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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Sun Jan 21 07:55:18 CET 2018 from (71.140.204.87)

Posted by:

Warbling Danko

Location: Alabama

Whispering Danko isn't so bad. Then again, I think maybe that ought to be Whispering Manuel. Maybe I'm Danko the Imposter.


Entered at Sun Jan 21 07:42:48 CET 2018 from (24.184.48.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bling Danko. There ya go Warbler. Another variation.


Entered at Sat Jan 20 21:29:18 CET 2018 from (24.184.48.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Compared To What

From 1969.

Not alot of bands try this one. I know one performer for whom it's a standard.


Entered at Sat Jan 20 03:10:31 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Whoa!

The cause of Tom Petty's death is essentially an accidental overdose: " “multisystem organ failure due to resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest due to mixed drug toxicity.”


Entered at Sat Jan 20 02:22:13 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Y' know Warbler, Warbling Danko is a good name, & reasonable choice. Should you ever tire of it, you might give Whispering Danko a whirl. It's a little more adventurious....mysterious even...that outa place i works so I'm leaving it.


Entered at Sat Jan 20 02:06:21 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Warbler, just put the address in the body of the post and write - dot com. Peopel will understand

When Amy wants to play blues, she's a real humdinger of a uptempo blues singer. She can belt em out. I've not witnesses enough of it in the two of her band shows i saw, but don't know what to tell you to expect from her at a blues festival. I saw her sing some blues with Levon;s band at Rambles, and with The Barnburners. sh;es right at home, and excellent when she does..

Alvin Youngblood Hart is a badass at any kind of music. Blues, any kind of Rock and roll, or country. I've seen him solo in St Louis, acoustic, at one of Henry Townsend's birthday parties, and later on, i caught him at a Merle Haggard Tribute at Lincoln Center in the winter/spring of 2005 i tihnk. it voulda been 2007 thought, i doubt it. The lineup was Larry Campbell, Teresa Wiliams, Jorma Kauhonene, Alvin, & Jim Lauderdale, with tony Leoone on drums, Lincoln schleiffer on bass, and Barry Mitterhoff i tihnk played some mandolin. In any event, Jorma didntl; have one f his best vocal nightss, and ALvin, much younger, really stole the show. vocally, on guitar, & in terms of presence. ( imho). but, everyone was suprerb, Teresa really shone on vocals too,


Entered at Sat Jan 20 00:41:59 CET 2018 from (162.253.24.242)

Posted by:

Warbling Danko

So I just found out Amy Helm will be playing at the Blind Willie McTell festival in Thomson, GA this May. I went last year and wasn't overly impressed with the lineup (with the noteworthy exception of Alvin Youngblood Hart), but this year might be different. Who here has seen Amy Helm play? What should I expect? Just how "bluesy" would you say she is?

I tried to link the festival homepage, but I keep getting flicked off by Johnny Cash...


Entered at Fri Jan 19 22:26:16 CET 2018 from (162.253.24.242)

Posted by:

Warbling Danko

Location: Alabama

JQ-

My personal opinion about the Roy Moore v. Doug Jones outcome is that it's a temporary upset and not necessarily an indication of a sweeping shift in demographics. If such a change is occurring, it's all going to be very gradual. Roy Moore was accused of some awful things and wasn't even very popular with Republicans, but it was still closer than a lot of people want to think about. I live in a university town, which often feels like a political bubble, so it can be a tricky vantage from which to judge trends across the rest of the state.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 23:25:51 CET 2018 from (85.164.75.178)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: «Miss You»

Linked photo: The rather international crew behind soon-to-be-major-hit «Miss You», released this week. L-r: The trio Major Lazer — Jillionaire (Trinidad), Diplo (USA) & Walshy Fire (Jamiaca) — Cashmere Cat (Norway) and Tory Lanez (Canada). CC visited Levon’s barn with us a couple of years ago, and seriously enjoyed the top quality performances and the vibes of Woodstock. Music, the universal language.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 09:10:35 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: serrez a gauche

Driving on the left … here in Poole as a Channel ferry port we have some multilingual keep to the left” signs. A friend lived in West Africa. The problem is that English-speaking countries drive on the left, French ones drive on the right. There were long land borders with no marker of the border when he lived there in the early 70s. He said cars would be driving on the left, see others cars coming towards them driving on the right … assume they’d crossed the border and switch sides. The car coming the other way would make the same assumption and so both would crash, but on the other side of the road. Then comes the question of which country they were in at the time. He thought it was a good test case for training car insurance people.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 09:02:16 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

While I normally steer insects, even wasps, towards doors or windows, it is a good thing to kill false black widow spiders. They're spreading quite fast in the UK, especially in the south … cold weather kills them apparently. and the much milder winters of the last twenty years have caused the spread. They wouldn't kill anyone, but a bite is painful and can add a fever. Even if we see one in the garden shed, and we frequently do, we'll squash it.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 07:30:43 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I meant the noodling not Bill's lucky escape, but true, Australia seems to have more than its fair share alarming insects, snakes, etc. My sister-in-law just sent a picture of a huntsman spider she caught in her house. Personally, I never kill spiders. Always trap them and take them out, but I wouldn't want to tangle with one of those guys.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 06:09:04 CET 2018 from (1.43.212.33)

Posted by:

Wallsend

A lot of visitors to Australia don't realise how dangerous things can be here. People start drinking and they think they will go for a swim not realising that there are crocs in the water. Of course you cannot see them at night. Another danger is the heat. Someone died a few days back after they got lost on a hiking track. They were only lost for a couple of hours but that was all it took. Still, you are much more likely to die of a road accident than a croc. Tourists often drift over to the wrong side of the road because they are not used to driving on the left. Same in New Zealand.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 04:31:43 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Sounds to me like that jolly old combination, alcohol and testosterone.

Good grief Bill - glad you were spared a gruesome end, yikes!


Entered at Thu Jan 18 03:45:33 CET 2018 from (24.114.76.7)

Posted by:

Bill M

The next time I hear people wondering why today's not-quite-adults can be so brainless as to munch into a Tide biscuit, I'll tell them about stump-fishing / noodling / handfishing. Sometimes I wonder how so many of us got this far.

Wallsend: Odd timing, you bringing up dangerous Australian wildlife. Just yesterday I replied to an email from Rockin Chair, who'd sent along some pictures of his boat. Nice looking, so I said nice things and added that I'd hitched a lift on one like it in northeast Queensland long ago. I told him that I'd waded to shore in the dark because the boat was falling apart, but I didn't add the detail that I started in chest-high water, walked up, over and down the other side of a big sandbar a couple hundred yards offshore, then continued to the beach where I spent the night. Next morning some locals. Making conversation, mentioned some things in passing that indicated that the sandbar id crossed was the nightly stomping grounds of the local 12-footer (meaning croc). I still sometimes get a bit of a shiver thinking about how my story could have ended.


Entered at Thu Jan 18 02:50:43 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.124)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Roy Moore

Hi and welcome Warbling Danko - Do you think that left turn in the recent ‘Bama election is indicative of anything permanent or will see an equal and opposite turn in this November’s congressional election?


Entered at Thu Jan 18 01:37:22 CET 2018 from (71.140.204.87)

Posted by:

Warbling Danko

Location: Alabama

Lisa-

That's called noodling or handfishing in my experience but I wouldn't be surprised if Ronnie and Levon had their own terminology over in Arkansas. Can't say I've ever tried this.


Entered at Wed Jan 17 23:20:51 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Speaking of swamps, didn't Ronnie Hawkins and Levon talk about some bizarre and dangerous nighttime practice involving old water-logged tree stumps in swamps and snakes? Or was it snakes? Called something like catfish-dogging? Where you reach down into the rotted tree stump in the dark, but you're not sure what exactly you're going to be grabbing? Possibility 1 - fish; possibility 2 - poisonous snake?


Entered at Wed Jan 17 22:48:37 CET 2018 from (1.43.212.33)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is a video of Okefenokee Joe on youtube singing the song about his dog. Seems like a good guy. He would fit in well in Australia. We have heaps of dangerous animals. When I went on holiday in north Queensland there were lots of signs along the beach saying 'Beware of crocodiles'. I wasn't keen on taking my chances so I stayed out the water.


Entered at Wed Jan 17 10:39:19 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just checked online … MacKenzie Crook said in November that Series III would be the last. The "Series IV in 2018" may just have been an announcer on autopilot. But who knows? The last "EPISODES" aired in the USA in August and still hasn't been shown here.

You enquired last month about Toby Jones on stage. Well … We now have tickets to see Toby Jones (Detectorists) with Stephen Mangan (Episodes) in Harold Pinter's "The Birthday Party" in March.


Entered at Wed Jan 17 10:35:01 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Detectorists

We're watching Season 3 through again (BBC4 broadcast the whole series in one evening just after Christmas and we recorded it). After the last episode, the announcer said "Watch out for Series IV in 2018."


Entered at Wed Jan 17 06:46:53 CET 2018 from (71.140.204.87)

Posted by:

Warbling Danko

Location: Alabama

Bill F here. I'll be posting under this name from now on for several reasons, but primarily because there are several names here similar to Bill F and I don't want to cause any confusion.

Jeff A. - I don't have any real close calls with alligators per se. I've been on enough swamps and rivers that I've been around them and even had them come mere inches from my canoe, but I never felt like I was in any danger. I've come a lot closer to being bitten by a copperhead.

I actually grew up in Georgia and we had an old swamp man named Okefenokee Joe who would come out to the schools, showing off snakes and preaching a message of outdoor competency he called being "Swampwise." He was sort of our local equivalent to the Crocodile Hunter—a living folkloric character. I remember him playing his guitar to us and singing a ballad about his dog Swampy who got eaten by an alligator. I'm pretty sure Okefenokee Joe is still around but it's probably been over 15 years since I've seen him.


Entered at Wed Jan 17 05:28:29 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Detectorists

PV - Did you say there was a season 4? Season 3 started here yesterday on Acorn TV. I’m trying to watch it slowly..


Entered at Tue Jan 16 22:31:34 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Greatest Showman

Cinema reviews continue with The Greatest Showman. It is the Academy season.


Entered at Tue Jan 16 17:56:58 CET 2018 from (95.232.213.51)

Posted by:

Francesco Sinibaldi

Le sourire et le conte du cœur. ( other version ) Quand les ombres de la nuit reviennent sur les roses pour donner une chanson le soupir mystérieux m'invite à traduire le chant de la mort et alors le sourire devient le manteau d'un sonnet délicat. Francesco Sinibaldi


Entered at Tue Jan 16 17:19:58 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Abraham, Martin & John

Bob Dylan and Clyde King's beautiful version of Abraham, Martin & John from Trouble No More.


Entered at Tue Jan 16 09:57:22 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.63)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Larkin & Poe

Editing photos and graphics for a video with the TV on the background, I overheard the names Larkin and Poe in close proximity. Sure enough, Larkin is the John Cusack character, and Poe is the Nicholas Cage character , in Con air. I've seen the flick or parts of it several times over the years, but never made the connection.


Entered at Tue Jan 16 03:43:39 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.63)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill F, since you're from down AlaBbma way, do you have any alligator tales to tell?


Entered at Mon Jan 15 17:48:20 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Long Years of Music

I'm a long time fan of Ray Materick Bill. I remember mentioning him long ways back. I guess my favourite song of Otis Redding should be "Dock of the Bay" but I have a real soft spot for "Try A Little Tenderness".

In todays music, the young man who impresses me by far the most is the Australian boy, "Keith Urban". Many hear may not listen to him because he is deemed Country. I've just been watching his new years show where he pays tribute to all the musicians who died last year. He is quite incredible no matter what music he plays. Give him a listen on this youtube new years show it is worth it.


Entered at Mon Jan 15 17:16:27 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.255)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc again: Lost on YouTube (you know how it goes), I was led to Ray Materick's mid '70s Daniel Lanois produced hit, "Linda Put The Coffee On", which caused me to seek out Materick's absolutely stunning first release, a tiny but forgotten hit, "Seasons Of Plenty" - see link. (He's from Hamilton, Ontario, though recently retired to the Gulf Islands of British Columbia, I've heard.)


Entered at Mon Jan 15 17:05:53 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.255)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: You're right about "Old Hotel" by Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. Garth's accordion creates a similar magical languor on "Tennessee Blues" by Bobby Charles (just Bobby, Garth and Amos Garrett). As a friend said when I played it for him ages ago, "I could listen to this all day." Come to think of it, when I introduced him to Robbie's solo on Ronnie Hawkins' "Who Do You Love" on the same evening (he's English and maybe five years younger than me, so came to the Band via TLW), his eyes popped out of his head and he said, "Bill - I must have this!) So a good judge of music.


Entered at Mon Jan 15 17:04:06 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.63)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Thirty plus minutes of Nilsson live from 71

Linked ......Nilsson was a Bed Stuy Brooklyn native who moved to L.A. as a teen.


Entered at Mon Jan 15 15:49:52 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fads

Lisa you are right. In the 60's Pea Coats were a fad. Also Greek fishermen's hats. Also in the late 80's, (at least out here in our country). In the eighties I think some people got tired of being cowboys.

Greek fishermen's hats were the only hat I ever wore much. They are wool, comfortable and the reason I wore them. When I was a fisherman. Gillnetting, when you are hauling your net in a howling south east wind, rain blowing in your eyes so hard you can hardly see you understand the value of those hats.

30 years and more ago we fished the "fall fishing" in October, November. We fished for "chum" salmon, also known as "dog salmon", so named because the Indians used to feed them to their dogs. This time of year the weather gets really bitter out here.

My mum always used to knit us Indian Sweaters. I don't know if you know of the very famous "Cowichan" sweaters the indian women knit. You can find them on the internet. Anyway many years ago I begged my mum to knit me a pullover one. She did, a black one. I still have it tho' it is worn thru' in places.

I would have on just a T shirt and that sweater and my rain gear. Out in that cold howling wind it was like my mum always had her arms wrapped around me. I was warm and comfortable. One night about the mid eighties there was a fleet of us fishing off the north shore of Malcolm Island. By the morning the wind was over 50 knots. I went out to pick up my morning set. The wind was so hard I had to keep putting my boat in reverse to get enough slack to get the fish out. These fish average 15 pounds. I had 110. By the time I got my net aboard I could hardly lift my arms. Wrapped in that sweater I leaned back against my net drum for a few minutes and rested. I then got inside, headed my boat for Port Hardy and put the auto pilot on. I got some coffee going. One of my friends called me on the vhf phone. He said where in hell have you been we were worried about you. I said I was picking my gawd damn net. He says did you get fish? I said I got 110........he had 9...:-)


Entered at Mon Jan 15 14:39:11 CET 2018 from (65.92.194.255)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Steel Men / Google / BaRK

I had a chance to test a friend's new Google toy - a wireless music box that will play what you ask it to play. The first test was "Google, play Blackie and the Rodeo Kings". It did, second album, first song. The second test was "Google, play 'Steel Men'". It did, a version by an Andy Lang, who I hadn't heard of. Old-style googling turned-up the facts that it was really Andy Lee Lang, an Austrian (not Australian) C&W singer whose version of 'Steel Men' is, amazingly, from this millennium - 2010. It owes much to the Jimmy Dean version.

I also learned that the earliest cover of the Debonairs' original was by Roger Whittaker, his second 45 when he was still going as Rog Whittaker, June 1962. As it was done before the Jimmy Dean, it's closer to the Debonairs - see link.


Entered at Mon Jan 15 04:48:41 CET 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: gb, pencils, maybe even music

Yeah, Lisa I remember pea coats as well. I might give Bill F similar advice as you did. My introduction to Jan's site, perhaps 8 or 9 years back maybe, was I read every article in the Library. In fact I think I did that before reading TW'soF and B. Hoskyn's 1st book. I actually thought that one preferable to Small Town, which seemed more interested in name-dropping than anything else. Either way, Bill, keep writing.

To the aside-sort of comment about clothing etc. I actually find that other topics keep a certain amount of vitality here. You definitely need to keep Norm dropping in his nuggets, and we can't all speak intelligently about seafarin'.

Peter: you're tale of troubles w/ headgear and presumably, headmasters (the old term here for heads of private schools), put me in mind of our prep school. In those days you had to wear a coat & tie for classes; take off the coat if the temperature got above 80F; (glenn t, did you ever go over to St. Louis?). We had, I think 6 or 7 different dress regs, but I recall guys stretching the idea of a tie by tying a shoelace around their collared shirt. That and ripping the patch pockets off your grubbiest Levi cords to fit under the no-patch-pocket regime were certain ways to earn demerits.

Jeff: I'm more of a wood guy, but my roofer's got a good brake as he does tons of sheetmetal. I actually put a couple of rubber bands around my #3 Ticonderogas & they stay above my ear/in the ball cap in pretty good fashion. Heights: I worked for one guy that couldn't countenance even pump jacks; we had to pipe stage everything. Of course, that said I can barely move my 24"/24' aluminum pick on my own these days. I'll leave most of the political stuff to you, although I'll admit I've come up w/ a better way to reference Twitler than my previous "La Naranja", which doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. When you had a new guy, were they the "FNG", or is that particular to New England? But in that vein, for me, he's now the "SFG", stable f genius.

Peter: I look forward to your 3 Billboards review. What I've read so far elsewhere seems to call to mind "Nebraska", from a few years ago or that northland mining flick w/ Ms McDormand and Charlize Theron or even further back, a Paul Newman movie w/ Melanie Griffith set in an old upstate NY rust-belt sort of place.

Todd: thanks for your links.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 23:20:27 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Otis Redding - Live in Europe

Whew, thanks for the reminder! Nobody’s home except me and I’ve been blasting it. The best record by the King of Soul is quite a thing. December marked the 50th anniversary of his death, I still remember that news. I’ve been listening to Eddie Hinton recently and I can hear him creeping into Otis, strictly homage and not copy-cat in my opinion.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 20:24:21 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I remember pea coats or jackets from the 60s. Weren't they popular then just as regular winter coats?


Entered at Sun Jan 14 17:36:38 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blow the man down boys!

In reference to John and Peter's resent comments regarding great coats. I have a real fine great coat. I've had it so many years I don't remember where I bought it. It has no tags or identification on it. It is black and has the shoulder straps to stow a hat so I may have got it at the Army - Navy surplus second hand store. Mine doesn't get much use as I use it over blazer and slacks or a suit, clothes I seldom wear. What I am coming to is Pea Coats.

I expect that some of you know what pea coats are. What brought this to mind, I went down to the store here the other day. The south east was howling and it was raining. An old fellow in the store said to me. "That looks like a warm comfortable coat". I said it is a pea coat. I was surprised he didn't know what that was.

I have a fairly new pea coat I got from Wal-Mart a while back. My daughter commented on it one day. I told her it was a pea coat. What's that she says. I said it's what sailors wear I've had them all thru your life. I looked them up for her on the internet. I was surprised to find the controversy of their origin. Now Peter and Dunc may have some history of this. Some are saying the Netherlands, some England amoungst other places. I used to get the real good wool pea coats used from the surplus store but can't find them any more.

Post Script - It would seem the senile character from the Scandinavian quarter who had to hack my name way back there has finally lost his marbles, or is looking for attention. Championing Trump, I suppose because Trump as Hitler chooses the light skinned blonde homosapians over the dark. Remember we all bleed red, see with our eyes, talk out of our mouths. Show me a difference.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 17:33:54 CET 2018 from (67.80.30.201)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC. My sincere answer to you is to seek daily psychiatric help ( you can take weekends off, give the poor healer a break) or just end your misery :-). If neither appeal to you, well, there's always the needle.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 16:33:45 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live in Europe

Absolutely, John D. What I wrote in my "Best of 2017" on my blog (BEST REISSUE):

Reissued on vinyl, Black Friday 2017. I was pondering the vinyl at £17.99 and I was directed to the remastered CD version, a Japanese import at £3.99. This stands with The Last Waltz and Bob Marley & The Wailers: Live At The Lyceum as a contender for best live album of all time. Just a few days before, I’d bought Sam Cooke One Night Stand! Live at The Harlem Square Cub(1963) which Rod Stewart rates as his favourite live album.

In spite of having a pile of Sam Cooke records, and knowing that Otis Redding regarded him as his ultimate musical guide and inspiration, I hadn’t realised that live Sam Cooke sounds way more like later Otis than Sam Cooke’s studio versions. However, then you put on Live in Europe. Otis’s band : Booker T and The MGs plus The Mar-Kays / Memphis Horns. Otis’s band would have blown Sam Cooke’s band off any stage anywhere. Duck Dunn’s bass playing is even better than on the studio stuff, the drums are rock solid and it is the ultimate soul horn section. Above all, the whole band are totally into what they’re doing, caught up in the excitement. It’s the difference between backing (on the Sam Cooke, a band that included King Curtis) and participating wholeheartedly in the excitement (Otis’s band). One of the three best live albums of all time. Wikipedia says it was Paris. I hear English voices in the audience. I know Otis Blue backwards, and he brings something new to every song.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 15:19:34 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Otis Redding : Live in Europe

One of Peter's top 5. In my opinion of my favourite live albums of all time.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 13:58:32 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My last five albums played:

California Stop Over: Johnnie Darrell - Japanese CD, arrived yesterday … the one with the first ever recording of "Willin'"

Otis Redding : Live in Europe (my most played album of recent weeks)

"A Brand New Me" Aretha Franklin & Royal Philharmonic

What In The Natural World - Jake Xerxes Fussell (GB recommended)

"A Love So Beautiful" Roy Orbison & Royal Philharmonic (bought because I liked the Aretha and it was only £6 in the supermarket)


Entered at Sun Jan 14 13:16:44 CET 2018 from (86.147.169.238)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: 'She was common, flirty, she looked about thirty'

Last five albums I have played.

'The Rolling Stones On Air' -absolute must for any record collection, took me back to sitting through 'The Joe Loss Show' waiting for the featured group to come on. I love British rhythm and blues. The Stones are brilliant.

Dr Feelgood 'Down By The Jetty' - really good band.

Blackie and The Rodeo Kings 'Let's Frolic Again'. Great album. 'Old Hotel' has the brilliant Garth on accordion and Richard Bell on piano. Reeechard. I could listen to this song over and over again.

John Martyn's posthumous album 'Heaven and Earth'. Garth plays a great accordion on 'Stand Amazed'. Unlike anything else I heard him play? Jimmy Weider and Levon helped finish the album also, but Levon is not credited.

Lighthouse Family 'Ocean Drive'. A gift, but I still enjoy pop.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 13:10:59 CET 2018 from (95.145.103.166)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham

Subject: Seeing the light?

NWC - I’m just staggered. Not that you support a lying, ignorant, anti-intellectual dummy with a self-confessed history of molesting other people but that you anticipate showing the GB the light!


Entered at Sun Jan 14 12:56:07 CET 2018 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Politics (a subject which is OK for Mr. Hoiberg in Jeff A's posts, apparently).

Jeff A, I am a straight shooter: Donald Trump is the best thing which has happened for the USA after Elvis.

With that said; I wonder why he is so unpopular among some Jews when he is the most positive President to the State of Israel for decades? I don't get it. DONT POST AN ANSWER HERE! Jan will be mad. Just post a link or a furious Jewish clarification to my emailaddress lastname(Danish pastry)spray.se. If you don't have the access to my car-site you might to get the lastname from Jan or ever from equally so politically correct Peter V.

You see, I am contributing in a political (white middle-aged, western, academic, mostly men) site with ten thousands of daily visitors in my own language and I would like to be The Man Who Will Show The Light.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 12:53:05 CET 2018 from (86.147.169.238)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Catching Up

Some really good posts lately. Thanks.

Welcome Bill F. I've seen two Alabamian musicians, both brilliant - Spooner Oldham and Emmylou Harris. Songwriters from the south. Glad you found the Band. We may even be distantly related.

Bob F - Enjoyed the article on 'This Old Porch'. Great song. Bob was only one of many musicians for me during these years. But, three great albums I value.

Bill M - really like 'Black Sheep' on the album. May be stand out track for me. But that is all I know of Serena Ryder - a really emotional performance, a different voice.

Jeff. This is not a classic time for British politics either.

Peter - enjoyed review of KT Tunstall. Was on telly at Xmas. Really good. Will have to get something of hers.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 12:37:15 CET 2018 from (86.147.169.238)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Paul Jones

Well that's me been at Tiny's football, Tae-Kwan Do and Swimming this weekend. Now free.

Peter, I've been back in the sixties looking at what bands played Scotland. Found Scots of St James, Mogul Thrash and Forever More gigs.

But what was really interesting was when Manfred Mann played a hall in Larbert. They were booed and had pennies thrown at them because the Sound System wouldn't work at first. Paul Jones did cartwheels across the stage at one point until they sorted it out. His eternal youth must be in the genes. But quite an extreme way to dodge the pennies!

Incidentally, I bought 'The Manfreds' album a few years back after your first review. Really pleased they rerecorded the songs - a good album.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 07:26:27 CET 2018 from (32.216.239.111)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: And I never met girls who could sing so sweet, Like the angels that live in Houston

Link above is to an Amy Helm performance of Little Feat's 'Roll Um Easy' from Ohio last year. I've never heard her do this in any of the shows I've been to, but she really gets inside of the song, and I'd really love to hear it someday. Wonderful fretless bass playing by the fellow on the bass as well.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 07:07:57 CET 2018 from (32.216.239.111)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Atlantic City - Amy Helm

Link above is a recent live performance of Amy Helm with the Cris Jacobs Band doing a nice version of 'Atlantic City'. Bound to put a smile on the face of anyone who saw The Band live in the 1990's.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 06:57:09 CET 2018 from (32.216.239.111)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Larkin Poe With Elvis Costello

Here's a clip of Elvis Costello performing 'Blame It On Cain' with Larkin Poe from a few years ago.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 06:29:19 CET 2018 from (32.216.239.111)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Forever Young - Larkin Poe

Hey folks, been quite tardy again. Hope everyone is having a good 2018 so far.

Link above is a video that the gals known as Larkin Poe posted on November 12, which was Neil Young's birthday. It's not the Dylan / The Band version of 'Forever Young', but a cover of a song by a group named "Alphaville". Never heard of that group, but it's a lovely performance and touching that they thought of Mr. Young on his birthday. They even threw in a couple of bars of 'Helpless' at the the end.

Always impressed by these young ladies, and appreciate their commitment to the music. If nothing else they've very earnest. And I love their harmonies...simple yet effective.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 04:03:58 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill F. You're a young whippersnapper.



Entered at Sun Jan 14 02:35:55 CET 2018 from (162.253.24.242)

Posted by:

Bill F

-Jeff A.

I'm in my early 30s, so I guess you could call me a younger guy even if I don't always feel that way these days. And the Warbling Danko definitely sounds like a bird. It's actually from a song I was working on a while back as a tribute to Rick. It never amounted to much, but I still like the image of the bird with the lonely song. I'm playing and singing a lot more now, so maybe I'll revisit that material.

-Lisa

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll dig through the archives some, especially if I can search it by topic. I've already noticed how much activity the site had back in late 1999 right after Danko passed. It's pretty surreal to dig through that.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 01:51:51 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

It's a fascinating story Norm. Yes, most, the great majority, of those Mohawks were from Canada, not all. One reservation they came from, Akwesasne, was in New York. And way back early in the century, some Mohawks had their families living in Brooklyn.

That's serious work, man. I worked my way up to being able to run around on a 12" plank close to 40' up, but after my injuries really started effecting my balance, i lost all my nerve for heights. But even in my prime, i'd say my limit for daredeviling maxed out around 35 -40'. I've no idea how those guys can do that.....


Entered at Sun Jan 14 01:03:24 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Steel Men

Lisa, you may have meant "North American Indians" because all those Mohawks who build those sky scrapers are Canadian. There are many great stories about the heritage of families who generations of build those buildings.

If you google the Iron Workers Bridge there are some fantastic pictures of the bridge with that beautiful view. Also googling the Mohawk steel workers, there are tons of pictures of them on high and the buildings they have built.


Entered at Sun Jan 14 00:19:10 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Thanks Norm, that's a different way of looking at it. I remember seeing a program some years ago on PBS about the link between the Native Americans and skyscrapers. As a person who gets edgy and dizzy on a stepladder I can't even begin to imagine that kind of courage.

Hi Bill F - may I recommend the GB archives to you? When I first found this site over five years ago I started reading my way through them. The sheer volume is truly incredible, and in a way it almost mirrors all the ups and downs, ins and outs and huge personalities of the whole development of the internet today. It's quite a trip. Jan's site has been host to a Heinz-like variety of amazing people, some now gone, and just about every aspect of The Band and all the members has been debated many many times. Some terrific writers here too, so I hope you'll have a look.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 22:26:34 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Da Troof

The truth is in Garth.

Anyone can doubt anything else i ascertain all they want. But that statement is beyond doubt.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 22:19:56 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

Bill F, reading those Band books is a bit like triangulating cell phone locations. Somewhere in the middle is the truth. Small Town Talk is worth a read as well - though it often paints a more negative picture.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 19:44:49 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Darkest Hour

It's that time of the year when all the good movies come out together for Awards. My second in two days … Darkest Hour, yet another about Dunkirk and May 1940, this time featuring Gary Oldman as Churchill.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 18:41:23 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Correction

I think I was still half asleep. The name of the bridge is "The Iron Workers Memorial Bridge."


Entered at Sat Jan 13 17:37:23 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: White Wolf Pack - from a different perspective.

Thinking of those native fellows, and I've read much and love to look at the pictures of the things they, caused me to google just now.

I found this article some of you may be interested to read. It is called "White Wolf Pack" the Mohawks who built Manhattan. The way the article begins is startling. A crew is setting girders way up on a building. Suddenly they hear a noise like thunder. They look up, and as told by one worker. A plane is coming. It is so low I can see the rivets on the joints, I can read the serial numbers. I thought what is he doing? Then when the plane hit the trade center I knew something must be wrong. But as the second plane came and hit the other building I knew it must be planned.

As many of these men had worked on those building 30 years before and knew them very well, they went down with all haste to help. This account of this disaster is something I hadn't heard and considered. It is astonishing.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 17:32:49 CET 2018 from (24.114.75.145)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Bill F: Welcome.

Peter V: Thanks for the extra info on Jimmy Dean. Some of dean's earliest recordings (mid '50s were done for washington-based DC label, backed by DC's houseband, Frank Motley and the Motley Crew, who would soon relocate to Toronto as one of the principal Yonge Street groups. The Debonairs were also a Yonge Street band, part of a flowering calypso scene. Oddly enough, another guy playing calypso on Yonge in the early '60s was Will Millar, who would go on to success with another Toronto group of immigrants, the Irish Rovers.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 17:24:23 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Bridge

I remember the day it happened. It was frightening..........and then so sad.

Lisa, just the name of the song and then think of the "Steel Men" and what they do. Something melancholy would not do. The song had to sound hard and tough and stand out. That is what Jimmy Dean made of it. It worked, that song made many people feel better.

It was a long time of lobbying to have the name changed from "The Second Narrows" bridge to the "Steel workers Bridge" which is much more fitting. Thru' the years I have listened to first hand accounts of workers who survived it and witnesses. People who couldn't believe what they were seeing.

There are stories and people have tried to discover what it is with those Indian fellows from back east who are "Steel Men". They build "Sky Scrapers" and for some reason in their DNA, they have no fear of heights at all.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 14:57:38 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, since you're just reading This Wheel's On Fire I'm inclined to ask if you are a young guy?

A Warbling Danko sounds like a type of bird.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 12:11:30 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Steel Men

Welcome to Bill F

Steel Men - I remember the Jimmy Dean version (LINKED) which I'd say is superior, very well. It was the follow up to P.T. 109, and in the UK, the one before that was Big Bad John. That was when CBS (American Columbia) had just opened up on the UK as "the 5th major label" and had their own Radio Luxembourg promo show, on which Jimmy Dean featured heavily. Given their very middle of the road catalogue in 1962, Jimmy Dean stood out. They had to be CBS in much of the world, as EMI's Columbia label already had that name. Eventually, decades later, CBS bought the name from EMI.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 08:22:57 CET 2018 from (71.140.204.87)

Posted by:

Bill F

-Jeff A.

Maybe Funkadelic. I didn't know if I should use a real name or a screen name for the Guest Book. I might post under the name Warbling Danko in the future.

I'm on a major band kick right now since I'm half way through Levon's "This Wheel's on Fire." Unfortunately, they've gotten through the first first three albums at this point and things are looking pretty grim. It always bums me out to read about The Band's decline and dissolution. Their was never really anyone else like them.

I got Levon's and Robbie's books at the same time, so I'll have to read them side by side and watch the sparks fly. I've already read "A Musical History" but it seemed to stay pretty neutral if I remember right.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 08:14:37 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

John D, I have been tempted. I have one of their summer hats made from Coffee bean sacks. Real Cool (but not so much on me)


Entered at Sat Jan 13 07:59:47 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill F. Welcome. Is that F for Fedora, Fender.........Fuzz-Tone?


Entered at Sat Jan 13 07:03:09 CET 2018 from (71.140.204.87)

Posted by:

Bill F

Location: Alabama

Subject: Greetings

I've been using this site for a long time now for chords and lyrics, but would love to connect more with other people who love The Band and everything they were all about. I tried the chatroom a few times with no success, so it looks like the guestbook is the place to go. I imagine you've exhausted so many Band related topics that it's hard to know what to say (it looks like hats are the thing now?). So why don't I just start with "hello"? We'll see where we can go from there.


Entered at Sat Jan 13 04:35:33 CET 2018 from (64.229.180.95)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: I certainly see what you mean, but that's popular music for you. I find the discrepancy between topic and mood in this case much less troubling than in, say, "Run For Your Life" by the Beatles.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 20:58:59 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Steel Men

What a curious song! No, I never heard it before, although my husband recognized it right away. We didn't move up here till 1960 though, so I missed that event. Doesn't it sound oddly upbeat for a song about a tragedy to you? That sort of dance rhythm - you almost expect a couple "Yee-haws" in there ...

Some years ago that bridge was renamed The Ironworkers' Memorial Bridge in honor of the men who died there, and it is one of the very worst traffic clogs in the Lower Mainland when there's an accident, which there invariably is.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 20:20:05 CET 2018 from (64.229.180.95)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Townes V generally makes me think of Fred E - and the linked "I Like Trains" mentions Texas in the very first line. Mandolin by Willie P Bennett.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 20:15:17 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Buckskin Stallion Blues

Link to the great cover of Buckskin Stallion Blues used in "Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri."


Entered at Fri Jan 12 20:12:34 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

My review of "Three Billboard outside Ebbing, Missouri" added. It did well in the Golden Globes, hopefully even better in the Oscars. A major sequence is played to The Night They Drove Old Dixie down, though they play the Joan Baez version not The Band version. Should be a decent payday for Robbie though. I think there is good artistic reason in the context of the film for choosing Joanie's version. Great Townes van Zandt too.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 19:53:50 CET 2018 from (64.229.180.95)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: singing / Caribbean / Serena Ryder / BaRK

Lisa: The other night I attended a talk+ on the Caribbean influence on the Toronto music scene. The speakers mentioned a bunch of old local groups with West Indies roots and asked if they'd missed anyone. So I mentioned Debonairs, and the fact that they're only record, "Steel Men" - about a construction tragedy in the Vancouver area in '58 - was a big local hit in '62. And since then I've been singing it to myself. Do you remember it - see link? (Jimmy Dean covered it - more C&W but still much the same 'mento' feel.)

An alumnus of the Debonairs, Glen Solzano, later fathered singer Serena Ryder, who is likely known to most Canadians here, and maybe some others - perhaps Dunc if he's picked up BaRK's "Kings and Queens" album. Their duet with Serena, "Black Sheep", can also be found on YouTube.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 19:50:00 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Forth Worth Blues

B.Lee, right on, Townes and Guy Clark, two great Texas songwriters. I've always loved Steve Earle's song to Townes, Forth Worth Blues. Link is to his performance of song at Townes tribute show. Nanci Griffith's reaction to the song is so pure and beautiful. Two more great Texas songwriters, Steve Earle and Nanci Griffith.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 19:01:44 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, the only appropriate places for Twitler are either in the ground or in a internet free padded cell with multiple secured doors. He is an abomination upon the earth.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 09:35:12 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Embassy

The controversial embassy location is a fast growing area, but was until a few years ago, industrial wasteland. While so much of the interesting stuff in London is now on the Soyuth Bank, the new Embassy is about a mile west of the more interesting bits. Still, I would think it would hasten the spread of interesting bitsalong the south bank.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 08:52:07 CET 2018 from (31.48.7.170)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Jeff

That story has not had a big impact over here yet, Jeff, because it has been overshadowed by Trump's decision not to visit Britain to open the new American embassy. Trump is not coming because he said he doesn't like it.

A professor from Birmingham University, an American who has lived in the UK for 30 years, mentioned the news you allude to when questioned about the impact in the US of his decision not to visit the UK. The professor said that his decision not to visit the UK has had little impact in the States because of the story you mention.

Incidentally, I have never heard an American academic speak so negatively about an American president in my life. He talked about Trump being like the loudmouth in the pub. Talked about tantrums etc.

There is one thing quite sad about this for Scots. Normally we would be very pleased that the President's background was Scottish. But he is an embarrassment.

On a lighter note enjoyed stories about hats and weddings.Thanks.


Entered at Fri Jan 12 03:30:14 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I imagine you folk saw today's happening in the u.S. Twitler put us closer to bloodshed in the streets. My opinion has always been that is what he wants, and that he expected to lose the election, but to create mayhem after he lost.....

His remarks about Haiti, El Salvador, and shithole countries today- well, , he ls getting us closer to blodshed here.....There's no way he is going to let us get to midterm elections next November without mayhem.....He's gonna push it the whole way....


Entered at Fri Jan 12 00:13:47 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso, i always kept my pencils in my tool belt,and often left one on my brake. I had em buried in my truck too. (For those of you unfamiliar, a brake is a metal brake, mine were always the 10'6" Tapco Pro models. Today they go for 1800 and up, i think the last one i bought was in 1996, for just under a grand. and i thought that was minor robbery.

Unless i was working alone,I never had enough pencils. I used carpenters pencils in marking to cut and bend sheet metal, siding, headers on windows,..... though i did alot of window jobs alone, maybe 5 % of my work, but usually i took my helper, and at least half the time, had another ace sheet metal mechanic with me. If so, he did most of the metal bending and capping, i installed & we both caulked.. the helper also did a lot of the metal cutting and bending...But, no one but me could ever hold on to the damn pencils. And of course i lost some myself.. I used to keep two or three in my tool belt., by the end of the day, i was usually robbed of em. I ad stashes in my truck and garage, but , they went........

Siding, i went through more pencils...there could be two to four of us, and we all used pencils all day long. Marking , cutting....again, my guys lost & grabbed pencils all day long. And thirty feet , forty feet up in the air, and you drop your pencil. It sucks. The moral is, have way too many pencils, it's never enough.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 22:53:26 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Remind you of someone?

"A man comes home from work late, his wife inquires: 'A lot of traffic?' He replies, 'no cheating, no cheating, absolutely no cheating, everyone agrees, no cheating, even my co-workers have said, no cheating, absolutely no cheating..'"


Entered at Thu Jan 11 21:47:15 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Rod & Kingsmen Hats

Rod, for a mere $237.50 American that hat can be yours.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 17:54:14 CET 2018 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Roger, thanks to Haso we can divert to the next subject: Carpenter's Pencils.

A siding crew can never have enough carpenter's pencils. I'll expound when i have more time.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 15:38:06 CET 2018 from (79.75.176.151)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Hats

Check out Hatmosphere by Danny Thompson.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 15:15:42 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Talking of oldie but goldie, or rather "heritage artists, I was appalled to read today that the BBC is engaging in a sweep of male DJs, to be replaced by females, and the most prominent one to go is Paul Jones. Paul Jones has done The Blues Show for years on Radio Two, and no one is more erudite on the subject. More to the point, the live artists on the show, like Van Morrison, are delighted to be accompanied by Paul Jones on harmonica. He is at least being replaced by a musician, Cerys Matthews, ex-Catatonia, but good as she is, she does not have the gravitas or steeping in the blues of Paul Jones. Mind you, she did a stunning version of Baby It's Cold Outside with Tom Jones a few years ago. Paul Jones is 75 (and looks about 50) so maybe he's happy to call it a day, but there's a whole generation of blues fans devoted to that show because of Paul Jones.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 15:08:21 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Full Monty

I'd say the best-known version of "You can Leave Your Hat On" is the Tom Jones cover version used in The Full Monty film, and it's a song he always does live. Link is a more recent live version on "The Voice."


Entered at Thu Jan 11 14:58:58 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hats

Remember guys, from the 50's Gene Vincent and the "Blue Caps". They wore baby blue, what we called skimmers. When they sang "Bee Bop-a-lula" in Jane Mansfield's movie, "The girl can't help it". At a certain part of the song they would throw their heads back tossing off their caps.

There is a song, I can't remember who did it. "I'm not a real cowboy, I just found this hat."

Never could wear hats, my hair is so thick I'm insulated. Now it is just starting to thin to where it's reasonable. I wear a touke sometimes in winter. Got to be real cold tho'!


Entered at Thu Jan 11 14:39:56 CET 2018 from (24.114.106.35)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronna

Haso: "You Can Leave Your Hat On" was written and first recorded by Randy Newman, I believe, though BB Bland may well have recorded a version. Joe Cocker did, and Robbie Lane and the Disciples (who took over for our guys on the Hawkins bandstand, have been playing it live since the '80s, if not before.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 12:25:04 CET 2018 from (77.103.81.34)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Hatsville, Barbour Co.

Subject: Which site have I landed on?

I haven't looked in for a couple of days and when I do look in I find we've turned into hats and fashion central.


Entered at Thu Jan 11 08:47:34 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

I loved Robbie's hat in the "Don't Do It" segment from TLW. Hard to get these days though there is a local hat maker here who makes one - called a Kingsman I think. Reasonably expensive. Rick seemed to be the hat guy in The Band. I'm not a trend setter but I'd wear one if they came back into fashion.

Peter, you're admission about the scrooge hat was probably too much information. :-)


Entered at Thu Jan 11 06:23:20 CET 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: hats

I'd always noted how the OQ seemed pretty fond of hats. Plus isn't there some story that Roger Waters told at Love for Levon about a ballcap that L gave him?

Isn't there a Bobby Blue Bland song about "you can leave your hat on". Always thought it one very sexy blues tune. Of course, there's probably more to the story.

Peter, I'm in your league, the very follically-challenged; so, have been wearing hats for years. Plus, being a carpenter, they help hold the pencil up there, way better than just your ear. Here in the States, I find a good hoodie even more critical; even usu sleep w/ one pulled up over my head at night. A pullover though, not a zip-up.

Yeah, spots on the head or not, just once getting sunburned up on top... the aftermath (ouch) cured me of ever being out in the sun w/out covering. Then again, there's the saying about such as Peter (& moi): "grass doesn't grow where it's active".

Now, wellies, that's another topic. In Central America, almost all the campesinos y cabballeros wear green wellies (w/ spurs slid down over them if they are on horseback). Good jungle and coffee-harvesting wear. Although you do see spurs over sandals on riders as well.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 23:39:00 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You used to be able to get imitation Barbour jackets. I had one years ago. Then they became part of the "Young Fogie" country gent look along with green wellies. I once saw a couple in Barbours and green wellies spraying aerosol mud on their Land Rover before posing through Chelsea. Bucolic LAND Rover obviously, not Range Rover.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 22:58:55 CET 2018 from (47.20.223.104)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Barbour coats. Talk about a coat of wax....


Entered at Wed Jan 10 19:39:46 CET 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Great story,Jeff!


Entered at Wed Jan 10 18:12:01 CET 2018 from (47.20.223.104)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You couldn't get me in a hat when i was a kid or teen. I wouldn't dream of wearing one till i started working out doors all day all year long, i was already twenty five.Even then, i'd only wear one in winter, cold weather, or the rain , and only began wearing one occasionally in the summer about ten years ago. Now it's constant, cause the risk is profound for me.

This past June or July i attended my cousin's daughter's wedding. She is becoming a reform rabbi, and married a guy who grew up in but left Chabad. which is a wing of Chasidism. Since his family is Lubavitch, Chasidic, there was lot of negotiation to this wedding, and it was hybrid of sorts. With the main reception room being secular, and the Chasidim having two rooms of their own, one for men, one for women... The ceremonies ahead were very very Chasidic.

About a week before i had made my first visit to a dermatologist, regarding spots on my head. He froze off a lot of spots and asa result i had brown welts on my head. so, a few days before the wedding i went to a Judaica store and asked for the largest black yarmulke they had. It's black velvet, and i think a six inch kippah (pronounced keepah). In any event, as large and well constructed as it is, it's almost as effective as a insulated ski cap.

Miracle of miracles, that kippah also made me pass for pious. At that wedding it also made the groom's father and another very Chasidic man both ask if i was a rebbe. My friend's crowd was far more astute, not that easily fooled.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 17:34:29 CET 2018 from (47.20.223.104)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, other than possibly being kinda beat up, the hats Levon and Robbie are wearing that photo you linked are of the general type the Orthodox were wearing at the wedding. The quality they had was amazing. These were really sharp, really well made hats. I've seen other pictures where Band members were wearing hats of the general ilk.



Entered at Wed Jan 10 15:24:28 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Barbour Prices. Wow!

Just saw the price list on Amazon. Boy they better be a good coat!


Entered at Wed Jan 10 15:21:54 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter

Should have gone to "Sunday Morning" show first. The company is called Barbour. Wondering if they sell them in Canada. I'll look.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 15:19:04 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: British Clothing

Peter, they did a special on a British clothing company that makes great coats for inclement weather on TV Sunday morning. Stars with the letter "B." People love them so much they send them back to the company from time to time for restitching. People just don't want to get rid of them. Apparently they are waxed on the surface. Wish I could remember.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 12:51:17 CET 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff

Not up to date on the band you mentioned or informed about any current music in that genre. I’m kinda stuck in all the other music I enjoy and the occasional dip into Lubavitcher tunes is where I land these days.But,with NO HAT!


Entered at Wed Jan 10 10:07:03 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: If you want to get ahead, get a hat

My first proper hat was dull green, bought in 1969, and based on the one Levon is wearing in the linked photo. Such hats were rare in Norwich at the time, unless you were an elderly farmer. People recognised it as a Band style hat and thought of the Band as wearing hats because of the photo.

As our British friends know, we had to wear caps at school. It was a serious offence to be seen out in school uniform, which in our case was a grey suit and school tie, without a cap. Of course by the time you were 14 or 15, a colourful school cap was deeply embarrassing, and also caused ribald comments when we grammar school (selective state school) boys cycled past the rougher secondary modern school lads on the way home. When we were 16, and bought our Vespa and Lambretta scooters we were hauled before the headmaster for the offence of wearing crash helmets instead of school caps … five or six of us. One lad's dad was a police inspector and went to the school in fury at the headmaster forbidding us effectively to wear crash helmets. Of course he did not apologise, though our detentions were cancelled. He simply made it an offence not to wear a crash helmet (wisely). Then we got detentions because we had found it amusing to tape our school caps on top of the crash helmets. Not an offence on any statute book, so to speak, but they could make up rules and offences as they chose in those days.


Entered at Wed Jan 10 05:03:39 CET 2018 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Recognization!

It's stronger than recognition.

Hal Blaine getting a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

Some others too, Emmylou, Tina T...........


Entered at Wed Jan 10 03:50:46 CET 2018 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, isn't RR's own publishing under the name Medicine Hat?


Entered at Wed Jan 10 03:35:35 CET 2018 from (64.229.180.95)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: no cat in hat

Offhand, I can't think of a Band song with a hat in it, unless you count capless (and batless) Ferdinand. Even then I think 'capless' meant 'naked' (and 'batless' 'flaccid').


Entered at Tue Jan 9 20:22:57 CET 2018 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Just a slight bissell more bass, bubbela. And perhaps a half a db up on the piano. :-)

Jed, I checked with my friend, who is recuperating from the night's festivities. It was the Aaron Teitelbaum Orchestra with Schlomi Gaskall fronting.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 18:41:59 CET 2018 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, the two hat makers i know in Brooklyn are Goorin Brothers in Park Slope and Williamsburg, and Bencraft in Sunset Park. I used to get great hats in Kenco, both when they were in Woodstock, and in the newer location in Hurley. Kenco was my favorite place to buy hats. They often had the best winter wool hats, iconic old brands, top qaulity while it was still available, Yukon warm winter hats. And great hats for any season, every type, berets, safari, you name it..... All of those hats met various known and unknown dire fates, in any event i miss em. But like you i stay hatted most of the time out of doors, warmth and uv protection, i got two flat hats and a bunch of ski caps... but i need me one of the Orthodox black hats, there's wide brim with various height & shaped chimney stacks on em, and there's also gangster style.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 17:40:16 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff may know … I recall a very good hat shop in Smith Street in Brooklyn. Bought a couple there. Also Bridport in Dorset has THREE hat shops in the High Street and has a "Hat weekend" once a year.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 17:38:13 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van the Hat

Van the Man is never seen without a hat. Nor am I. Shaven head … hat needed in winter for cold. Hat needed in summer for sun. I even have a Scrooge nightcap. There may be the odd hatless October day or April day.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 16:55:25 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Toronto, Canada
Web: My link

Subject: Meyer The Hatter New Orleans

When I really want a hat; it's off to Meyer The Hatter in New Orleans. The greatest assortment of hats that any man would want. Ask Dr. John. That's where the Dr. buys his hats. I now only buy them; when I am in New Orleans.

I ordered one once; from Toronto and the hat price was fine. However the U.S. Postal service has become horrible. They wanted as much to send a light hat to Toronto as it was costing me to actually buy the Hat. The same for First Edition books that I send for in Jackson Mississippi. The Postal Service there is not cost effective. Oh, did I order the hat anyway? Yes!!! I really wanted that hat.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 16:08:22 CET 2018 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Hats and such

Hats. Yes, at times a necessary evil, though they do pile up. Lots of baseball style caps, some of them even for baseball teams...or team (Phillies). Always worn outside when gardening. There is a ridiculous hat with neck cover for same, sadly so worn it is seldom...worn. Straw wide brim hats in summer for outdoor occasions. One basal cell removed, more on the way we suppose. Wide brim hats look cool, but can't be worn while driving. Damn you, headrests! Lyle Lovett has a song about hats. You can have his girl, but "Don't Touch My Hat"

Which brings us back to the Texas songwriters, thread originated by dunc I think, I would recommend the dean (IMHO) of Texas songwriters Guy Clark. There is a two-disk set 'Craftsman' which neatly summarizes his early to mid periods. Also a two-fer of his first two albums 'Old No. 1' & 'Texas Cooking' is/was available. Of his later work I would recommend 'Workbench Songs'. Mr. Clark was not only a wise and prolific writer, but a guitar technician and repairman who wrote many of his songs AT the workbench in his basement. I believe there is a scene in the Townes Van Zant biopic 'Be Here To Love Me' in which Mr. Clark is interviewed while deconstructing and rebuilding a guitar neck. Oh, and Townes is another avenue, more like a mine shaft, you will want to fall into.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 13:04:33 CET 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Hats

Never been a hat guy myself.Those kind.Baseball hats on occasion and wool hats in season,but generally I look dumb in hats.Or dumber.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 12:21:29 CET 2018 from (67.80.24.130)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

And the hats! Mind you, i walk amongst Orthodox & Chasidim daily, & have been to one Chasidic wedding. But my friend & his shul mates had the best hats I've seen yet. When i have a few hundred to burn, I'm gonna have him take me wherever he gets his hats.There's a few Yidlach hat shops a couple miles from me, but i wanna go wherever he got his. Hats like these, you never saw such hats.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 12:15:36 CET 2018 from (67.80.24.130)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Btw Jed, they had the sound down pat. I was in shock. I actually was able to converse with people on the opposite side of the table. PA systems were really good, levels ,mix, vocal quality. Better than most clubs these days.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 12:11:33 CET 2018 from (67.80.24.130)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, you guessed the venue. A friend said the band was named the Eric Teitelbaum Orchestra, but i wasn't sure if he was pulling my leg or not. I'll ask the groom's father & get back to you. Honestly, I'm surprised I didn't get it myself....

Off to the glaucoma doc on an hour of sleep. Unless I cawfee up well, think I may return another day for the field of vision test.Or they may just tape my eyelids up to get me through it.


Entered at Tue Jan 9 11:27:02 CET 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff-orthodox weddings

Been to many orthodox Jewish weddings.Love them.But the music-generally terrible,too loud,and lousy PA systems.Do you recall the name of the band? As an aside,in the 60’s and 70’s there were some great bands and some excellent musicians like Yehuda Issacs(drums),David Nulman(keys,guitar),the late great Yossie Piamenta(lead guitar),and Mickey Lane(bass).These days the bands are awful.BTW was the wedding at Terrace on the Park?


Entered at Tue Jan 9 07:01:10 CET 2018 from (67.80.24.130)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I just returned from the wedding one of my oldest friend's son & new bride. My friend was a wild man in high school, in college, & after, then.... he & his wife became very orthodox before they got married, about thirty years ago. If i recallit started with kabala classes... In any event, I've been to a couple of NYC high society weddings. This Orthodox Jewish wedding in Queens was more tasteful and more enjoyable than any wedding I've been to yet. The Orchestra was amazing. The string led orchestra pefrormed for about an hour & a half before the reception and through the ceremony... When the orchestra came on for the reception we were eating our soup. I gottsa tell ya,all of a sudden it sounded like we were in Hell's Kitchen and a wild Irish fiddle led band with a serious drummer and bassist had invaded. This was no klezmer fiddle up front. Killer band, i didn't count, but I'd say 14 or 15 pieces....

About thirty minutes later I was thinking for a way to describe the band at the table , & surprised a few people by declaring: The only way to describe this band is "Heavy Yid."

Dunc, I saw John Martyn open for some one once. It might have been in the 70s, maybe the 80sa. but most likely the 70s. I say that cause i have far better recollection of shows i saw in the 80s than in the 70s. There may even have been more tham two acts on the bill. If he opened for someone at brooklyn College, it woulda been a show i saw between 72 & 75, when ii went to high school next door. If it was at The Bottom Line, it woulda been pre Aug 1981, or after Jan 1985. I remeber being very imprEssed by his playing and his sounds, and his singing.

yes Martyn was great, & certainly put that echoplex to use..


Entered at Mon Jan 8 15:59:04 CET 2018 from (31.48.7.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: New York, Jeff

Jeff, I have three tracks of John Martyn recorded at Kennys Castaways, New York in 1977, including the echoplex, 'Outside In'.

And 'Live at the Bottom Line' New York, 1983.

Never made New York, Jeff.


Entered at Mon Jan 8 14:45:51 CET 2018 from (31.48.7.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Echoplex

Rod, the person credited in the UK with developing the use of the echoplex is John Martyn.

The first time I saw it done it was amazing, I couldn't believe it. All that brilliant sound coming out of an 'electrified acoustic guitar' with only one person on stage.

If you go to YouTube and google 'Inside Out' or 'Outside In' (especially this version), you'll get the idea.

There is a good example of playing electric guitar unusually on 'One World' with David Gilmour on YouTube too.

Brilliant musician, cult status and his biography is aptly named 'Some People Are Crazy'.

Links with the Band and I love his two duets with Levon on 'No Little Boy'.

For me, 'Solid Air' would be in my top ten albums of all time.


Entered at Mon Jan 8 01:32:53 CET 2018 from (80.4.34.215)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Planes again - for NWC [apologies to the rest of you]

Thanks for your comment, NWC. I've only flown once in a DC-3(Dakota)and that was limited to a 'joy ride' over Edinburgh but it was a 'bucket list' notion on my part and I'm really glad I did it. My first flight was across the English Channel in a Vickers Viking (more or less the British equivalent to a Dakota. I don't recall either being particularly noisy but maybe that was just the circumstances (first flight, in one case, and a much-desired flight in the other). My second flight, the return journey was in a Bristol Wayfarer, a freight plane converted for passenger use, and it till had fixed undercarriage, unusual for a largish transport plane even then. You could see the wheels going round in the wind as you flew along.

I have never flown in an Avro York (a post-war British transport plane based on the Lancaster bomber, with a similar wing and those four Merlin engines) but my memory of it is its noise - but it was noisy, not in its decibel level as much as the way the sound it made penetrated the atmosphere. In my youth, I lived near Heathrow Airport and, really late on clear and really still nights, you could hear an Avro York coming in to land while it was still way, way out. I think it was a mail service or the like. Some nights, I got out of bed just to look and, though you could hear it distinctly, its lights seemed to be far away. Not an attractive-looking plane, its approach, as it came closer and closer and got lower and lower, seemed more lumbering than graceful - but it's thw sound of it that I really remember. [NOTE: my bedroom was on the 'right' side of the house, which lay parallel to the line of approach, about 750 metres south of it, and about 3000 metres from touchdown]


Entered at Mon Jan 8 00:44:53 CET 2018 from (84.209.140.171)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Reverb systems

As a very young man/party animal, me and some «friends» once ended up sleeping it off on the floor of an old recording studio in Sweden. I crashed next to this old-style massive, ultra-sensitive 500-pound plate-reverb system (probably a German EMT like the one linked above, they were quite common), that made weird noises all through the night. And woke us all up in the morning when someone crashed into it while trying to find a bathroom.


Entered at Mon Jan 8 00:26:49 CET 2018 from (172.12.248.174)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

Another good version of Willin' is by a guy named Chris Jones, who has since passed on. Worth a look. He actually did it twice, once by himself (guitar and vocal) and once with a harmonica player named Steve Baker. I'll leave off posting a link, but the second one is better, not because there's anything lacking in the first, but Baker's harp solo and backing vocal carry it home.


Entered at Sun Jan 7 18:02:18 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, an echoplex is a delay, a reverb effect. They started as tape delays, made with vacuum tubes and tapes in the contraptions..

There's plenty on their history and use on reverb dot com, and there's you tubes that get into echoplexs & fulltones too


Entered at Sun Jan 7 17:54:05 CET 2018 from (84.209.140.171)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Rick and Terry Danko, and Levon Helm, school photos.


Entered at Sun Jan 7 07:34:03 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

Been away for a few days catching a Bryan Adams concert. A seriously good act. What is a echoplex Jeff?


Entered at Sat Jan 6 01:35:15 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But in the article Berger does seem to confuse or entangle vocal sounds with vocal performances.Minimally he ignores the importance of gettign a great recording... You do have to get that great performance to be able to record it...but getting a great performance captured in a poor or mediocre recording is not going to do that great performance justice. And Ramone was a master of sound....So, you need the great vocal performance and the great vocal sound recording, to have a great vocal production...


Entered at Sat Jan 6 00:27:57 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: You guys should enjoy this link.

I generally agree...yet it ain't necessarily so simple. But in the case of a production for a particular artist at a particular moment, maybe it is..

(In the case of vocalists interpreting songs they haven't written) Connection to the song is also ultra important. though there really is no order, that may not be possible till the other conditions Berger writes about are met, but it is super important. And it's often a beautiful thing to see happen.... Some vocalists come prepared, some don't. Sometimes the prep doesn't mean anything anyway.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 23:58:25 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Of course, that comment was in response to Bob's most recent post.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 23:38:19 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

New records and live shows were a big part of what we looked forward to back in the 70s. And in the 80s, 90s, new recordings to a much less frequent degree, but live shows, really more. As many shows as I went to in the 70s, it pales in comparison to how many in the 80s, 90s, and though less than in the two just noted decades, even in the 2000s. The drop off for me really was in this decade. there's just less i want to catch, and i'm also not willing to drive three hours for a great show. It used to be like going around the corner, grab friends and go, but not no more.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 20:28:44 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.94)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hostiles review

PV - Thanks for that - do you do criticism professionally? It was a tome for me but very well penned, presented and informative.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 20:28:19 CET 2018 from (24.114.69.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D has nailed it, folks. Even if you're not particular to the song, you can hold your hands over the spinning vinyl and make use of the warmth caused by it rubbing against the stylus. This is a benefit you can't get from a CD, much less a digital download.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 19:17:20 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hostiles reviewed

My review is linked of "Hostiles" which opened today in the UK. A very good attempt at that grail: the revival of the Classic Western.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 17:56:49 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Mr. January

How great was Bob Dylan's mid 70's January Releases!

1974 - Planet Waves

1975 - Blood On The Tracks

1976 - Desire

I can remember everyone of those release dates. Where we purchased the record and the level of excitement and wonderment. Best of times.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 16:30:10 CET 2018 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Aircrafts

Thanks Ian W for commenting my post on Bombardier aircraft (January 1st). You didn't enjoy your flight because of the noice as much as I did. Let me explain: Bombardier reminds me of an ancient Douglas DC-3 (known even as Dakota). The noice, for sure, limited space, bumpy ride and slow landing/takeoff. European companies like Finnish company Aero used DC-3 planes which had taken part in WW2, especially in Normandie. As a very young boy I had the chance to sit on the pilot's knee and "fly" this iconic aircraft. So, to be inside a turbo-prop is like to listen to my first LP again.

Band connection: "... as bumpy that I almost cried..."


Entered at Fri Jan 5 14:31:19 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: 2018

Wishing everyone in 2018 that Life will be indeed....A Carnival.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 14:13:51 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

JOHN D

Subject: BILL M

Bill, time to play Bruce Cockburn's "Coldest Night Of The Year"; over and over again.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 12:28:47 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: West Texas Highway

Dunc, I love West Texas Highway from Step Inside This House. Great story about a rich guy picking up an old rodeo bum hitchhiking and by the time the ride is over is envying the hitchhiker a bit.

I love Neil forever but I feel sad when I hear his brand new music. Something isn't right.

We finally got around to watching an Al Edge recommendation, Peaky Blinders. Really really good especially early seasons(Thanks Al!). Never got into Nick Cave until I heard his songs in this show. Now I'm ordering a bunch of his records. It never ends! Have you seen this show?


Entered at Fri Jan 5 12:09:45 CET 2018 from (86.146.121.49)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Forgot, Bob

Really enjoying Neil's 'Hitchhiker'. Would have missed it, if you hadn't flagged it up. I don't keep up. We have similar thoughts on Neil.

The version of 'Powderfinger' is worth the price of the album alone. Many thanks.

Rolling Stones at BBC is brilliant, Peter. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 11:40:07 CET 2018 from (86.146.121.49)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Bob F

Thanks, Bob F. I play that song too.

I always thought about the Dundonian, who left my home town and ended up in the middle of nowhere and called the place Dundee.

In 1896, the population was 199 - two livestock dealers, a clothier, a general store, a seller of notions, and a Mr Biffle, who sold organs. In 1909 a bank was opened by Alex Albright, who became the owner of the biggest Karakul sheep ranch in the world.

So the guy in Townes's song was probably a sheep man, not a cowboy. I wanted him to be a cowboy, Bob.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 09:30:49 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Washington DC

It could certainly make a good Oxford American CD. As well as Marvin Gaye, and Billy Stewart, you have Duke Ellington, John Fahey, The Country Gentlemen, Eva Cassidy, Chuck Brown. That's enough famous ones on which to build the usual eclectic and surprising Oxford mix.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 06:13:33 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Ivory or Ivery

Yes. It was his birth name JQ. There's a Brooklyn born and still living here singer named Ivery Bell. He has fronted in versions ( not original bands) of the Delfonics & Blue Magic, and worked in the O Jays, Stylistics, on and on...These days he';s singing a lot of gospel. He's got a great voice but he's really up there in that Frankie Valle range.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 05:49:27 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.94)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Ivory Joe Hunter

His “Cold Gray Light Of Dawn” is a favorite one I first heard as a Nick Lowe cover version. I heard that take awhile back on a TV show. No idea which one. I recall reading that Ivory was his real name and not a piano player’s moniker. Lots of good stuff -


Entered at Fri Jan 5 04:30:40 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

YOu all know the song Since I met you Baby-- One of the great texas songwriters was Ivory Joe Hunter. Known in blues and r& b, he also may have been the first or one of the first black singers or songwriters with country hits. Was a performer at the Opry as well


Entered at Fri Jan 5 04:08:12 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

D.C. had a real solid local funk scene (Virginia had one too). More relative to that in the future. Not funk, but Larry Burnett of Firefall is a D.C. native. r


Entered at Fri Jan 5 03:50:00 CET 2018 from (24.114.69.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Washington,whether technically north or south, spawned Marvin Gaye and Billy Stewart. And no doubt many more.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 01:51:16 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

JQ, I do. Check out this great article on how they came to write this song.


Entered at Fri Jan 5 01:26:49 CET 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: This Old Porch

Bob - Through the years I ’ve taken some poetic license and called this great song the story of Texas. You think it is too?


Entered at Fri Jan 5 01:21:46 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: This Old Porch

Link to one of the all time great Texas songs. This Old Porch, written by Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen. From Lyle's nearly perfect first record. I've listened to this on continuous repeats thru the years.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 23:41:08 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I would guess they'd count West Virginia and Oklahoma, and do the Carolinas as two years. Plus Virginia. I hope so. What about DC? The old question, is Washington a Southern city? Have they done Florida? I must have missed that one,


Entered at Thu Jan 4 22:18:35 CET 2018 from (63.92.242.201)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Oxford Southern music- what's left?

Peter - I believe, not certain, that Virginia and the Carolinas are all that's left. I don't know if they'll consider West Virginia and Oklahoma as Southern states for their purposes. Ae they Southern? Dead red if that counts.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 21:42:15 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You could spend many interesting hours comparing states. Tennessee with its two very different centres definitely punches well above its population size, as do Mississippi and Louisiana. You would expect New York, California and Illinois to be huge contenders on sheer size of population.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 21:37:29 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Raggy Levy

JQ: Playing it now. At the time (2016) he was one of the many artists I didn't know on the Georgia disc. I'd forgotten the track. A great compilation … James Brown, Larry Jon Wilson, Sharon Jones, Allmans, Otis Redding, Gram Parsons and … yes … Henry Mancini. That's how eclectic they are.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 20:52:19 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Lyle Lovett

Dunc, great post. I love Step Inside This House and almost everything else Lyle has done. He's also a great live performer with a great band.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 20:37:57 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.84)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Oxford

PV - The first song I heard by Jake Fussell was on an Oxford disc; he’s from Georgia so likely that one, a few years back. It was Raggy Levi from his first LP, very catchy and there's a number of live versions on YouTube. I thought he was ancient when I first heard it.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 20:04:13 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

An interesting thought brought about by this current conversation, that also ties to the discussion around JQs original mention of a week ago about soul music...On the subject of music(s) and influences on it (them)....... Everything in a writers or artist's life, is what ends up in the music. Some things will be the strongest, and it will vary from writer to writer. The various origins a writer has MAY be the the strongest,and birth/raising can be very strong in there, but where a writer goes, physically, geographically & musically , sure is gonna come into play too. Music itself knows no bounds, and it;s all over, and the mix is quite something. But geography, timing, exposures to WHOMS too, all that gets in there.

Dave Alvin for example. There's no separating Alvin from California....Yet his exposures in Downey and surrounding California were to multiple kinds of music, and even locally for him, witnessing and therefore studying at the feet of the great old blues artists. He had powerful exposure to the blues, right there at home as a kid. But also, country, rock.. ...Yet...California lives in Alvin;s writings and who he is.......


Entered at Thu Jan 4 19:49:08 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Just for the record, though associated with Texas, Ray Benson is a Phillydelphia Yid. He moved Asleep AT The Wheel to Texas in the 70s.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 19:41:33 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, Bill. I think you guys might have lost sight of Bob's point. Bob's statement was about the state that songwriters came from: "Amazing how many great songwriters come out of Texas. Probably more then any other state."

In any event, there is an exchange of information.

I dunno if Bob realizes he may be encouraging Texas to cecede, build a wall around the state.

Just an aside. In the storm restoration business, the biggest, most, and worst lowlife & criminal contractors came from two places: the state of Texas, and the general Chicago area,


Entered at Thu Jan 4 17:00:29 CET 2018 from (67.70.151.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Detroit minus Motown still leaves Fascination and Check-Mate, both of which released 45s by Paul London and the Capers / Kapers - both with Garth Hudson.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 16:22:47 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tennessee ran to a 2 CD set from Oxford American … I mean, it does have Memphis AND Nashville to contrast. There have been a few localized sets, but I'd say New Orleans generated the most "One city" sets on my shelves, I guess there's a coherent feel. Charlie Gillett's "Sounds of The City" series ran to five fine double CD sets … New York, New Orleans, Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis. All worth having. Then I guess the huge series of Motown box sets does Detroit forwards,backwards and sideways … but I do have a Detroit compilation somewhere with no Motown tracks.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 14:19:36 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete. Obviously, there's a wealth of talent in every state. I really thought Bob's statement was either just off hand, or he mighta been looking to get a conversation going. Cause Bob gotta know, the Five Boroughs birthed the mother lode.

Actually, it's a futile & pointless pursuit to start counting heads...& as sated, enormous talent is everywhere ...... my first thought reading the statement was Bob was just pulling our collective string :-)


Entered at Thu Jan 4 13:12:16 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: State by state

This year Oxford American did Kentucky, ranging from 1927 to 2017. I’ve missed some (you can’t buy it in the UK), but I have Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia. It’s an unmissable annual treat.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 13:03:35 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i was thinking along your lines. Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, and likely every other southern state, you could spend years. Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, probably Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama too, you could spend years on the songwriters.... Same for New york, Michigan, Massachusets, California, probably Illinois, Ohio... most sates is what I'm thinking... Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho, Alaska, Montana, an The Dakotas might be thinnish,,, but start thinking bout Oklahoma and there's a treasure chest full, Woody Guthrie and JJ Cale, Leon Russell just for starters....


Entered at Thu Jan 4 12:10:22 CET 2018 from (86.146.121.49)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Texas songs

I play Lyle Lovett and really like 'Step Inside This House', which took me into Townes Van Zandt and I bought a two CD set.

I think his songs are well crafted and thoughtful. I became intrigued by 'Snake Mountain Blues', where the cowboy's yellow headed wayward girl goes down to Dundee 'And Have Her A Time'. It's in the classic song writing genre of who's going to notice me when I'm dead, but where it is different is the pace of the song and also good harmonica playing and the guitar playing around the melody is brilliant. I always stopped what I was doing and listened to the song when it came on.

The fact that she went down to Dundee always intrigued me for obvious reasons.

So having some time in retirement (in between active babysitting), I was googling Texas maps. Dundee is now a very small place in Texas, but I know why she went down to Dundee. There was a hotel in Dundee related to the building of the railway. That's why she chose to visit Dundee with 'Mr Ten Dollar Man' - because of the presence of the hotel and what it had to offer.

I wondered if 'Mr Ten Dollar Man' is a Texan phrase to signify a big shot or was just thought up by Townes Van Zandt.

But be warned, I was once playing the CD when my daughter came in. 'That's really cheery music,' she said.

But I have also liked Western Swing for a long time. I'm a new convert to Asleep At The Wheel. They swing. The brilliant 'Roly Poly' is playing just now with lines such as Roly Poly, Eating Corn and Tatoes'. Great playing and singing.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 10:45:21 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: T for Texas

I treasure the Oxford American annual covermount discs with the music issue. They take a (Southern) state each year now. They're very eclectic discs. The concept works. Well, it does with the South. You might have a problem with some states, but all the Southern ones have more than enough stuff.


Entered at Thu Jan 4 00:19:05 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.55)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Texas

Hi Bob - You are so right about how much great music and great poetry set to music, has come from there. Recently I did a 2 hour show where I played only Texas music and left out a mountain of great stuff - my bad. I believe one could do a 2-hour weekly show with great, hand-picked, Texas music only and have 0 repeats, if that was the format. And the stories about the Texas artists would give any programmer loads of interesting stories to talk about.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 22:21:20 CET 2018 from (67.70.151.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: Interesting timing, as I was just thinking of you. I was stuck on hold, killing time by reading some magazine articles on artificial intelligence. One on autonomous cars said that eventually driver's licences will be as scarce as "doctorates in Latin or tugboat captaincies." I had no idea you knew Latin!


Entered at Wed Jan 3 21:52:32 CET 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Willin

Have you ever looked to see how many people have covered that gawd damn song. Many terribly. The best in my mind was Lowell George with "Little Feat".

In 76' 77' you cold walk in just about any bar in Vancouver and hear that song. The best around was a group I first met at the old American Hotel down on Main Street...pun intended. They were called "6 Cylinder" a few years later Lorne Burns the drummer played in my band, as did Danny Smith the lead guitar.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 20:36:50 CET 2018 from (67.70.151.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Speaking of MoI and the original LF, was Don Preston among the Leon Russell crowd that Levon gigged with in LA in '66 post Dylan?


Entered at Wed Jan 3 20:31:20 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: James McMurtry

JQ, this country could use a lot more radio shows playing McMurtry. He's always been a favorite of mine. Amazing how many great songwriters come out of Texas. Probably more then any other state.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 20:24:30 CET 2018 from (67.70.151.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Thanks for the education re "Willin'" guys. I've listened to five versions (3 Little Feat, 1 Seatrain, 1 Byrds) and can't decide between Seatrain and Sailin' Shoes. Seatrain wins on spirit, Sailin' Shoes on, oh, honesty. Interesting how the first LF version still has the scent of MoI in the vocal.

The links to none of the above, but to something I can't hear enough: "Biscuit's Boogie", with Richard Bell (soon of Full Tilt) on piano, Richard Newell on vocals and harp (soon to play on Electric Flag's reunion album), and Larry Atamanuik (soon to join Seatrain) on drums. Plus the great Doug Riley on organ, Rheal Lanthier and John Gibbard on guitars, and Roly Greenway on bass.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 19:14:49 CET 2018 from (67.70.151.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I would have placed "Me and Bobby McGee" in the #3 spot. That said, I can't recall witnessing anyone performing "Proud Mary" or "Bobby McGee" - and certainly not "Willin'" - and only a few times have I seen a group attempt "The Weight" - and almost all of those would have been a) the Band themselves, b) Levon with the Cates, or c) a Band, Levon or TLW tribute. I have, however, listened to veteran bar musicians complaining about having had to play "Mary" and "Bobby" all the time back in the day (i.e., the early '70s, before I started doing the rounds myself). But it was "Knock On Wood" that guys seemed to be the most sick of playing.

In my experience, "Knock On Wood" still gets played often (too often, IMO), and if a single Band song is on somebody's setlist, it's most likely going to be "The Shape I'm In".

Does anyone else hear CCR's "Lodi" as a sequel to "The Weight"? Or that "Willin'" has something to do with "Up On Cripple Creek"?


Entered at Wed Jan 3 18:32:56 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: MoI

I had a good Google. Others have wondered the same … did the Mothers ever play "Willin'". Almost certainly not by the comments.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 18:31:18 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jake Xerxes Fussell

Thanks for the suggestion. I've been playing it today. Excellent. I don't hear The Band at all though. A bit of Ry Cooder though, but in a way it reminds me more of late 60s British artists like Bert Jansch and John Renbourn.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 16:53:03 CET 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Willin'

Gregg Allmän covered it on his final album,Southern Blood.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 14:19:40 CET 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Willin'

Peter,

Thanks for the history lesson. I had no idea that it dated back to the MOI.

I wonder if a live version of that exists or if FZ just refused to play it at all.

joe


Entered at Wed Jan 3 12:43:02 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm Willing' ranks with The Weight and Proud Mary as songs every self-respecting bar band should know. I'd say they're the top three for me. The "Sailin' Shoes" version is my favourite too, but it took me a few years to get it familiar enough to surplant the Seatrain. Of course it is so often the first one you hear and it seems that was Seatrain.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 09:23:38 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Warped by the rain

Joe got me researching.

The first Little Feat album was released January 1971, recorded August-September 1970. That had their first version of Willin’ which has Ry Cooder guesting on guitar as Lowell George had injured his hand. The classic version, also the one I think is best, is from Sailin’ Shoes, released in May 1972.

The first Seatrain album is two words “Sea Train” and 1969. The second is listed as 1970 everywhere. According to Discogs it was “Canada 1970”, “US unknown” and “UK 1971”. The latter matches my memory. I definitely knew Mrs V when I bought it, and we met in May 1971. Is the US date correct? Billboard reviewed it in January 1971.

Whatever, they seem to have been at least equal first if not first. The song was known from Lowell George’s time in the Mothers of Invention apparently, November 1968 to May 1969, as Lowell later claimed Zappa fired him because the song was about dope and it was unsuitable for the Mothers (what with having a beginning, middle and end, perhaps!)

Ah, a bit more from Wiki:

Lowell George’s signature piece was first released on lesser known country great Johnny Darrell’s 1970 album California Stop Over. Darrell’s version is a crisp honky-tonk and may reflect George’s initial vision for the piece. The original Little Feat recording of “Willin’” features similar up-tempo Lowell George vocals over a sparse but high-spirited Ry Cooder slide guitar. Cooder was filling in on slide due to a hand injury George had sustained on the propeller of a model airplane. Little Feat re-recorded the more well known road-weary version of the song for their 1972 release.

So yes, the Seatrain Willin’ does re-date the Little Feat release


Entered at Wed Jan 3 07:10:09 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Another lawsuit against Spotify, 1.6 billion

There's a pile of em. What feels like 4 months ago or so, i got notification of one that might or might not mean something to me.. But, it will be another month or two til they're even set up for me to check if i was infringed up on or not. i check occasionally, and it;s always in the future...School for Fools i didn't license for digital streaming till the Johnnie record, when i licensed em both for streaming . But,apparently there's also the question of whether the licenses granted were adequate... the lawyers will be duking this out for a while, and apparently the idea is to get proper compensation.... I think it;s quite some time now, maybe 5 or 6 years, but there was a settlement on a class action lawsuit against XM Sirius, that redirected some funds my way. The funny thing is, the most royalties i had ever received were from Sirius and XM airplay. ..

Right now i'm leaning towards not licensing the next2 projects for streaming. I'll have to find out if it's possible to permit iTunes downloads but prevent iTunes streaming, iTunes match, any Apple stuff. Apparently Bandcamp has the highest quality downloads available, and no streaming.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 05:30:33 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, it's possible, but keep in mind, musicians only get to shows or to hang when they ain't working..... Gigs, recording sessions, always come first.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 04:22:59 CET 2018 from (24.114.70.165)

Posted by:

Bill M

It would make perfect sense for Andy Kulberg to have been the 'boss', as he was the only holdover from the original group (i.e., Blues Project) once Roy Blumenfeld left.

My guess is that Kulberg attended the Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour date in NYC, as did Band members - maybe to see Joe Cocker, maybe to see their old bandmate Sandy Konikoff drumming for Cocker, maybe to see Leon Russell and the other Oklahomans that Levon had played with years earlier in LA, or maybe to see the opening act, Ronnie Hawkins And Many Others (later known as Crowbar). Larry Atamanuik was Ronnie's drummer at the time, and wouldn't have failed to impress a bassist.


Entered at Wed Jan 3 00:43:12 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, that occurrence was in between Rick's death and Kulberg's in 02. I was living in St Louis, so I'm pretty sure it was sometime between early January and early May, 2001, when i was in NY.I'm not certain, but unless something reminds me of being there, i don't think i was in NYC during the winter of 2000.


Entered at Tue Jan 2 23:45:24 CET 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Seatrain

Peter,

I am not sure that Seatrain would have heard the Salin' Shoes version of Willin' if Allmusicdotcom's timeline is accurate. If they did, it would have been interesting to hear if that would have changed their version of the song.

I bought that album while in college because of the RS review. I just could not get into it - - not sure why. It reminds me how intensely personal music can be.

I hate to disagree with Mrs. V, but Little Feat's version sounds like a truck driver is singing the song and has been on the road for too many miles. Personal again.

joe


Entered at Tue Jan 2 22:13:30 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rick Hall

I was trying to set up an interview with Rick Hall a few weeks back; but his son said he was not well. I had no idea how sick he was. A true iconic figure in popular music and what a producer. R.I.P. Rick Hall.


Entered at Tue Jan 2 21:22:04 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod. Andy Kulberg was somewhat kinda close to Danko in stance, the way he stood onstage, even some sonic.... The resemblance, well....

I caught a good amount of Blues Project shows in the 90s & maybe the early 2000s in NYC, possibly some in the late 80s- if they were doing em, i was there. Well over a dozen. All in NYC in the Bottom Line. Some were Blues Project alone, some were The Blues Project opening for another act of Kooper's..

At one show i was standing at the bar, turn to my right, Elliott Randall was next to me. We were kibbizing, I mentioned to him that the way Kulberg stood on stage, even his build & face to a degree,& some of the sonics reminded me of Rick. Elliott smiled wide, & said -Yes,& Rick also played both play through an echoplex.


Entered at Tue Jan 2 20:47:25 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

There is a Dutch TV performance by Seatrain on YouTube that gives an idea of who sung what songs (mostly from Seatrain and MM). Baskin and Peter Rowan do all the leads. There's a few interviews on YT as well. Andy Kulberg comes across as the leader. A funky bass player as well.


Entered at Tue Jan 2 18:49:58 CET 2018 from (67.80.25.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rick Hall died.


Entered at Tue Jan 2 16:30:35 CET 2018 from (24.114.69.57)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rod: An interesting thought. I don't know who sings what on the Seatrain songs I know, but I don't recall anything sounding like Richard. Nevertheless, the success of the Band, with their rural / old-mannish vocals, made it acceptable for others (like Seatrain) to sing like that. Still, Seatrain must've recognised that they lacked a more traditional big voice or they wouldn't've gone after Luke Gibson. (You can find Luke and the Apostles on Youtube; I highly recommend the a-sides of their two 45s - "Been Burnt" from '66/'67 and "You Make Me High" from '70.)


Entered at Tue Jan 2 00:29:28 CET 2018 from (210.86.80.8)

Posted by:

Rod

I love that 2nd Seatrain album. The following two were a bit patchy but North Coast is a stand out. If The Band had have kicked Richard out of the group (as Robbie alluded to in his book) then Lloyd Baskin might have been an incredible replacement. From what I've read around the net I get the impression that he might be quite religous.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 22:24:53 CET 2018 from (1.43.212.33)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I am somewhat belatedly working my way through the 10 cd boot of the soundboard recordings of the 74 tour. The uneven mix throws up some interesting aspects of the songs. Definitely worth revisiting.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 21:29:56 CET 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Hey Bill, go for it! Happy New Year everybody!


Entered at Mon Jan 1 20:37:42 CET 2018 from (80.4.34.215)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Seatrain LP

It was indeed the 'Marblehead Messenger' LP to which I referred. It was recorded in Marblehead, Mass. and, many, many years later, we got to visit Marblehead itself very briefly. It was towards the end of a day. A space in its very small central parking lot was yielded up as we arrived. There was a group of musicians playing on the sea wall nearby. Though the nearest restaurant was unable to take us, a local advised somewhere a short walk away. We ate overlooking the rough and tumble of the sea. And we ended up chatting a shop owner with British connections. Despite my reaction to that particular Seatrain LP, I have fond memories of the place that 'inspired' it.

Yes, some planes can be remarkably noisy inside, particularly those originally developed for use by the military, such as the CASA C-212. On my first visit to Spain in the very early 1960s, the Spanish military were still flying aircraft that were, essentially, from the WWII era or earlier. I can quite clearly recall their equivalent of the Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter and of the Heinkel He 111 bomber! I even saw a Dornier Do 24 flying boat land in the harbour one evening. The reason I mention this is that I can also recall their Junkers Ju 52 three-engined transport planes, the type that the CASA C-212 was designed to replace. I've not flown in either but I imagine the Ju 52 was pretty noisy inside, so maybe the CASA C-212 didn't seem too bad to them.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 20:34:40 CET 2018 from (107.77.97.75)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: James McMurtry

Hi Bob - I posted here that I recently read that Cocktaw Bingo is our new national anthem. Plus I had just played it on the air seconds before I read your note. A sign??


Entered at Mon Jan 1 20:16:50 CET 2018 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: New James McMurtry Protest Song

James McMurtry has a new protest song called State Of The Union. McMurtry is responsible for the last great protest song, his 2005's heart wrenching masterpiece We Can't Make It Here Anymore. He's going on tour this month opening for Jason Isbell. Now that will be a great show.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 19:04:25 CET 2018 from (67.81.96.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, put some slide on it change a few words--willin to travel ten miles - you're Lowell George low on gas. I'


Entered at Mon Jan 1 16:01:48 CET 2018 from (24.114.49.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Willin'

John D: thanks for the link. I thing Lloyd's line (with your added word), "Will travel up to ten miles really", will make a dilly of an opening for my planned contribution to the Great American Songbook (which is mentioned yet again by Lloyd).

Lisa: I just sang that line to myself and I hear a new "Macarena" coming on.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 15:47:47 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lloyd Baskin

"Will travel up to 10 miles." Really.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 15:46:33 CET 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Seatrain & singer Lloyd Baskin

I admit that I ordered Marblehead to complete their catalog. I have to agree with Peter that the "Seatrain" album prior to Marblehead, I believe to be their best. I do want to say that Bloodshot Eyes and the cover of Watching The River Flow was the reason I purchased Watch a long time ago. Like to find out what happened to singer Lloyd Baskin. Always thought he had a Bandish sound to his voice. Whatever happened to Lloyd Baskin? The link might surprise you.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 12:31:58 CET 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Marblehead Messenger was the dull one. The middle "Seatrain" produced by George Martin remains a favourite, and Mrs V swears that their high-speed Willin' is better than either Little Feat studio version.

Ian, For a passenger plane and noise, it's hard to beat the Casa C-212 Aviocar, much used in Spanish internal flights. It was high wing, 20 odd seats, and if you got a seat right by the engine (as I did twice) you could neither hear anything nor see anything. One flight to La Coruna deafened me for a day, plus I could barely speak after trying to converse during the flight.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 03:22:59 CET 2018 from (80.4.34.215)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Happy New Year etc etc

While I've not been 'obvious' in recent months, I ahve been checking in from time to time and just wanted to wish all a "very Happy New Year!".

To pick a few recent themes;

I had a green card in the mid-1960s and this was indeed sufficient for one to be drafted (or so I was told at the time).

Like Peter, I found the Seatrain album I once owned 'a tad dull'. When circumstances required that I divest myself of some of my LPs, it was one of those that just had to go.

Someone, some time way back, mentioned having flown in a DHC-8 (now known as a Bombardier Dash 8). In the last 6 months, family circumstances have seen me make 12 flights to and from Scotland, all of them in this type of aircraft. Technically, these were the in the "Q" series, the 'Q' standing for 'quiet' apparently - they are not particulalrly. For ecologically-minded folk, a turboprop aircraft will use roughly 50% less fuel (plus or minus 10%) than a regional jet.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 02:41:00 CET 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: happy new year!

greeting Band fans! have we/are we/will we (depending on your time zone) be listening to that new year's eve concert from long ago? The Band rocking the Academy of Music? Garth's incredible Chest Fever intro? The best way to ring in the New Year! No no, I don't want to hang up my Rock 'N Roll shoes!


Entered at Mon Jan 1 01:28:24 CET 2018 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A distant voice from the near future.

Bill M: No flying cars, yet.


Entered at Mon Jan 1 00:09:24 CET 2018 from (24.114.49.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Fred. You too. As you've already spent time there, do you have any tips on what we might look out for?


Entered at Sun Dec 31 18:40:50 CET 2017 from (67.81.96.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, it's my year again. Rrrrrrrrrroof roof roof! That's Happy New Year all around!


Entered at Sun Dec 31 16:04:00 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Year of the Dog.

Wishing everyone all the best in 2018.


Entered at Sun Dec 31 15:11:04 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Last Jedi

Link to my film review of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, on the grounds that many of you will have seen it.


Entered at Sun Dec 31 11:32:08 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Draft to Vietnam

So how did Levon manage? He said he married a Canadian woman platonic friend to avoid the draft. He says “I became a Canadian landed immigrant and that fixed the draft issue.” But surely, even dual nationality was not a fix to the issue. A student at my university got drafted who had dual British & US nationality and had to return fast, and not go back. Or was the window for conscription quite narrow, so that once you’d passed it, you were OK? In which case, just being able to stay in Canada for a period would have been enough … but they were constantly crossing the border. Did the “Landed immigrant” count as “applying for Canadian citizenship”?

In the late 60s there were all sorts of stories running around UK universities about British guys who went over to do a year’s course, or a summer school and got served draft notices, though I don’t know if any were actually drafted. There must have been one or two to keep the rumours fuelled. In one of those major crossroads in life I was offered a place to do a research degree on Realism in the American novel at Tulane in New Orleans, or Hollywood & The Novel (my choice) at East Anglia. I’d seen a visiting professor from Tulane speak brilliantly on Realism (Frank Norris, Sinclair Lewis, Upton Sinclair etc) and was so impressed I applied. I chose East Anglia … Hollywood & The Novel was all my idea, and I never thought a university would accept it for a thesis, but they did. And in the UK you got a government grant, so you didn’t have to teach on the side to survive, or have to repay it. I recall rumours about the draft were a minor factor. In retrospect, it’s one of the huge “What if …?” moments in my life. I like New Orleans too.

The government grant plus an absolute refusal to enter the Vietnam War are why I feel a great debt to Harold Wilson. RIP!


Entered at Sun Dec 31 05:22:26 CET 2017 from (24.114.49.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

As if on cue, the following appeared three minutes ago in the book I'm reading, the newish Gordon lightfoot biography:

"I was able to work in the States on the basis of an H-1 visa, which we kept renewing. All you really have to do is get a work permit sorted. Get set up with the IRS down there and pay your taxes." Remember that Gord's manager from '64-'71 was Albert Grossman.


Entered at Sun Dec 31 03:13:35 CET 2017 from (24.114.49.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: my understanding is that the draft was arranged to be gameable by those who knew the rules - mostly the wealthy and well-connected. Exhibit A: President It and his deferrals. I believe that the stats show that African-Americans were far more likely to be drafted, and of those drafted, far more likely to find themselves in SE Asia.

A US-born friend of mine stayed in the US to finish his grade 12, and then university, when his parents were tranferred to Toronto for work reasons. Being a diligent scholar, he accessed the admirably public data on the draft and found that when you registered, you registered in a particular pool - of your choosing to some degree. And he found that nobody had ever been drafted from the Toronto pool, which consisted largely of the sons of Canada-based US diplomats and corporate execs. Naturally he registered there, and of course never heard from the draft board. He would certainly have dodged if he had heard, but that proved unnecessary.

But what interests me most at this point is what arrangements were made by Albert Grossman and other managers to keep their US-based Canadian clients out of the army. Some, I'm sure, we're totally under the radar. Others likely had a series of renewable short-term permits. Some, like Neil Young had nothing to worry about because of existing health conditions. But so little seems to have been written about it - Young's book tells his tale, but Robbie's is silent. As is David Clayton Thomas's. One of the Janis Joplin has her group dressing bassist Brad Campbell as a woman, makeup and all, so as to evade capture on tour at one point. I'm thinking this must have been the Kozmic Blues Band, where Brad was the only Canuck; in Full Tilt he was one of four - so again, what magic did Grossman perform? Hmm - maybe he registered everybody in Toronto?


Entered at Sun Dec 31 02:14:12 CET 2017 from (67.81.96.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sheesh Mike, if enough of you feel that way, ya think by now you Canuckis woulda stopped spelling things the British way. You can spell like us, and i promise you won;t have to bow to Twitler. One way or the other, we're gonna get rid of him. Hopefully without any noticeable blood shed. But he will go......

I do hate to say it, but a lot of Twitler's tactics are typical old primtive NYC methods. but not those of anyone of any acclaim or consequences. The small timers, that never got anywhere are the ones that would use his bullying and terrorist approaches. And they usually never got far, were always very limited in their respective corners. Many of em never get past square one, some get a little somewhere but never get real far. I've said it many times, but if he was born poor or middle class, & grew up with that mindset, Twitler woulda not been gale to get a janitors job here in NY.. But so much of his approach, the phrases, the mannerisms, even the syntax and phrasing, is very very familiar to NYers. As wild as his speech is, as weird & as discombobulated as it is, so much f it is still NYC. Alot of people here speak int hat broken way, he has elevated it further though, no one can compare to him in that area.


Entered at Sun Dec 31 00:15:39 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mike, they are British awards, not English ones. Note how proud Northern Ireland was of Van’s knighthood. Historically, this stuff did award political donors, time servers and civil servants, but it is largely being redirected to people of merit in the arts, sport and charities and the general population can suggest people who quietly help their communities.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 23:52:30 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Palace honors

With apologies to my Scottish friends, what typically British bullshit.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 23:05:32 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.75)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The draft

Bill M - I never knew that a green card resident could be drafted. They got me at 18 but I didn’t serve with anybody but Americans. I like the draft, as an equalizer, and perhaps all those rich GOP parents living in the burbs might not have been so gung-ho about the Iraq invasion if their darlings might have had to go -


Entered at Sat Dec 30 15:32:07 CET 2017 from (24.114.70.79)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno

Back to Blues Project / Seatrain: it occurs to me that Andy Kulberg must've had something of a soft spot for Toronto musicians of they day, as organist Peter Jermyn of Luke and the Apostles was offered Al Kooper's vacant spot in the '60s, and negotiations were entered into to recruit Luke (Gibson) as vocalist in the early '70s.

The Apostles were a known commodity in NY, and the original lineup recorded its only 45 there for Electra, produced by Paul Rothchild. Jermyn told me in the '70s that he wanted to do it but turned down the offer because he'd need a Green Card, which he saw as coming with an automatic draft notice. Luke may have had similar reservations, or maybe he was just sick of band politics.

Certainly the prospect of being drafted kept lots of talent in Canada - but certainly not all. I wonder how the band members managed it? I know of only one, a member of the Great Scots, an LA-based band of Nova Scotians, who was drafted and sent to Vietnam, which he survived. Dewey Martin, eventually of Buffalo Springfield, did his stint of duty, but that was in '61 or '62, a simpler time.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 10:30:40 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sir George Ivan Morrison

Thee you go. Photo of Sir Ivan and Prince Charles linked plus article in Belfast newspaper.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 10:28:33 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Knights of the round discs

Sir Barry BeeGee (Gibb) is the other this year. Again, well-deserved. These awards are getting better, with Sir Van last year. There are photos online. They really do wear morning suits and get tapped on the shoulders with a sword.

The obvious missing one is Keef, but commenting on Sir Mick's investiture he said he would accept an honour, but only if it was King.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 02:31:14 CET 2017 from (24.114.70.79)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: to be honest, much as I love the song "Marblehead Messenger", it and "13 Questions" would mke a dandy best-of 45. If "Willin'" fans demand an EP, I'm okay with that. Otherwise, disappointing as you say.

It's worth mentioning that Seatrain started out as the tail-end of the legendary Blues Project - i.e., bassist Andy Kulberg and drummer Roy Blumenfeld once Kooper and Katz had started BS&T and Kalb and Flanders had found other things to do. Larry Atamanuik replaced Blumenfeld for the two middle LPs and then joined Winter Consort.

Maybe Dunc woould know if Atamanuik is a Scottish name. I'd always assumed Ukrainian until I was in Edinburgh a couple years ago and saw a suburban bus heading to some three- or four-syllable place ending in "uik".

For what it's worth, the only records I know that Larry was on in his days in Toronto were two 45s by Dean Curtis and the Lively Set (ca '65), one 45 by the Luv-Lites (ca. '67) and the first two King Biscuit Boy albums ('70-'71; both had Richard Bell on piano, and the first had former Suede, John 'Johnny Rhythm' Rutter, on BG vocals and percussion). Come to think of it, the above-mentioned Dean Curtis moved on to take former Hawk Jerry Penfound in Quorum, and appeared on their second LP.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 01:40:50 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ringo

Congratulations to SIR Richard Starkey aka Ringo Starr. Nice to see it happen.


Entered at Sat Dec 30 00:29:32 CET 2017 from (67.81.96.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Too Friggin Funny

Bob, what do you think of the lyric to Find Yourslef? We agree that Ro Fino is a serious and wonderful; writer and performer. We agree that Find Yourself is great musically, and that GaGa gets our YaYAs on it. But, i gotta tell ya, as far as a song goes, i think Find Yourself is a horrible lyric. That lyric is just plain old rubbish. The musical performances are great, but would you expect Willie's kid to hire bums?

JQ, that was a killer show you saw. Sea Train and It's A Beautiful day were killer bands. I bet Tull was too, but they were never really much my taste. I enjoyed em when they'd hit the radio , but, tull wasn;t something i'd listen to at home or put in a player in my car.

Norm, it's good your spending time making music with friends and family.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 23:26:18 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Seatrain

Richard Greene was the violinist. Brilliant player


Entered at Fri Dec 29 23:14:07 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.75)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Seatrain

I saw Jethro Tull in 1971at the LA Forum and I believe that Seatrain was the opener, then It’s A Beautiful Day, then JT. Did Seatrain have a violinist too, like IABD? One or the other did Orange Blossom Special, faster and faster, which was a huge crowd pleaser. I dont know if I’d seen a Forum show (maybe Chicago) up to that point and the big, loud sound was so dam powerful and new to me then. Sort of life changing.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 23:02:03 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Detectorists

JQ: the third season has just finished in the UK. As it ended, they said a 4th was in the works.

On two recommendations … yours and his … it's on order.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 22:57:51 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.75)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Jake Fussell/The Detectorists

PV - Does your mate have good taste?

We’ve completely binged on The Detectorists, right through season 2 and then back through season one; which we had mostly forgotten, details wise. An aspect I like is the pub thing, one’s local, the center of social life, pub quiz, etc. I know in Ireland those country pubs have just about faded out now; reckon it’s the same story in England? We loved watching the series and I’ve read there’s a 3rd season in the works.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 18:56:47 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Lukas Nelson & Promise Of The Real

One of the best records I heard all year was by Lukas Nelson. Check out this great song Find Yourself with Lady Gaga on background vocals. What a groove.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 18:35:11 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John, you should try and see “Cilla”. Great portrayals of Cilla, George Martin, Brian Epstein, The Big Three, The Beatles, Kingsize Taylor, Rory Storm & The Hurricanes. It’s a brilliant mini-series.

Yes, Seatrain did two LPs with the same title. The second is the George Martin one. I haven’t heard Marblehead Messenger in years, but it always had a Cahoots / Chicago III reputation if you see what I mean. It was one I was looking forward to greatly at the time, but found a tad dull.

JQ: I was just in a shop and a friend told me his best album of 2017 was … Jake Xerxes Fussell’s: What in the Natural World too.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 18:20:39 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Rose in Paradise

Hello John D! Up until a couple weeks ago I still had roses blooming. A few days ago I was mowing my lawn. Now the mowing was not so much for the grass, but the gawd damn leaves off the cherry trees. I hate raking them so I mulch them with my mower.

So Happy New year to allayuz. Keep the faith and the music moving. I have kinda taken I hiatus from things electronic. Since retiring, (it's a year now!) I sort of haven't bothered with my cell phone, Face book or much of anything like this. I kinda lost interest.

I've gotten into playing music again. My youngest brother and I played together for years. We have picked up with some of our old friends that we played with for a long time and are starting up some gigs. Some of our life long fans are very enthusiastic for our music. Kinda feels right.

So keep safe and hope the new year is good to us all. Maybe we will be able to get by without the crazies who run some of these countries bringing war upon us. Remember WAR WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR????ABSOLUTELY NOTHING......say it again y'all.

Take a look on youtube, there is a video, the picture is just a highway rig and a guy on a motor bike, but the Allman Brothers playing, "Goin down that road feeling bad" super hot slide picking.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 18:20:40 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.192)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Elliott Randall in Seatrain

Elliott Randall was in Seatrain for a while too. there's a picture of em on his website. Photo # 6, taken 1969.some really great photos all around. there's one of the Planotones at the bitter end, the guy at the mic, in our right corner is Angel Rissoff, RIP.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 17:26:43 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jan

Double vision again Jan. By the way, Happy New Year Jan. It's probably warmer in Norway than it is here this week.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 17:25:30 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

jJohn D

Subject: Cilla

No Peter I have not seen the Cilla TV series. The George Martin Box is for those who are completists. I wouldn't pay for what they are asking for it now. I was fortunate enough back in the day to receive it as a promo. By the way, being the completist I am, I just ordered Marblehead Messenger. I have the one prior; which I always thought was there first CD; but in fact was there second. The first Seatrain CD is rather obscure. Yes Bill, I remember Larry well. I don't believe he made it to the "Watch" CD; which was not produced by Sir George.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 17:01:20 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.192)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

America been bery bery good to Cashmere Cat, Jan. :-). At Thanksgiving at my cousins, my cousin's friend's family was there. One daughter is a college student, and very involved in booking & running the shows at the college she attends. I asked her what she music she likes, and if she ever heard of Cashmere Cat. Her face lit up, and she exclaimed :"I love Cashmere Cat!."

A little later I asked her if she ever heard of Muddy Waters. She responded: "They run deep?"

I have two respectable witnesses.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 15:55:07 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Singing

Lisa,

I have sung in one form or another from childhood. I sang in school choirs since primary school. Of course being the son of a music teacher, this was sort of mandatory. Choir, Band or both. But singing for the hell of it was not out of question. I remember being 10 or 12, singing Simon and Garfunkel and Peter, Paul and Mary songs in harmony with my brother while sitting in the back of the boat as Dad motored us out to the fishing hole on the Rideau canal.

These days I sing in the band, mostly harmony and sing tenor (not my natural bass) in a Catholic church choir, which is a bit odd because I am not Catholic. (Long story, although my brother served as a Jewish Cantor for a few years and he's Episcopalian!)

While working in Midland, Michigan a few years ago I fell in with a group of ladies at an impromptu late night round-robin after the folk festival, managing to find empty harmonies somehow, mostly by just opening my mouth and not thinking too hard. After a few Folk Society sing-ins and a rehearsal or two, I even played a gig with them. My spotlight song was Turn Your Radio On.

And then there are the odd late nights when the acoustic and the songbooks come out and I do my quixotic interpretation of Beatles, folk, and who knows what else. I have notebooks with songs I transcribed from LPs and Cassettes up to 40 years ago.

Singing is one of the joys of life. I'm not really that good at it, but is sure is fun!


Entered at Fri Dec 29 15:47:32 CET 2017 from (24.114.50.55)

Posted by:

Bill M

What exactly is this "American Songbook" we hear of? Does it include "Choo Choo Chaboogie"? If not, why not?


Entered at Fri Dec 29 15:20:19 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Lisa . Not a singer, but I do a mean 'It's All Over Now' at the karaoke. Not so often now.

Related to Burt Bacharach, I saw two contrasting shows in the same concert hall.We have a wonderful concert hall in Glasgow.

Just a few years ago, I saw Burt himself play - a brilliant band/orchestra and three great young singers, one of whom was a really great guitarist. The soundtrack to our lives. Great song after great song. Brilliant musicianship.

About twenty years ago, I saw Dionne Warwick. She zomped through the Bacharach hits in a medley, then gave us the American song book. Certainly a really good singer, but when the hour was up, that was it, finished. No encore. A flat evening.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 15:10:06 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I enjoyed that very much, Jan … it's incredibly catchy too. Nice black PB as well!


Entered at Fri Dec 29 14:06:13 CET 2017 from (84.209.128.180)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Rolling Stone Magazine just published their «10 Best Music Videos of 2017» article. And I am *in* one of those videos, even «playing» bass there for about a second. I kid you not.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 13:38:34 CET 2017 from (24.114.50.55)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I don't see "Marblehead Message" as anything other than a brilliant choice that leaves "Willin'" and most other records in the shade. I loved it at first hearing, long before I learned that drummer Larry Atamanuik was a Torontonian who'd been hired from Ronnie Hawkins' band of the time. (Hawkins had taken Atamanuik, King Biscuit Boy and Scott Cushnie with him to record his first Atlantic LP Duanne Allman etc., though producer Tom Dowd chose to go with his regular studio drummer, Roger Hawkins.)


Entered at Fri Dec 29 09:32:28 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: George Martin

I assume you've seen the Cilla TV mini-series, John?

I hadn’t known there was a George Martin 6 CD set. Just read the track list on amazon. It’s astonishing in its range. It also goes for £168 – £30 a disc, as does the 1 disc Highlights version. These are 2001 releases and there’s just the one remaining new one for sale so I guess they can ask whatever they want.

The big surprise is how many children’s favourites on my in-car playlist for the grandkids are his … Nellie the Elephent, Robin Hood (Dick James version) Hole in The Ground, Right Said Fred, My Brother … plus the great Rolf Harris ones we no longer play.

What I hadn’t realized was that Sun Arise by Rolf Harris was released at the same time as Love Me Do. I just checked. Love Me Do had its week on the chart at #27, and the next week Sun Arise entered at #21 on its way to #2 in the chart at Christmas 1962. It must have overshadowed Love Me Do in his mind!

I’m pretty sure I have every track on Disc 3 – the 60s pop hits … on 45. The one I never realized was George Martin is Land of 1000 Dances by The Action … a recent acquisition in the Record Store Day 45s box of The Action. I also hadn’t realized he produced the Mahavishnu Orchestra.

The weird choice to me on the set is Seatrain’s Marblehead Messenger. He also produced their previous album, which is the more popular one with its brilliant fast take on “I’m Willing.”


Entered at Fri Dec 29 05:08:16 CET 2017 from (74.12.50.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie Robertson's interest seems to have saved a Toronto club

Here's a link to an article in the Thursday "Toronto Star". If you skip ahead to near the end you'll find the story of Robbie and his biographical documentary.


Entered at Fri Dec 29 03:43:47 CET 2017 from (67.80.27.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

:-) Lisa, i must point out, I'm no real singer. That's a public service announcement. I sing. I sing when i'm writing, and i sing plenty enough to work my songs up, record em, send in copyrights on em, 99.999% of the time way before anyone else ever hears the song..... And i sing enough to communicate to musicians and real vocalists. Unless it's an instrumental without lyrics, you really are gonna sing to write an actual formed song..

Separately, though I'm no singer there are times that i have a real specific way, timing & phrasing, that the song needs to be sung with to work out with the music, and there's been two times i had to show two different extraordinarily gifted for real and successful vocalists how to sing the song, the way in to the song. Though i had given em recordings of me singing em, i guess they didn;t do their homework or it didn't stick, & because there was only one way in, they couldn;t find the way in to the song...... ........

Sometimes i do scratch vocals when the band is tracking live. But i hire some of the greatest singers alive for real vocals.. There are three of the best on this next project ( i may still add two more songs & another vocalist, there's ten tracks now), and odds are unless anyone here heard of em through me, they never heard of em. But they are names in the industry. One of em, a woman, backed up Aretha Franklin, Celine Dion, many others. She's a good friend, a truly amazing singer, & leaves most of the singers getting hits & airplay in the dirt.. Same for the two guys on the project, truly amazing vocalists. There's one big name singer too.

What i like to sing besides my own stuff, - well, there's a lot. But i don't usually sing along with radio or records. and i never sing along at a show. Why people do that is beyond me, Didn;t they go to hear the vocalist?

. I'll sing songs when there's no music going, songs I'm working on or songs i really dig. But a song'll get in my head and i'll start singing. What songs? Well, could be anything, something, an occurrence, a sight, a sign, a thought might lead me , immediately, or down a line, to think of a song, and I'm off. Blue Sky ( Allmans) is one of those songs that can just hit me sometimes.....

Sometimes a song takes a root, and i might fall in to other ways to perform the song. The End is Not in Sight , by The Amazing Rhythm Aces is one of those.. i had a really different and cool way to perform the song, whole different arrangement on it, several years back. Many years ago i used to love to sing most of the New Riders songs off their first record, cause i learned em when i was learning guitar, same for a bunch of Poco songs.... "When i need good lovin I always .........".still pops out of my mouth occasionally.

I do have jaw stuff that interferes with decent singing. A dentist caused me to have TMJ in 1986 or 87. By 93 i was 95% out of the woods, one of the last true gnathologists , a 85 or 86 year old man dentist that had been working on me for two years. But he retired suddenly, his younger partner ( who was kind of a friend, & coincidentally was the dentist for Donald, Amy, & Levon too, down here in the city) never completed the process fully. But, for a good while i was right enough and I was able to enjoy singing almost decently.... but over time things starting reversing some, enough to interfere with any kinda real singing


Entered at Fri Dec 29 03:38:47 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: George Martin

Peter got me listening to Cilla Black again. From there my wife gave me the Blu-ray video of George Martin called Produced By George Martin that came out in 2012. I saw it once on PBS and found it both entertaining and informative. That leads me to a CD that got delivered today, Matt Monro, The George Martin Years. All things Sir George this Christmas. And oh yes began listening to the George Martin 6 CD box set again. Peter Sellers speaking A Hard Day's Night is worth the price of admission. Sir George. A brilliant man; who was also a musician, and an arranger.


Entered at Thu Dec 28 22:47:00 CET 2017 from (24.114.50.55)

Posted by:

Bill M

Good question Lisa. For me, it's not types but specific songs - and also I don't belt, I murmur along or whine along when it's a high-voice chorus. "Khenna Ghalat Ghalat To Chuupana Sahi Sahi" (sp?) by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, "God" by John Lennon, "The Weight" and "The Stones I Throw" by our guys ... and no doubt a small handful of others.


Entered at Thu Dec 28 21:25:14 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I should add, the songs you like to sing aren't necessarily the songs you like to listen to. They can be completely different categories - just songs that suit your voice, that you really get into singing.


Entered at Thu Dec 28 20:39:32 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Singing

After Peter's mention of Cilla Black I listened to a number of different versions of Anyone Who Had A Heart, and it got me thinking ...

When I was a kid my parents had some great opera recordings, so I fell in love with opera at an early age, and my first ambition in life was to be an opera singer. Didn't happen, of course, but I have always loved to sing. And Burt Bacharach's songs are just a blast, you can really let go. I had a hard time shutting up and listening to Sheridan Smith, Cilla, et al - just wanted to belt away at top voice.

So I was wondering, anybody else here just love to sing? I know Jeff and Norm are pros, but what about the rest of you? And what kind of songs do you like to sing?


Entered at Thu Dec 28 02:57:27 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Can't call some of em Ruskies no more......Quite a while now, anyone not from Russia proper bristles if you call em Russians. They're adamantly Ukranians, Georgians. Moldovians, Estonians, Azerbaijans, Armenians, Kyrgystanians, etc etc...There's a bunch....they get rather ruffled about it.......... But, most of em talk to me in russian.. My responses vary. I have told one or two not to tamper with our elections no more.


Entered at Thu Dec 28 02:26:50 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Jeff, Ruskies! Watch ‘em!


Entered at Thu Dec 28 01:11:50 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, in the last decade to two we got loads of people from Kazakhstan & Uzbekistan. Eurasians. They all speak Russian.



Entered at Wed Dec 27 22:53:39 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Jeff, probably so. A lot of them live in Argentina apparently. Don’t know what that signifies.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 22:00:09 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike.. Kiszkan sounds like the name of a country that a lot of the people in my neighborhood might be from.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 18:35:35 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Little-known facts

Johnny Bower was born John Kiszkan. (Not sure why I convey this other than I hadn’t known.)

Season’s greetings to everyone, espy the old BFB gang.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 18:10:09 CET 2017 from (24.114.55.145)

Posted by:

Bill M

It should not go unmentioned that Toronto Maple Leafs hockey great, goalie Johnny Bower, died on Boxing Day. Not only did he do well in front of the net, he also did well on the local music charts, scoring big with "Honky, The Christmas Goose" in '65 (or was it '66?) It was on Capitol records of Canada, a label that was awash in cash at the time from its ownership of basically the entire British invasion of Canada, aside from the Stones. So they had money for novelty records - the Bower one, a "Get Smart" spoof by the Smart Set (really the Five Man Electrical Band) and a wondrous Dylan parody, "Like A Dribbling Fram" by Race Marbles (really Garry Ferrier, a CHUM dj who'd also written comedy with a very young Lorne Michaels and eventually moved to LA to ply that trade, with some success).


Entered at Wed Dec 27 17:34:53 CET 2017 from (24.114.55.145)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I know exactly what you mean. Also, a nice write-up on the "Crossing the Great Divide" by Pat B can be found in the Bootleg subsection of this site's discography. As you already have it, it should be a nice get-reacquainted session for you.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 17:01:00 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: RoseAnn

Thanks, Al. Perhaps Bob F could alert us when the EP becomes available.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 15:05:50 CET 2017 from (86.175.225.210)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Seasons Greetings

Merry Chrimbo and Happy New Year to all fellow Bandites.

PS. I've been kindly blessed with a sneak preview of RoseAnn's forthcoming 5 track EP.

Fuckinghell we are all in for a rare treat is all I'll say.

:-0)

PPS Cheers for heads up on that programme Dunc.

PPS Cheers Pete for all your reviews. Immense mate.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 27 14:00:29 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Wayfaring Stranger

Peter, Roger, Al and Norbert - the BBC Scotland series, Wayfaring Stranger is on BBC iplayer just now for Xmas period. (3 episodes)

The influence of the music of the old world on the new world. Interesting and some really good performances.

I wish my American and Canadian friends could see it.

Black Jack Davy playing just now with Bob, now Archie Fisher showing where it came from, The Three gypsies.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 13:44:48 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Bill M. How do you know when you own too much music? Just found the album; within my Band collection. Thanks for the reminder. Time for a Listen.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 13:39:29 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Bill M. Where would you find "Crossing The Great Divide?" Can't find it on the internet so far.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 11:32:14 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Merry Xmas, Norbert. Enjoyed your post.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 11:07:08 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Nothing like constructive criticism, Peter.


Entered at Wed Dec 27 09:24:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Christmas Listening

As usual this year's favourite Christmas background CD was a budget one from 1986 issued by the W.H. Smith store, basically carols but with trumpets as well as organ. We have been playing it for 30 years and no other carols record touches it. "W.H. Smith" as a record label only had a few releases.

Then yesterday I put on Ben Keith's "Seven Gates" produced by Neil Young … Christmas music to pedal steel on 'repeat'. I thought it an inspired choice as the background to a large family party, until halfway through the second playing, Mrs V said "Can you please take that muzak crap off. It's driving me mad!" and I saw others nodding in agreement. Oh dear. Back to Phil Spector again then. On reflection, "Seven Gates"is the closest Neil Young ever got to muzak.


Entered at Tue Dec 26 14:33:42 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: A Christmas surprise/ Norbert

For nearly twenty years ago we were wandering on the French mountains. I don't remember if it was Christmas or New Year. Cellular phones were not in every ones pockets back then. We had one from the proud German make Siemens. Ms NWC wanted to make a call to some relative but connected by insidence to Norbert instead. Norbert's mother answered... There were some confusion first but it went just allright!

At some point during the Christmas/New Years dinner after a few glasses one of us always asks: "Do you remember when we...?" "Yes!"

What a warm moment in one's life which happens only once.


Entered at Tue Dec 26 14:15:13 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Christmas

If our old true friend NORBERT so why not me...

It is really an anti-climax here for us. The Swedish nazi-site has announced J. S. Bach's Christmas Oratory as the music of the week. Wagner I could accept but Bach? As always Bach is our Christmas music at home (beside Christmas Carols sung by King's College Choir). Either 1.) Swedish nazis have become northwestcoasterians or 2.) I have become a nazi. I prefer nr 1.

There are (semi)serius thoughts of becoming Americans again. Ms NWC's ancestors were American citicens and it is possible for those people to be Americans. Maybe I, as a spouse, can be an American too. If Melania can, why not me? I dream of eating hot dogs in Brooklyn, growing potatoes in Idaho, driving a Porsche as a queer in Frisco.

Onnellista Uutta Vuotta


Entered at Tue Dec 26 09:15:50 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hitchcock

A few years ago, the UK had a series of DVDs in uniform cases covering virtually all of Hitchcock, Regrettably, I only bought about four, but Rear Window was one. It's great to re-visit classics. On the plane from the USA , having watched The Secret Scripture again, everything new seemed to be either kids or superhero, but nestling in there was The Maltese Falcon which I'd rate as the best film I've seen on a plane since I watched Casablanca back in the days when they had one film on a big screen at the end of the cabin.


Entered at Tue Dec 26 03:48:36 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hitchcock

TCM - Turner Classic Movies - just began a 24 hour Hitchcock marathon! Right now it’s Rear Window to be followed by North by Northwest and then it looks like all the best. Strangers on a Train tomorrow morning! Company’s gone and we’re settling in for the night: 1 strong coffee, popcorn, Oregon Pinot Noir, etc.


Entered at Tue Dec 26 02:03:20 CET 2017 from (74.12.50.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

Merry Christmas, especially those celebrating it. Nice of you to check in Glenn T - and also Norbert with your typically nice story.

JQ: I agree about "Time Has Come Today" - Awesome song, especially when they come back in after the weirdness. Their drummer, Brian Keenan, was a peer of our guys on the NY/NJ scene in the mid '60s, and his group at the time (I forget the name) released a 45 on ATCO at about the same time as the Hawks did. Post Chambers Brothers, he was in Genya Raven and Baby, who recorded an awesome cover of "Flying" (the one that Long John Baldry a bit later).

Dunc: When you watched "Yonge Street Rock and Roll Stories", you likely noticed that Jon and Lee and the Checkmates were big news in Toronto. Their bassist, Peter Hodgson, was also in Genya Raven and Baby.

Peter V: A great R&B cover of "Tennessee Waltz" was released in '63 by Frank Motley and the Motley Crew featuring Curley Bridges.

There was no vinyl under the tree this morning, but there were four CDS - a Best of Otis (no "Tennessee Waltz", I'm afraid) and a three-CD Hawks/Band bootleg, "Crossing The Great Divide". Some great new (to me) early stuff.



Entered at Mon Dec 25 19:54:11 CET 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: HO HO HO!

Merry Christmas to all The Band fans. Many thanks to all those who are regular (and infrequent) posters, and to Jan for keeping this guestbook going. Peace, love, joy to all!


Entered at Mon Dec 25 16:43:05 CET 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The Nehterlands

Yesterday, Christmas Eve and already in the dusk, our village postman rushed by to deliver an “over looked” envelope. In the door I noticed the cold wind from up north, a forerunner of heavy snow fall.

I sat down in the easy chair in front of the fire place, poured some more wine and turned the envelope a few times around in wonder.

I opened the envelope, what could it be?

….It was a Band CD; ….. a closer look thought me that this CD once belonged to me, a long time ago. ….

Staring into the fire I traveled back to the NY City, Christmas Eve 2003, …. .

………waiting for my plane at JFK, I happen to sit next to fellow waiting man. He’d got a one-way ticket for the homeless to New Zealand. He was a nice guy, we chatted briefly and already I had to go so I said goodbye and wished him the best of luck. Just before checking in I realized this man could use The Band and I made a fast return and handed him the Band CD I carried with me. It already had my name on it and I apologized for that. That was what I could remember about this CD.

While opening the CD cover yesterday evening, a little note from my homeless friend dropped out and I began to read it …..

Someday in New Zealand he got a lift from a man, it was a long ride from almost a day. At some point the man in the car even paid dinner for the homeless man. At the end of that ride the homeless man gave the driver the Band CD to show his gratitude and also that CD was almost the only thing he had to give.

The man in the big car drove away, but stopped after a few hundred feet, he was moved by the gift from the homeless man, reversed and drove back up to the homeless man and asked him if he had a place to stay for the night. The homeless man said he did not have and gladly accepted the offer from the driver that he could stay for the night with his family.

To make a long story short, the driver had his own company, the two men became friends, the homeless guy started working for that firm from the driver. He man grabbed this chance with both hands and worked his way up. Later he married the only daughter of the driver. Last year the driver had died leaving his daughter and son in law the firm. Recently, going through the drivers stuff, my friend had found The Band CD again….that was what he had written me.

I thought about his luck …. does it take so little to get lucky? ….. I walked outside, to close the window blinds, it was snowing ….. I looking at our beautiful house, the roof covered with a thick white blanket now, I realized that I have been lucky too…. I also got a Band CD from someone long ago, and also one or two people have given me a chance someday …. maybe now is a just the right time to be thankful and think about them who are not so lucky.

Dinner time,

Merry Christmas to you all.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 13:12:34 CET 2017 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Merry Christmas one and all.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 11:31:03 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rolling on the river

Link to Solomon Burke doing a live version of Proud Mary in 2009. A lot of fun.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 10:02:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Country Got Soul

JQ: The Dectectorists … I watched a new episode a few days ago, the last of Series 3. They announced a Series 4 for next year at the end.

I agree about Toby Jones. I haven’t seen him on stage, and it’s 6 years since he did live theatre. Inspired casting for “Dad’s Army” was Toby as Captain Mainwaring, and Bill Nighy as Sergeant Wilson. Pity the sscript wasn’t as good as the cast.

Country Soul has its own section on my shelves. The Kent Country Got Soul series of compilations, the Country Funk series, the Dirty Laundry – the Soul of Black Country, and its sequel. I love that stuff and Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham are involved in a lot of it.

The Band, Levon & The Hawks and Levon Helm solo did a lot of stuff that would fit the category. Motown covers … Lovin’ You Is Sweeter Than Ever, Baby Don’t Do It, plus He Don’t Love You, Holy Cow. Lots of Levon solo. Levon fits especially because of his accent. Tony Joe White, some vocal Link Wray, Larry Jon Wilson are great. Then the black guys doing country songs … try Otis Redding on Tennessee Waltz, Joe Tex on King Of The Road. I'd start any compilation with Solomon Burke doing Proud Mary.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 09:19:46 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Detectorists

JQ: I've heard that there is a third season (this year). I've only seen seasons 1 & 2. I guess I'm waiting for the third season to magically appear on my computer like the previous two did. ; )

It's a nice change of pace from most TV fare. I really liked the two seasons I watched. Fingers crossed for the third one.

I put Toby Jones in the category of a select few (of actors) who are good in anything they are cast in --- even if the movie/TV show is a clunker.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 05:22:40 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Just pointing out the facts. There are such things. And - If you refer to people's statements, getting it right is worthwhile.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 05:04:45 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: screwing up the conversation?

it's just a conversation, some true & false impressions and questions for all the folks here i can learn something from. so, am i on your shit list now? it's been well attended by a lot of contributors here through the years, some stay and some move on, just not worth the imperial agro, etc


Entered at Mon Dec 25 04:28:25 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ. then it must follow that you also only think of blues as coming from the deep south. ............Your statement:" Of course you guys are correct about the wide and international spread of soul music." You're doing a good job of screwing up the conversation too. I sure ain't talking about the wide and international spread of soul music. I'm saying the early soul music that came out of other places is authentic early soul.....And the early soul music happened in many places at the same time, especially considering the true sources influenced musicians and writers in and from many places... But if you want to talk about authenticity and geography, the early Memphis soul that Steve Cropper was so instrumental in, as a writer, player, arranger, maybe sometimes producer, well, Cropper was from Missouri.

BTW, Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals didn't open till 1959... & Muscle Shoals Sound Studios didn't open till 69.... Remember soul music was already happening many places.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 03:09:23 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.51)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Country Soul and The Detectorists

Jeff and PV - Of course you guys are correct about the wide and international spread of soul music. I was thinking about the definition and epicenter of those styles. I think the integrated aspect of Country Soul is unique, where southern white guys seem to use more of their original voice rather trying to mimic a black voice. Consider Charlie Rich and Dan Penn as examples.

Jeff, you mentioned the Chambers Bros and I recall that their integrated group pleased a lot of fans back then. I loved Time and I think there was also a long version that we heard sometimes, and always looked forward to, on AM; which was the only radio we had then.

The Detectorists: PV - I watched the season that was available (are there more coming?) and thoroughly enjoyed it. Do you think that Toby Jones has entered the group of English actors who are worth watching for their performance, stand alone? I think he has. Is he active on the stage as well?


Entered at Mon Dec 25 01:20:27 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, Syl Johnson, now in his 80s, is one of the proponents of Chicago soul. As of a few years ago he was still performing. He must ne ib his 80s. His brother, Jimmy Johnson is a blues player,s still performs. they were originslly from Arkansas .

Sugar Pie DeSanto is still performing once in a while in San fransisco.

Rescue Me was written by Oliver Sain, in St Louis. He produced Fontella Bass &Bobby McClure, a great St Louis singer who died young. The band was originally the Oliver s\Sain Soul Revue.... Before that Sain was Litle Milton's bandleader, they were based in StLouis. Soul music comes form everywhere.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 00:46:39 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sweet Soul Music

Tamla Motown definitely gets included in UK thoughts as “soul.” Though someone said Motown is about teen love, and Stax / Volt / Atlantic about adult love. Also, if you listen to any of those below, there’s as much "soul" as Stax / Volt / Atlantic.

Ain’t Too Proud To Beg – The Temptations

Don’t Look Back – The Temptations

Reach Out I’ll Be There – Four Tops

I Can’t Help Myself – Four Tops

You Keep Me Hangin’ On – Supremes

Going To A Go Go – Miracles

Tears of A Clown – Smokey Robinson

Uptight – Stevie Wonder

I Heard It Through The Grapevine – Marvin Gaye

Baby Don’t Do It – Marvin Gaye

War – Edwin Starr

That was just random. Discos and UK soul bands would have mixed them up happily with Memphis stuff, and Chicago stuff from The Impressions, Curtis Mayfield solo, Major Lance, and from the Chess label for Rescue Me by Fontella Bass, Who’s Cheatin’ Who by Little Milton, Soulful Dress by Sugar Pie DeSanto. And New Orleans for Robert Parker and Lee Dorsey.

I have many playlists of soul, and as discos did in the 60s, I’ll add in All or Nothing (Small Faces), Keep On Running (Spencer Davis), Let’s Hang On – Four Seasons, Out of Time – Chris Farlowe, Got To Get You Into My Life – Cliff Bennett. Those white records slid easily into soul playlists. As did Geno Washington & Jimmy James … black artists working in Britain.


Entered at Mon Dec 25 00:33:14 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Happy Christmas

LINK is to a YouTube for The Felice Brothers Christmas song from last year, "Country Ham." Have a good listen to the words. Enjoy the day!


Entered at Sun Dec 24 22:56:20 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ, like any music, soul music can & did come from any place. the Isley Brothers came from Ohio. a whole lot soul music came outta Ohio, Philly,............the chambers Brothers came from L.A.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 21:31:37 CET 2017 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: generational tastes

PV - I recall, at some point in the 80's, a girl that worked for me, 1 generation removed, referred to "early" Wham as to what I should be listening to. Is Motown from the 60's considered soul music? I think of soul as strictly from Memphis and Muscle Shoals, that general area - Country Soul too, my all time favorite category.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 16:32:17 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.163)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks and Merry Xmas

I'm working through the Beatles' albums just now - a few plays for each over the holiday. Reminds me of primary school to the youth club to dances. Just done Beatles For Sale, now Magical Mystery Tour.

Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year, Eveybody.

Thanks for your posts. I value your contributions.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 15:29:14 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Seasonal Listening

I don't mean Wham & Slade …

Fred: Adjusting our listening to the season? I've never thought about that, but it's a point I'm going to give some thought too. Funny, dark Autumn days make me think of the Church Youth Club as an early teen … and therefore early 60s chart pop songs. Reggae is summer. Hmm …


Entered at Sun Dec 24 14:32:36 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Pretty in Punk

Peter: I find that it is a seasonal thing, listening to those mentioned previously and foregoing all else. It seems I listen to The Band, Springsteen and Nick Lowe moreso in autumn compared to the rest of the year. Summer seems to be the time of 60s/70s R&B and rock/pop and Chuck Berry. Ska in the spring.

Then there's stuff I listen to primarily during the day or at night.

It gets too complicated at times. : )

Jeff: sometimes "honourable", sometimes not. All depends. Different folks, different viewpoints. ; )


Entered at Sun Dec 24 14:04:43 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

XTX are a long way from punk for most of their output. The Police? Andy Somers (original name) was one I used to watch in Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band 13 or 14 years before The Police, playing R&B and soul. Then he changed the spelling from Somers to Summers and got a punk haircut.

Anyway enjoy it Fred. Nothing more pleasurable than immersing oneself in the music of one’s heyday. As I do daily with 60s soul.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 13:30:32 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff

What do i know Fred? The name The Clash was punk enough to bring on that delusion....Back to Honorable Fred - San.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 09:28:26 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Punk-tured

I always felt the Clash were not a punk band (although they did start out that way). A (sort of) late 70s English version of The Band's Americana.

And XTC crafted so much un-punk-like music.

As for me: the punk costume never really held any appeal. Nor the obligatory sneering at life. Also I valued my long(ish) hair back in the day. : )

I forgot to add Joe Jackson to that list of recent listening. Ooops!


Entered at Sun Dec 24 05:26:22 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred! Till now, if anyone ever called you a punk, i woulda defended your honor. But! You're a punk!


Entered at Sun Dec 24 05:20:24 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

It's December, early winter, so that means my musical listening activities are in time-travel mode (back to my teens and early 20s): focusing on XTC, The Clash, some Jam and The Police (first two albums).

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to one and all.


Entered at Sun Dec 24 00:45:20 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Best of 2017 - Screen

Done theatre and music. This year SCREEN gets its own section … my choices of films and TV from 2017. Please add yours / comment!


Entered at Sat Dec 23 03:49:45 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.247)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Merry Christmas?

That's a great photo of young Rick! Thanks Terry & Jan.

Assuming that Twitler hasn't canceled it in other countries, Merry Christmas to All of you who celebrate it.


Entered at Sat Dec 23 00:06:11 CET 2017 from (84.209.128.180)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Rick Danko, 11 years old, school photo posted by brother Terry Danko on FB.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 21:10:48 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I love that Cilla Black sequence. I was told that right into the early 70s, George Martin reserved Cilla Black sessions for the cream of session guys. John Wetton was one of them.

I would be remiss as a record collector nerd and anorak, if I failed to point out that the record you see spinning in the film has the yellow Parlophone logo, so is the EP, not the single.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 20:46:55 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Sheridan Smith seems to be one of those hugely talented people who excels in everything. I loved her Cilla, and agree with Peter about her singing - she's amazing.

Merry Christmas everybody, best wishes to all you special people!


Entered at Fri Dec 22 20:30:17 CET 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Hillman, Buckingham & McVie

Peter, I agree that Red Sun is the strongest track. RS selected In My World - - I didn't agree. joe


Entered at Fri Dec 22 18:12:43 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hillman, Buckingham & McVie

Now that would be a fine band … Thanks for the reminder, Joe. I had Chris Hillman’s “Here She Comes Again” in my “2017” Playlist from the UNCUT covermount disc. I meant to buy the album, and forgot about it.

I also tend to more back catalogue albums than new. The Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie album had some heavy rotation in the car and “Red Sun’ nearly got into my ten favourite tracks. The thing is, I prefer the tracks where Christine McVie is the lead vocal.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 17:42:44 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sheridan

Dunc mentions Gavin & Stacey, where Sheridan Smith plays the sister. As I said, she's a good choice for #11. Link is to her as Cilla Black, from the TV mini-series "Cilla", I linked this months ago, or even years ago.

She re-does Anyone Who Had A Heart on her new album. As well as City of Stars from La La Land, Crazy and Superstar.

As I've mentioned we spent a happy half hour with "Anyone Who Had A Heart" comparing Sheridan Smith from "Cilla", Cilla Black's version, Dionne Warwick's version and Sheridan Smith's new version. We decided Sheridan from the "Cilla" TV series was the best, perfectly replicating George Martin's arrangement. Then came her 2017 version, then Cilla Black with Dionne Warwick a long way behind. Cilla Black had covered it but brought an uninhibited youthful passion to the song that renders the original Dionne looking cold. George Martin improve the arrangement too. Burt Bacharach said years ago his favourite was the rawer Cilla Black version. While Sheridan retains Cilla's passion, she is actually a more controlled singer.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 17:34:57 CET 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Best of 2017

Well, I went back thru my 2017 purchases and out of the 68 records acquired, 52 were catalog albums (Peter Green and early FM, Paul Butterfield, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt, the Rolling Stones, Steely Dan, The Cate Brothers, Tom Petty, Gregg Allman and others) Out of the 15 current records I Purchased in 2017, I would characterize them as follows:

1. Records I would listen to on a regular basis.

Ray Davies - Americana

Chris Hillman - Bidin' My Time

Gregg Allman - Southern Blood

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie

Stanton Moore - With You in Mind

The John Sally Ride

2. Records I would occasionally listen to.

Trombone Shorty - Parking Lot Symphony

Van Morrison - Roll with the Punches

Jason Isbell - The Nashville Sound

Shalby Lynne and Allison Moorer - Not Dark Yet

3. The remaining 5 will be donated to my local library.

On the re-issue front, I have enjoyed the re-mixed Sgt Peppers - a revelation to me. Also, On Air, by the Rolling Stones and the Jesse Ed Davis Anthology.

Have a great holiday everyone. Joe


Entered at Fri Dec 22 17:20:26 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Josienne Clarke and Ben Walker

As they will be unfamiliar, let's add a link from the BBC Folk Awards 2015, with traditional English folk. Their current album is originals. She has that pure voice.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 17:16:37 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Americana

JQ: I had a discussion on Ray Davies' "Americana" last week in a friend's record store. He was playing it and I said, 'Oh, you like it too.'

'No, not at all,' he said, 'I thought it was utter crap the first time through a few weeks ago, and because I like Ray Davies, I wanted to make sure.'

It is a "Marmite" album apparently … love it or hate it. He concluded that he agreed with his first impression. I like Ray's sense of irony and the title track is ironic, but then the spoken voice bits get annoying.

OK, if I take that one out there were three contenders for #11. "Sheridan" by Sheridan Smith (probably a bit MoR for many here); "Playing With Fire" by Jennifer Nettles, technically last year, but it didn't appear in UK shops. And "overnight" by Josienne Clarke and Ben Walker - very folky and probably hard to find. I bought it at the gig.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 10:55:50 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.163)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Bob F. That unfinished line should read that the article related to the music industry was interesting, but sad.

Wish I had been there, Jeff.

Ok Peter, that's my next four.

JQ. Coincidentally, just finished watching the boxed set of Gavin and Stacey last night. Rob Brydon is brilliant as Uncle Bryn. Really enjoyed series. I don't know if you saw it in the States,JQ, but if you didn't look up Rob Brydon doing his small man in a box impression.

Away to small ones' xmas carnival today.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 06:10:18 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.16)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Trip to Spain

Sorry, they’re all Michael Winterbottom - I got confused with Stephen Frears.


Entered at Fri Dec 22 03:59:22 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.16)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Trip to Spain

I just watched this, the 3rd of the Trip movies with Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan. These deals really hit my comedy sweet spot. It’s the same theme as the first two: fancy food, great beauty shots - land and cityscapes - funny impersonations and riffs on Philomena, Coogan’s success, Don Quixote and the Inquisition. A new director this time - Winterbottom, and I think it’s better than the Italy one. On Netflix.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 23:40:23 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.16)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 2017

I didn’t listen to much new stuff this year but my favorite is Jake Xerxes Fussell’s: What in the Natural World. Uncut had it at #44 which he was really happy with. I tried hard to like Ray Davies’ Americana but must admit I found it to be rubbish. Apologies PV; I’m digging into the rest of your list and trust your taste and I’m rarely disappointed -


Entered at Thu Dec 21 22:10:28 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon HydePark

Dunc, you're getting old favourites with a good band. As far as new material, that's Jimmy Cliff's Vietnam plus Jimmy duets on Mother & Child Reunion. It's not "new light through old windows" really, but a very good series of versions of what we know.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 22:08:57 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.74)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, i think that CSNY recording is from the show with The Band, Tom Scott & the LA Express, & Joni Mitchell. Maybe The Beach Boys too. I was there with 5 of my friends. It was a mob scene. It was an all day afair, so we schlepped coolers of food & beverages on the train, then on the Long Island Rail Road, then through the mobs. The sound was pretty poor.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 18:49:36 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Gregg Allman - Song for Adam

Peter & Dunc, great lists. I really like the Gregg Allman record. Check out this great video for Song For Adam.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 18:37:33 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.163)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

These are the albums I bought in 2017, which I play the most. Nothing really new.

CSNY Roosevelt Raceway, Westbury, NY Sept 1974.

Steely Dan -Aja

Steely Dan - Can't Buy A Thrill

Steely Dan - Gaucho - (almost saw them, but they cancelled)

Jesse Winchester - Humour Me (great New Grass Revival album)

JJ Cale Okie

JJ Cale Grasshopper (had them on vinyl, had a collection on CD, but missed them)

Tracy Chapman Our Bright Future (thought I should get something more of her in addition to her greatest hits)

Asleep At The Wheel - love that Texan swing. The singer is a really good singer.

Love Affair - Greatest Hits (great pop)

Paul Simon - Songs From The Capeman (That's Me Complete Now)

Neil Young - Live At The Cellar Door

Neil Young - A Treasure

Paul McCartney - Band On The Run

Paul McCartney - Ram

Paul McCartney - McCartney II (all remastered very well)

But I gave away double that amount of albums.

I never bought Bob's recent bootleg or his triple album set. Two albums of standards was enough.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 17:48:27 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Best of 2017 … I missed Bob Dylan from the concerts list! Don't know why. Still #8 is about right. Now added.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 17:46:34 CET 2017 from (81.152.133.163)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Bob F. Looking forward to playing the album on Xmas day before we all meet up on Christmas day. The article related

Thanks, Peter, - two interesting reads. I appreciate your reviews. I'm looking forward to getting the Stones two disc set on Christmas day. I will buy Ray Davies, Otis Redding, PP Arnold and Paul Simon albums. Am I getting something different from the Paul Simon album? I've got to be sure I'm going to play them. I culled about thirty albums to Oxfam record shop, recently. Didn't play them, but once did.

Glad you had a good birthday party, mate. I thought your tribute to John Wetton was the best piece of writing related to GB this year. I have him playing on Family tracks.

The one that got away. I would have liked Family to have done an album, where they are sitting and are all quiet, because I think the showmanship maybe overshadowed some really good songs and musicianship. Or am I talking crap? I'm thinking about a couple of items on YouTube.

Playing 'Anyway' by Family just now. Some really good music and Chappo is a really good singer.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 14:55:09 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: BEST OF 2017 - MUSIC

My BEST OF 2017- MUSIC is now on line. Albums, Reissues, Archive issues, Songs, Most Played, Live gigs.

Do comment there or here. Hopefully it will inspire some here to post their Best of 2017 lists. Go for it!


Entered at Thu Dec 21 14:44:54 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: How To Make Gravy

It's the 21st of December.


Entered at Thu Dec 21 00:31:42 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Eclection

Peter V: This post's for you, principally - you and Jerry T in absentia (RIP). Flipping through "Becoming Electra", a new-seeming label history in the music section of my local bookstore, I came across a few paragraphs devoted to the multinational late '60s group Eclection (two Australians, one Englishman, one Montreal-seasoned Fenno-Norwegian and one Canuck). I learned that their name was suggested by none other than Joni Mitchell, whose good friend Marcie was at the time the girlfriend of the Canadian in the group, Michael Rosen. Apparently Marcie and Michael told Joni of the group's ethnic makeup and she replied something like, "That's certainly an eclectic mix. You should call yourselves Eclection."


Entered at Wed Dec 20 11:43:13 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hamilton

JQ: Hamilton is sold out to the end of June, and they have ensured no secondary market … you only get your ticket scanner e-mail 24 hours before the performance, and they ID everyone. I've signed up for an alert for when they release July to December tickets. Unfortunately, Ticketmaster will only select seats for you, which is crap. Often, if a show is hard to get, I put "select your own sets" and find two single seats that are left over. We don't mind not sitting together.

The trouble is, when a show runs 6 days a week in a large theatre converted to the purpose (it took 16 months), and is set to run for years, you know that actors need vacations, you may well see understudies, and because of vacations, understudies need understudies … which is why otherwise I avoid the big long running musicals. It's in an odd theatre … in Victoria, so not in the main Covent Garden commercial theatre area, nor on the South Bank's more "artistic" theatre area.

Still, I'll try for the second half of 2018 when tickets are released. Though apparently the whole of this run went in minutes. The trick will be to go straight for Monday nights.


Entered at Wed Dec 20 05:00:27 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.77)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

that was supposed to be - digital causes of the decline of the music industry.


Entered at Wed Dec 20 03:00:58 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Best of theater

Thanks for that Peter - will you be taking in Hamilton?


Entered at Wed Dec 20 00:57:35 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.77)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Analagous to bemoaning the demise of the music industry, I, and many New Yorkers & other people world wide have bemoaned the death of"playing outside."People all over the world have noticed how kids used to grow up outdoors, playing with each other, without adult supervision. In NYC we grew up in the street, or school yards, but literally in the street, playing stickball, two hand touch football, , and a lot of other games, right in the streets we lived on....There wasn;t excessive car traffice on the sidestreetm and when they came, the dricvers waited for us to stop.....today, kids got indoor computer games, but, with the multitude of cars, kids could never play in the street. they'd be mowed down. But also with the abductions, and the gangs, and the crime, parents won't let their kids out a their site. I covered Brooklyn and parts of Queens on my bicycle. today, if i was raising a kid, i wouldn;t let that kid on a bike, no way//they got bike lanes in NYC all ove r the borioughs now...you gotta be nuts to get ona bike here.... but there's plemty of lunatics riding, even with baby's, no joke... i think these peopel belong ina a padded cell...................the whole world has changed for the worst....


Entered at Wed Dec 20 00:35:00 CET 2017 from (67.80.29.77)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That's a great article by Rhett Miller Bob. i like it much better than his music...the entire article is important and hopefully gets read, but, here's what i think one of the most important sections of the article is:
"As the old (and abundantly flawed) avenues of income are closed off entirely, our new music delivery system reroutes the great majority of returns from music-making back to the corporations.
Artists have never been good at maximizing the monetization of their work. And in the new money-challenged world of music, we’ve found ourselves cut out almost entirely. Even casual observers saw the shift from purchased music, which still managed to allot a small percentage of the profit to the artist, to music’s current state of literal worthlessness. Now the streaming services negotiate backroom deals with labels that dole out fees to artists in such minuscule sums that you would lose money by burning the gas it would require to drive to the bank to deposit the check in your account."

His story of how Google ripped him off is very important too.

Read in progression,the last paragraph of Miller's article is very powerful.Anyone who has read my posts since i entered in 02 knows i've been decrying the digital causes (delivery & recording go hand in hand) of the entire music industry. I've always screamed about how the digital world has effected the great studios and engineers, as well as the artists, labels, publishers, etc etc, on and on...

. It' still possible to find great engineers, & great studios but increasingly, so many great engineers have become assholes. Why? cause they can't make a living, or are working much to hard to make one..Now,in their late 50s, 60s, and 70s, they are working as hard as they did when they were 20, maybe harder, and making the same or less money. and many of these guys are running all over the world to do it. No joke. i could tell ya stories. and it's a fucking shame. But, also, you gotta realize, that this effects the artists they work with too. It falls on the shoulders and on the sound of the artists that hire them....


Entered at Wed Dec 20 00:13:10 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Best of Theatre 2017

My annual round up of theatre. You might enjoy the vast variety in the photos of productions. Music to follow …


Entered at Tue Dec 19 23:40:45 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Rocker

If you've ever cared about music, please take a minute and read this Rhett Miller article.

Kev, very very funny. Trouble No More is a masterpiece by the way.

Dunc, I loved Witnesses! I hope you signed up for the online Neil Young Archives. It's presently free and amazing.


Entered at Tue Dec 19 18:49:08 CET 2017 from (86.128.254.41)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Yongue Street

I was googling and saw it on a site called Vimeo, which I have never used before.

Yes I enjoyed seeing the young Robbie and Levon playing Bo Diddley. Robbie's contributions were good. I always feel he speaks well. I enjoyed the scenes of the street well - Le Coq D'Or, Brown Derby and the young people on the street. It was about dancing in those days - boy meets girl.

I didn't realise that Yongue Street was only place you could get alcohol. Good to hear mentions of Robbie and the Robots and The Consuls. And the Canadian input into Hound Dog. Well done, Bill - a good watch. I'll watch the others in series.


Entered at Tue Dec 19 15:45:02 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Yonge Street

Dunc: Thanks. Yes, I was listed as a Researcher, along with singers Eric Mercury, George Olliver and Cathy Young, plus Neil Young's brother Bob. The first three all appeared as commentators - but nobody ever lets me near a camera, and only the bravest lets me near a microphone.

In any case, I'm glad you saw it and interested to know the how. Was it on TV, or commercial DVD or what? As far as I know, it appeared (in three parts - the '50s, early '60s R&B, late '67 folk/rock) just a couple times back when it was released - around 2012, I suppose. Did you see the stunning home video of young Robbie turning up with Levon in the late '50s - even before Robbie was in the Hawks?


Entered at Tue Dec 19 12:09:15 CET 2017 from (86.169.29.122)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Kevin. Witnesses became ridiculously far fetched - won't recommend.

I watched a documentary on Yongue Street and I think I noticed our own Bill M in the credits. I enjoyed it, probably because I had done my footwork exploring the haunts of the Band.

Not stuck in the middle, but stuck in the past. My Xmas albums, now finalised, will be The Stones at the BBC (thanks, Peter), Sandy Denny at the BBC (only saw her once when I was 18 and I wasn't really familiar with Fairport's music at the time), and Neil Young's new old one. (thanks, Bob F). Really like Neil's old stuff.


Entered at Tue Dec 19 03:45:09 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: There's related punning in "Adam Raised A Cain", which among other things suggests a superhuman Adam, Adam being able to raise the otherwise unraisable.

Kevin J: your mention of Vietnam reminded me of an annoying bit of Greil Marcus's book on LARS that I'd read last night. Talking about dyland and the Hawks touring Europe, he says, "They carried the country with them, the drama they enacted was no more or less American than Coca-Cola or Mickey Mousen Charlie Chaplin or the Vietnam War." What on earth is that supposed to mean, when the the last two were, respectively, principally British and principally Vietnamese? (Plus there's the fact that two thirds of the group carrying "the" country were in fact also not American.)


Entered at Mon Dec 18 22:22:40 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.55)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: GB action

Hi Kevin - I think it tough because there’s so little new info about The Band now. However the folks here remain great music listeners and I find the tips and music knowledge to be a great part of all this. (C’mon Pat B!) Current events too. Was it you Kevin that brought Larkin Poe to our attention? I was in Atlanta last week and they’re damn proud of them now too! Eddie’s Attic there is a great venue and was their home joint for a good while, pre-fame.

And course I’d like to see more posts and I hope Jan doesn’t throw in the towel due a to low interest perception. This and the season makes me think of some of the great contributors we’ve lost over time: Rollie, Steve, David P and the good doctor come to mind. Did we lose JTull too?

Happy Christmas everybody!


Entered at Mon Dec 18 21:18:45 CET 2017 from (184.146.92.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: What's New ?

The What's New section of this GB for December 18 has a number of interesting items but of particular note is the 2nd item from JH's friend Craig who has complied all of RR's media and interviews for Testimony. Scroll down to the bottom to access the great Herle Burly podcast. Highly recommended. It is in two parts.


Entered at Mon Dec 18 19:42:42 CET 2017 from (184.146.92.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Interesting to go to the GB Archives and just one year ago at December 2016, most days were at 17 to 20 posts a day......BEG, JT....and Sebastian Robertson at December 17. Things have changed.


Entered at Mon Dec 18 16:13:23 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.150)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, Good luck to you.

Oy vey es mir, Virgil was no evangelical . As matter of fact, he had a thing for a Jewish girl, but her family moved North when the Civil War was on the horizon. Her family had wanted him to convert so the romance could proceed, and they could be grandparents ( Moishe or Miriam Kane woulda been the first), but when he heard he had to get his pecker chopped, he wouldn't consider it. The poor guy was devastated. There's a song but that too.


Entered at Mon Dec 18 12:51:19 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A long time since we did lyrics …

The actual line is "You can't raise a Caine BACK UP when he's in defeat." The narrator has said that his brother is dead, but consider that he might be referring to himself as the defeated one and unable to get back to where he used to be mentally or materially (plus the little pun on raising cane or Kain).


Entered at Mon Dec 18 10:04:43 CET 2017 from (82.40.223.42)

Posted by:

Mike

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Night they drove old Dixie down

The richness and authenticity of the lyrics of this wonderful song are let down a little by the last line "You can't raise a Cane when he is in defeat". You can't raise him because he's dead, not defeated. So the following might do a little better for the last two lines: I SWEAR BY THE HOLY JUDGEMENT SEAT YOU CAN'T RAISE A CANE WHEN HE IS DOWN SIX FEET With best wishes.


Entered at Sun Dec 17 10:08:00 CET 2017 from (24.114.71.18)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Oh, how I miss the Glory days of DVD BOX and LED LIGHT

Or Poe's:

"That my days have been a dream/ Yet if hope has flown away/ In a night, or in a day/ In a vision, or in none/ Is it therefore the less gone?"

Or better yet, just the straightforward rock n roll of Rod Stewart's "Italian Girls" from Never a Dull Monent:

"She was tall, thin and tarty/ And she drove a Maserati"

Dunc: I love ya and glad you are enjoying your retirement with such musical and visual ( TV & movie ) accompaniment ... Currently watching the Ken Burns Vietnam series. Much brilliance in terms of film making, some clumsy music selections but highly recommended....albeit depressing to see such unnecessary death over so many years. Thank you for the dvd tips........ BTW, Bob F is currently on holiday in Katmandu. It may be a while before we here from him though as Jeff is reporting that the border guards somewhere near Mongolia confiscated his copy of "Trouble No More" and Bob has gone underground in an effort to recapture the lost discs.


Entered at Sat Dec 16 22:33:04 CET 2017 from (95.244.148.118)

Posted by:

Francesco Sinibaldi

Therefore a dream... An eternal glimmer while the sound of a blackbird calls the desire of an inner appearance.... Francesco Sinibaldi


Entered at Thu Dec 14 15:12:45 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed. All these years, you never noticed i did. One long, one short block. R & e24th. But i went to Midwood.


Entered at Thu Dec 14 13:24:09 CET 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff A.

Jeff-I grew up a few blocks from madison hs...shocked to read that story.On a different note,Madison had a great gym albeit the rims were a bit tight.


Entered at Thu Dec 14 06:55:11 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Alice Merton Story in Bill Board


Entered at Thu Dec 14 03:17:37 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Nicole Atkins - Darkness Falls So Quiet

Dig this one- i mentioned it a good while ago. This song been getting good play here a while now.

thought i posted this one in between the other two but i guess not.


Entered at Thu Dec 14 03:07:47 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Josh Ritter - Feels Like Lightning

good one from Ritter, gets alot of airplay here too.


Entered at Thu Dec 14 02:56:29 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Alice Merton - No Roots

this song has been getting a lot of adult contemporary play for a while.It;s damn good- there are also some acoustic versions of it on you tube. Whoever produced it, i'd think that the producer is responsible for the sound that the hit version has. not exactly my taste, but very powerful and kinda compelling. The vocal is excellent, as is the song.


Entered at Wed Dec 13 23:08:34 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That sign for luxury rentals, i believe that's one of the buildings that used to be in Warbasse, a Mitchell Llama NYC controlled public housing program that afforded middle income and upper lower income people or families great housing at far less than market rates....Not give aways by any means, but affordable. Good buildings, well kept, but not luxury...People would wait 12, 16, maybe 20 years sometimes to get into a Mitchell Llama building and were happy when they did. But, as a cost of gentrification, Mitchell Llama has been getting privatized and taken over by private interests. The carpet baggers today know how to get to everything.


Entered at Wed Dec 13 20:35:31 CET 2017 from (67.80.26.66)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

This happened less than two miles from home yesterday. High school kids killing each other. A rumble with knives. I've no info as to the root cause. this article doesn't say it but i though some one died. I grew up around the corner from James Madison High School, one of the non hosting schools represented.


Entered at Wed Dec 13 09:19:54 CET 2017 from (86.158.93.104)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Jeff. I think streaming demeans the music. The music is not valued. As I said in the Summer, I got access to Amazon Music for the first time. I noticed I wasn't giving new music to me a fair chance. Rushing through songs etc.

I don't stream at all now. But I was reading that young people access songs through their phone, often not paying and this is the difference compared to my generation - will discard the song - unlike the way my generation value these songs for life. Don't know if that is true or not.


Entered at Wed Dec 13 01:18:26 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.252)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Spotify losing fortunes, Spotify execs earning 7 figures.

and of course, the songwriters and artists get paid borscht.


Entered at Wed Dec 13 00:44:32 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Versatile Van

Any opinions on Van Morrison’s new standards album, Versatile? I’ve listened through twice and have severe doubts. Great playing, but frankly I am tired of these songs, and he does them very well, but adds nothing new. On the other hand, can’t stop listening to the recent one by Imelda May.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 22:31:36 CET 2017 from (86.158.93.104)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I'll go with Monty Python, Bill M. Coincidentally, I saw Spamelot in Toronto..... And the bloody printer has just gone. That's it!!!!!!!!! Right Through the fucking window. 5 things broken in 5 days. I don't believe it.

Nice to hear from you, Kevin. My Xmas book is the new Le Carre. I rewatched the Gary Oldman film last night.

Thanks, Peter. It's the two disc version I'm getting with the second disc being The Stones sing Rogers and Hammerstein.

Other Xmas discs will be Sandy Denny 'Live at the BBC' and Neil Young's new old one. I went to the local shop today and it had sold out, so will go to Central Glasgow to get it. Thanks, Bob F.

Am watching the French 'Witness:A Frozen Death', Kevin and Bob F. Scary.

And also box setting 'Gavin and Stacey'. Great stuff.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 21:58:38 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.252)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Dickey Betts going out on a short tour.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 17:45:27 CET 2017 from (213.205.198.58)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: No stone unturned

There are two versions of On Air in the UK, one CD Or two CD de luxe. In the USA last week I only saw the two CD version which is yellow. The one CD is orange. Every British band in those days did Hi Heel Sneakers. We did Long Tall Shorty too - same song, different words. A friend’s band also did Mo Shorty, the guitar instrumental version.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 16:19:19 CET 2017 from (65.92.193.32)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I'm not sure if a country song is the natural outcome. You and missus Dunc ringing bells and calling out "Unclean, Unclean" is funny stuff, so I see Terry Jones as you and Eric Idle as missus. And any song with Python involvement is bound to be closer to Flanders and Swan than Johnny Cash, I'm afraid.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 15:28:56 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: jh

Hee Hee.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 11:00:34 CET 2017 from (86.158.93.104)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Hi Heel Sneakers

Enjoyed the post, Peter. Took me back. So that's my Xmas album, I bought it last night. One worrying thing...I could only see a description of what is on Disc 1. Disc 2 is not The Stones sing 'The American Song Book' is it? Mick doing 'Some Enchanted Evening'. Surely not?

I'm into 60s just now. Just played The Searchers, Marmalade, The Kinks, The Hollies, The Animals, Love Affair's Greatest Hits, Flowers (Bumbles liked this compilation), With The Beatles and Please Please Me. And from America The Byrds and The Loving Spoonful's Greatest Hits.

I remember when the nation seemed to be obsessed with Hi Heel Sneakers. The first time I hard it was at the youth club. I was disappointed. The group played a lot of R n'B standards and all I wanted was covers of the charts. I think it's sad the demise of the youth club. A warm place where boy meets girl, listening to records and once a month a live band. But from that first hearing, everywhere you went you heard Hi Heel Sneakers.

My first TV when I got married was a Grundig. Pure Quality, Man. (say in Glasgow accent)

Thanks, Peter

I feel a country song coming on. My Dyson, my shower and my washing machine have just broken in the last 48 hours. Ordered two sets of bells from Amazon for me and the wife. 'Unclean, Unclean!'

Congrats, Ari.


Entered at Tue Dec 12 08:54:05 CET 2017 from (68.196.220.75)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Rob Fraboni

Recorded an album of originals this summer with Rob Fraboni. It was surreal and the album should be coming out in the next few months!


Entered at Mon Dec 11 22:21:33 CET 2017 from (85.164.75.178)

Posted by:

jh

Double vision, eh, John? 😁


Entered at Mon Dec 11 19:21:40 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Happy birthday, Angie. Hope you are well.


Entered at Mon Dec 11 17:44:56 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Johnny Halliday RIP

Indeed. RIP. My sister had Johnny Halliday EPs from French holidays. BUT I would argue with that "The French Elvis" tag. I'd say "The French Cliff Richard." I like Cliff Richard too, but there is a significant difference.


Entered at Mon Dec 11 13:15:18 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Didn't notice the two "j's" in the "name" line.


Entered at Mon Dec 11 13:13:30 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

Wonderful memories Peter. Amazing what a piece of music can bring back visual memories of a youthful time. Happens to me a lot. I can hear a song and it can take me back to the time and place of my youth and it's always happy thoughts. What did Garth say in The Last Waltz? And I'm paraphrasing here. Music is a healer. Something like that.


Entered at Mon Dec 11 10:50:12 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: On Air

Really enjoying the Rolling Stones “On Air” BBC recordings. There are some bits of nostalgia here. Memphis, Tennessee is from their first BBC session in October 1963. It’s the lyrics: “the PHONE BOY took the message” “Her MOTHER did not agree” “try to get her number back in Memphis Tennessee”. They are exactly the erroneous ones my teen garage band used to do. A memory was dredged up. Our rhythm guitarist had one of those Grundig tape recorders with little square plastic microphone, which he would put against a large ancient wireless to record the Top 20 Show on Sundays, and the odd live appearance on Saturday Club. We learned a few songs from that tape recorder, and I reckon one was from that long lost (until now) Rolling Stones broadcast.

The other one I noted was Hi-Heel Sneakers from April 1964. The song only has two verses, which are repeated in the Tommy Tucker version. Mick Jagger was happy to go on prestige national radio only knowing verse 2 and no more, and just kept repeating verse 2. It’s not hard! I can recite the right ones now.

The whole set reminds me how hugely influential the Rolling Stones were in bringing R&B to a mass audience. We’d all say “This is a Chuck Berry / Muddy Waters / Bo Diddley / Solomon Burke / Howlin’ Wolf song” but in reality we first learned most of them from the Rolling Stones. Eight Chuck Berry covers on “On Air.” Many of the songs on "On Air" are ones they never recorded. e.g. They also do Levon's old favourite, Fannie Mae.


Entered at Sun Dec 10 21:26:44 CET 2017 from (47.20.222.99)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Speaking of Rick, the Professor Louie & The Crowmatix are doing a show celebrating him at Bearville Theatre, Dec 27th I believe. Last time i saw them was in a small 35 person room in brooklyn and they were phenomenal.


Entered at Sun Dec 10 20:05:49 CET 2017 from (24.114.71.18)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Robbie Robertson on Rick Danko.......

"Smile, Soul, Fretless, Pool shark, Radiant, Restless, Infinite. Rick Danko."


Entered at Sun Dec 10 18:41:59 CET 2017 from (24.114.71.18)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Rick Danko

18 years has passed so quickly. Think of Rick a lot and with sadness every December. So many great memories though.


Entered at Sun Dec 10 16:02:38 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: RIP Johnny Halliday, the ELVIS in France

I must admit that I - with my cider bottle shoulders - felt unease when Ms. NWC was in love with the handsome Johnny Halliday. The music was tight, honest, strong semi-aggressive but always women-friendly. There is an OPTIC 2000 shop in France which is selling eye-glasses. In the south of France they used good ol' Johnny in their advertizing. "Wow!" shouted Ms. NWC when we rode thru a Provencal village in the middle of the night. Johnny did it right. Three Presidents of France were presenton the funeral.


Entered at Sun Dec 10 14:50:49 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Self-drive cars

If the internet was invented by the devil - like I assume - the self-driving cars are invented by his/her mother. The ultimate form of driving a car is rallying. (US posters: scroll now, rally is not about precidential election!) Already in the eighties we transported us "on the wrong side of the road" in a humble Ford Escort to Chester in Wales to watch the RAC Rally. My dream was to see this British rally. A Finn won it, of course.

The year 1980 will always be remembered in the history of the vanishing European civilization. The car maker SAAB put an end to their rallying department. I wrote a letter to the CO of SAAB where I warned for a bancrupt. Unfortunately I had right.


Entered at Sat Dec 9 15:35:22 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

With vinyl, there is a major esoteric thing about the mother, then the duplicate stampers. Some record companies would press a thousand from a stamper, others might press 5000 before making a new stamper. If you get REALLY esoteric, and this happens with Beatles LPs, the stamper number is on the record, and it's believed that earlier ones are better because the "mother" is less worn when it makes the duplicate stamper. I think I've got the terms right, but haven't checked.

There are only a limited number of artists where collectors are fanatic enough, but certainly The Beatles, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin are the ones where you see people with LED light magnifying glasses at record fairs, checking the matrix numbers.

There's a store in LA that listens to every album on sale and grades the quality of the pressing, so they might have a dozen "Rubber Soul" all at different prices … all near mint, but different pressings.


Entered at Sat Dec 9 14:18:13 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

You make a good point Peter. I remember years ago I had a good friend at Capitol Canada. He gave me an entire Beatles Japanese Vinyl catalog. It sounded better than any previous vinyl or CD to this day that I owned. I might not get this right; but back then the Japanese didn't make as many copies from what they called "The Mother?" Have I got that right. There are those here who know what I mean; but that sound was unbelievable.


Entered at Fri Dec 8 23:50:09 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

That is the box. I think such a comprehensive vinyl reissue is a major accolade, but I would love to know more about the source and remastering.


Entered at Fri Dec 8 21:38:13 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Vinyl

Yes that's the one jh. An industry friend was given one when it came out in 2015 and basically said it was OK. Now he's not a vinyl aficionado His reaction was, I got it all. If David P were still with us, he would have a much better answer..


Entered at Fri Dec 8 19:13:23 CET 2017 from (84.209.128.180)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: OQ vinyl box

It’s this one, yes? More info. about the set welcome.


Entered at Fri Dec 8 17:43:37 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can see PC self drive cars. They'll stop and refuse to go on if you insult other drivers, swear or instruct the car to use the horn in a city to express irritation.


Entered at Thu Dec 7 17:50:59 CET 2017 from (67.70.151.66)

Posted by:

Bill M

Given that AutoCrect is the leading edge of artificial intelligence, I can hardly wait for self-driving vehicles. "Alexa, How do you plead?" "Innocent your honour; I knew that Mr Viney was English so naturally assumed he meant left when he said right."


Entered at Thu Dec 7 00:20:34 CET 2017 from (184.146.92.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Restaurant in Piece

I am generally not a fan of passing along “joke” e-mails but thought the autocorrect one especially funny and relevant as every damn time I send a WhatsApp message, autocorrect figures out a way to mess things up !

Thanks to Michael C and Bill M for the Tom Rush mentions. Lovely guitar as well as that voice. So much music and great to have this place to be reminded of or introduced to music.

Anyone who hasn't already done so, run don't walk to the 'What's New" section of this GB and check out the John Scheele photos of The Band.....Wow !

David Herle: Every fan of the Band should check out the two part interview that David Herle did with Robbie Robertson. Look for "Herle Burly" with Robbie. Might be the best RR feature interview ever done.. The off the record intro is very cool.


Entered at Thu Dec 7 00:18:22 CET 2017 from (67.80.30.33)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

If Franken resigns might as well name Twitler the Emperor.


Entered at Wed Dec 6 21:28:01 CET 2017 from (40.139.179.11)

Posted by:

Peter V

Back to the Capitol Albums Box. The first two and Rock of Ages were reissued on vinyl years ago. It’s a bold decision to reissue Cahoots and Islands on 180 gram vinyl though. Interesting and good on Capitol.


Entered at Wed Dec 6 21:24:48 CET 2017 from (40.139.179.11)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just seen on another site:

“The man who invented autocorrect has died. Restaurant in Piece.”


Entered at Wed Dec 6 18:09:51 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.19)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: double down

I think the expression here comes from blackjack - the most popular card game in US casinos - where the original bet is doubled based on the optimism that the one allowable next card will deliver a winning hand.


Entered at Wed Dec 6 18:02:55 CET 2017 from (64.229.14.210)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I hadn't heard 'double down' used to mean 'have two' before either, but I can see the sense of applying the phrase to that new use. I didn't know the gambling origin; generally I hear it used to mean 'try harder'. I wonder if it'll be ever used in the cold Anglosphere to refer to a winter coat made with extra goose feathers?


Entered at Wed Dec 6 16:13:27 CET 2017 from (40.139.179.11)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: In Boston

A language question. John D said “double down” on albums, and I have a bottle of Poland Spring water in front of me, and the label says “Double Down - Grab two.” In Britain, we’d say “double up”. I’ve never noticed it before … then saw it twice in 5 minutes. I knew double down was a gambling term, but didn’t know it as having two of the same thing.


Entered at Tue Dec 5 21:48:39 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Choktaw Bingo

James McMurtry's a good writer and this one is the closest he ever got to a hit. I read a piece recently where this song was referred to as our new national anthem!


Entered at Tue Dec 5 21:06:59 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Ha Ha. Good one Bill!


Entered at Tue Dec 5 19:50:22 CET 2017 from (24.114.53.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks John D. Our Euro-chums have to remember that a heavy box like that can take two full years to float across, depending on currents.


Entered at Tue Dec 5 17:01:25 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Band Vinyl

That set actually came out in 2015. Still sells on Amazon here for $186.00. Got all the music and don't need to double down; but David P would have. The man loved his vinyl.


Entered at Tue Dec 5 02:19:58 CET 2017 from (67.81.97.62)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ludwig lives in & has a mastering facility in Maine. At least still did as of a conversation i had with a mastering engineer a month ago.


Entered at Tue Dec 5 00:47:53 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Richard Painter Ringtone

When this mess gets fixed I think he’ll be one of the heroes and great characters of the whole thing, a la Sam Ervin. In his Texas, monotone, mouth-closed and angry voice: “This is just flat ridiculous”. I’ll happily buy his ringtone when/if it arrives. He’s on fire today on MSNBC!


Entered at Mon Dec 4 23:13:13 CET 2017 from (24.114.77.181)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Peter V: I saw it in my local store a couple weeks ago, but because I don't follow these things I convinced myself that it had been around for years and had been reordered for the Xmas rush. David P would have plugged Robert Ludwig's work on Big Brown. BTW, is Mr Ludwig still aboveground?


Entered at Mon Dec 4 15:37:55 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lightfoot - Second cup of coffee

Watched some documentary of Lightfoot yesterday. Some interview with his drummer who went in his dressing room and found him face down when he had that aneurism and thank fully they fixed him up. So many of Gordon's songs I spent a lifetime singing and enjoyed every minute.

Always seemed to me "Second Cup of Coffee" was a song to sing when you were by yourself with time to reflect. At times sitting out on the deck of my fish boat on a nice calm day with my net out in the water.

"And if I don't stop this trembling hand from reaching for the phone,

I'll be reaching for the bottle before this day is done."


Entered at Mon Dec 4 14:28:26 CET 2017 from (40.139.179.11)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Band 1968-1977 Capitol Albums Box Set

I miss David P. I’d love to know more about these reissued 180gram Band vinyl albums. Remastered from what? Analogue originals? Who knows? I guess we must all have all of them as no one seems interested.


Entered at Sun Dec 3 12:16:26 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: News and Updates

Thanks Mr. Hoiberg for News and Updates from November 4th and onwards (pics and video). The only problem seems to be my good ol' Linux system etc. which seem to protect me too rigorously for all the bad things in the internet. I have to start Windows 10 instead :-(

I admire you for keeping this site alive. I would have been too scary already for fifteen years ago!


Entered at Sat Dec 2 18:57:09 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Insect bread (mainly to Bill M who has figured it out completely and will - with a bit of luck - survive a BIG meteor hitting Saskatchewan.)

You're welcome, Bill M.

During the WW2 there were substitutes for several exotic things: coffee, tobacco, chocklate. There goes a story in the family from early fifteens when the real coffee FINALLY came to the stores thanks to Olympic Games in Helsinki: after a long ride on the train we came home and I - a three/four years old guy - said: "Now we are going to have a real good coffee!" (Everybody laughed nicely...) What a sad difference to see girls and macueraus sipping cappucino in Cafe di Roma in Cannes.


Entered at Sat Dec 2 18:17:42 CET 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Neil Young/John D

John D-most grateful you suggested Neil on live stream last night.He wad magnificent-the setlist,his intensity, the singing,Neil's acoustic guitars, banjos,piano,etc. all were spot on.


Entered at Sat Dec 2 00:26:58 CET 2017 from (67.80.30.39)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Paul, you're welcome. Steve Freund ( from my neighborhood, we grew up separated by half a mile and 6 or 7 years,, but spent many years in Chicago & now many in The SF Bay area),Tad Robinson, & Ken Saydak,a chicagoan (moved to Colorado) along with the long time phenomenal chicago rhythm section of Harlan Terson and Marty Binder, old friends of Steve & Ken, just recorded an album for Denmark, over a week in chicago, about a month ago.


Entered at Sat Dec 2 00:14:30 CET 2017 from (98.14.251.145)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Band vinyl box set

Just saw The Band Capitol Albums 1968-1977 boxed set of LPs. All on 180 gram vinyl.


Entered at Sat Dec 2 00:02:30 CET 2017 from (84.209.138.227)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

The lovely Norah Jones’ «What Am I to You?», recorded in 2004, with sprinkles of musical magic from Levon and Garth all over the track.


Entered at Fri Dec 1 17:36:38 CET 2017 from (64.229.15.189)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Gomer Pyle, RIP

We've lost another great one. I expect that US president It will demand the deceased be accorded full military honours.


Entered at Fri Dec 1 15:45:22 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Neil Young Tonight

Well, it's Neil Young's secret concert tonight on the internet. Strong rumour is that it will be in Omemee Ontario. "There is town in North Ontario." Streaming on CTV.ca


Entered at Fri Dec 1 15:31:09 CET 2017 from (172.12.248.174)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

Thanks for the link to Tad Robinson. I have always known the guy's name, but never really followed up. He's got fantastic versions of Eight Days a Week and Too Late to Turn Back Now on youtube, also. Future research.


Entered at Fri Dec 1 00:55:40 CET 2017 from (98.14.251.145)

Posted by:

Peter V

They say that in proportion of losses of life to size of home population, the Canadians lost the highest percentage at D Day too.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 23:48:05 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Historical Revelations!

Agree with you on Evangeline and Longfellow Bill. I also much enjoyed reading about Ms.Maillet, thank you. I had a long night. The many pictures on that fellow's site for Acadian Driftwood drove me first of all to google earth.

I expect you have used it some. The many wonderful pictures all over the world I eagerly enjoy. I found myself trecking all over "Acadia", Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island. What a beautiful place that is. I then got into the history of that war and the Plains of Abraham.

Fast forward to WW1. Isn't it amazing how the French people, since the Battle for Vimy Ridge have held the Canadian Soldiers in such high regard. My grandfather a Scot who immigrated to Canada at age 16 was a Canadian soldier at Vimy Ridge. In the greater outcome of things that battle became somewhat unimportant except to say the Canadian soldiers were very much respected there after. However to this day the French never forgot.

After the war for Acadia, all those years later the wounds healed some what I suppose. Of course by that time the Canadian soldier was of many colours and ethnic diversity.

So I spent a long very interesting night. When I get into history it can't be helped.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 18:21:53 CET 2017 from (64.229.15.189)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Rockin C: "Evangeline" the song, performed by Emmylou Harris for TLW the movie, is of course very much related to the expulsion of the Acadians. Mercifully, it is just a fraction of the length of "Evangeline" the poem - by Henry Wadsworth, who history knows as Longfellow in recognition of the fact that he did tend to go on and on and on (see link for proof) Longfellow's other big hit was "The Song of Hiawatha", which is shorter and has a zippier rhythm to it. I find it interesting that both Longfellow pieces are closely related to Robbie Robertson's late-Band and solo work.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 17:46:21 CET 2017 from (65.124.117.4)

Posted by:

Michael Curren

Location: Boston

Subject: The Band in Boston power outage solved

Thanks All! I reached out to Tom Rush and he did not recall this incident, though something similar happened to him the same year,at Symphony Hall. I actually found the Boston Globe article about this Sept. 2, 1976 concert in their archives. Rick was in fact delayed at the border, and the power went out and came back repeatedly during The Band's set! The article says Levon was trying to grapple with tech issues with the house crew in between songs. Rick arrived eventually and was only on stage for 4 songs. The Globe writer was not flattering of the performance, but when your tech fails you on stage, it can ruin the whole gig. Thanks again for tolerating my search down my trivia memory lane.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 05:24:01 CET 2017 from (67.81.97.76)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Tad Robinson again, this time with the Dave Specter Band from chicago. This time a few Jews with Blues. You guys may wanna check out Tad's site, he sings with a lot of great bands, and his own band tours too. Truly one of the best blues & soul singers around, exceptionally gifted....Lots of stage energy too....

norm, you ain't the only four eyed fuck around. I got through that last post i made fine, but this time i guess i just it the regular "sign the GB link", & when i tried to put this one through, old Johnny said fuggehdaboudit you four eyed fuck, hit the road fucko.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 05:16:23 CET 2017 from (67.81.97.76)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Tad Robinson/ Bruce Katz

i caught this guy tonight guest fronting The Bruce Katz Band at Lucilles, the samller but big room in BBkings here. Tad spent his childhood in NYC i guess, but then moved, lives in Indianapolis.But is yidlach. And a superb blues & soul singer. As good as you'll fidn today , and m the way things are, should, and is positioned to run to the top of the blues world. No joke. Up top there's a link to his band doin one of hi priginals. the vocal is gorgeous, that's the reason i linked it.

Bruce Katz has always been a superb piano and organ player, and tonight wasa no exception. He and his band were excellent. My friend and I only stayed for the first set, but that's cause she gotta oik in the morning.But they blew the place away. Two amazing Jews with blues in one band, i hadda go.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 05:07:58 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

Thank you for that Bill. That is the one. It is interesting at 3.33 the plaque explaining the name of this historical event and the explanation. It's funny how there are other recordings of the song and people in ignorance of knowing "The Band" attribute the song to some one else. Very often they are quickly corrected tho'.

I really enjoy all the art work. It adds to the explanation of the song I think. There are some well expressed comments. Very often there is the usual negative trash.


Entered at Thu Nov 30 04:53:34 CET 2017 from (64.229.15.189)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Anyone inspired by the images at Rockin Chair's link to look into the expulsion of the Acadians, especially the partly mythical and partly true return to Acadia that is touched on in "Acadian Driftwood", might click on the link here and then proceed to track down a copy of Antonine Maillet's award-winning 1979 novel, "Pelagie-la-Charrette" (published in English in the US as simply "Pelagie").


Entered at Thu Nov 30 04:29:42 CET 2017 from (64.229.15.189)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Rockin Chair's link

This is, I suppose, the link that Rockin Chair was referring to - the illustrated "Acadian Driftwood".


Entered at Wed Nov 29 23:07:41 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

While enjoying some youtube songs I happened on this video. I wonder how many of you have seen it? Uploaded by a fellow named Guy Belliveau.

It is a masterpiece. There are many beautiful painting, maps showing the towns of Acadia and much more. It is beautiful. There are comments from Acadian people, (some who still live in the area). Wonderful comments. I wonder if Robbie has ever seen it. I'm sure it would warm his heart.

I see I'm not allowed to give the code, (according to Johnny). I guess if you just search Acadian Driftwood uploaded by Guy Belliveau you may see it. I am impressed.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 21:13:21 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.128)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, forget that "old goat". i meant "four eyed fuck." :-)


Entered at Wed Nov 29 21:05:02 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.128)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm,about 2/3 of the U.S has been anti Twitler all along. The Congressmen that are insane or bought off or both, ansd the electoral colege voters that were influenced against correct behavior, all have behaved contrary to how they shoudl , often what they should do by the will of their constituents, or, or what they shoudl do by the Constitution or a nirmal conscience or morals.

So the problem is not hte American people. The majority of Americans want twitler gone. And the majority of Amercians are hoping beyond hope that Muellers investigations and how he and congress follow through get rid o Twitler, Pence, and sessons and many more. i would expect you see enough on MSNBC to be aware of that.

Our teat is in a ringer here. I will blame Obama for it some- ths subterfuge the russians pulled off with Twitler has been developing for decades and i can;t imagine that during 8 years of Obama the FBI or another agency hadn;t brought this up, more than 2 and half years ago........ it never shoulda got this far....but, people did not take Trump seriously.... I guess they figured fraudelunet money transactions were okay.... But as log as correction takes, this country is fighting for it;s existence right now. Myueller's in charge. itr;s a long ,involved, difficult process. apparently Mueller is progressing far faster thna anyone thought possible, but it si the world championship chess game, for much higher stakes. don;t expect it to happen 1,2,3

As slow as you go o na fucking tugboat you should relate ya old goat.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 20:43:26 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Hype!!!

In a couple more days it will be December. I will then consider putting up some Christmas lights and allowing myself to sit back with my head phones on and my eyes closed and listen to "Christmas must be tonight".

I can never condone the Christmas season being forced on us before they even celebrate that Halloween crap.

More and more it becomes hard to get enthusiastic about the Christmas Holiday when we have to live next door to a lunatic who is only about himself. All he knows is trying to be a bully and insult people as much as possible and try to bring war on us all.

When will the people in the USA wake up and say enough is enough The insolent way he treated old indigenous men who put their life on the line to win a war so idiots like him have the freedom to be as much of an asshole as possible. It is shameful.

When I was a kid I started wearing glasses at age seven. I had a life time of bullying. At age 18 I shot up to just over 6 feet and 190 pounds. I worked out with other guys. There was no more bullying. I would give my right eye to have Donald Trump in the middle of a foot ball field man to man for about 5 minutes to show him what being bullied and what it feels like to get a real shit kicking.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 20:28:57 CET 2017 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: Chills down the spine - that's it. There something otherwordly about the otherwise muted backing. Paul Griffin on organ I believe. And Vancouver's Trevor Veitch on guitar.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 19:58:23 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Dobro

They're gorgeous - send chills down your spine.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 19:25:54 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tom Rush

Thanks for the link Bill. Haven't thought of Tom Rush in a long time. The haunting dobro licks in that song are soothing.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 15:33:51 CET 2017 from (72.142.116.154)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I had to listen to Rush's "Drivin' Wheel" again this morning, and was delighted that at the end of the song YouTube took me straight into Tom's version of "Urge For Going". Reminded me that I have three of his LPs - more than just about any artist aside from the Band. Also reminded me of Joni Mitchell's architectural as well as literary brilliance.


Entered at Wed Nov 29 06:43:56 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.128)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: It's Your Secret ( Sea Level song title)

Victoria's Secret made a commercial using a heavily edited down version of the Rick Roberts song Colorado. It was the second track on "The Blue" Flying Burrito Brothers album. Notice the director cut from a close up of a model's mountains just before the word mountains- in the lyric "i left your mountains"....


Entered at Tue Nov 28 12:18:30 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M & Tom Rush

Couldn't agree more Bill.


Entered at Tue Nov 28 05:48:27 CET 2017 from (24.114.95.89)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Someone mentions Tom Rush and I'm at YouTube listening to him. Who can beat this one, "Lost My Driving Wheel".


Entered at Mon Nov 27 22:28:16 CET 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Michael, if you look at the Tape Archives on this site for 9/2/76 there is a list of the songs performed and it mentions the show stopped because of the power outage.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 21:37:34 CET 2017 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Rush and Trouble

I remember my brother telling me about a COUPLE of concerts where Tom Rush opened for THE BAND. Never heard the story of the power outage though. I also remember that Rick and Tom may have played together. Maybe same shows??

Listening to 'Trouble No More' lately. Awesome band. Iffy message. Dylan's all in though; totally committed to gospel. As I have a gospel background I can appreciate it more than some. Did I mention a GREAT band? Fred Tackett!


Entered at Mon Nov 27 20:35:43 CET 2017 from (24.114.103.7)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: the headline in today's Ottawa citizen: "Finns Introduce Insect Bread". Thanks so much!


Entered at Mon Nov 27 15:11:08 CET 2017 from (65.124.117.4)

Posted by:

Michael Curren

Location: Boston

Subject: The night The Band lost power?

I attended a concert of The Band at the Music Hall in Boston in the mid to late 70's. Tom Rush was the opening act. My recollection was that after a long break between acts, it was announced that Rick had been delayed indefinitely at the border in Toronto, and so The Band would play without him....The guys came out and played great but, I am guessing 4-6 songs into the set, the power went out on the entire block due to construction, and the concert ended there, rather abruptly. I have a vivid image in my mind of Robbie wailing away on guitar, mid-riff, when it all went dark and silent (accept for Levon of course). My question is, has anyone heard of this event and is there anything written about it anywhere?


Entered at Mon Nov 27 10:03:16 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bob's tour bus was parked at the Inn on the Park when we were there. 1993? I didn't see him. We asked a waiter if Dylan was there and he said "We're not allowed to say … but the answer isn't no."


Entered at Mon Nov 27 08:54:50 CET 2017 from (210.86.75.44)

Posted by:

Rod

Correction, it was The Real Richard Manuel. It's on YouTube - so may be able to find it that way


Entered at Mon Nov 27 08:52:39 CET 2017 from (210.86.75.44)

Posted by:

Rod

Have you guys been over to The Richard Manuel Fans FB page recently? There's a link to a outtake from The No Reason To Cry sessions. Richard doing Ray Charles What Would I Do Without You. Amazing!


Entered at Mon Nov 27 06:31:17 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.122)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: PSB

Thanks loads for that! It was extremely interesting, thorough and educational. I was one of those that dropped out of Dylan fandom during that patch.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 04:14:59 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I don't even know where or what Chelsea Market is. If you found me there, it wouldn't've been me.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 03:02:37 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Jeff, I know. Got dazzled by all the lights. And the big buildings. Geez.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 02:36:03 CET 2017 from (64.229.15.189)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Peter V: The Inn on the Park was Dylan's favourite hotel in Toronto until it became a car dealership. Hmm - PSB could confirm this, but didn't Bob have a weakness for Scotch 'n' Salmon?


Entered at Mon Nov 27 02:20:37 CET 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Trouble No More

Greetings folks, the above link is to my review of Dylan's Bootleg Series Vol. 13, Trouble No More, and somehow I did work in a Band mention.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 01:43:17 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Missed your chance to be in a music video.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 01:33:01 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You fucked up not contacting me Mike.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 01:01:10 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Interesting proposition, Jeff. But Norm appears to be currently somewhere in Hans Christian Andersonland, so working out the details may be difficult. Btw, I looked for you at Chelsea Market last week during a short stay in Manhattan. Had a slice, too, from some place called Filaga Pizzeria. It was good but probably not up to your standard. And you’re right about our PCV. We’ve done our share of upfucking the planet (pardon my Belgian). Yup, fer sure.


Entered at Mon Nov 27 00:09:50 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: A Thanksgiving Deal.

I'm thankful for Canada for birthing so many great bands, and great musicians.And for stopping all that damned snow and wind from reaching us down here.. There's always a trade off Mike. I can take Norm (LMAO) and all that PYC and Dupont crap you guys make. But i don't want them goddamn tar sands you're sending us.

I'll tell you what. Keep them tar sands oils and send us Norm. You should like that deal. I'll keep Norm busy.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 23:32:04 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: USA and Canada. A memory

Early 90s, Inn on The Park, Toronto. The guy at the next table leans over.

Hey, you’re Australian, right?

No, actually, I’m Brit …

I always know Australians. Great guys. With us in Vietnam …

But no, actually I’m Brit …

I’m American. What do you think of Canadians, er, Cobber?

Well, like anyone else they’re …

I’m an American. Canadians are weird.

Really?

Yeah, they’re just really weird.

The American man, who was wearing a bright red tartan tuxedo, then ordered a double whisky to accompany his salmon.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 19:14:29 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, I've done more for the Canadian economy than you know. Though i believe the great majority f the vinyl siding i sold ( & often isntalled) over a period spanning four decades was made in the U.S, it seemed that 75 % or more of the pvc vertical blinds (the slats ) i sold and installed during 4 years in the 90s and a few in the 2000s were made in Canada. That said, apparently you guys are doing as much to pollute the planet as we...
( Vinyl siding btw, sucks. there are some fine panels, and a true craftsman can often make screwed up structures look good witha good panel, but, pvc clad metal is much better. And of course, nothing beats great wood siding or masonry. Give me a brick house every time. Real stucco is great too. this imitation stucco shit is just that. Pure dreck.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 18:57:45 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Canada ("... flying on a dirty condola... ")

Finally I had the chance to fly on 'de Havilland Canada Dash 8' (Zurich - Lyon - Zurich). Not too much of space and a bumpy landing - just like for one hundred of years ago. I loved it! Local Coast Guard in Sweden flies over my head twice a day with similar machines.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 18:55:39 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.23)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ, cool your jets. Most people here have been aware that Canada has a different Thanksgiving, and some of us even wish the Canucks Happy Thanksgiving. Attention is part of sensitivity after all..But, troothfully, as a sanely selectively liberal guy, i happily took the opportunity to, in a friendly relative GB way, break your ultra liberal but inattentive balls.

Mike, if Norm plays his cards right, and lives long enough, when i get through these two projects, I could still smuggle him across the border and record that song he inspired me to write with him singing. The craggier and croakier his salt strained vocal chords sound the better, so as long as he can still breath enough, age won't matter.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 18:15:56 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

JQ, relax. We’re having fun. It’s a Sunday fun day.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 18:11:18 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: WTF?

I’m not sure what I’ve done, but how can I learn more about Canada without asking a Canadian? I admit my ignorance, but I’m not sure it called for a PC alert; if I even have that right?


Entered at Sun Nov 26 17:42:14 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Friends

Gosh, Jeff, I’m somewhat impressed by your Canuckistanized sensitivity to our cultural (and holiday) habits. I have a feeling, however, that that’s largely due to good old boy Norm’s longstanding influence on you, and on our southern cousins in general, over the years. Keep up the good work, old pal. We need all the friends we can get down there now that our Dear Good Neighbor intends to slap us silly on cross-border trade matters (viz., the ongoing trilateral NAFTA trade talks). Yeah, that’s a big deal here. So, keep watching out for us, Jeff. It can’t hurt.


Entered at Sun Nov 26 17:30:00 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… especially as Canadians have more to give thanks for currently!


Entered at Sun Nov 26 04:01:41 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.208)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Seriously speaking, JQ, you really ought to take a Canuckistani sensitivity course. I wasn't gonna comment about it, but i can't hold it in any longer.


Entered at Fri Nov 24 18:30:01 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jon Boden review

Link to my review of Jon Boden & The Remnant Kings. Great show from the ex-Bellowhead lead singer, and he played the whole of his solo album "Afterglow" in sequence too. Eleven piece band.


Entered at Fri Nov 24 07:48:11 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Thanks Giving

Our thanks giving was weeks ago.


Entered at Fri Nov 24 06:28:24 CET 2017 from (166.216.157.84)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Zimmy

Does Bob have a wife these days? Has he since Sarah? Happy Thanksgiving everybody! Is this celebrated in Canada?


Entered at Fri Nov 24 04:53:21 CET 2017 from (69.203.125.109)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Happy Thanksgiving all! Saw a sizzling show last night by Bob Dylan and Mavis Staples and their bands at NYC's Beacon Theatre, where they're in the middle of a 5-show run. Both were in fine voice and great spirits, with Bob even grinning some crazy grins a couple of times during Thunder on the Mountain. Mavis is touring on a brand new album; Bob brought his Sinatra material and some high-energy and surprising (even for him!) rearrangements of his classics. Wonderful show... their flames still burn bright.


Entered at Thu Nov 23 18:58:28 CET 2017 from (174.232.133.156)

Posted by:

Calvin

Happy Thanksgiving everyone. Trying to decide between King Crimson or Squeeze tomorrow night. Kansas Saturday night.


Entered at Thu Nov 23 17:19:08 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.112)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you! For people who love the Band, it's not just a U.S. of A. American National Holiday. It's a Musical Holiday incomplete without watching The Last Waltz.


Entered at Wed Nov 22 20:57:01 CET 2017 from (85.164.75.178)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

TWoF, Dylan, Danko, Canadian Hall of Fame!


Entered at Tue Nov 21 18:40:53 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Amy Helm

Jon, I've watched and enjoyed it and added a link above.


Entered at Tue Nov 21 17:39:26 CET 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Amy Helm--"When I Paint My Masterpiece"

Go to youtube; search for "amy helm masterpiece". Lovely.


Entered at Mon Nov 20 11:53:58 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: A Little Pain

My favourite track on the new Margo Price album, "All American Made" is "A Little Pain" (Linked).

Note the lyric:

I'm so tired but I can't sleep

Too many obligations I'm trying to keep

Gotta please everybody except for myself

But like Levon said, "Ain't in it for my health"

So it joins the list of songs with Band references.


Entered at Sun Nov 19 22:56:09 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: J Geils

Thanks for that Bill. I should have looked for the date first. He died just a few days before we left Australia to come home. He died April 11 and I believe we left Brisbane April 18.


Entered at Sun Nov 19 16:17:33 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.118)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Location: Johnny Cash Sent Me
Web: My link

Subject: Neil Young:..... Everything is free.

"Hi there,
December 1st will be a big day for me. The Visitor will be coming to your town. I will be going to my town. You will be able to hear me and see me. My archive will open on that same day, a place you can visit and experience every song I have ever released in the highest quality your machine will allow. It’s the way it’s supposed to be. In the beginning, everything is free.
Lots of Love,
neil


Entered at Sun Nov 19 05:50:31 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: I think we noted J Geils's passing. I remember saying here that I'd seen them in the early '70s - phenomenal live, even though I've never liked their records. Can't think why I would have noted that otherwise. For what it's worth, they and Gentle Giant opened for Jefferson Starship.


Entered at Sun Nov 19 02:47:51 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Maybe I just wasn't around

I don't recall ever hearing this guy mentioned on this site. J Geils died earlier this year.

It is raining and blowing like hell. With the fire place burning upstairs and the wood stove down stairs I'm enjoying laying around, cleaning up my shop down stairs a little, playing a little guitar and......I don't have to be out there any more. What a great feeling.

I found some old J Geils music laying around. I used to like his band way back when, Some good stuff. One of those Young brothers who started AC-DC died today. Only 64 with dementia sad.

It is so good to be able to lay back with no jobs to think about.....and just enjoy the music.


Entered at Sat Nov 18 18:37:40 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van no. 2

Roll With The Punches mixed old R&B with his own stuff and new compositions too. Maybe this is the second part of the project, this time standards oriented. As you say, Christmas is Coming … and with it comes the Great American Songbook.

Listening to Transformation, my favourite track on Roll With The Punches. It's just one little bit different to People Get Ready to me.


Entered at Sat Nov 18 14:50:47 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van's Releases

Peter I have to agree. Very short time between releases. With songs of that nature; perhaps Van and his people felt it would make a great Christmas release? Nostalgia etc. The last time I remember an artist releasing two albums that quickly (if my memory servers me well) was after Dylan released Self Portrait; in June of 69 and just four months later; in October, New Morning; which I loved.


Entered at Sat Nov 18 13:37:11 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van no. 2

John D: I was amazed to see the news of another Van Morrison album, "Versatile" due December 1st. I just looked at amazon, and it says "Roll With The Punches" was released 22nd September, which makes it just ten weeks between the two releases. That's prolific with a capital P.

Rolling Stone says that Van wrote seven new songs for the record. Not true. At least three of the Van Morrison compositions are Van songs from way back. I Forgot That Love Existed (Poetic Champions Compose, 1987), Start All Over Again (Enlightenment, 1990) and Only A Dream (Down The Road, 2002). Then there are these standards. A curious release.


Entered at Sat Nov 18 07:16:55 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.118)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso, I'll check out that article.... The music scene in East St Louis was still going when I lived in St Louis in the first half of the 80s, but i didn't know about it. I had one degree of separation is all, but i didn't know about it...When i returned to St Louis in late 97 it was essentially done, within a couple of years i became friends with musicians who had been part of that as players & / or audience.... i ended up spending a good amount of time visiting in homes there. & as a contractor, i did a whole helluva lot of siding, window, & roofing jobs in East St Louis & the surrounding towns.

Nux, I'm glad you're digging Stuff.


Entered at Sat Nov 18 04:43:14 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Jeff A

Hey Jeff, I was just reading a review of a new Sports Illustrated documentary about high school football in E. St. Louis, IL. If memory serves, back when you and I and Glenn t were discussing life, song, etc in Alton, you seemed to have a lot of 1st hand experience in E. St. L., especially w/ some of the blues players from there. Anyway, this looked to be an interesting study of the place, despite it's obvious sports bent (and that it will be broadcast on Fox, sorry, I don't recall when).

For my part, I wish now that I'd at least ventured down there, though I know it makes the toughest parts of Alton or the city acrosst the River look like country clubs. Oh yeah, the title is "89 Blocks". Unfortunately, back when I lived out there, I was a pretty numb college student who couldn't get anywhere near figuring out how to hear more of the blues I'd been turned onto all through h.s. and college... Muddy, John Lee, Lightin' Hopkins, Sonny Boy, B.B. & Albert, the godfather at his crossroads fending off his hellhound, etc. I suppose I was more likely to travel out to Carrolton or Whitehall for bluegrass live, than to E. St.L. or clubs in the center of St. Louis itself. Ultimately, my loss.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 15:33:02 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Van Morrison

Move over Bob Dylan. Now it's Van's turn to look way back.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 13:49:36 CET 2017 from (197.245.248.35)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: JEFF A_STUFF

Thats incredible Jeff,I must say I do enjoy the 2 guitar lineup a lot.I must check out more stuff of Stuff,such groove!


Entered at Fri Nov 17 12:58:23 CET 2017 from (86.171.51.109)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Interesting, Peter. The debate up here this week is that young people are being priced out of going to football nowadays. I would be happy going to English non league football. We have 'junior'(as opposed to senior) football too up here and the bigger clubs get attendances in their hundreds.

The problem up here is that we are a small country with a huge conurbation and how can teams with average home attendances of 3 000 compete with two teams that have average home attendances of over 50 000. Also people travel from other parts of Scotland and Ireland to see the old firm. Huge clubs.

Yet, percentage of population attending a football match on Saturday is still the highest in Europe. Just a small country...living next to the most glamorous league in the world.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 11:22:16 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lower down the leagues

(My post just swam in to the ether … I'll retype from memory)

Darlington. Last Saturday we were having coffee in Banbury. The guy at the next table was saying he was going to Farnborough to see Farnborough v Banbury. He was saying he'd supported Tottenham Hotspur all his life, but couldn't afford the tickets anymore, let alone travel to Premier League away games. Farnborough would be a 90 minute drive. It would have been fun … I looked the next day, and it was a 3-3 draw. He added that non-league was more entertaining.

A few months earlier, a similar conversation in Southampton. I had an appointment next to the Eastleigh ground with a physio. Eastleigh is basically a suburb of Southampton. The physio was telling me that non-league Eastleigh were doing well because so many people couldn't afford to see Southampton in the Premier League, so were getting their Saturday football at Eastleigh. He said he could afford to take his sons, and friends to Eastleigh.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 10:35:24 CET 2017 from (86.171.51.109)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Al, others scroll past

Thanks, Al. A truly outstanding person. A great Scot. And he came from an outstanding family. His brother, Bob, is revered in Dundee amongst the Dundee fans for winning the league and getting to the semi finals of the European Cup, the following year. It is so difficult to win the league, if you are not one of the Old Firm.

The Scottish/Liverpool connection. I was disappointed when it was revealed that a couple of years back that the referee for the second leg of the Roma -Dundee United semi final had been bribed 50 000 Euros to ensure Roma got through. There is a real sense of frustration in me that those Dundee United players have received nothing for their efforts. I think the whole of Scotland was looking forward to a Dundee United - Liverpool final. My biggest regret in football. Felt so sorry for Jim McLean.

I thought Ian St John did well. I miss the Saint/Greavsie show.

Let's drink a toast to the Darlington fans of this world, Al. Turn up, home and away, week in, week out and get nothing. Enjoyed the book. Thanks, Al.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 05:02:45 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: come una pietra scalciata

I've finally gotten around to reading my copy of Greil Marcus's book on "Like A Rolling Stone". I was captured by his description of an Italian light-rap version by Articolo 31 so looked it up on YouTube - see link. A fine specimen indeed.


Entered at Fri Nov 17 01:39:16 CET 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Shankly: Nature's Fire

Cheers Dunc. Many thanks for the BBC Scotland nod. Been awaiting it with baited breath. Caught it on BBC i player and somehow managed through a steadily flowing veil of tears to get through it.

Been telling Bob all about the communion we as fans had with the great man. A wonderful thing yet in one regard really quite scary as you reflect upon its unique intensity.

Indeed, it really is impossible to convey just what Bill Shankly the man represented to Reds supporters like myself or, I'm sure, what we as his disciples represented to him. It had to be unique. A pure and emotional bond unlike anything else and beyond even that as fans we all felt for the club itself, although it definitely fed and intensified that attachment too. Certainly in the sporting world nothing I've ever witnessed approached it. Looking back it was quite scary in that unrestrained intensity it generated within the likes of myself, particularly in the Boys Pen and on the Spion Kop. Suffice to say if Shanks had told any of us young lads to say put our hand in a fire we'd have unhesitatingly done it. No question about it. And that sort of hold really is quite sobering as you look back. Yet so devout was our devotion to the man. As for the film I was so pleased it managed so accurately and so beautifully to capture the depth of that unshakeable unbreakable two way devotion and attachment and how it was so rooted in that shared Scottish/Liverpudlian working class crucible which forged it.


Entered at Thu Nov 16 20:02:02 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Eric Gale of Stuff can be heard here playing in much the same style on this circa '67 record by Dianne Brooks, it seems to me. Dianne told me that "Eric" played on it, so I thought Clapton and looked unsuccessfully for confirmation for many months. So then I asked the producer, Harvey Brooks, who set me straight. Not my finest moment. The lead guitarist on Dianne's previous 45 was Robbie Robertson.


Entered at Wed Nov 15 17:56:20 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Nux, hard to imagine a band with Chris Parker & Steve Gadd drumming together, huh? The later & recent Stuff had Clint DeGanon on drums, he's the drummer on the 6 tracks i cut 4 years ago for my upcoming project. the recent band usually had only one guitar and two or more horns, one of which is Alex Foster.


Entered at Wed Nov 15 16:34:31 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Now git....I say git it right!

Roy!...I say Roy!!...........gawd damn boy! it is not the you-nited states....it's the un-nited states. We can't have y'all comin' up here from Bammy and spreadin' yer ill will! Do yuh hear me boy? Yer bilt too close to the ground son....the fast ones are goin' right over yer head.


Entered at Wed Nov 15 16:00:19 CET 2017 from (197.245.248.35)

Posted by:

Nux

Subject: Stuff

Wow,I'm now a "Stuff" fan


Entered at Wed Nov 15 00:07:41 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.89)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Stuff

You guys will want to listen to this.It's much better than the live Stuff LP. This was one of the great all time NYC bands. One of the all time bands...they were all always great, individually, and in various formations, before they formed Stuff. and as Stuff- as a unit they backed up Joe Cocker, recorded that Stingray record with him & toured with him, an also Paul simon. Gordon Edwards, the founder and leader, is a dyed in the wool Brooklyn boy, from Bed stuy, will be till the day he dies. Great guy, real character, real sharp in his way.... the Stuff band that he had till two years ago ( he's had hand issues lately) was amazing...i saw a lto of great shows of theirs in real small rooms with great sound. unfortunately the videos of the newer Stuff do nt do the band justice at all. but this recording will blow you away.


Entered at Tue Nov 14 20:51:22 CET 2017 from (67.80.28.89)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jon, i couldn't answer that. I know that when i returned to NYC i didn;t go to the original club again, but when it "reopened" in a basement that had been a bowling alley in Bayside Queens i saw a few Mountain shows there. Leslie West, Corky Laing, and Noel Redding. I'm not sure what the dealk was. They didn;t have regular shows there, or a real business, just very occassional shows. but it was called My Father's Place when they did it. Stack chairs were used , it was very portable. but the sound was fine.....great shows...


Entered at Tue Nov 14 19:55:21 CET 2017 from (24.114.76.233)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I don't like the term 'Americana' as applied to music or records, but inevitably much geat music will be found in the section so labelled. That said, I've never found anything I was lookinf for there - BaRK, Fred Eaglesmith, Peter Boyd ... À cynical friend quipped many years ago the 'new country' was code for 'rock and roll without African Americans' (not that he used that last term). I have a feeling that'Americana' is similarly filtered (at least in record stores).


Entered at Tue Nov 14 16:13:44 CET 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Jeff, great news on My Father's Place reopening. I know Rick Danko played there in 1977, touring on his solo album. Did Levon&Rick/the reformed Band ever play there in the 80s?


Entered at Tue Nov 14 10:56:43 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sure thing on Bonnie. When she wants to be, she's a badass blues player. Rory Block as well.


Entered at Tue Nov 14 10:16:29 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Agree with you on Joe B. Would you let Bonnie Raitt in? I would.


Entered at Tue Nov 14 09:32:54 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, the views of that Tower Record manager are not uncommon.There are many younger African american blues players here today who are angry about not being able to develop solid careers quickly ( they have no idea what their forebearers really were up against and also no idea of the reality of today). The anger & backlash they have thrown at white players is pretty intense. The thing is, it should have nothing to do with color. Truth is though, the great majority of the young white people playing blues are not that good. but the young black kids ain;t no young Muddy Waters, buddy Guy, Larry Davis, Magic sam, etc etc , either..

I gotta tell ya, if i managed a record store Joe Bonamssa wouldn't get in my blues section. The garbage can or the dumpster is where i feel is recorde belong.

but, now that i tihnk of it, red headed Texan Gib Wharton sure could play the blues & jazz on his pedal steel.Gib died a week or two ago, Any one who can pick up any of his solo albums, the one i have is a maaterpiece. Gib pulled it out of his trenchcoat pocket and gave it to me many years ago. I told him how much i had enjoyed his playing, and he laid the disc on me. wouldn't take a dime for it,


Entered at Tue Nov 14 08:39:52 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Blurred lines …

I just added a "Rant" to my blog on the new BBC TV series "Howards End." Whether you've seen it or not, I was so annoyed by the deliberate use of "out of focus" that I took a few screenshots. I know we have photographers here … I'd be interested in any comments (you can comment over at the article). As I say, you don't have to have seen it.


Entered at Tue Nov 14 08:26:02 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fine lines being drawn …

Americana helped as a category cutting across rock and country. In the late and lamented days of Tower Records megastore in Piccadilly Circus they eventually had different sections for Country & Western, New Country, Americana, Bluegrass and Folk. This meant it was hard to decide where to look. The Band were in Americana. The Dillards were in Bluegrass, I think wrongly. A story I've told before is I asked the formidable manager … an Afro-Carribbean guy … where Bonnie Raitt was. He asked where I was looking and I said "Blues." He pointed me to Country. I said,'But she's recording with John Lee Hooker!" His answer was, 'She's got red hair and uses pedal steel. No way does she get in MY blues section."


Entered at Tue Nov 14 03:52:26 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ- it's a individual thing. Poco, the Burritos, The Byrds, Nitty Gritty, Jerry Jeff, Heartsfield, Marshall Tucker, Charlie Daniels, a whole pile of others,the New Riders, etc etc etc, were all big here in NYC, but not in every crowd. Amongst my friends, they were kinda bigger than Zeppelin, The Beatles, or the Stones....



Entered at Tue Nov 14 01:53:22 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Hoo F_ - _ng Ray! Good News For A Change

A short lifetime later, My Father's Place will reopen.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 23:51:53 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rock & Roll & Country....To...Country Rock

Comments from the Roger McGuinn, (while making "Circle 2" with the Dirt Band. "When we went down to Nashville and cut Sweet Hearts of the Rodeo our folk and Rock & Roll fans hated us. They thought we went over to the other side. At that time country was considered political. We didn't know if we could keep our rock fans and gain country fans. For a while there we lost them both."

The problem now a days is that too many people don't even really understand the difference. Depending on the band, some get slid into pop rock, country rock, progressive country. Distributors like to put labels on music and file them where they deam appropriate in their stores. Most of them have no fucking idea what they are doing. n\ Have any of you guys seen some of the cartoons that have been done of the el presidentay of the US Hay. They are gawd damn hilarious. This one guy who has drawn him has done it so perfectly. He has these tiny little hands he is waving around while the real voice is blabbing some of these idiotic comments he has made. I near soiled myself yes-a-day evening watching this on tv.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 23:14:37 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.130)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hank Wilson’s Back

I’ve been listening to this album today. It’s Leon Russell doing old school country standards. I recall that when it came out it was a bridge for LR fans to try out country music. In that era the hipsters hated country music. This album and Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger helped close that gap around the same time. The Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo came first in that way but I don’t think worked as well in bringing people into country sounds. Burrito Bros too. I have quite a few friends that still can’t hear anything country. One old pal is that way but loves CCR - which if you added in a steel guitar part to some of their songs would easily turn them into a country tune.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 21:06:56 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

If it wasn't for non musical topics ths GB woulda been dead and gone long ago. And the connection of real life to music is 100,000% .

Though

Sometimes the lines between people's musical ability and personalities or behavior is very very minimal, hard to discern. Yet, even that is a affirmation and demonstration of how real music and song actually is.

Nothing is more tenuous than creating music and it hinges on & at the speed of hummingbird's wings. Yet pros and real talents pull it out regardless of circumstance.... How it sometimes happens is truly a wonder. For someone who doesn't worry about what God is, i can tell you, musicality of people is proof there is something out there we can refer to as the Spirit, The Power, or if we choose- God.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 21:00:31 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

BTW Lee,next time Kevin performs, i'll let you know in case it hits when you want a trip to NYC.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 20:40:57 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, Kevin Harris is doing very well. He had some shows this summer, has been out of town with family, and is returning to NYC soon.

Isn't it amazing that some of these totally astonishing singers fall under the public radar? The man has had a varied but distinguished career, including Broadway , but the general public gets deprived of these great voices...

Just for the record, so nothing i wrote gets misinterpreted, verbal and mental abuse takes it toll. And can ceetianly effect people's behavior and personality-- soemtimes the rest of their lives. But, phydical and r sexual assault, sexual abuse, and going to war, is certainly worse and will generally have far worse effects.

A World without abuse would be heaven


Entered at Mon Nov 13 20:07:24 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.93)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Peter V

Here Here!! Unless it’s Hear Hear!! Music is our primary purpose here and those topics are what folks weigh-in on most frequently. But, personally, I really like some of the more general topics that pop up too.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 18:04:36 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Kevin Harris, Tina Brown

Jeff, spent most of the morning listening to the Kevin Harris clips, starting with the one you posted. Talented singer, amazing that he was just off of throat cancer and therapy. How is he doing now, some four years later? Killer band, too.

Peter, I have mixed feeling about your somewhat high horse re Tina Brown and PTSD. (Tina Brown being overly dramatic? Go figure...)

Yes, living under the yoke of male dominance in your day-to-day existence may not rate up there with the atrocities of war, but it does take a toll. My step-mom only admitted after retirement that the only reason she kept her last job was that she was forced "service" of her obnoxious and dominating boss under explicit threat that if she didn't she would lose her job. She will carry these squalid memories for the rest of her life. It is heart-wrenching that so many women (and men) have had to carry the shame and pain for so many years. Hopefully, perhaps, a climate change has occurred in which their stories are being given credence. That these incidents may have taken place years ago does not make them any less repugnant. The denials of those like Roy Moore ring hollow, and painting the accusers as opportunistic and politically motivated is downright disgusting.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 17:52:17 CET 2017 from (47.20.223.83)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i had no difficulty understanding your post. And i don't find you out of line. Tina brown would not have suffered PTSD from exposure to loud mouthness, disgusting nehavior, obnoxiousness. Prolonged exposure to it will effect people but she sure could have quit- i doubt she was chained to her job. she probably chose to accept the high pay and take the verbal environment,,... Women who are sexually abused, they will or can have a type of PTSD.. There is all kinds of trauma- growing up with horrible abusive people can traumatize you, but certainly not like going to war.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 17:16:28 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My post on The Sunday Times was also prompted by buying a remembrance poppy from a guy in his late 20s on Remembrance Sunday just an hour earlier. He had a row of medals on his chest and just the one leg. Then you read this highly-priviliged person saying she has PTSD.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 17:12:15 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hang on, I’m saying that having a bullying, aggressive boss (Tina Brown never says she was sexually harassed, just bullied) is NOT equivalent to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder which people get from wartime events, or from horrific events like The Twin Towers on 9/11. That’s PTSD. It gives people nightmares and flashbacks. My dad drove the BBC radio truck into Belsen, one of the very first vehicles to enter. My mum said he had nightmares about it the rest of his life until he died aged 53. That’s PTSD, not that anyone would ever have called it that in those days. Having a boss, however unpleasant, swearing at you in a loud voice might be distressing and cause you to feel nervous, but it’s certainly not PTSD unless you’re totally precious.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 15:30:57 CET 2017 from (69.50.54.223)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: PTSD

Sorry your morning coffee was ruined Peter. How about sticking to music? Or sparing us your comments on things you clearly know nothing about.


Entered at Mon Nov 13 10:57:07 CET 2017 from (86.161.15.121)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Football, Al

I enjoyed the new Shankly documentary, Al on BBC Scotland. Make sure you see it, Al on i player. You'll not learn anything new, but it will keep the great man's name alive. You'll perhaps know some of the fans?


Entered at Mon Nov 13 04:55:26 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.168)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Check out Bronx native Kevin Harris- who just three years prior to this show had Stage 1V throat and throat cancer. He's a vocal coach, that likely helped a lot with his complete comeback. He has a hot band, and yes, that is Mike Clark ( Herbie Hancock's HeadHunters and a gazillion other heavy bands under his belt)


Entered at Sun Nov 12 19:31:23 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Eugene Smith Bill M

Interesting Bill. Knew about Hendrix; but not Eugene. I know his sister very well. I'll have to ask.


Entered at Sun Nov 12 14:16:16 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: The Band (album)

I agree with DUNC about The Band (abum). I purchased it for 'The Weight'. A mistake I don't regreat.


Entered at Sun Nov 12 13:46:30 CET 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Sexuall harrasments

I found Ms. NorthWestCoaster crying in front of the 'puter: "No one has harrassed me sexually in my job. Am I so UGLY and UNSEXY?" I said: "You had a good co'operation with the male colleagues, right? You didn't flirt with the boss to get higher position in the organisation, right? Your male colleagues saw that your spouse was a bit crazy, so they felt comfortably when you were present, right?"

Pooh! She was satisfied. I didn't have to draw my winning card: "Actually, you were sexually harrassed by an older church musician in the 80s who chased you with a branding iron when you visited a piggery."


Entered at Sun Nov 12 13:09:31 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It makes you sick … my morning coffee was ruined by reading Tina Brown in The Sunday Times who says she had PTSD … Post Traumatic Stress Disorder … after working for Harvey Weinstein. The interviewer asked her what she meant and she detailed “Profanity, shouting, humiliating, lying, aggressing.”

So for Tina that equates to say being in a truck blown up by a roadside bomb, being splattered with your best friends’ body parts, and perhaps losing a limb yourself?

How precious are these people?


Entered at Sun Nov 12 12:32:36 CET 2017 from (86.161.15.121)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: The Band

The Band is my favourite album. There are many albums which are important to me, but it's the album I play the most. Still after all these years - I bought it in 1975 I think - I get something new from it every time. I played it twice yesterday and was thinking about the interplay of instruments, including Richard's voice and his interpretation of the lyrics on King Harvest(Has Surely Come). Brilliant.

This got me reading Peter's excellent article on the song. There is a lot of work in it and Peter quotes other relevant people's thoughts on aspects of the song. I think the extract I quote from Peter's article below on the instruments nails it beautifully. I quote.

'To me, the instruments all assume distinct personalities, reflecting and commenting on the lyrics. There’s the guitar, picking, plucky, strutting and wirey, creating an argumentative extra line. Then there’s the bass, dogged, persistent. These are the farmer. The extended notes of Garth’s organ are a contrast, with the irresistible sweep of history resonating through them. Then the drums, the inexorable thump of the seasons changing, the rustle of the wind.'

Peter also goes on to say how important Richard's voice is to the song, which made it difficult for the reformed band to play it. Certainly his vocal performance is brilliant.

Thanks, Peter.

Which brings me to Whispering Pines. Levon's and Richard's voices echoing is one of the greatest vocal moments in rock history. But it is the instrumentation behind the voices which makes the voices truly brilliant. 'Standing by the well'...Great stuff.

Then I went up and handed in 6 albums to the Oxfam music shop in the West End of Glasgow. still sorting out the collection. If it's not played it's out. But I bought two albums...weak willed that I am.

And for lunch, and Glasgow has a big Italian community, - freshly baked foccaccia with Italian sausage, mozzarella, sun dried tomatoes and caramelised onions with cappuccino. That'll match anything in Brooklyn, Jeff.


Entered at Sun Nov 12 03:56:29 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I believe Jimi Hendrix's was part Cherokee thanks to his mother. Eugene Smith too. I suspect the mix is not uncommon in Nova Scotia too, thanks to 17th-century marriages between Micmacs with Loyalists from the newly independent American colonies.


Entered at Sat Nov 11 19:47:43 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Black Indians

I liked the way Robbie told it (and of course he worked with a lot of them on Storyville), more or less: "The escaped slaves ended up on the Indian reserves, and it was 'Yeah, you can stay with us', and then after a while there were all these little black Indians running around .." with a little smile at the end.


Entered at Sat Nov 11 19:22:03 CET 2017 from (75.157.168.91)

Posted by:

BONK

Me too! Peter and John. Just read in the Toronto Star that someone on the Isle of Jersey owns a hell of a lot of music rights from some big stars. Some kind of tax haven.


Entered at Sat Nov 11 17:24:03 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D: Me, too. I would also have loved to hear Jerry's response.


Entered at Sat Nov 11 15:33:51 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: New Dylan box and JT

I'm thinking a lot about Jerry these days. Whenever a new Dyan album; or box came out I would receive emails from Jerry; with his analysis and feelings about the release. I really miss him a lot. When the box came out last week, I forgot for a moment that Jerry was gone and was awaiting his email. Then reality quickly set in. Jerry, Miss you my old friend.


Entered at Sat Nov 11 15:26:15 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rumble the HBO special

Was really a good film. Interesting facts that I was not aware of. Didn't know the "black, indian" relationship. Charlie Patton for one. Was nice to see Dockery Plantation. I've visited it twice before. So historical to the blues.


Entered at Fri Nov 10 16:20:22 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And! on it goes.........

Trump (sounding like Fog Horn Leg Horn) is talkin' on the phone to Roy Moore. "Roy! I say ROY! don't worry about it son. I got away with a little pussy fondling myself from time to time. But Y'all better be careful son if yuh git up here to Washington. Some of them boys from Congress want to take yuh out behind the Pentagon and give yuh a good whoopin.......nice boy but he's kinda dumb........


Entered at Fri Nov 10 06:43:53 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Subject: rumble, etc

Lisa: haven't seen "Rumble" yet, but it got some showing in the cities and a fair amount of write-up earlier this fall both in the Boston Globe and the NYT. Have to figure out a way to access it for the ol' dvd player. However, have recently re-watched the you-tubes of the Band induction into hall of fame and EC's, which RR introduced. Really makes one wish Levon could have buried the hatchet, at least long enough to have participated.

Norm and glenn t: keep at it, folks. We all need heartfelt, as well as the occasional light-hearted commentary.

No offense to anyone, but under the circumstances, I can't say I'm chafing at the bit to move to Alabama. Wow, we may end up w/ Gregg Gianforte of Montana in the House and Roy Moore as a U.S. Senator. Amazing. Rolling Stone article from this summer, before Gianforte attacked the Guardian reporter, was absolutely astounding. Bet no one here knew that there were dinosaurs on Noah's ark. That's what he believes. Plus there's no biblical basis for retiring and collecting social security... hell Noah was 600 years old and he was building an ark. Good thing; it's assuaged my spouse's guilt at wanting to retire before her mid-60's... I mean we're barely a tenth of the way according to the Gianforte/Moore calculus.


Entered at Fri Nov 10 00:26:31 CET 2017 from (24.114.73.186)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: Thanks for the reminder about "Rumble", which I've been meaning to see. Ties to the Hawks are thick on the ground, beyond Robbie's place in the movie. Former Hawks Stan Szelest and Sandy Konikoff both played with Robbie in the Hawks (and Stan was in the post-Robbie Band, they both played on Jesse Ed's first solo LP, and they both played in Link Wray's group in the 70s. Jesse Ed had met the Hawks in Oklahoma in '65, and seems to have taken one of the songs they played, "Bacon Fat", to Taj Mahal - as it was mistakenly credited to Garth and Robbie on Taj's first album.


Entered at Thu Nov 9 20:57:37 CET 2017 from (67.81.96.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

One of the greatest singers I've heard, one of the greatest entertainers i've seen, died today. After about a year and half of fighting liver cancer, Angel Rissoff has gone to heaven. A very cool dude, a straight up guy, and all around great person, Angel will be missed. I met Angel in the spring of 2013. He's a vocal cornerstone of my upcoming release. There's four amazing singers on it- but if i had to pick one singer to sing every song i ever wrote, it would be Angel. RIP.



Entered at Thu Nov 9 20:51:17 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World

Has anybody seen this new documentary? It's being shown on specialty channels here in Canada and it's very good. Features Jesse Ed Davis, Randy Castillo, Link Wray and others, and of course The Band.


Entered at Thu Nov 9 15:44:06 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree with the Ronnie Spector comparison, Todd (except obviously in height!)


Entered at Thu Nov 9 05:43:45 CET 2017 from (32.216.232.98)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Simi

Thanks for the links Peter. So much talent. I wasn't aware of the updated Tigerlilly project, so will seek that out. Also enjoyed Simi singing with The Duke and The King.

Sunday night, she performed, among other things, 'Good Friend' and 'Pyramid' at the Skylark/Amy Helm show. As I was sitting in the audience, soaking it all in, it occurred to me that that Simi Stone is kind of like a modern day Ronnie Spector....not a clone or imitation, but has a similar quality and attack in her singing, as well as a simmering charisma that is impossible to ignore.


Entered at Thu Nov 9 04:32:28 CET 2017 from (65.92.194.249)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Whitey Glan RIP

John D: Was sad to lean of Whitey's passing. Brilliant drummer - Mandala, Bush, Alice Cooper, Lou Reed, Bette Midler, David Wilcox, etc.


Entered at Wed Nov 8 14:22:16 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Duke & The King

And finally … Simi Stone when she was in The Duke & The King with Simone Felice … No Easy Way Out live.


Entered at Wed Nov 8 14:17:43 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Simi Stone

Link to the Simi Stone video for "Good friend."


Entered at Wed Nov 8 14:15:13 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Simi Stone

Simi Stone is an amazing find, Todd, I've seen her twice with Simone Felice and once solo. Great violin player too. Check out Natalie Merchant's recent work where Simi is sometimes a foil to her voice.

I'd recommend Jealousy from Paradise is here … this is a 2015 remake of a 1995 song, but the addition of Simi takes it to another level.

Then from 2014's Natalie Merchant, Simi does superb backing vocals on Ladybird and Go Down Moses.

"Ladybird" is linked. Go right through … the last minute is incredibly "Beatlesque" at their most orchestral!


Entered at Wed Nov 8 06:36:53 CET 2017 from (32.216.249.199)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Cutler's Records / Skylark

B.lee, I remember Cutler’s records, which was a New Haven institution for many years, but in the mid to late 1980’s, on my college student budget, I spent more time at the smaller Rhymes records, which was just down the street and up a flight of stairs. They had a pretty good selection of used records at the time. Pretty cool that you met your wife in Cutler’s!
I lived in Hamden for a few years as kid, and know that stretch of route 10 between New Haven and Cheshire pretty well.

Sounds like your wife lived in or near the section of New Haven that used to be known as “Goatville”. Not sure if anyone still refers to it by that anymore, but my Great Aunt & Uncle lived a couple of blocks from there and, and owned and operated a restaurant called Archie Moore’s in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It was a neighborhood bar & grill type of place.

I saw a very nice show the other night. Amy Helm put together a band of 10 women for a project called “Skylark”, and they did a show at Levon’s barn in Woodstock, 2 gigs at city winery in NYC, and then one night at Infinity Music Hall in Norfolk, CT which is up in the hills in the Northwestern part of the state. Great venue, and is probably one of the oldest theaters in the state. It was one of the most joyous nights of live music that I’ve seen in a while. A lot of ensemble playing and singling, as well as featuring different vocalists through the night. Felt at times like a soul revue, other times a roots revival, and occasionally a Texas Roadhouse stomp. It was the closest thing in feel and vibe to a Midnight Ramble that I’ve experienced since Levon passed away, so I’m really happy that I was able to go.

The ladies involved were Amy Helm, Nicki Bluhm, Rachael Yamagata, Carolyn Wonderland, Cindy Cashdollar, Shelley King, Jennifer Condos, Emily Gimble, Allison Miller and Simi Stone.

With the exception of Amy and Cindy Cashdollar, I had never seen any of the other women before, and was blown away by the amount of talent gathered in one place. Simi Stone and Nicki Bluhm were very impressive…wonderful voices. I bought both of their records at the venue on my way out.


Entered at Wed Nov 8 04:13:50 CET 2017 from (67.80.30.64)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ- not so. Northam won the governor's seat by 9 points. The largest margin in 32 years. The Virginia suburbs really came to life against Twitler.


Entered at Wed Nov 8 03:47:43 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.118)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Some good news!

Good news for Dems (& America!) tonight! I believe it’s all anti Trump which should be instructive to Dems as to their focus in 2018. Tonight can also restore some faith in the electorate, finally. Still though, the elections were too close, no room for Dem errors.


Entered at Wed Nov 8 01:11:30 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Truth & The REAL Truth

Glenn you didn't do anything wrong. Expressing your feelings in such a crazy situation is only normal. Things just get a little slack here these days.

Now I want to turn to some humor for a minute because things are so crazy this is warranted. In Blazing Saddles when the "Hang man" is hanging every body and Harvey Corman keeps sticking his head out the window and talking to him.

One time he sticks his head out the window, there is a guy with his hands tied behind his back and a noose around his neck. His horse also has a noose around his neck. Next time is a guy in a wheel chair with a noose around his neck. What is going on with this US Government about now is just as crazy.


Entered at Tue Nov 7 21:24:40 CET 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: did i clobber the conversation? sorry...


Entered at Tue Nov 7 02:42:07 CET 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: people with guns kill people

i've always detested that phrase "guns don't kill people; people do." that's utter crap! what they should be saying is "guns don't kill people; people with guns do." i don't know what it's gonna take to turn the tide on the issue of guns in america, but i hope politicians will begin to stand up and against the gun lobby. of course it would helpful if the lunatic from the oval office found a more appropriate place for his pronouncements (a closet somewhere far, far away). if the bloodshed continues my family will move to another country (seriously).


Entered at Mon Nov 6 23:51:47 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I can’t believe that yet again a moron in a police uniform stands in front of a tv camera to say ‘guns don’t kill. People do.’ What?


Entered at Mon Nov 6 20:51:33 CET 2017 from (67.80.27.171)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

It's a mental health thing. The mental health of most Congressmen & the President.


Entered at Mon Nov 6 19:12:29 CET 2017 from (24.114.75.57)

Posted by:

Bill M

The US president itself said that the shooting of 26 innocent people was "not a guns thing". I wonder what, in its mindlet, would be.


Entered at Mon Nov 6 17:03:02 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As many will know, the new Dylan box set is problematic for me, as I dislike the songs (if you can call turgid rants "song") so much. However, the completist compulsion had me get the de luxe box set, and I followed advice and started on CD8 … the UK tour Live in London where Dylan began putting the old songs back in the set. A good place to start … as John D said, sound quality is very high, and there are storming versions of some classics. Knocking On Heaven's Door gets the Live at Budokan reggae version, Blowing in The Wind is fabulous with gospel singing.

And after the Texas massacre we have to ask yet again as Bob did in 1962 … 55 years ago …

how many times must the cannon balls fly

before they're forever banned?

No one ever explains to me why the USA accepts that the 2nd Amendment is restricted so that you can't have an anti-aircraft missile in your backyard, but does not realise that means a line has been drawn. The position of that line can therefore be shifted.


Entered at Mon Nov 6 16:35:18 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Does it make any sense???

Mr Trump! you really don't need to worry about Muslims coming into your country and terrorising your people. You raise enough right at home.

How does a guy who has been court marshalled for assaulting his wife and child, and is dishonourably discharged, and lowered in rank get to own any gun, never mind a semi automatic weapon. Is this making any sense?


Entered at Mon Nov 6 10:10:21 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’d say Lisa’s example was assault, and the guys should have been fired. We never had anything that overt in teaching, but they say the police and the fire service and military were abusive to women recruits as standard practice. I worked for a Swiss language school group, and in the early 70s they were very strict on anything like sexual harassment. We had to register all social meetings with students of the opposite sex outside the school too. One senior admin guy was fired instantly when he was found to be screwing his secretary. It relaxed later, but in 1971 it was very strict and enshrined in the contracts.

Powerful men could behave appallingly. My example would be George Brown, deputy prime minister under Harold Wilson in the 1960s. He came to a meeting in Hull in the mid-60s, and was grabbing women’s breasts, putting his hand up skirts left right and centre, and was as drunk as a skunk too. One guy wanted to punch him out when he grabbed a girl’s breasts, and was stopped from punching the deputy PM by the police escort. It did not occur to the police escort to stop George Brown grabbing women though.

I think Prime Ministers like to have a buffoon as deputy or in a senior position. Wilson had George Brown. Blair had Prescott (essential as a link to trade unions as Blair was so posh), but Prescott was a buffoon. Teresa May tolerates Boris Johnston because he also owns the loyalty of a large wing of her party, but as a buffoon his challenge is limited. The major example is LBJ I guess … also a buffoon fond of holding meetings while seated on the toilet like a French monarch of the 18th century, but he had the Southern Democrat vote. That was one when the deputy got power.


Entered at Mon Nov 6 05:06:11 CET 2017 from (24.184.51.156)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Jones Act. Man the Deck.

Geez Norm. It's a good thing you cleared that up. Since it was shipping involved, I'd bet a bunch of us GBers thought the Jones Act was unspeakable, maybe you and your first and second mates, all decked out in wigs and such. :-)


Entered at Mon Nov 6 04:15:49 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Anthony Bourdain

I don't know how many of you may have watched this man? I've watched him for quite some time. I have become comfortable with the feeling that he is a straight shooter. He tells his stories about these countries he visits honestly.

This evening we watched his visit to Puerto Rico, (before the storm). It was so beautiful and the people wonderful. So here is the thing, (which he never mentioned). When the hurricane hit and the devastation and help the people required was slow coming, I recall I mentioned this at the time.

The "Jones Act" over one hundred years old. No one made any comment, perhaps many don't understand it. It took Trump several days after the storm to give the "Jones Act Waver", (which was given to Texas before the hurricane hit there. He allowed the American shipping companies to be paid their exhorbitant prices for delivering the goods that they monopolized before allowing outside help.)

This "Act" which is over 100 years old maintains that "no ships shall deliver goods and services to any American lands or colonies unless the ships are built in the USA and manned by American sailors and staff. Puerto Rico is a prime example of this. How do they get everything they need on that island but by ship. These shipping companies owned by the American billionaires have the monopoly and charge what ever they please. What choice do those people have?

Then they have a fucked up President that berates them for being 72 billion dollars in debt. Well how do you think they got that way. There is what..... over 2 million American citizens there who don't even get to vote. The only reason that island is part of America is so Uncle Sam can bleed them dry. It is disgusting!


Entered at Mon Nov 6 03:00:36 CET 2017 from (24.184.51.156)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The world is changing in major ways. Technology, instant and full media coverage of things, the ability of almost anyone to get their sensational story plastered through out the world, makes things different today. Victims have a voice, people have a voice. Of course, mores have changed too, what's acceptable has changed- but the media is part of it too. The social changes between the late 50s and now have taken hold, gestated, and the technology has been the new last piece of the puzzle.

Sexual harassment, sexual assault, being pressured into having sex other ways, was never right. I'll just point out the obvious, that in that and many other regards, the way of the world has generally been power & strength get their way. In war, in society, in wealth, in sex, in business.... regarding sex, the changes have been coming, and they are arriving here in this country in almost full force now,

The shoe is going on the other foot,because now guys gotta be extra careful what they say to women.Hell, now you gotta be careful whose direction you look at... i wouldn;t wanna be a kid today......Though, offer me the chance to go back 30 or so years and i'll take it...


Entered at Sun Nov 5 17:46:38 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Mad Men revisited

There are so many degrees of harassment and assault, and what's happening now may seem like an overreaction, but is it? You guys ask any female in your lives about their experiences, and see if they think it is. I'm not going to get into anything heavy here, but I'll tell you two instances of what you might call harassment or at least male entitlement which might be regarded very differently today:

In the early 70s I was the copy typist at a Vancouver advertising agency. And for anyone who thinks the goings-on in the TV series "Mad Men" were exaggerated I can tell you they weren't, although no one ever lost a foot at my agency.

1) I was walking with a sheaf of copy down the large room the artists, typists and production guys all shared, and I was wearing a loose-fitting dress (no belt at the waist). One of the artists was coming towards me, and as he passed he flipped my dress over my head, so I was briefly standing there in my underwear. And judging from the snickers from the unusually large group of guys at the production end of the room I got the distinct impression this had been well planned in advance.

2) I was standing on the curb (busy downtown street) waiting to run across to the coffee shop for coffee when suddenly someone smacked me on the rear end so hard he knocked me off the curb and onto the street. It was no love tap, it was a stinging slap. I whirled around ready to deliver a slap of my own, only to find one of the hot young account execs smirking there. My hand stopped about an inch from his face (I wish it hadn't), because it just wouldn't have done to slap the face of one of the higher-ups. Funny thing is, this guy is now a fairly prominent person in a different field entirely, and from time to time I see articles about him and his company in the paper and wonder if he's still such an ***hole. Maybe he smartened up over the years - I hope so.

I should add that it was a really fun job for the most part and I really liked almost everybody there. But it was a pretty wild place sometimes, where anything would go, and no one batted an eyelash. You were just supposed to smile and be a "good sport" about stuff this this. Now both these events would surely be considered harassment at least, and probably assault in the second instance.


Entered at Sun Nov 5 17:21:23 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.7)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm,i hope you had protection on your computer Norm. If so, take your technocillin - meaning run your scans. Nude celebrity sites might be as bad as porn sites for spreading viruses. If things start burning when you pee, well....... at your age you should know better :-)



Entered at Sun Nov 5 16:35:20 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: To Hide It!

Peter I should think that people would remember more. I suppose on this continent they "pretend" to be still nieve.

From the Victorian age in your place, they all wore wigs. As to the reason why, it doesn't take a lot of explaining as to the cause. Funny how the tradition was carried on so long.

In the flick with Johnny Depp, can't quite remember the name, (devil something). About Jack the Ripper and who he really was. The Prince with his favourite hooker. The Masons and their rituals,

This whole thing of sexual degenerates and men in power has been around since time began. Men and women trying to jump start their career and what some of them "will do". So that the people who are on the power trip convince themselves in their warped minds that they can do anything.

In sports particularly here in hockey. Coaches that like priests use young boys because they are convinced the boys are too afraid, too ashamed to say anything. These boys wanting to work hard and make a career for themselves are vulnerable.

I happened the other day to be watching a flick on TV. I was trying to remember the name of an actress in this movie. I finally went to my computer and looked her up. She is very famous and a very good actress in many movies. She is from Edmonton. Now the thing is there were pictures of her there so I scrolled thru these pictures and I was shocked by the nude pictures of her. It never occurred to me she would do that. I substituted her name for another. Same thing. I was amazed to find any actress you could name just about. Same thing. My question is do they do this because they want to or are they pressured into doing this.

Women I held in high regard as wonderful talented "ladies", I am some what let down.


Entered at Sun Nov 5 15:07:14 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The whole harassment / exploitation angle was so intrinsic to the rock world that it escapes attention. Our assumption that it happens is so strong. I’m not surprised that powerful men get caught out … film producers, theatre directors, film stars, politicians. It happens with employment in offices and in schools too and surely we all know that. I had one boss in teaching who was such a sleaze that we tried hard never to let him alone in an office with any female.

It’s good that people are saying “Enough is enough” belatedly, but I am surprised that the media (another area rife with it) is expressing surprise. For example, I thought every theatregoer in Britain knew Kevin Spacey's preferences when he was director at the Old Vic. I never realized it was a secret. Best Richard III I ever saw too.


Entered at Sun Nov 5 02:28:51 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: Maybe it's time for a reshoot of a comprehensive 'next of kin' at the Danko farm?

John D: Thanks for the tip. I had it in my hands today in a bookstore, but I figured I'd drop a hint and wait 'til Xmas.


Entered at Sun Nov 5 01:49:02 CET 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Ben, I've been wondering when the whole issue is going to spread to the rock world - funny that it hasn't so far. You'd think there'd be ample cause. I remember reading from someone, maybe Bill Avis, saying that it was really heartbreaking, the way the girls would show up later with babies who were the spitting image of some of the Band members. I suppose it's all moot now, and maybe no one knows where to even begin. And also you could say the circumstances were different back then, but still ...


Entered at Sat Nov 4 23:05:29 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Private Eye

I have a very good run of Private Eye from about 1964 to 1968 in binders, then I stopped buying every issue, moving to Oz and IT instead. Wish I'd kept them. OZ is worth a fortune. My younger son got very keen on Private Eye about ten years ago, probably from seeing the editor, Ian Hislop, on “Have I Got News For You” every week. Now I buy it when I see it. I think the Weinstein cover from two weeks ago is a classic.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 20:03:17 CET 2017 from (97.92.250.170)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Enough with your Bandsplation......

Whoa......... In the current climate, "I just want to break even" seems pretty benign, but I guess I shouldn't give them any ideas.........


Entered at Sat Nov 4 18:05:19 CET 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: P.eye [don't get excited Jeff lad - not the pizza variety]

Hey Pete - our Chris has not missed a copy since he was 18. He's 43 now and still gets every issue. I dread to imagine the depth of the scepticism it's engrained into him but the irony is the only other thing he buys is the Daily T - purely for the cryptic crozzie I must add. Or so he says.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Nov 4 17:59:57 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.7)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks Pete, that seems like a great magazine. I may have to subscribe.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 17:14:29 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Private Eye covers

There is a complete library of covers. Use "Search" for 2017.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 17:11:56 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Private Eye

Private Eye was started in the early 1960s, Peter Cook being the owner for years. It's a satirical fortnightly magazine, but also has inside stories from journalists who can't get the stories in the papers they work for. Good cartoons. Famous for its front covers. See if you can find a run of them online.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 16:10:35 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.7)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

BTW, i think Pizza Express has live music...If i ain't wrong for a change , Woodstock's Lindsay Webster performed there this past year.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 16:07:54 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.7)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

John, as i once before posted, 8 or 9 photos that Bob F.'s wife, Susan, took of Dylan, were included int he booklet in that new Dylan box set, Trouble No More.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 16:02:58 CET 2017 from (24.184.48.7)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete , that cartoon is great commentary on the state of alotta things today. Your inclusion of it binds together several threads already tied together here. Those of you who have nothin better to do will admire the multi dimension of my statement. :-)

Intriguing title for a magazine, Pete. Dick Tracy or mild r rated material?


Entered at Sat Nov 4 15:22:52 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Bill, if you get the chance, pick up the new biography; on Joni Mitchell. Reckless Daughter. David Yaffe the author took 10 years to complete. A lot of reasons behind that; as he explains in the book. He’s a full time professor in Syracuse. There are about eight books out on Joni; but it’s my opinion this will be the definitive version. Made me want to revisit the film, Shadows and Light.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 15:16:57 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan

Was pleasantly surprised yesterday; when I listened to some tracks of the new Dylan box. I don’t remember being that enamered with that period; but the audio of the live recordings were excellent. A lot of Toronto stuff on it. Rob Bowman was one of three writers who did the liner notes.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 14:26:18 CET 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: LOL

Ha ha, Funny stuff P.

Respect to dear old Fats and all that but it did make me guffaw!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Nov 4 13:40:22 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pizza

See you there, Al. I'll have the dough balls with garlic butter starter and a Soho 65 pizza Romana.

In Private Eye last issue, they had a cartoon … not exact words because I can't find the magazine … but two youths are looking at a newspaper seller's poster "Fats Domino RIP" and one is saying "He must be the bloke what invented pizza."


Entered at Sat Nov 4 05:44:01 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.112)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: J Hammond

PSB thanks. He’s got great stories; he’s not a raconteur but he’s got the best memory precision of any of those guys I’ve heard from then. Is he writing a book? He grew up in Greenwich Village in the 50’s and was into that scene - what a time and place to be!


Entered at Sat Nov 4 05:08:45 CET 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

A clip on your tube I haven't seen before: BO DIDDLEY with Robbie Roberston and Eric Clapton, 4,03


Entered at Sat Nov 4 02:50:28 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

PSB: Thanks for the link. I could listen to Hammond forever; with some luck I'll never have to hear Maron again.


Entered at Sat Nov 4 01:12:07 CET 2017 from (84.209.146.203)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

R&R HoF rehearsal with EC


Entered at Fri Nov 3 23:27:35 CET 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Fuck it. I'm off to Pizza Express.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Nov 3 18:09:09 CET 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: John Hammond Jr on The Band and Dylan

Mark Maron interviews John Hammnd on WTF, and about 50 minutes in Hammond talks about introducing Bob Dylan to The Hawks. Maron keeps getting him off track and he takes awhile to get there, but he does.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 16:24:06 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: More apizza

Todd, I have been to Modern. Good pies, but as I recall a noisy room. My late Father-In-Law liked it. Lately on trips north, since Mom is now in Cheshire (a few miles more up Rt. 10) I go to Eli's on Whitney's takeout in Hamden. I can get the pies up to Cheshire before they go cold. Good, if not spectacular.

Mrs. Lee used to live on Nicholl St., not so far from State. Her sister for many years has lived on Bishop, just off of Whitney, and still does. So for the last 20 years or so I have visited the area often.

I met my wife in front of the Billie Holiday bin in Cutler's Records (the old one) while working a job in Naugatuck. I have stayed at the Hotel Duncan and after late nights at the site eaten at Mamoun's Falafel. (Open til 4am, don't have the coffee if you expect to sleep!) I've been to Toad's. At one time I knew more homeless people in New Haven than...what's the opposite of homeless...homed? Great place, love to move there if I could afford it and could find work there.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 12:55:59 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks John D! Yes, they look 15 with enviable facial hair.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 12:44:46 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

John Hammond is a guest on the latest WTF podcast. His interview starts at circa the 30 minute mark


Entered at Fri Nov 3 07:25:39 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Todd, at the risk of being unintentionally curt, I'll respond briefly. I just "woke up" to take leak after a mostly unsuccessful attempt at sleep, and am trying to get a few hours sleep before driving norf in a couple more hours. Yep, the dough is different. There is some mild stiffness & hardness in Sally's crust, especially when you eat a leftover "slice" two and half hours after it came out of the oven. The inside color is kinda whiter than NYC pizza too. It mighta been the fact that i had the white potatoe and onion pie, but the oil was totally clear - unlike NYC pizza, which when correct, has a gorgeous orangish cast ( no, thank god nothing like Cheeto in Chief's orange). Yes, Lee, Todd's right, i don't recall seeing eggplant on the menu. They do have tuna, clam, even plain tomato without any cheese. But you can check their website.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 05:25:23 CET 2017 from (32.216.226.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Apizza

Jeff, glad that you got to experience some authentic New Haven style apizza! And yes, it's pronounced "ah-beetz", but mostly in New Haven and surrounding areas. Other areas of Connecticut, especially further North, don't call it apizza.

I was born about a mile from Wooster street, where Pepe’s and Sally's are located, and my childhood home was less than 10 miles away. It wasn't until I went away to college, that I discovered that not every town had great pizza like New Haven. I guess it would be like growing up in Paris, moving away, and discovering that not everyone could make a great baguette.

One of the reasons that New Haven style pizza has it's own personality, consistency and style, is that Frank Pepe (and most of the other Italians that settled in the Wooster Square area) came from the Almafi Coast just south of Naples. Sal Consiglio was Frank Pepe's nephew, and opened Sally's a dozen or so years after the original Pepe's opened in 1925. It's my understanding that Sal worked in Pepe's pizzeria in his younger days and learned his trade there, although he added some of his own touches along the way. The cool thing about Sally's is that most of the pizzas that have come out of their oven for the past 75 years or so have been personally made by Sal (until he passed away), and his two sons Richard and Bobby. So they've been able to maintain a very consistent style and quality over all these years. It’s my understanding the Frank Sinatra was a Sally’s man, and as legend has it, would send his driver up to New Haven to pick up pizza for him.

Pepe's on Wooster Street is still very good, but I ate at one of their satellite locations once, and the experience was underwhelming. Even though they are using the same recipes, it's a facsimile of the real thing. Decent, but not great. Definitely go to Wooster street for the real Pepe’s experience.

I'm not sure exactly what makes New Haven style pizza different from New York's, but I've read that one of the main differences in the dough, is that they use a longer (24 hour cold) fermentation in New Haven, and then let the dough come up to room temperature before shaping. The typical tomato used for the sauce is a San Marzano tomato, but that is probably pretty common in many places. I think the key thing is the dough, and baking it in a decades old coal fired oven, in the case of Sally's and Pepe's.

Modern Apizza, on State Street in New Haven is one of the other long-time good ones. My brother likes Modern over the others. The late great JTull Fan turned me on to Zuppardi’s in West Haven which is also very good and old school family place kind of like Sally’s. There’s another place on Crown Street near Yale University in New Haven called “Bar” and their pizza is usually pretty good, but if definitely more of a College hipster type crowd as opposed to old school Italian. If you ever make it to BAR, you can also check out Louie’s lunch across the street….home of the first hamburger.

B.Lee, I don’t know about an eggplant pie at Sally’s, but I doubt it. I’ve heard that Modern makes a good eggplant pizza.

The link above has a good overview of New Haven apizza.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 01:43:51 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Such young fresh faces

The Band on the Ed Sullivan show.


Entered at Fri Nov 3 00:27:29 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

BTW, apizza is pronouced ahbeetz. Though in Connecticut they may pronounce it differently.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 23:48:33 CET 2017 from (24.184.49.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

It's Sally's Apizza on the hangin sign Lee. the window says Sally's Pizzeria.Even the real old timers in Brooklyn say apizza thought the signs don't. I don;t recall the menu, but it;s likely on their website. I heeded the advice of my friend who lives locally and got there close to opening time. I suggest the same to you. The place holds about 15 - 16 booths that could seat 6 easily but are better for four, and also has 4 or 5 booths for two. There's also room for them to add tables for four or six to about 10 of the booths. I saw them add a table to a booth early on for a party of 5. the place has a good capacity but it was filling up quickly on a Wednesday.

i figure Todd gotta know this place, if not he should. The most well known New Haven joint is Frank Pepe's, but it may have to do with the fact that they opened up what might be close to a dozen places now.... these guys don't have, never have had those ambitions, these guys are all about the food and the deep connection. As far as I'm grade school, junior high, and high school classes should have to go there on a field trip. And Yale University courses should have an outing and visit with the brothers that own and run it.

This is an entire way of life that is vanished and the little that's left is disappearing, we're lucky when we can find one the few remaining vestiges of it now.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 21:30:04 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I've never been to Spain, and you're not painting a pretty picture.

NwC: I didn't mean to ignore your mention of Kalevala the other day. My understanding is that it's a very long poem that ties together various tales of Finnish heroes and derring-do - all in the rhythm that Longfellow borrowed for "The Song of Hiawatha" (On the banks of Gitche-Gumi ...). When droned endlessly in battle, it often caused the other side to scream "Make it stop" before they threw down their arms and ran away. The industrious Scots automated this function in the form of the bagpipe.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 20:13:02 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: Four hours from New Haven

Subject: Pizza or Apizza?

Jeff, does Sally's say "pizza" or "apizza". The latter seems prevalent in New Haven. Mrs. Lee grew up in Hamden, just a spit north. I have visited several excellent places, pizza and apizza in New Haven. Next trip to visit we may check Sally's out. Do they make an eggplant pie?


Entered at Thu Nov 2 19:02:50 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: JQ

JQ, it's funny. I loved the white potatoe, onion, & parmesan pie at Sally's. And i think everyone should eat half a pie of it before they die. But,. though it's the realest pizza alright, & they have one helluva crust, a alightly little untypical yet very typical of the finest crusts,something about it is unpizzalike. And it;s not that it doesnt have tomato sauce. Potato, and even onion are just odd things to put on pizza. To me. I loved it, really did, but, if i never eat it again, or dont eat ot again for five years, i'm okay. When i go back with people who haven;t had it i might have a small slice but go for other things myself....yet that onion taste won't or might not mix well with other pizza tastes in your mouth.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 18:34:37 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Tradition

Thinking about Sally's Pizza for a minute, the dedication these men have is amazing. The pie is the same pie their father made 60 or 70s years ago, and it is to die for. The place operates 5 days a week, three from 4 to 9, and the other two days are slightly longer hours. When i got there at 4:45 the place was half full, of mostly older folk, at essentially 59 I was one of the few youngsters. By 6:15 the place was filling up, including some younger folk, even as young as 30ish..

But, dont ya think that if the kids of the two sons of Sal wanted to go into the family abusiness that the old timers woulda retired? Or worked for em? I gotta figure that the old men are there cause they just don;t want to give up the ship, don;t want to see this tradition, this neighborhood & food fixture die away. I spoke with one for a bit, he is face lit up when i told him we drove from Brooklyn special ( on the advice of a bass player) & that i loved his pie. Talking with some other customers, they mostly been going there since they were kids....

The metal trays the pie is served on are a thing of the past too. You gotta see em stack one on top of two already one a table. ..Clunk, whar a sound also...You could kill some one if you hit em on the head with one of these..

the world needs these places... and these kind of people in it.

Tradition.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 18:27:04 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: White potato and onion!

JFC that sounds tremendous! For some reason out here, even in PDX proper, I can’t find anything like that. We likely beat the east coast when it comes to tacos, etc but for pizza it’s go east young man!


Entered at Thu Nov 2 17:41:57 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, that last post of yours contained some fine food & drink criticism. Hell, plain old fine writing: "Tastes great. Blows your head off in the bar. And your arse off when you get back to the hotel." Cracked me up.

On that note, i drove up to Sally's Pizza in New Haven yesteday. The original ower's sons run it- in their 70s. They have 4 workers, all over 60 i'd say. Well, one might be in his 50s. .The original joint, original decor,wood paneling from i guess the 30s,all booth saeating, place looks like a diner/moose lodge/pizzeria all in one. We had the white potatoe and onion pie, which is those ingedients with a lot of parmesan cheese ( not mozz, or the commrcially supplied pizza cheese) , baked in the ancient original oven. Phenomenal. Next time I'll try the clam. Worth the two hour trip each way.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 17:33:26 CET 2017 from (67.80.25.78)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Linked McEuen interview about leaving The Nitty Gritty, why, and his career.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 16:54:15 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Champagne perry tasted good enough to fool generations of British women (mainly) that it was champagne. In the West of England, rough cider is the cause of much eye-watering stomach acidity.

The roughest cider I saw was in Galicia in Spain. The bars have a trough running along the base that looks … and smells … exactly like a urinal. You get a glass. It's cloudy and the bottom third is pulp. You drink the top and throw the dregs into the trough. Or urinal. Tastes great. Blows your head off in the bar. And your arse off when you get back to the hotel.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 15:41:17 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: An I can never get enough

“I’m on the night train/Love that stuff . . . .” Thanks for the Guns N’ Roses info, Kevin. I never made the connection. Aging brain, I guess. Also thanks to Peter for the Perry wine explainer. . . . So, then, I was drinking fermented pear juice? All I can remember is that it was smooth. Likely from the years the bottle spent inside my wine cupboard. I’m a sucker for sweet apply cider, particularly now in Niagara harvest season, but I’m told that one glassful is comparable to eating 5-6 apples. Hello diarrhea.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 15:18:42 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Perry

Perry is pear cider … in Britain we only call it cider if it's alcoholic. Nowadays there are ranks of "designer perry" in stores next to the "designer ciders." They also make perry wines. The bestseller is Babycham (baby champagne), sold in tiny bottles and the favourite drink of women a few years older than me.

The other British cheap sparkler was Pomagne … made from apples and sold in full size bottles. Extremely sweet, but really cheap. We once won a case of 12 at a school raffle. We tried one, and donated eleven bottles to the next school raffle.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 11:05:06 CET 2017 from (86.166.233.45)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

My wife and I polished off a bottle of Ripasso last night. Beautiful.

We enjoyed Canadian wine on our holiday. Nice. Bought it at Honest Eds.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 03:42:40 CET 2017 from (202.85.75.13)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mike Nomad - Night Train Express

Mike..... The guys in Guns n Roses enjoyed that wine so much that they wrote a song about it. On the Appetite for Destruction album.


Entered at Thu Nov 2 00:48:13 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: My wife's still quite partial to Chianti Ruffino, and I've grown to appreciate it too. I'm totally unfamiliar with everything else you guys have been talking about, except for the stuff that the British and Australians call lemonade. It was in the Outback that I was introduced to Tia Maria with lemonade. A very pretty young woman was a good part of the reason I tried it, but it certainly tasted good at the time. (Got a note from her today saying her daughter's getting married - so Tia Maria is very ancient history.)


Entered at Thu Nov 2 00:49:59 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bottle of Wine Fruit of the Vine!!

When yuh gonna let me get sober..........

I remember as a kid, (the brown paper bag drinkers), used to get these red wines called 999 and 444. I was so young I don't remember the reason for those numbers. I just remember being given a "swig" out of that bottle....gawd awful!

Now a day, Susan and I fairly often have a white wine before dinner or with white fish, and a red with dinner. Susan gets our wine from a place like a you brew where you go and bottle your own wine that you have chosen. We have some good wines.

Mixing those drinks. Now I have never been much of a guy for soft drinks, (sody pop). However we have a pop here in Canada called Canada Dry, ginger ale. They have in resent times come out with several flavours, cran berry, black berry, and.......When I bought our yacht we have now there was some ginger ale left in the fridge. "Green Tea Ginger Ale" DAMN....is that stuff good. I started to put it about 2 to 1 in white wine. It is damn good........so there.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 18:53:54 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The wine I most enjoyed drinking was in the early 1980s. I was in a hotel in Tokyo and there was a typhoon. My talk was cancelled. So was that of an author and friend from a rival publisher. We spent the day in the hotel coffee shop, and had a few beers with an equally stuck US baseball team. As the evening wore on, we were bemoaning the then very sweet rose wine that was all you found in most Japanese establishments back then. My friend saw two bottles of straw covered Chianti Ruffino decorating a shelf in the coffee shop. They were full. He tried to buy them. Not for sale. They were decoration. We clubbed together and kept upping the price until the barman finally agreed to sell them … something like £20 each, a ludicrous sum in those days. We retired to a table and drank both. Absolutely delicious, even after five years upright on a shelf.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 18:52:56 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.110)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Spanada (sponn-yadda)

Sorry, I could not find the “nya” symbol for spanish. This one popped up, at least in SoCal, during this era too. It was more of a wine punch deal, similar I think to Sangria and best over ice. I don't recall its power but it could do double duty as a sub for bong water.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 16:50:13 CET 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Vino tales

One late night in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, in search of a cheap mind-altering beverage, I stumbled into a drug store (a pharmacy, that is) and procured a dust-laden bottle of Night Train Express, a “fine California Perry wine” whatever that was, drawn principally to the black-and-white label depicting a line drawing of a speeding railway steam locomotive barreling into the night. The wine never made it past my lips; a friend managed to steer me into a nearby bar where we found other sustenance. But I kept the bottle on a shelf at home for several years before, in an act of desperation I suppose, I opened it one evening. It turned out to be quite palatable, in fact downright delicious. I think I paid $2.99 for it. That was a long time ago.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 16:05:51 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Wine Women & Loud Happy Songs

Link to Ringo Starr from Beaucoups of Blues. A great record that rarely turns up … I saw one yesterday, but I bought it when it came out in 1970 or 71.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 13:38:52 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Wine, wine, wine, do your stuff...

Back in the college days, yes, Mateus Rose was popular with the ladies, especially. We also liked something called Black Cat, I think a German white that went down well. Of course if you were really short on change, there was "Mad Dog", Mogen-David MD 20/20. More bang for the buck. It is actually still marketed in, what I am told, an array of disgusting flavors and colors, being essentially fruit juice and grain alcohol.

Regarding Italian wine, I went to have dinner at the home of friends of Mrs. Lee #1, an Italian couple. The husband was a supervisor in the garment trade, and would receive tributes of jugs of homemade red wine. It was strong stuff. I found this out the hard way when I was offered a glass, fairly full as I recall. It was not until my eyelids were drooping that I noticed our hosts were cutting theirs with 7-up. I had to go upstairs and take a nap. As we drove home (the Mrs. behind the wheel) that I apologized for my embarrassing (to me) brown on the bus as Mr. Zappa would say. "Oh, no" Mrs. said, "It was a compliment that you were so comfortable in their home that you took a nap!"


Entered at Wed Nov 1 11:50:18 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Good for the blood according to Grandma

I remember, also, getting a tablespoon of red wine and sugar after every meal (at my grandmother's)...starting at the age of 5. According to her it was good for the blood.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 11:46:05 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Mixing 7 UP & Red WIne

Peter V: Were your grandmothers all from Italy?!? Anyone growing up in North America, with a grandmother who had immigrated from Italy, knows that concoction from their childhood. It was the gateway drink to a lifetime of imbibing wine.  


Entered at Wed Nov 1 10:26:02 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We are in the days when RED WINE was what it said on the bottle. None of this merlot and cabernet, let alone Beaujolais or Chateuneuf du Pape.

Did you ever burn corks in the candle flame then use them to draw on the labels? Don Cortez being a good one.

Just in case the North Americans imagine we were mixing still lemonade with lemon juice and bits of lemon with Lambrusco, I should explain that in Britain “lemonade” is Seven-Up or Sprite. In the 60s it would have been Corona in large bottles, then later R. Whites.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 10:16:19 CET 2017 from (86.166.233.45)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

You missed Don Cortez, guys - the wine bottles with the faces on them.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 05:17:47 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Those crazy Brits...

Jeff: I think they were too busy with putting candles in empty wine bottles and mixing Lambrusco with lemonade. ; )


Entered at Wed Nov 1 01:37:14 CET 2017 from (67.80.30.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Didn't you British guys take drugs? Window pane, smoke hash and weed, tuminols, mushrooms, etc etc?


Entered at Wed Nov 1 00:40:39 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lambrusco was another you could drink in vast quantity. Cheap, not very alcoholic. When we were doing theatre shows for EFL students every week, three of the cast drank Old England Sherry, blended in the UK from Cyprus sherry. That was incredibly strong. I stuck with the Parafino.


Entered at Wed Nov 1 00:21:12 CET 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Days of Wine and Rose

Hey Pete - remember when Lambrusco became all the rage. It wass pretty cheap I recall and we used to flued it down like lemonade LOL. can't recall exactly when it was but I guess it was early '70's in the next wave after Mateus Rose, Liebfraumilch etc

:-0)


Entered at Wed Nov 1 00:00:37 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mateus soon lost out to Blue Nun as the favourite rock tipple. We couldn't afford Blue Nun, so subsisted on Lutomer Yugoslav Reisling at half the price. For red it was Hungarian Bulls Blood if flush with cash, or Hungarian Carafino Red if not. Generally known as Parafino, it came in rose and white too. We loved the Chianti served in open carafes at the first pizzeria in town about 1969. A few years later a more discerning friend from out of town pointed out that it had the very distinctive mineral taste of Bournemouth tap water. He reckoned it was at least 25% tap water. Well, we had to make it up with quantity and it was sold in litres.


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