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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Tue Aug 30 09:55:47 CEST 2016 from (202.67.46.31)

Posted by:

grosir sepatu wanita

Web: My link

numpang absen ya bos, kunjungan pertama nih


Entered at Tue Aug 30 09:52:48 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Sopranos are singing …

While getting that Joey Dee video, I naturally found a 2011 interview on line. He's speaking about Morris Levy, the Mob and Payola. LINKED

One quote, "Peppermint Twist was the number one song in the country. I get a royalty check and it states that I owe Roulette $8,000. I said where's my royalty money? He (Levy) said "Joe, keep your mouth shut. You're gonna get hurt."

Also, "These guys can open doors for you. Or they can put you in a box."

Well, at least Spotify doesn't come after you with baseball bats. Yet.


Entered at Tue Aug 30 09:35:47 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Joey Dee

Thanks, Bill. I did a Toppermost on Joey Dee & he Starliters. To my amazement, the site found a video of my favourite Joey Dee track, What Kind of Love Is This (linked). It's miscredited to "and the Starliters" but is a studio orchestra from the film Two Tickets to Paris. I never knowingly dispose of a 45. The ones I referred to in the article would be Ya Ya, Shout and Peppermint Twist … What Kind of Love Is This is later. I've also got Hey Let's Twist, but never found a 45 single of Hot Pastrami. It was released in the UK.

The Joey Dee rarity / oddity is a flexidisc called "Dance The Authentic Peppermint Twist" an instructional record. I can't remember where I found it, at a Record Fair I think.


Entered at Tue Aug 30 04:07:43 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: JT

I had a big guufaww Jerry :-)


Entered at Tue Aug 30 03:58:24 CEST 2016 from (24.114.59.45)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Fabulous work on the singles blog. Smiled a lot and learned a lot too. Do you still have your Joey Dee 45s? I'm partial to his "Hot Pastrami" - parts 1&2.


Entered at Tue Aug 30 02:46:28 CEST 2016 from (65.95.178.79)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Frisco Kid

So, did you drove or did you flew? (The Frisco Kid)


Entered at Mon Aug 29 23:36:48 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV and his '45's!!!

FANTASTIC mate!!!!

Sigh - the memories that little lot evoked. Bloodyhell. I'll show Mags tomorrow night when I get the chance. Superb.


Entered at Mon Aug 29 23:33:25 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gene Wilder

I'm sad to read just now that Gene Wilder passed away yesterday. We've lost one of the greatest comics. So many of his movies were great.

I was a really great fan of his movies with Richard Prior. They worked well together. My particular favourite was "Silver Streak".......Rest in Peace Gene.

Thanks Bob!


Entered at Mon Aug 29 22:17:50 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

His Master's Voice was EMI's premier label, with most of the prestige classical stuff. On popular, they had Ray Charles, Swinging Blue Jeans, Manfred Mann.

Columbia (NOT related to US Columbia) was the chief popular label (Cliff Richard, The Shadows, Frank Ifield, Helen Shapiro), with poor George Martin at Parlophone relegated to novelty stuff … until he signed The Beatles.

But EMI ran three parallel competing labels.

HMV and RCA both used the Nipper logo and spent 50 years arguing about it.


Entered at Mon Aug 29 21:54:38 CEST 2016 from (100.14.113.51)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: NWC

NWC, I sent you an email per your request.

Happy Birthday, Norm!


Entered at Mon Aug 29 20:52:59 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: His Master's Voice

Hadn't heard of the 'His Master's Voice' label til I roved through Peter's blog. Is that where Dylan got "His Master's Voice is calling me, said Tweedle De Dum to Tweedle De Dee"?


Entered at Mon Aug 29 20:16:40 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Chris Eldridge - 9 Pound Hammer

Has any one heard this feller before? A gawd damn flat pick master of acoustic guitar. He has Kentucky blue grass in his blood.

Today at the ripe old age of 72 now :-) I'm.....pushin age 73!


Entered at Mon Aug 29 19:10:10 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Names, Scribble & Numbers

OK, at last here is a sample from my work in progress on vinyl records and record collecting, a chapter on the names, scribble and numbers you find on secondhand records, with a humorous snapshot of a youth club record player evening in 1962, JUST before The Beatles took off … Follow the link, and please feel free to comment.


Entered at Mon Aug 29 17:31:59 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: better rap

Possibly the source of the Cat's nom de guerre.

Definitely NSFW.


Entered at Mon Aug 29 17:30:32 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: bad rap

Bob Dylan guests on this 1986 Kurtis Blow track.


Entered at Mon Aug 29 14:24:03 CEST 2016 from (31.146.244.60)

Posted by:

Helmet Heroes

Location: United States
Web: My link

Subject: game

Free Flash Games


Entered at Mon Aug 29 00:22:57 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Ralph McTell - Gary Peterson and Al Stewart

I may have sounded a bit dismissive of Gary Petrson but he was a very accomplished guitarist.

Al Stewart - I was a member of the Marquee Club in London for a while and once attended a folk evening there. Al Stewart did a guest spot and the only song I can recall him doing is "Desolation Row", with a spoken introduction about it being long and off Dylan's latest album. According to my old pocket diary, that was on 3 October 1965 and, I believe, HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED had only been released in the UK two days earlier, on 1 October 1965! Al Stewart must have really worked at it to get it down. As it happens, I had spent the summer in the States on a working holiday and, having bought the album there, was familiar with the song. Goodness knows what others there made of it, though.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 20:35:41 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

One I had missed. The cover CD for UNCUT 233 (October 2016, just on sale) is "Sounds of The New West 2016." Track 2 is "Desperate and Depressed" by Margo Price, whose album "Midwest Farmer's Daughter" will be in my Best of 2016. "Desperate and Depressed" was the B-side of Hurtin' (On The Bottle, a 45 on Third Man Records. I had never seen it.

Anyway. it includes the lines:

We busked in Sarasota

I made twenty-seven-bucks

"wept for Richard Manuel.

"Thinkin' I might have his luck."

Live version is linked.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 16:13:54 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dolly Parton

Her new CD, Pure and Simple, comes with a bonus CD of her legendary Glastonbury 2014 concert. So often live stuff at big festivals is "You had to be there" but not in this case … Dolly really takes no prisoners. Phenomenal performance with (as predicted) a first class band.

Check the video link to Glastonbury 2014 and Jolene to brighten up your day … it's the first time I've seen the security guards doing a dance routine at a concert.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 13:38:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Ian. Ralph McTell isn't mentioned in "Bournemouth A-Go-Go: A 60s Memoir" which is odd as it focuses more on Al Stewart and the folk scene (which centred at The Disques A-Go-Go, hence the title … it was rented to a Folk Club on Mondays). I wonder if he ever got there? I'll ask. We suspect Paul Simon did.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 07:08:49 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Jeff: No need for a medal...

just a small plaque commemorating the event is enough....if I ever get through to the end of that article, that is.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 06:58:06 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Hawkins & The Hawks. 40 Days.

I imagine this has been posted here many times, but, I've never seen it before.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 06:28:55 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Geoff Muldaur & Jim Kweskin. New release & tour.

A not to be missed if possible show. Tour dates are listed to the right of the article.


Entered at Sun Aug 28 01:36:58 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Nathaniel Rateliff

I think I sent the wrong clip, try this one. Although that last one was pretty good, he's a 12-stepper and 2-stepper there!


Entered at Sat Aug 27 21:02:45 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Nathaniel Rateliff

I think the SOB song has already become a classic. John D is right about their take on The Shape I'm In. SOB is normally their closing song and here they segue in & out of TSII really well. That's respect, creativity and some musical chops altogether.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 19:31:54 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.103)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Fred.. A for effort but no fucking medal....yet.

See Fred, that article even aggravated your computer. What a fucking age for real artists..& real interaction. & life. Great art comes from living, not being locked in a room in front of a computer screen, playing for tips.This aspect of the article, & others, also highlights the endless discussion of how when money was removed from the equation, the ability of labels to spend dough on new artists & artist promotion was gone... What's replacing it is pretty pitiful & depressing.



Entered at Sat Aug 27 16:15:35 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats Come to mind. They do a great job on The Shape I'm In and has been quoted as saying "The Band were a big influence on them."


Entered at Sat Aug 27 16:05:21 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: NWC Question

Your right NWC. It's the post about don't come round here anymore. I thought the topic of The Band's music on new groups was interesting to me.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 15:57:46 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorhtWestcoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Mr. Wigo

Mr. Wigo, I would like to talk with you about one of your posts in this gb / Norbert's gb. Please email me your address. The most convenient and secure way to find my address and real name is visiting following gb entries: 'Sun Jun 5 12:53:12 CEST 2016' and 'Fri Nov 28 20:54:22 CET 2008'. Thank you.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 15:49:07 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NWC

Location: The same as usual.

Subject: OOOOPS.... JD / JT / John D

Ooops, sorry. I meant _JT_.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 15:46:13 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Great thoughts? / JD

I agree. Which thoughts you were referring to? There are several JT posts here during the past days!


Entered at Sat Aug 27 15:25:42 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT

Well said JT. Great thoughts.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 14:16:31 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: I tried, but couldn't get to the end of that article you linked to (about the future of music). Even my laptop could get to the end of it without getting the dreaded Apple spinning beachball of death appearing several times.

I'll try again tomorrow, fortifying myself with some very strong coffee!

Hopefully the computer will be in tip-top shape, too.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 14:13:21 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: The webmaster JH - critics

Thanks BILL M and JT for your thoughts on "Don't come back here anymore..." I came to think of webmaster's roll. (I don't know how hard he has been harassed and suffered because of this gb, I assume it is a lot. In any case, I am grateful to this Norwegian viking!) However, he has not been strong enough in making this forum pleasant and secure. Many gbers have been hurt by the trolls we all know by the name but never say it aloud. People left because there were so many questions which remained unanswered. I can remember only one clear statement from webmaster during the last five years. It was against WALLSEND. In my world he was just posting simple entries which were pointing to the very _nucleus_ of the Band... in academic manner which should be familiar and reasonable to the webmaster thinking about his profession.

But once again: IF WE EVER WILL SIT ON THE PARK BENCH IN FRONT OF 'SYSTEMBOLAGET' IN STROEMSTAD I WILL BUY YOU A BOTTLE - what the h**l - TWO BOTTES OF 'KOSKENKORVA' AND TALK ABOUT LINUX!


Entered at Sat Aug 27 11:42:38 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.103)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: POP. They're writing about Cashy (Cashmere Cat's apparent nickname) in Billboard Magazine.


Entered at Sat Aug 27 05:39:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cowboy Junkies

We just secured tickets for Cowboy Junkies in Sydney near Victoria. If you don't know or haven't heard this band, well, you are in for a treat. Row 5 in a small theatre. Thank goodness for Monday Magazine for alerting us. What luck!


Entered at Sat Aug 27 02:07:06 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.103)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Future Of Music.

If you can read all of this you deserve a fucking medal. It's downright depressing said the guy who posted the death by bagpipe article.

I couldn't read it all. I didn't even scroll to see how much was left. I was already scanning by the time I got to $4.20

Burt apparently, this is viable, people make real money.

What a fucking world.



Entered at Sat Aug 27 02:03:03 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Beatles heads up

For Beatles buffs. Superb news regarding a new Hollywood Bowl 'live' album remixed by George Martin's son. Sounds incredible. Plus a separate documentary film/DVD release of their fairly brief touring career. Wow.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 27 00:11:38 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.135)

Posted by:

Bill M

Mike N: Yes, funny it's funny, and yes, you need to get a life.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 23:15:48 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Well, you know...

Subject: The wanderer... hilarious!

Hilarious, Mike. You made my day. Nothing like laughter (almost)


Entered at Fri Aug 26 20:16:11 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.119)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Random thoughts

I occasionally have wondered if JT types in "Victoria and Toronto intermittently" each time he posts here or whether he simply drops in the line from a copy-and-drop key on his device's keyboard. (Yes, I know: I need to get a life.) But today, after yet again giving it considerable thought (about 4-5 minutes) it occurred to me that all he has to do is type in "Vatican," which could stand in for "Victoria And Toronto," followed by the 'i' for "intermittently" and "can" for his country of domicile. That's a saving of 25 keystrokes, multiplied by . . . well, you get the idea. His typing finger will thank him.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 19:08:30 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: RIP

Bill M - on that topic: Somebody mentioned Rollie and I thought about Steve and now David P of course. I drifted into TLW people too and those that have passed. Emmett Grogan, shortly thereafter, and Bill Graham too.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 16:02:13 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Warmin' Up!

Bill! I had forgotten your story. Out here many bass players warmed up with Sailors Hornpipe. That was a common thing. Sometimes to watch a guy stumble thru' that was funny.

Dunc, you may recall our conversations years ago about Dollar Academy where my grand father, (mum's dad) grew up with his brother. My grand father Francis and his brother Donald. Grand father survived "Vimy Ridge" and Donald who had gone to Australia and was an infantry soldier was killed. I don't remember where. I like to look at the pictures of Dollar Academy on Google earth.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 15:58:24 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Blowin' In The Wind

For all wind instrument musicians: At the end of the article in the medical journal discussing fungi in bagpipes and hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a description of the importance and methods of cleaning ALL wind instruments. Take heed.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 15:41:15 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, I learned about it in my General George Custer history class.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 15:08:43 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.119)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Death skirl

Geez, Jeff, where do you find this stuff?


Entered at Fri Aug 26 13:38:56 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: That article about The Last Waltz

That was a very interesting article to read. Thanks!

To this day, for the life of me, I cannot figure out why my 13 (at the time) year old cousin (three years younger than me) ended up buying the Last Waltz LP when it came out. He wasn't a fan of anyone at TLW. Maybe he knew who Dylan was, but my cousin was more of a Beatles liking kid. He wasn't really into music that much, though. Then when punk came around he jumped on that bandwagon with a vengeance.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 13:32:23 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Kevin J

That was a nice article on the Great Gilles. In my alternate universe, Gilles won the World Championship in 1982, again in 1983 and in 1985. After helping his teammate, Michele Alboreto secure the title in 1986, while finishing 2nd in the final standings, the mighty Gilles retired from the world of F1 to enjoy the rest of his days with his family and friends, while watching his son win with Williams and then again with Ferrari. : )


Entered at Fri Aug 26 13:28:13 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Bagpipes

I must have been a Scot in a previous life because I really enjoy listening to the bagpipes. In elementary school, my friend who hailed from Glasgow was perplexed by this.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 12:01:15 CEST 2016 from (86.168.32.31)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

The bagpipes story is big across here, Jeff. There are articles in newspapers and stories on TV and radio news programmes warning how important it is to clean pipes and how you should do it properly.

Thanks Westcoaster. We had a Canadian relation who was killed in WW 2. A small photograph was up in the house for many years. Sadly we have lost touch with Canadian family members.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 11:55:23 CEST 2016 from (86.168.32.31)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Thanks Joe J and those who contributed to picking the Band's top ten. Got me playing Big Pink, The Brown Album and Stage Fright one after another yesterday.

The Band are just absolutely, gloriously, brilliant in so many ways. Everytime I listen to a Band album, and I know I'm a come lately - only been listening to them for about 44 years now, I hear something new and brilliant I've not heard before.

I enjoyed every moment of listening to the three albums, but was left thinking how wonderful the endings of Unfaithful Servant and The Shape I'm In are. The work that has gone into these endings and how they are things of real beauty. I loved the piano on Sleeping and the drumming on Time To Kill.

The lyrics of Caledonia Mission had me thinking, so I read Peter's article again, and the article on The Last Waltz had me re reading PSB's article on hearing of the death of Richard.

We must always celebrate the talent of Richard - what a legacy he has left us.

The Band - greatest band ever.

Just A Whistle Stop is playing in the background. Got to run and get the three year old from nursery - 2-5 year olds football starts tomorrow. Winter coming.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 05:58:34 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Death by bagpipe.

There's a big difference between older & new bagpipes,


Entered at Fri Aug 26 05:42:49 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Don't Come Around Here...'

You're of course correct, Bill M. There are many who don't come around here anymore. Some because of perceived mysogyny; some because of a perception that discussed a 'feud' again and again is futile and uninformative; some because they think its all been said about the OQ'; some because they don't find anything here of interest anymore; some are just 'gone' sad to say.

The key to maintaining this site as a forum for discussion in my view is a focus on how new music reflects on The Band and their legacy and also a discussion of how the art of music can be supported and/or damaged by the approach taken by those who make it and produce it. We've done somewhat well on the latter but have only sporadically succeeded with the former.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 05:26:11 CEST 2016 from (76.67.15.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Joe J: Thanks for the link to the TLW article.

Any talk of the Sailor's Hornpipe reminds me to the following story, which I posted here in 2003:

... a young man approaches the city's best rock bassist (Denny Gerrard of Bearsville artist Jericho) and says "Denny, will you teach me how to play?" Denny rips off an amazingly fast "Sailor's Hornpipe" and asks, "do you think you'll ever be able to do that?" When the answer comes back along the lines of "Oh no, not in a million years", Denny says simply, "Then there's nothing I can teach you."

Rockin C: Denny was in the Paupers with Adam Mitchell, who I know you like. The Paupers were part of Albert Grossman's stable from '67-'69, so must've known our guys from then, if not from Toronto.

By the way, looking at this site's archives for January 2003, as I just did, in sobering. So many good and interesting people who don't come around here anymore, most by choice I suppose, though some definitely not.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 04:23:27 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Scotland The Brave .... The Devils Brigade & Dave Hum

OK Bassman.....I think I'm following you.......I think.

Last night when I showed Susan Dave's video of that song, as he is from the UK, we then got into much more discussion.

Susan and I both have deep roots in Scotland and she got to saying how she loved the bag pipes. I had never told her that in high school I played snare in the high school pipe marching band.

So I got to educating her about the pipes and she knew this peace of music but never knew what it was called or the significance of it. Susan's dad was a pilot in WW2 and he never liked to discuss his roll in the destruction.

Susan had never seen this movie. I'm betting some of you have as it is based on actual fact of the First special forces. Combining Canadian and American units.

As she watched this scene Susan cried thinking of her father. A pretty powerful scene.

Here are the pipes for you Dunc, if you've never seen this film.


Entered at Fri Aug 26 03:15:37 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Herb Donates 10.1 Million To Pay For music majors college education in Los Angeles Community College.

Herb Alpert does more than the right thing. Linked.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 20:24:56 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Ralph McTell

It's not much of a story, in reality.

I knew him a little bit back in the mid-1960s, when he was still Ralph May. I ran the folk club at college for a couple of years. In the second year, his brother started there and he recommended a jug band called The Strimmed Implements, a trio formed by Mick Bartlett, who was known as "Henry". Ralph was one the trio and usually did a solo spot. They brought with them a young girl who sat in the audience and then joined them for a couple of songs - Jacqui McShee, later of Pentangle. I also booked "Gary and Ralph" once; Gary (Peterson, I think) was an ex-pat American who was clearly stoned and treated it all as a giggle rather than a gig. As I recall, Ralph had met him when they were both busking in Paris. Anyway, apart from Gary, they all came from South London but started a weekly folk club in North London - Ye Olde Crowne on Highgate Hill. I was member number 007 and went along quite a few times. So that's the background. Now let me move forward 20 years.

As I said, we went to the early show and, beforehand, I put a note for him in at the stage door. I mentioned that it was the anniversary of Guthrie's death and that he used to do Guthrie songs. He didn't do one in the opening set, which was a disappointment. The next day, at the hotel, I referred to the note and he said he's been given it between the two shows. He thanked me for reminding him about Guthrie and said that he had indeed done a Guthrie song in the evening show - I think it was "1913 Massacre" but my memory may be at fault. Not much of a story, really, but it's a fond memory. I'm not even sure he really remembered me (it was a bit more than 20 years later and a lot had happened to him in the intervening period) but he did recall playing with The Strimmed Implements and performing with American Gary - and THE GAS-LIGHT (GOOD TIME FOLK CLUB) on Highgate Hill.

However, Peter, if you should get to talk to him, ask about the time he spent in Poole and Southborne in the early 1960s, doing a succession of odd jobs to keep body and soul together while honing his craft. He and friends stayed long enough to rent flats locally, so I think it was several months rather than a few weeks. I doubt if the flats were very salubrious, though.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 18:55:38 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Peter, always fascinating your struggle to be Bill’s most faithful servant and you don’t have to thank me.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 18:14:17 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Server called Levon

Happy 25th Anniversary Linux!


Entered at Thu Aug 25 17:59:31 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: PA/DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: It's ALL related

OK, Rockin' Chair, I figgered you were just feeling your spinach when you posted the link to (the amazing) Dave Hum doing the Sailor's Hornpipe, but stick around a while and you get this (see link) and the Band connection is revealed!


Entered at Thu Aug 25 16:52:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

There's a January 2016 page with 43 lost TLW photos from The San Francisco Chronicle. The link should go to image 40 which shows The Berkeley Promenade Orchestra and the diners. Browse the others - some great shots.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 16:45:12 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dinner music at TLW

I was intrigued to read that music was played during the Thanksgiving Dinner. Is there a recording of the music played during the dinner before the show began?


Entered at Thu Aug 25 15:05:54 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: TLW

'Big Time' indeed. And what a time it was. Great piece by EG.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 13:02:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Everlys

I saw the two UK 80s tours too, Ian. Pete Wingfield's hit was an extremely big hit, whatever! Do share the Ralph McTell story before November 1st when I see him.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 11:37:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Me too, best article on TLW yet!


Entered at Thu Aug 25 11:04:48 CEST 2016 from (210.86.87.68)

Posted by:

Rod

yep - often the comments are more interesting than the article. Interesting idea about musicians receiving roylaties while they remained members of the band. I wonder when The Band sold more recordings - before or after 78? When did they formally break up (in a business sense)?


Entered at Thu Aug 25 10:29:04 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Joe's linked Last Waltz article

Agree with you Kev. 100%

Thanks Joe - that was an incredible read. Enjoyed it so much and reading the degree of dedication has elevated my understanding of and admiration for the guys - which isn't actually humanly possible. But still.

I guess quite apart from the obvious prima facie Last Waltz element of the piece, what reading it does do is to also afford insight into how years earlier at Big Pink they must have channeled and honed their incredible musical gifts into an entity that no other feckers have ever managed to emulate. They strove for perfection. And attained it. Nothing remotely make-do. Everything crafted and rehearsed and honed to the n'th degree which even with musicians/vocalists of simply high standard would no doubt guarantee great results. However, when you have all five individuals of their standing all striving for that individual and collective perfection you begin to enter unchartered musical territory.

Which, I'm guessing is why we ended up being gifted those initial incredible, nay, peerless albums.

So thanks once again for that Joe. You've made my day.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 25 09:32:04 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Everly Brothers

I met the Everlys once - if "met" is the right word. They were playing a local venue and, because we took along one of our kids, we went to the early show. It was a Saturday (the 20th anniversary if Woody Guthrie's death, as it happens).

The next day, my wife was out and about on some chore or other and returned to say she'd seen the limos at a local hotel. So we grabbed our concert programme book and a few other things and went off there for morning coffee. It was late morning and, slowly, the various performers came down to the lobby/lounge area. We got our programme book signed by most if not all of the musicians, including the Everlys.I think Don was the more reluctant but, since everyone else had done so, he probably thought he had little choice. And Pete Wingfield signed the label of his "18 With A Bullet" single, to a chorus of sarcasm from his fellow band members, including Albert Lee: "Oh, is that your one and only hit single, Pete? Your one and only!" - with heavy emphasis on the "one and only" phrase.

These days, it would have been all selfies", I guess, but we never even took a camera along. I do have a cassette recording of their concert somewhere or other, though.

The support act was Ralph McTell and there's another little story concerning this encounter but maybe another time.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 06:11:12 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

It's far too simplistic, but, it addresses an issue.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 05:49:24 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Sailor's Hornpipe.......Popeye's song

For all you no good!.........no account land lubbers! Listen to this street picker........and watch the girls behind him!


Entered at Thu Aug 25 02:15:37 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.165)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Sorry, Rollie! Let's call it a tie.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 02:11:20 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.165)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Wow! Thank you, Joe. The most enjoyable article I have ever read on TLW....period - end of story.


Entered at Thu Aug 25 01:40:46 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Last Waltz

Link is to a Oui article by Emmett Grogan from Jan. 1977.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 23:53:48 CEST 2016 from (76.69.119.202)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Fred......No, but I did think of you when reading the article LINKED above on Gilles Villeneuve. A really well done piece that brought back so many memories. Spa this weekend !


Entered at Wed Aug 24 23:27:18 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bye Bye Love 1957/58

First record I ever bought -


Entered at Wed Aug 24 21:29:10 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Bunch

Richard & Linda didn't just play The Everlys in the car to Teddy, they recorded them too … link to "When Will I Be loved?" by The Bunch.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 21:26:33 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Devoted To You

I loved "Foreverly" by Billie Joe + Norah too. Also "What The Brothers Sang" by Bonnie Prince Billie and Dawn McCarthy in 2013 (linked), The male / female blend works so well on Everly songs. Stuck in a traffic jam today and The Price of Love by Don & Phil came on the radio, rendering me happy to be sitting there.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 21:18:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Teddy Thompson says that on car journeys as a kid, The Everly Brothers cassette played nonstop.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 15:25:28 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Teddy Thompson & Kelly Jones

I love this album Peter. Yes a real throwback to the great duet albums out of Nashville in the fifties. I still think The Billy Joe Armstrong Norah Jones tribute was amazing to the Everly Brothers specifically. BTW. Try and google Kelly Jones. It's really hard; because there is a male artist; with the same name; who keeps coming up.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 14:33:44 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Peach Sherbert?


Entered at Wed Aug 24 14:31:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, the "11th Symphony" by Albert Herbert Norbert Hubert Schubert was subtitled "The Superfighters Symphony." The unfinished 12th was called "The Sherbert Symphony."


Entered at Wed Aug 24 14:26:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Teddy Thompson & Kelly Jones

Many thanks for the pointer to their "Little Windows" album. It's the third or fourth Everly Brothers "tribute" by a male / female duo recently. But in this case they're new originals which sound more like The Everly Bros than the Everly Bros. Link to the video.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 14:22:17 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin J: any thoughts on the duelling superfighters? : )


Entered at Wed Aug 24 05:10:48 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.165)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh Mickey, you're so fine. You're so fine, you blow my mind......Not Schubert.....surely...


Entered at Wed Aug 24 04:03:08 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The John Prine Album

I found this on youtube. The line up on John's album is extraordinary. there are many people who have done this song but this cover is great.

Sorry for all my spelling mistakes. Watch this. the line up of the ladies who put their talent into this project is quite amazing.


Entered at Wed Aug 24 03:29:53 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.165)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....alright, it's back to "quaint" TV shows I guess...


Entered at Tue Aug 23 19:19:07 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.146)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: No need to play the victim card - we're not godforsaken, we're godforsaking. Furthermore don't think for a minute that socio-linguists don't have fueds to discuss. Endlessly.


Entered at Tue Aug 23 18:30:35 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Joni out & about

[My link] to photo of TLW alumna @ LA Chick Corea gig Sat nite.


Entered at Tue Aug 23 16:24:02 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Schubert

nevermind


Entered at Tue Aug 23 15:07:22 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: John Prine

Driving home yesterday, CBC tells me John Prine, now 70 has just released a new album. He duets with some of the great ladies like Allison Crause and Susan Tedeski.

I got to hear John's cover of an old song of George Jones, the "Colour of the Blues." John and Susan Tedeski do a wonderful job of the song. No doubt this will be worthwhile having.


Entered at Tue Aug 23 14:17:31 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Schubert & Ragtime & Norbert

Here's the link to RAGTIME (Schubert) and BMW (Norbert). BMW being also Birthe, Marlene und Wilma, maybe. I studied Finnish language at the same time in University whit this gentleman. Now he is Ph. D. Honore Causa (socio-linguistics) and I am stuck in this godforsaken internet forum.


Entered at Tue Aug 23 02:15:38 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: For Nick Lowe fans -

This is a 39 minute high-quality audio of a Nick Lowe performance when he toured and opened for Wilco. As a big fan myself I find his solo arrangements and performance of certain songs to be superior to his studio versions: "When I Write the Book" and "I Read A Lot" are examples in this show. This also includes a very tasteful version of Allison, (My Aim Is True). And the crowd seems attentive, respectful & mostly quiet, given he's an opening act, an old guy and that they're there primarily there for Wilco -


Entered at Tue Aug 23 00:54:27 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Shubert

Jeez Ragtime, that is some in depth and top notch investigative journalism! Try to find something big enough on Trump to wrap this mess up in a final way - I can't imagine much more than we already know but it seems the masses are finding his new silence this week to be persuasive in his favor.


Entered at Mon Aug 22 23:47:20 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Der Leiermann

Ragtime, to be continued ;-)


Entered at Mon Aug 22 15:10:49 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: John Hammond tribute concert 1975

An interesting artifact . . . audio from a PBS tribute show with performances from Hammond Jr, Sonny Terry, a Benny Goodman small band (with George Benson).

Dylan does "Hurricane," "Oh Sister" and "Simple Twist of Fate" (with a few lyrics changes) with Howie Wyeth, Rob Stoner and Scarlet Rivera.

In the comments section, there's a link to a contemporary _Rolling Stone_ commentary by Robert Palmer.


Entered at Mon Aug 22 01:00:14 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.237)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Levon & Bruce

Linked. Levon & the Woodstock All Stars with a visit from the Boss. 1982? Randy, Jimmy. Paul Branin, Stan Szelest, ........ Saw that band countless times, they always ripped!...Too bad the camera focused on Springsteen, but this is till nice to have.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 15:31:30 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Favourites

I'm too lazy to write what might be my favourite top ten, and then I'd think of something and it might change. I think tho' seeing every one else's favs I would have to put "The Ballad of Pepote Rouge" ahead of some of them.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 14:42:58 CEST 2016 from (92.25.233.148)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Winterreise & The Band

Here is what we all know so well...

"There was a chill that night / in the hobo jungle / Over the train yard lay a smooth coat of frost / And although nobody here really knows where they're goin' / At the very same time nobody's lost / (...) This old man lay frozen / on the cold, cold ground / (...) / Drifters and rounders / and distant friends / Here I lie without anger or regret / I'm in no one's debt / Man goes nowhere / Ev'rything comes like tomorrow / (...) / He spent his whole life pursuing the horizon / Ridin' the rods / Sleepin' under the stars / Playin' the odds / from a rollin' box car"

and this...

"The organ grinder and his monkey / Still walkin' the same old beat / The shoe-shine boy slappin' leather / He puts the rhythm in your feet / Ragman, your song of the street / Keeps haunting my memory / Music in the air / I hear it ev'rywhere / Rags, bones and old city songs / Play them one more time for me"

And here is Franz Schubert (1797-1828): Winterreise No. 24. English tranalation of The Organ-Grinder (Der Leiermann)

"Up behind the village / The organ-grinder has his pitch / He stands barefoot or shuffles / On the frozen ground / With stiff fingers / He coaxes out the sound / (...) / No one listens to him / Or looks at him, or cares / Dogs snarl at him / Dogs chase him / But he wears a smile / He shows no fear or disappointment / But turns the handle round and round / Shall I join you on your journey? / Will you play the music to my songs?"

Need I say more? Robertson surely knew his Schubert...


Entered at Sun Aug 21 13:30:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jupiter Hollow …

A template for all sorts of Garthian genius playing that could have been developed.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 12:47:15 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Last Waltz Suite

It's got that air of prog about it. Which is fine by me. Perhaps they would have (or could have) created a new type of rock Prog Americana.

: )


Entered at Sun Aug 21 11:52:17 CEST 2016 from (79.75.188.39)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: The Last Waltz Suite

The Band and especially Garth could really have gone on to embrace technology at the time and done another NLSC/TLWS type album. I do remember thinking how it wasn't as raw as The Brown album but over the years I have come to love them as much as the early stuff.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 11:25:46 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Tragically Hip's last...

Kudos to the CBC for letting the world watch for free.

Sometimes Canada's public institutions do things the right way.

August 20th was one.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 10:54:18 CEST 2016 from (125.239.241.155)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Well

That's where The Band could have gone if they stuck with it. A simple song but a great arrangement. I like all of that Last Waltz Suite. It promised so much,


Entered at Sun Aug 21 02:41:09 CEST 2016 from (96.54.61.38)

Posted by:

Bonk

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Amy Helm

You know, I don't get too impressed by most newer bands as I get older but Amy Helm changed that last night. Her and the band hit the stage at 7:45 last night and just destroyed the audience with 3 songs that were sequed into each other that were absolute rockers. At the end of the third everyone was looking at each other and saying, OK, if that's the way it's gonna be! One of them was Slippin and a sliding. The only band song they played, and by the way no one asked for any more, was Dixie and it was superb. Lots of funny banter with the crowd and she had a lot of people singing along to Atlantic City. They did a version of Gentling Me that gave me goosebumps. I'll try to remember the set list and post it. After the show the usual lined up to get cd's signed and when it was my turn I just said to her 'after that show I don't need anything else from you little lady but I got something for you' and passed her an original Cabbagetown T-shirt. She blurted out, Oh my god. My Dad always talked about that place. If she gets close to anyone here on the site go and see her. Great night.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 02:00:09 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Eric Siblin

Bill! have any of you guys heard of this fellow, Eric Siblin? Has written an album, and a book, "Studio Grace". Some not bad music, a girl, (can't remember her name) sings one of his songs. I like it.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 01:31:52 CEST 2016 from (76.67.15.13)

Posted by:

bill m

Web: My link

Subject: Tragically Hip

All things Hip, including best songs and where to see their final final concert this evening from anywhere in the world.


Entered at Sun Aug 21 00:11:08 CEST 2016 from (24.114.64.251)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Hawks gig for Jerry's list

JT: I dug up a gig notice for a "Levon Helm and the Hawks" gig at the Brass Rail Tavern in London - in the August 15, 1964, "London Free Press". Says it's the final day of their week-long stay. Starting Monday was the 5 Ascots, who a few years later would join Hawkins and evolve into Crowbar. The notice also say ther'd be a Jam Session that day (the Saturday), from 3-6:00 pm. I imagine that at least some of the Hawks would have taken part.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 23:23:41 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: the hip

Never been to a concert; never bought an album.

In their prime I'd backed away from r & r, listened to country , blues and jazz. Generation too late; tried to get into U2 and REM round about that time. Limited success.

But the Hip songs were everywhere. They just oozed into your consciousness. I'd have a problem with nailing down my top 10. Too many. Link to one of my favourites,


Entered at Sat Aug 20 17:09:08 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Projects

Another sunny day......sanding the teak decks on the Rockin Chair.....with the music blasting.

As well as Rockin Chair, my other theme song is Jimmy Buffet, "A Pirate Looks at Forty"....give it a listen.

Yes I am a pirate, 200 years too late,

The cannons don't thunder, there's nothing to plunder,

I'm an over forty victim of fate, arriving to late, arriving to late.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:52:57 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And besides

Ashes of laughter, the coast is clear,

Why do the best things always DISAPPEAR!...............


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:47:53 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: A fly on the wall............

I agree with all-a-yuz.....but I'm never gonna admit to that. I think yer all great.

Peter! I don't even know what the fuck Toppermost is. I was just going by what you had writ.

It's easy to understand that Bob. Just listen to this "Love For Levon"..........sure do miss those guys, and I'm glad I lived when I did.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:33:34 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hey Bob [2]

Forgot to say - Get Up Jake and Katie's been Gone very nearly make it into that 10 which I posted blow. Love them both.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:30:44 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Hey Bob

I bet you can guess the song that finishes every 'do' round our neck of the woods and has done since 1964 - Evertonian's permitting of course.

Linked

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:21:15 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Great 'Band' contemplations

I love all this which is why I re-posted Fred's original post. After all why the fuck else do we come on here if not to drain every last drop of passion and enthusiasm for the finest band that ever graced the planet. So great to see what the likes of Rags, Bob, PV, Norm, Bill and SaD have to say. Hopefully more will give us their slants.

Particularly loved Rag's list and his little explanations plus Pete's explanation of his selection process and the Big Pink/Brown Album/Stagefright obstacle blocking the way for any later song including Ophelia!! Nice one fellas.

When I've got a bit more time I'm gonna try to explain the Ophelia ambivalence I have. Just briefly though - for what it's worth I do think the song is superb in every way. It's just not for me. As it stands, it was really interesting to read Bob's personal insight into it.

Looked at from afar it seems to me like it all must have revolved around Levon's huge prominence in that neck of the woods and his immersion in the song. But I'd love to hear more from Bob about that aspect.

As regards personal favourites which I guess is really what it's all about, for now I thought I'd come at it from the point of view of which Band songs I could never imagine ever doing without. It's so hard to whittle it down as Pete alluded to but at the moment here's what I'd say are my ten that I'd really miss if i could never hear them again. There's so many others of course. But I think these are the foremost ones to fit that criterion.

We Can Talk About It
King Harvest
Unfaithful Servant
It Makes No Difference
Rockin Chair
Dixie
The Weight
Whispering Pines
Ain't no More Cane
Caledonia Mission

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 20 15:01:19 CEST 2016 from (213.205.194.19)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: The Weight

Follow the Toppermost link, Norm. The Weight is there, and the list is alphabetical, no ranking from 1 to10


Entered at Sat Aug 20 14:50:52 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Easy...peasy..

Bob F: Penny Lane & Butterfield 8. : )


Entered at Sat Aug 20 14:21:13 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: More 'Nordic Noir' tourism

Original "Wallander" TV series were filmed in the city of Ystad on the southern coast of Scania. They became rich by fishing herring in the Middle Ages. Now they are fishing blood-thursty tourists. They welcome all to see the sceneries.

Late Mr. HENNING MANKELL who wrote the Wallander books said that he has dropped all writers who had influenced him, one by one. The last one to be dropped was BOB DYLAN! Not bad for a Hibbing lad. I hope he didn't mean Self Portrait, though.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 13:37:45 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

If you go out for live music in the Hudson Valley two songs you have a strong possibility of hearing before the night ends are The Weight and Ophelia. If you're playing out you best know your way around those two. Probably no place else in the world where that's the norm. Even the great Diana Krall played Ophelia when she came through a couple years back.

Top 10 Band for me is really hard. It would be constantly changing. Maybe Ophelia now but in a few months it would be Look Out Cleveland in that spot. Three songs I'm always listening to that are usually ignored on lists are Get Up Jake, Katies Been Gone and Bessie Smith.

In the end it's like trying to decide between Penny Lane or Strawberry Fields or was Elizabeth Taylor greater in Butterfield 8 or Cleopatra. Fun discussions but really impossible in a good way.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 13:38:15 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Messed up!!!!

Yer all crazy!.........Peter doesn't even have "The Weight" in any list short or long!


Entered at Sat Aug 20 10:51:01 CEST 2016 from (92.25.233.148)

Posted by:

Ragtime

And btw, Ophelia doesn't come close, as much as I like this tune on a lazy Saturday morning with nothing else to do...

There are too many really great contenders...


Entered at Sat Aug 20 10:22:18 CEST 2016 from (92.25.233.148)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Top 12

Peter's shortlist reflects very much my top 30. I'd like to include Rag Mama Rag in my top 12 because it 's a wonder.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 08:29:19 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "about #24 or 25"

Ophelia easily makes a Top Five of “Songs The Band and members played most. The Shape I'm In comes close.

When I did that Toppermost Ten (LINKED AGAIN), it wasn’t in the 20 plus contestants I shortlisted. My Top Ten was on Toppermost, but a song has to pass every track on the brown album, and virtually all of Big Pink, and over half of Stage Fright to get on the list. In fact, on my shortlist, trying to show a stylistic range, Life Is A Carnival took its place … similar style, great horns version.

My final shortlist had 23, and as well as the ten selected included Acadian Driftwood, Across The Great Divide, All La Glory, Caledonia Mission, Chest Fever, Jemima Surrender, Life Is A Carnival, The Shape I’m In, Stage Fright, Tears of Rage, Unfaithful Servant, When You Awake, W.S. Walcott Medicine Show.

That’s an extremely strong list to be admitted to. Ophelia WAS in the thirty list before that.


Entered at Sat Aug 20 05:56:27 CEST 2016 from (76.67.15.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Even if it wouldn't hit my Band top 10, "Ophelia" has its charms - including the arrangement, as sadavid noted, and - for me - the line "Ophelia, please darken my door".


Entered at Sat Aug 20 03:47:13 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Crazy gawd damn Englishmen

Very well said Sadavid. I thought about this very seriously all day..........yeah right!

Al said all those crazy things because he was bored and wanted some excitement. No one in their right mind would think that way about Ophelia.

Now here's the other crazy gawd damn Englishman Peter! These guys just don't understand that Dixieland, N"Alins, rockin blues feel. When yer woman leaves Y'all....what do y'do but cry. Without a doubt one of the best songs any where EVER!


Entered at Sat Aug 20 02:09:29 CEST 2016 from (114.75.203.63)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Don't recall seeing this before although it may have just slipped my mind.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 20:22:48 CEST 2016 from (92.25.233.148)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: My own Guardian Top 11

The Unfaithful Servant because of Rick

King Harvest (Has Surely Come) because of its perfection

Rockin' Chair because of the obvious

To Kingdom Come because of Robbie

The Rumor because of the rumor

Up On Cripple Creek because of Levon and Garth

We Can Talk because of Richard

The Weight because of its eternal power

Jupiter Hollow because of Viney's exegesis

The Well because of the visionary

Rags and Bones because nobody ever mentions Rags and Bones


Entered at Fri Aug 19 18:47:13 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: horny

Dixieland with a rock feel, or conversely, "Ophelia" is magnificent. And magnificently arranged.The guitar solo is prominently brilliant. Less prominently, so are the drums, bass, first and second vocals . . . .

I was trying to work out how the horn section was built, and looked for clues in the "Sidemen" section of Jan's Discography entry. All Garth, I think, except for the bass playing tuba lines (not unusual at Band camp). Garth is credited with "brass" but that might be synthetic brass. I think the saxes and clarinet are really real.

Interesting that everyone gets credit for production (except Garth) and mixing (except Richard). There are also 3x outboard engineers, 2 of whom are also mixers. Oh, and "The Band" is also a producer.

See [My link] for another 'rock band does jazz' exercise.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 16:51:21 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Batten down the haches, Al, I'm limping up the motorway to join you. Whatever the merits of Ophelia, it wouldn't be in my Band Top Ten. We Can Talk would be.

Hang on! It is already. Link is to my Toppermost Top Ten on The Band. It was Toppermost #3 before we started writing essays … the original idea was just a bare list. My Top Ten is way superior to The Guardian's and includes King Harvest, Daniel & The Sacred Harp and Jupiter Hollow.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 16:04:46 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Aw no

Now I've got Norm steamin straight for me too.

Shit

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 15:55:11 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ophilia

What are you smokin' Al? That is about the dumbest thing I've heard yet. For sure one of the greatest songs the Band ever did. From the intro just makes you want to dance.

After the 29 of this month, I'll be able to say (with complete honesty).

I spent my whole life at sea, now I'm pushin' age 73

And there ain't no place I'd rather be..........

Than sittin on the big seat on the top deck of the "Rockin Chair" cruising the coast with no particular place to go.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 15:50:11 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Holy shit - Fred's on the warpath too

Ha ha

The shutters are going up. I can't handle two desperadoes. Unless I call in that granny from over the water. Shit maybe she is feckin Ophelia!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 15:46:55 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha...

...boards on the windows!

Prepare to repel disssenters

I knew that'd coax you out Bob!!

Wonderful stuff.

RoseAnn sang it at the Caledonia - even better than Levon!!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 15:46:01 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Re: Ophelia

Al: that's just crazy talk. You must be still reeling from the 3 goals LFC let in last weekend, See if you can get Mr. Klopp's attention and tell him to get the defending sorted out!

: )


Entered at Fri Aug 19 15:03:00 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Boards on the window........

Oh no Mr Edge, Ophelia is wonderful for all the right reasons. Vocals, story line and Robbie's guitar. My only gripe is the solo should be much longer. Your arguments don't hold up. Let's say Liverpool has a wide open shot at the goal with 10 seconds left, score tied, for the championship! And there you are Al, standing on your seat screaming you don't want it, it's to perfect. "Throw a couple of defenders in his way". Something like that. All kidding aside, I never get tired of Ophelia. It just lifts the spirit.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 14:32:56 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: You got me thinking' juxtaposition

"But I'd rather be burned in Canada

Than to freeze here in the South!"

"He said I'm fabulously rich

C'mon just let's go

She kinda bit her lip

Geez, I don't know

But I can guarantee

There'll be no knock on the door

I'm total pro that's what I'm here for

I come from downtown

Born ready for you

Armed with will and determination

And grace, too"


Entered at Fri Aug 19 13:03:00 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Totally with you on We Can Talk Fred. For me, more than any other song in the canon, We Can Talk represents The Band. Even more than the obvious ones.

As for Ophelia - at the risk of offending the sensibilities of every other poster on here - it's never cut it for me. Don't get me wrong, it's clearly brilliant for what it is and for the style of music it represents. It's packed with obvious quality Levon vocals and the instrumentation impeccable. I just never listen to it or ever really find myself wanting to. I find it predictable and derivative. I know where it's going all the time and where it's gonna end up - which is precisely the opposite to why I love the music of The Band. I can listen to We Can Talk a million times - I probably have - and never do I get the feeling that I know where it's going.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 12:27:06 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: It's all a matter of personal taste. Or so I've heard. : )

My only quibble is We Can Talk isn't on the list. I would have replaced Whispering Pines with it. I could also knock Acadian Driftwood off there too. Replaced by.....hmmm.......Ophelia.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 11:20:58 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Rags and Nux - The Well

Yeah - meant to say - really interesting choice that one. In that Guardian comments section of that linked piece below I don't think there was a single mention of The Well.

I really like it. But I can never quite tie it in with my own sense of what The Band means to me. I did work with a guy once on the Blackpool Sea Wall job who absolutely loved it and felt The Well and Out of The Blue were the best things The Band had ever done.

It all just goes to show how diverse a musical legacy the boys laid down and what an amazing tunesmith Robbie was.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 11:12:58 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Fred's Band post

Surprised so few - in fact I think only me and Dunc - seem to have picked up on Fred's post linking a list of 10 songs which the Guardian's Barry Nicholson considers define our musical heroes.

Anyroad in case anyone did just miss it I've linked it again above.

Clearly there can never be a concensus on this as we all know from previous lists we've done on here. However, the beauty of Nicholson's piece is that he takes every track and provides his own view and insight into why he regards it as definitive.

It makes for a wonderful read for anybody interested in The Band and I'd have thought it was essential reading for all of us lot with our long term imbued devotion to the original quintet. And the gist of what he says reveals the guy to be clearly as devoted to our guys as we all are.

The comments section accompanying the article is likewise a must read - with snippets varying from the obvious casual fan to diehards like ourselves. It all makes for a fascinating read to see how so many perceive the boys.

Oh and btw I'll be marking each of your homework tasks on this later!!

Or I might get Pete to do it!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 19 10:29:21 CEST 2016 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Location: Durban South Africa

Subject: Ragtime_The Well

Wow Ragtime,I really like "The Well" and great to see another person that rates it highly.How spooky is the horn arrangement and violin! Definitely in my top 10!


Entered at Fri Aug 19 01:48:59 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

Cheers mate.

I'll try and ask around this end.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 01:46:42 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bonk

Do please pass on my congrats to your Scouse friend and neigbour from a fellow Liverpudlian. Writing your first book and managing to get it published takes one hell of a lot of hard work and perseverence.

It's close on 20 quid over here so I won't be getting it right away - but I've notified the powers that be that it's on my Christmas list!


Entered at Fri Aug 19 00:53:16 CEST 2016 from (96.54.61.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Islnd

Subject: Lisa

Yes Lisa. Had have my tickets for weeks. It's a great little venue for about 180 people with 3 barbecues going outside with a lot of home cooking right from the farm.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 00:36:38 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

NorthWestCoaster, I agree with Dunc, we just finished the first season of The Bridge and it was excellent. Also, you should be rooting for a show from your own neck of the woods. Come on. How about Rita? Probably the best television show about a teacher. Ever.

Dunc, I loved River also. You have great taste my friend.

Kevin, a thriving video store in 2016. Wow! Unheard of in my area. All we have are those stupid Red Boxes at the grocery store where you can rent all the Fast and Furious films at one time.


Entered at Fri Aug 19 00:18:37 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Ragtime

Yes Ragtime its Danish. My apologies.

But an even better (in my humble opinion) Danish series is Borgen, but it's political not detective.

Kevin thanks. I wished I had a DVD hire shop like yours. Make sure you see The Bridge, The Killing, Happy Valley, Borgen, River and Spiral. Good recommendations for anyone.

Also becoming older now, but I think Rebus is great. Is this available in North America?


Entered at Fri Aug 19 00:04:28 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Region coding

Al, UK DVDs are region 2 coded, American are region 1. Because I have a lot of American discs I had all the DVD players chipped so they will play region 1. Ten years ago it cost £30, but recently all you needed was the shop to forget to enable the region coding, as most Pioneer and Panasonic were uncoded. out of the box, and the shop was supposed to switch on the coding. With some machines there is a coding fix online to remove region coding. You can also play region 1 on computers but you can only switch them between regions a small number of times - I think four on a Mac.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:50:34 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Oops, missed your post. Unfortunately I'm pretty ignorant about these kinds of differences, so I'm hoping Peter can help you out.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:48:11 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Yay!

You won't regret it Al!


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:37:04 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Slings & Arrows

Lisa - just went to order it on Amazon only to find it's not compatible for UK dvd's.

Any suggestions?

Pete - did you order a copy?


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:29:39 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Ophelia snatch

Lisa - I'm hooked. Just watched the link. It's ordered. You've sold me. Looks right up Mag's street.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:25:50 CEST 2016 from (92.25.233.148)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: The Guardian' s The Band Top 10

Of course I agree with the choices and I like the explanations of my fave newspaper, but my top-10 would always include The Well.

And by the way, The Killing is not Swedish but Danish.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:24:42 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Tough old bird

She's from the posh suburbs Jeff.

She wouldn't last 5 minutes this side of the water where the arl women really are hard cases!!!

Joking aside - what a star! It was in the L'Pool Echo last night and I've got to say it did make me reflect on what I'd do in the same situation against THREE muggers. Somehow I can't see me nonchalantly bashing one of their heads against the cash machine whilst fending off the other two. Then again, it's not even that easy to think of Daniel Craig doing it without a camera crew in tow.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 22:14:59 CEST 2016 from (76.69.119.202)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dunc: I am all for limited exposition in films but the Oldman film of TTSP really took it to the extreme and no film should assume that everyone seeing it had read the book...that was my only real gripe. Well that, and the fact that it paled so much in comparison to the Alec Guinness mini-series. By the way, I really enjoy hearing of these retirement projects of yours so heavily focussed on the arts. Bravo.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 21:24:49 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: A little taste of S&A

Well Al, if it will help plead your case to Mrs E you can tell her it stars the devastatingly handsome and talented Paul Gross (the Mountie from due South, if she remembers that show) in a role he was born to play, IMO.

Bonk, are you going to Amy's show?


Entered at Thu Aug 18 21:08:11 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: River

Did anybody else find River gripping. Unusual. See link.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 20:59:28 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Thanks Fred, really enjoyed the article.

Have sailed from Copenhagen to Malmo, Northwestcoaster. The Bridge is really popular here. There's good weather coming your way.

Really enjoyed Striking Matches, Jeff.

Rewatched all the John Le Carre boxed sets, Kevin and am rereading all the novels as a retirement project. I'm a great fan. Where I disagree with you, Kevin (in a friendly way) is I enjoyed the Gary Oldman film.

I'm with Al strongly on this - you need to see Happy Valley and Spiral. I thought Happy Valley was going to be parochial, but it is gripping. Great acting.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 20:34:29 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.255)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Not sure, but this old bird might be a scouse.

Al? Tough old lady, that's for certain.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 20:20:22 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: acorn

Bassmanlee - Thanks for that; I'd never heard of it. Looks like there's a cheap - $4.99 monthly - offer there now.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 20:00:58 CEST 2016 from (74.108.30.68)

Posted by:

Joan

I like the series MI5. The first season was really good. Interesting characters and situations. By the second season it got weird be killed off mostly likable characters and put new people in but they didn't really work.

my major complaint with British comedies and dramas is the miking. Sometimes the accents are hard to understand and you have to turn the sound rollout to get something clear.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 19:09:55 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: True Detective

Great shout Sad!!

I thought that first season was superb. Dark, steamy, mysterious in a supernatural way, unpredictable, insanely gripping and at times downright scary a la Silence of Lambs and Seven. The two lead actors both utterly amazing both individually and as a team plus the most erotic bit of eroticism I've seen in years involving Woody from Cheers.

Got to say because season one was so fantastic, I found season 2 a bit of a let down but I'm sure a re-watch might bring out a different view.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 18 18:58:44 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hey Lisa

Great seeing you posting and ta for heads up on the fellow Scouser's buke!!

And what a coincidence Bonk living in the same house as the author!!

Also love the sound of Slings & Arrows. I'm not exactly what you'd term a regular theatregoer but I did do Macbeth for GCE 'O' level!!!!

Failed it miserably like - but we won't go there just now!!

:-0)

That said, I do love anything that pricks the pomposity balloon which I'm guessing simply has to be one of the things at the core of the show. The only problem is the 24 quid price tag plus shipping I'm guessing. Very tempting tho.

I'm sensing some major justification grovelling to Mag is gonna be on the agenda for both these items.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 18 18:16:42 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.255)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Java Blues..........."Gonna drink coffee till i die"

See the link!

Commercials, background music. Too bad Rick ain't alive to be the spokesman.....then there's the Folger's coffee commercial Levon was just a spoonful away from shooting.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 17:04:29 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

This article appeared in this morning's paper. Thought you all would enjoy it.

Bonk, it just goes to show - you can take the boy out of Liverpool, but you can't take Liverpool out of the boy!


Entered at Thu Aug 18 15:46:44 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: PA/DE, USA

Subject: Television

NorthWestCoaster, I agree with you on Midsommer. We liked it enough to use it as an excuse (after exhausting the local libraries selection) to splurge on a Roku box and a subscription to Acorn, which is a service that streams a variety of BBC programs (and maybe some independents, not sure). We see that there is a new series adapting M. C. Beaton's Agatha Raisin books, but the lead is far too young and sleek to make that quaint series work IMHO. Mrs. lee usually controls the remotes so I am not able to pull up the names of all the shows we have watched. I do have a hard time understanding the accents, but half the time I can't catch what the Americans on screen are saying, either. A couple of series we tried were just incomprehensible to our 'Merican ears.

Thanks to everyone for sharing their faves. We will search them out.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 15:17:11 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: "The Bridge" again

I vote with my car. I never drive over the bridge (toll) ... taking the slow boat instead.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 15:08:19 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Swedish crime / Email me and I'll send you directions to the places where "The Bridge" was filmed. (Original versions)

Sorry DUNC, I don't like "The Bridge". It was filmed here in Scania Northwest which in reality is full of light, beaches, surfers and fishing villages. The TV series showed a dark and criminal picture of it all. It is not just a digital illusion but alltogether this particular place is hard to find. Luckilly, I know where it is. (BTW Mrs. NorthWestCoaster was watching the TV series for just five seconds and said "YIKES".) Unfortunately, I see this bridge on our morning walk if the weather is clear. Also luckilly, the lows from Scotland prevents this to happen very often!

There is one more reason. I have worked with Swedish women like the police woman in "The Bridge" (original version). It makes good television but in reality it is just vaist of the time for a middleaged male.

...and RAGTIME! You said 'Midsomer murders' are lame and old-fashioned. For sure. That's why I like the series.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 15:08:07 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: dicks on the box

I don't think anyone's mentioned HBO's _True Detective_.

2 seasons to date, both outstanding.

T Bone Burnett picks the music, and it should hit the sweet spot for many among those assembled here - L. Cohen over opening credits in Season 2; Season one (set in Louisiana) uses (among many others) TLW alumni Dylan, Emmylou, the Staple Singers, and Bobby Charles (!)


Entered at Thu Aug 18 13:38:50 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.255)

Posted by:

Jeff A

Web: My link

Subject: Striking Matches / Average White Band Cover

Dunc, & the rest of us AWB fans, for you guys.

A couple of young whippersnappers. And one's a dollface.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 13:31:09 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

The Band's setlists.


Entered at Thu Aug 18 03:00:23 CEST 2016 from (96.54.61.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Lisa -Liverpool Lad

Hey Lisa. Peter has been a neighbor and friend for over 20 years. He drives me nuts because his scouse accent never changes. And he's been here 40 years!


Entered at Thu Aug 18 02:55:14 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Series!???

Onliest series I ever wanted to watch was..."Loonie Tunes", 'specially Fog Horn Leg Horn.....and the Muppets..y'know.....it ain't easy bein' Greeen!


Entered at Thu Aug 18 00:10:35 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Sorry, for some reason that didn't come through. The book is "Liverpool Lad: Adventures growing up in post-war Liverpool" by Peter Haase. Sounds right up your alley.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 23:55:24 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: http://vancouversun.com/entertainment/books/review-optimism-key-to-buoyant-memoir

Al, this one's for you - a book, not a TV show. You came to mind immediately when I read this review, and I thought you'd enjoy it.

I've been away from the GB for a bit and only just learned about David Powell. What a loss, such a special guy. I was very sorry to read such sad news. He'll be missed for sure.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 23:43:53 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

A weird Hamlet?? Dare I ask?

I'm thrilled that you've ordered Slings & Arrows, and can't wait to hear what you think of it. I know it's expensive, but it's worth every penny, and bears re-watching. Also great to share with friends - everyone I've recommended it to has loved it.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 23:15:58 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Slings & Arrows

Ordered! I look forward to it very much … we are working on a weird version of Hamlet!


Entered at Wed Aug 17 22:57:35 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa, it sounds my perfect series! Will try and find it asap. Many thanks for the tip.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 22:24:15 CEST 2016 from (76.69.119.202)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I am fortunate to regularly pass through an upscale neighbourhood where vcr's and clock radio's still no doubt blink "12:12" constantly and where a neighbourhood video store is not only still open but thriving. Great foreign, British and documentary sections. Just like record stores, I love the experience of browsing and talking with the Quentin Tarantino type guys who work there. Most shops around town have closed and all of those corporate shitholes like Blockbuster have - good riddance. Proud that I never once set foot in one.

Case Histories: Yes, Mike...the music also caught my attention as it was guitar heavy which is rare and also the photography was great.

Not Crime/Detective related that was the subject but a turning point of sorts in the quality upgrade of the British mini-series type show was the 1979 production of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy with Alec Guinness. I just watched it again recently and loved it. Also the second part Smiley's People.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 22:11:27 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Not well-known but great series

I'd like to put in a vote for a Canadian series (three seasons, six episodes each) which has never been widely shown, or known - Slings & Arrows, which I think is one of the best shows ever made.

It's about the trials, tribulations and relationships of a repertory theater company (which among theater people who have seen it is considered hilariously and sometimes painfully accurate) with terrific performances from literally the whole cast, really stellar acting.

Each season concerns the production of a Shakespeare play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Lear), but if you're not a Shakespearian don't let that worry you - it's not necessary. But it might make one out of you - it did me!

Peter, you in particular would absolutely love this if you haven't already seen it. It's just outstanding, and I can't say too many great things about it!


Entered at Wed Aug 17 19:53:42 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Our local specialised in chicken and sweetcorn soup, Al. Always a couple of peas and a few slivers of carrot, which was perfect for Japer Carrot's quip, that it doesn't matter what you've eaten, what gets puked on the pavement always has sweetcorn, peas and carrots.

Our local shut dramatically after a police raid. Local jokes mentioned the usefulness of having a fur shop as well as a restaurant, but it turned out to be mundane crime instead - importing Class A drugs in industrial quantities.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 18:55:38 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Telly addicts

Hey Mike, we loved Case Histories to bits too. Really quirky and Jason ?? Issaacs was made for the role. Superb. Hopefully, there's more to come but I don't think it had great ratings. I think it was on BBC2 over here.

Dunc - Spiral is a great shout for me. We loved it. I'd recommend it to Bob F and Mike C. It's Paris police/murder mystery with subtitles [of course]and the lead woman detective is to die for. I believe series 6 is coming though I'm not sure when. Another good one like it though I don't think it's in the same class as Spiral is Branquo.

I notice you North Americans really love the British stuff. Is it the quaint manner in which our murders are despatched and then investigated by quaint policemen/women?

:-0)

Don't get me wrong I love many of them too and of the recent ones I think both seasons of Happy Valley with the incredible Sarah Lancashire stand comparison with any from the past including the superb Jimmy mcGovern's Cracker and Lynda La Plante's Prime Suspect. [both scouse playwrights btw which is why I named them! :-0)]. I also liked Line of Duty but I did feel the second season fell away a bit with its twists and turns. Also the baddy detective was dead spit of a guy [Ando] I used to work with and the more he featured the more I couldn't get the image of Ando's gob out of my head.

That said, it's the American stuff which really captivates me. Obviously The Sopranos, Breaking Bad, The Wire and Deadwood are simply incredible series and stand shoulder to shoulder for me. But there's so many really terrific ones - we love Bosch in which Titus Welliver is so feckin cool and Ray Donovan in which Jon Voight is a jewel, The Shield which for me still has arguably the best final episode of any series. Also one which doesn't seem to get much acclaim but which we think is superb is The Americans with the Russian spy family. So understated but so gripping. There's so many.

Then, of course, there's our most 'must watch' American show - The Walking Dead - which is back in just over a month. Yippeee.

And that concludes the telly watching from Liverpool.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Aug 17 18:11:46 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete and chicken fried rice

You clearly used to go to your Bournemouth equivalent of the Ko-- Na- on South Road like us. Pissed up to the eyeballs you wouldn't know chicken fried rice from its feline equivalent if they put you on an identity parade!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Aug 17 18:05:43 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred's Guardian article on The Band

Well in mate.

I think it's auperb article Fred. So glad you linked it. The guy is clearly a huge fan and 'gets it'. I think his list is as definitive as any though personally speaking I'd probably go with 7 of his list with We Can Talk, Rockin Chair and King Harvest at the expense of Stagefright, Shape I'm in and Masterpiece.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Aug 17 17:31:01 CEST 2016 from (184.145.68.151)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: David Crosby

David Crosby, who is set to release a new album this fall, says he can't explain "how I even have a voice after all the bad things I did to it." [link above to an interview in today's New York Times] "But here I am, I’ve got it and truthfully think I’m singing as well as I ever have. Probably some of the best I’ve ever done, in terms of storytelling quality. I could not be happier about the singing. It’s just a joy."


Entered at Wed Aug 17 16:47:31 CEST 2016 from (99.231.74.112)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Nag's Head North/Levon and the Cates

Bill M/JT-I had forgotten about that special guest appearance by Mr. Zimmerman at Nag's Head North. Many good acts played there over the years.

Bill M-presumably one of those Levon and the Cates dates that you listed was when they were filmed for SCTV playing in an empty restaurant, and were introduced and interviewed by Eugene Levy as a faux reporter. Some of the shows were taped in Edmonton, so I suppose that's a (remote) possibility too.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 15:57:57 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: British TV

I always liked the Maigret series (with Michael Gambon) from the 1990s.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 15:55:01 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Thanks for the info on the Levon Helm & Mary Steenburgen movie.

Never seen it, nor heard about it. I did some checking, it's got a pretty good cast. Then again so do a lot of films that turn out to be duds.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 15:51:58 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Top 10 songs by The Band (from The Guardian)

Agree? Disagree?


Entered at Wed Aug 17 15:37:11 CEST 2016 from (184.145.68.151)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Phew! Kevin, that was a close one. But I'm glad you enjoyed (are enjoying) Case Histories. Some terrif background music, too, which often sent me scrambling to locate the artist and the piece being played. I realize we all have exclusive tastes. For example, I loved the movie Gosford Park and the '80s TV adaptation of Brideshead Revisited but soon lost all interest in Downton Abbey, while all others around me raved about it. For me, it was credibility.

Re Wallander, thanks Bob F and Dunc. I'll look into it.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 14:35:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, thirty years ago we might have suggested the video store was next to an ethnic restaurant, but we'd never get away with it now.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 13:56:25 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Police series

There are two Wallenders from Sweden, Bob.

But the Swedish series which are very popular here are The Bridge and The Killing, both really good.

Also really good is the French series 'Spiral'. Also really good.

I rewatched Rebus recently. Ken Stott is brilliant.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 13:31:42 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Wallender

Mike, there is a version of Wallender from Sweden which is really great. Over 30 episodes with an actual conclusion at the end.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 12:39:00 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Why was the video store guy chasing a cat with a meat cleaver?

Ha ha - cracked me up that P!!

Maybe it was actually a butcher's shop!!!


Entered at Wed Aug 17 12:20:02 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Video shop

You still have them? Since Blockbuster collapsed here, I don't think there are any left. Why was the video store guy chasing a cat with a meat cleaver?


Entered at Wed Aug 17 06:35:38 CEST 2016 from (24.114.58.116)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mike Nomad

Mike.......stopped by my video shop tonight and rented "Case Histories".....first 5 minutes while the main guy was chasing cats out of a garden with a cleaver for a bag lady.....I thought "oh, no, the one guy on this GB I could never imagine letting me down has really run one up on me" .....wow, not the case at all.....2 episodes in and just great scattered brilliance.....Thank you !


Entered at Wed Aug 17 05:30:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Nagshead North

Bill M: I remember the Dylan/Paul James event. It was at Nagshead North, a bar in Thornhill. I kicked myself for not getting there to be part of that. I don't think there is any recording around of that event. If there is, I haven't seen/heard it.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 05:18:23 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: GREAT SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH RICHIE FURAY

First is on how he met Stills & Young. You can just let one run into the next.


Entered at Wed Aug 17 04:58:29 CEST 2016 from (76.67.15.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: gigs for the gig list(s)

JT / Ian W: Maybe there are some dates here that aren't on your gig lists:

Rick Danko / Paul Butterfield, August 20, 1979 (two shows) and August 21, 1979 (two shows), El Mocambo, Toronto (cancelled and rescheduled for ...)

Rick Danko / Paul Butterfield, September 6, 1979 (two shows) and September 7, 1979 (two shows), El Mocambo, Toronto (shifted by a day to ...

Rick Danko / Paul Butterfield, September 7, 1979 (two shows) and September 8 (two shows), El Mocambo, Toronto (cancelled and rescheduled for ...)

Rick Danko / Paul Butterfield Band, February 13, 1980 (two shows) and February 14, 1980 (two shows), El Mocambo, Toronto (pushed back by a day to ...)

Rick Danko / Paul Butterfield, February 14, 1980 (two shows) and February 15, 1980 (two shows), El Mocambo, Toronto ( cancelled)

Levon Helm and the Cate Brothers Band, Tuesday to Saturday, September (exact dates unknown), 1980, Nickelodeon, Toronto

Levon Helm and the Cate Brothers, November 14, 1980, Sparky's Restaurant and Tavern, Brampton, Ontario

Bob Dylan (introduced as a hitchhiker from Vancouver), unscheduled appearance to jam with Paul James, November 1986, Thornhill, Ontario


Entered at Tue Aug 16 23:45:17 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, that had to be am extra special show for you. HAving long term close friendships with the band members , even in one case a lifelong friendship, when the music is actually first rate and spectacular, it might make it extra meaningful. Great music is great music. And it can be personal. It's very hard to define or even identify the bit of difference when you're close with the people involved. It is not an insider thing. Those who describe themselves as such are morons.It's just a friend & family thing... Maybe there is no difference except the friendship & the closeness, & the mutual acceptance & knowledge. Including knowledge of the fact that the musicians are ordinary people too, regardless...



Entered at Tue Aug 16 23:27:04 CEST 2016 from (114.75.86.82)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

End of the Line is on Youtube.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 20:24:55 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: End of the Line

Fred, the movie you mentioned is "End of the Line". Levon plays one of a pair of railway workers who "borrow" a locomotive and drive it to Chicago to protest the closure of their depot. Kind of an adventure/buddy movie. I saw it once many years ago, and as I recall it was pretty low-key and unfortunately I don't remember much about it.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 20:24:34 CEST 2016 from (24.114.78.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I agree the Brett's Holmes was/is definitive.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 19:56:27 CEST 2016 from (184.145.68.151)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: More Brit teevee crime

Kevin, hope you didn't miss Case Histories, an excellent British crime drama TV series that was set and filmed in Edinburgh. The first series premiered in 2011 in Britain and the U.S., where it was broadcast on PBS. Filming for the second series began the following year. So good I bought the DVD set. Also, anyone mention Wallander? Another terrific British crime drama series set in Sweden (it was Sweden, wasn't it?) and also broadcast by PBS. Both at the top of my list.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 19:03:27 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Live music today …

I think you’re right about live music, Jeff. A week ago I went to The Lexington in London to see The David Cross Band, supported by Richard Palmer-James. It’s a small venue, but packed for the very rare chance to see the King Crimson violinist, David Cross, plus King Crimson lyricist (Lark’s Tongues, Starless & Bible Black, Red) Richard Palmer-James, playing in London in the first time in decades. I didn’t review it, because these are people I know, Richard since we were four. It was a great evening. First a solo set, by Richard, including Easy Money (and selections from his forthcoming album, Takeaway), then David Cross with David Jackson from Van Der Graaf Generator as a duo (David Jackson is famed for playing two saxes in Roland Kirk style), then The David Cross Band, with David Jackson. The room was full of people clutching “Larks Tongues In Aspic” LPs to be signed. David Cross Band are all first-rate seasoned professionals, capable of playing a stadium gig with anyone. They don’t get together often, and it’s clearly for the love of playing.Every member of the audience felt privileged to be there … but of course it’s not “a living” anymore. Session work, studio production, music lecturing at a university are the “day jobs.”

Richard is a full-time songwriter, and a founder member of Supertramp, with a long list of European Continent hits. It’s fascinating to see him strip down “Easy Money” one of King Crimson’s best-known songs to just acoustic guitar. The iPhone video (LINKED) missed the starting verse and chorus unfortunately. He announced it as a “Dorset folk song”… true as his co-writers Robert Fripp and John Wetton are also from Dorset.

You can also find David Cross Band's versions of the King Crimson songs Starless and 21st Century Schizoid Man from the same gig on YouTube.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 17:23:58 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.114)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: British TV

Bob.....I agree completely with how good Prime Suspect was and it seemingly setting a new standard for shows of that era.......Another one I always think of as standing above the pack and raising the bar during that time was "Cracker" with the great Robbie Coltrane. ( The Band connections galore ! )

That all said, the best crime/detective show in TV history was from the UK in the 1980's - "Sherlock Holmes" starring Jeremy Brett. The definitive portrayal of Holmes. Mid 1980's started and they did 20 or 30 episodes ending in early to mid 90's.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 16:17:46 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "Old music is outselling new music for the first time ever, according to Nielsen. Some of its has to do with millennials preferring to consume music via streaming or not to pay for it at all"

See the link

"Or, maybe it's a sign that a growing number of people are choosing to stream newly released digital albums rather than purchasing them. With the increasing popularity of platforms such as Spotify and Apple Music, consumers now have instant access to all the newest music for roughly $10 a month. And they're not limited by shelf space or budget."


Entered at Tue Aug 16 15:56:40 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Peter V, we love Episodes. Great cast on that show and the writing is very funny and clever.We're enjoying the new music related Roadies on Showtime plus Ray Donovan. HBO towers over everything else, but like Showtime, we're paying for one night a week more or less.

The biggest problem with the music industry is young people are no longer interested. If you go all the way back to the big band era, it was always young people buying records and supporting live music. Look at a photo of Newport Folk Festival from the 60's and one from last month. All young people in the 60's. Now the audience are all grandparents. I understand young people still go to big festivals like Bonnaroo and to electronic shows but that is more of a happening. Young people never buy anything music related now, They all use Spodify. All day long they're trying to catch the pokemon on their Iphones using google maps. Really no time for music. What we need is something magical like The Beatles to happen again.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 11:08:55 CEST 2016 from (210.86.97.201)

Posted by:

Rod

Of course you can pay YouTube to push your clip further up the search engine but I also heard somewhere that people pay for robots to hit their URL which can result in a huge number of "hits". I saw a clip the other day of some guy playing a lead solo over a Beatles song - 95K hits. Ridiculous.

I like those Tiny Desk concerts. Seen some great acts like Wilco and OCMS doing them. Not unlike the Unplugged thing from a while back.I don't know if there is any financial benefit for them. It's not a new concept though. People have been doing radio promos for decades.

I bought a record (vinyl) of The Jam's "The Gift" album the other day. The only media I could find it on. Unfortunately I only have a crappy portable player so I'm tempted to down load the best songs from YouTube. I liked the way The Band vinyl reissues had a voucher to down load the MP3s for free.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 10:33:10 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc- you wrote "made a living". So you are aware tht it is past tense. Today most artists of the caliber that made a living before can't make a living. And that's the difference... And many artists that are okay, or good, but could be great, if they had the opportunity to develop as the past industry presented, never really do develop....

Time to call it a night.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 10:18:55 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Jeff

Thanks for your depressing, but informative posts, Jeff. They are a bit different to what I had been reading relating to YouTube.

I had never noticed 'Tiny Desk Concerts' until recently reading about them. I don't understand why established artists do them, but they must think there is a benefit.

I'll finish with your quote 'It's an extremely rough world today for music and musicians'.

But there are still people who come through to make it big.

Though my CD collection is full of artists, who made a living, rather than achieved stardom.

Thanks, Jeff.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 10:17:30 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Dunc, the linked article deal directly with youtube & artists royalties. This of course will effect name artists in a greater way, but, think how it devastates artists trying to get a foothold. When there was a music economy, it was different.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 10:09:20 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: TV

1987 British TV? In my memory that was the Dallas / Knots Landing / Dynasty era, plus for kids Neighbours, Home & Away … and Prisoner Cell Block H … a feast of Australian stuff. Home grown British soaps like Eastenders and Coronation Street are something I have avoided for decades. Maybe you saw those. There were some really crap game shows, but then game shows are always crap. I just checked … it was the year Inspector Morse started. For comedy, French & Saunders. Otherwise it looks a remarkably poor year.

The thing about British TV is to stick to BBC. The amount of advertising has greatly increased on British ITV – it used to be 2 minutes per 30 minutes with breaks once in a 30 minute programme, twice in a 60 minute. Last year, Downton Abbey seemed to break at least four times. I find any American broadcast TV totally unwatcheable because of the intrusive adverts. Also, unlike here, a lot are local, so cheaply made, strident and crass – a guy shouting about the deals at his used car lot.

I love HBO and I prefer to watch box sets than broadcast. I’d say our watching is 90% BBC – BBC 1, BBC2, BBC4, BBC News because I love being advertising free with no breaks.

The last few months, the ones I set the timer for are The Musketeers and Versailles. They are mildly confusing, one being set in the reign of Louis XIII, the other 20 years later with Louis XIV. Versailles was hated by the TV critics. We watched it through, bought the box set and have started again. On box sets we are steadily ploughing through The Good Wife. We also set the timer for Would I Lie To You? Have I Got News For You and The Graham Norton chat show. That’s about it.

Our favourite sitcom of the last five years is Episodes (Stephen Mangan, Matt LeBlanc).


Entered at Tue Aug 16 08:02:12 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, of course my comments re you tube were in answer to you regarding new or newer artists, emerging artists. Established acts are a totally different league. even so, how it translates to sales for older established acts is questionable...


Entered at Tue Aug 16 07:26:06 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Probably A Music Industry Con Job Aimed At NeoPhytes or Desperate Gullible Types

Sound Royalties Dot Com

About two weeks now i tried to place that address both as a link, or in the body of a post here. I just tried again in the note to dunc. It was impossible. But it wasn't the link. It was my description of it that got it banished...

that website popped up in my FB feed several times. I have visited the site briefly, and my computer has not been infected or crashed.... I've not investigated, & i won't ... But i bet it's a con job. A P....A....Y... D....A....Y L...O...A....n, Cash advance on Legal Settlements approach to the music industry...

The word i had to spell out with ..... in between letters, i guess jan intelligently has the site set to reject that word. I got "scram" every time! :-)

Anyway, I imagine there to be a difference between these guys & actual "respectable" labels, regardless of how respectable they were.......


Entered at Tue Aug 16 06:54:27 CEST 2016 from (67.84.78.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Dunc/ You Tube?

Dunc, ( typo alert, there will be some) a partial , fragmented, & possibly inaccurate answer to your question and other musings or observations re You tube: In my opinion and in my experience, unless a artist, or act is very lucky, you can forget You Tube being worth a damn unless you have money to spend. And the money gets spent in a lot of places.......But something has to drive people to the you tube video. It's either luck, or you make a cat performance to your music video- or you spend serious money...... will that translate to actual income? fucked if i know.

At one time bookers, talent agents, managers, all looked at you tube to see how artists had a following. Today, a quickly increasing ratio of music industry people are of the mind that social media is a waste of time- again- unless you have money to spend. It all comes back to money. thing is, the money you spend makes you far less money today- in fact the odds are you will still lose money.

The organic aspect of social, fb friends sending people to your bandcamp, you tubes, songs, videos. forget it....social media- well, if you are a musician or artist or songwriter, even if you go out of your way to support many others, unless you are more famous than they are,or hire them REGULARLY, or might seem to be the next hip thing, most artists & musicians will ignore you when it is their turn to promote and support your project, show, song, you tube video etc...... I speak from personal experience & the experience of dozens if not well over a hundred of my friends & cohorts...

And it's only common sense & courtesy. To me, talent & art is talent & art. If someone is good, you want them to succeed, & for others to enjoy them. So you write something for them, & share their work... It does';t cost you anything. And the more worthy artists succeed, the better it is for everyone. But the truth is, on FB & most social media, unless some one is famous, not many are helping them..... So many think that it hurts their own odds. And so many think they have to save their plus for themselves.. But when it's some one famous they got their nose right up their tucches....And average people, non artists, well, some of them will help, but most just don;t care. Again, unless its some oen famous. OR a alligator that eats the zookepper that was screwing it's offspring.yes, that happened in Naples Florida.

Where does you tube translate into money, record sales, ticket sales..........i doubt it helps the average performer much today. As you know, to me, the devil is digital..I don;t see any return from it. I just think it's over......

I don;t know if many of you noticed, but you tube long ago really restricted the versions of songs that used to be up. So if you want to see a version of Song H by artist 123, that you used t see regularly, that may no longer be possible.

Tiny desk concerts? How fucking stoopid is that. And to have guys like Graham Nash doing them ( i think it was him), hpw pitiful is that. Why should he even bother? How fucking lame is it?

Dots and screens fuck with your brain. We've all been fucked.

Writing to people all over the world on computers, well, some of you are delightful. Sending paperwork in a email, yes, it;s much fastre than real mail.......but, what is the expense?

We're now looking at a world where the work force is going to be replaced by robots, and even truckdrivers may be replaced by driverless trucks eventually.What the fuck? Of course, robots don;t need to listen to music so there you go. It all makes sense now.

I produce some shows in a club. i've had a trio of some of the baddest cats walking the face of the earth in. Deadly motherfuckers. In a great room, with great sound, class operation. We drew 17 people. 10 were on the guest list. No joke. and we worked it. Demoralizing doesn't even come close to describing the feeling. Thankfully the clubowner was a mensch & went above our deal & took a jab on the chin so we all took a beating instead of the trio getting hit by a shotgun... He didn't have to do it..... And he shocked me when he did. It's an extremely rough world today for music and musicians. There's no sense to it. The only time it makes sense is when the music is getting made.

I've asked myslef how in the world can players get up there and perform properly when they are worried about losing their ass.......the only answer i can come up with is that it;s the same way i am still able to sit down and write songs that i know may never get recorded or , even if i do record them, regardless of how good they are, may never get heard by more than a few hundred or few thousabd people..... & may keep me in debt indefinitely

But the knot in your stomach gets bigger & tighter all the time.... So Dunc, You Tubes, & all of it.... It's not a mtter of dedication, craft, ability- it;s a matter of starting with money, being cold hearted, & out for the kill.

Taylor Swift is a good example. She has some degree of talent, and a huge degree of dedication. And started with a ton of daddy's money. and tunnel vision and always had a business plan. The money is the biggest key. You can be supe r talented, dedicated, be willign to work hard,- if you don;t have the money, or the backer with the money, and good plan, forget it. Taylor Swift 's music leaves me empty- but she had the marketing ability, the money, the plan, and that makes the machine.



Entered at Tue Aug 16 06:12:10 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.114)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"End of The Line", Fred. Not seen it. Enjoyed every role Levon ever platyed but this one looks like it could be a challenge even with the alluring Miss Steenburgen....

"Line of Duty": I just finished the latest - season 3 - and while enjoying this series, I only rate it a tick above "movie of the week" fare......very enjoyable but also very flawed......especially with the lead actor being so terribly miscast.....Martin Compton at just under 4 feet of height is as realistic a policeman as Barry Manilow would be as a member of The Band. Impossible to take him seriously just as it is many of the other characters. Housewife stuff really - but admititly addictive due to some sharp writing and direction.

"Foyle's War": Likely a bit too subtle for most tastes but I believe to be brilliant. Season's 7 and 8, set in the immediate aftermath of WW2 are as good or better than the first 6 seasons.


Entered at Tue Aug 16 03:02:26 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Levon & Mary Steenburgen

Has anyone ever seen this movie?


Entered at Tue Aug 16 00:16:26 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Television Shows

Ragtime, I saw the first season of Line of Duty on Mr. Alan Edge's recommendation. Loved it. I love Luther. Waiting for last season to come on Netflix. Al also recommended Happy Valley. We tried it but we had trouble with the accents. Going to give it another try with sub titles. Thanks.

Kevin, I've got your recommendations written down. We will get to them. Thanks. Right now we're in the middle of The Bridge which is really great. The Danish/Swedish version.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 23:32:27 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Bob F, my free advise: if you really want a treat, watch "Luther", "Line of Duty" or "Happy Valley". First class UK crime drama. Breathtaking. Avoid lame oldfashioned whodunits like "New Tricks", "Midsomer Murders" and "Death in Paradise".


Entered at Mon Aug 15 21:27:36 CEST 2016 from (96.86.236.133)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: David Powell photos

My thanks to Jan & to Garry Powell for sharing those great pics of David last week. Just as I remember him...


Entered at Mon Aug 15 21:11:36 CEST 2016 from (84.215.177.75)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Photo info.

1960/61 pic of Levon, Will "Pop" Jones, Rebel Payne and Robbie. We need to find out when and were this photo (link above) was taken, who took it and where it was originally published. Anyone?


Entered at Mon Aug 15 20:06:48 CEST 2016 from (76.69.119.202)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: I can highly recommend the following British detective shows:

– “Endeavour”: It’s a prequel to the great Inspector Morse series, but might even be better. The 3rd season is out next week by start at the beginning.

– “George Gently”: Early to mid-60”s England with Martin Shaw. The best work of his career. Some fine music as well.

– “Grantchester”: A Vicar that enjoys the ladies and drinking and smoking helps a grizzled detective solve crimes. Set in the 50’s. Excellent writing and casting. It is actually the casting that sets the British shows apart. Janitors tend to have pot bellies and bad teeth whereas in the US shows, the janitors and waitresses all look like supermodels.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 19:40:45 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: English Crime Shows

My wife and I are huge television crime show fans. With all the streaming services we're able to watch crime shows from around the world. Thanks to a life time of live music our hearing is down the drain, so we actually welcome any opportunity to use sub titles without feeling guilty. We're completely won over by the English shows, DCI Banks, Scott and Baily, Luther and many more. Recently Hulu added the entire Prime Suspect series staring Helen Mirren which is to crime shows what The Beatles are to rock and roll. I remember being in England in 1987 and being absolutely appalled at how bad the television shows were. I couldn't understand how the English could work all day knowing they had such bad television to look forward to at night. Now you guys have the best shows! How did that happen?


Entered at Mon Aug 15 19:03:22 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: PA/DE, USA

Subject: YouTube

In general, I listen to a wide range of music, mostly at work, on headphones. I greatly appreciate the links that y'all post here which sometimes lead down various rabbit holes to discover artists or performers I would not have been exposed to otherwise. What I can't figure out is how YouTube decides what to play "next". There is an icon that SAYS "playing next" but more often than not, it is NOT what plays next. So go figure.

I am a bit uneasy when I see someone putting up an entire album, unless that album is out of print. A live performance is one thing, but "sharing" an entire album is IMO infringing on the copyright and performance rights of the artist. Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free? On the other hand, like dubbing things to tape back in the day, the sound quality is often lessened, and if you really like the artist and want the best listening experience, (and the liner notes, etc.) you will get the CD. Definitely a grey area.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 18:43:52 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: self promotion and opportunity for me to find out

I think its a great opportunity for an emerging musician/artist to have an outlet to show her/his ability. I'm all for that. How does one 'happen' on that artist? Is there a place that says "Here's a new folk artist. You may like him/her." I'd love something like that for you tube.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 18:20:57 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Jed, YouTube

I think there is a change, Jed. And that change is that artists are using YouTube rather than being used by YouTube. Not in all cases.

Here is a link to the Karine Polwart Trio playing a Michael Marra song. She is a folksinger who is developing a following throughout Britain. The video is well done and produced by the band for you tube.

Music websites use this clip.

I think what I have been reading is that an emerging artist has to use YouTube for their benefit. And be aware that promoters will look at YouTube to see if they think an artist is worth booking.

So maybe seeing this clip coupled with radio and tv will lead to people buying her music and/or going to see her in concert.

But I really don't know.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:41:29 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Me too- I often ended up with CD / DVD sets (so as to get two extra tracks on the CD or whatever) and rarely even try the DVD. YouTube is a different thing. We tend to watch music DVDs in the kitchen while cooking, and so mainly it's listening rather than watching intently. I guess that's because there's a small TV with a DVD player and sound bar, but no CD player. Yes, I realise you can play CDs on a DVD player.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:33:26 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Youtube

I listen/watch a lot of music on youtube.They have complete albums,live concerts,etc.It is a true ripoff of the artists and the ultimate convenience for the listener/viewer.Why pull out the album when it can be heard,easily,on youtube?The attitude today is so very far from the artist or the artist's interest or stake in the music.The artist is there to be ripped off.Sad.But convenient.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:32:51 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Just normal

I think it was just a quite normal relationship albeit short and intense, Peter. Nowadays he would probably go home and discuss it with his parents. Actually, when I read your sixties trilogy (really good read), I thought about the whole trip again.

It was rumoured that Steven Stills heard about the relationship and wrote a song about it.

The Troggs were popular up here. No surprise a Scottish band had a massive hit with 'Love Is All Around'. I think Reg was trying to look trendy Bowieish with the jump suit, but the beer had taken its toll.

Playing the Troggs' greatest hits just now. Great stuff. Amazed you have the singles.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:16:40 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Al, JT

Thanks, Al.

That is the way I feel, JT. I listen to CDs not watch DVDs. I will, however, use YouTube to listen to music and will look at links posted here.

But there is no doubt that many artists are using YouTube to showcase their music.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:12:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Troggs

I acquired the original “The Best of The Troggs” LP recently- I had all the 45s already. As it was released at the time, it does not include Love Is All Around, later to become Reg Presley’s pension. They came from Andover, Hampshire and knew the virtues of simplicity, but I recall them as somewhat sartorially challenged, like Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. who also had a rural demeanour that clashed with psychedelic garb. Andover was around the furthest my pals’ local soul band travelled, and as an army base, it was always notorious for fights in the dance halls. The Troggs were the local heroes. I still remember the first time an engineer played me The Troggs Tape, which later was issued as part of a 2x 45 set.

Intrigued by the “Last Tango” tale of your mate, Dunc. I’m trying to think of a polite comment involving butter and Stork but I can’t think of one.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 17:04:22 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.114)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, Bob F and to you and Bassmanlee for the reminders on Dave Alvin too.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 16:50:55 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Web: My link

Subject: Personal preference

I was impressed when the artistic accompaniment of a visual film accompanied music on MTV and the like in the 80s. But for me it didn't stick. Even today, I rarely watch concerts on TV or watch DVDs, despite owning them. I don't seek out the you tube or vimeo videos to see the artist. If I do, it is only to listen. When I hear that there is something worth hearing on you tube, it is for me to listen to it, not 'see' it. I agree that the exposure is good. Yesterday, they showed 'The Last Waltz' on TV in the afternoon. I turned up the volume and sat on the patio near the speakers which were nearby, opened the screened window, and enjoyed the warmth of thesun and the vibrancy and excitement of the music. I enjoy live shows and the experience of being in a small room to hear live music and see the performer, but that does not translate to the screen for me. Somewhat strange, but that's it.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 16:09:43 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff's stance

Also I'd like to endorse Dun'c comments re Jeff's steadfast stance about the need for a fairer deal for artists.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 16:06:48 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Food for Thought

That's really interesting re the You Tube thing Dunc. Especially given the efforts we've been making re RoseAnn. Could explain a lot.

I had actually noticed this phenomenon before and put up a post on here about it. Some utter garbage song/artist which I can't recall had had about 250 million hits/views. It contrasted with the hits/views for some what we arl arses would deem established songs/artists which had had only tens or hundreds of thousands. I use the term 'only' deliberately as the numerical contrast is so stark.

Serious food for thought re RoseAnn.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Aug 15 15:22:55 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Troggs

It happened round about 1971, Peter before I became boring. The gig was at Sheffield University.Four of us went down. The Troggs were great. Reg was pleased to see us. He was wearing a jump suit with the hint of a belly, but the band were great. All the hits of our formative years played the way they should be.

Three of us made it back on time, but one of our merry band took ten days to get back. He met a Sheffield University girl and had a Last Tango experience. His mum in Dundee was having kittens wondering what was happening to him. We knew, but couldn't tell her what he was doing. I remember going to the red phonebox to phone the student flat to tell him that there was trouble at home. Much alcohol was consumed on the trip.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 13:53:36 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Reg Presley

More importantly, Dunc, were The Troggs any good?


Entered at Mon Aug 15 11:56:58 CEST 2016 from (31.53.17.205)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: YouTube

Hope this does not sound patronising, but I've found many of the recent posts interesting on the GB especially related to the difficulties of artists nowadays.

Thanks Jeff A for consistently supporting artists and pointing out the challenges they have to meet in this era.

It's so complicated nowadays - you need good songs, a good act and I don't think you're allowed the time to settle into your act, your music needs to be played on radio and there are so many channels, you need a good agent with links to promoters, you've to make money from concerts and you need a website.

Then the bit I'm not too sure of - so out of touch nowadays - how the music is accessed and shared(it's not about passing the album about nowadays or somebody making up a reel to reel tape and inviting mates to the flat to get pissed together.) There is twitter, facebook, streaming - so complicated.

But for more than a while, I've noticed how artists especially emerging artists or artists with a decent, but not huge following are using YouTube - right across the genres from Scottish folk singers to American singer/ songwriters. There are mini concerts, songs recorded before concerts, songs from concerts, videos etc - all done to a high standard - sitting in your bedroom playing a song seems to be less important for artists who are playing gigs.

I don't have a clue about the music industry so I googled. And it seems, through reading various articles, that YouTube is the most popular accessing tool for online delivery of an artist's work; among the under 18s it is the preferred platform for listening to music; it is important to combine good music with good visuals(well we knew that from MTV); and YouTube is linked to twitter, facebook, music websites etc which is important for spreading music. (That's clear to see on this GB - look at the number of linked posts nowadays)

And no evidence for this, but will a promoter look at the number of hits an artist is receiving on YouTube before booking them; or a radio station do likewise before playing a new artist.

I've not got a clue abut music nowadays, and this is from someone who once hitched from Dundee to Sheffield with mates to see The Troggs. So how important is YouTube? Discuss.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 11:26:39 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Beach Volleyball with the big bouncy boobies

I can honestly say I've never watched it even when it's been on the telly.

Guess I must either be gay, completely weird ...or just have a soft spot... for old time rock 'n' roll that is!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Aug 15 10:35:07 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It Makes No Difference

When I saw the 90s Band live, it was the best song in the set - the combination of Rick's voice, plus Garth's solo in the middle. Both lifted it into the stratosphere.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 09:42:22 CEST 2016 from (219.89.14.215)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: It makes no difference

this is one of those songs where the performance really makes a difference. The Band nailed in their 76 performances with a hint of anger ,desparation and pathos. Alot of other versions I've heard (including the later versions of The Band) just had the pathos and it didn't do it for me. And it needs that descending bass (playing the 3rd) at the beginning of the verse to add that tension.


Entered at Mon Aug 15 01:56:53 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Kevin, truth. What a classic line, indoor volleyball is jazz... beach volleyball is rock & roll. Man is that perfect!


Entered at Mon Aug 15 00:57:22 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: vball

OMG Kevin you've outed me. I haven't watched indoor volleyball ever. I've been telling everyone that Kerry Walsh-Jennings is my cousin. Busted.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 23:08:21 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.26)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, i caught the Dead in the 70s, 74, 75, 76, 77 Don't think i saw them again till 85 through 88 . 88 one, was the Rainforest show with sting, suzanne vega. Back then i caught a gazillions shows. I had a couple of great scalpers and i 'd pay 100 or so a ticket each for a pair and always sit within the first 6 or 7 rows dead center in Madison Sq Garden, etc .I think after that Rainforest show i was out.... I might have seen a few more...........but i remember once i felt a big change in the music, I wasn't digging it ...

Don't worry about that misread. It just kept conversation going......You didn't break any beer bottles, or accuse anybody of imagined crimes against humanity.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 20:59:08 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.114)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Indoor Volleyball is Jazz......Beach Volleyball is rock n roll.....that's all you need to know...........thinking of those bikini's, Seth Blatter may have stolen millions and thoroughly corrupted a sport but one of his most left footed steps might have been suggesting women's soccer could achieve much wider popularity if only the players wore sexier uniforms pointing to women's beach volleyball as an example........Outrageous BUT since Beach volleyball has been an Olympic sport ( 1998 ) , I don't know anyone who has ever watched an indoor volleyball match since.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 19:52:10 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Opinions

So much criticism and judgement is about standards we barely understand. Mrs V and I just sat through the Men’s Artistic Gymnastics from Rio. So the Gold was 15.633 (Britain). Is that to three decimal points? Or do the numbers mean something else? We had happily opined that the Brazilian (silver) was the best, but we don’t have a clue how it’s scored or what the marks are given for. The same with the diving. What’s a double pike? Who knows? But we still give opinions … bad stumble there. Slight hop. Ouch … bad entry into the water. Bit of a splash there. But we don’t know what we’re talking about.

I often think about my total lack of formal musical education … never stops me having an opinion though!


Entered at Sun Aug 14 19:01:05 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Culture clash

There was somewhat of a culture clash with the Grateful Dead and British musicians (same with Jefferson Airplane). I guess it was 1972 (the “Europe 72 Tour”). A lot of professional musicians went to see them. The story I heard was that a large group of British musicians (well-known ones) walked out after 20 minutes, complaining that the Dead were noodling around, as if trying to get in tune for ages (and these are pre electronic tuner days and they added they were having difficulty in doing so). The consensus was that they were merely inept, and no one waited long enough for them to get warmed up and start playing. I think “our guys” had grown up playing in soul bands before prog bands, and had been taught to hit the stage up and running with impact. In retrospect, I would say it was impatience / a difference of style. The Dead played for 3 hours, but took 20 minutes to warm up. Our guys were used to 90 minutes, rocking from the beginning.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 18:22:08 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff A.

My bad-I did misread.Oops.I left GD shows in '88-agree the crowds got rowdy.Through the 70's and early eighties it was,generally speaking,a very nice bunch of people.It changed as the world has changed.The crowds at Dead cover shows have become more difficult.I saw Warren Haynes cover Garcia with the Symphony-too much talking to hear the subtleties and excellence of the symphonies.But,generally nice people,nice time.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 17:57:28 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.26)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed. Bob & Joan both wrote negatively of the Dead audience & dealing with the crowds.. They did not write The Dead were sloppy musically. You misunderstood them both. Bad Jed.:-)

I caught a healthy share of Dead shows. I'd say 60% were completely brilliant.Thirty percent about half the show was brilliant. I did know when not to see them . There were lengthy periods I stayed far away .


Entered at Sun Aug 14 13:28:15 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Pitch Correction

YouTube has it’s content ID to automatically scan songs, movies etc. for copyright reasons. One trick You Tubers use to fool this content ID is pitch correction. That’s why some songs on You Tube sound so bad. Just that you know dear Band friends.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 12:14:29 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Last Waltz show at Lincoln Center Outdoors(and a brief word on Grateful Dead)

Yes,it was a tribute show.I went and had a fun time-Larry,Jim,Terasa led the way with some interesting guests.Yes,Teddy Thomson was good.I'm a huge fan of Lucinda and no one can ever be expected to sing like Rick.But when she's on she's a fine singer,her songwriting is outstanding and her bands tend to be quite excellent. Discovered the genius of Doug Pettibone's guitar playing in a few live shows and on side 2 of Live @ Fillmore West.She did a nice job of IMND that evening,way better than her miserable performance of Whispering Pines at Love for Levon(a show killed by the horrible sound of the cavernous NJ arena where it took place).All a matter of taste and quite subjective,like most musical likes and dislikes.Dr. John is sadly a shell of himself musically.Bob Weir was pretty good and while it was a free(no one was cashing in,Kevin!) show,outdoors and the sound was not great it was a fun fun evening and the spirit and intent of The Band was evident on stage and in the crowd,particularly among us older folk.Buddy Miller was a highlight and delivered big time and Teresa's vocals are first rate.Larry and Jim always bring it,the horns were incredible.Regarding the so called sloppiness of the Dead,I can probably share a stack of many live shows that would change minds.But,it's all a matter of taste so I'm not gonna try to convince anyone.Jerry and Phil are two of the most ingenious musicians ever to play R&R music imho! But,I'm a long time Deadhead,Lucinda fan,and fan of things not too liked in certain places,but taste is taste...taugtologically speaking of course😀🎸🎻🎺🎷


Entered at Sun Aug 14 08:46:09 CEST 2016 from (84.215.177.75)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Landy photo of Rick


Entered at Sun Aug 14 07:27:39 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Teddy Thompson

He might have been the best singer of the whole lot. Try his album of country covers: Up Front & Down Low. A handful of other good records too. He's got a new one of duets with a girl whose name I don't recall that has received good notices too. He runs with the Rufus Wainwright crowd and of course the rest of the Thompson family /


Entered at Sun Aug 14 02:05:27 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: IMND FA

'It Makes No Difference' is a difficult song. I believe we've heard the definitive version. No reason not to take a shot at it though.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 01:27:29 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norman, you prompted me to think about who coulda sung It Makes No Difference & done it real justice....I think you woulda thought of these, but just topped out prematurely.. Richie Furay & Tim Schmidt could both have sung It Makes No Difference easily. Paul Cotton probably would have been able to, & George Grantham for sure, but maybe a might too high (same for Schmidt, maybe). Jimmy Ibbotson & Jeff Hanna maybe. Gene Clark i'd bet woulda aced it, & Blondie Chaplin, for damn sure...Gram Parsons?? furay, Clark, and Parsons, the main contenders... I doubt anyone but Danko could ever make that song do what it does to people. but, those others..... .. To me. it's moot, cause the Band's versions are all we need.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 01:12:37 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.46)

Posted by:

Jeff

Web: My link

Subject: Poco / Magnolia & Ro Fino

We all have different tastes. That's a good thing, cause we get exposed to more that way, and sometimes like new things we didn't yet know......I've never been a fan of Lucinda's. There's the odd okay original song....

I'd much prefer to watch & listen to a Ro Fino performance than a Lucinda performance....Now I think Ro is a fan of Lucinda's. So if Lucinda influenced Ro positively, then she's okay in my book. Cause Ro is great.

Magnolia, for me, it's Poco or Paul Cotton solo, or J.J.


Entered at Sun Aug 14 00:50:29 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Lucinda Williams Magnolia

I've seen Lucinda many times over the course of her career. She's not one of those artists that can just jump right it. Always needs a little warm up. Last year she played The Bardavon, first few songs were a train wreck, the rest of the show was wonderful. Like Dylan, she can't just go out there and fake it. When she's on she can sing as good as almost anyone . Not going to get into how great songwriter she is.

Check out her cover of JJ Cale's Magnolia.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 18:05:33 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Lucinda / Mike Nomad

Thanks Mike for reminding me that I have to wash my hair tonight.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 17:36:57 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Good The Bad and the Ugly

I've never liked Lucinda Williams singing and 5 seconds of that is the bad and the ugly....noise.

In this link My Morning Jacket does a credible job of this song. The only critic I can make of this, this boy singing the song cannot quite achieve the same vocal control that Rick Danko could. That is not a put down to him, as very few people could control their vocal pitch as Rick Danko could on high notes. The only other person who could on that type of song from that era was Randy Meisner as in "Take it to the Limit".


Entered at Sat Aug 13 17:36:04 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I've refrained from saying much about various Band Tributes & Last Waltz tributes. What i will say is that the participants are all sincere & very talented. I don't go to see Band tributes or Band tribute bands. That doesn't mean that i think other people shouldn't. People are free to perform Band music or enjoy Band music any way they want.

Me, the only Band songs not performed by the Band that really struck me as Bsnd songs & felt like Band songs were performed by original Band members, be they solo, or in some aggregation. The Band really can't be done right by anyone else. Soem oen might play guitar si,iar to RR, might play drums similar to Levon, on & on- but the beautiful musical unusuality of all 5 players that became a beautful musical unusuality of itself, cannnot be receated r even done justice to. Declare it a re-creation, or a tribute, or a tribute band, you are putting a big burden on the event and yourself. that said, it's only my opinion, and I'm no expert or final authority. People have the right to play and enjoy what they will,

Aaron, PRofessor's Louie's Cromatix's, have in the past, & recently did hit home for me in a very real & different way. I have heard Band songs performed by many people before. None struck me, that i can remember. Last winter i saw Louie & company in a 35 seat room in Brooklyn, and their healthy 2 set show included at the most 4 or 5 Band songs. They didn't OVER TRY to sound like the Band, & they didnt try to sound unlike the Band. There was an true intimacy, friendship, & love, and great musicianship, , in the performances. A depth of authenticity attained by not trying to be authentic or deconstructive. It was natural excellent musicianship, love, and respect that can't be feigned. I teared up a couple of times, cause while it wasn't the Band,can;t be the Band , it wasn;t billed as a tribute to them, but it was undorned,love for The Band, not for the masses, but for themselves and 35 schmucks in a small slightly warm room on a winter's night. BTW,they drove about three hours each way to make very little money to do this. IT is not an industry for them.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 16:57:44 CEST 2016 from (142.114.165.177)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Lucinda

Yikes!


Entered at Sat Aug 13 15:55:06 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan as a painter (MFBP and Self Portrait cover art)

I had already (almost) forgotten this. - The link is from Eurovision Song Contest in 1975, the Finnish entry. Eurovision Song Contest is bigger than life up here. Here some Finnish folkies are painting their self portrait. It shows how influential maestro in painting Bob Dylan was. Really.

The music itself is embaracing to see and listen to after fourtyone years. At least it got maximum points from Germany and Switzerland. Thanks Norbert and Ingvar Kamprad for these points.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 15:44:44 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bad day?

Kevin J: I agree. I am a big fan on Lucinda Williams. I can't imagine what happened. I was really disappointed by this performance of a great song. It was bereft of all the emotive impact of that song. Maybe another day but not that day and that performance.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 14:35:21 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Budapest Post

Sixteen years ago there are 2 legendary posts posted here. Precisely at the turn of the century a man waited for the orient express in the Budapest Keleti, he had to wait for 65 minutes. Killing his time on the railway station he googled some on his laptop and, by accident, found this great site. He was a fan of The Band and made his first of two post, a short thanks post. It was well written, eloquent and had the right tone, but it wasn’t extraordinary yet.

Five minutes were gone and the man now had one hour to spend till his train would arrive. He used precisely 60 minutes to write his second and, as far as we know, last post before he stepped on board of the Orient Express heading east, leaving Europe in the 20th century and entering Asia in the 21th century.

His second post said it all about The Band but also leaving room, it could have been written by Ilkka, Bill, Peter or you and me, if we had a year to make it, there was something of all of us in that post, yet none of us had written it.

It was about The Band and the essence of life, about love, brotherhood without being sentimental. It talked about the beauty of the universe, the complexities, the journey life is, about creating and sharing, making memories, leaving pretentions, about the value of time; all embedded in love for The Band.

I sometimes think about this post, it was never told before, yet it sounded familiar. I looked many times in the archives here but never found it again. And even that, I now think, was part of that legendary post, maybe, just maybe, God is a Band fan too and gave them one hour of his precious time.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 08:15:03 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.114)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: It Makes a Difference - Yes it Does !

If you ever needed absolute proof of the genius of Rick Danko or Robbie Robertson - do spend a few painful minutes watching a Link over at Expecting Rain of an absolutely dreadful performance by Lucinda Williams of "It Makes No Difference" - backed by otherwise favourites of mine - Larry Campbell and Jim Weider - in just one more romper of musicians cashing in on the great Last Waltz but not bothering to spend even 5 minutes rehearsing the signature songs. I've seen beginner students covering TLW songs with 100 times the quality and dignity that these guys mustered on "It Makes No Difference".........Shamefull !


Entered at Sat Aug 13 00:31:06 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: NRPS

Yes, interested. In the last month I picked up copies of Brujo and Oh, What A Mighty Time.


Entered at Sat Aug 13 00:01:34 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: The Best of Everything

When Tom Petty and The Hb's really had the magic. I never get tired of this beautiful song. Was this the last song Robbie, Richard and Garth all worked on?


Entered at Fri Aug 12 23:45:24 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Avery Fisher Hall

Joan, I saw the Patti Smith Group at Avery Fisher Hall March of 1976. I think it took a few more years before they stopped doing 'rock shows'.

Every time I saw The Grateful Dead or someone in The Dead family it was always a mess. Never a comfortable or enjoyable experience for me anyway.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 23:33:17 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.244)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Agreed Lee. Battin was not great in The Riders. Or The Burritos.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 20:32:15 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmalee

Location: PA&DE, USA

Subject: NRPS

Back in the day I LOVED The Riders, especially the first four records. Dirty Business, Henry, Dim Light Thick Smoke, Glendale Train, Whiskey (which I do solo), Sutter's Mill, You Should of Seen Me Runnin'...the list goes on. After that they got a bit (well, a lot) less focused. I loved Dave Torbert and still consider him an influence. Once Skip Batten joined it was pretty much all down hill IMO. (We have had the "Once Skip Batten joins, you've pretty much jumped the shark" conversation before.)

Saw them once around maybe around '73 in the Temple University gymnasium. As I recall, a fine show.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 19:51:28 CEST 2016 from (74.108.30.68)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jed

I Saw NRPS at Lincoln Center around 1973. They were good but the audience was was bad. Everone was stoned out of their minds People were standing on the red velvet seats of Avery Fisher hall. The women had taken over the mensroom And everyone eas smoking weed in there,I think that they never had another rock concert there


Entered at Fri Aug 12 17:33:33 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Sadavid, many thanks!


Entered at Fri Aug 12 17:13:05 CEST 2016 from (99.231.74.112)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Eugene Smith etc.

Bill M-thanks for the heads up for the Eugene Smith and the Warm-Up Band Reunion at Hugh's Room. Should be a good show. The acoustic Strawbs also sounds interesting.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 14:29:53 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: The Last Waltz 40th anniversary tribute

MP3 artifact of the event recorded by an audience member.
This is the NYC concert mentioned by BWNWITenn the other day.

Midnight Ramble Band, Bob Weir, Buddy Miller, Lucinda Williams, Patti Griffith, Teddy Thompson, Dr. John, Howard Johnson. Etc.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 04:55:02 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.244)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Once upon a time The Riders were really cool. Way back in 73, the first songs I learned to finger pick were Henry, Louisiana Lady, & Portland Woman.Of course, they're really active the last decade, with original member Nelson, first full time steel player Cage,, Ronnie Penque, Michael Falzarano, & on drums, Johnny Markowski, the son of Gene Clark's producer., Thomas Jefferson Kaye. I haven't seen them in several decades, since the S kip Battin days, but should.


Entered at Fri Aug 12 00:49:10 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: NRPS

A group that really "country rocks" & is unfortunately too overlooked is the New Riders of the Purple Sage.Having Garcia sit in often on their albums & live shows was an added bonus.Any admirers here?


Entered at Thu Aug 11 21:41:14 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Dave Alvin

I was lucky enough to live very close to the Coachhouse in San Juan Capistrano, CA, which was a regular spot for Dave Alvin. Always with a great band: David Lindley, DJ Bonebreak, Syd Straw, Jorge Calderon and almost always Chris Gaffney, that LA/OC crowd. But never Phil except with The Blasters. He's in Portland in 2 weeks - at an old church venue!

Somebody mentioned the song Blackjack David. It's a great folk song with an ancient history - try rockabillyist Warren Smith's take from 1956.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 19:31:24 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Lamentations

Bill M: Unfortunately commitments on the other side of the continent prevent me from being there on 9.10. Thanks. I watch the calendar at Hugh's and lament the shows I can't get to. I make up for that by seeing David Vest and others at Herman's on the left coast.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 19:12:05 CEST 2016 from (76.67.15.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Subject: Eugene Smith and Warm-Up Band reunion show at Hugh's Room

JT (and this may interest you too, GregD): Speaking of Hugh's Room, Eugene Smith and the Warm-Up Band will be doing a reunion show there on October 9. I saw them a billion times in the '70s, when they were always excellent and at times totally phenomenal. One particular show at the Hotel California on Jarvis was one of the four or five best shows I've seen by anyone anywhere anywhen. If you're in town JT, the acoustic Strawbs play two nights earlier the same week.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 17:39:58 CEST 2016 from (131.137.35.8)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: a goddamn impossible way of life

Why touring is even harder on DJs.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 17:36:16 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.244)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peter, I used to catch Dave Alvin in a small venue in St Louis named Off Broadway. I saw him outside in a larger venue, & tht was great too, but you're right. The small venue tour with his brother must be out of this world. Here they are playing City Winery. A medium sized venue i don't care for. Four people at a table that's small for 2. Sound is okay, not spectacular. 28 bucks to sit out in right field at the bar, where the sound is better, would be the way to go.......Shame is, these are the clubs that have a circuit of some good acts....The price is the price, but the comfort level is a different story. Being caged like cattle in a tight box, no dice.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 17:12:42 CEST 2016 from (100.34.253.103)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Re: Dave Alvin

The Dave and Phil Alvin tour which has been going on for a couple of years now is easily one of the best shows you're going to see. I've seen it twice and they were amazing both times. But one of the reasons the show is so great is that it is in a club, where you can easily get close-up and see everything that is going on. Somewhere around 20 years ago give or take a year or two, I saw Dave Alvin open for Dylan and Joni Mitchell in a college arena. He was good, but didn't convey the power he does in a smaller venue.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 16:49:07 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.244)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Casey Jones for the 2010s

A tangent to the train song thread. Read the linked article. Pretty wild but I've seen all kinds of stuff.... The 70s were the Wild West on NYCtrains, but these days are worse, The trains are mostly grafitti free, but there's more homeless people on the trains than ever. The trains are stinkier. The crime , hard to say if it's more violent, but it always seems like it's a split second away... I never sit on the train. Never...If you gotta react, you're faster standing. And you're far less likely to dose off standing up too.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 14:28:37 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Small venue live in a chair

Having written and discussed the issue of live performance, let me say the there is little more enjoyable to me than going to a small club venue with tables and chairs and a small stage (Hugh's Room in Toronto and Herman's in Victoria are examples) and hearing/seeing a live performer in a relaxed atmosphere where you can see the faces of the performers from 10-20 feet away and watch the hands make those sounds as the vocal cords share emotions. We talk about $$$. This type of experience is priceless.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 12:35:20 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Living gbers

(ROCKIN CHAIR might know this song as a Waylon fan.)

Livin’ gbers are a dying breed
There ain’t too many left
To tell the truth, I ain’t been feelin’
Real hot lately my damn self.

But I ain’t old and I ain’t bitter
I ain’t mad at anyone
So don’t go takin’ seriously
What’s poked at you in fun.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Thanks Webmaster and Mike C.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 04:48:06 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, in the end of that last comment, tour could mean anything. Casinos to dive bars.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 04:35:48 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Absolutely Jerry. You might recall that later in life Levon did not like the road much either.

Yet there is another side. Any musician is generally happiest, most alive, & most connected, playing music...Playing music is what musicians do. Be they bands, acts, artists, or sidemen... And touring is part of that.. While the ideal situation would be playing for three hundred or three thousand people every night in their home town,or within an hour or three, for many, touring has always been an essential part of their ability to make a living. And to practice their craft or art..To a very large degree, at the entry levels of new acts, a lot of that has been stripped away for the majority of real quality acts of music that this group would really enjoy.

Established people do make a living, or part of a living, though. It has all changed. Like you, I'm not the only one in here with friends who have and to degrees still do spend a lot of time on the road.

For older name acts,& in older traditional musics, the amount of touring has diminished. But it's there, & still representative of a good amount of their income. The sidemen that have toured with name artists, , it's still an important part of their living. When they're home, they give lessons, take any club work they can get ( some work 3 - 6 nights a week in NYC,& other cities or areas, may make 50 - 200 a night), might work on their own projects, & take all the session work they can.
I know players who are among the best of the best, who are home more often than not, & have all kinds of gigs besides touring, do all those things i mentioned above, & more. Some compose for musicals in development. Some have some other kind of trade- think of things like making stained glass, repairing bicycles etc, repairing watches...

I also know some insanely serious acclaimed players in their 60s who will load up & drive three hours to do gigs that pay a hundred bucks. Cause it's what they do & enjoy. And it's when they feel. And sure, they need to make a living, a hunfred bucks is stealing from them, - these are guys who's playing you can't put a price tag on. 400, 500, 600 bucks a show, sure, A grand, sure... The point is, it isn't necessarily a loss leader. It's what they do & have had to do to make a living & to play. When tours supported records, acts were still independent businesses. It was part of it. Today they can't earn on music sales, & for so many, most of the money has been taken out of touring. For most new acts, there's no money in touring. For other acts, it's the only way to make a living.

I know artists all over the place who work in their own greater local area 1 to 5 or 6 nights a week, & go to Europe one to four times a year for 1 - 3 week runs. Or just one or two shows. Some of these artists get short tours in the U. S too, some more than short. Some can't get their own tours that would earn a profit in the U.S anymore. We're talking heavy talents, acclaimed people, with histories & discographies..

The Ringo article discussed that opening acts on big name tours may have to pay to get the gig.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 02:34:38 CEST 2016 from (114.75.193.74)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Great version of Ophelia by Dr Teeth at the 14 minute mark.


Entered at Thu Aug 11 01:00:03 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Dave Alvin

Basmanlee, you're absolutely on target with Dave Alvin's version of Kern River. Love that. Got me listening to Blackjack Dave, one of my favorite records. So many great songs, 1968, From A Kitchen Table, Mary Brown, California Snow and the great Abilene. Dave played a show last fall with his brother Phil at the Towne Crier in Beacon, NY. Fantastic performance. Packed club on a Sunday night but a performer of his talent shouldn't still be playing clubs. Just not right. Link to Abilene.


Entered at Wed Aug 10 23:40:08 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Performing live

Jeff: For most live acts (exceptions being the megastars), I have always looked at touring as being like a 'lost leader', a way for a performer to keep you interested and 'help' you invest in him/her. Having spoken to some fairly impressive name performers in the past, they have confirmed this. Live performing for most is no way to make a decent living and certainly takes its toll if you do too much of it (family and the individual performer). When someone we know said something like 'touring is no way to live' and some other negative similar comments, he wasn't kidding. From what I have been told, the buses and the hours and the food and the lack of sleep and the separation and the often poor income that goes along with all that effort is brutal.


Entered at Wed Aug 10 20:22:51 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Ringo On Opening Acts

See the link. The average person that you talk to in everyday life thinks that artists / bands can make a living touring... Who are they?. We've had the endless discussion here. Some of the more recent ones, like the one with Rod, actually went somewhere interesting.


Entered at Wed Aug 10 17:28:22 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, your reference to Page & Plant & actual fees demonstrates how important every word & every punctuation mark plus every possible arguable interpretation of such in a contract has enormous import.. And therein lies so large a expense in everything. And you gotta have contracts.

I recently had a shot at a deal with a significant celebrity from Brooklyn. The manager wanted to "partner up" on a small deal that could have led to much more. 500 customized shirts for one event of 5k attendance. I offered the deal at actual labor & material cost ( a loss of significant time) , just exposure & his appearance in both shirts, the original, & my new custom creation. My only requirement was for a simple licensing contract (him licensing me his image for that project) & that apparently was a deal breaker. "It's just 500 shirts." Yeah well, without the right contract it coulda been a lot more. Outa my tucches. Forever. People look for morons. This is never dead, anything else could still happen..... Demographics change.

That 100% licensing rule can have the effect of preventing songwriters who are not in the same PRO from collaborating.

It's possible single song publishing agreements could be a solution. I've not discussed this enough yet with an attorney.. Somewhere i have a single song publishing contract my lawyer wanted me to have someone sign with me over a decade ago. I refused to insult the man .. Hindsight!

I gotta find that single song publishing agreement. Reading it might answer me, & then again you might need The Supreme Court to interpret it relative to this new development too...

In cases where the co write is really more of an arrangement where cowrite might be offered, the solution is an arrangement contract.Which could create ego issues too. Then again, if the artists can understand the issues, should not. But many would be surprised how so many artists can't grasp reasonably simple concepts. And bug out.

Considering that the making of real music is pretty much dead, it's kinda of academic. Like many aspects of life, the music business has become a case of anyone still willing to participate either knowingly consents to be the worst kind of abuse, or just gets raped repeatedly.

All this said,I've been involved in some great nights of music in the last month. And some of those were great nights of friendship as well. The problem is you got a community of likeminded people who care about each other, watching each other bleed to death. Trying to stop the bleeding & mostly failing. Meanwhile creating the most beautiful, extraordinary music for 17 to 65 people. And I'm talking about name players. It's a fucking crime. Might as well be in a M.A.S.H. unit...


Entered at Wed Aug 10 16:32:11 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Time will TELL

You older guys will get a kick out of this. Since I was 18, when I got my drivers license I have always had a restriction on my license, (corrective lenses).

Last February I had the cataract surgery in my right eye and a new lense was installed. I went this week and renewed my drivers license, as I'll be 72 on the 29th. I was given an eye exam and I no longer have any restriction on my license.

So you got to wait your whole life to see things right :-) haw haw haw!


Entered at Wed Aug 10 14:01:18 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Mike Nomad, will do and thanks.


Entered at Wed Aug 10 10:21:08 CEST 2016 from (86.187.18.92)

Posted by:

Peter v

Sorry, I keep posting then thinking of another point. Page and Plant won their legal battle with the Estate of Randy California, but did not win legal fees of £650,000. It's fair enough indemnifying the streaming company for your co-writer's share of any fees, but you'd have to say "of actual fees - not to include lawyer's fees."


Entered at Wed Aug 10 10:12:21 CEST 2016 from (86.187.18.92)

Posted by:

Peter V

I just realized that Jeff, being alphabetically advantaged, has a worse problem. The little things may come to first in alphabetical order, leaving him to do the idemnifying and sorting out. It is doubly hard with estates because they're people you don't know and never worked with. It hasn't happened to me, but the worst scenario for authors (and I guess songwriters) is when "The Estate" is administered by lawyers or a bank. This was how they kept that "Happy Birthday" copyright, dubious in the first place, going for decades beyond its term.


Entered at Wed Aug 10 10:08:24 CEST 2016 from (86.187.18.92)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good link, Jeff. It is part of a process of making us consult the lawyers over more and more things. In the UK, the process was vastly accelerated by "Tone" (Tony Blair) and his loathsome lawyer wife, Cherie. It affects us in so many ways. In 1977 my first publishing contract consisted of two pages. Now they run to a small book, and every time you do a new one there are little tweaks everywhere in 30 pages so you are advised to … consult a lawyer.

On the music publishing thing on co-writers, I have similar issues. Two of my past co-writers are now "Estate of …" and I have no address for a third. Licenses come through … all little things, like using an extract in an exam in a country for £30. Sometimes I know they just went to my co-authors because with "V" as an initial, I an alphabetically challenged … they go to first named author, and my co-authors were a "C" and an "H". Other times, they just come to me because I'm still (just about) active. In the songwriters situation, I certainly wouldn't pay $1000 per song for a lawyer to sort out contracts. The sums involved are small anyway. I'd just idemnify them and sort it out with a co-writer myself. So he or she wants half the £30? I'll send you a cheque.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 22:40:57 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Rhe new 100% Dept Of Justicee licensing rule. The DOJ Antitrust Litigation Division Section III appears to be completely in the pocket of Google

Deptmt of Justice & google screwing songwriters. It's been in the works, protested, contested, ACAP& BMI are fighting it, but.........

See the link


Entered at Tue Aug 9 18:50:59 CEST 2016 from (184.145.68.151)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Bob F

Would appc a personal heads-up if ever RoseAnn plays western New York or, my heavens, that terra incognita to the north. Thnx.

Re David Powell, a very nice gesture from the Webmaster.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 18:29:03 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tis sweet to be remembered.....David Powell

Thank you for that Jan.........and Mike. It is fitting to see the tribute to David, he was an easy man to admire.

As the population of this site after so many years starts to dwindle, it's important to remember all who were here and what we share. The BAND stands the test of time in what they brought to us and how they brought us together.

Rest in peaceful music David, I'm sure this old song of Flatt & Scruggs brings comfort.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 17:31:42 CEST 2016 from (84.215.177.75)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

The Late Great David Powell


Entered at Tue Aug 9 15:37:50 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

BoB F

JT, it's a magnificent song. It can be like a mantra during troubled times. I'm not a huge Gabriel fan but that song has always meant a lot to me.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 15:31:40 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Don't Give Up

Bob F: I always thought 'Don't Give Up' was the stellar song on the quintessential Peter Gabriel Album. It is moving and heartfelt and puts Peter Gabriel into another stratosphere as a singer/writer.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 15:18:11 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Don't Give Up

Is everyone familiar with Willie Nelson and Sinead O'Connors version of Pater Gabriel's Don't Give Up? I't so beautiful. So many times Willie has taken classic songs and recorded versions that can stand on their own. No matter what you thing of Sinead her heart is always in the right place and what a singer!


Entered at Tue Aug 9 14:34:48 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bob Dylan Nobel Prize Literature seriously

Its time! 'Visions of Johanna' among many other works deserve to be awarded on merit. Lesser works (in my view) have achieved Nobel status. The body of work speaks for itself. Its time. Its past time. "Inside the museums, infinity goes up on trial".


Entered at Tue Aug 9 12:54:02 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bob Dylan and the Nobel Prize in Literature (semi-seriously)

I don't post this because my friend RAGTIME has "more or less kindly wondered" if 'Lay Lady Lay' is worth the Prize. No, this is because Professor Emeritus in literature science Mr. Ola Holmgren has written a book of eight reasons to give Mr. Dylan the Prize. (Only in Swedish so far: "Stickspår : åtta skäl varför Bob Dylan borde tilldelas Nobelpriset i litteratur"; Carlsson publ.) One of the reasons is 'Blind Willie McTell'. Many of the reasons are related to the 80s which has not been a popular decade in this forum, though. I like Mr. Dylan's songs from the 80's.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 09:19:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Legend of Jesse James

I guess that's the obvious album, with One More Shot (later done by DFA) as a standout track.

Then Secret To A Long Life from Arkansas traveler by Michelle Shocked.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 02:51:30 CEST 2016 from (24.102.124.171)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Gimme a Stone

Thanks for that fun clip, Ragtime--nice to see that song is remembered. A real gem from the Largo album.

Let's keep it rolling. What are some other essential tracks with Levon guest vocals, not found on Band albums or Levon solo albums?


Entered at Tue Aug 9 02:24:49 CEST 2016 from (24.114.53.246)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: Clapton, Salmon? I always thought he was Cod.


Entered at Tue Aug 9 01:16:49 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: recreation

Catch and release guys. Catch and release.


Entered at Sun Aug 7 19:51:45 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: BILL!!!!!!!!

I said 86 he died at Bill.....86! not 84 gawd damn yuh!

Yer telling me you don't like New Orleans blues? Gawd man listen to Pete play "St. James Infirmary" here.


Entered at Sun Aug 7 12:29:19 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries
Web: My link

Subject: Amy & Little Feat

Maybe you know this already, but if not: I enjoyed Gimme A Stone by Little Feat with Amy Helm, Teresa Williams and Larry Campbell in Jamaica in 2014.

In her father's footsteps with this song... Absalom, Absalom, Would I die for you my son, I would have it all undone, The way it all came down...


Entered at Sun Aug 7 12:19:49 CEST 2016 from (79.177.42.8)

Posted by:

פורץ מנעולים באשדוד

Location: israel
Web: My link

Subject: the band

I'm really enjoying the design and layout of your site. It's a very easy on the eyes which makes it much more enjoyable for me to come here and visit more often. Did you hire out a designer to create your theme? Excellent work!


Entered at Sun Aug 7 11:06:23 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elvis

Just reading reviews of the book about Elvis "since death." What emerges is that Priscilla Presley may be the most astute and successful music biz manager of all time. The Colonel sold Elvis's publishing for $4.5m in 1973 to clear gambling debts, and when Elvis died there was $1m left in cash in the bank, and an inheritance tax bill of $10m. His dad hadn't got a clue, but when Vernon died in 1979, Priscilla took over and developed the huge posthumous Elvis industry. Not a name you'd think of along with Berry Gordy, Ahmet Ertegun, Albert Grossman, David Geffen … but apparently Priscilla should be in the top few music managers.


Entered at Sun Aug 7 07:29:33 CEST 2016 from (74.12.48.240)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nice to see others nod in the direction of three artists I've often championed here over the years - all for their train songs. So thanks to GregD for mentioning Eugene Smith's version of "Freight Train", to Basmanlee for mentioning David Wiffen's "(I've Lost My) Driving Wheel", and Joe J for mentioning Bill Cowsill's (and Jeff Thatcher's) terrific group, the Blue Shadows.

Flipping through a box of clippings today, I found Garth talking about Ronnie Hawkins buying him a Laird organ when he joined the Hawks because he refused to play a Hammond. And Ronnie says, "He wanted to sound like Garth Hudson and not Jimmy Smith." Perfect, I thought. And where is RtO anyway?

Rockin C: I'm astounded that Pete Fountain was only 84. I'd've guess 112 since he sorta looks and definitely sounds old the only one of his albums I've ever owned. One of those Design budget LPs from the early '60s, which I bought not for Pete but because Design also released a shitload of old material by Frank Motley and the Motley Crew around the same time - some credited, some not - so if the titles on a Design LP sound likely and the price is right, then I will likely buy the thing on spec. I've hit uncredited paydirt just once, and it wasn't the Pete Fountain LP.


Entered at Sun Aug 7 05:39:17 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pete Fountain

I guess my last post is a little late. I looked it up on line. Pete Fountain did die today. One of the most important New Orleans blues and jazz men. I absolutely loved his music with that clarinet. He owned a club on Bourbon Street. His history is long and wonderful. Sadly this year we've lost another great musician.


Entered at Sun Aug 7 05:32:25 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: 'TILL The Rivers all Run Dry - I'll Ride This Train

Sounds good Bill, good stuff Ragtime. I knew I could count on you Jerry.

Now listen you guys. Susan and I had to make a quick trip down to Campbell River today. On the way down I'm sure I heard on the radio, Pete Fountain died today at 86. A N'Alins blues man who played a lot of sweet music.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 23:33:32 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: King of Comedy

Good to hear that The King of Comedy soundtrack will be released as a cd. Thanks Joe Frey for mentioning. I will be the first to order it. As much as I like my rumbling vinyl copy, a remastering of Between Trains is long overdue... I've got to let it roll... I've got to let it ride...

And by the way... you all cry me a river... didn't I tell you I don't like The River Hymn...


Entered at Sat Aug 6 20:39:50 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link is to the Blue Shadows featuring the late Bobby Cowsill.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 19:03:39 CEST 2016 from (173.49.27.202)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Rivers

I nominate Mr. Merle Haggard's Kern River to the list. While I never heard the original until recently, and it sure ain't shabby, there is a great haunting rendition on Mr. Dave Alvin's West of the West album. (An album worth seeking out if you've never heard it.) Ms. Emmylou Harris has also covered the song on her All I Intended To Be collection, but despite the stellar accompaniment (Duncan, Leitz, Autldridge, etc.) I give the blue ribbon to Mr. Alvin.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 18:18:04 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Withdraw

Norm: Used the word on purpose, as you probably know. The reference to withdrawal is pulled right out of the headlines. Ryan, anyone?


Entered at Sat Aug 6 18:04:44 CEST 2016 from (24.114.54.106)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: "I'm Movin' On" was on the Band-Hawks setlist for a couple while in '63. Matt Lucas had a big hit with it at the time, so Hawkins let his set up his drumkit and sing his big song onstage every night for two weeks.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 17:52:53 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Trumped??

Jerry! be careful how you use that word now-a-days!


Entered at Sat Aug 6 17:30:45 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Train Songs?? Start at the beginning!

Jimmy Rogers had too many train songs to list. Hank Snow had "I'm Movin' On".


Entered at Sat Aug 6 17:03:11 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'trumped'

Whoops: Peter V 'trumped me' - oh, I think I'll have to withdraw (it). Defeated yet again.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 16:54:38 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The River Song: don't forget -Watching The River Flow

And Bob and RoseAnn, a fine song it is.

Bob loves rivers.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 15:32:53 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: The River Song - RoseAnn Fino

I know the plugs are endless and shameless, sorry, RoseAnn has a river song called The River Song. This was the first song she wrote after the full length record came out. Also the first song she was ever outwardly proud off. For weeks after she wrote it she would search the city for open mics so she could play it.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 14:09:51 CEST 2016 from (74.70.250.136)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Albany

Subject: King of Comedy

The King of Comedy is getting its CD worldwide release on October 16th. About time.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 14:06:55 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Nortwest

Subject: Current threads are changing so fast.

Forget the trains and the rivers! This afternoon's thread is lightweight electric skateboards and flat or gently rolling lowlands also dotted with many lakes. My entry is Herman's Hermits: 'No Milk Today'.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 13:03:36 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "Many Rivers To Cross" - The Band

We have enough material. All we need now is a careful sequencing:

SOMEWHERE DOWN THE CRAZY RIVER – Robbie Robertson

AMAZON (RIVER OF DREAMS) – The Band

THE RIVER HYMN – The Band

CHANGE IS GONNA COME- The Band

TAKE ME TO THE RIVER- Levon Helm

WIDE RIVER TO CROSS – Levon Helm

BLUE RIVER- Danko, Fleld, Anderson

WOMEN CROSS THE RIVER - Danko, Fleld, Anderson

MANY RIVERS TO CROSS (instrumental)- Jim Weider (also Band live tapes) RIVERS OF BABYLON – The Band, various live tapes

TRAVELIN’ RIVERSIDE BLUES- John Hammond Jnr (+ 3 Hawks)

GREEN RIVER- John Fogerty, Robbie Robertson, Bruce Springsteen (R&R HoF)

CRASH ON THE LEVEE – Bob Dylan & The Band

ONE SINGLE RIVER - Bob Dylan & The Band

BIG RIVER - Bob Dylan & The Band

RIVER OF TEARS – Bonnie Raitt, Richard Manuel

RIVER OF MONEY- Sony sessions, Jules Shear, Rick Danko

RIVERBOAT QUEEN – Blondie Chaplin (+ Garth Hudson)

TWO RIVERS – Robbie Robertson (Visit to Six Nations documentary)


Entered at Sat Aug 6 12:40:50 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Double gatefold vinyl? So 2 CDs? On the vinyl should we split literal rivers from metaphorical rivers? (religious as in Many Rivers to Cross or tears as in Cry Me A River or River of Salt?) The same will be true of trains. People Get ready was briefly done in the Basement, but that's not a real train either. Difficult one!


Entered at Sat Aug 6 11:48:56 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Rivers

On the proposed Band double gatefold compilation - The Train and The River (after Jimmy Giuffre) we've got to have 'A Change Is Gonna Come'.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 10:15:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rivers

With a little thought, I bet we could find ten or twelve Band ones for a compilation. With the Bonnie Raitt / Richard Manuel we're on six already.

BTW, I don't think we can count Caldonia as being by Louis Jordan, and Jordan is a river.


Entered at Sat Aug 6 04:32:05 CEST 2016 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: river

more river-related tracks: Down By the River - Neil Young; River of Tears - Bonnie Raitt (with RIchard Manuel); Across the River - Bruce Hornsby; The River - Dan Fogelberg; Ferry Cross the Mersey - Gerry & Pacemakers


Entered at Fri Aug 5 23:35:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Down By The Riverside …

SOMEWHERE DOWN THE CRAZY RIVER – Robbie Robertson

AMAZON (RIVER OF DREAMS) – The Band

THE RIVER HYMN – The Band

TAKE ME TO THE RIVER- Levon Helm

BLUE RIVER- Danko, Fleld, Anderson

RIVER OF LIFE- The Neville Brothers

RIVER DEEP MOUNTAIN HIGH – Ike & Tina Turner

YELLOW RIVER- Christie

GREEN RIVER- CCR

RED RIVER ROCK – Johnny & The Hurricanes

MANY RIVERS TO CROSS – Jimmy Cliff

WATCHIN’ THE RIVER FLOW – Bob Dylan

CRY ME A RIVER- Julie London, Joe Cocker

RIVERS OF BABYLON – Bony M

RIVER OF SALT- Ketty Lester

LAZY RIVER – Bobby Darin

OL’ MAN RIVER- Paul Robeson



Entered at Fri Aug 5 23:18:11 CEST 2016 from (76.69.119.202)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mike C

Thank you. I also recall that David once posted a picture of himself from a show. My guess would be about 3 years ago. It is here in the archives, somewhere.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 22:29:25 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Mike C, thanks.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 21:07:38 CEST 2016 from (68.230.36.51)

Posted by:

Chris Nelson

Web: My link

Subject: Burning Man Festival Tickets

If anyone is looking for cheap burning man tickets check the link above. Burning Man takes place in late August at Black Rock City in Nevada.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 19:49:51 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Add my thanks to Mike for the insights on David. Thank you for sharing that.

I still do CDR compilations and force them upon friends etc. I put everything on my playlists on Apple Lossless or full WAV files, so my compilations sound better than MP3s, even in the car. Like Roger, I like themed ones. I had a nice early 60s Girls names one. I did one called "Le Kilt" (Roger will know the place) featuring only tracks I can guarantee were played at this venue in the first half of 1966. They are, as often has been observed, more fun for the compiler than the recipient.

OK … on to river songs …


Entered at Fri Aug 5 19:10:17 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Brahms and Lists

Ha ha

Nice one Rog. I'd have taken the humph if you didn't have Bruce in there!!!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 5 17:38:37 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Compilations

Compilations - I used to do the best compilations Al. I'd do them for myself and for friends. I never did a trains one but I've got a great Rivers compilation.

The River - The Boss,

The River Hymn - The Band

Proud Mary - CCR

River - Joni

Matapedia - Kate and Anna

and so forth. It was before Mississippi by Dylan. Load of other RIVER songs.

I had another compilation in which every song had to have a bit of a foreign language.

Michelle - The fabs

Je Suis Désolé - Mark Knopfler

You Never Can Tell - Chuck Berry

René and George Magritte - Paul Simon

Arcadian Driftwood and so forth.

But somehow we stopped producing compilations once MP3s appeared. But I might go and do a train one now!


Entered at Fri Aug 5 16:31:16 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Mike C

Mike - that was really nice to read. I never even knew David performed so extensively, only that he played guitar. So thanks so much for posting your little insight.

Not sure if you saw it but David's brother Gary asked if anyone on here had insights such as your own or messages of condolence then he'd be pleased if they could be sent to his e-mail address.

It's powellgsATappstateDOTedu


Entered at Fri Aug 5 16:15:49 CEST 2016 from (99.231.74.112)

Posted by:

GregD

Web: My link

Subject: train songs

In addition to Canadian Railroad Trilogy mentioned by Kevin J., other Canadian contributions to the genre include Night Train by Bruce Cockburn, and Freight Train by Eugene Smith, who has been mentioned here periodically by Bill M. as a Yonge St. contemporary of our boys in the 60's.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 16:12:09 CEST 2016 from (70.15.249.23)

Posted by:

bob w.

Mike C, thank you for your post.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 15:18:35 CEST 2016 from (96.86.236.133)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: The Late Great David Powell

It's shocking to check in here & learn the sad news about David Powell. Reading the many tributes to him only drives home how much he will be missed by all of us.

I knew David, though not well, mostly by virtue of geography as we both live near Atlanta. We "met" first here in the guestbook & had planned to meet in person to catch Levon's Barnburners show in nearby Winder. 1999, I think it was. Levon was there for two nights & for whatever reason we couldn't make the same night. I'm pretty sure both of us posted about those shows here in the guestbook at the time.

But I learned that he played gigs around town so did manage to finally meet him & hear him play several times over the years, although it has been quite a while since I last saw him. My wife & I would try to catch him whenever he was playing somewhere north of Atlanta, close to where we live. Sometimes Don Pugatch, another guestbooker from days of yore, would show up too & David would often join us at our table between sets. It was a two man band. Steve (sorry, but I can't recall his last name) played acoustic guitar & did most of the singing, supported by David on his trusty Telecaster. They knew hundreds of songs. Once when they were taking requests, my wife's sister called out half in jest, "Rocky Raccoon!" And before the first chuckle was out of our mouths, Steve & David had already launched into it. Another favorite of mine was "Stairway to Freebird", their hilarious mashup of the two.

David was just what you would expect based on his presence here in the guestbook. Soft-spoken & polite, intelligent with a wry wit. He seemed to me the embodiment of something you often hear about but rarely see; a gentleman & a scholar.

My sincere condolences to his family & his friends, those who knew him well & loved him. This guestbook, and the world, is a poorer place for the the loss of such a good person. Rest in peace, David.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 14:53:48 CEST 2016 from (31.53.120.247)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, various

Another great post, Al. When I saw the Who, I think we were the first to see Who's Next in its entirety, before some hits. The idea was that they ironed out the faults before reaching London and the 'big' reviews. But I loved the show.

Kevin, I was waiting for Canadian Railroad Trilogy from you. Great stuff.

Roger, When I saw Burt Bacharach, a great night, the only disappointment was that he didn't play 'The Story of My life'.

As well as people who have seen many bands, I was always fascinated by those musicos, who have never thrown a record or CD away, and are still collecting - massive collections. I used to wonder about David P's collection.

I liked one of Peter's old posts relating how he saw Jimmy Page still collecting music. Still committed to the cause.

I'm a collector but not only of CDs - but art, books, Dundee postal history and my son's football cuttings. Involvement in this GB has made me fill in the gaps.

My retirement project has moved from Steely Dan to early solo McCartney.

Really enjoyed the trains' posts.

Playing the brilliant Joe Egan just now.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 14:50:32 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: trainspotting

Just Like This Train - Ms. Joni Mitchell

Train Kept A-Rollin' - Mr. Johnny Burnette gave it it's signature guitar riff, carried on by the Yardbirds, Led Zep, and finally Aerosmith

If Love Was A Train and The L&N Don't Stop Here Anymore appear together on an album by Ms. Michelle Shocked.

Downtown Train - written by Mr. Tom Waits and a hit for Mr. Rod Stewart.

Bob F beat me to Bound for Glory. There is still a tune rattling around me brain, female vocal, can't pinpoint it. May be the Rosanne Cash song mentioned. Will have to give that a listen.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 14:25:13 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Another great little snippet from footy site Bob - this time re a Neil Young gig

Perhaps someone off here was at this gig:-

""I went to see Neil Young play a gig at The Whisky A'gogo in Hollywood. I wasn't working the show, I just went along as I have always liked Neil Young......

He kicked off the set with a new song that no one had heard before. Then he followed it with another new one, then another...... The crowd were getting very agitated as they wanted to hear him play the songs they all knew and loved. Neil was having none of it.

By the time an hour was up he had played a complete set of new un-released material and the crowd were very, very angry. He calmed them down by announcing that there would be a short interval and the second set would consist of songs that they had all heard before.

He came back on stage after about 10 minutes and repeated the first set.

The crowd was really pissed off but Neil Young didn't give a toss. Also he hadn't told any porkies because they had heard them all before - about an an hour or so before!! (He was superb, by the way.)

Neil Young - pure class.""


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:59:54 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Trains

Riding on a Railroad - James Taylor

Peace Train - Cat Stevens

Runaway Train - Roseanne Cash

Bob Dylan's Dream - BD

The train songs, really endless and wonderful. Great idea.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:41:26 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Roger

Don't you still do compilation CD's Rog?

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:39:47 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Mega gigs

It's amazing isn't it Dunc.

When I asked him to do it I knew from what he'd told me in the past that he'd been privvy to a lot but never expected it to be such a staggering array of artists. And those he's listed are compiled off the top off his head. I guess there's loads more.

Then again, I guess it was his role for 30 years or so with the bands he looked after going right back to the early '60's and they were all pretty major artists so I guess as he says it all just came with the flow.

BTW Dunc, although my reason for asking him to post it was simply to get him into print as it were and certainly not to get up folk's noses, whilst most responses on the other site are simply expressing their amazement like yourself, it's definitely generated a few instances of penis envy.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:37:55 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ragtime

Blimey Rags surely you're at least gonna crawl up to the railroad track and let the 4-19 scratch yer feckin back lad!

I mean fairs fair mate!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:06:40 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Trains

What's happening? I seem to have landed in a trainspotters website... This beloved hangout looks like Clapham Junction today, or the Island of Sodor for that matter...

They're two, they're four, they're six, they're eight, shunting trucks and hauling freight, red and green and brown and blue, they're the really useful crew, all with different roles to play, round Woodstock sheds or far away...

Richard, Robbie, Garth and Rick, Levon and his friends are the really useful crew.

I can hear the whistle blowing, yes, that train is a-coming and soon you'll be going... I'll take the A train and leave.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 13:03:59 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham Europe

Subject: Takes a train to cry...

No-one mentioned Bob Dylan's 'Takes a lot to laugh, takes a train to cry'?. Michael Holliday was big in our house in the midlands too. The Story Of My Life makes it onto a compilation of mine. How I miss making compilation tapes and CDs since digital media have rendered them obsolete.

6.5 Special was my first experience of contemporary music - though I think they often played a piece of classical music to make sure we young listeners were brought up proper. Nothing like that on Oh Boy - the commercial channel's later rival programme which had Cliff Richard with a fantastic,rebellious, sneering, hip-swinging performance each week.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 12:26:14 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Scnia Northwest

Subject: Trains

Good to see BASSMANLEE including 'Slow Train Coming' in his list. I like the angry feeling, almost bitterness in Mr. Dylan's attitude - a few decades before Mr. Trump.

I'd like to add 'I Treni Per Tozeur'. For two reasons: 1.) I discussed this Italian song between rock and barock with the former gb regular EMPTY NOW 2.) We had a plan to take this train between Algeria and Tunis for many years ago but due to the political situation (ISIS) in North Africa we are too scary. Now it is too late! Like my late mother said: "travel when you are young, you'll never know when the borders will be closed". After all, she had heard Adolf Hitler speaking in Leipzig in late 30s. - Do always like the Mother says!


Entered at Fri Aug 5 11:39:30 CEST 2016 from (31.53.120.247)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Great post, Peter. I was too young for skiffle, but I was always fascinated by a guy who lived along from my gran's house, who carried a tea box bass. House is a bit of a misnomer. The entire extended family lived within a square mile - only half the houses had inside toilets and no member of the family had a bath in their house. Changed days. Late fifties Britain.

Amazing post, Al. Really some list of bands. I reached a peak of seeing bands in 1971 and 1972. Apart from seeing some big bands at a huge venue, the Who being the most memorable gig, because of where I lived (not Edinburgh or Glasgow) I saw a lot of emerging bands, some of whom went on to do well. Also saw a lot of good Scottish bands.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 08:44:52 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Six Five Special

The Six-Five Special! Theme to Britain’s first rock & roll TV show. Broadcast after the 6 o’clock news. I guess we only had 5 minutes of news in those days (Princess Margaret wore a yellow hat to the Chelsea Flower Show, Accrington Stanley beat Manchester United five-nil and Russia invaded Hungary).

Originally by the Bob Cort Skiffle Group, but I only remember it by Don Lang who soon took over.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 06:30:20 CEST 2016 from (24.114.68.161)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Guitars

....interesting picture over at RR 's Facebook page of him playing a Les Paul during TLW - Acadian Driftwood.


Entered at Fri Aug 5 05:26:06 CEST 2016 from (24.114.68.161)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....and the truly great ""Runaway Train" from Soul Asylum


Entered at Fri Aug 5 05:24:37 CEST 2016 from (24.114.68.161)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh my, what about:

"No One is Innocent" - The Sex Pistols

"Canadian Railroad Trilogy" - Gordon Lightfoot

"Pain Train" - The Guess Who

"Trains" - Al Stewart


Entered at Fri Aug 5 02:55:42 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Train Songs

This Train is Bound For Glory - Woody Guthrie

Down Bound Train - Springsteen

Land of Hopes & Dreams - Springsteen

Runaway Train - Tom Petty and The HB's

People Get Ready - Curtis Mayfield

Morning Train - Sheena Easton

Folsom Prison Blues - Johnny Cash

If I'm On The Late Side - The Faces


Entered at Fri Aug 5 02:47:36 CEST 2016 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: train of thought

what about these?

was this already mentioned? the band: hobo jungle;

also: bruce springsteen: downbound train, and land of hope and dreams;

curtis mayfield: people get ready;

bob dylan: freight train blues;

jethro tull: locomotive breath;

los lobos: that train don't stop here, and everybody loves a train;

warren zevon: poor poor pitiful me;

little feat: new d (it won't let me spell it out) freight train


Entered at Fri Aug 5 01:44:13 CEST 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Trains

Peter V. Does "one after 909' count?


Entered at Fri Aug 5 00:51:16 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Megagig man

I think I've mentioned before about Bob - a fella on our LFC footy site - who was tour manager for many groups down the years, most notably Cream. I think the last time I posted about him concerned him listening to the original Big Pink acetate with Eric Clapton.

Anyroad, he's an extremely unassuming guy is our Bob, but there was a thread on the website entitled 'bands I saw when they mattered" and after much persuading I managed to winkle a post out of Bob about the bands he'd seen down the years.

Needless to say Bob's gig cv sort of put everyone else's somewhat in the shade.

Anyroad, here's his post which I'm sure many on here would be most interested to see.

""Just for the record I was Tour Manager of Cream; Jack Bruce's various bands; Cozy Powell; Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow; Kraftwerk; The Clash; Scorpions and finished up with The Kinks' final world tour and then Ray Davies' solo tours.

I was lucky enough to see many bands at the height of their careers including The Beatles in my hometown of Liverpool many times (I was paying my dues learning my trade as road manager of The RoadRunners and The Merseys back then )

Pink Floyd at The Perfumed Garden, Earl's Court and Knebworth....

The Who (The Merseys had the same management) as we played on the same bill many times - plus the legendary Charlton stadium gig....

Untold American bands in the late 60s who played on the same bill as Cream, like Janis Joplin, Steppenwolf, Lovin' Spoonful, Vanilla Fudge, Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and countless more that I've long since forgotten (it was the 60s after all! )

Bob Dylan who I worked with at the Guitar Legends festival in Seville, Spain.

David Bowie at The Royal Festival Hall

Lou Reed at Max's Kansas City.

The Eurythmics when I worked on their 80s tour. Not my kind of music but they were nice people...

Rainbow and Scorpions had many support bands on their lengthy tours of the USA who went on to make it in their own right, such as AC/DC, Def Leppard, Bon Jovi, Black Sabbath...... too many to mention really.

That list just springs to mind off the top of my head and there have been many others but the most memorable show by far was seeing James Brown and The Flames live at The Apollo in Harlem back in '68 when I was the only white guy in a crowd of 2000 blacks and nobody gave me a moment's grief because it was all about the music.. !

Led Zep (who were good mates) 3 hour-long sets was too much to sit through but the gigs were good social occasions and most of the evening was spent hanging out at the backstage bar...)

Elvis in Las Vegas.. ( I popped over from Los Angeles where I was living at the time and I knew the promoter)

*******The Band at the IOW festival. (Memorable) My kind of music.*******

Jimi Hendrix loadsa times - including his first gig in England at The Speakeasy (where I shared a table with Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck who were both blown away by Jimi's performance)

I took all the above for granted I hate to say but I realize how lucky I was just to be in the right place at the right time. Some of the people I worked with were fantastic and highly talented while others were grade-A assholes who were a right pain to be anywhere near but all of them put food on my table and provided me with a great lifestyle in a job I loved.

And all told I wouldn't change a thing !""""

Yeah - I bet you wouldn't Bob lad!!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 4 23:01:18 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joe J: "8:05" in honour of David Powell, the GB's biggest Moby Grape fan.

Thanks to Bassmanlee for mentioning Tom Rush's version of David Wiffen's "Driving Wheel", which can be heard at www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyyCAU_TZ28. Organ by Paul Griffin, dobro by David Bromberg, guitar by Trevor Veitch, who'd been in 3's A Crowd with Wiffen and brought the song to Rush's attention.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 22:33:59 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The clicketty-clack

I love trains too. There's a nice 3-hour ride from Portland to Seattle, mostly on the coast, I've taken manny times. I went from Portland to Chicago a few years back and it was a mixed bag: ghastly food served on white linen with a fresh flower on every table. The ride through Glacier National Park was amazing; then the balance of Montana and Dakota was a dust-blown moonscape.

But I think the part I like the most is the steady clicketty-clack, it becomes a soothing chant; like a well performed rosary.

Train of Love - JC, Rick Danko, Jimmie Dale Gilmore

Train-time (live) - Jack Bruce/Cream

Waiting For A Train - Boz Skaggs' version off his first record


Entered at Thu Aug 4 22:24:12 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Original Billy Connolly reference

Dunc, the original joke on the Michael Parkinson Show which inspired the Irn-Bru ad. We British will all know it by heart, so for our North American Readers it is linked. You must see it.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 22:23:08 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: trains and planes

I'm sure you all have mentioned most every train song on the Billy Bragg/Joe Henry album. I'm still dealing with the fact that the last song on the album was a 'plane' song, maybe one of the first plane songs. Please don't start another thread of plane songs.

'Trains and Boats and Planes'.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 22:16:32 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rockin' On The Railroad

I wonder if there are ten Chuck Berry songs with important train references?


Entered at Thu Aug 4 22:14:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Between Trains

No, Joan, you're the first to mention Between Trains. That means none of the rest of us get a stamp on our Bandfan Loyalty Cards (10 stamps = free cup of coffee). I'm amazed none of us mentioned it.

Bassmanlee. Trains in the Distance. We used to have a house backing on the railway in Bournemouth. It ran in a pretty deep cutting and we had a big garden. When we tried to sell, most potential buyers were put off by the railway, but after two or three weeks we had got used to it. About ten to midnight a train often stopped near us, but no horns, and at 6 a.m. the oil goods train rumbled gently through from Wytch Farm (England's largest inland oil well). But we found it all a comforting sound as Paul Simon did. In contrast, a car stopping outside your house at 2 a.m. with doors opening and closing suddenly is disconcerting. A train in a deep cutting is a pleasant sound.

On the other hands friends in London had an underground line running right below their house and that was weird. The house shook. The same is true of the theatre where the Kenneth Branagh Season is on in London. I don't know what they're doing about live broadcasts but it's very loud when you're in the theatre.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 21:48:36 CEST 2016 from (74.108.28.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Train

I am sure someone listed Between Trains Robbie There is Train in Vain The clash and Blu Water Line Also Take the A train and The MTA. A stretch perhaps but ....


Entered at Thu Aug 4 21:19:51 CEST 2016 from (93.97.196.231)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Menorca

Subject: Train songs stopping at Woodstock

Choo Choo Mama - Ten Years After

Silver Train - Johnny Winter

City of New Orleans - Alro Guthrie

Big Railroad Blues - Grateful Dead

Hear My Train A'comin' - Jimi Hendrix

5:15 - The Who


Entered at Thu Aug 4 18:10:37 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: Trains train

This has become a brain worm...

Slow Train Coming - Mr. Dylan

Desperadoes Waiting For a Train - the late, great Mr. Guy Clark, well done by Mr. Jerry Jeff Walker

(Lost My) Drivin' Wheel - another Tom Rush, I believe, written by David Wiffen, whose name I do not know but he is Canadian

Glendale Train - New Riders of the Purple Sage

Slow Train - The Staples Singers - not familiar with this, found it while searching for a different Staples song that I did not find.

Last Train - Mavis Staples - see comment above.

Let It Roll - Chuck Berry

And the list goes on...

BTW, Peter, I hear lots of trains in the distance as I live at the top of a hill overlooking the Amtrak NE Corridor lines. On cool nights when the windows are open, those damn things sound like they are running through the yard, especially the high speed Ascella trains. And some of the drivers are very horn happy. Everybody thinks it's true, if they don't live near the tracks!


Entered at Thu Aug 4 18:01:49 CEST 2016 from (31.53.120.247)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Freight Train

Freight Train was so popular here in the folk clubs, Bassmanlee.

Here's it sung by the writer, Elizabeth Cotten, I think. Great stuff


Entered at Thu Aug 4 18:03:03 CEST 2016 from (92.22.58.140)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Steve Earle And The Del McCoury Band - Texas Eagle


Entered at Thu Aug 4 17:42:53 CEST 2016 from (31.53.120.247)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Irn Bru Train advert

I hate these f.......... toilets. Billy Connolly inspired irn bru train advert. It will help if you know the joke Billy Connolly told on Parkinson, which helped catapult his career.

Love the Canadian Aces and the Honolulu Heartbreakers Bill M. You don't get names like that now.

Still play 'Story of My Life', Al. Michael Holliday was huge.

Yes, you need 'City of New Orleans', and 'Folsom Prison Blues'.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 17:19:21 CEST 2016 from (31.53.120.247)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Our Guys and Slowhand - Trains

Really like the Guy Clark and Michael Holliday songs. Great stuff.

Really like train songs, and I think that The Band and Eric playing 'Last Train To Memphis' from Jubilation is up there with the best.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 17:00:54 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Love Dixie Flyer P.

Bassman - The intro to Midnight Special by Creedence is something else.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 4 15:57:06 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, Michael Holliday was major here too. Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom) was a radio hit of my childhood, as was Stairway of Love. The Story of My Life was #1. Your tale of a confusing aunt’s friend reminds me of a friend of ours. Her aunt went out with Charles Bronson’s stunt double, who of course had the exact facial hair to match and was a lookalike. It must have been useful in a noisy Yeats Wine Lodge of a Friday night.

The Gone Dead Train that comes to my mind is Randy Newman, trying to sound like Mick Jagger, on the Performance OST.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 15:51:51 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dixie Flyer

City of New Orleans reminded me of Randy Newman's Dixie Flyer (linked).


Entered at Thu Aug 4 14:47:08 CEST 2016 from (85.165.151.5)

Posted by:

dagman

Web: My link

Subject: 1976 radio interviews

^^^ Jim Ladd interviews Robbie & Rick


Entered at Thu Aug 4 14:39:00 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Train Songs

Daddy What's a Train, written by U. Utah Phillips, recorded by several people, I think Tom Paxton and maybe even John Denver.

How can we leave out City of New Orleans, written by the late, great Steve Goodman, made famous by Arlo Guthrie

Catch That Train, Jerry Garcia Band

Panama Limited, Tom Rush, based on a song by Bukka White (see link)

C'mon! Midnight Special, too many versions to mention...

Freight Train, Freight Train, Peter, Paul & Mary

And the list goes on...


Entered at Thu Aug 4 13:52:33 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Al: Not the Bullett train (you have to reserve a ticket --almost airline prices-- for one of those), just the regular ones. : )

From the Land of the Rising Sun (linked):

Train Train - The Blue Hearts


Entered at Thu Aug 4 13:37:37 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: More trains of thought

Last Train to Clarksville - Davy, Pete, Micky and Mike

Gone Dead Train - Crazy Horse

Long Train Runnin' - Doobies

Train leaves here this morning - the amazing Gene Clark


Entered at Thu Aug 4 13:32:01 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred

hey Fred - there's surely got to be one about the Tokyo bullet crammed to the rafters isn't there?

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 4 13:27:43 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha - Michael Holiday - the racist twat!!!

Hey Pete - I grew up believing that Michael Holiday used to go out with my aunty until I found out it wasn't the one who sang 'Runaway Train'.

Not sure if it was the Liverpool connection but his songs seem to have featured prominently in our house back then - The Story of My Life, Starry Eyed. Was it the same down your way Pete?

And a bit later came 'Four Feather Falls' for which he sang the theme tune - ha ha! I think Tex Tucker was modelled on Michael H. Not sure who Grandpa Twink was modelled on

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 4 13:19:46 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A few more songs about trains

Southern Pacific - Neil Young

Night Train - Steve Winwood

5:15 - The Who

Nighttime In The Switching Yard - Warren Zevon

Two Trains - Little Feat; Lowell George


Entered at Thu Aug 4 11:06:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Runaway Train

I had never noticed until today the implication until today of the lyric:

"The porter got an awful fright, he near turned white" … before but I guess if it was on the Chicago Line in 1889 it is a line you'd skip nowadays!


Entered at Thu Aug 4 11:02:31 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Runaway Train

North American readers may not be familiar with the hit version here … linked.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 10:56:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I do love a list …

Train songs. I love a list.

NIGHT TRAIN by James Brown has to be the most-played train song by British musicians of the R&B and soul era.

MYSTERY TRAIN by Junior Parker and Elvis Presley and The Band is early rock ‘n’ roll at its best.

THE RUNAWAY TRAIN by Michael Holliday was the UK version. It has been on my kids in car cassette, then CDR then iPod Playlist through two generations of kids.

CASEY JONES by The Grateful Dead is a very similar story to the above, and if you said “play just one train song” it would be my first choice. Workingman’s Dead.

CHATTANOOGA CHOO-CHOO by Glenn Miller was one of my mum’s all-time favourites, and I still love it.

TRAIN ROUND THE BEND is from “Loaded” by The Velvet Underground, and one of those tracks that pops into my head whenever waiting at the local station where the train appears around a bend.

MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO GEORGIA by Gladys Knight & The Pips. Fabulous soul.

FREIGHT TRAIN by Chas McDevitt & Nancy Whisky was one of the first and biggest hits of the skiffle era and OK, it’s a cover version, and maybe not the best, but it’s the one I know. Incidentally, they also did the cover version of their own hit for Woolworths Embassy budget label under a different name.

LAST TRAIN TO SAN FERNANDO by Johnny Duncan is another skiffle era hit, memorable by being an absolute favourite when I was a kid.

TRAIN IN THE DISTANCE by Paul Simon is on “Hearts & Bones.” Arguably his best album … I think Graceland just edges it, but it’s close.



Entered at Thu Aug 4 10:50:55 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Trains

Two opposite ends of the musical spectrum:

Texas And Pacific - Louis Jordan

Trans Europe Express - Kraftwerk


Entered at Thu Aug 4 10:49:07 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

I just read about the sad news regarding David P.

R.I.P.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 10:09:42 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Train Songs

Great idea Joe lad.

This one could run and run I bet

I'll get me coat :-0)

Anyroad, my link is not a train song as such but the only reference to a train in a song that makes me struggle to hold back a tear each time I hear it. Also whilst we're still getting over the news about the passing of our fellow Gb'er David P it has a nice link to his home state.

It's the one and only Gene singing 'In The Pines' on the truly beautiful Silverado live album. Around the 2.25 mark he sings the verse that gets me in so many ways - mostly 'cos it's Gene of course - but it's just such an evocative line for someone like me who's never seen an American freight train in the flesh as it were only in my mind's eye...

"Now the longest train I ever saw it went down the Georgia line"
"Saw the engine pass at six o clock and cab it went by at nine"

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 4 06:46:20 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: ditto

Joe J: The last one from me (for now at least). More poignant (and complicated), but less centred on the train than the others.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 06:38:34 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: train songs

Joe J: Another favourite of mine is "Choo Choo Cha-Boogie". While the best versions are by the song's originator, Louis Jordan, I've linked to a nice one by the Canadian Aces because there's a strong Band link in that singer-pianist Scott Cushnie had been in the Suedes then the Hawks with Robbie Robertson twenty years earlier.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 06:23:42 CEST 2016 from (201.87.221.171)

Posted by:

Sara

Web: My link

Anybody loving the recent Van Morrison release? Sweet Thing is amazing, love John Platania's work.


Entered at Thu Aug 4 05:12:07 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joe J: The link is to Fred Eaglesmith's "I Like Trains".


Entered at Thu Aug 4 04:58:02 CEST 2016 from (67.167.98.19)

Posted by:

Tom

Subject: Train songs

Two of my favorites:

Rolling Stones, Love in Vain: https://youtu.be/ryRDcE2sB2A

The Meters, Stop That Train: https://youtu.be/Lnk9NN21DX0


Entered at Thu Aug 4 02:53:50 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: railroad record

See link to Joe Henry & Billy Bragg's 'Railroad Record'. Last song is Lightfoot's 'Early Morning Rain'. Bit of a transitional song I guess. "You can't jump a jet plane like you can a freight train". Like to hear some recommendations for train songs.


Entered at Wed Aug 3 19:04:17 CEST 2016 from (24.114.69.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

I suppose that, unlike our guys with MFBP, the Allmans meant 'next of kin' in more of an obituarial sense.


Entered at Wed Aug 3 15:03:41 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Brothers & Sisters

It was the only Allman Brothers LP record I owned back in the day. I always thought it the most appealing one to Band fans (and "Top Gear" fans). I lost the LP long ago. Was the UK one a gatefold? Or was it just the kids on the front and back? My CD copy doesn't reproduce the centre. I assume Jessica must be their highest earning title worldwide.


Entered at Wed Aug 3 09:13:38 CEST 2016 from (93.97.196.231)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Menorca

Subject: Next of Kin

The Allmam Bothers: Brothers and Sisters


Entered at Wed Aug 3 09:11:15 CEST 2016 from (210.86.97.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Transmission Impossible

I picked up this 3 CD set today. Basically it's the 1970 Syria Mosque gig, 1973 Roosevelt Stadium and 1976 Carter Baron concerts. So nothing new though the Roosevelt concert sounds different than the other one I have (though Shape I'm In gets butchered differently on both). Alot to get through but I mainly bought it for the Mosque performance which I've always liked


Entered at Wed Aug 3 07:38:59 CEST 2016 from (107.141.198.138)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Web: My link

Has everyone heard about the latest Last Waltz tribute show, this one with some fairly high-powered guests? I'm going to the AMA Fest here, so I wish this wasn't the special NYC version.


Entered at Wed Aug 3 07:32:04 CEST 2016 from (107.141.198.138)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Sorry to hear about David Powell.


Entered at Tue Aug 2 18:30:53 CEST 2016 from (31.50.120.196)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Next of Kin

I can't think of any with many album covers with many relatives in a picture but the Band influenced Unhalfbricking by Fairport Convention had Sandy Denny's mum and dad on the cover, with the band in the distance separated by a fence. Surely like the rest of the album influenced by The Band.


Entered at Tue Aug 2 14:00:43 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Subject: Next of Kin photo

I picked up Rod Stewart's "Smiler" for £1 today. I don't think I'd ever opened the gatefold before, but he has the Big Pink style "next of kin" and more photo inside. I'm trying to think how many others followed The Band on that one? I would say the Island sampler "You Can All Join In" with all the band members of all the bands in one photo was similarly inspired, though without relatives. Any others come to mind?


Entered at Tue Aug 2 00:54:11 CEST 2016 from (136.167.102.146)

Posted by:

Dave Hopkins

Sorry to hear about David Powell. He was a true music lover and I always appreciated how his passion came through every time he posted here.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 23:31:21 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Blind willie Mctell

On that double recommendation, I just ordered a copy.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 22:53:35 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Blind Willie McTell - Atlanta 12 String

This is one of the records David Powell recommended. Not just for its content, which is top notch, but also for its sonic quality. It was recorded in 1949 on what must have been very good equipment for that era. As I recall he considered it the best sound quality of any of those ancient acoustic-only blues guys, even those that were found and recorded later on in the 60's. And he was right, all around.

On Willie McTell and whether "nobody could sing the blues like" him: I'm not certain he was a blues singer, he was more urban and ragtime sounding to me. He was unique and accomplished in his guitar playing and very original in his storytelling style. He's my personal favorite and standout in that large and somewhat similar sounding genre and that album gets a lot of regular play here -


Entered at Mon Aug 1 21:19:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Nice links, Jan. David Powell was also quoted in many of the "Band Songs" articles here after I asked people to comment and added them.

While a Kylie fan, I don't think she adds anything to TWOF. Julie Driscoll remains the best ever version, with The Band second and The Byrds third.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 19:07:47 CEST 2016 from (84.215.151.101)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: David P.

:' -(


Entered at Mon Aug 1 18:12:28 CEST 2016 from (67.84.240.86)

Posted by:

Ari

Location: United States
Web: My link

Kylie Minogue plays a song I didn't expect her to play. The song has been credited on some sites as a song by "Bob Dylan and Bob Danko" so, y`know.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 15:22:08 CEST 2016 from (70.106.183.152)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: David Powell

Al Edge: thank you for sharing David's top twenty album list. It's a great one, just as he was one of the great voices here for so many years. I'm glad those archives exist. David's voice lives on in that sense, just as Rick's and Richard's and Levon's voices live on. Rest in peace, David.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 15:17:16 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: David P & Jason Isbell

Al, wonderful post. A younger artist, by comparison, that David P championed from time to time was Jason Isbell. Link is to Isbell's beautiful song Danko/Manual.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 14:05:49 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: William Bell

My latest purchase is "This Is Where I Live" by William Bell. I just started reading the sleeve notes. I'll note that Amy Helm adds harmony vocal to Mississippi-Arkansas Bridge. A bridge runs across by Helena. The song is by William Bell, John Leventhal and Marc "Walking in Memphis" Cohn. It contains the line:

"She came to hear the music … Sonny Boy and B.B. King." and "There was a club across the river … across the bridge to Arkansas." I wondered if they'd asked Amy because of the obvious connection.

I wish they'd tried a remake of "Private Number", the original of which would be the soul choice in my Desert Island Top Ten.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 13:57:58 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Southern Accent?

Delighted to re-read David's Top 20, Al. My first reaction is to seek out the half dozen I don't know. One thing that will always be with us is David's habit of referring to musicians "Mr" and "Ms" a Southern formality that I used to find slightly strange, but has grown on me. i'm going to try doing it from time to time in tribute!


Entered at Mon Aug 1 11:07:00 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Location: Liverpool

Subject: DAVID POWELL RIP

Very sad to read of David’s passing. My heartfelt condolences to his loved ones on their huge loss.

It goes without saying as a long standing GB’er it is also our loss too.

Ever since discovering the GB some 20 years or so ago, David Powell and the GB have seemed to me to be inextricably entwined, such it is barely conceivable his name and his will not feature on any future entries. Thankfully the legacy of his musical insight is recorded within the GB for posterity.

And what insight he provided.

I guess owing to the uniqueness of the subject matter it celebrates, the GB is a unique cyber institution. Anyone steeped in the GB, who has trawled through other websites will know such claim of uniqueness is no idle assertion. The pages of the GB have been blessed with some incredibly informed posters and postings down the years. Along with several other long standing luminaries past and present whom I won’t embarrass by naming, the name of David Powell resonates as representing the very pinnacle of the posters and postings that have encapsulated the GB’s stature.

Amongst the often quite wonderful offerings of those luminaries, David’s stamp on each of his own countless postings was personified by a meticulousness that not only set his own insights apart from the fray but which can only be borne of a rare and pure passion and delight in whatever it was he was addressing. Never with any politicking, David simply stuck to the task in hand and by doing so revealed the purity of that passion within him.

A trawl through the archives will reveal innumerable examples of David’s GB legacy. One that stuck out to me because of the uniqueness of its detail and intricacies compared to that of every other contributor – and I set it out below for folks to view that precision - was the time each GB’er was asked to compile the list of our top 20 favourite albums. Needless to say, David’s list was, you might say, the jewel in the crown – not I might add because of the selections themselves since as we all know so well audio beauty is very much in the ear/mind of the beholder. No it is because of the precision with which David identified each particular album – clearly revealing his devotion to Mono vinyl recordings!!

We shall miss you and your unique insights DP. Rest in Peace mate.

DAVID P

(1)"The Band" -- The Band (Capitol green label "RL" pressing)

(2)"Live at the Fillmore East" -- Allman Brothers Band (Capricorn pink label)

(3)"Absolutely Free" -- The Mothers of Invention (Verve mono)

(4)"Aretha Now" -- Aretha Franklin (Atlantic)

(5)"2 Guitars Country Style" -- Speedy West & Jimmy Bryant (Capitol mono)

(6)"Portrait in Jazz" -- Bill Evans Trio (Riverside mono)

(7)"Sibelius Symphony No. 2" -- Sir John Barbirolli cond. The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (Chesky)

(8)"Julie Is Her Name" -- Julie London (Liberty mono)

(9)"12 Songs" -- Randy Newman (Warner white label promo)

(10)"Dixie Chicken" -- Little Feat (Mobile Fidelity reissue

(11)"Blonde On Blonde" -- Dylan (Columbia mono)

(12)"Blood On The Tracks" -- Dylan (Columbia white label promo)

(13)"Surrealistic Pillow" -- Jefferson Airplane (RCA mono) (

14)"Moby Grape 69" -- Moby Grape (Columbia 360 stereo 1A pressing)

(15)"Very Extremely Dangerous" -- Eddie Hinton (Capricorn)

(16)"Music From Big Pink" -- The Band (Mobile Fidelity 1982 reissue)

(17)"Changes" -- Buddy Fite (Cyclone Records)

(18)"Way Out West" -- Sonny Rollins (Comtemporary Records mono)

(19)"Here's Little Richard" -- Richard Penniman (Specialty mono)

(20)"Beethoven Symphony No. 6 'Pastorale'" -- Bruno Walter cond. Columbia Symphony Orchestra (Columbia "6-eye" stereo)


Entered at Mon Aug 1 08:32:31 CEST 2016 from (210.86.97.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: RIP David P


Entered at Mon Aug 1 06:35:00 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.5)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Awful about David Powell, he clearly was a decent person. Communication with him was always easy & pleasant.

Danny Seraphine, Chicago's drummer, is playing The Cutting Room in NYC on Oct 13th. Danny Seraphine's Badass Rockin' Big Band feat. Peter Fish, Will Lee and Everett Bradley.. I've no clue if it's a one off or a tour. The Cutting Room is home to many great one off shows..


Entered at Mon Aug 1 06:13:22 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: David P, RIP

Yes, a huge, huge loss for this place and all of us in it. David seemed to have wandered in on every great band in existence when they were just starting out - sort of like Forrest Gump with a phenomenal brain, record collection and sound system.


Entered at Mon Aug 1 01:04:18 CEST 2016 from (65.95.176.55)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: David P

I'll add my thanks for the wonderful contributions that David made to this community. His insights were welcomed. We are all diminished by his passing.


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