:01:50 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: Butterfield tribute


Entered at Wed Apr 22 00:54:19 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.156)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: ... and they called him crazy! ...

sadavid: You raise a good point. Chester ate a lot of chicken, but he bought even more than he needed. His cabin on the outskirts of Nazereth was so well stocked that he was in the habit of feeding it to his dog whenever he could. Still, that sort of thing can ge pretty tiresome. Hence the sign announcing free room and board for anyone willing to feed the dog.


Entered at Wed Apr 22 00:49:47 CEST 2015 from (58.104.4.216)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The signed cover of the Record Store Day Basement Tapes.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 21:20:32 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: free range

Pat B: Also impressed with Peter's Table of Contents, although I'm not sure I buy the "cowboy." Itinerant for sure. Anyway we now know cowboys do do stuff we thought they didn't do. And it's not at all clear the tale-teller will be the one being fed the chicken. Like Chester, he may have already eaten more than any man's seen . . . .


Entered at Tue Apr 21 21:12:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Always look on the bright side of life

Al, glad to hear it's calming. Think, it could have been Balls' palsy instead of Bell's palsy. That's the one you REALLY don't want.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 20:56:39 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: I haven't seen it, but I believe it's a repro of the 12-song publisher's demo that was sent to the Byrds, Manfred Mann et al, complete with nearly blank cover. And I believe there were three grades made for Record Store Day - normal black vinyl, 180-gram black vinyl and pink vinyl. All of the pink and at least some of the 180-gram were signed individually by Garth. The chart at the link says it was the ninth-best seller on RSD.

Al E: Good to hear things've improved, especially the mood. By the way, do you call it Feckin' Bell's Palsy or Bell's Feckin' Palsy?


Entered at Tue Apr 21 19:52:20 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Distorted gobs and all that

Thanks to Pete, Jerry, Pat and Rog for their insights on the Bells Palsy. Appreciate it.

I'm in a slightly better place with it all right now. The steroids course is finished and the gob still makes me look like Charles Laughton in the belfry and I'm still struggling to eat, drink and smile but the doctor has prescribed an eye gel which seems to be resolving the problem of the 'dry eye' which was by far the most troublesome aspect to deal with as it was preventing me doing any fecking thing.

To think it's taken this little episode for me to realise the reason why I've been blinking away once every five seconds for 60 odd years.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 21 19:45:00 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, very well done although no real cowboy would eat chicken on Sunday.

Bill M, what the heck is that?


Entered at Tue Apr 21 18:57:37 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: also from RSD: "The Basement Tape" on vinyl

And then there's this, sold autographed and numbered by Garth ... Did anyone here get it?


Entered at Tue Apr 21 18:44:25 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Norbert: It sounds like an interesting album, with titles like those. You could probably also use them as lines in a remake of "Who Do You Love".

Peter V: Excellent effort!

Roger: I like "Grey Fox" too. Building on sadavid's post about changing farming practices, on a trip through a sagebrush segment of the BC interior (Lillooet to Kamloops) a decade ago I was surprised to learn that underneath all those hillside acres of weird black netting was ginseng for the Japanese market.

The link's to a record-store-day LP that pairs Doug Paisley and Phil Ochs. I believe that Garth Hudson appears on Paisley's last two solo albums, from which this material may be drawn.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 17:06:04 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Charity

My legacy:

Two nude minutes in ice water to reduce traffic lights.

Bicycle mountain growing old protest climb (2x).

Bear till you drop contest to save the world

24 hours in prison for depressed clowns.

One month without waste for freedom.

and I walked 20 miles against boldness.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 16:38:31 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bugger! Missed the Trucker's Tale at #5.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 16:36:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Brown Canterbury Tales

Pity, the two US Canterbury towns are Connecticut and New Hampshire. Never mind . I like the concept. So in sequence

The cowboy’s tale

The hobo’s tale

The soldier’s tale

The errant son’s tale

The lonely lover’s tale

The minstrel’s tale

The sailor’s tale

The weatherman’s tale

The thief’s tale

The servant’s tale

The farmer’s tale.



Entered at Tue Apr 21 15:49:21 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: theme time radio hour

JQ: It's almost a concept album - 75 per cent, 9 of 12 tunes. Slightly higher percentage if you include "Get Up Jake" in the calculation.

The concept or theme is a little difficult to label precisely, but there might be a clue in the remark (somewhere . . . ) that the album could have been titled _Harvest_. Consider that three-quarters of the songs are narratives of retrospect, tales from the tellers' pasts. You could almost frame it like a _Canterbury Tales_ -- x number of dusty travellers find themselves in a roadhouse on the borderline . . . in turn, each takes a swallow of something refreshing and begins to reminisce . . . .

It's not quite that tidy, but that's the gist.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 15:08:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JQ: As the book "Confederates In The Attic" indicates just about anything set in the South between 1860 and 2015 could be argued to have Civil War connections, even at 5th or 6th remove. You could argue it's a landscape like Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County, and goes though various eras. You get cars frozen up, truck drivers, Fender guitars so it's a fair time spread. Geographically you're in Lake Charles, Tennessee, the Great Divide which is the Rockies and wherever Cripple Creek might be.

No, I don't think it's a concept album, but it's atmospherics and themes defines "Americana."


Entered at Tue Apr 21 15:02:35 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Phew! That'll be my fourth "Mystery train" then, but I'll have to get it.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 14:01:18 CEST 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band books

Peter, I agree with you that the 90's Band albums should have been given more coverage in the "revised" Hoskyn's book. To be fair, Levon didn't do much better in the revised versions of his book. I think he basically described them as being made for small labels with a limited budget.

For a more thorough analysis of the Band's discography, you should read the latest revised version of Greil Marcus's 'Mystery Train'. He covers the entire spectrum of the Band's group and solo recording career from The Hawks up through Dirt Farmer. I disagree with a fair amount of his analysis, but it's a very good read.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 06:56:57 CEST 2015 from (96.53.4.74)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Calgary today

Subject: Canadian Westerns

Canadian westerns - the only one I can think of is The Grey Fox - a terrific little film starring Richard Farnsworth. I can't remember much of the plot - but remember it as a great film. Lots of westerns made in Canada. Maybe the best is McCabe and Mrs Miller. Filmed in BC by Robert Altman, but set just over the border in Washington.


Entered at Tue Apr 21 06:30:28 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Brown Album and the Civil War

Do we think the Brown Album is also a concept record with some/most songs somewhat related to TNTDODD and the Civil War? Seems that way by its attitude perhaps.

I was just listening to a husband and wife deal called Jus Post Bellum and their songs are about that era too. United/Divided is another album of songs written about and during the war. And then Garth's The Beutiful Old has a few from then also. It's just lovely, stirring stuff to me -


Entered at Tue Apr 21 00:12:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: If 60 were 80

Sorry, the 90s Band were 60% not 80%, which was the 80s Band. Whatever, the three 90s albums deserve more than a sentence in a book on The Band.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 22:47:22 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Nightcrawler verdict:

Good but Creepy.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 20:53:29 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: agrobusiness

And (in common with the "evolution" of many industries) the megafarms don't provide much in the way of jobs, anyway. The larger the fields, the farther apart the turn rows, the larger the machinery, the fewer folks you need on the land. Also it helps to eliminate the last remaining islands of trees and drain the low spots that used to mitigate flood season. Best-practice for livestock is also fewer humans to more animals - with results it is better not to observe too closely. The best you can hope for is that they do the value-added in your community, so there are a few factory jobs.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 20:22:29 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Agribusiness

Last year when we were in horribly depressed Clarksville & West Helena, the tour guide was excited because Monsanto was buying up all the land which would provide jobs. Obviously with GM crops. A lifeline for the people locally … the opposite for the planet.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 19:42:06 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Nightcrawler

We're going to watch Nightcrawler this evening, they say it's one of the best of 2014.

"Nightcrawler is one of those movies where you come to appreciate the movie to a high degree of praise, but at the same time, you tell yourself you never want to watch it again. Yes --- this is a dark movie. Whether it's through the score, the plot, or even the cinematography, this film exudes a thick musk of slime, the kind that exemplifies the power of film in general. Every element to the film is essential to craft its tone and it delivers with flying colors. "Nightcrawler" is an excellently crafted movie."

"There’s blood in the road and money to be made from it. It’s a shameful business. Go Lou, go!"


Entered at Mon Apr 20 15:50:28 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: big sky country

The farms of west Canuckistan are larger now than they ever were . . . in the main grain-farming regions, production now requires so much capital that it is more and more "agribusiness" - family farms are increasingly marginal. Stories are regularly published of families with two off-farm jobs who are still going broke. Lentils and chickpeas for India and other points east are the coming cash crop. Some of the best land in the world, & a challenge to keep it in C'stani hands. There's a controversy in British Columbia over a UK firm that's taking farmland out of production in order to plant trees for carbon offsets.

You say 'early Canadian western,' I think Nelson Eddy / Jeanette MacDonald _Rose Marie_ featuring the songs "Indian Love Call" and the one at [My link]. The Monty Python guys must have seen it.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 14:09:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Barney, I certainly apologize for the tone of my comment. Especially because as we now know (after years of fuss) that you were right over the photo. It's a long time ago, but even at the point there was a lot of extra stuff twixt original and revised that didn't get mentioned. You still end in 1992, apart from the short Rick obituary and Levon interview. The discography, in 2003, does not mention three albums by the reunited Band, the text gets rid of them in half a sentence (three fine albums of amiable and sometimes moving rock) and at 80% the 90s Band were a lot more "original" than most groups that carried on.

By "don't buy" I meant "don't buy again if you have the original edition" which I still think fair comment. I am a great admirer of the original book (and of your other books too). I bought the original in hardback, and the 2003 edition.

Would you claim that for someone who already owned the original, it was a worthwhile addition? Especially if say they had already read the 1998 Levon piece?

Over the years of photos and various things, you have been much maligned here, and regular posters will assure you that nearly always I have been the first to fly to your defence. The main attack, from both sides (Robertsonian and Levonista) is that "you were not there" but I'm of the opinion that everyone who WAS there is to a degree blinded by loyalties, and I found your book objective.

Anyway, I'd happily discuss more by e-mail. theband(one word) followed by the usual sign followed by viney dot uk dot com.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 13:48:33 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Calling Mars

Barney, I enjoyed reading your book on The Band but I am now confused.

Does the link not show the rear cover of the 2003 reissue of your book?

And if so, what does "Revised Edition with a New Postscript" mean, if not "revised/expanded version"?


Entered at Mon Apr 20 12:34:23 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Prairies

For flat (and I mean really flat) prairies you need to go to Saskatchewan.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 12:29:37 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Alberta # 5

Thanks for the link, Peter. By golly, that museum has grown - but, then, it's 40 years since I was there, so it is not really unexpected. A leaflet from then says it displays the "only mounted dinosaur specimen in Canada, the Edmontosaurus skeleton ... over 30 feet in length", though a photo in a booklet captions it a "Duck-billed Dinosaur". They've certainly got quite a few more such skeletons now.

It was not just the vastness of the prairies that struck me (I'd worked for a firm making combine harvesters and had seen many photos and films of these "huge beasts" working in formation across these huge fields to harvest the crops there)but it was the fact that, because it was all so vast and relatively flat, my eyes and my brain computed the landscape to be quite low. I was quite taken aback when, suddenly, we descended into a valley cut by a large river over centuries of centuries to find a town like Drumheller. That's what caught me out, anyway.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 11:20:43 CEST 2015 from (176.248.146.37)

Posted by:

Barney Hoskyns

Location: Mars

Hi Peter, I've just seen the things you wrote about the 2003 edition of my Band book, which made me see red. If I had presented the book as a "revised/expanded version", as you claim, your comments would be valid. But I did not, and neither did the publisher. I'd like you to retract that and think a bit more carefully next time. Regards, Barney


Entered at Mon Apr 20 11:02:43 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Don Covay

My Toppermost article on Don Covay went up today. Do comment over there!


Entered at Mon Apr 20 09:59:58 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Alberta #4

Driving out across the prairies makes you realize most European farming is market gardening, though Italian friends have said the same about England compared to Italy - very large fields with very few buildings. But the scale of the prairies is a whole different ballgame again. Awesome in the actual meaning of the word.

Talk of Alberta also makes me wonder. In the heyday of westerns on films and TV, did anyone ever do a Canadian western? Can't think of one … though I know some "US" westerns were filmed in BC and Alberta.


Entered at Mon Apr 20 03:29:17 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.87)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Viney

This is the same child who throws adults cellphones in the trash, correct? Great kid!


Entered at Mon Apr 20 02:50:36 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rebel Yell - Stonewall Jackson - SC Gwynne

Hi Pat B - I'm just getting started on this one. Have you read it? Do you credit it?


Entered at Mon Apr 20 02:13:28 CEST 2015 from (24.64.134.120)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Banff tonight

Subject: Drumheller

Thank you Peter and Ian - Drumheller's on the agenda for tomorrow.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 20:48:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sentimental kiddie stuff: scroll by.

We had the grandkids here today – 11, 9, 4, + 20 months. We had them watering the garden (it’s dry and warm here) and the three older ones know full well that turning the hose on each other means instant “tap off.”

Our 20 month old had the hose. You could see he was getting excited about something. Finally, he turned and sprayed me from head to foot. He had hysterics. He knew he was the first person in the world ever who’d had such a brilliantly original and funny idea with a hose.

Apologies for posting sentimental greetings card stuff.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 18:20:55 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Alberta #3

I remember the suspension bridge - we took photos. Link is museum now. I recall stopping at a place called Beiseker, which had a gas station. Period. The most exciting thing about it. But one of the days driving around I most remember, Metallic red Buick. Crap car.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 17:43:07 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Drumheller again

Peter, I dug out some notes I made at the time. I described Drumheller as having "an unearthly sort of setting which disorientates one and is, at the same time, oppressive. The backcloth for a science fiction western shoot-out, perhaps".

I think it must have been much more informal in the mid-1970s.

The curator of the small museum was 87-year old Mrs Jessie Robertson, who not only answered our many questions but then invited us back to her house on 4th Street West, marking the route on a town map so we wouldn't get lost. There, we looked at dinosaur bones, petrufied wood and, what I called, "other relics of bygone ages" that she had in her own collection.

After that, we visited the Homestead Museum, which impressed me, and the Little Church (capacity:6), which did not.

My other notes refer to us, en route, walking across the Swinging Bridge, which I described as "a highly rickety suspension contraption made from a discarded Tiger Moth".

Another tourist site was "The Ghost Town of Wayne" which was, I noted,"neither a town nor unoccupied".

And there are several references to having to use dirt roads to get and from Drumheller.

And I still have two (different) 25 cent booklets with the same title - "The Badlands of the Red River Valley", the neater and nice one being for 1973-74 and the less attractive one being from 1974-75.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 16:26:47 CEST 2015 from (174.50.91.92)

Posted by:

Kat

Subject: Levon

Heaven must know he gave all he could. Thanks, Lee. Always loved and never forgotten.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 15:53:31 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Levon

Keeping Levon in my thoughts today.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 11:55:21 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, the museum opened in 1985. It was a major thing by 1994. It now says it's "the biggest" which I don't doubt.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 11:51:11 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Drumheller memories

We went to Drumheller in 1975 (on a drive from Calgary to Edmonton) and I guess things were not so well set up back then. I still have a couple of small souvenirs from Drumheller - a bit of brown stone (actually petrified sequoia wood) and a small circular "stone" with crystals in the middle (a bit of dinosaur bone with crystallised marrowbone) - bought at the small museum for a dollar each, as I recall. Each comes in a small bag with a museum label attached. It was in the "shoulder" period between winter and summer and I found Drumheller a rather foreboding place, with few people about, dank, everything brown apart from the grey clouds and a large kitschy model of a dinosaur. We left town using the Bleriot ferry across the river, I seem to recall.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 09:49:13 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Blowin' in the Wind II

Good morning Peter, haha, no I didn't know that one, thanks.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 09:01:00 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Some of the Canadians in the car park had wellington boots in their cars for the occasion, but it's not the kind of thing you fly with.


Entered at Sun Apr 19 08:58:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Muddy Places

Roger, I had BBC Live reports streaming and we had a phone call but I kept an eye on it. It started at 1-1 then Bournemouth scored. 2-1 and I was relaxed. Then Sheffield equalized after 90 minutes and I uttered a loud and foul expletive, most surprising for the caller who didn’t know I had my eye on the screen. I didn’t realize it could be so stressful just watching a live text stream.

It may have changed in 21 years, as places do, but we took a drive out from Calgary to the huge dinosaur museum at Drumheller. On the way we stopped to look at the Drumheller hoodoo formations, and that was the spectacular bit. You know in the realistic-looking Western movies how much mud there is? I’m thinking of the street in Support Your Local Sheriff. The car park viewpoint you inevitably get to is the place. Then you walk to look, and it gets you into mud so muddy that you know you had never actually seen mud before. It sucks the shoes off your feet. The rental car was new, but if it had been my carpets I would have wept. No wonder the dinosaurs got stuck. But we all still remember it. If you go, I suggest buying a roll of bin liners to cover your feet and some elastic bands. The view was worth the effort,


Entered at Sun Apr 19 02:17:34 CEST 2015 from (209.52.143.10)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Revelstoke BC

Subject: Hell's bells Al

Hi Al, sorry about the Bell's Palsy. I had two colleagues who had it. One of them had a severely frozen left side of her face but it only lasted a week. The other didn't suffer so severely but it lasted for around three weeks. Good luck with it.

Cheer yourself by following AFC Bournemouth's path into the premier division. (Not much of a consolation for you I appreciate but think of me and Peter). Despite a stutter this weekend they could still make it. I go to two matches a year on average now - an Old Trafford fixture (apologies - I get offered a ticket) and I always make it to at least one Bournemouth fixture. That could be one and the same next season.

I'm currently driving from Vancouver to Calgary. My son has a Canadian girlfriend and we stayed with her parents for a couple of nights two days ago. Without any prompting from me her father put Music From Big Pink on as we were having drinks. I LOVE Canada. We haven't visited BC before but my son and his girlfriend are making plans to live out here. Whoopee.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 22:34:15 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Saturday Nite

Norbert, I’m sure you know the earlier one. Bob was talking to a student at a 1961 folk club gig in Minnesota, and she told him how she’d spent hours working on a school quiz, got off the bus, and a gust of wind snatched away the answer sheet. ‘You see, Bob,’ she is alleged to have said, ‘The answers are blowing in the wind.’

‘Think about it,’ he replied, ‘You’ll remember them. Don’t agonize about it. They’ll just come to you.’

‘Right,’ she said, ‘You mean don’t think twice, it’s alright.’

From such acorns, mighty oaks grow,


Entered at Sat Apr 18 18:56:14 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: 1962 Gerdes Folk City mumbling resolved

Peter, thanks for your words on Cadillac Records the other day

Almost exactly this day in 1962 Dylan first performed “Blowin’ in the Wind” in Gerdes Folk City in Greenwich NYC. Luckily this unique performance was taped by Jack Perkins.

On that tape you can hear two people mumbling something in the background but you can’t hear what they are saying. For more than 50 years diehard Dylan fans are speculating about what has been said during that song there back in 1962. Last year Jojo Green from Houston, a Dylan fan and NASA IT expert, has used the extreme powerful NASA computer Johanna to resolve this mystery. It obviously said:

“....kiss me under the light of a thousant stars.....”

In 2014 Ed Sheeran used this phrase in his song; Thinking Out Loud.

Have a nice weekend all.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 17:09:52 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Al, a close friend had a bout. All I can say is that he is almost completely recovered but it does take time. Hang in.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 16:24:26 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto usually

Subject: Optimism over time

It will pass and subside in time in most. It gradually dissipates. Steroids the usual early on. Difficult. A straw helps with drinking during the worst time.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 14:48:47 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Record Store Day … one for Dunc (also appropriate to our recent discussion), John Martyn's Cocain is released … yes, with no "e" on the end. A repro of his original 1967 single (in a new picture sleeve) backed with London Conversation.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 12:28:24 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Record Store Day 2015

Record Store Day 2015 … got to my favourite shop at ten past eight and queued for 20 minutes. I got most stuff on my wants list, with “For What’s Its Worth” by Art (i.e. Spooky Tooth) at the top of the list. I’ve got an original single but it’s hissy and crackly. Frank Wilson’s $25,000 single on Motown, Do I Love You, gets a facsimile Record Store Day release at £9.99. Well, not quite facsimile, since the three known original copies are all autographed by Frank Wilson.

For our North Americans, reading this on the iPhone waiting for the store to open, do not have a panic attack about finding the Bob Dylan single … I checked out a second shop on the way home at 10 am. Both shops had over a dozen copies left. it’s not actually “limited” and if it’s like the limited edition “Wigwam” 45 you’ll be able to get it any time.

The one that got away … neither shop had been able to get even one copy … is Family’s first single (on Liberty) Scene Through The Eye of A Lens.

My favourite purchase was 2 LPs … The Animals Live in 1964 and Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames Live in 1964.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 12:20:12 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Needles & Pins

Al, my old writing partner had a bout. The good news as well as nobody seeming to know what causes it, it goes away again and no one seemed to know why either. His was accompanied by patches of total hair loss on his face. At the same time I had a numb upper lip for several months, and in the end we put it down to a MaxPax coffee machine outside our office. We were working long days finishing a book, and drinking a Max Pax coffee every 30 or 40 minutes. In those days (35 years ago) it was pre-loaded in the cups in the machine and had a load of chemicals in to stop it sticking together. Anyway, we both stopped drinking it and my symptoms went in a week and I’ve avoided ANY instant coffee since, though real coffee is fine. i.e. it’s not the coffee but the stuff that keeps the granules from sticking together.

Instant advice is if it’s nerve related, acupuncture is always worth a try. I had brilliant results from acupuncture for RSI in my elbow and hand and, touch wood, it never returned. Also a neck problem and a knee problem had good results from acupuncture.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 11:10:20 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

I'd loved to have taken part in this mini-exploration of mental health as I'm closely related to two sufferers from this awful blight - so the family support aspect is close to my heart.

Regrettably I'll have to pass on it for the moment. Would you know it I've been stricken with Bell's Palsy and at the same time I've somehow contrived to wrench all my frigging right side shoulder muscles.

If anyone's got any inside info on the bell's palsy - in particular the time it lasts and how best to deal with the limitations it hits you with mainly eyesight/eating - I'd sure appreciate it since right now it's proving a real intrusion. I'm currently on the 4th day of 7 day intensive steroid course but up to now it just seems to be developing.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 06:33:44 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.110)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm certainly not referring to any particular musician...... this is general & applies to any drug addict from any walk of life: You can't force some one to get clean or stay clean....


Entered at Sat Apr 18 03:52:47 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Complex

Robbie got that right. Retrospect is easy.( Shoulda, coulda....) Oh, if we could be as wise before a tragedy as after. And with this problem, it is so complicated and so private and so hard. If you've been on the planet long enough, in some way or another, you look at people and behaviour and it is complex and some of it is overall unknowable and what is obvious after the fact is difficult to deal with as time moves in slow-motion through one's life.


Entered at Sat Apr 18 03:05:04 CEST 2015 from (58.104.10.55)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think this quote from Robbie says it all:

"I can't tell other people's stories," "It's not right. You know, they wouldn't say, 'Well, you know Robbie did this and Robbie did that.' It's like you were in this club. All I can tell you is you know it existed. And it went from bad to worse to the ultimate nightmare imaginable. And people survived it. Got smarter. Changed. Some people were able to help themselves. And some people weren't. And you see in a case like Richard, where you can't help yourself — there's the poor guy left at the end of the pack who's saying, 'Wait for me. I can't help myself.' But you don't know that. You just think, 'This guy's just got to get a grip.' Well, it's not like that. But how do you expect everybody to be so knowledgeable and so smart? Saying, 'Oh, I know what this fellow needs. This fellow needs to go into a certain clinic. Get into a program. And that's his one chance of getting through this alive.' We don't know those things. You know those things when it's too late."


Entered at Fri Apr 17 22:04:05 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Septum

Great line by that doc,Peter! Thanks.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 21:52:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jed, a doctor I know who practised in central London told me that when someone presents with a rotted septum, the first question is, "So which bank do you work for?"


Entered at Fri Apr 17 17:40:26 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: fin de siecle

sadavid: I couldn't choose between those two, but the first, ISR, wins on humour. But both COULD be taken as sly references to the state of the career. MFBP is obviously the first release by our guys qua Band and the summation of the project that brought Levon back into the fold. Given the success great critical and reasonable commercial success of MFBP, it wasn't unreasonable for them to assert that KH(HSC). A case can be made for others.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 16:49:04 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the end of the affair

Bill M: [My link] is a bit of a meditation on another aspect of what the author calls the "dying art" (because 'the album' as an art form is terminal) of track sequencing: the choice of the last song. His angle is those 'last songs' that resonate with him personally, and comes with a playlist. His The Band choice is "I Shall Be Released"; worthy, but I (et beaucoup al) would go with "King Harvest."


Entered at Fri Apr 17 16:37:25 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Wallsend-divergent direction

You may be surprised that musicians are not the only career that correlates highly with misuse of substances as well:wall street people increase performance skill and stamina-i.e. Adderall.Or,corporate lawyers.Kitchen workers-coke,meth,weed.Ballplayers in all sports throughout history performance enhances,doctors,dentists,etc.,etc.And alcohol and cigarettes are a prolific and severely damaging addiction I treat as well,again,not at all restricted to musicians.And,I've had the honor to try to help a wide range of people in practice,hospital work and research over many decades. And the reserch suggests such patterns as well.And,I've had the distinct honor of trying to help musicians as well-indeed,an occupational hazard not only restricted to R&R.Put simply,this is a societal matter-the hysteria over drug use feeds the problem.Most people cure(stop or moderate) their addictions or dependencies on their own-no AA,NA,Rehab,hospitals,meds,people like me.And most people moderate drugs and have no problem with pot(yes,THC level is high and some knowledge,like with alcohol,of the product is needed)psychedelics(yes-hard data-recent research on that,particularly if use is done with intent and purpose and safety precautions and proper set,setting) and moderated alcohol use and yes,coffee is a dug(see Andrew Weil-from chocolate to heron).So this is a much more nuanced field of study than portrayed.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 16:29:33 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: will it go round in circles?

A few weeks ago, when Al E invited us to name albums with three great leasing songs, the Move's "Shazam" came immediately to mind, but then I realised that it couldn't be in the running because the side with the three brilliant songs in a row ("Fields Of People", "Don't Make My Baby Blue", "The Last Thing On My Mind") is side 2. That got me thinking of the 'big' song on side 1, "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited", 'revisited' because it was a greatly extended version of an earlier pop single, which I suspect was Roy Wood's Birmingham-focused answer to Lennon's "Strawberry Fields". The line "Lock the door and throw the key away" made me think of Suzanne in "Fire And Rain", which Wallsend has now mentioned.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 16:08:07 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: One more comment...

Jed is so right when he notes that we have to escape from those rigid boxes and recognize the importance of personalizing medical care. There is no 'one size fits all' in medicine no matter what area of care was is under consideration. Therapeutic interventions have a wide range of possibilities and they should be individualized for the needs and wishes (yes, the person has to have input into the decision!) of the person receiving the care and treatment. The 'paternalistic/maternalistic 'approach of the physician to the person/patient is 'way past gone' and the 'I'm the doctor. Do what I say" approach is doomed. I grew up with much of that approach and it bugged me even as I trained in the 70s. Jed. Thank you again for your comments. They are vital and they are important. Music indeed is the reason we are here, but sharing ideas that improve the health and (like music) expand the mind is its first cousin.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 14:38:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Politics

A second "communication skills" article on the UK Opposition Leaders debate last night.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 03:24:16 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 2 stars

Good on you for giving a thumbs up for Karl Eric Andersen who oversees 'Expecting Rain". With Jan H. of this BG, the 2 are the best at what they do and they should be lauded for excellence.


Entered at Fri Apr 17 01:35:18 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Lou

Here is another excellent article about Lou Reed, written by his first wife. These Lou Reed articles appeared on Expecting Rain this week. The guy who run's the Expecting Rain website does an amazing job and I think should always be credited.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 23:48:05 CEST 2015 from (58.104.19.140)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Agreed. Also, the kind of extreme lifestyle they led as young musicians would tend to amplify the divergent directions they went in.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 23:22:35 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Well, I remember Robbie saying (in an American Masters program on Martin Scorsese) that he went to visit Marty, who had ended up in hospital with serious problems, that it was brought home in no uncertain terms that it was a case of change the life style or die. When it's put that way ...

As far as TLW is concerned, I rather suspect that drug use was only one divisive issue. Don't forget that these guys had been together since they were teenagers, and if you think of your own life and how you changed between the ages of, say, 18 and 34, it's always seemed amazing to me that they stayed together as long as they did, and not at all surprising that their lives went in different directions. And I don't think it's useful to blame anybody, it's just how life goes.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 22:55:24 CEST 2015 from (58.104.19.140)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, I agree that the various addictions of the guys is a personal issue but the problem is that it is all tied in with the way things ended with TLW etc. I thought the comments Robbie made at various times about how he came out of the black period when he was living with Martin Scorcese were illuminating to say the least.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 22:22:57 CEST 2015 from (71.90.201.96)

Posted by:

Cyborg

Web: My link

Subject: Dust

" 'Cause a man who walks by the side of the road Can turn himself around He can pick himself up And dust himself off And start all over again My friend..."


Entered at Thu Apr 16 22:22:49 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Thanks Jed, I appreciate that, and I certainly didn't mean to put you in an awkward spot by discussing it. And I agree about The Band - far too much already written about what is basically a personal issue. I only meant it as a general connection.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 21:56:44 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Addiction

Again,I appreciate the kind comments,but I get further into this with great hesitancy.First,I come here,as many do to relax,talk/read music stuff,enjoy,etc.Second,no website can do justice to such discussion,particularly given the significant limitations.But,my expertise is addiction,and yes,the Vancouver model is excellent and yes,i'm all for using the drug of addiction as a component of the treatment-i.e-methadone,nicotine patch,THC patch(being developed in Lexington,KY) for MJ addiction,and many more.Most good medical centers offer a range of options for treatment,not one size fits all,but I am from the harm reduction/motivational interviewing school of thought.I won't get into the addictions of the guys in The Band-I'm a big believer if you don't know the specifics,best not to offer opinions!


Entered at Thu Apr 16 21:46:21 CEST 2015 from (58.104.19.140)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, I agree with you about the 'free speech' issue. Just going out of your way to insult other people's sincere beliefs seems like a stupid thing to do to me.

Today's drug culture scares the hell out of me - I cannot understand why anybody would want to get involved with any of it.

Talk of mental illness and music brings to mind James Taylor's 'Fire and Rain' . That was truly a stunning song. The Black Prairie's song was just crass.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 21:02:44 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Jed, I found everything you wrote to be of great interest. And there was a musical connection, i.e. the Black Prairie lyrics. Ever since the Charlie Hebdo incident I have been increasingly dismayed by the fact that so many people feel they have the God-given right to write, spout, scream or whatever anything they want to, no matter how offensive or hurtful to others. Free speech! No one must be dictated to or censored, ever! Well, there are consequences, as we have all seen.

And Jed, as a person who is involved in the psychiatric field and research, what are your thoughts on providing addicts who have failed at rehab multiple times with prescribed drugs, and facilities like Vancouver's Insite, which provides drug users with clean needles and medical staff who can intervene in case of overdose, etc. (They do not provide drugs, though.) I know this is not strictly on the topic of music, but given the problems The Band had with various substances, maybe it's not so far off?


Entered at Thu Apr 16 20:45:31 CEST 2015 from (74.43.18.162)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Weed

IMHO - Today's weed is just not the same as that which I knew in the mid 80's. One hit today and your out of it (which is why I don't smoke any more). Instead of the giggles and munchies you get the Panics!


Entered at Thu Apr 16 20:27:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Over dinner, Mrs V expanded on the elderly psychiatrist 1970 / 71. She typed letters on the subject. He reckoned that there were two instances: shock after a heart attack, and grief after bereavement, where tincture of cannabis was an excellent prescription. He told her most country doctors carried it with them in the 1930s and 1940s for precisely these uses and a blanket ban was wrong. He didn't advocate recreational use nor regular use (except for himself, but he had a stressful job).


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:45:36 CEST 2015 from (74.43.18.162)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: RS Article and Lyrics

Ringo Article in current RS mentions RR. Overall fun read.

Lyrics in that song are just stupid


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:44:45 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jed

Do you practice in NY It sounds like a group my husband has been involved with.Do you know Richard Carlton ? He works with Alternative medicine also


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:41:14 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jed, all well said.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:29:41 CEST 2015 from (86.151.72.203)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Off At A Tangent

Thanks sadavid. Just got that album in the last few weeks.

Enjoyed the posts Jed, Peter, JT. Thanks, Wallsend.

One thing that is happening in Scotland (and UK, Peter?) is there is an acceptance that mental illness will affect 1 in 4 of us. The stigma of mental illness is disappearing, although perhaps not as quickly as intelligent people would want. There is talk in the lead up to this general election that much more will be spent to improve mental health in this country.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:09:52 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jed, I enjoyed your professional rants and perspective. Just as I enjoyed Steve on politics.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 19:00:43 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Apologies

Enough of my professional rants and challenges.Prefer this be a place of music.Felt I had to say it,but enough! My apologies.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 18:58:29 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter-Cannabis

As for cannabis as treatment.Most,if not every drug merits both consideration or rejection depending on the individualized treatment plan.But,evey applicable drug to a particular condition,if drugs can help not hinder,ought be considered.Thus,if cannabis can help,and the practitioner is knowledgable about proper dosing and CBD/THC ratio then go for it.If not,get a specialist in that area.Same for the very recent work with varied psychedelic medicines (since early 90's when research was restarted with private funding in usa,and since significantly expanded.In England there is advanced research occurring,with limitations due to government as well) which should also be considered alongside the more conventional treatments.This is very slowly beginning to happen in more progressive sectors with great success.Pushback from powerful forces are always looming.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 18:46:38 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Meds

To reiterate,meds have their place,but not for everyone,always.Furthur,the protocols demand that everyone get the same thing for the same complaint,an absurd form of inexact medicine applied in an inexact science.Can we even regulate human emotions with uniform consistency?Is there benefit to always closing off rather than learning to manage certain emotions?For some,meds are the best and most reasonable way to go-Thats a fact for some,not for others.The point being,no one size fits all ideological or money motivated approach is going to be truly in the best interests of helping people get better.That can be true of the rehab industry in the USA,the pharmaceutical industry or about the financial incentive for med,psych,and social work schools in the usa(the three branches of primary mental health care in the USA)to maintain their outdated and uninspired curriculums and inexact diagnostic categorizations.Again,not that we don't help people in our work.We do.But,generally done by thinking your way around the rigid boxes the industry has created thereby boxing itself and its patients into a miserable quagmire.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 17:27:05 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

Read the book, seen the film, seen two different productions of the stage play.

Mrs V often talks about this. When I met her she was working at a state (NHS) psychiatric clinic as a secretary to the psychiatrists while waiting to go to drama school. At that point electro-shock therapy was just starting to be questioned, and there was much dispute (she typed it out) between the "medicators" and the "talking therapy" schools. Her opinion was strongly with the latter, as she often says they were all nicer people too. With elderly people, especially with dementia, there has been despair about the widespread use of "chemical coshes" as a control mechanism in hospitals and care facilities. It was a problem with mental illness 40 odd years ago, but no one much questioned it. Except Ken Kesey.

She remembers that the oldest and most successful therapist, then in his 60s, so he must be long gone, self-prescribed a few drops of tincture of cannabis in his morning coffee, and used to say how effective it had been before it was illegal.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 16:59:06 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Richard Manuel

And while I'm thinking about it, I found the lyrics of 'Richard Manuel' difficult and like so many here, had to turn away. It reminded me a lot of comments made by Mr. Dylan so many years ago (first at the Tom Paine event and later about an assassination) which were controversial and somewhat unpopular. Its hard to listen to or look at 'the other side' and it makes us queasy and uncomfortable. Most important to the lyrics is the idea that people close have to suffer the pain of hearing such things. The first person narrative of those lyrics are very painful. They conjure up horrible emotions and perhaps at this time are better left unsaid to avoid suffering. These are some thoughts I had upon reading the lyrics. A first person account of a tragic event is for some too much to bear. Maybe that kind of sensitivity to other people's feelings is something that is becoming increasingly absent in today's world.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 16:48:12 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Psychiatry

JED: Thank you for your insights and comments. I read the article by Lou Reed's sister as well and many of the thoughts and ideas you so clearly discussed here struck me as I read. Psychiatry and its science, in an attempt to embrace pharmacotherapy as its central approach, with all the powers that form the foundation of that approach, has ignored or forgotten the human elements that form the foundation of a person's being. It creates zombies with altered physiology, often to the detriment of the individual being treated. A major reevaluation of this science is needed now.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 16:10:18 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Lou

Wallsend,thanks for an excellent article about Lou and the damage caused by psychiatry to both Lou and his family.How sad to read.As a shrink who is both a clinician and researcher myself,I am sad to say that while much has advanced in mental health,much remains the same as we might be merely caught up in the current fads rather that what really helps people.Families and individuals are still,on a daily basis,being ravaged by the failings of mental health,its limited and distorted knowledge base and often its misguided assumptions.And this coming,without tooting my own horn,from a so called respected practioner in the field.So sad for the people we try to help.Often,95% of my practice is spent protecting people from myself and my profession.In those circumstances there's a fighting chance to actually help improve lives.My heart goes out to Lou's sister and family-she is correct-with evidence based family treatment Lou's family would have benefitted and Lou would have experienced those benefits in his own life.Sadly,too many practitioners today would simply begin medicating everyone,thereby neglecting family therapy as well.That would result in outcomes that are not much different than what they already experienced.Why?Because meds are in today and despite the evidence for family therapy in such matters,the average shrink is taught to follow ideology rather that what both makes sense and is scientifically valid.Strange but true-like rehab,despite data demonstrating it fails,we continue to recommend it for addicts despite a host of evidence based approaches that actually work,but are not as popular,well known and feeding the money machine called rehab.No matter that they have effective outcomes and rehab doesn't.So,yes-I feel for Lou and family,but I feel more for the living,the suffering who are still victimized by the same psychiatric demons.Im not suggesting meds don't have a very useful and important role to play,but rigid ideological thinking about any form of treatment is always contraindicated.Each person should have the benefit of an individualized treatment plan,thus avoiding predetermined approaches that may not fit for a particular person.A sad state of affairs indeed that some of us try daily to change.Ironically,I'm part of a group of researchers that meets monthly with government types to fill them in on current science since practices are continued and advocated that unfortunately no longer(or never) have validity.We have minimal impact.Money,power,income stream is more powerful.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 16:08:24 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: old, favourites

Dunc: Lately I've been renewing my acquaintance with an old favourite album . . . it's a little alarming that this cut is the one that sticks in my head . . . .


Entered at Thu Apr 16 14:45:26 CEST 2015 from (31.53.125.213)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Ageing hipsters, true story

A guy went into one of my favourite second hand CD shops, wearing all the mod gear. People travel to this CD shop from other parts of Scotland because of its reputation.

Guy:Do you have a mods record section?

Shop assistant:Yes, over here.

Guy:I've parked my scooter at the door. Is that OK?

Shop assistant:No problem. What type of scooter is it? Lambretta? Vespa?

Guy:No, it's a mobility.


Entered at Thu Apr 16 03:52:00 CEST 2015 from (58.104.15.122)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A really interesting piece by Lou Reed's sister.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 21:51:27 CEST 2015 from (58.104.15.122)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Some cool photos on the John Scheele Facebook page.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 17:31:04 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.68)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Bill Withers

Bill Withers interview linked.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 14:57:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Songwriters

Didn't The Civil Wars meet on some songwriting workshop?

On the other hand, Lennon & McCartney didn't.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 14:51:38 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.68)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Speed Dating For Songwriters:Oy

Well, it's gotta be better than the Master Songwriters Computer Program.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 14:49:40 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the man that killed John Wilkes Booth

The bizarre story of the mad hatter, lay preacher, Union sergeant and self-made eunuch who survived Andersonville and defied Dan Butterfield, John Mosby and the War Department.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 02:03:17 CEST 2015 from (58.104.18.41)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across this version of 'Holy Mother' that Clapton did with Pavarotti. Not usually a fan of rock-classical fusion but this works pretty well.


Entered at Wed Apr 15 00:36:18 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Danko/Manuel

Danko/Manuel by the great Jason Isbell. This is how it's done.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 20:31:09 CEST 2015 from (136.167.102.175)

Posted by:

Dave H

I guess I'm in the minority, but I like the Black Prairie song.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 19:49:42 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Sorry I had to post the non linked. Tinyurl did not work http://www.knowyoursong.com/Richard-Manuel-by-Black-Prairie-Lyrics.html/Hotel-On-Fire-line-11.html


Entered at Tue Apr 14 19:45:12 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Richard Manuel

http://www.knowyoursong.com/Richard-Manuel-by-Black-Prairie-Lyrics.html/Hotel-On-Fire-line-11.html These are the lyrics for Black Prarie song.They are truly odious


Entered at Tue Apr 14 18:42:37 CEST 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Black Prairie

I don't care if a person is attracted to tragedy or not, to write a song with lyrics like those shows a truly appalling lack of humanity and sensitivity. I couldn't believe what I was hearing. Just terrible!


Entered at Tue Apr 14 18:04:28 CEST 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: That song

The lyrics for that song are unbelievably awful no matter the intention. The melody is stolen from David Bromberg's "Kaatskill Serenade."


Entered at Tue Apr 14 17:49:25 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I think it was RR who said Whiter Shade of Pale was a repeat of When A Man Loves A Woman. Recently I've read a bit about the Grateful Dead whose 70's vocalist Donna Godchaux sang on the Percy Sledge song. Andrew Wright played the organ on it and is listed as one of the writers. Sledge was also a co-writer but supposedly gave the song to Wright and bassist Calvin Lewis, thus costing Sledge millions of dollars. RIP, Percy Sledge.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 17:39:02 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Black Prairie … I can't comment because I press "play" and it says "You have watched this video" which I haven't. Maybe blocked for the UK?


Entered at Tue Apr 14 15:48:46 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Song/Dylan-Atlanic City

The lyrics were insensitive but the tune and the players were pretty good. On a different front,the songs I heard from the first show of this leg of the never ending tour were quite excellent.Same setlist,the band tighter and more tasty than before(if that's even possible),and Bob's voice was as clear as ever.The overall musicianship is exquisite.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 14:07:06 CEST 2015 from (58.104.17.147)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Sorry guys, I should't have posted the link to that song. I didn't listen to the words carefully so I didn't realise how tasteless it was.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 14:01:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon & Sting Together On Stage

The review is now up on my blog - see link. A long and comprehensive review with full setlist … a great evening!


Entered at Tue Apr 14 13:38:37 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, I thought I heard it right away, have been afraid to listen twice from the start, have been afraid to look up the lyrics, cause i might start writing really nasty stuff .


Entered at Tue Apr 14 13:05:43 CEST 2015 from (92.18.191.149)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Black Prairie

Black Prairie Beautifully Remember “Richard Manuel” link above. Apparently one of the songwriters has always been attracted to tragedy.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 11:37:49 CEST 2015 from (219.89.46.52)

Posted by:

Rod

pretty crappy song all round


Entered at Tue Apr 14 09:30:10 CEST 2015 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Richard Manuel song.......

Neither am I Jeff......I couldn't believe what I thought I was hearing so looked up the lyrics......A shame is all I can say.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 08:25:10 CEST 2015 from (68.196.242.165)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm not digging that song by Black Prairie one bit.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 07:55:35 CEST 2015 from (94.118.96.1)

Posted by:

Peter V

Paul Simon & Sting review will be up later today. We're in Stratford (Royal Shakespeare Company) on the way home, and when I copy the review from Pages to Wordpress on my iPad it loses all spacing which with a 37 song setlist and 17 musicians is a tedious task to resstore line breaks. It works instantly on my iMac, but not on iPad. Don't know why.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 06:16:45 CEST 2015 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Reasons for the delay in the Paul Simon/Sting concert review from Peter........either the show was so great that it's taking him time to find the words to due it justice....or a more likely scenario, he was seated beside a 47 year old shifty eyed weirdo in a stinky Poice t-shirt that stated yelling for "Roxanne" before the lights went down and Peter tossed him over a railing some time before intermission.....He's now on the run from authorities.


Entered at Tue Apr 14 01:35:09 CEST 2015 from (58.104.17.6)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Black Prairie's song Richard Manuel.


Entered at Mon Apr 13 19:56:04 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Coincidentally, Saturday saw us out in the east end watching the former leader of the Mystics, Johnny Wright do his weekly matinee. Unfortunately his usual musical partner had subbed out - which usually means that the Downchild Blues Band is touring. A nice version of "The Weight" was rendered.

Thursday it was Hugh's Room for a tribute to David Wiffen (who is still with us, I hasten to add). Tom Wilson of BaRK put the show together and appeared as performer and MC. Tom did powerful versions of a few Wiffen tunes, but nothing compared to what the Cowboy Junkies came up with on "Lost My Driving Wheel". Wow! I'm hoping some of the performances will find their way onto YouTube, but not yet as far as I can tell.


Entered at Mon Apr 13 17:12:25 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan in Baltimore April 2015

Dylan reviews from Baltimore have been exceptionally good and someone actually 'called out' the reviewer I discussed yesterday in one of the reviews from Baltimore.

The best advice for anyone going to see Dylan was to get to know the material on the most recent albums, especially 'Tempest' before going. Whether new 'Sinatra' songs will appear in concert, who knows? My guess is they will.


Entered at Mon Apr 13 04:35:49 CEST 2015 from (50.38.89.29)

Posted by:

Mitch Ritter

Location: Ore-Wa
Web: My link

Subject: Lamentations on Richard Manuel, Rick Danko, Levon Helm

KALW Public Radio, San Francisco's weekly show FOLK MUSIC & BEYOND played the band Black Prairie's set from Newport Folk Fest of 2013 in which they included their song lamenting the loss of Richard Manuel. http://www.kalwfolk.org/Playlists/150411.php Despite living near Black Prairie's hometown in Po'town, Ore I'd never heard this song. Taken together with Robbie's song "Fallen Angel" and Steve Forbert's memorial for Rick Danko "Wild As the Wind" and The Band's own "Too Soon Gone" the as-yet to be recorded songs recalling Levon Helm's Rambles At the Barn there sounds like enough material for a Book of Lamentations On The Band. RIP, Z"L may their presences abide among us as a blessing...


Entered at Mon Apr 13 01:45:24 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: error

Yes, thanks Peter Stone Brown. My error, as I usually 'get there' via Expecting Rain. I read that review at the site Peter mentions. Thanks for the correction.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 17:01:23 CEST 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: sliight correction

The other review JT is talking about of Atlantic City as at boblinks, not Expecting Rain.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 15:58:06 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bob Dylan in Atlantic City April 2015

Peter Stone Brown reviewed Bob Dylan in Atlantic City in his usual masterful way, explaining and describing each song with clarity and depth.

The next review at Expecting Rain by a Dylanophile was quite negative. A quote from that review noted 'Literally the whole show should have been sponsored by the Geratol Radio Hour. I had to do everything possible just to stay awake.'.

This type of comment is one I have heard from some who want the vibrancy of the recordings to miraculously appear on stage. Well folks, that ain't gonna happen. What you get is new interpretation and variation. That's what Dylan does. Like all of us, every day is a new day and what we perceive and do every day can have variability. In fact, I like that about Dylan concerts. The set lists are often the same over a tour (with a few changes at times), but there can be subtle changes. That this listener doesn't need the band behind Dylan, as he says in his review, is well and good (though he lauds their playing), but this is not what Dylan is doing right now. He is damning with faint praise throughout his review of that show. His description of the mangling of songs (TUIB, STOF) suggests that he, like so many, want it as he knows it and not some other way. I suggest that if that is what one wants, listen to the records and stay away from the show, especially if the result is going to be perceived boredom. This reviewer was 60 and had seen many shows before. He of course is entitled to be put off by what he heard but through it all I perceived someone who was unsatisfied by the newer material and wanted the 'old Dylan' up on stage. He talks about breaking the show into 2 parts, so that he may here a run of 'greatest hits' (my interpretation from what he wrote).

Well, there is no 'old Dylan' anymore. There is the current Bob Dylan, the new Dylan, the septuagenarian, putting it all out on stage with a freshness of song that shows that he has not stopped interpreting his world as he always has. Read Peter Stone Brown's review of Atlantic City to understand current Bob Dylan. As for the youth who are going to the shows...the 60+s might learn something from their response to current Dylan.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 15:03:44 CEST 2015 from (89.206.247.72)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Puss 'n' Boots

Love the album. Favourites are Leaving London and Jesus Etc. But it's all good.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 14:13:36 CEST 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan / Tom T. Hall

Thanks Calvin for your response. For me Dylan's worst rocking nightmares in New York and Tom's story of snow-covered motel in West Virginia - where he is drinking whiskey and founding a farewell letter inside a Bible - are both great pieces of American musical heritage. I am not unique. It is like with Mr. Helm and Mr. Robertson here. The majority here loves them both. - And Peter V, enjoy yourself.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 14:13:22 CEST 2015 from (219.97.126.0)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Pat - Ha! I was listening to that same RMI video after writing the previous post, it's pretty cool. Not sure I'd want to hear the whole record, though. Great toy to complement the analog stuff and the Lowrey, it probably hasn't aged so well out of that context. My opinion only...


Entered at Sun Apr 12 13:40:35 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

It was a sort of a back handed compliment to Tom T., while being an insult as well.

Reading the quotes afterwards, much easier to decipher than just listening. Dylan says he doesnt doubt Tom T. is a great songwriter he just doesnt like his songs are about "Trying to Connect with People.......Were all in this together".

I dont think there is a damn thing wrong with writing about, as Dylan Says, Slow Moving Trains and rain,....Big Pick up Trucks and Little Country Steams." And there certainly isnt anything wrong with singing about (Good) "Bourbon in a Glass".

Sometimes Dylan just says shit because he likes to say shit, Hell Haggard and him have toured together and Haggard covers Dont Think Twice on his latest album. So this idea of Bob's that Haggard doesn't like him seems crazy. But If Im reading Bob correct, always a crap shoot, he isnt a fan of Tom T.'s Straight out with no metaphor here is a story that happened to me or something Im feeling right now school of songwriting.

Too Bad, there is a reason Tom. T. had 20+ Top Tens on the Country Charts from the late 60s til the Early 80s. Some pretty catchy, albeit simple, tunes.

Speaking of good songs, anyone hear the album by Puss N Boots from last year? It's a group that features Norah Jones and a couple other folks I only had a passing knowledge of. But they do a great cover fo Twilight. Actually it's just a solid album start to finish.


Entered at Sun Apr 12 09:52:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excitement is building here … Paul Simon & Sting tonight. It's been a quiet year for music so far. Hopefully it will pick up, but everything good locally has clashed with theatre booked months earlier.


Entered at Sat Apr 11 22:10:02 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Kerrin, here's a taste.


Entered at Sat Apr 11 15:02:54 CEST 2015 from (219.97.126.0)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Absolutely, Pat. The mono synths are audible here and there but they were only cherries on a very large and sumptuous Lowrey cake. I think the point I was trying to make is that many casual listeners hear the brass & strings, and oddities like the glockenspiel percussion, and assume Garth was mostly playing synthesizers.

To be honest I can hardly ever pick the RMI KC-I, probably because I don't really know what it sounds like. I almost bought one once, but if we forget about the rarity, the Garth connection, and all those cool pedals, I'm not sure they sound that great - primitive digital synthesis after all.


Entered at Sat Apr 11 12:30:00 CEST 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: What did poor old Tom T. Hall do to deserve Bob Dylan’s scorn?

Mr. Dylan made fun of poor old Tom in his speech recently. I have two American Idols: Mr. Bob Dylan and Mr.Tom T. Hall. And not only because one of them never learned play harmonica and one of them is - or was - a heavy drinking man. In both cases, just like me. As you see this is a bad situation. From Mr. Dylan I learned that "lyrics can have a meaning" and from Mr. Hall I learned that "a meaning can have the lyrics". I have tried to find the reason to Mr. Dylan's slams of country legend Merle Haggard, ‘50s songwriting giants Leiber and Stoller, and Tom T. Hall, which, in turn, prompted that portion of the American public that devours every crazy thing Bob Dylan says to ask this rarely-contemplated humdinger: “Tom T. Who?” - Is there anyone here who can explain this? Kevin? JT? Charlie Y ? - but he is not here anymore. He is on damned Fakebook!


Entered at Fri Apr 10 17:43:30 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kerrin, you are the boss, but you can hear a lot of Garth's monophonic synths along with the RMI on the 1976 Genetic Methods. But he sure could make that new Lowrey do some crazy things.


Entered at Fri Apr 10 15:50:42 CEST 2015 from (111.64.248.33)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Little Brother

I don't know of the "Palladium Circles" CD, but presumably it's another repackaging of the September 1976 live radio broadcast. There are some very nice quality tapes of this in circulation, not ROA nice but still one of the best unofficial shows known. Paul Butterfield cameo'd on several shows on that tour, usually on LIAC which was played as a closing or encore number. 1976 was my favourite year for Genetic Methods, and the Palladium show was perhaps the best of all. The synth stuff is almost all coming out of the Lowrey in fact, with judicious use of a Roland RE201 Space Echo...


Entered at Fri Apr 10 12:07:20 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Forgetful me...

Thanks I'll Eat It Here (Lowell George):

What Do You Want the Girl to Do?, Honest Man, Two Trains


Entered at Fri Apr 10 12:03:36 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Let's all do the Stevie G stomp

For me these have a strong top three opening sequence:

OUTLANDOS D'AMOUR (The Police):

Next to You, So Lonely, Roxanne

THE CARS:

Good Times Roll, My Best Friend's Girl, Just What I Needed

BLACK SEA (XTC):

Respectable Street, Generals and Majors, Living Through Another Cuba

PARTY OF ONE (Nick Lowe):

You've Got the Look I Like, (I Want to Build a) Jumbo Ark, Gai-Gin Man

EXCITABLE BOY (Warren Zevon):

Johnny Stritkes Up The Band, Roland The Headless Thompson Gunner, Excitable Boy and... batting fourth...Werewolves of London.

I've probably forgot an album or two.

AL EDGE: will the soap opera antics at LFC ever end? These past several seasons it's one thing or another (i.e Roy Hodgson & the return of King Kenny, the Suarez sagas, the Stevie G farewell tour of 2015, and now the Sterling contract will he or won't he sign one distraction)

Egads! Along with the abysmal defending it's enough to drive one around the bend.

Modern footie, eh? ; )


Entered at Fri Apr 10 10:01:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Perfect starters

Great minds think alike.

Just picked up “Classic Rock” as it’s a dedicated vinyl issue on the 250 records you must own.

They have a page on “Taking Sides" on “Ten LPs that frontloaded their best stuff.” As here, it lists the Joshua Tree and Asia (1982) for the same reasons – three great songs in a row at the start. It then lists Supertramp’s Crime of the Century:

QUOTE: Supertramp assemble the perfect order. Not only for how the themes of loneliness and lunacy build on each previous tune, but in all musical considerations – key, tempo, form. It’s just right. Bloody well right. UNQUOTE

Agreed and “Moondance” gets the same accolade. So far I thought the writer of the article was perceptive, then The Doors (1967 debut) blew it. But otherwise right. Others mentioned were Fun House by The Stooges, Not Fragile by Bachman Turner Overdrive, Outlandos d’Amour by Police, Wind & Wuthering by Genesis, then On A Storyteller’s Night by Magnum. I have never heard anything by Magnum, at least knowingly, and to me it’s a proprietary brand of chocolate-coated ice-cream confection on a stick. But apparently side one is flawless and the reviewer was right on U2, Asia, Van, Supertramp and Police at least so I’ll have to believe it.

But might not test it. On Police, I'm seeing Paul Simon with Sting at the weekend.


Entered at Fri Apr 10 00:28:14 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.100)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

2:27 or 2:28 in to The Shape I'm In, there's a glimpse of Preston & Clemons throwing shoulder moves at each other.


Entered at Thu Apr 9 20:20:20 CEST 2015 from (165.120.0.1)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"Only Love Can Break Your Heart" - CSNY with Joni, Wembley 1974. Great stuff.


Entered at Thu Apr 9 13:16:31 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Three drummers

Yes, but according to the CD and DVD, the three are Levon Helm, Jim Keltner and Ringo Starr. Ringo booked Jim Keltner, knowing he needed a drummer while he sang up front.

The story was that Levon was invited with Rick, but as they had two drummers, it was suggested he do "percussion" to which his answer was strong, determined and to the point. So they had three drummers.

Incidentally, I caught a "drummers" discussion on radio the other day which repeated the points on the superb nature of Ringo's playing, repeating the point that came up here, that you can tell which Beatles song is which by listening to the drum track.


Entered at Thu Apr 9 13:13:25 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rick

Only Rick was cool enough to get away with dressing like that! More importantly,Ricks singing was steller as always and his bass playing reminded me why he was one of the most creative and compelling bassists of the times.Just incredible playing.


Entered at Thu Apr 9 08:31:21 CEST 2015 from (219.89.46.52)

Posted by:

Rod

always nice to see Rick playing a Ripper - even if his costume is a bit "out there"


Entered at Thu Apr 9 06:43:25 CEST 2015 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia

Subject: Katharina

Details, please!


Entered at Thu Apr 9 05:17:49 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.129)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Rick's Outfit / Shape I'm In

Three Drummers all through that tour. When Ringo sang up front, his son took his drums.....


Entered at Thu Apr 9 03:51:09 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.129)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Cripple Creek vid

Linked. These guys were mostly in the 50ish range at the time. And it was a wild tour. Imagine if they did this at a younger age.


Entered at Thu Apr 9 00:58:06 CEST 2015 from (174.50.91.92)

Posted by:

Katharina

Location: New Mexico

In March 1966 during the Dylan world tour Ricky and some friends came up to Taos and we all tripped on peyote buttons for over a week. Will spare the details but wonder if anyone else remembers this? The bigger question would be how could you ever forget?


Entered at Wed Apr 8 19:47:30 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

LB, it's Paul Butterfield.


Entered at Wed Apr 8 19:21:52 CEST 2015 from (108.2.171.40)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook archives

Subject: "Palladium Circles" comment/question

I just caught up to "Palladium Circles"; at first, the murky and uneven sound put me off-- it's always a drag when the audience is miked better than the vocals. But I grudgingly admit it's "listenable", even though I keep wishing for "Rock of Ages"-quality sound throughout.

I can't get enough of the "Genetic Method"/"Chest Fever" performances as it is, so for me Garth's 1976 version is worth the price of the CD. I like his always-evolving electronic/synth palette, which to me incorporated "New Age" sounds in a GOOD way; too bad the recording doesn't do it full justice, especially the "Chest Fever" half.

Question: Is that a harmonica I hear in "Life Is a Carnival"? There's certainly a blues harp sound that isn't coming from Garth or the horn section.

The sketchy "liner notes" don't indicate any guest appearances. WTF?

PS: I never liked the photo they used for the cover; to me, the boys look strained and unhappy-- especially Levon, who looks like he's thinking of throwing the photographer out the window.


Entered at Wed Apr 8 15:59:28 CEST 2015 from (129.42.208.183)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: TP & The HB's

The first 3 songs on Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers 'Damn The Torpedoes', Refugee, Here Come My Girl and Even The Losers helped change everything for that band. Took them from the theatre to the arena. Great band that hasn't been the same since Petty fired Stan Lynch.


Entered at Wed Apr 8 15:39:44 CEST 2015 from (165.120.0.1)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Thanks, Kevin. A great choice. I was thinking about the first three tracks from All Mod Cons by The Jam (1978): All Mod Cons/To Be Someone/Mister Clean. Second choice would be It's A Very Deep Sea/The Story of Someone's Shoe/Changing of the Guard - from Confessions of a Pop Group by The Style Council. To be fair apart from those three tracks I couldn't recommend the album.

Two very different styles of music from the same guy. I've linked to "It's a Very Deep Sea" (eighties hairstyles complete with 'mousse abuse'). A fine tune, as is "Changing of the Guard" (wildly romantic ... the sound of gushing pheromones).


Entered at Wed Apr 8 15:15:47 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: jgamaica farewell

"now, I met a girl, you know, the beautiful kind
she took to me and that was . . . fine, but
when morning came and the room was sunny
all she had to say was 'gimme my money, honey."


Entered at Wed Apr 8 08:43:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sequencing

The Joshua Tree by U2 is a good example of one criterion for sequencing … maximum impact in an era when the album was the most important medium for AoR, and I guess that’s the point. Those first three tracks were all issued as singles …though in reverse order … With or Without You / Where The Streets Have No Name /I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For. I suspected they’d decided on the singles in advance, but I Googled, and they handed over the job to singer Kirsty MacColl, Steve Lillywhite’s wife. The band told her to put "Where the Streets Have No Name" first and "Mothers of the Disappeared" last, with the rest sequenced according to her preference. So she worked out the impact … often a non-band member can do that best.

In which case, the first Asia album 1982 uses the same concept but in the correct order. The first three singles, Heat of The Moment, Only Time Will Tell, Sole Survivor are tracks 1 to 3 and that’s the order they were released in.

If you look at those 60s albums which were two hits and ten fillers, they were released after the hits, and started each side with a hit.

There are many criteria for sequencing. Take “narrative” which has to come first with rock operas from Tommy to The Legend of Jesse James.

A frequent one with different members writing will be internal politics, literally ‘one of yours, then one of mine’

Other things that are discussed are style, tempo (like ending a live ballroom set with a slow one for snogging in the last dance), lyrics (not narrative, but shifting the mood), and producers may go into keys which don’t (or do) clash from one song to the next.

Out there somewhere must be an album sequenced as a computer would like it with track names in strict alphabetical order.


Entered at Wed Apr 8 08:35:37 CEST 2015 from (24.114.56.117)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Grabbed by the Goolies.........

.......1981 Kingston, Ontario - a cross between Cathy Evelyn Smith and Bambi was the ( unexpected ) company.......I was the happiest/proudest guy in the world as I woke up....lasted unil she mentioned oh so casually that "friends" were expected to leave presents.......Anyhow, since Al is encouraging us to steer clear of heavies like Band,Van and Dylan, I thought I might offer up one in memory of the one and only TJ......Motörhead was the band and the first 3 off their easy listenning masterpiece Ace Of Spades.......were "Ace of Spades" , "Love Me Like a Reptile" and "Shoot You in the Back"..........ahhhh, memories.....

Paul Weller's Wild Wood - "Sunflower", "Can You Heal Us" and "Wild Wood" - for my pal Simon......


Entered at Wed Apr 8 06:08:41 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Al, well then...Tears For Fears: Woman in Chains, Badman's Song, Sowing the Seeds of Love. And the entire second side.


Entered at Wed Apr 8 05:04:39 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fit the battle

Al Edge: I agree with you regarding 'The Joshua Tree'. I goes down fine with me. One should not negate excellent work because of other current sensibilities. Excellent work stands as excellent work and does not degrade. Dylan's Blonde on Blonde did not get worse because some of the 80s work was not up to par. (just one example).


Entered at Wed Apr 8 02:23:29 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Opening Threesomes

So glad I prompted this examining of our collective pop/rock sensibilities not only on here but on the footy website I frequent.

There's been a lot of folks particularly on the other site who've realised that when you reflect on it just how relatively few of our favourite albums actually hit the mark with a cast iron threesome.

That said, there's been some great choices on both sites at which I've found myself nodding in agreement. There's also been a fair few choices I've not been familiar with that have found me clicking onto You Tube to check out.

Got to say for my own take on it the criterion I've applied has seen me purposely steering clear of anything that I feel might be termed on the 'heavy' side that would struggle to impress anyone not heavily into music. So, the sort of proven top quality stuff many of you on here have cited and which constitute my own preferred taste - Band, Van, Dylan, Little Feat etc - I've tended to exclude.

So my own picks have been more quality pop oriented - stuff that might perhaps be considered a mite 'lightweight' yet is hard to dispute doesn't grab you by the goolies and refuses to let go.

With The Beatles
1. It Won't be Long
2.All I Gotta Do
3.All My Loving

REM - Reckoning
1.Harbourcoat
2.7 Chinese Brothers
3.So Central Rain [I'm Sorry]

Teenage Fanclub - Grand Prix
1.About You
2.Sparky's Dream
3.Mellow Doubt
[I should add this pure heavenly pop album actually peaks on tracks 4 through to 7]

Finally a concession to a selection that I know will not go down well on here just as it hasn't gone down well on the other site but IMHO has an opening threesome that are performed to do precisely what they were intended to do which was to grab hold of the average pop sensibility and shake it till it dropped.

U2 - Joshua tree
Where the Streets have No name
I Still haven't Found What I'm Looking For
With or Without You


Entered at Wed Apr 8 01:18:36 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Personally I'd take either of the first three from the first two Traffic albums: Paper Sun, Dealer, Coloured Rain; or You Can All Join In, Pearly Queen, and Don't Be Sad. Yes, I know the first album is the American version.


Entered at Tue Apr 7 20:07:15 CEST 2015 from (129.42.208.184)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Blood and Bruce

Kevin, that's a great pick. My favorite.

I also love Born to Run with Thunder Road, Tenth Avenue Freeze Out, Night and Darkness On The Edge Of Town with Badlands, Adam Raised A Cain and Something in The Night.


Entered at Tue Apr 7 19:15:45 CEST 2015 from (75.182.19.80)

Posted by:

JG53

Location: SC

Subject: Last waltz cover

does anyone know if there is a last waltz cover that is missing the gold stamping (was there a re-issue with just the yellow background coming through?)


Entered at Tue Apr 7 16:57:24 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

john D

Subject: Mac Owners

Just wondering if any Mac owners out there have an alternative for recording from turntable to computer using something other than Audacity. Audacity does have a software playthrough feature; where you can hear what you are recording at the time of recording from vinyl. It's the one thing I miss from the PC world where it was hardware that did it for you. Thanks. I use wave pad for everything else;but it doesn't have this feature. Recording So Many Roads to computer. I seem to have read somewhere that the vinyl version has a much better sound that the CD version and I don't own the CD version.


Entered at Tue Apr 7 14:31:51 CEST 2015 from (24.114.56.117)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Sequencing was alright on this one.....

Blood on the Tracks........."Tangled Up in Blue", "Simple Twist of Fate", "You're a Big Girl Now"


Entered at Tue Apr 7 08:36:31 CEST 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Cadillac Records

Band connection to Cadillac Records. Along with the many Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters stories, Levon's friend and co-conspirator, Hubert Sumlin does a great cameo. In a scene in the studio, the Wolf's band is recording. An actor playing Hubert is sitting, playing a guitar. Behind him, the janitor walks by, pushing a broom. He was portrayed by Mr Hubert himself.


Entered at Tue Apr 7 07:46:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good call on Traffic, Glen. I keep thinking Dylan, but while a lot please me, there's usually one that the "non-dedicated" listener won't like. Street Legal takes off with Changing of The Guards, the third track is No Time To Think … both favorites, but in between you've got New Pony which is "not the strongest song on the album." Blonde on Blonde, which might even compete with The Band to a Desert Island starts off with Rainy Day Women, (I love, but some don't) then Pledging My Time is much weaker than the rest of the album. Looking along the Dylan shelves (five of them!), I wonder if sequencing was not his strong point.


Entered at Tue Apr 7 06:18:04 CEST 2015 from (72.190.113.156)

Posted by:

Glenn T

Subject: first 3

Traffic: John Barleycorn Must Die

1-Glad; 2-Freedom Rider; 3-Empty Pages


Entered at Mon Apr 6 23:21:23 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Byrds-Tambourine Man, Feel A Whole Lot Better, Spanish Harlem Incident.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 20:18:09 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the opening three

How 'bout Spirit's "Doctor Sardonicus": 1. "Prelude – Nothin' to Hide", Nature's Way" and "Animal Zoo"?

Or the Thompsons' "I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight": "When I Get To The Border", "The Calvary Cross" and "Withered And Died"?

Or the Tragically Hip's "Fully Completely": "Courage", "Waiting For A Place To Happen" and "At The Hundredth Meridian"?


Entered at Mon Apr 6 19:46:58 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: Razor Face

Just gave it a fresh listen Pat, and I see what you mean re: with the accordion. I also didn't realize that Rick Wakeman from Yes, played organ on that track.

Peter V, American Beauty is another fine choice. I missed that one as I was browsing my CD shelf the other night, since that CD lives in my car most of the time.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 19:22:23 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Paul Simon


Entered at Mon Apr 6 19:22:33 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, that accordion solo at the end of Razor Face reminds me of someone.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:38:52 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That sounds like signs of a misspent youth, Joan! It made me think that Volunteers doesn't have a dud track on it either, and I'd take the first three on either side.

Side one: We Can Be Together / Good Sheperd / The Farm.

Side two: Turn My Life Down / Wooden Ships / Eskimo Blue Day.

Actually, Crown of Creation works pretty well too. On both sides.

So does "American Beauty"

Side one: Box of Rain / Friend of The Devil / Sugar Magnolia

Side two: Ripple / Brokedown Palace / Till The Morning Comes … though all five on each side are unmissable. Band like status!


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:35:33 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Web: My link

Subject: I thank the Lord for the people I have found

Probably another overplayed and obvious one, but here's a nice 1972 clip of Elton doing 'Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters'


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:33:03 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Cadillac Records (2008)

Pat, any recollection of Chess Records of Leonard and Phil Chess?


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:29:42 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

3 great tracks: from Jefferson Airplane Surrealistic Pillow 1: She has funny cars 2:Somebody to love 3:You're my best friend I listened to this a lot


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:29:08 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: Crossposted

Ha, Just noticed Peter, that you also included 'Border Song' in the Toppermost link. That was a great era for Elton John music.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:25:46 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Web: My link

Subject: Madman

Yes, Madman is another great one, but I feel it drops just a hair on 'Razor Face'. Again, probably personal preference.

Thinking about Elton John reminded me of this live clip of 'Border Song' from 1970.....when it was all about the music, before too much of the showbiz seeped in. Love his touch on the piano. Heavy and light at the same time.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:23:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Staves / Brian Wilson

Dead, Born & Grown is a brilliant album. I haven't got the new one yet, but probably will. They're on my "concert watch" list. They're in Glasgow on May 3rd (one for Dunc.) but not coming in my direction.

"Pier Pressure" by Brian Wilson is playing right now. For ex-Band member interest Blondie Chaplin appears on "Sail Away" (not the Randy Newman song). Make sure you get the Deluxe version … 18 tracks instead of 13.

I don't think Elton John is a "guilty pleasure" … just " a pleasure." Then again Rob the Organ and I did the Elton Toppermost (linked).


Entered at Mon Apr 6 18:11:05 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

On Facebook Robbie has posted that he finished the last chapter and it's on its way to editing. I'm looking forward to it


Entered at Mon Apr 6 17:43:23 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, no need to apologize for EJ. Madman Across The Water is brilliant from beginning to end (even admitting that a lot of it is beyond overplayed).


Entered at Mon Apr 6 16:37:42 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: I keep a close watch on this heart of mine

Kevin J. Thanks for the feedback. It's probably just a matter of personal preference but 'Battle of Evermore' from Led Zep IV doesn't quite make it for me. First two tracks qualify for sure, but the transition to the third is too abrupt for me. Fine song, so it's probably just me.

Thanks for the support on Sir Elton though. I never really took him seriously until I got to college and had a roommate who opened my ears to some of his earlier work. Favorite album from him was Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy.

You're probably right regarding Mr. Cash. I have heard that he was inconsistent over the years, so it may be best that it remained a fantasy for me. Sometimes our heroes don't always live up to the legend. Case in point would be the first time that I was able to see Bob Dylan in concert. It was at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts on July 4th, 1991. I was underwhelmed by the performance, and my wife (who was my girlfriend at the time) has never forgiven me for bringing her to that show. Years later I discovered that it was ranked once, on one of the Dylan fan-sites, as one of the worst Dylan concerts of all time.

I saw him a number of times years after that, and he has redeemed himself in my eyes, but I've never been able to get my wife to another Dylan show, after that ill-fated night in Lenox.

Peter V, Good call on Van Morrison's Moondance album. When I was considering my list, I had only flipped through the albums that I have on Vinyl and CD. For some reason all of my Van Morrison stuff is on cassette tapes, and I didn't look through those. 5 strong tracks to be sure.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 14:18:20 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Staves

Peter V and all you UKers: I haven't seen you comment on this trio and recently read about them. Have you heard/seen them in concert? What's the word? Opened for The Civil Wars at one time.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 14:17:55 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JG

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Staves

Peter V and all you UKers: I haven't seen you comment on this trio and recently read about them. Have you heard/seen them in concert? What's the word? Opened for The Civil Wars at one time.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 12:17:21 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Poldark

If any of you have been pulled into "Poldark" you might be interested in an article I've just put up … more on the genre than on this particular TV series.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 10:07:52 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Peter, coincidence? ....


Entered at Mon Apr 6 08:55:05 CEST 2015 from (219.89.46.52)

Posted by:

Rod

Did you break even JH?


Entered at Mon Apr 6 01:16:23 CEST 2015 from (24.114.56.117)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Johnny Cash & Todd

Todd.......I guess it really would have come down to when you saw Johnny Cash in concert.....more than likely you would have been disappointed as he was known to really lollygag through many shows and tours.....lots talking and bringing out his wife to take up a lot of the time at the shows......Perhaps the early years would have been riveting and interestingly the later years as he morphed into appealing more to the young rock/alternative crowd would have been better..........As rock fans who came of age in the 70's and 80's - we were actually treated to a great time of sound and performance standard.........The country guys were quite hopeless on that front........Garth Brooks was once quoted as saying "Thank God for April Wine" as seeing them live when he was young made him realize what giving fans their money's worth was all about.


Entered at Mon Apr 6 00:04:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Appropriately for the day then, Norbert!


Entered at Sun Apr 5 22:39:15 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Interstellar

Pat, it was almost a religious experience ……..


Entered at Sun Apr 5 18:44:45 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norbert, I think you will enjoy your trip with Nolan, if only to appreciate all the nods to 2011 A Space Odyssey.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 14:29:39 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Jan, you're lucky.

On a lighter note; this afternoon Els and I will give birth to our hunger to escape this very planet, accompanying genius Christopher Nolan. We will explore the beauty and majesty of what lies so close and yet is so far.

"Hope is built on faith, but faith cannot overcome a burning planet just as love cannot solve the challenges of understanding gravity. But, love can motivate, emotions can drive rationality if we understand why those closest to us are for better or worse, the universe we inhabit, the universe within which we build our sense of self and community."

Bon Voyage!


Entered at Sun Apr 5 13:25:31 CEST 2015 from (84.215.225.138)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Just came back from two nice weeks in NYC, hanging with the kid and seeing him play some great gigs, meeting the lovely Kay again and enjoying the Big Apple. Easter 10 years ago came to mind when the jet-lag kept me awake last night. This was in an upstate NY hotel, in the middle of the night. And here comes the Easter Bunny, aka Garth Hudson! Jumping around in the lobby with bags full of chocolate and candy for a confused Dutch bassplayer and a (very) post-Midnight Ramble Norwegian. Then we saw dear Maud in the car outside, laughing at us, and understood who was the mastermind behind this surprise attack. We had some serious fun during that trip, Harmie. And you know what happens when you have too much fun... Happy Easter to the Hudsons and all of our friends out there.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 12:31:15 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Easter Egg --) Beatles --) Her Majesty --) Abbey Road --) Zebra Crossing --) Famous Photo --) Imitated Images --) Traffic Jams --) Red Hot Chili Peppers --) Strategic Socks --) Shoes --) Italy --) Sun & Summer --) The Band --) GB --) Easter Egg [back to the start]


Entered at Sun Apr 5 11:53:23 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Happy Easter All

Todd (haha) ……… ok we’ll pass the bad ends cause it's Easter ;-)


Entered at Sun Apr 5 11:27:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, "I'm Your Man" is the most perfect three so far. It's interesting how the Beatles / Paul McCartney keep doing two, then shifting sideways. Take Band On The Run / Jet / Bluebird.

It's particularly difficult when you like every track, but so often track 3 by anyone dips / goes sideways. However Len's "Old Ideas" has 1 Going Home 2 Amen 3 Show Me The Place, so no discernible quality drop.

The album I've listened to the most the last year, "Natalie Merchant" has a straight 1-2-3-4: Ladybird, Maggie Said, Texas, Go Down Moses. No discernible quality drop or pausing for a rest there.

But Van Morrison beats that with a straight five: 1. And It Stoned Me / 2 Moondance / 3 Crazy Love / 4 Caravan / 5 Into The Mystic. Not a trace of a quality drop.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 10:29:50 CEST 2015 from (24.114.56.117)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd.......nicely done as it actually got me reviewing how many favourite and consensus great albums don't quite have 3 great songs leading off.......surprising actually.......anyhow, Led Zep IV has Black Dog , Rock n Roll and Battle of Evermore and just in case you find 3 lacking, 4 is the Masterful Stairway to Heaven.

......anyhow, some great selections you have - even crazy pudgy little Elton who might be easy to scoff at for all sorts of reasons but my sister did love him and I went back years later and soaked in that album in her memory and sorry but anyone that doesn't hear the strength of openning 3 songs just isn't listenning...........by the way, the openning 3 of Leonard Cohen's masterpiece "I'm Your Man" album "First We Take Manhattan", "Ain't No Cure For Love" and "Everybody Knows" is as good as it gets in my opinion.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 08:29:10 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy Easter.

Earlier in the week I found a box of singles in as charity sop at 50p each, all good condition, original sleeves. I thought such finds were in the past - it doesn't happen nowadays. So I bought about thirty. Fats Domino, Larry Williams, The Yardbirds … all good stuff. The first two out of the box give me an idea for another little brain teaser.

First was Hang Up My Rock ‘n’ Roll Shoes / What Am I Living For? by Chuck Willis. The Band covered both sides, even if the B-side was a bonus track on a CD. Their original investment in the single paid off.

Next out was Sweet Little Sixteen / Reelin’ and Rockin’ by Chuck Berry. Both sides covered by The Rollng Stones, The B-side was earlier, the A-side was the 1978 tour live.

It started me thinking. What other singles had BOTH sides covered by one artist? “Golden Oldie” reissues with double A-sides banned of course. I know my favorite local band in 1964/5 did both sides of Hi Heel Sneakers / I Don’t Want Cha by Tommy Tucker, but they never recorded.

I did come up with the single The Weight / I Shall Be Released. Joe Cocker used to cover both sides, often in the same show. I Shall Be Released is on Live at Woodstock, The Weight on extended Mad Dogs & Englishmen.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 05:17:29 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The 1-2-3 Punch

Excellent choice Jon. I was thinking about Lucinda Williams, and was going to try to go for one of her earlier albums and missed Car Wheels for some reason. Glad that you mentioned it.

Speaking of Lucinda Williams, I've often wondered if there was some way that she could have fit into The Band in the 1980's or 1990's. Great songwriter with great sensibilities and attitude, I also think it would have been interesting to hear her voice blended with the guys. And she often channels that deep swampy Louisiana vibe which has so much feel to it.

Just saw an old clip of Johnny Cash on Saturday Night live from 1982, singing 'Sunday Morning Comning Down'. That one performance pretty much obliterates my entire list. Such a special man with so much charisma, just by being himself. Wish that I had the chance to see him in concert when I was younger.


Entered at Sun Apr 5 04:49:13 CEST 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: The 1-2-3 Hot Tracks Album Kickoff

How about Lucinda Williams, Car Wheels on a Gravel Road:

1. Right in Time
2. Car Wheels on a Gravel Road
3. 2 Cool 2 B Forgotten

Definitely no filler there. :)


Entered at Sun Apr 5 02:08:41 CEST 2015 from (174.226.65.0)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Culling The Herd

Norbert, no problem. We can lop a few off of my list.
Anyway that will clear some space for Donny Osmond and Barry Manilow who were originally left off, as my list was getting too long!


Entered at Sun Apr 5 00:26:40 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Todd thanks, sure we will guard this, but Elton John and ZZ Top have to go, sorry.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 21:46:52 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The 1-2-3 Hot Tracks Album Kickoff

Al Edge, Tougher challenge than I would have thought!

Many of my favorite albums seem to have a great start with the first two tracks, then often times the third track is sometimes a little less impressive. Makes sense, especially in the days of sequencing 5 songs or so on one side of an LP to start the side strong with the first song or two, maybe change things up in the middle of the side, (very often less strong than tracks 1 & 2) and then end the side with something strong again…..then saving another very strong track to kick off side 2 of the LP. Nowadays, with CD’s the thought process is a little different, as what used to be the beginning of a side two is now the middle of the one sided CD.

That said, here are a some choices (not in any particular order) that I made with albums which I consider to have three strong opening tracks, and I have to say that they weren’t necessarily the albums that I would have thought would stand out in this way. It’s that elusive killer third track that removed many of the other heavy hitters from contention. Even by some of the mighty groups like the Beatles and Stones, and quite a few of the Bob Dylan albums. The Band Brown album belongs on the list, but I will leave it off here, as it is a given.

ZZ Top – Deguello
I Thank You
She Loves My Automobile
I’m Bad, I’m Nationwide

Ryan Adams & The Cardinals – Jacksonville City Nights
A Kiss Before I Go
The End
Hard Way To Fall

The Band – Jericho
Remedy
Blind Willie McTell
The Caves of Jericho

Cowboy Junkies – The Trinity Sessions
Mining For Gold
Misguided Angel
Blue Moon Revisited (Song for Elvis)

Bob Dylan – Love And Theft
Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum
Mississippi
Summer Days

The Replacements – Hootenanny
Hootenanny
Run It
Color Me Impressed

The Rolling Stones – Some Girls
Miss You
When The Whip Comes Down
Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me)

Stevie Ray Vaughn – Texas Flood
Love Struck Baby
Pride And Joy
Texas Flood

John Hiatt – Bring The Family
Memphis In The Meantime
Alone In The Dark
Thing Called Love

U2 – War
Sunday Bloody Sunday
Seconds
New Year’s Day

Aretha Franklin –I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You
Respect
Drown In My Own Tears
I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)

Elton John – Goodbye Yellow Brick Road
Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding
Candle In The Wind
Bennie and the Jets

Yikes, this was harder than I thought! Since many of my favorite albums didn’t make the list, I would conclude that there’s more to a great album, when taken in its entirety, than just the first three tracks.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 21:13:37 CEST 2015 from (58.104.15.99)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Link is to a short 1994 article on Robbie.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 20:35:20 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

The other night while I was surfing TV channels, I came across a movie I had seen some time ago called Eddie and the cruisers. It bears resemblance to the story Robbie wanted to produce.. In the story a rockstar disappears leaving behind unpublished music. One of the scenes has Eddie and the band playing at a club on the Jersey shore called Tony Mart(without the S at the end) thought it was interesting


Entered at Sat Apr 4 19:08:40 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.184)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Irish Cop & the London Lawyer

A London lawyer runs a stop sign and gets pulled over by an Irish cop.
He thinks that he is smarter than the cop because he is a lawyer from London and is certain that he has a better education then any Irish cop.
He decides to prove this to himself and have some fun at the Irish cop's expense!

Irish cop says, "License and registration, please."

London Lawyer says, "What for?"

Irish cop says, "Ye didnae come to a complete stop at the stop sign."

London Lawyer says, "I slowed down, and no one was coming."

Irish cop says, "Ye still didnae come to a complete stop. License and registration, please."

London Lawyer asks, "What's the difference?"

Irish cop says, "The difference is, ye huvte come to complete stop, that’s the law. Now your license and registration, please!"

London Lawyer says, "If you can show me the legal difference between slow down and stop, I'll give you my license and registration and you give me the ticket. If not, you let me go and don't give me the ticket.

Irish cop says, "Sounds fair. Exit your vehicle, sir."

The London Lawyer exits his vehicle.

The Irish cop takes out his wooden baton and starts beating the shit out of the lawyer and says,
"Daeye want me to stop, or just slow down?”


Entered at Sat Apr 4 18:21:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I missed the Paxman grilling of Ed and of Dave too. Apparently both got a hard time, which is his job. Like John Humphreys on Radio 4, he's seen it all, been lied to by all of them and had questions ignored. These guys do a good job.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 17:35:03 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The election

Nice analysis P

I only watched a snatch of it. Got to say I do find it difficult to attach any credibility to these people.

What did you make of Paxman's treatment of Ed?


Entered at Sat Apr 4 17:31:53 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Matt Anderson - I'm on Fire

Wow Bill.

Just caught hold of that video link - something pretty special going on there. Beautiful guitar intro and the main body vocal is superb but boy does the fella take it to another level towards the end.

:-0)

Many thanks for that


Entered at Sat Apr 4 14:31:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: UK party leaders debate

As in 2010, I've done an article on the 2015 Political Debate on TV, ignoring entirely (I hope) political content,but focussing on communication skills, forms of address, appearance etc. It might be of interest! Or not. Linked.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 12:59:43 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: A Germany Day

Subject: The German "Walz"

We’re going to send the home town carpenter on his “Walz” (journyman’s years). He will be away for three years and one day (he‘s not allowed 50km from his home town). He will go with 5 Euro’s in his pocket as a boy and return with 5 Euro’s in his pocket as a carpenter.

Dunc thank you.

Al, you remind me of that Stranglers line: “You better watch out for the scoobies” ;-)

Anyway we make it a craft day here in Germany; ....brew our own sacred herbal healing beer …….back our own bread. Strong bread that makes you glue your dentals extra firm.

When the bread is in the oven, the beer to calm, we take the 3 string guitar and play Americana.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 07:09:56 CEST 2015 from (58.104.20.95)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

1987 article from Rolling Stone about Robbie at the time his first album came out. I guess this must be a well-known article but I don't recall reading it before.


Entered at Sat Apr 4 00:05:09 CEST 2015 from (99.148.150.77)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Subject: Rockin' Chair Article

Flash forward. Their next album, “Stage Fright”, had several great cuts, but was mostly strained. They recorded four more studio albums together over the next eight years, none really worth remembering.......................hhhmmmmmmm.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 23:26:18 CEST 2015 from (58.104.23.241)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Does anybody know anything about this boot - I haven't downloaded it yet but it has couple of tracks by Robbie on it.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 22:17:50 CEST 2015 from (58.104.23.241)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Speaking of Darktown Strutters Ball I came across this video of Les Paul and Mary Ford - it makes you realise how much the world has changed.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 21:36:10 CEST 2015 from (86.169.26.125)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Great tracks, Al.

The comments about Stage Fright I didn't like, but I thought the appreciation of the Band was heartfelt.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 20:23:13 CEST 2015 from (50.72.229.129)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: re: Hoagy

Don't forget that "Darktown Strutters' Ball" was quoted on the jacket of The Brown Album.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 19:54:57 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Roll Away The Stone

Has anybody ever figured out why the big Dude demanded a primative blood sacrifice of His son? What was He so pissed off at anyway? Is that the kind of Guy anybody would really want to spend eternity with? What gives?


Entered at Fri Apr 3 19:38:39 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Happy holidays to everybody


Entered at Fri Apr 3 19:34:46 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Beatles For Sale

You're right Dunc though I think the dip in tempo of Baby's in Black veered me away. I guess you could say All I Gotta Do does the same thing on With The Beatles but I just love the track so much for the memory connotations - mainly in that it was the first album I ever owned!!

I'm sure I've said this before to Pete - I love No Reply and Loser but for me the unsung gems on Beatles For Sale are the two tracks that I'd term the atypical early Beatles sound - What You're Doing and Every Little Thing.

And yeah - sorry meant to thank Wallsend for that great link [though not sure Pete and a few others will appreciate the dismissal of Stagefright] and Norb and NW for being quirky.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 3 19:00:31 CEST 2015 from (86.169.26.125)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Happy Easter

Al:I'm a great fan of 'Hard Day's Night' but I think the first three songs on 'Beatles For Sale' are a great opening for an album.

'No Reply'

'I'm A Loser'

'Baby In Black' Three sad songs, three Lennon-McCartney songs then a cover, thoughtful lyrics, songs of different tempos, maybe tempos not related to sad songs, good playing and George's guitar coming to the fore.

Thanks Todd and Norbert for thoughtful posts.

Thanks Wallsend. Enjoyed link.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 18:12:37 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Happy Easter

Just a little fun task for everyone.

On my footy forum they're currently debating which album has the strongest three song opening.

It's a damn sight more difficult than it seems to find the album that has what you'd term the dream opening 3 song salvo no matter which artist you explore.

I'd exclude The Band from the nominations - presumably we'd all go for the same ones.

If I were to say that when I looked reflected on all The Beatles I ended up with either With The Beatles which had

1.It Won't Be Long
2. All I Gotta Do
3. All My Loving

Hard days Night came a close second.

Anyroad, it's better than peeling spuds. Or maybe it's better to peel the spuds while reflecting on it.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 3 17:07:47 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Wanted to do some paper work today, but I can’t concentrate. We’re thinking of buying this lovely house in Holland, thatched roof, dead end street, double garage, great garden …. almost too perfect. Can’t keep my mind off it.... we’ll see.....

Anyway the BBQ burns already, after that a movie (to keep busy);

1) Interstellar [the new hype?] or

2) The Hobbit, The Battle of Five Armies [a must after the other two] or

3) John Wick [to kick it all out].

Let’s take a bottle of red wine and watch them all, life's too short ;-)

Have a nice weekend!


Entered at Fri Apr 3 12:57:12 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: fraud and counterfeit intelligence services

Subject: Music Intelligence Fraud

Correction, just forget that that Griffith’s link chart thing, it’s a fraud ….. U2 fans would be smarter than Dylan fans …..haha


Entered at Fri Apr 3 12:35:44 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: YouTube comments & our intelligence rate

The best YouTube comments can still be found under classical music (although Blues is catching up lately).

According to studies; “The Griffith’s chart reveals Bob Dylan favorite of smart people.”

Anyway we’re not the smartest around here; after a long nothing ...... brilliant people listen to Beethoven (link ;-) …..

Hi NorthWest, our time to fill The Book!


Entered at Fri Apr 3 12:04:12 CEST 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania NorthWest

Subject: Matteuspassion (Swedish ortography)

Funny, I was just about post on Bach myself. Maybe we still have telepathy between us?

I have this music on C-cassette from the late seventies. It is a given tradition to pick up this cassette in Easter. It still works. I wonder if today's downloaded files can be listened to in 2055. Will there still be equipment you can use? I doubt.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 11:19:34 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Matthäus Passion - Erbarme Dich

Now I’m not a religious man but yesterday in an abandoned factory we witnessed the Matthäus Passion performed by a choir of homeless people …..at the end we all became homeless and lost there in that cold empty hall, felt sorrow and pain, we all cried but strange enough there was hope too. ….. maybe there is religion after all.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 04:00:57 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.159)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend: Thanks for the link. I like the tie to Hoagy Carmichael. Not only is there also "Georgia", there's "Lazy Bones", which is echoed in "Get Up Jake", "Sleeping", et al. I've always loved Amos Garrett's version of the song, which the Muldaurs allowed him to sing on their "Sweet Potatoes" album.

sadavid: Glad you found Matt Andersen worth spending time with - and that it led to some interesting ruminations about other people. Despite similarities, I'd say Knopfler's and Cockburn's lions are at opposite ends of the songwriting spectrum. One group comprised the kings of London's 'jungle', or at least saw themselves as such. The other were simply the foil for someone newly seized of a muscular christianity. Kinda like the bear or bearcat in C&W and R&B songs, or the cobra that was turned into a necktie by a rampaging Ellis McDaniels.

As for Richard Manuel's songs and statements, so many make me sad because I'm reminded that at some point he stopped seeing even the slightest sliver of light needed to sustain him (i.e., let him "break even").


Entered at Fri Apr 3 03:58:17 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.217)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Happy Holidays to everyone.


Entered at Fri Apr 3 00:00:06 CEST 2015 from (58.104.9.2)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A piece on 'Rockin' Chair'.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 23:25:57 CEST 2015 from (87.144.162.140)

Posted by:

Norbert

Nothing_01.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 23:22:17 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Whispering Pines

Sadavid, interesting thoughts tying in Amazing Grace and the lost are found.

Another more recent influence could also be the Johnny Horton song from the late 1950's called Whispering Pines. Quite a different song, but similar as far as some of the feeling that the pines invoke.

"The snowflakes fall as winter calls and time just seems to fly
Is it the loneliness in me that makes me want to cry"

"Whispering pines whispering pines tell me is it so
Whispering pines whispering pines you're the one who knows
My darling's gone oh she's gone and I need your sympathy
Whispering pines send my baby back to me"



Entered at Thu Apr 2 22:22:09 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Dream on, you heathens. Your Habs won't see the Lord's Cup until Toews and Kane retire.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 22:16:46 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: grace notes

I forgot to mention - John Newton, the "Amazing Grace" lyricist, began as an over-achieving sinner and became a clergyman - so the hymn is authentically autobiographical. But if the W'pedia entry is accurate, it seems he was "found" as much through the love of a good woman as by divine intervention.

Depending on your point of view, of course, the one doesn't preclude the other . . . .


Entered at Thu Apr 2 21:48:18 CEST 2015 from (76.71.4.29)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Elvis Gratton

JT……I share your thoughts on Carey Price and would really love to see a long run in the playoffs for the Habs.Dare to dream of even a Cup! What a happy Spring that would be. Just so damn competitive nowadays that winning four rounds is very difficult, especially for a team that has some challenges scoring……..and remember JT, that Bay street hapless lot calling themselves the LEAFS may just put a smile on your face yet…….9.5% chance at Connor McDavid……..I’ll leave the country for 20 years if that happens but I will be happy for you…….I always liked the story that the late-truly great Quebec filmmaker Pierre Falardeau used to tell about how he was able to manage a smile on night of the first Quebec referendum….As a separatist, he was naturally crushed with the Yes side getting trounced but his neighbour was an elderly Anglo lady – a sweet soul who used to bake him chocolate cookies every week and he at least took consolation that she would be happy. Just thinking about Falardeau and Elvis Gratton makes me smile.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 21:36:08 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: lost and found

Todd: thanks for your persuasive thoughts on "Whispering Pines." - got me musing again . . . .

As I hinted in my previous, I think "Pines" has a deliberate echo of "Amazing Grace" - the lost/found pairing is the most obvious, and there's also the preoccupation with blindness/sight. The echo would be consistent with the thread of interest in religious Revival in Band songs - top-of-mind reference points are "Walcott," "Daniel" and "Saved." "Revival" I think of as a feature of Americana and U.S. cultural history in general, although all of the Western world experienced same.

In any case, I took a quick stroll through some of the long and fascinating W'pedia entry on "Amazing Grace," which I recommend, at [My link]. These passages are particularly intriguing:

"The greatest influences in the 19th century that propelled "Amazing Grace" to spread across the U.S. and become a staple of religious services in many denominations and regions were the Second Great Awakening and the development of shape note singing communities."

"Common meter hymns were interchangeable with a variety of tunes; more than twenty musical settings of "Amazing Grace" circulated with varying popularity [. . . .]"Amazing Grace", with the words written by Newton and joined with "New Britain", the melody most currently associated with it, appeared for the first time in Walker's shape note tunebook Southern Harmony in 1847."

"[In the Civil War] "Amazing Grace" set to "New Britain" was included in two hymnals distributed to soldiers . . . ."


Entered at Thu Apr 2 19:37:13 CEST 2015 from (70.54.128.217)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Cary Price: a class act

Kevin: The trophies and awards are just beginning for the class act known as Cary Price. Lord Stanley will be in good company when he raises that piece of 'silver' above his head in a couple of months. Well deserved!


Entered at Thu Apr 2 19:09:28 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Whispering Pines

I should add that 'Whispering Pines' has always been one of my favorite Band songs, but I never actually took the time to think about the meaning of the lyrics until now. It always been one of those songs that you can let wash over you and get immersed in the feeling. The interplay of Richard's and Levon's call and response vocals is one of the finest moments in the entire Band canon.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 19:01:26 CEST 2015 from (76.71.4.29)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…and for those that care, I am in touch with old GB regulars DVD BOX and LED LIGHT on Facebook. Both are doing well…..other than the e-cigs and non-alcoholic beers, life is swell for both of them.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 19:00:09 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.116)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Whispering Pines

Sadavid, Interesting thoughts on 'Whispering Pines'. Here's my take on it.

The answer to this line in the first verse:
"If only one star shines, That's just enough to get inside"

Can be found in this line from the second verse:
"Protect my only light, 'cause she once belonged to me"

The light is the the loved one who is now gone. A beacon. She is the star who shines. The star shining is the love that they shared. Getting "inside" can refer to getting inside his heart and soul, breaking through and inhabiting his being.
The light is the love, and even though she is now gone, he wants the light, and the love to be protected forever.

"If only one star shines" means that a person only has to experience true love once, or to be loved by one light, to know how it feels, "That's just enough to get inside" is getting inside his heart and soul. One person can love another, but for love to to be complete and enduring, it takes both to let the other inside.

And it will always be there, even as a memory, even when obscured by a haze. And with faith and patience, one can wait for the fog to clear, till it all comes round, and the lost are found.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 15:32:46 CEST 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Mavis Staples on "Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall"


Entered at Thu Apr 2 15:31:06 CEST 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Larry Campbell/Teresa Williams

New track from their upcoming album. Love it...


Entered at Thu Apr 2 14:57:11 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the phantom limb and other tails

joe j: apologies for the clumsy simile - I was trying, with fewer words, to observe that this is a phenomenon that occurs pretty commonly (I've experienced it myself) - feeling the touch or presence, or hearing the voice, of a loved one who has passed.


Entered at Thu Apr 2 09:16:30 CEST 2015 from (24.114.64.74)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....Steve....if you are looking in, forget the packaging business of Lost Waltz, think Scott Walker and Stephen Harper - both dangerous - take it from there please.

Cynthia Lennon: I didn't know her but from a distance someone who always seemed to carry herself with grace - against the almost impossible obstacles of Beatle world and Yoko/John.......I was sorry to hear the news of her death.

Solomon: A great April Fools one.........it got me. Perfect in that it really was almost believable. And one would have to know filmmakere to really understand how.....

5 predictions to take to the bank.............1.) Carey Price will win the Hart and Vezina trophies , 2.) Justin Trudeau will be the next Priime Minister of Canada, 3.) Jeb Bush will be the next President of the USA , 4.) Conner McDavid will be the next great one , 5.) Jeff will not sell his publishing to Pat, though in 2033, he will concede that digital was all right after all...........and a 6th..........a hope really, that Joni will be just fine and she'll come out swinging.......


Entered at Thu Apr 2 00:21:24 CEST 2015 from (166.137.126.114)

Posted by:

Sandra Mermella

Subject: The box set CD's

Hi Steve this is what I am referring to. The CDs packaging is just as exquisite as the original event. The four discs are contained in a book binder cover housing the CD "envelopes" as well as a copy of the Last Waltz guest welcome card. Also included are 36 pages of photos, liner notes, song and personnel listings, discographies and the like. Each binder is numbered and only 3,000 sets were pressed. The recording is a solid one. It's an unmixed soundboard, so even the released tracks have a slightly different flavour to them. Some portions contain a "hum" indicating that this might be from film footage but it doesn't intrude too badly. The Complete Last Waltz is for those of you who just couldn't be satisfied with a chopped version of The Band's last show.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 21:29:33 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Whispering Pines

"He feels her presence like a phantom limb". Jeez, Sadavid. Might not be an original simile but it'll put a whole new perspective on that song fer sure.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 21:21:35 CEST 2015 from (92.18.180.33)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Cynthia Lennon

R.I.P. Cynthia Lennon

Thanks for correcting the story for me Bill M. I knew you would spot April Fools' Day gag straight away.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 20:51:23 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: down the rabbit hole: Leo in the pines

Bill M: Something in the timbre & technique of Matt Andersen’s “I’m On Fire” guitar work reminded me of Cockburn’s “Wondering Where the Lions Are.” Which led me to Mark Knopfler’s wonderful “Lions” (from the first Dire Straits album). Not a whole bunch of commonality between the two (apart from the name of the beast) – one song is about a young woman alone in the big city, and the other, I suppose, is about the ecstasy of thinkin’ ‘bout eternity. But I’ve long been struck by the sameness of “I’m wondering where the lions are” and “I’m thinking ‘bout the lions – what happened to the lions?”

In the Knopfler song, the young woman leaves her daily grind and rides the commuter train:

The evening paper is horror-torn
But there’s hope for later, Capricorn
Lucky stars give her just enough to get her home

Just enough what?
I’d always supposed it to mean the ‘hope’ that’s promised in the astrology column – and it might be a bit sarcastic, but in context I think it’s meant sympathetically (if the Daily Horoscope is what gets you through the night, you’re in dire straits indeed). But stars give light, and you can also take it in the sense of ‘it’s lucky the stars give her enough light so that she can make it home safely.’ Which has some logic, given the gathering darkness and the latent menace in the situation (‘a young woman alone . . .’).

The “just enough” made me think of “Whispering Pines”: “if only one star shines, that’s just enough to get inside.” I’ve always had trouble with that “get inside” – it makes no obvious sense, and I took it as a sort of shorthand for “get inside the situation,” to make sense of what’s going on. Possible, but not convincing.

If you take the phrase more literally, it could make sense if the fellow is outside in the dark and unable to find his way home (to get inside) unless he gets a little light to see by. This is also not terribly convincing – isn’t he inside his lonely room in the first place? Or should the “whispering pines, rising of the tide” have alerted us to the fact that he is now outdoors?

But the lovely thing about lyrics is that any number of meanings for a given word or passage can co-exist quite comfortably. “Whispering Pines” is more impressionist than realist anyway; it’s the mood that matters above all. For me it’s always been about a man whose One True Love has died. She could be merely lost (at sea?) but it seems too bleak even for that. The man is alone in a lonely room in an empty house, lost in the gloom / night / daze / haze / clouds, lost in the pines, in the pines, where the sunshine is a cold mockery. The only sounds are the mournful note of the foghorn and the cry of the gulls. He feels her presence like a phantom limb, only to wake from the dream to the darkness. Yet, in his despair, he hopes for hope. In the service of a lost cause, reaching to the clouds, looking through a haze, calling out to sea, he seeks the sight of some amazing grace – that the rainmaker will hear his call, that what once was lost may be found, that the light of a single star might reach him, that the life-giving water might once again weep from the heavens.

More or less.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 20:36:40 CEST 2015 from (166.137.126.114)

Posted by:

Sandra Mermella

Subject: The box set CD's

Loved watching the DVD of The Last Waltz and all the great talented musicians. Wish I could have been there!!!!! Buying the CD collection. Thank all of you must have been great memories !


Entered at Wed Apr 1 20:30:52 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.159)

Posted by:

Bill M

Solomon: a few of the details are off, notably the year - and of course tha thought that Pennebaker had no idea. First, it wasn't a Hawks show in '64 but a Dylan / Hawks get-acquainted / reheasal in '65. Pennebaker came to Toronto as part of Dylan's entourage to check out the new potential recruits. As usual, Robbie tried to convince the new guy to take a razor to his amp to get the right guitar sound, but Bob knew it was all BS.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 14:34:16 CEST 2015 from (92.18.180.33)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Levon and the Hawks

Recently D. A. Pennebaker revealed he had found a rare full 1964 concert film of Levon and the Hawks in his archive. He went on to say he threw it out back in 1995 because he didn't know who Levon and the Hawks were. Oh lordy!


Entered at Wed Apr 1 11:17:51 CEST 2015 from (94.118.96.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

My thoughts and hopes with Joni Mitchell, who according to BBC News just now is in Intensive Care inhospital.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 06:26:47 CEST 2015 from (68.196.242.28)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Fb video

second chorus - once he hit the second chorus, not verse. I typed verse in error. Forgive the bold lettering, was another error. Damn cell phone musta gav me brain damage, more errors all the time. Yesterday i told a friend, hey, we're coming into winter..... then twenty minutes later i shot video and called a teacher of mine whose name ended in blum, the same name, but ended it with berg. three fucking times. didn;t catch till editing...


Entered at Wed Apr 1 05:40:36 CEST 2015 from (68.196.242.28)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Richie Furay. Today.

a SUGGESTION - SOME OF YOU MAY WISH TO
Go to Facebook, and access the public group "Richie Furay Band - In Concert TBD"
After a recent short but hectic tour East over here, that followed another short but hectic tour in California, 70 or 71 year old Richie went home for about two days, then flew back here yesterday, for a Cd Release signing.

I missed his shows here, and also couldn;t make the performance tonight.
There is a clip of him doing a solo version of Kind Woman at Barnes & Noble today on the group page. It's uncharacteristically imperfect, till the second chorus. Understandably, the man is working really hard, even for a 50 year old.
The man is 70 or so, and working his ass off. Yet, once he hits that second verse, it becomes pure perfection, pure beauty. which is probably what he delivers for the whole song, or close to it, most of the time these days. the times i;ve seen him in the 2000s, that's how it was.


Entered at Wed Apr 1 03:00:12 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.2)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Garth with BaRK

sadavid: I guess I should remember every second of the show, but I don't. Something tells me there were two nights, and I went to the first, so the tape could've been from the second. There was an intermission (which I recall because I went backstage with a dying friend to say hello to Garth and Maud). Maybe Garth did just the second half, but it's difficult to imagine them dispensing with "Acadian Driftwood" in the early going. Maybe Garth switched to unmiked accordion for AD? Wish I could ask the friend, a big Band fan who had gone to see the TLW movie opening with me 30 years earlier.

As for Matt Andersen, it was his performance of "Ain't No Sunshine" on "The Vinyl Cafe" a few years ago that turned me onto him. Awesome version - much better than there merely impressive ones on YouTube.


[See the guestbook archive for more]


[History] [Members] [Library] [Discography] [Videography] [Filmography] [Pictures] [Audio Files] [Video Clips] [Tape Archive] [Concerts] [Related Artists] [Merchandise] [Guestbook] [Chat Room] [Search] [What's New?] [Main Page]

Webmaster