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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Wed May 25 12:59:02 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Suisse

This is to take part in the latest thread:

We were in Switzerland (or Suisse) in Verbier for a year ago and said a small sticker in a lamppost saying "FREEDOM TO SCANIA!" (A short historical background: Scania is a province in Denmark which Sweden was occupying for a few centuries ago. Some people are -more or less seriously - working for an independent Scania. Like Scotland, Corse, Basque.) But who would want to propagate for free Scania in Verbier?


Entered at Wed May 25 12:39:29 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't know, Norbert. Give a Swiss an apple and the next thing you know you're standing in the town square with it balanced on your head and a big bloke with a crossbow aiming at it.

Having spent ten years years working for a Swiss company in the 70s, I will say the wine is exquisite, and you can't ever find it outside Switzerland because they consume it all.


Entered at Wed May 25 12:31:26 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Apple

Yesterday a brief Switzerland visit to a little town in a Canton with no name.

At the local grocery I watched an old woman buying an apple. She picked up one, looked at it from all sites, discussed it with the shop assistant, then put it back into the box. She picked up apple number two and discussed it even more thorough but also returned this one in the box. Same ritual for nr: 3 and 4. The next exemplar was finally given her approval. She rejected the bag the shop assistant offered her and stored nr.5 in her handbag, paid for the chosen one and gave the shop assistant a hand before she walked on.

This purchase had taken about ten minutes but nobody got impatient, all accepted it with grace.

For some reason this strange Swiss apple event got me emotional. Outside town, in the face of the first mountain I encountered, I stopped my car, stepped outside, took a deep breath and yodeled the mountain as lout as I could to save me from crying.

Before the Nordwand answered my call I knew I had discovered the secret of this little country in the Alps. Switzerland is great because of their Apples, they respect them and treat them as equals, that must be a superlative form of civilization.

During my 1000 miles drive home I realized the Swiss don’t need no EU: They had William Tell to spark their believe in apples, that was the only guide they ever needed to become the richest country on earth and every time they smile, their golden teeth flicker in the sunlight.

p.s.: In 1974 Steve Jobs picked this story up in the south of India.


Entered at Tue May 24 23:46:55 CEST 2016 from (114.75.81.1)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, thanks for the link. The music is amazing but the photography is also amazing.


Entered at Tue May 24 23:29:46 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Courage

Bill M: Gord Downie is in good hands. Dr. Perry and his team are as good as they get! With Gord's attitude and strength of character and with his total commitment to whatever he does, we must celebrate Gord and The Hip by doing what we always do...appreciate all that Gord and The Hip are. I look forward to the new album.


Entered at Tue May 24 23:13:12 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: Early photo shoots

A conversation with the photographer who shot some of the early iconic Dylan pictures.


Entered at Tue May 24 22:28:58 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.31)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Very sad about Gord Downie. Very. He certainly deserves to have his eulogy sung by Ry Cooder when the time comes, as per one of the best parts of the magnificent "At The Hundredth Meridian".


Entered at Tue May 24 21:00:33 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Nat Hentoff

Thanks so much for posting that article, JQ - a really fascinating look into the young Bob Dylan when he was relatively open, and very different from the later Bob. Even way back then he was on the same path though. It really shines through.

But he was wrong about his fame not lasting!


Entered at Tue May 24 19:35:17 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.149)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You got it Lee. Parody song for the Storm Damage Insurance Restoration Industry, or from another angle, The Humane Society. Or just an alternate chorus to throw into Whipping Post..


Entered at Tue May 24 18:13:49 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: October 1964 - Bob Dylan

Here's an article about a recording session then -


Entered at Tue May 24 17:38:31 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al Kooper describes how he was assigned to help Bob while he finalised lyrics. Bob played him the song on guitar or piano, then Al Kooper kept on playing it on piano while Bob worked on the lyrics, stopping him every few seconds, He says it allowed him to learn them, and to run through the melodies with the studio guys before Bob arrived for sessions.


Entered at Tue May 24 17:33:28 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

PSB, Mojo uses a “remove from shelves” dating system, so the BoB issue is dated “July 2016” #272. Michael Simmons discusses the odd fact that the release date is disputed, but concludes it was 20th June in the USA, two or three weeks later in the UK.

I listened through the “Blonde on Blonde Revisited” covers disc. I have to say it sent me straight back to the original. The ones that stood out as worth doing were Pledging My Time in a gentle folky version by My Darling Clementine and One of Must Know by Chip Taylor, recent, done in his “aged” voice. It’s kind of “Listen to this Bob. Now you know how Frank Sinatra would have felt about your last two.” Steve Gunn’s Visions of Johanna and Peter Bruntnell’s Just Like A Woman suffer from being too straight, while Malcolm Middleton’s Rainy Day Women suffers from being too weird. Phosphoresent get nice chiming sounds on I Want You.


Entered at Tue May 24 16:43:50 CEST 2016 from (100.34.147.66)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: re: Mojo

Peter, I guess since it's out already Mojo thinks Blonde On Blonde came out in May, or do they ignore the release date? It really came out at the end of June.


Entered at Tue May 24 16:35:59 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ode to 75: Bob Dylan

Robert: Your songs have been a soundtrack to my life. You said in ways I could never have said the things I was thinking in my ideologic revolution of 15 years on the planet. Then you created Shakespearian images of modern scenes. A return to family and a retractions from those scenes led to the Band and that contribution is without peer for me. Alias was profound. A separation led to pain and Blood evoked it. The spirit met the flesh and then, as is the case for most human endeavour if one is around long enough, a nadir of sorts. Renaissance as the struggle to find what was once finally was found. Then the joy of finding kindred spirits and giving us Wilbury. Covers followed and the mining of gems returning us to and reminding us of the blues you first put out on that $104 record. And then a slew of fine recordings to show us that creativity of lyric and melody is always possible no matter what age if its in your soul. The best of radio was placed front and centre with your moderation and professorial explanations of where it all came from. And with Christmas and then Sinatra and others came Dylan variations on the Theme but with dignity. I will never forget Nov. 15, 1965 when I witnessed you at Massey Hall for the first time. I have been privileged to hear Blonde On Blonde. There are no words (though I try) to explain the impact on my being but that impact is exceptional and has not been reproduced by any artist. I know the creativity of lyric and melody and its interpretation will continue. This is still a work in progress. Thank you.


Entered at Tue May 24 15:03:47 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Gord Downie

It is with great sadness that I respond to having read this morning that Gord Downie of The Tragically Hip has terminal brain cancer. A new record by the band will be released next month and a tour will follow. Gord Downie is an original and the and his band since the late 80s have been bright lights on the Canadian music scene. From the bars of Kingston to the venues of Toronto to international prominence, this group of musicians sang of Canada and all that it is. When awards are given, the people's choice has always been The Tragically Hip.


Entered at Tue May 24 14:26:28 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Subject: Like, pigs

Now if only we could get Greg Allman to sing your line, Jeff, we'd be in...hog heaven? Sometimes I feel, sometimes I feel...

"Like" and "man" in my mind go back to the Beatnik days. "Like, dig?" Maynard G. Krebbs on the Dobie Gillis show in the 60's. So, not really 'youth-speak'. "Dude" I think came later with the surfer/slacker crowd. "Ya know?"


Entered at Tue May 24 13:28:51 CEST 2016 from (114.75.76.117)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Linked is Al Kooper's review of MFBP from 1968. Probably well know to people here but I hadn't read it before.


Entered at Tue May 24 09:01:04 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mojo

The latest Mojo focusses on "Blonde on Blonde" with a cover mount disc of cover versions - apparently also available as 2 LPs. Two things. Turn to the "Fallen Angels" review, for the full page illustration. They should do it as a print and sell it. It's a pastiche of the Freewheeling cover with Bob & Frank Sinatra, insead of Bob and Suzy Rotolo.

Second good stuff on Blonde on Blonde. Al Kooper insists there was no second Nashville recording dates. He also describes how he and Robbie shared a room in Roger Miller's King of The Road motel, but he went to Bob's more luxurious hotel to work on arrangements. Shared rooms were common for bands on the road for economy, but for a prestige recording session it shows these guys were rated as "poor enough to put up with sharing."


Entered at Tue May 24 02:25:05 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.4)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: A Pig Named Hamlet In A Hailstorm

I almost forgot. The pig's name is Hamlet.


Entered at Tue May 24 02:09:12 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.4)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Before I'm Barbecued or Salted & Hung Out To Cure.

Of course, i 'm not happy about the pig being terrified, and am glad it wasn't harmed. If it suffered any injuries it seems it is now back to normal. I think it was 2004, a herd of 44 or 45 cows was wiped out by about 4" hail in a town named Mobley, Missouri. All of em, or close to all, were killed by the hail. Not a good way to go.

Barbeque is Southeatern Regional Spelling.


Entered at Tue May 24 01:30:18 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.4)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Sometimes I feel like I'm a pig in a hailstorm.

Sometimes I feel like I'm a pig in a hailstorm.

See the link. Maybe you got to be a roofer to appreciate this, or maybe you just go to know the song i referenced.


Entered at Mon May 23 21:14:08 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I agree, Joan........more than anything though. I find certain phrases are fine if used in an age appropriate way. For instance, when two teenage boys are watching a sports highlight show and one turns to the other and exclaims "that's just sick, bro"......that is fine, it's how they talk at times in some circles at that age.......but when 50 or 60 year olds start appropriating youth phrases - it just sounds dumb.


Entered at Mon May 23 20:17:43 CEST 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

I also dislike the use of "Dude" as s greeting or sentence starter as in "Dude you coming over later"


Entered at Mon May 23 18:36:54 CEST 2016 from (206.108.16.161)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Releases

Interesting titles, Peter. I vaguely know perhaps one song from the 9 7" records. Not a bad thing to release less well known recordings.


Entered at Mon May 23 18:01:59 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Rockin' Chair , Jeff A

RC, there is a Band connection in Norbert's latest post: "... and landed in Brussels, on a flight so bumpy I almost cried..."

Thanks Jeff A for your latest Dylan post. I didn't know that. (Who did?)


Entered at Mon May 23 16:43:36 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

For vinyl fans, Jack White's Third Man records (see link) has just licensed nine very early Tamla 45s and reissued them. I just bought the bundle and they arrived today. Great stuff for soul fans.


Entered at Mon May 23 15:48:21 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Funny All Over

You need this one as well, Al.


Entered at Mon May 23 14:42:48 CEST 2016 from (206.108.16.161)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Back to 'Judas'

Apparently, according to discussions at the Robertson site, 'Judas' and what followed may have been shouted at more than 1 venue. There are witnesses who were there (this particular one in Glasgow). So, if true, Manchester Free Trade Hall was not the only one. I didn't know that. This witness says the Dylan comment which followed (complete with expletive) was also shouted before LARS was played in Glasgow. Interesting.


Entered at Mon May 23 13:54:31 CEST 2016 from (206.108.16.161)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Words

"It's only words

And words are all I have

To take your heart away"

I can't help it, Norm. I'll absorb the expletive. Safe travels.


Entered at Mon May 23 11:49:24 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ooh wack....

Ha ha - great stuff Pete lad - if I had to plump for one person in the entire universe who might still have a copy then I'd be concentrating my efforts around the vicinity of Poole...

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 23 11:35:51 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: You can't get over a thing like that …

I have "If You know What I Mean" on 45, Al. For North Americans, The Vernons Girls were named from Vernons Football Pools (a weekly gamble on results which was widespread then).


Entered at Mon May 23 09:57:37 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Ooh wack well you know what I mean

We've got to be honest and hold our hands up and say Liverpudlians don't emerge too well from any ruminations on the origins of this language desecration - see link

'er....well...like...er..you know worra mean, like la....'

If I had a pound for every time that exact phrase has been uttered in my own fair city then I wouldn't still be having to work

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 23 09:24:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Polonius: "It is very like a whale."

Wihout looking it up, if you take the Top 20 words in speech in frequency (a, the, I, you, it, is etc), then "like" as a verbal tic comes in around #14.

I reckon you have something on the "hippy" sense, because the other one is "kinda / kind of". It's as if you're diluting your statement. Not "They play well" but "they play … um, like … well." You're diluting whatever your statement is, so not coming across as a clear, certain person, but a … like … fashionably diffident low key kind of guy.


Entered at Mon May 23 07:19:52 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....and I am glad you are, Norm...safe travels.


Entered at Mon May 23 06:06:54 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A great right HAND!

It's confirmed! I'm not at all surprised that you would take the kid's side Kevin. That's your style, but he is not any George St. Pierre. He's never been put up against any one meaningful or worth while. So it is easy for you to think that he is something worth while.

I doubt if you have ever seen any one who can really do the damage in a brawl........I have spent most my life in bars living that life. Had knives pulled on me, and guns a couple of times..........but!.....I'm still here son.


Entered at Mon May 23 05:51:57 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

In the words of the late great Pierre Elliot Trudeau - "Fuddle Duddle" - my great and good friend, Norm........By the way, if you do meet junior outside a bar, do take care, he has nerve and a great right hand.......oh, and I did like the way that "Conservative Whip" trotted along oh so gingerly and obediently when the charismatic and determined Prime Minister Justin grabbed him by the arm and led him bravely through a barricade of pansy NDP and Conservative MP's....... Bravo Justin.....and good on him to apologize for the inadvertent elbow to the lady MP.

Long may Justin reign !


Entered at Mon May 23 05:30:10 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lay "Mans" Terms

Jesus Christ Jerry! quit getting so technical! There are those of us that are just old GAWD DAMN tug boat guys. You are starting to sound like some gawd damn college professor who likes to lord it over us illiterate country bumpkins.

There is one prominent expletive for the word..."fuck off!!!"

Kevin!.....you low down no good up town stuffed shirt ....I can't think of any more derogotorry names to call you. I guess you are very proud of your Trudeau kid, man handling people, picking on girls. You called Stephen Harper a "bully". Well if that Trudeau kid were out side a bar here, I'd kick his ass all over the parking lot and leave him with a few scars to remember the little piss ant prick. You eastern assholes think you are so hollier than thou. I am discusted.


Entered at Mon May 23 04:35:14 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: MF

You bet, Mike.

" "Although the words gender and sex both have the sense 'the state of being male or female', they are typically used in slightly different ways: sex tends to refer to biological differences, while gender refers to cultural or social ones."


Entered at Mon May 23 04:32:02 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

So, like....Trump is the fuckin nominee and even though he is like a confirmed racist lunatic, we are rallying around him because he is like no longer self funding and no longer going to deport 11 million rapists and like no longer going to raise taxes on the 1%......,you know, Megyn...he is like one of us.....Fox family/NRA stamped through and through........"You bet, Biff"


Entered at Mon May 23 04:31:11 CEST 2016 from (184.145.67.44)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: To be clear . . .

Gee, mom, what's a gender? . . . You mean, used by both sexes?


Entered at Mon May 23 04:08:15 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Not all nouns require the expletive

To be clear, it is Gastown. (corrected automatically in previous post by this site). And yes, there is a time and place for the expletive but not to describe every 2nd noun in a sentence.


Entered at Mon May 23 04:03:36 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Expletive 'f' as adjective

While we're talking about words used by youth, describing everything with the expletive ' f..k.n' (as an adjective) in every sentence used (by both genders) is something I heard today a number of times while walking the streets of Gaston in Vancouver. It is something I don't quite get.


Entered at Mon May 23 03:17:26 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Like..........hey Man!

You are only half there Jerry. I'm sure you remember in the sixties......."Like you know what I mean MAN!

It fucking well infuriates me when people use that expression..........."Like" .......or "man".

I refuse to discuss this any further. It's just gawd damn stupid. People and their hopeless vocabulary. Same as when we discussed..........."WHATEVER!"

I'm leaving tomorrow morning......got so many jobs I'm in shock! so long for now gang.


Entered at Mon May 23 02:08:43 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: "Like"

This is a theory only - I think that word hit the lingo first as a way for pot smokers to describe how stoney they feel with a simile. Say circa 1966. And from there it just stuck and expanded to what it is today. Maybe? I know a couple from Cork and they use it as frequently as most, but differently. For example: "I'm on my way like".


Entered at Mon May 23 01:30:33 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: To the Moon, Alice

And I'm like that Bill M like he knows so much and he's like it comes with the territory and I'm like well ...yea.

"My name/ Andrea Wilson. Uh-huh. That's right. Andrea. Uh-huh. I know. It's like I do not talk funny. I'm sure."


Entered at Mon May 23 01:12:26 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.158)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm like "What are the meanings of 'like'?" And Peter's like "Like can mean three thing - this, that or the other." So I'm like "Hey, you missed my meaning, you know."

Joan: You would like the song by Joe Hall and the Continental Drift that goes:

It's an okey-dokey- type thing, good day eh
It's an okey-dokey- type thing, good day eh
It's an okey-dokey- type thing, good day eh
Like you know, like you know, like you know

I believe it's on their "Rancho Banano" album if you want to check it out. Or maybe "Direct to Delete".


Entered at Mon May 23 01:00:58 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: I hate like

It is that hesitation device which I abhor... Multiple times in one excessively long like sentence like it drives me crazy like why does it have to be like that way like I just don't get it.


Entered at Mon May 23 00:11:40 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Like

In spoken English, like as a hesitation device is measurably more frequent than 'like' in the sense 'I like The Band.' Or in the sense 'restless farewell is very like the parting glass.'


Entered at Sun May 22 22:26:16 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Gold Medal for Canada at the Workd Hockey Championships. 2nd straight. Soon to be - if not already - world's greatest player Connor McDavid with the game winning goal. Finland silver, Russia bronze.


Entered at Sun May 22 22:01:53 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sports 'you know'

'You know' is the athlete's spacer.


Entered at Sun May 22 21:58:00 CEST 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: like

I hate the use of "like"" Also dislike "you know". It is aay of filling conversation gaps. My Dad would always say "no I don't know' Stopped me from using it much


Entered at Sun May 22 20:54:03 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Like'

Speaking of 'You bet", how did the word 'like' get into the youth vocabulary so profoundly? Does it irk anyone else? I know its a 'spacer' (maybe gives one time to think when speaking) - the current 'um', but it seems so much more prevalent.


Entered at Sun May 22 20:28:52 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

If you find yourself in the United States and hear someone respond to a "Thank you" with "You Bet".......mark that person down as a Republican.


Entered at Sun May 22 19:27:45 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff......True on Garnier and that does soften the blow somewhat - perhaps considerably - but still wrong to lose a job in a band over illness.

Lightfoot Covers: Not easy...... I believe Gord 's recording of "Summer side of Life" to be almost perfect........I thought BARK's cover was uninspired - to be kind.


Entered at Sun May 22 17:57:58 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: BARK

Thanks Bill M. It's a good version of a great song. BARK always seem to add to the songs they cover.


Entered at Sun May 22 17:45:50 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.128)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin- I think it's fair to realize that in many ways ( which we do not have to list or necessarily even exactly know or be able to guess) Dylan has never clicked with one musician as he has with Garnier. Who replaced Kenny & never left.The relationship is the longest band member relationship Dylan s had, & that's afforded him much. ............And likely has even extended to the fact that other of the band members have been with him a real good while now. For some it's the second or third time, no?


Entered at Sun May 22 17:32:17 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Bandexit

Norm, nobody knows Brussels.


Entered at Sun May 22 16:54:16 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Live Tragedy

The Orpheum in Vancouver is a traditional seated theatre much like Massey Hall. It is a wonderful site built for music and is highly regarded. In our opinion, the sound technician tragically destroyed John Grant, whose lyrics were not discernible. His wonderful voice boomed through the site as a loud drone and the lyrics were lost. Andrew Bird suffered less of that fate. This multi instrumentalist could be vocally discriminated some of the time, but the problem was only partially solved. The last time this happened to me, I was at a Tom Petty concert and couldn't make out lyrics or music. I know there are sound checks. I think the artist should 'tape' himself and go out and actually hear what it sounds like in the audience areas before the show to make sure he/she is being heard and getting what is desired. Overall.... Tragedy it was!


Entered at Sun May 22 16:40:49 CEST 2016 from (184.145.67.44)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Great link to the Aaronson interview, Jeff. Thanks.


Entered at Sun May 22 14:00:29 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.128)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Bob' Dylan's Bar Mitzvah was 62 years ago today. L'Chaim.

In the linked video taken at a Chabad telethon in 1989, Bob Dylan accompanies his son-in-law Peter Himmelman and Harry Dean Stanton on harmonica during “Hava Nagila”. Is that Jon Voight at the end?

May 22, 1954 (from Jewdayo)

Bobby Zimmerman's Bar Mitzvah

Bob Dylan (Robert Zimmerman) became a bar mitzvah on this date in 1954, two days shy of his 13th birthday, at Agudas Achim, the only synagogue in Hibbing, Minnesota. The guest list numbered 400; Dylan’s father was president of B’nai Brith, and his mother was president of the local Hadassah chapter. “The town didn’t have a rabbi, and it was time for me to be bar mitsved,” Dylan would later tell the tale. “Suddenly a rabbi showed up under strange circumstances for only a year. He and his wife got off the bus in the middle of winter. He showed up just in time for me to learn this stuff. He was an old man from Brooklyn who had a white beard and wore a black hat and black clothes. They put him upstairs above the cafe, which was the local hangout. It was a rock and roll cafe where I used to hang out, too. I use to go up there every day to learn the stuff, either after school or after dinner. After studying with him an hour or so, I’d come down and boogie.” Seven years later, during his debut at Gerde’s Folk City in New York, Dylan said into the microphone, “Here’s a foreign song I learned out in Utah,” and then sang a flat-footed parody of “Hava Nagila” ending with a yodel. “With the yodel and a finishing harmonica flourish,” noted Larry Yudelson in the Washington Post (1991), “Dylan had outlined an epitaph for the Hebrew folk songs sung by folksingers like Theodore Bikel and the Weavers as part of a vaguely leftist, workingman’s ethnic repertoire. The mockery was prescient: The left would not be strumming love songs about Israeli soldiers much longer.” In 1962, Dylan would record his first album, Bob Dylan, for Columbia Records, and launch his historic career.

“While Jewish leaders are preaching continuity, Dylan quietly raised five children, saw them to bar mitzvahs and Jewish weddings, but is most at home perpetuating the culture of the Woody Guthrie and the old blues singers. At the same time, he has an intense desire for God and salvation, a tremendous awareness of man’s sinfulness and an appreciation of how much compassion is required in this world. His is an intense, spiritual emotional message, very Hasidic, with much to teach the Jewish world.” —Larry Yudelson



Entered at Sun May 22 08:44:55 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Ben Pike

Ben.....not sure if you use Facebook, but there is a story on RR's Facebook page in the last few days which shows a picture of him writing his biography - in long hand no less...800 plus pages ! - the interesting part is a button on the desk which can be seen and reads "Free Leonard Pelletier".


Entered at Sun May 22 08:02:59 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Daryl Hall & friends....The Weight

I came across this on my internet walkabout today,


Entered at Sun May 22 07:37:16 CEST 2016 from (24.114.70.110)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jeff's linked interview......

Sad actually, Jeff.....to me at least as I have always believed in the principle that injury or illness should never be the cause of job loss and taking Aaronson at his word...his time off from Dylan due to a cancer treatment was comforted by being assured by Bob that his job was safe.....seems that that was not the case......none of us know the whole story but it bothers me to even think of this........the other parts were fun, granted......tip: never turn down an invitation to party with a band leader, kids....

Wallsend's Link: I had seen the Robbie Robertson, Elvis Costello, Rita Coolidge performance of "I Shall Be Released" before but not quite in that clarity.....wonderful.....and it really does make you shake your head and wonder how Robbie didn't miss performing more......love the guitar.


Entered at Sun May 22 02:17:38 CEST 2016 from (68.196.243.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Great interview with Kenny Aaronson. Reccommended for many reasons.


Entered at Sun May 22 02:04:26 CEST 2016 from (68.196.243.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: What would the Rolling Stones sound like doing "Like A Rolling Stone?"

Just like a rolling stone. Linked

True story. Very early 90s,Don Was was producing The Stones & that song was part of it. Some one asked him the question, that was his answer.


Entered at Sun May 22 01:57:29 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Subjectivity??????

Jesus Christ Norbert! are you mixing those heavy red French wines with Shnapps agin? I didn't understands a gawd damn thing you said.........frightening and disturbing......:-)


Entered at Sun May 22 00:52:38 CEST 2016 from (64.114.196.118)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Andrew Bird and John Grant

Seeing /hearing Andrew Bird and John Grant tonight in Vancouver BC at the Orpheum. These are talented musicians.


Entered at Sat May 21 23:50:11 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.6)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: What a difference an aitch makes

The Brexiters have chosen "I Shall Be Released" as their theme song. \eu-n The Stay side has parried with "I Shall Be Releashed".


Entered at Sat May 21 22:44:34 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Bandexit

A few days ago I saw Peter in a blue skintight bodysuit with a circle of 12 gold stars on his chest walking around in this very GB.
After numerous open letters from economists, entrepreneurs and multinationals now members of the cultural elite for or against a Bandexit have thrown themselves into The Band EU referendum debate.
'From Norbert to Peter, creativity inspires and influences the rest of the world, " it says in an open letter " we believe that participation of The Band GB in the EU strengthens this role. "

This intervention of the 'Bluvvies' is a credit to the pro camp and their struggle for a Stay-voice. If the letter will change the voting posters’, however, remains to be seen. "How in God's name contributes a membership of the EU in creativity and imagination?" poster and Bandexiteer Crazy Chester wondered. “How have Pink Floyd, The Beatles, The Stones, Francis Bacon, etc. created such beautiful art without the support from Brussels?” another poster asked.

The "Bluvvie" scribblers suggest that collaboration with Brussels, where many funds for the creative sector come from, is necessary. But there are more, far more important markets. The letter ignores the simple fact that the largest markets are outside the EU. The US is not there. Asia either. The Bluvvies letter also contributes to the impression that the discussion in a higher sense goes between elite and ordinary posters. The former greatly benefit from open borders. Some signataires partly living outside the EU zone.

Ragtime traveled to Brussels for the Band GB to make an equally informative as hilarious documentary about the functioning of the EU. With eyebrows raised, painful grimaces and astonished looks the legendary poster went to Berlaymont and other related offices where the Eurocrats are hiding. On the basis of interviews he learned everything about cucumber guidelines 'trialogues' and the protracted discussions on the definition of book faded brown.

His amazement peaked when he was explaining that MEPs move every few months with office and all to Strasbourg to vote, a ritual that costs 130 million euros each year.

Anyway some new EU laws for The Band GB to come:

For more than 20 years the European Union's "book faded brown war" has raged: ….. The “light” book faded brown will be banned and only the dark book faded brown will remain.

On a lighter note:
Backslash n will be changed in backslash eu-n and now will be used to create a line-break.
Backslash b will be changed in backslash eu-b and now will be used to create a paragraph.


Entered at Sat May 21 22:17:29 CEST 2016 from (114.75.73.16)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A clip of Robbie playing 'I Shall be Released' with Elvis Costello I don't recall seeing before.


Entered at Fri May 20 23:32:49 CEST 2016 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Garth Hudson on "Day Of The Dead" Grateful Dead track

Garth provides some nice keyboard orchestration for "Brokedown Palace" by Richard Reed Parry with Caroline Shaw and Little Scream (featuring Garth Hudson).


Entered at Fri May 20 18:16:14 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.26)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry for now, or posterity, i agree on rebranding / reschmanding. But there are youth who think Joe Bonamassa is blues. He might cover blues material, but to me he's other...,

While the -they don't get it- is true in general, there's plenty think they're playing it. And then there are those fewer numbers making real commitments to it to varying degrees of musicality & professionalism. .


Entered at Fri May 20 16:44:22 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: BARK

Bill M: Thanks for the link to BARK Lightfoot. I look forward to the next BARK tour of Canada. I've seen and heard Steven and BARK a number of times, and they are among the best in the business right now.


Entered at Fri May 20 16:13:47 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Asphalt

Jeff: Thanks for linking 'selling the blues' article. I don't think a rebranding is going to do much to kindle the flame for today's youth. They can write in to say I'm wrong (if any of them actually visit here), but I think they just don't get it. Its likely that some day in the future, for reasons that are probably similar to the reasons we got into blues 50 years ago, the youth of that time will once again 'discover' that music form along with Dylan and other originals who paved the way. Just my opinion.


Entered at Fri May 20 10:27:58 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Band photos

Though I have the book, I'll try and see the exhibition. Can't make the launch though - already booked for A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Roger, Paul Simon tickets secured! See email.

Interestingly, I had both my Macs open, one on the venue site, one on Ticketmaster. As online booking opening, the front section was "unavailable" on the gig site and Ticketmaster. "Best available" was way back on the gig site, much better on Ticketmaster. I guess the venue has allocated the very best tickets to the "VIP Packages" then the next best lot to Ticketmaster. The VIP Packages were on sale an hour earlier.


Entered at Fri May 20 07:11:54 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "Selling The Blues"

If you got the time, linked is an intelligent analysis of the state of business of the blues.

"One promoter I spoke with told me straight out that if he put the word “Blues” on a poster he would lose at least half of his market that would have gone to the show. As a booking agent for young blues band, I can’t tell you how many venues tell me that they cannot book blues because it doesn’t draw.."


Entered at Fri May 20 05:59:47 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.121)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: Here's Blackie and the Rodeo Kings' version of Lightfoot's "The Summer Side Of Life".


Entered at Fri May 20 02:44:47 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Lightfoot

Kev, I'll match your ten and up you another ten.


Entered at Thu May 19 23:38:26 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: E. Landy OQ photos

The Landy photos are exceptional. The book is 'labour' of love and commitment. If I were in London UK, I'd be there in a heartbeat.


Entered at Thu May 19 22:36:52 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks JT, Kevin and Jeff.

Gordon Lightfoot has great songs. 'Beautiful' is fantastic. I'll need to seek out some more albums or a boxed set.

As JT said a couple of days ago, there's just too much music.

And being Scottish, there is that extra dimension to my music. I'll play artists that probably nobody else here will play. Just now I'm playing Joe Egan's solo album, just recently rereleased on CD, which is great.


Entered at Thu May 19 21:58:29 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, JT. What a pro Lightfoot is. Almost 80 and he's out there doing almost 30 songs a night. Having an impressive body of work to draw from helps....I could add 10 songs without a seconds thought that he omitted.


Entered at Thu May 19 21:38:37 CEST 2016 from (84.215.171.237)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

You want to see this (link above) if you're in London, UK, in June. And we may show up for the launch on the 8th!


Entered at Thu May 19 21:19:51 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good night out, eh Dunc :-)


Entered at Thu May 19 20:59:39 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 18 5 16 Glasgow Lightfoot setlist

Here is the setlist from Gordon Lightfoot Glasgow show of 18.5.16, Kevin.

Set 1: 1. Sweet Guinevere 2. Did She Mention My Name 3. Waiting for You 4. Never Too Close 5. Don Quixote 6. Clouds of Loneliness 7. A Painter Passing Through 8. Spanish Moss 9. Shadows 10. Beautiful (followed by band introductions) 11. The Watchman's Gone 12. The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald 13. Carefree Highway Set 2: 14. Pony Man 15. Now & Then 16. Ribbon of Darkness 17. Sundown 18. 14 Karat Gold 19. I'd Rather Press On 20. Minstrel of the Dawn 21. Let It Ride 22. If You Could Read My Mind 23. Restless 24. Baby Step Back 25. Early Morning Rain Encore: 26. Rainy Day People 27. Cold on the Shoulder


Entered at Thu May 19 20:23:50 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dunc.......Thank you for the review of the Lightfoot show and really happy that you enjoyed the evening. Carter Lancaster was playing guitar in the band, the last time I checked. As you likely know, Gord's long time friend/band mate and guitar player Terry Clements passed away a few years ago.........did he do "Summer side of Life" and/or "Canadian Railroad Trilogy" ?


Entered at Thu May 19 18:57:56 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Just one of the nice things going on here. Great, good music is a mood enhancer. We love it cause it makes feel good. Some great music might make us feel sorta bad, but in a great way... All the good vibrations that Ro's music & performances have elicited from exposure attest to serving the purpose. .


Entered at Thu May 19 18:04:52 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Vinyl

Al, for the record, I'm also not Chazz Palminteri. Now neither of us have any excuses other than senility to screw that up.:-)


Entered at Thu May 19 17:09:55 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tom Russel - Blue Wing

The passing of Guy Clark is very hard to take. You lay back in the swivel Rockin Chair at the desk and look at the list of all the writers and singers of songs that have made you life comfortable and worth while in so many ways.

Billy Jo Shaver, Guy Clark, Townes Van Zante, the list goes on a long way. I've chosen a song from Tom Russell about an old Indian, his fight with jail and the bottle. Listen to "Blue Wing" Tom Russell is great.

I recall the story when he wrote "Navajo Rug". He didn't have it quite finished the way he wanted so he looked to Ian Tyson for help. He was in awe of Ian and couldn't approach him, so he put the song in Ian's guitar case with a note, I thought you might help me out with this, which Ian did.


Entered at Thu May 19 16:26:13 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: BEWARE …

There;s a series of posts with links from unknown names that look as if they're part of a discussion, but are cut and pasted lines from older posts. DO NOT TOUCH THE LINKS


Entered at Thu May 19 13:38:52 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Chez Pazienza's article

Jeff, thanks for clearing up that you haven't changed your name to Chez!

Got to say I was a bit worried for a bit there as I much prefer Jeff to Chez!!!

;-0)


Entered at Thu May 19 13:09:18 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot

I really enjoyed Gordon Lightfoot last night. He referred to the fact that he hadn't played Glasgow for 35 years. A great night.

A knowledgeable, good crowd, who had probably travelled from many parts of Scotland to see him. \An older voice, but clear and the voice was up front, the song being important. A great band - keyboards, bass, drums and lead guitar. The band was quiet and their contributions relevant. The lead guitarist on acoustic and electric guitars was great, effortless and his contributions really enhanced the songs. Sorry I don't know their names. Some help Bill M?

Good interaction, mentioned he had just flown in from Toronto. Good intro to 'The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald'.

Began with a mix of old and new songs in the first half then more and more standards. Got a standing ovation and did an encore.

For me the admission price alone was worth it for 'Early Morning Rain' and 'If You Could Read My Mind', which he sang beautifully. But lots of great songs.

Now onto complete the tour. Noted a British company was handling transport, and all the gear went into one truck. Efficient travel.

What added to the experience was the beautiful hall with great acoustics.

But it was all down to absolutely brilliant songs.


Entered at Thu May 19 12:28:53 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, my post lacked a synopsis. Aside from a few spare words to connect dots, my post body was all quotes from the article.

I made no comment regarding the article. It's not "Jeff's article". Just an article i read & posted.


Entered at Thu May 19 11:44:27 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff's article re rock's swansong

A really interesting and absorbing article Jeff lad - with an awful lot of sobering realities.

So thanks for posting it - and your great little synopsis of its main thrust.

And yet - my two youngest grandkids pester me to play Cathy's Clown over and over whenever they're at our house [every fecking day!!] or in the car!

So is Rock music really as dead as this Chez guy believes it to be?

Well complacency is the forerunner of any fall and yet I don't think so. Going by my grandkids desperation to absorb one of the genre's earliest 3 minute masterpieces and having just 4 days ago witnessing Roseann Fino singing the genre's latest masterpiece namely her amazing Drinking Song I'd say reports of its demise would seem to be wildly exaggerated.

Of course the intrinsic financial malady that has always plagued rock's very soul will never go away - it will merely just re-invent itself in a multitude of different guises - the current most virulent and evil being the ease of access for ordinary joes and janes via the worldwide web which threatens to strangle the life out of it.

But real creativity is at heart a really tough cookie. As the breathtaking magnificence of Roseann's Drinking Song exemplifies.

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 19 10:55:54 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Presslagu

Web: My link

Pete, i'm guessing my Sony reel to reel is a 72, as that's when i got it. One of these days i must have it examined.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:55:24 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

aantamim

Web: My link

I got this in 1969 while in RVN - just like most of the guys there. Japanese stereos and cameras were all the rage there and then. The brake failed in the mid 80's and rendered it inoperable. But reassuring to see there's folks that can bring them back up -


Entered at Thu May 19 10:54:48 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Ikisae

Web: My link

Review of Rita Coolidge on my blog. Her new autobiography is out … great band, great setlist. I asked her about Agrigento too.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:54:20 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

aan512

Web: My link

I wasn't familiar with the Peltier case, maybe because I don't live in the US.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:53:37 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Naruto Senpai

Web: My link

Ben Pike: You're talking nonsense. As recently as last year, Robbie Robertson was involved in a very forceful submission to the White House and the making of a video/public service video that garnered all sorts iof publicity on the subject of amnesty for Leonard Pelltier.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:53:05 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Unixlagu

Web: My link

Thanks Peter and Jeff. Enjoyed the reel to reel posts. Took me right back. In student days, I used to enjoy going to this guy's flat, whose hobby was making up tapes from various bands to play on his Akai reel to reel. Sound was great.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:52:31 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Flashlagu

Web: My link

Peter V: My favourite link between pop-rock and the Jungle Book is Donovan's wonderful "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" (i.e., the mongoose) from his Bandish "Open Road" LP. RTT was the follow-up single to "Atlantis", which I've previously linked to our guys' "The Shape I'm In".


Entered at Thu May 19 10:51:43 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Zenlagu

Web: My link

i love this website, because elegant.


Entered at Thu May 19 10:50:06 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

Rutelagu

Web: My link

i see many people here :)


Entered at Thu May 19 10:49:06 CEST 2016 from (120.164.44.217)

Posted by:

A'an Tamim Ma'arif

Web: My link

hi admin, this web is awesome for me..


Entered at Thu May 19 10:37:08 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: R & R, New & Old Music, Desert Trip

See the link, if you wish. A view on music & the times. With ties to subject matter that arises on a regular basis, in different ways. Here's a few quick excerpts.

About new music: "Rock, you see, is pretty much dead. This isn't to say that there aren't still bands out there playing rock-and-roll to decent-sized audiences. It's simply that rock as a kind of music and a way of life -- three chords and the truth -- no longer holds a place of preeminence within our culture. What was the rebellious spirit of rock and the mythological canon of the bands and artists who performed it has morphed into something painfully banal, easily accessible, thoroughly inoffensive and not the least bit dangerous.................."

& "Millennials have already shown they have little in the way of need for or appreciation of rock-and-roll and the fiery rebellious quality that made it such a vital art form for so long. It was the music of youth, but today's youth have no real need for it. And that was always the thing about rock-and-roll -- it was something you needed. It expressed a gut emotion that nothing else could. "

About good old r & R & the Desert Trip weekend: "The Stones, Dylan, Paul McCartney, The Who, Neil Young and Roger Waters will all be there -- in one place, at one time"

"This thing is aimed squarely at Boomer nostalgia in the name of bilking Boomer bucks. Desert Trip won't be wall to wall Millennial hipsters. It'll be their parents and grandparents."

"What it will also be, unfortunately, is maybe the clearest reminder possible that the era in which bands and artists like the ones performing is utterly finished -- as is that kind of music itself. No offense to the genius of every act playing and infinite respect for the iconic path each forged through pop music history, but at this stage of their careers, seeing all these artists together on one stage feels like a memorial service for rock-and-roll. "

"What you have with this show is both a reminder of the absolute pinnacle of rock-and-roll and its last gasp. Maybe it's fitting that the people who once took the genre to its highest high are the ones who show up together decades later on the same stage to serve as its ceremonial end. The fact is there are no more Stones or Neil Youngs or McCartneys or Dylans out there. Not only has the music industry destroyed the spirit of rock-and-roll by making it nearly impossible for upstart bands with a dream of shaking the world to its core to achieve that dream -- because in the age of streaming it's so hard to make any sort of living playing music -- but so much of the passion has gone out of music anyway."


Entered at Thu May 19 07:43:33 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Jerry Jeff doing Guy. I was lucky enough to live and play in Austin in the mid 70's. Phew.


Entered at Wed May 18 20:40:03 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Guy Clark

So many of his lyrics were affecting....I like this one:

"I have seen the David, I’ve seen the Mona Lisa too.....and I have heard Doc Watson play “Columbus Stockade Blues.”


Entered at Wed May 18 19:52:45 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: Heartbroke
Web: My link

Subject: Guy

Very, very sad to hear that Guy Clark has passed. A unique talent, and one hell of a songwriter. Can't even listen to his voice right now without the tears flowing. So many great songs, sung with subtlety and feeling. Hope he is with Susanna now.


Entered at Wed May 18 19:38:37 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: My Favourite Picture of You

I arrived home for a late supper last night, (of the 17 days of this month, we already worked 13). After a nice supper with my Susan I was recording invoices on my computer. I took the trouble to click on the site here, only to see the very sad news of the loss of Guy Clark.

This will be a year to be remembered we have lost so many of our prominent folks in the entertainment world.

On one of those collection dvd's I have, watching Guy repair a guitar, (I'm sure every one knows he was a fine luthier). He plays LA Freeway, acoustic by himself. What a gentleman. A great songster, accomplished picker and performer. It has been a treat to have shared his life and music.

"Pack up all yer dishes, make note of all good wishes,

say good bye to the land lord for me, sons-a-bitches always bore me.

Throw out those LA papers, moldy boxes of vanilla wafers

Adios to all this concrete, gotta get me some dirt road back street."

So long Guy, I'll play that song forever.


Entered at Wed May 18 18:56:43 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: wrong words

that shoulda woulda shoulda been: except for if it were recorded analogue, .....

the post took too long for me today, & i still fucked it up.


Entered at Wed May 18 18:44:05 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Stuff That Works. Jamie Hartford Band with Guy Clark

Title Track of an seriously powerful (almost total) masterpiece of a record. Great enough that I was moved to write a track by track review that the bassist used parts of promoting the project. The songwriting & performances were brilliant.

In Feb 2004 i ran into Rick the drummer at a Crystal Gayle show, he's her longtime drummer. He hipped me to the band & that they were playing in a day or two in a bar. The band was great, & I got a cd from dave as soon as it showed up from the factory.

Except for if it was recorded digitally, & mastered accordingly, that record couldn't have been better. For 2004 it was well enough recorded digitally in Dave Pomeroy's (the bassist) basement studio, & i don't recall who mastered it or where, but i remember a total fucking masterpiece of (save Stuff that Works,) original songs & performances struggling to break out past the recording & mastering. Which were way superior to today's average standard of what is coming out by the average band trying ti get heard. Of course, this was no average band. This was the cream of Nashville's crop & their friends, all equals. The songs & performances & arrangement were so superior, & just fighting to be heard that how many percent more, break out past that limitation, boundary. Of course, the YOU TUBE sound is more disappointing or limiting. But we give up great radio & get You Tube & Spotify etc

Apparently The whole cd is on You Tube, & i reccomend listening & trying to buy it.

I remember Pomeroy bitching that he wasn't being successful getting Nashville airplay for this record.

Looks like Cd Baby has some discs, hopefully the same or at least comparable production run to the one i got & not inferior. http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/jhartfordband


Entered at Wed May 18 16:13:27 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Guy Clark RIP

One of the all time greats. My favorite Guy song is Stuff That Works. Words to live by.


Entered at Wed May 18 16:06:57 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: The Replacements

Just finished reading this incredible bio on The Replacements called Trouble Boys . If anyone has had any interest at all in this group, you have to read this book. What a crazy bunch. Literally. Every page had me shaking my head. I thought I knew their story having been a fan and having seen them perform a bunch of times. However, I really didn't know anything. Their story would make the great rock and roll movie were not for the fact that they were so horrible as people. Still the comedy, heartbreak, talent and wasted opportunities make such an interesting story.


Entered at Wed May 18 15:07:42 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: A band from Brooklyn

Not the kind of young band to which I was referring, but nevertheless, worth noting again

"Sharon Lafaye Jones (born May 4, 1956) is an American soul/funk singer. She is the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based out of Brooklyn, New York. Jones experienced a breakthrough success relatively late in life, releasing her first record when she was 40 years old In 2014, Jones was nominated for her first Grammy for Best R&B Album for Give the People What They Want."

I was noting bands like The National and Grizzly Bear...and there are many others.


Entered at Wed May 18 08:18:37 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, I might ( & might not) answer this in more detail later, but, to answer your LITERAL question, as you worded it, "Jeff: There are many great young bands out of Brooklyn over the past 10-15 years. I know you don't share my views on some of them, but which (if any) have you become aware of that you like?", the answer is: None that I'm aware of.


Entered at Wed May 18 06:31:01 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Brooklyn bands

Jeff: There are many great young bands out of Brooklyn over the past 10-15 years. I know you don't share my views on some of them, but which (if any) have you become aware of that you like?


Entered at Wed May 18 04:35:00 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, these guys, and probably about another few or more hundred on this level, ran NYC from the late 60s , early 70s till sometime in the late 90s. And they held a strong presence as long as there were still clubs hanging on. There's still tons of guys on this level left here ( often blind , crippled or crazy by now ), & when we're lucky, a place pops up to get a scene going for a little while. We're less lucky all the time, & of course, the reason is the price of real estate. Right now all anyone can do is get a 45 to 70 minute set, & then worry on getting at least 50 people willing to pay a cover, & a 20 buck minimum or more, in that time, then leave...It's not always easy to do that with the age demographic,( & the kids aren't looking for older acts the way we were when we were young, we don't get em out)..........When we find a place that'll let us hang all night it works, a helluva lot more people come, drift in & out,& people spend more. But still, the clubs wanna know they will turn over people & money. It's a fucking shame, & amazing music goes to waste. Yet dreck is on stage all over the place cause so many bands and solo acts will play for free or passing the hat...And club / bar owners are happy as long as asses are in seats or on bar stools.


Entered at Wed May 18 04:16:59 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, thanks,& no thanks necessary. But,you are familiar with quite a bit of Tee's work. He was an original & permanent member of Stuff. As such he was in the backing band for one of Joe Cocker's early big tours, and then the Stingray album. He and sometimes all, sometimes some of the members of Stuff also recorded and toured with Paul Simon. You've heard a lot of Richard Tee, you just didn't know that you did. For my money Stuff was one of the greatest bands of all time. and also contained some of the greatest characters of all time. They don't come with more personality and pure Brooklyn/ NYC everything than Gordon Edwards. And the man is nothing but total pure music.


Entered at Wed May 18 04:12:20 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: I'm sure there are many more

Holy s..t: Richard Tee has an amazing 'curriculum vitae' - what a list of contributions...Sometimes the players on an album get their names out there prominently (like Steve Gadd) but somehow (embarrassingly) I missed this musician. Thanks again, Jeff.


Entered at Wed May 18 03:57:56 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The best of what we are here

Thank you, Jeff, for bringing this concert and Richard Tee to my attention. Despite some years on the planet, there are still many artists who I have not experienced to any degree. Richard Tee is one such. I have said this before. One of the beauties and strengths of this site is the opportunity to bring to our attention artists who are for some of us 'under the radar'. From the old to the new, our experience and its sharing enriches us all. Leave the BS behind. What has happened here in the past 24 hours is why I stay and listen for these gems.


Entered at Wed May 18 02:22:59 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Two hour Richard Tee concert from 1990 at The Bottom Line. linked.

Tee, Jom Tropea, Steve Gadd, Tom Scott, Ralph McDonald, Will Lee. Tee & McDonald are dead, Tropea & Will Lee are still active around the NYC area & everywhere. Gadd of course is all over the place but based out of Scottsdale.


Entered at Wed May 18 00:58:34 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: John D & RoseAnn Fino

John D, please email me at robert.fino@aol.com with your mailing address and email address. I would love to send you RoseAnn's cd's and mp3 of her new song. Thank you for considering RoseAnn for your excellent radio show.


Entered at Tue May 17 22:01:17 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Parking at UofT

As for parking at UofT, John D, its nice to see that nothing has changed. It was impossible in those UofT days. It may be worth taking the TTC to College/University (Spadina line) and having a nice walk.


Entered at Tue May 17 21:59:45 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company" - Mark Twain


Entered at Tue May 17 21:49:24 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Name checking/spelling

RoseAnn, Roseann, Rose Anne, Rose Ann.

I gather the correct one is RoseAnn.(Dad should know) We will all learn that. ( With rising fame, no one will err.)

Like Bob Dillon - some early writers wrote Dillon and not Dylan. These things matter despite what Mr. Twain said.


Entered at Tue May 17 21:25:52 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John D

I listened to your show stored in the radio station's archive today. Really enjoyed it. Thanks.


Entered at Tue May 17 21:11:44 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT & Al

First JT thank you for your very kind words. Good thing I didn't check first to see how long it took to find a parking space there. Wow. 45 minutes last week. Al, yes I'm on the air every Saturday 2-4 pm Eastern Time. Regarding Rose Anne's music I'll have to buy her album and play it. I sampled some of her stuff today. A very fine singer songwriter. Thank you both. I actually have friends in England that listen to me. I guess it would be 7-9 pm over there.


Entered at Tue May 17 21:04:51 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Guy Clark - "LA Freeway" - Austin City Limits - I love this performance.

Thank you for the great review, Al. Happy for Bob F and his daughter. Hopefully she had time to walk up Penny Lane or to visit the church and graveyard John and Paul first met.


Entered at Tue May 17 21:01:54 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mark Twain again

Mark Twain also said --"Anyone who can only think of one way to spell a word obviously lacks imagination.”


Entered at Tue May 17 19:30:33 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: A general statement that applies to all of us at various times, many more frequently than others.

"The difference between the right word and the nearly right word is the same as that between the lightning and the lightning bug." - Mark Twain


Entered at Tue May 17 19:30:20 CEST 2016 from (92.22.53.12)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P Guy Clark

Let Him Roll.


Entered at Tue May 17 19:26:24 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bravo Al Edge!


Entered at Tue May 17 19:19:46 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon

Thanks for telling me, Roger. I didn't know it was on. I've just registered on the BIC site and will try for the best possible four tickets I can on Friday (two for you, two for us). We're off to The Globe on Friday for Taming of The Shrew, but it's evening, so I can try for an hour or so of pressing refresh before we go. Great news!


Entered at Tue May 17 18:49:33 CEST 2016 from (85.72.155.210)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Greece

Subject: Rose Anne Fino

I'm so sorry to be missing Roseanne Fino's tour - particularly after your comments Al. We're on hols in Greece all of May. Peter - score us a couple of Paul Simon tickets at the BIC? I won't have internet till Friday night so will miss out - I'll send money promptly... I had a ticket for Man U v Bournemouth on Sunday - thankfully this Greek sailing holiday took priority!


Entered at Tue May 17 18:47:30 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can't see why anyone should get annoyed, Bob. There's a heritage of great "Americana" music that should be cherished and promoted. RoseAnn is one of a select group of artists (actually a lot from NY State … Simone Felice, Simi Stone, Leslie Mendelson + plenty of British / Irish ones … Anna Mitchell springs to mind) who are carrying the torch for great music. It's why I'm optimistic about the future.

What she really needs right now in her career (I think) is a good tour as support to a like-minded major act.


Entered at Tue May 17 17:23:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: RoseAnn Fino

My apologies: RoseAnn ... not what I have been writing at times.. (I hate it when names are spelled incorrectly.


Entered at Tue May 17 17:17:55 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn and Al

I know it's only a matter of time before folks on The Guestbook that are not interested In RoseAnn's music are going to get annoyed. However I just want to thank everyone that has helped out, Jeff of course, Peter, PSB, Dunc, JT and everyone else that took the the time to listen to RoseAnn's songs. I remember Bumbles use to say he never listened to anyone who was younger then him and I know a lot of people feel that way.

I just want to take a minute and tell you folks what Alan Edge did for RoseAnn. He spent weeks contacting venues in Liverpool looking for a show. RoseAnn only had the one night in Liverpool which was a Sunday. Obviously a tough night for live music. He went back and forth communicating with several venues before securing a gig. He contacted agents, radio stations, newspaper and everyone else in Liverpool. I think if Aunt Mimi was still alive he would have picked her up and brought her to the show. lol RoseAnn ended up playing to a packed house. She really is sky high about the Liverpool show. I can't thank Al enough. Truly a great guy.


Entered at Tue May 17 16:58:35 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Guy Clark

Has just recently been announced in several papers that Guy Clark has died.


Entered at Tue May 17 16:25:19 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: CIUT-FM Mixed Bag 2-4 PM Saturdays EST John Donabie

Al Edge: John D is doing a wonderful show on CIUT FM (just put CIUT-FM into the subject line in Google or wherever) and you can listen to it live on Saturday 2-4 PM EST (maybe 6 hours or so different for you). Radio the way it should be and the way I remember it. He won't toot his own horn but I will. John D is simply superb. He talks to his audience as if each person is in the room having a conversation with him. The musical choices are wide and varied and reflect the best. Needless to say Levon and the Hawks, the Band, and Dylan are all there. The past few weeks have reminded us of the music we love and discuss here. CIUT FM is my alma mater radio station (UofT) and it has always provided an eclectic and wide mix of the best of what radio can be. Try it. You'll love it!


Entered at Tue May 17 16:05:09 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: John D

John

Hope you're well mate.

Like most of us on here with addled minds and multiple commitments, I've kind of lost track of whether you're still doing a show in your neck of the woods or whether you still retain contact with those who still do have their own shows.

You may have seen on here a few - or more than a few - references to RoseAnn Fino. Not sure if you know but she's the daughter of Bob F who posts on here from time to time.

If you do still have a show or are in touch with your old station d'you think there'd be a possibility of getting some airplay for this girl and perhaps getting her that little push she so desperately needs and deserves.

Were she some ordinary talent I'd never dream of asking but I honestly believe the girl to be a phenomenal talent who's developing her artistic pedigree as we speak.

Hope you don't mind me asking on here but I've no longer got your e-mail address

If you'd rather get back to me by e-mail mine is aledgewith the circular'at' thing blueyonderdotcodotuk

Cheers mate.

:-0)


Entered at Tue May 17 14:56:54 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Moon Struck One

Yvonne Elliman's album Food of Love; from 1973 will be released on CD May 27th. This album contained her Band recording of The Moon Struck One.


Entered at Tue May 17 12:52:41 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Al

Roseann and I tried to meet up, but she was pressed for time. I was hoping to give her a tour of Glasgow.

I would definitely have gone and seen Roseann, Al, but the concert was at 3pm, and I have family football commitments at that time. Just can't get out of them.

Glad you saw her and hopefully, I will see her next time.


Entered at Tue May 17 12:35:57 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Roseann

I'm sure you'll love to see her performing Pete. You too Dunc - she was in Glasgow the night before I think.


Entered at Tue May 17 11:19:29 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: 50 Years Ago

It was 50 years ago today that Bob Dylan played Manchester and somebody from the audience shouted 'Judas'.

He later played Glasgow and Edinburgh. I was too young at this time, but had a friend who attended the Edinburgh concert - he said the crowd roughly divided into three groups - those for, those against and those who were puzzled. He later did a tremendous etching of the crowd.

Our boys got an honourable mention on BBC Radio Scotland news today.

The music expert being interviewed told a story related to a Bob Dylan concert in Glasgow. One of the security guys before the concert came to the manager of he event and said that there was a guy at the back door who was saying he was Bob Dylan. When they went to the back door, Bob had cycled from the hotel to the venue, wearing a hoodie, a face mask and shades.

Really enjoying Bob's new album.


Entered at Tue May 17 11:15:27 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RoseAnne Fino

Great reviews and feedback, Al. I'm doubly disappointed that I couldn't get to London yesterday … we have a lot of "grandparenting" this week and I can't get away. Next time!


Entered at Tue May 17 10:36:56 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Looks as if Roseann enjoyed herself anyroad:

:-0)

There are no words to explain how happy I am after my show in Liverpool at The Caledonia. The crowd was so amazing and warm. Tonight alone made this whole trip worth it, I felt electric. The small fan base I had here brought so many people and gave me such a welcome. Feeling all the feels. Thanks for reminding why I do what I do.

Well in luv!!

You deserve it. You were fantastic!


Entered at Tue May 17 00:43:31 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: ROSEANN in LIVERPOOL

Cheers fellas. Only to glad to pass on my sentiments and I agree we should all feel proud that one of our own is showing this amazing promise and beginning to make some impact.

Between us all on here I'm sure we can help procure more gigs for her [and her band] wherever we reside and help spread the word about what a little nugget we have in our midst.

It does take a fair bit of effort to get these things sorted - but as we can see from last night - it's certainly more than worth it in the end.

Last night at least two fairly "mature" fellas felt compelled to approach Roseann following the performance to tell her that she was the best thing they'd seen in years of attending these sort of gigs.

In such a way the name can spread

The beauty of it all is that as Jerry and Jeff both alluded to this girl truly is the real deal so any efforts made can be done so with the cast iron reassurance that the artist being pushed is truly special.

She's the most delightful thing imaginable to meet and chat with but even though you know what she's capable of part of you feels as she stands there so vulnerable looking on the stage that nothing special is going to unfold. But then she hits that first chord on that guitar of hers and she's away on a spine-tingling musical adventure that carries you along.

Apologies if you find all this fulsome praise embarrassing Bob lad - but the truth will out!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue May 17 00:20:51 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, good of you to write more. I'm glad more GBers are seeing Roseanne perform.


Entered at Tue May 17 00:18:18 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Proper!

Now that is a proper review of the highest standing. And I think the best is still yet to come from RoseAnn Fino. Thanks, Al


Entered at Mon May 16 23:30:10 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The past, present and future of rock 'n' roll

For Jerry, Norb, Jeff and any other GB'er who might care to know about the ongoing progress of an enormous burgeoning musical talent closely associated with this GB

ROSEANN FINO

REVIEW OF GIG AT THE CALEDONIA, LIVERPOOL – May 15th 2016

Big things occasionally arrive in small packages. And so it came to pass on Sunday evening at the very ordinary yet very wonderful cask fortified Caledonia ale house on Catherine Street in Georgian Liverpool that a pocket dynamo from New York State unleashed a whirlwind virtuoso musical performance on an unsuspecting Caledonia clientele.

Featuring principally a selection of her own golden nuggets and transfusing them with some killer covers RoseAnn Fino, alone with guitar, was quite simply sensational.

Of course, I already knew what to expect having been steeping myself in her music ever since her proud dad e-mailed me some six months or so ago asking me to give a listen to his daughter’s ‘Out from Under’ mini album. Fact is, ever since I’ve felt very little inclination to listen to anything other than Roseann’s steadily burgeoning repertoire of fabulous songs.

However, nobody else in The Caledonia last night – save perhaps for my own Roseann-beleaguered family members and friends – had any real idea what was about to smack them right between the eyes.

Namely unique, raw talent of the very highest musical level; a talent that bore witness to a pub’s hubbub gradually petering out in awe as each song unfurled its majesty.

From the opening rush of her latest single ‘Touch Me’ in which, by informing us what it’s like to ‘live under a bridge and have a garbage truck disturb your beauty sleep each morning’, she begins her saucy tale of how to wield a stick of female bravado to prod male machismo, we set out together on an hour long magic carpet ride of musical heaven.

As the lecherous excitement of ‘Touch Me’ still resonates it is quickly calmed by the beautiful mood contrasting aching laments of ‘The Night Rolls In’ delivered with the sort of heartfelt yearning the song demands. Then, still enraptured by ‘Night Rolls In’s stark beauty, we are treated to a rendition of Springsteen’s ‘Atlantic City’ that would have Bruce asking himself ‘why don’t I still do it like that?’. Well tough, Brucie lad – you may have penned the thing and The Band may have embellished it with those heavenly strains of mandolin but a little miss dynamo now owns the fecking thing!

Okay, so we’re 20 minutes or so into this and if I knew what to expect why then at this juncture did my eyes become increasingly moistened as the strains of the ensuing song couplet filled the air?

Explaining the emotional impact of the first of the couplet – ‘Boxed Wine’ – was straightforward enough. RoseAnne introduced it by outlining its particular Fino paternal connotations and, whilst thanking me for procuring her the night’s gig at The Caledonia, kindly linked me – a like-minded doting father - in with her own dad. So far so good. Emotions most certainly stirred. But not yet shaken.

That steadfastness wasn’t to last - as the second stage of the couplet was not so quite easily dealt with.

I’ve been privileged enough to have RoseAnn’s dad send me the MP3’s of the recorded tracks for RoseAnn’s forthcoming four track EP entitled ‘The Airing of Grievances’. The single from it - ‘Touch Me’ - is already out there as many will know and I think any discerning music fans can detect the ongoing musical progression that particular song reveals. It is, however, the remaining three tracks ‘Airing of Grievances’ itself, ‘The Drinking Song’ and ‘Californian Debutante’ - and particularly the latter two – which provide an inkling into just how accomplished a creative artist Robert Fino’s daughter has now become.

Yet even that insight and a daily exposure to the majesty of these recordings wasn’t enough to prepare me for what came next at The Caledonia, for as the strains of ‘The Drinking Song’ soared across the room, this particular delivery of the song announced itself as an entirely different ball game.

Without the dramatic piano, drum and cello accompaniment that define the recorded version you’d think the singer’s hard guitar strum however stridently and earnestly delivered would struggle to suffice. The opposite was the case. The song’s inherent drama if anything heightened. The haunting despair of RoseAnn’s vocals accentuated. They now spoke within a hitherto lively pub as if in some eerie empty church, its captive congregation hanging on each sentiment conveying the singer’s resigned nightly bar-room ritual, were suddenly jolted by the song’s outburst of defiance and desperate resolve – ‘But I’ll wake Up and you’ll see a different side of me and I won’t need these drinks to make myself feel free. I won’t hate the person staring back at me. I’ll make you so proud. It’ll be easy. I’ll make you all so proud. It’ll be easy.’

Let’s not demean the rest of the show by over-egging – were that at all possible - the majesty of this particular night’s ‘Drinking Song’. Especially when more Fino gems were to follow, delivered with that same professional aplomb and electric vibrancy. Amongst them were those two other magnificent new recordings ‘Airing of Grievances’ and ‘Californian Debutante’. They were interspersed with a lovingly delivered take of The Band’s ‘Ophelia’ before a vociferously implored encore of The Face’s ‘Ooh La La’, heartily roared by all, rounded the night off.

Lots of hugging and stuff followed before we all bade our farewells to RoseAnn and Tony, her most charming boyfriend. A superb convivial night was over. It will, of course, be remembered for our meeting RoseAnn and Tony and for the pocket dynamo’s all round stunning performance, for five minutes or so of which she had somehow managed the impossible trick of transforming a pub into a place of awestruck reverence.


Entered at Mon May 16 22:38:22 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Oy!

Thanks, Jeff. That's usually what happens when the news arrives by dog sled.


Entered at Mon May 16 22:25:47 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Thanks sadavid, nice find, I really enjoyed that. When I hear that arrangement with Terry's voice, it surprises me that Rick never tried the song in his live sets.


Entered at Mon May 16 22:10:14 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Terry Danko

"Whispering Pines"


Entered at Mon May 16 22:03:15 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hiawatha and the Peacemaker

Thank you, Wallsend. The interview with Robbie you linked from the CBC Q show was great. Nice to know 4,000 copies of "Hiawatha and the Peacemaker" were made available to libraries at First Nations schools and rec centres.


Entered at Mon May 16 21:45:01 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.139)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Yes, including the fact that Richard Bell appears on one of their albums, and may have been in the group for a time.

Speaking of Chicagoans, the same bin where I saw the Poco album with Paul Cotton (as well as three earlier ones without him) also held the Tufano and Giamerese LP, on which Marty Grebb might appear - and which was produced by Jack Richardson(who Robbie recorded with in '62).


Entered at Mon May 16 21:39:14 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Words

Mel Brooks once moved a film production out of Toronto on the grounds that he could not tolerate spending more than a few days in a town that couldn’t make a proper bagel…….Montrealers are familiar with this lament as thousands have turned around and left Toronto over the years for the same reason…..I like the idea of keeping a word like “schmuck” around…..and it really bothers me that radio DJ’s (at least the non CBC ones) now regularly use such phrases as “douche bag” and “pissed off”….or that the younger hockey play by play guys use phrases like “The 1/2 boards” or “The Wall”, instead of just "the boards" as it always was…………nonsense !

Thank you, Simon. I liked that interview with J.Garcia.


Entered at Mon May 16 21:19:13 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, whilst Brooks may have said this, the Onion ran with and apparently escalated it, close to 9 or 10 years ago....


Entered at Mon May 16 20:19:31 CEST 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Kal David

Bill M: And after Illinois Speed Press Kal David became a member of the Woodstock area-based Fabulous Rhinestones, along with Harvey Brooks and Marty Grebb (lots of Band connections).


Entered at Mon May 16 19:44:34 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Schmucks in Brooklyn

No offence, Jeff, but I heard somewhere that Brooklyn native Mel Brooks has launched a movement -- in Brooklyn, apparently -- to save the word "schmuck" from extinction. Wonder if you've heard anything. Brooks, saying he could no longer stand idly by while a vital part of American culture is lost forever, apparently has founded a private nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the word.

I figured you'd be the one to ask.

Brooks apparently remarked: "For many of us, saying 'schmuck' is a way of life. Yet when I walk down the street and see people behaving in foolish, pathetic, or otherwise schmucky ways, I hear only the words 'prick' and 'douche bag.' I just shake my head and think, 'I don't want to live in a world like this.' "

Personally, I think Brooks needs a good musical jingle to bolster support. Jeff?


Entered at Mon May 16 18:49:25 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Midwestern Farmer's Daughter

Has anyone else got into Margo Price's album? On Jack White's Third Man Records. Lovely easy country rock. Link to Hands of Time. (The clock moves).


Entered at Mon May 16 18:05:57 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.159)

Posted by:

Bill M

Killed some time at Costco by leafing through some of Philip Norman's McCartney bio. George is credited with introducing the Fab Four to our Fab Five, or at least MFBP. Norman has a nice line that the Beatles decided to leave White behind and go Pink - and hence the Twickenham rooftop 'show' and songs like ""Don't Bring Me Down" and "Long and Winding Road". Miss Fanny's earlier appearance among the "Na Na Na Nas" of the televised "Hey Jude" is not mentioened, though the show is.


Entered at Mon May 16 17:52:54 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Fallen Angels

Just playing 'Fallen Angels' just now. Beautiful songs and great musicians.

Three guitarists and steel guitar in the band - brilliant.

Just need a chicken in a basket and I could be at Pensioners' Night at the local social club.


Entered at Mon May 16 16:10:42 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Streaming Al Edge

Warner Music is earning about 2 M a day from streaming music. All while the artists get paid close to nothing for their performance, their songwriting, & if they own it, their publishing.

If this could lead to a new model, where developing artists, or unheard artists with superior music had a way in to the label, & an opportunity to sell a portion or all of their sound recording to the label, maybe a portion of their publishing as well ( if the label has that arm, likely so), then it would be okay businesswise for those lucky artists.

But the reality is that so far it's completely 1) more about mining the catalogies, & 2) about the story Peter told of the label chief declaring they'll only invest in guaranteed hits. And it's likely to stay that way.

Al is likely subscribing to the less is more school of music journalism & promotion.

Or maybe.....


Entered at Mon May 16 16:08:40 CEST 2016 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Larry Groce

Larry Groce, host of Mountain Stage, has this to say about The Band (he covers "Twilight" on his February 2016 release Live Forever): "The Band was it for me. Ray Wylie first introduced me to the Big Pink album when it came out and I was hooked. “The Last Waltz” concert contains the core and spirit of the music we present on Mountain Stage. Rick and Garth did this song on the show in 1989 and it immediately became a favorite." Garth played a key role on Larry's Green Pastures Are Before Me album, released in 1979.


Entered at Mon May 16 11:29:35 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, don't get carried away or too impressed with yourself.


Entered at Mon May 16 10:34:31 CEST 2016 from (122.104.0.174)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

An interview with Robbie.


Entered at Mon May 16 08:26:51 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Al, Jeff & ESC

Al, I’m with JT, could you please elucidate your nice comment on RoseAnn?

Jeff, good to see you’ve recognized humor.…. work on that and someday you’ll get Pat’s posts too.

ESC: The one reason Jamie-Lee is last is because those East Europeans only give each other points.


Entered at Mon May 16 06:42:15 CEST 2016 from (64.229.183.87)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno
Web: My link

Subject: Illinois Speed Press

Pat B: Seeing a Poco LP with Paul Cotton on it reminded me that Kal David's name came up on conversation recently. A guy (who happened to be a short-term, latter-day Hawk in 1970) mentioned lalst week that he'd be heading soon to the US Virgin Islands for a holiday and hoped to catch Kal David, who was booked into some clubs there at the time. I guess the guy's going with some musical buddies, because he said that one of them is friends with Kal. I wonder if it's Ed Roth, who certainly was and I believe still is.


Entered at Mon May 16 02:15:30 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Al

:-)


Entered at Mon May 16 02:09:09 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tell us, Al Edge

Al Edge: Good on you! Tell us when you can please.


Entered at Mon May 16 01:45:17 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RoseAnn Fino

I've seen the past, present and future of rock 'n' roll and its name is RoseAnn Fino

:-0)


Entered at Sun May 15 21:44:38 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers

Found some Hound Dog Tayler anecdotes on the net, great trio (in every sense).

“You alright Brother Ted?"
"Man, I don't feel so good, I got the dumps like a mother!"

“The HouseRockers never rehearsed before any shows. They also were big drinkers and as a rule played only after a reasonable amount of alcohol was consumed. During any given show, Hound Dog would first drink a straight shot of whiskey, chasing it with a mixed drink. He then would down a whole glass of beer. All three drinks were drank rapidly, one after the other. After that he was ready to play! Hound Dog would start off a show usually saying something like "Hey, let's have some fun!", and did they ever! They would play all night, six and seven hour shows were normal.

God's own slide-guitarist is leading the group. The other two guys are trying to hang on for dear life (and doing a darn good job of it). You wouldn't want your younger sister listening to these guys play "Roll Your Moneymaker," …….and plugging in his ultra-cheap Japanese guitar into his cracked-speaker Sears Silvertone amp. And with Brewer Phillips playing bass lines on his old Fender and Ted Harvey pounding away at the drums, this three-piece blues band made a lot of wonderful noise."

[all through the creative cut and past process of this post the author listened to authentically Hound Dog Taylor material]


Entered at Sun May 15 17:37:13 CEST 2016 from (86.161.1.234)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: Jerry Garcia on The Band & RR

Nothing earth-shattering but I thought it was worth posting anyway. I found this excerpt via Google Books ... I think it's from some sort of Dead compendium or anthology.
----------------------------
Do you listen to The Band's records?

Some of them I do. At first I just wanta say, "Wow, they're getting into this repetitive bag," each time I hear the record for the first time. Then after a few weeks it starts creeping into the back of my mind and I start thinking, "Wow, what was that tune?" And I go and find the record and put it on. It's like scratching an itch. Some of them I really dig, others I probably will, and then others I think are halfway efforts; it's just like anybody. I dig their music more or less consistently, so I don't really know if the record's good or not.

Which tunes on the new one do you like?

I love "Life is a Carnival"--that's beautiful. Shit, that's great. All the stuff in there, all those great parts. The Dylan song is great. too. I love that song. I'll probably sing that with the barroom band. I like to do those kinda tunes. They're good songs, and good songs are fun to sing.

You like Robbie Robertson?

Yeah, yeah. I went and visited with him one day, when we were on the East Coast. And I really dug being able to sit down and talk to him. It was just like that kinda stuff you do where you've never met anybody before, but you know what they do, and you respect them. We were both kinda there cause we'd been on that tour--we'd met before, actually--on that tour with Janis, that Canada thing. We really got off on their music, of course, and they dug our music, 'cause really, they're kinda similar. We just have slightly different viewpoints of an almost similar trip.

When I got together with him, we were talking on pretty groovy grounds, in terms of mutual respect and understanding. It was good. We talked about guitars, and pianos, and music ... and I went over and dug his studio. Just a friendly scene. It's one of those things that some time in the future, I'd love to be able to spend some time and actually work with those guys, actually play music together with them, under some circumstances or another.

How would you describe his guitar playing?

He's one of those guys who descended from Roy Buchanan and those Fifties Fender-pickers. I can hear where he's picked up a lotta his stuff. His approach to it is more or less orchestral. The kinda stuff he plays and the music, is like punctuation, and structural. He's an extremely subtle and refined guitar player, that's the way I think of him. I really admire him.


Entered at Sun May 15 11:57:16 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWetCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: "John Wesley Harding" -David P

Good to see "John Wesley Harding" mentioned here again. This is the Dylan LP I still listen to regularly. I have the note book on my desk in the bed room. It is beautiful, so simple. Whenever I have the chance to sit in fornt of a piano I'll play "Saint Augustine". I learned (hmmm...?) my English by trying to translate "Frankie Lee" to Finnish.


Entered at Sat May 14 23:45:11 CEST 2016 from (70.193.136.133)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Allen Toussaint

Warner/Rhino has just released ALLEN TOUSSAINT THE COMPLETE WARNER RECORDINGS. This 2-CD set was previously available from Rhino Handmade at twice the price. Included are the complete àlbums LIFE, LOVE AND FAITH, SOUTHERN NIGHTS, and MOTION. Also included is the single version of "Country John" and the complete 1975 live concert recorded in Philadelphia, which was recently released on vinyl for Record Store Day. The remastering is top notch. For fans of Mr. Toussaint this is a bargain - priced treat that will have you tapping your feet.


Entered at Sat May 14 22:53:30 CEST 2016 from (84.215.171.237)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Flophouse/JC Hopkins/Garth/Levon?

Check Youtube video linked above. The track is from a 1994 EP ("Upside Down") with the group Flophouse and semi-legendary producer JC Hopkins. There are indications of guest appearances by Garth and Lee here. And the connections between Hopkins and the boys are plentiful: Norah Jones, Ollabelle etc. Is it possible that our session discography is still incomplete? Anyone?


Entered at Sat May 14 20:32:01 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Münchhausen
Web: My link

So the Feud doesn’t spark up .... humor is killing it already?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Joan, Ilkka, thank you.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Books: Small Town Talk (link)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Behrens died. He was a member of the German TRIO group, a kind of (clown) drummer.

Trio had 3 well sold songs in the eighties (Da Da Da I don't love you you don't love me).

The three members of the group: Stephan Remmler, Gert Krawinkel and Peter Behrens.

Remmler wrote all the lyrics, Krawinkel all the music.

Remmler has a house in Basel (Switzerland) and on Lanzarote (Spanish isle), Krawinkel lived in Berlin and Spain.

Peter Behrens died poor in Wilhelmshaven (near Hamburg), without work or friends, his body emaciated by heroin and alcohol.

Maybe this is right so, but it isn’t.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Eurovision Song Contest: “Overtly political songs are not allowed “

Don’t let the kitsch and bizarre gimmicks fool you. The 2016 Eurovision Song Contest is a fierce, utmost serious, battle between The Ukraine and Russia, Jamala vs Lazarev is in real Poroshenko vs Poetin. It’s about Crimea, 1944 and Stalin but they mean Russia and Poetin. Let’s hope things don’t get out of control tonight.

Good night and strength to all of you (I’ll walk the dog now to ease the tension).


Entered at Sat May 14 17:34:00 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I guess Jeff just missed the humor and intent of my post. Maybe Bill M can explain it.


Entered at Sat May 14 13:11:09 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.156)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Cheap Trick

My prediction: Robbie will surprise and delight us by using a shot of him as a four-year-old on his tricycle on the back cover.


Entered at Sat May 14 11:58:08 CEST 2016 from (92.22.62.98)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Book

The picture looks like it was taken around 1976? I think it makes sense since most people were introduced to The Band via TLW and it will be released just before the 40th anniversary of TLW. It should help it shift a few more copies.


Entered at Sat May 14 06:11:40 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Pat: Fuck You.

Pat, you truly are a sick, twisted person who has complete inability to permit other people their differing opinions & get along with them at all. And not once in all the 15 years I've been here have you ever been able to argue anything with me without completely twisting my posts around. You are a sick, control freak. Go fuck yourself. I doubt any one else had difficulty with the humor or intent of my post to Kevin. There has been no correlation of the actual wording of my post to how you have presented it. You are doing a good job of proving my points about how you operate. Or that you have dementia & delusions of grandeur. Bill M certainly understood the point to the open shirt.

"Subject: Strictly Regarding Kevin's Statement

Kevin, regarding your assessment of the cover photo & whom buys rock& roll bios : it may or may not be a reasonable assessment that RR & his management team figure they have the heterosexual male market sewn up, & might be trying to appeal to the female & homosexual male audience."


Entered at Sat May 14 05:29:41 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Right, Jeff. You don't know what appeals to male homosexuals but you think RR and his team are using that particular photo to appeal to them. Yep, that's your usual approach to logic. Maybe stick with your Trump--RR connection because that was so cool.


Entered at Sat May 14 04:20:07 CEST 2016 from (64.229.183.87)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Tronno

sadavid: Thanks for posting the Russ Little article. He's a fabulous trombonist, though his choice of instrument means he'll never be a household name. He would have played with Ronnie Hawkins somewhere between the departure of Robbie Lane and the Disciples in '66 and the arrival of the Ascots (aka Crowbar) in '69, when the lineup on the bandstand was exceptionally fluid. However, as a member of the Silhouettes (with local greats Doug Riley, Steve Kennedy and Terry Bush) when they were the houseband at Club Bluenote ca '63-4, he would certainly have played with whichever of our guys showed up at the after-hours club to jam.

Re Robbie's photo, surely it's intended as a self-deprecating, campy joke - the mussed-up hair, the stoner eyes, the open shirt, the shiny vinyl jacket. My guess is that it was championed by one of the daughters. Oh Dad!!


Entered at Sat May 14 01:38:15 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pat, y'know, in light of your constant proven demeanor, your last post was really ironic. I've no idea what appeals to male homosexuals. But, since you twisted my post so you could infer that I do, I'd venture a guess that a tightass like you would strongly appeal to many.


Entered at Sat May 14 01:14:04 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Ani To The Teeth

JT, Napoleon is a great song. So many great songs on Dilate! One of my Ani favorites is To The Teeth which was a little later. It has the great line about taking all her friends and moving to Canada to die of old age. You can't over estimate what her songs mean to certain people. Real live saving stuff in some cases. I saw the tour also where she opened for Dylan. I remember her doing a wonderful version of Most of The Time.


Entered at Sat May 14 00:50:54 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ani favourite

Bob F: I had many Ani favourites: Napoleon was my favourite for a long time!


Entered at Sat May 14 00:18:34 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ani and RoseAnn

Bob: I saw Ani open for Dylan in the 90s. She stole the show. She is a superb performer and has a great stage presence and can effectively relate to her audience. I see the same in RoseAnn.


Entered at Fri May 13 23:17:09 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: RoseAnn and Ani

JT, thank you for the kind words. Greatly appreciated. You were right about the Ani influence. I use to take RoseAnn to Ani concerts when she was still in grade school. She use to play Not A Pretty Girl when she first started performing. She always had Ani lyrics on her bedroom wall growing up and when she moved to NYC for college painted them on her first apartment wall. Her landlord was not happy. Ani always had the best fans. Very vocal and very supportive.


Entered at Fri May 13 22:59:22 CEST 2016 from (114.75.97.48)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Nice to see someone from the Levon camp posting on Robbie's Facebook page. I hope (and expect) Robbie only has nice things to say about Levon in his book.


Entered at Fri May 13 20:21:03 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Martyrn Scorsese

Now available for purchase, fine art statue 1:4 scale of famed _The Last Waltz_ director Martin Scorsese.

18 inches tall.
Carved in 80% Western Red Cedar wood, 20% polymer clay.
Acrylic painted finish. With acrylic eye glass lenses.
Includes 26 x 13 inch wood, acrylic painted wall-mounting plaque with base and steel name plate.

From artist Mike "ReMike" Leavitt's "King Cuts" series of famous movie directors.

Free public opening at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery, W 20th St. NYC tomorrow.


Entered at Fri May 13 20:21:36 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: A little more on RoseAnn Fino

What is truly noteworthy regarding RoseAnn Fino is her evolution as is obvious when one watches her and listens to her since 2013. The newer material with the band behind her 'brings her out front and centre' and establishes her vocals in the midst of excellent musicianship. She is truly a band member while evoking an audience response through her presence on stage. This is what the stars do. She is destined.


Entered at Fri May 13 19:29:12 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: DFA

Thank you, Jon. I loved that story......we had Garth asking for a vacuum cleaner in 2016 to keep the mosquitos away from Maud and now a tale of Rick using one to warm the room.......years on the road does inspire creativity.....I saw Rick a few times during that DFA fist album period and he was in such great form.....Fine memories.


Entered at Fri May 13 17:58:25 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NorthWestCoaster, the correct spelling of the woman's name is Rotkiewicz. She's a nice gal. BTW, long ago she saw the light.


Entered at Fri May 13 17:16:02 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Roseann Fino in the UK now!

My strong advice: See Roseann Fino in Glasgow, Liverpool or London UK in the next 4 days. Watch the videos. I hope she comes to Canada soon. This is a major talent who has it all from where I sit.


Entered at Fri May 13 17:14:27 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: DFA

Some nice memories of Rick and the Danko Fjeld Andersen projects in Norway.


Entered at Fri May 13 16:58:07 CEST 2016 from (2.96.193.216)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Moviedrome

Having said that he did say Levon departed for an acting career? Rick Danko never got a mention. I suppose he didn't have the luxury of this Website back then.


Entered at Fri May 13 16:34:12 CEST 2016 from (2.96.193.216)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Moviedrome - Carny

Alex Cox introducing 'Carny' for BBC2's Moviedrome. I remember back in the late 80s or early 90s Alex Cox would tell us a bit about the film before it was shown on the BBC Moviedrome series. He was obviously a big fan of The Band.


Entered at Fri May 13 14:52:08 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: how is a trombone like an jaguar?

"Canadian musician loves his Jaguar E-Type for the sound"

Yet another graduate of the R. Hawkins Finishing School . . . .


Entered at Fri May 13 12:53:25 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Norbert's gb (again)

Btw it was "The GB". I had two names to suggest: "The GB" and "The Basement". Norbert chose the first one. I still prefer "The Basement".


Entered at Fri May 13 12:42:39 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: ... from the coast which always hit hard from bad weather from Scotland..... GGRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!

Subject: "Thanks for Little Pink" by Dunc

DUNC, by all means thank Norbert for Little Pink forum after that Mr. Hoiberg understandably closed this forum you are on now. The history books tell - actually, they DON'T tell because Peter V has refused, so far, to write the History Of The Guestbook:

Anyway, Ms. Rotkiewich (sorry for eventuel misspelling) started LITTLE PINK. Norbert joined her in maintaining her version of gb. This forum which had ment to be her fun after work turned to be a nightmare and she quit. After that Norbert - the hero who he is - wanted to save this place. He sent me in daily basis suggestions written in data language Pearl. He was a Microsoft man and I was a Netscape/Linux novice. We had our arguements. One of the best parts of my life, though! My biggest effort was the green colour instead of the brown colour in the Menu bar. (I was the debuty moderator for a while, too. A coward who I am, I quit.) - On the other hand, by that time I was desperately fighting against organized criminals who tried to get my students involved in drugs and prostitution. You'll get paranoid for less!


Entered at Fri May 13 09:00:28 CEST 2016 from (125.236.69.146)

Posted by:

Rod

Not the greatest picture of Robbie that I've seen. Looking forward to the book though. Working two nights in a row so just bought Small Town Talk to keep me busy (I'm just baby sitting some Oracle engineers and hopefully won't have to do too much).I know it's had a bad rap but I'm looking forward to reading it.


Entered at Fri May 13 07:16:24 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Welcome back, Pat!


Entered at Fri May 13 05:24:39 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Well, Jeff, I am happy to hear what an expert such as yourself thinks appeals to "male homosexuals". Enlightening.


Entered at Fri May 13 03:54:36 CEST 2016 from (67.70.150.101)

Posted by:

Bill M

My favourite part of the Robbie blurb is the end: "Above all, it’s the moving story of the profound friendship among five young men who together created a new kind of popular music." Sounds like our guys as a unit will get a decent proportion of the 336 pages. On scanning the Amazon site, I had to smile seeing the book at #37 in the section marked Biographies - Leaders and Notables - Rich & Famous. And also to be reminded that "How to Become Clairvoyant" came out in 2011; all of us who've listened intently to the album have known all about it for 15 years. Nice to see Six Nations properly called 'Reserve'.


Entered at Fri May 13 00:26:30 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Strictly Regarding Kevin's Statement

Kevin, regarding your assessment of the cover photo & whom buys rock& roll bios : it may or may not be a reasonable assessment that RR & his management team figure they have the heterosexual male market sewn up, & might be trying to appeal to the female & homosexual male audience.


Entered at Thu May 12 23:44:30 CEST 2016 from (114.75.88.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Kevin J, I agree with you about the Dylan book. Even though it covered some well know events I thought his perspective really provided some insights. Robbie's book is fairly long so hopefully there will be some new info even for diehard fans.


Entered at Thu May 12 23:04:47 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: The Voice

Peter V: I'll be first in line for the audio book if JRR reads. His speaking voice is one of the great ones; his timing and inflections are those of a true storyteller.


Entered at Thu May 12 22:53:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Testimony Audio CD

A question for Sebastian: Does Robbie read the Audio CD himself? Amazon doesn't say. Rod Stewart didn't read his. Robbie's own reading would be a bonus.


Entered at Thu May 12 22:31:54 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Complaining......

....funny, I was thinking that as I typed it.....The diehards will know most of the stories but the great pleasure for me with "Testimony" will be reading the book knowing that they are Robbie's own words..... A great part of my enjoyment of Bob Dylan's "Chronicles" was knowing those were his words.....made a big difference.


Entered at Thu May 12 22:05:06 CEST 2016 from (114.75.88.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The book hasn't come out yet and you are already complaining!!!


Entered at Thu May 12 21:47:12 CEST 2016 from (184.145.116.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Book Cover - Testimony

While I really only care what is on the inside, book covers do matter. I would have preferred a picture of Robbie with a guitar in it. Women will be more drawn to the penetrating pose shot.....while most men would favour a cover photo that had an instrument in it........and given men buy close to 75% of rock n roll biographies, I would have opted for the guitar cover had I had a say.


Entered at Thu May 12 19:18:35 CEST 2016 from (45.49.144.203)

Posted by:

Sebastian Robertson

Web: My link

Subject: Testimony

Hey Guestbookers - My dad just released this info today on his autobiography. Check the link.


Entered at Thu May 12 18:32:43 CEST 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Norbert

Thank you for sharing your incredible journey with us. You have lead an amazing life!As somewhat of a shut in, I vicariously enjoy your posts


Entered at Thu May 12 18:10:08 CEST 2016 from (70.193.167.90)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Music

This week I've been listening to:

Outstanding Record Store Day LP ALLEN TOUSSAINT LIVE IN PHILADELPHIA 1975

Recent Mobile Fidelity SACD reissues of PLANET WAVES and JOHN WESLEY HARDING

The Allman Brothers Band CD LIVE FROM A&R STUDIOS, NEW YORK, AUGUST 26, 1971 (scorching live performance recorded by Phil Ramone)

Buddy Miller & Friends CAYAMO SESSIONS AT SEA CD

John Pizzarelli MIDNIGHT MCCARTHY CD (covers of Sir Paul's post-Beatles material)


Entered at Thu May 12 16:54:26 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino

My daughter has shows this weekend in Glasgow, Liverpool and London. Please see link to her website. If anyone can attend or pass on info to someone who might be interested, it would be greatly appreciated. Also, please check out RoseAnn's new song Touch Me on her website. It was recorded in one day with 3 other songs that will be on her new ep coming out in July called An Airing of Grievances. If you like the song, please share. Thanks.


Entered at Thu May 12 16:39:19 CEST 2016 from (24.114.86.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Pete Traynor

From RR's Facebook page:

"Pete Traynor or Thumper as we called him, was an old pal of mine. We played in several bands together: The Rhythm Chords, Robbie and The Robots, Thumper and the Trambones, and the Suedes. He could just as easily build a guitar as play one. He hot-rodded my amps, guitars, or anything he could get his hands on. We ran together, double dated, and tried to stay out of trouble, sometimes unsuccessfully. As I went off to Arkansas to join Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks, Pete went on to become the premier guitar amp maker in Canada. He had an amazing gift for electronics and his amps had a powerful crystal sound. Some years back, they were making a documentary on me and Pete and i met up at my mother's old house in Toronto. He still had that fire in his eye like he needed to figure out what to build next. If David Bowie or Prince need an amp fixed up in heaven, I can tell you they're in good hands now. Thanks Thumper, for all the good times and wonderful memories. Blessings, Robbie"


Entered at Thu May 12 15:00:23 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Rhododendrons

Dunc, we have some of them here too and they are beautiful right now (in front of the house red ones and in the garden white ones).


Entered at Thu May 12 11:19:27 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Elder Statesmen musicians

Looking forward to seeing Gordon Lightfoot.

You can see performers who are still at the top of their game. Lou Reed over 50 years old was great. Van Morrison in a great band, with great musicians and backing singers, and happy was brilliant.

The experiences above were enhanced because they took place in a beautiful hall with beautiful acoustics - where I'll see Gordon Lightfoot perform. The evening will be a good theatrical experience, glass of wine etc. If his voice has gone, I'll celebrate his songs.

I've only seen Bob Dylan play a theatre once, a brilliant experience where he interacted with the audience and he enjoyed the experience enormously. The rest of his concerts I saw were arenas. Look at Peter Viney's reviews.

I have been to great arena concerts - Leonard and the Stones, but I'm tiring of going to arenas. It starts with the effort of buying tickets, massive car queues, sitting on a school seat and ends with seeing the performer on the horizon.

Arena concerts are finished for me, I think.


Entered at Thu May 12 10:39:34 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: The Smell of The Leaves

Hi Norbert, I'm Looking out on my garden just now. Beautiful. I built it years ago when I 'joined' this community. I look out on the many small Japanese trees and rhododendrons I planted a Magnolia Stellata, commemorating the Band, beautifully set in the middle. All around this small house. I remember winding up Steve and Abby about dung. Thanks for Little Pink, Norbert.

'The Smell of the Leaves of the Magnolia Trees In The Meadow'

Played Stage Fright three times back to back on Sunday. Absolutely brilliant. Peter the V always championed the Band's career beginning with 3 great albums. Could Stage Fright be better than Big Pink or the Brown Album?


Entered at Thu May 12 10:04:09 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill you’re a smart ass, you can’t help that, so it’s not your fault. But it’s good to have you here, being part of my world, our world …. you have no clue of all the adventures you and I have been through in the future, neither do I …. but we’ll think of some …. anyway, bon voyage to all of us.


Entered at Thu May 12 05:55:27 CEST 2016 from (67.70.150.101)

Posted by:

Birr M

Subject: blockchain

Nolbelt: Thanks for the education. I'm 40 pages into Don Tapscott's "Blockchain Revolution" - an excellent book thus far. As you may know, Tapscott is well-known as a technologist-futurist in this part of the world, but many years ago, in the sixties, he made an LP as part of a collective called Jeremy Dormouse. I like him better as a futurist.


Entered at Wed May 11 22:49:52 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The last witness

1) “What is the best time to plant a tree? Answer: twenty years ago. .... But what is the second best moment? Answer: Today”

2) “The shortest distance between two points is a line”

These are my favorite two proverbs …. they come from a country far away, that I came to love long ago …. Japan.

When I was younger I studied martial arts, I was pretty good at it and got a scholarship in Japan. I was given the chance to learn and refine my skills with the Sohei Monks (SM) in a remote monastery. After a while I started to participate in those weekend fighting matches in and around Tokyo. I got sucked into a Japanese glitter-weekend-world, a fast world of gambling matches, karaoke, Japanese sports cars, sushi women, coke, Sake and beer stands.

My Japanese friends couldn’t pronounce my name right so they gave me another name.

After some three years I got a knee injury and was forced to stop fighting. I returned to Europe and studied economics, computer cryptography, C++ and peer-to-peer networking.

After I got my PhD’s I started working in the city of London. I dressed up like Gordon Gekko and elbowed my way up, but it didn’t feel good. It was a dark world of corporate malfeasance banking of big-business tax avoidance, multinationals depriving governments of trillions of dollars in tax revenues by harboring profits in offshore havens. More and more I started to hate this whole phony money world and missed my pure Japanese monks dearly, the fresh sound of flesh, blood and bones in the morning in the beautiful foggy Japanese mountains.

When in 2008 the Lehman Brothers Bank debacle happened, that became my breaking point. From that moment on I started to think about money, pure money honest and brave like the Sohei Samurai Warrior Monks on a cold Sunday morning.

I did not like the notion of banks and bankers getting wealthy just because they hold the keys.

Not much later I published the Bitcoin Whitepaper, building on Wei Day’s thoughts and Nick Szabo’s Bitgold.

With my internet friends in two years we built the Bitcoin currency and it became a success.

In 2010 I had other things to do and parted from the Bitcoin movement, some went on till today.

I wasn’t looking for fame or money, I just wanted to proof we don’t need no corrupt bank system.

I had done my thing and wanted to live a quiet life in the shadow of The Band thinking of my monk friends now.

But success has many fathers and just a few days ago Craig Steven Wright an imposter came up and claimed he was me. That made me mad and endangered my friends and Japanese monks so I choose to reveal my real alias:

Satoshin San Nakamoto.

This name was given to me be the Sohei monks, I was proud of that name and I used it to make Bitcoins, the libertarian money.

In 2009 I paid Jan for a Band T-shirt 30 Bits and later I bought some Band stuff from Ilkka and Bill. See those payment just as a try-out. Anyway this 100 Bits block became famous as The Band Block. Every Cambridge or Oxford crypto knows about this block, it’s sought after for years …. no one found it yet .... you are among the first to know now …. a genesis witness.

As the ultimate proof here the code of the first 50 Bitcoins ever made, the Genesis block. The ledger of the Bitcoin transactions, the block chain, my private key, my signature and the public key (where Craig Steven Wright stopped, I begin).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

e9afc424b79e4f6ab42d99c81156d3a17228d6e1eef4139be78e948a9332a The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for anks00c3af42fc31103f1fdc0151fa747ff87349a4714df7cc52ea464e12dcd

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Please don’t touch this money, 50 bitcoins is about $20.000, - at the moment (so don’t copy and paste it away).

There will be some clever nerds and journalists from all over the world checking these keys, they’re annoying but harmless, please forgive me (you don’t have to warn them, they’ll find me here, don’t worry). I couldn’t think of a better and safer place to tell my story and at the same time share my love for the Band.

Satoshi will disappear again, thanks for being with me this moment.

Sayonara,

Satoshin San Nakamoto

Tags: Satoshi; Nakamoto; Nolbelt; Bitcoin; Genesis Block; Gavin Andresen; Craig Steven Wright

(please forget this post a.s.a.p., thank you)


Entered at Wed May 11 21:17:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sign language …

An interesting sign seen by Ian W. in Stratford, UK. I've added it to the Band reviews page on my blog so you can see it.


Entered at Wed May 11 19:17:45 CEST 2016 from (68.192.72.123)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sadavid, i had the incorrect notion that you lived in or near to Montreal. Thank you for the link, index & related info.


Entered at Wed May 11 16:24:56 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the art of the cost of living

Jeff: honestly, I can't speak to that point except to say that Montréal seems to have a ridiculous oversupply of culture in general (I speak as a citizen of a city with none), so it stands to reason that artists will have established ecosystems of affordability.

I recommend the tool at [My link] which provides a cost-of-living index for places around the world.

Prague is the index city (100); in comparison:
London 269
NYC 259
Toronto 178
Montréal 149
Winnipeg 141


Entered at Wed May 11 14:45:02 CEST 2016 from (99.249.59.50)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Pete Traynor R.I.P.

Bill M-Thanks for the link to the Pete Traynor obit. I didn't realize he had retired so early. An underappreciated figure in many ways when it comes to his contributions to amplification and sound systems, let alone the R & R scene in Toronto and environs. He'll live on for me every time I turn on my aging Traynor GuitarMate amp, which has traveled many miles and only suffered one broken tube, a testament to the durability of his equipment that was mentioned in the article.


Entered at Wed May 11 13:53:29 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.130)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Peter Traynor, RIP

Robbie's best buddy, bandmate in five or six early groups (notably the Robots and the Suedes), amp-maker and tech wiz to the Hawks ...


Entered at Wed May 11 08:28:21 CEST 2016 from (68.192.72.123)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sadavid, i heard part of an interview some self impressed putz that is in a band named The Operators, and some other bands ( one with a guy who is in Spoon, whomever the fuck Spoon is), gave on the radio today. He was speaking about just having moved back to Montreal, and said one reason was that is a ridiculously inexpensive place for artists to live. Whaddya have to say bout that,and anything related? i'm ain't about to go nowhere, but this stuff is of interest.


Entered at Tue May 10 15:35:27 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: genetic method

Peter V: thanks for the "Patsy Girl" link. A big hit with the Germans(!).

I'm reminded that MacManus Jr. produced The Specials first album -- and was much in evidence on the Roy Orbison "Black and White Night" special.


Entered at Tue May 10 10:03:30 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ross McManus recorded for Cannon, Crossbow and Rocket (all budget cover labels). For ballads he was Hal Prince, for Beatles covers he was Frank Bacon & The Baconeers.


Entered at Tue May 10 09:27:43 CEST 2016 from (67.87.217.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Norm

Give your head a shake! You'll feel better!


Entered at Tue May 10 08:27:19 CEST 2016 from (219.89.23.227)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: taking the plunge

Today I took my Ampeg bass copy in to be converted into a fretless. It's an Italia so not an exact copy but close enough ....... worked out cheaper than the Eastwood option. My other bass, a 75 Gibson Ripper, started out fretless but I had it fretted. So have feel like I've completed the full circle.


Entered at Tue May 10 05:16:01 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Just One More TIME!

OK!.......amidst all your fucked up dialogue, (you guys are in a time warp).....over and over and over.

As I Driftaway (again).....listen to this one piece of great music from one of my heros "WAYLON".


Entered at Mon May 9 23:45:49 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On music publishing and songwriting, histories of Woolworths Embassy label say they received pre-release copies of all Beatles early hits, so they could release them the same week as the original. Embassy covers sold in six figures for popular songs, and for publishing and songwriters, it was just extra sales at the same rate.


Entered at Mon May 9 23:27:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ross McManus

SaDavid, try and find Mojo October 2015 with a cover disc. It's an Elvis Costello collection of favourite tracks, and the last track is "It's Over" the Roy Orbison song, performed by "Hal Prince" which is the name Ross McManus used when recording budget cover versions for cheap 6 track EPs. We were so used to covers on radio that labels like Embassy, Top Six, Avenue could release regular EPs with covers of hits and sell loads.

It was bizarre on radio. Recently I found "Patsy Girl by Ross McManus with The Joe Loss Orchestra & The Blue Beats" on HMV, a proper label. I've linked it above. Cod blue beat with dead Loss plus a genuine Jamaican band. A real oddity.


Entered at Mon May 9 23:13:05 CEST 2016 from (67.87.217.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Dynaco Tube Amps

Dynaco Tube Amps returns.


Entered at Mon May 9 22:15:35 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: modern history

Peter V: (from your random thoughts yesterday) the whole idea of live on-air recreations of current pop music seems completely bizarre (to we who never lived it). MacManus / Costello recounts it from inside the inside in his autobiography -- and I was also astonished in that account by how late it lasted. You can see why pirate radio was such a force.

Elvis recounts how his dad would bring home handfuls of singles pushed on him by the corps, so he could learn the songs (and, I think, teach them to the other dead-Lossers) to sing them on radio. Things like pre-production pressings of "Please Please Me."


Entered at Mon May 9 21:45:38 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Sorry Bill. I misread. You did give David credit. What can I say? Shea and Rae kind of rhyme don't they?


Entered at Mon May 9 21:43:02 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M Mississippi Queen

Bill, I was reading back a number of posts; where you mention Red Shea co-wrote Mississippi Queen. Are you sure you didn't mean the late David Rea? Just wondering?


Entered at Mon May 9 19:08:51 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Yorkville photo Bill M

Sorry I didn't acknowledge, Bill. I did indeed notice. That is a ton of perception of who's who on your part. I seem to have missed the boat on even those I thought I recognized (exception was Cathy). Thanks. I wonder how that 'plaque evening' went?


Entered at Mon May 9 18:42:50 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Irving Azoff's letter is brilliant. Note:

QUOTE: I know realistically you won’t voluntarily agree to take on the task of asking artists for their permission. So, if you are going to continue to force artists to notify you when an infringing song is on YouTube, once an artist tells you that she wants her song taken off YouTube, you should keep it off. When the artist sends a "take down," it should be a "stay down." UNQUOTE

Exactly. It's a farce. It has happened with my videos. It takes about 3 weeks for YouTube to service your application to register as a "content owner." During this period, nothing is taken down. Then you apply to have it taken down, and four or five days later it is. Then an hour later someone else posts it, and you have to request a "take down" again. Mr Azoff's "a take down means a stay down" is right.


Entered at Mon May 9 17:57:28 CEST 2016 from (67.87.217.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Irving Azoff Open Letter to You Tube

See the link:"But when it comes to music, YouTube claims it has no control and can’t keep a song off its platform. You exercise control over content when it is good for your business. But the truth is that, from the beginning, free music consumption drove YouTube’s business, and so YouTube chose not to give artists control over how their music reaches their fans."


Entered at Mon May 9 16:33:29 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

It seems a safe assumption that Robbie got none of the publishing for the Hawkins, Canadian Squires or Levon and the Hawks tracks. That means he got nothing but songwriting royalties until Big Brown. My guess is that he's naver seen much in terms of writer's royalties from some of the earlier stuff either.

JT: Did you notice that I IDd most of the Yorkvillagers for you the other day?


Entered at Mon May 9 13:54:46 CEST 2016 from (70.193.133.241)

Posted by:

David P

Under the Capitol contract the record label covered the album recording costs.


Entered at Mon May 9 11:50:15 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Advances lessen risks. It depends on whether it’s a big “Come on” advance, or just enough to sustain you to finish it. Nowadays with text books, I tell new authors to take an advance that covers the full cost of doing the job, then think of any future royalty as a bonus IF it ever comes.

Kevin – I subscribe to the Mick Avory auteur theory with the Kinks. I heard he often used Waterloo Station, and once mentioned a spectacular sunset to Ray, though admittedly that was near Manchester a year earlier. He was also once heard to say his favourite occupation was lazing indoors on a rainy afternoon, and that’s not a great step from the words Ray wrote.


Entered at Mon May 9 11:35:49 CEST 2016 from (114.75.87.55)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Didn't they get an advance from Capital records to make MFBP. I don't really see where the risk was.


Entered at Mon May 9 10:52:56 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

I didn't really want to get the feud thing going again. I do feel that Robbie did write those songs. I have no doubt that the others influenced the arrangements in a very positive way.(listen to the piano and bass on Dixie and compare it to Baez's version). The point I was making that the five all assumed the same share of risk in recording those records. The risk was relatively high as Robbie wouldn't have been regarded as a class songwriter until after the Brown album. They could have done a Byrds type thing and recorded a Dylan covers album and maybe sold a lot more records. That's my only reason for saying they should/could have received more of the profits. They did of course make the right decisions musically.

For a great simply recorded demo listen to Robbie's version of Twilight. (Even if he was most likely playing Richard's piano at Shangri La with an engineer in attendance).


Entered at Mon May 9 04:09:12 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, my thoughts on both sides of the situation are unchanged. If you want to tell Rod how to think, and screw up your presentation of the thought process he actually used to reassess his opinions, give it a shot.


Entered at Mon May 9 02:09:58 CEST 2016 from (66.55.117.236)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Definitely Not Too Much of Nothing.....

..........From 1969 through Levon's lifetime and beyond - he enjoyed 20% of all The Band song publishing.......The other guy's sold their's back to Robbie at some point near the end of the band. As John D once said "I fell in love with The Band , not their business practises" but let's not let a change in the marketplace ( streaming era, etc) lead to a reevaluation of songwriting splits and then ridiculously only apply it to one band ( The Band ) in the rock n roll universe......"Ah, Biff the songwriter is starving in 2016.....damn, man...Ray Davies should have given Dave and all the other boys a songwriting credit on all The Kinks hits." C'mon !


Entered at Sun May 8 23:48:47 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Too Much Of Nothing .

David, so much for the 5 way split of publishing. As I've pointed out, the royalties resulting from songs or songwriting equal two hundred percent. 1oo% of songwriting, and 100% of publishing. Back then it was not uncommon for publishers to get the whole hundred percent. So, with regard to publishing, the fifth share of the portion of publishing royalties retained by each Band member was 20% of nothing.


Entered at Sun May 8 22:39:28 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But, back to this of Rod's: "All this has got me to thinking. If the main risk/expense of song writing is getting the songs out there then ........" For me it's a problematic way to look at the matter of renumeration....cause, intellectual property is intellectual property. And no one has or no business should have the ability to steal your intellectual property, fuck you out of your earnings, & keep the money. And that is what streaming is. It's a way businesses have invented to rob songwriters & sound recording owners. And the labels ( often full or partial sound recordings owners) are now in bed with the streaming services.

If a songwriter writes an original lyric & melody, copyrights it, it is his or hers & that is all it should take for full royalty to always apply if the song is sold. Streaming is not a sale. It was a workaround to sales..It should have been prevented by law by all world governments until a proper renumeration was agreed upon.


Entered at Sun May 8 21:57:41 CEST 2016 from (70.193.133.241)

Posted by:

David P

The ramifications of the publishing arrangement for MFBP is that songwriters Robbie, Richard and Rick did not have a share of publishing. Needless to say that includes their most covered song, The Weight, and the collaborations with Dylan, which have also been covered by numerous artists over the years.


Entered at Sun May 8 21:30:55 CEST 2016 from (70.193.133.241)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Publishing

The songs on Music From Big Pink (except for Long Black Veil) were published by Dylan's Dwarf Music. At the time Albert Grossman also had a share in the company.


Entered at Sun May 8 20:59:55 CEST 2016 from (66.55.117.236)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......well, I guess I am in the Richard Manuel and Rick Danko camp - which was the same camp as Robbie - where the songwriter gets the songwriters share. And remember, unlike bands of the day like The Who and others where principle songwriters like Pete Townsend also kept all their publishing......The Band's writers led by Robbie and Richard, shared publishing 5 ways on all songs.


Entered at Sun May 8 18:42:32 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The argument that Rod pointed to is part of the same one I made since i entered the Feud discussion here close to 15 years ago. As a songwriter, I always tied it to the original presentation of the songs but coupled to Levon's argument based on partnership. And I've often said I could argue both sides.

So, we've gotten nowhere except fucking older. What the fuck took you so long to come around Rod?.

Happy Mother's Day to the whole lot of you.


Entered at Sun May 8 15:38:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Little Eva

Carole King wrote that The Cookies recommended Little Eva as a babysitter. She writes:

"Pop legend has it that Gerry and I heard her singing around the house and said, "Stop! We must record that voice!" The truth is we knew Eva could sing when we hired her. With one of her older sisters covering child-care, Eva often sang on our demos."


Entered at Sun May 8 15:05:51 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, the expense of living, is constant. It can be filed under writing the song, and getting the songs out ( recorded & heard). One thing that has to impedes a lot of great material is the fact that people that should have deals but don't have to work to live & great songs & projects may sit endlessly.. sometimes great songs might sit a decade or more, maybe two decades, unrecorded & unheard. Of course, they may also mature. Great recordings can sit incompleted & grow moss.

I bet when you typed your Feud post, Levon smiled in Heaven & lifted his plastic glass of ice & Coke to you..

Fuck, now you got me going.


Entered at Sun May 8 14:49:26 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: I swear by the BLOOD below my feet. For this conversation let's call it blood.

Rod, you just cracked me up. And made this entire exchange very worthwhile.
You drove right through the DETOUR or ROAD CLOSED sign, but I see your point: "All this has got me to thinking. If the main risk/expense of song writing is getting the songs out there then maybe Levon had a point. Up until now I've been firmly in the Robbie camp but now I have doubts. If all 5 members shouldered the same risk and expense then perhaps they deserved equal share of the profits. Sorry to raise this old chestnut again."
As I understood it, the conversation / discussion, especially regarding risk, applies to the reasonably present times. But this same idea does apply: when you write songs you want to hear them. And you really want to hear them sound as good as possible. At least I do, to me that's just normal. For some time now, & the forseeable future, for the vast majority of songwriters, there's your risk.

In the time & circumstance of The Band, except for the time Levon was gone (remember though, he likely did not draw his salary when he was gone), the risk / expense as you put it, was equal- they had assumed it equally (everything was 5 ways from day one they left Ronnie). The actual writing of lyrics & melody was not. Now you well know I've based my view on many things. One thing was what Levon has presented as the accepted agreement & tacit understanding between the partners. No one has ever dispputed that..The other was the fact that The Band members did not get paid for what could be considered the arranging of the original presentation of the songs. Yet, if you consider that the publishing was split equally they did. But then you can come right back to the verbal & implied understanding of partnership. A conversation had been required to say * hey, our full fledged partnership has to be revised. Songwriting is different. * That conversation never happened. According to Levon, the other 4 raised the issue of copyright after the first record. And were surprised when it wasn't corrected on the second.... Many would say, the conversation didn't have to happen before Big Pink was released, because songwriting was a new aspect of their relationship..Well, to guys who were all out partners, & to some one who saw things in black & white, it would have to happen... I woke up to take a piss, not get into this one.

I could argue either side well.

Back then, there were different risks of course. But with the exclusion of the effort of working, many songwriters ( of all types, writers, or writer / performers) became successful without giving blood.(Pf course, there are those who got horse fucked). Because there was the industry infrastructure & businessmen to shoulder the effort. There was a way to exploit talent. That way was the industry built on what you call the analogue technologies. That's the only way i think any one can draw a real comparison to the plight of workers today. The opportunity is gone, & so much of what is left pays too little..because jobs are gone. B ut it is very different,.

There are jobs, & many people make fortunes...

Too much to consider, I gotta go back to sleep. But, it's funny & interesting how different outlooks & approaches can illuminate subjects.

The first time i glanced at your Feud thought I was firmly still sleeping & wondered if you were being sarcastic. I shook my head, read it again, thought about that you seem pretty serious most of the time, & "sounded" serious now.

One last quick thought.. THAT MAKES THIS RELEVANT TO THE PLIGHT OF A WRITER TODAY. One argument I used to make was that had RR been able to write those songs as one man singer songwriter demos, or with the normal demo accompaniment of the time, & him singing, songs like The Weight, never would have gotten the covers. But again, you can come back to payment for arranging & recording the songs via publishing... Today, the writer that wants his songs to sound great the first time out is paying. The writer can be writing alone, & recording on his dime. You're not gonna find anyone paying for the hard expense of time The Band grew the songs & those vocal arrangements, but writers/ producers are hiring great & often the right feel players for their ability to feel a song on the spot, live in the studio.. It's not happening one two three with songs as unusual or unique as The Band's, but some one with ability & ears, working within musical languages can make it happen & sparkle enough to make you cry.

BTW, i still think The Band efforts sometimes effected lyrics, & coulda changed directions of a song in progress too........That doesn't alter the rest of the perspective respectives though..

One more point re recording & expense- vocals. May or may not be the writer. Either way, be aware, a vocal can be a take or 18 takes. Or not even accomplished in one session. And a lot of time making a vocal comp. That's expensive.



Entered at Sun May 8 14:21:44 CEST 2016 from (70.193.133.241)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Little Eva

Goffin & King first became aware of Little Eva's talents when she worked as a babysitter for them as a teenager.


Entered at Sun May 8 10:59:50 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Locomotion link

Little Eva is miming on TV. It's the record. The backing voices are Carole King.


Entered at Sun May 8 10:56:28 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Some random thoughts.

DEMOS … listen to The Locomotion by Little Eva. Goffin & King wanted to pitch it to Dee Dee Sharp. What you hear is the demo, as they demoed with Little Eva. After Dee Dee Sharp rejected it, they tried a full studio version but it failed to match the demo, so they put that out. But that’s how well that two already established writers did the demo. The advantage of the Brill Building (which covers the one along the street where the younger writers worked) was that people helped out on each other’s demos.

Then P.J. Proby made a living because he could sing so like Elvis, that he spent his time doing demos for songwriters who wanted to pitch songs to Elvis. As Jeff points out, a demo is expensive … so it’s not yourself on acoustic guitar in your living room … though with modern technology, hits have been recorded on home equipment, but not ones with conventional instruments.

One of the biggest shifts was music on radio – in the 1920s it was felt it would destroy the record industry and it nearly did. In Britain, the Musicians Union resisted the shift from live music on radio to recordings far longer. In the 1960s, the BBC had a monopoly, and a strict needle time quotient. So much music on radio was live. That’s why we have those Beatles at the Beeb sessions, as Saturday Club on the “Light Programme” had live bands on air. We hated it at the time, as it meant the Joe Loss Orchestra (aka “The dead Loss Orchestra”) performing the latest Roy Orbison on air instead of simply playing the record. They were a dance band, but the guy covering Roy Orbison was Ross McManus, i.e. Elvis Costello’s dad. Note … to the songwriter it made absolutely no difference. You got paid on the cover version.

The BBC continued on TV with a similar live policy – it’s said that the resident Top of The Pops band of beer-sodden ageing musicians was so dire, that Simon & Garfunkel and Elton John were among those who did the rehearsal, then refused to do the show.

Then came discotheques, edging out live music from the mid-60s. In 1966 “dances” for 400 to 1400 people with live bands were common. In 1967 the BBC gave up its fight against Pirate Radio, and switched to playing records all the time. Yes, that late.

The songwriters like Carole King or Randy Newman or Neil Sedaka switched to being singer-songwriters. But not every great writer is a great singer or a virtuoso instrumentalist.

I suspect that’s why folk music is doing so well in the UK. I saw Spiers & Boden (from Bellowhead) in their duo shows in small venues, and it was viable because they had a guitar, a violin, several melodeons and concertinas, a stomp board and one small amp. It goes in the back of a car. On which, tradesmen may have to load up their vans every day (every van round here has "No tools left in this vehicle overnight" stickers on the back), but they don't usually then drive for five hours to work, start working at 9 pm, finish at 11 pm, reload the van, and drive home.


Entered at Sun May 8 09:44:41 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

All this has got me to thinking. If the main risk/expense of song writing is getting the songs out there then maybe Levon had a point. Up until now I've been firmly in the Robbie camp but now I have doubts. If all 5 members shouldered the same risk and expense then perhaps they deserved equal share of the profits. Sorry to raise this old chestnut again.


Entered at Sun May 8 08:07:12 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That should have been : Vinyl siding was the compact disc & DIGITAL home recording rig of the siding industry (at about the same time, too).

If one of the things you're saying is not everyone should think they are entitled to make a living as a songwriter, I agree with you entirely .

Separately, , in general terms, i find it hard to equate with business & trade. In specifics there's alot of analogies, in the general sense, i don't see it.

The world changes yes............. but what happened with big businesses being created that somehow managed to steal the songwriters & also artists income, is tied to the fact of what Peter mentioned- labels deciding not to release anything that is not a sure thing they can make succeed.so they've also found ways to milk every penny outr of what has already been released & succeeded, plus the new stuff that gets released......

You asked about you tube---------------there's an article i might find.......noone succeeds at getting their content off you tube- it might come off, it goes back on.


Entered at Sun May 8 07:50:20 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

No twisting Rod. You brought up risk in songwriting. You said there was none. Well, the whole point is getting heard. Once you are a songwriter you encounter a lot of fucking risk cause the point is having your songs heard. And to do that, if you're at all driven, if got balls, you put your money where your mouth is & you record. There's no separation... If you have focus & desire, & sticktuitiveness, you become an adept producer real fast. In this discussion you cannot separate out the recording & production of one's own songs the same way you can't remove a birth from the act of sex.. You fuck , you run the risk of having a kid. You fuck enough, you will have one, you might even have quintuplets....You write songs, you run the risk of recording & producing.

Nothing is riskier than song writing.

It's riskier than the best sex you ever had, or shooting up heroin.

************************************************************

Legislation is being pursued to the raise the fees streaming services must pay

***********************************************************

Tradesmen, businesses you say...First I'll point out, to me, who covers all three bases, it's a poor analogy. People usually embark on songwriting without the intent of that's how they want to make a living or money. And they get sucked in.. Trades & businesses , the only & declared intent is to make a living.... I was always able to find a way to adapt to changing trade & business environments.. Some one who is solely a songwriter, well, ........... There are solutions, but, it often involves removing what you were after.........& going to craft & business. Industrial music, writing commissioned songs, that kind of thing.... Hell, if you're a song writer, & you're actually good, you can create a business writing songs for anyone for any purpose or occassion.. ( i find myself starting to write songs for auto mechanics & physical therapists because it just happens, my brain just starts writing songs) but it's not what you were looking to do. .

I'm a tradesman. A salesman, & a siding & window mechanic. Drop me out of a plane blindfolded, into any town in the boondocks, or any suburb, or city... give me a pen, a blank piece of paper, & let me go pick out siding, roofing, & window samples. I'll go knock on doors & within 3 - 4 months have a flourishing business going & a profit already turned. And I've been able to do that & have for well over thirty years. Starting in the 2000s, I'm every bit as good at the kinds of songwriting & production I enjoy, & they are viable, yet fuck me if i could ever turn a profit at it today. In the 60s, 70s, or even 80s i would have built an empire.

I will draw one comparison to where you want to take this.. Vinyl siding was the compact disc & home recording rig of the siding industry. Every asshole with a hammer & a pair of snips decided he was a siding mechanic..... thirty years later, most of em, & their grandchildren, still can't hang siding or do metal trimwork worth a damn......... there's a majority percentage of your new breed of songwriters, engineers, & mastering engineers.


Entered at Sun May 8 06:15:15 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Jeff, I guess we are coming at this from different angles. Yes, musicians and songwriters deserve fare pay for their efforts. I just don't know how you achieve that in this day and age. Technology just makes it too easy to to bypass the legitimate distribution channels. Sure illegal downloading is theft and streaming pays bugger all. What do you do? Can you tell Spotify they have to pay a certain amount to the creators for each download? I know they pay F all at the moment. You could try going after the people who make illegal downloads avaliable? It really annoys me to see whole albums avaliable on YouTube - but why aren't the content owners getting that shutdown?

I do think though that music is a performance art. I know it's hard getting out their touring and loading up vans as you get older but I'm sure many aging tradesmen feel the same. I also know that trades people (and lots of other business people) spend alot of time,expense and effort working on quotes that never get accepted.

You did sort of twist my original point that the creation of a song doesn't in itself incur alot of expense or risk. Yes creating demos and recording can be expensive and time consuming - I never said it wasn't. Thats a whole different can of worms.


Entered at Sun May 8 04:23:01 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: tip of the iceberg

Rod, business environments, societal attitudes & shifts, economies,all figure in. It's not just technology. BTW, when you typed analogue recording, you also ignored broadcasting. Airplay could easily create as much or more income for songwriters as covers on records did.

If you think live performance is the future for artists, there is no future for many great artists..... There's a whole helluva lot of A + list players that gotta play for 50 bucks, or 100 bucks, or on a good night 200 bucks, to stay sharp & have a little fun. And there's a lot of great acts that ain't got nowhere to play..Cause they won't go play for what might be 50 to 100 bucks a "man", and they can't justify rehearsing new material for that kind of money.

While I' not going to get into discussing your first post on this subject deeply, I'll point out that ( even before but more so ) since the bottom fell out of the industry, many songwriters spend a lot of money recording their own material.There is a demo industry, a lot of producers & studios make it their bread & butter. It serves a purpose, not for me, but for others......... Me, I've always thought THAT IN THIS ENVIRONMENT there's no point in making a demo..jump in, make the best record possible. Go for broke, which is a real possibility.

Peter made some real good points to you earlier... Superior songwriting is real work, it is serious, it ain't a hobby or part time, & it is a risk, & it is a huge investment of time ( which is what people use to earn with & survive) , & presenting your songwriting often becomes an enormous expense. Want to record a killer record of your songs with great musicians, in a great studio, with a great engineer, then mix it & master it with great engineers in great facilities? Conservatively, you're spending 5 - 6 grand a song. People do do this. You can spend a lot less, decide where you are cutting. There's people who only spend ten grand to make a whole album of their songs, or less even. They get less, but, it still is a risk..

Time? Not an investment? Go make a record,. Deal with the schedules of the musicians you want to hire, the studios you want, the engineers you want, see how many months you'll take out of your life to make that record. Today, greator shitty songwriters might open up their veins to try to get heard. Both in terms of time & money..... And great work & great productions get hidden in with the piles of crap getting tossed into the air today...........

You're very wrong about legislation - it can change things to a significant degree. It won't make enough difference, it will not restore the numbers, but it can restore some of the loss.

Live performance - you aren't in touch with what touring acts can make on the way up today. 40, 50, 60 year olds (can't live out of vans & 35 dollar motel rooms. And if you ain't in a tribute band ( or are ), or if you ain't in a classic hit act, no matter how good or great you are, that's what you're looking at.......... Working for next to nothing. Walmart employees make more.....


Entered at Sun May 8 01:17:15 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

To sort of paraphrase someboby - I think the songwriter will end up being the low man on the totem pole again. I don't think this is a good thing. It's just that the technology that supported them (analog recording) has been superceded and no amount of law making is going to help. Only another change in technology might do that. I suspect that most artists are now recording to support their live shows rather than touring to support an album.

Was it David Bowie who made a good deal of money by securitisng his future royalties? The organizations that bought the bonds took a hit as the royalties dried up with the advent of dowbloads.


Entered at Sat May 7 19:04:28 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

No real time to give this much consideration to make a presentable post ( i've been on 7 subways and a bus and walked about 6 miles already today, and it's only 1 PM here, plus i've got to get back out the door, i have about another 3 or 4 subways and another 4 to 5 miles of walking ahead of me today), but I'll add to my last remark that in regards to Peter's opening statement to a fine post (" Songwriting. Thee are two sides, a working musician writing, which is part of the job, and a solo songwriter.), there are more sides and angles to this. They possibly fall into the two categories you opened with. I've not thought it out. And I'll also venture that writing music or songs is not necessarily part of the job of a working musician, but being a working musician is something a songwriter may or may not also do. I know it's picayune , and will certainly venture that if we all got paid to post we could all take hours thinking out perfect statements.


Entered at Sat May 7 16:42:33 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cultural crime

I have perhaps a simple perspective on this because I am merely a music enthusiast and have no financial stake.. It is absolutely clear to me that the composer (lyricist and player(s)/singer(s)) MUST be paid properly and adequately for the music that is sent out to the public IN ANY FORMAT OR FORM. Streaming cannot be an exception. Of course the business enterprise must be served, but first and foremost, the creators of the art must be paid properly and should receive an important portion of the dollars that flow from their creativity.. It is time to address this issue in a sincere and meaningful way. It is a social and cultural crime against the composers/musicians to continue to ignore the need to address this issue.


Entered at Sat May 7 13:36:21 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

My lack of argument with Peter's post is because there is nothing incorrect in it. All the subjects & the various tangents raised in this discussion, could be discussed ad infinitum.


Entered at Sat May 7 13:30:03 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.161)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, I could spend a lot of time to dispute or counter most or all of your paragraph. I'll settle for pointing out that your self correction about what you refer to collectively as the Brill Building (writers) is incorrect. You can bet your bippee that there was no one method, & that most or all the writers got paid either salaries ( maybe a short time till they improved or wised up ) , by the song, salaries & points, or draws against royalties (which is essentially what publishing is). Bet your bippee again, that eventually almost everyone smartened up & got publishing deals as fast as they could. What a publishing deal is money against your future royalties. Songwriting equals two hundred percent . The songwriting share of royalties is 100%, the publishing share is 100%. The piece of publishing royalties a songwriter gets to keep when he or she has a publishing deal has increased from often zero to any deal one makes, possibly just an administration fee. The publishers job is invaluable .


Entered at Sat May 7 11:38:55 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Songwriting. Thee are two sides, a working musician writing, which is part of the job, and a solo songwriter. It may seem like a part-time hobby (like writing books) and that’s how you write the first one or two … but if you’re going to sustain a career, or even just a bare living, you will have to do it most of the day. Few songwriters have the golden touch so that every melody comes out perfect and ready to go. Much has to be crumpled and deposited in the wastebasket. A lot of ones they think are great may nosedive. I highly recommend the ACE Records songwriters CD compilations showing the range of (say) Goffin and King, or Jerry Ragovoy or Bert Berns or Leiber & Stoller. There are a lot of CDs in the series.

We (Mrs V and I) are in much the same position as regards the Internet. We spent nearly twenty years writing comedy ELT videos, and we made a good living from it. But sales didn’t just tail off slowly (as with text books), they stopped totally in a six month to twelve month period. People expect this stuff to be free now. You can’t preserve the old model, but now this sort of material is written for a fee, not a royalty. It’s a poor fee too and recent stuff I’ve seen is dire. You simply don’t put your all into something for a pittance. You do for the prospect of a royalty. You then accept that you can spend a year on one thing and make virtually nothing, and a year on something else and make a lot of money.

Clive Selwood’s tale is one I’ve quoted before and will again. When he was head of Polydor Records in the UK, the big boss came over from Germany. They all assembled for a meeting. The boss explained that they’d researched the sales of last few years, and only 5% of record releases made a profit. So, he said, they had come up with a solution! In future they would only release records that were certain to be Top Ten hits.


Entered at Sat May 7 10:28:10 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Maybe the Brill building wasn't a good example. Those writers provably got paid for their labours but signed off on any royalty payments.


Entered at Sat May 7 10:24:11 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: song writers royalties

That's a hard issue. My gut feeling is that songwriters should get paid and get recognition for their endeavours. But there are heaps of great song writers and songs out there that have never got recognition because they haven't been pushed hard enough or picked up by the right people. Writing a song does take time and talent but there is no real financial outlay there. No risk involved as there is in recording an album or putting a tour together. The technology of the past 100 years or so did allow songwriters to at times make a huge amount of money. That has changed and expectations probably need to change accordingly. It comes down to the Brill building philosophy vs the singer songwriter/performer model. Performers who can write good songs will still make money but mostly from performances or selling their performances through some medium. The fact is that techology, the interent and off shoring has affected all sorts of people. Right from the local factory being off-shored to India or song writers earning a tipance from streaming. Musicians will and are looking more to live performance to make a living - a model that pre-dates the recording industry. I feel that is the way of the future and that it is pointless trying to preserve the old model via a bunch of un-inforcable laws. Having said that I don't want a bunch of managers and executives making money at the expense of the creators.


Entered at Sat May 7 05:07:45 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.173)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Van The Man. Important Live releases

1) Bill. I've been bitching about that since I entered here in 2002. In fact, I've been bitching about how & why everything associated with digital music ( which includes delivery systems which is what streaming is) has impacted everyone & everything, from the writers, musicians, engineers, studios, to distributors, & consumers.

2) See the link. Van Morrison 1973 Troubador performances getting released


Entered at Sat May 7 04:10:02 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.0)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: needs to be said again and again: streaming hoses songwriters


Entered at Sat May 7 03:58:05 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Yorkville photo

sadavid: I didn't know about the thing this evening. Bummer!

JT: Top-left is, I believe, community organiser David Depoe. Next to him is Greg Fitpatrick of Nucleus, who is seated above Hugh Leggat of Nucleus and Foot in Coldwater. The guy hugging Greg I don't recognise, but beside him, strung out in a line pretty much is the group Milestone - John Cleveland-Hughes, unrecognised, Michael Tarry (who later had a big solo hit with "Rosalie"), Nick Balkou, unrecognised, Bob Doughty and another unrecognised. (Two of the unrecognised Milestoners would be Norman Wellbanks and Matt Dennington.) The band's excellent saxist, Ian Kojima (who spent the '80s with Chris deBurgh) is back to the left, above JC-L. Next to Milestone is the three members of Edward Bear - Danny Marks (of whom Sandy Konikoff is a huge fan), Paul Weldon and Larry Evoy. Moving back to the left, next to Leggat we have Bruno Weckerle, Gord Waszek and Buzz Shearman from Leigh Ashford, then Sebastian Agnello, who had been in the Lords of London before they became Nucleus, and whose band at the time, the Male Bagg, was signed to Mainstream when that label went on a shopping spree with the money they made selling Janis and Big Brother to Columbia. Then there are two unrecognised guys who I suspect are members of the Ugly Ducklings (perhaps Howie Smith and one of the Kindred brothers); certainly the guys next to them are group leader Dave Byngham (a huge Robbie fan, which is why the b-side of their first 45 (from '66) was a cover of "I Can Tell") and Robin Boers (who got to record in LA with BB King, Charlie Musselwhite and Barry Goldberg). And then there are two other unrecogniseds. At the front is, as JT said, Cathy Young, along with Jimmy Watson from Kensington Market.

A bit more on Milestone: in '72 they merged with a local supergroup (and they really were) - Rick James, Ed Roth, Denny Gerrard from the Grossman-managed Paupers and Pat Little from Luke and the Apostles. The result was redubbed the Great White Cane, who went to LA and stayed in Steven Stills's house while recording a superb LP with Jimmy Ienner. Hard to find, but well worth tracking down.


Entered at Sat May 7 00:53:25 CEST 2016 from (207.164.2.174)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Apologies

Sadavid: sorry! Does your machine correct your name to an 'f'? What is Safavid?


Entered at Sat May 7 00:52:19 CEST 2016 from (207.164.2.174)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Who's who?

Safavid: How many of the musicians sitting in front of The Penny Farthing can our readers name. I think I see Keith McKie (and maybe Gene Martynec) and possibly Bruce Cockburn. Hard to tell who is who, though Cathy Young is sitting at the front kneeling. Bill M. probably can identify everyone.


Entered at Fri May 6 22:42:40 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Yorkville

I've been to Yorkville.


Entered at Fri May 6 21:44:31 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: your youth is now History

Where Gordon Lightfoot will be this evening -- unveiling historical plaques at former Yorkville folk clubs.

Musical performance by the Bill M - boosted Luke and the Apostles.


Entered at Fri May 6 21:23:45 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks JT, Kevin, Peter and Bill. Thanks for posts and links. I remember Steve being a great fan of Gordon Lightfoot.

I really don't know a lot about Gordon, but have seen I think three of the concerts with Gordon and Red and a bass player on TV. Really enjoyed them. As I said I play the greatest hits.

When I saw Ramblin' Jack Elliot's last appearance in Scotland, he said all the best singers are Canadians...then gave a list of names finishing with Hank Snow.

I agree, Peter. What cream does Paul Jones use.


Entered at Fri May 6 15:56:43 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Richard Bell

Thanks Bill. I listened again to 'Summer Side of Life' from the tribute. Richard Bell plays keyboards with aplomb. Great!


Entered at Fri May 6 15:19:04 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: As a fellow BaRK fan, I point out that a terrific cover of "The Summer Side Of Life" was BaRK's contribution to the excellent "Beautiful" Lightfoot tribute CD of some years ago. Blue Rodeo, Cowboy Junkies, Sylvia Tyson, Maria Muldaur, Barenaked Ladies, et al.


Entered at Fri May 6 14:55:21 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Trading Places

All of this Gord Lightfoot thinking has got the mind churning. October's megastar 'ella' series has Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan on Friday night. Can you imagine if they switch roles: Stones play Sinatra and Dylan covers while Bob Dylan and his Band play You Can't Always Get What You Want and Satisfaction? What a hoot that would be!


Entered at Fri May 6 13:58:00 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Gordian

On reflection, I think its important to remember that Mr. Lightfoot was quite ill on a few occasions in the past few years and that illness may have taken its toll at least for some periods and we may have seen the impact even though he had recovered (the voice may have lingered). He sounded close to his old self in the 2015 most recent video I watched. Full of confidence and as I said, giving it everything but with vocal Gordian fullness.


Entered at Fri May 6 13:44:49 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lightfoot

I'm not so sure now. I just watched a video from 2015 from a concert in Niagara Falls and Gordon Lightfoot sounded great and very different from the Ottawa concert I previously watched/listened to. The voice in 2015 was there in its full Lightfootian splendour. It may be back. Dunc, you'll bear witness and report back.


Entered at Fri May 6 13:20:10 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Mariposa Dylan

Today, at Expecting Rain, there are photos of Bob Dylan with Gordon Lightfoot (and Sara Dylan and Jesse Dylan and his brother and Leon Redbone and others) from Toronto Island (Mariposa Folk Festival 1972), an annual event. Toronto Island (previously called Centre Island) is part of Toronto and just south, a ferry ride away. (It is actually a group of very small islands). Mariposa was famously held there in 1972 summer (though often it was held in Orillia on Lake Simcoe (not far from where CasinoRama is now). I have seen a very few of the photos now offered at Expecting Rain. I did not attend unfortunately. Dylan and his entourage were attendees (he did not perform). Not too long after a movie and Planet Waves came along.


Entered at Fri May 6 10:56:10 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oxford looks good, and smaller venue too. I’m a bit worried about the voice though. On the whole, women seem to keep it better than men … Paul Jones being the stunning exception, with it all still there. But in recent years, Judy Collins, Joan Baez, Rita Coolidge, Emmylou Harris and Natalie Merchant (though she’s 15-20 years younger) have all kept the voice. Maybe the failing of testosterone screws it up rather than age. Van Morrison just gets stronger and deeper live though. It might be that women tend to take better care of themselves physically.

A few years ago, in one of the rare moments I’ve watched breakfast TV, a doctor, a research skin specialist was on TV. His big research project had “proved” that there’s no difference between the most expensive skin creams and plain baby cream. They had two beautifully groomed women on the show, older beauty experts, probably near sixty. Their skins looked like the proverbial baby’s bum, or a peach if you prefer. His skin looked like a crocodile bag that had been buried in soft wet earth for a few months. The underside of an aged scrotum is another description that comes to mind. He blithely told them that all the money they had spent on skin care was a waste of money. They listened as women do to prattling toddlers, with faint smiles on their faces. Both were aware that the camera was their argument.


Entered at Fri May 6 05:32:56 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lightfoot tour: UK

For any of you who have the urge: May 18 Glasgow, UK Royal Concert Hall 20 Liverpool, UK Empire Theatre 21 Newcastle, UK City Hall 22 Manchester, UK Bridgewater Hall 24 London, UK Royal Albert Hall 25 Oxford, UK Oxford New Theatre 27 Birmingham, UK Symphony Hall 28 Southend, UK Cliffs Pavilion 29 Bristol, UK Colston Hall 31 Belfast, UK Waterfront Hall


Entered at Fri May 6 05:28:32 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Negotiations

Negotions: Gord Lightfoot - Bill M: I remember it and note that it made number 35 on the Toronto Chum Chart in Nov. 1962. Who would have predicted from that song what we ultimately got from Gordon Lightfoot only a few years later. That song was a bit of fluff typical of other fluff that was coming out during that era and I didn't think much of it in those days as I listened to radio and made choices on which 45s to buy. Not this one.


Entered at Fri May 6 05:25:25 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Vocals

Kevin: I listened on You Tube to some recent Gordon Lightfoot (of last year) and I have to agree. The range is there but it is a wisp of his former voice with only the thin edge left. As you said, it was clear that he was giving everything he had. He hits the notes and the musicianship and playing was very good but alas, the voice is a remnant of its old self. Nevertheless, he is an icon and respect remains. Also, one might be surprised. Dylan's upswinging disappeared and something positive returned. So, who knows...


Entered at Fri May 6 05:12:33 CEST 2016 from (66.55.117.236)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot..........Dunc

Dunc.......Gordon Lightfoot is an iconic musician in Canada. Unlike The Band, Joni, and Neil Young, his career is also notable in that he chose to stay living full-time in the country rather than relocate to the U.S. - as so many other musicians of his stature did in the 1960's...........I admire his songwriting enormously and would pick "Summerside of Life" as my favourite Lightfoot song......see YouTube BBC 1972 fir a great version. "Railroad Trilogy" and "If You could Read My Mind" would be 2 and 3 on a very long list............Now the sad news......the wonderful voice is completely shot and his live performances are no longer the great joy they once were......far far from it. Unlike Dylan, he was never one to play around with arrangements - so this "voice is gone" version doesen't fool anyone. I do hope you find some enjoyment at the show...he still gives everything he has but I'm afraid there is not much there any more.


Entered at Fri May 6 05:03:13 CEST 2016 from (65.92.194.123)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: As a public service, I'm posting a link to Gordon Lightfoot's second solo 45, from '62 - though the copy shown says '63, because that's when it came out in the the UK. He was the host of a British C&W TV show at the time, I believe. Note that the songwriter, Les Pouliot, is the brother of Red Shea, who didn't sign on as Lightfoot's accompanist until '66, when he replaced the great David Rea, who'd jumped to Ian and Sylvia, a much bigger act at the time.

You might investigate Rea's work - Lightfoot's first LP, several with I&S (right up to just before Great Speckled Bird), and at least three solo LPs, all of them worthwhile. (He also spent time in the UK while with Fairport Convention in the '70s and co-wrote "Mississippi Queen" with Felix Pappalardi, who'd been I&S's sometime-bassist.)


Entered at Fri May 6 01:05:43 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: The link is to Red Shea's only solo record that I know of, from 1961. Starts out pretty standard but moves into Robbie-style string-bending. At the time, Red was a member of Larry Lee and the Leesures, meaning he was rooming with our guys.


Entered at Thu May 5 23:34:40 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lightfoot/Shea/Stockfish

Sorry Dunc. The band was Red Shea, John Stockfish with Gordon Lightfoot. It was March 1967.


Entered at Thu May 5 23:29:32 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot

Dunc. I saw Gordon Lightfoot at Massey Hall in Toronto in about 1967 or 68 with some friends from high school. He was a 3 piece with Red O'Shea if I recall. He was wonderful, a treasure. We were doing press for the local school and were allowed backstage after the show. It was quite the experience. Have not seen him since but always have admired his work. His voice is unique. You can pick it out. You're very fortunate to hear him now. Enjoy.


Entered at Thu May 5 22:32:19 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot

Just got tickets for Gordon Lightfoot. Don't really know much about Gordon, other than the best sellers and TV concerts. But I play the greatest hits often. The concert is in a beautiful concert hall.

But I really enjoyed the guitar playing of the late Red Shea on recordings and a few TV concerts.

Thought about Steve, who always championed Gordon.


Entered at Thu May 5 21:27:13 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bob F

Bob F. Could you e mail me again? Having difficulties with your e mail, it's linking to Jeff's.


Entered at Thu May 5 21:10:54 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: rock 'n' roll-r

NWC: Thanks for that. Heidi is talented indeed. It's also a rare pleasure to experience a kick-ass, full-out accordion orchestra.


Entered at Thu May 5 18:16:02 CEST 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

When my husband was in school in Lausanne shop keepers would greet customers with Bonjour Monsieurdam. An all purpose greeting


Entered at Thu May 5 18:12:00 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.98)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: It's The Little Things

NWC. Amongst the other virtues of her performance, at about 1:19 or so in, Heidi rolled or trilled an R with the best of them.


Entered at Thu May 5 17:31:46 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Slavic/Jewish musical heritage

Mainly to cheer up our Jewish gbers I'd like to post this link. It is my former student Heidi (The First Runner-up In Finnish Tango Queen Competition and a music journalist in Swedish public service radio) singing a Slavic/Jewish song. A bunch of old Finnish men playig accordian as well! So, here is one minute an fifty one seconds with this talented lady. She was my student for two years. Life is not fair ;-) Sorry boys.


Entered at Thu May 5 14:35:14 CEST 2016 from (46.166.188.224)

Posted by:

Karen

Web: My link

Thanks for this lovelt site!! Enjoyed it alot


Entered at Thu May 5 14:34:08 CEST 2016 from (46.166.188.224)

Posted by:

Astrid

Location: Netherlands
Web: My link

My favourite band of all times. May they live forever!


Entered at Thu May 5 13:07:33 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Thanks Rockin' Chair

Thanks for your post on "Sointula", a Finnish settlement on your coastal region. In fact the first part of the word (= Sointu) means even "a chord". A musical connection here, too. Similar utopian socialist Finnish settlements has been established even in South America and near the town of Vladivostok on the other side of the Pacific Ocean. They are all fanished for long ago.

BTW Rockin' Chair, I enjoy your posts - even if sometimes a bit raw - just like propably all gb regulars.


Entered at Thu May 5 10:43:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In English Language Teaching textbooks, we demonstrate our PC craftMANship, or blandness, by adhering to PARSNIPS. These are the unmentionable topic areas for ELT / ESL publishers: P- politics, A – alcohol, R – religion, S – sex, N – narcotics, Isms – (sexism, communism, atheism), P- pork products. Even that list is bowdlerized, because in reality, I also stands for Israel, and with it all countries with disputed territories … Korea, Taiwan, Gibraltar, Falkland Islands, which are never mentioned in international textbooks.

There was a minor fuss a few years ago when signs on the front of refuse trucks were changed in some towns from MEN WORKING AT REAR to OPERATIVES WORKING AT REAR. A large fleet of trucks was repainted with the sign . They could (a) have got a far cheaper adhesive stick on sign made, or (b) simply agreed that all future trucks would have the changed words. It cost a lot of money to change existing ones.


Entered at Thu May 5 06:16:22 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.133)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, get to me , no. Give me an opening in which to inject humor, yes. Which is possibly what you meant, though you wrote other.


Entered at Thu May 5 03:54:48 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

I figured that would get to you, Jeff.


Entered at Thu May 5 02:48:20 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.133)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good old fucking fashioned workmanship may be provided by men or women of any gender. Fuck the flicking fucking lingo licking police. And if they have any relatives in Port Hardy, Norm can fuck them too.

Both you guys are funny. Norm's funny too.


Entered at Thu May 5 02:41:37 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Das boot

Thanks, sadavid. A hip wader, if I ever saw one.


Entered at Wed May 4 23:14:49 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Jeff

Jeff, give me an e mail some time.


Entered at Wed May 4 22:56:48 CEST 2016 from (31.50.95.178)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Jeff

I'll certainly do my best, but may be babysitting.


Entered at Wed May 4 21:53:20 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: that sinking feeling

Mike Nomad: see [My link].


Entered at Wed May 4 21:19:10 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Concretized footwear

Tsk, tsk, Jeff. Don't let the language cops nab you. Workmanship? Why, back in a previous line of work I would have been excoriated if I had used that word. It's workPERSONship, Jeff. Doncha see? Btw, we DO have language police in Canada, did you know? In Quebec, where commercial and retail signs must become in French, or have a prominent French equivalent usage displayed. So, cement shoes becomes . . . what? Des chaussures de concrete? Maybe Landmark can be of help.


Entered at Wed May 4 20:26:56 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.133)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Cement Shoes. But They Were Made In China.

Like the old days. Except the the workmanship ain't as good. Right here, in the hood. I'm on the edge of Sheepshead Bay, opposite Manhattan Beach. The inlet of the bay separates us slightly, till it ends, about 1/2 mile west.


Entered at Wed May 4 19:43:36 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Music poet laureate

Many evaluations of Bob Dylan over the first few years (with some exceptions of course) would have led the oddsmakers to betting 5000-1 that he would not ever be the music poet laureate of the 20th century. By Leicester 1966, and the big 3 albums of 1965-66, it became evident that, like the soccer team, even a 2$ (or pound) bet would have been a very worthwhile bet.


Entered at Wed May 4 11:23:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

interment, not internment.


Entered at Wed May 4 11:22:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 2nd May 1965

This is the date that Bob Dylan played the De Montfort Hall, Leicester and is just about the best of the bonus live sessions for Cutting Edge full box set purchasers. So it was exactly 51 years later that Leicester were confirmed as winners of the Premier League. Many say it was the re-internment of King Richard III after centuries languishing in an unmarked grave in a Leicester car park that brought the success. But I think it was Bob Dylan's 51 year effect.

It is a great event for football. At last the long monopoly of just four teams has been broken, and if Tottenham come second it's a double breaking. I suspect everyone was cheering Leicester on, with the exception of Tottenham supporters near the end, and I'd bet they're pleased too.

My dad worked for the John Bull Rubber Company (they made tyres) whose head office was in Leicester, a bit tenuous but I suppose it's nearly a link.


Entered at Wed May 4 06:37:13 CEST 2016 from (174.88.135.95)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: 5000-1 odds

It just goes to show that in sport leagues, anything is possible and most likely you'll see it if you are lucky enough to be on the planet and are patient and wait long enough.


Entered at Wed May 4 05:45:46 CEST 2016 from (67.87.217.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Definitely Robertson.


Entered at Wed May 4 04:04:30 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.140)

Posted by:

Bill M

I wonder if Donald Trump has a favourite among the OQ. Thoughts?


Entered at Wed May 4 01:37:58 CEST 2016 from (114.75.74.10)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Things have been a bit quiet here recently. I suggest we either go back to talking about the feud or discuss Leicester's magnificent win in the EPL. Having spent my formative years in Leicester (0-2), I vote for the latter. (Band connection: Dylan and the Band played a concert in Leicester May 15, 1966 - I just missed them by seven years)


Entered at Tue May 3 23:36:21 CEST 2016 from (67.87.217.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Ro Fino itinerary. Glasgow, Liverpool, London

Dunc, Peter, Al.

Ro Fino, solo

May 14, Glasgow, The Amethyst 3PM

May 15th Liverpool. The Caledonia 8 PM

May 16th London, the Green note 9 PM



Entered at Tue May 3 21:14:48 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan/The (Old) Peoples' Rock Concert Thing

I enjoyed the first Sinatra album.I'd enjoy a return to Dylan again.Speaking of Dylan,it seems he'll be playing Oldstock and was wondering if he'd play his "regular" setlist of Sinatra standards & "recent" album material(at a festival with a ton of people)?Would that piss people off big time or what?Or,will he go back to some R&R?Which voice will emerge? Will "fans" go nuts---his voice is different! He growls! What song is that?! Where are the old songs? Why did he change the tunes? The words?!This is an opportunity for some prime time contrarianism!


Entered at Tue May 3 16:35:23 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "sing in a . . . straight ahead way"

bassmanlee: glad you have discovered how to become clairvoyant; best of luck . . . . I second your emotion re: the übermelismatiche anthems. One of the joys of the Winnipeg Jets home games is the approach of their anthemeer, Stacey Nattrass: "my personal stance on anthems is that they should be sung like anthems, not pop songs. So while it might be fun to bust out and show off some tricks I don't think it is all that appropriate. I think of that Simpsons episode where the anthem goes on for twenty or more minutes. That would be bad. Also, people want to sing along. It's hard for them to do that if you change up the melody or go off on some tangent."


Entered at Tue May 3 16:06:25 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vocal range and piety

I have a long-held theory about Christianity and vocal prowess. If you were someone with a tendency to miss the notes, church was an embarrassment, and therefore an excruciating experience. If you were one of the choir it was enjoyable … I’m talking about Anglican churches here. When we visited the African American church in West Helena there was enough drums, organ, guitar, volume and exuberance to make even the most reserved non-singer burst into song. It wasn’t like that when I was a kid at all, and I link agnosticism with poor singing ability.

It reminds me of a family funeral a couple of years ago. There were 20-30 people, and an elderly relative missed a verse in both All things Bright & Beautiful and Jerusalem (sung at most UK weddings and funerals because everyone likes the tune). So he was singing a different verse to the rest of us and was too deaf to notice. The trouble was he had the loudest voice, and was also severely flat. It was hard to keep a straight face even on such a sombre occasion.

Charles Wesley had the knack of writing tunes most people could sing or at least attempt. The same has been said of This Land Is Your Land … that Woody Guthrie deliberately wrote something most people could sing, based on a simplified version of a known melody of a Baptist hymn. He said it was in response to God Bless America. Though the Star Spangled Banner is noticeably very hard for the singing-challenged.

As Scotland and Wales have their own anthems, and all of us share God Save The Queen, there have been issues at sports events, where England uses the British anthem. There have been calls for an English anthem, with the suggestions being Land of Hope & Glory or Jerusalem. I'd prefer the less imperialistic Jerusalem.


Entered at Tue May 3 15:08:29 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: That's Life!.....That's what all the people say.

Old Blue eyes, you don't like him? Considering Brenda Lee, also don't forget that little fireball with the big voice............Timi Yuro singing.........Make the World go Away.

I'm gone to sea..........


Entered at Tue May 3 14:51:09 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Subject: Vocal prowess

As an amateur musician and son of a life-long music educator, I have perhaps a different view of vocal 'talent'. Everyone should sing. Even if they can't. Singing is a communal activity. The proliferation of singing contest programs and the resulting ubiquity of over-the-top performances galls me. I don't want to hear a Whitney Houston-style melismatic National Anthem. I want to hear the people in the stands sing it. Hey, if you can't hit the high notes, HARMONIZE. Sheesh.

To paraphrase an old song (done superbly by Maria Muldaur) "It ain't the pitch, it's the emotion!"


Entered at Tue May 3 14:29:20 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Vocals

I've been listening to some Dylan of 2016 on-line at Expecting Rain. If the 'Sinatra/standards' experience has contributed to anything, it has been a return to 'voice' with singing that is the best of what has come to be expected when one goes to a Dylan concert. Both the covers and his own songs (Tangled, Changed, and the more recent Dylan compositions). The range is back and what was in the past at times disheartening has evaporated. We get vocals that go well with the band and are welcome to the ear.


Entered at Tue May 3 14:27:08 CEST 2016 from (70.193.165.89)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Shadows in the Night

As far as timing, Dylan's Sinatra àlbums was released during centennial anniversary year of the crooner's birth.


Entered at Tue May 3 14:20:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bassmanlee - my sister had it last year. She no longer wears glasses, and says she had never seen colours so brightly in her memory as since the operation!

Yes, in a way the Great American Songbook is folk, in that everyone knows them, and Pop Idol and X Factor are adding 60s pop / rock to that songbook, as so many contestants choose classic songs. You'd have to say You've Lost That Loving Feeling and Hallelujah are examples which should now be considered "Great American Songbook." I think the backing of Dylan's retro stuff is sublime, and fascinating to see what a small conventional band can do with what were big band arrangements. The amazing thing is that Brenda Lee was just 16 when she cut that, but her voice soars on it.

Bob deserves to do what he wants, and would anyway, and there have been many stumbling blocks for me along the way … I bought every album, nearly all on the day of release too. But the Christmas album, Sinatra, Great American Songbook - a lot of these songs require a vocal range he doesn't possess.


Entered at Tue May 3 14:01:41 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: Dylan goes retro

Have to say, I dig it. Mr. Z revealed in his memoir that his tastes and influences were, in his early days, even, were much wider than his audience would expect. I like the country-ish steel guitar treatments, and his voice is better than ever, except maybe the Nashville Skyline period.

While discounting some of Mr. Sinatra's personality and behaviors, I will admit an admiration for his work, especially the RCA and Reprise years. The guy had state of the art recording equipment, excellent arrangers, top-notch studio musicians and an unbelievably excellent songbook to draw from, many written expressly for HIM. What's not to like?

Take, then, the Ella Fitzgerald renderings of many of the exact same songs. Different, exquisite, often (IMHO) superior, but Frank holds his own. My all-time find was Ella's American Songbook box set in a used bin. Most expensive CD purchase ever, and worth every penny.

Peter, I see a parallel in the Brenda Lee cover...a pop musician attempting (and succeeding) in interpreting a jazz standard. Perhaps Mr. Z is making the argument that as these obviously professionally "composed" songs have become so widely dispersed and reinterpreted that they have become "folk music", part of our collective vocabulary.

On a personal note, please keep me in your thoughts as I go under the knife tomorrow for cataract surgery. Can't wait to be able to see in 3D again!


Entered at Tue May 3 13:03:48 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

I have a nice condition old Philips R2R from the fifties that I'm too scared to plug in. bought it for $10. makes a nice shelf display piece anyway


Entered at Tue May 3 10:29:55 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ah, now here's the link

Sorry forgot to add the link. All The Way. Brenda Lee.


Entered at Tue May 3 10:26:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All The Way

Lovely job, Rod. I had a couple of light weight metal 7" spools once that looked great. I used one permanently as the "recipient spool."

Incidentally, well-restored basic auto change early 60s record players go for £150 to £200.

The link is to Brenda Lee singing All The Way … my favourite version. It's from the "All The Way" LP in 1961. It is a superb album … Tragedy is even better, plus Lover Come Back To Me, On The Sunny Side of The Street, Kansas City.

One of my issues with the Great American Songbook, if you were a female singer in the 60s, the old managers and agents with cigars permanently in their mouths made you record this stuff. They all had to. The difference with Brenda Lee was she was produced by Owen Bradley with Nashville's finest, and she had the voice to do it.


Entered at Tue May 3 09:29:44 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Reel to Reels

I just finished this project last weekend. A couple od old 1960s tape recorders and a Sound Blaster amp from the 90's. Just an MP3 player now but it looks the part.


Entered at Tue May 3 09:16:49 CEST 2016 from (210.86.100.25)

Posted by:

Rod

I really liked Shadows in the Night. Looking forward to hearing more of his new release.


Entered at Tue May 3 07:07:29 CEST 2016 from (74.12.51.23)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: I can't imagine wanting to own more Sinatra than the one 45 I have of his, "In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning".


Entered at Tue May 3 00:50:28 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Janis - American Masters Series

Really looking forward to American Masters Series on Janis tomorrow night.


Entered at Tue May 3 00:44:06 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Beyonce

Peter, my daughter has been raving non stop about the Beyonce since it came out. I don't know. I think you have to be from the dance/hip hop generation to get it. When my kids were small they blasted Tupac and Eminem all day. I was able to enjoy and appreciate a lot of it. I think as my hearing has gotten worse I don't have enough patience with layered sounds. I do love when she sings ballads like in Cadillac Records.


Entered at Mon May 2 22:17:54 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"Nitemare" is the spelling on my copy of "Another Side of Bb Dylan." An original pressing too. I'll concede it might not be the greatest example of Bob's genius, but I'll take it over recent stuff. And it was the one my dad found most offensive.

Incidentally, I read three reviews of Beyonce over the weekend - all five star and saying it was her defining album. I did like her as Etta James.


Entered at Mon May 2 21:11:54 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Series of Dreams?

It could be a 'Series of Dreams'. Maybe Brenda singing 'Sweet Nothings' into Bob's ear.


Entered at Mon May 2 21:10:46 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.188)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT. I doubt anyone here feels as I, & I know people will have many examples of covers they love or think are great. But, in general, my feeling about Band covers are different than most people's. Dylan, I'm all for hearing Bob doing Band songs. But in general, it's the unusual case where I think some one should have done a Band cover. Now, it's time to get some sleep. My clock is off.


Entered at Mon May 2 21:08:24 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bad dream?

You mean like 'Street Rock' with Kurtis Blow? OK. Or maybe even a solo. Motopsycho 'Nitemare' indeed.


Entered at Mon May 2 21:04:49 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But really, I want Dylan singing something wild and transcendent about being 75, or alternatively rapping on the state of the world in 2016. If I want to hear "All The Way" I'll go for Brenda Lee in 1962.


Entered at Mon May 2 20:53:55 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Elixir

Peter V: I beg to differ. With a piano and a small dose of elixir, I think you might want to give Dylan a chance at the local inn. You never know.


Entered at Mon May 2 20:40:46 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Highly recommend the new RoseAnne Fino track "Touch Me" excellent stuff.

As to that Old Black Magic etc, I can see my blue Dansette in the corner of the living room, and my dad's pained expression as "Motorpsycho Nitemare" blasted out. But he really can't sing, my dad protested. My dad had sung Oh, For The Wings Of A Dove on early British radio when he was ten and considered himself an expert. I argued my case vehemently. YES, he can sing! YES, he does sing differently but it expresses.

But my Dad was right about the Great American Song Book. Dylan wouldn't last ten minutes in the Lounge Bar at the Red Lion Hotel.

I'll go for him doing Hank Williams or John Lee Hooker, but not Frank.


Entered at Mon May 2 20:03:22 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fino fine

Good one, Jeff. Thank you. Shades of Ani and with a good band behind her. Fino: definitely looking forward to the album.


Entered at Mon May 2 19:51:02 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.188)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Ro Plugged In

Electric Five Piece Fino with new single at the link.


Entered at Mon May 2 19:29:21 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Folk and blues covers

I should add that I very much admired Dylan's early 90s 2 albums of covers of folk and blues. He could do that again and I'd very much like that.


Entered at Mon May 2 19:20:18 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Wish list

Bob F: I share some of your feelings, but still enjoy the interpretations of the songs by Dylan. I did NOT ever listen to Sinatra and the like and did not appreciate them. At 67, and not because of Dylan, I have found something in some of what Sinatra did. I too would much prefer new material with the creative compositions of Love and Theft or Time Out of Mind. I'm not sure we'll ever get that again but we can hope. To be clear, I never looked down on some of the Dylan albums you noted in your recent comments. They may have not been up to Visions of Johanna but they were better for the most part than 90% of what others were writing and putting out at that time. I can't say it bores me to tears but I won't listen to these repeatedly the way I listen to many of the original Dylan compositions. Maybe Dylan will cover others with his current very positive vocal ability. An expanded Warren Zevon album of covers by Dylan would sure be welcome for example. He could do some Johnny Cash or Hank Williams and I'd like that. Maybe he should cover The Band (now wouldn't that be something).


Entered at Mon May 2 18:18:34 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: All The Way

Link to Dylan's version of All The Way from his new record. I guess it sounds fine and is beautifully recorded, honestly though this stuff bores me to tears. Didn't John Lennon say something once like "before Elvis there was nothing". That has always rang true for me. Of course I understand you have the great jazz and blues artists and Woody and Hank and everything evolves from all of that. I thing about when Dylan was making great records like Street Legal, Shot of Love, Infidels and Empire Burlesque and so many critics and fans were disapointed. Crazy times. If he was to reach back and make a record of that caliber now, it would be cause for some serious celebrating. When Dylan put out the soundtrack Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid, Jon Landau totally thrashed him in Rolling Stone. Can you imagine anyone in their right mind thrashing such beautiful, original music? Now everyone drools over this crap. I just don't get it. I'd much rather have a collection of him doing Elvis, Chuck Berry or Burt Bacharach songs then this Sinatra stuff. These songs never rang true for me. Where I grew up older people were always listening to Sinatra, Dean Martin, Al Martino and the rest. I didn't like it then and now that I'm an old man I still thing it's donkey dust.


Entered at Mon May 2 16:17:12 CEST 2016 from (65.93.116.108)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Good to see some interesting posts here re Leonard Peltier. Also appc Norm's comment about harmony and respect. The Old Sea Dog makes a good point. Must be the sea air, I reckon.


Entered at Mon May 2 15:05:08 CEST 2016 from (70.193.173.13)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Leonard Peltier

Mr. Peltier was convicted of the execution murders of two FBI agents. Despite the efforts of his highly qualified lawyers over the years, the convictions have been upheld on appeal. While the liberal presidents Clinton and Obama have pardoned or commuted the sentences of a large number of those convicted of non-violent crimes, the fact that Peltier remains in prison is a poltical reality.


Entered at Mon May 2 14:54:11 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Leonard Peltier Fine Art

Check out the "smoking Willie Nelson" print, also available as a T-shirt . . . .


Entered at Mon May 2 05:15:46 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sointula

The subject is the name of a little Finnish settlement on Malcolm Island a few miles below Port Hardy. That is a Finnish word that means, 'In Harmony'.

I choose that because it is in harmony to see people getting along with respect here.

I'm away to sea again tomorrow. I have a lot of work going on and very steady just now. Have to go and load a load of gravel on my barge and deliver to the head of Smith Inlet. Then more booming ground work.

I have been having thoughts that, maybe the old man upstairs just thinks it's not time for me to retire yet. I'm still pretty productive. I really do look forward to just cruising around on our yacht tho'.

In reality tho' when one is healthy, working hard and making a good living, it's pretty hard to complain isn't it? It's funny, every year at this time all my old friends are headed north fishing. They stop in Port Hardy and when many of them see me on the wharf they say, "I thought you were gonna retire!"..........I'm tryin'

Y'all stay healthy and happy. Keep the music true...


Entered at Mon May 2 04:54:29 CEST 2016 from (24.114.73.162)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"Now it's time for all of us to call for Leonard Pelltier's freedom" - Robbie Robertson, 2015

Ben Pike..... A refreshing attitude, you have....... Scoll back to just Wallsend's link of today for the video that I referred to that Robbie was involved with........It was just part of a continued press that the very top powers in Washington have been presented with in recent years.


Entered at Mon May 2 03:27:33 CEST 2016 from (184.206.63.8)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Free Leonard

Kevin J, I take you at your word and have never been happier to have been wrong.

I can find nothing online about the efforts you speak of, if you have any links please post them.


Entered at Mon May 2 03:14:36 CEST 2016 from (68.192.72.104)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i'm guessing my Sony reel to reel is a 72, as that's when i got it. One of these days i must have it examined.


Entered at Mon May 2 03:10:55 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: TEAC 4010

I got this in 1969 while in RVN - just like most of the guys there. Japanese stereos and cameras were all the rage there and then. The brake failed in the mid 80's and rendered it inoperable. But reassuring to see there's folks that can bring them back up -


Entered at Mon May 2 01:37:58 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rita Coolidge

Review of Rita Coolidge on my blog. Her new autobiography is out … great band, great setlist. I asked her about Agrigento too.


Entered at Mon May 2 00:51:25 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bob W - Hillsborough verdict aftermath

That ESPN documentary is only now available over here Bob presumably since the verdict. I think the powers that be had banned it but not sure of the specific reason

I've only had opportunity to watch the opening 40 minutes but it's clearly been brilliantly put together and so far conveys precisely what took place as we in Liverpool especially those of us who were there have always known.

The link is an Observer article by one of the lads on our footie website who survived the horrors in the central pens. It is an astonishing piece of writing that conveys so much of what was initially so harrowing and latterly for 27 years so evil about Hillsborough.


Entered at Sun May 1 23:28:49 CEST 2016 from (114.75.86.239)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I wasn't familiar with the Peltier case, maybe because I don't live in the US.

Peter, I once flirted with the idea of buying an Akai reel to reel. Your post brought back some forgotten memories.


Entered at Sun May 1 22:12:06 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.11)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I take it that Ben P is leading the Peltier campaign this time around - not that he cares about Peltier but to show Robbie what a real non-chic man can accomplish.


Entered at Sun May 1 17:24:28 CEST 2016 from (24.114.73.162)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: BS

Ben Pike: You're talking nonsense. As recently as last year, Robbie Robertson was involved in a very forceful submission to the White House and the making of a video/public service video that garnered all sorts iof publicity on the subject of amnesty for Leonard Pelltier.


Entered at Sun May 1 13:22:44 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Akai was another good reel-to-reel player. A friend had one too. If you were really obsessive you could add leader tape between tracks pre-dating search on CD players by a dozen years - you used fast forwards, and the machines stopped when they hit leader. You could only do that if you didn't turn the tape over, and just used one direction … four track had two tracks going in each direction for home use.

In the days of Language Laboratory for English teaching we used half track master tapes, and the student booths back in 1971 had open reel loaded in large cartridges which broke regularly, and we had a technician repairing and reloading them. The big innovation was when the student booths switched to cassette, but because they ran and used high speed forward and back, there were serious tape breakage rates. We tried using expensive metal cased cassettes, to combat heat build up- they were used about ten hours a day, and in some daft piece of design, were installed below the student's seat, so enclosed. They were locked away so that students couldn't touch (or purloin) the cassettes. They had controls in front of them. We later discovered it was cheaper just to throw cassettes away as they snapped. We had five 24-booth language labs, so bought cassettes by the thousand. From long experience, Philips cassettes were the most durable!


Entered at Sun May 1 13:01:03 CEST 2016 from (31.50.123.21)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Reel to Reel

Thanks Peter and Jeff. Enjoyed the reel to reel posts.

Took me right back. In student days, I used to enjoy going to this guy's flat, whose hobby was making up tapes from various bands to play on his Akai reel to reel. Sound was great.


Entered at Sun May 1 12:18:53 CEST 2016 from (184.206.174.49)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Remember, Remember

Hey, remember the outrage of the Bill Clinton pardons? /n Not many do. The national media, eager to hip derision on Clinton in 2001, furious over their failure to drive him from office, sustained a months log attacks on his use of Presidential Pardons. Marc Rich, a wealthy flack higher up in Israel had put in a good word for, was at the center of the storm. His pardon was treated with roughly the outrage of the Mi Lai massacrer because....some reason. Some of Clinton's pardons, involving his own business and relations, were questionable, some were actually quite noble. /n Such was the atmosphere that Clinton was derided by the "progressives" that always hated him for who he didn't pardon. Remember Leonard Peltier?/n Not many do. Our own Robbie Robertson (forgive me, but this is my justification for injecting politics into the guest book) took a shot at Clinton with a weak pun at an awards show, Pelitier wasn't "Mark Rich enough." We won't forget you, he promised. Well, 16 years (not on the road) later, and Robbie hasn't so much as burped a word about Peltier. And he has a liberal President this time to deride for not issuing the pardon. /n To be fair, not everyone has forgotten, you can keep up with a clemency campaign on a Facebook page if you are interested. Bottom line: Robbie liberal chic was short lived.


Entered at Sun May 1 11:08:33 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, why didn't you post on reel-to-reel two weeks ago? A local shop had two matched UHER reel to reels - not the UHER Report portable, beloved of journalists, but ones for home use. "Matched" the shop was told, which means they would have been set up with the same head bias etc for recording. Both were a bit battered. They hadn't had any power run through them in 25 years, and my friend who runs the shop said I could have them for a donation to charity, whatever I wanted to give. I used to use a UHER Report in the 70s and it was the standard high-quality portable machine. I was sorely tempted, but Mrs V has recently mentioned my Sony Open-Reel (1971) and asked pointedly "Does that still work? When was the last time you used it?" So bringing in two battered-looking UHERs was out of the question.

All my dubbed 4-track open reels went to the dump years ago, though I still have a box of live recordings of our theatre shows done on a Revox.

The trouble is that even though the heads survive, in all likelihood, the motors of an unused open reel will have died, as with turntables and cassette players. With lack of use the lubrication runs out of the motors or solidifies and they seize. Another issue, inherent with open reel, is that tapes tend to sound best on the machine they were recorded on. Thus tapes done on my Sony sounded as good as stuff done on the Revox (which cost six times as much). Of course you can fiddle around with the head bias on a Revox to match the original. Domestic machines like the Sony, even good ones, are fixed. Tape quality is an enormous factor, as is print-through on tape that hasn't been moved in years. But I do have nostalgia for scissors and leader tape and sticking bits together.

As I posted years ago, a producer who had spent much time archiving at the BBC, said 50s and early 60s tapes survived really well, but late 60s and 70s had printed through, shed coatings etc.


Entered at Sun May 1 07:02:12 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Revolution Will Not Be Digitized!

See the Link : It says: Sell your records, it’s time for the reel-to-reel revival.

The Reel To Reel Comeback Revolution

Writing about a modified TASCAM unit in 2013, a reviewer from The Absolute Sound glowed about the superiority of reel-to-reel: "Folks, to say that this was a 'better' sound," he writes, "even 'an extraordinarily better' sound, doesn’t cut it. This was a revolution."


Entered at Sun May 1 02:25:59 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.7)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: My favourite link between pop-rock and the Jungle Book is Donovan's wonderful "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" (i.e., the mongoose) from his Bandish "Open Road" LP. RTT was the follow-up single to "Atlantis", which I've previously linked to our guys' "The Shape I'm In".


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