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The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 21:50:50 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.45)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Nice work. Our Canadian men do not come off well. The one stick-figure guy, who resembles John Cleese so may be an English migrant worker, seems to be spraying 'his' tree with Off or WD40. And if the lad with the hatchet continues to chop in such an unsafe manner, he may well turn himself into a girlie some time soon.

I couldn't help but think of Jamie Oliver when you started calling things 'lovely' - the favourite adjective of British cooking shows. And then you mentioned Jamie yourself. Presumably he'd soon be telling us what he's doing with his lovely corned beef and his lovely cow-shaped cookie cutter.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 21:00:06 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D: Still transfixed by The Kinks Are Village Green Preservation Society box set. The Beatles and Bob Dylan have to stand in line!


Entered at Thu Nov 15 20:28:13 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter C

Looking for your review of The White Album Peter. Realize a lot of music to go through.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 18:41:04 CET 2018 from (2600:387:6:80e::81)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Brexit - and PV

Peter V - That was dam good work! Very good! But be careful you don’t die of cynicism!


Entered at Thu Nov 15 18:24:34 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

We saw Jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove for partner's birthday one year. I did not know anything about this musician but I had heard he was one of the younger musicians in his forties. I thought great. He might be able to bring a younger age group to jazz. He performed at one of our "Jazz" weeks. We also checked out Derek Trucks Band for free and partner could barely stand the music. I told him the GB are big fans. Maybe it was the selection of songs? Anyway, I really enjoyed Roy Hargrove's music. I cannot tell you what we heard as we don't have his music. I had just told partner to buy one of his recordings as we had such a good time. Shortly after, I heard on TV that Roy had passed at 49. I thought, no he's too young, maybe I misheard. I checked online and yes he passed. :-((
So glad I was able to witness his musicality and talent.....


Entered at Thu Nov 15 17:47:47 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Last night I had the strangest dream …

… and saw the post-Brexit world as fervent (rabid?) Brexiteers might see it. So did an illustrated piece on it. Linked. Set your watch to 1951 before reading.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 17:23:34 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Searching For A Gem"

Audio: International Album Releases (Regular)

Bob Dylan and The Band - Planet Waves as well as other recordings

Last 5
Twist In My Sobriety...Tanita Takaram...British singer-songwriter who has one of the deepest voices. Born in Münster, Germany, of an Indo-Fijian father, and a Sarawakian mother.

She Ain't Right For You...Macy Gray...Love her raspy voice.

Jesse Colin Young...????

So Hard Done By...The Tragically Hip...Canadian band from Kingston, Ontario...I used to wake up to this song via CFNY FM radio station.

Bobcaygeon...The Tragically Hip...Finally stopped by Bobcaygeon this past summer. Friend was looking for land/Cottage. She ended up buying an absolutely stunning cottage in Haliburton area outside of Bancroft via of huge inheritance and paid in cash! Family who had to sell property left just about everything including their CDS. We had friends over for dinner so I chose laid back music such as Sade, Norah Jones, etc.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 16:46:41 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sebastian Robertson on ‘Survivors Guide to Prison’ Score, Writing With His Famous Dad

The seasoned composer discusses drone-oriented new doc soundtrack, why he was reluctant to follow his
father Robbie into the family business

March 21, 2018
By RICHARD BIENSTOCK


Entered at Thu Nov 15 03:37:17 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Larkin Poe

Thanks for your input Haso. Now I'm not sure who first started the Larkin Poe thread. However whether it was Todd or you, I thank you both. I'm loving it. I think I did see their Ophelia vid. They are just pure music. I sure am glad you enjoy Playing For Change as well. I just continually find more artists who have joined the movement. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could actually change the world with this music. We really need it.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 03:26:05 CET 2018 from (2601:188:c300:cbc6:a09d:8879:fdd2:fed)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: Larkin

Norm: it mighta been Todd originally. I know I've brought them up as well; I even went to the local brick & mortar store and ordered up their cd "Peach". Looks like I'll have to order another one, as a new album is a-coming. I liked their take on R. Johnson's "Kitchen" so much that I e-mailed PfC to thank them for hooking up w/ Rebecca and Megan. (The Allbros recorded that tune back when Dickie was still in good graces. So far only you and I seem to be GBers who are regulars w/ Playing for Change.) Anyway, if you haven't yet, catch LP's version of Ophelia. They have a good 40 or more youtubes that they call "tip-o-the-hat" series, recorded w/out any backing band. Kind of a nice way to recognize ones' influences. W/ a background in a family bluegrass band, all I can say is, they ain't singin' no bluegrass now. Another good listen is any of their recordings of Son House's "Preacher Man Blues".

Speaking of brick and mortar, at a differnet establishment, I just acquired the new Kubernik tome on the OQ. Graphically takes after Robbie's LI&R for middle school libraries.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 19:59:02 CET 2018 from (2001:980:e13a:1:530:a963:cb48:40f0)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki

'Hymyilevä Mies' is a Finnish black and white movie, Raging Bull in the old snow. The story is situated in 1962.

This film is only mentioned here cause of the 5 minutes original 1962 footage included in the movie. It shows us a young, smoking, Ilkka, doing a slick Webster Hall on a black and white piano.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 16:56:28 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Larkin Poe & Shuffle Dancing

I'm awake now Todd! Have any of yuz had occasion to watch "shuffle dancing??

There is a youtube video, my all time favourite Elvis song "His Latest Flame", (Marie's the name) All these sweet young girls with rubber legs shuffle dance. Different girls in different spots. Really something to watch.

A laugh, one comment of this videos comments. A guy says, "I tried dancing like this. The Dr says I can go back to work next week!"


Entered at Wed Nov 14 16:33:55 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan - The Planet Waves Sessions / Outside The Law (The Best Of 1973-1975)


Entered at Wed Nov 14 16:00:23 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Todd

Todd, wasn't it you who brought us to those Po girls? My brain isn't working yet this morning, the first name escapes me. I stumbled on a youtube vid of them singing a Robert Johnson song. Really wonderful. Good to hear from you Todd.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 15:15:06 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.45)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: Nice video, nice song. Goodnight Moonshine has much the same make-up (a married couple) and feel as Whitehorse - see link. And like Goodnight Moonshine, both halves had musical careers before the hook-up. I'd heard of both Luke Doucet and Melissa McClelland as solo artists, and they still were such when both appeared at a BaRK tribute to the Last Waltz - with Garth guesting - that I caught some years ago. Each sang a song at that time, but I don't remember which.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 07:37:46 CET 2018 from (32.216.235.140)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Goodnight Moonshine

Not sure if I posted about this at the time, but there was a group that opened for an Amy Helm show in Hamden, CT back in June 2018. They're called Goodnight Moonshine and primarily consist of Molly Venter and Eben Pariser, who happen to be a married couple, although they both had music careers prior to meeting each other. Molly is one-third of an all female bluegrass group called Red Molly. Eben is a member of a group from Brooklyn called Roosevelt Dime.

I had never heard of them prior to the Amy Helm gig, but it was one of those moments where you feel lucky to show up early enough to catch the opening act. Anecdotally, the show was a stone's throw from a place I had lived when I was about 7 years old in Hamden, CT. And Molly is originally from New Haven, CT where I have a lot of family history, so there was something very familiar about the whole affair.

They probably fall loosely into the category of "Americana". The main appeal for me is Molly's vocals combined with Eben's understated but tasty guitar work. Nothing flashy, but each exude sincerity and passion. I bought one of their CD's that night after the show, and have been playing it pretty regularly over the past several months.

At the link is of performance of their song 'Winston Salem' from the Rockwood Music Hall in NYC.
"The sound of devil music is coming out through open doors
two women ask the bartender for heavy handed pours"


Entered at Wed Nov 14 05:42:44 CET 2018 from (2601:188:c300:cbc6:743a:2e12:fa57:6e20)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: tour '74

Anybody notice the photo in the recent Rolling Stone ("Hot List" issue) that's evidently Bob sitting on the floor, it appears, writing songs said to be on Blood on the Tracks? Looked to me like Robbie sitting at a table quite in the background. Would this have been during the '74 Tour? As I recall that ultimately was ostensibly in support of Planet Waves. Anybody know the timeline? BotT released after the Tour and PW? I know almost nothing about BotT. The write up w/ the photo speaks to how quickly Dylan recorded it (in it's original version) and that his son saw it as being the story of his parents marriage dissolving.

At the time, I only recall being one row from the very top at Kiel Auditorium in St.L. to see '74. A friend who regularly played banjo in a bluegrass trio at a bar called The Crock scored the tix. Good thing I knew all The Band's lyrics; the vocal mix was pretty muddy that far away. Remember Kiel, Glenn and Jeff A.? And, yes of course, being young college kids, the bar was known to us as The Crotch.

Norm: sorry to hear of Neil Young's house. My wife's uncle fortunately passed about a year ago. Her sister from Ventura County was watching the news on tv, their Uncle Bud's house went up as well. Up above Zuma Beach in Malibu. The cousins had been living there, sorting out family stuff and getting it ready to sell since he died. Fortunately they had evacuated around 11:30 a.m. and are safe down in San Diego. The tv time stamps were 3:15 p.m. (a bush aflame) and 3:27 (the entire house engulfed). Seems like Shangri-La, now Rick Rubin's, is likely in that same neighborhood, across the road and above Zuma Beach. Anyone know of its condition?


Entered at Tue Nov 13 22:25:34 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:c069:fa99:446b:8610)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Richard on drums. Planet Waves. Learning the song. Probably before Levon showed up (he was a day late).


Entered at Tue Nov 13 19:55:49 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Uggggh...Garth Hudson on keys...Ben Harper on backing vocals at the very end of IUTWOW...John "Scrappy" Sneider - trumpets, flugelhorn and horn arrangements (3, 4 and 9)


Entered at Tue Nov 13 19:45:43 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I was not posting when JT passed.....I think I haven't said too much because if I write about it it makes it more real.

First time JT and I became acquainted I delivered one of my CDS to his work place. Not sure if it was Band related or a brown eyed girl mix. He gave me Dylan and The Band at Maple Leaf Gardens. Yup THE Concert I missed in 1974. We communicated by email as we are huge music fans. When I actually met JT it was complete luck and coincidence. I was lined up to see Robbie at Indigo for the second time. Mr. Maximus' partner was with me as I wanted a photo. Btw those of you who have seen me with my friend...Mr. Maximus...He is not my partner. Only two people from this site have met him as he thinks I'm crazy to want to meet people from a music site. I guess I am crazy then. Most experiences were positive. I also think that just because you have The Band in common it doesn't mean that you can sustain a real friendship as you might only have the music in common. I still appreciated meeting everyone as I wasn't hiding who I was and was truly interested in the posters who post here from Canada and US. Maybe one day I will meet others from other countries. I am a people person whereas partner is more selective and private. Aren't we the perfect match? lol

The first time I met Robbie at Indigo I gave a stranger my camera and photo turned out blurred...So this time I brought a friend along. Anyway, all of a sudden while in line I can hear that the person standing right in front of me was...kinda...loud. LOL He turns around and I cannot remember who started talking first but soon enough we discovered that we were both from The Band GB. We blah, blah, blahed until it was his turn to meet and greet with Robbie first. I overheard JT sharing with Robbie about how his Dad was one of the partners who owned the Concord Tavern where The Hawks performed many times. Wow....It must have been a really cool and special moment right there for sure. JT was at the afternoon gigs back in the day having a coke. He told me that his Dad especially liked Robbie because he was so polite. Well that's how I remember it.

I sent JH the photo I took of Robbie and JT. Maybe one day he'll add it to the Fans page. JT did not know that I took the photo but I sent it to him as I knew he would be surprised and very appreciative. Maybe when he moved from living by a Castle to mid-town TO; he somehow lost the photo and asked for another one to be sent to him. Or since he also lived in Victoria, BC practising medicine...I love when a little act of kindness makes someone's day, don't you? JT was a huge music fan who was so open to new music and was loyal especially to Bob Dylan and The Band. He also loved his Toronto Maple Leafs even when they were terrible. I wish he could see the huge improvement with the team now. I am grateful that our paths crossed. :-D

"Creativity begets creativity, It becomes a catalyst" Arthur says, strumming a hand-painted guitar. He talks of the responsibility of inspiration, of not letting a creative spark go uncaptured. He smiles, and plays on.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 18:51:31 CET 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Miles opening for The Band. The boys' performance was immortalized by Rubber Dubber in one of the first bootlegs being sold in record stores. Levon was supposedly dosed which made for a subpar performance. If you're interested in what Miles sounded like in that period, Wolfgang's Vault has a number of his performances from the summer of 1970 including a video from Tanglewood.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 18:00:20 CET 2018 from (31.49.54.139)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Peter, I didn't know Christchurch was so close until very recently. Thanks, BEG. Last ten played. I've been busy.

Jericho -The Band

Times Like These - Rick Danko

Collected EPs - Roseann Fino

The Very Best Of the Flying Burrito Brothers

One of These Nights - Eagles

Like An Old Fashioned Waltz - Sandy Denny

The North Star Grassman and the Ravens - Sandy Denny

Good As I Been To You - Bob Dylan

Another Side of Bob Dylan

Bringing It All Back Home - Bob Dylan


Entered at Tue Nov 13 17:33:51 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks. That’s interesting, John D. It was Levon in TWOF saying he hadn’t heard anything after Sketches of Spain – Robbie must have been more keen on Miles, especially given that Rolling Stone that BEG linked with Miles Davis and Robbie Robertson from 1969 … I have a copy of that.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 17:28:11 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

One more once again 'cause I dig this band so much. Even older brother appreciated them. The year 1977 was one of my best years for music in general.

In praise of Willy DeVille (William Borsey), singer and songwriter, born 25 August 1950; died 6 August 2009.

"Miracle was recorded in London and produced by Dire Straits guitarist Mark Knopfler, who also co-wrote the song “Spanish Jack” with DeVille."

"Born William Borsey in Stamford, Connecticut, DeVille grew up in a blue-collar household and left school aged 14, immediately settling in New York City, where he worked in various menial jobs and attended local blues and folk clubs. By the late 1960s he was confident enough of his singing, guitar-playing and songwriting to attempt to get a record deal. Feeling out of place in a US music scene dominated by psychedelic guitarists, he shifted to London in 1970, but remained unable to find anyone interested in his music.

Returning to New York, he bought a truck and began travelling around the US, working and looking for like-minded musicians. Settling in San Francisco, he formed Mink DeVille, changing his own surname to DeVille in 1974. By 1975 he had convinced the other band members to move to New York.

Quickly installed as the house band at the decrepit Manhattan club CBGBs, Mink DeVille found themselves at the centre of what would soon be known as punk rock. That Mink DeVille’s musical references were far wider than any of the other bands – their songs mixed blues and soul, Mexican and Cajun, doo-wop and Latin musical flavours – marked them out. What DeVille shared with his contemporaries was an aggressive persona and an addiction to heroin.

Mink DeVille signed to Capitol Records and, produced by Jack Nitzsche – the arranger and producer who had shaped the finest recordings of Phil Spector and Neil Young – their debut album, Cabretta, was released in the summer of 1977. Cabretta received excellent reviews, while the single Spanish Stroll became a top 20 hit in the UK. DeVille was flown to London to meet the press and immediately things got off to a bad start, when the singer angrily confronted journalists who had upset him by classifying him as a “punk rocker”. His combative approach with the media was made worse by his wife, Toots, who shadowed him and would threaten anyone she took against."


Entered at Tue Nov 13 16:59:42 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Willy DeVille paid his own price for the indifference and ignorance of a system that didn’t tolerate his anconformist personality. That system renounced Willy’s talent just because his bad habits created a feeling of unease among the dominant conventional morals of his time. Willy DeVille was a misfit who spanned the ages of punk and grunge. He would emerge from the dark New York night to sing about love and emotion while evoking the great soulmen of the fifties and sixties. His music and his life went against the tide, carrying him to an early end in 2009, at the age of 59. He was hard to pin down, with a sharp-edged face, the air of a gambler, a malicious, penetrating gaze and a sharp tongue. There was something in Willy DeVille that is lacking in today’s day and age, a sense of romanticism, a fondness for history and charm. With the simplest verse he knew how to capture the smile of a streetsmart Venus, the pulse of ghetto people.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 16:51:34 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rolling Stone Magazine No 48, 27 December 1969 Rolling Stones Miles Davis Robbie Robertson The Band

I asked partner about Miles this morning. He would not have been interested to see Miles with The Band. He was only a huge fan of Miles until 1966.
;-D


Entered at Tue Nov 13 16:39:07 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Miles Davis The Band 1970 Hollywood Bowl Concert Poster Type Ad
PERFORMERS:
Band
Miles Davis
VENUE:
Hollywood Bowl CA
DATE: 7/10/70

Last Five

Your House...Steel Pulse...British Reggae

Pardon...Robert Cray...Great Blues Licks. The few times I have seen Robert he's never performed one of my favourite songs.

The Contortionist...Garland Jeffreys...One of the best vocalists in rock/reggae. One of his best penned songs. Bonus Louuu provides backing vocals.

Shame On The Moon...Rodney Crowell...One of Mary Martin's favourites too.

I broke That Promise...Mink DeVille...Really miss Willy and band. So lucky to have seen his band at Massey Hall and twice at The Edge. R&B/Soul

Doc Pomus appreciated Willy's music and songwriting as well.

I Used To Know How To Walk On Water...Joseph Arthur and Garth Hudson on keys. Amazing lyrics and Garth adds his magic. JT was glad that I posted his music in this GB. He was always eager to discover new music. I still have not seen him live. Love his paintings as well. Sometimes he'll even paint while performing a song.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 15:09:25 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Miles Davis

Peter; in 2011; when I interviewed Robbie for the Clairvoyant album, we talked about that concert and this is what he told me. The Band were headlining that concert and they got to pick an opening act. Robbie says they looked at a list and he couldn't believe his eyes that Miles Davis was on it. They were; in fact big fans and admirers of Davis. He said that the crowd was there to see The Band and were not that enthused to have to sit through Miles Davis. In other words it was "come on, bring on The Band." Robbie was and is a big fan of Bitches Brew.

You are right that they did go to see Cannonball; just down the street; where he and his band including Zawinul would appear at the Colonial tavern. I saw them there as well; at a different time period.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 11:39:29 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Miles Davis supported the Band in 1970 at the Hollywood Bowl. Levon says in TWOF that they hadn’t heard anything after “Sketches of Spain” and were in shock at the electric band, so went on to play one of the worst sets they ever played. On Bitches Brew they had Joe Zawinul on one side of the stereo and Chick Corea on the other. The Hawks also had a “Cannonball Adderley” period in Toronto where they were playing justy along the street and used to go and watch Cannonball’s band, which had Joe Zawinul on piano … so the Zawinul connection and interest is long.

LINK is Cannonball Adderley's band from 1966 doing Mercy, Mercy, Mercy. One of my favourite tracks ever. Written by Joe Zawinul.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 08:32:02 CET 2018 from (210.86.86.51)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Mystery Train

Just been listening to the first few tracks of Miles Davis's Bitches Brew. I wonder if Garth was listening to that around the time they were recording Mystery Train. Some of his parts sound very influenced by the keyboards on BB. Liked that Colin Linden song.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 04:44:26 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M When The Spirit Comes

OK Bill. You made me look :-) Listening to When The Sprit Comes. Man... 1988. Colin and Rick sounding good.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 00:40:44 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: How do you cope

Son of a bitch! Have you guys seen? Neil Young lost his home for the second time to these fires.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 23:51:22 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Dunc, yes, Christchurch is a reluctant and forced member of the new conurbation, which as in 1971 (when it failed to coalesce) is still arguing over a name.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 23:39:05 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.45)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Because I'm now playing the copy of Colin Linden's "When the Spirit Comes" LP that I bought last week, I'm posting a link to the title song, with Rick Danko taking the third verse and singing harmonies throughout, and Garth Hudson on keyboards.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 19:41:29 CET 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:5111:6819:349c:d7bf)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Peter. That explains it. Isn't Christchurch part of the conurbation too?

It was a surprising follow up single and too long a time. Signs of mismanagement.

For me and probably a lot of children and teenagers, the top twenty on Sunday evenings was essential listening. Rag Mama Rag should have been followed up immediately as it left the charts. In my wide grouping, nobody listened to the B sides, but we passed singles about and taped the chart shows (considered a naf alternative).

A good article I read several years ago on how important the single was at the time featured Manfred Mann, who described how stressful it was to keep producing hit singles. Terrible pressure he said. As soon as he stopped writing hits, the band would be dropped from the record label.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 18:58:29 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.45)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: War, the song

BEG: Let us not forget DOA's hardcore version from '82. I recall buying it in England in the winter of '83/'84 - feeling desperate for CanCon, I suppose.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 17:09:21 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Total Destruction

Looking at the news this morning, Paradise, California. A complete town gone! Those poor people, where do you begin to start over after a lifetime and you have nothing.

Instead of some compassion and understanding, a president who can do nothing but blame and talk about dollars......just a gawd damn inhuman piece of flesh.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 15:38:10 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"The concert itself is a fairly relaxed affair with stretches of instrumental detours and an intuitive interplay among the musicians, who come across like cooks working in tandem to concoct a gumbo stew expertly seasoned with all of their influences. To further stretch the metaphor, many of the numbers here are delivered at an unhurried, simmering pace. But rarely do they come to a boil — or even better, a boiling over — of heat, power, and dynamism. One notable exception to this is Danko’s arrestingly soulful take on Robertson’s “It Makes No Difference,” which sounds as if it’s actually costing Danko something deep down to sing."


Entered at Mon Nov 12 15:23:52 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and to lighten things up on this Monday morning...Here's one especially for Fred as I think his grandma has the same name.

One film this year that you have to see if you are interested in really trying to understand racism...The Hate U Give (Thug).


Entered at Mon Nov 12 15:12:55 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"War" is a counterculture-era soul song written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong for the Motown label in 1969. Whitfield first produced the song – an obvious anti-Vietnam War protest – with The Temptations as the original vocalists. After Motown began receiving repeated requests to release "War" as a single, Whitfield re-recorded the song with Edwin Starr as the vocalist, with the label deciding to withhold the Temptations' version from single release so as not to alienate their more conservative fans. Starr's version of "War" was a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1970, and is not only the most successful and well-known record of his career, but it is also one of the most popular protest songs ever recorded. It was one of 161 songs on the Clear Channel no-play list after September 11, 2001.[1]

The song's power was reasserted when Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band took their rendition into the U.S. Top 10 in 1986. It was also covered by Frankie Goes to Hollywood in 1984 and more recently by the Rock band Black Stone Cherry on its 2016 album Kentucky."


Entered at Mon Nov 12 11:05:40 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V.

Answer: Absolutely Nothing. (Edwin Starr).


Entered at Sun Nov 11 20:59:15 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: War what is it Good For

JQ considering the where for and the why has no time line and very obviously no lessons learned. Consider the civil (internal wars) in many countries to this day. Consider how Donald Trump will sell weapons to Saudi Arabia to kill people in Yemen, (it's all about the money) there is no morality.

The reason WW1 is always front and center this Remembrance is because the "modern world" had not experienced the losses in a world war. I have spoken before how my grand father was at Vimy Ridge. Many people have never even taken the time to understand that battle. My grand dad made it home but died at only 44. He was ever pretty hard on my grandma and his children. Back then there was not much understood about post traumatic stress disorder.

I have watched the documentary of the excavations of Vimy Ridge. The amount of bodies and skeletons they found in the tunnels under that ridge and piecing together how those people died. The horror of it just makes you cry.

Look at the fine young people of today and the agony of wounds they suffer and go home to a country that doesn't properly care for them. A president that obviously does not give a shit. It is hard to understand how the people who support this gutless fool can excuse his disrespect and behaviour. They talk about him being a tuff guy. Only with his mouth.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 20:41:58 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

JQ, it happens, so don't be too hard on yourself. It seems to be a quirk of human nature that you're often just not that interested until it's too late, and I've done it too. Lots of things I never thought to ask, and now I'll never know.

I did ask my dad about the war, but I could tell even at an early age that he didn't want to talk about it. He was in Germany long enough to pick up the language so it must have been quite a while, and heaven only knows what he experienced there. He was so young too, just 18 at the start I believe.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 20:24:27 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa: After the royal family, the Canadian High Commissioner got to lay the next wreath. In population terms, as was pointed out, Canada lost the highest percentage in the Normandy landings.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 19:16:12 CET 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::64)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Our Dad’s service

Lisa - I think my story is different in that I think my Dad would have talked to us about it; but we weren’t interested and never asked. I believe he mostly walked from Normandy to Berlin but I can’t say that for certain. I can only imagine the horror, poignancy and excitement of what he endured. My uncle died there. There’s 4 of us and we know so little and now everyone that could know is gone. And that’s a self-inflicted shame.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 18:29:38 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Very moving and true, Peter. My dad spent four years in WW2, some of it in Germany, but would never talk about it, or not to his daughters anyway. I don't know if he ever said anything to my brothers, but I doubt it. Those four years left their mark on him though, that I know.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 18:19:41 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There is that WW1 v WW2 difference. In WW1 they were clamouring to join up and were slaughtered in their masses. And for what? Kaiser Wilhem II, Czar Nicholas II and King George V were first cousins. That’s the deep sadness of it.

WW2 was different – it was ‘we have no choice but to fight the evil.’


Entered at Sun Nov 11 17:56:20 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: WW1 - Why?

PV - Thanks for that article. I don’t know how exactly the history of this war’s cause can be brought into the current rememberances, but with all the attention being paid, I wish some leader would bring it up. So many lessons could have been learned and applied in the century that followed; but they weren’t.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 17:27:44 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Poppies

Link to my short article to commemorate 100 years since the end of World War One.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 17:19:32 CET 2018 from (2001:980:e13a:1:a9a2:6fb6:90e5:c064)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Tenn & car phones

Tenn, good to see you here.

From my German paper friend a story about car phone’s

“I remember my first mobile phone better than my first kiss. Okay, it may have been the woman. Or was it the Siemens S3 com? In 1995, at least, it was the latest technical gadget, because with this device you could send a, pre-typed, SMS.

The S3 com had a stubby antenna, which I liked sticking out of my breast pocket of my denim jacket. Silent mode was unusual at the time. First, because hardly anyone called anyway. Secondly, because you absolutely wanted others to hear when it ever rang. There were even situations where I was just pretending to be on the phone. Just to look cool.

Mr. Drews, the local phone retailer, demanded 49 dollar for the Siemens S3 com. Of course, only if I signed a two-year strangle contract with D1 (German radio telephone network) at the same time. The strangle (gag) went like this: 49 dollar monthly base fee, per minute of call € 1.99. "Cheap" was only after work, then the minute price dropped to 39 cents. Still nearly four dimes.

The decisive factor at the time was whether the tariff calculated "in seconds" or "by the minute." The latter was rip-off, because if an answering machine jumped in on the other side or you had dialed yourself in, you had to pay right away for a whole minute.

For my car, an Opel Astra "Sportive" (75 hp), I bought an outdoor antenna. Less to have a better reception. More to show the others that I always could if I just wanted to. To make phone calls.

My CB radio device most had found childish. I personally thought it sounded like big world when the truckers were talking to each other on the nearby A7 and I could listen in.

Sometime in 1994, as a precursor to the car phone, I bought a pale green "Scall." This was a pager that others could reach by phone to let me know I might please call them back. Never, as far as I remember, has anyone ever done that. "


Entered at Sun Nov 11 16:00:33 CET 2018 from (2001:980:e13a:1:a9a2:6fb6:90e5:c064)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: 100

“I wish those people who talk about going on with this war whatever it costs could see the soldiers suffering from mustard gas poisoning. Great mustard-coloured blisters, blind eyes, all sticky and stuck together, always fighting for breath, with voices a mere whisper, saying that their throats are closing and they know they will choke.”

[Nurse Vera Brittain]


Entered at Sat Nov 10 23:44:33 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, President Farter has followed up by declining to attend the world leaders conference for Armistice Day in Paris tomorrow.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 22:25:39 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:1d3e:c9c2:e918:92ac)

Posted by:

Pat B

Wow. Tenn/Cal. Like old home week.

Trump is a degenerate.

One of the Cali fires is three blocks from my ex-wife's house. She saved some stuff then left. My daughter who in in NY may lose a bunch of her old stuff. Meanwhile our degenerate president is chomping Le Big Macs and tweeting like 12 year old bully.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 21:44:08 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tonight's BBC news - Trump declined to visit the US War Memorial in France because it "was raining." What would have happened to a US soldier in 1918 who declined to stay in the trenches for the same reason?


Entered at Sat Nov 10 21:32:05 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Presidential Comments

The latest of the village idiot blaming the forest service in California for forest fires is now the stupidest comment I've ever heard. I suppose if a fireman slipped and fell off a ladder it would be his fault for being a fireman.

Some how those folks in the USA got to figure out a way to get rid of that looney tune.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 16:38:07 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"It wasn't until [Joni] heard Bob Dylan's "Positively Fourth Street" that she finally began to understand how to tap the power of this private poetry in a song. She recalled, "When I heard that 'You've got a lot of nerve to say you are my friend' I thought, now that's poetry; now we're talking. That direct, confronting speech, commingled with imagery, was what was lacking for me."

Dylan's influence ranged from Lou Reed and Johnny Cash, to Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles. The legendary Sam Cooke was blown away by Dylan, and immediately recognized that his work would change music history.

When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."

When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."

Santana always calls out, "Long live Coltrane. I call out, "Long Live Joni Mitchell!"

Joni Mitchell on TLW performing with The Band. She reports they were all so high and so out of tune. It worked for me.

Tenn! Drop me a line to let me know how you've been doing sometime.
First poster Lisa who stood up for brown eyed girl. It is understandable when you post controversial posts at times and stand up for something. It was because of Tenn's posts that I was able to continue expressing myself in this GB. Those who tried to drive me away also were my teachers. They helped me to develop a backbone on the internet. Don't look back. Keep moving and hopefully inspire others to get up and stand up.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 09:51:51 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tenn! (or should I say “Cal” now) good to see you here. My son just moved back to LA, where he used to live, after several years in NYC. We Facetimed last night (UK time) and he was in the backyard and said “Look behind me”. We said “Wow, those are massive clouds.” No, it was smoke from Ventura County (he is near Eagle Rock).


Entered at Sat Nov 10 05:38:02 CET 2018 from (2606:6000:66f8:4d00:993f:f2f7:c625:ce41)

Posted by:

BWNWILos Angeles

Location: No longer Tenn

The Woolsey fire in Ventura County seems to be right where The Band’s old studio Shangri-La is (currently owned by Rick Rubin). It’s spread all the way to the ocean, right at Zuma Beach. It’s also at Point Dume, where Dylan has lived in the same house since the mid ‘70s. I don’t know where Robbie lives, but I assume he’s also still in Malibu. Hope everything is okay (although “everything” is not... already 35,000 acres burned and 250,000 people evacuated with the fire 0% contained).


Entered at Sat Nov 10 05:19:23 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Robert Bradley's Blackwater Surprise is an American band. It formed in 1994 when former members of the band Second Self met the blind street performer Robert Bradley. Bradley was born in Alabama, and gained musical experience and spirit by singing as a child at The Alabama School for the Blind. He had spent several years in Detroit by 1994, performing occasionally on the street, and playing on Saturdays in Detroit's Eastern Market,[1] when guitarist Michael Nehra, bassist Andrew Nehra, and drummer Jeff Fowlkes overheard Bradley through an open window while rehearsing for a new project. After listening to Bradley sing for an hour, they invited him up to the studio to record several acoustic songs, then asked him to become their vocalist."


Entered at Sat Nov 10 04:09:52 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie, Dominique, Delphine, Alexandra


Entered at Sat Nov 10 03:50:31 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks to Bill M. I really enjoyed myself at Canadian Indie Week with three (four as two brothers) songwriters were absolutely great! Brothers Petric's vocals were soothing and a delight to listen to. Amanda Rheume sang about struggles with anxiety and depression as many do, and Clayton Bellamy (sang about death of a marriage. Clayton is on Garth's A Canadian Tribute to The Band...Yazoo Street Scandal in The Road Hammers. Wow...He really projects his vocals with huge power. You cannot help but pay attention. I loved how they all fed off of each others creativity and supported each other by listening intently to each other. No cover but 10.00 for wine? I guess I do not get out much. lol I stopped at two. One of Clayton's "people" asked if I wanted to meet Clayton as I told him about Garth's CD. Sure, why not?

Well...After conversation I am about to leave and I realize I have my large bag but no purse!!!! WTF! I said no this can't be happening to me on such a great night which just happened to be my Name Day as well. Well the same person who introduced me to Clayton came over to help and when we couldn't find it; all of a sudden I remembered I went upstairs and was chatting with the host of the joint. So we run upstairs...and sure enough....I couldn't believe it my bag was right in front of her on the floor where I guess I had put down as I was putting on my coat...and no one lifted it!!!! I was able to exhale and vowed next time one wine max. lol Everything was inside...An angel was by my side for sure. Thanks again Bill M...The vibe was great and the people who attended and all the singer-songwriters. PS Let me know next time Michale Fanfara of Louu's band is performing in town.

Last 5:
In or Out...Ani DiFranco
Goodbye's All We Got Left...Steve Earle
Penny More...The Skydiggers
Starboy...The Weeknd (featuring Daft Punk)
If You Go (Spanish Version)...Jon Secada
Save Me...Joan Armatrading

Otherworld Cottage Industries proudly hosts music and pop culture author Harvey Kubernik's KUBERNIK'S KORNER


Entered at Fri Nov 9 23:46:01 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "Widows" review

For the film fans, link to my review of "Widows" which as it happens has its worst violent scene played out to Madame George by Van Morrison!


Entered at Fri Nov 9 22:53:50 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:1d3e:c9c2:e918:92ac)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Van Morrison Holy Grail. Download it before Van finds out.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 20:50:17 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Discs 1 & 2

When you read the discs in iTunes, it appears that CD 2 is marked 2018. Discs 1 & 3 are marked 1968. No reference to 2018 remix.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 20:43:27 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: White album

Me too, John D. Just back from the cinema with a review to do before I break the shrink wrap.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 19:20:34 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: November 9th White Album Release

Well I came home this morning to find a package; from Amazon waiting for me in the mailbox. What could it be? Forgot that back in September I had ordered, The Beatles White Album 3 CD set. Didn't go for the large Deluxe set. I'll be honest; if I really like what I hear I may order the other. Permission; from Mrs.D will be required. Only required for the expensive box sets. Well, I have unwrapped it and am about to listen.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 16:41:27 CET 2018 from (147.135.11.113)

Posted by:

Amos

Subject: Last Five

Jon Cleary - I'm Not Mad. Englishman who moved to N'awlins and now sounds like Lowell George and Little Feat.

Fela Kuti - Alu Jon Janki Jon. I love a bit of Afrobeat mixed in with my Americana !

The Band - Jupiter Hollow. Robbie and Garth shine on this one.

Guy Clark - Let Him Roll. Guy at his best.

Steve Earle and The Del McCoury Band - The Mountain. One of the best songwriters with one of the best Bluegrass band's around. I can believe this album is now 20 years old!



Entered at Fri Nov 9 16:03:29 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: New Band Book Released November 6th.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 14:22:30 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The big pink house on the village green

Record Collector, November 2018, has a comprehensive piece on The Kinks “Village Green Preservation Society” with new interviews, to match the new box set.

QUOTE: Ray’s impulse to retreat to his roots had many adherents in 1968, as rock retrenched from the previous year’s psychedelic excess, not least in the Beatles and Stones LPs which swamped The Kinks impact that Christmas. The Band’s Music From Big Pink, released in August, offered their Big Pink basement as a mythic refuge from a chaotic year much like The Village Green.

“That’s curious,” Dave (Davies) considers, “I never connected the dots to those two records. But there is a lot that’s similar, although it’s about growing up as young men, and the American past. Yeah, that’s a fair comparison. When I first heard The Band, I really got it.

We used to get influenced by The Band and they were quite influenced by us, agrees (Mick) Avory. They said “We got a lot from The Kinks,” which I was surprised to hear. UNQOTE

Actually, I still think much of the Americana glow over MFBP is reflected back from the brown album as an afterthought, but I always thought that The Band and The Kinks had a shared mindset on music in 1968 … eliminate screaming solos, psychedelia and get down to the songs, with a strong sense of past musical styles.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 14:18:35 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc: They didn't follow up Rag Mama Rag until Time To Kill from Stage Fright … a poor choice of single, I thought at the time.

The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra … it's origin was partly history, but I'd guess its main basis is as 'the orchestra of the south and south-west.' They regularly play in Bristol, Southampton … all over the South and Bournemouth has a dead central location. Their reputation grew by appointing the right conductors. An irony is that they're no longer based in Bournemouth, but in Poole. Bournemouth demolished its fine concert hall, and they moved to Poole Lighthouse which is where they play their regular concert series We were in Bath bemoaning our lack of good theatre in Poole, and the Bath inhabitants we were speaking to announced that they drove to Poole every week for the BSO concerts in winter.

In a year or two, Bournemouth and Poole are being combined is one town, possibly city, with just one local government, so it's academic. While I live in Poole, I'm half a mile from the Bournemouth border, and 4 miles from central Poole.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 12:27:43 CET 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:2405:4f60:379c:b1c)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I had never heard of them, Peter, and they seemed to have gained a little fame in their time. It was 1970 that I started to frequent the folk clubs.

Interesting about the Gilbert and Sullivan. John Martyn's parents were light opera singers, a popular genre at the time in the UK.They divorced and John visited his mum, who lived on a barge on the Thames. I always thought it unusual that Bournemouth, which I always thought of as a seaside town because of Scottish holidaying habits, had a world class orchestra.

Pat's posts I found mildly depressing because I felt that The Band should have been the headline act, but understand why they were not.

This takes me back to mismanagement. I'll not go into it all again. Peter has posted about playing 'The Weight' in the university union, but it never charted into the Top Twenty. I would argue that an important breakthrough for The Band in the UK was 'Rag Mama Rag', which did break into the top twenty and had a lot of exposure. We used to share our singles, which may explain the poor state of some records.

I loved and bought Rag Mama Rag, but there seemed to be no follow up - another example of poor management. What was the follow up single, Peter? Was there no promotion of it? It would be 1972 when a record shop owner played me the Brown album when I heard the Band again.

The Weight is revered now amongst the Americana crowd in the UK. I heard Ricky Ross play it on his show in the summer and gave it an intro such as the most important record in Americana or the record which started it all - can't remember the exact words.

But, many people across here don't know The Band.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 11:11:35 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cleanliness, recycling and skimming

B.Lee- I meant it had been played once with a damaged stylus when it was new. Yes, recycled plastic is a 70s issue, as were those RCA ultra-thin Dynaflex pressings.

Another issue is skimming, though this record isn’t valuable enough for that … Rare record Guide prices a mint copy at £35. I paid £10.

Skimming is shaving the top layer of vinyl off to remove scratches and abrasions. It also ruins the sound. It’s done with the really expensive records, and they get away with it because in London especially, they have Far East collectors who buy vinyl as an investment, and it is highly unlikely they will ever be played. I was at a friend’s shop (well, all the local shop owners have become friends over the years) and he had a box someone wanted to sell to him, and had left for him to price. We looked through together. The gem was Electric Ladyland. That’s rated at £700 in mint condition with blue text on the sleeve (first pressing), or £300 mint with white text. This was blue text. The seller had mentioned he wanted £100 for it. His in-store test record player wasn’t working, because yet again a customer had stolen the cartridge. The record was gleaming vinyl, spotless. My friend said he was going to pass on it. I asked why. He pointed out the sleeve, which was “excellent” rather than “mint.” No tears, no writing, but you could see it had been used and records taken in and out. He pointed out that it didn’t match the quality of the record, though it was still excellent. He said it just “smelled” suspicious to him, and he reckoned it was a skimmed record.

I don’t reckon the Natural Acoustic Band was skimmed, but it was RCA label (not Dynaflex though). I would guess “played on a crap record player with a very heavy stylus.”

For collectors, a few years ago radio stations were dumping their vinyl libraries and you saw a lot of copies (always with radio station stickers). These were usually a dubious buy. A hi-fi record deck has a stylus pressure of 1 to 2 grams. Radio stations (well, certainly the BBC) set a stylus pressure of 3.5 grams to make sure records didn’t skip on air. So if it was a popular title, you can hear the wear.

Then there’s cleaning. A store I go to in Stratford has a record cleaner with liquid and vacuum (a £400 one) and everything over £20 secondhand has been cleaned. A store in Bristol does the same, and if it’s less than £20, they’ll clean it for £5. This really improves sound … I keep meaning to get one. The ultimate are sonic cleaners which cost £3000, and they’re the same system used for cleaning jewels. Apparently while they can’t do anything about scratches, they take every last bit of stuff from the grooves … and even new vinyl has scurf in the grooves.

I had a tip from a classical seller. He visits my local stores once a month and they keep potential classical LPs aside for him. He really knows his stuff … the companies that never used “recycled vinyl” were Decca and EMI, and so early stereo classical on HMV or Decca are the most collectable. No one is interested in Deutsche Grammophon (Polygram) apparently. Anyway, his cleaning tip? Simply play the record once through, then clean your stylus. It will sound way better second time.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 04:43:05 CET 2018 from (108.36.226.127)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Vinyl Rice Crispies

Peter, I would suspect "recycled" vinyl. As I understood it at the time, it was an attempt by the pressing plants to make better margins by taking botched pressings (label and all), trimmings, floor sweepings, bits of Jimmy Hoffa, whatever, and mixing them in with "virgin" vinyl. Often used for obscure artist releases and record club pressings, the result looked fine but sounded dreadful. Never heard of one tearing up a stylus, though.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 19:11:32 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Natural Acoustic Band

Current listening. A 2-on-1 CD by The Natural Acoustic Band from 1969. A band from Glasgow, two men, one woman. I bought an LP of their first album a few weeks ago, and as can happen, it was pristine clean in a perfect sleeve, but when played was all hiss, crackle and pop. Probably played only once, years ago, with a totally wrecked stylus. But it sounded good musically, and so I ordered the CD. Very unusual- at times on the second album (Branching In) it sounds like Kate Bush!

Title track of first album linked. Do you remember them, Dunc?


Entered at Thu Nov 8 17:41:04 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Peter

It's not necessary........every body knows it! :-) :-)


Entered at Thu Nov 8 17:24:42 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: IRA

What they are saying this morning, as long as the Republicans had control of the House Intelligence committee Nunes had Trump's back. Now it is in his face. The republicans would never ask for his tax returns. Now you can be sure the Dems will.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 17:22:55 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Think I'll get a T-shirt made with "I am a rude and terrible person."


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:19:24 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The axe comes down!

JQ, I don't think things are as bad as you may feel now. Trump is making his threats and trying to bullshit his way thru' like he has his whole life. It's not going to work now.

Nunes gives up control to Adam Shciff. This bum boy of Trump's, Whitaker who will take over the DOJ thinks he can cut funding to Bob Mueller and shut him down and it will all just go away. That won't happen. People who think Bob Mueller has no evidence and on and on have no idea. The integrity of Mr Mueller is sound. If he had "nothing" he would have said so long ago. He lives by that old rule, go quietly and carry a big stick. I don't think Trump has slept for a long time worrying about him. Another old saying "me thinks thou does't protest too much". I think the dominos will start pretty soon now.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 08:54:54 CET 2018 from (98.103.125.160)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hi Bassman

I guess it was just the Trump presser today and then the guy that will replace Sessions - am I actually feeling sorry for that twerp Sessions?? - it just feels like we’re in for a lot more hell before it’s over. I agree there are reasons for rationale optimism now though too.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 06:47:15 CET 2018 from (108.36.226.127)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Are we?

JQ, what makes you think this way? The Dems have regained the House and the Reps still need help for a "super majority", a fact (!) admitted by the Rump in his lengthy press conference. (Got a chuckle when he called one of the reporters "rude". There's the pot calling the kettle black, eh?)

Of course he waited until AFTER the conference to announce that Mr. Sessions is going bye-bye. I predict a flurry of Executive Orders and such to compensate for the loss of majority in both houses. Could be worse. A lot of new faces on the Donkey side, especially women in the House. So IMHO there is hope.

On a musical note, watching the AXS cable channel a lot, at least when they are not rerunning things I've already seen. Today a rerun of Dan Rather's interview of Joan Baez. What a class act! Later a 75 birthday celebration for Mavis Staples recorded almost 2 years ago with an impressive roster including Bonnie Raitt, Keb Mo, Taj Mahal, Emmylou Harris (who says Mavis calls her 'AmyLou'), Gregg Allman and some relative youngsters like Glen Hansard, Grace Potter, Ryan Bingham, Eric Church. Followed by a Joss Stone (eh) and Mavis double-bill live set. Guess what song ended both the birthday party and the short Mavis performance? Three guesses and the first two don't count.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 06:01:57 CET 2018 from (98.103.125.160)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bad news from America

So, after a genuine hard day of work today, I got up on today’s news and will report that we’re still fucked over here..


Entered at Thu Nov 8 02:34:12 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Childhood Memories

Well I got home yesterday with my chaffuere Susie Darlin. Got my left eye rebuilt in Courtenay. So they are both done! "I can see clearly now.....!"

It has been interesting reading of the likes and dislikes of music and theater that some of you were introduced to. There was music in my life always. Our Dad played guitar and sang. He and a few of his mates played for dances in the small villages on the islands we lived on. Many cook house parties. The cook house of small logging camps was the common room. The largest room usually with tables for the crews to eat so the place to party. Dad loved to play, Jimmy Rogers, "Mississippi Delta Blues" Hank Snow, Hank Williams.

Of course my music I began on was from a wind up grammaphone. When I was about 7 because our Dad had suffered double pneumonia and almost died we had to move away from the water for a time. We moved to Burnaby, (beside Vancouver). Now consider a bush rat like me all I had ever heard was the battery radio with the music we got at night when the reception was ok.

Any one who has been to Vancouver may be aware of "Stanley Park" our huge park that winds along the Vancouver water front. Out there along the beach is "Theater Under The Stars" an open air theater. My grandma, (who was my best buddy) took me to see the live musical production of the "Wizard of Oz". Well you can imagine a 7 year old kid who has never seen any thing! It was magic! I love it to this day.

My first movies I ever saw at a theater, "Alice in Wonderland" unbelievable to me. Also my mum took us to see "The Great Caruso" the life of Enrico Caruso, played by Mario Lanza. His singing was so beautiful I have never forgotten it. Now with youtube I sometimes lay back in my chair with the head phones on listening to him sing on youtube reliving that time. I still love it.

If you listen to Van Morrison's album "Pay the Devil" you pretty much hear the songs I began singing. The concerts our mum took us to from my age 6 were, Wilf Carter, Hank Snow and Slim Witman and Hank Williams not long before he died.

Early junior high my oldest brother Howie had taken accordion lessons and got pretty good. He hooked up with other of his high school buddies and he was soon playing guitar. I was designated singer. Buddy Holly, Everly Brothers, Gene Vincent, and soon Elvis. So music was ever present.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 20:59:51 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Thanks for that - a factoid that I was unaware of. I think Gerber's also on David Ackles' first album along with other Rhinoceros musicians, likely including Bill Mundi - and if so, there's another Band connection. Yesterday's basement record store also had two of Ackles LPs - "Subway to the Country", with just Doug Hastings of the Rhinos, and "American Gothic". I can't think of the latter without a quiet "yippy-yi-o-ki-yay" running through my mind. I like to think you'll recall my thoughts on the relationship between "Montana Song" on "American Gothic" and Zappa's "Moving To Montana".


Entered at Wed Nov 7 19:51:20 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:6ca3:dceb:bfa4:4b8b)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, in another Band connection Alan Gerber (a fellow Roosevelt alumni) had something to do with Renaldo & Clara.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 15:53:21 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: stroll on by ...

Peter V: My mind has dropped the politics, but I'm stuck with a "Walk On By" earworm. I've always despised that song so am trying to rewire the worm to "The Stroll" by the Diamonds - see link. They were the third and most interesting of Toronto's successful vocal groups of the '50s - Four Lads, Crew Cuts, Diamonds. And the only one with even tenuous links to Hawkins / Hawks: original lead singer Dave Somerville was replaced by Ernie Malone from the Blue Tones, whose one record featured a bunch of Yonge Street regulars, and Malone was replaced by Don Weir, whose brother Ian was in the short-lived version of the Hawks between the Crowbar lineup and Atkinson, Danko and Ford lineup.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 10:52:31 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Politics (scroll by)

It was built into the system at the deepest level, but let’s just say Alaska – 740,000, North Dakota – 755,000, Rhode Island – 1.6 million. Six senators.

California – 39.5 million, Texas – 28 million, New York State -19.85 million. Six senators.

Our system with an unelected House of Lords stuffed with political appointments is even creakier.

The next upgrade in our voting system should reduce our 650 MPs to 600 MPs in more evenly-sized constituencies. Currently the range in size of the electorate is 55,000 to 95,000. In the 1960s, it was a far wider range – I think it was from 28,000 to 130,000. Trouble is, MPS have to vote on fifty of them losing their seats, and the changes will greatly favour Conservative - who largely hold the large and growing suburban constituencies rather than the ever-decreasing inner city ones.

And Channel 4 News survey yesterday, the largest since the referendum, indicates that 54% would now vote “Remain” in Europe.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 06:35:04 CET 2018 from (98.103.125.160)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Good news from America!

Pretty huge that the house is firmly in Dem’s hands and we now have a bit of a first check on Trump. A number of state govts have flipped to Dems too. All spending emanates from the house, so that’s good and new control on him. The investigations that were deliberately corrupted can be restarted with gusto. Still a divided country, but the anti Trump majority has found traction and is trending that way even in the senate and other close losses. Hopefully the accendant right wing movements around the world will pay attention.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 03:52:32 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

JS: I don't have the 45 but I like the idea. The only 45 I like to play at 33 is Kate Bush's "Wuthering Heights".


Entered at Wed Nov 7 03:14:43 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: record collecting in the T-dot

Was pleased to find a copy of John Hammond's "Mirrors" LP in a store today. While it says there's two songs with Robbie, Garth and Levon, I think there's only one, "I Wish You Would", which Hammond would re-record the following year (1966) with Robbie and Rick.

And down the street I was surprised and delighted to find the wonderful "Bengali Bauls at Big Pink" LP. Garth's first production credit, I imagine. In the same place I also bought an early Colin Linden LP, "When The Spirit Comes", which has Garth, Rick and Sredni helping out here and there, including a version of "Chest Fever". And I bought a Bearfoot 45 for 50 cents because it has Terry Danko and Jim Atkinson on it.

BEG: The second store, Black Market on Queen West, has a couple of Byron Lee LPs if you're interested.

Pat B: Thinking of you and my long post yesterday, I spent a dollar on Tim Ryan's "The Runner" LP. Tim was the other co-writer of "If You Can't Dance To This", and Bob Yeomans wrote half the songs, plays guitar and provide back-up vocals - along with your sometime-collaborator Rand Bishop and former fellow-Chicagoan Alan Gerber.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 02:32:37 CET 2018 from (2600:1013:b011:add9:869:138f:a5c:2265)

Posted by:

JS

Subject: Richard & Johnny Nash

Richard liked to play his 45 of “l Can See Clearly Now” at 33 RPM when he’d spin favorites at his house. He took some inspiration from Johnny Nash and Michael Jackson too - but liked to bring them down in range. Try it sometime - and imagine Richard covering that song!


Entered at Tue Nov 6 16:43:32 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Peter...Reflecting on Johnny Nash's I Can See Clearly Now; I thought about all the songs I taught the kidzzz to perform for others. Here are a few of them.

I Can See Clearly Now...Jimmy Cliff...I ran into former student who was in my grade 3/4 class. It was the year form hell. I apologized to student for not being their best teacher that year. Bless his heart. He said that he loved the songs I taught them from Jimmy Cliff to Robbie's Shine Your Light. I was grieving at the same time.

Three Little Birds...Bob Marley and the Wailers was performed by grade 1/2 class.

Trouble Me...10000 Maniacs...was taught to many classes from grade 1/2 to grade 6.

Work...Bob Marley and the Wailers...I changed Jah to We.

Sunshine Reggae...I organized school concert with all grades and called it Positive Vibrations.

Next song would have been Dylan's Man Gave All The Names To All The Animals...I would have changed to We Gave All The Names To All The Animals.

Everyone in my classes and Music Appreciation clubs would at least have been exposed to reggae if it wasn't played at home and The Band's music especially Robbie's Native Music and other solo work. I would provide the music from many genres and students would draw, explore colour while feeling the music, act out how the music made them feel and think etc. One of my favourite times with the kidzzz would begin every morning with Cherokee Morning Song from Robbie's Music For The Native Americans...sometimes sung in rounds.

At a Conference we were asked to introduce ourselves by sharing a favourite place. I shared that my favourite place was to be surrounded by music. I take the best from all genres of music. There is no genre that is crap. Even disco and rap is in my music collection as I take the best from the best. :-D


Entered at Tue Nov 6 16:04:15 CET 2018 from (2605:8d80:6c1:14a8:dc48:cd5a:aac2:3742)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: you must've seen the documentary where Chris Blackwell speaks quite feelingly about the effort that the Wailers made to turn out that great album on time and within the modest budget he's allowed them By then, though, they had already done a fair bit of recording and we're well known in Jamaica and among the Jamaican diaspora elsewhere. At the first, 1967, edition of the annual Caribana event in Toronto that BEG mentioned yesterday, a local group called the Cougars played Marley's "Bend Down Low". (That year the event was held over two weekends. The first show was taped, and two albums were pressed and ready for sale on the second weekend!)


Entered at Tue Nov 6 15:58:43 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Peter...You are the king of music here. I hear your place is just packed with music...everywhere. You are also the king of this GB. You are the only one who has consistently posted for years. We have similar musical tastes to boot!

Bill M...I checked out the singer-songwriters and I especially liked the one who will be performing on Thursday. I had to look up the venue. I will see what I can do as I am supposed to be attending a fundraiser but maybe that one is next week. I see a burger and a beer is the special? If I do show up and I see you; you can have the beer. I would really like to meet your partner. Anyway, only drank it at Ry High for the possible buzz and cheapness. My partner's father was a brew master and imagezulu would work at Carlings as a student who also attended the same school as both of us but he was five years ahead. Later take over by Molson's.

Lisa...Loved how you posted that family didn't have much money but music was always there. BEAUTIFUL. We did not have a lot of money either once I started kindergarten but education was always stressed and valued. Also my father apparently was known in the community to be one of the most creative folk dancers as he'd create his own dance steps. I remember once I said to my mother how I really liked this one dance move that my father's first cousin always exhibited at our weddings. She told me that it was my father who taught him those steps as they were close buddies. I just smiled with pride. Otherwise his passion was football (soccer).


Entered at Tue Nov 6 10:45:37 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stir It Up

BEG, this is from my Toppermost article on Bob Marley:

Monday 23rd April 1973. New release day for records. I always made a point of going to Wax Records in Bournemouth to check out the new releases. I was teaching English as a Foreign Language. It meant a race down to the town centre in lunchtime, or in a free lesson. That day I was free before lunch, so unhurried. I walked in. The manager said, “You will buy this. I guarantee it. Just listen,” and put on Catch A Fire. He chose Side Two for familiarity, because Stir It Up was known. Neither of us had heard of The Wailers, but I already had Johnny Nash’s I Can See Clearly Now LP and Stir It Up was my favourite track. It had been out for a year. Then The Wailers’ version of Stir It Up crept out of the speakers. We stood, transfixed. Yes, I bought the LP which is why my copy is a first day LP with lighter cover. There are just 20,000 of them. I was showing it to someone ten years ago and tore the flame.

At my 70th birthday party, the band was 3/4th of Tetrad from 1969 reunited for the occasion (the fourth member, John Wetton, had passed away a few months before). They added a couple of friends as the evening wore on, one from earlier, one later. There was a "What shall we do next?" moment, and one started the chords of "Stir It Up" and said "Does everyone know this?" Bob, the drummer, said "Well, I backed Johnny Nash on tour when this was a hit."


Entered at Mon Nov 5 23:43:49 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

BEG: If you like the Roadhammers' version of "Yazoo Street Scandal" on Garth's "A Canadian Celebration of the Band", you might check out the gig at the link. Clayton Bellamy is the Roadhammer who sang the song (so very well), and he's one of three singer-songwriter's performing this Thursday downtown. Starts at 5:00 PM so they're looking for an after-work crowd of youngish office workers.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 23:36:56 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Thanks. I can't even remember how the second one goes. England Dan and John Ford Coley later had a lesser hit with "If You Can't Dance To This", and I was wondering if that was the one you were referring to because it didn't do nearly as well on the charts. It was written by two guys from Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, one of whom, Bob Yeomens had played with Scott Cushnie in '65 in the Vendettas, one of Ronnie Hawkins's Enterprises' stable of artists. Thirty years later, Bob would play on Scott's two 'big' boogie woogie (ish) CDs - "Two Piano, No Waiting" and "Two Pianos, No Waiting Vol 2".


Entered at Mon Nov 5 23:29:47 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Uhhhh....I forgot about The Band and Robbie. I heard TNTDDD via Joan Baez on FM radio during high school and some The Band music. The radio was so important in my life as I would listen to my transistor radio as much as possible in very early years and then only FM radio until it became so washed out.

It was in 1978 when I saw TLW at the Elgin Theatre twice in one night that I was hooked. Robbie appeared unapproachable in general and of course I was drawn to bad boy Rick. I first bought their greatest hits on CD. I always have to sing The Weight or Up On Cripple Creek before anyone knows what I am talking about. Older brother not drawn to them at all. All his posters on his wall were of British musicians but one female...Rita Coolidge. Also poster of many kinds of hashish and Che. Ha! He's never really been left of centre whereas I am..

"But the Robertson-Helm feud is an old and perhaps irresolvable story. In "Testimony," Robertson chooses mostly to celebrate his late brother in arms rather than re-litigate their disagreements. He does point out, several times, that Helm wasn't, as he writes, "a song person”—meaning that he could play like the devil but was rarely interested in writing. Additionally, Robertson points out that Manuel’s contributions—he was the writer or co-writer of several of the Band's first songs—sharply diminished as his personal struggles mounted. In the end, Robertson emphasizes, gently but clearly, that the Band's beloved songs—and the harmonies, ingenious instrumentation, and transcendent sound contained therein—wouldn't exist if he hadn't taken the plain initiative to write them in the first place. Robertson was a heady operator, but he was also the group’s bridge from the basement to the wider world. There wouldn’t be a story of the Band, or a villain to give it drama, without him."


Entered at Mon Nov 5 23:03:22 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan, Rick Danko & Levon Helm - Lone Star Cafe, NY (16th February 1983) [Full Performance]

Lisa...We did not even have a record player at home. My older brother by five years only had an 8-track player. In my very early years the only music I was exposed to was our ethnic music that was played at weddings and dances. I loved how it was so inclusive where everyone got up and held hands or put their arms around each other and danced the night away.

When the Beatles arrived I was maybe eight years old but somehow I saw all the Beatles films and just loved the escapism from my reality. My Aunt and Uncle worked for Electrohome for awhile between owning many restaurants and many of my relatives owned including my own...They gave me one of those small record players where you play your 45's. Wow...One of my best gifts ever. We did live with many relatives via of my paternal grandfather who brought many over from both sides of the family.

When Woodstock arrived I only knew one other classmate who also saw the film before high school and I remember vividly how the went on about Joe Cocker and his...movements.

Oh I forgot before Woodstock and after the Beatles our community of friends would play baseball and then we'd listen to Motown or the Beach Boys. The boys would pretend they were the Beatles and we'd pretend we were the Supremes. I still remember one creative family from England whose youngest daughter was my age and if we didn't have enough females to impersonate the Supremes; she'd just say one dropped out. This family could all draw well. They were only of two families who lived in an apartment. High school for me was Louuu, Bowie, Rod the Mod via of my brother's music. His music changed over the years. Mine was pretty consistent.

First big concert was bus tour during high school to see Yes at Maple Leaf Gardens. I was not into Yes but I did know about the Roundabout. I just wanted to check out the big city and the big venue. One thing happened that could have gone wrong but I was lucky. We had floor seats and all of a sudden I feel glass flying my way. Some yahoo literally threw their mickey into the air and some glass landed on me......

It wasn't until I moved to TO for University in the mid-seventies that I discovered BMW. Bob drove BMW'S. Trench town rock was the very first song I heard from their UK concert. That's all it took. I was hooked for life. No one was into reggae in my world at the time so I saw Bob Marley and The Wailers on my own. I was lucky as I just had to cross the street to see them. The only song I remember is "Get Up Stand Up" I somehow feel blessed that I was a part of that night. I was around 23 whereas Ben Harper was 12. I somehow missed their show at Massey Hall at an earlier date. :-(((( I never liked Calypso music from Trinidad but did attend Caribana many times with and without Caribbean friends who I either met at work or literally on the street at Caribana.

In general I am drawn to singer-songwriters...Bob Marley...Louuu Reed...Van Morrison...Garland Jeffreys via Louuu...Bob Dylan...Once I heard Like A Rolling Stone I just totally connected.

"When the music hits you feel no pain." Bob Marley


Entered at Mon Nov 5 21:14:14 CET 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, "I'd Really Like To See You Tonight" (#2) and "Nights Are Forever Without You" (#10). Probably the first reference to those songs here.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 20:21:29 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Bill, I guess I was a little misleading. I didn't mean cultural experiences specifically, just what kind of music you heard when you were very young, from any source, and what sort of influence it had over your musical tastes now.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 20:09:50 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I'm with you when it comes to operetta, Peter. And Bill, that's too bad. It doesn't sound like anything there was a very good fit for you. The only field trip I ever went on at any school was to the symphony, ironically enough. Somehow school field trips weren't done much where I was, because even that was in Grade 12. Yours sound really great though, Peter. Lucky!


Entered at Mon Nov 5 19:46:12 CET 2018 from (2605:8d80:6c1:31a5:e40b:5d01:f8ac:1779)

Posted by:

Bill M

To which Dan / Coley hit do you reluctantly refer? And don't forget tour-mate Linda Ronstadt, who'd had a bunch of hits in what we're then recent years.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 18:57:23 CET 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, Daryl Sanders (author of the new book on BoB) disputes some of the descriptions of the Nashville show. He says it was brilliant and that the Nashville press was jacked to see the group. I believe its the only time the OQ played Nashville.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 18:40:36 CET 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Thanks to Dag for the Band articles. First off, they never did play on Oakland CA in early October 76, so the Nashville show truly was the last real gig they had. Also interesting is Nashville is the last time the five of them played as the OQ. I think the decision to close shop was already made by the time they played Nashville so RR's quote is a tad disingenuous. Perhaps he wasn't quite ready to announce the decision.

I think some of those 76 dates really highlighted the position the group had descended to. ZZ Top was supporting two albums at the time. Both had gone gold, and both had produced sizable radio hits (and massive FM play). In Austin TX they played with Fleetwood Mac who were supporting their self-title album. That album was #1 with 7 million in sales powered by three huge radio hits. Also on that bill: Chicago was still releasing platinum albums (Greatest Hits in 75 sold 5 million) and radio hits; Steve Miller was supporting Fly Like An Eagle, his biggest seller; Firefall had a big radio hit; and England Dan and John Ford Coley (I can't believe I just wrote that) had a top 20 hit that went gold. Meanwhile NLSC hit #26 then disappeared and Ophelia released as a single peaked at #62. You could easily argue that The Band was the least commercially successful group on those bills.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 16:27:56 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, you need to be in Britain, Bill. Some of the best music I’ve seen has been behind plays. The Royal Shakespeare Company gets major writers … e.g. Jon Boden and Laura Marling have composed new music for shows. Last week, at “Troilus & Cressida” they had a major Evelyn Glennie percussion accompaniment. The next day, Tamburlaine had two percussionists and violin. It’s always done live at the RSC or Globe too.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 15:22:20 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Especially when she's perpetually on the top deck and you're perpetually still not.

Culture: I don't remember encountering much capital-C Culture, and here is the sum total. I no longer remember why (and suspect that I'd 'won' a draw), but my grade 7 English teacher and his wife drove me to see a small-town theatre production of "The Man For All Seasons" two hours away. I didn't have a good time.

At some point during highschool, one of my classes was bussed in to Toronto to see the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from the very top row of Massey Hall. All I recall is that something was made of the fact that the main piece called for so many big deep drums that student percussionists were recruited from the University of Toronto. I didn't have a good time.

And one year the same highschool took advantage of a provincial taking-culture-to-the-schools program so we had ballet one time, some kind of classical music another, likely some Shakespeare a third, no doubt et cetera. All repulsive to the young me, with no upside at all since we didn't even get away from school.

Since then, I've seen three more plays, no more symphony, no ballet and maybe two modern dance performances.

I'm not counting the time when ballet students from the same university invaded the matted dancefloor as guitarist David Rea played one of the three sets that made up his "Hellhound On My Trail" tribute to Robert Johnson blues show. I remember Rea saying between sets, "These dancers have got to go." I also recall a sloshed Bruce Palmer (from Buffalo Springfield) showing off some karate moves, but that too was between sets and not on stage.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 14:20:53 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: You can't put your arms around a memory

Thanks, Dag, that worked. 25,000 at Nashville in 1976 and no encore and yet the writer says it was one of the best shows he’d seen … I guess it was a ZZ Top crowd, and they’d been hoping for Black Oak Arkansas as support, and The Band were a replacement? Sounds like a head-banging, air guitar playing crowd to me. So not poor attendance (which they complained of elsewhere in 1976) but a large crowd who wasn’t into their music at all. You can see Robbie thinking, ‘Fuck this.’ The mistake was putting them in as support to the wrong kind of band.

Dunc – it was my dad who took me to Gilbert & Sullivan light opera, so they were adult productions. He was very keen on it. School was the trips to the symphony orchestra, which was very good indeed … it would have been Constantin Silvestri as conductor. All the schools in Bournemouth were bussed there in double decker buses for these daytime concerts, once or twice a year, with erudite narration between pieces. I guess the town were paying for the schools and the orchestra, so decided to get their money’s worth. We loved it, because we’d be parked up next to busses from the girl’s schools, who safe on the top deck of a double decker were inclined to gesture (!) to the boys … Bournemouth was mainly single-sex schools (still is). Silvestri was a phenomenal conductor – I had a brief 1966 spell of going to his concerts. Over the years I’ve accumulated copies of Respighi’s “Pines of Rome” hoping to get the experience of seeing it live (which I have twice in recent years), but it never matches up to the memory.

(title at the top is a Stevie Nicks song)


Entered at Mon Nov 5 12:25:31 CET 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:e466:be51:b77c:c2a8)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Some great posts. Thanks.

Norm, got it. I thought it was Susan's sister, who was in Australia. I've hung up my boots. Lots to explore in Scotland.

I come in at Bobby Darin. I seem to know all the words to the songs, Lisa, but don't know how.

I think part of passing the qualy, Peter, was access to the Gilbert and Sullivan Society at the school you attended... which the plebs never got. I'm word perfect on those Tommy Steele numbers. My favourite Tommy Steele story is when he got his chance at serious theatre. He was going through the first reading of the play sitting in a circle with fellow actors on the stage, and he pretended to John Gielgud and the other actors that he was a poor reader. He could see the other actors looking at each other and thinking 'poor working class boy', but nobody interrupted his sounding out of words. He burst out laughing at the end of the reading.

Last five played.

Bob Dylan 'Blood on the Tracks'

The Band 'Stage Fright'

Neil Young 'Hitchhiker' - a masterpiece. Love this album Thanks for alert, Bob, I might have missed this.

JJ Cale 'Really' - absolutely love those first eight albums - a new sound at the time.

Tony McManus - 'Mysterious Boundaries'. This is classical music and I love it. A great self taught Celtic musician plays JS Bach and other composers and I love it. This album was praised very highly by John Renbourn before his death.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 11:55:51 CET 2018 from (88.91.155.104)

Posted by:

dag

Peter V: does this work? drive.google-DOT-com/open?id=0B2GbiDMdeNX6bmFHUThBb01hV2c (replace -DOT- with . and put h t t p s colon double forward slash in front of it)


Entered at Mon Nov 5 10:36:25 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dag, how do those links work? Zero happens when I put them in my browser.

I guess we're on the relative lack of sales of the Band's 1976 tour pre-TLW. We were still a year ahead from punk, so it's not that reaction. I'd guess a combination of poor management decisions, like being 3rd on the bill behind CSNY and Joni Mitchell (and on the same billing level as Tom Scott & The LA Express) right after the Before The Flood tour. It's status drop. Also, the performers who do well live vary the act a great deal … e.g. Van Morrison for much of his career (though not early or late), or improvise a lot so that it's never the same … Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin. You can tell by the vast number of Led Zep / Dead bootlegs. I collected a lot of Band cassettes and the show barely varied over a year. The Band might have suffered from being "too good" so not the appeal of Rolling Stones or Dylan boots where sloppiness adds interest, and also from eschewing solos. So people thought, 'Well, I've seen them twice and it's about the same." The only major variation was how Garth did The Genetic Method.

There's a Grateful Dead CD where they cut together many versions of Dark Star. An interesting Garth prospect there!


Entered at Mon Nov 5 09:56:16 CET 2018 from (88.91.155.104)

Posted by:

dag

Another mention of the Nashville show: postimg.cc/5X4H2yFq


Entered at Mon Nov 5 09:04:04 CET 2018 from (1.43.129.8)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Dag, thanks for that. That is quite a find. Especially the Robbie quote. When people offer opinions now about TLW and Robbie's decision to quit, I think they forget that in 1976 The Band was just not that popular.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 08:42:51 CET 2018 from (88.91.155.104)

Posted by:

dag

Subject: More on The Band in Nashville 1976

postimg.cc/4K1PrDGW


Entered at Mon Nov 5 04:15:13 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JQ: "54-46 That's My Number" is a great song. Here's a link to the original by Toots and the Maytals. It appears along with the stunning "Pressure Drop" on the group's "Sweet and Dandy", one of the best LPs of all time to my way of thinking (and listening). Fortunately the whole album's been repackaged a couple of times on CD. The one I've seen most often (in bargain bins at places like Walmart) is called just "Toots and the Maytals". Their only hit in Canada (and I suspect the States) was the later "Funky Kingston", which I've never cared for, even decades later when I thought I would.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 22:24:50 CET 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::52)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Recents

54-46 That’s My Number - Byron Lee. Did this one come up here recently? Happy sounding stuff!

Don’t Let Go - Roy Hamilton. Just the song on repeat.

Chicago Transit Authority, 1969 - Try it as loud as your wife/kids/grandkids will allow.

A Little Bit of Rain - Sid Selvidge - His singing voice comes right out of the Delta, like Jesse Winchester and Mose Allison that way. All 3 came from a couple hours of each other; Mose, although 15 years older, outlived the other two. It wasn’t Delta blues or rock n’ roll though, but deeply soulful, sweetly ripened and in tenor. R Danko had that going too, naturally, but without the accent. Try “The River” off that album.

Gunfighter Ballads - Marty Robbins


Entered at Sun Nov 4 21:24:16 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Five from the Fifties

Five pre-teen earworms for me:

Lay Down Your Arms – Anne Shelton

A White Sport Coat & A Pink Carnation – The King Brothers, UK cover and Marty Robbins

Little White Bull – Tommy Steele

Here Comes Summer- Jerry Keller

Singing The Blues – Tommy Steele UK cover.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 21:19:54 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great post, Lisa. My dad sang on the second British radio station as a teenager (O, For The Wings of A Dove etc) and shuddered at the sound of our teen band in the front room. When I was young, I had to attend many amateur light operas … I recall The Student Prince, but it was mainly Gilbert & Sullivan … The Mikado, Pirates of Penzance, that sort of thing. At school, we had regular trips to see the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (all local schools did) do a special school’s daytime concert. I ended up loathing light opera, in fact, and loathing serious opera even more.

My big musical epiphany was when my sister’s best friend went on holiday and left us her record player and records. I loved it … 1958. Tommy Steele, Elvis Presley. I rarely left it for a fortnight.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 21:08:40 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

My goodness, I'm hardly a classical music queen - I can barely read music, and don't play any instrument, but thank you! But you bring up an interesting subject, one I've been wanting to ask people here. You mentioned a trip to the opera that had a strong influence on you when you were 13. I'm thinking pretty well everyone here has a musical background of some sort, amateur or professional, or is a person that music matters terribly to in their lives, to the point where they couldn't live without it.

All the guys in The Band had music in their backgrounds, and almost every musician you've ever heard interviewed talks about their early musical influences. In my case, my dad was a classical musician, so that's what I grew up with. In fact, I never heard any pop music at all till I was 11, only songs that played at places like shopping centers, going with my mom. "One-Eyed One-Horned Flying Purple People Eaters", "Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini" - novelty songs like that. So when I did find out about rock and roll it hit like a ton of bricks, a whole new musical world. Though to be honest, it wasn't the greatest time musically for the most part until the Beatles came along. But that's what happens when you're that age. I begged for a transistor radio for Christmas, and my parents, bless their hearts, thinking I wanted it to listen to Saturday Afternoon At The Opera, gave me one. I was obsessed ... well, you probably all have similar stories.

But as far back as I can remember, classical music was what I heard. My mother also played piano (not professionally), but as I think a respite from child duties used to practice for hours - Brahms, Beethoven, Schubert. And from an early age we were taken to concerts. To this day, the sound of an orchestra tuning up sends a shiver down my spine like nothing else does. So in my childhood there wasn't a lot of money, but there was always music, and I wouldn't trade that for all the privileges in the world.

So my question is, what did you hear when you were young and impressionable? Do you still love it, if it's different from the music you listen to now?

beg, there's no such thing as TMI from you - I love the fact that you write about your own experiences. When people write personal stories here it adds so much to the picture we all have of each other, and yours is very vivid!


Entered at Sun Nov 4 21:07:50 CET 2018 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Can't link.

What's with WLDCore.dll ?


Entered at Sun Nov 4 19:25:57 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Glass Onion

Sounds incredible even on a computer. I don't think we could have recovered from seeing a video like that back in the day. We'd still be out there. Can't wait to hear it on a proper system.

The "White" Mojo recounts that George Martin went on holiday, fed up with it (he always disliked the album) and Ken Scott, later Bowie's producer, oversaw some of the later recordings on the White album.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 14:59:29 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for Artie link. I think I will try to see him next year.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 13:27:49 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here it is Peter! Art Garfunkel's recent interview on Sunday Morning show was not from this year but last year. And by chance it's his birthday tomorrow!
Art Garfunkel interview from CBS Morning November 5, 2017 (Artie´s Brithday)


Entered at Sun Nov 4 12:10:03 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lenny Breau...Country, Jazz, Flamenco.

"Lenny flew to Toronto in early November 1961. I booked a recording studio at Hallmark Studios for November 28, 1961. On the day before, I made arrangements to take Lenny to Ronnie Hawkin's home in Mississauga, in order to rehearse with Rick Danko, acoustic bassist, who played for Ronnie, and Levon Helm on drums. The rehearsal lasted about two hours with Lenny quickly running through the numbers with Rick and Levon that he contemplated recording. "The Hallmark Sessions" were recorded on November 28, 1961. Lenny, Rick Danko and Levon Helm recorded the seven Jazz numbers in stereo. Lenny then recorded the two Country & Western numbers and the four Flamenco numbers in mono. What was astounding to the recording engineers, and to everyone present, was that Lenny played the entire Jazz session without any rehearsal or interruption. After a short coffee break, Lenny played the Country & Western numbers, changed guitars, and played the four Flamenco numbers - again, without rehearsal or interruption. What has been produced on this CD, is in my estimation, the purest and finest work that Lenny ever performed or recorded."

"This video, filmed in Nashville, Tennessee at RCA Studios, captures Lenny in the studio during the recording sessions for "Guitar Sounds From Lenny Breau", Lenny's first album as a leader on RCA records. There is an extensive interview with Lenny where he discusses his music and his early roots. Chet Atkins is also interviewed on this video. He provides some commentary on what they were trying to do in terms of recording Lenny's first album. This is a rare glimpse into the genius that was and still is Lenny Breau."

Lenny Breau - "One More Take" - Documentary - 1968

Lisa...Third time seeing ballet Oneigen...I mentioned ballet to you in particular as you are our classical music queen as Ragtime is our king. Wish both of you would post about this genre as I am quite ignorant in this area. Partner's mother was a huge fan. The only music you'd hear at her home. She had no influence on her son or daughter. Anyway, fantastic vocals and acting and story last night. Loved sitting beside me was a mom and her two young sons totally into the performance. My first experience with opera was when I was 13 years old via a school trip. In those days only students with good behaviour were taken on out of town trips. Another trip was to Toronto's Royal Ontario Museum for those of us taking Latin in high school. Anyway, I cannot remember name of opera but I knew that I was hungry for any art based experiences. Taking a bus ride from small town talk home (36,00) to the small apple at then O'Keefe Centre, was a big deal.. now Sony Centre where I practise free yoga. I have seen many ballets as I had a yearly subscription for two years. First time however I saw a ballet at our Canadian Opera Company. Another small world...I dated one of their lighting directors while in University. I quickly checked the program but he was no longer working with company. Ahhhh...I have such fond memories. I just wasn't ready to be with a good guy at the time....He had also attended the same school Bill M and I attended. I transferred to UofT after three years. Too much information? Just refer to me as the Joni Mitchell of the Band Guest Book. ;-D

"Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin, based on Pushkin’s verse novel of the same title, has come to represent Russian character and emotion at its most intense. When Michael Levine and I developed on our production for the Metropolitan Opera, we sought to find a poetic response to this most intensely subjective and emotive of operas. Pushkin’s original work, however, is much cooler, distant and critical in tone, and so we also tried - where appropriate - to re-capture some of the distinctive spirit of the original."


Entered at Sun Nov 4 02:44:53 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Rick and Levon backing Lenny Breau in '61

Brought together by Ronnie Hawkins as a result of visit from Lenny when he first arrived in Toronto from Winnipeg. R&H acquit themselves well in jazz.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 01:43:18 CET 2018 from (64.229.183.107)

Posted by:

Bill M

"Glass Onion". Hmmm. Sounded layered, like the sonic equivalent of stacked transparencies. Which is what a glass onion would be, I suppose - so they achieved exacting what they were aiming for. Me, I'd still prefer a melding.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 00:38:42 CET 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:5ddd:1dea:676e:da84)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Pat B

I've wondered for some time now if you took a song like Glass Onion, and just released it to modern day radio, what the response would be to a new generation. Or some of MFBP.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 00:28:34 CET 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:5ddd:1dea:676e:da84)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Pat

Thanks for that Pat. It sounds so fresh. Like it was just released.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 23:38:10 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:bd40:e1e0:2470:24e7)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Beatles "Glass Onion"--new mix and video.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 22:30:16 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Days like this

It's a shit day today, raining and blowing. So glad to be home with both fires burning. So I was just listening to a youtube vid of David Linley that he did in LA - 2016. He's paying tribute to Linda Ronstad singing and playing that old song Warren Zevon wrote for Linda, "Poor poor Pitiful Me". Damn does he sound good doing that. David is the same age as me.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 21:55:30 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dvorak

Thanks Lisa - it wasn't that one, but that one IS familiar too. What did it end up as in the rock world?


Entered at Sat Nov 3 21:49:05 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:bd40:e1e0:2470:24e7)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Here's that Nashville notice on The Band gig with ZZ Top that Dag posted


Entered at Sat Nov 3 20:14:25 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Peter, try this. A possibility is Slavonic Dance #2 starting at 6:48.

Wow, two ballet mentions in two days, is it trending? beg, how was Eugene Onegin? Is the National Ballet?


Entered at Sat Nov 3 19:44:12 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My five:

Just back from seeing a ballet with my granddaughters to various Dvorak suites. One really bugging me as it gives a melodic hook to a VERY well-known pop song, but I can’t get what it is (it’s not a New World Symphony theme).

Peter, Paul & Mary Greatest Hits- on the way home on the iPod. It started with asking about the song 500 Miles and we just let it play.

Judy Collins selections – which we went into the rest of the way.

Ian Felice- going to concert yesterday and all day yesterday.

Blood on The Tracks – Bob Dylan, in preparation for opening the box set tomorrow. Driving back from Ian Felice.

Felice Brothers – this morning, re-listening to songs Ian Felice played


Entered at Sat Nov 3 17:05:16 CET 2018 from (159.89.156.216)

Posted by:

Amos

Subject: Five

Marc Ribot - Songs of Resistance 1942-2018 Steve Earle and Tift Merrit - Srinivas

Greg Brown - Oh You

Neneh Cherry & The Thing - Dream Baby Dream

Free - My Brother Jake

Curtis Mayfield - So In Love


Entered at Sat Nov 3 16:10:27 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I been listening and DUNC

The FIVE! - Clarence (Gatemouth) Brown - "I Hate These Doggone Blues"

Allman Brothers - "Goin Down That Road Feelin Bad"

Genesis - "That's All"

Eddy Rabbit - $2 in the Juke Box

Jeff Lynne - "Telephone"

Not sure how I said that Dunc, but Susan is going to Brisbane, Australia again to visit her daughter and grand kids. She is taking her sister with her 'cause I won't go this time. Jenny, (Susan's daughter) was travelling in Australia with friends years ago. She met the love of her life. She came home and cried a lot. So she went back to Australia and got married and settled there. She is a school teacher now and her husband is an electrical contractor. They have a beautiful home and two beautiful children.

Susan is taking her sister because between them they got enough aeroplan miles to go first class almost for free. I don't and econo is about $2500. If you want first class and a place to stretch out it's about $7000. That just pisses me off. The 16 hours sitting on that plane is too gawd damn hard on me and my arthritis.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 14:40:41 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Time Goes By What's It Really Like To Get Old

Elder Music: The Band


Entered at Sat Nov 3 14:30:23 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Daniel Lanois & Pharrell Williams at Home in the Studio | ARTST TLK

Daniel Lanois invites Pharrell Williams into his Los Angeles home to talk about learning from legends like U2, Bob Dylan, Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel and the Neville Brothers and his ongoing experimentation with sound. From recording in castles and barns to collaborating with Billy Bob Thornton, they discuss the storied career that led Rolling Stone to name him the most important producer of 80s.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 13:27:47 CET 2018 from (83.248.191.8)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Norbert / Politics

Thanks Norbert. - My main concern is not Vladimir Vladimirovich. It is frau Merkel and monsieur Macron. The good news are that Peter V and his people are already saved. "Saved", indeed ;-)


Entered at Sat Nov 3 12:55:01 CET 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::66)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Orson Welles

And.. his final movie - The Other Side of the Wind - from the early/mid 70’s has just been released and is now available on Netflix.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 11:39:56 CET 2018 from (70.51.82.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Al Kooper: The Making of Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde / The Record That Changed Nashville

Last Five
Could You Be Loved...Bob Marley and The Wailers
I Believe I Can Fly...Yolanda Adams
In A Big Country...Big Country
I Call Your Name...Willy DeVille
Old Habits Die Hard...Dave Stewart and Mick Jagger


Entered at Sat Nov 3 11:34:41 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ian Felice

Review of Ian Felice at Winchester (linked). He was visiting his solo 'Kingdom of Dreams' plus stuff from the album due in 2019 and Felice Brothers favourites.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 09:37:42 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Black Mountain Sides CD

December issue of Mojo. Excellent


Entered at Sat Nov 3 06:44:38 CET 2018 from (2001:464d:e65d:0:85ec:9a14:c7fe:8f3b)

Posted by:

dag

Subject: Nashville, September 1976

Newspaper cutting: i.postimg.cc/SRvQ1frb/The-Tennessean-Wed-Sep-22-1976.jpg


Entered at Fri Nov 2 21:25:26 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Citizen Kane

It’s on TCM now and I can’t count how many times I’ve seen it but if a couple of years or so passes between viewings it becomes new again and so perfectly brilliant. Welles was just 25 years old! The Trumpian comparisons are relatively recent and so damn easy to see too. Like a lot of folks I rate this as the best film of all time.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 19:34:35 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Blonde On Blonde

Just when you think you know a lot about an album. I am really enjoying the new book on the making of Blonde On Blonde. Not sure where he is getting all his information from; but I'm loving it. To trace back to the Lightnin' Hopkins song Automobile Blues being the influence for Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat was really a gem of information. I downloaded the song (and by the way you have to get the actual version they talk about in the book, The Complete Prestige / Bluesville Recordings) was something else. Learning every day about this iconic album.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 17:35:26 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Mojo Mag

PV - Is the Mojo disc you spoke of the November or December issue?


Entered at Fri Nov 2 16:49:01 CET 2018 from (2001:980:e13a:1:78d0:95c0:c5f0:bc95)

Posted by:

Norbert

Ilkka, if ever Russia invades the Baltic states 😉 Ragtime and I come to rescue you and your Nordic Band server.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Beneath a poem from my great late friend Willem Wilmink

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Back End

Most trains drive along the back end of life. You see a shed with a bicycle against it. A little boy is still up and is allowed just some more. You can see the kitchen door slightly open.

If you were not driven by this train, you could enter that house without hesitation. As soon as the twilight had dropped, you were no longer lost. And you didn't even encounter astonished looks. You'd come anyway, everyone would have suspected this. They would be nodding almost invisible to you, for whoever is expected is barely greeted.

You could just join the table and all things were suddenly good again. As soon as the twilight had dropped, you were no longer lost. You didn't have to drink a drop of alcohol, because the lemonade would taste like cognac. You saw the fire shine from behind mica glass, there came a blackbird sitting, singing on the roof.

And those few people you've never been able to miss, came in there with a smile on their face. You would never again get lost, you’d close the book of all sadnesses. But oh well, the train has passed and is miles away from there.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:46:41 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lou's Velvet Underground...Pale Blue Eyes. When you listen to the sensitivity and vulnerability of Louuu's singing here...You just knew that all his head games with the media at times was just his shield. I doubt Laurie Anderson could have lived with Louuu if he was everything people wrote about him. However, just like Dylan at the beginning of his musical journey I am also sure that he could be a complete jerk at times as we all are capable of being when pushed to the limit.
In praise of Louuu Reed!


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:31:57 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Fistful of Mercy also performs Louuu's Pale Blue Eyes. Not surprising as Joseph Arthur is such a huge fan of Louuu Reed's that he recorded an entire album of Louuu's songs. He eventually met Louuu via Peter Gabriel. However, if I had to pick my fave cover it would be by Emmylouuu and Sheryl Crow performed at an award show. I told you that every award show always has at least one gem waiting to be found and experienced.

Lisa...Tomorrow night I will be hearing classical music along with seeing my fave ballet EUGENE ONEGIN Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky for the third time.

Bandanas in previous post should have been Band fans. lol...I don't drink coffee so I am very slow in the morning.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:07:27 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi JQ...Daniel Lanoi's Shine recording is transcendent for me. Btw, the bass player in the video with Daniel who I previously posted was Darryl Johnson who was in Emvylouuu's Spyboy. And when I saw Crazy Horse with Neil Young besides Brian Blade...Buddy Miller was also there in 1993. Important year for Bandanas.

Fistful of Mercy's Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur and Dhani Harrison's Restore Me is also transcendent for me. Their secret ingredient in their other worldly stew is violinist Jassy Green formerly of the Jayhawks.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 11:24:17 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Mojo cover disc (current) is Black Mountain Sides and has several interesting acoustic guitar pieces by people I've never heard of (as well as stuff from Jake Xerxes Fussell and Roy Harper).


Entered at Fri Nov 2 11:21:48 CET 2018 from (77.103.81.34)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Daniel Lanois

Daniel Lanois visited the UK to perform a couple of gigs in the summer of 2017. I'd long wanted to see him and he performed at a small venue in Hackney. Maybe 70 in the audience. One of my best gigs last year. The drummer - who's name I forget, was outstanding. Very different from Brian Blades, who is also outstanding!


Entered at Fri Nov 2 11:12:49 CET 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:3c9b:18a7:60e4:a076)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Transcendent

Interesting word 'transcendent'. Difficult. I've been thinking about it coincidentally. Guitar magazine listed 50 'transcendent' acoustic guitarists. Some are mentioned in the GB, but others I haven't heard of. Interesting. Perhaps somebody could link this for GBers. It can be reached through Tony McManus's website.

Some great band related posts, which I agree with - the Band always seeming 'fresh', three great singers, singing in their way, the Before The Flood Tour etc. Thanks.

Thanks Norm. It is understandable that Susan will want to see her sister. The pull of family.

Nice to hear from you Bob F - an interesting link. Thanks, PSB.

Playing in the background - 'Stage Fright'.

Next part of the retirement project is a detailed listening of the first eight JJ Cale albums. I wonder if it was because I was into JJ Cale, that I sort of missed Mark Knoefler?


Entered at Thu Nov 1 22:46:48 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Daniel Lanois & Emmylou Harris

I saw Daniel Lanois with Emmylou Harris in 2014 - he was the support, and the leader of the backing group for the "Wrecking Ball" tour. Review linked.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 20:13:15 CET 2018 from (74.12.34.105)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: 'Transcendent' is a great word. Often hoped for but seldom experienced in live music. For me the first was in 1973 and I don't need more than my fingers to count them all.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 19:39:58 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Norm, I read about that story but didn't realize it was so close to you. Port Alice is so tiny you'd hardly expect something like that. It sometimes seems that in earlier times angry people mostly found less violent outlets to express themselves, but now feel entitled to give free rein to the most vicious acts they can think of. And it's not just here in North America, Trump notwithstanding - it feels like there's some crazy Extremism Influenza that's everywhere in the world right now. I've been around for a while and I've never seen anything like the division that's happening right now. The Sixties don't even come close, and they were pretty bad.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 18:00:05 CET 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::86)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Transcendent

Brown Eyed Girl - I saw Daniel Lanois in a trio at a small venue in the early 90’s. It was, I think, right after FTBofW came out. He had 3 numberered guitars and the bass player was the guy from New Orleans that was on those 2 records. I’m always hoping for a performance that’s transcendent and this was one of those rare experiences.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 15:53:14 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Buffalo Springfield

As I was doing a little chore for the children yesterday afternoon, (making up goodie bags). I was thinking about the constant violence of these days. I found myself humming "For What it's Worth". It is more relevant now than ever. One comment on the video was, "Looking at our situation now, what have we learned in the last 50 years......nothing."

There's something happening here, what it is ain't exactly clear....

Even in our quiet little village of Port Alice, in one of the condos a guy opens a package in his kitchen. It was a bomb and blew most of his hand off! Sent IN THE MAIL by his brother a guy in his seventies in Yellow Knife because of a $7000 debt. A friend of mine who lives in the same complex said he couldn't believe the noise.

I truly believe this Trump lunatic incites people with his animated, aggressive and violent attitude.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 15:29:23 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Just tryin' to write it down while I still remember
The winds are cold, but not yet, it's not yet December
Fireballs bursting in the sky, Wasaga Beach, first of July,
You said to me, hey I gotta whole lotta love to give

When I met Daniel Lanois at Canadian Music Week I told him my absolute favourite track from For The Beauty Of Wynona 1993...Lotta Love To Give. Everyone is just cooking here. Perhaps autobiographical lyrics as well. He was so interested to know which song resonated the most with me. Take a look at the other musicians. Aren't they the ones who have played with Emmylouuu? If I'm not mistaken when I saw Neil Young and Crazy Horse; the opening act was Emmylouuu with drummer Brian Blade and these musicians? Daniel did not only share his art for us but he actually performed it with his first instrument the steel guitar.

Small world in that I was sitting two seats away from one of Daniel's camping buddies from Hamilton. He was trying to pick me up all evening as he could not believe that my partner was in TO while I was in NYC at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival. Anyway, when I saw Robbie at Canadian Music Week he did not perform so one of my friends dumped him and lost interest in his music. Ouch! Oh and another small world incident...After we saw Daniel someone saw me with my camera and telephoto lens so he came around to chat. When he told me that he was off to see Daniel at the Elmocombo to watch him perform and write about the show for one of the entertainment papers; he invited me to join him. I said I didn't have a ticket. No problem as I was his photographer. Sometimes I am lucky alright. Fun night up close with Daniel and Brian Blade...The Brian Blade!! He wanted me to continue checking out more bands at various clubs but I told him that I had to go home and work on report cards. ;-D


Entered at Thu Nov 1 13:25:37 CET 2018 from (24.180.41.200)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

Subject: LIVE BOB AND BOYS

What do you think? I After all the years and huge catalog of official releases and boots, when I want to hear Bob and the boys live, I reach for where it all started for me (and an album I originally didn't like) "Before the Flood." The now often maligned 74 tour just sounds better, Bob's full throttled approach on the acustic stuff works great, and the perfect balance of this menace works best on the superb take of "Just Like a Woman" one of Bob's greatest performances, to my ears. These are the best mixes on the Band solo live, though The Last Waltz remixes may be just as good. "Alexa, play "Before The Flood" I think is what I will say for the long haul.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:53:10 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Neil Young meets Charles Manson. Revolution Blues

"The poignant track carries some star power with it as well featuring the talents of David Crosby on rythm guitar, Levon Helm on drums, Rick Danko on bass, and Ben Keith on the Wurlitzer. Crosby in fact was not a fan of the song at first telling him “don’t sing about that. It’s not funny,” but Young didn’t find it funny. He was in a dark place in his life and you can hear that through the depressing and angered songs throughout the album.

“Revolution Blues” snapshots a dismal point in American history and showcases the horrors of what one person can think and do."


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:41:51 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko
79.10.12.

"To put it simply, this guy is Aston Barrett of American country, soul and foremost funk playing, because:

First, he feels rhythm like only a professional after like 15 and more years of playing can, he can play anywhere, ahead, behind, on the top of the beat, he can identify any 16th note within the bar he wants to play and he will do anytime even thought the rest of the band plays straight (check out e.g. King Harvest Has Surely Come). You know, I believe he did no play much notes because (or maybe one of the reasons for that would be) he understood how much fun is to "play" with the rhythm as the bass player, how you can change the sense of groove, because only the less becomes more, or as he said, what is not there is more important than what you play. Just the rhythm part makes him a funkateer on line with Jamerson, Bootsy, Graham, Miller...

Next, he can add a sense of a moving harmony only with one note playing. Check, for example Unfaithful Servant. If you let me know which chords are in the chorus, I'll be grateful, I still haven't deciphered some parts of it. Plus he uses chordal approach, his starting point being triads, but starting on 3rd, 5th of the chord (check the Servant again). It is so refreshing in times when everyone learns scales with no relation to the chords (harmony). He makes such interesting bass lines only knowing the voice leading chord tone to root, root to chord tone etc. That implies great knowledge of harmony.

And last, the tone. Holy ****, how did he make such a deep bottomed, rounded, punchy sound with a pick? Sometimes you cannot tell what is the bass drum and what the bass guitar.

If these reasons are not enough for you, check out Neil Young's Revolution Blues from the On the Beach album. As much as I love Crazy Horse, this just kicks ass, with Rick's slides adding that eerie something to the already dense, almost horror like atmosphere of the song..." talkbass.com


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:19:09 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Trick or treat...or rock n' roll? Why choose? If you need some of the best Halloween rock songs, we're your ghouls. Happy Hallowe'en!


Entered at Wed Oct 31 13:05:33 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Travails of the Melodic Bass Guitarist

Excellent article by PSB which makes the new box set even more eagerly anticipated.

On “melodic bass players” Rick Danko was not alone in running into trouble from a bandmate. This is from the “White Album” issue of Mojo. What a brilliant idea it seemed to do a plain white cover, but a newsagent told me that he had a stack of returns because no one noticed that it was Mojo. Anyway,. They interviewed Paul McCartney:

“I remember George would bitch about my bass parts – which you know, I listen to them and sometimes they’re pretty flowery. They’re not just dung, dung, dung, dung … Sometimes there’s big melodies in there. I think the bass would probably irritate George ‘cos it was a bit too flowery. Or it seemed to be at the time.” Paul McCartney.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 11:54:20 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.201)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: PSB's Review of More Blood, More Tracks


Entered at Wed Oct 31 10:10:59 CET 2018 from (210.86.84.17)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Tony levin

I watched an interview with Tony Levin recently. He talked about a big KC tour.seems like well balanced guy. Loved his playing for Robbie and Peter gabriel


Entered at Wed Oct 31 02:02:33 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Lou was very near death, you can hear his life energy dissipating. He was summoning some last available energy for this interview."


Entered at Wed Oct 31 01:58:57 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

STYLE ON FILM: THE LAST WALTZ


Entered at Wed Oct 31 01:54:03 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

An Almost Complete Guide To The Gear Of TLW

Last Five Kensington Market
Livin' For You...Al Green
Good Friend...Violent Femmes
I Call Your Name...Willy DeVille
Desperado...The Eagles
I Wonder...Robert Cray


Entered at Wed Oct 31 01:11:40 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:5c7e:ccbc:13d1:dcc4)

Posted by:

Pat B

Rick Beato's catalog of videos is tremendous. His analysis of different movie composers' styles is spot on, as is his take on this latest (and ridiculous) legal hi-jinks.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 00:49:39 CET 2018 from (75.98.19.134)

Posted by:

Bill M

Belated seconding haso's post re post-Pittsburgh. Canada had a similar episode a year or so ago, though directed at those of a different faith. In both cases it was innocent humans targeted by a sick man professing to follow a prophet of love.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 19:07:41 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ed Sheeran v Marvin Gaye

This potentially changes the songwriting debate. A fascinating comparison by Rick Beato (linked) of Ed Sheeran's Thinking Out Loud v Marvin Gaye's Let's Get It On. Sheeran was subject of a mega million law suit for ripping it off. The tempo and chord progression and groove are near identical, as are the bass and drums. He cuts them together. As Beato points out the crucial top line, melody, differs though. So in standard legal precedent, there should be no case BUT Marvin Gaye's estate won a similar case regarding Got To Give It Up.

Lyrics (valued usually at 50%) are obviously different as in He's So Fine versus My Sweet Lord, but they argue over the music 50%.

Fascinating analysis by Beato on the linked video.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 18:11:44 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: King Crimson

Review of the first Show(s) in King Crimson's late 2018 tour. Linked. One to see! Tony Levin on bass for a Band-ish link.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 21:15:32 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Funny how time slips away....


Entered at Mon Oct 29 20:55:11 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

What this world needs today
A little spiritual healing
And everyone has got to say
That it's a good feeling

Spiritual Healing
So good
It gives a higher feeling (oohhhh yeah)
Spiritual Healing
So good
It's good for your bad feeling

Satisfy yourself and be a part of it
(be a part of it, c'mon and be a part of it)
Reunite your love and be a part of me
Hear what I say...

Open your heart so wide
Let love come 'round in here, believe
If you have that love in your own life
Let it shine (x3) yeah

Living in this world of today, we don't love
It is a waste of time
If you have that love in your heart
You gotta give it to em with the spiritual feeling

Songwriters: Frederick Hibbert (Toots of Toots and The Maytals)
Spiritual Healing


Entered at Mon Oct 29 20:46:31 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Songs That Matter: The Band, ‘The Weight’
“The Weight” belies its name by beginning lightly, with the keen tickle of strings, precise yet also casual. You feel like you’re on someone’s porch, down home, listening to a few folks make music at sundown.

“The Weight” is not folk-rock, nor what Time magazine, in their cover story on The Band in 1970, called “country rock.” It is gospel music. Every performance of it I was lucky enough to hear at Helm’s home in Woodstock made you feel like you were in church, on a quiet night — or at a glorious camp meeting, on nights when “the barn” was packed to its strong rafters for a special guest like Mavis Staples. The night she came to the Midnight Ramble, Staples stood radiant between her goddaughter Amy Helm and Levon, pressing both lovely hands to her chest on every “put the load right on me.” The performance was transporting. There were funny times, too. One celebrated guest, despite his reading glasses and the lyric sheet in front of him, didn’t know the “crazy Chester” verse that the guests were usually given the honor of singing. He flubbed the words, and Larry Campbell, longtime leader of the Levon Helm Band, slid next to him to sing into the mic while everyone in the barn, as usual, sang along. Levon was bent double over the drums, laughing like a little boy — genuinely tickled to pieces both by someone lousing up, and everyone helping out."


Entered at Mon Oct 29 20:21:41 CET 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:515b:68ac:f772:c4f9)

Posted by:

Pat B

Another thing about The Weight: it was an acoustic song with only a fairly muted electric bass on it. Compared to everything else that was going on in late 1968, it was a true outlierin terms of production.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 18:36:08 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Songwriting … by definition in copyright law, the melody line plus lyric. All else is arrangement – and John Simon later complains that arrangers never get cut in / due credit. Going back (and it was a discussion I had yesterday), Levon lived close to Memphis, and he knew well that people such as Elvis enjoyed a “cut” of songwriting without actually doing any. They also knew about all those “Magill” credits (Morris Levy’s secretary) on Ronnie Hawkins records. Robbie knew too. So you get two incompatible viewpoints. One is the fierce “right of paternity” in copyright law (Robbie) and the definition of what songwriting is. The other that it was a negotiable thing and people got cut into a share for all sorts of reasons. Being an inspiration isn’t one of them normally, or the girlfriends / lovers of writers of so many love songs would be in for a share. They’re not.

On bass and Rick, way back near the beginning of this forum, certainly whileRick was still with us, some one from the 90s Band camp commented that Rick was not a “riffing bass player.” It caused a minor flurry at the time. I knew what he meant, though one can point to Don’t Do It as as fine a piece of riffing bass playing as you’ll find. But Rick was not one to plod on with a riff from choice.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 16:54:03 CET 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Band vocals

I was at a restaurant last night where the sound system was playing 60s/70s pop songs, and the Big Pink version of The Weight came on. As many umpteen times as I've heard it, hearing it out of the album sequence and in an unfamiliar context I was really struck by the freshness of it, and how different it sounds than the Beatles and other big pop groups. The Band's vocals are just SO cool -- just as described by Glenn/BEG's article -- and there's this frenzied, yelping quality when they dig into each chorus that was (somehow, after all these years) a real surprise. The original studio version also sounds a bit more laidback, and more like a gospel song, than the smoother live versions that I think I've gotten used to.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 16:08:34 CET 2018 from (98.6.21.229)

Posted by:

Glenn

Subject: Band vocals

Thanks BEG for the article links and, in particular, that quote about The Band's vocals. It's really true that when other groups' vocalists layer and align their vocals so tightly they lose the color, impact and delight that the aggregate of Rick's, Ricard's and Levon's unique, individual contributions provide. There certainly is some beauty when the vocals coalesce more uniformly, but the effect of The Band's separate but equal blend seems to provide a fresh and rewarding impact every time I hear them. Not sure I'm explaining this as well as the article, but I think we all know what I mean. And I believe the different combinations of those Band voices also sets The Band well apart from other groups: Rick and Richard together, Richard and Levon, Rick and Levon. I can't think of any other group that had so many options for coloring their music vocally as The Band did. I think it's what helps keep their music sounding so vital and rewarding listen after listen!


Entered at Mon Oct 29 13:49:16 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band’s ‘Rock of Ages’ Is the Greatest Live Album Ever

"The Band was different. Levon Helm’s voice was a throaty Delta burr. Richard Manuel’s was a black-coffee moan. Rick Danko’s was a high, clear sob. They didn’t sound anything alike. When they sang, they stumbled in and out and over and under each other, Appalachian-style, making no attempt to neatly align every note. And yet the effect was at least as potent as Lennon-McCartney-Harrison or the Wilson-Love clan. Usually with harmony, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. But with The Band you can hear always hear the parts and the whole at the same time, and the force and beauty of each is undiminished. A seamless blend is breathtaking, but you get more music for your money with The Band—more lines and phrasings and shadings per second, more to discover and delight in and return to. No other group is like that."


Entered at Mon Oct 29 13:45:19 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Call Me Levon
By Ken Gordon


Entered at Mon Oct 29 13:32:47 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Listen: Legendary Record Producer John Simon
By DAVE MICHAELS • JUN 29, 2018

John Simon sits down with Dave Michaels for an in-depth conversation and trip down memory lane about his start in the record business, producing for some of the era's greatest artists, his thoughts on music today and much more.

haso...Always good to see you. Thank you.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 12:46:12 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V & John Simon

Peter I too was very surprised about the comments; regarding Rick's melodic bass playing; therefore Levon used Leon. I have never heard that before. Also and to your credit Peter, Simon tells us an important fact about songwriting and who was in fact the songwriter; in the Band. It's the person who sits down and ACTUALLY writes the words and music that is the songwriter; even if he or she has been told stories that would lend thoughts to the song.

Now after saying that I would remind people of my Johnny Mercer, Bobby Daring story; about Mercer having a hard time with a song and Darin gives him an important thought on the song. Mercer then credits Darin with 50% of the writing. Darin does ask him why. Mercer replies; "because you gave me inspiration." Now that was Mercer's choice.

I was also interested in Simon's first hand knowledge of Garth's Genetic Method. Simon could tell the "mood" Garth was in by the way he would play it. If Garth was in a good mood the method would be played more bouncy and playful. Some interesting facts; in this book.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 12:38:28 CET 2018 from (2605:8d80:6c1:5423:44a0:f408:1411:35cb)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: "Too Soon Gone" strikes me as so close to the bone that Rick (at least) wouldn't've let anyone else near it. And since Rob Leon is credited with playing on it and two others that don't seem to be natural fit, but not others that would be, maybe the people in charge of jacket layout simply misread the asterisked notes they were given.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 10:24:27 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John Simon’s book: yes, there are some layout oddities, specifically many paragraphs are indented, often alternate ones. I don’t think that’s a “style” in the Vellum programme I use to transfer books from Word to Amazon print on demand. You can go direct from Word into assembling the book, and I’ve done that, but it needs a degree of tidying up afterwards. I’d guessed something just went wrong – I can’t see any reason to indent some paragraphs. I’d guess it was a tabs setting in Word.

No one picked up on that strange statement about the 90s Band, so I’ll re-post it:

Nearly at the end. John Simon said this about "Jericho."

"Then Levon told me he had enough of playing with Rick's melodic bass playing and craved a steady, more conventional player. So Rob Leon, a Woodstock fixture, would play most of the bass parts on the album."

Looking at the sleeve notes, Rob Leon is credited with bass on Too Soon Gone, Amazon and Jericho. There are a lot of sitting-in guests on the album. From John Simon's note, you'd expect it to be Stuff You Gotta Watch, Same Thing and Blues Stay Away From Me, none of them interesting enough melodically for a bass player of Rick Danko's quality. Paul McCartney and Rick Danko were the two great melodic bass players. I noted Rick looking bored on the blues numbers on stage, and Levon used to play bass guitar on Crazy Mama live. 12 bars with a basic riff are hardly challenging. I also realized that Amazon, Too Soon Gone and Jericho were not performed live. Did Rob Leon play more than he was credited for? Or was John Simon overstating it with "most of the bass parts."?

David P was our resident Allmans expert. I guess we’d had Led Zeppelin, Fleetwood Mac, Groundhogs, Savoy Brown , Blodwyn Pig, very early Jethro Tull and many others, which meant more white boys playing blues riffs was not a major thrill however well done. I still think the Rolling Stones were never bettered in that area.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 23:14:17 CET 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: 5 and catching up

Wow, things have gotten a good deal more active on the gb; or I've just been sleeping.

Glenn: happy you did use the "t" before, but understand no need of it now. How's fall in TX, hopefully a bit cooler?. Agreed, as I've said before, nice to see BEG and Lisa on here. Any other women out there? Especially any willing to go toe to toe w/ that ol' seadog, Norm?

Peter V: I was able to get the local bookstore to acquire John Simon's memoir from the alphabet company for a reasonable mark-up. I appreciate the rationales you enumerated, from the author's point-of-view. That said, since the owner and I get together over coffee to discuss local and other politics on occasion, I figured the least I could do was buy "Truth..." through his shoppe. I do find it's layout a bit curious w/ what seems like an excessive amount of what architects call negative space. That said, as 1 chapter is titled, he was "The only one who was there". I'm on my 2nd read-through of Sammy's pool house, before I finish the book.

On books, finished the Joni bio "Restless Daughter", just before I got the J. Simon book. Complicated artist, that's for sure. Hard to believe w/ the voice she had, that she may have exceeded Levon in nicotine intake.

So last 5, tried to start w/ the 2000 remaster of MFBP, but the jewel case was empty in the car, found the cd was still to home. 5:

40th TLW: disc ending w/ Van's Caravan. Unfortunately had a bunch of gunk on the cd from glue in the packaging/ book that it came in and skipped all over that tune ("the most house", Mac).

King Sunny Ade: odu

Neil Young: Live Rust. Wondered if the 1964 version of RR listened to the acoustic parts of this, would he think Neil "a strummer".

The Avett Bros: not sure of the title; came w/ a small, maybe 45 rpm add-on. I often hear of them as drawing from the OQ; to my ears I hear more of the Fab 4 and Lyle Lovett than The Band.

Allman Brothers: Beginnings, which is the combination of their 1st album and Idylwild South. For Peter and those of you on that side of the Atlantic: in some fashion this early Allman Bros would seem like a response from a (primarily) white band of U.S. musicians to the Stones and Led version of the blues. Was it JQ, here, that was so well-versed on the Allmans? Does my analysis on Beginnings square at all?

Last 2 notes: saw a band live I've spoken of here (Dustbowl Revival) about 2 months ago, grateful to them to mark 50 years of MFBP... opened w/ "Don't Do It" and 1/2 way through mentioned MFBP before covering "The Weight", all be it using a pre-recorded organ part as they don't mix a keyboard in w/ 2 horns, a mandolin and a fiddle/violin among 8 players.

And wishing Jeff A., Bob F., and any other folk in particular, peace and comfort in these post-Pittsburgh times.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 22:56:35 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

3 Photos of The Band
Austin, Texas
1976

The Band - Austin 76 by Scott Newton

from 600.00
The Band, taken at the Sunday Break II in 1976 by photographer Scott Newton from our exclusive collection,
The Scott Newton Archive.

Available as a signed, limited edition photographic print

Photographers notes: The Band coming offstage. Sunday Break II, Austin, TX. 1976. When photographing musicians I usually prefer to shoot them performing, with the Muse running through them. Sometimes, however, they are just so cool as people that their off moments are just as revealing. This would be one of those times. These guys had "cool" just dripping off 'em. They were the real deal.

Don't forget to click on photos to enlarge to receive the full effect. ;-D


Entered at Sun Oct 28 22:47:29 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

WRITING
Richard Manuel
Richard Manuel's Piano

Enter Butch Dener into the conversation in article...
I have to say it again...I still can't believe I was waiting in line to see The Rascals in NYC and Butch and his partner walk right by me. Btw ask your partner about cabbage town girl emailing her about painting to raise money for your medical bills. It was me and I think bw ended up buying Zzzz's painting. Life can be strange, eh?


Entered at Sun Oct 28 22:28:57 CET 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Photo of BAND
UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 03: ROYAL ALBERT HALL Photo of BAND, L-R: Robbie Robertson, Levon Helm
(playing guitar), Rick Danko, Richard Manuel (on drums), Garth Hudson - performing live onstage
(Photo by Mick Gold/Redferns)
575.00

Norbert... :-D

Derozan was an all-star but not a superstar like Vince Carter and Kawahi Leonard. Superstars win games...especially in the playoffs. He can play offence and defence. Derozan and Lowry cannot play defence, although only now Lowry is passing the ball more. I kept yelling for Demar to PASS THE BALL. What I do love about him is that he's opened up a conversation about mental health. As we all know...It doesn't matter how much money you earn, how famous you are, how fortunate you are to make a living following your passion and skill set...Depression, anxiety, bipolar, etc. affects EVERY ONE EQUALLY.

I know that I'm in trouble when I go into a second hand store and spot Landy's photo book for 20.00 and I just stare at it and just leave it on the shelf. No big deal as I have two other books by Landy. Same as a photo book of Vivian Maier's work. Again I have another book of her work and partner has two of her work but still, at that time it meant nothing to me. And since books and music are everything to me...I knew I was slipping when I had no interest. Yoga and homeopathic remedies eventually snapped me out of my funk and I am back to posting. Sorry...lol.

Last Five
Last Goodbye...Jeff Buckley
Sunshine Reggae...Laid Back
Running Up That Hill...Kate Bush
This Old Heart Of Mine...The Isley Brothers
How Could You...K-Ci and Jo Jo


Entered at Sun Oct 28 19:12:13 CET 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter Uncut

Peter can't find the December edition of UNCUT over here as yet; with Dylan on the cover; as it is apparently the December edition.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 18:46:16 CET 2018 from (2001:985:3a52:1:6535:59b3:a804:bfbb)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Norbert

Laat mij daar midden in oneindigheid

The Band vernemen dat mijn oren klonken.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 14:59:15 CET 2018 from (83.248.191.8)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Bob Dylan

My recent sentimental post got me thinking of BOB DYLAN. - 'John Wesley Harding' is my November album, 'Christmas album' is my (you are not dumm!) December album. All the cold months are dedecated to his meaningless and cold and no-sensitive and no-political albums after he amazing 'Shenandoah' - track. "Self Portrait" is so June and July (I had the similar nylon shirt back then). 'Nashville Skyline' is August. 'New Morning' is so September.

That's it.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 14:39:22 CET 2018 from (83.248.191.8)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Brothers in arms / Norbert

This is a so tragic post that even NORM should have a Cleanex on the bridge of his vessel.

I have posted before that this happens only once in a lifetime. That was not true. It happens twice!

I had a friend in the late sixties who guided me to the music of Bob Dylan and WOODY GUTHRIE. His brother was a Dylanolog and Finland's best writer in his genre: historical plays. (I borrowed his "John Westley Harding" and scratched it during a lunch break ... I will burn in hell for that!) Their interest in Woody was real, in music and in the real life. They all three were hit by this awful Huntington decease. My friend died for a few weeks ago. That's it... the end.

Norbert is/was a similar friend to me for years and years ago when I had the hard times. I hope and know - and believe - that I was the good friend to him and helped him to save this guestbook.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 01:28:40 CEST 2018 from (2605:8d80:6a2:825f:88b6:8422:8043:c359)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: organic music

Has anyone mentioned "Telstar"?

Nicely done, Norbert. You were gone too long, but now we know you put your time to good use.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 19:53:10 CEST 2018 from (2001:980:e13a:1:5517:b96f:816c:3fe1)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Band Testament

A few year now I have this recurring dream: At the mall I buy shopping carts full of Band CD’s.
This morning I told my wife Els about it, after I was finished, she was silent for at least 10 minutes and then said: “Norbert you lost the Lord ….” now she lovingly touched my hand and continued “ …but you found The Band ….” She's right, here are 10 powerful Band miracles.

Testimony 1: The cyclist
During the tour The France this year, the evening before the time trial, Hollands best cyclist and world champion Tom Dumoulin found out he had forgotten his skinsuit. Now what to do? Dumoulin was pissed. Tom’s boss, Sunweb manager Iwan Spekenbrink was desperate, finally Spekenbrink called Exteondo (the skinsuit firm from the Basque Country in Spain).
Exteondo called up their best and already retired seamstress Maria Avangaro. She worked the whole night to make a new suit. During that night she played The Band out loud, over and over again. It gave her the strength to carry on she later stated. At 3.30 am she stepped onto the back of the fast motorcycle of her son Miquel. They drove 500 miles, Maria in agony clinging on to Tom's suit … but just in time she handed the new suit to Dumoulin and told him her story. Needless to say that Tom won the race by 1 sec. After the race he thanked Maria but she refused to accept his gratitude. With a soft-spoken voice, she answered devoutly, "No Mr. Dumoulin, don’t thank me, please thank The Band".

Testimony 2: La gloire de mon père
At a young age Marcel Pagnol’s father left him. The father was broke, didn’t have nothing anymore Marcel didn’t see his father ever again. But before the man left he said to Marcel: “Little Marcel, I have to go now and I have nothing left to give you but my love for The Band”
Marcel Pagnol is regarded as one of France’s greatest writers. He later stated that the love for The Band, he once got from his father Marcel Sr. was the best thing he had ever got. And that without The Band he never could have written his 1990 filmed novel ‘La Gloire de ma père’.

Testimony 3:
During The Last Waltz Burton Richter and Samuel C.C. Ting discovered the subatomic J/ψ meson particle (although some claim it was 1974). Richter and Ting are Band fans, many Nobel Laureates refer to the little subatomic particle as The Little Band particle now.

Testimony 4: The Brown Eyed Girl
The Brown Eyed Girl.

Testimony 5: The man in the wheel chair
Last Sunday Els and I went cycling to the nearby lake. We lost our way, randomly I turned left, right, left, left, right, finally we arrived at the lake. Just in time to see a man in a wheel chair hit the water. I jumped after him and we pulled him and his wheelchair out of the water. We dried him up and as I placed his headphone, which was still playing, over his ears again I noticed he was listening to The Band. That evening I knew it wasn’t us that had saved the man from drowning, it was The Band. Unknowingly The Band had pointed us in the direction of the drowning man. Wonders do happen with the Band.

Testimony 6: The dog
When our dog was young he was strong and proud, always at my site when I played the Band. Nowadays he’s old, almost blind and almost deaf. He stumbles around, bumping against tables and chairs, often sinking into depressions. Only when I put him my head phones up he smiles and is waving his tail. The Band gives him the spirit to carry on and empty his cup of life dignified. The Band helping pets to survive.... Testimony 7: I'm still working on 7

Testimony 8: [Deleted, jh]

Testimony 9: Fries The Band
In Germany I worked next door to Döner – Pizzeria - Imbiß specialty restaurant Aktas. One day I asked them to make a special meal with all my favorite ingredients: a bratwurst- fries layer, topped with shawarma- döner covered with Dutch cheese heated in a grill oven till the cheese melts.
Okay it’s not healthy but it tastes good, soon other customers also ordered this meal. As I’m a vivid Band fan, always talking Band in the restaurant they named the meal “Fries The Band”. It became popular in the whole of Germany, Belgium, France and Holland. Fries The Band reached the Nepalese capital city of Kathmandu in 2017, when a chef returning from a visit to Germany was asked to prepare a "typically German" meal (he replaced the shawarma with chicken). Now Nepal is in the ban of The Band meal too.
Anyway, thanks to The Band young people, all over the world, who have never heard of The Band now eat The Band…..(The Band works in mysterious ways)

Testimony 10: The Fairy Tale Road
In Germany there is a wonderful, famous, road, they call it The Fairy Tale Route. Situated on this fairy tale route, in a fairy tale village, stands a lovely little fairy tale house.
In this fairy talest of all fairy tale house lives a Band fan; Jim von der Lippe. Jim has 5 sons: Garth, Richard, Rick, Levon and Robbie. Every day Jim and his five sons play a Band song in their little garden in front of their little house. People that walk by will stop and hum along.
So if you’re ever in Germany and hear Jim, Garth, Richard, Rick, Levon and Robbie sing a Band song in front of a wonderful little fairy tale house, know it all not just a fairy tale.

Have a great weekend all, cheers.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 12:00:00 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Raptors

Derozan was an excellent player for the Raptors. But Leonard is a whole different level of talent-a multidimensional athlete who can shoot,drive,pass,rebound and play defense, all at a high caliber of play. Since the game is way different today,where defense has taken an extreme back seat to prolific offenses,Leonard’s true genius won’t be fully appreciated. Come playoff time,when the game is more about defense and the refs let them play Leonards skills will be noticed big time.And I’m not meaning to be minimizing his offensive skills either. This guy,when healthy,is a top 3 player in the world. And really fun to watch with those larger than Dr. J hands!


Entered at Sat Oct 27 03:47:41 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Auggie Myers

The organist from The Sir Douglas Quintet. He went on to do that with the Texas Tornados.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 00:34:39 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Just one more...and then there are organists who can sing. Not on this song but...I just need to hear it because everyone is feeding off each other and probable my fave song from this concert.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 00:19:55 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Sat Oct 27 00:15:32 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson- Loved my time in Montreal
Mitch Melnick talks life and music with the Legendary Robbie Robertson
TSN Montreal 690


Entered at Sat Oct 27 00:11:13 CEST 2018 from (89.105.117.177)

Posted by:

Peter v

Went on to mention 96 tears and Norm beat me to it.

RIP Tony Joe White


Entered at Sat Oct 27 00:04:28 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson – people told us: “You’re americana”

"Along the way. . .we heard this expression, ‘Americana.’ People then were saying, ‘You’re Americana.’ And I was like, ‘We’re from Canada. We’re North Americana, maybe.’ But isn’t that ironic? Isn’t it ironic that you’re accusing me of something, and I’m not even from here? There’s a poetic beauty in the way things work out. I’m still not sure I know what it is.”

It took a lot of rehearsal to get ready for The Last Waltz. “As a musician,” Robertson tells Shiflett, “you can appreciate that we had to learn 20-some odd songs that we had never played before, going from Muddy Waters to Joni Mitchell, who has too many chords in her songs, and tunings that your fingers can’t even reach! It was a feat of musicianship to play all these different songs with all these different people. We had no cheat sheets. We had no music stands. None of us read music except Garth. . . It was a music feat of everything: dynamics, styles, everything, to play with all these different people, and nobody screwed up anything the whole night. It was a Guinness Book of Records! Match this!”

Let's Go Raptors!!!! Danny Green leads in pluses on the floor. He can communicate with reporters with ease. He evinces sheer joy. How could anyone not want to be around him? I dig him as I dig Kawahi Leonard. And Danny's smile...and he has a basketball camp every summer in Orillia where Gordon Lightfoot is from. Positive energy has hit TO! :-D


Entered at Fri Oct 26 23:49:36 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Secret Jewish History of Robbie Robertson and The Band
Seth Rogovoy
November 23, 2016
Getty Images
Read more: https://forward.com/culture/354993/the-secret-jewish-history-of-robbie-robertson-and-the-band/


Entered at Fri Oct 26 23:44:01 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wild Honey Orchestra, Featuring Jackson Browne and Garth Hudson, Triumphs Again with Tribute to The Band
Written By Paul Zollo // March 30, 2017

"Soon as he started playing however, there was no doubt who was there. Launching into a remarkably epic and inspired version of his famous solo organ fantasy “The Genetic Method,” which precedes “Chest Fever,” he immediately entranced everyone there. Later he delivered an extended piano solo before the gorgeous “It Makes No Difference” that was remarkable in its range and power, blending jazz, blues, rock and roll, Broadway, classical, folk and more into a soulful and seamless whole. It was amazing, and reminded us yet again why the guys in The Band, long before they had become The Band, went to Garth’s mom and asked permission to put her virtuoso boy in their group."


Entered at Fri Oct 26 23:38:51 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Norfolk County Ontario's Garden
Footsteps of Rock Legends Start in Simcoe with Rick Danko and The Band

Last Five Downtown Toronto
Independence Day...Bruce Springsteen
Angeline...Joe Cocker
Price Tag...Jessie J Featuring B.o.B
Dying To Live...Edgar Winter Band
My Back Pages...Dylan 30th Anniversary


Entered at Fri Oct 26 16:04:07 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tony Joe White

I just see on a friend's Face Book page Tony Joe White has died. Damn I was just listening to his music yesterday. I saw the best comment I've ever seen on the Youtube vid of him singing Boom Boom Boom Boom. A woman simply wrote, "I'm moist again!" Few people had a voice that equalled his. Susan's sister Donna who is one of those gawd damn fanatical Elvis fans tried to tell me "Elvis sings Polk Salad Annie better than Tony Joe White!" Crazy old woman Elvis couldn't even come close. There is a black and white vid on Youtube of a very young Tong Joe singing and playing that song. His voice and his licks the way he wrote it can't be equalled.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 15:41:45 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: ? & The Mysterians

96 Tears 1966 one of the most notable organ tunes. Recorded in a living room! I wondered when you'd get to Booker T Peter. Yer slowin' down old son!

Regarding Peter bragging about the Englishmen's "large organs" That evokes the story about old Ollie. He comes home from work one day with a handful of five dollar bills. His wife says "Olaf! where did you get all that money?" He said well at lunch time today at work the boys was playin' dis game they called "Long Cock!" Every one put a five dollar on the table then they open up their zipper and pull out their organ. So who has the longest win all the five dollars. Olaf!! you didn't show dem dat ting did you? Only enough to win Olga.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 11:38:10 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dave Baby Cortez's minor hit here was Rinky Dink, one I've always liked, and played only last week.

No discussion of organ pre-Band can ignore Booker T & The MGs.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 09:41:36 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

As well as those Pat mentioned, add Georgie Fame, Zoot Money, Graham Bond Organization.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 09:40:08 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, we Brits have always been renowned for our prominent organs.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 09:15:34 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:6:80e::3b)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Organs

Thanks Pat. The Animals and Rascals of course. I loved that take of HotRS - still, to this day! And the organ part really makes it go. That’s your favored instrument to play, right? It was the first song that I could play and sing at the same time, after 20 years of trying... only playing part time though!


Entered at Fri Oct 26 07:30:47 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

JQ, the British Invasion had a number of prominent organ groups. The Animals House of the Rising Sun came out in June 1964 and pointed Dylan in an electric direction. The Dave Clark Five had a Vox Continental as part of their stew. Manfred Mann and Crispian St. Peter both featured the Hammond. On this side of the pond, the Rascals debuted in late 65 with I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore which featured an upfront Hammond B3. They came out of the same NJ scene (in addition to the NY Peppermint Lounge) that the Hawks worked.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 06:28:04 CEST 2018 from (32.216.253.225)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Masterpiece

And while I'm at it, I'll post this link to a version of 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' from an Amy Helm show from 2017.
They look like they're having heck of a fun time with this one! Pure joy.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 06:26:59 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:6:80e::24)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Organ sounds

Listening to TSTIThrow the organ stands right up front. I’m only using my memory but it seems that was a rare thing back then. Lots of piano players in that era but, aside from Like a Rolling Stone, I’m having trouble recalling any recorded piece with an organ placed high in the mix or a group using that sound live. If my memory serves then this is another original element that The Band (to be) led with. Although, as a youngster, I was a big fan of Dave Baby Cortez’ The Happy Organ - I think that would be a good name for a massage parlor!


Entered at Fri Oct 26 06:10:48 CEST 2018 from (32.216.252.132)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: The Stones I Throw - Amy Helm's version

Hey folks. Just popping in and noticed mention of 'The Stones I Throw.

I've been meaning to post something about this since seeing Amy at a show in New York state a few weeks ago. She's been performing it recently, and it's also one of the tracks on her recently released album named 'This Too Shall Light'. It's really a wonderful album that rewards repeated listening. I'm still finding nuances in it that I didn't notice the first few times that I've played it.

At the link is a video of Amy performing it at a Paste studio session earlier this month. We all know that Richard Manuel set a pretty high bar and offers a uniqueness that is all his own, but I think Amy does a really nice job on this, and manages to capture a sense of his phrasing. Check it out!


Entered at Fri Oct 26 04:53:46 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for posting the link to that little article on "The Stones I Throw" etc. Interesting to see the reference to Roy Buchanan having played rhythm guitar on "Nineteen Years Old". I have no idea where that comes from, but at least it makes more sense than the idea that Roy played bass on "Who Do You Love" (which is what the UK CD of Hawkins's Roulette material tells us).


Entered at Thu Oct 25 21:46:53 CEST 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:41ce:b000:97b0:8806)

Posted by:

Pat B

BEG, thanks for the photos. I have the boot on cassette somewhere. My seats weren't as good as the photog's.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 04:10:05 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

This one is for Pat B. Btw, I did make it to O'Hare Airport via Gulf Shores Alabama.
16 Photographs – January 3, 1974 – Bob Dylan & The Band Chicago Stadium
Good night. Good bye.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 03:55:07 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Debut single from Levon & The Hawks - The Band!

"Bob Dylan would contact the club in August, just weeks after famously “going electric” at the Newport Folk Festival..."

"Before the Hawks changed their name to the Canadian Squires, then soon after to Levon & the Hawks after parting ways with Ronnie Hawkins, members of the band — credited as Mark Levon Helm, Eric Hudson and Jamie R. Roberston, along with jazz and R&B bassist Jimmy Lewis, a young Michael Bloomfield on piano and Charlie Musselwhite on harmonica —recorded an electric blues session with John Hammond Jr., which would become his Vanguard album So Many Roads, released at the beginning of 1965."


Entered at Thu Oct 25 03:26:04 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Lisa...Did you see the photo of the very young Robbie, Levon and Rick? Hands down Rick! ;-D

Van the Man: "Another great early duet is from 1971 — “4% Pantomime,” with the Band. I sang it with Richard Manuel. I was living in Woodstock, and Robbie [Robertson] asked if I could write a song with him. That’s what came out of it. That song was about Richard — he’s in the lyrics."

Hi John D. I forgot info was on this site. I just quickly did a little research and found info for you but I have no other info to share. I do have Greil Marcus' Invisible Republic on Basement Tapes. Maybe some info there?

Dreadlock Derek Rose...He wears them well. Kawahi Leonard! Finally the Raps acquire a superstar since Vince Carter. I love his zen like everything's cool man play making. Thank you, even if you're only with us for the year! Watching the game now. I watch them all...Brings joy my way as does watching many times Van and Wavelength. :-D


Entered at Wed Oct 24 23:20:09 CEST 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:bda1:a4a1:4e66:4ab5)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Band, Rooftop of the Hilton Hotel, Mayfair, London 1971

The Band had been booed back in the 60’s when Bob Dylan had the audacity to go electric and shock the purist folkies at the very Royal and Loyal Albert Hall. They were back to play there again, brave lads! I was sent along to do a group shot for the Melody Maker front page and all was well taking a few individual pics of The Band until I asked if I could do a group shot. ‘We don’t pose’ they answered in union! Drat! What could I do? From deep in the darkened room Albert Grossman appeared. He was Bob Dylan and The Band’s manager and was in his dressing gown, carpet slippers wearing thick glasses. I’d met Albert a few months earlier when I photographed a very young Linda Ronstadt. I told him that I needed a group shot for the front page or else I’m ******! Albert nodded silently and asked the lads to pose for me. They weren’t too happy about this but I did manage to shoot a few rolls of film atop the Hilton Hotel. The concert they played was brilliant and nobody booed; only cheered!

Barrie Wentzell


Entered at Wed Oct 24 22:38:57 CEST 2018 from (136.167.102.8)

Posted by:

Dave H

John D: If memory serves, Sid Griffin took a shot at figuring out who played what instrument on each song in his book on the Basement Tapes. Of course, most of the Band-only songs on the 1975 Basement Tapes album turned out not to be genuine basement tapes in the first place. Offhand, the ones where the instrumentation differs from the standard lineup are "Yazoo Street Scandal," "Ain't No More Cane," and "Don't Ya Tell Henry," which all have Levon playing mandolin and Richard playing drums. Plus it's John Simon playing the piano on "Long Distance Operator" while Richard sings and blows harp.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 21:51:24 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

beg, that first set of photographs from the I Love The Band Tumblr site is incredible - so many never before seen photographs from Band members' childhoods on up. Where on earth did they get them all I wonder? Just a treasure trove!

Also, in the second set it's interesting to see the Winterland configuration of the Thanksgiving dinner and dancing, and a great photo of Winterland from Garth's keyboard's POV.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 20:56:25 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: BEG Hideki Watanabe's The Band Pages,

No need to reply Beg on that Basement Tapes question. I went to Band Resources on this site and click on the link that is in my subject line. It just says not found. Not sure if he's following the Band anymore?


Entered at Wed Oct 24 18:09:25 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Beg

Beg I can't believe I never went to those pages that you sent me to. Incredible. Just Incredible information.

However I notice On the Basement Tapes there are only a few tracks listed; where in fact there are 24. Do you think it may be updated one day? Thank you again. I wonder where all that information came from?


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:44:06 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Van Morrison - Wavelength - 2/1/1979 - Belfast (OFFICIAL) with added bonus violinist Toni Marcus.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:36:45 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Long-lost 'Last Waltz' 43 photos from legendary S.F. concert discovered amid dust.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:00:56 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I don't see this photo in the library.
18-year-old Rick Danko at the Summer Garden in Port Dover, Ontario in 1962.
Even a photo of Dylan's daughter Desiree with Bob, etc.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 14:15:37 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Thank You

Thank you everyone for your help.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 13:41:15 CEST 2018 from (173.243.42.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: there goes the Robert E Lee

See link for a possible new sense of the phrase ...


Entered at Wed Oct 24 03:52:59 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: John D

Hi John! Don't know if you ever got to watching some of the youtube videos for example, "The making of Up On Cripple Creek" or "The making of Rockin Chair". There is quite a lot of commentary from, mostly Robbie & Levon as to why who sang lead and who played what and why. They are very interesting.

One interview with Levon on these is how he says. We would maybe all take a turn at singing a song and then we would discuss who should sing it and why. Much of this is at the sound board in the studio and it really is very interesting how these songs evolved and the thought process that went into them. Just my two bits worth.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 23:36:53 CEST 2018 from (98.6.21.229)

Posted by:

Glenn

Subject: Wavelength, Fa Fa Fa

Yes, love that song of Van's, and the album of the same name is good (Garth contributes), too. And I like Natalia from the Wavelength album. Coincidentally I just listened to Otis Redding's "Fa Fa Fa (Sad Song)" a couple of days ago. The disc included Otis's set at Monterey Pop festival: great, energetic versions of Shake, Respect, I've Been Loving You Too Long, Satisfaction, and Try a Little Tenderness.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 22:47:58 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Glenn. I found the link before I saw your post. We were on the same wavelength I guess. Isn't Wavelength a great Van song btw? I was on my way to participate in a medical research project for a PHD student in kiniseology when I hear on my Nano.....Fa Fa Fa (Sad Song). I think I've posted this one before. I like it as Papa Wemba from Zaire has a nice dance step while he's groovin'. One of my students' father made a cassette for me with his songs. Just out of the blue he did that for me. I can't tell you how any act of kindness warms the heart.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 22:30:23 CEST 2018 from (98.6.21.229)

Posted by:

Glenn

Subject: That's the link

Thanks for posting that link BEG. John D: that's the link I mentioned for finding who plays what.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 22:27:12 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Who Plays What Instruments The Band.

Last Five Songs:
Ultimate Sacrifice...Robert Bradley's Blackwater Surprise
People Got To Be Free..The Rascals
Fa Fa Fa Fa...(Sad Song) Papa Wemba
It Isn't Going To Be That Way...Steve Forbert
So Political...Spirit Of The West


Entered at Tue Oct 23 22:16:37 CEST 2018 from (98.6.21.229)

Posted by:

Glenn

Subject: Who plays what...

think I'll drop the T when posting my name (since I seem to be the only Glenn these days). Anyway...

John D: On this website click on the Library link, then click on Lead vocals in Band songs, then click on link that says See also Hideki Watanabe's "Who Plays What Instruments on Band Songs"


Entered at Tue Oct 23 22:00:43 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Amos...Thanks for your help. I will probably go with Covenant as I love Real Good Friend for the lyrics and the groove.

glenn t... Thank you kindly. :-D

"During this time, while Helm was temporarily absent from the group, Manuel taught himself to play drums in a technically irreverent, “loosey-goosey” style, a little behind the beat, similar to jazz drumming. In the Band era he would frequently assume the drummer’s stool when Helm played mandolin or guitar. Examples of this are the songs “Rag Mama Rag” and “Evangeline”. Manuel’s drumming is prominent on the album Cahoots.

The early months in Woodstock also allowed Manuel and Robertson to develop as songwriters."


Entered at Tue Oct 23 21:35:53 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Band Track Notes

This might seem like an odd question; after all these years; but after reading John Simon's chapters on The recording of The Band, talking about Richard switching to drums on particular tracks and Garth moving from organ to piano. Is there any documentation on who played what on all Band recordings? Obviously we know the main instruments of each member; but I found Simon's way of talking about Richard's drum style quite interesting and amusing; which may be wonder what tracks throughout their career did the boys switch instruments.

By the way I do admire Simon's honesty; when for example he mentions he had never heard of Otis Redding; before Monterey Pop Festival. Found that hard to believe.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 17:29:53 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Best of.......

There is so much music to cherish. This morning I woke with Roy Orbison in my head singing "In Dreams". I just listened to it with the head phones. I doubt there is a more beautiful song and voice.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 15:42:16 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Penquin Eggs, Prawns & Crabs and of course the music

A lot of exciting information coming forth! Hi Dunc! managed to get Suz and I a small feed of prawn and crab yesterday. The commercial prawn season here is very short in May however there was 18 boats here this year and they really cleaned them out takes a quite a while for them to build again. We have so many summer people here now they really clean up the crabs too. As well we are plagued with sea otters they have taken so many crab. We used to get crab any where from 20 to 60 feet of water. Now we have to set traps at nearly 200 feet.

Peter very kindly sent me two of Nic Jones CD's including Penquin Eggs. They have given me a great deal of enjoyment and I turned my brothers and other friends on to him. Very unique and beautiful guitar work.

I am now not sure whether I'll get across to your land next late spring as I had planned. Susan needs to go to Australia again and see her daughter and grand kids. Her sister is going with her as I refuse to take that killer plane ride again. So I would have to come by myself.......I'll have to think on this.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 15:40:07 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: speaking of the olden days at CHUM-FM, remember when you guys jumped all over the first Loggins and Messina album, "Sittin' In"? So much so that I, and likely others, got tired of hearing it. Well, I dove back into it and it's mostly superb. And now I am wise enough to hear some Buffalo Springfield, a fair bit of Poco and a whole lot of the Band in the playing of Messina and the stellar team of musicians. (I recall being very impressed with drummer Merel Bregante way back when and still am). But what really struck me the most is that the longest and most FM-y cut, "Same Old Wine" sounds like Traffic (Low-Spark era). Al Garth as Chris Wood - very satisfying. Messina as a somewhat countrier Robertson throughout.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 15:06:50 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan Uncut

You need to get the latest Uncut … the covermount CD is "The Best of The Bootleg Series" with 12 Bob Dyan "Bootleg Series" selections. You're A Big Girl Now is the first release from "More Blood, More Tracks" - just Bob and guitar and as the notes point out the noise is his shirt or jacket buttons on the back of the guitar. It's a really good selection across the series.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 14:41:04 CEST 2018 from (86.133.154.126)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Penguin Eggs

Peter the V is a great contributor to this site and over the last couple of years has expanded my knowledge of English folk music, that's English not British you guys on that side of the pond and he recently introduced me to the work of Nic Jones. So when record (CD) collecting on Friday, I was in search of his work.

The only thing I could find, and which I knew of already because of Peter was 'Penguin Egggs'. It is a brilliant album, which I missed.

It's in the Observer list of 100 greatest British albums between 'Let it Bleed and 'Station to Station'; and was voted he second most important folk album on Radio 2. I must have played the first album a thousand times. (Scots would vote differently because we listen to a different folk programme up here.)

Nic Jones sings and plays guitar and fiddle really well.. There are a few other instruments on the album, all great, but I particularly like the harmonium, and the instruments come together as beautifully as when the Chieftains play.

I suspected a couple of songs were Scottish and I was right, written by a Scot, who worked in the whaling industry after the war. You always need a Scot.

The link to this site is that Bob Dylan has obviously listened to it as he covered the excellent 'Canadee I O'. (Hi Norm). I like Bob's acoustic albums and sometimes he gets criticised for not giving credit to the original arranger. But I think this is unfair. Everybody from pros, to semi pros to good amateurs played Dylan songs in the folk days.

Great album.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 14:02:37 CEST 2018 from (86.133.154.126)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Pat B, Peter V, Stephen, Dave H and HVD. Enjoyed the recent posts. Good to hear that Rick is a good guy.

I always liked your post years ago, Pat B, when you posted how you collected Garth's'Genetic Methods'. It underlined to me, a non musician, how good Garth was. And I remember someone explaining to me Richard's piano role in the band.

Also it was because of Peter V and a couple of others that I understood how great a song Visions of Johanna is.

Thanks John D. I really appreciate your stories. It's another reason I enjoy the GB. What is interesting is that at some time when touring this side of the pond, Art Garfunkel said that the reason he and Paul Simon split up was Paul's height. I thought he was just being nasty at the time.

Hi Glenn...I echo your thoughts.

I am playing 'The Band' just now. It is just absolutely brilliant. Still sounds so fresh.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 03:12:34 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.186)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Thanks for posting that review by Henri Robideau. Another first-hand review of the first shows was by Ralph Gleason, who Robideau mentioned. It appears in one of the paperbacks published in the early '70s by "Rolling Stone Magazine." One of the books, maybe the same one has a whole section on the Band, including Al Kooper's review of MFBP. Come to think of it, the Interviews book in the same series is well worth tracking down for the separate but blending interviews with Dylan and Robertson. Dylan talks about himself and the Hawks being taken by the Winwood brothers to see some ruin in Birmingham after a show in '66. And almost forty years later Robbie brings Steve Winwood to sing and play on his album. Me, I'd love to have seen the look on Richard's face when he met Steve's brother.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 01:27:42 CEST 2018 from (2601:243:1100:428d:5dd5:f65c:859b:3ea1)

Posted by:

Tom G

Location: NOLA/Chicago

Subject: Winterland

That is a great find, Pat B - thank you! I'm grateful I got to see them 20 months later. Hard to imagine what it must have been like to see their first ever Band show. Very special.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 21:11:02 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Wow is right, how amazing after all these years and great photos too. That's the best account I've ever read of that concert - really gives you a feel for what the atmosphere must have been like. Has anyone ever tracked down the hypnotist, Pierre Clement, do any of you know? It would be really interesting to hear his version, though I guess it's unlikely he'd still be alive.

This morning's paper had an article on a new 4-part series on PBS called Native America. It says, "Looking through the lens of what Glassman calls 'native knowledge and modern scholarship', the series, narrated by Mohawk and musical legend Robbie Robertson, brings together history, science and tradition to uncover and celebrate stories."

Glenn t, thank you for your kind words.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 21:03:12 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fabulous piece on Winterland. I'd never seem it either.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 20:35:37 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Wow. A great first hand account of the Band's maiden show complete with photos I've never seen. Wow.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 19:15:18 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Visions

I found the site. There's more to say, including Robbie spending a week on the first stereo mix of Blonde on Blonde. This is what he has to say on "The Cutting Edge", Complete Version, Disc 13, Track 10:

So now, from the second verse onwards, we have Dylan’s vocals punctuated by Robertson’s improvised electric guitar fills. This seems to have been Robertson’s only appearance during the February sessions, and some have disputed that he was there at all. But his style seems to me unmistakeable. Like most risk-takers he made a couple of slips, and these were edited out for the original US mono album; but most other mixes have left his notes untouched, and that’s the way it is here too. For this take someone is recruited to play cymbal strokes in between verses; this was recorded separately from the drums, on the same tape track/ stem as Robertson’s lead guitar. For the US mono mix this stem was quite low in the mix, and had its higher frequencies heavily damped; here it is presented rather more clearly, though still not as loud as on some of the later mixes.

(FOOTNOTE): Charlie McCoy, interviewed in Hit Parader, October 1966, said that “The second time Dylan came in he brought his own guitar player with him – Robby Robertson – who by the way is one of the best blues guitar players I’ve ever heard in my life.” Daryl Sanders, who wrote a good article on the “Blonde On Blonde” sessions for Nashville Scene in 2011, maintained the same, and credited the lead guitar on ‘Visions Of Johanna’ to Wayne Moss. Another possibility is that the original February recording was in fact made with one of the Nashville guitarists playing lead, and that during the March sessions, when Robertson was present, Dylan had the original lead guitar track replaced with an overdub of Robertson’s guitar, adding the cymbal at the same time – much like the drum overdub for ‘4th Time Around’. There is no documentary evidence of overdubs being recorded at the March sessions, but the lack of recording sheets for the Nashville sessions makes matters more obscure, so this cannot at present be ruled out.

(In the Sanders book, Jerry Kennedy gets credited not Wayne Moss)


Entered at Mon Oct 22 19:03:02 CEST 2018 from (2600:1702:4580:5e80:801a:c6f1:e845:d516)

Posted by:

Pat B

Dave H, I'm familiar with Roger Ford's work but I don't recall his overdub theory. Do you have the link for it? Thanks.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 17:38:45 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.186)

Posted by:

Bill M

Stephen N: Interesting post, though I don't have MFBP50 so have nothing to add.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 15:35:58 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lisa

Thank you Lisa.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 09:17:49 CEST 2018 from (24.68.202.123)

Posted by:

Stephen Novik

Location: Edmonton, Alberta

Subject: Music From Big Pink 50th anniversary edition release

Yesterday I purchased the CD version of MFBP's 50th Anniversary edition, I wasn't sure what to expect. I certainly enjoyed it, and I'll listen to it again because it invites the opportunity to re-listen to the other MFBP releases. I was especially shocked to hear the "new" mix of The Weight, which included the 'cut' Hammond organ part played by Richard. It was amazing to hear that bit in its original context-- made me think-- 'I've never heard that before'! and yet, I had-- I just wasn't aware. With the headphones on, you can faintly hear it (like a ghost!) on the 1987 MFBP, the 2000 MFBP (all CDs I've listened to-- my preferred format, though I do appreciate vinyl as well.) and... just listening to ROA version of The Weight where Richard plays it after every chorus! It was so new to me yesterday that went looking for mentions of it on the 'Net, and I discovered this version was released in 2005 on iTunes! It makes me wonder why it was originally cut in the first place.... I'd love to hear from anybody else about this-- or anything else I should pay attention to on MFBP 50th!! Thanks!


Entered at Sun Oct 21 20:47:47 CEST 2018 from (2605:6000:8b0b:6a00:d7b:7e86:f4af:5a15)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Lisa, BEG

I just want to say how wonderful it is to have Lisa and BEG back in the conversation. You were missed! The world's got too many boys' clubs. Your contributions are vital and essential. Thank you, thank you.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 03:55:07 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

"Living it, not documenting it" - what a good way to put it, John!


Entered at Sat Oct 20 22:47:11 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In general, first person memory is not especially reliable. I've found this out comparing notes with old friends. We recall totally different things. In one case, a friend had a detailed gig diary and it recorded three days we spent working in Essex. "I've never been to those places," I said. Then I looked at the diary. Oh, yes, I had. But I remembered stuff he didn't. It's a faulty mechanism, memory, and does not improve with age.

New generations, constantly prompted by hundreds of photos, will remember in more detail than we ever did. I'd go to Paris for a week in the 70s, and take one twelve shot Kodak film, use it, and half would be crap. Nowadays you'd have 200 digital photos.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 22:39:54 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ain't it just like the night to play tricks …

Dave H. Thanks for revealing info. To me, the overdub makes sense – the guitar is so entwined with the lyric, that it needs someone who can get deep into the lyric and respond to it. A post-dubbing session makes this more likely. Either it’s Robbie or the unsung Nashville guy was a genius who had an inspiration for a style that Robbie copied ever after.

Session sheets, as The Telegraph magazine articles discovered, record who was paid under the union rules. I’d guess Robbie & Al Kooper had their own side arrangement with Dylan.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 22:38:22 CEST 2018 from (2407:7000:8435:df65:94d1:fa4c:f811:485f)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Jericho

Peter, that's an interesting quote from John Simons book.(still waiting for my copy to arrive). The bass parts never seemed that dankoish to me. It would be a shame if it was true. Seems like they used "The Band" as a moniker for those albums. Way too many guests.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 18:01:47 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Musicians Memories

After 50 years of doing artist interviews, I have found and so have many others; including famous authors: who do this for a living, believe that the musician's memory (MOST TIMES) is not your best authentication. It's hard for them to remember different sessions of decades ago. That's why you have to look to the people around them for some accuracy. Robbie's a smart guy and I would tend to believe his story about Visions; but most times musicians are not the most reliable for factual information. Not their fault! They were "living it" not "documenting" it. Peter Guralnick and I discussed this at one point.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 12:44:32 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Gentle Giant

As Bill M will attest, CHUM-FM led the way in playing British rock thanks to music director Benjy Karch; who loved pretty much everything that was coming out of England; during the early 70's. Gentle Giant was indeed a staple.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 05:41:15 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: Visions of Robbie

I haven't read the new book yet, but here's my understanding of the questions surrounding the lead guitar on "Visions of Johanna." There were two separate Nashville sessions for Blonde on Blonde, February 14-17 and March 7-10, 1966, with a break in between during which Dylan continued to tour with the Hawks. Surviving records indicate that the album cut of "Visions" was recorded on February 14, 1966. But there is no evidence that Robbie Robertson accompanied Dylan to Nashville for the February recording session. He's not listed in the musician files for those dates, and he's not obviously audible on any of the other tracks cut during the first batch of recordings—even the early alternate takes of "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat" also recorded on the 14th. (It's hard to imagine Dylan cutting that song in particular without Robbie playing on it, if Robbie indeed were in town.) Indeed, Robbie himself implies in his autobiography that he only attended the second set of Nashville sessions in March, which produced the album version of "Pill-Box Hat" as well as a few other cuts on which his guitar is by all accounts present, like "Pledging My Time" and "Obviously Five Believers." And Al Kooper's memory is not unimpeachable—Kooper has been known to insist that Dylan only made a single trip to Nashville in 1966, which is surely wrong given the other available evidence.

So how could it be Robbie Robertson playing the lead lines on "Visions"? Roger Ford's hypothesis is that RR was overdubbed later, at some point during the March sessions, onto the original February 14 recording. His evidence for this claim is that he doesn't hear any bleed-through of the lead guitar into Dylan's vocal mic in the surround-sound remix of "Visions," unlike the other instruments on the track. Seems plausible to me, though there isn't any documentation of such an overdub. I certainly agree that the playing sounds more like Robbie than any of the Nashville musicians, but I wonder whether this will remain a mystery—perhaps appropriately so, for a song that itself is so musically and lyrically shrouded in shadows, dreams, and tricks played by the night.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 23:52:21 CEST 2018 from (109.144.217.140)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Gentle Giant

They used to be Simon Dupree and the Big Sound and were superb live so I believe it


Entered at Fri Oct 19 18:57:38 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Speaking of record shows, at ours last week an English guy said to me that Gentle Giant was one of the best live bands ever. Having seen them once, in '75 as the opening act for J Geils Band and Jefferson Starship, I can see how that might be true.

Lisa: I hadn't heard the 'legally blind from birth' part before either, and it doesn't sound likely. It seems that he'd always worn thick glasses, but I don't think that's the same thing, necessarily, as being legally blind. (Of course, what's 'legal' changes from place to place and time to time anyway - viz just this Weednesday.)

HVD: Nice story about Rick.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 18:47:49 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:6:806::41)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Or his left hand or both


Entered at Fri Oct 19 18:46:19 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:6:806::41)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Talcum powder

I’ve read that Jeff Beck uses a load of that on his right hand as a sort of lubricant. That he want a slippery fret board.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 15:07:39 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jeff Beck & Tal Wilkenfeld

Got up this morning....05:30.....arthritis in the shoulders aching like hell. Got me a coffee ......and a couple of Tylenol.

So I put on the headphones and relax myself listening to these folks at the Cross Roads 2007. So as I'm watching this I notice something. At 1:30 on the tape there is a closeup of Jeff's hands as he plays. It looks to me like he has a lot of resin on his fingers of his right hand. Must be resin huh?....couldn't be the other stuff.......could it????


Entered at Fri Oct 19 11:46:49 CEST 2018 from (1.43.129.8)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just came across a nice clip of Rick I hadn't seen before. You can find it if your search: Rick Danko Sings Long Black Veil with Happy and Artie Traum & Gang


Entered at Fri Oct 19 10:25:39 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Thin Wild Mercury Music

The new Daryl Sanders arrived yesterday. I have two train trips this weekend and was looking forward to reading it on the train. I opened it at random to find him stating that Robbie does not play on Visions of Johanna and was not in Nashville that day. We've done this before and someone managed to ask Al Kooper face to face. I'd go with Al Kooper, but I felt irritated and don't feel like reading the rest yet. A novel takes its place in my bag.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 20:01:17 CEST 2018 from (163.151.255.10)

Posted by:

Hudson Valley Dude

Subject: Rick Danko

Quick story, saw Rick Danko years ago at the Turning Point in Piermont. Had some albums and things for him to sign, waiting outside his bus, weather was poor(forgot if it was raining or freezing),he opens the door and says we shouldn't be waiting outside to come inside his tour bus and he will sign everything and answer any questions (WOW)so we proceed inside ,he signs everything talks to us for a while,I ask is there any chance he will play "Unfaithful Servant" he says its not on the setlist,anyway we thank him for his kindness and go into the club get a table at the side of the stage watching the opening act. He comes in heads for the dressing room in the back see's me walks up to the stage grabs a guitar points at our table and plays "Unfaithful Servant" and goes to his dressing room to get ready for his show that didn't start for another 45 minutes. That's the kind of guy he was !!


Entered at Thu Oct 18 19:58:25 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Bill, Scott's story was first posted on Slippedisc, a widely read classical music blog from Europe, when he was first reported missing, and followed up a few days ago. I was surprised, as rock news is generally not covered there and when it is, it's usually confined to the big names. I was also surprised to read in the story you posted that he was legally blind from birth - in all the times his name's come up in all the Band references, I don't believe I ever read that before. Is it true?


Entered at Thu Oct 18 18:11:33 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Cliff Richard review

Long review of Cliff (Sir Cliff) Richard and his 60th Anniversary tour. Might be news for North Americans. His first hit was 1958, but to my surprise he is actually 6 days younger than John Lennon!


Entered at Thu Oct 18 16:44:08 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:51eb:9004:f162:c772)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: I don't want to have a nice day, Amos

I agree, Amos. I really like that version of 'Excuse Me Mister', but I don't know the original.

You've got me playing and enjoying Greg Brown, including playing the above mentioned track...and smiling.

A starting point is to get him to either play solo at Celtic Connections or in Transatlantic Sessions is to contact the director of Celtic Connections, our big New Year festival. However there will be a change of director this year.

Contact donaldshawatglasgowconcerthallsdotcom

Hopefully he will respond. Thanks, Amos.

Hope you got some prawns and crabs, Norm. Had a Scottish prawn baguette with side salad at a pleasant cafe for lunch. Played several Village Stompers' tunes - I know the tunes. What an unusual dance in the video.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 15:59:20 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Lisa: The BBC is onto the Cushnie story - though there's no mention of Robbie or Ronnie. I'm glad they noted that Scott had a great sense of humour and would have found the story hilarious if he'd been here to hear it. That's exactly what a friend who guested with the Suedes a couple times told me on Tuesday.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 15:18:56 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What's in a name

Well Bill it just means to me now there will be more people just "legally" blowing that shit in my face. I got nothing against it. The smell of it just makes me sick for some reason.........oh and Bei Bir, I thought maybe you were a great fan of that kid whose name we don't like to mention (Bieber is it?) :-)


Entered at Thu Oct 18 15:06:04 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Scott Cushnie

Been a lot of talk about Scott Cushnie the last few days. Very sad news of his death for such a brilliant musician and a very giving person This is called Early In The Morning.. He was there back in the beginning of the Toronto Sound. Here is a track from Two Pianos No Waiting. There are in fact 3 pianos. The late great Doug Riley and Ms. Joan Besen.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 14:29:26 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norm: The fact that I said "Bei Bir" had absolutely nothing to do with the fact that yesterday was the day that a large number of our compatriots were out buy pot. As you know well, but potential tourists from the GB may not, October 17, 2018 is the day that marijuana (possessing, growing, cooking with …) was legalised in Canada - across the board and not just for medical reasons.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 09:39:26 CEST 2018 from (79.75.170.126)

Posted by:

Amos

brown eyed girl - so many great Greg Brown albums

Going Driftless: An Artist's Tribute to Greg Brown (Various artists)

Milk of the Moon

Covenant

Freak Flag

The Evening Call

Dream City: Essential Recordings, 1997-2006

I hope you find his music as wonderful as i have done over the years.

Dunc - Transatlantic Sessions has to be a contender for the greatest music series ever! John Martyn's version of Ben Harper's Excuse Me Mister is one of my highlights from the series. I just want to know how to get Greg Brown on the next series? I think he would be perfect.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 07:33:02 CEST 2018 from (2001:4644:9569:0:40b5:9548:ff54:b6bf)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Don't Start Me Talkin'...

Garth at The Vault in Camden, NJ, last wekend, talking about playing with Richard and Levon.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 06:10:44 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: To me you are beautiful

You had it almost right Bill. The second word is Mir. I remember long ago trying to find the real meaning. I had it pretty right. However now a day on the internet here there is contradiction. I haven't found the original of the song. It means to me you are beautiful. Some want to say it is a Yiddish folk song. Others say it is just plain German. There is no way for me to know. I think the song came out around 1937 there is umpteen different recordings of it.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 04:00:43 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Lisa: Thanks for your note about Scott Cushnie. He was a nice soul and a fine musician. I was surprised that he even had a website - see link - which fortunately is still up. Taken together, the videos give a pretty good sense of his music and style. If you have time for just one, try the top right. If you remember 1980, you'll know that not many people were playing those songs like that.

Norm: Scott's Professor Piano and the Canadian Aces album includes a nice version of "Bei Bir Mist Du Schon" (spelling?), I believe. As does "The Canadian Aces Live at Albert's Hall", recorded back then but not released until Pacemaker put it out on CD in 2009.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 01:05:20 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Village Stompers .........AGAIN!

Dunc, on youtube you can get "Top Tracks of the Village Stompers". I'm sure what you would also like is their song "Bei Mir Bist Du Schon". What you will be hearing is a real Dixie Land, N'Awlins brass band sound.

Funny you mentioned brass and I immediately thought of the Village Stompers. I haven't listened to them in years but in the early 60's they were really hot!


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:47:14 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Village Stompers

That's all great stuff Dunc and I'll be listening to as much as I can. Make no mistake. It's a great way to spend retirement. When I have time. My retirement is a busy place.

Right now our weather is beautiful (what we call Indian summer). I had wood piled and tarped outside. I'v used a little so that I have room to split some more and get it inside which is what I'm doing as well as getting little chores on my boats done. I also have to get the prawn and crab traps out.

I mention the "Village Stompers" because if you like brass, listen to "Washington Square" way back from the 60's. It starts with banjo then becomes full blown brass. A real catchy tune.

Retirement is GREAT!


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:01:42 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:7135:9c26:a72:a310)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Spencer The Rover

I've spent about three hours on this today. One of my favourite English songs is Spencer The Rover. I think it is from Sussex, Peter, Roger - so a great Southern English song.

I came across it on Sunday's Child by John Martyn, years ago. But I liked the lyrics - universally appropriate - someone away from home in Yorkshire missing their children. Also chosen by English guys on Desert Island discs ...and I can see why.

But today I played versions by Shirley and Dolly Collins, beautiful singers; a recording by Robin Dransfield backed by a brass band - I like brass bands; an unaccompanied version by the Copper Family from the fifties, and this family kept the song alive - enjoyable too. I don't know anything about these singers.

Then I heard a modern, beautifully produced version by the Irish singer, Cara Dillon, this version influenced by John Martyn's version.

But my favourite version is from Transatlantic Sessions and John Martyn is backed by Danny Thompson, Phil Cunningham, Ally Bain and Jay Ungar. Absolutely brilliant. Have a look on Youtube.

If you give it a go on Youtube, take a look at May You Never by John Martyn with Danny Thompson, Kathy Mathea and Jerry Douglas. Over a million hits.

I think this is a valid use of retirement time...mmm...


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:27:43 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brian Bennett was the highly-rated drummer of The Shdows.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 18:51:28 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Alll the Road Running

Glad you enjoyed that Dunc. I believe I made one error. I called Richard Bennett, (Brian). I have a friend named Brian Bennett I suppose is where that came from. There is sure a great linup of musicians playing with Mark on that tour.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 13:44:33 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:a551:3782:9814:cdd2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Norm. Played the album on Youtube and enjoyed it. It does have a Celtic feel to it. I don't have anything of Mark Knoeffler (sp?), but saw him as support for Bob on one of his tours.

I have several Emmylou Harris albums and have seen her a few times. She can certainly do Celtic. You probably know this already, but if you don't, check out the Transatlantic Sessions on Youtube where country meets Celtic.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 11:11:21 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There's another Atlantic label Jamaican LP, from a year earlier, 1964. That's "Jamaica Ska.' They must have dipped a toe in the water and retreated. That also has Byron Lee, as well as the Maytals.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 04:33:16 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Nice story, nice image. Thanks for sharing it.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 22:40:33 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:55d6:c0b2:dc46:ec77)

Posted by:

Pat B

I played in a Chicago-based funk band in the mid-70's that worked in Canada a number of times. We played a place near Montreal that had a big supper/show room on the first floor and a rock club in the basement. Byron Lee and the Dragonaires were in the show club and we became fast friends with the musicians. Lee only showed on the weekends. They spent a lot of times downstairs oohing and ahhing at my Hammond B2 modified to a B3. During the days they taught us soccer and we taught them baseball.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 22:08:58 CEST 2018 from (64.229.14.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronno
Web: My link

Peter V: Thanks for the Byron Lee post. Although dismissed as too loungey it seems, he and the Dragonaires was big around here from the mid-'60s well into the '70s, touring through regularly and releasing a surprising number or albums. Most of the them were on the Transworld label - never Atlantic. One was called "Blast Off" I recall, and one was called "Reggay" (then a newish word with unfixed spelling). If you recall when we standing at the record show in Brighton a few years ago, perhaps admiring your newly bought US promo copy of Hawkins / Hawks "Bo Diddley" / "Who Do You Love", I got excited at one point when a rock steady record come over the PA and I nipped over to find out what it was. What it was was an early record by trumpeter / singer JoJo Bennett, who'd jumped ship from the Dragonaires in Toronto (in '67 or '68) to join a local group, the Cougars. The link is to a song he'd recorded with the Dragonaires not long before. By the late '70s he was leading the Satellites, a very successful - and still running - Toronto-based reggae group.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 20:24:32 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

"I never forget, and I never forgive" - now there's a code to live by!

Bill, thank you for all the Scott Cushnie updates. So sad, and rather bizarre.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 18:49:42 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Listening: It's been an enjoyable week or two with the Bobbie Gentry box set. I've tended to play one CD all day while I'm working, and I agree that CD4 - with Glen Campbell is the weakest by far.

The other on replay has been "Jump Up" by Byron Lee. An unusual plunge into Caribbean music by Atlantic (of all labels) recorded in Jamaica in 1965, though the "Jump Up" rhythm is Trinidad. I found the LP recently … a big brass section, organ, three percussionists and NO guitar. I think several tracks are bass pedals on the organ too. It took me to back to Georgie Fame's "Rhythm & Blue Beat" EP from the same era. Georgie Fame's "Madness" is the track that named the two-tone band. Atlantic toyed with Jamaican music a bit in 1965, but I guess never had the local expertise and contacts of Island.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 17:26:03 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

A place where you wouldn't normally find a former Hawk - Aerosmith's "Big Ten Inch Record". Scott Cushnie got this gig because producer Jack Douglas had played guitar is several bands and on several records with Scott in the US and Toronto between '67 and '71.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 16:49:36 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: link to "Down In The Alley"

I like the accompanying photos, including some of Scott Cushnie in the '70s and the early '80s when he ran a fabulous group called Professor Piano and the Canadian Aces (who focused on music from the '40s - when they weren't called Professor Piano and the Rockin' Deltoids performing rockabilly from the '50s).

Cushnie had a long, spotty and interesting career with Ronnie Hawkins. In the winter of '59/'60 he was hired from the Suedes to replace Will 'Pop' Jones (and brought in Robbie Robertson soon after). In '64-'65 he returned to Hawkins to do A&R and run the Hawk publishing arm of Hawkins's new record label; he also sang lead, uncredited, on the Stratotones' first record for the label, produced Ronnie's first record for the label, and Robbie Lane's first record, and joined another of the label's groups, the Vendettas. And in '69 he returned to Hawkins to replace Richard Bell when Bell left for Janis Joplin's Full Tilt band. Hence his appearance on the Muscle Shoals album along with fellow-Hawk Richard 'King Biscuit Boy' Newell. (Then Hawk drummer Larry Atamanuik also accompanied Hawkins to the sessions in Alabama, but the producer wanted to go with his usual David Hood - Roger Hawkins rhythm team.)


Entered at Tue Oct 16 16:38:26 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Straght Goods

Actually the truth is Paul Simon is a Hobbit! So you guys shouldn't be picking on him.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 16:14:25 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

At this link you can hear Scott Cushnie playing with Ronnie Hawkins, with Duanne Allman and King Biscuit Boy tearing it up in the foreground. This, likely edited to some degree, was the B-side to Hawkins's minor 1970 hit, "Down In The Alley", on which Cushnie is more prominent.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 00:39:00 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the link. In an attempt to correct what might become the historical record, it was 1959 and it was the Consuls, not Little Caesar and the Consuls (which is what the remaining pair decided to call the new group they put together after Robbie, Peter and Gene had bailed to join Scott). Minor points, I know.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 00:36:51 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: "Short People Got No Reason"

Does anyone remember that song from the late 70's? My younger brother Lorne played lead guitar with me for quite a while then. Like our father Lorne is 5'5". I'm just over 6'. If I walked over to Lorne's side of the stage to say something to him he would freak. Get on your own side, don't stand by me. He was real young then. He wore 3 or 4 inch lifts and was mad as hell about his height. Well that song came out, (it's probably on youtube. He said if you ever play that song I'm walking off the stage. One day while he was complaining, I said but you know Lorne the way you play and everything you do you are 10 feet tall in my eyes. Well he just about started to cry. Thanks Norm he says. Too many little guys just have that short man attitude that they hate every thing.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 23:20:12 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Bill M.

"It was about that time — 1958 or so — that Cushnie met Robbie Robertson, a young guitarist playing guitar with Little Caesar and The Consuls.

"They came to a dance hall in Oakville. There was a big upright piano sitting by the stage. They played all these Chuck Berry songs and I knew all the piano parts by heart from the radio. So I went up, took the front off the upright, and played along with the band. I was 18 and Robbie was maybe 16."

After the show, Robertson and two other members of the band approached Cushnie, informed him that they were forming a new band and invited him to join on piano. Cushnie gave the band its name, The Suedes, as in Blue Suede Shoes.

Cushnie left to join Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks. "I was the first Canadian in Ronnie's band," Cushnie says. "I played with him a few months, but I wasn't crazy about him.

"I brought Robbie into the band because he was my best friend. The bass player had stolen some money and they fired him out of the band. So I told Ronnie that he should get Robbie Robertson. Ronnie said, 'Does he play bass?' And I said, 'he can play anything.'"


Entered at Mon Oct 15 22:52:35 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Peter. I was hoping that clip would be the one where Art did not rule out anything between him and Paul Simon.
My brother 5' 11' worked at a hotel where a lot of musicians hang out. He hung out with Tom Jones one day. Not sure how that transpired. He did tell me that he indeed wears lifts because of his height. Nothing wrong with that as we all have something we are not comfortable with and would change. The other day my new Naturopath was surprised that I am 5'4'' as she said I look taller. Maybe good posture? lol In the article about Paul and Art...Paul didn't like being a lot shorter than Art and Art didn't like that he was dependent on Paul for the songs. When I ran into Tom Wilson he looked shorter and much more approachable up close and personal. When I watch him perform he looks taller and quite intimidating. After the interview on TVO Ontario; not at all. :-D

Greg Brown...Anyone suggest which recording is worth buying/downloading? Thank you.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 22:09:23 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: 4' 9" - perfect for a touring musician. Paul's transcontinental bus trip in "America" must've been a heck of a lot more comfortable than mine was. He's probably unfolded himself after a Singapore Airlines flight without even wincing.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 21:20:10 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Height

According to Wiki, Paul Simon is 5 foot 2 inches. Mrs V is 5 foot, a height I know well. I have seen Paul Simon enough standing against mics, Marshall stacks, other people, holding guitars etc. I would place him at 4 foot 10 inches maximum, probably 4 foot 9 inches. He is nowhere near 5 foot 2 inches.

Art Garfunkel looks a full foot taller. So if John D reckons he's 5 foot 8 inches, draw the conclusion.

I'm reminded of the Tom Jones show in 1968, where all the 5 foot 6 inch dancers on the previous show got replaced by a team of 5 foot dancers to make Tom look tall. I've stood next to him. On Wiki he claims to be 5 foot 9 inches. I am 6 foot 1 inches now, but 6 foot 2.5 inches then. I towered over him. 5 foot 4? Maybe 5 foot 5? Why do they lie?


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:34:41 CEST 2018 from (65.92.192.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Bonk's post re Scott Cushnie

Here's a link to the article mentioned in Bonk's post about the send ending to the life of Scott Cushnie, the musician who got Robbie Robertson into Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:16:52 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I got the idea from the notes on the doors at the concert, and then watching the interviews just now, that he is something of a diva.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 18:57:56 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

JOHN D

Subject: Art

About 15 years ago Art came to town on a promotion tour. First I was surprised how short he was. Now when I say short, he was my height. About five foot eight. I guess watching him stand next to Paul, I now really know how short Paul was; or is. No big deal; but at the time I was surprised.

I have a ton of T shirts. I just threw one on that morning and after meeting him, I learnt something about him.

”So your tee shirt says New York; are you trying to impress me?” “Huh?” I said. Because he’s from New York I guess he thought I was trying to impress him. The radio station I was working for at the time was called CISS-FM, Toronto’s first New Country station. He asked me what he doing there guessing it was because of the format. I told him I didn’t know (I now getting a little miffed). “I guess it’s because your handlers brought you here.” Insert awkward silence. We then moved on to the interview and all went well. Hate it when your heroes disappoint. He might be a very nice guy; but not that day.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 18:57:11 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think the forbidden word begins with g, has three letters, and ends with y, and a is in the middle. Garfunkel was saying there was nothing like that in their long relationship.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 18:56:01 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I found the clip, BEG and tried three times to post a transcript, but it gets the Johnny Cash finger every time. It must be a forbidden word.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 18:12:41 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sunday Morning
Art Garfunkel on his voice linked.

Another video is not available here. Could you check it out Peter? Art Garfunkel on his teaming with Paul Simon | 0:37
In this web extra, singer Art Garfunkel reads a passage from his new memoir, "What Is It All but Luminous," in which he frames his historic partnership with singer-songwriter Paul Simon.

I made a mistake as the Art interview was on CBS Sunday Morning show not on 60 Minutes. I watch religiously thanks to bob wigo who pointed us in that direction many moons ago. Many thanks.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 17:38:17 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Art

Thanks, BEG. Yes, that was the bit about Artie's saying his voice had recovered when it hadn’t. Wishful thinking, maybe. From my 2007 review of Art:

"Art Garfunkel doesn’t rock, as his onetime partner has said, but his voice is so sublime, it has healing qualities. We had dead centre front row seats for the show last night at Bournemouth Pavilion. Bizarrely, we had received a letter from the venue that morning (everyone did) reminding us that we MUST be seated before 7.30. Everyone was, and sat in silence for twenty minutes until it started, enlivened only by announcements that anyone wishing to go to the toilet must only do between songs. There were notices on the door saying “Loves, please do not open this door during the concert. It affects my concentration, Art.” So Art is a tad obsessive about a quiet seated audience- similar happened after the interval. They didn’t restart until every seat was taken in the sold-out theatre."

The notes were written by hand (presumably by Art), so obviously in the interval every one of them got purloined which should be predictable. He was extremely good though, and as we were dead centre front row, he seemed to fix on Mrs V's face (who is a very good attentive listener) and sang a couple straight to her.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 17:15:45 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Tom Wilson Pays Homage to Hamilton's Musical History with New Mural

The mural's title, The Mystic Highway, is Wilson's term for Highway 6, a route he believes has possessed rich musical mojo.

"In Hamilton, we've looked to Buffalo and we've looked down the Mystic Highway for inspiration," he explained. "Highway 6 runs from Hamilton through Port Dover, to Turkey Point. It's where Robbie Robertson spent summers on the Six Nations. It's where Ronnie Hawkins fired his drunk bass player and hired a young Rick Danko. It's where Canadian rock and roll got to party at Summer Gardens in Port Dover with 12-inch hotdogs and Speedo bathing suits. It's where migrant workers from the islands meet Six Nations and Mohawks and tobacco fields and tourists come together and developed their own kind of gumbo."

I was so close to having a conversation with Tom Wilson. I ran into him at the headquarters for Canadian Music Week looking for info re Levon's Ain't In It For My Health. We said hello and then just as I was about to blah, blah, blah...His daughter called him and that was that. There is also a very informative and honest interview I saw on TVO not too long ago. I really like BARK as they are so different as individuals and as musicians. They never disappoint when you see them perform at various venues in town.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 16:59:44 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

'I was tired of the drama. I couldn’t trust Art any more. He let us all down': Paul Simon on the toxic truth behind his lifelong feud with Art Garfunkel
By ROBERT HILBURN
PUBLISHED: 17:04 EDT, 21 April 2018 | UPDATED: 10:20 EDT, 22 April 2018

Whenever Art's films come up I rarely see mention of one of my faves...Bad Timing (A Sexual Obsession). Recently on 60 Minutes Art didn't totally count out anything...Theresa Russel and Harvey Keitel in film who I really like in any film and really cool guitar riff is playing when Art and Theresa meet at a party. Maybe it was a cult film for some of us.

Other films recently seen that I really enjoyed. Here are my last 5. I love lists Dunc.
Crazy Rich Asians
A Star Is Born
The Wife
Fahrenheit 11/9
Whitney

I would like to see Colette and Three Identical Strangers.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 16:19:50 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Nick Schilder & Simon Keizer

Peter have any of you guys heard these two young men sing? They have an acoustic accompaniment and they sing "Sounds of Silence, The Boxer and Cecelia" They do great justice to Simon and Garfunkel.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 14:04:38 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’ve recounted this before. When we were doing our theatre shows for ELT students in the 1970s, we had a guy (Patrick) who had sung light opera and who could hit Bridge Over Troubled Water perfectly (and The Boxer). In many areas such as reliability, turning up late, he was a pain in the arse, but we tolerated him because we always did one or the other on every show, and he always got a standing ovation. We also had a great pianist, and a superb baby grand piano. This was when our drummer discovered that you could get the Moog effect in The Boxer by thumping a Watkins Copicat echo unit hard with your fist at the appropriate point, so we always had the echo unit next to the bass tom-tom.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 13:58:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I had heard that last time Art was using the vocal "lift" button on his mic for the high bits - you can bring in a pre-recorded track that way. I still might try and see him - he was very good but that was a few years ago.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 13:53:57 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Paul Simon

In hindsight I have to agree with Peter about the song itself. As Simon was near the end of the song I turned to my son and said, "that's a really, really hard song to sing." So maybe I should give Paul the benefit of the doubt; because the first song was really good.. It's a very hard song to sing; although Garfunkel is sure to sing it on his upcoming tour.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 13:12:43 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Simon on Jericho

Nearly at the end. John Simon said this about "Jericho."

"Then Levon told me he had enough of playing with Rick's melodic bass playing and craved a steady, more conventional player. So Rob Leon, a Woodstock fixture, would play most of the bass parts on the album."

Looking at the sleeve notes, Rob Leon is credited with bass on Too Soon Gone, Amazon and Jericho. There are a lot of sitting-in guests on the album. From John Simon's note, you'd expect it to be Stuff You Gotta Watch, Same Thing and Blues Stay Away From Me, none of them interesting enough melodically for a bass player of Rick Danko's quality. Paul McCartney and Rick Danko were the two great melodic bass players. I noted Rick looking bored on the blues numbers on stage, and Levon used to play bass guitar on Crazy Mama live. 12 bars with a basic riff are hardly challenging. I also realized that Amazon, Too Soon Gone and Jericho were not performed live. Did Rob Leon play more than he was credited for? Or was John Simon overstating it with "most of the bass parts."?

It also reveals a rift over material and direction that I had long suspected, which is why Rick was doing his melodic material with Danko, Fjeld, Anderson rather than getting it on albums by the reunited Band. .


Entered at Mon Oct 15 12:38:37 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon 2018

I've relinked my Hyde Park review. I'll cut and paste the bit on Bridge here:

On to the big one. Bridge Over Troubled Water. He said:

“This song felt as if it came through me, as if I was a conduit for it. Then I gave the song away and I seldom sung it after that, so I had a strange relationship to it as if it wasn’t my song, but tonight, on my final tour I’m going to reclaim my lost child.”

Slightly unfair to Art Garfunkel, though I know what he means. When you write something, sharing credit is hard. The most praised unit in our first textbook Streamline English pre-dated meeting my co-writer. I’d say only one word was changed from my original, and yet we were both praised equally for it. On the other hand, Artie’s soaring voice propelled Bridge Over Troubled Water to its status as one of the most popular songs of the century. It’s also untrue that Paul Simon hasn’t done it and rethought it himself, sometimes quite radically, as with the Jesse Dixon Singers on Live Rhymin’. However, nothing prepared me for this sublime treatment, in a lower key, but with a trumpet part that drew tears for its sheer beauty. END EXTRACT

He was indeed shaky on SNL, I agree. He was way better on "You Can't Run" because the arrangement with YMusic was worked up for the album. On Bridge he was trying to use YMusic and some of the band. Having seen him in the summer, it's not time to leave the ice (though he says he is). He is in way, way better voice than Bob Dylan was even 20 or 30 years ago. But "Bridge" is a swine to sing, and he did find it hard on that show. He has a huge repertoire. Maybe it's time to avoid it! He can still sing The Boxer brilliantly.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 22:08:30 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Paul Simon Last night on SNL

Paul Simon has said in the past that even though he wrote "Bridge" he really felt it was Artie's song; because of the way Art sang it. Last night proved it was Artie's song. It was a weak vocal from Simon and at times a little off pitch. It reminded me of a performance recently on TV from Tony Bennett; who I just adore; but at 92 Tony 's voice really didn't sound strong. However I just want to add that "Can't Run But"; from Simon sounded OK.

There's an expression in Canada. You'll see why. "A guy has to know when it's time to skate off the ice." I don't think I'm being harsh here. Gosh I'm such a Canadian. Always apologizing. :-)


Entered at Sun Oct 14 18:37:22 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: All the Road Running

Thank you Dunc. Very much enjoying Tony McManus. His playing style put me in mind of Marc Knofphler. That brought me to one of my most revered DVD's. All the Road Running with Emmylou Harris. There is a lot of Celtic music on that tour and I guess if I had to pick only one music to listen to it would be celtic. Perhaps it has to do with my grand father coming from Scotland on one side and my other grand fathers family coming from Wales.

I'd love to hear Tony play with Mark. If you chance to listen to "All the Road Running", a particular song, "I dug up a Diamond", Mark plays a Les Paul, as does Brian Bennett. The solo they play and harmonize guitars is chilling. I love it. Thanks for Tony, Dunc.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 18:01:31 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and brown eyed girl's fave cover would be by Jeff Buckley at 125 million.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 17:52:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The absurdity of popularity on the internet. My granddaughter is learning “Hallelujah” for a school concert. She listens continuously to the Pentatonix version. It has had 359 MILLION views.

Paul Simon, Can’t Run But. Vancouver is 6,687. SNL is 22,000. Then Bridge Over Troubled Water at Hyde Park (an audience cellphone) is just 1,462 views.

Admittedly Leonard Cohen Live in London for Hallelujah hits 122 million views. k.d. lang in Winnipeg 2005 has 18 million views. John Cale official video has 374,414 views.

I do wonder about small kids singing it in chorus - has anyone ever listened to the lyrics?


Entered at Sun Oct 14 17:01:15 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

October 14, 2018, 9:58 AM
Tina Turner on her voice, finding serenity, and losing a son

I saw her in NYC at Radio City Music Hall in 1993. Chris Isaak opened for her. I found her show too rehearsed. I know I can be a harsh critic. I do love listening to her nuggets of wisdom as in this interview just an hour ago.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:30:52 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:3d52:214e:bf75:f156)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Happy birthday, Jan. Great site.

I enjoyed the song very much Norm, which took me on Youtube into Dan Fogelberg 'Another Auld Lang Syne or similar title', - a good song, Harper Valley PTA, Ode to Billy Joe, Del McCourie Band playing 'For What It's Worth', John Denver and Mama Cass playing 'Leaving On A Jet lane', The Band playing 'Up On Cripple Creek' and finished with a 2012's version of 'The Weight' at The US Americana Awards. Well worth a google. Busy doing nothing. Thanks, Norm. Make sure you check out, Tony McManus, self taught from a humble background and now living in Canada.

Playing 'The Bunch' and enjoying it. Linda Peters (then named) new to me this summer is a really good singer, the Dundee horns are great. Roger Ball is called Roger Bell and there are three Dundee horns, Mogul Thrash gets a mention. It is what it is - a bunch of young musicians playing songs they revere. A sing along. Thanks, Peter and Bill.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:23:15 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks Peter but video is unavailable here. So I am posting his performance of Can't Run But from when he performed in Vancouver. I like the Orchestra. Sorry about sounding so dismissive in my last post but I expected a lot from Simon and I know how much you dig him. For some reason as soon as I heard him perform last night....For me to turn the channel right away....


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:10:45 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Can't Run But

Can't Run But has the advantage of coming from the album (linked). This is the other one from SNL. BEG has linked Bridge for us.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:07:36 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bridge Over SNL

It's the same backing from YMusic as Hyde Park. That's online too (audience shot). Hyde Park had the sense of place and huge audience. The arrangements with YMusic probably work best on less familiar songs as on "In The Blue Light" because we have fewer preconceptions. I think YMusic is a great move for him, in that it gives a subtle edge. On the other hand his voice is thinning - more apparently than at Hyde Park, but I guess he was warmed up there.

Art Garfunkel has just announced a 2019 UK tour. The recent Paul Simon bio says they fell out when Artie said he could still hit the notes for a tour and he couldn't. I saw Art Garfunkel on his last UK tour. This one isn't coming to my town or near. I'm in two minds.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:03:53 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Peter and JD...When I saw Paul Simon on SNL last night I turned the channel right away. Anyway, I guess this was his second song last night which I missed.

Last 5 while on my way to Kleinberg's McMichael Art Gallery yesterday. I was sort of surprised...Now there is even a hip-hop exhibit.
Oh La De Da...The Staple Singers
Let's Do It Again...The Staple Singers...Sexy song for the gospel group.
I Still Belong To Jesus...Robert Randolph...Thank you Robbie for exposing him via your playlist to performing with him.
Sweet Angeline...Elvis Presley
Creep...TLC


Entered at Sun Oct 14 14:06:09 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Paul Simon Last night on SNL

Would love to read any comments; on Paul Simon; who appeared last night on SNL. I have my own thoughts; which I will share later. Thanks.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 12:57:19 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The new book on The Band promises unpublished interviews with Jerry Garcia and Andrew Loog Oldham. OK, but I have a feeling the Jerry Garcia interview can't be recent on the grounds of him being deceased. Andrew Loog Oldham is an interesting raconteur in his books. He hasn't mentioned The Band before. Should be interesting.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 12:33:53 CEST 2018 from (83.248.191.8)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Mr. Hoibergs BIG 6-0

I second to NORM's idea to a gathering at Mr. Hoibergs BIG 6-0 in Norway and this site's BIG 2-5. Maybe we could do what I have dreamed about since the year 2000: the gb community could "record" The Best Of The Very Best Of The Band. I promise to boil my blues harmonica in whiskey and marinate my banjo in cough medicine! - OK, it is easy for me to say. Only a few hours car drive on E6.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 10:44:23 CEST 2018 from (210.86.87.98)

Posted by:

Rod

Yeah I'll probably buy it in case I miss something. Just ordered John Simons book the other night. Looking forward to that one


Entered at Sun Oct 14 04:31:11 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Carpet Bagger Gome On

It always amazes me that every time some one writes a book they are compelled to tell us. "We have pictures and interviews NEVER SEEN BEFORE! I wonder when they are going to run out of things that have been digging into people's lives.

Of course the hard core fans will buy it because they are afraid they might miss something.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 01:14:19 CEST 2018 from (2001:4644:9569:0:58cf:c2d:18ae:2d65)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: New TB book

Worth ordering a copy, I guess?


Entered at Sat Oct 13 21:07:07 CEST 2018 from (1.43.129.8)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I hope you were not hinting at the fact that being 60 is just the same as every other damn year. We can never let that secret get out.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 18:53:45 CEST 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:48d1:4864:f3f1:19bd)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Scott Cushnie

Sorry. National Post.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 18:50:54 CEST 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:48d1:4864:f3f1:19bd)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Scott Cushnie

It looks like the mystery to Scott's disappearance has been solved. I can't attach the article but it's online at the Toronto Sun. Very sad.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 16:57:11 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Maybe this doesn't belong here.........but

I am greatly moved listening to Andrea Bocelli and Sarah Brightman sing "Time to Say Good Bye".


Entered at Sat Oct 13 15:56:30 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Shit Disturber

Peter! Quit trying to intimidate yer host!


Entered at Sat Oct 13 12:15:45 CEST 2018 from (213.205.240.217)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Happy birthday Jan

A year to go. When you get to the next one you will discover what we all discover at 60, but we all have to swear never to tell anyone who is younger. So I cant tell you but It is embarassing, awful and universal. Don’t worry about it for another year.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 10:24:33 CEST 2018 from (210.86.87.248)

Posted by:

Rod

Happy birthday Jan . Thanks for creating this site...and keeping it going


Entered at Sat Oct 13 00:55:25 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

A mere babe! Many happy returns, Jan!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 23:19:58 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Happy Birthday Jan. All The Best!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 22:28:30 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Healthy Happy Birthday to Jan the Man!

It is so good to see you Ray!!!!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 21:29:24 CEST 2018 from (70.30.45.165)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: jh

Best birthday wishes from the Great White North, at least before DJT deems otherwise.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:52:09 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Happy birthday Jan..

... but to call 59 getting old sort of hurts my feelings, and likely some more of the geezers here.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:12:08 CEST 2018 from (65.92.194.36)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jan H: Best wishes. 'Fifty nine' has such a nice sound that we'll understand if you choose to reuse it. May there be many more celebrations to come in any case.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 17:59:20 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Getting old

Have a good birthday Jan (yer just a kid yet :-). Do we have to come to Norway for the party next year?? I'm in!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 17:40:33 CEST 2018 from (2001:4644:9569:0:747b:adec:df6:2e2f)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Getting old...

...yours truly is celebrating his 59th today. With good friends, a big paella cooked up by the SO and lovely Spanish red wine flowing free. Next year this site will celebrate it's 25th...


Entered at Fri Oct 12 15:25:20 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Two Things

Thanks for that pony song Bill! I love it. That's my kind of music. I woke up this morning at 5 o'clock with The Vogues "5 o'clock World" running thru' my head. Now I'm not sure if it is a pop song or rock. It's the last one I remember some one yodeling in.

Actually 3 things. Now Dunc, (and some of the rest of yuz) need to listen to what I said the other day because it seems you are wanting to listen to acoustic stuff. Johnathan McEuen and his son John playing Dan Fogelberg's old song "The Leader of the Band". It's a great song and they do a good job. LISTEN to it!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 02:41:02 CEST 2018 from (2001:49d0:8511:3:8d01:e69:de05:32ea)

Posted by:

ray mizumura

Location: Lawrence Kansas / flyover country / the heartland / 2008 NCAA Men's basketball champions University of Kansas

Subject: black Klansman

Peter -- Thank you for doing this review. I’ve been having a look at The Band guestbook again, too. Always a nice place to be–“oh, to be home again…” I wanted you to know that here at the University of Kansas, one of our top professors is Kevin Wilmott, a co-writer of the Lee film. He’s a superb director, too. Born and bred in Kansas–he’s still here, although I’m sure he has other opportunities. One day he's in Cannes, the next he's in Kansas.

Ron Stallworth visited the University of Kansas campus recently for some speaking and book signing activities.

Very nice to read you, Pat Brennan, Brown Eyed Girl, and all the fine Band people here. I may weigh in with a comment or two again soon...fair warning ;)


Entered at Fri Oct 12 02:20:49 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Thank you Norm, I'm glad to hear that.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 23:17:31 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Good and the Sad

That's good John. I'm going to remember that! I used a wrong word. It's never pathetic. Some times it's sad. There have been times when Susie gets upset with herself for forgetting. She is one of these people who worries a lot.

So I hold her and reassure her, she's ok. She gets all panic stricken that she is getting alzhiemers. I say no you are not! We are just getting a little old, hell I forget lots. I tried to just joke once. I said well if you get alzheimers you only need to own one movie then.....I just about got beat up for that remark.

I notice Joan is posting on face book with some of the old gang like Jan and Deborah.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 22:14:24 CEST 2018 from (129.97.124.28)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JQ: Glad you liked what you heard of Julian Fauth. You probably found this promo video for the "Everybody Ought to Treat a Stranger Right" album. The title song, which opens, has audible background vocal contributions from Terra Hazelton who BEG, Wittenstein and I (all at different tables) heard singing with Garth Hudson and Jeff Healey at Jeff's club many years ago, and from Julian's Electro-Fi label mate Harrison Kennedy, who'd been a member of the Chairmen of the Board in the '70s. (He sang lead on their second hit, "Chairman Of The Board").


Entered at Thu Oct 11 21:12:42 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Me

Thank you Beg for posting that link. It is actually 5 decades. Yikes!!!


Entered at Thu Oct 11 20:29:22 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Bandishly??? :-)

beg, I've been worried about Joan for quite a while now. I know her health was a problem and she was finding it harder and harder to post. I hope she's okay and at least is still able to read everything here.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 19:51:38 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: NORM

About forgetting. You'll love this one Norm.

In 1995 Ronnie Hawkins and I were travelling to Arkansas. He told me we would make a stopover ; just outside of Nashville and spend a couple of days with one of his old guitar players. OK OK I'm getting to the point now.

We were having lunch and the guitar player says something to his Mom that he mentioned to her the day before. The Mother replies with I forgot. Mother it was only yesterday I told you that. Here it comes. The Mother looks at his and says quietly, "I know son; but I've slept since then." We all laughed pretty hard. I use that line all the time now and get a snicker; or two.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 19:26:20 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:6:804::17)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: How I Won the War and Julian Fauth

PV - I’m really enjoying and learning from your film reviews. Oddly I know much less about that era than I know about the 30’s through film noir’s time into the early 50’s.

Bill M - Thanks loads for the intro to Julian Fauth. I’m just now going through his catalog and it seems right up my alley as far as my current tastes.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 18:47:37 CEST 2018 from (129.97.124.28)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Glad you posted about Bobbie Gentry, as it reminded me to post this link to a review of new documentary about the life of singer-songwriter Gene MacLellan. (Gentry to Glen Campbell to Anne Murray to "Snowbird", written by Gene.)

MacLellan is noteworthy for the GB crowd due to his early days as one of the three members of the Consuls (the others being Robbie Robertson and Peter Deremigis) who upon meeting pianist Scott Cushnie left the Consuls to form the Suedes in far-off 1959. And it was of course Cushnie who was first hired by Hawkins a few months later and who subsequently convinced Ronnie that Robbie would be fine choice to replace departed bassist James Evans.

The review doesn't mention Robbie, the Suedes or the Consuls, and it wouldn't surprise me if the film doesn't either. It certainly should, as Gene, who wrote, sang and played (once Robbie joined) rhythm guitar, was or felt pushed out in favour of bassist Pete Traynor and singer Johnny Rhythm (nee Rutter). Couldn't have help his self-worth.

I'll note that the 1970 hit version of MacLellan's other big song, "Put Your Hand In The Hand", was sung and played quite Bandishly by Ocean, whose album also included a cover of "The Stones I Throw".


Entered at Thu Oct 11 18:21:46 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bobbie Gentry

After several days of Bobbie Gentry's box set, I'm enjoying it more and more. The 2nd disc "The delta Sweete" is a particular pleasure - in that Big Boss Man, Parchman Farm, The Seventh Son and Tobacco Road were all from my garage band days, but never like this. The bonus tracks are also worth having for a change.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 18:07:48 CEST 2018 from (129.97.124.28)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Subject: trusting one's vehicle to know the way ...

Norm: Your little story reminds me of "I Hope My Pony Knows The Way Back Home" - see link. Note that this is not the Tom Waits song, but a song written by local guitarist Jay Danley and sung by Julian Fauth. Great song, magnificent album called "Everybody Ought to Treat a Stranger Right". In my books it's hard to go wrong with a Blind Willie Johnson reference.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 17:14:09 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:c87c:5d2a:39db:6c31)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks for comments Bill M and Peter...am smiling. I have an image of Mel Gibson riding in circles on a white horse, sword in the air, face painted in blue and white emulsion, rallying the troops to 'Fight for breakfast'.

Last five played reflect recent postings in GB.

Paul Simon 'You're The One' - forgot about it - this album will receive more plays. 'Darling Lorraine' is really only song I know well.

Steely Dan 'Two Against Nature'. Never knew about this album until Toppermost, but I think it is brilliant. In addition to the clever lyrics, great production, and I could listen to the music alone.

John Martyn 'Bless The Weather' always playing it. Danny Thompson has a big influence and Richard Thompson plays on it.

Family 'Music In A Doll's House' Love this album - exciting and innovative, great musicianship, making full use of the instruments band members could play, for example the violin parts, but the production could be better, I think something to do with balance.

'The Best of Booker T and the MGs' - finally got it and now have got three important instrumentals in the history of British music.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 17:13:21 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Getting Old!

It's some times pathetic........scarey, and pretty funny. At the breakfast table this morning.

Susan, "I have to leave on the 15th to go down island." (Her and her sister and their girl friend are going to their spa and get massages.). Me, "I know ya told me". Susan "Well.....when is my appointment with Andy?" Me "Who is Andy? what in hell are you talking about?" Susan "For putting my winter tires on!"

Jesus Christ, the man's name is Adam, Susan, I just told you yesterday. Your tires are in my truck. I'm taking them over to the shop this morning and your appointment is tomorrow at one o'clock. Seeing as today is the eleventh your appointment is the 12th, 3 days before you leave.

Susan "Well I can't remember time!" You also can't remember where yer going you get lost in a gawd damn parking lot! Do you even remember the way to Port Hardy? Susan..........Well....my car does. "Stop talking Susan, my head is starting to hurt!


Entered at Thu Oct 11 17:04:23 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

International Day Of The Girl!

Glad you are still posting Lisa. I have not heard from Joan in ages. We did chat while I was in NYC. I miss Serenity as well and all the other female posters as there is no balance in perspective and experiences anymore. Oh well. Happy Healthy International Day Of The Girl...All eye colours are equal. :-D


Entered at Thu Oct 11 16:47:58 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: How I Won The War

I was saving the "How I Won The War" retrospective film review (linked) because I remember so many lines clearly. At the time it was advertised as a John Lennon film, but it wasn't really!


Entered at Thu Oct 11 16:03:26 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

May be old news but I could not scroll back almost two years. Hope this post is ok but I lost your email so here goes.
For JD...Congrats on your retirement this past summer?

John Donabie spent four decades in Canadian radio as a Toronto disc jockey, show host, intervewer and talk show host. It was great to see your daughter and grandchild here as well as I have met your son. We were in line to see Levon and Richard Bell at the Horseshoe. You sure interviewed many of the greats. We are fortunate to have you posting here with all of your experience and stories to share from the music biz. And yes you give good voice. :-D Please say hello to your partner. It was a pleasure to meet her outside of Hugh's Room. We were all there for Levon's Tribute.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 15:59:29 CEST 2018 from (129.97.124.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I agree that Erma's is the better record by all rational measures, but there's something in the stumbling musicianship and give-it-a-whirl spirit in the Janis / Big Brother version that makes it more appealing to me.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 15:48:34 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Erma Franklin

As Erma released Piece of My Heart a year before Janis, It has always been my favourite. Also I think the definitive R&B version. It's interesting that Bert Berns wanted Van Morrison to record it; but he apparently declined.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 14:35:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Could be, Bill. I personally vastly prefer the Erma Franklin version. See John Simon on Janis practising screams.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 13:46:55 CEST 2018 from (2605:8d80:6c1:1226:108f:7d44:9483:2949)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I found in the olden days that Erma Franklin's "Piece Of My Heart" was raised and praised as an indirect criticism of the departed Janis. I'm not saying that was the case with John Simon, who seems likely to have heard all sorts of Brill Building productions like Erma on Shout in the course of his work in NY studios.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 11:12:17 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I didn't know ZZ Top were that big in the 70s - they're very much an 80s and 90s band in the UK (first hit was 1983). They broke through in the UK, but circa 73 to 76 I would have ignored them totally, much as I ignored The Allman Brothers and Lynrd Skynard (apart from "Brothers & Sisters"). I even found "Live at Filmore East" boring. But it makes me think of John Simon not having heard of Otis Redding - soul was way bigger here than hard rock. The early 70s to me is Marvin Gaye, Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Sly & The Family Stone etc, then Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff. OR singer / songwriters and country rock.

I'm around The Electric Flag point in John Simon's book, but noted that he expressed admiration for Erma Franklin's "Piece of My Heart" - odd that he knew that, but not Otis Redding! He has some wry observations on "Cheap Thrills", an album with an iconic sleeve design, easily the best thing about it. It's one framed on my walls.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 00:36:46 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:7057:e5fc:dfde:34ef)

Posted by:

Pat B

PV, as Barney Hoskyns and RR said--and as I recall of the July 76 outdoor date near Chicago--they weren't drawing that well on their own. ZZ Top meanwhile had huge albums in 73 and 75 (and a big radio hit with Tush) that kept them on the road starting in May of 76 through Dec of 77. Their stage setup for that tour was massive.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 22:57:10 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Otis, Tina & Ike

Peter thank you for responding. I guess my ears are still working; if your in agreement.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 20:43:14 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ry Cooder version

The other great instrumental version.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 19:32:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ike & Tina on TV

This is probably the original, then.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 19:14:46 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Everything's / I think / it's gonna work out fine/ all right

I purchased the Otis Rush on iTunes as soon as I’d heard a bit – beautiful playing, and it is indeed exactly the same song as It’s Gonna Work Out Fine by Ike & Tina Turner. A bit of Googling reveals that the Ike & Tina song was written by Rose Marie McCoy & Sylvia McKinney. McCoy was born in Arkansas in 1922, and wrote the song in 1961.

Otis Rush became known with “I Can’t Quit You” in 1956. He joined Vanguard Records in 1965, so if the recording is on Vanguard, it seems he was covering Ike and Tina’s million selling record on the Sue label. Who gets the writing credit, John D?

I loved the song and especially the Manfred Mann cover. A few years ago I saw Paul Jones duetting on it with P.P. Arnold.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 18:05:14 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

6:28....Robbie admits that FFFF hurt his feelings and then you will see a snippet of Levon in 1993....7:30 talking about Robbie with no FFFF insight.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:51:14 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band, Cate Brothers and ZZ Top Nashville, Tennessee State Fairgrounds, September 25, 1976. Hmmm...You then go to ZZ Top Concert Archives and tour is not listed.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:42:48 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sound A Likes Otis Rush & Ike & Tina Turner

OK. Yesterday I am listening to Otis Rush; from that incredible Vanguard Blues Album called, Chicago The Blues Today Vol. 02. I'm listening to an instrumental called, "Everything's Going To Turn Out Alright." As I listen, I'm saying to myself, I've heard this before; but as a vocal. Eventually it hits me. "It's Going To Work Out Fine" by Ike and Tina Turner sounds exactly like Otis Rush's instrumental.

I'm hoping someone else can A-B these two pieces of music. I'm sure you'll agree they sound the same. Thanks for your time.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:40:47 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bill M is somewhere here with Robbie 2016.
"In celebration of his highly anticipated memoir Testimony, legendary songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson joins George Stroumboulopoulos for a unique onstage conversation about his life, music, and artistic influences both with The Band and as a solo artist, as well as his collaborations with award-winning musicians and filmmakers such as Ronnie Hawkins, Bob Dylan, and Martin Scorsese."


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:25:04 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Jan H. I found the magical door after all.
Here is Robbie, his good pal Heather Reisman and somewhere is brown eyed girl March 29, 2011.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 11:21:52 CEST 2018 from (1.43.129.8)

Posted by:

Wallsend

According setlist.fm there was also a show at the Paramount Theatre in Oakland on October 3.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 10:59:58 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Band opening for ZZ Top in 1976? It's hard to believe how their management mishandled the billing status stuff - most obviously where after the Before The Flood tour, the one with the most requests for tickets ever, they went out as support act to CSNY. By the time they get to Wembley a few months after Before The Flood, they were THIRD on the bill after CSNY and Joni Mitchell. OK, I know that Before The Flood was "BOB DYLAN & THE BAND" rather than "THE BAND" but the art of rock management is making sure your acts get the billing / status they deserve. And then pushing a bit more too.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 04:29:50 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:dd7e:68d7:f7be:181b)

Posted by:

Pat B

Well, we all used to think that the Band's last show as the Band before TLW was the Syria Mosque on September 21, 1976. I've been communicating with Daryl Sanders who authored the great new book on the making of Blonde On Blonde, and he mentioned he saw the Band open for ZZ Top in Nashville on September 25. His info checks out on a ZZ Top website. Interesting tidbit.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 22:17:35 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I really enjoyed Reckless Daughter Portrait of Joni Mitchell...David Yaffe. I also couldn't put down Heaven and Hell My Life In The Eagles (1974-2001)...Don Felder. I was really disappointed that The Eagles did not want him in the band in 2013 when I finally was able to see them perform. I am now reading Born To Run...Bruce Springsteen.

Joni Mitchell’s Openhearted Heroism
She made the best music of her generation by falling in love, over and over, while defending her sense of self.

By Dan Chiasson

Last 5 while on my way to free yoga class.
Maggie May...Rod the Mod...I saw him perform during Across The Atlantic tour in 1979. All I remember is that I was dumped right after the Concert. He was the only one I knew who saw The Band with Dylan in 1974. Timing is everything, isn't it?
The Pan Within Live...The Waterboys...copied from brother's CD.
Pardon...Robert Cray...Everytime I hear this song I see myself playing blues guitar with many cool licks while Levon is playing drums. Yes I have a great imagination!
Let's Do It Again...The Staple Singers...I feel blessed that I saw all of them at Harbourfront for free! Two other times I saw Mavis solo. Love her as many do!
Caravan...Van and The Band!


Entered at Tue Oct 9 20:28:55 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:dd7e:68d7:f7be:181b)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

"That Thin Wild Mercury Sound" by Daryl Sanders on the making of Blonde On Blonde is another must read. Tremendous insight into the NY and (especially) the Nashville sessions. A lot of must-read's lately.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 19:16:30 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vote for Breakfast

I can see the Scottish people declining to vote for breakfast, if the choice is only porridge with salt on.

Now if the offer was avocado on sourdough with poached eggs, fresh tomato salsa and some pancetta they might get a "yes" vote.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 19:14:09 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: BlacKkKlansman

Review of Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman linked. What a film! What a soundtrack too!


Entered at Tue Oct 9 17:43:43 CEST 2018 from (2605:8d80:6a4:e692:1c6b:e20f:b006:ddb7)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: A silly slip by Blackford, but Brexit does sound like a fast-acting high-fibre breakfast cereal.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 15:54:25 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:c02e:edd5:1f6d:64d4)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Pissing with laughter

For Roger and Peter, others scroll past.

The portly, - I'll have a pudding - leader of the SNP - Ian Blackford, hypocritical in that he holds down second jobs, in addition to his role of MP, said at the SNP conference yesterday, after building up to a climax in his speech, 'The Scottish people did not vote for breakfast'...instead of Brexit.

Second time he has done it. Last time in the Commons a Tory replied, 'You haven't lost out on breakfast.'

Tears still rolling down my cheeks.

I nearly wrote 'Daniel Lorraine' in the previous post.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 15:35:28 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:c02e:edd5:1f6d:64d4)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: In The Blue Light

I'm really enjoying the new Paul Simon. If I was being honest, of the ten songs on it, only one would have been in my Toppermost.

In addition to 'One Man's Ceiling', I really enjoy 'Rene and Georgette Magritte with Their Dog After The War' and think 'Darling Lorraine' is a really good song.

I think Paul is wanting us to relook at some of his work again. I got into 'Hearts and Bones' because of Peter's praise for 'Rene and Georgette', but more importantly because of Roger, if I remember correctly(Hi Roger), saying it was his favourite Paul Simon album. I thought let's complete the Paul Simon collection. I also loved a huge Rene Magritte exhibition in Edinburgh, a city I love. I really like this album.

But four songs on the album come from 'You're The One', which I bought to be complete, but I've neglected this album. I'm returning to this album and really enjoying it.

I think the production of this album is really good. But I'm not an expert on production. I was skating on thin ice when I made those 'knowledgeable' statements on production when arguing with Peter last week. When a producer gets to the best six takes when recording, I wouldn't have a clue which one to select, although I can recognise turkeys.

There are only ten tracks, which I like, because less is more. I wouldn't have liked a set of out takes added on at the end.

So I think this album is a beautiful and different production of songs Paul feels his public has neglected.

Than you, Peter,for your regular reviews.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 04:43:46 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those who missed it the first time. Here is Robbie and Aaron Neville's cover of "Crazy Love" from the film Phenomenon.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 04:22:38 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Bill M...Gobble gobble. We never have turkey. My brother is a sommelier and gourmet cook so dinner is usually at his place. Music at his home was ethnic or dance....lol....At one point I was shocked whenI heard Sarah Mclaughlin. We do however have in common, Mink Deville, The Waterboys, Bob Marley. He is also the one who introduced me to Louuu and west coast US bands, etc.

Main article: Interracial marriage in the United States (Bob Marley always said that there is only one race...The human race.)
I was sloppy Bill M. It was in 1967 that ALL States honoured interracial marriages. This is why it was huge at Monterey to have an audience that was not only white or black. I had on VHS these concerts and as soon as Otis Redding got on stage he said to the audience, "This is the love crowd, right? We all love each other don't we?"

"U.S States, by the date of repeal of anti-miscegenation laws:
No laws passed
Repealed before 1887
Repealed between 1948 and 1967
Overturned on 12 June 1967

Interracial marriage in the United States has been fully legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 Supreme Court decision that deemed anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional, with many states choosing to legalize interracial marriage at much earlier dates."


Entered at Tue Oct 9 03:25:23 CEST 2018 from (76.66.110.162)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for mentioning the Neville / Robertson "Crazy Love". Never been a Neville fan, but Robbie's guitar is magical, as you. Two switch topics, I can't imagine that interracial marriage was illegal all across the US until the 1960s - though I can see it being against the law in certain places. Maybe Wikipedia's wrong, but it has Barack Obama's parents marrying in the US in 1961. Trump would no doubt have gone to town on that if it hadn't been perfectly legit.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 17:09:51 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Talking of Monterey Pop, John Simon says in the book that he'd never heard of Otis Redding until that point. Hard to believe. Otis was huge in Europe.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 16:49:28 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

haso... :-D

Last Five via songs copied from CDS and/or downloads.
I Heard It Through The Grapevine...Gladys Knight And The Pips...Saw them at Ontario Place for 7.00?
Crazy Love...Robbie and Aaron Neville...Special duo covering another fave writer Van the Man. Robbie's guitar work is otherworldly and Aaron's angelic voice never disappoints.
The American In Me...Steve Forbert...Always comforting voice. I told him so when I met him at Hugh's Room. Knockin' On Heaven's Door (Reggae Version Unknown Artist)...Maybe I taped this from the radio while in Montego Bay in Jamaica as we were staying with family of my friends.
San Francisco...Scott McKenzie...Monterey Pop Festival Sunday June 18/67. Apparently Otis and others at this Summer Of Love Concert were performing for a "mixed" audience. It wasn't even until around this time that it was legal to marry in the States if you were in an interracial relationship.

Happy Healthy Thanksgiving...Give Thanks And Praises


Entered at Mon Oct 8 11:33:40 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Weekend listening

Two odd ones. I found them secondhand, and listened through on vinyl and copied them for two astrologer friends.

John Dankworth - Zodiac Variations

Nat Adderly, Nick Holmes, Cannonball Adderly - Soul Zodiac.

The second is largely portentous and pretentious, but the John Dankworth has some really good moments, though he insisted that for each named track, the soloist (all jazz greats) had to be the right star sign.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 11:30:20 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rollin' Down The Road

On amazon print on demand, I'll relink Rolling Down The Road which Dunc so kindly mentioned. There are three sample stories on there. You can find it on amazon.com and amazon.co.uk - probably everywhere. As I said, the local printing for each area really brings down costs. If you get to your local amazon, you should be able to look inside which shows the Velum layout system. There are about ten styles you can choose from when you proof them up for amazon.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 11:27:14 CEST 2018 from (31.52.144.143)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Still a very rainy Scotland

Subject: Keeping Up

I have heard perhaps not listened to the following music over the weekend, through the vehicle of grandchildren - two teenagers and a five year old.

Magic - Rude'. I enjoy this song and really enjoy the brilliant guitar solo.

Calvin Harris, Dua Lipa 'One Kiss' - 378 million hits on Youtube. You can understand why Roses chocolates advertise before this song is played and why newspapers' advertising revenues are dowm.

My five year old grandson is constantly singing 'Shut Up and Dance with Me' by Walk The Moon. He flosses to it. Only 294 million hits on Youtube.

Music is alive and well.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 10:50:58 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:d03c:b4a5:7279:ee59)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: A very rainy Scotland

Danny Thompson plays a significant part in my musical life, JQ. Check out the Transatlantic Sessions on Youtube, if you are not familiar with them.

I had never heard of 'The Bunch' before. That's a must for me. The Dundee Horns, Sandy Denny and a host of others I like on the same album. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 09:35:55 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Simon via amazon

Because I use them too, I can tell from the paper and binding that the book is amazon print on demand. They now do this locally in a number of locations which reduces postage, plus amazon have their own system. As an author, you earn far more per copy from amazon than you would from a conventional publisher. I can buy also copies in bulk from amazon and sell them from my own site or via a bookstore, but actually it's not worth it. They can mail them (and package them) much more cheaply than I can, and the printing charge is the same either way. If you wanted to invest in over 1000 copies from a conventional printer, you'd get them cheaper per copy, but the amazon system really is the best of both worlds for the author with a small production run, especially if it's international in appeal.

I've done it both ways, and unless you want to spend lots of time standing in line at the post office, OR pay someone else 20% to warehouse and distribute and mail, amazon print on demand is the way to go. This year, one amazon print on demand book has been shortlisted for a major literary prize, so I'm told.

I don't know what software John used to submit it to amazon, but his paragraphing is a bit odd, with some indented for no reason. If you are planning on writing one yourself, fiction or non-fiction, there's a programme called Vellum which does the layout for you. Three of my seven books have been re-done using Vellum. It's much more elegant than using WORD files, which I did originally. You can either pay Vellum one book at a time, or buy unlimited use.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 07:36:31 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I went to what I thought was his website and tried to order the book, but just kept being sent back to the home page when I tried to place the order. I ended up having to use Amazon, though I would rather have bought it directly from his site.

Anyway, sounds good!


Entered at Mon Oct 8 04:01:32 CEST 2018 from (2601:188:c300:cbc6:c037:9573:f4e6:576)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: J. Simon

Peter: is there any other info on your copy of John's memoir about imprint? Do we have any other choice other than A-zon? I e-mailed him from his website about the book and another question, but don't believe I've had any response. His website does appear to be quite inactive. Other than Garth writing, I've thought that J. Simon would be as interesting as anybody.

So nice to read your "bylines" again, Angelina.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 21:44:06 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:fdf2:f0b4:71ad:99d6)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, her name is Marilyn Crispell. The first vid I found of her on Youtube is a duo performance with Howard Johnson at the Woodstock Jazz Festival in the early 80's.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 20:01:29 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:fdf2:f0b4:71ad:99d6)

Posted by:

Pat B

PV, yes I was struck by the eclectic experiences Simon had in the business. It certainly adds context to his work with the boys.

So I'm reading a book on a really outside, intellectual, free jazz musician I used to listen to a long time ago named Anthony Braxton. Really weird music. The book has a series of interviews he did along with a description of a two week English tour in 1985. The author also interviews the accompanying female pianist who is a Cecil Taylor acolyte (another outside player) and asks her where she lives. She says Woodstock NY. The author asks if she knows The Band. She says yes, she has played with Richard Manuel. Both the author and she love the Band. Strange but heartening.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 17:51:48 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Richard Thompson - Austin City Limits

This has been my favorite of RT’s since it came out in the aughts. He really doesn’t need a studio production to strut his stuff, with Danny Thompson & Michael Jerome, both brilliant here too.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 13:02:58 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Simon

Highly recommended … I haven't even got to The Band yet, but it's very enjoyable and insightful into music. I love the description of recording Broadway play soundtracks. Like George Martin, he had a thorough grounding in the "non-rock" side of recording first. I'd say a must-read. It looks self-published via amazon, as are my novels and he's holding a very low price for print copies (I know how much Amazon takes for the page length).

On production, the obituaries of Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick have been interesting too. Dunc mentioned his influence the other day.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 23:37:16 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: If you knew Peggy Sue

The woman who inspired the song Peggy Sue has died at the age of 78.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 20:56:32 CEST 2018 from (2001:700:a00:ff62::6)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Whizz

When I was a teenager in the '70s here in Norway, central stimulants (amphetamine/phenmetrazine, or "high-school fat-girl diet pills" as Richard Manuel called them) were still available without prescription (or under the counter) at pharmacies in Southern Europe. This was when charter trips to Spain started taking off here in Scandinavia, so we had a steady inflow of the stuff, in particular the Spanish Bustaid pills that were immensely popular among speed-freaks. I've been told. This is the same stuff that fueled the Beatles in their early Hamburg days.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 16:24:17 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Pattie Boyd chats to Ronnie Wood about her photographs of The Beatles in India. They also talk about The Band, and going to The Last Waltz - where Ronnie was pulled from the audience to perform on stage for the finale."

Hi Dunc. I have been walking' about and listening to songs on my Nano in shuffle mode. I like being surprised as various genres pop up. Here are the last 5.

Rain Over Me Featuring Marc Anthony...Pitbull...Especially invigorating while taking a cab ride in Habana.
Stir It Up...Dianna King...Cool Runnings Soundtrack. Our Canadian John Candy was in film.
Cloudbusting...Kate Bush...Where are you?
I'm Scared...Canadian Burton Cummings...My mother enjoyed his greatest hits so I gave her the CD.
Wagon Wheel...Darius Rucker


Entered at Sat Oct 6 15:38:01 CEST 2018 from (71.179.2.109)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia MD

Subject: Band reference

Sometimes you get surprised by a Band reference from what seems like out of nowhere. Two recent ones:

1. David Letterman's Netflix show with Jay-Z had an extended tangent on Shangri-La. [I may have posted this before.]

2. And just yesterday on the recent Netflix offering, "Norm Macdonald Has a Show" he interviewed Jane Fonda who talked about JRR and Levon. Seems she had a bit of a crush on Levon, but Robbie did not hold a candle to Tony Curtis. I nearly fell off my elliptical when this appeared on the teevee. Episode 5 has the content referred to above.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 13:28:06 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:785c:f6eb:d6f9:d5aa)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Jed, Bill M and Glenn.

The Tom Petty collection looks interesting, Glenn, but I don't know him well. I bought a double cd of his work back in the day because of the Traveling Wilburys and I really enjoy it.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 13:11:12 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:785c:f6eb:d6f9:d5aa)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: between footballs

Subject: Richard Thompson

I've been playing the Richard Thompson Acoustic Classics a lot, JQ.

I have the early classic Fairport Convention albums, but followed Sandy Denny when she went solo and lost touch with Fairport and Richard. This could maybe be explained by a lot of great similar type Scottish bands at the time.

After a Summer discussion on Richard Thompson on here, Peter (thanks) kindly sent me examples of his work. I loved it.

At the same time I noticed that the leading acoustic guitarist, Tony McManus holds acoustic guitar teaching weekends with Richard Thompson.

So I bought 'Acoustic Classics' by Richard Thompson a couple of weeks back. I absolutely love this album.

The songs are well crafted, full of imagery and thought, manifesting in great lyrics. I like his singing, Peter, but I didn't realise how outstanding a guitar player he was. I think as JQ was alluding to, this is a brilliant guitar album.

So I strongly recommend this album. It's a must have.

Then a coincidence. There is a great song on the album, 'Beeswing' where the writer meets a wild girl in the 'steamie in Cauldrum Street' in the sixties. The steamie is a public washhouse. I thought surely not the public washhouse I know in my home town. I've been in the pub in Caldrum Street several times. I googled and it is this steamie the song refers too. Another London Scot using his knowledge of Scotland.

Brilliant album. Buy it.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 10:48:57 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On German autobahn service stations they used to have slot machines with "Stay awake" tablets for long distance drivers circa 1970. People said they were just high doses of glucose but I've eaten bars of chocolate to keep awake, and these were something else altogether. No wonder Germans drove so extremely fast.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 10:45:26 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill's Cowsills example reminds me of another aspect. Often it’s “joining the family business” and even successful bands are a “small’ business in number of people involved. I’m thinking of Rick Nelson, The Everly Brothers, Liza Minelli, Shuggie Otis, Roseanne Cash … even, I guess, Michael Jackson joined an ongoing business as did Little Jimmy Osmond. That’s a bit like the corner grocery store where you know they’ll employ their kids before anyone else and we think nothing of it. There’s only a job vacancy if the kids don’t want to do it.

In some ways kids can revitalize the business … Shuggie Otis gave a massive lift to the Johnny Otis Show when I saw them in the early 70s, as did Michael Jackson to his brothers. The last Glen Campbell tour was with his kids backing him, but then no one else could have given him the care and attention in his condition. Amy Helm I believe had a major role in Levon doing Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt.

Then there’s just wonderful family combinations. Eliza Carthy and her mother, Norma Waterson, springs to mind. I’m not sure which direction the nepotism would be on that one.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 03:57:40 CEST 2018 from (76.66.110.162)

Posted by:

Bill M

You have to remember that nepotism can sometimes stab you in the back. Consider the Cowsill brothers - having a fine old time in a regular just-guys group, but then finding themselves saddled with their mother AND their little sister. Yeesh!


Entered at Fri Oct 5 23:48:31 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bennies and other addatives

You are right JQ. Benzadrine began in about the 1930's. Doctors started using then for different applications and one of the things they noticed right away is when patients were lethargic they used them to "perk them up".

I remember reading a book on Johnny Cash many years ago. Due to his work load he started in using them (just like truck drivers) to keep him awake. He got hooked into uppers so bad there were times when he needed sleep and had time he couldn't. He would go out in his jeep and just drive and drive, then get out and walk in the desert trying to stop buzzing.

It was long ago that long haul truckers started out with them. An example of how the truckers were is displayed in the movie "Hofa" with Jack Nicholson and Danny DeVito. Nicholson showed one time how Danny DeVito had his fingers all burned and scarred from holding a cigarette between his fingers to wake himself up when he was falling asleep. Very bad stuff those little pills.

I had friends who got heavy into coke. It wasn't to stay awake they got themselves all jacked up. Then thought they were really playing great music and they were gawd awful! I hate all that shit.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 23:12:15 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bennie & The Jets

In the UK the "Mods" pills as in Quadrophenia were called "French blues" but I suspect they were the same as the "whites" Lowell George was writing about, which are the same as Elton John was also noting.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 22:33:52 CEST 2018 from (222.152.72.191)

Posted by:

Rod

I love seatrains version of willin . Maybe it doesn't reflect the mood of the lyrics but there awesome performances and a great groove


Entered at Fri Oct 5 22:07:38 CEST 2018 from (2600:1017:b82e:2cb3:1419:79f3:81a0:1cc8)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dunc

My comment was about musical nepotism not nepotism in general. You still may disagree but I felt the need to clarify. Thanks for your thoughts-I enjoyed reading your entire post.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 21:10:46 CEST 2018 from (98.6.21.229)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Friday 5

I've been enjoying the Tom Petty: An American Treasure 4-cd set (nicely done box of alternate takes, live tracks, deep cuts); The Band: Islands; Gram Parsons: Anthology / Sacred Hearts & Fallen Angels (great, great stuff); Neil Young: Live at Massey Hall 1971 (a treat to hear these solo, acoustic versions); and Steve Winwood: Greatest Hits Live (disc 2).

Thanks to all for recent discussions. See - we can discuss and debate without getting nasty & personal! Keep it up, and keep it clean! Have a great weekend all.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 20:26:05 CEST 2018 from (2605:8d80:6a1:2ab0:e0ce:ad2d:983b:13a9)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for your note alluding to Seatrain drummer Larry Atamanuik being a Hawkins alumnus. As a matter of fack, if the computer hadn't eaten my first attempt to post the Bunch track, I would have pointed out the Hawks link last night. Plus I would have noted that in between, Larry was in the original lineup of Crowbar, who I'd mentioned the day before in relation to the group's cover of "Hey Baby". Not only that, for Dunc's edification I would have noted the title-wise similarity of my favourite Seatrain track, "Marblehead Messenger" to my favourite Mountain track, "Nantucket Sleighride".


Entered at Fri Oct 5 19:47:26 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Whites

The whites where I was were small white pills with a scored cross; we also called them crossed whites. Some people used them continuously, others when they could find them or for a specific purpose like a long car trip or all night studying. I think they were Benzedrine and, unlike meth, I don’t believe they were home made. The arrival of cocaine in the early 70’s seemed to reduce the party popularity of whites. I think it was around the same time Valium replaced reds/barbiturates. Of course this is only what I’ve read..


Entered at Fri Oct 5 19:25:49 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:a575:7edd:1426:3d2b)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Welcome

Welcome Wynndixie. Experts on this site will willingly answer your questions.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 18:57:57 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My Friday five:

Chickasaw County Girl: Bobbie Gentry – Disc Six

Chickasaw County Girl: Bobbie Gentry – Disc Seven

Bigger – Sugarland

Blood Red Roses – Rod Stewart

Dancing Queen – Cher


Entered at Fri Oct 5 18:54:59 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I realize Teddy Thompson is not in Richard's league on guitar, but live he has that "propulsive acoustic rhythm guitar" knack that The Everlys and John Lennon had.I still think he benefits greatly from not having Richard's mannered accent, which irritates me. Of course, Richard has often sat in on guitar on his records.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 18:51:48 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Weed, whites and wine … Norm, I assumed whites were "the truckers friend" i.e. speed, so the cranked up version makes equal sense and is more likely to be what a long distance trucker would get by on than the "downer paced" second Little Feat version? As ever, it's often what you hear first, and for many, Seatrain was the first version they heard. The Johnny Darrell was too obscure and the (first) Little Feat version was later. Also a very nice bass guitar sound. As Bill will tell you, the drummer was another Ronnie Hawkins band member.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:51:30 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Seatrain - Willin

Peter I just gave that another listen and disliked it even more! That constant wah sound is impossible for me to listen to. I don't think those people even get what that song is. The tiredness of the road. Like Merle Haggard's "White Line Fever" (and that is the white line on the road) not what you villan's are thinking. That isn't a song that can be revved up like that.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:46:15 CEST 2018 from (76.66.111.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

I don't recall anyone talking about recording engineer Geoff Emerick's contributions to the sound of the Beatles on most of their classic albums, and now he has passed - see link.

FWiW, I've been mulling things over and concluded that "Across The Universe" is my favourite Beatles song.

Oh yes, can any of you think what Goose Creek Symphony number - a cover, it seems to me - would have received a lot of FM-radio play in the early '70s? I was thinking it might have been "Willin'", but it seems not.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:33:34 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Teddy Thompson & recents

I’m a real fan of Teddy Thompson too. His singing range is limited but fine for the great songs he writes. PV - TT’s guitar chops are ok but rudimentary compared to his Pa. Dunc wrote he was listening to Richard’s Solo Acoustic album; I think if you give that a listen you’ll hear an incrediblely accomplished player.

Recents:

- The Essential Otis Rush

- Liam Clancy - The Dutchman - He’s such a great singer

- Rolling Stones - December’s Children - Fun nostalgia from a garden variety cover band, at that point at least.

- Commander Cody - Live in Austin 1974 - Heavy twang from Telecaster master Bill Kirchen

- Chris Smither - Train Home - He’s a good writer, clever too.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 16:21:38 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:c4aa:d000:9276:47ec)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks, Peter. I agree with a lot of the last post, but nepotism is wrong. Did not know about the last part related to the theatre. I reread 'Nation Shall Speak Unto Nation' recently and nearly mentioned it in my post. Maybe one day we 'll get that drink.

For other GBers 'Rolling Down The Road' is an excellent book by Peter, and the short stories stand alone, if you haven't read his other books. It is an excellent collection of stories. My favourite story is 'The Record Collector', which deserves published in Mojo or some other related magazine. Brilliant. And when I read 'The Folk Singer', I always think of Davey Graham, although he wasn't a folk singer. Buy it GBers.

Thanks, Jed, but I can't agree. Before I retired, a part of my job was to interview candidates for posts in schools throughout my local authority area. It was imperative that the interviews were fair and my job to ensure they were fair.

Thanks BEG. Nice to hear from you. Playing your own compilations nowadays on the MP3?

Nice to hear from you, Bob F. As we say in Scotland, stop spitting the dummies out the pram and come back and post. I'm playing the excellent 'Willow Springs' just now. It is a great album with great songs, great guitar, great musicianship and isn't the production great. And I've been playing the Waterboys on YouTube. I was playing Roseann last week, still love the last EP. Buy it folks if you don't have it. I actually wondered if money was plentiful, what one of our wonderful producers would do with the tracks on the EP. Get back here. Look how Peter and I have had an argument without falling out (Twinkle in my eye).

Away for a nap. I've been pumping weights this morning and enjoying (?) our new music as it shouts out the speakers and am babysitting tonight. But my next post is going to be very positive.

Thanks fellow GBers. I enjoy your posts.



Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:51:50 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Uncovered "Covers"

Thanks for that Bill! I much enjoyed it. We seem to be on a trail of "Uncovered Covers". I'm sure many know Dan Fogelberg's beautiful song "The Leader of the Band." Well there is a youtube vid. of Johnathan McEuen of the Dirt Band, (he is playing mandolin) beside him his son John. Young John sings Leader of the Band. He does a pretty fine job. Got to be a great feeling for the old man. I know, I've stood with my son Craig playing beside me.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 14:42:55 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Swimmer

I've linked the latest in my series of retrospective views of late 60s movies. This time Burt Lancaster in "The Swimmer" from 1968. These old movies are getting a surprising number of views, hence the link. Do comment over there if you want.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 12:44:24 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It's a family affair …

Dunc, we need to do this over a drink, but … See my BBC Interview story- it really was true until very recently, I agree. As I said, Mrs V found herself at a major drama audition “weekend” the only one with no connections. But that doesn’t mean those benefitting are not talented.

Nepotism isn’t an upper-middle class preserve– try getting a job as a Docker or Steel Worker via Trades Unions in the past (my uncles got jobs in the steel works because of their dad working there). That was true of Trades Unions in many countries. I would think Giles Martin said that with a self-deprecating smile on his face.

On the three I listed first, I’ve seen every Wainwright on stage at different times and Teddy Thompson. Rufus is a better singer and writer than either his dad or mum. Equally, Teddy Thompson has his dad’s guitar playing ability plus his mum’s singing ability … so he’s a better singer than Richard, and he’s a first rate songwriter too. Amy is a great singer and player. They’re all three as good as you get.

Actors I listed certainly got that first rung through connections, but British theatre is so incredibly competitive and so over-subscribed with talent, that the second rung has to be ability. If I look back at Royal Shakespeare or National Theatre reviews from five years ago, I won’t have seen 80% of the cast again since. If you’re as good as Phyllis Logan, who I saw just a few weeks ago in the play “Switzerland” - the second time I’ve seen her in two years – you will get there whatever.

Yes, we have a generation of privately-educated (even Etonian) stars in their thirties and forties, but if you look at the twenties age group, young white actors are disadvantaged because of heavy ethnic positive discrimination. Many theatres cast at Central London levels of balance (38% from ethnic groups) which are dramatically higher than the country as a whole. This is also true of drama schools admissions. Universities now ask for a lower admission grades from applicants from “poorer postcodes” to try and level the playing field.

With The Beatles, Dylan, and The Band, there’s also the huge matter of trust. Every time the Beatles archive tapes got dusted off, stuff leaked out. The same happened with the extended Basement Tapes at least twice, and listen to the Woodstock boot – that was not recorded in a field. That’s soundboard. I guess they need an extremely tight circle of trust, and that means “family” – and listening to Paul, I’m sure that circle of trust includes Giles Martin.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 12:45:30 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Whether or not it’s nepotism is not the point. All that counts-is it good?! If it’s good then who does it is irrelevant.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 11:30:39 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:c1c1:91f:8fe7:1848)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Nepotism runs in families

I couldn't disagree with you more, Peter.

From a Guardian interview before Las Vegas opened, Giles Martin said, 'Nepotism should be alive and well in the music industry - and I'm trying to support it.' "You could argue that I've got the job because I'm George Martin's son, which is absolutely true, it really is. I'm being absolutely honest about it. But I'm proud of the job I've done."

I think the Seatrain version spoils a good song, not a great song. Seatrain are at best mediocre. I don't see how you can't see that. When does the Seatrain Las Vegas show open?

As for the list of artists you mention, who have famous fathers, I think many of them are just average...just, and wouldn't have got there if it wasn't for their fathers.

And I have no doubt that those actors got the breaks because of their parental connections. You are missing the glaring argument. The big debate in British acting is that because of austerity, actors are all coming from one class. How does a British working class actor get to the top now. The ones I have lived near are Brian Cox and Phyllis Logan...would they make it now?

John D - Sebastian getting the job because of his father is absolute nepotism. Glaring nepotism. I never bought it. So Giles Martin got the job because some of his old man's work rubbed off on him. Pathetic argument.

Now John, I don't know if you keep up with British broadcasting. One of the big radio jobs, Radio 2, is going to Zowie Ball. The present incumbent is paid 1.5 million pounds and has left because his salary has been disclosed. I find her tedious, but she got her start because her father was a mediocre children's presenter.

Class and nepotism are very much alive and well in the UK. We still have a section of the House of Lords, where Lords inherit their seats. Ridiculous.

The Beatles are about the Beatles, not George Martin, and certainly not Giles Martin.

Read the John Lennon letters.

The UK is a centre of excellence for record production from the sound engineering courses at universities to the end products. I listen to the music my seventeen year old granddaughters play in different genres and some of it is really excellent. There are many capable producers in the UK.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 09:44:59 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last year my local record store bought in someone’s Allen Toussaint collection. All the albums, lots of producer sessions. My favourite find was Phew! By Claudia Lennear. Side one is rock, with Ry Cooder backing. Side two is soul with great Allen Toussaint songs and production. The song I finish my exercise session with most days is Shoo-Rah-Shoo-Rah, by Betty Wright (written and produced by Allen Toussaint). When Levon said how well Levon & The Hawks could play Lee Dorsey, that really meant meant Allen Toussaint.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 09:36:31 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Willin’ sits with The Weight and Proud Mary – if you hear a bar band do a reasonable version of any of them, you’re delighted. Any bar band that plays all three will go down well.

The Bunch – a great album. For Dunc, the Dundee Horns play on some tracks.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 06:11:20 CEST 2018 from (76.66.111.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

I get what Norm's saying about some of the version of "Willin'" - the singers seem too peppy in light of the lyrics. If lack of pep is the only criterion, then Gene Parsons and the Byrds win hands-down. And if you give it a handicap because it's an unfinished demo, then it might even win no matter what other criteria are thrown in. But overall I'm with Mrs V - Seatrain, and to tell you the truth, it's mainly because of the zip. For me, the Lowell George versions just drag and drag.

Norm: Apparently you don't care so much for the Ronstadt version for much the same reason I don't care for her cover of "When Will I Be Loved". Have you heard the stunning, and truly sad-sounding version by Sandy Denny and Linda about-to-be Thompson on the "Bunch" album? It's linked here.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 04:41:41 CEST 2018 from (108.36.226.127)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: nepotism or what's in a name...

Nicholas Cage nee Nicholas Coppola. Changed his name to avoid getting special treatment due to his famous uncle (and later cousin?).


Entered at Fri Oct 5 03:53:47 CEST 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:78aa:f027:9d7e:4b26)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Norm

What time on Monday? I'm in Cordova Bay right now. About an hour away.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 02:49:38 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bonk

What de hell are you doing now? Where are you? I am coming down to Chemainus on Monday for a little business. How far way are you?


Entered at Fri Oct 5 01:34:22 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bonk

Bonk you can find it on Amazon.ca I got the Kindle edition.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 23:47:47 CEST 2018 from (2604:6000:e903:ea00:80a:d941:b00d:daa5)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

I ordered mine from Amazon.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 23:43:31 CEST 2018 from (2001:569:be12:5700:78aa:f027:9d7e:4b26)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: John Simon

Where do I find John's book. I've looked everywhere.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 23:29:02 CEST 2018 from (2604:6000:e903:ea00:690c:e32e:f7dc:ea17)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: John Simon - MFBP

I wonder what John Simon thinks of the remix. I am ambivalent about it. Some tracks seem to benefit from it and others I don't see the point other than increased volume (67 year old ears may be the culprit here, though).

Just finished John Simon"s book and enjoyed it quite a bit. His honesty about only writing about what he remembers and not inventing a story line was quite refreshing to me.

No mention of Stage Fright, which surprised me a bit. As a big Gil Evans fan, I did enjoy his stories about him.

I thought he was very fair about his representation of the strengths of each member of The Band.

For those not familiar with his records, I commend to you his first album, Journey (my favorite) and Harmony Farm. Still in heavy rotation at my house.

One last comment: John Simon and Allen Toussaint were the two producers whose records they produced, I would buy just on their names alone. Very few clinkers in that lot.

joe


Entered at Thu Oct 4 23:03:35 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Levon could have had a whole separate career as an actor. Totally natural.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 20:24:11 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Speaking of talent, innate or inherited, Sissy Spacek recently gave an interview where she talked about her various roles. This is what she had to say about playing Loretta Lynn:

"Her daddy was played by Levon Helm, one of the great, great musicians. He had never acted before and he was unbelievable! It was just, he was stunning!"

I also remember reading somewhere that when she first saw Levon in character, Loretta Lynn burst into tears, he was so like her dad.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 19:04:52 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D: Absolutely agree on the superior quality of Sebastian's work on those discs. I'd also like to have heard him do MFBP based on that production. If you have the interest, stuff must rub off on you from your family - as well as musical talent does seem to run in the blood.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:48:02 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Agreeing with Peter

Dunc. In your comments about Giles Martin and nepotism. Does that mean that letting Sebastian Robertson produce discs 3-4 of The Academy of Music mean the same thing; because Robbie is his Dad?

I'll be honest when the news came out that Sebastian was producing disc 3-4 I thought that perhaps this was indeed nepotism; because I had never heard of Sebastian producing anything at all.

Then I bought the package. It is my belief that Sebastian's production and mixes of those two disc were far superior. Sebastian proved himself. I'd like to see him take on more Band Classic albums; as Giles is doing now. Sorry I think when you sit beside a music genius like George Martin, a little has to rub off. I've interviewed Giles twice and he is one intelligent and masterful producer. Just my opinion. I wish Sebastian had something to do with MFSB at 50. Clearmountain's is just a little too brittle & perfect for me. That said, time to read to John Simon's book.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:39:53 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Beggars

I was surprised as well,Peter,thinking there might be bonus tracks or some sound alteration. Just more of the same-must have a great booklet!


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:32:13 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Warning

I'm suddenly getting a warning; when opening this site that it is not secure. Anyone else getting this warning?


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:36:44 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Is there no end?

Just received an ad for the "Beggar's Banquet" box set. Nothing much at all- original vinyl, plus a 12" one-sided single of Sympathy for the Devil and a Japanese flexi disc of Mick Jagger on the phone commenting. No temptation to buy it all all.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:32:37 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Willin'

I agree that the Johnny Darrell has the phrasing all over the place and is too "country." I love Seatrain's version with Richard Greene on violin. The second Little Feat version is obviously the ultimate (though Mrs V prefers Seatrain, which I think we bought first). I thought The Byrds version was a bit weak.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:23:34 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gregg Allman & Jackson Browne

Thanks for that Jed. You are absolutely right. I had forgotten about that.

There is also a youtube vid of Jackson Browne with a group called "Lucius" beautiful dobro really haunting and sad and of course Jackson sings the song right. Just great! It is at a Linda Ronstad tribute.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:14:49 CEST 2018 from (107.77.173.4)

Posted by:

wynndixie

Location: Somewhere south

Hey y'all, have recently jumped on The Band-wagon (where have I been for the past fifty years?!?). Already appreciating the knowledge and civility here...so please forgive me if I ask questions about the boys that are probably as worn out as the grooves on your 'Brown' album


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:21:26 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Willin

Gregg Allman covers it sweetly on his final album,Southern Blood.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:00:01 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Willin

Those are both pretty awful versions of that song Peter. Linda Ronstad's isn't bad, Steve Earl does a cover, (not great). The arrangement to listen to is the Byrds. Gene Parsons sings that song great! The way it should be sung and arranged with the desperation and tiredness of the guy it's about. Those other covers are bouncy, jangley covers that do the song no justice.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 15:29:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Johnny Darrell

This was the first version released of "Willin'. According to YouTube, Clarence White played guitar.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 15:23:38 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Seatrain

Have a listen to "I'm Willin'" As we found out a few months ago, this was the second version released, and actually pre-dates the first of the two Little Feat versions, even though it's Lowell George's song and written while in the Mothers of Invention. The first version ever released was by Johnny Darrell on "California Stop-Over."


Entered at Thu Oct 4 15:13:42 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nepotism? Or Inherited ability?

Dunc, what is nepotism, what is inherited ability, what is environment?

Look at the number of musicians who had musicians in the family. Elvis Costello’s dad in a dance band, Paul McCartney’s dad playing pub piano. Then Hank Williams Jnr and Hank Williams III. Or take Randy Newman’s family. Whitney Houston was the daughter of Cissy Houston as well as the cousin of Dionne and Dee Dee Warwick. Or siblings who can both play … Ray and Dave Davies, The Everlys, Aretha and Erma Franklin, Paul McCartney & Mike McGear, Mark and David Knopfler. The list could go on and on. I think musical ability is hereditary. It works with maths too – I was always terrible, but my father-in-law was brilliant, as was my daughter’s father-in-law. All my kids and grandkids have excelled at maths, and it’s definitely NOT from my side of the family. Add languages … families where the parents are bilingual or trilingual produce kids who are good at languages.

Then apart from genes, you grow up in a nurturing environment for music. Amy Helm, Rufus Wainwright (and family) and Teddy Thompson spring to mind where BOTH parents were singers. That has to rub off on you. Norah Jones? Jakob Dylan? Harper Simon? Zak Starkey? Sebastian Robertson? Julian Lennon? In some cases, I suspect the family background hampered rather than accelerated careers.

Move on to actors. Mrs V pointed out that when she went on a drama audition weekend age 18, she was the only one there who had no actors or directors in the family. So yes, that’s partly nepotism, but growing up in a theatrical family will gift confidence in public. If I think of theatre, I recall stellar performances from Freddie Fox (son of Edward), Samuel West (son of Timothy West and Prunella Scales), Joely Richardson (daughter of Tony Richardson & Vanessa Redgrave), Rory Kinnear (son of Roy Kinnear). We worked with Cathryn Harrison, daughter of Noel Harrison who was in turn the son of Rex Harrison. These are dynasties.

So yes, having a famous parent might help you onto the first rung of the ladder. As they used to say about classical Hollywood studios “The Son-in-law Also Rises.” But you won’t get beyond that first rung without genuine talent. The Beatles and EMI have no reason to gift a job to Giles Martin. They know lots of people (and their own relatives) they could favour instead. As the other two who saw “Love” added, he helped create an amazing musical experience, and went on to Sgt Pepper. I reckon the White Album will be good.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 10:49:54 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:244f:c225:eae7:f659)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Still not convinced at all. I don't buy into that crap about George Martin being the fifth Beatle. Absolute rubbish. It's the Beatles who wrote the songs. He helped technically, but in my opinion he took too much credit...far too much.

As John said, Of course, "George Martin was a great help in translating our music technically when we needed it, but for the cameraman to take credit from the director is a bit too much. I'd like to hear what the producer of John Cage's 'Fontana Mix' would say about that... Don't be so paranoid, George, we still love you," ended the main part of the note, signed by John (and Yoko who was there)."

What about 'Seatrain'? Dreadful crap. Will we be getting a remastered release of their greatest hits?.

I saw several shows in Las Vegas. Every show was to the highest standard of performance. It's got to be.

And Giles Martin is not George Martin. He got the gig because of nepotism. Many producers would be capable of doing what he has done.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 04:27:24 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bob Fino

Hi Bob - Good to see you in again, thanks for that. Maybe reconsider, a bit of time under the belt can sometimes take the heat out of a controversy while still making your point. The head count is high quality but fewer in number these days. C’mon back mate -


Entered at Thu Oct 4 01:05:06 CEST 2018 from (24.44.153.201)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: PSB When Will This Dance End

Peter Stone Brown performing "When Will This Dance End" 9/30/18 at The Locks in Philadelphia.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 21:35:01 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ovations

I meant to comment. You notice how most guys who play acoustic guitars on stage put those plugs in the holes in the guitar otherwise they feed back. That is not necessary with Ovations because of the placement of those pickups. My Adamma, like Glen Campbell always played have the small holes above and below the neck with a great sound. As well with the fiberglass back they stay in tune much better. I recall years ago the sound man at the JR Country Club in Vancouver told my brother I love that Ovation of Norm's on stage it comes out with a great sound and is very easy to EQ.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 21:28:26 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tobias

Hi John. On some of the songs I notice he is playing a Tobias. However on others it's different. The Tobias has very long prominent horns and big black pickups. The one I'm talking about doesn't have horns. The lower part of the body at the neck just slopes away toward the tail and you can't see the pickups.

As a matter of fact Lindsey plays a guitar that looks to be the same make at one point and the same kind of blonde (sort of orange colour). On his guitar you can't notice pickups either. I'm wondering if they are something like my Ovations. The pickups are called "black dots" they are mounted in the bridge right under each string.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 21:14:08 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Norm

Norm this will make it easier. I saw another bass that looked very much like the one I mentioned in earlier post; but here is a John McVie smorgasbord of basses.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 21:07:38 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Norm.

Norm it’s either a Tobias Classic or....sorry on iPad and will be back with another post.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 18:03:10 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Norm

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: John McVie's bass

I'm tired of writing "Rockin Chair"! to hell with it.

I need a little help here! On the youtube video of Fleetwood Mac's "Dance" tour of '97, John McVie is playing this bass. (Particularly on the vid of "Say that you Love me"). I'm trying to see what kind of bass that is. You can't see any pickups on the front. He has great lines and great sound on that song. I've looked up all his bass instruments on line but can't find it.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:56:07 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Blood On The Tracks Project

"In 2004 David Spelman was hired to curate and produce The Blood On The Tracks Project, a concert celebrating the 30th anniversary of Bob Dylan's landmark album Blood On The Tracks. The sold-out event took place at New York City's Merkin Concert Hall and was broadcast live on WFUV and later as a two-hour radio special, syndicated to over fifty NPR affiliates.

A distinctive roster of singer-songwriters, bands and instrumentalists performed their own arrangements of the album’s ten songs, as well as instrumental interludes. Featured artists included Joan Osborne, Citizen Cope, Jesse Harris, Vernon Reid, Chocolate Genius, Toshi Reagon, Alex de Grassi, Ollabelle, Jeffrey Gaines, Brandon Ross, Richard Barone, Tony Visconti, Joel Harrison, and Buddy Cage.

Crabby and I met Buddy Cage's partner Leslie at the time before the show. I wish I could remember which one of the other artists she was really interested in seeing. It was maybe Vernon Reid or......lol.

Anyway, here is Ollabelle's performance that night of "You're A Big Girl Now". Amy Helm was great as always!


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:36:49 CEST 2018 from (64.229.246.134)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Music video by Bob Dylan performing If You See Her Say Hello (Take 1) (Lyric Video). (C) 2018 Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

I see a lot of people
As I make the rounds
And I hear her name here and there
As I go from town to town
And I've never gotten used to it
I've just learned to turn it off
Either I'm too sensitive
Or else I'm gettin' soft

Wallsend...Sorry I forgot to respond to your post last week. It took me a long time to finish reading Robbie's memoir. I was surprised as same thing happened with Dylan's Chronicles. I expected so much. I did however appreciate reading about his Jewish relatives and his storytelling here. I am looking forward to his stories from 1976 to present.

Dunc...Last five songs as I rarely listen to complete recordings these days.
Cruise (Remix featuring Nelly)...Florida Georgia Line
Girl Of The North Country...The Waterboys
Old Habits Die Hard...Dave Stewart and Mick Jagger
Soldier...Damien
Tupelo Honey/Why Must I Always Explain (Live 1991)...Van and Dylan


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:27:32 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Love

My wife and I have seen it twice at The Mirage. I couldn't believe how really, really magnificent it is. Even; after going a second time. It's a "must" if your ever going to Las Vegas. Giles Martin. Tops in my book! Also don't have to much to drink; before the show (and I mean water or anything) because there are no bathroom breaks. :-)


Entered at Wed Oct 3 12:39:25 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Blood On The Tracks

I keep getting amazon adverts for the 6 CD box set of Blood On The Tracks. I don't like the format as you get multiple versions of the same song one after the other. I AM interested in the multiple versions, but I'd also like someone to have selected the best take of each New York session and assembled it as one coherent album on one of the discs. Nine versions of You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go, one after the other, is Clinton Heylin / Obsessive area rather than something to sit and listen to.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 12:31:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Have a listen to John Lennon interviewed on George Martin in 1975, with Bob Harris (Linked). As the notes below say, it's one of John's fairer and more balanced comments. I think what he says is fair … they taught George Martin about rock and roll, but it was a two-way thing and he taught them a great deal too.

In the early 70s, my old friend, the late John Wetton, played bass guitar on many George Martin "pop" sessions, and said it was a privilege to be asked because you knew you'd be with the very best players … such as Clem Cattini on drums and Chris Spedding on guitar. He had nothing but praise for George Martin as a producer and as a person.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 11:00:19 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:d21:4d70:c61d:9363)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Never knew that Bill M. I still play the Cream classics. Just too much music.

Thanks Rockin' Chair. Never knew that you had a link to whaling. The book is still in print and I'll pick it up. Queue of books just now and I'm interested in John Simon's. Do I buy it, Pat? I enjoyed Robbie's book.

Spinning discs is obsolete, Rockin Chair. I was outside a club in Glasgow when a bus pulling a massive trailer from Germany pulled up. The DJ and his roadies moved some amount of gear into the club.

Not convinced. I always think about what John Lennon thought about George Martin.

New Paul Simon is on just now. I'm enjoying it. It's good when the original writer redoes songs. And relevant.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 10:59:01 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Viva Lost Wages

Las Vegas – we found it a good entry point to the western USA. I hate doing a 10 or 11 hour flight and getting straight in a rental car. In Las Vegas the airport’s right at the end of the strip, and you don’t need a car while you’re there … a very short taxi ride. Like Orlando (but unlike the big cities), the immigration guys are polite and “tourist friendly.” So we found you could book two or three nights cheaply, take in two Cirque du Soleil shows (O and Ka are also brilliant) and of course exposure to daylight and sun is the best way to get rid of jet lag – it resets the body clock. Lots of sun in Las Vegas. So then a short taxi ride back to the airport after a couple of nights sleep, and pick up a rental car – and you’re already out of town.

The first time, we stayed at the Venetian then newly opened. The check in guy said to Mrs V “I love your accent so much that I’m upgrading you to a suite.” She thanked him profusely, and he said, “I gotta hear that again! So I’m upgrading you again to a bigger suite!” We had two bathrooms, one either side of the bed (As I said in my review, Las Vegas caters for bed companions who don’t know each other well enough to share a bathroom) and a further toilet in the living room and about four TVs. She said she knew all those drama speech classes would come in useful one day.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 00:43:16 CEST 2018 from (2605:6000:8b0b:6a00:fc2a:d92:3635:64c2)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Beatles' LOVE

I agree with PV about Giles and the LOVE show in Lost Wages. I've seen it twice! It has to be experienced to be believed; it's in the round, so there's action everywhere: scenes pop up from beneath, folks flying and climbing from up above, dancers, acrobats, and actors, footage projected on screens and walls, and speakers in every seat to deliver the best sound. And the music! My goodness, it's all glorious and exhilirating. Expensive, but worth it. I'd see it again if the opportunity presents itself. LOVE it!

And like PV, I've never spent a dime gambling. Just took in the show, had a nice meal, and split.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 23:37:30 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:3d90:3d7e:141e:dcd7)

Posted by:

Pat B

Giles Martin worked with Paul and Ringo on Love. I'm guessing this White Album remix is an assignment.

I finished the John Simon book which is required reading although I wish it were three times as long. His analysis of the fued is spot on as is his description (as he saw it) of the relation of each member to the whole. If I read it right, the songs recorded for BP in NY were done in one night which is mind-blowing. The arc of his career pre-Band really sets an interesting stage for his work with the group. He's also a very funny guy.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 22:22:53 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Beatles "Love"

Review of the "Love" Las Vegas show. Do not judge Giles Martin if you haven't see it!


Entered at Tue Oct 2 18:39:31 CEST 2018 from (104.129.192.189)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Lindsey Buckingham

Westcoaster- LB learned to play from John Stewart (Kingston Trio and solo). I don’t know if it was personal lessons. They both started on banjo, used the same electric guitar brand and that banjo finger/claw style to play. I’m a big fan too.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:46:07 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Carrying On

Thanks Bill. I listened to that Hans Staymer pretty different. The particular Fleetwood Mac performance, (I wish I had been there) was 1997, called "The Dance". When they play "Say that you love me", all five are lined up across the stage. Mic is playing an arrangement on his drums with no kick. Christine of course sings the song. (as well as being beautiful she is a dynamite singer). Lynsay's style on that banjo as well as picking solo plays that claw hammer style of a rythmn strum thru the verses that sounds great.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:28:36 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rockin Banjo

Don't forget Bill. The original Eagles "Take It Easy" Bernie Leadon finished it with banjo.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:27:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm comparing remix qualities, Bill. The two originals are chalk and cheese, opposite ends of the spectrum, though both stand among the best ever recordings.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:06:17 CEST 2018 from (2605:8d80:6a1:dcb1:38e5:afcd:846:b659)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: For banjo on a rock song, you might look on youtube for "Dig A Hole" by the Hans Staymer Band. I love the harmonics especially. The work of Eddie Patterson.

Peter V: if you meant that Giles Martin did a better job producing a remastered classic than Bob Clearmountain did, then I'm inclined to believe you (though I've heard neither). But not if you mean that George M did a better job of producing the original than did John Simon.

Dunc: Glad you liked the Mountain song, and you wrer right in thinking in atypical of their output. It was sung by their bassist, Felix Pappalardi, who'd most famously produced Cream. When he left Mountain, his place was taken by a talented Scot named Jack Bruce. The new lineup, redubbed West, Bruce and Laing who did a couple of albums before becoming, I believe, a law firm. Corky Laing, by the way, is from Montreal, but is of Scottish ancestry - plus he had Levon helm write the forward to his autobiography / memoire.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 16:09:16 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whaling & Spinning Discs

Dunc I don't know if you recall way back some where I mentioned my Great Grand Dad, (who was born in London), ran away to sea on a whaler at the age of twelve. He spent his younger years whaling. He became a journalist and author of 40 some books. One that may interest you is called "The Cruise of The Cachalot". I expect you know cachalot is the French word for a sperm whale. My youngest daughter has always been fascinated by his books and collects them. One very interesting one she has is called "Deep Sea Plunderings". Short stories that are true accounts of piracy.

Funny that you use the term "spinning discs". I wonder how long it has been since any DJs actually did that?


Entered at Tue Oct 2 15:51:50 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Just got the Kindle edition of the John Simon book. Haven't started read it yet. Sorry to read Pat that the MFBP chapter is short.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 13:15:20 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:9586:1f84:f97e:42f4)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Couldn't agree more, Bill.

Played 'Nantucket Sleighride'. I don't know Mountain, but enjoyed the track. Not what I expected - very different from what I thought it would be. The whaling song I know is 'The Balaena', which I used to hear back in the days when folk was hip. I find it disappointing that a lot of these Scottish songs will be lost because folk is not so important now. It's all about DJs spinning discs now.

Thanks, Bill


Entered at Tue Oct 2 12:01:18 CEST 2018 from (1.43.129.8)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I was just watching a video of Uncle John's Band as I read your post. It is a show from 1989. It is a great song but Jerry looks in bad shape. I don't know why they went for the two drummers. I just don't see the point of it.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 11:05:21 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sugar Magnolia

Norm mentioned the way songs suddenly crop up in your head. I woke up in the night with Sugar Magnolia playing in my head. Went back to sleep, and in the morning I woke up and it started running again. You do think "Where did that come from?" I have heard "American Beauty" in the last two weeks … we were discussing "Ripple" here, and I put it on for a car journey. But that was several days ago.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 10:59:55 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Love the Martins

Bill, I thought you were dissing the famous guitars whose factory apparently appears in "The Weight." I have heard many people doing the same … Judy Collins explains her tuning time on stage as her love of the Martin sound in spite of their inability to hold tuning on a hot spotlit stage, and I spent a pleasant morning with a guitarist friend who uses a Martin for studio work, but was looking for an early 1960s Gibson acoustic for stage work because Martins required too much tuning between songs.

If you doubt the genius of the "Beatle" Martins (father and son) listen to "Love" - better still go and see the show in Las Vegas in surround sound. I took out the Sgt Pepper remixes to compare to MFBP remixes. There's no question as to the better producer.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 04:59:55 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Music......and.......MORE MUSIC!!!!!

Thanks Bill. I tried to find that on youtube, but couldn't.

I have been trying to come up with 5 gang, sorry. I have been listening to so much stuff it's hard.

Many times lately I am drawn to Fleetwood Mac. I think Lindsay Buckingham is so underrated. He is a terrific singer and his style on guitar and banjo are unequalled. In "Say That You Love Me" his banjo picking (using a banjo for a rock song) is very impressive.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 03:27:54 CEST 2018 from (76.66.111.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I agree that the importance of the Martins continues to be overstated.

A great 20th-century whaling song is "Nantucket Sleighride" by Mountain.

Rockin C: Crowbar's last (minor) hit was a cover of "Hey Baby" in the mid '70s. Lots of links to Hawkins and our guys.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 02:42:38 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hey Baby!

By the way Peter. It was Delbert McClinton playing the harp on that song with Bruce.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 00:14:57 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:a4a7:7651:f9ea:d078)

Posted by:

Pat B

Got the John Simon book. Read the Big Pink chapter. Short but excellent. I'll wait until I get through Stage Fright to offer thoughts.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 22:25:31 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fascinating on “Grace”, Dunc. Reviews mention it as an “old Irish rebel song” but it is modern pastiche from 1985 then, just as “Long Back Veil” is a pastiche Appalachian murder ballad … and more so, “The Patriot Game” by Dominic Behan is a pastiche early 20th century rebel song. I never realized. They used to say that there is no Irishman as Irish as a London Irishman (e.g. Martin McDonagh) and I guess Rod Stewart as a “London- Scot” has tended to an exaggerated version waving the tartan at all times. Whatever, he sings them up a storm on the new one.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 21:50:06 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:3131:608d:c0e2:2b00)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Grace was only written in 1985 and is about a true tale related to the Easter Uprising of 1916. A little controversial up here as Celtic fans sing it at their matches, which is where Rod Stewart heard it. He plays too much to the Celtic crowd for me now - showbiz. I still play the white double collection of Rod Stewart and the Faces, which was released quite a few years ago.

Red Rose is the mark made by the harpooon when it pierces the whale. I've heard it a few times a long time ago. I come from the home of Scottish whaling and some of my forebears were whalers. Rod Stewart on The One Show said it was Ewan McColl who told him about it.

I'll not buy the new White album pack. It smells of nepotism and class to me. Every time the rich, privileged boy needs some money he uses Daddy and returns to the Beatles. Nepotism and class still present in this country. I think returning to the Beatles' work makes the Martins seem bigger than they are in the story.

On my record collecting day on Friday I bought

Steely Dan - Two Against Nature

Paul Simon - In The Blue Light

Richard Thompson - Acoustic Classics

Booker T and the MGs - Stax Classics.

Football day Saturday and babysitting yesterday, so listening today. Really pleased so far.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 21:01:39 CEST 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Garth & Maud show

A real interesting Garth & Maud show coming up, this time performing live soundtracks to films... Kingston, NY on October 28th. Try brownpapertickets dot com, type Garth's name and the event should come up.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 19:01:12 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Blood Red Roses

Only one listen through so far, but the new Rod Stewart, Blood Red Roses, is very good indeed. The title track is raucous Bellowhead style English folk! But there's a lot of variety. Farewell is very moving. Also the old Irish rebel song Grace.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 18:53:13 CEST 2018 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Brett Kavanaugh/Pulp Fiction

Oh dear...


Entered at Mon Oct 1 18:42:44 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bruce Channel's "Hey Baby" was John Lennon's inspiration for the harmonica part in "Love Me Do."


Entered at Mon Oct 1 02:43:57 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Crazy Chester

Hey John. Don't know if you found this or not. This radio hour was created by Andreas Werner, began fall of 2017. It is streaming on various sites. It sure is cool.

The emojie, I gues I did the colon, hyphon, back bracket and it must show up to you as an emojie. I don't know man! I'm too old and ignorant to figure any of this stuff out.


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