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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 21:38:14 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kevin, it's one ID if you're white, but two if you're black, and they also have to be notarized by a legal attorney with the last 24 hours.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 21:21:16 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Breaking News.....

NEWS FLASH: Realizing that a victory by The Band over Alice Cooper would forever end their subculture stature and wanting to retain The Band's cachet which has been so carefully built up over 40 years, former band guitarist and principle songwriter Robbie Robertson has been accused during the last 24 hours of having his people at the gates of the "Ultimate Classic Rock" magazine, asking all voters to show proper ID.......this has been interpreted by some as a blatant act of voter suppression.....a particularly disgruntled fan identified only as Ben who had been turned away today was seen screaming that the whole thing is a farce anyway and that Alice would have been crushed already had the contest been between the best of The Band - the 1990' version - and Alice Cooper.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 20:58:10 CET 2015 from (98.215.30.129)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Subject: Vote

Voting site is definitely flawed. By voting on separate computers quickly in back to back time period, I can see that one vote changes the percentage of The Band by -.03; should be increasing The Band's percentage. I have done this several times with the same resulting lost of points.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 20:26:37 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Darn!

I go away from the computer for a few hours and were down 5 points! Gotta get active voting!


Entered at Fri Feb 27 20:12:44 CET 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Enigma

Enigma Code: Al = B; ice = A; Coo=N; per=D.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 20:10:33 CET 2015 from (58.104.19.74)

Posted by:

Wallsend

George Bush must have been the worst president in US history. If he hadn't been asleep at the wheel 9/11 would never have happened. If he hadn't invaded Iraq the whole Middle East would't be in the mess it is now. All that money could have been diverted in to providing Americans with basic medical care. I cannot believe anybody is seriously considering electing another Bush as president.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 19:58:05 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Huh.... Alice and The Band swap-flip? …. I’ll stop my random IP voter right away :-(


Entered at Fri Feb 27 19:14:14 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Anyone else notice the tricks being played at the ballot box? I've voted 7 or 8 times now and sometimes The Band is at the top of the ballot and at other times they are the bottom name....hmmmm, trusting any vote placed after midnite is difficult but wondering whether Alice has been benefitting from the greater likelihood that Band fans are more often higher than Alice fans.

Jeb Bush......helping an idiot brother out of a treehouse as a kid is one thing, imagine living with the knowledge that by a stroke of a pen you put a former male cheerleader in charge of the world. Some estimate that up to 1 million less people on this planet would be dead or injured had he and the truly evil Dick Cheney not terrorized us all for 8 years.........weird thing is that Jeb Bush might just be the best of the Republicans out there now.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 18:31:41 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Band v Cooper

We need Jeb Bush on board. Is he a Band fan? There's a man who knows how to fix a vote. Can't he send someone round to intimidate Alice Cooper fans perhaps? A few Florida police officers staring through their windows maybe?


Entered at Fri Feb 27 16:40:05 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Voting Void

It becomes an even more empty exercise (in which I continue to participate out of loyalty to US and the OQ.) We'll beat them with the best music and lyrics which made North America great. Alice Cooper will be our supporting act. Keep filling in that dot beside 'THE BAND'.


Entered at Fri Feb 27 13:38:35 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Voting

We were up around 5-6 points yesterday,down1-2 this morning.Those darn Alice fans must drink alot blood to resist sleep to vote all night.Us Band fans are creakier,but we can stuff ballot boxes too.VOTE and Vote often!


Entered at Fri Feb 27 13:31:15 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The spirit of A Rocker

Anything Dylan says to RS is suspect.He loves yanking their chain and clearly has used,but never loved RS.And his spirited rocking is just excellent!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 23:49:48 CET 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Spectrum

Performers on all sides of the political spectrum: left, right and centre. What will they think of next? Voting for who is best? Maybe political office based upon the vote? Oh wait... that's happened for American presidents before.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 23:47:53 CET 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Glam Rock

Kevin, Valentines Day 1973 we country bumpkins got to see David Bowie for the first time at Radio City Music Hall. Wonderful! Now that man knew how to wear a dress.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 21:47:54 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Alice Votes

......so the flaming lefties that love The Band and Bob Dylan have been stuffing ballot boxes for weeks and a preachers son partial to dresses, make-up and snakes in his pants is revealed as a Republican........the world is unfolding as it should......and sit tight Bob, Westerns all end the same, Raylan shoots Boyd and rides off in the sunset with Ava on his horse.........just don't tell me one way or the other because I don't subscribe to anything - just purchase whole dvd sets when they are released to retail......always a bit behind. We just purchased Season 4 of Game of Thrones - still great.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 21:01:02 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: In Bob's own words......for Jed

If the Music Cares Grammy speech taught us anything it's that people take what Bob Dylan says seriously, who am I to argue with the great man:

Bob Dylan: "I never did do rock & roll"

Rolling Stone: You've never sung a rock & roll song?

Bob Dylan : "No, I never have, only in spirit."

Rolling Stone: You can't really dance to one of your songs.

Bob Dylan: " I couldn't."

JQ: I liked David Bowie a lot but for the songs never the dresses........I liked punk and some of the new wave but was never a glammer.....

Bob F: I agree that season 5 of Justified was a major fall off. I still enjoyed it but understand Yost and Olyphant's decision to end the series at season 6. I still really like Raylan's character.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 20:48:12 CET 2015 from (58.104.16.198)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just reading up a bit about Alice Cooper. Seems he is a big George Bush fan - I guess that is all you need to know when deciding how to vote.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 20:15:14 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan is,has been,is sometimes,many times a rocker

Not as a folkie or in his current incarnation and at other times ,but Dylan has long been a hard rocker.With The Band in '66 and 74,with Petty,the Dead,many times during the never ending tour.Ive seen shows that blew the roof off the place--oddly,Silvio in the theater at MSG in '91,I believe,was great rockin,the whole place up and dancing and then being further blown away by lengthy,outstanding guitar leads.Of course ,there was that strange period where Dylan assumed the role of lead player while the greats he hired played rhythm.To this day I can't understand that!But,maybe the term rocker is being used differently,but IMO Dylan is a rocker when he chooses to be.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 20:14:10 CET 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Alice

Kevin - What the heck are you doing citing elitist critics?? No sweat, I'll yield to your POV, no offense. Just curious, were you into the 80's Glam thing?


Entered at Thu Feb 26 20:06:46 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Omar & the Howlers (link)


Entered at Thu Feb 26 19:56:27 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: The Cat

Jeez …. while we're driving on our rear-view mirrors here, little Høiberg down shifts two, turns in and disappears, full throttle power sliding, beyond the horizon…...

I know the old Høiberg tried to hold him back and that triggered him …… but Bill is right, it’s mainly this GB that pushed to great heights …. ;-)


Entered at Thu Feb 26 19:50:15 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.179)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Justified

Kevin, we're into the 6th and final season. Really getting tv bummed that Boyd and Ava are probably not going to have a happy ending. I was hoping they end up with a huge weed farm in Kentucky. I'm sick of the Deputy Marshall Gibbons character.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 19:23:41 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob Dylan is no rocker but he sure does know a good songwriter......

From a 1978 Rolling Stone magazine interview with Bob Dylan.......this is for you JQ:

Rolling Stone: Now that we somehow got onto this subject, who else do you like right now? New Wave groups?

Bob Dylan: "No. I'm not interested in them. I think Alice Cooper is an overlooked songwriter. I like Ry Cooder. And I like Dave Mason's version of something which is on the jukebox right now."


Entered at Thu Feb 26 18:33:54 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Alice's Perspective

Alice is no fool.He knows good music even if he chooses not to play or sing it.His deep dark dirty secret is that,from his perspective,The Band is simply the best thing to hit music in our lifetime,Thus,Alice will,without anyone's knowledge,continue voting as often as possible for The Band.His belief is we all should do the same.Heck,Alice ain't nonody's fool-he knows good music!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 18:04:25 CET 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Alice

Kevin - I think I know what you mean. Would Dylan/L Cohen/J Prine, etc be in that serious crowd you hate? Or The Band? I totally understand the need to simply wail and move at times. But then you called Alice or some other music an "art form" - talk about pretension! AC's stuff is more analagous to a Kincaide painting or a Veg-O-Matic: warm shite. It's little wonder that he ended up a Christian conservative.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 17:36:32 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Congrats JH!

You must be so proud!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 16:41:30 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Good rock from Vince and the gang

Vince had it in those early years. I still remember seeing Alice Cooper on stage at Varsity Stadium in the late 1960s in one of those 2 day events with multiple bands. It was a dress and a chicken and all the theatrics but the music was good and one could see there was potential. I agree with Kevin on some of those songs he has just listed. Its good rock on a par with some of the good simple rock of the last 30-40 years and it stands up well. We won't compare it to anything because that is an empty exercise. It is what it is and what it is is good.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 16:35:57 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I liked a lot of Alice Cooper's 45s in their days with WB. Mostly, I think, due to a young Bob Ezrin's touch as producer (and sometimes co-writer). There are indirect Band links. For one, Ezrin sat with Garth and Robbie (and Duff Roman) at the head table at the Canadian Walk of Fame ceremony we talked a bit about a few months ago. Plus, Ezrin got the production gig with Alice Cooper only because they'd signed on with producer Jack Richardson (who'd recorded with Robbie as fellow sidemen on a Dianne Brooks record in 1961), but Jack didn't care for the group and passed them along to his protege, Ezrin.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 16:30:22 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Alice Cooper

I really liked the "Welcome to my Nightmare" album.......""Only Women Bleed", "The Black Widow" , "Cold Ethyl" and the title track........taking rock music too seriously is what killed the art form.......hello U2 ! Give me "School's Out" or "Billion dollar Babies" or the essential "I'm Eighteen" any day/any year over all the schlock rock/prog rock or serious rock that is out there.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 16:26:34 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Boredom

We are all boring here at the dude ranch. No one over 30 has anything of any value in his/her head. The 20s know it all. Listen to them. they will take you where you need to go. Just ask them! If they are lucky, they will become boring too. All that boredom eventually makes you a star if you stick to it. Again, JH and CC, congratulations.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 15:41:07 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.182)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Alice C

'Only Woman Bleed' is another great Alice Cooper song. As you get older you realize you have to give credit where credit is due.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 15:35:34 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

jh: I remember back when Cashmere C was a mere pup (or kitten). He must've been in his acting-out phase: he'd post the occasional comment about how boring he found the Band to be, and by implication his old man (and the rest of us). I hope that he is now as justifiably proud of you as you are of him.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 13:20:30 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.184)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Congratulations Jan!

Jan, congratulations to your son. What an amazing accomplishment!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 11:12:02 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Lo-Fi equipment

I moved house quite a while back and have slowly been sorting out "stuff". A couple of things have appeared that I had long forgotten.

One was my first record player. I was past my teens when I got it (music was a radio or live experience before that). It is a Dansette Transit - a portable player about the size of a small-to-middling suitcase. It has cleaned up nicely but I haven't yet had the nerve to see if it still works.

The second was more recent - a small Sony pocket radio, AM and FM only, with a built-in speaker. I've never been one for high-end equipment (I appreciate it but grew up listening to crackly radio broadcasts) but had forgotten the pleasures of a cheap mono radio. I have one of those devices you can plug in and "broadcast" on FM. I put on a Leiber & Stoller CD, tuned in the cheapo radio and went about my daily routine and chores a-smiling.



Entered at Thu Feb 26 09:37:18 CET 2015 from (58.104.14.213)

Posted by:

Wallsend

For god's sake Peter get a grip. We are talking about Alice Cooper. Back in the day no serious rock fan would have given him the time of day.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 09:19:12 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Alice Cooper was special

"I'm Eighteen" is a great song - responsible for starting both "The Ramones" and "The Sex Pistols" and was a favorite of Elvis's......not too shabby for a golfer ! I still listen to it regularly.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 08:35:52 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Voting – that’s what I was trying to say in the comment on Wolf Hall. I’ll happily press the “feed me” button like a laboratory rat, or rather the “Vote” button. But while I can recall two songs … School’s Out & Teenage Lament 74 (though only the title in the second case), I’m happy to say “Band good. Alice Cooper bad” and vote away. While from memory of odd TV clips, I think this is probably right, I don’t actually KNOW.

I do possess the first Alice Cooper album actually, but I doubt the vinyl has seen daylight in decades. It’s the Zappa produced one on Straight, and I bought it with the (fantastic) GTO’s record and Trout Mask Replica all on the same day for peanuts. All US import copies, all in the “unsold” sale bin somewhere. I will take it out. This is a dangerous moment. I might be converted and start voting the other way.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 05:59:48 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The 'Capture'

Bill M: You have captured the essence of Bob Dylan. He is the quintessential wordsmith with an imagination and a spontaneous creativity that allows for remodelling of ideas within sentences to alter the meaning without any degradation of the work.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 04:23:01 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm still happily working through the complete BT. Disc 4 now, I believe. The most striking thing, besides how endlessly creative Garth is, is the tweaks to the lyrics of "I Shall Be Released": from "everything has been misplaced" to "everything can be replaced", from "every man must crawl" to "every man must fall", from "all down from west to east" to "from the west down to the east". And then there's the great lines that I'd never even noticed before: "Yonder standeth me in this lonely crowd, a man who says he's not to blame". Dylan as everyman, but also Dylan as the butt of his own barbs, just like JT and I agree he was in "Ballad Of A Thin Man".


Entered at Thu Feb 26 03:42:32 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norb

Location: Bed, iPhone

Just dus dropped my hourly vote, we' re ahead already. Apple! there is no backslash here in my iPhone and THE automatic spelling controle is à burden! (You can't turn the sucker off?!). Ragtime goed je te zien.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 02:51:41 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Folly

I'm helping for the sake of JH and this site. But what foolishness this voting is. Empty and meaningless. Ask Alice Cooper who should be acknowledged. Vince is a very good musician and has had an impact. But this is at the level of ridiculous. It is not a contest. Vince knows that the Band beats all!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 02:49:02 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band has pulled ahead of Alice

Lets not get overconfident and keep voting!


Entered at Thu Feb 26 02:12:26 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Frozen Ocean

Subject: Who the eff is Alice

Can't be much voting. I just put her over the top (50.2%). I'm trying to remember Alice. All I'm getting is the intro to 'School's Out'.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 01:32:54 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Battle of the Bands / StarBuckers

There's no way The Band plays second fiddle to Alice Cooper. 60, 70s, 80s,or 90s Band, one drummer, or two drummers.
Even if Pete had sat on Alice's lap in Starbuck's, or actually more likely vice versa, there would be no justification.


Entered at Thu Feb 26 00:07:01 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Man Called Alice

Most interesting was the BBC 4 interview with Peter Kominsky and Mark Rylance after Episode 6 of Wolf Hall which I just watched. They discussed the era, Thomas Cromwell v Sir Thomas More, Protestant v Catholic, Henry VIII v Rome. Kominsky pointed out that people were beheaded, burnt at the stake, hung, drawn and quartered over what, 500 years later, appear as tiny, insignificant arguments over minor issues of religious interpretation. Kominsky drew the obvious parallel with the Middle East today, pointing out a religion 500 years younger than Christianity going through the same struggles..

So … in 500 years, will the difference between our 2015 Western political parties appear significant (if anyone iis there in 2515)? Will Republican v Democrat, or Conservative v Labour seem tiny issues? Will they appear to be tiny differences of shade within the same overall colour? To a visitor from the Alpha Centauri Colony, will the difference between School's Out and King Harvest be hard to detect?

But golf playing is pretty unforgiveable


Entered at Wed Feb 25 22:31:20 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: not all Harry Smith

This is probably what Bob was remembering in The Basement ("Po' Lazarus).

A. Cooper may be a pleasant guy, but he is still a golf-playing Republican and as such has no business as a rock star.

Wonderful times for C. Cat . . . I just wish I could appreciate the music a little more . . . a recent _Globe_ article touted the work of Toronto's BadBadNotGood with Ghostface Killah: "BBNG were born for this gig. If Ghost is Dylan, BBNG are the Band." I YouTubed the track "Tone's Rap" -- a nice atmospheric slow blues, but the rap's all about pimping -- you can enjoy the word play once or twice, but it's not something you wanna spend much time with . . . .


Entered at Wed Feb 25 21:31:11 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, we were at the next table to Alice. He had quite a few people come up to him and was extremely courteous and pleasant to all- most so in asking them questions about themselves rather than just accepting praise. I was impressed. "Very nice guy" was my reaction.

BUT can Teenage Lament '74 beat The Weight? That is the question.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 21:00:43 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: No,The Band is in the game and Alice hasn't won yet

Earlier we went from over 20 points down to 11 down,now we are just under 6 down.Keep voting often! I'm beginning to think like Joe Kennedy did in working with Mayor Daly to insure that Jack won in Chicago! HAHA! Vote for The Band!


Entered at Wed Feb 25 20:56:00 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Pop Mega Force !

Congrats to your son, Jan. A truly great accomplishment to get to the very top of the pop music world. As Rick Danko once said "that $500 wine did taste gooood"......hope he is having the time of his life as well.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 20:54:55 CET 2015 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Alice Cooper???

Alice Cooper... the outdated king of bombast... and he would pass the timeless Band...?

I'm shocked.

Goedenavond Norbert & Hyvää iltaa NorthWestCoaster. You both did your civic duty, didn't you?


Entered at Wed Feb 25 20:37:07 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Cashmere Cat 101, from SPIN Magazine today :-)


Entered at Wed Feb 25 20:26:45 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky

Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (Russian Empire 1896 – 1934) is one of the most important psychologists of human cultural and biosocial development ever. He was a genius and all his work was done, at warp speed, between his 28 -37th (when he died). It took till 1960 before they (West) discovered his ground breaking work.

Little Brother good to see you

Jed, just voted (a few :-)

Hyvää iltaa Ilkka


Entered at Wed Feb 25 19:21:38 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: As of this moment

We are 11 percentage points behind.We were down by over 20 points.If we surge(I despise the word and its overuse) we can win this thing!


Entered at Wed Feb 25 19:11:46 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Keep Voting-We're Catching Up


Entered at Wed Feb 25 19:06:01 CET 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Alice

Recently one of the specialty channels showed a program called "Super Duper Alice Cooper", which I watched out of curiosity. It was pretty absorbing actually, and quite revealing - he was very open and honest, and seems to be all that Peter said. He credits golf as one thing that helped him beat his severe addictions and keeps him centered.

Re "My Way" - I always knew people get pretty passionate about their music, but surely murder is taking things a bit far?


Entered at Wed Feb 25 18:59:12 CET 2015 from (100.34.3.106)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook archives

Subject: "Bengali Bauls at Big Pink" available?

I've been re-reading Sid Griffin's "Million Dollar Bash" to get in the mood for the "Basement Tapes" box set I acquired last Christmas.

Pardon another dumb question that's probably been asked here a thousand times-- but was "Bengali Bauls at Big Pink" ever released on CD? My Internet search was negative.

It's not exactly a hot commercial property, but lots of obscure/esoteric music is released to niche markets, so why not an album that's a legend or icon to Dylan/Band fans?

If it's not available on CD, is it available in any other form, i.e. a download somewhere, etc.?

While I'm at it, I guess I should ask if it's worth having-- I've seen lots of references to it, but surprisingly little about the actual music!

Thanks for your attention and consideration.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 17:53:32 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Thanks

Thanks, folks. I did know that they appeared on SNL; I just didn't recall the date. I think I still have the "Georgia etc" single from around the same period.

I guess whoever posted it on-line was too young to think it worth mentioning that it was from SNL.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 17:10:30 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: SNL The Band 30 10 76

The Band performed "Life is a Carnival," "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," "Stage Fright," and "Georgia on My Mind." on 30/10/76 on SNL


Entered at Wed Feb 25 17:06:42 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: SNL 30 10 76

A quick search on the Internet and in other locations that document shows confirms that The Band appeared on Saturday Night Live on 30/10/76.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 17:01:59 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: (1) Festival Express; (2) Band on TV in 1976 ?

The first was prompted by my search for the second but I'll start with (1). (1) There was a five page article on FESTIVAL EXPRESS in ROLLING STONE #65, which was mastheaded as 3 September 1970 but printed on 12 August 1970. /n In the second paragraph, it lists the travellers on the 12-coach train. The last-mentioned is "Rick Danko of The Band". I would infer from this that he was the only member of The Band who actually took the train, as surmised in Peter V's review of the film.

There is (complimentary) mention of Garth's intro to "Chest Fever" in Toronto.

If I read it right, The Band played a "short set" in Winnipeg and Robbie is quoted as saying he's unhappy about playing festivals and explaining why they played this tour. It's quite a long quote.

After Winnipeg, Mountain left and The Band were expected abpoard but only Rick and Jon Taplin appeared. Robbie went back to New York "To check out the mixes on (their) upcoming album" and the others, after partying the night before, didn't make the train on time. Rick and Taplin only just made it, apparently.

There are a couple of stories/quotes from/by Rick before and at Calgary.

I may have missed the odd thing in quickly scanning through the five pages.

(2) Someone recently posted a You Tube clip on a Dylan site. It showed someone in the audience and asked if it might be Dylan in disguise. Someone else suggested Larry Sloman and it sure looked more like him than Dylan, I have to say. But that was not the reason I mention it here.

The wording associated with this clip reads as follows: "On October 30, 1976, The Band appeared as the musical guest on a weekly late night sketch-based comedy show". It says that the mystery man in the audience appears about 16 minutes in. Is this appearance by The Band known about herein? And, if so, what's the name of the TV show?


Entered at Wed Feb 25 16:41:20 CET 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

I gave Alice Cooper a try, and to my surprise they really are much better than The Band. I've been voting them around the clock.

;)


Entered at Wed Feb 25 15:28:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Unthanks

Review linked of last night's concert in Yeovil, Somerset. Perfect stage sound. Sublime voices. Wonderful material from the new album "Mount the Air." Trust me, you need this album!


Entered at Wed Feb 25 14:55:05 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Vote Alice Cooper v The Band

Personally, I think we're fucked. Alice Cooper has walked past Neil Young and Bob Seger (who in turn walked past Genesis … WTF?). This means both the world's Alice Cooper fans have alarms set to vote hourly 24 hours a day. We may outnumber those two Alice fans by almost ten to one (on regular attendance) but I suspect we lack the necessary weirdness to keep voting. A lost cause?

Having sat next to Alice Cooper in Starbucks in Borders (the latter was a bookstore lost in the mists of time for young readers), I can testify that he seemed pleasant, friendly and erudite. So we can't get too pissed off.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 12:07:05 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan's 101st Theme Time Radio Hour Programme

Dylan's 101st Theme Time Radio Hour programme ("Kiss") is on BBC Radio 6 Music, this coming Sunday:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b054gw9x

It will be on the BBC i_Player, I believe, too - but maybe only available in the U.K.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 10:39:15 CET 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Whiplash

Good to see Norbert here again - sometimes the obvious should be said too. However, I liked GOEDENAVOND more than GUTEN ABEND.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 09:06:10 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....well, if an off-key warble of "My Way" gets you shot in the Philippines......take cover cause Alice is leading The Band 65-35 !

I do still love "I'm Eighteen" though.....


Entered at Wed Feb 25 08:07:27 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

last round of voting has started. time for all Levonistas, Robertsonians, Dankophiles and the rest of you, to follow the link above and once again do your civic duty.


Entered at Wed Feb 25 00:52:55 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sadavid........Thank you, the "aside" you referred to in that article on The Who's is indeed something to look forward to. So many interesting characters passed through the Albert Grossman neighbourhood..........also, that piece on the "My Way" killings was something else.


Entered at Tue Feb 24 22:56:42 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: edit

...err, "Hoskyns' ". Ouch.


Entered at Tue Feb 24 22:55:19 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M

Subject: Barney book

The article about Hoskins' book links to quite a few VERY interesting articles about The Who, their managers and Moon the Loon.


Entered at Tue Feb 24 21:42:12 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Whiplash movie review (spoilers)

Yesterday we went to see the movie Whiplash. Entering the cinema room from underneath the screen a little too late, we greeted all 5 visitor separately with a warm “guten Abend” and a friendly nod of the head.

Whiplash is about a guy who wants to become Buddy Rich.

It’s a combination of the ‘sadistic’ trainer and the boxer’s (jazz drummer's), moving, never give in blood, sweat and tears.

Is it worth the hype? …… hm, beautiful shots and colors ….. a pretty good movie but little over the top here and there …. by that just missing the masterpiece (i.m.o.)……. anyway the last drumming scene is phenomenal (link) …... 4* (out of 5*)

Trivia question: Miles Teller did some of the drumming himself but the last scene was overdubbed, who was the real drummer?

Guten Abend


Entered at Tue Feb 24 20:35:27 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sadavid

Your link about the book takes you to an article regarding The Who.


Entered at Tue Feb 24 16:46:22 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Barney's version

According to an aside in this article, Barney Hoskyns has a "forthcoming" book, _Smalltown Talk_ (sic), "a portrait of Albert Grossman’s creation of the Woodstock music scene in the 60s."


Entered at Tue Feb 24 07:49:10 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

57-43! we're in the final!


Entered at Mon Feb 23 21:48:25 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Anka kills in the Far East

(Thais Die For John Denver)

We all know music has the power to inspire passion . . . wonder if Bob Dylan is aware of the sinister powers of the Sinatra Songbook . . . .


Entered at Mon Feb 23 19:54:18 CET 2015 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Astoria, OR

JT - Don't forget about us - the best secret in Oregon.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 16:44:23 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'The west is the best'

The West Coast (from Oregon to Washington (Seattle) to Victoria and Vancouver Island to Vancouver (city) is another series of venues where an emerging young artist might thrive. Look at 2016 as the new album comes out for those opportunities. There are many appropriate venues in Victoria and Duncan and Saltspring Island to consider, not to mention those in places like Portland and Seattle.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 16:39:19 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: JT winery concert series

Ten minutes after I sent that e-mail to the winery, I heard back. The 2015 concert series is already 'locked and loaded' as I expected it might be. However, the write suggested that any recommendations go to Marquis Entertainment Inc. who are responsible for this series. I'll follow up as should any of you interested in helping.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 16:38:30 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes artists need websites. A Wordpress Blog is so easy to set up and maintain, and for a small annual fee you can have a name without "wordpress" in it … not that I bother. There are so many good free templates with loads more at $40 to $50. You can get templates orientated to music or pictures or text or video. Essential.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 16:25:46 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: JT (Jackson Triggs) summer series recoomendationfor Roseann Fino

I've sent an e-mail to Jackson-Triggs winery in Niagara-on-the-Lake in Ontario recommending Roseann Fino to them for their upcoming summer series. If you go to their site, you'll see that they've had Sam Roberts Band, Bruce Cockburn, Colin James, and many others. It is apparently an excellent venue and attracts many. It would be a good venue for her.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 15:38:05 CET 2015 from (24.235.179.53)

Posted by:

J.L Avis

Location: CANADA

Subject: The Last Waltz - a musical celebration of THE BAND - LIVE -

Jerome Levon Avis OTTAWA Blues FANS - for 1 Night ONLY. Wed Mar 4 2015 - Shenkman Arts Centre The Last Waltz - a Musical Celebration of THE BAND - Live - comes to the Ottawa area. A very special event. 16 blues all stars including, The Weber Brothers (The Hawks), Jimmy Bowskill, Steve Mariner (Monkey Junk), Johnny Max, Brad Campbell (The Yohawks) and other special surprise guests playing the music of THE BAND from Martin Scorcese’s 1976 award winning documentary, THE LAST WALTZ. Also music by Paul Butterfield, Muddy Waters, Van Morrison, Neil Young, and Bob Dylan. 9 piece band with 4 horns including TUBA! w Juno and MBA award winning musical director Lance Anderson, Jerome Levon Avis (Levon Helm’s godson) and members of The Hawks, Blood Sweat and Tears, Manteca etc. Canada’s top players. Because of everybody’s busy schedules with their own bands, this show only tours twice a year. Don’t miss it. Wed Mar 4 8PM http://shenkmanarts.ca/…/march_mar…/the_last_waltz/index.htm We will also be in: Mar 6 Picton On - Regent Theatre - http://www.theregenttheatre.org/…/thelastwaltztributetothe…/ Mar 13 - Violet’s Venue in Barrie ON (only 7 tickets left) - http://tickets.violetsvenue.com/events/view/53 Mar 14th - Music By The Bay Live - Ajax ON - http://musicbythebaylive.com/…/last-waltz-music-band-ticke…/


Entered at Mon Feb 23 13:58:06 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Review of RoseAnn Fino's first album (linked) - I've been in London all weekend and so missed the discussion. Point out how The Civil Wars, The Mastersons, Simone Felice all seemed to do very well on the Britain / Ireland / Netherlands / Germany / Scandinavia circuit! Hope she'll make it across the Atlantic.

After seeing Mark Rylance yesterday in Farinelli & The King, it took us four hours to drive home instead of the normal 2.5 hours, thus arriving home too late. If I had got home 90 mins earlier and had time to eat something, I could have gone to see Garland Jeffreys just down the road - two miles away. But after four hours of stop-start traffic in heavy rain and no food, I didn't. Still, the play with a counter-tenor reproducing the arias of an 18th century castrato was incredible.


Entered at Mon Feb 23 07:22:07 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.77)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT, by contacting Hugh's Room as someone who frequents the place, and requesting that you would like them to consider booking Roseann, you made a good first step in raising their consciousness. In a totally innocent way, it's kinda even better than a booking agent contacting their booker, and it's a nice approach to open the door. All that said, now, please do the same with all the clubs in between NYC and Toronto, so we can all work on getting her & the band there and back.....

House concerts .... There's many veteran artists that do as many of them as they can, and also use em to pave the way of getting to & from club gigs.



Entered at Mon Feb 23 01:29:20 CET 2015 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: Bob F

You must be bursting with pride!!!


Entered at Sun Feb 22 22:48:21 CET 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Pat B, thanks. Your absolutely right. In the last year she finally found her band and wrote 10 songs for a new record. Mostly they've been playing all the new songs at her shows now. Once she records and releases the new songs, she definitely has to work on promoting them to the max.

John D, thanks again.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 19:48:15 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Hugh's Room

Richard and his crew are great people dedicated to people like your daughter Bob. Fingers crossed.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 19:04:52 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

BobF, it is vitally important for a young artist--heck, any artist--to take advantage of the digital marketplace. She needs to do a website, she needs to make performance videos and put them on her own Youtube channel, she needs to inhabit new folk websites, and she should try to collaborate with like-minded artists around the world.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 18:58:36 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino

Jeff, John D, JT, Kevin, thank you for the kind words about RoseAnn's music.

JT, RoseAnn doesn't have a web site yet. She does have this press kit which she needs to update. In the last couple of months she's played RockWood Music Hall, Mercury Lounge and The Bitter End in NYC. The rest of the time she's been playing in Astoria and Brooklyn. We really appreciate you inquiring about a show for RoseAnn in Toronto. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 16:42:42 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hugh's Room yet again

Just so you know, performers in the next few months at Hugh's Room include Iris Dement, Mary Gauthier and Dar Williams as well as Stephen Fearing. There will be a tribute to Levon Helm in the next couple of months and also a Dylan tribute during that period. This is an excellent small venue. New cds/albums are often introduced there.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 15:54:51 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Pizza crusts

Yesterday I saw an ad for pizza crusts stuffed with hot dogs.Ouch!


Entered at Sun Feb 22 15:07:34 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hugh's Room again (for Roseann Fino)

Regarding Roseann Fino, I got an e-mail back from the people at Hugh's Room thanking me and saying that they have referred the matter to the individuals who look at newer talent and booking and will look at it. That came back hours after I sent them my e-mail. Let's hope something good comes out of this, Jeff.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 13:51:25 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The Kitchen

Subject: The Battle of the Pizza Crust

I wonder if the Battle of the Stuffed Pizza Crust has reached the USA yet ...... it begun six or seven years ago in Asia by Pizza Hut with whole “shrimp-in-blankets” being grafted onto its crusts. Today the crust wars are being hard-fought by Domino’s and Pizza Hut in England, Germany and France ....


Entered at Sun Feb 22 03:46:56 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Wallsend, you are confused. If the song had not yet a complete form, as a song, Randy would not have said: " Jimmy Weider and Colin Linden wrote the tune."

Randy is not a sarcastic guy. It's safe to consider that "all we had to do was figure out how to play it." was his declaration that they were interpeting it for their comfort. Finding a way you are comfortable with a song, is just that. Rearranging a song is just that. A complete song is available to be interpreted to fit the artist.


Entered at Sun Feb 22 03:38:53 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hugh's Room Toronto

I sent an e-mail to Hugh's Room in Toronto re Roseann Fino. It is a great room in Toronto and would suit her well. We'll see if I get an answer. I pointed to the I Tunes album source and also to You Tube. Who knows what can happen?


Entered at Sun Feb 22 02:57:32 CET 2015 from (58.104.6.229)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Interesting quote from Randy Ciarlante about collaborative song writing:

“Remedy” was the first track we felt good about during the barn sessions. Jimmy Weider and Colin Linden wrote the tune, and all we had to do was figure out how to play it. We threw around some ideas and finally came up with the end result. We tracked it with two drumkits, and the parts got mixed together. Levon was using Hot Rods. They had and still do have a unique sound in that room. I played with sticks so we’d have that sound source to work with in the mix. Levon made that track come alive, and I was riding shotgun. If you’re going to create a Band track, he’s the main rhythm ingredient. I was a pinch of salt here and a shot of pepper there.


Entered at Sat Feb 21 22:09:49 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: "But you said we had the music so we'd be alright"

"I want you to realize there's no where I'd rather be/ Than sitting in the kitchen drinking boxed wine/ Bob Dylan singing "I shall be free" - Roseann Fino

Nicely done Jeff......a reminder of how good a night out can be..........and thanks to that post, I found this link of Roseann Fino's "Boxed Wine" - just a beautiful song and performance.


Entered at Sat Feb 21 20:22:02 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

John, Roseann Fino, or Ro as she is also called, certainly is Bob F.'s daughter. Jerry, stay tuned. Meanwhile, you might want to sponsor a show in Toronto. You'd be hailed as a genius.


Entered at Sat Feb 21 16:12:03 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Sorry. Name is spelled Roseann. No "e".


Entered at Sat Feb 21 16:06:03 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jeff

Jeff is Rosanne Bob F's daughter? Sorry I'm not on the inside here. She sounds great.


Entered at Sat Feb 21 15:58:56 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

JT her album is available on iTunes.

BTW did anyone see Bill Maher last night? I had no idea that songwriters gett very little for their songs streamed on line. The guest was songwriter Aloe Blacc. Here is a link to his comments. Taylor Swift has taken herself off Spotify. Very interesting article.


Entered at Sat Feb 21 10:17:43 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Thank you Jeff A

The best of the GB: So good to read a timely review of an excellent performer. Where can one hear her (is there a new album available now?) Advice, please. Thanks for the review. Who did you see afterwards?


Entered at Sat Feb 21 09:02:17 CET 2015 from (173.3.50.20)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Most of the things we write on this Gb don't matter all that much. We like to think they do, but they don't. What I'm about to write actually does matter. My words aren't going to do it justice. I went elsewhere after, saw another set, hung with people, and am too tired to find the correct words. But:

Roseanne Fino is the real thing. I don't mean she's good. I don't mean she;s very good. I mean the girl is exceptional enough & the performance & material reached that rare level of beauty that watching and listening i had tears in my eyes two or three times and goosebumps once.

Those of you who pay attention to my posts and opinions know i don't write much good about new music. You know i don't hear much new music or many new artists that i write anything good about. And I don't comment much about many artists you guys endorse & love, especially the newer ones, usually cause i don't feel the same way.... Roseanne did 10 originals and one cover. Another listen might improve my opinion for the better, but - Only two of the songs were just okay or maybe just better than okay . The rest of the new originals struck me as absolutely wonderful and superior. And Ro's performance is mind blowing, staggeringly superior and starworthy. BTW, the soundman tonight deserved kudos :-)

Without exaggerating, if this was 1975, this was the kind of performance that breaks an artist. Agents, labels, would all be falling all over themselves to sign Ro Fino. She'd have been signed already, and she'd be on her way. Forget the first record, like i indicated in December, we're in a completely different realm.

When i tell ya the girl got it all , musical talent galore ( vocal, guitar, songwriting), stage presence, looks, personality, and she' real, and aside from one small mis by the pianist there was not a flaw in the show, i mean it. and the band covered the mis...

Ro is the realest thing. No pretense, no airs, no phoniness, no theatrics. Just completely on top of her game, seemingly effortlessly, totally into what she was doing and loving living every second of it. This was one darn high energy show, Ro's performance, the feel, the polished raw professionalism, and also her killer band, knocked me over & out.

Then after her set, i went elsewhere, saw a great 90 minute set, and hung with one of the finest rock & roll and blues musicians alive. All before 1 in the morning.


Entered at Fri Feb 20 17:06:35 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: For whom the bells toll

Pat, at dawn, with their freedom like a sun, they came over the bridge. …… your dad and mine, shoulder to shoulder …..

Peter, thanks

Jeff, it was the Goldman and Sachs house market fraud (one of their many) turned into the album fraud (knowing many hard working people are ruined by Goldman and Sachs, I just gave it to them ;-)


Entered at Fri Feb 20 16:53:36 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: GB Offspring Performing Tonight In NYC

Anyone in NYC looking in, Bob's daughter Roseanne Fino, is performing at The Bitter End on Bleecker St tonight. First act goes on 7, Ro and her band will hit 7:45 - 8, do a 45 minute set. C'mon out, a little cold weather won't kill ya.

Unfortunately how a lot of the clubs survive today is the 45 minute set rule... 4 to6 bands a night, each band gets 45 minutes. Some only get 30. Really sucks. But because people don't come out in as big numbers as in the past, and also because clubs try to get bands to pay for free or bupkis, that's what it's become here in NY.


Entered at Fri Feb 20 12:50:15 CET 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Fashionable photos - short memory?

At least I dressed that way in the late sixties, you hipsters.


Entered at Fri Feb 20 10:19:44 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Neil Young and Alice Cooper? I can see the similarities. Um, both are North American and have longish straight hair, and both made lots of records in the early 70s. Oh, and both recorded for WEA labels. Coming next: The Beatles or the Bay City Rollers? Time to vote! It’s a tough one … but we managed the Rolling Stones v New Kids on The Block as well as Bob Dylan v Andy Williams. We can do it!

Seagulls are the rats of the air. Every seaside town has signs saying DO NOT FEED GULLS, which is worrying if you’re a dyslexic young woman. Talking of seagulls on soundtracks, we filmed a video in a car rental depot in Bristol once, and the location booker had not realized that though several miles inland, we were next to the city rubbish dump and the noise of seagulls all day was appalling. The other thing is the shit eats through car paint – always clean it off immediately, but if you park somewhere picturesque like Lyme Regis in Dorset, trails of shit are guaranteed. By the amount, you’d think they were albatrosses or eagles. I always put unfinished bottles of water in the boot of the car so as to be ready for instant seagull shite removal.


Entered at Fri Feb 20 03:03:52 CET 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: JH / Civic Duty

Alice Cooper over Neil Young? How serious can this poll be?


Entered at Fri Feb 20 01:39:24 CET 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: AFOS

A Flock Of Seagulls - "I Ran" - don't let me be misunderstood.

And I love 'A Salty Dog' in spite of its seagulls.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 23:48:30 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.93)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, one of my lines responding to you should have been more developed, maybe like this " regarding the scenario you presented, of course, one could think - offer even the biggest name photographer enough money for a straight work for hire shoot.................."


Entered at Thu Feb 19 23:19:27 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.93)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Hit the link.

I linked a very interesting article that sheds a lot of light on the quality of the music forms that most people listen to most frequently today. That being mp3s and streaming. The video gives you a slight idea of what is lost in mp3 compression. The writer makes the point that mp3s were developed for technology that existed over 20 years ago. that our computers are very different today & can handle much better files.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 23:09:52 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.213)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Johnson

I assume the footage of Richard is from Eat the Document although I think in one of the Dylan biographies I read they were working on another movie in Woodstock. I don't remember the details.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 22:00:28 CET 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: McKinley Morganfield/Chester Burnett/Ellis McDaniel

The RS early album's songwriting credits brought me names that I had never heard of previously. We were prime-time for them:15-16-17 years of age then and those covers and style were essential to our rabid learning about the music of our own country. A listening and learning and playing habit that has never left us -


Entered at Thu Feb 19 21:59:43 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.93)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Kevin, Photography

Kevin, though i'm not a photographer, my theoretical take is that there is no set in stone, unchangeable approach.I don't care how big the star or the label is. A photographer and the entity and entities or individuals involved have to come to an agreement.If the photographer or the other parties don't like a demand, they move on. Of course, one could think - offer even the biggest name photographer enough money for a shoot, why wouldn't they take it? At the same time, the photographer needs, should probably want some control over or input into what gets used..... how things get altered, we're in a digital world, remember? Alterations are a dime a thousand... there are more variables than you realize and there is much more at stake than you realize....



Entered at Thu Feb 19 21:22:18 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: far away in time

Thanks for bringing up the gulls, Bill -- I retain a visceral hatred for the pestilential scavengers since a traumatic day decades back, my first and last visit to Wasaga Beach beach. I think the buggers had a seat on the planning commission; the McDonald's was just across the road from the sand, and they'd wait for you to fetch the fries over before attacking with claw and beak and shitting on your head.

Also the first time I'd seen paunchy middle-aged persons strutting about in thong swimsuits . . . really, it's a wonder I'm normal.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 21:21:08 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Todd & Photos

I might have the publications mixed up but I seem to recall quite an in-depth article in Rolling Stone magazine of several years back on rock n roll photography and a number of the well knownt photographers were featured. One anecdote that stayed with me because it was a bit surprising was a story that Rod Stewart seemed to be the least vain and fussy of the big time stars....after a 1/2 day shoot didn't even care to look at any photos and cheerfully told the guy to send in whatever he felt best.

......but back to The Band.........Elliot Landy's pictures really did help with the image and mythology but the ownwership question is an interesting one. Surely in this day and age, if a photographer is brought in to do an all day shoot of a star like Rihanna , he wouldn't have the rights - ever ? - to sell the pictures, would he ? Of course, if he retained ownership from the get go, that is clear but would not the artist or record company keep control of that image always?


Entered at Thu Feb 19 19:06:54 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hot Rocks

I've always felt that Hot Rocks was the best "Best Of" compilation ever released. There seems to have been hundreds of RS ones since but that one holds a special place.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 18:29:52 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Rolling Stones

Satanic Majesties was largely misguided - collectible now for the cover with 3D bit. Personally, I think Let It Bleed the towering masterpiece, bookended either side by Beggar's Banquet and Sticky Fingers, both close. I'd go along with Mick Jagger's statement that Exile on Main Street was all riffs and no songs, even if the critics love it. If I could only take three … Let It Bleed, the first album and a Greatest Hits (early) to round up the singles.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 18:29:39 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

A Salty Dog by Procol Harum had the sound of real seagulls.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 18:25:53 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Send in the comment, Kevin. It has merit. I personally don't avoid the big ones for exactly the reason you state. The Beach Boys are an exception - as was Leonard Cohen. Because The Beatles, Bob Dylan and The Band were so early, we just did a straight ten with little comment.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 18:04:49 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Though I am still smarting over having not made your great laughs list of some weeks back ( I do like to think that had the list been extended, I might have been at 4 and 5 ).....I did chuckle at that post and did remember that long standing dislike of yours for Hotel California.

......no doubt that anyone who grew up with FM radio and had to endure the torture of having so many big songs played o death has scars and likely has a list if many that they would be happy to never hear again.....too many to list for me but the odd thing is that there are some that despite way to many listennings, I never have tired of.....not in the slightest......These include: Hotel California, The Weight, Stairway to Heaven, Maggie May, Sultans of Swing and Losing My Religion.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 17:44:57 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.182)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Stones

JT, I've always loved She's A Rainbow, Citadel and Sing This All Together also. It still has to be considered a misstep. Beggers Banquet more then made up for any misstep. A masterpiece along with everything else they did up to and including Some Girls.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 17:35:42 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: The absurd thing is you interrupting a completely sensible conversation about seagulls to talk about how to please little green men. But since you asked, I think they're our only hope of escaping our choking planet so would be disinclined to thrust "Hotel California" on them. In the words of Blind Willie Johnson, "Everybody ought to treat a stranger right, a long way from home" (see link).


Entered at Thu Feb 19 17:14:40 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Toppermost

This waiving of the rules for the Beach Boys at Toppermost reminds me of a similar honour that had been accorded certain hockey players as they retired and were considered for the Hockey Hall of Fame. The best of the best like Rocket Richard, Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Jean Beliveau, Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux had the normal 3 year waiting period for induction waived...........in the Toppermost world, I guess there would be a handful of other artists where that might apply.......but I would far rather see a clear division for every artist featured ( or at least the major mainstream ones ) where each list would have 10 must-haves ( the most representative ones ) and 10 hidden gems. My only quible with the site is the absurdity that now sometimes results when the contributor feels they should omit a great song solely because of its popularity.......Imagine landing from outer space and being directed to a list on The Eagles and not seeing "Hotel California" listed, or "Stairway" for Zep or "The Weight" for The Band, etc.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 16:57:23 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 2000 Light Years From Home

"Majesties Request" - not a great album but I admired' 2000 Light Years From Home' from its inception. There are a few others that merit mention but certainly this seemed like a (weak) response by a group trying to keep up with a trend. I found it relatively sad, since this quintet was so good at what they did and likely failed to do this type of thing.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 16:52:57 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: droppings

And of course there is "I Ran (so far away)" by those pesky birds. They wake us up most mornings searching for food refuse on the streets. They are brazen.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 16:44:19 CET 2015 from (107.170.192.225)

Posted by:

Johnson

Web: My link

Subject: Richard on film

I wonder if anyone knows anything about the above clip of Richard and Dylan in Woodstock? If you scroll the video to 19:53 minutes you will see a long clip of Richard look straight at the camera. It was said in the documentary that The Band followed Dylan to Woodstock to make a film.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 16:29:26 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc / Kevin J: Thanks. Interesting that the Bad Company seagull lines-up with Dylan's harbinger and Neil Young's lines-up with Behan's Jonathan Livingston. Where's the cubist seagull, not just B&W but also all personality shades between - the caring parent, the workinggull, the harassing shit-hawk eyeing your fries ...


Entered at Thu Feb 19 16:06:42 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Seagulls......

.....and another one Bill M, fom the first Bad Company album. Paul Rogers sounds great singing anything.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 15:44:53 CET 2015 from (31.48.0.159)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Seagulls

You know this one, Bill M.

'Seagulls circle endlessly, I sing in silent harmony, we shall be free'

Here's a clue. Is that Neil Young at the door window?


Entered at Thu Feb 19 15:30:05 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Until this week, if you'd asked me to names songs with seagulls in them I'd've come up with just Love Sculpture's "Seagull", from their wonderful "Forms and Feelings" album.

But now I know of two more, both on disc 1 of the complete Basement Tapes set. The second of the two is Dylan's rendition of Brendan Behan's "Royal Canal", where the seagull is something that can be seen through the tiny cell window by a prisoner. So more like how Richard Bach viewed the things - free and even zen-like. The first reference is "Let me tell you brother it's coming when the seagulls fly over the town". You don't get the sense that what's coming is all sweetness and light, unlike, say, the song that goes "When the swallows come back for cappuccino".


Entered at Thu Feb 19 14:39:12 CET 2015 from (31.48.0.159)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Don't Worry Baby, Stones

How difficult it is to select only 21 Beach Boys tracks. Peter, Dlew and their mate's post on Toppermost is well worth a read - three insights, and the webmaster has done a great job presenting their work with a lot of great clips and links. I've linked it above.

I don't think 'Their Satanic Majesties Request' is the Stones' best work. But I think where The Stones are innovative are in producing outstanding singles in the sixties - 'Satisfaction', 'The Last Time', 'Jumping Jack Flash', '19th Nervous Breakdown', 'Have You Seen Your Mother Baby', 'Get Off My Cloud', 'Ruby Tuesday', 'Paint It Black', 'Honky Talk Women', 'Let's Spend The Night Together', and 'Brown Sugar'.

And in the three albums,'Let It Bleed', 'Exile On Main Street', and 'Sticky Fingers'.

Playing 'Pet Sounds' just now.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 14:15:05 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Photography Business

Typically in a commercial photography situation, the photographer retains copyright (the right to make copies) of the images, and charges a licensing fee for usage of the photos. The exception would be if the photographer is an employee or it is done as a work made for hire. In those cases, the employer would own the copyright. The other option would be if the photographer signed his rights away in a rights buy-out for a much higher upfront commission, which is less common, as clients like to keep their expenses as low as possible to maximize their own profit. Think of it as compared to renting a hotel room vs. buying a house.

In most cases, many businesses do not want the longer term expense of having a photographer as an employee (buying the house), and it is more economical to pay a licensing fee (renting the hotel room) for a limited usage. Employees need things like benefits including consistent income, sick pay, vacation pay, holiday pay, pensions, and health insurance. Independent or freelance photographers need to provide for theses expenses on their own. If they can make a few hundred dollars selling a print (that they own the copyright to) decades after the fact, it's really a drop in the bucket. Some photographers get lucky and end up having a few celebrity portraits that they can resell. Look at it as a nice , but unreliable and inconsistent source of retirement income.

The late photographer Jim Marshall, has prints for sale that range anywhere from $1,500 to $4,000. At those prices, it is considered art, rather than a reprint. Most photographers are not in the position of having iconic photos of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, or even The Band during their legendary years.

I can't speak for Elliot Landy, but it is highly probable that his original fee to photograph The Band was quite low, and he may have even had to pay for some of his own film and processing, and provided his own equipment to produce the photo shoots.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 12:24:33 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Done it, Jan. While I felt bad about Jefferson Airplane, I'm happy to vote for The Band v Jethro Tull. Sorry to JTullFan …


Entered at Thu Feb 19 12:06:46 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: The Band vs. Jethro Tull

And we're in the semis! Time to do your civic duty again.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 10:17:39 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don't Worry Baby

Usually I play someone a lot in the time leading to a Topprmost then switch. Yesterday I played Holland three times, and the day before LA (Light Album) twice. I'd suddenly thought, 'Why didn't I include Good Timing?" I suspect "Don't Worry Baby" was a virtual 22nd, as our webmaster added a video at the end, which is a gentle hint. I mentioned it as a B-side that we wore out and it is on my "short Beach Boys" playlist.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 09:56:55 CET 2015 from (58.104.9.150)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Didn't Levon ask Elliot Landy for a cut of the fee for photos of the Band he was selling and didn't Elliot refuse.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 09:24:32 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The collage

Well found. The collage was OK, and muted down. That was probably the intent for a cover - which means the foreshortened bodies and out-of-the-box shoes didn't matter. The photographer was only interested in chest up. That's why it's weird selling the original full shots rather than assembling a collage as intended. As no doubt Time paid a fee, and The Band would not have received a modeling fee as it was publicity … the question of image rights comes up. If someone was selling a photo of me for $300, I might ask where my share was!


Entered at Thu Feb 19 06:46:44 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Just don't judge me by my shoes

Interesting to see the studio photos of the guys.
I don't think it's all that uncommon to have new shoes and / or clothes for a studio portrait. Can you imagine how that white seamless background paper would have looked they had tromped on over still wearing their muddy boots from the John Joy Road, Band album cover shoot. Would have been a mess!

The thing that stood out to me as different, was seeing them photographed independently. Most of the photos from this era show them as a group, all posed together which reflects the togetherness of that time period for them.

It was much the same with the Beatles. In their early photos, they were often shown together. Compare that to the White album, and Let It Be albums where the photos chosen had them shown as individuals.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 06:10:59 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Atlantic City

Clip of Amy Helm and the guys performing 'Atlantic City' from the barrel room at City Winery in NYC. This must have been prior to her show upstairs at the Winery on Feb 4th. I saw her 2 nights later in Old Saybrook, CT. Nice acoustic version with a lot of natural reverb from the cellar.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 02:09:20 CET 2015 from (67.84.76.22)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Not speaking ill of the dead ( as Pete declared) , or the living. Saw the item in the link with some weird ads linked alongside an article early today & in light of the current discussion of an interview, and the fact that pink scarves have been the topic of conversation here from time to time, figured as fucked up as it is, it's worth mentioning. Amongst other things,this is a for real actual pink color , and though i have no real idea, from this interview he gave & other things, it seems Lou might have been one to wear this scarf proudly.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 01:49:46 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Stones were always followers

Someone said the Stones were not innovators. Quite right!

The Beatles' "Sgt Pepper" album came out in mid-1967; The Stones'"Satanic Majesties" at the end of the year.

I would suggest that many here will not only be able to name the songs on "Sgt Pepper" (or, at least, a goodly number of them), but also to recall the tunes and probably to sing some of the words.

On the other hand, could you do it with "Satanic Majesties"? I would guess not.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 01:40:19 CET 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: photo session outtakes

I thought those studio images looked familiar. Linked is an old "'70s photo collage" from Jan's archive. They are all alternate poses, and better too.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 01:05:16 CET 2015 from (67.84.76.22)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, If Johnny Winter opened up, i was at that same Stones concert. I'm never able to recall if it was 72 or 73. My friend's dad was a politician, another close family member worked for the promoter, so a few of us got hooked up with some nice seats.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 00:34:43 CET 2015 from (31.48.0.159)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various points

I always see Bob Dylan as up there and far ahead of any singer songwriter. When I saw Sid Griffin talking on the 'Basement Tapes', a hugely enjoyable experience, he put forward a strong case for the importance of Dylan - mentioning that he is the only musician on the list of the 100 most important people in the 20th century. Was this a UN list? Look at the publicity in Britain recently after the release of the Basement Tapes and the recent album.

Then I always say that my favourite group is The Band, but The Beatles always enter this conversation.

But I think the Stones are great, seen them twice, and are brilliant.

But how do you measure bands against each other. Lou Reed(older) would be up there in the best concerts I have seen.

Peter, Dlew and their pal's post on the Beach Boys on Toppermost has had me playing The Beach Boys all evening. Listen to 'Don't Worry Baby' on headphones. What a brilliant piece of music. And it never even made the Toppermost list!

So how can you compare.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 00:21:20 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fab 4 /'Fabber' 5

The movies did not get me. It was Rubber Soul that started to get me a bit interested. I did like Roll Over Beethoven from the start and a few of the other covers cuts. I agree with your comment on the Stones, Peter. I knew nothing of the blues and minimal about R&B until the RS. I also agree that their versions were exceptional for the most part. I still listen to those old albums and they are my company often when I fly.


Entered at Thu Feb 19 00:08:06 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

From a British perspective, me and most of my friends "fell out of love" with The Beatles around the two films, Hard Day's Night & Help, because The Stones were just taking off.

In retrospect we were totally cloth-eared as the Stones were derivative and we soon turned to Chuck, Bo, Marvin Gaye, Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, Slim Harpo and John Lee Hooker instead. We should be eternally grateful to the Stones for exposing us to this wealth of stuff, and for covering it so well themselves that we were inspired to listen to it further. Though it was derivative, they often equalled the originals or even bettered them.

The Beatles got the more attuned back with Beatles for Sale, though many had to wait for Rubber Soul before they went back and realized the joys they missed. In retrospect it was all magic, but in 1964? If you thought you were hip, the Beatles was the stuff girls screamed to. The Stones were serious.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 23:51:58 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Basically, no musician should ever dare to knock The Beatles (Lou Reed) or Dylan (Joni Mitchell). They are in a different league, even to the Stones and even to The Band. Though as a non-musician, I reserve the right to knock anyone.

One I heard today in a record shop discussing this was Joni's apparent claim (I don't know where) that Dylan paid to have roadies send her de-tuned guitars on stage.

Paranoia runs deep, into your life it will creep …


Entered at Wed Feb 18 23:09:39 CET 2015 from (58.104.9.150)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I don't deny that the Stones provided great entertainment. They did what they did really well. I just don't seen it as being very innovative. With the Beatles and Dylan and our guys you can see a period where they just imitated and this changed it to something really new. I just don't see that kind of transition with the Stones. That isn't to say they didn't write some great songs.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 22:52:35 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Music mining deep

I don't disagree with the importance of the Beatles. They mattered!! Period. My comments relate only to how they hit me in 1963-64. If truth be told, you might hear that from many who were there at the time. The first material seemed 'light-weight' and the musicianship at first was OK but not stellar (GH perhaps excepted). They were tight and I guess it was some of the pap material that I didn't appreciate at the time. But again, their relevance - no question. I would put there ultimate impact on popular music at the highest level - like Dylan and lyrical music. But The Stones got me in the heart of my being and in 1963, lyrics mattered and my that depth mattered. I think Lou would have said (and maybe he did) something different later in his career.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 22:34:24 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: The Stones

Wallsend, I don't disagree with your Beatles sentence. Before The Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan my world was back and white. The next day everything was in color. I do think your underestimating the importance of The Rolling Stones. For many years they meant just about everything. I heard 'Winter' on the radio this morning and I could feel the sun for the first time in weeks. In 1972 when The Stones played Madison Square Garden we were the happiest train load of country bumpkins heading to the big city . The Stones never disappointed in those days. Love them forever.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:41:56 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The best advice for any of these guys is "Never do interviews." Always sensible.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:37:42 CET 2015 from (65.93.118.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

That would be swell, Kevin. But I'm not hopeful. Angie appears to have moved on. But then, I'm up for a nice surprise.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:31:16 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Mike Nomad.........on a positive note, this just might bring brown eyed girl back, and swinging at that.

Wallsend: Perfect two sentences......case closed.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:26:01 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually Lou said "I got a BA in English at Syracuse University." Nothing against Syracuse, Lou, I know nothing of it, but it;s not fucking Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or Princeton, is t?


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:23:27 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lou Reed destroys his mystique

"I did a creative writing class at university, I got a BA in English"

Jesus! (title of a Lou Reed song there). In 1987, as in this interview, he was really, really SUCH an arsehole. Do not speak ill of the dead, but this interview was cretinous beyond belief. I think a bonfire of VU / Lou Reed albums is called for immediately. What a prat!


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:22:24 CET 2015 from (58.104.9.150)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The Beatles are important not just because they changed music in a really unique way but because they also changed the world. The Stones just popularised a form of music that already existed.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:17:29 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Lou Reed had all sorts of poses and I saw through them all......his comments on the Beatles are idiotic. He had once made some disparaging comments about Bob Dylan as well but then changed his tune when his "girlfriend" pointed him towards some compliments that Dylan had directed his way.........I loved the "New York" record and "Walk This Way" is rock music in its most perfect, simple beauty but his interviews were never anything to take seriously.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:14:05 CET 2015 from (67.84.76.22)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Missing Link.

Pete, forgive me, i thought i linked it, guess i didn't look at everything before i approved my post. the link is essential. You can hear him say it.



Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:12:39 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Having Googled and found the Lou Reed 1987 stuff, I have to say that in terms of artistic merit, much as I love the VU and Lou Reed, Lou was not fit to lick the Beatles' bottoms (much as he would have liked to).


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:09:07 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A link would have been useful, but not having read the interview, I agree that The Doors were stupid.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 21:02:52 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Lou Reed and The Fab 4

Jeff A: I understand completely how Lou Reed felt. When the Beatles came out, I had exactly that reaction. In fact, I didn't get to appreciate much of what they did until later when I guess my tastes changed or expanded (probably both) and I could see some merit in the early stuff and got to like some of the later material. But I was not an instant fan, preferring the Rolling Stones with their roots of rock /blues approach right from the start. Even now, I can appreciate their contribution but when held up to absolute musical scrutiny with all things considered, a critical approach will find holes in the overall oeuvre. (not so different however to many, including Lou Reed's work).


Entered at Wed Feb 18 20:34:28 CET 2015 from (99.148.155.130)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Subject: Jacqueline Bissett

Jacqueline Bissett, oh la la!


Entered at Wed Feb 18 19:56:21 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Who do you like Lou ?

......if only he had answered Merle Haggard and Tom T Hall, the interview would have been perfect !


Entered at Wed Feb 18 19:42:08 CET 2015 from (67.84.76.22)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Lou Reed on the Beatles

Lou Reed interview. Parts are quoted in print. there is also a video linked to the audio interview. You can hear this in his own words, in context, with his own intonation. Draw your own conclusions.

“From my point of view … the other stuff couldn’t come up to our ankles, not up to my kneecap, not up to my ankles, the level we were on, compared to everyone else. I mean they were just painfully stupid and pretentious, and when they did try to get, in quotes, ‘arty,’ it was worse than stupid rock & roll. What I mean by ‘stupid,’ I mean, like, The Doors.”

“I never liked the Beatles,” Reed said. “I thought they were garbage. If you say, ‘Who did you like?’ I liked nobody.”


Entered at Wed Feb 18 19:24:09 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Photos: Time Magazine had also made a decision to go with sketches of the very photogenic Beatles for their cover. The Beatles being the first rock band so honoured.....The Band was the 2nd rock band to be featured on a cover. This was a strange period in history ( 1967-1970 ) where even great looking guys like Paul McCartney, Robbie Robertson and Rick Danko were made to look squirrelly because of facial hair. Putting rockers on the cover would have been risqué enough for the old boys running the magazine but to return to the offices without even the hint of a glamour shot would have been frustrating for a photographer. Danko and Robertson went almost a decade obscuring their looks......I guess not until 74 or 75 when they were back to looking sharp in the 1959 to 1966 kind of way.

JT: As a Habs fan, the plight of the Leafs is a concern to me as they are creeping closer to qualifying for the Conner McDavid lottery and he is a once in a generation type talent......but yes,the bunch that are there now with the ridiculous decision that Burke made to build a team around Kessel and Phaneuf is exactly where I thought they would be. No heart and highly unlikable which is a bad combination for a losing team.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 15:37:46 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

They do show how evocative Elliot Landy's photos were in comparison. Cut outs was a bad idea, as was posing them "like lemons." They look stiff and uncomfortable, and (e,g.) Robbie's mustard polo neck does not have the mountain men mystery of Landy's pictures! Colour was a bad idea too.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 15:25:23 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: where's that guy from _Rat_

The Levon one's okay - good hat and native dignity, I suppose. But all in all, about the dweebiest pix we've seen. Very glad _Time_ chose to go with the drawing, which carries a nice aura of mystery & menace.


Entered at Wed Feb 18 09:32:37 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Photos

Richard had access to a time machine and had managed to buy a grungy retro style 2015 cardigan from a London UK boutique for only £400.

Pat’s right- they look as if they bought shoes for it. I wondered why the pictures are being sold “uncropped” with the studio revealed. I also imagine they weren’t used because they’re not very good. The only one I’d definitely use is Rick Danko, by far the best photo and pose.

What got me is that both Garth and Richard are odd photos. Robbie and Levon are boring photos. For years we did educational video, and the accompanying books had still photos – often 200 to 300, which were taken during the camera rehearsals for filming. I would have 2000 to 3000 transparencies to choose from for the book. We always had a professional photographer, and I also took photos throughout, as often it was a case of capturing an exact expression or move, which when filming live action, involves luck. We’d end up using 20% of mine.

Anyway, on two shoots, the professional photographer was about 6 foot three or four … he was taller than me. He did a lot of newspaper work and football. He was appalled when I asked if he did weddings. Never! he said. Good job, because he wouldn’t have got a second wedding gig. He invariably took photos from his eyeline, not the subjects eyeline. The result was that the actors all looked oddly shortened with the heads too big and the legs too short. I see the effect in Garth and Richard (linked) – though hair and bushy beards and narrow trousers accentuate it. After the first shoot, I really annoyed him by constantly saying “Can you bend your knees and get the actors’ eyelines, not yours?’ Still his landscapes were fabulous.

Anyway, if I’d been the Time photo editor, Rick is the only one that would have taken my attention. But $300 for prints of the others? Phew!


Entered at Wed Feb 18 04:41:32 CET 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Band 1969 photos

Great find. Was Richard wearing his grandma's sweater?


Entered at Tue Feb 17 23:59:55 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Frustration

Kevin J: That's where the Leafs are lately (S. Creek), unfortunately. Perplexing is an understatement for a Leaf fan. How can a team that almost tore up the league for 2 1/2 months disappear? I know; Everyone says its playing in Toronto. They say it is the stupid fans with their constant filling of the stadium. They say its the crazy salaries for so many years. You and I have heard it all. I still don't get it. You cannot condemn so many people individually. What is team chemistry? What happens when there appears to be a lack of leadership. Why does a player like van Riemsdyk, who went to the net for 2 months, stop doing that/ stop screening the goaltender/become almost unnoticeable. Why is young Kadri failing (not falling) most of the time? These are enigmatic questions with no obvious answers. The experts think they know but when I read them, they come up with all the crap I wrote above. I don't buy any of it. Truth be... I don't know!


Entered at Wed Feb 18 00:00:09 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Wow. They all had nice shoes.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 23:34:17 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: 1969 OQ studio portraits

Hadn't seen these before.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 22:14:13 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hothouse Flowers

Thank you, Pat B. Thinking about the David Letterman show - it really has been the go to place to see rock n roll on tv for a very long time. In terms of a daily show, I would guess nothing has come close. I preferred the show in its early days, especially the small band with Jordon on drums and Hiram Bullock on guitar but the show has consistently booked good guest bands and singers for a long time......I guess the next 20 years will be Jimmy Fallon for this sort of thing.

Bill M: funny and it is weird, is it not how often this sort of thing happens......I will quite regularly be reading something and come across a word or a phrase that is unusual or new to me and then over the next few days/weeks will be surprised at how often it appears in all sorts of places.

Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara have a new show on CBC called "Schitt's Creek"..........I have no idea about how good or bad the show will be but it has been hilarious to hear the live promos on Hockey Night in Canada telecasts as the play by play guys advise everyone of the new comedy on the network.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 20:57:56 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Most Of The Time

I found this link at Expecting Rain. An anonymous young lady with an arresting and beguiling version of a Dylan classic.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 19:56:34 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

It's an oldie (1956), but the one that's got me at the moment is "Cherokee Dance" by Bob Landers with Willie Joe and his Unitar. At the link you should find follow-on links to other things by Willie Joe Duncan.

Speaking of primitive, I finally picked up the complete Dylan basement tapes set last night. I was dumbfounded to read the fourth sentence of Sid Griffin's marquee notes: " ... cubist accompaniment of four backing musicians ..." Poor Sid - probably called in the correction just as the trucks were leaving the warehouse. Ah well - at least the music is fabulous.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 18:24:25 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Van The Man

Wow! What a mixed bag of duet partners. I hope it's like a Christmas record where sometimes the unlikely combination can make a great record.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 18:03:32 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Real Real Gone

The new Van Morrison Duets album is announced (see link) - you should be able to stream Real Real Gone with Michael Buble but I couldn't get it to work. Heard it on the car radio this morning. The duet that fascinates me is "Whatever Happened to P.J. Proby" sung with P.J. Proby!


Entered at Tue Feb 17 15:20:46 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Memphis

Jon, that is a great version. Check out this version of Solomon Burke performing Memphis with Buddy Miller on guitar. What a great singer!


Entered at Tue Feb 17 12:12:55 CET 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: That's How I Got to Memphis

Bob, try Solomon Burke's 'Memphis' if you haven't already.


Entered at Tue Feb 17 01:49:17 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Waterboys

I just checked and it was almost 25 years ago that I saw The Waterboys at a venue less than 2 miles from where I was then living. I went with my eldest.

Knowing the venue, we hung around after the show and Mike Scott and other band members came down a corridor. At that point, I pulled out three original copies of JUNGLELAND, the fanzine he had edited in 1977 from the next town from where I'd lived. When he spotted them, he asked to borrow them a moment and enthusiastically showed them around to his fellow band members. He commented that I'd re-stapled the pages, saying he had personally undertaken that chore. He then signed the cover of each one for me.

Some years back, I sold the magazines to a Waterboys fan but not before photocopying the covers.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 22:43:39 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Tom T. Hall

'Harper Valley PTA' is a Tom T. Hall song of course. He also wrote the classic 'That's How I Got To Memphis' and a ton of other great songs. No matter who covers Memphis it always sounds great. Roseanne Cash has a great version but my favorite is Buddy Miller's.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 21:20:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hothouse Flowers were way better than U2. As were The Waterboys.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 19:47:52 CET 2015 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hothouse Flowers

I thought they were good too. I recall them being called the next U-2. The main guy - Liam Maloney (in Irish?) - was a talented singer & writer & musician who also had big-time charisma. They hit right when Irish culture & music was hitting pop culture, River Dance, etc -


Entered at Mon Feb 16 19:40:48 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mike Scott's Waterboys

I've heard a cut from the new album and I like it a lot. I've been listening to the available old You Tube cuts and they are great. I'll go to Ditch or Lyle's today based on your recommendations and see what Waterboys they've got and what Mike Scott they have. Its always nice to delve into something deeply that you haven't had motivation for in the past. Thanks for all the input.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 19:39:52 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Well then, Kevin J, you'll like this.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 18:29:57 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Hothouse Flowers

Thinking of the 80's reminded me of this other fine band from that period.........LINKED: a great cover of a classic song.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 18:13:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent Fisherman’s Blues video, co-written by Steve Wickham in fact. The Whole of The Moon was the mega UK hit when it was reissued in 1991, easily their best-known UK track. But I still think "Appointment with Mr Yeats" is their masterpiece.

I love Harper Valley PTA too, but it was Jeannie C. Riley, not Bobbie Gentry.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 17:54:24 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: speaking of Bobbie Gentry...

At a Ramble in about 2006, the LHS Band played an instrumental version of "Harper Valley PTA". Heavy on gutsy sounds, especially the horns. Slinky and greasy to the max, it was one of the most satisfying things I ever put in my ears. Magnificent.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 16:55:10 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: UK

For those in the UK: November 2015 dates for The Waterboys - all over the kingdom. And Seattle night after Victoria, 21 May.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 16:09:37 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Waterboys.....

......my vote goes to This is the Sea..........Still remember hearing "The Whole of the Moon" on the radio and thinking that there was some hope after all......Karl Wallinger was an important part of The Waterboys in the early days.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 13:44:38 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Fisherman's Blues


Entered at Mon Feb 16 13:38:23 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: The Waterboys

Peter, On a slow day you should go back and listen to This Is The Sea and Fisherman's Blues. To put it in some kind of context to a long time Waterboys fan they would be their Highway 61 and Blonde on Blonde. Also Mike Scott has Steve Wickham, the worlds greatest rock fiddle player along side him. Without whom, your right the Waterboys at this point would be Mike Scott and hired hands.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 09:10:27 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: November Tale - The Waterboys

Link to November Tale, lead video from "Modern Blues" - hopefully it will play in North America too. A good taster for the album and they're bound to feature it.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 09:06:27 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Waterboys

We discussed them recently- apparently the new album, Modern Blues, is delayed in North America until the tour. I've been playing it for a few weeks. I would expect a focus on that and the last one, An Appointment With Mr Yeats, which I reckon is their best album, though Modern Blues is nearly as good.

I've linked my May 2012 review. The tour was billed as "An Appointment With The Waterboys" and for me there was too much early stuff and not enough from "An Appointment With Mr Yeats" which I'd expected in full from the billing. The stuff from "Mr Yeats" was way better and occupied most of the second set.

The Waterboys aren't really a band, so much as Mike Scott. The new album was done in Nashville with top American session guys like David Hood, except for the fiddle player Steve Wickham, who with Mike Scott is the essential element.

On live shows, I was just Googling tonight's films and saw that Rumer was playing in town three miles away last night! One of my favourite artists of the last few years, and I have all her albums. Show was sold out, and I didn't see a single advert - so it must have sold out so fast they didn't bother,


Entered at Mon Feb 16 03:05:54 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: The Waterboys

JT, The Waterboys are my wife's favorite band. This Is The Sea and Fisherman's Blues are great records. Universal Hall is also very good. Mike Scott's solo record Bring It All In is terrific.

Jeff, I've seen Teresa Williams a bunch of times. Great singer.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 02:42:35 CET 2015 from (173.3.50.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert. Where'd you find that info re Goldman Sachs?


Entered at Mon Feb 16 02:39:39 CET 2015 from (173.3.50.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, I've always enjoyed Jill Sobule. Never can take large or very frequent doses, but I enjoy her work. She's a good & smart artist. Teresa..... Bob, have you had the chance to see Teresa sing straight old fashioned country? I caught a Merle Haggard tribute at Lincoln Center, i guess close to 10 years ago now. Maybe 10 on the nose. She, Larry, Jorma, Jim Lauderdale, & Alvin Yoongblood Hart. Man, she can blow you away on real country music, which is her background. i think she's a tennessee girl. For me, her & Alvin's performances were the highlights of the show that night. Jorma had an uncharacteristic semi off night, seemed as though he might not have been feeling well.

A few years back I saw Elaine Caswell sing a perfect, powerful rendition of White Rabbitt, to slamming accompaniment by Jimmy Vivino & friends. Just a month or so ago I saw a younger gal, Sari Schorr do a fine & powerful rendition at a show of hers, backed brilliantly by 4 of the finest touring and studio musicians to be found. All NYC natives, each with staggering amounts of major credits. The sound man even did a great job of reverb on her vocal in the amounts in the right places in the end of the song. Her guitarist that night was a longtime friend & cohort of mine. I asked him if the sound man had that, or if i missed something. He smiled, said it "was the sound man Sometimes they actually do know what they are doing."


Entered at Mon Feb 16 02:29:43 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Waterboys

The Waterboys are coming to Victoria! We secured tickets for the May 20 show at University of Victoria. Looking forward to this one. We'll get very familiar with the music before we go. We have been aware of them but took a larger interest after the recent release. Any suggestions of the best cds/albums?


Entered at Mon Feb 16 00:54:39 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Download Releases

In addition to the Cleveland 1978 classic show, Springsteen has now released the 1975 Tower Theatre, Philadelphia show on his download site. You also can get the shows on cd.

I wonder why The Band team are not releasing concerts using the download method.


Entered at Mon Feb 16 00:09:54 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Chasing Rabbits

Haven't heard the 'White Rabbit', but my sense is that would be a tougher song to pull off. Grace Slick owns that one.

No intention of starting an argument, but as a Doors fan, I always felt that Jefferson Airplane was sort of a cousin to the Doors. To my ears and sensibilities, they had a lot in common. I suppose it can come down to preference for the singer, as to which band one prefers, but I see them as almost being cut from the same psychedelic rock cloth.

In the interest of full disclosure, I have 6 Doors albums, and 2 Jefferson Airplane albums.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 23:15:14 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I also miss Dlew and Rob the Organ here, but "Rob Morgan" on the Toppermost Beach Boys is not Rob the Organ, but is a different frequent and valued contributor to Toppermost too.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 23:10:39 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My judgement was also on White Rabbit (not linked). Too much of a JA fan to take it!


Entered at Sun Feb 15 22:41:34 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Somebody To Love

While I thought the sound somewhat lacking on the November 2013 'Somebody to Love' performance, I thought that the December 2014 'Somebody to Love', (Jeff's second helping of Tuna link) - performance was fine....it probably sounded even better in the Hall. Teresa Williams is a fine singer.

Bob F, thanks for the Susanna Hoffs link. It wasn't cool to like The Bangles among my rock snob friends in the 1980's, but Ms. Hoffs was a guilty pleasure for me.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 22:24:57 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Oh Yeah ! Bad Company!

Give Bob F the dial and let him run the show all day !


Entered at Sun Feb 15 22:20:35 CET 2015 from (76.66.129.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Thank you for that Jill Sobuke link.....the best I have seen in a long while.......wonderful. The "Somebody to Love" performances, on the other hand, were tough to watch.

Dave Alvin.......Interesting to note that he is the subject of a recent Toppermost write up.....one of those ones where I have no idea whether the guy has it well pegged or not but it will serve as a guide to me which is nice........reading the Beach Boys one makes me realize how much we miss Dlew and Rob The Organ at this place.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 22:18:38 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Susanna Hoffs

The Teresa Williams reminded me of this great Susanna Hoffs video. It's interesting when you see normally reserved performers letting loose.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 21:59:38 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It was also Hot Tuna - fantastic with just Jack & Jorma (with Jill Sobule) but just a mess when everyone else joined in.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 21:55:43 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Come back, Grace, all is forgiven …

Loved the Jill Sobule footage. Loathed the Theresa Williams footage. Sorry, I thought she was dire!


Entered at Sun Feb 15 20:08:31 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Teresa Williams singing Somebody To Love

Jeff, that's a great version. I've seen Teresa Williams perform a bunch of times but I've never heard her sing like that.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 19:44:11 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Musical Derivates

Goldman Sachs wants to make a few bucks out of the music industry (their latest bubble).

This is how it works: They put 118 different albums into an album pool called Collateralized Album Obligations. Then they sell investors the idea that, because a bunch of those albums would turn out to be OK, there was no reason to worry so much about the shitty ones. Thus, junk-rated albums are turned into AAA-rated investments. Second, to hedge its own bets, Goldman Sachs will get companies like AIG to provide credit default swaps on these synthetic album collateralized debt obligations (album CDO’s) .

It’s that simple :-).


Entered at Sun Feb 15 19:12:09 CET 2015 from (173.3.50.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Second Helping of Tuna

Here's another. Jorma's fine. The sound of the video is another thing, but hey, it's better than nothing. The drummer, no Skoota Warner, but all drummers are different, is Justin Guip. The former engineer at LHS. GE Smith is on this too. There's another video of it, different sound, but it's only a partial vid.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 18:55:22 CET 2015 from (173.3.50.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Hot Tuna , Teresa Williams singing Somebody To Love

See the link Pete. Jack with a chick singer. There's other versions where at one view Teresa shines even more, Jorma wasn't as good, and a different drummer far less effective on the one i found so i chose this one. This one has stuck in my head for a year now.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 18:38:26 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Where is Bobbie Gentry?

Thanks, Bob. That was completely new to me. Excellent performance, and doesn't Jack Casady look great? Good to hear his bass behind a female singer again. As a friend said 30 years ago, Jack is so good, what would he be like if he'd discovered the Fender Jazz Bass?


Entered at Sun Feb 15 18:11:12 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Bobbi Gentry

Peter, have you ever heard the Jill Sobule song 'Where is Bobbi Gentry'? The link is to a live version with some decent sidemen.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 16:28:33 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sid Griffin

I found Sid Griffin's 2014 album "The Trick Is To Breathe" CD yesterday and am thoroughly enjoying it. The first track is "Ode to Bobbie Gentry" and I've linked the live version, though the studio cut is also on YouTube. But his intro to the song is great too.

Another you might enjoy is his imagined "Jimmie Rodgers / Bob Dylan" collaboration "Blue Yodel nos. 12 & 35." Or indeed Elvis Presley Calls His Mother After the Ed Sullivan Show. A highly recommended record by one of the great writers on the Basement Tapes.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 14:20:16 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Beach Boys

An unusual new Toppermost, on The Beach Boys, expanded from the normal ten to 21 tracks: 7 each from me, Dlew and Rob Morgan. Please add any comments over there.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 10:53:59 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert, I'm sure I recommended it before, but Tamar by Mal Peet is a great story about the Dutch resistance in WW2. It's classified as "young adult" but we read it here and both found it important.


Entered at Sun Feb 15 01:42:59 CET 2015 from (58.104.11.17)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Interview with Robbie from a few years back that I hadn't seen before. Nothing especially new or interesting. Robbie starts at around 39:00.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 22:56:24 CET 2015 from (67.84.76.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good one, Ian.

Thanks for putting up Bern's song Bob.

It's good to read that people's fathers had backbone & fortitude in the worst kind of dangerous situation.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 22:22:34 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Funny

Ian W; I love it. And right on the mark.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 21:14:12 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: My favourite Jewish joke

A Jew was shipwrecked on a desert island. He was there for years and years. Then, one day, he spies a passing ship, way off towards the horizon, so he rushes to the place where he has long had a bonfire ready, lights it and the smoke billows up into the sky. The ship changes direction and a small boat comes ashore.

"How long have you been here?", asks the rescuer.

"I don't know exactly”, replies the Jew, “Years and years".

"Well, you've certainly used your time well. That's a fine house that you've built over there".

"No, No", says the Jew, "That's not my house, that's my synagogue".

"Well", replies the rescuer, "Then that must by your house, over there, on the other side".

At that, the Jew turns to his rescuer. He lowers his head to be close to the rescuer's ear and whispers, "No, No. That's the other synagogue, the one I wouldn't be seen dead in".


Entered at Sat Feb 14 20:33:00 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Enlightenment

Keep talking, all. We are starting to learn a little bit about who we are and how we got here and it is enlightening.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 20:28:56 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norbert, my father was a highly decorated artillery officer in the war; 387th Field Artillery, 104th Infantry Division. Campaigned through France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany. Helped liberate the camp at Nordhausen. He didn't talk about it at all until quite late in his life. He was training to invade Japan when they dropped the big one. He served during Korea too. Your father and mine might have been near each other at some point.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 20:04:30 CET 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Tom T Hall & pop music

Tom T Hall was one of a number of country guys who doubled their success by creating songs that crossed over into pop. I'm not sure what that formula is; perhaps no banjos or steel guitars. Although the Deliverance banjo deal was also #1 in pop. Ray Charles hit the trifecta with his foray into country music in the early 60s: country, pop and r&b.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 19:39:39 CET 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Recent posts on Yiddish

Yes Peter, Yiddish has an official status somewhere, in this case in Sweden. It is one of the official minority languages with certain rights in communities. Other languages are Finnish, Sami, Romani, Meankieli.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 19:23:41 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: My Dad's War

I have a picture of a bear chested man standing on his hands in front of some men. The picture was taken in France 1944 and that man is my father. He was born in Amsterdam (like me).

In the war my farther hide a Jewish woman in his house. A Dutch man knew this and tried to blackmail my father. My dad went to the resistance and they took care of that. In return my father had to help Jews to escape from Amsterdam. At one point the Germans got to know about this and went after him. He had to run. Via Belgium he landed in France.

In France, with no money and no papers he turned to the local major, to get some papers. The major of the small town instantly knew my father was on the run and, risking his own neck, got papers for my father. He asked my father if he had a place to stay and told him to go to this farm house outside town. The residents of that farm treated my dad as their son, also risking their own lives. Before the end of the war my farther heard it was safe to return to Holland and so he went back. For some reason his departure from the farm went wrong, the French people, had arranged a little party with food and wine but my father missed that, he always regretted that proper farewell.

Many years after the war he went back that the little town in France, but all were gone.

Later my father worked for a German company, he didn’t like that much in the beginning I can still remember but it turned out to be his best boss ever.

My dad never talked about the war.

I always liked the French and we have had a house over there. Now I live with my wife Ells in a beautiful house in a little town in Germany. In our spacious garden there is a bower and a fine Dutch glass house (Els’ place), on our driveway are two German cars and in the garage a vintage Porsche. We love our German neighbors, we help another when needed.

Life turns in strange ways ...... have a nice weekend all.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 19:08:43 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Tom T. Hall song of recent talk--worth watching all the way through.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 18:05:30 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Bruce Agora

Carmen, that's how I did it also. I was wondering what the difference was between the cd version and the HD audio. My ears are so shot it probably doesn't matter anyway. Your absolutely right both the Springsteen and Isbell are amazing. I'm also enjoying a new 2 song download from Isbell and Amanda Shires called Sea Songs. They do a great version of Warren Zevon's Mutineer.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 18:00:07 CET 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bob T

Bob- yes - 3 cd set for about 20 bucks.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 17:59:36 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cashmere Cat congratulations

Congratulations again on the success of Cashmere Cat as a career continues to blossom and thrive. Talent will always find its way. Father and son should be proud.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 17:51:11 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Alix Goolden Performance Hall

Alix Goolden Performance Hall in Victoria BC (on Pandora) is the name of this theatre. I dislike the correction feature which I continuously miss until its too late.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 17:49:10 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Lucinda Williams

Lucinda Williams received an excellent review of her concert at the 800 seat Alex Golden Theatre last night. Unfortunately, even though it is right around the corner from us (5 min. walk), by the time we heard about it, it was sold out. Superb for the past 20 years, she continues to thrive and her recent album is highly regarded. We saw Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings at that venue. Seeing performers in 'soft seat theatres' or small venues spoil you for arena events. My days in arenas are likely over except for sporting events.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 17:44:59 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Bruce Agora

Carmen, did you buy the Bruce from his web site?


Entered at Sat Feb 14 17:31:44 CET 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: New Music Recommendations

Just picked up 2 new CD's. Bruce Live at The Agora, Cleveland 1978 and Jason Isbell Live Austin. Both are excellent. The Bruce CD is by far the Best Bruce Live Show I have ever heard on CD. Isbell's Danko Manuel makes your skin crawl. Both well worth the money.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 15:58:23 CET 2015 from (31.48.7.122)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Yiddish

Enjoyed the recent posts related to Yiddish. Thanks. There is a push on just now in educating children about the Scots language in schools, many of the words now dying out. Teachers used to knock these words oiut of us.

Enjoyed Peter's post relating to his meeting of Jimmy Page.

In fact, really enjoyed the GB recently. Thanks. I think Dylan has a right to get fed up. Too much criticism. I never realised that there are people who have googled every phrase of his own book looking for plagiarism, until I read Ian Bell's book.

I think Dylan is so far ahead of any other singer/songwriter and I'm a Johnny Come Lately, getting interested in Dylan at the time of 'Lay Lady Lay'.

Never met anybody famous, but I was many years ago involved in the education of children about the Holocaust and met a truly remarkable man, a cantor, who had met Anne Frank.

Thanks, everybody.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 15:49:30 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Just a thought...

Thanks, Jan, for making it possible for people to continue to share ideas and experiences and views about music and life. This wonderful technology (internet and what it has provided) has allowed all to share and so learn. This site, with its all its positives and all its scars, and with its positives and negatives, is an open forum for conversation and stimulation. Even when I'm disturbed, I stay on. The ashes blow away and new ideas get planted.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 15:26:10 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Thanks JT


Entered at Sat Feb 14 15:18:09 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dan Bern

Bob F: Songs are never trivial. They give commentary to life. Thank you. I just read the lyrics. They ring true. My mom was one of 8. 5 of 8 perished along with her parents in the camps. Now she's the only one still surviving, at 90. And she remembers and has shared (finally). The massacre never stops. Only the locations change.

I know of Dan Bern and have heard his songs but not this one. I'll seek out his material at Ditch Records later today or soon. If not, on line.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 15:15:29 CET 2015 from (87.144.171.127)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: 911

Playmobil has released it first Porsche 911 (Carrera S in Red, 1:18).


Entered at Sat Feb 14 14:52:22 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Dan Bern's Lithuania

Jed, JT, Jeff, reading your conversations the past couple of days made me think of this song. They only have this version on you tube.The studio version is way more beautiful. I don't mean to trivialize what your discussing with a song but if you have a minute, check out the lyrics.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 14:12:47 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Critics of the arts again

Finally, Dylan on 'the critics' in Flanagan interview: I agree that they have a job to do. Unless they are musicians, these journalist/critics will never understand what it means to go up on a stage and perform. That is why I enjoy Peter Stone Brown's reviews so much. I believe that perspective allows the writer to give us relevant insights into a performance whether on stage or on record. Somehow, there are a few others who approach that kind of insight. It seems that those critics have been around the business somewhat (Peter V is good at this but from what I have read from him, he has seen 'the stage lights and the amps and the instruments close up' and so can do criticism effectively). What irks me about critics is the seeming lack of doing their homework and of aping what others say and repeating what is prevalent . Those traits of critical writing are tedious and empty and boring and without merit. Too often, that is what we get. So I think Dylan's attitude toward critics in the past (from the 60s interviews where he played with journalist/critic questions to MusicCare) is a reflection of his correct understanding that most critics unfortunately don't consider all aspects of a performance before they write. Of course, it may be a reflection of the editor of the newspaper or magazine as to what survives because of space, but that should inspire even harder research with words carefully chosen to give an accurate portrayal of the piece being reviewed an criticized.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 13:59:29 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Father perspectives

Jed: Thanks for your comments about your father. They struck home for me. Though I was born in a DP camp overseas, I grew up in Canada and my influences outside my home from earliest times were North American. In the midst of those influences were the carry overs from the small town my dad came from in Europe. Those cannot disappear. To say we were at loggerheads often during my youth would be a gross understatement. I felt he was overbearing and railed against that authority and said things during those years which I remember and regret completely. We never really got each other until later and then when I had 'made it' I was too busy to take advantage of my possibilities with a great man. (sounds like that Harry Chapin song). Too late and he was gone. But he taught me, with his Yiddish and broken English and his background about honesty and loyalty and truth and kindness and commitment and all the things that matter. You don't get to do it over again. He had his flaws as a father as did I. But what was good about him was as good as it gets. He never abandoned Yiddish and spoke it often and so I heard it for the 20 or so years I lived in that house. He was a real 'mensch'.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 13:47:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Flanagan interview: a perspective

This interview continues the new Dylan trend to open up and let us understand a little more of what has been motivating him musically. We had a glimpse of this during the radio programs and it is clear to me from these last 3 expressions (AARP, MusicCare, and Flanagan) that Dylan had a lot of input into the radio show. His comments on Aaron Neville are interesting. We saw him in concert here in Victoria and agree that his delivery and interpretation of songs is at another level. I agree with Peter about the extraordinary comments he makes on Delta blues and how that illuminates. Finally, its nice to have some (post MusicCare) perspective on some of the comments that concerned some. Dylan doesn't seem to carry a grudge. There was a sense of historical perspective that he describes when he relates negative interactions with some during the early period of his career. In Dylan's mind, from what he said to Flanagan, that was then and this is now. He carries no malice. He was saying how he felt at that time, being apparently put down in one way or another by some. It is never fun to be put down when you are trying to do something. Dylan was being honest in speaking to that crowd with that personal historical perspective on how his feelings were being affected during those early 60s years and how he recalls he responded to those feelings. You can't fault his honesty in sharing those feelings with that audience. A comment like 'But that was then and this is now. I hold no malice to those people. That's how I felt then" might have helped during MusicCare. Flanagan's interview makes that clear to me. We'll have to live with it. All of us can be better sometimes at what we say and do when we say and do things. Oversights and errors are made. Again, human beings, all of us. No pedestal.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 05:28:40 CET 2015 from (32.216.228.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: CW Gatlin & Amy Helm

Video clip at the above link. CW Gatlin and Amy Helm standing on the side of the road next to a car....probably in Arkansas, singing 'Will The Circle Be Unbroken'. Simple, loose, and perfect music. I could listen to this all day.

Glad that the Bob Dylan thing was cleared up. That was a scary time back there, pondering Bob's spiral into negativity.

Pat B, Thanks for the info on Mrs. Mitchell. I didn't know that was a name she had acquired through marriage.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 04:09:56 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sam Andrew, original member of Big Brother & The Holding Company, has died. RIP.


Entered at Sat Feb 14 01:30:51 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: More language comments [ignore if not interested]

Peter, I have no idea if “feign” is the root of “fain-nights” (or “fainies”); it just seemed a possibility, that’s all.

In Cumbria, where I lived for many years, the local dialect included words from the long ago times when the Vikings settled the area, and, amongst other things, you can still find the influence in local place names. The most famous waterfall up there is Aira Force, which is nothing to do with aviation. It relates to “foss”, Norwegian for waterfall. This one, as you might suspect, is to be found on Aira Beck, “bekk” being the Norwegian for “brook” or “small stream”.

The influx (and later retention) of words from one culture to another, based on invasion and/or political alliances, happens all over. Go to Vienna, where they speak a local version of German, and you will find that the word for “pavement” (or “sidewalk”) is not “pflaster” but “trottoir” (the French word) and that a certain type of coffee drunk there is a “melange” (again French). Austrian may not be a language in its own right but has a distinct version such that older people, in particular, complain that the influence of Germany-based TV channels is diluting “their” form of German amongst the young.



Entered at Fri Feb 13 23:23:44 CET 2015 from (58.104.15.172)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Some interesting extracts from the book: George Harrison Behind the Locked Door


Entered at Fri Feb 13 22:55:36 CET 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Fun cover of 'When I Paint My Masterpiece', found in my Youtube travels.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 22:53:54 CET 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: new Pops Staples album

newly finished Pops Staples album released next week, produced by Mavis and Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) here in Chicago.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 21:00:54 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan's Comments

So pleased with his comments(not that he needs me to be pleased!). "You had to be there" may say it all!


Entered at Fri Feb 13 20:01:12 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Love Dylan on Delta blues! Great comments.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 19:30:08 CET 2015 from (24.114.75.213)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill Flanagan, please contact Norm.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 19:06:52 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.183)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan Post MusiCares Coversation with Bill Flanagan

Check out this new interview on Dylan's web site.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 19:03:28 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Orthodox and Yiddish

Jeff I believe you are correct that Yiddish has completely disappeared from modern day orthodox households,although it's alive beyond brooklyn in parts of chassidic Jerusalem as well.And,yes I recall the non orthodox members of my non orthodox synagogue( my affiliation as a child) speaking fluent Yiddish.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 17:22:42 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dad

My dad passed in 2011.He was a musicologist,a musician, and scholar in Jewish texts as well as being a devout man.He had perfect pitch and was a perfect man. For my late mom,also a musician,opera singer,radio star in the late 30's,and great piano player he was the perfect match.She also edited his many works and was an active voice in helping him conceptualize and publish his many books and articles.So,at one point,he decided it would be fun to do the Yiddish book.In relation to the discussion here of Yiddish,Dad and I never got there.So I never understood his intellectual and emotional intent and,possibly my understanding from a hopefully,more mature nd wiser perspective.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 17:17:17 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

How close is Yiddish to 'proper' German? I looks as if it'd be pretty close, perhaps no farther than Schwabish?

Closer to the Band, listening to "Redboy" this morning I finally realised that Robbie'd dropped the straight line from a classic musicians' joke into "Making A Noise": "The drums stop; this is where the white man gets worried." You betcha - now it's time for the bass solo.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:58:07 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Kettle?

The other one I love is: "Hack moch nicht kein (or is it ein? cheinik" (transliterated). I used to get that one from my parents all the time when I did my customary nagging as a kid.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:54:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Onion

That's the one, Jeff. Thanks


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:21:31 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm glad i took a last look before I actually run out to Boro Park, one of the heavily Chasidic neighborhoods here.

JT, could it be this curse you're looking for: "Vaksn zolstu vi a tsibele mitn kop in dr'erd!"..
Which means:
May you grow like an onion with your head in the ground.
Of course, like all Yiddish curses, there is a far deeper meaning, you need to think about the implications, what the back story & future development of the scenario might be.

Jed, your dad sounds like a interesting guy. Yes, As we've both discussed, Yiddish is flourishing in the chasidic and more potent orthodox communities in NY, and of course some other places. It is not used anywhere near as much in the more mainstream orthodox communities.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:12:52 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Young People/Yiddish

BTW,there are many young people speaking Yiddish as a primary language in the chassidic communities in Brooklyn,New Square,Kiryas Joel,and other chassidic communities.Unfortunately they also receive very little,if any secular education.Thus,when the younger community members are interviewed(rarely and sadly,around some disaster)their English is thick with Yiddish accent.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:11:47 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Harduf's dictionary

David Mendel Harduf (Toronto, I believe) wrote a very good transliterated Yiddish dictionary that may still be available. I was very aware of his work and used to have a copy. Not sure where it is right now but I may try to find it. I became aware of him and it first from a professional connection. Might be worth a look again.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:06:07 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff A.

No disrespect taken at all,in fact I appreciate your comments.I believe my father might very well have agreed with you.Perhaps my perceptions are based on my limited experience and exposure primarily based on family and family friends,the "adults".They used it as cover from the kids and we tended to grow up seeing the language as a negative.It was not until college when I saw the utility of Yiddish beyond my limited experience.This lasted only a short time until my dad's book came out.I may reread it or at the very least rethink it,particularly after considering the book by Michael Wex that you suggested.l


Entered at Fri Feb 13 16:03:47 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Yiddish again

My parents and relatives and everyone around them spoke Yiddish mainly for the first 10 years after we all arrived in Canada from the various DP camps. They all spoke Polish and Yiddish in those camps. My parents sometimes spoke Polish, which I never really picked up and know nothing of. Even now, those who are left often will speak Yiddish, but less so than what I remember from the 50s. Despite the attempts to maintain it, I am not optimistic. As a cultural piece to be preserved, I am glad to hear that efforts continue. Unless it is spoken regularly, it will go the way of so many other languages. Sad. What's the one about an onion? (De solst wachsen vie a tsibel....). Help me, Jeff.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 15:48:33 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, no disrespect intended, but you might do yourself and your heritage well, to read Born to Kvetch, by Michael Wex. I've mentioned it here in the past. Wex is a Canadian Jew and one of the foremost living scholars of Yiddish, it's origins, and the psychogeotheohistorical development of it and in relation to the Torah & Talmud as well. The book is a fantastic read, and riotously funny. Where you see negativity, Wex and most see humor and adaptation, and also a good degree of superstition. Negative aspects in the language and culture are not the kind of negative that most people associate with the word, alot of the "negativity" in the religious culture that Yiddish was the language of was based on keeping Jews Jewish, and not assimilating. Typical aspects of what i think you meant as negatviity, meaning the kind of psychological negativity most people think of when they think of negatviity, is not something the language or culture itself spewed. There are negative individuals in every culture. The culture actually entirely celebrates and holds life sacred. There is nothing more valuable than life, and the Yiddish attitude is actually to find humor, to never give up, to always help anyone you can. And not to profit from other people's misfortunes.

Where yiddish flourishes today is pretty much strictly in the chasidic & orthodox communities. Less so amongst the younger orthodox. In my grandparents generation, the not so observant Jews were all fluent. By my parents generation , amongst those born here, it was far less used, but they had decent knowledge.

The general dialect conversation and some of the areas touched upon by a few of you can get pretty interesting. Different dialects of a language may have very different meanings for the same words.Got to run , but maybe there'll be time to discuss that later.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 14:45:53 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Street

Time to go back To New York for a tune up.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 14:04:22 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jed, we link on life, and language origins. For example, a normal "job" for small children in deep rural areas was carrying out dad's lunch to the fields.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 14:01:56 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ian, in Dorset that was just "Fainies." and I never knew the origin until today.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 13:58:46 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lallans

Yes, Tom was intent that it was Lallans. We had a few discussions. I maintained that most regional dialects, if written differently, looked different. Though grammar comes into play. For example, a popular pub toilet sign in Dorset when i was a kid was "Yere tiz." Which looks weird till you realize it's "Here it is."

My grandad moved from deepest rural Dorset to the big town (Bournemouth) when he was 12, but could speak 19th century Dorset, and his example was:

Wahr be garn, jarge?

Tek fada dinner.

Gie I a bit.

Dursn't. Fada ud wak I.

That looks quite foreign until you translate:

Where be going, George?

(To) Take father's dinner.

Give I a bit.

(I) daren't. Father would whack (hit) I.

There are noticeable grammar differences (like no I / me distinction), but they're transparent to almost any English speaker.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 13:58:24 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: A Scots word that fascinated me

I can remember reaching agreement at work about something or other and being smilingly told, “Ya nae ta butchie” (at least, that’s what I heard – “You are not to ‘butchie’ ”). It was explained that it meant I could not go back on what I’d agreed.

Later, there was an article in the local paper, which I have kept (23 April 1971). It concerned an enquiry from the editor (and then also compiler) of the Scottish National Dictionary about “terbutsme” and the article said that readers would recognise it as the word “terbutchie”, which “was used whenever someone had a change of mind”. Towards the end of the article, it suggested that the word “is not so common nowadays and is obviously disappearing from the vocabulary of local children”.

When I started to look for links to the word, I thought it must be connected either to “bouch” (a sneak) or to “boutch” (to botch or bungle). Though I still like my explanation, the academics disagree and it now appears in the on-line Scottish National Dictionary thus:

http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/trebuck

It seems to serve a similar function to (but is not the same as) saying “fain-nights” (or “feign-nights”?) after making a mistake (in the part of London in which I was grew up anyway and maybe elsewhere) or crossing one’s fingers behind one’s back when saying something that one doesn’t really mean.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 13:49:42 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Yiddish as coverup

For many of my early years my parents would talk Yiddish when they didnt want me to know what they were saying.As time went on I began to understand,often by inflection or tone.Many years later,my dad,a musician and college professor of music,wrote a book on the many saying of the Jewish people through the Yiddish language.I was struck by how many of these sayings were reflections of the social context of the lives people were leading at the point in history when many of these sayings emerged.Tough living often leads to what seems to be an inordinate focus on sayings that cast quite a negative shadow on life.Of course,one cannot ignore the great creativity of Yiddish literature,the stories and traditions beautifully woven together in story form.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 13:01:01 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Scots language (or dialect?)

Though a Londoner, I lived and worked in southern Scotland (and just a few miles south of the border) for a large part of my life. My wife is Scottish and, indeed, we recently spent a few days in the Glasgow area visiting family.

I assume that your fellow lecturer was referring to "Lallans" (or "Lowlands"). I have two Scots dictionaries already. "Chambers Scots Dictionary" (subtitled, "serving as a glossary for Ramsay, Ferguson, Burns, Scott, Galt, minor poets, kailyard novelists, and a host of other writers pf the Scottish tongue") defines "Lallan" as "the Lowland dialect", when referring to the language. "The Scots Dialect Dictionary" likewise.

Both dictionaries contain the same introductory essay by William Grant, which I haven't read since I don't know when. Much of it is about the variations in pronunciation across Scotland - but it goes back to 1911. He even produced a map of Scotland, showing not only the "Celtic Border" (the lowland dialects being south and east of this border) but also differentiated the various "versions" of Lowland Scots (seven in all). I suspect that much has changed in this regard since then, however.

Of more interest to me were (and still are) the many words that are more or less unique to Scotland.

The Scots Language Society is called just that - though its magazine is called "Lallans". I could add that the above does not cover Ulster but there is also an Ulster-Scots Language Society, the magazine of which is called "Ullans". If you want to know more about the links between Scotland and Ulster, the Book "Wayfaring Strangers" covers this as part of an examination of the influence of the music from (primarily) Scotland and Ulster on the Americas and its spread therein.

Meanwhile, try this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Scots_language


Entered at Fri Feb 13 10:31:12 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting stuff on Yiddish, a language fascinating to linguists, in that it’s neither a national language, not a regional language nor a “lingua franca” (second language used for trade) but a first language used by one ethnic group in many different countries. It’s definitely not “a dialect.” It’s a hybrid, but so is English. I recall a talk years ago - apparently “American Yiddish” elements exist, and as in “American English” one is innovative word combination to form new words.

What is and what is a language and what is a dialect is the national boundaries (army & a navy) question. I once did a short lecture tour with Tom MacArthur who was then working on a Scots dictionary (i.e. Lowland Scots, considered a dialect of English NOT Gaelic). He maintained that it was a language – if you start spelling it phonetically it begins to look very different. He said it was further from standard English than Dutch is from German, or the Scandinavian languages from each other.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 05:13:55 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, your Yiddishkeit needs a tuneup & some street time. That phrase means the same thing as "gey flig mit der vild gens."


Entered at Fri Feb 13 04:00:30 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

john D

Subject: Joe B Mauldin

Legendary bass player; from the Crickets, Joe B has died.

R.I.P. to a legendary musician. Buddy's got his bass player back.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 02:46:05 CET 2015 from (58.104.4.228)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Link is to Paul playing Let it Be at the 1999 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with a back up band including Robbie. The video has 2.5 million hits so I guess it is well known but I hadn't seen it before.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 01:24:33 CET 2015 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia
Web: My link

Subject: Yiddish, etc

JT, thanks for your fascinating comments about Yiddish in your own family and life. As to preserving the language with New York as its hub of living use, it's a great idea -- and you're not the first to think of it!

See link above to the YIVO cultural institute in New York, one of whose missions is exactly the preservation and maintenance of Yiddish and documentation of its use in poetry, drama, etc. You might find stuff of interest on the website.

The two brothers Max and Uriel Weinreich were both brilliant linguists. Uriel, who taught at Columbia U., died prematurely of cancer just prior to the publication of his Yiddish-English dictionary; it was Max who formulated the timeless maxim: "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy."


Entered at Fri Feb 13 01:19:15 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Dog Lovers

Norm, I also love my dog.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 01:15:23 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Norm

Norm, my bad. I've haven't been here since 01 or 02. In the Hudson Valley where I'm from, people don't talk to each other like that. Especially if you claim to be friends. However, I'm an old man and I realize around the world people people have different customs and manners of speaking. Maybe that kind of talk is considered a "How you doing?" greeting in your part of the world. I always enjoy your posts and don't want to get on your bad side. Next time I'll mind my own business.


Entered at Fri Feb 13 00:02:04 CET 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Good vibrations

Norm: He said a nice thing. Read back a couple of days and you will see. He explained his comment to Kevin and you can find that too. Nice to hear from you again, Norm.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:55:38 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Malka Marom

A funny story told my Malka Marom involving Leonard Cohen....

"Something like that happened to me also, with Roshi, I mean. Also in the ’70s, while I was on a shoot in Montreal, I get an invitation from Leonard to come to his house for dinner. So I walk in and I see this amazing-looking elder, almost like a halo around him, sitting cross-legged on a chair by the table. And I said to Leonard, “Who is this luminous elder?” “That’s my teacher. I call him Roshi,” Leonard said. So I turn to Roshi and start talking to him. Like, “Pleased to meet you, how fortunate you are to have Leonard for a student …” Leonard interrupted with that grin of his that I love, “Roshi doesn’t understand a word of English.” “Wow, is he ever radiant, Leonard, what a glow about him …” “Yeah, but you know, he can’t get it up. Would you get it up for him?” Leonard said, joking or teaching some illuminating Buddhist lesson? I couldn’t tell. It certainly illuminated to me that under my sort of bohemian, debonair, woman of- the-world spirit is the daughter of my father: a religious observant Jew, who, though a bit shocked and very embarrassed, reverted to the Jewish traditional way of learning: answering a question with a question. “Why would you follow a teacher who can’t get it up?” “For the balance,” Leonard replied, barely able to keep a straight face. “I have one teacher who can't get it up and one who can't get it down."


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:33:20 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Stop the presses

Forget it Jerry, I just came across his translation. I was about to call my lawyer Mike Krugle and get a translation. I shoulda told Bob, (I never said a gawd damn thing). Now get it right it's two words.

Don't ever loose your own language it's very important that people retain who they are. The same with our local natives. They teach the young people now and it's a good thing.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:32:31 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I picked up the October 4, 1969 issue of "Rolling Stone" yesterday because it has a very interesting article titled "Dylan on the Isle of Wight". Maybe it's here in the library already; some interesting stuff anyway. Here are some bits ...

[Dylan says] "But basically we're just having a holiday." That 'holiday', according to guitarist Robbie Robertson of the Band, consists in almost non-stop jamming. in fact, Dylan's appetite for music-making far exceeded the Band's. "He just lies to paly all the time," Robertson said. We could hardly finish our first album because he wanted to play all the time."

And then: the Band. A nice had for them, as they jiggled and thumped right into "We Can Talk About It Now." They were in soaring good form, pouring good country rock and roll into the damp night air: "Long Black Veil," "Chest Fever," "The Weight," "I Shall Be Released," "Loving You," "Ain't No More Cane on the Brazos," and "Don't Tell Henry. Forty-five minutes of solid good-rocking Anglo-Saxon music.

On came Dylan ... first song, "She Belongs to Me." ... There was a slightly more down-home resilience to "I Threw It All Away" and "Maggie's Farm" than on the recordings, possibly due to the Band's mellow, sinewy backings. "Highway 61" positively rocked. Then the Band departed for a time .... In "Like A Rolling Stone" ... he sang, goosing the song along all the better, with the Band, who had re-joined him now, adding their resonant voices to the chorus.

"I Pity The Poor Immigrant" took on sea chantey notes with Garth Hudson's accordion accompaniment. Song after song rolled on, "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight," "I Dreamed I Saw St Augustine," "Lay Lady Lay," "One Too Many Mornings." And then Dylan announced: "We're going to do one more for you." Just the slightest sardonic grin. "This was a big hit over here by Manfred Mann, a great group, a great group." A whoop of anticipation, and sure enough, it was "Mighty Quinn," mighty funky. ... So he did an encore of two more songs, the fist of them a new Dylan song, a slow gentle ballad called "Who's Gonna Throw That Next Throw," then followed it with a prancing "Rainy Day Women No. 12 and No 35."


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:22:04 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Kanye West just debuted the first track from his new album. The song is titled "Wolves". Produced by Cashmere Cat. :-)


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:14:28 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What he said!??

I have just returned home........look at this mess. Jerry! what did Jeff say?.....about me being on a boat. Little bugger knows I don't speak Jiddish.

From where you came Jerry, there are some of us who have never forgotten those horrors. In my own experience I lived with a lady for about 8 years. We were and still are very good friends. Her story was something I had not been aware of before meeting her. She was a Gypsy. Her father was from Transalvania, Hungary. I had never been aware before how much those people had been hated as well. The extermination of those people as well was a horror. I spent many nights on this computer reading of the treatment of those people that is documented. I still have a hard time every day believing what human beings can do to one another.

Just this morning on the news some guy in the states, I forget where went and shot another family apparently over a parking spot in an apartment complex which also was racially motivated.

Now having said that, as for your comment Bob F. I don't know how long you been participating. I came here first about 01 or 02. I'm not going to go into what has gone on before, but comment to you is (withhold evaluation until comprehension is complete. I don't think you really know what you are talking about. To you then it seems ok for Jeff to tell Pat and Peter to go fuck them selves, (childish at best in my mind). Jeff and I have had a very volatile marriage for many years. It's easy to get Jeff riled, (when in doubt scream and shout run in circles all about). Once he takes his meds, Jeff has always come out with some very constructive thoughts and experiences regarding music. He's also a compassionate and kind man. In other words he loved his dog.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 23:08:50 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I guess we all have the right to decide in these matters, though very few of those who exercise that right to judge would ever consider doing anything about it beyond sharing their views.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 20:43:28 CET 2015 from (65.93.118.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Interesting Boyd pix. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 20:02:18 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: 1968

Thank you Peter M and Bob F for the Dave Alvin connections. I did not remember about the Justified link and though I knew The Blasters I had not paid any attention to his solo recordings........."Blackjack David" sounds great.......the above link can also go to a Jools Holland show with Phil and Dave do some Big Bill Broonzy.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 19:18:43 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: New Dylan Back of CD Cover

Anyone know who the woman in the mask is; on the back of the new Dylan CD? I think she could be just a model brought in for the shot; as they stare at a SUN recording. Then again it's Bob. Who knows? Haven't seen this mentioned before.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 18:34:25 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, I noted photo 7 because it very well may be the Buffalo '74 show that the Band opened. That's Freddie King on the left.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 18:27:17 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Pictures 7 and 17 are of note. Patti Boyd was at the LW.

Ben, about ten years ago I recorded with Dave Alvin. After one take I said I thought it sounded like the Basement Tapes. He laughed and said, "And that's a good thing."


Entered at Thu Feb 12 17:39:19 CET 2015 from (129.42.208.179)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan & Kanye

Ben, I don't know if you saw this article on Expecting Rain this morning.

I use to think Sting was the king of annoying until Kanye showed up.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 17:27:38 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: B-side himself

Chris Charlesworth appreciates The Band.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 16:20:00 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Queen's English

English on the other hand is a problem for me. Sorry for the 'know' for 'no' and for a couple of other errors. Typing exposes carelessness. Though I care, not checking before submitting is 'careless'.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 15:39:37 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Yiddish: my first language

Jeff A: I spoke the language apparently as my first language from the time I could speak. That's what my parents spoke in the attic/apartment we lived in when we came here from the DP camp in 48. With friends on the street in Toronto, English soon took over. By age 4, it was all English. I have a complete comprehension of Yiddish whenever it is spoken with absolutely know difficulty understanding it when it is spoken to me. But I have to construct and reach for words - easier than then French I studied at school ( I can find some of those words too). It is a language that is slowly disappearing since it is not spoken by anyone as an official language in any country. New Yorkers should try to preserve it since I think that is the hub for its continued use.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 15:27:07 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sverige

And #1 in Sweden.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 14:53:51 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: SHADOWS IN THE NIGHT -UK CHARTS #1

While Dylan's new album hit top 10 in many countries in its first week out, it is #1 on UK official albums chart.

I read some of the stuff at Expecting Rain references and noted a comment by one journalist that 'trash talk' as he calls it humanizes the speaker. Others here have said that and on reflection we learn about 73 year old Bob Dylan from his words recently. Some may not like knowing but that's life. The question remains - Does it matter that I now know this side of Bob Dylan? It is a reflection perhaps of what one would like him to be and how one might want him to act, but who has the right to decide on these matters? That Bob Dylan shared these matters with us 1) was generous 2) showed his other side 3) may have been uncomfortable to many 4) showed some human characteristics (sensitivity to comments made in the past, frailty at times, who knows what else: we weren't there when the events occurred) perhaps. Some say that to understand the art one has to know the person behind the art. I'm not so sure about that. We don't know Bob Dylan despite these comments. We have no idea who he is, how he feels, or what he thinks and that, I believe, is appropriate. A slight glimpse from 30 -35 minutes of a prepared speech tells us little more. Some want to know. I am content with the brilliance of Visions of Johanna and the vehemence of Idiot Wind and the sadness of the current album. The work tells me all I need or want to know about the artist. The rest I can leave behind.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 14:14:45 CET 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Dave Alvin

Nice to see Dave Alvin mentioned here. He is a criminally underrated songwriter and singer. Both with the Blasters and solo, he is one of the best. Does anyone know if he ever played a Ramble? That would have been special.

For anyone still upset by Dylan's comments about Leiber/Stoller and Tom T. Hall, I haven't seen anyone commenting about Kanye West's disrectfull treatment of Beck at the Gramy's. To me, Kanye's actions were far worse that anything Dylan said.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 09:35:20 CET 2015 from (103.237.156.133)

Posted by:

free credit report

Location: Lodnon
Web: My link

Subject: credi check

While it may not be or two items on your credit report: accurate or inaccurate. Credit providers may have reported inaccurate information in your report! more information : http://www.free-creditreports.co.uk , http://www.free-creditcheck.co.uk , http://www.freecreditreportcheck.co.uk , http:///www.annualcreditreportfree.co.uk , http://www.creditreport-free.co.uk


Entered at Thu Feb 12 08:34:07 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Only in America

See the Charlie Gillett article linked. Mann & Weil collaborated with Leiber & Stoller for this ironic song which then got hijacked and done as "straight" by Jay & The Americans. The Drifters original version, shelved in 1963, is on YouTube.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 07:55:42 CET 2015 from (219.89.221.66)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject:

The problem with musical hero's is that you always build up your own perception of them ... and that may be nothing like they are actually like in person. That certainly happened to me with The Band in the early days as there was very little about them in the press. There was always plenty written about Bob so that speech wasn't really a surprise. He is probably one of the very few people in the music business who can really say something like that. Maybe only Macca is the only other surviving star who can truly say he changed the course of popular music. The onlt thing I can remember about Tom T Hall is that song about NZ. I don't play it that often.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 04:05:05 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.145)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: How many aisles must a man walk down?

Peter V / Ian W: Thanks for the link to and discussion of the brilliant "Shopping For Clothes". When I first heard it on a compilation years ago I was expecting another "Charlie Brown", and was surprised by the social commentary. Same sort of issues Dylan sang about way back when, as Ian said.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 01:56:21 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Dave Alvin

Peter M, so far I've only seen him in the one cameo. One of my all time favorite records is Blackjack David with Abeiine, From A Kitchen Table and 1968. So good.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 01:39:07 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.208)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Expressions

Kevin, there ain't a goddamned "gawddam" in that expression.

"Stay healthy, because you can kill yourself later."

Gezunt means healthy. You won't find any kinda god damn in Yiddish.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 01:12:35 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: odds and ends

a.)Don't underestimate Bob's deadpan delivery and dry, dry sense of humor. b.) Mick Jones always plays a heavy. It's paid the bills for him for many years. c.)I haven't seen Justified in a long time (since season 1). Does Dave Alvin still make occasional appearances? I know a few (4!), of his songs have been used on the show, and that he and his band appeared on camera in a bar in one of the early episodes. He called the show "The Rockford Files" meets "The Sopranos" set in Kentucky.


Entered at Thu Feb 12 00:32:44 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Jason Isbell/Amanda Shires Perform Mutineer

Kevin, check this out. They did this for the first encore at The Beacon.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 23:44:46 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Joni's Mitchell is a married name from a long time ago.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 22:55:49 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob......The Boyd Crowder character going from as bad as it gets in season 1 to a completely believable good guy in season 2 and then back to the bad side with Raylan's old squeeze Ava to boot at some point in sesaon 3 might be the best arc of any character in television history.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 22:45:10 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Justified!

Kevin, we're in the middle of season four. We haven't watched anything else all week! We love it. Thanks for the tip. My wife went to visit her sister in Florida for a week so I'm on a Justified freeze out until she gets back. I find myself rooting for those crazy kids Boyd and Ava. Do you think that's normal?


Entered at Wed Feb 11 22:38:37 CET 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Never heard Shoppin' For Clothes before, but I love it. It's now got me mulling over a Coasters compilation CD. (Thanks Bob!)


Entered at Wed Feb 11 22:19:45 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Robert & Roberta

Well said Jed.

I'm not cheering the fact that Bob included some remarks that seem unnecessary and mean spirited. Just accepting it as one moment in this particular man's 73 year old lifetime. It's Bob Dylan, warts and all. I'm sure he's had many other opportunities to disappoint. Lord knows that I have.

I forget what the hub-bub was about with Joni Mitchell's comments about Bob, other than she called him a phony for not using his real name. I'm not sure of the circumstances surrounding her name, but she was born as Roberta Joan Anderson, and now she's Joni Mitchell...no big deal, just a name change. Silliness, and makes her look petty. Oh, I forgot that I'm trying not to be judgmental.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:48:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shoppin' for Clothes

I always loved "Stand in the mirror and dig yourself" - I'll bet Bob likes it too!


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:44:56 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

NEWS FLASH: After a 12 century waiting period......"Gawddamn" has been officially accepted to the Yiddish language.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:40:09 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Shopping for clothes

Is it really a novelty record? Dylan may have tagged it as such but, for me, it's as much social commentary as some of Dylan's own songs.

"That suit is pure herringbone" - I always loved that line.

And the record has a "sound" and Dylan's always been someone who lauded the "sound" of particular records.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:36:55 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More Bob

Yup,Bob does inspire lots of talk and thought-in that order too often! Those who are upset with his talk because they,in a sense,expect more from him,as hero,as icon,as a person might very well be disappointed given their expectations for him.As a person,indeed he is guilty of human frailties as we all are.To me,he is not an icon,a hero,a leader-he's no more(since I'm not his intimate friend or family) than a gifted and unique musician,songwriter and poet who has an extraordinarily interesting perception of the human condition.If we expect him to live up to the narratives in his songs(and the messages we percieve)we are doing so based on our projections of Dylan's songs as reflections of a rigid and fixed lifelong truth,incapable of the change and alteration that so many people experience as they age.Or perhaps the song was never about the writer or his personal viewpoint.Or,something he strived to be but knew he wasn't.Put simply,so many of our judgements of Dylan are about us,our projections,our viewpoints,etc.While for some(not me)the speech,viewed straightforwardly,can be viewed negatively,to do so based on the imposition of our projections and expectations might be unrealistic.The good news is,as always,the music.The new album is a blast,the last two bootleg releases were sensational,with more to come.The concert I saw at the Beacon was excellent and unique.And,he's still creating and performing.The Grateful Dead took pride in blowing every big,public or filmed performance with their worst playing,destroying each opportunity for some positive exposure.Dylan seems to enjoy his version of the Dead's "blowing it"with artistic rebellion and contrarian behavior,thereby,according to some, doing wrong,or wronging his fan base---his grammy and legend remarks,his news conferences and "attitude",selling out(one example of many accusations was regarding car commercials(!)),his gospel/religion phase,going electric,the protest lyrics,disappearing upstate,self-portrait,world gone wrong,etc.etc.etc.Yes,Bob is a bit eccentric,but he is here.That's very very good.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:20:21 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Justified

I had made reference a while back to a favourite tv show called "Justified" of which Bob F was about to start watching........I just started season 5 last night and in a Band connection......Mickey Jones is back playing a heavyweight drug dealer........he has had quite a career as a character actor - Mickey has........wonder wether he might think of attending the next Super Bowl ? :)

Adam.......Thank you.....I've been listenning to my Danko/Fjeld/Andersen - some beautiful music.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 21:15:02 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Link to "Shoppin' for Clothes' by The Coasters, produced by Leiber & Stoller. A seminal "pre-rap" record. I guess it's The Coasters that Bob meant by novelty - it's considerably more than that.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 20:50:05 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan and Leiber & Stoller

I must have heard dozens of Leiber & Stoller songs over the years and have never thought of them as “novelty songs”. And I’m pretty sure that the young Dylan would have appreciated at least some of the early Elvis songs that they wrote. They also co-wrote “Young Blood” with Doc Pomus, on whom Dylan does cast praise. And Dylan has performed “Kansas City”, which is usually attributed to L&S, though I seem to recall some doubt as to its true authorship. Finally, he name-checked “Along Came Jones” in “Million Dollar Bash”

I have kept a two-hour BBC radio documentary about them, recorded on cassette way back in the 1970s sometime, and still pull it out to play from time to time, despite its poorish quality. I’d love to hear it in pristine quality.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 20:01:12 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Not sure as to what a part 2 is exactly in the singles game but as for great 2 sided singles......."Reason to Be" side 1 and "Maggie May" side 2.........also was "Stage Fright" not a side 2 ton""We Can Talk" .

Bob F : Had Joni's statement about Bob been greeted here with a "Good on her" as Bob's speech was, then I might well have had someting to say.......but it wasn't and as such one has nothing to do with the other.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 19:58:24 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There is also the never resolved story of "Hawks session work for Red Bird" vaguely mentioned, but never hunted down. The Shangri-Las at this time covered "You Cheated You Lied" and credited it to "Levon Helm" (a false credit dating back to Ronnie Hawkins & Morris Levy). This suggests a connection somewhere in the mists of time.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 19:52:00 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As noted on Toppermost, Zoot Money does What'd I Say, gets half way through and stops. He says "This is how I learned it. That was Part One. Here comes Part Two.'


Entered at Wed Feb 11 19:48:18 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.147)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Lieber and Stoller produced Robbie Robertson in his role as sideman on John Hammond's "I Can Tell". Rick Danko too if they did more than just the initial session with Bill Wyman on bass.

Thanks for the two-sided singles thread. Seems the time to note that one of my record-buying rules of thumb is to pick up any 45 where the b-side is part 2 of the a-side - Shout, Twist and Shout, Honeydripper, Sky Pilot, World and any numer of other JB records, One Nation Under One Groove, Peppermint Twist and other Joey Dee records, Lonely Girl, American Pie ...


Entered at Wed Feb 11 19:43:51 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Double Sided Slabs

That's an easy one!
The Doors: 'Love Me Two Times' / 'Moonlight Drive'.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 19:01:55 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Double-sided singles

A more productive thread. Pomus & Schuman wrote one of the greatest double-sided singles: His Latest Flame / Little Sister. One of the other greatest pairings was The Weight / I Shall Be Released. Then Up On Cripple Creek / Dixie.

Also God Only Knows / Wouldn't It Be Nice, Strawberry Fields / Penny Lane, Baby Please Don't Go / Gloria. Or The Shirelles Will You Love Me Tomorrow / Boys.

Any more?


Entered at Wed Feb 11 18:50:31 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Zinmmer(frames) At Dawn or Leiber Me Alone

OK, it’s Zimmer (frames at dawn). First off, Jerry Leiber is dead. He would be eighty-three if not. Bob Dylan is seventy-three.

Leiber & Stoller were Brill Building songwriters. Dylan was the new thing that knocked them off their perch. In the autobiography, “Hound Dog”, in 2009, Dylan is not mentioned as far as I can see. These guys were working in the New York of the 1950s and early 60s with mafia types taking over their offices at Red Bird because of Shadow Morton’s debts. I feel that we should expect “Sopranos vernacular” from their lips.

To suggest that Pomus & Schuman were good, but Leiber & Stoller not is patently absurd. Anyone would pair them as peers. I couldn’t put a cigarette paper between them. Funnily enough, the first web reference I found to Pomus & Schuman describes them as “second only to Leiber & Stoller.” Personally, I’d say “equal to.” I’m listening to Volume 2 of Ace’s three volume Leiber & Stoller Story.

So Bob took exception to a comment the (then) seventy-six year old Leiber made. It’s fair for him to say “Such a remark makes Leiber a vindictive arsehole in my eyes” but to say that his music was not good, smacks of (second) childhood-ishness.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 18:04:51 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.208)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT, thank you. Y'know, you being a Yid, and actually writing Thank you, reminded me that I was rude not voicing my concern for Norm when he announced that his life was in eminent danger. Taking the helm of a ship in good weather, in that condition is risky, but in bad weather, oy, vey is mir. Not just you, also Kevin, hypothesizing about humor, reminded me there was something that for quite some time now, I had forgotten to write back to Norm.

So Norm, all this traveling in boats, in bad weather, forgive me, i forgot my manners. i really meant to write you :

Abi gezunt dos leben ken men zikh ale mol nemen


Entered at Wed Feb 11 17:55:15 CET 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Musicares

While I was amazed Saturday morning to wake up and find that Dylan actually gave a speech, once the contents of the speech were revealed I wasn't thrilled. Of course I was glad to see him pay tribute to Peter, Paul & Mary, Joan Baez and others. However the comments on Lieber and Stoller, Haggard and Tom T. Hall were unfortunate and on the level of they didn't like me, I didn't like them. Check out the article in the Washington Post on Dylan and Tom T. Hall. It's on today's Expecting Rain. As to both Rolling Stone and the NY Times receiving Dylan's actual notes, it's possible he screwed up reading the speech but it's also possible it's spin. Dylan once sang a great John Prine song called "People Puttin' People Down." Too bad he didn't listen to the lyrics.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 17:07:53 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Blues

Jeff A: Thank you for educating me further with this description of 'hillbilly' music. We need more of this.

Ian W: Bob Dylan's Blues were probably 'saved up' as you note in your post a few minutes ago. Given what Leiber is said to have said, his comments were pretty benign. Leiber and Stoller, as Peter notes, did write some good pop songs and had a lot of success. The comment ascribed to Leiber (if he said it) is rude! It is below the belt. What happened with Haggard and Hall? Who knows? The anthem - probably unnecessary despite its dire nature but it makes a point. Finally, a shot at his critics via the voice issue... his critics should know. "How does it feel?". There are a few good critics (as there are a few good journalists and newspaper people who do their homework,) but from my years I would say that most of them have deadlines are don't do their research and say and write things that lack a full workup. Then they are repeated. I haven't seen many of these critics (yes, there are a few as evidenced by the positive reviews) who skewered Dylan for his voice speaking up in the past few weeks, having heard 'Shadows In the Night' or some of his recent concerts saying 'The voice is back". Doesn't sell like saying that he's lost it.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 16:52:53 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.208)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: JQ you'll enjoy reading this

Hillbilly Music / See the link. Anyone who has heard enough knows what the scope of what is considered traditional blues should be.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 16:42:00 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan's MusiCares speech

A friend of mine just sent me some comments from a friend of his who was present at the MusiCares event in LA. The latter said that everyone expected any speech by Dylan to be short, saying nothing of lasting note, so both the length and content were barely believable. The poetry and rhythm of the speech as delivered in Dylan’s “distinctive voice” on the night is contrasted with reading it in print afterwards. The feeling was that Dylan had been saving these thoughts over the years and just let them all out in one go.

Jerry Leiber’s remarks about Dylan in the 2008 book Tell the Truth Until They Bleed: Coming Clean in the Dirty World of Blues and Rock 'n' Roll by Josh Alan Friedman must have cut him very deep.

Merle Haggard? What was “Workingman’s Blues #2” all about then?

That version of the US national anthem sung at the boxing match? That was pretty dire.

Whatever else, Dylan’s was not your typical showbiz award acceptance speech. They tend to be bland, often bolstered by empty praise. And the fact that someone close to Dylan let ROLLING STONE use Dylan’s own notes in their report surely indicates that this was something Dylan felt strongly about and wanted to say.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 15:21:13 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Ah, so, a Scorpio Woman - made me link to the Link Wray song of that title. I loved the David Crosby quote in the article "as humble as Mussolini." There are a few people that could be applied to. I will store it in my mind for future use.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 15:12:53 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the tirader

A kind of lite recent profile of Joni - seems like she's doing publicity (!) for a new box set compilation.

I really don't set any store by astrology, but Ms. Mitchell and I share a birthday, and there's something very familiar in her default attitude of generalized crabbiness.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 11:01:10 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Just Saying

Kevin, so you have no problem with Joni's tirade but you think Dylan's comments were rude and petty? I find that really strange.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 02:08:13 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Apologies for the misspelling in the previous post


Entered at Wed Feb 11 01:50:51 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Why me, Lord?

Kris Krostofferson - story and song:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tA7E7pbUws#t=215


Entered at Wed Feb 11 01:43:08 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ashamed? Hardly.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 01:35:38 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: MusiCares speech - brief clips

Very brief clips (and it would be nice to see video of the whole thing or even an audio recording) but maybe it comes across differently - something in the way it was delivered

http://deredactie.be/cm/vrtnieuws/videozone/nieuws/cultuurenmedia/1.2232045


Entered at Wed Feb 11 01:29:03 CET 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Tour '74 - St Louis

If, when you look at Wallsend's "Stage Fright", you click on the St Louis clip listed to the right, you will see a couple of brief glimpses of Leon Russell. He's the guy in the white cowboy hat. Apparently, he danced on to the stage, tried to put his hat on Dylan's head, didn't join Dylan at the mike, though invited to do so, and then danced back off the stage.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 01:15:37 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob F.......

As to Joni........So ?

As to the Jeff and Norm show...........you and most others seem so willing to see the wink and nod in everything Bob says........are you saying you don't see that in Norm's ( granted often off colour ) posts........c'mon.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 00:38:03 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Jive Talk

Kevin, I don't remember you have any problem with Joni Mitchell's anti Dylan tirade.

Closer to home, yesterday, Norm made a crude hateful comment at Jeff for no apparent reason. Instead of calling him out on it, you made a joke of it. In fact nobody here told Norm to cut it out. That was bullshit. We all should be ashamed of ourselves for allowing that kind of talk to go unchecked.


Entered at Wed Feb 11 00:07:39 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't expect Bob Dylan to be a "nice guy" and would be kinda disappointed if the voice of Positively 4th Street and Like A Rolling Stone turned out too nice.

I wish though he'd direct his ire at other targets. We both flinched in "Selma" at the bland over-enunciated cover of "Masters of War." It turned out to be by Odetta (which I've added to the review). But I can't see him attacking Odetta. I thought Robbie Robertson came out justified in his comment that Bob needed to listen to Curtis Mayfield: Keep on Pushing by The Impressions (courtesy of Curtis Mayfield) worked a lot better in the context of the film than Masters of War. As did Ol' Man Trouble by Otis Redding. BUT the original Dylan probably would have worked.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 23:03:50 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, very true. It is always disheartening to see someone you admire unburden themselves when you believe the wise thing to do is to keep it in house--especially if you believe the action to be unwarranted.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 22:25:56 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed.......Most correct.....certainly not life defining In either case. I think you nailed it in an earlier post when discussing how surprising it is/was to see people of unquestioned genius in a particular area be so sensitive to any and all criticism and more than that to have registered it all and then years later - unburden it all in such ( in my opinion ) an undignified way.........I always remember when one of the big shots in punk rock ( perhaps Rotten ) saying at the peak of the movement that it was sooooo easy to hate the likes of Pink Floyd and ELP because they all took themselves too seriously......but that is was much harder to get a hate-on for Rod Stewart because at the end of the day he was who he was - an ex-ditch digger who wanted nothing more than to sing and shag blondes and that was exactly what he was doing................I always believed Bob Dylan to be the guy who so beautifully put the petty and rude Mike Love in his place back in 1991 with that gentle reminder about "forgiveness". To see him years later stick a shiv in Merle Haggard and go out of his way to belittle an identifiable young girl who mangled the US national anthem just to make a point about how unfair the big bad critics have been to him was very hard to take.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:46:27 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Terrible things

When I suggested kind of passing over the speeches and not defining the entirety of a person's life based on what he said in a particular moment,this should not be mistaken for giving someone a pass for saying or doing things that go beyond an acceptable line-thus,if one threatens murder,an extreme of course,such forgiveness or passing over the act would not be reasonable to accept.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:40:22 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Another Take

So here's another take on both Dylan/Jordan,Kevin.In Dylan's case I'm ok with what he said,although till we see/hear it the jury may be out.Given my tendency to view everything Dylan in an approving,nonetheless judgemental manner,I see this speech as ok.However,even if everyone was to conclude that Dylan's speech was "not nice",like with Jordan I view it from the perspective that we are all human.We all do some terrible things,some private and some public.His moment,like Jordan's was public.Thus,I view it as a moment,not a life defining or career defining situation.One bad page in a book a doesn't make for a "bad" book.So,I see Jordan for his genuis and Dylan for his.Jordan was churlish and childish,and IMO Dylan was playful.Either way,merely a moment.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:38:33 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Luxuriating in 'Shadows Of The Night'. Dram of Bowmore. I'm hoping the missus is OK making out to this. I'm making plans for Valentine's. What'll I do? Can't change me now. Stay with me. Adult music.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:30:23 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Great clip Bill......I have not heard or seen much of Bruce Cockburn in a while.

I do want to take back my description of Michael Jordon as a cretin....silly choice of words.....An uncomfortable speech to watch and revealing of just how thin his armor was in places but not necessarily a complete picture of his character.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:28:28 CET 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

I've always seen The Band as a supergroup collection of solo artists. You single Rick out and look at his recordings from 1977-1999, that's a major chunk of his career. As a solo artist, I love when it shows you a different sound and vision that the individual person has, and doesn't try to sound like the "mothership" group. As Peter V always said, Rick was criminally under-used in the '80s/'90s Band songwriting department. Look at all the songs of his they could have been playing regularly.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 21:22:17 CET 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Rick's solo career

As my music tastes remain Band centric, I've been exploring the underplayed eras of the saga. I just love Rick's solo recordings and find them extremely rewarding. RICK DANKO (1977) is just a flat out excellent album, the unreleased work from late '70s/80s on CRYIN' HEART BLUES is fantastic, the DANKO/FJELD/ANDERSEN material is some of his best work, and the late '90s solo/Jubilation material fits perfectly with TIMES LIKE THESE. And his songwriting contributions are wonderful. I have 46 tracks in my Danko solo iTunes list, and he wrote/co-wrote more than half of them.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 20:51:57 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's a link to Bruce Cockburn and group performing his own "Somebody Touched Me" - same god, different song. Note Richard Bell and Colin Linden, and presumably John Dymond and Gary Craig, in other words the BARK band. It's from what I think is Cockburn's best album, "Nothing But A Burning Light", which took its title from Blind Willie Johnson's answer to his own musical question, What Is The Soul Of A Man?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 20:15:57 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed: Your suggestion to seek out the Michael Jordon basketball HOF induction speech brings to mind that ( I am sure ) mythical Bob Dylan/Led Zeppelin story - where, as the story goes, Zep's mighty manager Peter Grant spotted Bob Dylan at a hotel bar one night and walked up and took a seat beside him.....bracing himself, he cleared his throught, extended a hand and said "Hello, I'm Peter Grant, manager of Led Zeppelin"........Dylan paused, looked him over and replied "I don't come to you with my problems, do I ?"

......joking aside Jed, while the Jordon speech is quite a sad and difficult thing to watch in that it is such a naked case of an unravelling of an image - your point about the value of hearing and seeing a delivery rather than just reading a text has merit. Certainly in the Jordon case, one is left with no doubt as to the cut of his jib............With The Dylan speech, I heard enough of the delivery and read it over carefully enough to know what it was about and I stand firmly with my position. Did Bob reveal himself to be a cretin in the way MJ dd ? Of course not, not even close, but his speech was rude and petty and unbecoming of someone that I have much love for.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 20:04:36 CET 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Thanks PSB

Whoops: I should do my research more carefully! (Glass houses/stones) Thanks, Peter. Back to square one.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 17:48:39 CET 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Somebody Touched Me

The "Somebody Touched Me" Dylan sang is an old bluegrass gospel song and wasn't written by Ahmet Ertegun. It was written by Leon Bowles and Tim Frye.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 17:21:53 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ehrtegun

"Somebody Touched Me" is a song written by Ahmat Ehrtegun. Dylan sang it at times about 15 years ago early in his concerts. If he carried this issue wit him, I doubt if that would have happened.

That he noted Ehrtegun's 'dislike' of his songs during this speech was part of a comment regarding how Sam Phillips found them favourable. Reviewing their history, I don't think this was a poke at a now passed record executive, but rather a historical comment about what it was like to be a rising singer/songwriter in the early 60s. Just my take on this particular comment.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 16:58:29 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Chicago 1/74 Dylan and The Band

That's Dylan up front (back to the audience: sometimes side) in Chicago on 3/1/74 (first date of the 74 tour) (in the link film a few posts ago). Don't know if he was on stage on 4/1/74 but he certainly was not on stage with The Band when I saw them on 10/1/74 and the record on line indicates that that first show may have been the only time he was on stage with them during the tour and that stopped because (it is said) Dylan didn't like the mechanics and made the change. Anyone have more insight? Who was in Chicago on 4/1/74 who might know because he/she was there?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 16:32:21 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: You take what you need and you leave the rest

Interesting point Bill. My perspective with Dylan (as well as folks in my real life) is that sometimes you have to take the good with the bad, and while Bob may have benefited from some sort of filter, there was, as you noted, a lot of interesting stuff in that speech.
I’d like to judge him, but then I remember that not everything that comes out of my pie hole is, puppies, rainbows, and unicorns either.

I may have posted this thought already, but I suppose that all Bob is really trying to say is:
“How many roads must a man walk down, before you call him a man?”


Entered at Tue Feb 10 16:22:55 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Quote from a book

From J.A. Friedman's book "Tell The Truth Until They Bleed". Jerry Leiber is said to have said the following according to this book's author:

""He was playing a role - I never believed he was real. Had a lot of chicks? So did Mickey Rooney. The fact that he was hip, inscrutable, and quiet - this m.....f.....r is self-aggrandizing and full of shit."

If he said it, when he said it, and why he said it all remain unclear or unknown. Maybe others know. Its not pretty and certainly was unkind. Any why Mickey Rooney got it in the same breath is also unkind. Rude?

Stoller is different person. Why hit them both if this is the sore point?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 16:19:21 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm again with Kevin J, now that I've finally read the transcription of Dylan's speech, thanks to the link that John D provided. Of course he (and all of us) has the right to say what he said (or we said about what he said), but I don't see why he'd felt the need to use the platform he had to cast others in a negative light. If you really don't care what people think, then you don't go out of your way to take some sort of revenge.

Still, overall it was enlightening, plus it was sometimes pretty funny, for example, all the Why me lords. It was nice to hear him acknowledge his really early supporters, it was nice to hear him tie certain of his songs to the folk and blues standards of others, and even to the idea-finding and -expanding-upon tradition of Shakespeare.

And, given his earlier idea that "Traditional music ... is all about vegetables and death", it was fascinating to see him recalling Tom Hall's line about "tomatoes on the vine, and onions" - and later raising the idea of Hall shooting himself in his minivan (which didn't happen, I was relieved to learn).

All that said, what did Hall say that ticked him off so much? Was it really some 1973 Hall interview, or was it something in Hall's 1976 book, "How I Write Songs, Why You Can" (the title of which presages a whole lot of what Dylan talks bout in the early going).

Until a visit to Wikipedia this morning I knew nothing about Tom T Hall besides his name and musical genre, and now I know, among other things, that he wrote "Harper Valley PTA". Ironically, when I read Dylan's recitation of "Sunday Morning Coming Down" last night, it called two songs to mind: "Gentle On My Mind" and "Harper Valley PTA". So I don't know that Hall's mind would have been unduly boggled by Kristofferson's lyric. Jeez, even the political stance behind HVPTA is all that different from that behind "Ballad Of A Thin Man".


Entered at Tue Feb 10 16:17:20 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Stage Fright

Thanks for that 'StageFright' clip from Chicago 1974 Wallsend. Ive never heard any of the bootlegs, but if that's the genuine audio from the performance, it sounds pretty good to me.

I have to be honest and say that even though I'm generally a big Dylan fan, I think that what The Band was doing on that tour is more interesting than Dylan's performances. His vocals were a little too "shouty" for me (at least on what I've heard on the official release). For his mid 1970's concerts, I prefer what he captured on much of the Rolling Thunder tour.

Ben, I'm also thankful that, as someone who was too young to see all 5 original Band members in concert, I was able to see Richard, Garth, Rick & Levon in the 1980's, and then Garth, Rick, and Levon in the 1990's, and then plenty of Levon and Garth in the 2000's. Decades of musical enjoyment!

Yes, I realize that it was not the "original quintet", but it was still quality music and I enjoyed it, and appreciated the fact that they were putting it out there.
If Robbie had ever performed relatively close to my neighborhood, I would have gone to see him too.

I never got to see the 1927 Yankees play either, but that didn't stop me from seeing some great Yankee teams in the decades where it was practical for me to attend.

Pat, interesting clip about Dylan going electric. Now I see what all the "furor" was about.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 14:39:55 CET 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I'm very suprised at the negative reaction to Dylan's speech. The comments seemed very balanced to me. For every criticism, Dylan provided a compliemt to a wide range of artists from Joan Baez to Kris Kristofferson to Billy Lee Riley to Doc Pomus. For a comparison, the Joni Mitchell comments about Dylan were much angrier than anything Dylan said about Tom T. Hall or Leiber and Stoller in this speech.

Going back to recent comments here on the "feud". I think that the legacy of the Band, Levon and Robbie is assured. For someone to suggest that Levon's allegations about songwriting mis-credits and other business improprieties does anything to diminish the legacy of The Band is absurd. It seems to me that the person who is most responsible for keeping the legacy of the Band alive, it would be Levon by actually going out and performing the music live from 1977 until his death in 2012.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 11:54:51 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.30)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I don't recall seeing this footage from the '74 tour before.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 11:35:23 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Hitler piece is wonderful. I liked him confusing Albert Goldman and Albert Grossman too! Subtle touch.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 11:10:41 CET 2015 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Talking Third Reich Blues

Pat - nice one. I loved it. Particular nice touch - the aside about the jazz organ. And I predicted the last line!


Entered at Tue Feb 10 11:03:27 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually, I think the line is "I'm glad to be here … I'm glad to be anywhere.'


Entered at Tue Feb 10 10:42:50 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It may be a Max Miller joke. It seems likely. I did lights on Tommy Cooper for weeks on end, and he used it. So many jokes originate with Max Miller. He was bet that he couldn't say "fuck" on the radio n the 1950s. He agreed he couldn't but said he could spell it out.

A man went to the opticians. The optician said "Read the bottom line of the eye chart." So the man started reading … W … J … K

Stop! said the optician. 'Where I see F, you see K."


Entered at Tue Feb 10 10:34:48 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Keith's "It's good to be here, it's good to be anywhere" line is attributed to him at the opening of a tour in Nurnburg in 1998, that had been delayed after he took a fall from a ladder at his home in Connecticut. Other folks report his saying it as early as 1995. He himself described it as "an old Max Miller joke".


Entered at Tue Feb 10 07:07:58 CET 2015 from (219.89.221.66)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Grammys

Old Crow Medicine Show win a Grammy for their worst album ever. I love that band (in the Willie Watson days)and they probably deserve it more than a lot of acts but Remedy ..really?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 05:47:57 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Amy At The Kate

In other news, I had the pleasure of seeing Amy Helm perform in Old Saybrook, CT this past Friday evening. It had been a while since I’d been to a show, so it was good to get a nice jolt of live music to sooth the soul and clear out the cobwebs. Lovely theater called “The Kate” named after Katherine Hepburn, who used to have a home down the road in nearby Fenwick on Long Island Sound. Great sound, lighting, comfortable seats, and a nice intimate feel in the theater, which probably holds about 250 people.

Strong solid performance as always from Amy and the boys. One of the songs she’s doing now is a stripped down version of ‘The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down’. Byron on bass, Dan Littleton on Acoustic guitar. Drummer Dave Berger switches over to a little pump organ, and Amy beats on a bass drum mounted near her mic stand. Real simple and moving tribute, without trying to copy or mimic the original. When she sings the line: “Like my father before me, I will work the land”, There’s some additional resonance added, as she is now carrying on where her Dad left off. A sense of loss there, but also a spirit of resilience and carrying on.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 02:21:36 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Waiting on Judgement Day

The only time I can recall Dylan ever talking about possible regret or wishing he had said something differently, was in regard to the song ‘Ballad in Plain D’, which was inspired after an argument with girlfriend Suze Rotollo’s sister, Carla, and contained a fair amount of animosity towards both Carla and her mother, who Dylan had strained relationships with. Among other things in the song, Bob refers to Carla as a parasite.

When Suze was asked about the song in an interview, she was able to forgive Bob, and had some perspective on what it was he was doing. Here is a quote from Suze Rotollo regarding the song:
“I understood what he was doing. It was the end of something and we both were hurt and bitter. His art was his outlet, his exorcism. It was healthy. That was the way he wrote out his life, the loving songs, the cynical songs, the political songs, they are all part of the way he saw his world and lived his life, period."

Years later, in 1985, Dylan was asked about the song and if he had any regrets about it.
Dylan: "Oh yeah, that one! I look back and say 'I must have been a real schmuck to write that.' I look back at that particular one and say, of all the songs I've written, maybe I could have left that alone."

And Jed makes a good point that hearing the speech and reading it can provoke different types of reactions. Perhaps even seeing the speech would add to the perception. Maybe he was winking and grinning during the scathing parts. ;-)


Entered at Tue Feb 10 02:03:53 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Yet

We judge nonetheless.In the middle of an ongoing narrative.Human nature I guess.I agree with lots of what you say,JT.That too is a judgement about your judgement in relation my judgement of your judgement.Nice work for all parties!


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:59:23 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I thought I would try my hand at this.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:46:53 CET 2015 from (162.217.234.191)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Prime Minister Justin

Kevin, is that wishful thinking on your part? He'll never be the man his old man was. Problem with the Libs is there really wasn't anyone to actually be a leader. They had to try using a name. To bad there wasn't some leaders like the old days like Lester B. Anyway Eve Adams must have the hots for Justin. She's crossin' the house.

No more concerts for me. Small venues is all I could enjoy now. Remember I'M AN OLD MAN Kevin.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:32:57 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Elusive RZ

I love a lot about Dylan. One of the things I love most is the enigma. You cannot pin him down. His consistency is his inconsistency. The interview and speech are just another 'day in the life'. Tune in, folks. It ain't over 'til its over.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:30:06 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Existentialism

I thought it was Keith Richards who said "It's nice to be here. It's nice to be anywhere" after the fall from a tree. Did Dylan say "Its nice to be... anywhere" first?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:28:48 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Who's to Judge?

Perhaps this in another chapter in Dylan's poetic,often times comedic and misleading narrative.Or,is this and the AARP interview,finally,the real thing? Why Now? Will it lead to a new album-I am Here?


Entered at Tue Feb 10 01:12:03 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Good Points

Jed, JT, really good points on the Dylan speech.

It's interesting that the one songwriter who thrashes him in public, Joni Mitchell, he has nothing to say about. I don't think anything he said was personal. I think he was just having some fun.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 00:59:05 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Choking on words

No running over people with tour bus. Hyperbole to make a point. OK. But this is a speech. Its words. Yes, maybe to be reconsidered. But a little strong, though these words might not sit well with us. Rude. No. Wrong venue. Maybe. Petty. Depends on what instigated the comments. Everyone has to own up to their behaviour. All of us. Dylan knew what he was doing. He owes us no explanation, but of course we, being humans, would love to know. Someone elsewhere said it was maybe a response to Stealer's Wheel 'parody' of L&S (Stuck In The Middle With You). Who knows? I don't presume to understand Mr. Dylan and like Vanessa Redgrave, its not her politics, its her acting. She can say and think what she wants. Its her dime. Sits in the craw. A little but thats show biz.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 00:35:13 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Kevin/Dylan Speech

You may want to YouTube Michael Jordan's HOF acceptance speech,which you may see in a similar way,albeit even angrier,if indeed Dylan's speech is angry.Is it a matter of great artists ,instead of gaining love and appreciation for their genius,receiving ridicule,hassle,anger directed at them?Are they striking back?Are they hurt? But tone and phrasing mean something too and Dylan knows alot about those two things.So lets hear the speech to "judge" his intent and to see how they stack up in relation to the words.Jordan's speech had anger in all aspects-delivery,tone,phrasing and words.I'm interested to hear,and I neglected to mention the visuals and their impact on how we judge the speech,how we all feel about it after we see/hear it.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 00:15:58 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dave H

Right on target.


Entered at Tue Feb 10 00:03:14 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: now what?

t-t-t-t-esting


Entered at Mon Feb 9 23:50:20 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: More Dylan

Dave H. No need for apologies, but rather than the feud question, I might ask Bob why he collaborated in songwriting with Richard and Rick, but not so much with Robbie. I just get the feeling that there was a lost opportunity there for two master songsmiths to write together.

Pat, I suppose the recent Basement release is “complete” if one’s primary interest is Bob Dylan, but as a hybrid fan, I was hoping the complete version would have everything from the Basement, including the Hawks stuff. That said, I’m thankful for what was released (once I was able to snag one at a reasonable price), and I will have to be patient (and pony up again) for the rest, if it ever gets released.

There are other things I would prefer to hear first as well, instead of the 1974 tour. For starters, the Royal Albert Hall from 1971 is at the top of my wish list.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 23:48:26 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff..........Take heart.....he doesn't know it yet , but future Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is about to make Norm's life uncomfortable......no, no...he's not banning tugboats or making the misspelling of "mystery" a criminal offense but he will be outlawing all concerts with ticket prices above $1500........yeah, you got it.......no more Eagles for Norm and his bother.

Bob F: The parking spot was a sure sign of the good times you were to have.....glad to hear it.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 23:29:04 CET 2015 from (58.104.20.179)

Posted by:

Wallsend

One of my favorite Dylan lines is from the 74 Tour. Seemingly at every show he said 'Great to be in Seattle' or 'Great to be in Chicago.'. Then one night he could't remember where he was so he said 'Great to be ... anywhere'. I am sure the feeling that the BTs are not complete is a marketing device and in three years they will come out with the 'Really, Truly Complete Basement Tapes'. I am sure Dylan is more interested in his new CD than the BTs. Why would he be interested in something fifty years old that he didn't care about at the time?


Entered at Mon Feb 9 23:25:21 CET 2015 from (162.217.234.191)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Always look on the bright side of life.

Put 'em up.......quite the intro. You told Pat and Peter to go f### themselves. You have been rude and confrontational for ..years. Reality is you need to lighten up. You take life far too seriously.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 23:00:03 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.159)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Actually Pat..i thought Norm's post served a purpose. Norm, thanks for making that Deliverance post & continuing to present your personality so well. You guys have been doing a wonderful job of that..... though Norm, you probably owe the Band an apology. I doubt that any Band members would want Dixie linked to the scene you referred to from Deliverance.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:45:54 CET 2015 from (85.165.150.158)

Posted by:

DagB

Location: Norway
Web: My link

Subject: Video: The Band in Norway 1994

Part 1: http://tv.nrk.no/serie/the-band-i-bergen/FHLD11000194/21-08-1994 ------- Part 2: http://tv.nrk.no/serie/the-band-i-bergen/FHLD11000294/24-08-1994


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:43:11 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I just can't imagine feeling that the latest BT release seems incomplete. And, as a reminder, a BTF Bootleg release will have The Band on 70% of it. If there is going to be a series of Band Bootleg releases, I can think of about a million other shows I'd rather hear than the BTF tour.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:34:47 CET 2015 from (24.91.116.154)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: If Bob Dylan joined the Band Guestbook

(with apologies to Todd)

Dylan: Hi, I'm Bob Dylan, great to be here, what's up guys?

20 people at once: Should Levon have gotten songwriting royalties???


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:31:22 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Selma

Review of Selma added at my blog. Feel free to comment over there, though it's not "instant" as I have to push an "approve" button (and will be asleep!)


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:28:38 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Jason Isbell at Beacon Thea

Kevin, it was really terrific. His band reminded me of The Heartbreakers when they were young and playing like their life depended on it. I love a great southern band. He did almost all of Southeastern and all the old songs except for 'Outfit'. I shouldn't have posted that the other day. His vocals and guitar playing were suburb. His wife Amanda Shires flew in for this show. What a wonderful player! I even found a parking space on the street. Great night.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:23:38 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Big Bobby D.

Bob F. That makes sense, and I'm afraid that you're you're correct. I suppose I'm still getting over the BD & The Band Basement Tapes "Complete" Box, that didn't feel quite as complete as it could have been.

Can you imagine if the next release is called "Before the Flood Complete", and doesn't contain any of the Band tracks?

While some of Dylan's recent comments may have benefited from some filtering, I'm not shocked that he decided to bite back a little. The man has been skewered over the years from many different directions. Can you imagine getting booed by thousands of people simply for doing your job and sharing your art? Who knows, if he feels like he needs to vent some more, he may want to consider contributing to this Guestbook. It's a good place to get some perspective on one's opinions.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 22:05:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the Jimmy Page link, which has upgraded my 99% to 100%. The voice and the clothes fit too. So Link Wray …I'm only interested if Robbie Robertson's on it … this guy knows his guitar players. As we might expect.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 21:40:51 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norm, God won't but Jeff might.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 21:39:26 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I think Dylan is a pretty funny guy.

Peter, the first BTF show in Chicago was famously much different than what the tour morphed into--as I'm sure you know. Dylan did three songs then stayed onstage as the Band did three more. Then Dylan did some more followed by a break, Dylan's acoustic set, then all together for a final run and encore. At a post show meeting, nobody liked the pace, so they split it up with Dylan departing while the Band did their own set. At the risk of sounding repetitious, a Bootleg release of BTF will sound a lot different than the release; Garth overdubbed a lot of stuff as additions rather than replacements. Wolfgang's Vault has all the Forum shows which served as the basis for most of the official release. Feel free to compare.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 21:04:25 CET 2015 from (162.217.234.191)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Deliverance

Well I'm goin' out west where I belong!

Guys in kayaks goin down a river singing the night they drove old Dixie down!.........sounds like Deliverance to me.Some one is gonna make Jeff squeal like pig?

I have my lady up here on the big boat with her tablet so I could see what was going on. God's gonna get me hunh Pat.

What's this business about Tom T


Entered at Mon Feb 9 19:29:57 CET 2015 from (24.91.116.154)

Posted by:

Dave H

Personally, I thought Dylan's "complaints" about Cohen, Waits, Reed, etc. not getting the same criticism for their singing were at best half-serious. I wouldn't be surprised if there were chuckles in the audience.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 19:18:56 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Here and there:

I really enjoyed that Jimmy Page story, Peter.......and feeling "spare" was a great description......The above link provides a glimpse of Jimmy Page's record collection.

Bob Dylan.........one does get the feeling that Bob could wake up today and order his tour bus to reverse over 6 "Peurto Ricons" and everyone would jump to his defense hailing the homicidal act as yet another brilliant move in his great career............I love Bob Dylan and he has been an important party my life but hearing ( or rather reading him ) prattle on like a 9 year old - oh boo hoo hoo, the big bad critics made fun of me but why not Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits ( wake up Bob, I'm not sure I've read a single review of either artist over 35 years tha DID NOT make reference to their vocals shortcomings ) was hard to take............Yes, there were some lovely parts of the speech, especially the last parts but it was ruined by a rudeness and pettiness that was just not necessary.

Bob F: Hope that you were able to make the show at the Beacon.....I know that there was snow in the area but trust you got there? Would like to hear your thoughts on the show.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 19:13:11 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

I also think that Gaga's 15 minutes of fame; with Mr. Bennet is wearing thin. It looked last night that she was trying to loudly out sing him. Geeez your singing with a legend for crying out loud. I think she forgets that she's doing a duet; not a solo performance.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 19:09:30 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rihanna/West/McCartney last night

I tell my son to watch for this performance; because I've heard it on iTunes and I think it's great; but you would never know it was Rihanna and West last night based on the original recording. First of all I believe McCartney's mic was not on. You couldn't hear him. The live version last night, to me, sounded nothing like the version on iTunes. The official version sounds much more acoustic. If I had heard last nights version first, I would not be interested.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 18:33:50 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Bootleg Series

Todd, If they release something from 1974 as part of The Bootleg Series, I would imagine it would only include the Dylan lead vocals. When they did the Live 1975 Rolling Thunder it only had the Dylan songs plus the Baez duets.

Is it me or does Dylan seem more interested in the Shadows In The Night release then he was about the Complete Basement Tapes?


Entered at Mon Feb 9 18:17:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Performance part 3

Pharrell and Sam Smith: its there: Nice to hear Stevie play that soulful harmonica as only he can . And yes, the Lady is the real thing: under all the glitz, she can sing. And those 'country' singers (I use the term loosely) are very good, especially Church. Rhianna can do it and well. Beck and Chris Martin: worth the wait for me. Overall, Annie stole the show.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 17:33:34 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Performance part 2

Annie Lennox gets her own accolade: Holy s..t! Not a surprise, but wow!!! Dale Hawkins got his due from that performance. Just great. Hozier- have to watch him. very good tonight.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 17:18:50 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Performance part 1

Performances part 1: AC-DC - as usual, top notch delivery; Ariana Grande - she's go it and I expect she will be central for a while; Ed Sheeran - a real talent; boy was it nice to hear John Mayer. ELO - love Jeff Lynne - really good. Underwhelmed by some of the others. Nice to see Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil honoured. More to come.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 16:28:13 CET 2015 from (32.216.255.7)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Dylan & The Band 1974

I would love to see a box set released from the concerts that Dyaln and the Band did in 1974. My fear however, is that if is released as part of the bootleg series, it will be called something like: "Bob Dylan & The Band: Live 1974", and will only include the songs that Dylan sang lead vocals on, and will omit the songs that featured The Band on lead vocals.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 15:47:04 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: It got me thinking

Glad to see Beck Hansen finally get his due. Sorry to see Sharon Jones (and the Dap-Kings) miss out. Roseanne Cash deserved her acknowledgement big time.

All of this made me think about albums that clearly stood out and were missed. I don't know the history of this award, but how could "Blonde on Blonde" not get identified. What was the musical climate (I lived through it) in the 60s that did not recognize the brilliance of so many of the albums that are excellent. I won't even mention MFBP or many Beatles albums. Maybe there should be a show called "Let's Do The Grammy's Again - a kind of reality show - take the albums of the year and get some musical people up on stage as a panel - and then maybe have a texting vote or something like that from the public - wouldn't that be something (he said, tongue-firmly-in-cheek).

John D - I was never a fan of Tom Jones but he has got pipes and he does justice to Dylan's song. AC-DC songs have become anthems. Finally, I don't know how the industry cannot be aware of so many indie performers who put out wonderful creative albums and are ignored. There has to be a group of people in the industry who monitor more than sales and identify excellence on its own without $$ attached.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 15:07:58 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Of interest, I had linked Tom Jones doing Bob Dylan's "What Good am I" yesterday.....not fom the Music Cares but a fine performance fom The Troubadour.

AC/DC.......not everyone's cup of tea, but always an outstanding live show........ Brown Eyed Girl will remember well how they defined the term "blown off the stage" when they did that and then some to The Rolling Stones at SARS Fest in Toronto several years back.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 14:14:57 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: John D

So sorry,you made your post at the same time my post had landed!


Entered at Mon Feb 9 14:13:18 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Roy OrbisonAngus Young

John D,respectfully,Roy sang well later in his life,but he died at 52.Tom Jones is 74 and I agree his voice was a highlight of he show,which I could only watch parts of without falling asleep. Angus Young is an excellent guitarist and I enjoy his playing,but while its purely a matter of personal taste,I couldn't mention him in the same breath as Clapton.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 14:11:18 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Roy Orbison

Yes I'm quite aware that Roy died a long time ago; but I looked back at my line; in the previous post and didn't like the way I phrased it.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 14:03:15 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT & The Grammys

Well JT, I will admit that there were a few I didn't know. I just want to say that Tom Jones was incredible. Like Roy Orbison, his voice remains stronger than ever. In an article I read this morning about the Dylan tribute for MusiCares, Jones was the first artist of the night to get a standing ovation.

My wife couldn't believe my excitement at seeing ACDC starting up as LL Cool J quickly introduced them. Despite his brother missing due to dementia and the drummer not allowed to travel, Angus Young just blew me away. We don't hear him mentioned in the same breath as Clapton's; but man what a guitar player and performer at the same time. He always does. Brian Johnson makes my throat hurt; but he may be one of the greatest Rock singers around.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 09:20:32 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: bootlegs

I noticed a couple of things yesterday at the Record Fair - Dylan bootlegs are going on and on, and prices are shooting up. I might have been tempted by a 2014 show to see if people are right about the voice being back, but the new boots were £23. They used to be £12 to £15 a year ago. There are now several box sets, including "The Complete Flood" which appeared twice, as 4CD sets at a ludicrous £65. It looks as if it's the complete Los Angeles recordings which became "Before The Flood" - both shows rather than the mix of the two shows that was released. I can't say it tempted me at all, but it is out there (and mentioned online).

Given the wonderful official Isle of Wight and Basement Tapes in the "Bootleg Series" I assume that a "Before The Flood" tour box might eventually appear officially … and the show that we'll want is Chicago, where they did different stuff for the first show of the tour, and I believe Dylan stayed on rhythm guitar for The Band's set. Pat was probably there. Is that right?


Entered at Mon Feb 9 03:21:44 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Haggard/Dylan 2005

Merle Haggard toured with Dylan for a few months in 2005.


Entered at Mon Feb 9 01:18:17 CET 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete and Jimmy

Ha ha

Great story P.

You shoulda stuck the 'ead on him mate!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Feb 9 00:46:46 CET 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

I've been saying for years that the English blues rock guitarists knew of, followed and were influenced by Robbie's mid '60s shredding. Someone should tell Jimmy Pagee to buy that '90s "Roulette" double disc collection, and compile the 18 or so Hawks tracks using Ronnie's awesome discog listing at his website.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 21:59:51 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Don't really understand Dylan dissing Haggard, Hall and Lieber-Stoller but if the most criticized artist of all time wants to give a little back I'm good with that. I BTF that Dylan has recorded songs by all three artists though I don't know any off the top of my head. Go to work on that my friends.

Still waiting on 'Shadows' but accessed "Lucky Old Sun" today. Comparing him to Willie. Herron vs. Raphael. Seems to work with Caol Ila.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 20:11:24 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Who is that masked (wo)man?

Yup. Being on the west coast has its perks. I spoke to mom just now and it is cold and snowing a ton in TO, as you know, John. The sun is out here and its 11C and maybe going up. The cherry blossoms appeared last month near our office. We get hockey earlier and so on.

John, who are all these Grammy nominees? Never mind Latin, Gospel etc. Who are the mainstream performers etc? There was a time when I knew. No more. I watch what comes out but I've never even heard of most of these.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 19:57:00 CET 2015 from (74.108.29.164)

Posted by:

Joan

I was very interested to read Bob's comments on Joan Baez. That is really high praise.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 19:44:57 CET 2015 from (173.237.187.244)

Posted by:

Felicity

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: Thanks

I have always love the songs


Entered at Sun Feb 8 19:01:19 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

john D

Subject: JT

You are so lucky to be on the west coast for any award show. At least they are over at a decent time.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 18:34:16 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Grammy 2015

In anticipation of tonight's Grammy Awards (I watch to see performances even though I rail against this type of competition often), going through the list of nominees, I am amazed as I go through the list that I know very few of the performers. I found Beck, Black Keys, John Legend, Jack White, and a few others, but the number of names I don't know approach 95-98%. Notables: Ariana Grande, Robbie Robertson, and Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings are up for awards. Giving them their due recognition as nominees, I do hope Sharon Jones wins and for our beloved JH, lets see Ariana Grande get more of the attention she and her cohorts deserve. Awards go on and I will continue to observe (with the itch I always have about them).


Entered at Sun Feb 8 17:28:51 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I also picked up a bootleg of Bob Dylan, Manchester 1965 (NOT 1966). The level's a bit low, but it's extremely good on performance - listened driving home. Only £3 - it wasn't a bootleg dealer, just someone with many s/h CDs at £3. I also got NY Sessions for £3 (the original Blood on the Tracks takes.)

There were lots of new 180g bootleg copies of classic bootleg LPs - Royal Albert Hall, Stealin', Great White Wonder, Blind Boy Grunt & The Hawks. I thought they were rendered obsolete by the BTs box set, but apparently not. I think it's copying the original bootleg sleeves and labels that appeals.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 17:11:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Out of context

Peter V: That is a great story. Thanks for sharing. Its funny seeing famous people out of context. One day about 8:00 PM in Toronto about 15 years ago, Iwas shopping at our local large supermarket, and in the aisle, there was Bruce Cockburn, with a shopping cart pushing up and down picking up groceries. I reminded him of this in Victoria when I met him in concert and he seemed to remember going to that store often when he lived in the area I lived in at that time. It would be great for others to share stories like this. Please do.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 17:05:16 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Soul

Robbie's comment was on the virtue of succinct lyrics rather than music Bob didn't know. His radio shows would suggest he has about the widest knowledge of anyone living.

Today I went to the record fair at Reading, a large one. I have been told that Jimmy Page is a frequent visitor. Near the end of my three hour visit, I was looking at a stall which had several Ronnie Hawkins albums (mainly post Band) and at the back, on display was “Ronnie Hawkins” the first LP, 1959, priced at £60 (or $90). Tempting, but too much for me. A guy next to me said ‘Can I see the Ronnie Hawkins?’ and the stallholder said ‘Of course, Jimmy. How are you today, Jimmy? That’s the first LP. Levon Helm’s on it.’ So the guy started looking at it, white hair in a pony tail. He said, ‘It’s got writing on it, and I’ve got a couple of EPs with this stuff on.’ Then the stallholder said, ‘I’ve got a load of Ronnie Hawkins LPs over here.’ (He meant 3 or 4). And the guy said ‘I’m only interested if Robbie Robertson’s on them.’ My ears were burning, because I was 90% sure that this was Jimmy Page. He picked up “Arkansas Rock Pile” so I said, ‘Robbie’s only on one side.’ People are usually chatty at these events, but he ignored my comment. I felt a bit spare, so I drifted away to look elsewhere. When I got outside, I googled “Jimmy Page- images” and I’ll revise that “90%” to “99%”.

If Sebastian’s looking in, Robbie must be very well used to peer praise, but this might be an unexpected one! “I’m only interested if Robbie Robertson’s on them.”


Entered at Sun Feb 8 16:55:54 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: I Don't Think So

Peter V, if Dylan was hanging out with The Staple Singers and Nina Simone in 1962-63 I really don't believe he needed Robbie Robertson to tell him about Smokey Robinson and Curtis Mayfield? There is a classic Al Aronwitz story about Dylan staying up all night listening to Marvin Gaye's 'Can I Get A Witness' while writing 'Mr Tambourine Man'. Did you ever read Tarantula? He has a fantastic piece in there about Aretha. This guy lives for music just like the rest of us.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 15:47:36 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The letter

John D alerted me to the Lefsetz letter and now its available on line at Expecting Rain

This short excerpt from that letter on the Dylan speech sums it up best. 'And what happened was that Bob Dylan revealed he’s been listening all the while, he knows what we’ve been saying about him, he’s got an opinion about it, and unlike everybody else in this sold-out business he’s not afraid to step on toes, he’s not afraid to offend."

The writer also notes that we had a classic Bob Dylan move, wherein he did something unexpected. That was my take on it too. When Dylan surprises, it is all Dylan. Folk with meaningful lyrics, poetry and Shakespearian visual stories with characters to match, 'your a liar' country and Cash, the basement, the OQ and the tour, Rolling Thunder, painting. Christ, Knopfler, movies, Grateful Dead, Lanois, Wiggle Wiggle and Unbelievable, Time Out of Mind, an Oscar, Never Ending, radio, painting, iron works, Sinatra and now an interview and then a speech to expose himself and his thoughts after concealing them.Sometimes it worked. Sometimes it didn't. But as noted, he follows his muse. What a career? And its still ongoing? Wow.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 15:27:50 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Reading Bob's speech

Reading and re-reading Bob's speech (thank you John D), it is clear to me as it is to John D and anyone else that reads it (and not just the highlights noted by certain writers) in sequence as a whole that Bob has been collecting his thoughts to put this type of presentation together for some time now. He is describing a career in evolution. The characters portrayed during that career in this speech helped or in some cases were not supportive. Bob clearly felt that to give perspective to it all, the lead characters should get their due. (Why he left our the OQ is a mystery to me. Maybe it was too close to the release of the Basement Tapes and he didn't want to promote.) When I read it all in context, it makes more sense. That some didn't like what he wrote or how he wrote rounds out Bob's experience with his critics. Bob was listening and responding on a professional level to what people were saying. As usual, Bob has taken the unconventional route. Even this speech falls into that category, since it is so unconventional for him. In context, I can appreciate what Bob was saying to those who disparaged what he has done. He has the right to criticize back at them and did that. Bob the critic of others is a new aspect of Bob Dylan. We have never seen it before except in song lyrics. Now for the first time we have it in spoken word. Bob has crossed boundaries once again.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 14:00:11 CET 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan

No mention of THE BAND??


Entered at Sun Feb 8 12:07:16 CET 2015 from (83.249.132.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Where should I send my bank account number, mister?

Mr. Dylan has the right to say anything he wants in his speech. It is his call. But, as a big fan of Tom T. Hall, I just want to know: Where should I send my bank account number to get back all the money I have spent to buy the records during all these years. Fair enough?


Entered at Sun Feb 8 11:53:08 CET 2015 from (217.79.191.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Ferienresort Cochem

Subject: The Long Hug Home

On this holiday park here in Cochem Koos Rabbit (professional mascot rabbit) sells hugs. His Little Rabbit Hug is on sale for just € 9.95 (all in).

This morning, on my way to the toilet with an aching head, the doorbell rang. My wife had treated me a hug….. “Oh God Els…..” now I should have kicked that Rabbit right out, but I didn’t ……and so at 8.30 AM, in my shorts, in the snow, I was hugging Bunny Koos between the BMW and house nr. 437.

While I noticed Koos had been drinking too last night….. I was …. and I don’t know what came over me, but I was almost crying and I didn't want to let go the fuckin’ Rabbit …. I was hugging my late father and mother, I was hugging my lost friend, …. I was just hugging this whole crazy world.. …. Koos was shouting to let loose now … ……but I couldn’t ….. I saw our neighbours walking by, smiling and I didn’t care, all I wanted was to hold on (to what I had lost) ….. . the situation lasted till security popped up and together with my embarrassed wife parted us …. the Rabbit wanted more money….. I slammed the door into his face .


Entered at Sun Feb 8 09:30:52 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: Tom Jones "What Good Am I"


Entered at Sun Feb 8 08:05:46 CET 2015 from (67.87.216.240)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks John D.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 06:53:16 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

So Tom T. Hall is Mr. Jones. I always suspected that.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 04:50:49 CET 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan MusiCares For those who actually want to read what Bob Said

Dylan's speech.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 03:39:52 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Dylan considered

Bob Dylan indeed should be able to say what he likes. The consequences of what he says are his and I am certain he considered what he was going to say (he had text from which he was reading) well before he came to this event. Despite my general discomfort with airing dirt in public and at such an event, this is not my call or our call...this is Dylan's call. He has his reasons. As someone said, the comments were negative but not overwhelming.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 01:54:51 CET 2015 from (67.87.216.240)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I had seen your link Kev. It's universally common to give Bob multiple airings.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 01:21:22 CET 2015 from (58.104.17.218)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Bob should be able to say what ever he likes. In the quotes I read i didn't see any personal attacks just him saying he likes this and doesn't like that. I was interested in his comments about Johnny Cash and "It's Alright Ma'.


Entered at Sun Feb 8 00:48:04 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: A cleansing of the palate was called for so the above LINK is Bob Dylan at his best - in this case accepting RRHOF induction and addressing comments Mike Love' had made earlier in the evening.......

Jeff: As Bumbles used to say "beat ya to it " scroll down a few posts....


Entered at Sun Feb 8 00:32:00 CET 2015 from (67.87.216.240)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Dylan speech article linked above


Entered at Sun Feb 8 00:11:51 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Dirty laundry

Airing dirty laundry is generally not a good thing. For Dylan to speak out like this is uncharacteristic. I need to know the facts before I condemn the act. It is generally not good to say those kinds of things at this type of event. Nevertheless, Dylan must have thought hard about what he was saying since it is all written on paper as he speaks. I wonder what really happened for those kinds of things to be said? I wouldn't say 'shame on him' unless I know the facts. My 'good on him' relates to the fact that he spoke so candidly on so many issues and actually prepared, not to the fact that he aired that 'dirty laundry'. I said I had mixed feelings about the latter and I do. We will likely never know.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 23:49:48 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… and indeed Spanish Harlem Incident and Spanish is the Loving Tongue! But Spanish Harlem is an all-time classic.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 23:37:36 CET 2015 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Well, he wrote Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. I love Shadows in the Night. Really beautiful.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 23:16:28 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To save you scrolling

Bob said:

"I didn't really care what Leiber & Stoller thought of my songs," Dylan said of the songwriting team who wrote several of Elvis Presley's early hits, including Hound Dog and Don't Be Cruel. "They didn't like them. But Doc Pomus did.

"That was all right they didn't like them. 'Cause I didn't like their songs, either.

"Yakety yak, don't talk back. Charlie Brown is a clown. Baby, I'm a hog for you. Novelty songs. They weren't saying anything serious.

END QUOTE. I am reminded of RR's advice to Bob to listen to Smokey Robinson and Curtis Mayfield … and add Leiber & Stoller. They were doing things with Spanish Harlem, On Broadway, Stand By Me that he didn't attempt- different genre of course, but NOT a lesser genre. They might not have written Visions of Johanna, and wouldn't have been able to. But could Bob have written Spanish Harlem? I think probably not.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 21:14:46 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Leiber & Stoller

Hang on, Bob dissing Leiber & Stoller? He doesn’t like their songs?

All I can say is :

Spanish Harlem, Stand By Me, On Broadway, Is That All There Is?, Love Potion No 9, Searchin, Hound Dog, Poison Ivy, Yakety Yak, Smokey Joe’s Café. Kansas City, Along Came Jones, Young Blood, Jackson, Jailhouse Rock, Ruby Baby, Saved, Baby I Don’t Care, Some Other Guy, King Creole, Bossa Nova Baby, There Goes My Baby, Drip Drop …

Note two The Band recorded. More with Ronnie.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 20:40:11 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: LINK to the Dylan Take-down Speech



Entered at Sat Feb 7 20:33:17 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dylan or Mike Love ???

JT........I can't agree with your feeling of "Good on him"..... I would lean more towards "Shame on him"........a very Mike Love kind of thing to say "he heard" that Merle Haggard didn't like his music and who cares since Merle Haggard isn't much anyway......or to take a Tom T Hall lyric and hold it up to ridicule or to just destroy some young girl who mangled the US national anthem at a Floyd Mayweatther fight where Floyd was fighting "some Puerto Rican" - like Bob couldn't have bothered to find out the name of someone he had paid to see fight for the championship of the world..........and to top it off he again failed to acknowledge The Band........a petty speech unbecoming of a great artist.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 17:26:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan Candor

I read the media this morning regarding Dylan's Musicare speech. He spoke for 30-40 minutes (depending on who you read). I had mixed feelings. I admire the honesty in speaking glowingly about the contributions of others but was slightly taken aback as he was also speaking in somewhat negative terms about others. He was pretty frank about his 'likes' and 'dislikes'. I guess when you get as many barbs thrown at you over this many years, you collect some negatives and at some time when there is a forum, you can meet those negatives head on. The comments were not fierce in the way that Joni Mitchell's appeared to sound. But he took down writers for simplicity of content and 'overcooked' lyrics. Sometimes one has to look in the mirror and remember the few works that one might have done in simplicity and that might be over cooked (right Kevin J?). He spoke out against the critics and I liked that. Even if the critics are right, they deserve to have a response, positive or negative. To date, most often, Dylan has shrugged them off with disdain. This time, he gave the what for, asking why he gets all this negativity while Cohen and Waits and others don't? Overall, the honesty of the speech was refreshing and its cantor was welcoming (like the recent AARP interview). Good on him!


Entered at Sat Feb 7 16:55:24 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Voting denigration

It all started again with this JA (Jefferson Airplane) vs The Band vote. It may be a 'who do you like better' vote but it comes across as a 'who is better' vote. It riles me and so I spoke about my concern.. JA was a superb band and did some excellent work. JA stands on its own. It doesn't need to be denigrated by a comparative vote.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 16:14:58 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Shadows In The Night - another listening

"Shadows In The Night" - Bob Dylan: It is an album that after listening stops you in your tracks and freezes your emotions. Suspended a7 37,000 feet last evening, I listened again on earphones and was blown away by the expressions of angst and grief punctuated by the odd smiling phrase. Despite these not being his songs, he owns them on this record. They are Dylan at 73 and it sounds like he chose them because he had something to say (again). This record must be considered something special. In its phrasing and its tone, it has created a monument to lost love.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 12:55:19 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Bill. The 1971 one has Steve Cropper, Larry Knechtel et al.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 10:16:29 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Glyn Johns & Levon

Glyn Johns on Levon

I continue with Glyn Johns “Sound Man.” He’s just got to “The Legend of Jesse James” and contradicts his Stage Fright statement that he had not met The Band when Levon asked for him to do a mix. In the ”Jesse James” chapter he says he knew Levon from the 1969 Isle of Wight rehearsals. Anyway, good stuff on Jesse James. Levon was the first artist contacted and they built it around him. Johns flew to Spain with Paul Kennerley to pitch it to Levon who was filming there. Emmylou Harris was next on board. Levon throughout played drums and sang live, and his only overdub was with Emmylou Harris. Johnny Cash, sadly, recorded his vocal entirely separately in Nashville. So Levon and Johnny did not perform together on the record.

The book is annoying me on Mr Johns behalf. The editing is by Ms Spellchecker as we say. There’s a seminal rock memoir there fighting to get out among inconsistencies (as above) and the over praise of his friends. You can’t say EVERY album was your favourite and one of the best you ever did and heard. Nor that everyone is a likeable and wonderful person. Blue Rider Press is part of Penguin, and as anyone who was in publishing twenty years ago and now, will tell you, professional editors who have the input they should have, are now thin on the ground. Legal checks? Whole departments will trawl it for slander. Ms Microsoft does the line-editing. But no one does the real job of editing. In my heyday, we'd sit and discuss the entire book, virtually line by line. To quote Todd Rundgren (as I started with Stage Fright):

This is the sound of bad edting. (Something / Anything)


Entered at Sat Feb 7 02:51:53 CET 2015 from (73.47.239.0)

Posted by:

Haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: comparisons and a ? from 5 days ago

JT: You are right on. Maybe I'm missing part of the ultra-competitive gene, or at least the ultra part. I've never understood, when it came to art or any other creative endeavor, how competition should somehow be a prime motivation. Seems like it should be MUCH more about the expression of oneself or selves. And that's said as a pretty typical North American male, w/ an affinity for sports and sporting competitions. Now I'll have to retrace a bit to see who you are referencing as JA.

I guess I will be guilty of some judgement however, going back to Sunday's North American football festivity. I say N.A., Norm, to differentiate from the rest of the world's football and acknowledge that you guys in Canada have a brand of it, too; woe betide ya if the Grey Cup ever becomes the over-hyped and produced monstrosity we have here. And that is said as a more-or-less follower of the winning side on Sunday last.

But when you all were debating about RR not being ID-ed on the broadcast, I've got to say: 1. We're all dreaming if we think The Band means anywhere near enough to the general audience, as they do to us, for RR to get a shout-out. 2. However, it does show the quality that Paul Allen brings to the table. Coach Belichek tends to have Jon Bon Jovi join the Krafts in their owners' box. No offense, but Jon Bon Jovi! You've got to be kidding me. 3. And on the subject of "artist", was the 1/2 time show an example of what auto-tune microphones do? I guess we're on the wrong side of a generational line, but my spouse just walked completely out during Ms. Perry's performance. 4. Last thing, right at the end, as Seattle was drawing near the goalline, during one of the shots of Mr. Allen's box where I could see that, yes, indeed, that was RR in the next row down; Robbie kinda did some boogaloo thing w/ his hands. Maybe Sebastian can ask if he was trying to channel the old guy in the white suit from Winterland, circa 1969. I thought it was hilarious and the 1st night jitters w/ the hypnotist in the wings, came right to mind.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 02:16:26 CET 2015 from (24.102.114.90)

Posted by:

Eddie

Subject: Bob

I really like the new Dylan album.


Entered at Sat Feb 7 02:14:55 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.149)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: You've pretty much got the picture re DCT. "Boom Boom" was his 1964 hit (and is on YouTube, complete with Fred Keeler's fabulous Robbie-style guitar work). The Hawks knew DCT well from his days fronting them as Ronnie Hawkins' auxilliary frontman for in-town gigs. So it was natural that they would have hooked up with his producer, Duff Roman, for thir own first post-Hawkins session (unreleased 'til AMH). DCT's first two records, both '64, were produced by Duff for another label, but then he moved to Duff's own label. There, in'65 and '66, he recorded a couple dozen tracks, mostly backed by the Shays, with a handful each backed by the Rogues (i.e., the Mandala) and the Bossmen. No horns on any of them.

In '69, Decca bought or licensed some of the Shays tracks from Duff Roman, added BS&T-type horns and unleased them on an unsuspecting public. I never liked them, though some of the basic horn-less tracks are very strong. Most of the DCT tracks were released on vinyl in the '60s on three Roman Records LPs - "David Clayton Thomas and the Shays a Go-Go", "David Clayton Thomas Sings It Like It Is" and "Something Else by David Clayton Thomas, the Shays and the Paupers" (a comp LP) and a half-dozen 45s. All worth owning.

By the way, there's at least one more untitled DCT album around - produced in LA by Domenic Troiano, I believe.

Oh yes, I think "Boom Boom" on the Decca LP was a "65 re-do, which turned up on "Sings It Like It Is" (which was an uneven grab-bag of tracks, anchored by the most brilliant record of the man's career, "Brainwashed" from the DCT and the Bossmen era of '66.

Fun factoid for Pat B: The original core of the Bossmen was three guys who'd jumped ship from Just US, leaving Ed Roth and Neil Merryweather to bring in some new guys, who evolved into Merryweather.

Related fun factoid with a tie to Garth: Two other Bossmen came from the Stormy Glovers, Mary Martin proteges who recorded Leonard Cohen songs before anyone else, using sheet music calligraphed by Garth, who also did some studio work with them.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 22:24:53 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Jason Isbell

Joe, I know but I never get tired of that song.

Kevin, we're going to his show tomorrow night at The Beacon Thea. This will be the first time I've seen him solo. Really looking forward to it. I'm just hoping the snow doesn't come earlier then predicted. Did you get the dvd from Austin City Limits? That's really good.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 22:18:30 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Danko/Manuel

LINKED: "Danko/Manuel" with an introduction that I particularly liked......the great Jason Isbell with the best version of the song I have heard.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 21:29:04 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Isbell

Bob, that song's not exactly new. I believe it was on 'Decoration Day' nearly ten years ago. Isbell's now a solo act and always worth a listen.

It's 7 & rain at 5:00 PM yet we are promised -29 wind chill by midnight. The fluctuations in temperature seem so extreme this winter. Might be just old bones. Waiting patiently on the new Dylan with a bottle of Bowmore to accompany. They say it's a virtue.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 21:06:07 CET 2015 from (74.14.49.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you Bob F......."Outfit" along with "Alabama Pines" and "TVA" are my favorite Jason Isbell songs..........It's been several years since I had seen him and someone better hide the cookies and cake in a higher shelf....he's almost unrecognizabke in your clip with the weight he has put on since the Drive By Truckers days.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 19:51:14 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Jason Isbell

Anyone not familiar with Jason Isbell, please take a minute and check out this song. This guy is so good.

The Band connection is he wrote the song Danko/Manuel when he was in the Drive By Truckers.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 18:17:44 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don Covay, David Clayton Thomas

Don Covay RIP. In fact his Toppermost is in the earliest stages of creation.

One for Bill M & The Clearly Canadians. Yesterday I found the two David Clayton-Thomas albums with no title, the 1971 CBS one and the American Decca 1969 one. The Decca one, from what I can see online was recorded in 1966, but not released until an attempt to ride the coat tails of BS&T. Is Boom-Boom the 1964 recording?

An online comment says it’s a fraud according to the singer – early unreleased tracks with a post-BST overdubbed horn section. I paid £3.99, which looking online was over the going rate!


Entered at Fri Feb 6 16:40:21 CET 2015 from (74.43.18.162)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce

Bruce Fans should check out the XPN web site.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 16:10:31 CET 2015 from (86.190.64.12)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Baffin Island

Subject: Dylan

I think Dylan's new album is really good. I like how the songs have been uncovered. I like Bob's singing, the bass and the pedal steel, which I read about. Thanks for reviews Peter and Peter. I think it's good that the songs are of the same genre.

I'm with JT. I think the albums since 'Time Out Of Mind' are very good. I think 'Love and Theft' is a great album.

Playing 'Songs of Leonard Cohen' just now.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 14:28:00 CET 2015 from (70.49.47.25)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The folly of comparing creative work

Stirring the pot: You've heard me on this before, but I need to speak on this. This obsession with 'who is better?' or 'who do you like more? (in this case) gets at the human trait of need to compare. When it comes to artistic expression, I find it perplexing. Why do I have to decide between JA and The Band? Why is it important to anyone. Again, I judge each individual piece of work on its own merits. So do most of you here. And yet, we respond to the trap ( I think its a trap) of asking our sensory input to put these 2 performers side by side and choosing. What can possibly be gained, either by me or by the receiver (s) of this information, from that knowledge. What will be the benefit to anyone? Maybe we should have a top 25 performers of the century and order them so we know that Group X is number 1 while Group Y is number 25. Then we will know. And how would that benefit anyone. I like the lists that put 25-50 best of the year (I know, what about the others who were not identified: well, you have to stop somewhere). Achieving order and sorting is helpful in some arenas. When it comes to artistic achievement, I prefer to identify individual achievements. If I were the Oscars, I'd come out with 10 -15 films that excelled that year and discuss the attributes that made me select them. I'd ask the public also to let the producer of the TV show know what films they identified as excellent and why. I'd put that on TV. But, then, who would watch? No one cares unless there is a competition, right? At least in sports, there is face to face competition with somewhat of a level playing field. (same time, same types of players, etc). Here, as we try to compare, there is anarchy. I am a voice in the wilderness on this one. I don't hear outcries against this sort of thing. I'll just have to enjoy both JA and The Band and look at each individual creation by these musicians on their own individual merits. That is hard work sometimes but its worth it. Certainly, it is more fulfilling to me than voting for who is better or who I like better.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 07:57:17 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: What's in a name?

One way or another, Dylan earned his career, and has kept it going. When he first came to New York City as an unknown, it certainly wasn't his name that got him his album deal, or made his career a success. He imbued the name with success on the basis of his ability to create....the name didn't do that for him. He is still the same artist at his core....just evolved over the decades.

Same thing with Scorcese. The name didn't make his films successful. The man who made the films (who happened to be named Scorcese), did that.

It's not like these guys were born on third base, and thought that they had hit a triple. They earned it through creativity and hard work.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 02:36:09 CET 2015 from (67.84.78.11)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Apparently Don Covay passed away on Jan 30th. At 76, or 77 years of age.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 01:03:09 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

As I have often said, for a year I put in a shilling for three plays on the jukebox in the university common room every morning : The Weight, White Rabbit, I Shall Be Released. But for me my JA top 20 is closer to my heart than a hypothetical Band 'bottom 20.' It's not as far as Sophie's choice, but I still don't like having to reject JA.


Entered at Fri Feb 6 00:49:48 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hmm. White Rabbit v The Moon Struck One … Crown of Creation v Volcano … Eskimo Blue Day v Islands … Hard call, guys. Still in the end, I gritted my teeth, closed my eyes and voted … according to secret ballot.

(Obviously for The Band).


Entered at Fri Feb 6 00:27:08 CET 2015 from (58.104.10.205)

Posted by:

Wallsend

It is now 71.96.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 23:54:30 CET 2015 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Civic duty

As much as I like Jefferson Airplane, of course I did my civic duty. It's now 69.37% for our guys.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 23:40:39 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Time to do your civic duty.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 17:56:16 CET 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: Bob

A couple of months ago, on a Sunday afternoon, my wife noted that there were a few tickets left for Bob Dylan's show that evening at The Academy of Music. Mary had never seen him before, as she doesn't tolerate gigantic sports stadium shows. We sat near the ceiling in the back of this elegant venue. No, he did not play guitar. He sometimes played piano. The band was on the mark the entire time, going from subtle gentle support to near ferocity on the lively parts of Duquesne Whistle. Working Man's Blues #2 was a delight, and Tangled Up In Blue had a different flavor than I'd ever heard before, as well as a few mischievous lyric changes. I'd heard that he was going to close with Stay With Me, and I was puzzled as to how he'd fit this Rod Stewart/Ian McLagen/Faces rocking raveup into his 2014 set. Of course, it was the Frank Sinatra song, and I now smile everytime it gets airplay on the radio. I'm not surprised, as he has spoken with admiration about Frank for years. He also has written of his respect and friendship with Frank Sinatra Jr. The evening was delightful, the vocals poignant and expressive, the band's playing and the sound quality were perfect. We left there knowing we'd seen an event that one could only experience here and now, and once gone, it's gone. How fortunate to live in these times. Who cares how Strangers In the Night sells? He wanted to do it, and that's okay. It delights some people, it gets the "meh" from others. Maybe in 2015 Bob will start worrying about people's perception of him? I think not.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 16:09:46 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Glenn Frey is major label … Universal Music (though just "UM" not a sub-label). It must have been a very expensive record to make. There are all sorts of reasons why stuff doesn't sell. Rumour had it that due to jealousy and resentment at his high royalty, EMI deliberately "stiffed" a couple of Paul McCartney albums (which is why he moved to Starbucks).


Entered at Thu Feb 5 15:42:14 CET 2015 from (70.49.47.25)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Agreement and discussion on the NAME

Of course a big name behind an album of standards is going to help sell the album. That Frey's album did not reach our collective consciousness may be the fault of his people or of his status on the music scene at that time. One could of course say that Dylan's status is not what it was but I maintain that he has had a steady following despite the criticisms levelled at him. Dylan's name certainly has helped this album; that is undeniable. The interview and the material being put out ahead of time and the continued interest in Dylan set this up for a 'win'. But, it has to be good to survive. And it is good. My point is that the body of work in the past years (since Time Out Of Mind) has been very good in the main and that these albums would work without the big name, though the name sells them. On their own merits, those albums are very good. I find it difficult to criticize most of the serious albums of the past 15 years and conclude that this music is not relevant or well done. The band and the production is very good and can stand up effectively to much of what has come out during this period. I too have been disappointed at times at some of the concerts I have attended, but only because I thought that Dylan had difficulty singing (this is likely a physical problem and can affect the overall performance in the same way that poor sleep chronically can daily affect the way you feel and operate during the day). That his voice has returned (at least the range is now there and on record it sounds much improved) is reassuring and may go along with the recent concert reviews that have noted the improvement in his voice and the overall success of the concerts of late. Though I dislike large venues, I will likely return to the concert scene for Dylan because of this. Albums can fail if the 'machine' does not promote them well. In Frey's case, that may have been the issue. In Dylan's case promotion has certainly helped. In Dylan's cover album though, the quality is there for it to be a great success.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 12:23:16 CET 2015 from (87.152.120.121)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: How your toilet can help to make your dreams come true

Everyone here knows about musical syncopation and its use to overload the brain to induce abreaction and/or prelude brain washing [P.Floyd, "Empty Spaces"] .

Another well-known neurocognitive affect: Repeating messages makes people believe it, no natter now stupid it is……[Germany, 1933]

Take advantage of this neurocognitive function ..... for years our toilet wicker basket was loaded with Porche 911 info....

My current toilet project is Rammstein,…

Someone know how to built a glass house?, anyway first Cochem for the weekend.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 10:40:55 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There is a point in Wallsend’s comments. I picked up a secondhand copy of the Glenn Frey “After Hours” 2012 album of Great American Songbook stuff. I’d never seen it, nor read a review, though according to Wiki it got to #92 US and #116 UK (or vice versa). To me it appeared then sank without trace. It is an interesting venture is that he gets Caroline No and Randy Newman’s Same Girl in there and you can’t see the joins with the standards. Also a great return to the original Route 66 rather than the Chuck Berry cover. Twenty musicians and a thirty-one piece string section. It sounds great. But so many people have done these sort of songs and thrown the full orchestra at them.

Bob’s virtue is getting that pedal steel and bass to carry the entire thing with very muted horns a few times. That’s why it’s different, and also there is the novelty of him actually managing to hit the notes – we knew Rod Stewart and Glenn Frey could hit the notes before we started, which is why it’s less exciting. There is a major interest boost in that (a) Bob selected the songs and (b) Bob can sing them. In the interview he mentions the mic very close, no headphones.

I still maintain though that four or possibly five songs stand out, and the rest are pretty generic Sinatra-fare to my ear.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 06:30:18 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, Bo Fortson was the singer on California Sun. The organ player? One of the great names in garage rock: Otto Nuss.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 06:00:32 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Ari

Letterman talking heights tonight on the show. New heights. Funny play on words.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 04:21:38 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.140)

Posted by:

Bill M

"California Sun" by the Rivieras, I believe written and produced by Henry Glover, who worked with our guys when they were with Hawkins, when they were the Canadian Squires, when they were the Band and afterwards. And while I can accept that some young guys from South Bend recorded and toured as the Rivieras, "California Sun" has to have been sung by someone somewhat older. Wilbert Harrison is who it sounds like. By the way, wasn't there an earlier version - by someone with a name like Joe Jones?


Entered at Thu Feb 5 03:36:18 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Neurons, not neutrons

It keeps correcting neurons. It has a problem with neurons. It wants to make cells into particles. That makes me nervous.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 03:28:27 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Into my neutrons

Loved 'California Sun'! It had that unique raw vibe that entered my nervous system. Others like that 1) Mona 2) 19th Nervous Breakdown 3) Talkin' Bout You 4) Stuck in the Middle With You 5) What I Like About You

So many others...


Entered at Thu Feb 5 03:23:54 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Rivieras? California Sun? Let's Have a Party? South Bend, Indiana's greatest contribution to garage rock?


Entered at Thu Feb 5 03:20:03 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Quality vs sales

I did understand what you meant and I understood the import of what you said. However, I disagree. I think those albums stand well on their own, with or without Dylan's name. They are very good albums. I am glad you agree. A lot of good music is made by musicians with small followings. Of course Dylan's name sells. That is the name of the game. What I am saying is that those are good albums with our without Dylan's name. They would have been noticed like many albums by lesser names are noticed. Pitchfork, Metacritic and many others bring these lesser known performers to our attention. To imply that they would not have been noticed I believe is incorrect. Yes, there are musicians on the street who busk and have talent who are not noticed. That is not the case for many performers today who have developed a following. Putting the albums I mentioned in that category, without Dylan's name , with a lesser following, they would have been reviewed and noted to be of very good quality. Maybe sales wouldn't be what they are without a name like Dylan. That's a different question.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 03:11:18 CET 2015 from (58.104.9.218)

Posted by:

Wallsend

JT, I didn't mean that the albums were not good, although they are not my cup of tea, but merely that if someone whose name was not Dylan had put them out, they would not have been picked up on. I think heaps of great music comes out that is not appreciated or even listened to simply because the musicians that make it are not already famous.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 02:24:35 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Tempest, Time Out Of Mind, Love And Theft, Modern Times

"As for Dylan, if his name wasn't attached to his recent works I doubt they would get any attention."

I cannot agree. This album and many of the last 10 should get the rich and complete attention and praise they deserve. From Tempest to Time Out of Mind to Modern Times to Love and Theft, those albums are very good works and should be acknowledged. The brilliance of Blonde on Blonde and Highway 61 Revisited and Blood on the Tracks does not in any way detract from the very good albums mentioned above. The songs and the presentation of those songs is very good. Not everyone will agree, but the critics often were positive. As a body of work, the last 10-15 years may have been uneven, but overall there is very good and creativework done by an artist who cared with a band who cared. This has to be said because again comparisons to what is brilliant is fraught with danger. A work stands on its own and to me, and I will say it loud and clear, these aforementioned albums are very good. I defend them for their substance and positive worth!


Entered at Thu Feb 5 01:38:48 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Spilling thoughts

Ray: I was on the planet before Dylan became a part of my life. For 13 years, I knew Beethoven, Shrimp Boats Are Coming, Chuck Berry, Dion and The Rivieras. Then came Dylan and my world was transformed. I agree with you. From a music point of view, for those first few years, it was a Dylan world and we were all lucky enough to be present. For me, that went on to Desire. I am still knocked out when I hear those albums. It must have a lot to do with the time of life that those lyrics and melodies hit me. They hit me hard and they have stayed in my heart and mind and have never departed. They are glued to my essence. When I listen to the later material, I see an evolved Dylan and with that time in my life, as an evolved JT, I appreciate the symmetry. Bottom line - Dylan has always mattered to me. When he sings standards, his respect for the songs (as PSB says so eloquently in his review) is my respect for him. There is no way to assign a number to how good this new album is. It is what it is and it is good. It is Dylan.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 01:23:14 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Guitar

I didn't want to imply that Dylan needs to play the guitar. (now that would be a surprise again) He has excellent choices to stand next to him and give him what he requires.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 01:18:58 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Acoustic Troubadour again

I understand that the recording studio is not the stage. But, if Bob Dylan still can sing with that range, then I think its time to go out on an acoustic tour to small venues with this Band and do some of his older material with minimal electricity to remind us all of what was and bring his own 'old standards' into today's realm. That is a dream for me and I'd go a long way to hear that. Or maybe even a singer with a harmonica with a microphone and guitar accompaniment reprising songs from days gone by. I won't be surprised by anything anymore. No one could have predicted this one, though with hindsight the radio show might have given us a clue.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 01:10:08 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: My take; Shadows In The Night

1) The heartfelt presentations are astounding 2) I'm astonished by his vocals and the range. I didn't know it was still in those vocal cords after all these years 3) The band and its subtle support is wondrous 4) Its Another Side of Bob Dylan and I thoroughly enjoyed it 5) The choices are interesting and reflect a sadness which Bob delivers with truth and dignity.


Entered at Thu Feb 5 00:57:18 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: PSB Review

PSB, loved your review. The last paragraph says it all.

"While Shadows In The Night will no doubt have its detractors, in terms of feel, cohesiveness and intensity, it’s one of the best albums he’s released this century. Acutely aware that he was one of the contributors to knocking these songs off the charts, there is no doubt that he put a lot of thought into both the presentation and the performance and cares about this music deeply. Dylan has always been about music tradition, even when people thought he was breaking with it. In making this music sound vital, not like a relic, without the slightest hint of camp, he is clearly saying this too is part of the tradition. And while he’s aiming this towards his older fans, he’ll probably end up teaching some kids about Frank Sinatra, popular music and musical arrangements along the way."


Entered at Thu Feb 5 00:23:06 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Leonard Cohen is quite a bit older and still comes up with great original albums. But I don't think you can or should judge an album of interestingly done standards by the same criteria.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 23:35:09 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Dylan is seventy something years old, expecting him to come up with great albums now is a little unreasonable.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 23:33:52 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Record Collector February 2015 is Americana. They show 12 record sleeves on the front. Top left, the first of the twelve is MFBP.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 23:29:50 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I typed Surf's Up, but I could equally have typed Pet Sounds or SMiLE. All unequivocally five star.

I would estimate without counting that Bob Dylan has done more five star albums than anyone else, though both Paul Simon & Leonard Cohen, far less prolific, might have a higher percentage on what they actually released. Yes, Bob Dylan is the Shakespeare of our era. But do try Henry VI Part One to check out that even the bard didn't hit a consistent five star - it wasn't all Hamlet. Shadows In The Night has magic bits, but really, is anything on there up with the very best albums? (One major consideration being that he didn't write the lyrics!)


Entered at Wed Feb 4 23:13:42 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ray, I agree with you about Dylan. I forgive all the troughs, including the Christmas album. Still doesn't mean I want to listen to his recent output. I am not surprised he put out an album of Sinatra songs considering what he wrote in Chronicles. The idea itself is not a bad one.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 23:05:59 CET 2015 from (84.215.230.4)

Posted by:

jh

And my kid plays his gigs using a mixer and a MacBook...


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:59:50 CET 2015 from (72.190.113.156)

Posted by:

Glenn T

Subject: Surf's Up?

Peter: In your list of 5 star albums you list the Beach Boys Surf's Up. Did you mean that album or Pet Sounds? Just curious.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:52:34 CET 2015 from (129.237.250.161)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: lawrence kansas, the heartland of flyover country

Subject: it's Bob Dylan's world, we just live in it

Regardless of the consequences, I'm close to uncritical of Dylan. After all he's been through (and put us through, the good bad and ugly and funny and everything in between and beyond), and all the world has been through, I just marvel at the fact that he's still performing, still recording, and still doing it his way. Yeah, even before he covered Sinatra, and after, he'll still do it like that. He is one of the most important and influential artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in any medium. And he always earns our attention, regardless of the peaks and valleys of his legendary career. One of my college teachers once told our class about how he felt, as a kid, when Franklin Roosevelt died. Roosevelt had been President ever since that Professor was born. The Prof could not fathom FDR's death, couldn't conceive of another person being President. I have similar feelings about Dylan and our culture. I haven't lived in an American culture when there hasn't been a Bob Dylan (I was born in 1963). Our culture matters the way it does, our culture is what it is, in substantial part because of Dylan.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:40:51 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

JT, you are probably right. Also, my opinion about these things doesn't amount to anything. Seeing Easy Rider completely transformed my life. I have posted this comment before but I will say it again just because I like saying it: Easy Rider demonstrated the creative power of combining two art forms together. That is one reason I am quite sympathetic to Robbie's point of view when he talks about these things. I don't think we should take TLW for granted just because we are so familiar with it. Coming up with the idea and executing it so well was an incredible achievement.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:29:30 CET 2015 from (70.49.47.25)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Media

I guess we agree about the media.

Its a period piece and should be judged in that way. I think the problem is that you were too close to it and when one gets that close, sometimes the brightness is intolerable.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:20:17 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

JT, I was on the political side of hippiedom and can report that very few of my peers had any interest in anything beyond self-gratification. Opposing the Vietnam War became a fashion for most people that was all. Some things stand the test of time better than others and Easy Rider is really dated, great cinematography though. As for Dylan, if his name wasn't attached to his recent works I doubt they would get any attention. The media has a lot of space to fill now so they spend their time building things up and tearing it down.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:18:26 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

The actual movie making techniques in Easy Rider are fascinating, and its use of music is revolutionary. I love the movie.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 22:04:00 CET 2015 from (70.49.47.25)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Silly

"It looks silly". (I had to write!) So do most times that are not current. Most of what humans did once seems out of date and so it receives derision or it is brushed away with a flick of the wrist. I think the tone of this particular comment comes from the sense that we were there and 'how could we be that or do that?" given our demeanour today. We are after all so mature now and so whatever. I prefer to take a wider view and appreciate the sensibilities which went into the hippie movement, the peace and love necessity in a time of war, and why we felt it was important to feel something when killing was going on all around us. Given the events of today, maybe a little of that sensibility might even be helpful.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 21:57:06 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shadows of The Night

Kevin, I mentioned the 5 star thing in my review. I’ve seen a 9/10 and two x 5 stars for “Shadows of The Night.” This is silly. I like it. I think the arrangements are brilliant, but as I said:

I’ve read the 9/10 UNCUT review and the “five star” reviews. That’s patently ludicrous. Any scale works down from the top, so five stars means as good as Sergeant Pepper, Surf’s Up, Astral Weeks, Born in the USA, Graceland, Bookends, Hejira … let alone Freewheelin’, Times They Are A-Changing, Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline, Blood On The Tracks, Desire, Live 1966 and (if you must) Time Out of Mind. There is no scale invented where it rubs shoulders or gets within spitting distance with any of those albums.

Three stars is generous for me.

If you confine it only to Bob, let’s grade the scale. 5 stars for Blonde on Blonde. One star for Dylan & The Dead. Fit all the rest in that scale. Then how can you rate it as five? There are only either 3 or 4 songs of 5 star songwriting quality for starters (That Lucky Old Sun, Autumn Leaves, Some Enchanted Evening, possibly What’ll I Do). This is intrinsic quality, not Bob’s interpretation.

Sit and listen to Visions of Johanna, Don’t Think Twice, Changing of The Guard or whatever … do you seriously rate ANYTHING on Shadows of The Night at that level? I do think That Lucky Old Son scrapes a 5 star interpretation though.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 21:30:52 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

It was through Easy Rider that I got in to The Band. I was so disappointed their rendering of The Weight was not on the original soundtrack. I don't doubt the importance of that movie in historical terms but I think it hasn't aged well. All that hippie stuff seemed great at the time but now it just looks silly. Still, it reflects the time it was made just like the Grapes of Wrath.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 21:12:46 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

It's worthwhile to note another movie that helped cement The Weight as a cultural signpost. Easy Rider came out in the summer of 69. At that point MFBP had been out about a year, but the group had famously performed very little. The album had sold OK and FM radio embraced a number of the songs, but it remained something of a cult classic. Easy Rider--both artistically and financially successful with an added hip cachet--burned The Weight into the public consciousness. Easy Rider is now seen as one of the most important American movies of all time, having helped overturn the studio stranglehold and launching the New Hollywood. New directors took advantage of the freedom--Coppola, Spielberg, Lucas, and one Martin Scorsese--and helped revolutionize the movie industry.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 21:03:35 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Kevin, well at least we are in agreement that Robbie's playing was fantastic. It is really impressive how he played in different styles to suit the setting. Listening to the 66 & 74 stuff you would hardily think it was the same guy that played at the IOW and on MFBP. In discussing the popularity of TLW, I think you have to take in to account that it is seen as a Scorcese film. If another director had produced a similar thing it may not have the same reputation. Mere speculation of course. Speaking of TLW, I find it interesting that Levon's fans all follow his lead in complaining about how The Band was portrayed but I thought Levon looked fantastic in the TLW and got plenty of on-screen time. He did great songs and had some of the best lines in the interviews.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 21:03:35 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.33)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend- do you actually think that people who listen to or appreciate Katy Perry's music or anything in that class of dreck will know or care who played guitar on what Bob Dylan songs, or who played guitar with Bob Dylan ever? Do you think they'll know or care who had anything to do with a soundtrack to a film? Iconic cultural stuff lasts. Whether or not the masses know who created it is another story.When newscasters stop people in the street, ask if they knew who George Washington, Winston Churchill, Marie Antoinette, Napoleon , or Marco Polo was , what happens?


Entered at Wed Feb 4 20:37:47 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Wallsend........I have been playing "Another Self Portrait" a whole lot over the last few months and to your point am reminded of just how wonderfully Robbie's playing complimented Bob Dylan.......startling almost in just how good that combination was - and from 1966 through to 1976 and TLW. Bob's had several great players with him over the years but no one who exerted his authority in such a good way as RR. Listenning to IoW has and reading some reviews of the 1974 tour has really driven home that point..............I don't disagree with your general take on popularity ( most people would be stunned to know that RR's 1987 debut has sold 3 times more than MFBP and Brown album combined in Canada ) but in terms of legacy, I strongly feel that The Weight and TLW ( perhaps more so given it enduring popularity 40 years on ) will be what is remembered and honoured more than guitar playing or Scoresese film music.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 20:33:44 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Putemup, it may be well know amongst people you meet but that is not really a representative sample. How many of Katie Perry's fans do you think know The Weight? How many of them know the work of Scorcese?


Entered at Wed Feb 4 20:28:08 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.33)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend. The Weight is exceptionally well known - but, many people do not know the song they know is The Weight. When I mention the Band or Levon to people i meet in every day life, or ask in they know their music, if they don't recognize the name, I'll sing a few bars of the chorus to the Weight and everyone recognizes it. But, there seems to be an upsurge in the amount of music loving or musical people in their early 20s know the names The Band & Levon Helm.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 20:10:54 CET 2015 from (58.104.7.236)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Kevin, I think you over estimate how well know The Weight actually is. I doubt whether even people of our generation know it in the same way they know Beatles songs. I think someone is more likely to have a 'legacy' as the footnote in the story of a really famous person than on their own. If Robbie had been sitting next to Dylan at the Super Bowl he probably would have been named. Despite Levon's scorn, Scorcese is really big and the period he spent with Robbie is critical in terms of his overall career. As for Robbie's playing in 66, it was very innovative. There may have been people playing in a similar style like Bloomfield or Buchanan, but connecting that style of playing to Dylan's songs in a live setting was pretty amazing.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 19:09:31 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Anyone Remember Laughter ?

LINKED: From Newsweek and at today's Expecting Rain, a list of the top 60 ( ! ) versions of L.Cohen's "Hallelejuh".......I love Bob Dylan but to rank his live covers above the original recording is absurd.....and kd can not be lower than 2 on any list.

Bob Dylan has now moved into that rarest of category - 5 stars no matter what he releases. I love parts of the new release but like Temptest it sure could have benefitted from a change of pace somewhere along the way.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 18:26:05 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.33)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Unforgetable? Children's books. Maybe a McCartney type collaboration with Fiddy Cents & Niki Minaj.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 18:25:52 CET 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: My review of Shadows In The Night

Click the link for my review of the new Dylan album.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 17:10:17 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Almost 40 years later....

On second thought, films do live longer in memories......and so the Scoresese link is there.....not for soundtrack work though but for The Last Waltz........40 years down the line already and it still tops every list ever published ranking the top music films.......these film lists tend to remain unchanged for long periods of time ( hello Citizen Kane ) and are are instrumental in directing people toward viewing choices......I can see TLW and by extension The Band's music being played 50 years from now.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 17:03:06 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: kookaburra sits in the old gum tree-ee ...

Kevin J: 50 years from now some poor bastard in a successful Australian band is going to be quoted by the media: "Well, we based the bridge on a traditional folk song from Appalachia in America, 'Take A Load Off Annie'. You know the one?" And the very next day, long bony lawyer hands will start reaching out across the waters ...


Entered at Wed Feb 4 16:45:00 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Wallsend......

.........Are you kidding?.........50 years from now, many people will be singing and playing "The Weight"........few, if any, will be around to comment on the great choices the music director/consultant made in choosing tunes for "The Colour of Money" or the guitar playing on the 1966 tour with Dylan.......trust me on this one.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 11:40:51 CET 2015 from (58.104.21.155)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I watched the movie Goodfellas the other day. When I heard the music in the movie I thought Robbie must have had something to do with but seemingly not. A few days ago people were writing about Robbie's legacy. Rather than The Band, Robbie will probably be remembered for his work with Dylan, especially on the 66 tour where his playing was such a critical part of the sound, and for his work with Scorcese. Both Dylan and Scorcese will be remembered by a lot of people for a long time but i don't think the same can be said of The Band.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 05:36:53 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, RR probably didn't have access to most of the recently released BT material. Exactly how much is hard to say. I've heard a good chunk of the stuff the four guys did in the basement apart from the Dylan material, and the pickings are slim. My guess is BF2JD will be important for the Hawks-era material that is uncovered.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 05:23:17 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Mixing up the medicine

I still have a lot of exploring to do on the Bob Dylan Complete Basement Tapes box that came out last year. I waited to buy it until the price was more affordable, but now I’m glad that I have it, as it does a nice job of showing the progression of Bob and the boys exploring many varied musical avenues. I still feel as though there’s a piece missing which should eventually help to fill in the gap between the Basement Tapes and Music From Big Pink. I will be patient and look forward to the day when Bacon Fat To Judgment Day becomes a reality, and the Hawks to Band transition is more fully illuminated.

I had a thought that this release would in some way, make the official 1975 Basement Tapes album obsolete, but somehow my appreciation for that original album still remains strong. It used to bother me that it was inauthentic in some way, and that too much was added in the 1970’s, but now that I’ve heard more of the authentic material on the Dylan Bootleg series release, I have a better appreciation for what Robbie was trying to do with the 1975 release. He had to wade through much of this material, and put together an album from work that was never intended to be a proper album in the first place.

Ultimately the 1975 album remains very listenable and remains one of my favorite Dylan/Band albums. Yeah, it’s a bit of a mish-mosh, but it all hangs together as a pretty nice double album. I’ve got it on vinyl, and two CD releases. Great album cover art as well.


Entered at Wed Feb 4 00:15:28 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

From the stuff I’m writing on record collecting, “wrong” and “partial” credits are depressingly not rare. On payment though, I assume catalogue numbers and ASCAP / BMI codes determine payment, not what’s printed on there – for example elite producers often have points, but it’s not noted.

It is nevertheless annoying. For years my main publisher only listed one author name on royalty accounts, and it was the alphabetically lowest even where that wasn’t the order on the book cover. So on some videos, my old partner got 10% for the series name (and wrote nothing), and I got 90%, and his name was not on the book cover at all, but his name was the only one on the statement list with titles. It didn’t affect what we got paid at all, but it annoyed me incredibly for 25 years, even though only we and the accounts dept saw it.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 22:53:14 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norm, Todd has a connection that may help you avoid a confrontation with the Lord, but it may involve swearing fealty to a certain pop songstress.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 22:45:23 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Actually, Todd, if something appears in a songwriting credit and no one says anything about it for, let's say, twenty years, I'm gonna guess there's something more to it than the accuracy of those credits. Just a hunch.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 21:48:28 CET 2015 from (174.236.5.59)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: That same old riddle

Hey Kevin. I knew that we went back some years and had some history, but I didn’t realize that I was your first! Funny you should mention the renegade Guestbook. Was that the pink one? Earlier I was trying to search for a post that I made back in 2004, and discovered the gap here in the Guestbook archives. Then remembered that it must have happened during the shutdown years. Things were pretty wild back in those days…..I was so much younger then, I’m older than that now….

Dunc, congratulations on your team’s success. It’s always nice when your local team (in any sport) does well.

Pat, No, I wasn’t saying anything about ‘We Can Talk’. I was talking about ‘Strawberry Wine’. One thing that I’ve been educated about in this very Guestbook over the years, is that the credits on the albums provide everything anyone ever needs to know about song authorship. If it’s printed on a record jacket, then it is true. No questions, absolute, money in the bank solid. Mistakes made by humans in this arena just don’t happen.

That’s why I was surprised to see it happen at all on the recent box set. It would be one thing if Levon had 20 or 30 writing credits, and one happened to slip through the cracks. But ‘Strawberry Wine’? It’s been well established that Levon earned a co-write on that, and yet no credit this time around. It’s not an evil plot….just something that happened. Let’s call it a whoopsie, a fairly obvious whoopsie, but a whoopsie nonetheless. My point is that mistakes are always possible when human being are involved, and there are no guarantees that mistakes couldn’t have happened in the past. Human beings in a rock and roll band. Anything is possible.

I’ve got to run now, and get my Katy Perry tattoo tuned up in time for next month’s meeting, (they’re kind of strict about that sort of thing) but will check in later.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 21:37:23 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You'll have to go and visit them, Dunc. I have heard that Baffin Island even has some visible green bits in mid-summer.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 21:07:48 CET 2015 from (86.190.64.12)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: A lifetime memory

Bill M. I'll remember the eight kayaks sailing down the Clyde with a husky on one of them, a beautiful silhouette against the red sunset, singing 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down' unaccompanied, apart from beautiful harmonies. Better than any concert.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 21:02:43 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan

The album is wonderful,a delicate experience.The interview was a classic.Great questions too.I love AARP-each month they send me the magazine to remind me of my age.Although,I hope some old fogey doesn't gather up the nerve to steal my Dylan copy from the mail!


Entered at Tue Feb 3 20:49:42 CET 2015 from (70.49.47.25)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Commitment and loyalty is measurable

True loyalty is measured by commitment to a team and the continued involvement despite lack of success. In the case of the Toronto Maple Leafs, since 1967. Joan, you understand. Kevin J.. a Stanley Cup looms for the Canadiens. I could cheer for the Canucks, since they are in BC, but its hard when my blood runs blue from age 4.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 20:30:07 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I see, Jeff. Or you could just have put "Scroll back a few posts."


Entered at Tue Feb 3 20:13:10 CET 2015 from (70.53.47.84)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Judgement Day

Todd……all is cool…I don’t forget that 10 or 11 years ago at the old guestbook ( the renegade one ), you were the first person to talk to me and over the years have also always been there with some humour and guidance whenever I have – occasionally – gone off the rails…..just your post with the stew of “collaboration”/”attachment” and “outliving” – rubbed the wrong way – that’ all…..as you say, talking over a drink is much easier than writing in a forum…but this is what we have and glad that we do.

Dylan interview: Wonderful….long may he run. Hope we have another decade of great music from the man.

Jeff’s call for Judgement…………..one can’t help but picture a scene taking place at the Pearly gates in about 35 years……where God turns to St. Peter and says “well, all in all, those 3 Band loving guys were great people and most deserving of a place here but, alas, we had to turn them away” but why St. Peter asked…….”Long Story, the sad part is it all could have been different if only that prick Al Michaels had ID’ed a once preening egomaniac who played guitar and was partial to pink scarves”


Entered at Tue Feb 3 20:05:04 CET 2015 from (74.108.29.164)

Posted by:

Joan

JT about your comments about how people's emotional attachment to the sports teams betters their life. Sadly I am a Jets and Mets fan so I don't know what to say. Are Illuminati related to Scientology? :-)


Entered at Tue Feb 3 19:36:23 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thank you Dunc! One of the best laughs I've had at the BG, top three for sure - along with Dave Z's (or was it Brian Sz's) photo of the Moonstruck Ones and Pat B's recent "Fuck me - I thought we were gonna hit Lars!"

Laughs are good.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 19:24:00 CET 2015 from (86.190.64.12)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: What does it matter?

What does it matter if Robbie was not id'd at the superbowl?

My team from Scotland's smallest city got to the league cup final on Saturday.

I wake up this morning to find that the team that we're playing against in the final, one of the biggest teams in the world, has bought two of our best players.

Robbie was definitely not at the game.

And when Peter is sunbathing under his palms, I am freezing with permafrost outside. At least it's a change from the constant rain.

And there has been one benefit. As I was walking along the Clyde with my grandson, I met a group of Inuit people, who had followed the cold weather while hunting a pack of seals. We became great friends. All of them were Band fans.

I set them off on their way back to Canada and in return am sitting down to a plate of seal and chips just now.

They regretted missing the super bowl.

Am playing 'Love and Theft' and 'Modern Times' just now. The seal is a bit salty.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 19:19:41 CET 2015 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: to quote Ron Sexsmith - applicable to most here at some point(s)

God so loved the idiot boy
He gave him a pair of eyes to explore
Gave him a pair of hands to destroy
Any good thing that he found


Entered at Tue Feb 3 18:42:41 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band

The Band and each member of The Band contributed to creating some of the most profound music of the 20th century.Levon and Robbie are members of The Band.None of us lived their lives or have any clue what they actually felt and did in real life.To insult dead or living members is the terrain of a very limited group of infantile fans who believe their own dopey,ill informed opinions.To say Levon destroyed RR's legacy is an insult to Levon and Robbie.Now go back to YOUR feud,since Levon and Robbie are obviously beyond it.How absurd.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 18:30:30 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Morman, Westie, portray me any way you like. Reality is very different from how you guys portray things. But, guys like you, when they can't get their way fair and square, resort to all kinds of low life tactics. That's okay. the good Lord will deal with you one day. Odds are pretty solid that how you guys behave in your differences with me is represntative of how you've dealt with others in your lives. Time will come, you'll get called...


Entered at Tue Feb 3 17:51:23 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Well, that settles that.

Todd, are you saying there was a mistake that kept Levon's name off We Can Talk?


Entered at Tue Feb 3 17:49:24 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The last word

Jeff,Jeff,Jeff.......what is it Jeff? did your big sister dress you up in dresses, or did your mum love your brother more than you? You just don't play well with others.

I'm goin away to work this morning, now you go stand in the corner 'till I get back. It'll only be a couple of days....or so.

Life is a mistery. I got it all figured out what I was going to do today. 07:00 hrs having my coffee. The phone rings......a friend of mine. watch this Jeff ?Norm! you got to come and move this grapple yarder for these guys right away". So here I go out into the south east blowin' gawd damn misery.

Pat....Peter.....be gentle with Jeff. I think he's emotionally very fragile just now.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 17:30:09 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Illuminate

So it's not one of those Groucho Marx deals where he doesn't care to belong to any club that will have him as a member. I will have stop practicing the secret handshake, and go back to my simple life as a Shepard.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 17:26:12 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete. Read this. It shall portray the fact that you responded to someone else, not I. My post was innocuous as you and all well know. After you read this, you & Pat, can go fuck yourselves.

"Entered at Mon Feb 2 10:06:00 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)
Posted by:
Peter V
The debate on whether Robbie or Levon would be most likely to be ID’d by a sports commentator reaches new heights in the feud. Sports commentators are people who usually use numbers printed on people’s backs to help ID them. Private Eye magazine has a regular feature on dumb quotes from sports commentators.

I had thought we hit the high-water mark some years ago on physical height. A casual mention that Robbie was taller than Levon led to impassioned posts stating, against all photographic and video evidence, that either they were the same height or Levon was taller. One poster thought him a six footer. As I was six foot three in my prime I was pleased to see that mere height was considered a virtue worth arguing about. Incidentally, the height / weight and BP machine at our doctors’ had me as 6 foot and a half inch last week, so where did those 2.5 inches go? I daren’t measure the other vital statistic which could not have afforded such a loss even in my twenties.

Entered at Mon Feb 2 08:00:05 CET 2015 from (58.104.3.10)
Posted by:
Wallsend
Ari, Interesting post. 1 or 2 years ago I would have agreed with you but I think in internet-land the tide has turned against Levon. I think the hate that is being posted about Robbie is being done by an increasingly small group of people who post under a lot of different names. If you look at the literary style that is used in the various posts it is all almost exactly the same.

Entered at Mon Feb 2 07:50:24 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)
Posted by:
Kevin J
Subject: "Oh look Betty, the guy who wrote King Harvest"
Goodness gracious.........not being id'ed at the world's largest square-headed convention is a badge of honour........Jon Bon Jovi and Elton John would have - bet on it - knowing Robbie was not is very comforting !

Entered at Mon Feb 2 06:53:18 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)
Posted by:
Ari
Yeah, well, it's really great that Robbie is still active, and just enjoying myself, but I'm willing to bet that Robbie cares about his legacy: it should be among the best songwriters and best guitarists, and I'm sorry but in my eyes Band leader. I don't mean to stir up anything by that but I feel that Levon really destroyed Robbie's legacy. I mean, that's really sad...
But it's always good to see Robbie so I'm happy anyways.

Entered at Mon Feb 2 06:47:34 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.226)
Posted by:
Jeff A.
Ari, i know. It is odd. I think that even today, if the circumstances had presented themselves, they would have ID'ed Levon.
Entered at Mon Feb 2 05:34:19 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)
Posted by:
Ari
Web: My link

Saw Robbie twice on Super Bowl Far East Man, definitely him. That was pretty shocking as they didn't ID him, he was just at the bottom of the screen as one of Paul Allen's guests. I always remember that they hang out alot. Really funny to me."

Norm- see the quotation marks? That's how to use them...


Entered at Tue Feb 3 17:20:57 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Illuminati

Hate to break it you, Todd, but you don't get invited to join. If you are one of us (whoops! where's delete …) you already know it.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 16:54:36 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That's right, Jeff. Ari posted that RR had been seen at a game. He wasn't ID'd. You said they'd have ID'd Levon. So we're all in agreement?


Entered at Tue Feb 3 16:49:06 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Luke My Friend

Bill M, interesting observations. Don't know why the name Luke popped into my head at that moment, but you may be on to to something. Perhaps I was talking about the Gospel according to Jimmy Ray "Luke" Paulman, but who knows?

Jeff, Uncle Jimmy called and he wants his corkscrew back. He's getting thirsty ever since Kevin made him sit in the corner.

Kevin J. I probably didn't make myself as clear as I could have, but just know that my heart is in the right place most of the time. If we were having a conversation in a bar, I'm sure that more of the nuance and balance would come through.

This Illuminati business is fascinating, but I'm already a member of too many secret societies to keep track of, so I'll have to pass. Also, I can't sing or dance, so I don't think that they'd want me.



Entered at Tue Feb 3 16:27:49 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fahrenheit 451

Bill! are you trying to depress me? I won't ever be able to read what you have to say any more? You must have seen the movie. They burned all the books, so every one had to become a book and go round reciting them to remember.

Jeff!,,,shut up with yer gawd damn quote for a while! Yer always trying to be right and you never are. The book yer gonna be is the Webster's Dictionary.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 15:17:04 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A

Subject: You guys just can't help but be crooked

Pete, there ya go again.You wrote to Ari:"Ari, I would have posted about seeing Robbie on TV at a game myself. My comment was because Jeff suggested Levon would have been ID'd not Robbie. Was the tallness debate you? I hadn't thought so for a moment. Apologies if I offended." Well, that is untrue. Ari made his initial comment. Below is my only response to him prior tu your retort.

Entered at Mon Feb 2 06:47:34 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.226)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ari, i know. It is odd. I think that even today, if the circumstances had presented themselves, they would have ID'ed Levon.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 13:05:06 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Guestbook of Revelations

Todd: Hmmm. You bring up both 'the end of time' and old Luke - who as we know was waiting on Judgment Day, by which time the Lion (whether Levon or Robbie) will by lying down with the Lamb (whether Levon or Robbie). Could be, I suppose.

But I'm pretty sure that Robbie's name will not be attached to "The Weight" by then - though most 'humans' will be familiar with the song. It won't be attached because nothing will be printed, and nothing will be printed because it will be a time of no more reading. Why bother? Machines will fix themselves as well as us, entertainment choices will be baked into our brains in gestation (without credits) and any need for signage will have been obviated by the Silicon Sally and Silicon Frank of the internet of things: "Don't touch that dial!"


Entered at Tue Feb 3 11:06:24 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To get away from all this snow …

Dunc, just to make you feel better, we have about one inch of snow this morning. I'll have to go out and tie the tops of the palms together later. It plays havoc if the snow gets right in there.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 11:03:27 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan and the Illuminati

What an amazing Dylan interview! It must be one of his most explicit descriptions of recording ever, let alone the other stuff. Too much to digest in one sitting. If I'd read it yesterday, I don't think I'd have done the review - too much material to think about. It was an odd day - I had two long appointments cancelled, one 12 to 2, one 4 to 5, which left me listening all day. Maybe Bob is now hoping to "get more pussy than Frank Sinatra" as Ronnie Hawkins once promised the Hawks.

Ari, I would have posted about seeing Robbie on TV at a game myself. My comment was because Jeff suggested Levon would have been ID'd not Robbie. Was the tallness debate you? I hadn't thought so for a moment. Apologies if I offended.

I found the Illuminati stuff illuminating. As a fan of Robert Anton Wilson's "The Illuminatus Trilogy" (not that I can remember anything about it) I Googled a bit. This is terrifying! I used to think there was a secret group of world leaders and shadowy billionaires who actually ran the world. I could live with that. I would have accepted that Bob Dylan might be a member.

But the truth according to the net is much more worrying. The secret group who rule the world apparently now include JayZ, Kanye West, Madonna, Celine Dion, Justin Bieber and (oddly) Emma Watson from the Harry Potter films. How can this be? It seemed so unlikely, but then I thought of an explanation. The little green aliens who do run the world have decided to adopt human form and become pop stars. They used to become world leaders, but that got really boring, so they switched. Isn't that what we'd all do? After you take that on board, it all becomes logical.

Jeff- rule on this one for us, is Robbie or Levon more likely to have been part of the Illuminati?


Entered at Tue Feb 3 09:13:34 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: You're all a bunch of old fuddy duddy's

Dylan AARP Interview linked


Entered at Tue Feb 3 08:44:13 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Strawberry Wine

Pat, perhaps it was a mistake, but since there are so few songs that Levon is credited on, getting even one of them wrong is fairly profound. And if mistakes can be made now, then mistakes can have been made in the past.

Katy Perry. Oy. I don’t have time to dive in to that world, but I wish her luck.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 08:38:06 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Kevin, Deep breath brother….I wasn’t suggesting that Robbie’s legacy “will just be” the things that I mentioned. We all are acutely aware of his considerable gifts talents and skills, as it has unfolded during our lifetimes. We’ve lived it and know it, and feel it and breathe it. It’s all relatively recent history.

My comments about his legacy were directed at folks who are concerned about YouTube comments and things that happen in other parts of the Internet. And yes, Sebastian has elevated / protected / reinforced / improved his fathers online image in some of these rough and tumble comments sections. He should get some credit for that. It can’t be an easy thing. I’m not saying that Robbie needs that, but it is an effort that didn’t exist 10 years ago. Having Sebastian in his corner is not a bad thing and doesn’t reduce Robbie’s stature at all. Sebastian was very clear when he introduced himself to us in this forum, that one of the things he was going to do was work on his Father’s online presence.

My comment about having his “name attached” was more of a forward looking observation. It wasn’t intended to imply that he simply attached his name to the songs….more of an observation that his name will forever be welded / attached / cemented / joined at the hip, to these songs, until the end of time. In 100 years, ‘The Weight’ will say Robertson, just as it does today, and that (along with many other songs) will ultimately be the long-term keeper of his legacy as a songwriter. Long long long after any pithy YouTube comments have vanished.

Most people don’t know or remember the ins and outs, working methods, or other special qualities of the great blues composer Willie Dixon, but in 100 years, ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’, ‘Little Red Rooster’, and ‘Spoonful’ among many other songs, will still have Willie Dixon’s name “attached” to them, and that is and will be an important part of his legacy. Woody Guthrie will forever have his name attached to ‘This Land Is You Land’. It’s not meant as a slam. The gospel according to Luke will always be the Gospel according to Luke. Credit is an important part of a long term legacy.

It’s fine to disagree with Levon’s claims, and many people have the ability to do that in a reasonable way. Others don’t.

Kevin, you lost me with Uncle Jimmy pouring the wine, but I don't think it has anything to do with my intentions, so I can’t comment on that.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 07:28:53 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, there is a wealth of inet info on accusations that the former Christian artist Katy Perry is a tool of the Illuminati--much of it regarded seriously by its wacky authors.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 07:26:38 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, since Levon is credited on the remastered Stage Fright album and AMH, I'm going to guess it's a mistake rather than a conspiracy of silence.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 07:16:10 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Not sure someone had to......

.......Todd, really.......so Robbie Robertson's legacy will just be - acording to you "having his name ATTACHED to The Band's greatest collaborations" and "still being alive and having the last word" rather than a legacy of the visionary of the sound and tone of one of the greatest and influential albums of all time in "Music From Big Pink" or the writer of perhaps the greatest song in the history of rock n roll in "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" ( or The Weight or Acadian Driftwood or It makes No Difference or 15 or 20 others.... ) or one of the greatest guitarists in the history of rock n roll or the creator/visionary of the consensus greatest film in rock n roll history "The Last Waltz"............it's insulting to even suggest that RR has needed his son to "elevate" his image or that only by outliving his bandmates will his legacy be secured...........as John D said many years ago "I fell in love with The Band - not their business practices" or something to that effect..........for Christsakes, none of us know who got short changed on what or whether Robbie had an edge on the others when he bought out the purchasing interests of Rick, Richard and Garth........but NONE of that has anything to do with the legacy of one of the greatest songwriters in the history of rock n roll........and that "name attached" bit reeks of asking your Uncle Jimmy at a family get-together if you can "assist with the wine" when you really want to say "pour the fu*king wine Uncle Jimmy - I'm getting thirsty".


Entered at Tue Feb 3 07:06:23 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Pat, I'm not sure that I understand the Katy Perry Illuminati reference....She's a pop singer right?

As far as legacy manipulation is concerned, I'm still waiting for an explanation as to why Levon is no longer credited for 'Strawberry Wine' on the 'Live at the Academy' Rock of Ages box set. Is he no longer considered a writer of that song?


Entered at Tue Feb 3 06:54:08 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I see Todd has also fallen under the Katy Perry Illuminati spell, but some harsh facts remain. Levon co-wrote a book and gave innumerable interviews that have lasted well past his passing. What he decided to share (and, as importantly, not share) with the world is now a major part of his legacy. RR has also answered Levon's claims directly and succinctly--the relative length of their lives has no bearing on it. And those fires that Sebastian has to extinguish--who started them? Finally, there are a number of "collaborative efforts" that don't have RR's name on them but do include other members of the group.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 06:18:41 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Boring Discussion

Ari, if you don’t like what you read, then why do you read it? Just wanted to try that logic out.

The reason that I spoke up, is that someone had to. And by the way I’ll decide for myself when and what I’d like to talk about, or not talk about. I usually try to do it in a respectful way, but I’m human, sometimes I fail, sometimes I hit the mark. It’s great that you’re concerned about Robbie’s legacy (which will be absolutely fine by the way), but some respect should be afforded to Levon’s memory, regardless of whether or not you agree with HIS presentation of HIS experiences with The Band.

No hard feelings. You’ll figure it out.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 05:56:07 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Ari

If I had known that this comment would spawn a boring discussion I would not have made it.

Todd, if you don't like talking about it, why are you talking about it? Last time I posted something I got virtually no response, it's annoying to simply type Levon/Robbie and then get beaten over the head with it.

Way to easy for people to hate on football, but guess what, it makes alot of people very happy, brings friends that would otherwise not see each other a reason to celebrate every Sunday during the cold winter and is a special event for many Americans who don't have it super easy: just let them have it. Also, for every bonehead that likes to think professional football is for morons and idiots, well, you're right, alot of idiots do enjoy it, but if you look at it more like a game of chess rather than a gladiator fight, it really becomes an interesting game between Coaches/QBs trying to outsmart the other men under an enormous amount of pressure, like a stadium full of people booing you...If you don't like to play it in the UK that's fine, don't play with us, but just leave us alone while we enjoy it.

Peter, don't give me grief over a comment I made when I was 16. Sometimes I just don't understand where you're coming from at all. I don't post often anymore, I just like to read what you all write, but today, I did not like what I read.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 05:19:52 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: A Touch of Grey

Norm, No sweat. I understand where you’re coming from and, like you I don’t understand the need to keep stirring the pot. I know that your comment about Levon and Mark Walberg wasn’t made with malice, and illustrates the point that time marches on. Heck my teen-aged daughters wouldn’t even know who Mark Walberg is, and would probably think that he is old too. Of course they do know who Levon is, but they are probably an anomaly for their age group thanks to their crazy father. On the other hand, when the halftime show came on, I had to explain to my wife who Katy Perry was. She wasn’t too impressed.

When I was a kid my Dad made sure that I knew about people like Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Jack Teagarden, Duke Ellington, and Sidney Bechet, and other musicians from previous generations. Most of my friends (born in the 1960’s) had no idea about those cats.

I had the opportunity to go to my 30th High School reunion recently. I didn’t realize that I went to high school with a bunch of middle-aged people. I guess I’ve put a few years on too.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 04:23:34 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Telling it straight

Todd your comments are sentimental and I certainly don't intend any disrespect to you. These comments that started this conversation were absurd and silly.

Why Ari thought it even worth commenting on as to where some one would have put a camera on Levon Helm and said "here is Levon Helm of the BAND". Really how many people watching tv and a super bowl would know who Levon Helm or Robbie Robertson are? Count the number of people over the years who have shown up on this site who really know and are life time fans.

We have discussed this many times over the years. Many fans here didn't even know of the Band until the Last Waltz! their closing down. Many of us often laugh about the old joke. When you say to some one, "That song is by (the band) and you get the answer, what band?"

Some of the people shown are people that are HUGE in the public eye at this time. I wouldn't doubt there are many people in these days who would say, "who is Sir Paul McCartney."

This Guest Book is for Dinosaurs as far as media is concerned now a days. We love it. For many of us it is our history. But when you make any comments on a super bowl forum, don't expect that you will get a lot of response from "Band Fans".

Jeff has made it clear over many years his position on feud of the band, which I believe are in the minds of a demented few. You know very well my position on this subject Todd. People have got to have a real sordid axe to grind or be very sadistic to want to engage in this crap and keep stirring the pot. Levon Helm will be forever loved by many of us for his contribution to what many of us know to be one of the largest parts of the history of music of our time.

My comment, if he was sitting by Marc Walberg and commentators said, "who is that old guy sitting beside Marc Walberg", is sadly because there are not enough of us left who will carry and remember the legacy of this great band.............time marches on


Entered at Tue Feb 3 03:46:41 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Legacy

I can’t speak to the rest of the wild world internet, but in this page It’s been many years since there was any significant “Robbie Bashing” or legacy destroying nefariousness. On the other hand there seem to be a few folks who grab any opportunity to take jabs at Levon, which is certainly a shame in a Band fan oriented website. It’s even more disturbing in light of the fact that ever since Levon has passed away from a truly dreadful disease, he is no longer alive to defend himself and protect his own legacy. It just strikes me as odd and disrespectful to make sport of the man under the circumstances.

As far as legacy is concerned, I think that Robbie’s legacy will ultimately be intact. He has the profound benefit and advantage of still being alive and will get the last word. He has much control of the Band’s recorded output, as well as a significant amount of input as to what gets released, and how it gets released. Plus Sebastian is doing a fine job of elevating his Dad’s image, and putting out the fires as they ignite.

Many years from now, when much of the internet chatter has faded into the ether, the artifacts that will remain will be the songs, and a very many of the Band’s greatest collaborative works will have the name Robbie Robertson attached to them for all eternity. And that will be his legacy….not some mindless YouTube comments, or wherever else people go to get their jollies. Whether or not Robbie gets good screen time at a Sporting event is largely irrelevant.

But please, can’t we let Levon rest in peace? We will all get the chance someday to answer for our actions.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 03:15:49 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Those silly Americans

Joe J, I agree. I don’t watch much football either, but it was nice to see a game that was competitive up until the end, rather than some years where it’s a one-sided blowout.

Probably better for ratings too, to have a close game, but since they only had a paltry 100 million viewers, it’s practically a non-event compared to the International sports. Either way, I don’t think that Robbie missed out on much publicity, and I think his legacy will be just fine.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 02:20:29 CET 2015 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Supper

Great game though. I'm not much of an NFL fan and my missus less so. Nevertheless we watched it all and she swore like a sailor at the bitter end. Anything that stirs the pot's good with me.


Entered at Tue Feb 3 00:24:06 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.128)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: good heavens!

Peter V: What must his holiness have thought when he heard that Levon knew the queen?


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:59:06 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norm, let me help. Jeff posted, "he'd have been id'ed". You posted, "Levon would have got id'd at the supper bowl". Let that be a lesson.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:58:10 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh! and by the way.

If Levon had been at the game, he probably would have been sitting beside Marc Walberg who the camera flashed, because he had a cameo part in Marc's picture "Shooter". Then they would have said, "Who is that old guy sitting beside Marc."


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:55:08 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We all recall those Royal jubilees, Churchill’s funeral, wedding of Prince William, and then the Second Coming where Levon was ID’d . It’s like the old joke. Levon is on the Vatican balcony, flanked by Barack Obama, Queen Elizabeth and the Pope, and the commentator says “I know Levon, but who are the others?’


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:48:16 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Clearly........

I ain't playin no mo..........this is too emotionally hard on me. Susan always wants to know why I sit at the computer and sob!


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:35:21 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Geez Norm, forgive me for thinking that the use of quotes when discussing what some one wrote or said and using their name indicates that you are quoting them. I did not realize that is defined as a comment. Now that I've been corrected, all is well.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:29:30 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: Spell Check

Umm...."terrific" bowl.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:27:40 CET 2015 from (32.216.236.197)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Teriffic Bowl

Don't tell anyone, but there's a rumor going around that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is taller than Robbie Robertson.

The amazing thing is that Tom Brady, at the ripe old age of 37, is still flourishing in the rough and tumble world of professional football, which is 4 years older than Robbie was when he retired from "the road" in 1976.

The difference between Robbie and Levon in respect to the Superbowl (and this silliness over being identified or not), is that Robbie was watching the game with the team owner - multi-multi-billionaire Paul Allen. If Levon (R.I.P.) was still with us, it's more likely that he would have been watching the game at home on television with family & friends.

What I really want to know is who drove Robbie to the game?


Entered at Mon Feb 2 23:07:16 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: As mudd!

I'm scratchin the hair right off my head. Jerry starts again using gawd damn big words I don't understand!

Jeff tells me I have to "quote him". I only commented on what he said. Do I have to quote him Pat?

Awright Bob I'm just goin to keep my gawd damn big mouth shut.......get myself in trouble.

Come to think of it a couple of our real good buddies who live in Olympia Washington called a short time ago. Dave & Edie Pope. Have a nice cruiser called "R Time". Dave spend a lot of time in Nome , Alaska in the military. We love to travel with those folks and of course they are Sea Hawk fans!


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:46:55 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norm, is it clear now?


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:45:24 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm,IF I recall correctly:

what actually occurred is that the NFL approached potential performers and then asked them to consider paying for the spot. Katy Perry and the league came to agreement but Perry refused to pay. Time or Newsweek just had a piece on it. The way The NFL tried to justify asking for payment was claiming they were looking for a way to offset the cost of the extravaganza and make the artist aware of, have some responsibility for the huge expense incurred.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:38:10 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: From one side to the other

Bob, from the perspective you are describing, hell ya! I enjoy the super bowl. However there are many people that go into hawk to enjoy that event, just like Christmas. Like any event it has it's good side and it's down side. My comments for example were not directed as to good or bad. It's all just an attitude that is some times a little hard to stomach.

Just as some one aspired to. There are people who go to lengths to make sure they are noticed there and the camera is put to them. To think that a camera man just looks around and searches out some one to put the camera on isn't true. They put that camera where they are told too.

As I said earlier, (maybe I can find the article again). I believe there were 4 people, I think one was that girl Beonca, (I don't know if I spelt that right). Anyway it looks like it is going to come up for bids to have the half time entertainment spot.

What is it, I forget, something like 1.2 million for a 20 second ad for that tv time.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:36:10 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Neurons

That's neurons, though I kind of liked NEUTRONS better.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:32:13 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Correct Quotes Matter...

Pete, it's interesting and unfortunate that a harmless comment made by Ari, and a harmless responding thought by me, led to Ari' initiating what you later identified as "new heights in the feud" "debate."

Norm, c'mon man, do you really think i care about the super bowl, or who performs at it? I don't think i;ve watched more than one or two in their entirety, and only small pieces of others. I haven't watched any of it in many years.Then again, I could really care less about most professional sports. Yet, if I was aware that any Band members were to perform in any sports event at halftime, or opening ceremonies i would watch. i wasn't aware Robbie was going to be involved in the Olympics, or i;d have watched that.

But Norm, please, if you are going to quote me, or anyone, please get the wording correct, and the context. The wording you ascribed to me was incorrect.
What I actually wrote, & my spelling, were a far cry different and here it is: "Ari, i know. It is odd. I think that even today, if the circumstances had presented themselves, they would have ID'ed Levon." See, i could care less about the Super Bowl & the perfromers, but Ari's opening comment was so odd to me, ( as in who cares if they I.D.'ed celebrities or not), I responded my responding thought. And look what happened....Guys blew it up into The Feud... Levon in The Super Bowl, well, it would make sense. Especially in a New Orleans Super Bowl, and including Alan Toussaint, the horns, maybe the Tribes.

A thought about RR not being I.D.ed at the Super Bowl. Even back in the day,most of the average music listeners who saw The Last Waltz, ProBaBlY would not later have recognized RR afterwards sans the red scarf.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:32:47 CET 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Go, Leafs, Go (Don't laugh, Kevin)

BOB F: Right on the money. Sporting events take you away from the everyday and bring you into another realm. That is the power of entertainment. This a good thing. If commercialism and other BS comes along with it, we can choose not to participate as consumers/viewers. I for one love sporting events, and the bigger, the better. There are studies which have shown that individuals who have ties to teams have better emotional health. Best of all, we can walk away from the experience unscathed. Lighten up and suffer with a team. It is a good workout for your emotional neutrons.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:20:21 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

In America everyone seems to enjoy The Super Bowl. It comes in the middle of a long hard winter. Neighbors and families get together have Super Bowl parties. The bars are full, grocery stores make some money, local pizza and sandwich shops make some money. What's wrong with that? People even seem to enjoy the commercials. Life is hard. If something makes people happy I personally think it's a good thing.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 22:16:47 CET 2015 from (86.190.64.12)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Super bowls

I was at the real superbowl on Saturday - Hampden in the cold, but now a cup final to look forward to.

The singing of pop songs by the crowd 'Love is in the Air' and 'Beautiful Sunday', Kevin.

Enjoyed your review, Peter.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 21:50:03 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The supper bowl! I guffawed at that...Peter little dick

Jesus.......Jeff has some great imagination...."Levon would have got id'd at the supper bowl". He must believe in the tooth fairy too.

Here is an example of the very vain American football leagues and how they see themselves. I read on my news here, how entertainers at half time are not paid a penny. "The world wide exposure they get for their careers, sales and concerts is huge", this year the acts that were trying to secure that half time spot were going to be charged for the privilege of performing there.

I know we have a lot of friends in the states, but come on. Their attitude towards the super bowl, and the "World Series"? We have always had a laugh out of that. The US&A is the world........I guess to some people. There are many international leagues in, soccer (football), cricket, rugby, and hockey non are called the world league.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 21:00:41 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

To put the over the top hype about the Super Bowl into some perspective, consider that a Pakistan-India match at the 2011 World Cup of cricket drew 1 billion viewers world-wide.....or one that Fred and I remenber fondly, the great final race of the 1997 F1 season at Jerez Spain when Jacques Villeneuve out dueled Michael Schumacher to win the World Championship - that race drew 1.2 Billion viewers.......there were some lovely sights in Spain on that day.......as to any half dressed starlets being id'ed during the tea-breaks of the Pakistan-India match.....I don't remember any.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 20:58:56 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yes, Kevin J, where over 500 million people watched RR perform his brilliant song "Stomp Dance (Unity)". Still wasn't enough to get a mention from the Super Bowl announcers--perhaps if he had had some more character actor roles...


Entered at Mon Feb 2 20:33:47 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: UK

Please, what is this"Supper Bowl"?


Entered at Mon Feb 2 20:18:30 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

People get id'ed at events like this by making sure in advance their publicity people let the network know of their presence.........worth noting that a world-wide audience for an Openning Ceremony of an Olympics is consistently 5-7 times that of a Super Bowl......and Robbie was the feature performer at the openning ceremony for the 2002 Olympics - world-wide viewings of 593 Million.........yesterday's Super Bowl drew just over 100 Million in the US with likely just a trickle in the rest of the world........and Robbie was id'ed in 2002.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 19:58:35 CET 2015 from (173.3.48.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

An acclaimed career as a character actor with many noteworthy parts, three Grammys as a solo artist and a member of The Band which received The Lifetime Achievement Grammy, he'd have been id'ed. Had he lived, The Midnight Ramble Band may have been invited to perform at a Super Bowl. Of course, i could care less about this, or about The Super Bowl. but, i thought Ari's notice interesting.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 19:46:45 CET 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: "Levon Destroyed Robbie's Legacy"

I was kind of shocked when I read that.One man cannot destroy or for that matter,make another man's legacy.We each make our own legacy.It's for others to manipulate.And,after reading Peter's post and LOL I couldn't top the height thing.Too funny.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 19:05:31 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan: Shadows in The Night

I bought it at 9.05 this morning. it's been playing all day and I've spent the day reviewing it. My review is linked.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 17:01:20 CET 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Everyone relax. Jeff and Ari were just sharing their delusions, no doubt spellbound by Katy Perry's salute to the Illuminati.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 16:42:40 CET 2015 from (131.137.34.237)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: sports announcers

Peter V: It gets worse . . . I saw very little of the Super Bowl telecast, but at one point they had a few of the camerapersons holding on celebrities in the crowd (and in boxes). The announcer noted John Travolta, Steven Tyler and one or two others. Then he said, "We have royalty attending as well, here's Sir Paul McCartney."

I think it was the "Sir" that threw him off . . . .


Entered at Mon Feb 2 16:33:27 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chiar

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: no-no-no-no-no-no-NO!

They couldn't have shown or ID'd Robbie............fer Chris-sake........It would have started a "fued" on the field and they never would have got the game played.

Onliest thing that happened in that gawd damn game was, the final pass the defender wanted it more than the receiver did.....obviously. Otherwise Seattle would have won that game.

Don't matter what record Tom Brady broke or for all his work, he will NEVER play with the class Joe Montana did. End of story.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 10:06:00 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The debate on whether Robbie or Levon would be most likely to be ID’d by a sports commentator reaches new heights in the feud. Sports commentators are people who usually use numbers printed on people’s backs to help ID them. Private Eye magazine has a regular feature on dumb quotes from sports commentators.

I had thought we hit the high-water mark some years ago on physical height. A casual mention that Robbie was taller than Levon led to impassioned posts stating, against all photographic and video evidence, that either they were the same height or Levon was taller. One poster thought him a six footer. As I was six foot three in my prime I was pleased to see that mere height was considered a virtue worth arguing about. Incidentally, the height / weight and BP machine at our doctors’ had me as 6 foot and a half inch last week, so where did those 2.5 inches go? I daren’t measure the other vital statistic which could not have afforded such a loss even in my twenties.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 08:00:05 CET 2015 from (58.104.3.10)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ari, Interesting post. 1 or 2 years ago I would have agreed with you but I think in internet-land the tide has turned against Levon. I think the hate that is being posted about Robbie is being done by an increasingly small group of people who post under a lot of different names. If you look at the literary style that is used in the various posts it is all almost exactly the same.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 07:50:24 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: "Oh look Betty, the guy who wrote King Harvest"

Goodness gracious.........not being id'ed at the world's largest square-headed convention is a badge of honour........Jon Bon Jovi and Elton John would have - bet on it - knowing Robbie was not is very comforting !


Entered at Mon Feb 2 06:53:18 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Ari

Yeah, well, it's really great that Robbie is still active, and just enjoying myself, but I'm willing to bet that Robbie cares about his legacy: it should be among the best songwriters and best guitarists, and I'm sorry but in my eyes Band leader. I don't mean to stir up anything by that but I feel that Levon really destroyed Robbie's legacy. I mean, that's really sad...

But it's always good to see Robbie so I'm happy anyways.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 06:47:34 CET 2015 from (67.84.77.226)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ari, i know. It is odd. I think that even today, if the circumstances had presented themselves, they would have ID'ed Levon.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 05:34:19 CET 2015 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Saw Robbie twice on Super Bowl Far East Man, definitely him. That was pretty shocking as they didn't ID him, he was just at the bottom of the screen as one of Paul Allen's guests. I always remember that they hang out alot. Really funny to me.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 05:04:24 CET 2015 from (66.243.203.85)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, Maine

Subject: Super Bowl

I'm pretty sure I spotted RR sitting in front of Paul Allen at the Super Bowl. He was pretty happy until the last 30 seconds of the game. Who is Katy Perry? I guess the old guard is to old for the half-time show.


Entered at Mon Feb 2 01:54:49 CET 2015 from (24.114.58.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Call

.....and Robbie also played on The Call's album "Reconiled" - which at the time was quite newsworthy as it was a year or two before RR's big re-emergence with his 1987 debut album......also, in many of the interviews Robbie gave around the time of his first album, he went out of his way to praise Michael Been and The Call and also, I recall, Mike Scott and The Waterboys.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 23:35:15 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Connections

And another "band connection", Peter.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 23:33:29 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Of limited interest, I'm sure. I link music and film reviews here, but not theatre. However, Saturday's was such a wild and extraordinary leap, that I have linked it. The Merchant of Venice, set in the Rialto Casino, Las Vegas, with an Elvis impersonator, and a game show "Destiny" to choose a husband for Portia. Completely unexpected, over the top and wonderful. Lots of live Elvis songs too.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 23:29:28 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Call

… and Garth Hudson played on three albums by The Call.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 23:02:19 CET 2015 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club.....a little more history

Not sure how many of yuz may know more of this. (mostly lots more than me at any rate).

Robert Levon Been, front man for BRMC, is the son of Michael Been whose band was The Call, (amoungst many other bands he was part of.).

Michael Been was sound man for his son's band and while on tour in Belgium, August 19/2010 Michael died of a heart attack. Very sad for his son.

BRMC recorded one of Michael's songs after has passing. Also Robert joined a reunion of his father's band "The Call" and took his father's place.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 20:23:10 CET 2015 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: The Modern Lovers

Peter, loved your list and write up. I would have included 'Hospital' which is my favorite Richman after 'Roadrunner'. You got me listening to The Modern Lovers all day. Been awhile. Thanks for that.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 12:17:15 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers

Latest Toppermost is up. This is where The Doors and Pete Seeger get mentioned.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 11:55:06 CET 2015 from (87.152.120.121)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Women

Joan, men have big fragile ego’s with voracious appetite that caused a lot of trouble through time (not me of course ;-). So there is your right ….


Entered at Sun Feb 1 05:31:25 CET 2015 from (58.104.16.77)

Posted by:

Wallsend

In one of the promo videos for the BTs Dylan mention what the inspiration was for some of the songs. There seemed to be a very tenuous link between the initial idea and the song. Given that, it might be hard to link the lyrics of specific songs to specific events in the real world.


Entered at Sun Feb 1 04:55:36 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Getting back to "Blind Willie McTell", it seems to be a song written by a thoughtful and imaginative guy sitting in some St James Hotel somewhere, listening to a blues tape and thinking about what the singer's life might have been like.

I'm inclined to go with the theory that the singer was Blind Willie Johnson rather than Blind Willie McTell. First, Johnson was born in and worked around East Texas, whereas McTell was born in and worked around Georgia. Second, and more significantly, was questioning, philosophical, moralising and gospel based; if you read or listen to the lyrics to "The Soul Of A Man" or "Everybody Ought To Treat A Stranger Right", you can imagine that Dylan's closing verse is also his:

"God is in his heaven
And we all want what's his
But power and greed and corruptible seed
Seem to be all that there is"

As for "All the way from New Orleans to Jerusalem", I take it as a kind of generalised life story of a slave in the southern US - from arrival by ship to 'crossing the Jordan River' to the 'promised land', whether that crossing was to the freedom of death (with heaven), or the freedom of life at the end of the Underground Railroad.

(To revisit Highway 61, that particular road leads from New Orleans to the Canadian border, via Hibbing Minnesota - though I can't imagine it as an escape route, even if it had existed at the time.)


Entered at Sun Feb 1 01:10:15 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

NWC: Tell him "Oui, Monsieur Chaise" in a soft, sultry voice." He'll love it.


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