The Band
Home

History
Members
Library
Discography
Videography
Filmography
Pictures
Audio files
Video clips
Tape archive
Concerts
Related artists
Merchandise
Guestbook
Chat Room
What's New?
Search

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 10:03:24 CEST 2016 from (31.52.38.35)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"Both those parties are political corpses propping each other up with rigor mortis" - Peter Hitchens on Labour and the Conservatives. Interview at link.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 09:24:16 CEST 2016 from (194.42.225.169)

Posted by:

Peter v

Defeat by Iceland reminds those Leave people that we do not rule the world, as they think. It also avoids England v France next, and that is better avoided this week.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 06:17:53 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bill M......Seal in Montreal

Bill M.....Thank you, my friend...... beautiful on so many levels.......and then read the comments below it and I understand why you and me in an increasing way have lost or are losing faith in humanity.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 05:30:01 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

A nice Youtube clip of Seal stepping in to sing with a Montreal street busker.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 01:44:25 CEST 2016 from (24.114.74.181)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: it may be apocryphal, but someone told me yesterday that this year's prize for the winner of the Iceland vs England game is a spot is a spot in the EU.


Entered at Tue Jun 28 01:12:13 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Iceland defeats England at European Cup.....

.........ok, The Queen IS stepping in to sort this one out !


Entered at Tue Jun 28 01:01:28 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.62)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dylan is a fucking genius, plain & simple. His fuckups are better than most musicians finest hour..thing is, no matter how circuitous the path, the band, and other great musicians, always find his lead, figure him out before it;s too late. and that is one of the signs of a master. People have to be able to play with you. Follow only takes you in. You gotta have the right people, and they have to be able to play with you. If you can't be played with you are only fucked up.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 23:05:35 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Da Da Da Da Da (repeat many times) Follow You Down

Thanks, Bill. I wouldn't have considered Louie Louie but yet... You Really Got Me, maybe. It was a weird start for Baby Let Me Follow You Down but it was effective.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 20:41:32 CEST 2016 from (24.114.72.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT; At TLW, when Dylan started playing what turned out to be "Let Me Follow You Down", I thought he was leading into "You've Really Got Me", but I can see you thinking it was going to be 'Louie Louie".


Entered at Mon Jun 27 19:08:08 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Big Four

1) The Procrastination .... Policies delayed are policies denied (tomorrow never comes).
2) The Scottish veto.
3) The Lammy: Voting out the non-binding referendum.
4) The second referendum.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 17:11:42 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Summertime Thing

I really enjoyed the summer songs on John D's Mixed Bag last week. When my kids were small I'd make mixed cd's for every holiday, change of season. I even made one for trains, horses, dogs. I always loved summer songs best. The kids were tough critics though. They'd argue that Dylan's Summer Days really belonged on the fall mix and The Stones Winter is really a summer song.

One of my favorite summer songs is Chuck Prophet's Summertime Thing. It's such a small town summer song with the greatest beat. It's one of those great songs like Garcia's Sugaree that you can just put on repeat for hours at a time.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 16:58:27 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Louie Louie Kignsmen on REO

For me, the best (and I only wish I still had it) was 'Louie Louie' (Kingsmen) on REO. Two minutes of rock and roll simple genius! After the seventh inning stretch here in Victoria in a local baseball field where the Victoria Harbourcats play ( we walk over there weekly to see a game in the best seats for about $40 for two), what gets played after 'Take Me Out To the Ballgame"? - you guessed it,..."Louie, Louie" and everyone starts to dance in their seats.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 15:22:18 CEST 2016 from (24.114.68.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: coulda been, though I doubt it as "Hell's half-acre was a phrase the parental units employed throughout my childhood. A purposeful exaggeration as in "I had to look all over hell' half-acre to find the screwdriver."

Reo was a subsidiary of Quality Records. While the Ron Hawkins Quartet 45 came out on Quality in '58, the Hawks backed Dallas Harms on his Reo 45 released at prettymuch the same time.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 15:11:20 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Shame!

The selfishness of internal Tory politics determines the future of a country and its growth! Shame! And by the way, do those who vie for this power have no foresight of what their machinations might do if they succeed? A competent executive ponders all options (win or lose: what will it mean?) before embarking on a treacherous voyage? And why was it necessary for Mr. Cameron to chose to abandon ship on day one? Did he really want out because he abhorred his detractors within the party? Did he have enough of the dirty game he was part of?


Entered at Mon Jun 27 15:05:48 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 45s on REO

Thanks, John. I bought many 45s on REO in those early 60s years. Some of the big acts were on REO in those days.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 14:10:46 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Norbert's Walk to London

Any fellow fitness/exercise nuts here? Sorry-I try to be apolitical but long walks/runs are cool.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 13:33:41 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT & Wild Weekend

Realize you asked Bill; but since I'm up.......yes Wild Weekend was indeed on Reo; when I bought it at Wilson & Lee in Oshawa.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 12:17:11 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Nobert

Yes, maybe Nicola or Angela are needed now.
In spite of the Brexit I prefer this site to remain English, anyway we’ve got two years to work on that (somehow a German The Band site is gewöhnungsbedürftig).


Entered at Mon Jun 27 11:34:08 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: I walked from Liverpool to London

see the link


Entered at Mon Jun 27 09:55:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

The plot thickens. Alistair Campbell, Blair’s chief advisor is a devious manipulator, though now retired effectively. He has been interviewed a lot, because he knows how politicians work. He reckons Johnson & Gove had no expectation of winning the vote. Johnson didn’t decide whether he was Remain or Leave until after the first weekend of the campaign. Campbell reckons both were sure of a narrow victory for Remain, whereupon they would wade in with generous concession speeches asking for party unity, and thus unseat and replace Cameron. Apparently, Johnson had only written a concession speech (which is why he didn’t comment for three days) and was shocked. Then last night Ian Duncan-Shit (Leave) said that it might say £350 million a week extra for the NHS instead of Europe on the campaign posters, but of course they didn’t mean that literally. It was about Tory internal politics and it misfired.

Neither party has credible leaders, nor alternatives in the wings. As I said on Facebook yesterday, in 1603 James VI of Scotland was invited to come and rule England as James I. I wonder if Nicola Sturgeon would take the job of British PM!


Entered at Mon Jun 27 07:31:29 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: REAL! Rock & Roll

Thank you for that guys! A great thread. Back in those daze that song just shook my soul, a mean dirty sax.

How goezit Bill? Long time since we shook hands. Jerry, I'm going to send you an e mail with a picture. My first time away up the Gardner Canal, (almost to Kemano). Along the beach in one area is the most odd streaking in the rock, right along the beach. In all my travels, I've never seen the likes of it.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 06:58:52 CEST 2016 from (32.216.241.32)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Hell's Half Acre

I was looking at a map of the Niagra Falls area, and noticed that there's an area of rapids on the Niagra River on the US side called Hell's Half Acre. Wonder if this is one of the names that stuck in Robbie's head during his travels to resurface on his first solo album in 1987.

I visited to the Falls many years ago, but never noticed the name for that part of the river before.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 06:45:31 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: REO

I bought 'Wild Weekend' when it came out. Wasn't it on REO in Canada, Bill"


Entered at Mon Jun 27 05:38:13 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin' C: "Wild Weekend" is a classic. The Rockin' Rebels were a Buffalo group who recorded the song in '59 or '60 for a local label. It had local success upon release, but didn't break nationally for another couple years, but which time the original group had broken up. In need of a follow-up but with no group to do one, the producers raided their own back catalogue for a similar-sounding song, "Rockin' Crickets", which they'd recorded in '59 with a Niagara Falls, Ontario group, (Big John Little and) the Hot Toddys. It had been a spotty hit back in '59 - doing well in at least Buffalo, Toronto and Seattle (!), where it was one of Jimi Hendrix's favourite records of the time, but now it was reissued as if it was a Rockin' Rebels record. By '63, the Hot Toddys were out of reach in Northern Quebec, so the producers back in Buffalo called in a third group to record enough tracks to complete a "Wild Weekend" LP, which also included the original "Wild Weekend" and the original "Rockin' Crickets. Band links?: Sandy Konikoff was doing jobbing gigs with the two brothers at the core of the original group when I first connected with him 15-20 years ago; Big John Little, who's still going strong at 86, knew Hawkins well back in the day; and the third group went on to back Richard Manuel and the Revols' manager Dave Mickie (later a Toronto DJ and '70s CHUM-FM colleague of John D) on 45.


Entered at Mon Jun 27 03:57:07 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Do you remember???????

The other night in the middle of the night as I towed on that towline......I started whistling a song. How do these things come into your mind?

The Rockin Rebels......"Wild Weekend" do y'all remember? Punch it in on youtube here......it's still great!


Entered at Mon Jun 27 01:44:57 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Wither.........thou goest?????

I actually got HOME!! ............and I got to see Ian trying to totally confuse me.........Where in fuck are we going Ian?? I just got back ...:-)


Entered at Mon Jun 27 00:30:16 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Whither?

Someone else has put us in the departure lounge.

We do not know where we're going, we do not when we're leaving, we do not know what route we will be taking, we do not know what it will be like when we get there and we don't even know if we'll recognise the place when we get there.

What's worse is that the people who put us in this departure lounge have no idea either.

And they don't even have a captain and crew.

And, if and when they've sorted all that out, they don't even know if Air Traffic Control will give them the route they want anyway.

But they're happy (delighted, even) because they always wanted to go and never thought they would but now we are - and, if we crash along the way, well, that's a price worth paying.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 23:50:11 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.184)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for the link to "US And Them". Very nice.

Speaking of sides, listening to Dylan and Hawks in Manchester this morning had me thinking that the boo-ers then are now Brexiters now.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 18:58:14 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Peter, let’s hope that 20% cut concerns the 7 series of the City Bankers, let the VW Golf boom in England after all and may this wishful thinking be tomorrow’s justice.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:59:39 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tradition, tradition... tra...di...tion (musical notes not included)

Maybe tradition should not be the prevailing approach given the seriousness of this issue. If Royalty had stepped up when Neville Chamberlain did his thing, who knows what might have happened. The priority has to be the good of the country and The Queen could make a huge difference if she believes that EU involvement is the best course. Tradition is important but sometimes a bold step must be taken.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:54:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Traditionally, the Royals keep right out of it. I noticed the front page of The Sun (aka The Scum) is raving about the iniquity of a Stop Boris! campaign in the Tory party. So clearly Murdoch’s money is on Boris Johnson, as it was on Blair and on Cameron. It’s a fair bet then to avoid whoever The Sun supports!


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:53:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Truth is something for elitists" the candidate's supporter says

'Truth is something for elitists". Who cares about fact-checkers. The candidate doesn't. He says what he wants and then slightly alters his comments. He never says "I was wrong" or "I lied" or 'I apologize". Like so many before him, he realizes that if he says it on television or in the media, it will be heard and believed by many and people will go away with what was said and to hell with the fact-checkers. They and their conclusions don't matter. Woe is me!


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:48:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Doug Paisley, Garth & Maud Hudson

I knew Garth had done two albums with Doug Paisley, but while browsing through old Mojo cover discs, I saw for the first time that Garth & Maud feature with Doug Paisley on "Return To The Dark Side of The Moon" performing Pink Floyd's "Us & Them." It's on YouTube (linked above).

I think this is one we just missed!


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:47:47 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Business partner

Dan Rather was just on CNN: He said (paraphrased) -All you remember as a viewer is his face. You can fact-check all you want. All you remember is his face. And if you like any of what he says (and sometimes he says things you agree with even if you don't agree with everything) and you keep seeing his face, you go away with that. His point is that media has become a business partner rather than an adversary. That is dangerous. Adversarial reporting should be a much larger part of any journalistic effort, on TV or otherwise. Dan Rather said the this is missing from current TV and media journalism. He talks candidly about ratings. A voice from the wilderness. In the interest of our future, the media should listen to Dan Rather. He's been there.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 17:23:02 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Buckingham Palace

Has the Royal Family,(Buckingham Palace) from the Queen down, made any comment regarding the current issue in the UK? I understand that the Queen is the monarch and not the government, but she is (or should be) more than a figurehead, and if her country is truly in some peril or turmoil regarding the impending change over the next 2 years, I would think that Buckingham Palace would have some stake in this and say (or even do) something? What is known?


Entered at Sun Jun 26 15:17:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Indeed, Norbert. Germany has enough sense to know that at 20% of production, the UK is its single largest export market for its cars … we recognize quality. Apparently it’s also the biggest market for kitchen equipment. That’s why I can’t see BMW (e,g.) closing down UK production of the Mini. Angela Merkel has worked that one out, though the French seemingly haven’t, as they didn’t a few years ago when they set fire to trucks loaded with LIVE British lambs which they saw as competition to French farmers, in spite of both of us being in the EU. But I don’t think that’s the point. I think the issue is a vision of the future.

A couple of weeks ago, A.A. Gill said it very well in The Sunday Times, when he said he can travel anywhere in Europe, look at the paintings in art galleries and totally comprehend the images. We are culturally entwined in so many ways. Sure, it might be that we may work together in smaller units … England, Scotland, Catalonia. The issue is peaceful co-operation. We never bought into the euro. Wisely it turned out, but most of us still feel European. In my work, I was lucky enough to speak in many countries in Europe, work with people in my publisher’s local offices, get to know them. I never felt I was in a “foreign” environment.

People moan about all sorts of things about Europe, many of them trivial. Yes there’s dreadful bureaucracy, but a lot of the laws protect people’s health and working rights. Europe subsidizes farming, but as a French colleague persuaded me years ago, self-sufficiency in food production is the very best defence against the problems of the future. Of course, paying people to keep land idle while importing cheaper vegetables from Africa and Peruvian asparagus is lunacy, and the UK has continued to do that.

The EU will be much poorer without the UK, because the UK was the leading voice to reform the bureaucracy, stop overpaying lots of fat cats in Brussels. That’s why we need to be IN and co-operating with many like-minded Europeans to reform and improve. .


Entered at Sun Jun 26 14:29:15 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Brexit: The Opinion

England is the most modern country in Europe, but onsite London it’s still an open air museum. While Peter is testing his VOTED IN felt outside, it’s time for some reflection. Concerning the EU and Brexit let’s not overreact about the consequences. Like Bremain would have been a mild form of leaving, Brexit will be a mild form of staying. The British will still buy BMW’s, German beer, wooden shoes and Rammstein, ok a little bit more expensive a little more complicated. Their windy island will remain that heap of sand across Germany. Of course Brussels now threatens severe with heavy words, the Junckers are angry and offended, but they will rinse it away with lots of expensive wine. Their intention to pepper the others in who also consider a withdrawal, will, in the end, prove to be counterproductive. Brussels’s little men’s political need to punish the Brexiteers will lose out under pressure of their own business community in favor of economic importance and not to cut any deeper into their own skin.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 14:00:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

With both political parties in turmoil, we actually can't have an election. But people are still trying to find a way back here. The most helpful thing of all, would be for the French to tone down the belligerent statements. They will only feed the flames and assist the "leave" campaigners. Merkl is showing sensible restraint.

The trouble is, and I know UKIP people locally, is that we all thought they were harmless buffoons with a big chip on their shoulder and the EU was the scapegoat. They are still buffoons. Our mistake was in thinking them harmless. It is a dire warning about Trump.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 13:28:52 CEST 2016 from (109.66.18.5)

Posted by:

פורץ מנעולים בחולון

Location: israel
Web: My link

Subject: the band

Great Work i like your site!


Entered at Sun Jun 26 12:36:45 CEST 2016 from (83.249.176.101)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan lines and EU (scroll)

In opposite to the common opinion here I was glad to hear the results in the UK. Yes, for the old people, country people, descent people, real people. "Oh me, oh my, love that Country Pie".

Just to take one silly EU thing: Our bank (we have been customers from the sixties) invited us to fill a form "to know us". Know us? After all these years? "Sorry, it is an EU thing". This paper was full of political questions. I said to Mrs. NorthWestCoaster: "I shall stop this paper to their bv#bd' ?+ififui#axx7)szgiid". She said: "In that case I'll step aside and yell: "WHO IS THAT MAN?"

...which, of course, is just another Dylan line, too.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 10:09:54 CEST 2016 from (125.239.241.225)

Posted by:

Rod

.. and I quite like Fallen Angels. Not as good as Shadows In The Night - but OK.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 10:07:06 CEST 2016 from (125.239.241.225)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: refererndums

Recently we had a referendum to change the flag. Basically the proposed new flag removed the Union Jack and replaced it with the silver fern with has become our unofficial symbol. The vote was lost (by the same margin as the Brexit vote) but alot of the opposition was from people who just didn't like the Government and would vote against anything they proposed. I suspect the same thing happened with Brexit - just a vote against the Goevernment and the ruling elite without a thought to the consequences. I've lost faith in referendums.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 03:21:11 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Fallen Angels

JT, I have to agree with you about Fallen Angels. Upon it's release I did slag the record here in the GB. I never give up on a Dylan record though and I have to admit it's grown on me with repeated listens. Also, going back as far as Love and Theft I can feel where these songs have influenced Dylan's songwriting,


Entered at Sun Jun 26 03:00:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fallen Angels Dylan

For the first time, I listened to Dylan's 'Fallen Angels' in sequence and all the way through. In short, it is a lovely album with great nuanced singing and wonderful subtle musical accompaniment. I think one has to forget what Dylan is to oneself (the way we have perceived him and built him up in our own minds) and just listen to this album for its own sake. In that context, it is a true work of musicianship and I value it highly. I needed just this to settle the turmoil of the last few days. It hit the spot today.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 01:48:04 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Faux thespian

They might audition but the politician would fall far short of what is required to be a true thespian. Shakespeare would turn him down for sure. Not even a bit part. He is a faux pas.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 01:35:30 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Idle/Cleese

2nd row tickets to see Idle/Cleese in OCTOBER in Victoria. Saw Cleese alone a couple of years ago here. Great!


Entered at Sun Jun 26 00:04:06 CEST 2016 from (24.114.55.108)

Posted by:

Bill M

Standing by himself over there is David Cameron, determined to hang around until October in case anyone should desire his sage advice!

Al E: Perhaps it's best not to re-ask Robbie's question, given her answer: "Nowhere".

These appear to be Pythonesque times. Today's paper alone had two clever references to the Fool Monty: 1) a picture of the next New Yorker magazine cover, showing a dapper Cleese (and chums) silly-waking off a cliff, and 2) a "Wife of Brian" reference in the headline of an article about a forged "ancient" document mentioning Jesus's better half.


Entered at Sun Jun 26 00:00:35 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: A vile sight

TV News just now - Donald Trump, Rupert Murdoch, Jerry Hall together in Scotland. I thought they must have been auditioning for the three evil old hags in Macbeth.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 22:39:57 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.132)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Whilst Europe is in a fiz, Canadian /U.S. relation are at their best since The Band came here & the U.S got the best of Canada's best.

A self professed techno moron, I'm doing business with a Canadian technology company. I've spent several hours a day on the phone with them most days this past week. Never have i been more impressed with a company, or a customer support department.Customer service is mostly a thing of the past. I have customer service experience daily, with people in all kinds of industries, all over the world, and 90% or more of the time, the experience is awful.That goes for U.S. located customer service, as well as outsourced teams or customer serivce at foreign.

For now i don't want to go into more detail, but i'm really amazed how well the customer support team of this canadian firm listens, answers, and behaves. I'm able to get most of em laughing,and we have a good time.What surprised me was that none of the people i asked if they knew The Band, knew them till i sang the chorus of The Weight. Young Whippersnappers, in their 20s & 30s, but fuck, you canucks gotta teach your chirren better!


Entered at Sat Jun 25 20:56:10 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Communicating with The Queen

Is there in fact a way to make suggestions to The Queen. It sounds like a plausible idea if she believes this is a huge detriment to her country?


Entered at Sat Jun 25 20:45:09 CEST 2016 from (92.22.62.46)

Posted by:

Solomon

On Change.org more than 130,000 have signed a petition calling for Mayor of London Sadiq Khan to declare London independent from the UK and apply for EU membership. Donald Trump tweeted - Just arrived in Scotland. Place is going wild over the vote. They took their country back, just like we will take America back. No games! He got the first part correct.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 20:45:09 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ian and Bobby Gregg and Kev and PV.

Ian - I apologise for being a tad facetious. Thing was I was trying to lighten the mood whilst also attempting [in vain it seems] to get everyone on here enthusing as manically as myself about RoseAnn's latest amazing EP.

The fact is your efforts at explaining the session fees etc were a tour de force and desrve only admiration for that effort and diligence.

Kev - I think your point is absolutely spot on about the utter ridiculousness and irresponsibility of a 50 + 1 % vote being sufficient in any civilized society to completely risk flipping everything on its head. I also endorse Pete's point about the abuse of the younger vote by self-serving wrinklies who care only for their own dwindling remaining time rather than that of their descendants.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 20:42:29 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Give her a call

Peter: Give the queen a call or write her an e-mail. The queen's legacy might be to save the EU and Britain would reign supreme as a major player. You might even get knighted, Sir Peter. Remember us when you pick up the OBE (Lucretia talking).


Entered at Sat Jun 25 20:30:56 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Queen does not have veto power … but you have given me an idea. She does have the power to dissolve parliament, thus triggering a general election. this was used in Australia via the Governor-General, I recall. That would be a potentially useful scenario.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 19:59:42 CEST 2016 from (72.143.234.238)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The tragedy of this vote is that the world - especially the stronger North American economies were just about ready to start gradually raising interest rates back to sensible levels - moving away from almost a decade of free money/zero interest rates that has had unhealthy consequences. Funds will now again flow to the safe haven of the U.S. dollar......interest rates will be kept low by central bankers the world over for prolonged periods and the very people that drove this vote - the older generation - will be the very people that will be most hurt by not earning any money on their bank deposits. Do 65 year olds really want to put big chunks of their cash into the stock market ? They will be forced to now.........Sad.

Worth noting that the EU has passed a bill aimed at this GB.....Smiley faces will now be not just mandatory but double regulation size on all posts deemed humorous in nature......rumbles of a new "leave" campaign have started.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 19:35:36 CEST 2016 from (32.216.241.32)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Peter V. Thanks for the history lesson re: George III. Glad to know that we're not viewed as the bad guys for our rebelliousness!

Kevin J, I agree with you that the vote ratio should be higher. At least 2/3 in these sorts of cases. What we too often get in a democracy is known as the tyranny of the majority. Thing is that people (not singling you out - it's all of us) only tend to worry about it when one is on the side where things didn't go the way one had hoped.

On the other hand, I thought that the voter turnout at 72% was generally quite good. There will always be a subset of the voting populace that doesn't pay attention, and doesn't show up to vote. Shame on them. Democracy requires participation.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 19:24:26 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Veto Power?

As for The Queen, does she have 'veto power"?


Entered at Sat Jun 25 19:22:58 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Apology never necessary, Ian

Ian: You never have to apologize for your scholarship. For me, what you do counts.

I think we all understood what you meant by 'we'. Not to make light of this decision, but Monty Pythonesque questions like 'what is the EU?'come to mind or maybe 'I'm here at the poll. What's this all about?' Oh dear!


Entered at Sat Jun 25 19:16:20 CEST 2016 from (64.12.116.70)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Hither or thither

The "we" in the question at the end of my last post was meant to refer to "we as a country", Al, rather than "we on the GB".

If Scotland gains independence within the EU, I have suggested to my wife, who is Scottish, that she seeks dual citizenship. This option would also likely be available to our children,all born in Scotland, and, more importantly, to our grandchildren, too. If any Brit here can make a similar claim, through Scottish, Irish or some other EU ancestry, then you may wish to consider doing likewise.

Going back a bit, I only intended to point out that, in my view, Levon did not play drums on Dylan's "Crawl Out" single, contrary to the claim in "A Musical History". It was only when this was doubted, that I explained the reasons I held that view. In doing so, I mentioned the payment to Bobby Gregg and it sort-of exploded from there on. Sorry if you found it a bit much.



Entered at Sat Jun 25 18:56:17 CEST 2016 from (166.216.157.15)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Ah Bartelby. Ah democracy.

I can't swear to its veracity but I read that the most popular questions and comments now on UK sites are:

- What is the EU?

- Why are we leaving the EU?

These questions are from after the referendum vote!

Did the queen weigh in? Seems that the oldest demo, those that voted in favor of Brexit, might still respect the monarchy?


Entered at Sat Jun 25 18:43:26 CEST 2016 from (72.143.234.238)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"50% plus one" is simply not a sufficient threshold for nation and life changing decisions. Simple as that......After the madness of living through allowing separatist forces in Quebec to call a 2nd referendum just 15 years after the first one........Canada was sensible enough to pass a law supported by the Supreme Court that made it clear that "50% plus one" was not enough to break up a country.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 18:35:51 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fact-checking

There are many 'worst parts' to what is going on today both in the USA and in the UK. One of the worst is the media approach to the populist demagogue continued attention with seemingly very little balance challenging what they say. One hears things like 'We need to fact-check' etc and then again the demagogues speak to the people and are never 'called ' on what they say. The demagogue does not have to repeat too often... the media take very good care of repeating the untruths. Fact-checking. Its a joke!


Entered at Sat Jun 25 17:21:31 CEST 2016 from (104.2.102.31)

Posted by:

Zzzz

Location: Forney, TX

Anybody loving the recent Van Morrison release? Sweet Thing is amazing, love John Platania's work.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 17:06:11 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Buyer's remorse?

Where do we go from here? Here is an entry from the Associated Press:

"Tens of thousands want a do-over. So many users are signing a petition for a re-run of Britain's referendum on European Union membership that they've crashed the House of Commons website hosting the document. The petition passed the 200,000 mark on Friday evening, with a map of the voting indicating that most activity was in London - where most boroughs backed the "remain" camp in the referendum. The House of Commons said it had seen "high volumes of simultaneous users on a single petition, significantly higher than on any previous occasion." A second referendum isn't in the cards for now, but experts say it isn't out of the question if those who back a British exit begin suffering from buyer's remorse."

Let's see what democracy can be? Can all the young people who didn't vote and anyone who regrets his/her vote continue this barrage to make the will of the people known (along with all those 'remainers' who did vote?


Entered at Sat Jun 25 16:21:19 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Belgium navy saves 14 British Bremainers

“In The Canal, a hundred miles north of Dunkirk, more than 13 people narrowly escaped drowning on Saturday after their smugglers’ boat capsized.

As Belgium naval ships approached to rescue the stricken asylum-seekers, their boat – a repurposed trawler – tipped over, throwing those on deck into the water. Luckily all 14 alleged Bremainers managed to climb on top of the keel of the reversed boat.

The marines secured the flipped trawler with it’s hawser and towed their payload to Belgium. As the tug entered the Dunkirk harbour the British refugees on keel started singing “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.” Google research learned that the song is a 70th him over the alleged resurrection of the South of the USA by a group called The Band.

A crowd of 6 Germans provided the 14 ex Bremainers a warm welcome. Back on EU soil the 14 rescued and the 6 Germans went straight into the pub.“


Entered at Sat Jun 25 13:23:49 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Where Do We Go From Here?

Well Ian lad we could always consult Robbie since he was the first to ask the question

OR

We could re-examine a tad more forensically than last time the Bobby Gregg session fees

OR

We could all share in my unbounded enthusiasm for RoseAnn's incredible musical offerings!

I know which I'm drawn to. What about your goodself mate?

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jun 25 13:10:36 CEST 2016 from (64.12.116.70)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Whither? Or Wither?

Oh, what a mess!

A referendum intended to resolve differences within the Conservative and to marginalise UKIP seems to have done neither?

The conduct of both campaigns, pitting PROJECT FEAR against PROJECT WHOPPER, was just plain awful.

I think it was Bertrand Russell who said that fools and fanatics are always sure of themselves whereas thoughtful people are more nuanced - or something like that. The LEAVE campaign was more passionate and this penetrated parts of this country rarely energised politically.

Where will we go from here?


Entered at Sat Jun 25 10:23:06 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: On a happier note [or notes] - RoseAnn again

Leaving aside for a moment the unpalatable culmination of social alienation, deprivation and disintegration.

Another of RoseAnn's growing line of admirers from the footy site where I've been plugging her latest record has this to say about it:

Not for me. Or, at least, it shouldn't be. Yet it grows. And it grows.

Her voice is familiar from the past, evoking a New York before I'd discovered the place. Punk was on my doorstep, a bus ride to Eric's [Liverpool night club] but New York had a distance and a magic that always fascinated me. I wanted to drink in CBGB's and Rose Ann's voice transports me there or back to playing records in my bedroom in the Seventies when NY was still exotic. She's wired in to the New York of my imagination, of sleazy bars and busy strangers, hustling and getting by in the big city. There's always been a fascination for New York in Liverpool from the days of sea and the trips of our fathers. John Lennon was just one to live that fascination.

The band are right up there and the production is first class but what stands out this time are the voice and lyrics, I love the little tales imbued with honesty and grit, there's a humanity there that's endearing and repays repeated listens. If the cameos painted are more relevant to my daughter than me, there is also a universality that we can all relate to.

The first track, Airing of Grievances, contrasts an uplifting chourus, 'Your so nice, I hope you stay a while and I don't mess it up' to a song about coping with depression in a genuinely touching insight, the more it's played the more it grows but that happens with all 4 songs.

The second track, the Drinking Song, is hugely impressive, it has you straight in the bar, avoiding going back to the lonlieness of an empty flat and going too far with a stranger. One night stand regret mixed with acknowledgement that there's something better but not right now. Haunting and a special mention to the Viola player, who dips in and out so deftly

The third song originally had me all Mick and Keef but after a few plays stands up completely on it's own and Mick and Keef disapear as if by magic, I happen to love the solo towards the end, I hate perfection as much as I love the diction of Shane McGowan and come to think of it, the Pouges are in here with many others influences. I love the way the lyrics are free from confines of the music in places. Reminds me of how Elvis Costello constructs his words.

The last song was initially my favourite, RoseAnn fell in love, nah nah na na na... but there's always a but. Lament that's a good description Al E. I like the buts throughout all of the four tracks, despair at times but you always feel there is an upside, sad at times but never sorry, enjoying life without it being easy.

Both Rose Ann and the band deserve much wider exposure and do need a couple of plays to bring out the best of them. One of those artists that repay a few listens with new discoveries, I really do hope they get the break through because they are certainly more than talented enough.""""

Wowser!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jun 25 10:02:04 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Listening to the radio today. One Conservative MP said the biggest mistake that Johnson and Gove could make is thinking this was a vote for them. As with Labour, the populist vote was “a plague on both your houses.” He added that some Conservative voters said they would never forgive Cameron for screwing this up, nor continue to vote Conservative.

I’ve always been critical of politicians per se, though I still argue that we have a Representative system and populist appeals to a mass single issue vote have no place in our democracy. The system was designed for debate and discussion within parliament. And a few politicians have emerged I admire … both Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) and Ruth Davidson (Conservative) were wise voices, and interestingly Nicola Sturgeon would get the vote of every woman I know in Southern England if she were standing here. Alan Johnson and Sadiq Khan for Labour both spoke sensibly in the final debates. And yes, Caroline Lucas (Green) also wrote sensibly in today’s Guardian, though no town has worse traffic management than green Brighton.

A tiny point … the upmarket Waitrose supermarket give you a free newspaper if you spend £5 weekdays, £10 weekends and have a loyalty card. The choice is Times, Telegraph, Mail (all Brexit) or Guardian. Yesterday, most unusually here in Tory Poole, the large pile of Guardians was down to a single copy, which I picked up. I’m not reading the Brexit press anymore.

Mrs V has just made two yellow felt name tags with “VOTED IN” on them.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 09:54:35 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M and JT

Jerry - I agree it's a valiant attempt to make sense of the spiralling madness.

Bill - I couldn't recall the text you cited from what I'd read. Eventually found it was in an entirely different piece about Boris Johnson.

Try the link above. The article is about a nation's social disintegration.

Even in places that voted to remain there have been areas blighted by deprivation where the vote was heavily to leave. And vice versa - other than those East Anglian exit/UKIP strongholds where the Polish immigration issue was so tinderbox.


Entered at Sat Jun 25 06:09:11 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

For what it's worth, I like the linked thought-piece from today's paper, "EU can’t go on forever without earning consent of the governed", which starts with "The EU must still make a case for itself, if it wants to keep the British decision from spreading across the continent."


Entered at Sat Jun 25 06:01:41 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Yes, some good points, but don't you find it rather windy-clever and at times addled? I'm like, What does this mean?: "If his name is on a shortlist of two put forward to Tory members, few doubt he would be the runaway winner."

Still, a critically important point with a transatlantic edge was made a few paragraphs earlier: "The deeper fear among [insert group name] now isn’t just of a recession. It’s about the rise of something new in [insert country] politics, unleashed when politicians with scant respect for truth meet desperate voters; and for the backlash to come, when it sinks in that [insert name or concept here] hasn’t ended immigration overnight or magically given depressed communities their futures back."


Entered at Sat Jun 25 01:58:45 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Thanks for the article, Al

Great review article of the smouldering issues: To me, one of the most telling lines regarding the PM and his colleague was: "What they had not figured out was that a diffuse, scattershot popular anger had not yet decisively found a powerful enough outlet, but that the staging of a referendum and the cohering of the leave cause would deliver exactly that."


Entered at Sat Jun 25 01:04:06 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: A quite definitive article on a completely dishevelled UK

A superb piece that reveals how this vote has picked off the UK's scabs to reveal the pus beneath


Entered at Sat Jun 25 00:21:25 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rant

Populist demagogue(s) - we see it in the USA now and we are seeing some version of it from the right in UK. They lick their collective lips at the lack of common sense of people who think that if things are said often enough, they will become fact (we've had that many times over the years, most horribly during a terrifying period in the 30's and 40's.) Democracy and its vote comes at a price. Contrary to what our leaders say, the people are not always correct in their decisions. Sometimes, when the people have 'spoken', disaster occurs. The vote does not always 'get it right'. The old adage - 'Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it.' might apply to the UK situation. The PM may have made an error in asking the question. Eventually, his government would have to face the fact that a significant number of his populace was unhappy with the EU. But was there not another approach than a referendum vote. Perhaps his government could have tweaked immigration and other issues to improve the issues of concern. Given what has happened over my lifetime, I don't have a lot of confidence in the populace 'democratic' vote. Germany in the 30's was only one example. Someone said on TV (CNN) that this is a struggle between globalism and nationalism and the latter won. Why can their not be a middle ground wherein the national state of the country can be improved when their are issues without abandoning a global approach. Logic and reason are not always paramount!


Entered at Sat Jun 25 00:00:32 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunno, Tod … something I wrote on this:

The War of Independence was a long time ago, and most British people accept that George III was the baddie and the revolutionaries the goodies. I don’t think that’s simply Hollywood film: I think most of us realize that our ancestors would have been most likely indentured servants or poor immigrants, and they would have eagerly joined the American cause if they’d been there in 1776. If they had been there, they might have been transported to the colonies for a crime like killing a rabbit on the local lord’s land.

The Declaration of Independence talks about George III ‘abolishing the free System of English Laws’ and ‘transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries’ because the framers, and many people in Britain, considered George III (Elector of Hanover) to be German, and the troops had large numbers of Hessian German-speaking mercenaries. This was necessary because British conscripts were considered highly likely to defect to the American side and hightail it westwards.

Similarly the War of 1812 doesn’t ruffle British feathers. The song The Battle of New Orleans was a major hit in Britain, albeit in the Lonnie Donegan version rather than Johnny Horton’s original. We were fine with the British running off in defeat, even if we surmised, rightly or wrongly, that most of the redcoats (as in the War of Independence) were Hessian mercenaries.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 23:40:23 CEST 2016 from (97.33.67.2)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT - New England - USA - North America - Earth

Subject: Island Status

I don't know the first thing about world currencies, but I've always thought it was interesting that the UK held onto the pound sterling rather than switching to the Euro. I'm sure the reasons are varied and complicated, but as an outsider, it always appeared to me that they were keeping one foot in the door and one foot out.

At the offices of one of my corporate clients here in the US, they have a routine of playing music over the PA system (a song or two) at 3:30 PM on Friday afternoons. Just a way to close out the week with something to get into weekend mindset. It's usually related to something topical (or increasingly) as a tribute to a recent death. For example they played 'Changes' on the Friday following Bowie's death, and 'Let's Go Crazy' on the Friday following the death of Prince.

Today at 3:30, they played a recording of 'God Save The Queen' followed by The Clash 'Should I Stay or Should I Go'. The owners of the company are from Norway, one of the chief financial dudes is English. and the CEO is from Austria, so needless to say, there is a fairly large International presence here for a Connecticut based company.

I don't know that I'm in a position to comment regarding Brexit, as my earliest ancestors fled England in 1633 to come to Connecticut. And I sometimes think there is lingering resentment towards America over the whole American War of Independence brouhaha and the War of 1812. So my opinion on the matter is probably negligible, but I have hope that a pragmatic solution will ultimately prevail and things will work out for the best for the UK as well as the region. But the ride will be bumpy in the short term.

It did occur to me, that this would be an opportune moment for the Rolling Stones to record an 'Exile on Main Street' Volume 2.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 22:28:22 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.187)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"...turnout in areas with a higher proportion of younger residents tended to be lower." - BBC....As I thought. Thank you, Peter. A fine link that was....but sad when one reflects that it was so unnecessary to even have had the vote.....and then there is Trump...his take: very good news because a falling pound will mean more people will be able to visit HIS UK properties....always about him. Pray for Hillary, folks.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 22:01:32 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

I lost my faith in the common sense of the people (and of most people) years ago, and now I've lost my faith in the morning after. It was a relatively new faith, founded on the rollercoaster results-reporting of the 2nd Quebec-separation referendum that Kevin J just mentioned. Most of us went to be totally sickened that the mostly-complete results reported by midnight had the separatists with a growing lead. But then we all got up to hear the news that the remaining votes were so solidly against separation that the unity of the country was saved by a wafer-thin margin.

While that referendum was built around a pretty straitforward in/out question, the earlier one revolved around a question like "Are you for or against the idea of Quebec becoming a sovereign nation in a to-be-negotiated special association with the rest of Canada?" It seems to me that this is the sort of thing that the UK has voted for, given the existence of Article 50 of the EU treaty that sets out the negotiations that must take place over a couple of years to snip and untangle things and re-tie and refashion the results. Presumably the UK government would negotiate for the UK, so couldn't it reset the table as it - together with the EU - wishes and then announce a second referendum to bless the reset table? All of which could mean that in three years not all that much will have changes, aside from details ...


Entered at Fri Jun 24 21:11:04 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: How different age groups voted

Kevin, scroll down on the link.

18-14 were 73% remain/

25-34 were 62% remain

35-44 were 52% remain

45-54 were 56% leave

55-64 were 57% leave

65 + were 60% leave

The aged and flatulent won the day. The vibrant, creative contributing places voted remain. The declining towns, the rural areas, the wealthy Brit First retirement areas voted leave. I'd say the "non-contributors" financially and creatively won the day. Looking at a Twitter feed just now, someone said "I feel more at home in Rome, Paris or Frankfurt than Sunderland." Hmm. Fair point.

Think of British food 40 years ago and look at it now.

Look back at the history of the Social Democrats, when Roy Jenkins, David Owen and Shirley Williams left the Labour Party BECAUSE IT WAS ANTI-EU, and being taken over by Trotskyists, like Mr Corbyn then, (and deeply corrupt in the North-East), and formed a new centre party. It was what we really need now. The sensible voices in Labour and Conservatives uniting with the remaining few Liberal Democrats to form a new centre party, pushing Gove, Johnson and the other right wing faux-UKIP lot to one side, and the feeble Corbyn to the other. The Social Democrats were a party I contributed to, and even joined. I'd do it again.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 20:38:59 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.187)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The CBC reported this morning that voter turnout was just 72%. I would be interested in what the turnout was for the 18-34 group.....my guess would be the older groups ( I'll refrain from using the term "old farts"....as I recall it sent a few here in to quite a tizzy some years back ) turned out in far greater numbers than the younger group......Passion is fine but too often 18-34 types don't answer the bell in meaningful constructive ways when it really counts....like taking the time to actually vote.

By way of comparison, the Canadian referendum of 1980 had a remarkable turnout of 94%. The 2nd separation referendum of 1995 ( yes, there was a 2nd one ! )had a 93.4% turnout. The good guys won both.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 19:06:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's the demographic that upsets me. If you look at the BBC graphs, up to age 45 there is a majority for Remain - highest 18-24, still high 25-34, then 35-44 is still for Remain. When you get to the old farts, my generation, it goes the other way. It's THEIR future. The young should decide.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 17:52:55 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Keep Calm and Carry On.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 16:20:24 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What was notable in Hampshire and Dorset that the fanatic houses and cars with "Leave" stickers had as many England flags as Britain flags. The way I feel about this country today is so sour, that I'm hoping Iceland bounce us out of the Euro 2016 finals, and that Northern Ireland (Remain) bounce out Wales (Leave).


Entered at Fri Jun 24 15:21:19 CEST 2016 from (86.128.176.57)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Sorry. By 'all' I meant all four nations of Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 15:18:46 CEST 2016 from (86.128.176.57)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: surprised

I thought the result would be close, based on what I'd been reading, but that we would all vote remain.

The Scottish campaign was very different to that in England. All leaders - Labour, Conservative, SNP, Green and Liberal Democrat were united and clear in their commitment to remaining in the EU. It was more low key. Every area has voted to remain in the EU.

The Conservative campaign down South was poor, trying to scare the electorate rather than accentuating the positives of remaining. I cringed when I heard Osborne raise the prospect of an austerity budget.

The Labour leadership was slow to start, poor, lack lustre and lacked conviction.

Nicola Sturgeon has already mentioned a second referendum - 'highly likely'. She'll not have wanted to do this, preferring to wait until she was sure she can win and for it to happen in a period of stability.

Also important to the result was that we are still in a period where mistrust of politicians is great. And many people feel that they have had nothing from the EU.

A monumental day, resulting in the demise of a prime minister.

Still, we can look forward to Trump-Boris summits.

Trump is in Scotland today, opening the revamped Trump Turnberry course, where he has spent millions. He has just been on the TV, where he has welcomed the decision, relating it to his own position, peole of the UK have 'taken their country back'.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 15:16:37 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JT on JD

What you say doesn't surprise me one bit Jerry. Just look at how immediately receptive the guy has been to the quality of RoseAnn's music. As it is I've listened a few times now via the internet. Hugely impressed by the music selection but I've got to say just as much by the warm fireside ambience of how it's presented.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 14:56:27 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Liverpool - we're Scouse not English

Come and live with us up here Pete - our vote was 60% remain!!!!

I understand Joe Anderson has hire Wolfendan's to tow us all lock stock and barrel down to Brittany!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jun 24 14:12:25 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JQ: once out, it’s “out.”

How wrong you are NWC. Farage was talking about the little people versus the banks and big politics. I think he was quoting Huey Long.

There was a protest vote in deprived areas against the status quo. Down here in the South I think we just have a lot of old and nasty people. But it’s all a huge con. Do those people in the North East who voted “Leave” really think that a bunch of people far to the right of Cameron are going to help them? The “European red tape” that Johnson was going on about involves things like car safety, pollution controls, restaurant cleanliness, worker’s protection, minimum wage … those are the sort of things that this bunch of chancers will throw straight in the bin. And the North-East will have a border between them and Scotland, because it’s for sure what’ll happen. If only the weather were better!

Ruth Davidson was great … until last night when she declined to repeat her accurate comment that Boris Johnson was a liar. As she pointed out, Johnson said “60% of our laws came from the EU.” Out of 120 new laws in the last year, only 4 came from the EU.

In future I will write EUROPEAN when asked for my nationality. Look at the towns and places that voted REMAIN … London, Liverpool, All of Scotland, All of Northern Ireland, Bath, Bristol, Exeter, South Devon, Stroud, Brighton, Lewes, Oxford, Cambridge, Norwich, York.

I've never wanted to move from Poole / Bournemouth as much in my life.

September 3rd 1939.

June 23rd 2016.

Bad, bad days that will resound in history.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 13:04:53 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Any hope?

PV - How does this work? Can their be another vote at some point?


Entered at Fri Jun 24 12:19:05 CEST 2016 from (83.249.166.233)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan lines to Peter V (EU) and Jeff A (dogs)

PETER V: Somewhere I can "gaze chimes of freedom flashing" here after all. This was the common ordinary people's victory over big banks in London City and multinational corporations. They simply said "ain't gonna work on Angie's farm no more" or "don't follow leaders, watch the parking meters".

JEFF A: A Dylan line for you, too: "If dogs run free, why not we. Abraham Lincoln said that".


Entered at Fri Jun 24 12:10:57 CEST 2016 from (5.70.194.148)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Little england

Subject: Adieu EU

Our family almost all work or worked in universities. Every leader of every British University agreed in public that there was no alternative to remaining in Europe. Some of them are quite old but they ain't that dumb. Dunc - save a space for us up there. Peter - I know you don't like Caroline Lucas but I think she's been terrific throughout the debate. As has Ruth Davidson in Scotland. The Remain campaign was weak but hard to explain the north east sinking us when they rely heavily on Nissan and the European Social Fund. Such a bad mistake. I want my Europe back.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 09:44:57 CEST 2016 from (125.239.241.225)

Posted by:

Rod

Our wine is pretty good and butter is now not so bad for you according to the scientists. I do remember spending a fortune on a bottle of NZ bubbly in Dundee.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 09:38:29 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rod, funny thing, just 5 minutes ago, Mrs V said "Well, at least we'll be getting more New Zealand lamb and butter again!" "And wine,' I muttered. Actually, they never stopped, but where New Zealand butter used to be the main one on sale, now French and Danish ones far exceed it. Yes, I remember then that New Zealand butter became standard on Japanese and Hong Kong airlines and in hotels, so new markets were found.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 09:10:29 CEST 2016 from (125.239.241.225)

Posted by:

Rod

I feel for you Peter. Democracy often doesn't work - or at least produce the best results for the bigger picture. I didn't expect this to happen. I'm worried for the (western) world at the moment with this happening and the possibility of Trump being the next US President.

The other side of the picture is that NZ took a big hit ecomically when Britain joined the EU. We adapted and survived but we are quite insignificant on a global scale. This will have wider ramifications but the British have been through worse and survived.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 08:28:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It’s the worst election result I can remember as an adult. The pound dives to its lowest against the dollar since 1985. British shares will plummet today. Obviously, with Scotland voting solidly remain, it’s also the end of the UK.

I just glanced over the lists … the three places I’d most like to move to … Bath, Lewes / Brighton and South Devon all voted strongly Remain.

But moving’s out of the question. House values will dive and in the uncertainty of the next two years, no one will be buying. On a personal level, I am due to take a pension I started in 1985 next month. Fortunately I can delay it, because as it’s stock market linked, I estimate it will lose 10% at least by the time it’s finally valued.

As the pollsters said all night, predictions were based on the educational levels in areas, and my goodness didn’t it match them. The dumber and older they were the more they voted Leave.

I’d say it’s worst of all for Labour. Their traditional heartlands followed Scotland which rejected Labour in the last election, and simply ignored the advice of virtually its entire leadership to vote Remain. The nastier wing of the Conservatives at least got their way along with the racist xenophobes in UKIP, so Conservative will swagger on, simply eradicating the reasonable and measured centrist voices. But the Labour leadership is truly fucked, being totally out of tune with its traditional voter base outside London. But we all are.

To borrow Roger’s simile and extend it … turkeys are birds who not only have tiny brains, but are earthbound and they have no concept of flying. They indeed just voted to bring Christmas forward.

It will sow deep divisions.

The man with the biggest smile on his face today is Vladimir Putin.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 07:27:23 CEST 2016 from (72.143.234.238)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: JQ's Thoughts......

......and yet representative democracy often doesn't work either as was illustrated in the United States this week when elected representatives voted against background checks for gun purchasers and even voted against preventing people on terrorist lists from buying guns...... all out of fear of the NRA......despite over 90% of the citizens of the USA favouring such restrictions......Truly mind blowing !

Every Canadian should pause and thank God for having had the truly great Pierre Elliot Trudeau leading our country in 1980 during the separation referendum......imagine if we had been led at the time by a limper like Joe Clark or David Cameron...... We would no longer have a country.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 06:23:45 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: WTF??

Looks like the Brits have chosen suicide. Between this and Trump I'm wondering if democracy is all it's cracked up to be; too many ignorant voters on both sides of the water, not fit to govern themselves.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 05:45:25 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: John Donabie

John, were you ever able to find the Nashville recording of Blonde on Blonde you wanted so much?


Entered at Fri Jun 24 03:26:05 CEST 2016 from (24.114.66.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I believe I moved loyalties from CKFH-Am to CHUM-Fm in mid '70, about the same time that John D made the same switch. I remember the other DJs you mentioned, and also Tim Thomas, Larry Green and Steve Harris. For me John was the Prophet (which meant it took months for me to come to terms with my admiration for "Neanderthal Man" by Hotlegs (proto 10CC) in the face of John's on-air dismissal of the thing). But Larry Green was very important to me too, despite his attempts to make us appreciate jazz. If nothing else, he introduced me to "The Stones I Throw" when he played John's copy one afternoon. While John would always be pushing the latest Band 45, and even the "Albert's Hall bootleg version of LARS, I don't believe I ever heard him play TSIT.


Entered at Fri Jun 24 02:02:20 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Singing praises to Donabie

Al and whoever else is a radiohead: You need to know that among the deans of FM radio in the 60's -80's, John Donabie reigned supreme. He was among a small group of superb communicators of that exciting time in music. With Peter Griffin, Rainer Schwartz, David Pritchard and Benjie Karsh (I am sure I forgot a few), John Donabie delivered the essence of a brilliant musical time which serves as the foundation of the music that we all love. John Donabie continues in that tradition. CIUT-FM shows its continued status (it was a force in the 60s and continues) as one of the foremost collegiate radio stations currently. John and CIUT can stand tall in any comparison. RoseAnn is in good company.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 23:55:17 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: JD's superb Mixed Bag Show Saturdays 2pm -4pm [7pm - 9pm UK time]

John - it's on at a nice time on this side of the pond and I'm pretty sure you'll be pulling in a fair few extra listeners from the Hudson valley and Liverpool areas from now on!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jun 23 20:29:30 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.187)

Posted by:

Kevin J

In a world gone mad, nice to see that the jury in the Led Zeppelin "Stairway To Heaven" got it right. Page and Plant were found not guilty today....silly that this ever even got to a trial, as I had stated here previously.

Hope that the vote goes the right way tonight as well.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 18:47:17 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al

I meant EP's.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 16:40:32 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

Your 5 hours ahead Al. That means to hear my show live, it would be between 7-9 pm for you. Thanks again Al. I agree about the mp's.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 14:48:16 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Ilka's Dog. Going down the road feeling bad.

Never feel bad for Bob!

Go catch a rabbit for breakfast instead. What the hell are you good for anyway?


Entered at Thu Jun 23 12:49:36 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: 'Don't Look Back' documentary

Last night I had heartburn after too many hot dogs and too much of beer after Sweden's loss against Belgium. I sat down in the front of the TV. All of the sudden, without a warning in the middle of the night I saw Dylan in 'Don't Look Back'. The sound in TV was turned to zero so I watched Dylan's eyes, mouth, bodylanguage, his companions, Mr. Grossman.

It was a disaster. I felt almost sorry for him. Who were these awful people? (Well, I knew their names, but...)


Entered at Thu Jun 23 06:28:08 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Ivan: I don't have any Mexican Band 45s, but I do have a Mexican big brown - with a multi-coloured cover, two songs missing and the titles translated into Spanish (though a poster here said they sounded like a mixture of Portuguese and Spanish). You can see it in the discography portion of this site by clicking this link.

I got it a the local Goodwill, along with a Mexican "Stage Fright" (which looks exactly like the Canadian / American ones - not that there was a wrap-around photo, but they often go missing) and a Mexican issue of the first Frost LP with a very different cover.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 01:26:19 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jon Donabie

That's great news John.

John, I really do think you're going to be spoilt for choice with what to play especially with the two latest 4 track EP's OUT FROM UNDER and AIRING OF GRIEVANCES. The original album is fine too, of course, and 'Boxed Wine' and 'All Packed Up' are terrific tracks off that album but it's the two EP's which I'm convinced really reveal the quality that this slip of a girl and her band are capable of unleashing.

I honestly can't wait to hear it John. Is there any chance of you posting date/time/link on here beforehand so I/we can listen to it Live? I've heard your recorded shows but not live. I don't mind staying up late or getting up early!! I think we're probably 5 or 6 hours ahead of you.

Cheers mate.


Entered at Thu Jun 23 00:09:09 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

I just received all of her recordings; from Dad Bob. Looking forward on doing a feature in a few weeks.


Entered at Wed Jun 22 13:13:22 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino - latest record - Airing of Grievances

There's been quite a few really glowing reviews of RoseAnn's new record on the footy website I go on following my eulogising about it.

The following one I particularly liked because it's from a long time musician from various semi prominent Liverpool bands of the past.

It's along the lines I was really hoping I'd see on here from similar folks steeped in music/the music industry.

Still I guess it's still early days and a lot of folks on here simply haven't quite got around to giving it a listen yet.

Just in case I've linked again RoseAnn's Bandcamp site where a free listen is available prior to purchasing umpteen really cheaply priced copies of this wonderful record for family and friends!

:-0)

Anyroad, here's Tim's nice little review

""""I've just had a real good listen this morning.

That first track is faintly reminiscent of something Gallagher and Lyle would write, I could even almost imagine them singing it. There's also a slightly Beatle'ish or maybe Hollies(ie Gouldman) chord progression going on in there, can't quite place it, and the driving drum beat is reminiscent of Aztec Camera-Somewhere in my Heart.

This should not in anyway be taken as a criticism, these comparisons if anything highlight that I rank it very highly indeed.

Second track, first listen I thought ooh The Band, melancholic, or perhaps a Robbie solo effort. Very nice, I really love the viola/violin on all of these, unobtrusive yet adding a poignancy to the backing. All superb..

Third track, Touch Me, I covered last time in the other thread. ie Sympathy with The Devil. On this listen I think the guitar solo towards the end could be re-done, it's just slightly stilted and a tad busy.

Fourth track, Really lovely. Many similarities/influences. DX-7 like bell tone keyboards - Gallagher and Lyle-Breakaway though not through a flanger, then Roberta Flack-First Time Ever I Saw Your Face or perhaps even the chorus from Mireille Mathieu-Les Bicyclettes De Belsize but slowed right down and shifted to a minor key.

But all of these similarities are inevitable and largely highly subjective and I'm not implying any conscious copying, it's just that us oldies perhaps have a more extensive knowledge and exposure of such older and forgotten stuff the younger generation are probably unaware of but that they have inadvertently assimilated.

The instrumentation and production is top notch quality and it's all very listenable stuff.

Then there's the lyrics. I really need to look them up, but from what I can hear, she seems to have some real skill there too, they seem well crafted stories of experiences, which is always a good thing.

Summary, really quite outstanding, she's a bit of a Star, or certainly should be.

Edit....just noticed this

Quote from: AlEdge on June 17, 2016, 09:58:56 PM BTW - that guitar on Touch Me is RoseAnn herself having her half minute in the sun - and you're right mate Keef Richards she ain't but half a dozen plays in you realise it fits the track mood perfectly - which I guess is sort of the object of the exercise!!

You're probably right Al. I was going to say earlier up above that it sounded rather like a guitarist who is comfortable playing rhythm but then has to stand in and play lead ( a bit like my own attempts at playing lead!!)""""


Entered at Wed Jun 22 12:12:43 CEST 2016 from (83.0.247.81)

Posted by:

Sander

Location: Moss
Web: My link

Subject: Kul side!

Kul side! Stå på!


Entered at Wed Jun 22 00:32:53 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ivan- your reference to the women of the house brought to mind the flick, The Quiet Man. John Wayne referred to Maureen O'Hara as Woman of the House. Next gal I live with I'll try that on for size, see how long i get away with t.


Entered at Tue Jun 21 23:40:26 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

free choice … best tracks … sorry!


Entered at Tue Jun 21 23:18:12 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My guess is that Mexican Capitol had a fee choice, and for me wisely chose the bet two tracks. Good coupling for a juke box. Though I spent many shillings playing both side of the original, We Can Talk is better juke box material than I Shall Be released.


Entered at Tue Jun 21 21:39:43 CEST 2016 from (71.180.26.116)

Posted by:

Ivan

Much to the dismay of the women of the house--which is everyone but me--I have an old jukebox filled mostly with R&B records. As a long-time fan of The Band, I've always wanted to have one of their 45s in the Wurlitzer, but somehow none of their Capitol 45 releases ever really struck me as jukebox material. Today on the popular auction site I stumbled across a Mexican (?!?) promo copy of The Weight with, curiously, my favorite Band tune on the flip: We Can Talk. It was a bit more than I wanted to pay, but the record is en route to me now. I'm curious as to who was buying their records in Mexico @1968/69, and what the reason would have been for bumping I Shall Be Released and making We Can Talk the Mexican B-side...?


Entered at Mon Jun 20 19:41:15 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Henry McCullough, Donovan

NorthWestCoaster - Donovan is from Scotland, while Henry was from Northern Ireland.

Interestingly, at the weekend, I read that Henry did session work on a Donovan album, but I don't know any more than this.


Entered at Mon Jun 20 16:00:13 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.187)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Eric Clapton and friends having some fun....a rare clip of Clapton doing something a little different.....and some impressive friends as well.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 16:42:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: James Jamerson

Looking for something else and I saw it. Motown paid James Jamerson basic scale, which was $52.50 for a three hour session in the early 1960s. Was Bobby Gregg worth 40 times more?


Entered at Sun Jun 19 15:54:46 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In the context, Manfred Mann was saying how much money session guys made, and he also marvelled that they could do it without travel expenses and time. He clearly thought £150 a week ($412) was very good money for Britain in 1968, and it was.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 13:46:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I saw Henry McCullogh a couple of times with Eire Apparent and with Paul McCartney, though he wasn't in Joe Cocker's band in the era when I saw them several times in Hull. RIP


Entered at Sun Jun 19 13:45:55 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Manfred Mann / Peter V

Please Peter V., what did MM really mean? - He lives a half of the year in this town. I am too scared to ask. I might make a fool of myself! (He is a tricky guy.)


Entered at Sun Jun 19 13:31:58 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Henry McCullough / Dunc

Sad to hear the news, Dunc.

On the lighter note: While driving a car in the night I keep myself awake by playing AIR GUITAR. Henry's playing in 'With A Little Help..' is my favourite. Another good one is the guitar solo in DONOVAN's 'Hurdy Gurdy Man'. Both two are from _Scotland_, right? (It makes "a double scotch" in my Finglish!) - At least the passangers will be awake when I play the famous G7 with no hands on the steering wheel.

Footnote: To those who are interested in linguistics, the language (American-English words with the Finnish ortogrphy) used by Finnish immgirants in Wisconsin and Minnesota was called for 'Finglish'.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 10:31:02 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: $9 over

Kevin, you’re right to be concerned about the $9. It was a lot of money in 1965, but on those earnings, it was the tip for the pizza delivery boy.

There must be a book on sessions somewhere. I can’t think Berry Gordy was paying James Jamerson $2000 a session (at 1965 prices) in Detroit, nor that Chess were shelling out that sort of money in Chicago. OK, $2000 a session. Three sessions bought a new Cadillac Deville convertible … $5639.

When I Googled, Billboard had stuff on the same 1965 page about Gold Star and Philles in LA being blacklisted by the union, because they were paying session guys in cash so that they could avoid their union contribution … which I assume, like the Screenwriters Guild, was a percentage of earnings. That would be the Wrecking Crew and Phil Spector.

Was Nashville cheaper than NYC? Was Muscle Shoals? It’s hard to think the latter could have produced so much and done so many sessions at those sort of prices. Was NYC an exception?

Without wanting to demean Mr Gregg’s contribution, you’d have to think a very good drummer was reasonably easy to source. If you think of Al Kooper’s organ part on Like A Rolling Stone, or James Jamerson’s bass guitar on any number of Motown singles, or the French horn player on Penny Lane or the sax player on Baker Street, you can see a session musician making a massive contribution to the record’s success. But the drums on Like A Rolling Stone? Perfect, of course, but you don’t think about them in the same way. I mean, here we were trying to guess whether it was Levon or Bobby Gregg on "Crawl Out" , without it being screamingly obvious. By The Weight, Levon is extremely distinctive, but I don't hear that unique quality on the Ronnie Hawkins' stuff.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 07:41:04 CEST 2016 from (24.114.77.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff.....10.....24.......and the chemicals were donated free of charge - one night only - to Todd......to use as an excuse or remedy.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 04:50:21 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.246)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

How many fingers you counting on with how many beers Kev?


Entered at Sun Jun 19 03:23:58 CEST 2016 from (24.114.77.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bobby Gregg has had more mentions over the last 3 days alone on The Band tribute page than Levon Helm, Garth Hudson, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko and Robbie Robertson have combined over the last 6 months......let no one ever doubt the powers of Bob Dylan......more than a thousand men will go sleepless tonight worrying about the $9 !


Entered at Sun Jun 19 03:10:46 CEST 2016 from (97.33.67.252)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Concert Scene

Currently at a Nelly concert. Earlier in the show was Iggy Azelia, and prior to that, a DJ / EDM duo known as The Chainsmokers.
Feeling a little out of my element. Been a while since I've been to a show that didn't include some mandolin, or doghouse bass at some point.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 02:20:21 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Sessionmen on scale

That's a very good suggestion, Bill. There are several mentions on the documents of AFTRA (including at least one for Dylan) but none of AFM.

Now you mention it, I seem to recall seeing a copy of an AFM session document. As you say, details of session musicians who were AFM members would not need to be specified, if payments were covered by an AFM contract and made through the AFM. Local 802 is in my mind as the one for New York but I don't know why and this could be a false memory.


Entered at Sun Jun 19 01:02:14 CEST 2016 from (24.114.58.40)

Posted by:

Bill M

Could it be that fees paid to other session musicians weren't listed because they were making scale, which everyone would have known? Perhaps the Chambers' fees were listed because singers weren't in the union so didn't have to be paid scale.


Entered at Sat Jun 18 23:30:51 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Henry McCullough

Henry McCullough died this week. As well as playing with Paul McCartney, he'll be remembered for playing lead guitar on Joe Cocker's 'With A Little Help From My Friends' at Woodstock.

In a week of session musicians related discussions, he played with Frankie Miller, Dr Feelgood, Marianne Faithful and many others. RIP


Entered at Sat Jun 18 22:58:47 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Session fees - more notes

What is odd about these documents, as I mentioned earlier, is that the other session musicians are not mentioned.

Artist Contract card page 27 shows the session for 2 August 1965. For that session, Lester Chambers of The Chambers Brothers got an amount of $180. The reason for the payment is not entirely clear but seems to read "AFTRA gr. Xvoc" (the "X" letter is not legible and may be an over-typed crossing out). I presume that Lester handled the business end for the other brothers and the four got $180 (gross) for their overdubbing efforts on "Tombstone Blues", though that was on 3 August 1965, not 2 August. Again, a little odd.

Sam Lay played drums on the 2 August session but is not shown on the Artist Contract Card. However, I do know what he got paid because, long ago, another collector (sadly now passed on) sent me a photocopy of the cheque counterfoil from Columbia Records (stationery form number "CR-102C REV. 9/64") and that shows a gross of $63.00 (a basic amount of $61 and a miscellaneous $2) and a net of $50.98 (after deductions for New York Disability Tax, New York Withholding Tax, Social Security Tax and Federal Withholding tax).

Why is Sam Lay's payment not on the Artist Contract Card? But then, other than Dylan, why are none of the other musicians either? Particularly when payments to Dylan are noted on them?

Now to Angeline Butler: her contribution on background vocals to "If You Gotta Go" on 15 January 1965 is included in the liner notes and she is quoted. Page 25 of the Artist Contract card shows this: "Angeline Butler AFTRA sc. to non-roy. artist $65.00". "non-roy." is presumably non-royalty but why is this significant?

Immediately below her entry on the page, there is another: "Holiday Travel Inc. airtravel NY/Chi/ $45.89". Who was involved in the "Bringing It All Back Home" session to justify a flight back to Chicago from New York? (Or was it a return fare?)



Entered at Sat Jun 18 21:10:29 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Manfred Mann was so surprised three years later that a "guy he knew" could make £150 ($412) a week for session work in the UK. I did know that most Nashville session men were "triple scale".


Entered at Sat Jun 18 21:07:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Ian. It seems astonishing still that Bobby Gregg for a "session" (at three in a day) earned the same as Mickey Jones for a full week on the road. While Gregg was extremely good, there's no "signature sound" that seems to be worth so much more than normal.


Entered at Sat Jun 18 20:17:32 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: More on session fees back then

If you're getting bored with this stuff, read no further.

Although I hadn't printed anything up, part of Page 29 and all of Page 31 from the Artist Contract card file are also included in "Bootleg Series 12".

Page 29 shows the following: "Robt Gregg mus.sc. 1/25/66 $2034.25". According to Krogsgaard, this was another day of multiple three-hour sessions: 2.30 - 5.30 pm, then 7 - 10 pm, and finally, 11.30 pm - 2.30 am. It would seem that Bobby Gregg got around $700 per three-hour session.

Page 31 shows several entries for Charlie McCoy on a mammoth session in Nashville. There were three three-hour sessions and one four-hour session, lasting from 6 pm on 9 March 1966 to 7 am on 10 March, with no breaks noted by Krogsgaard. McCoy got two payments for the sessions on 9 March 1966 ($401.00 and $553.00) and two payments for the sessions on 10 March 1966 (namely $939.30 and $1375.50) – four payments, presumably one for each session. It would appear from this that, as each three hour session ended and the next began, McCoy got recompensed at a higher rate.


Entered at Sat Jun 18 18:37:09 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "Talent Payments" and Bob Dylan sessions

"Talent Payments" is the title of the column on the Artist Contract card from which I have been quoting. I have pages 23, 25, 27 and 28 to hand, now I'm home. Before I get into some of the detail, let me make a few general comments.

Although it is called a "Card", it looks like this document was not printed on card. I say this because, with a bit of image manipulation, it looks like it was a double-sided document and you can faintly see what is printed or typed on the other side - not clearly enough to read it but clearly enough to know it's there. The reverse side is upside down compared to the front side and, since there are holes punched in the top side (on the front) and the bottom side (on the reverse), it looks like these documents were Kept in a ring binder. Thus, you could flick through the pages to see the information and could remove the pages to type updates.

And there were updates. Page 25, for example, relates to the sessions on 14 and 15 January 1965(for 1965's "Bringing it All Back Home") but refers to tracks released in 1966, 1967, 1969 and 1972.

There is also evidence on this page that white oblong strips were stuck on the cards to cover earlier information and replace it with later information. F0r example, a white strip has been applied giving "Warner Bros. Mus., A Div. of Warner Bros...." as the music publisher, presumably covering a reference to Witmark.

It also looks as though released tracks had line put through the typed song title. I assume that this was to make the song titles stand out when updating but it does seem an odd way of doing it.

The Artist Contract Cards are not always reproduced in "Bootleg Series 12" in full but, in all I've "done" so far, the right hand column (the one headed "TALENT PAYMENTS") is clear. This column has two sub-columns ("TO" and "AMOUNT") but the typists seem to have ignored this and treated it as one single column.

Very few of the session musicians are included in this "TALENT PAYMENTS" column, so it is possible that payment for, dare I say it, "run-of-the-mill" session musicians was processed in a different way.

OK, now to the relevant detail. On this Page 25 of the Artist Contract Card, there is an entry that reads:

"Bob Gregg mus. 1/15/65 $745.97"

The session on 15 January 1965 was a standard three-hour session (2.30 to 5.30 pm), according to Michael Krogsgaard. If Bobby Gregg got $745.97 for a three-hour session in January, then $2009.73" does sound high but not so way off for the session on 30 November 1965, which ran from "2.30 - 5.30 pm and from 7 pm till finished" according Krogsgaard.



Entered at Sat Jun 18 18:17:00 CEST 2016 from (24.114.77.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

An assortment of the world's greatest minds met recently to review and attempt to solve enduring world mysteries.......led by Garry Kasparov, over a 2 week period they managed to figure out....The Voynich manuscript.....the Phaist disc......the Shugbirough inscription.......the Bermuda Triangle........the identity of Jack the Ripper........Despite this success, the group leaders declared the conference a disappointment as they broke up having drawn a complete blank on the Bobby Gregg 1965 session fee.


Entered at Sat Jun 18 17:24:12 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wild speculation, Bobby Gregg

I can only hazard a guess, but maybe the $2009 “session fee” included payment for playing the West Coast December 1965 gigs. Possibly an easy way to pay in advance, perhaps a bit of creative accounting shifting tour costs onto recording costs.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 23:22:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I wondered the same, Ian, except that Dylan was solid future work, so best not held over a barrel. Even $209 seems very good indeed n 1965 terms.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 23:16:34 CEST 2016 from (84.215.141.93)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

And he knew the lyrics to UOCC by the age of three...with a Southern twang. Bonnaroo Festival, Manchester, TN, June 2016.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 21:53:48 CEST 2016 from (62.232.236.116)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: $2009

I can't answer your question directly, Peter, partly because I only have access to one Artist Contract Card (I'm still away from home) and partly because I cannot interpret all the information on the cards.

From memory, Gregg's figure was higher than for others, though not all musicians seem to feature on these documents and some payments were made to Dyan himself - neither of which I can readily explain.

I wonder if one of the factors relating to Gregg's payment is that Levon jumped ship suddenly and unexpectedly after the 28 November concert. With the 30 November session likely booked some time in advance and with a run of concerts on the West Coast imminent, Dylan was in a very tight spot indeed, so maybe he had to pay over the odds to get Gregg at all at such short notice.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 21:53:54 CEST 2016 from (24.114.57.43)

Posted by:

Bill M

An interview with Ringo Starr in the paper the other day has him saying that the ensemble+guests side of the Last Waltz inspired him to try the All-Star revue. Seems to. Have worked out well.

BTW, I watched the TLW film this past weekend - the first time on the big screen since opening day in '78. (in between I've seen it twice on small screens - VHS in Mecca, DVD in Toronto.) Truly magnicicent colour and film work. And no inferior performances. None of that is what I thought before now. Muddy Waters is still tops though.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 18:21:14 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Floor of Concord Tavern in that photo?

Maybe it is wishful thinking on my part, but the floor in that photo of Levon and the Hawks looks suspiciously like the floor of the old Concord Tavern. Can anyone confirm?


Entered at Fri Jun 17 17:52:11 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: July 18/19

Pat B - I'm coming in for a Cub's game in July and will likely be stationed at the pub if you're about then. You're missed here these days, don't abandon us por favor -


Entered at Fri Jun 17 17:38:47 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Liza Jane

Hi Pat - Is it Richard on the 5th verse? It goes pretty muddy, maybe JRR?


Entered at Fri Jun 17 17:09:04 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

JQ, the date is obviously wrong but what a great artifact.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 16:34:48 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

My condolences to U.K. posters here re the senseless slaying of Jo Cox.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 11:34:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window

I was googling Billboard to find out more. The 2 October 1965 issue spotlights Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window by The Vacels saying "The group has a hot contender with this strong Dylan material".That was 3 days before the first Hawks session. Linked to YouTube.

The main Billboard whole page advert with that Fender bass guitar photo is 25 December 1965 issue. UK magazines now use a Remove from Shelf date not a Published on date.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 10:58:52 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A little bit more

In case you didn't scroll all the way, Maurice Bacon of Love Affair says at the very end:

“We didn’t play on any of the singles. We’d only have three hours so the easiest, most efficient way was for Keith Mansfield to score the whole thing, bring in session guys like Clem Cattini on drums and Herbie Flowers on bass and do it in two takes. Mansfield was only involved with the singles, when we used orchestras. Otherwise, it was John Goodison. We were allowed to play on the B-sides and the album and write some tracks for the LP.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 10:46:48 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: $2009

Ian, what do the other session notes suggest about the level of fee being paid on a Dylan session then?

On session musicians, have a look at the attached Musicians Union article on the controversy surrounding Everlasting Love by Love Affair in 1968. There was a storm when it turned out that none of the band played on it. Why it was a surprise, I don’t know. It was well known that only McGuinn appeared on Mr Tambourine Man’s backing. It was common practice. Anyway, in 1968 the revelation was shock to the tabloid press.

The article has a lot on session work in Britain in 1968. Alan Parker, who played guitar on the single, along with Clem Cattini on drums, says he was paid a standard £9 for the session ($25 then), with a 10 shilling (50p) bonus if it was a hit.

Manfred Mann said he knew of one session musician (as if it was amazing) who earned £150 ($420) a week. Research I did on Woolworth’s Embassy covers label found a guy who sang three lead vocals per week and earned £40 a week from it ($112). £40 a week, or £2000 a year is around what a suburban / small town branch manager in a bank earned. So decent professional income. At the same time you could book The Who or The Kinks for a college dance for around £400, or $1100.

So it seems incredible that even given New York and a great reputation, that Bobby Gregg could have been paid $2009 for a session in 1965, however long it was. Comparing Mickey Jones $750 per week, this was a guy who played on one of the best selling albums of the early 60s, Trini Lopez Live At PJs as well as on those live Johnny Rivers albums.

I know from past conversations that session musicians were a special breed. The Musician Union article points out that session guys were used, not because the band concerned couldn’t play their instruments,, but because they worked faster. I was told that the session guy qualification was a popular song that they’ve never tried to play … in the 70s, Tie A Yellow Ribbon was the example given. The top session guys could sit and play it without having to work it out. A session musician once told me that there were famous, brilliant, stellar players who wouldn’t survive a day in a session environment, because they had different skills, and even 10 minutes sussing it out was too slow. This is why the same names appear again and again. Clem Cattini (ex-Tornados) probably played drums on more hit singles than any other session guy. John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page did hundreds of sessions. The joke around Record Fairs, where Mr Page is often seen, is that he is seeking out every record he ever played on. It's an innate skill … Messrs Page and Jones started very young. Alan Parker was playing guitar on many sessions at 23.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 09:58:43 CEST 2016 from (210.86.77.146)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Rick wearng a scarf

that's a cracking version of Carnival.


Entered at Fri Jun 17 02:23:54 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Billie Crystal Eulogy for Muhammad Ali

I actually got a day at home. This spring I have worked more than I ever have in my life. Susan says, I think you are going out in a blaze of glory. I think you are going to sell your business this year......I hope she is right.

Every one should take a few minutes to watch Billie Crystal's eulogy. A Jewish man giving this eulogy for his long time friend a black Muslim man. If every one could thinl like Billie and express themselves in this way.......what a wonderful world this could be.

To me two of the greatest men we could have the pleasure of watching. Both of them complete humanitarians. This eulogy is wonderful in every way, with humility, humor, sadness and complete respect.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 23:25:07 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

2025, a German mechanic and an English miner meet at a funeral.
The miner: I can’t make it alone ....
The mechanic: About 1940, that was not so good.
The miner: Why are you holding my hand?
The mechanic: Why are you holding mine?


Entered at Thu Jun 16 22:46:07 CEST 2016 from (62.232.236.116)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Crawl Out single release date

The release card (if that's what it's called) for the "Crawl Out" single has the shipping date typed as 6 Deceember 1965 but this is crossed out and replaced with a hand-written 8 December 1965. This would suggest a release date of Tuesday, 14 December 1965. However, quite a few people have said that they couldn't actually buy it until January 1966. My guess is that, in the run-up to the holiday season, distribution was a bit slower than normal.

Just out of interest, that release card (?) has an extra section typed on it. This section is headed "NOT FOR LABEL" (presumably a typing error for "NOTE FOR LABEL"). The section refers to the way the song title should be presented and reads as follows:

"The line under the word YOU & the question mark at the end (?) should be printed in BOLD TYPE !!!!! and should stand out from the other print."

So now you know. The words in CAPS are also underlined but I can't mange that on an I-Pad.

The "REL. NO." (release week) is typed on as "1201 IMMED.", which indicates the first week in December, Immediate(ly). They definitely planned to have the single out in the week following the recording session. This information was typed on the document and was not amended when the amended the shipping date in a red pen.

The 5 October and the 30 November sessions are both noted as Singles sessions, not album sessions. This, with an accelerated release date, probably indicates that Columbia Records execs were anxious to get a new Dylan single out and thus that Dylan was under some pressure to produce something.

A few days later, at the KQED press conference in San Francisco, Dylan said he had just recorded "Freeze Out" as a single but he didn't want it split in two over the two sides of a single. "Crawl Out" was the substitute.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 22:39:43 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Levon/Hawks - Liza Jane

This take is new to me. I think. It's live, labeled from 1966 in Oklahoma City -


Entered at Thu Jun 16 22:18:45 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: The Weight (Jim Weider, Randy Ciarlante)

Here's a killer version of Cripple Creek by The Weight! They'll be playing NY's City Winery on July 28.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 22:17:04 CEST 2016 from (62.232.236.116)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Crawl Out etc

First, I dashed off the last posting quickly before heading elsewhere, so apologies for some typos. I am now using my wife's I-pad, so there will probably be a few more here.

The various documents to which I referred are all in one or more of the various editions of "Bootleg Series 12". Some are small, some are repeated and all are cropped. I've scanned quite a few of them and, with a bit of image manipulation, got them to a legible state. There are several pages of Dylan's Artist Contract Card(s) in the set. Page 28 covers the two sessions we're discussing and it has a number of typing errors, so there may have been an extra "0" in the stated expenses for Bobby Gregg but"$2009.73" is what it reads. I have the latest ISIS magazine with me and that document is reproduced in it, so I have been able to check it now.

I don't have the other pages of the Artist Contract Card with me and the bit about Joe Souter is on another page but the relevant snippet is also in the magazine and it clearly refers to his expenses for the 30 November session. As I said, Michael Krogsgaard said that he was there earlier in the session when "Freeze Out' ("Visions") was being recorded. When the song was redone in Nashville in 1966, he played the bass, so perhaps he played bass on "Freeze Out" when it was recorded on 30 November 1965.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 18:58:31 CEST 2016 from (100.34.147.66)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Drummer on Crawl

Unfortunately all I have for the 18 disc set is a copy of the musician's listing, and not the "artists card." I find the $2,000 a session for Bobby Gregg to be highly suspicious, as suspicious as the photo of Dylan's passport or whatever it was on Biograph with the wrong birth date. I wish I had something to remember as to when "Crawl" finally appeared since I was waiting for it having heard a radio broadcast of the earlier version of the songs mistakenly released and announced as "Positively 4th Street," proof back then of Columbia's propensity to screw up.

I also strongly doubt Joe South was at the session.

As to mixing the single on November 30th, that wouldn't be a big deal.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 17:58:48 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ethical dilemma

This one's for Al Edge, though other sports fans may join in. I recorded England v Wales this afternoon, so my grandkids could watch it with me this evening. Of course I also watched it live. Here's the dilemma … is it permissible to boost nmy football cred by making suggestions before the event? e.g. "I can see the problem here. What they need to do is put Vardy and Sturridge on at half time. That's what I'd do if I were the manager."


Entered at Thu Jun 16 14:55:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd say Bobby Gregg on the single. Though I'm sure either Bobby Gregg or Levon could play anything they wanted to, there is no distinctive "Levon sound" on the single. All The Hawks strove to maintain the "band of brothers together through thick and thin" story. It was years before most people knew Levon was out for a long period.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 13:27:19 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Gregg

Link to Bobby gregg & Friends "The Jam" 1962, with Roy Buchanan on guitar. But still, $2000 a session? I Googled and as well as Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel, he drummed on "Church of Anthrax" by Terry Riley and John Cale.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 13:26:09 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "Crawl Out" singel - addendum

A couple of additional points:

1. Date of session:

The Artist Job Sheet shows both "Freeze out" and "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?" a s being recorded on 30 November 1965. In my view, the contemporary documentation overwhelmingly indicates that the "Crawl Out" single was indeed recorded on 30 November 1965. As I said earlier, I do not actually know but, if there are any contra-indicators, I'd be interested to learn of them.

2. Who were the musicians?:

If the "Crawl Out" single was recorded on 30 November 1965, then the drummer was Bobby Gregg, not Levon Helm. That much is clear but there are other, more problematical aspects. Michael Krogsgaard, an early chronicler of Dylan's sessions who had access to the Columbia Records archive, noted that, in addition to the other Hawks, Al Kooper was there throughout both sessions (2.30 - 5.30 pm and 7 pm onwards), that guitarist Joseph Souter was there for the earlier part of the session (2.30 - 7.30 pm) and that Paul Griffin was there from 5.00 - 10.30 pm). The liner notes for "The Cutting Edge" say either Richard Manuel or Paul Griffin on piano for "Crawl Out". "Joe Souter" (a.k.a. Joe South) received $115.47 expenses for the 30 November 1965 session (according to Dylan's Artist Contract document) but, since he was there for the earlier part and "Crawl Out" was recorded towards the end, he is unlikely to have been involved on the single. I have seen no documentation relating to Al Kooper's attendance but there were two organists at the session.

Perhaps those of you with sharper ears than mine might care to comment on which of the Hawks was actually on Dylan's "Cawl Out " single and which not.



Entered at Thu Jun 16 13:18:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Money

Bobby Gregg's session fee was $2009? Did you add a zero, Ian? It's a great deal of money in 1965 terms. In 1965 it was $2.80 to a pound (I Googled). So his fee was £714. In early 1966, working in an art museum, I received £10.50 a week, the full adult rate. So £540 a year. So $714 was a fortune.

Mickey Jones said he was paid $750 a week for the 1966 tour, which was more than The Hawks got each as he got free hotels, and they had to pay. So £267 a week, or the same as six months as a museum attendant. Really good money.

If Bobby Gregg cost $2000 for a session, then it's no wonder he didn't do many gigs. Even Dylan couldn't afford his hire. If that was the sort of rate, Robbie & Al Kooper would already have been richer than any of the other Hawks by the end of the Blonde on Blonde sessions. But I can't think they got paid that - there's no way they'd have economised on sharing a budget room (as Al Kooper described it) if they were being paid that sort of money.


Entered at Thu Jun 16 10:22:51 CEST 2016 from (114.75.193.188)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just started listening to the expanded version of It's Too Late to Stop Now. It is fantastic.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 23:28:50 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Just one hour ago, Rudi Hoffreiter (ZDF weatherman), made a prediction: In the year 2025 Bob Geldof will organize the first Brexit-Exit concert.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 22:31:35 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ian Rolling Stone Take 11 Alternate

Thanks Ian. No matter how many times I listen to the 18 disc package, I seem to hear new things all the time. The drumming at times almost sounds "march like" in a few spots. Rat-A-Tat-Tat like. Thank you. Going to play this version soon on my radio show. Ending is interesting as well. Thanks again Ian.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 20:41:15 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Tom Jones

Hi JT - That last round, a trilogy, from TJ was top notch to my taste. It's different than his typical persona but still Tom J, albeit stripped down a bit, and less urban. The gospel one is my fave and on Long Lost Suitcase he does a cover of Gillian Welch's brilliant Elvis Presley Blues! I believe all 3 were produced by Ethan Johns, Glyn's son. He's got his own thing going now in Americana and Blues music.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 19:22:04 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "The Cutting Edge" session information

While I agree, PSB, that the contemporary session and contract documentation was far from perfect, not helped by the fact that Bob Johnston was less assiduous in slating takes than Tom Wilson, those who assert that the "Crawl Out" single was actually recorded on 5 October and only mixed on 30 November would have to explain a lot to convince me.

The Tape Identification Data sheets note the contents of each reel of tape.

The relevant sheet for the 5 October 1965 session shows that only two takes of "Crawl Out Your Window" were attempted, both incomplete. It appears on the sheet after "Medicine Sunday and before "I Don't Want To Be Your Partner". Admittedly "Jet Pilot" (which came after "Medicine Sunday" and before "Crawl Out") is not listed on the sheet but there is a note at the bottom that reads, "Jet Pilot 2nd leader on tape UNANNOUNCED".

As mentioned above, Johnston did not always slate (announce) takes. Thus, in respect of "Crawl Out", there is a note that reads, "2 NOT SLATED" and, against "I Don't Want To Be Your Partner", another note reads "3 slated twice". I should add that, for the latter song, there are two takes marked "6" on the sheet. In a way, it is hardly surprising that the session information on "The Cutting Edge" is "not necessarily accurate".

Let me now turn to the Tape Identification Data sheets for the 30 November 1965 session. The first sheet (for the first reel used that day) only has the 7 takes at "Freeze Out" (aka "Visions of Johanna"). The second sheet for the next reel opens with another 7 takes of "Freeze Out" (at least one of which was not salted - the writing is faint) followed by 10 takes of "Crawl Out". The details of the "Crawl Out" takes are much clearer than those for "Freeze Out" (as though written in pen rather than pencil).

Importantly, the "CO" number for "Crawl Out" (CO 88582) follows immediately on from the "CO" number for "Freeze Out" (CO 88581). When recorded on 5 October 1965, "Crawl Out" had a different, earlier, "CO" number (namely CO 87184). Had Dylan and Johnston merely worked on a take recorded on 5 October, they would almost certainly have used the earlier CO number because that would have been the number announced on the tape they used.

If, as some have claimed, the 30 November session was used to mix a take of "Crawl Out" recorded on 5 October, why would the session sheet for 30 November show all 10 takes? They would simply have physically cut the selected take from the 5 October reel and put that take on a work reel. They would not have taken all 10 takes (including the 7 false starts) from the 5 October reel.

In addition to this, Dylan's Artist Contract Card (page 28, to be precise) shows that the single was recorded on 30 November 1965 (in fact, it is typed incorrectly as 20 November 1965 but that is obviously in error). The same document also shows (1) the "Crawl Out" single given as "CO 88581", (2) "Robt. Gregg" mus. sc. 11/30/65 $2009.73" as his fee for the session and (3) has the "Crawl Out" recorded on 5 October listed separately as "CO 87184" with no reference to any song from that session becoming a release.

There is another document, untitled but it seems to be a release card. It shows the details of the "Crawl Out" single, with "11-30-65 NYC" as the recording information, "CO 88582" as the CO number and "98616" as the Job Number, the very number on the Tape Identification Data sheets for the session on 30 November (the Job Number for the 5 October 1965 session was 98362).

In conclusion, I wasn't there, so I cannot claim to to know for sure, but the contemporary documents certainly show that the "Crawl Out" single was recorded on 30 November 1965 and therefor e with Bobby Gregg on drums, not Levon Helm.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 17:32:57 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tom Jones

Tom Jones; what a great performance of a great song! Thank you, Sadavid.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 17:24:16 CEST 2016 from (100.34.147.66)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Drummer on Crawl

More and more, I'm leaning to October 5th being the recording date which would make Levon the drummer. The record keeping at Columbia Records concerning Bob Dylan albums and who played on them, not to mention when they were actually released leaves much to be desired. I was told by someone totally in a position to know that the session info on The Cutting Edge was not necessarily accurate.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 16:37:45 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Drummer on "Like A Rolling Stone"

John, the short answer is Bobby Gregg.

"Rolling Stone" was recorded over two days (!5 and 16 June 1965) and Bobby Gregg was the drummer on both days.

In respect of Take 11, Roger Ford wrote, in his previous article (the one that covered the "Highway 61 Revisited" sessions), that "the music sounds lumpy compared with the master take" (the master take being Take 4, the one that produced the single and the opening track of the album).

In a footnote to his comments on Take 11, Roger said that the master take of "Rolling Stone" (Take 4) on "The Cutting Edge" was mixed to sound like the single/album track, on which the drums were made "less obtrusive". In contrast, the publisher's demo of the song, which used the same take (that is, Take 4) had the drums louder than the single/album track.

So, on the takes that follow Take 4 on "The Cutting Edge", the drums sound louder than on the Take with which we are so familiar.

I don't know if this helps.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 15:17:29 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: When We Were Very Young

Crosby, Stills, Nash, Young, Taylor, Reeves . . . and Jones.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 14:53:40 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More retro drinks

Babycham used to be called "champagne perry" but is now "sparkling perry." So it was pear. The apple equivalent was Pomagne, sold in full size bottles. We once won a case of ten Pomagne in a school raffle. We drank one, and offered to contribute a case of nine to the next raffle. They declined it. Apparently we had been the third winner. Everyone tried one bottle and put it back in the raffle.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 14:49:46 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Whisky Mac

One I'd forgotten, Dunc. Is it known in North America? It's whisky with flat ginger wine (NOT fizzy ginger ale). It was usually Stones Ginger Wine around here, though apparently Crabbies (who also make ginger beer) is better. There was a brief whisky mac revival about 10 years ago locally, when Dorset Organic Dry Ginger wine started appearing everywhere. I Googled and couldn't find it, so I suspect they went out of business.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 13:38:35 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ian W More Drums question please.

Ian. Could you please tell who played drums on Like A Rolling Stone take 11 Alternate Take. Parts of it sounds like military drumming almost. Quite unique and different from other versions.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 09:57:27 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "Crawl Out" single - drummer

Yes, Bill M, it was Bobby Gregg on the "Crawl Out" single.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 09:48:27 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shakespeare and James. A rambling aside.

Norbert and Bill: The accession of James VI of Scotland to become James I of England in 1603 as well is pretty crucial to Shakespeare scholars His theatre band became “The Kings Men” and prospered under James, but we get no more “English History” plays after 1599 (except for the very late Henry VIII). Under James, we get two plays set in a mythical “Britain” rather than England (King Lear, Cymbeline) plus we get Macbeth, which shows the intertwined English / Scottish history, with Malcolm fleeing to England … James VIth / Ist believed Banquo was his ancestor, and a line of eight Stuart kings had preceded James, which is shown in the parade of eight kings in the play. Old William S. knew upon which side his bread was buttered.

I’m sure that Henry V had certain cuts in the text after James became King too. There are lines about Scotland in the play that would not have been safe to declaim in front of James. The last twice I’ve seen it they’ve got big laughs too.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 06:07:18 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill, Scotland will shine again, just like Canada, that’s what our Band is all about.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 02:41:18 CEST 2016 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert:Neither the English nor the Scots like to admit that when the two countries became one, the Scots prevailed - but the Scottish king chose to move south for the weather and the culture. Much as our guys did in the 1960s.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 02:31:08 CEST 2016 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: Thanks. Whatever the truh of the matter, Sandy Konikoff is sure it wasn't him. Which leaves Bobby Gregg, I guess.


Entered at Wed Jun 15 01:18:05 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Did Levon play on Dylan's "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?" single

“A MUSICAL HISTORY” includes Dylan’s “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” single and the liner notes give the recording date as 5 October 1965 and state that Levon Helm plays drums on the track.

The imminent issue of the Dylan fanzine ISIS will contain the latest article by Roger Ford in a series that provides a track-by-track commentary on Dylan’s 18-CD “THE CUTTING EDGE” release. This particular article will look at Dylan’s New York sessions in October and November 1965, the ones that involve The Hawks.

Of particular interest here may be the conclusion that Dylan’s “Can YOU Please Crawl Out Your Window?” single released in December 1965 was recorded at the 30 November 1965 session, not at the 5 October 1965 session. This would mean that Levon was not the drummer on the single, as he had recently jumped ship.

This conclusion is based on session documents, not included in “THE CUTTING EDGE” but reproduced in the article, and on the Columbia Records documentation that is in “THE CUTTING EDGE”. Levon’s brief mention of the earlier session in “THIS WHEEL’S ON FIRE” is interesting. He makes a series of accurate statements that lead one to believe that he is on the single but never actually states that he was.

The aforementioned article follows the way things are presented in “THE CUTTING EDGE”, so the conclusion may not be surprising, but some folks, elsewhere, have argued differently (saying that the single was recorded at the 5 October 1965 session and then mixed at the 30 November 1965 session) and, thus, that Levon was on the single. Their view does not appear to be solidly based, however.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 22:20:41 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Liverpool someday 1960

Liverpool someday 1960, ships role in and out harbors and docks. Seamen return from New York City. Walking in jeans bringing Rock and Roll, Blues and Elvis and not much later The Band.

Farther up north maybe Scotland will force England to stay in the EU, someday.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 21:45:48 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, the Murdoch Press was well into it today "BE-LEAVE" said the Sun, a filthy rag full of shite if ever there was one. I reckon the phone-hacking scandal got closer to putting Murdoch in court than he expected, and Murdoch is venting rage on Cameron for failing to protect him.

Then the Daily Express is run by a professional pornographer, the Telegraph by a discredited entrepreneur and the Daily Mail by a very nasty piece of work. I cling to The Guardian today.

On Brexit, I was chatting at a party on Sunday. It is lunatic to make a major constitutional change on a simple majority vote. Anyone with any intelligence would have suggested two-thirds. BUT of course Britexit requires an Act of Parliament, so if the public (turkeys voting for Christmas) vote 50.01% for exit, parliament is fully entitled to say "not enough" and reject it. Fingers crossed!


Entered at Tue Jun 14 20:34:10 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Trump and Murdoch

Is see Murdoch is on board for Brexit - seems if we consistently don't do what these 2 suggest the world will be a better place -


Entered at Tue Jun 14 15:04:10 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Mike/RoseAnn

Mike - you made my heart soar with that post - particularly the bit where you state she's a unique talent - because that's exactly as I perceive her.

But I certainly don't feel I warrant any thanks. I've simply been trying to do right by RoseAnn. Indeed, I just feel we are blessed on here to have these early sneak previews/insights into a talent that is surely destined for some significant breakthrough at some stage.

The pleasure her music has provided me with these past 6 months or so equates with any listening experience i've ever had. So I feel it's me who should be doing the thanking to Bob for giving us the heads up.

I'm sure it's only a question of time before everyone with even the remotest musically inclined notions on the GB [which by definition being the GB of the greatest ever band kind of means everyone :-0] - and hopefully many similarly inclined on my own footy website - will have tapped into the same vein of ridiculous quality stuff this girl is serving up.

But thanks again Mike for espousing how you're feeling about this girl's music. Again, I know for a fact how much it will mean to them that yet another seasoned music fan is deriving joy from what this girl is giving us all.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 14:46:47 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: RoseAnn

I'm guessing that the Finos, daughter and father, must be particularly grateful to have two such dedicated proponents of this highly talented, young artist's music across the sea as Al and Dunc. It was because of them, especially Al, that I myself decided to see what the fuss was all about. I kind of had a clue a few months before but did nothing about it, unfortunately. Now I know. I've purchased everything that I can of RoseAnn's music. And I, too, have been listening constantly. RoseAnn is a unique talent. Even I, in my semi-geezerdom, can see that. So a loud thank you to Al Edge, and obviously to Jeff A, for shining the light.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 14:32:57 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: bandana becomes . . .

. . . a do-rag!

Appropriate for any occasion.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 13:16:32 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dunc's take on RoseAnn Fino's latest record - Airing of Grievances

Absolutely thrilled about that Dunc – and I know Bob will be too. Not to mention RoseAnn, of course. When all’s said and done she’s a young girl imbued with extremely rare musical/artistic gifts - a chunk of which most certainly derive from the very same musical origins most GBers know and love – who is simply desperate to have the music she’s created from scratch receive the sort of audience it deserves.

At present that audience is tiny so the disparity between the sort of reception her outstanding music merits and what it has so far acquired is immeasurable. Yet comments such as yours will help chip away at that huge disparity.

You posting just a little snippet like might seem on the face of it insignificant. Yet it actually represents something quite monumental. It means a man with unquestionable, dare I say impeccable :-0), musical taste acquired over decades is actually sat at home soaking up the musical offerings a young aspiring artist has sweated blood to create in a tiny New York bedsit room some 3000 miles away. What a wonderful fillip that must represent to someone like RoseAnn.

When glowing testimonies from the likes of yourself, JT, Jeff, PV and Bassmanlee are added to the nod of approval from an influential figure within the music business such as our own John Donabie it begins hopefully to create a head of steam which can help propel RoseAnn, her fabulous bandmates and her music towards acquiring the sort of audience commensurate with the musical package she is offering.

On the same tack I’ll put up another comment - amongst a fair few of similar ilk on a footy website I go on - from a mate who I finally persuaded to give up his precious time to give a listen to RoseAnn’s latest offering. All such comments have been passed on to Bob and RoseAnn.

“””””””Listened through thrice before posting and am listening now while writing.

First off, the band is tight as a gnat's chuff with outstanding arrangement on all four tracks with particular mention to Alyson on Viola.

RoseAnn is without doubt a huge talent and Al is right to champion her. She's found her own voice and style with this record. Yes, there are influences and tracks such as California Debutante has an infusion of Van Morrison, Nick Cave and Dylan, yet she brings a unique quality through the melody and her rich, spine tingling voice makes it her own. This song, in particular, has entered my noggin and refuses to move.

So there you go, Al, thanks for the gentle prodding!!!! Ha ha!! Bought the music and I now have to say I’m completely sold on this talent. Sorry I missed her in the Caledonia when she came to the 'Pool.

To those listening please give it a couple of go's; not because it is an acquired taste, far from it, but because you will change your mind as to best track. I'm thinking now, on 5th listening, maybe the title track is the best.....

.....and yet ,you know, The Drinking Song is so haunting and lovely.....”””””””””


Entered at Tue Jun 14 11:31:54 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Sorry to hear about death of Chips Moman. Still play 'Do Right Woman, Do Right Man', 'Dark End of the Street', the Box Tops among other things.

Enjoyed Isaac Hayes, Jeff. I remember reading that by the time Isaac had finished his version of'By The Time I Get To Phoenix', he could have driven there.

Other missing drinks from those sophisticated days, Peter - Babycham and Whisky Mac.

Still enjoying listening to RoseANN, Al.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 10:53:20 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A bandana may be called a kerchief. I didn't remember that either.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 10:50:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: ascots, bandanas and pink scarves

Many thanks to Mike for BANDANA. It’s a word I’ve been searching for over the last decade. A decade or more ago I was cruelly lampooned in these very pages for a perceived sartorial error. Someone linked a photo of me, and declared that I was a “limey wearing an ascot.” This puzzled British readers to whom an Ascot is a gas-fired water heater, often installed next to kitchen sinks.

Eventually we worked out that the item of neckwear under discussion was thought to be a cravat. In vain I protested that no Englishman wears a cravat with a black denim jacket outside the Festival Season (which runs from Glastonbury to the Reading Festival).

As I explained endlessly, in a debate that was revived as often as Robbie’s pink scarf, that the item in question was a scarf, a folded printed square of cotton cloth bearing a paisley pattern, that may be worn on the head (during the Festival season) or around the neck except for the December-February period. The triangular area was at the front because it was soaked with DEET. We had been filming a Robin Hood skit under an oak tree in a park next to Clifton Suspension Bridge, in fact he exact tree used in the TV series of Robin Hood, We were beset by midges, blackfly and even Blandford fly and had been liberally DEET sprayed. The actors had it worse than me, as their faces were covered in repellent to avoid red lumps which might cause continuity issues. Anyway, my publisher interviewed me and wanted a photo for an internal newsletter, and the professional photographer on set duly obliged.

In fact it was a BANDANA. A paisley patterned cotton square. A bandana is cool. An ascot is not. I’m delighted to see my choice of neckwear supported by Rick Danko in the excellent video that Jeff linked.

So Jeff, like you, the vague SCARF came to my mind first. The photo itself can be seen on most of my articles here, though only a head and shoulder thumbnail.

The very oak tree may be seen in the link to my old website. You may have to select ROBIN HOOD. The video series is now sadly out of print and totally unobtainable.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 06:40:33 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Chips Moman has died.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 06:27:42 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

See Mike. Like the man said. There ain't no free internet. You can't be free in a net. We've been caught! Every last fucking one of us.

That means you too Norm. You've been caught, red fucking handed!


Entered at Tue Jun 14 05:38:00 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

I was all geared up for your link, Jeff, but we third-rate Canuckians have been denied viewing rights by the YouTube gods. Blasted heathens we must be. Ah, fuck 'em.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 05:05:54 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Soul. The Power of Love/ Issac Hayes/ By The Time I Get To Phoenix

The impersonal, inauthentic, impossibly incommunicative web: I could not be more mellow right now unless I was dead Mike.

& here's Isaac Hayes doing By The Time I Get To Phoenix

***************************************************************

As I've been told about the internet.

You can't be free in a a net.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 04:52:46 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Geez, Jeff, mellow out, man.

Maybe it's just a crummy neckerchief.

Then again, a bandana is a type of scarf, no?

Time for bed.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 04:23:05 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Philosophy. GB Style.

Yes Mr Noamd. A perfect example of typing an incorrect word. I meant bandana, typed scarf. I fucked up. That should be the worst fuck up of my week. Though i can almost guarantee that i shall make some more significant fuck up before the week's out. Possibly before the day is over.When i run out of fuck ups, i'm history. Why do i keep fucking up? asked Neil Young. Well, any body could answer: Cause I'm breathing. OR - i was born to fuck up. IF you only take one thing away from this GB, let it be, we all are fuck ups. It's a question of degree.


Entered at Tue Jun 14 03:27:02 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Looks more like a bandana, Jeff.


Entered at Mon Jun 13 23:29:53 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Never saw this one before, or Rick wearing a scarf before.

The Band. Life is a Carnival. With the whole Conan O Brien Band. James is playing congas, Mike the tambourine. But Scott Healy did add a third keyboard.


Entered at Mon Jun 13 19:08:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Deep sleep

Ah, a seriously useful aid when Al finishes the book in 2018 (link to details). I got Max Richter's "From "Sleep" CD … just the single CD version, not the 8 hour with 8 CDs and DVD. It is brilliant at sending you off. I claim it's a sleep-like state though Mrs V comments no one snores and honks when in a dream like state, and that I'm right off. They just reduced the 8 CD version from £80 to £30 on amazon and I've ordered it. Max Richter has done eight hour concerts in Berlin and London with camp beds for the audience. The aim is to drift off into a deep relaxed state. That's why there's a DVD with the whole thing without pauses. The effect is incredibly relaxing.

BAND connection … Robbie's mash up for "Shutter Island", This Bitter Earth / On The Nature Of Daylight (Dinah Washington & Max Richter)


Entered at Mon Jun 13 15:25:29 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

That "something in the air" could be emanating from my neighbour's apartment.....fried fish tonight. : )


Entered at Mon Jun 13 14:51:24 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Telepathy

Ha ha - somehow I just felt you had Fred! Must be something in the air.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jun 13 14:39:01 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: I've sent you the 250000 words telepathically.


Entered at Mon Jun 13 13:07:06 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

FRED: you've got to explain in no more than 250,000 words how to pronounce Jurgen Klopp's name in a rare Japanese dialect

PETE: you've got to explain in half a paragraph why I can't get through more than half a page of your book each night before falling into this wonderful deep sleep

PS - don't worry P - the problem certainly ain't your book which is a hoot!!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jun 13 12:05:31 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Test on the Band

I've got to write a test? I thought those days were over. How many questions? Do we have an audio component? Phew. This could take days.


Entered at Mon Jun 13 11:52:12 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Test?!? Nobody told me there'd be a test! ; )


Entered at Mon Jun 13 11:15:09 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Test


Entered at Mon Jun 13 11:13:05 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: ROSEANN FINO - An established music critic's take on Airing of Grievances

Thanks to Jerry, Pete, Rog and Dunc for their kind words re me airing my own manic review of Airing [hmmpph :-0)]. I'm just delighted for RoseAnn and Bob and their family that your goodselves and the likes of Jeff and Bassmanlee - and most notably that truly amazingly cool DJ [JD] in our midst - rate the record so highly.

In meantime, thank goodness there's been a proper official review [LINKED above and REPEATED below] by a recognized music writer who seems to have been blown away by RoseAnn's new record if not quite so mammothly/manically as myself then certainly enough to have gone around the moon and back again in wonderment at the record's magnificence.

Indeed my only gripe with what he writes - and no disrespect to the artist he cites [Lucinda Williams] who in her own right is as we all know is more than pretty damn good - is that he felt compelled to draw parallels between RoseAnn's 'Drinking Song' and Lucinda's own 'Those Three Days'! I can see the connection but for me time will surely bear testament to the fact that whilst Lucinda's is certainly a terrific song, RoseAnn’s by contrast is surely dabbling with the status of mood-laden masterpiece.

On which note I do have to say that surely too now is the time for all of us GB’ers to BAND together to acclaim the daughter of one of our own for creating something so spectacularly good. Certainly in 20 odd years here I've not come across anything approaching such an achievement involving what is for all intents and purposes, in the case of RoseAnn, one of our own. Okay, so possibly on an entirely different pathway the stellar achievements of Jan's hugely talented son were a precursor but with respect to JH and his lad the sort of stuff he does, however excellent and hugely successful it is commercially, has never in cold stone truth really been the musical bag of the folks on here. RoseAnn's music in stark contrast couldn't be any more up our collective street.

All of which is telling me this is the ideal time to recreate precisely the sort of collective celebratory communion/concensus that underpins what the GB was created for - albeit in this instance not for the criminally under-appreciated original group we all love but for a metaphorical offspring of it who happens right now to be attaining a level of correspondingly under-appreciated musical excellence that befits our beloved musical heroes. Who knows how much a collective driving force from everyone who populates this very GB could summon up to help spread the word just that little bit about the incredible musical talent in our midst to perhaps help in remedying such under-appreciation?

At present, it has to be said that it does seem with the odd honourable exception that the GB's loop of acclaim for artists past, both mega giants and not so mega, often appears to blind the GB's collective eye to such fresh and vibrant new talent as RoseAnn. Of course, there’s nowt wrong and loads right with acclaiming the greats or not so greats either gone by or still hanging on by the skin of their old age pension books but when it's at the exclusion of new deserving blood surely anyone will understand how it might kind of suck a wee bit.

Anyroad, whilst I may well actually be doing it to an infinite degree my intention isn’t to preach – I mean who the feck am I to do so anyway? It’s just that right here and now with the release of this amazing record it might well represent the finest opportunity for RoseAnn to make the breakthrough the quality of her music so richly deserves. John Donabie’s exposure of her recording gems to a wider audience could well be the bridgehead needed to precipitate wider appreciation but a solid base of support from everyone who visits this GB, however regularly or infrequently, would most certainly not go amiss and might actually complement John D's own sterling efforts. It doesn't take that much time, effort or cash to purchase a few 5 dollar CD's and dish them out to friends and family - and nobody knows that more than myself. And that effort could well pay dividends for a deserving and truly astonishing talent struggling to be noticed.

Still awake? If so, here's the text of the official review I mentioned!!

:-0

""""Look, it’s time to get seriously hip to Queens, New York’s RoseAnn Fino or we’re going to lose her to Europe where she’s wandering about playing clubs in London, Paris, and Scotland, gathering steam, fans, critical attention, a slew of selfies and, most assuredly, some hot new songs.

Intent on getting her music out as it happens, Fino’s second EP within a year continues to grapple with the millennial perils of post-bust America. “I live beneath a bridge near a garbage truck that tells me when it’s morning.” And so begins the single “Touch Me,” a monster tune with the relentless tide of “Sympathy For The Devil” driving her reverberant howls and “Hey Heys” while the Lovely Misfits (pianist and right hand man Ryan Shapiro, violist Allyson Clare, bassist Pete O’Neill, and drummer Neil Nunziato) bash and slam like hell itself was heating up outside the studio door.

Sure, it’s an existential Hell, but it’s still jaggedly dystopian. She courageously deals with that whole mess in the title song, a ballsy, slice of tight wire rock/pop whose disarmingly insistent chorus “You’re so nice/I hope you/stay awhile/And I don”t mess it up/With all my worrying/And you’re so kind/I wish I could/Fix my mind/and not be so fucked up/And be happy/to be loved . . .” leaves you thinking, “Shit, ain’t no one that real anymore.” “Drinking Song,” cast à la Dylan circa Desire, is damn well one of the saddest songs since Lucinda’s “Those Three Days,” as Clare’s mournful viola puts blood in the track and Fino’s hung-over-next-morning-mistake vocal darkens the deep despair.

To all sworn to carrying the Elmore standard—Saving American Music—into battle, give this one a damn good listen. Once you hear, I’m not bullshitting you, tell your friends. Visit the website www.roseannfino.com, join the mailing list and see a show."""""

– Mike Jurkovic


Entered at Mon Jun 13 00:15:03 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.32)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Incomplete

Izzy Young moved to Sweden in `1973, operates his folklore center there, & hangs out in bars occasionally.


Entered at Mon Jun 13 00:09:32 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.32)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ, Sweden's s less costly than NYC & many other places that musicians might prefer living. And sometimes there's life opportunities. Survival comes first. Sometimes.

There's plenty of blues playing NYC Jews & musical people in Sweden.

A friend, Brian Kramer, from Brooklyn, moved there with his wife, who is Swedish, over twenty years ago. They raised two kids there. Brian seems to dominate the Stockholm blues scene. Has taught & developed a pile of Swedish players, & aside from making his own records & producing for others, has written a novel. Out Of The Blues.

Jon Ben Berger, from Brooklyn or Manhattan, also there.Jon set Richie Havens up onstage at Woodstock. They were closely associated.

Ancient Izzy Young (Israel Goodman Young) grew up in Da Bronx, but moved to Brooklyn after he finished high school. He went to brooklyn college, & after working in his father's bakery a few years, opened The Folklore Center in greenwich Village. And was very instrumental in the entire Greenwich Village Folk Scene. Izzy also prodeced Bob Dylan's first concert at Carnegie Hall. Dylan wrote a song about him or his center.

Brian visits NYC yearly. For a week to two. He's on forced feeding the entire time. Apparently the food in Sweden is disappointing for a guy from Brooklyn.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 22:31:45 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: I'll Take Sweeden

PV - I've noticed that thing about ex-pat musicians living in Scandinavia too. Most recently I read that Rockpile's Billy Bremer has lived in Sweeden for years. Bluesman JB Lenoir lived there too. I wonder if, for artists, it's akin that way to Paris in the 20's and 50's? Or, cynically, is it just an easier place to be a junkie?


Entered at Sun Jun 12 21:29:56 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Guinness

Jeff A - Guinness is a wonderful thing. It's an acquired taste and then a pal for life. Plus due to its low alcohol it can be very sessionable, for hours. Back in the day I never got in any trouble or much of a hangover unless I got into double digits pints. Low alcohol, served cold and, as opposed to its rep, it's actually a very light beer comparatively , 0 or very low, depending on the pub, CO2; so it's not very filling at all. It can be tough to get a good one though outside of bigger cities -


Entered at Sun Jun 12 21:28:54 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good to hear about Pete Abbott, Jan. A remarkable number of musicians either end up in Norway or marry Norwegians.

Dunc, rum and black was what I drank on my 18th birthday. i can still taste the inevitable vomit. When I worked in a pub circa 1968, we sold a LOT of rum and black. I guess it's gone the way of port and lemon, and whisky and dry ginger as "drinks that used to be popular." Rum and black was blackcurrant cordial and rum, basically Rum & Ribena (as Ian Dury called it).


Entered at Sun Jun 12 18:44:19 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.32)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, when i was swinging a hammer and looked like i just finished three tours in the Marines, i could put em away. And since then there have been occasional bouts where 4 pints of Guinness and i could walk a tightrope. These days, three large bottles of Becks and not needing an emergency room after chopping a chunk off a block cheese is an accomplishment. Fuck, not biting my own tongue off while chewing was just as risky as cutting the fucking thing.

Interesting story Jan. :-)


Entered at Sun Jun 12 17:29:30 CEST 2016 from (84.215.141.93)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: AWB etc.

Pete Abott, who was AWB's drummer from 1994-98, later worked as a secondary/high school music teacher in the little Norwegian town of Halden where we lived until recently. This was at a school for kids that want to do music as their main topic. To be accepted as a student there, you had to go through a test where you played your "main instrument" in front of a group of teachers that decided if you were good enough to enter the programme. When our son was 15 he really wanted to go to this school. The problem was that his "main instrument" were two Technics 1200 turntables, a battle mixer and a stack of vinyl -- he was at that time already considered one of the best turntablists in the country. To make a long story short: He performed for the acceptance test, the "jury" scratched their heads for a long time and did not know what to do with this, then found out he also could play piano, and let him enter as the first and still only music high school student in Norway with turntables as main instrument. And Pete Abott became his music teacher, as drumming and turntablism do have quite a lot in common. The high school and the work with AWB's drummer for three years changed everything for our kid -- he learned a lot, became self-confident, and the rest is history... And Pete Abott and Cashmere Cat (as his artist name is nowadays) are still the best of friends.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 17:20:33 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks, Peter. Politics is changing. Both Labour and Conservative parties nationally are split.

Maybe what is lost down South, is that the Conservatives are the official opposition in the Scottish parliament. They have a good leader and embrace One Nation Toryism. This is big change with Labour in third place.

Rum (OVD) and Black is a traditional Scottish drink, Peter, which I have never looked at again after a late teens experience.

Would have liked to have seen Steely Dan, JT. I had a double Greatest Hits, Katy Lied and two Donald Fagen solo albums. Always liked them, so have been buying up the back catalogue. Enjoy your posts.

Three bottles, Jeff. Getting on, mate. Enjoy your Brooklyn posts as always.

Am playing and enjoying Roseann Fino just now on my computer. Looking forward to getting my CDs. Normally don't download music.

I'm the guy on the train with the CDs, my Sony player, and my Grado (made in Brooklyn) headphones. I see kids smiling or making quiet sarcastic comments, Ha Ha.

Who's a dinosaur.

My favourite tee shirt I saw in Glasgow was 'I may be old, but I've seen all the best bands.'


Entered at Sun Jun 12 16:45:21 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The infernal machine

Sorry Dunc: The infernal machine corrected me. At least it can spell 'Dan' correctly the first time.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 16:44:00 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Steely Dan

Dunn: Steely Dan: From Tin Pan Alley to pop to articulate jazz, Becker and Fagen and all who played with them were brilliant. Their body of work is wonderful. I saw /heard them in Toronto and hope to have that opportunity again.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 16:41:22 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.32)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Greatest Band. The Band. Whole Concert. Schaefer Music Festival. Wolmman Skating Rink June 30 1071.

Having been born in 58, & fortunately having started going to concerts frequently in 72, I've always wished I was a few to 10 years older, cause of the live music I missed. On the other hand, I also know I likely would have served in Nam. Smart or stupid, right or wrong, guided or misguided, I don't think I'm the type to have avoided it when my countrymen couldn't without going to Canada or jail. I've never really thought it through. It's just a gut feeling I've always had since i was a kid at that time, don't know what i would have come up with if forced to intellectualize it & decide had i been just a bit older then.

But, those who were not in the military sure got to hear the greatest period of music ever. This popped up in my FB newsfeed just now. Half awake, over tired from a bout a month of little sleep, this sounds like some one might have recordrd it on a portable sony shoebox style cassette recorder. I made it to the second track, King Harvest, & there's no escaping the genius, the intricacy, the beauty & the fact that The Band was the greatest Rock & Roll Band. They may not have earned it on a level of combined consistency & longevity,with universal immediate impact, but, fuck, .........I'm out of words. Al, you can finish this if you want :-)

Fucking shame. Three lousy Becks last night & I'm worthless. The world is coming to an end. For fuck's sake, how I spotted this on the bottle is beyond me, but Beck's is now made in St. Louis Boolshit say I. Last time I buy Beck's. Unless it's the best bad choice. I make those often.... Life in the two thousand & teens............Fuck us all..... Hillary, you're my President.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 14:49:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, I was shocked that one, a Scotsman, chose Rum & coke! Perhaps it's less appalling as a thought than pouring Coca Cola onto a fine malt.

Yes, Question Time (an important programme here) was 3:2 Leavers, and of the two Remain speakers, Eddie Izzard was inarticulate and incoherent, let alone wearing lipstick and a pink beret, which might be good for the LGBT vote, but not helpful when you’re trying to persuade the average voter. I almost thought “set up.” As it’s a referendum we can’t just hope for “Scotland- Remain” either (which I was)… it’s down to individual votes. Abnsolutely right … the Labour leadership is more interested in sowing Conservative discord than campaigning for remain. Half-hearted is an exaggeration of Jeremy Corbyn’s campaign to stay.

True. Of course everytime the TV news shows Tony "Trust me - weapons of mass destruction" Blair plus John "I shagged Edwina Currie" Major urging us to stay, that’s more votes lost.

Years ago, we walked out of an Eddie Izzard gig (he is allegedly a standup comedian). He had no mic technique at all, and we could see him mumbling away in a 3000 seat hall, and the front centre 5 or 6 rows doubled up laughing. We couldn’t hear a word. When we left before the interval … we didn’t bother to wait, as so many were walking out, we were in a great crowd going into the car park. As a live performer he was beyond dire.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 11:34:03 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: AWB, EU

Never heard that record before, Peter. Enjoyed reading the band's likes. Whatever happened to whisky and cokes? Yuk!

I'm remain in EU too, but UK polls suggested 55-45 leave yesterday. Scotland was 60-40 remain. But I'm not so sure. There have been suggestions that we are not so different from the rest of the UK.

I feel the Remain Campaign is poor. Does the Labour leader want to remain in the EU? Damned by faint praise.

Meanwhile the Tory leadership is using greater and greater scare tactics related to the consequences of leaving.

And as soon as Angela Merkel, Barrack Obama, Michael Moore, the governor of the Bank of England,Eddie Izzard, (who was dire on Question Time), Tony Blair, John Major, seemingly hundreds of self appointed think tanks, heads of leading companies et al tell us what to do or else...I think that's more votes lost.

Brits don't like being told what to do. Barrack Obama saying we would be at the back of the queue didn't help.

Politics will never be the same after the referendum.

Just now 'Katy Lied' is playing away. Steely Dan are brilliant.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 10:46:00 CEST 2016 from (114.75.197.218)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A classic bit of British comedy.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 10:03:45 CEST 2016 from (31.52.116.113)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK EU

Subject: Votey McVoteface

Fat lady isn't in the building yet Bill. Fibby McFibface is finding it too easy to convince lots of folk here but many of them will be challenged to find their way to the polling station. #no way to run a democracy...


Entered at Sun Jun 12 09:51:07 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: There is a scroll bar. Politics.

Sorry, more on politics. Democracy has limits and if you look at the 1930s, the referendum was a tool of fascist dictators. This was lampooned in the Peter Cook / Dudley Moore film “The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer” where constant referendums (I believe referenda is too fancy a word) were used to control, the populace. Both the British and American systems are based on representative government as a filter. The British system evolved, and then later the Founding Fathers wisely distrusted “mob rule.”

My old politics professor wrote books on it. Capital punishment is the classic example. If you had a mass vote right after a gruesome child or serial killing, you might easily get over 70% (possibly including me) opting for burning the perpetrator alive in the town square, after torture. That’s not plucked from the air, polls indicate it. However, that’s not what civilised societies do, and in the longer term we must accept that incarceration is the only way. That’s why we elect representatives as a filter of considered debate and judgment between mass emotion and government action.

On that, the US Electoral College was designed with the same principle in mind. That’s why they are not obliged to follow the public choice. This might come in useful.

But it’s why Cameron, having won an election resoundingly against opposition from the Brexit-based UKIP, was a total idiot to call a referendum. He immediately put himself in the hands of the press barons … not only Murdoch, but the Daily Mail and Daily Express. It’s no way to run a country.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 07:20:59 CEST 2016 from (24.114.86.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jed

Just listened to the YouTube of Bob Dylan paying tribute to his good pal George doing "Something".....Beautiful ! That era 2002-2005, I saw Dylan many times and he and his band were great every time I saw them......"Cutting loose" wasn't noteworthy in those days.

Thank you.


Entered at Sun Jun 12 00:53:32 CEST 2016 from (74.12.51.18)

Posted by:

Bill M

Roger: Votey McVolteface seems to be chugging out to sea. Sad.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 20:29:17 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Something

'Something' is the only one I know of.

Of course, there is the Dylan/Harrison collaborations (Concert for Bengladesh and at Dylan's home in early 70s) and Traveling Wilburys but those are not covers.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 19:45:40 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan covers

Can anyone name the George Harrison songs Bob covered? My personal favorite is when he covered The Allman Brothers,Rambling Man-incredible fun!


Entered at Sat Jun 11 19:42:09 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Thanks PSB

Much appreciate your response on Freebird.I read reviews of the show and they confirm that,indeed Bob cut 'em loose and let them show their chops.Gonna check if there are any clips on YouTube-but cut loose,this band must kick some serious ass.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 15:55:12 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hopscotch

Dunc (and others). Hopscotch was the earlier version of Forever More and they did two singles, including a cover of Long Black Veil (covering The Band version). If you follow the link to the great 45.cat, which aims to scan and post every 45 ever released, you'll see their United Artists single. Scroll to images and enlarge the white box. it's a promo sheet from the demo, with the usual lists of likes and dislikes. Interestingly, 3 of the 4 cite Spooky Tooth as a "like." That confirms my view of the importance of Spooky tooth, who in turn did th British cover of "The weight."


Entered at Sat Jun 11 15:47:47 CEST 2016 from (94.197.121.53)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: The EU

Subject: No exit

Ditto Peter. We're just driving down to Cornwall - a county which has had shed loads of EU sponduliks but there's a mega Vote Leave campaign down there. Turkeys voting for Xmas.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 15:35:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sorry, parochial politics …

Brexit- a terrifying prospect. What I don’t understand is that in the last election, UKIP was on the ballot papers, and did badly everywhere. People had a chance to vote UKIP, who espoused a British exit, and didn’t. So given the choice (in the South) they voted mainly Conservative. So Conservative get in, and suddenly all these Conservative guys elected AGAINST UKIP suddenly turn around and espouse UKIP views. Boris Johnson, whose naked ambition is there for all to see, didn’t even decide which side he was on until the saw the way the wind was blowing. Gove is the worst education minister we ever had.

Then all these LEAVE people go on and on about immigration … OK, but they’re talking about Syrians, Afghans, Somalis, Albanians. These are NOT European Union countries, and whether we’re in or out makes no difference, except that France will no longer be obliged to stop them.

Then they whitter on about the Russian oligarchs and Arab millionaires in London … hey, but they’re not in the European Union either.

The guy rubbing his hands with glee at the prospect of a British exit is Vladimir Putin. Every tabloid newspaper has been obviously or covertly blowing the trumpet for Brexit because it sells newspapers. If all our Polish and other EU nurses and doctors and care workers left tomorrow, we wouldn’t have a National Health Service at all.

Sure, Brussels is full of bloated unelected bureaucrats making stupid laws. As is the European Court- many of the "judges" have no legal qualifications. But we can unite with like-minded countries and change that from within. We're looking at 71 years of uninterrupted peace in Western Europe. It’s a no brainer. REMAIN!


Entered at Sat Jun 11 14:49:19 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: James Taylor: extraordinary

James Taylor: Victoria BC: perfect sound in a hockey arena!; in superb voice: Steve Gadd: stellar band with pros of the first order; material from the new albums and many of the well-known songs: Superb! One of the truly great concerts I have ever been at. Hard to imagine him live as a force of nature but when he hit his stride with 'Knock On Wood' and 'How Sweet It Is' after playing some of those sweet songs you were at the heights. Kudos to a light and video show accompanying. who 'woulda thunk it'. James Taylor: a true survivor who's not done yet.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 14:42:06 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Soul

I have wondered from time to time if soul was more important in the formative years of us Brits than the North Americans in the GB community.

Although the Band could play soul really well.

Here's the late, great Alex Harvey with his Soul Band.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 14:13:53 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

Thanks Bill M. Really good track. I didn't really know about Forever More or Mogul Thrash until Peter told me about the earlier days. I play and enjoy the Forever More albums.(Thanks Peter)

I wrote the Toppermost AWB, but if I hadn't a couple of years earlier talked with Peter, I would have missed out the earlier history. Then myth I believed, with an element of truth behind it, was that they met at the art college in Dundee. And there were definitely local concerts.

I remember thinking it was great when they were number 1 in America, and there were three Dundonians and a guy from Perth in the Band. One band member had been to the same school as me and another's brother was a couple of years ahead of me at school.

Last summer I found out that the two west coasters, Onnie McIntyre and Hamish Stuart played in a band with my daughter's neighbour.

When reading about them for Toppermost (anorak on!) what came out was that they were all hardworking musicians dedicated to developing their craft.

I really still enjoy the AWB. Thanks Bill.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 12:17:51 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Brexit & The Band

Ilkka, thank you, good to have such a friend.

Brexit…… if Britain is out ….all of the Netherlands will follow instantly, Swiss will be out soon and Norway, including The Band, will be out shortly thereafter.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 09:37:53 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Forever More

The Forever More track that is closest to AWB for me is "Put Your Money On A Pony" but take a listen to "Something Sad" from Mogul Thrash (linked) … you could describe AWB as Forever More + Mogul Thrash's sax players. Mogul Thrash also had Canadian Mike Rosen (ex-Eclection) on trumpet and guitar and John Wetton on bass guitar. "Something Sad" is a very AWB "bass guitar and horns" number.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 06:31:52 CEST 2016 from (24.114.86.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Norm's Clip and Mr. Hockey

Norm.......belated thanks for another one of your Nashville gems ! God, I loved Barbara Mandrell as a kid....beauty and talent to burn.

Just back from Circuit Gilles Villeneuve and an after-party I attended...and someone mentioned the sad news of Ali AND Gordie Howe.....I had not known and was very saddened to hear of the other truly great number 9 passing on. RIP Gordie........lasting memory other than hockey is him driving 10 hours straight by himself in a small car to attend Rocket Richard's funeral in Montreal a few years ago when Gordie was already in failing health......Fiece competitors or not back in the day when rivals didn't pat each other on the bum and make gooey eyes at each other, Gordie simply said aching knees and back or not - he had to be there......a true legend and great guy to boot.

Sir Rod........Hilarious and beautiful news !


Entered at Sat Jun 11 05:31:19 CEST 2016 from (74.12.51.18)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: My favourite AWB-related song is actually by their forerunner group, Forever More. This one was an FM radio 'hit' in its day ('70-'71). I may even have heard it played by our John D on CHUM-FM back then.

Gotta give those FM guys credit for trying hard to interest goofs like me in jazz and true blues and electronica and exotica of various sorts, but my tastes were pretty mainstream rock and folk, though more often the more practitioners of mainstream styles. But I did eventually grow.

My parents had maybe six feet of 78s: my mother's classical and show tunes and my father's C&W - plus lots of pop as middle ground - 40's swing, Four Lads, Weavers, Andrews Sisters ... I don't recall them ever playing them, though I'm sure they did pre-kids. Very little to interest me later on - just "Sloop John B" by the Weavers, "Chattanooga Shoeshine Boy" / "Slewfoot Rag" by Red Foley and a couple by a old-time county group called George Wade and His Cornhuskers, a group that included the great fiddler Jean Carignan for some years.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 02:44:30 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: in-home music memories

JT and PV - We had Jo Stafford in the house too - her take on Hank W's Jambalaya is a clear memory. I was lucky enough to have 2 older sibs and one was prime-time for Elvis, so I got a lot of original rock n' roll and rockabilly. And the other was there for the folk thing of the late 50's/early 60's. All that pressed onto my tabula rasa and really stuck. Plus in LA then there were a couple of country music TV shows: Spade Cooley, Collins Kids, Merle Travis, Tex Ritter, Doyle O' Dell, etc. Thank goodness.


Entered at Sat Jun 11 01:14:52 CEST 2016 from (23.83.92.41)

Posted by:

Chris Pratt

Web: My link

Subject: Concert Festival

Cheap Lolla Tickets. Buy cheap Lollapalooza tickets securely online.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 23:56:15 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sir

Always a 'sir' to me. You wear it well.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 23:53:25 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Sir Rod

I've been overlooked in the Queen's birthday honours yet again, but delighted that we now have Sir Rod Stewart. You wear it well, Rod.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 20:37:48 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Shrimp Boats Are Coming - Jo Stafford

My mom told me that as a tot I listened to radio and would sing and know the lyrics to 'Shrimp Boats Are Coming' by Jo Stafford. I have no recollection but she swears up and down that its true.

My real love of music came in 1956 when I was at Tides Hotel in Jackson's Point in the summer and you could play music on the jukebox in the concession/food area (a Wurlitzer, I think) for 5 cents. I used to play Searchin' by The Coasters and songs by Chuck Berry at that time whenever I could get my hands on a nickel. The rest is history


Entered at Fri Jun 10 19:35:41 CEST 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Warren Zevon

Thanks Peter (PSB) for reminding me of that (re Warren Zevon) That is even more relevant to my argument.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 18:32:44 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: AWB

Incidentally, Peter knew the AWB also, JT.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 18:26:56 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Scottish soul, JT

Here is Scottish soul at its best...and dare I say this cover is better than the original, JT.

Soul was important in this neck of the woods


Entered at Fri Jun 10 18:23:49 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Records

Part of my eclecticism is recent, JT, since I started the never-ending mega work on record collecting and labels. If we go back to our first experiences of recorded music, we used to be dropped off at my mum’s friend (I was about 8) and her husband had a big gramophone and a huge classical collection (and no TV) and he played me and my sister a lot of stuff, and I couldn’t believe what pictures it all evoked. The early pop records I loved included A White Sport Coat and A Pink Carnation, Lay Down Your Arms (Ann Shelton), and on the radio I thought Here Comes Summer by Jerry Keller was the best thing I’d ever heard. We didn’t have a record player, but my sister’s friend went on a long holiday when I was 10 (my sister was 16) and loaned her all her records and record player. I couldn’t stop playing Little White Bull by Tommy Steele.

I got a radio in 1961 and used to listen to Radio Luxembourg every night. That was it. Girl groups, Clyde McPhatter’s Lover Please. Wolverton Mountain by Claude King. In the UK, we never had “specialist stations” so it was the BBC Light Programme or at night, Radio Luxembourg, which was record label sponsored half hour or 15 minute chunks. This meant we had (say) 15 minutes of whatever CBS or Decca were trying to sell, so we did get Johnny Cash next to The Ronettes and Gene McDaniels. That might be important … Sinatra was Light Programme, NOT Luxembourg.

I worked all summer when I was 15 and bought a Dansette record player in 1962. I bought a stack of records from a friend. The first full-price new single I bought was Sealed With A Kiss by Brian Hyland. I know the B-side, Summer Job, equally well. You do when you only have the one record.

I spent some time at a Record Fair discussing why most British collectors kept discs carefully in company / factory sleeves, and far fewer Americans did (the discussion was with an American my age). We worked out that at comparative prices and wages circa 1960, it took a British music fan around four times as long to earn the money for a single. Young fans rarely bought LPs, which is why EPs were important in te UK. Because they cost so much more in time worked, we looked after our 45 rpm records.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 18:09:13 CEST 2016 from (100.34.147.66)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan and covers

JT, Dylan did the Zevon covers before not after he died, but when he announced he was sick and would not live.

Yes, Dylan's show last night ended with an instrumental of "Free Bird" by his band. According to Bill Pagel: Just before the Free Bird instrumental jam, Bob said to the band, "OK, I'm cutting you guys loose. Show 'em what you can do".


Entered at Fri Jun 10 16:54:38 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The scope of music

I was in those early days of my life very selective. I admit that I rejected country music and avoided pop (Bobby Rydell, Fabian et al) and Frank Sinatra was anathema. These were either for little kids or hormone-stoked teenyboppers or older people who really knew nothing about music. Unlike some of our readers here, I did not even appreciate soul and r and b (with rare exception) in those teen years and into my early 20s. I remember the disdain I had for some of those music forms. My dad did bring home some bargain classical LPs (Beethoven et al) and I did see their merit but certainly did not spend the hours listening to them that I spent with Dylan and the Rolling Stones. It was only after CKFH, CKEY and CHUM FM that I began to understand the melting pot of music. I finally 'got' Sinatra in the 80s while soul and r and b hit me after Big G Walters. Country came later. I was not a Johnny Cash fan when he was in his heyday despite Dylan's interest and their 'meeting of minds' on record.

Why write this? I'd like to hear about other peoples experiences with the music we love. When I heard Levon and the Hawks at the Concord, I appreciated what they were doing but did not extend my interest to find out and listen to where that music was coming from. The student of music in me came later. Perhaps that's what happens to us all. I'm still having trouble with some rap and some metal and some grunge and some world music. Jazz was always with me from the start though I knew and understood little until more recently. I should say that Jeff A has given me some insights about his interests and we all know Peter V's eclectic tastes. Their visions have opened me up to new areas and, as I have said, that is one of the things I really like about this site.

So maybe we can hear from others on this topic?

We will hear/see James Taylor tonight.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 16:03:56 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Warren Zevon: all you need to know about Bob Dylan

My take only: Covering Warren Zevon soon after his untimely death is all one needs to know about Bob Dylan. Respect for the a body of work that was worth reprising. That is a part of what Bob Dylan is. This level of respect lives on throughout his career and you can hear it repeatedly in the course of his many albums and his live performances. Its not necessarily how well he did it but that he did it that counts. I think he derives joy from being a part of the whole.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 13:30:20 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: EUROPE - and long wish to remain so

Subject: RoseAnne Fino

Great review Al Edge. Great radio show John Donabie. I couldn't get to RoseAnne's UK shows because we were in Greece. Come back soon! I will hotfoot it over to buy the latest EP.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 12:44:15 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Free Bird?

Dylan closed his concert last night with that song.Was it the Lynryd Skynryd song?Anyone know anything about this?Thank you.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 12:28:16 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Mo Dylan

I forgot in my previous posts one of the gems, an album with the simple name: Dylan: 'Drunken Ira Hayes', 'Sarah Jane' and more. CBS were morons.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 12:17:41 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan / JT

Sir, it is a privilegium for me to discuss Dylan with you. - For me the best of Dylan's studio works is when he returns to his memories about real American songbook: The first two albums, John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline, Self Portait, New Morning, Planet Waves, the song "Shenandoah". Then came a long period of nonsense (expect playing blues with the guitar and, of course, the radio shows.) A lonesome stardust after all these vanished years is the star of Bethlehem, 'Christmas Album'.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 11:41:36 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Large wall

Kevin, is there any truth in the reports we're reading here that Canada is building a huge border wall to keep out the Americans once Donald Trump becomes president?


Entered at Fri Jun 10 10:24:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Covers albums

Agree, superb review Al.

On the subject of doing oldies, check out "Let The Record Show: Dexy's Do Irish & Country Soul" by Dexy's Midnight Runners, or by Kevin Rowland, however you want to say it. It's a weird mix - I'll Take You Home, Kathleen, Smoke Gets In Your Eyes on one hand, then To Love Somebody, You Wear It Well, Both Sides Now, then Carrickfergus and Curragh of Kildare. The track that really gets me is the instrumental opener, Women of Ireland, but every track is surprising in one way or another. And yes, I'm enjoying it much, much more than Fallen Angels.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 07:56:46 CEST 2016 from (24.114.86.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The essence and beauty, JT.....is that that Dylan always out-hipped the hiptors by being unhip himself....He loved Gordon Lightfoot and the critics of the day couldn't get their head around it...why's our "God" doing "Early Morning Rain"? "That's not cool" ....no it wasn't....it was just a flat out brilliantly written song...he got it, they didn't .....and on it goes,......that all said, even contrarians can trip themselves up and I really do wish he would spend time rediscovering his own vast and underplayed songbook.....I just like listening to his own words and as long as he is playing live I would again love to sit in a darkened theatre or arena and hear them.

Paul Ryan: Has there ever been a better example of a disgraceful public figure ? Acknowledging that someone is a textbook definition of a racist ( as Ryan did recently with Trump ) on the one hand and continuing to endorse the person on the other......is just mind blowing !

Bill M: I met with a guy in Montreal in the late 70's to buy a guitar......only a few things stand out......it would have been only a second instrument I had got my hands on as I was only 17.....the guy asked me about the Beatles and when I mentioned how much I liked George Harrison, he quickly mentioned how George had had to have Eric Clapton play on a signature song of his ( seemingly putting down me and George in one comment ) and he also casually mentioned he had just lost a kidney........he also added he was playing with Dominec Troiano...and that I t was dance/disco music they were doing.......only a few years later did I come to know Troiano and reflected back on this ....I didn't buy the guitar but you mentioned Wayne and I could almost swear that that was his name ! Reading more about Wayne, it couldn't have been but funny nevertheless, he did have curly hair and was balding....


Entered at Fri Jun 10 06:30:31 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Folk and Blues from before

And we should not forget 'Good As I Been To You' and 'World Gone Wrong' in this big wheel.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 06:26:45 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The titanic wheel of music

Greil Marcus' 'What is this shit?' article regarding 'Self Portrait' by Dylan gave me a thought. Dylan predicted 'Shadows of The Night' and 'Fallen Angels' as far back as 1970 when he showed his interest and knowledge of the American Songbook. He did it again with other covers over the years. We should not be surprised. He told us as much with his radio show when he highlighted the songs and performers who were the foundation of the American music lexicon. In that context, Dylan is a traveller on the same road and he wants us to know that. What separated him was his surreal lyrics; those songs are now part of the foundation and as Dylan covers the basics of the 30s to 60s, so Dylan gets covered by everyone and his brother/sister. It is all part of a continuum and Dylan is a cog in this titanic wheel.


Entered at Fri Jun 10 04:16:50 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Al Edge writes 'Pulitzerish'

Al: You missed your calling. That is a hell of an effective review! Well done.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 22:14:05 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Steely Dan, Peter

Sorry for my lack of clarity there, I was referring to your added comment - worthwhile getting the later albums etc in addition to your list. I would have commented on Toppermost, but the Steely Dan section is now closed.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 21:53:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Sultans of Swing is one of the best songs ever "about bands."

Many thanks for guitar advice. I went to a proper guitar store and got a Fender Squire Bullet Strat. £89.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 21:49:45 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Dunc, Steely Dan on Toppermost was Terry Newman, not me (Linked). But I had to check, thinking "Did I do that one?" A sign of age. I did do my own ten at the end as a comment, then it got discouraged to do alternative tens. But mine WAS better. Cousin Dupree and Rikki Don't Lose That Number are essential.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 21:49:35 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

That's great Dunc.

I'm going to be really interested in your take on it all, especially if you start off with her first album and then the two EP's in chronological order.

Your only problem of course is that it'll be a while before you can hear the latest of the three - but it'll be worth the wait mate.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jun 9 21:38:32 CEST 2016 from (86.130.197.138)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Al, Bob

Got off my arse and bought Roseann's album and eps. You have spurred me into action, Al Edge.

Just now the retirement project is Steely Dan. Enjoyed your Toppermost contribution on Steely Dan, Peter. I really enjoy this band and am listening more carefully and filling in the gaps.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 21:32:08 CEST 2016 from (100.11.151.162)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives (and Philly PA suburb)

Subject: Shout-Out to Peter V ;)

Peter V, FWIW your Mon Jun 6 12:09:34 CEST 2016 post (There always used to be a lot of “semi-pro” musicians....) vividly recalls, and inspired me to listen to, Dire Straits' "Sultans of Swing".


Entered at Thu Jun 9 18:00:24 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Airing of Grievances - review

So I’m not really sure how to talk about RoseAnn Fino’s new record. I rate it so highly but if I continue my odyssey to eulogise about the music she makes then I’m sure it’s tempting for folks to dismiss such eulogising as merely the ramblings of her dad’s mate. Or maybe some one-eyed fanatic. Also I know only too well that in the past I’ve rubbed people up the wrong way by shoving my enthusiasm in their faces when they want to make up their own minds free of propaganda from me.

And yet my problem is that considered middle ground territory has never been comfy territory for me. Ambivalence is not my scene. If I’m only so-so about something then I tend just to keep schtum . I don’t really see the point in writing or posting about anything I don’t consider remarkable.

So, yeah, you’ve guessed it, in this instance I’ll risk the dismissals, the slights and such like to enter the eulogising zone that comes most naturally to me. And, boy, does the quality of this record induce within me some urge for rampant eulogising. Quite simply, in my own humble/not so humble opinion [delete as most appropriate] the four tracks on RoseAnn's latest record are as good as anything I've ever come across since my late Uncle Dave first exposed me to the swinging joys of Bobby Darin back in the late ‘50’s.

Yes, I honestly believe it’s that good. And in mitigation against accusations of making such a claim spuriously I speak as someone who up until my exposure these past few months to Roseann’s latest offering has held Astral Weeks, Highway 61, The Band’s early albums, 12 Songs, Blue, Murmur, Please Please Me, Revolver, Talking Book, Sly’s Greatest Hits, The River and Grand Prix as my own personal high water listening benchmarks.

I was sent the MP3's some two months ago by Roseann's dad and have listened to all four tracks probably every day since - often repeated listenings. They are so good that even after so many repeated hearings I find myself still hankering after listening to them again and again. That, by my reckoning, is as stringent a litmus test as there ever was for a record's greatness. So much so, I've been desperate to put the MP3 links on here for others to share but kept my word to her dad that I would wait until the official release date which was yesterday.

As most reading this are already aware I've raved about RoseAnn before - and certainly not just because she's the daughter of a friend but because I believe she is quite simply an outstanding young artist with a rare lyrical/musical songwriting talent and a performing ability and charisma to complement her burgeoning creativity.

On her previous Out From Under record I felt three of the four tracks were outstanding. That was not simply my own take. Some on here - Jeff, JT, PV to name just three **** - felt similar if not quite so avid enthusiasm as myself for the quality of the songs on that record. But make no mistake, as good as that last record was, RoseAnn has now moved artistically onto another level with what I can only term a minor masterpiece in The Airing of Grievances.

It might sound like an outrageous claim given the lowly levels of recognition that exists for her to date but for me Airing of Grievances reveals an artist who creatively is already very near the top of the ladder. Aided and abetted by her trusty bandmates whose own musical qualities have clearly infused extra magic into the raw song ingredients with which RoseAnn has presented them, the record’s thematic material, its teasing, hauntingly beautiful melodies, Roseann’s unerring vocal authenticity, the tight clever arrangements and her own and her bandmates’ sterling musicianship are all wonderfully synthesised into what is a breathtaking collective.

The record’s theme is of crazy mixed up overwhelming despair laced with contrasting shards of defiant pride and contentment at a lifestyle at once challenged and debauched by hedonistic tendencies/weaknesses yet at the same time occasionally fulfilled by the music she manages to create and the ensuing joy it provides for her and her, as yet, small band of followers.

Yet whilst great records demand a consistent theme, they also need songs of distinction to provide the melodic platform to complete the circle. And on this record that requirement is met in bucketfuls.

The opening title track is unusual and not a little madcap. It uniquely blends singalong vaudeville with jaunty skiffle whilst introducing the record’s thread of desperation with a self-deprecating comic style belying that desperation. It works magnificently. The second track – the Drinking Song - is the record’s centrepiece. It is brief yet outstanding by any standard, taking us to the very heart of the singer’s despair and failures with a dark, brooding ballad that aches so much it would leave Hank Williams short of tears. The song’s musical climax soars to a peak that tears at your guts, promising escape and resolution only for that promise to be forsaken by the ultimate regret of the song’s closing lines. Track three, Touch Me, is a swirling rocker that sees the singer defiant, taunting willing admirers with provocative ‘come-ons’. Initial hearings pick up a Sympathy for The Devil connection. Several plays later the song has left any such slender mimicry far behind, revealing its full rocking majesty and simply demanding to be played again and again for its many layers to be absorbed.

The album’s closing track – Californian Debutante – is another stunning brooding lament. This time for a lost love that feels to the singer like it can be the only one she’ll ever know. Its haunting beauty brings to an end 20 minutes or so of incredible music that sits alongside any you care to name. It is to be hoped this landmark quartet of truly great songs marks a breakthrough for a talent so richly deserving of it. Such things don’t always pan out the way they should as we all know. But when you have an artist with music within their locker as good as this, then it is to be hoped it does.

**** The GB's own John Donabie is the latest to have had RoseAnn's music brought to his attention and recently featured her on his 'mixed bag' radio show ****


Entered at Thu Jun 9 17:07:03 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: more RoseAnn Fino

John Donabie's introduction of RoseAnn Fino to Canadian (and international) audiences was excellent on last week's CIUT FM 4 hour program. Hopefully, this will be followed by 'live in Canada' (Toronto and other places) tour. We have some excellent intimate venues in Canada that would be well suited for her..as John said...Hugh's Room in Toronto is one of them. The new EP is great.


Entered at Thu Jun 9 15:52:03 CEST 2016 from (64.229.238.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: Serge Daniloff

He's on Facebook apparently. [link above]


Entered at Thu Jun 9 14:49:17 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: RoseAnn

Bob, took up your invite. Stunning, emotional stuff. Many struggle to express their inner selves in a coherent and articulate way. RoseAnn hits it out of the park.


Entered at Wed Jun 8 23:19:24 CEST 2016 from (86.53.31.243)

Posted by:

jh

Anyone out there with functioning contact info. for our old friend Serge Daniloff? If so, please send us an e-mail. Thanks.


Entered at Wed Jun 8 16:47:22 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino An Airing of Greivances

Link is to Bandcamp where you can hear RoseAnn's new EP. Anyone in the New York area, RoseAnn and her band will be playing a cd release show at Union Pool in Brooklyn tonight at 9:00pm.


Entered at Wed Jun 8 16:47:11 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

Thank you for your kind comments Al. Much appreciated.


Entered at Wed Jun 8 16:10:54 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bob Dylan / JT, scroll!!!!

HENNING MANKELL, the Swedish writer (a leftist like me) launched a question: "When did you stop to listen regularly to Bob Dylan's studio albums?" For myself the answer is this: "New Morning is the last album." (Listen to 'Christmas Album' with joy once a year is hardly considered to be "regularly".).


Entered at Wed Jun 8 04:49:56 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Guitars & Amps & Inspiration

Peter! To inspire your grandson, let him watch an unprofessional street busker like this boy. However you know the dedication it takes to do this, (as well as the talent).

I also would like to share with you, (and you may have seen some). There are some very dedicated guitarists on youtube giving free VERY GOOD lessons as well as advise on guitars and amps. The main question is. Should you have a better guitar or a better amp to get the ultimate sound for your money. There is some very good advise there. Enjoy this video. This young man is a HOT!! player.


Entered at Wed Jun 8 02:58:53 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

:-)


Entered at Wed Jun 8 01:55:37 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: John Donabie/Roseann Fino

Just back from a night with our poor Steve and to cheer myself up I listened to John Donabie's Mixed Bag show on the net.

What a DJ you are John lad! I just love your style of presentation. Could listen to you and what you play all night [and day]. I'll certainly be tuning in again.

Of course the personal highlight for me was your RoseAnn Fino feature and boy did you do justice to her huge talent so evident to many of us on here - including now I'm delighted to say your goodself as is now also so evident from the glowing and fully warranted praise you gave her and her band.

On a personal level I can't thank you enough for your willingness to do thi but most of all for listening with such an open mind. I've tried over here in Liverpool with every outlet imaginable but the problem I've found is over here your fellow DJ's and media folk are simply unwilling to listen and give new talent the sort of open minded shot you've just afforded Roseann.

You're a real star JD - well in mate. And I don't care if it sounds a bit schmaltzy I'll say it anyroad - proud of you for the way you did that tonight.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jun 7 17:52:43 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Money by JT

No JT, you are wrong. - You were not naive, you were good-hearted and sensitive. It was not a childish idea you had. It was a good idea. You didn't lack knowledge. You did lack experience of life. Thank God!


Entered at Tue Jun 7 17:45:29 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Festival Express

No and no. But I remember it well.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 17:44:05 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Free Music - Festival Express

Jerry, this concert in Toronto confirms what you are saying. Were you there? Did you jump the fence?.....:-)


Entered at Tue Jun 7 17:27:34 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Money

As I read (as a non-musician but as a lover of all things music) about the sad plight of musicians who are struggling to make ends meet and still play live and record, I reflect on those halcyon days of the 60s when the youth (I was among them) thought that being 'commercial' while making music was a sin akin to a cultural felony. It was a stupid idea then but it was held by the majority of the 'in crowd' who separated (in their own minds) the 'business' from the music. It was naive and childish but that notion prevailed for quite a few years and many musicians were ostracized for being commercial. 'Free' music was the prevailing theme in that time and musical anarchy was what should be achieved. So there should be no fences at festivals and any musician who seemed to take money seriously was somehow tainted. The musicians were creating and making $$$ and the agents and the record companies and the festivals were making big $$$. But that didn't really register with the kids. Somehow, the music should be free. If they perceived a musician was 'in it for the money' it was a problem. And so musicians didn't openly discuss money. It was not a topic of conversation.

That attitude certainly wained over the years as people wised up and realized that music as an endeavour was impossible without dollars. Certainly, things have changed with the new technology and as so many have noted, its really tough now for so many with a huge impact on playing live shows or recording with the aim to sell. Naive we were and with no knowledge of how things really worked in music in those years. Why reflect on this at all? Just for perspective over 50-60 years.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 17:09:17 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA
Web: My link

Subject: guitars and Joan Baez

Peter, if the made-in-Mexico Fenders are available in your zone, don't hesitate to go for a Strat. My main instrument is a "MIM" Jazz bass, picked up used for the mid 200s (US) including a good road-worthy case and serves me quite well. I also have a MIM Strat that plays quite well. The key is to buy from a reputable dealer who will SET UP the guitar (action and intonation) which makes all the difference in the world. Can't say I can recommend the 'Squire' line, which are even cheaper, as I have no experience with them.

Those of you in the States should scour your TV listings for the Joan Baez 75th Birthday video being aired on PBS this month. Wow! The girl's still got it! Impressive list of guests including David Crosby, David Bromberg, Emmylou Harris, Joan Collins, the Indigo Girls (not a fan, but they fit nicely with Joan), Richard Thompson and many more (see link). This was not a typical "tribute" as Joan was on stage throughout. Final song, Forever Young. Fantastic.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 15:30:13 CEST 2016 from (129.42.208.184)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: John Donabie Mixed Bag

John D, thank you so much for playing RoseAnn's new song Touch Me on your show and all the kind words. To have her song on a show featuring so much great music like The Band, Stones, Johnny Winter and The Jayhawks. Wow! We can't thank you enough. Love your show and looking forward to the British Invasion special next week.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 14:47:44 CEST 2016 from (109.64.104.236)

Posted by:

Shiran savion

Location: Davie FL
Web: My link

Hey very nice site!! Man .. Beautiful .. Amazing .. I'll bookmark your website and take the feeds also…I am happy to find numerous useful info here in the post, we need develop more techniques in this regard, thanks for sharing. . . . . .


Entered at Tue Jun 7 13:41:44 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More on guitars

Peter-since you described your grandson's talent level I'm convinced he will love the strat and Roland micro cube immediately.Do NOT buy the setup you saw because it's cheap-it's not a good setup and a kid with any talent deserves something decent.There are also strat lookalikes that are quite good and cheaper than the real thing.The trick with electrics are simple-pick it up in the store-if it plays nicely without the amp,thats your guitar!Some very expensive gibsons have failed that test and when plugged in are,at times,no better than good Epiphones.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 13:33:17 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter-guitars

I've been playing for over 40 years and my son plays.Th best starter electric is a strat since its shape is a comfortable and perfect fit for the human body particularly when sitting.The fretboard is accessible and very manageable for younge folk.Do not get a telecaster as a first guitar-needs a lot of retuning and more difficult to manage.Epiphones are great to,but the fit of the strat is ideal for everyone,particularly kids.There are cheaper,kids models of strats made as well.As for amps,try the very affordable Roland micro cube,easy to move around,great sound,and affordable.Also has some neat effects.Orange amp is best for clarity of sound,also affordable and versatile.The idea that a child should only start with an acoustic,to me,seems absurd.Hope this is helpful.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 12:35:49 CEST 2016 from (129.42.208.184)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Guitars

Peter, my daughter started out with one of those starter guitars when she was in first grade. It served it's purpose which was to determine if she was serious. Within a year we picked up a used Alvarez with a pickup. Almost 20 years later she still has and plays that guitar.In fact that's the one she brought to England for recent shows. The first electric and what I would recommend checking out was an Epiphone. Reasonably priced, great selection and seemed to have a decent sound. She played that for a few years until we got her an American Strat one Christmas. Now she plays Gibson guitars. Check out the Epiphones.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 11:04:54 CEST 2016 from (203.184.15.147)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Peter, I'm of the "start 'em on acoustic" paradigm but if the boy wants electric they have some advantages, namely narrower necks and lighter actions, good for younger players. The weight of the body might be tiresome.

Cheap guitars are built of rubbish, obviously, but modern construction and setup tolerances are usually quite precise. A professional muso caught short could buy a $100 axe and gig and record with it, it will pretty much sound like it should and stay in tune. Far more playable than the budget models of old. Go for it!


Entered at Tue Jun 7 10:24:06 CEST 2016 from (114.75.211.209)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I recall an incident from Yehudi Menuhin's autobiography where he retold a story about how a relative bought him a cheap violin when he was a very small child. He tried to play it but didn't like the sound and so threw it on the ground much to the embarrassment of his parents. When it comes to musical instruments, I think it is best to buy something with a bit of quality.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 10:02:15 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guitar advice …

A request. My grandson, aged 11, wants an electric guitar. I'm sympathetic because without lessons he can find a melody line on the piano with ease, and he sings perfectly in tune. On amazon there are several packages at £89 ($130) which include a Strat lookalike, a 10 watt amp (with headphone outlet, thankfully) and an electronic tuner. Are these actually playable? In my day, cheap electrics looked OK, but had an appalling high action, which meant one was amazed at how much easier it was to hold down notes on a Fender (important for 11 year old fingers). I also thought a Tele lookalike might be easier to get your fingers around. All the guitarists I ask say "Start on an acoustic" but his dad has several good keyboards, and he really wants electric. I'm also concerned that several people told me "You need to be 14 to have long enough fingers - buy a very small acoustic first."


Entered at Tue Jun 7 09:54:20 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, you need to hear “Daddy Lessons” by Beyoncé from “Lemonade.” The New Orleans horn section has to be older guys in what I can only describe as “Dance goes Americana.” The YouTube live one is roughish- but it’s worth 99 cents on iTunes. If you recall Beyoncé as Etta James in Cadillac Records, we can see that the younger generation can and do empathize with classic stuff. Well, sometimes.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 09:27:00 CEST 2016 from (2.96.198.84)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko & Paul Butterfield – Live From The Blue Note Boulder Co 1979 (2016)

Paul Jones played a track from this on his BBC Rhythm and Blues show on Monday night.


Entered at Tue Jun 7 05:29:42 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

There's something called musicality. and then separately, there is the phenomena that in the past, up until the last ten to twenty years, the old school players and newer school players dug each other. The newer guys & gals sought out the older guys and gals, studied em, traveled with em, lived with em, worked with em. And the older timers welcomed them..This is both high & low profile. There's the obvious relationships many knos about, thenthere are dozens of players all around the country that not many people knows about that put in many years with some of the old greats. Alot of these players also took care of many these older musicians, right till the end.

Personally i dont hear musicality in alot of new music. And i doubt anyone can really point to these new post rock forms, and a whole lot of other new music,where the old guard and new guard are hanging out, working together, livign togther.

To a large degree, there is a very real turn into things unmusical, and the loss of the old relationships between old guard & new guard. The continuum of positive advncement is gone. For other reasons too, alot that we've beean discussing.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 21:20:07 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

the internet can be blamed for many things, but not everything. Who records were unlistenable long before.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 19:48:14 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: hate

A little late to the thread, but one of the most moving books I ever read was the autobiography of Malcolm X (as recorded by Alex Haley). Malcolm underwent a great change in outlook after a visit to Africa and turned against the "established" Elijah Muhammad's Black Muslim movement's view of the "White Devil". In fact, it was what got him killed. I believe that Ali reached the same conclusion.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 18:28:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's what I was saying too, Pat. Look at the concession stands for "heritage artists." People don't touch the latest albums. They want at best "Live Last Year With the Same Setlist".


Entered at Mon Jun 6 17:48:31 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Music has always been faddish. Jazz players used to make good money playing live, then they got killed by R%R. A typical rap was that the recordings that were putting them out of business were so crude and musically unworthy that they shouldn't be made. Yeah, right. Now DJ's are cashing in, as rock has become a thing of the past worthy of museums. Blues and Jazz are the worst selling music in the world. The demand for these styles is simply not there. Post-rock forms by bands like Tame Impala and Wavves are very popular, but face it, it's a young person's game.

As far as The Who goes, they ended when Moon died. I watched their latest concert on HBO and they sounded great, especially since they had about five backup singers doing most of the lifting. Daltrey sounded good too. But what were sales like for their Moon-less records? There is no shame in becoming a tribute band, but the musical mayhem that defined The Who and its music has been gone for forty years. Same thing happened to many groups we all love.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 15:32:35 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.61)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Been part of my bitch all along too Pete. The in person human interaction is irreplaceable and what stimulates creativity. In many ways digital is the opposite of life.Or it's the Frankenstein monster run amuck.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 15:28:05 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Video got up and walked away too. Textbooks are fast following- 100 redundancies at my old publisher recently. Digital is all very well, but no one seems to have a secure way of moneytizing it.

Mrs V is just reading "The Village Effect" about the difference between isolated learning (self study) and learning with humans. I notice as jobs become increasingly fixed to a screen on your own, job adverts are stressing "Join our team" and "Join our work family" to compensate for working alone most of the time. I think back, filming video with 25 people (even in a cold muddy field in January) was a social event. I really miss it now interacting with a screen all day.

Bring back people!


Entered at Mon Jun 6 15:06:31 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.61)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Recently,a Hammond USA Artist, drove 180 some odd miles each way to play accordion and organ in an Italian Restaurant in Brooklyn on a Friday night in Brooklyn. I kid you not.

Guys with storied careers are just squeaking by. Social Security checks, and old ladies with jobs, homes, and gelt often make it possible. The royalty checks have usually gone from significant amounts of money to borscht.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 12:09:34 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There always used to be a lot of “semi-pro” musicians. I mentioned this before, but a friend’s dad played sax in the dance band at the local dance hall- a large ballroom, playing six nights a week. Nearly all the band went from the ballroom to the railway station, collected the newspapers from the train, drove them round to the newsagents (leaving them in the doorways) and then went to bed. Others taught music to kids after school. One or two worked in music stores. The pianist used to sit in a balcony in a shopping arcade and play standards in the afternoons. I assume either playing six nights a week wasn’t much of a living (it was about a 14 piece band), or they might as well fill their spare time with making a bit of money. That was late 60s, but it was very much an earlier model. They had a fixed place of work. They didn’t travel.

My generation in rock bands had to travel. Semi-pro friends made more out of music than their day jobs, and travel was weekends and some evenings and in a 30 to 40 mile radius. When they went pro, it was often a case of driving 300 miles for £30, and sleeping in the van. In their first pro year, they all said they’d made more money semi-pro, but I suspect that was because semi-pro soul / covers bands worked a lot in those days, but when you went pro and made your first record, prog didn’t earn as much until you picked up enough record sales and radio play. Soul meant ballrooms / large clubs, but early prog meant little clubs or third on the bill on the college circuit.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 09:54:41 CEST 2016 from (210.86.95.103)

Posted by:

Rod

I understand Jeff. I'm not disagreeing with you. Where I come from there is not really a big enough market to employ lots of full time musicians - hardly any actually. There are three camps - the artists who try to make a living selling their own product,the those who make a living around there edges - mostly teaching or working in the supply side (retail, technical support) and the amateurs (that's me). All three camps can make great music - and they can all make some dross. They just finance it differently and have different aspirations. In a small market like NZ most of the better (technically) musicians belong in the second category. On a more global scale it is sad that great musicians struggle to get paid properly for gigs and it's also sad that we may not see the likes of The Band or The Who again. I just can't see any obvious solution. My point was that artists with an established following will end up performing more and maybe recording to entice punters along with the odd new song on youtube. I don't expect that they will may make alot of money selling CDs onsite. Most of my favourite acts hardly release CDs any more - maybe every couple of years at the most. It just ain't worth it I suspect.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 09:10:59 CEST 2016 from (114.75.205.115)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The world is changing and you have to be prepared to change with it if you don't want to get left behind. A few years back, in response to student demand, I adapted the Japanese courses I teach to an online format. Now at my university enrolments in other humanities courses are going down but Japanese is going up. Students love the flexibility of online learning and you can do things in the online environment you cannot do in the classroom. Those in the music business will have to adapt as well. People will always want music so it is a question of finding a new viable business model.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 05:24:39 CEST 2016 from (76.67.12.16)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: another realm where musicians' income is dwindling ...

Here's a link to a nice article about Toronto singer Wayne St. John, whose successful jingle business is on a steep decline - as are those of his competitors. As the article points out, the guy is also a pretty impressive vocalist, as can be glimpsed at 10:36 of part 3 of the "Tears Are Not Enough" video at youtube.com/watch?v=_9XBr3OxTuE. (Watch a bit further and you'll see Richard Manuel's name come up, as he was one of the many singers involved.)

Kevin J: If you caught Domenic Troiano's disco-fusion band of the late '70s, Wayne would have been the frontman.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 04:59:32 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.61)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, i will say this. I've said it before, I've been saying it since i entered here in 2002. The majority of recordings being put out today shouldn't even be getting recorded.And the quality of the majority of recordings is inferior to a good standard.... And then there are some artists and recordings whom they and the material and the recording really would benefit greatly from a fitting producer and better studios and engineers. Which once upon a time would have been readily available, there might have been choices. And the cross pollination effect that existed when there was a music economy also is something that contributed to the development of musicians and songwriters and artists.When there was an economy to support a musical culture the culture thrived. It made everyone better.


Entered at Mon Jun 6 04:10:06 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.61)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, I'm politely responding to the point in your last post about not being sure what i meant in my last post. Before mine that you asked about, you wrote " Artists now need to look at recording new stuff to attract people to their live shows rather than touring to support an album. I don't know if there is money in that - maybe it's just enough to make a reasonable living like the rest of us have to.". You've written often that records support tours today ..I'm aware you have an open mind, and I'm aware that you do occasionally actually indicate that you know you don't know everything, and are questioning. Which is sometimes unique here :-). So I'm just conversing with you. But my point was, there are very few artists in the position of wanting to afford that or the trouble. Look at the Who. If Daltrey is sayign that, well.........

But my point also is that a lot of fine artists that would have been recording years ago, when the industry could afford to develop and support them, can;t really even afford to tour anymore. You say underpaid, i say they ain't even really paid. When guys make a 100 bucks a show, and they may drive 2 hours each way, and they have to maintain their gear, are they even paid? Or are they playing for free, or are they out of pocket? what do guitars or keys, violins cost to own and maintain, what do vehicles cost, to own, maintain, insure? Gas, tolls? I'm producing shows for clubs & artists. It's hair raising, & every one of us on the artists side would make more money walking dogs. So when ANYONE thinks artists now make records to support tours,I gotta ask them, how many gigs till a record goes gold or platinum? I watch my friends try to sell their discs for 10 bucks at their shows. I see their old ladies stick the cds right under peoples noses trying to sell em. There's not enough nights in the year to sell enough discs to go gold or platinum in clubs and bars or small theaters. And grinding it out is for kids, not matured artists. the business end of this is mind boggling, and a few years of doing everything is all anyone could take. And forget doing everything well & still writing completely superior songs and playing superior music at the same time. . Theres' over a dozen different jobs involved, Without money, this cant be done on a solid musical scale with a real band. Just how it is. There has to be money from somewhere. A one or two man show, it;s hard for them. Still the same amount of responsibilities, just lest money that has to be made.But a one or two man act might make a living.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 23:55:01 CEST 2016 from (206.57.79.199)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sonny Liston

For a gritty look at boxing check out Mark Knopfler's tale of Sonny Liston from Shangri-La.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 23:54:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Paul Newman's salad dressing was crap. Bizarre on the TV News watching black churches celebrating Ali. Um, he was a muslim. Still, I know what they mean.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 23:43:52 CEST 2016 from (210.86.95.103)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Jeff

Couldn't really understand what your post was about Jeff. I think you were saying performing musicians are under payed. You're probably right.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 21:37:28 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Foot Note

I forgot to say, among my many books of our heroes in music and sport is a book I've had for many years and refer to often. Muhammad Ali by John Hennessey. It is a good read.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 21:32:33 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Understanding the Origin

It's not hard to understand you at all Jerry. What you have had to put up with from your heritage, (and the fact so many people refuse to be honest in that regard).

It never stops the way we see our governments and others, Australia for example wanting to acknowledge and apologize to their indigenous people for the way they have been treated. There was a talk show debate about this subject on the radio just the other day. (Should governments apologize and does it do any good.) This stemmed from more apologies to First Nations people.

In my mind, there is no amount of apologizing that can change what has gone before. Humanity must learn from it and try as in "Playing for Change" for people to really change their way of thinking regarding humanity. The words, "ethnic cleansing" should never even be heard again.

In much of what I read about the man, Ali in maturing certainly did change his ways of thinking. Many young men of all races exhibit that hatred until the 'knowing" starts to sink in.

If you have ever watched the documentary of "The Rumble in the Jungle" why they felt the need to go back to their roots, and the statement they were making in the doing, going back to Africa. It is an eye opener.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 21:12:03 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.61)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod,

So, P(l)ay how many gigs before a record goes platinum today? Yes, it is Pay to play. When venue owners want to pay 100 bucks a player ( no matter who they are), when gigs that pay 200 for people with very heavy itinerarys, discographies, credits, resumes, are hard to come buy and cherished,, when you have 9 piece bands of serious players playing for 450 bucks, it is pay to play.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 20:11:32 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sanitizing

Boxers box and he did it best. I admire that, no question. His connection to hate does not detract from that. He did indeed modify and so did a lot of good afterwards. Sanitizing an obituary...I guess that's the way of the media today. Its 'feel good' and that is OK by me. I don't know what was in his heart regarding humanity after that 60s period. His behaviour for those many years suggests that he let his 60's hate of whites go. He said so (something like - hating any man for his colour is wrong- I paraphrase) and I'll accept that as some kind of apology for a negative heart at one point. I remember Paul Newman for his acting - not for his salad dressing or his politics. But 'media sanitizing' - despite its good intent - doesn't sit well with me. When a long article is written or a TV show is displayed for the masses to consume, it should be 'honest' and 'totally honest'. So, just as they make comments on what good he did (and he did a lot of good), so should the media make comments on what his associations of the mid-60s meant. That would be an honest and complete assessment. I need that from the media. Others may not.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 19:46:59 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Elvis, Ali etc

To be fair Norm you're surely right about the 'King'. I deliberately left him out simply because I was just a few years too young to have experienced myself the impact he had. Whereas with The Beatles and Ali - like many on here - I lived through it.

Jerry - again fair play if the downside - and I'm assuming it's the period of Ali's Malcolm X connection to which you allude - mars how you perceive the man. You speak as you find. As it is, I'm in no sense what I'd term a huge Ali fan myself and prior to Saturday I've not given the fellow a moment's thought in decades. However, my point concerned his worldwide iconic immensity and I will forever be in awe as to how one man can be so amazingly gifted in so many ways and how he could harness those gifts to wield such a worldwide impact. One that I'm sure was overwhelmingly for good and particularly for the good of downtrodden black and ethnic people.

Yet like Norm, it is Ali the supreme sporting specimen that really takes my breath away. If I'm honest the political/social/cultural accompaniments remain just that. Accompaniments. Of course I have my own views on them and they point me to the fact he was overwhelmingly for the greater good. For me and so many others though it is Ali the supreme boxer that has always enchanted and beguiled as the attached brief clip even when past his prime bears unfaltering testimony.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 18:56:20 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Musical Backdrop for your avergae Baby Boomer.....hmmmm!

Al! maybe from your side of the water you can see it that way, however, (and I don't say that I'm right), I'm not sure that stacks up against Elvis Presley.

I recall one time when Michael Jackson was really dominating the music, (and video scene). He came out with that video "Thriller", which of course became huge for him. However statistics I read told that he would have to come out with hits like "Thriller" for 25 years to catch up to Elvis.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 17:57:25 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Float like a butterfly - sting like a bee!

In my estimation we have lost the greatest boxing athlete of our time. At those times when some one says, "Who would you most like to meet", my answer would always be "Mohammed Ali". Would have given anything to shake his hand. I am not an "autograph collector".

The greatest match of our time was The "Rumble in the Jungle". With all respect to George Forman who was great in his own right. Ali took every possible thing George could do and just kept saying to him, 'Is that all you got George?" He beat him physically and mentally.

One more of the greats of our time we have lost this year, how many more?


Entered at Sun Jun 5 16:42:30 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hooker Jr and David Vest

I saw/heard John Lee Hooker Jr. in Victoria at a small club a number of years ago. He has 3-4 albums out. He was great.

While I'm at it, don't forget to listen to Victoria's own David Vest and his new album.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 16:39:08 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Not the blues singer or his son

The next president: "John Jay Hooker, Jr. (August 24, 1930 – January 24, 2016) was an American attorney, entrepreneur, political gadfly and perennial candidate from Nashville, Tennessee, who was the Democratic nominee for Governor of Tennessee in 1970 and 1998." It was this man who was predicted and whose name resulted in boos according to the prevailing story.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 15:55:45 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Night of the Hurricane

Ali actually showed up at one of Dylan's Hurricane Benefits. That is where the famous photo of Dylan and Ali comes from. He did a live feed with Hurricane Carter who was in prison of course. He also introduced some southern politician as the next President. Which got hime booed. One of The Greatest Nights.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 15:48:36 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You're right, Jerry. Hate eats the hater.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 14:54:37 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hate - emotional cancer

Ali's ambivalence about his 'game' and his take on it are right on the money. I can see it. But the group he joined was filled with hate and though one can understand why anyone might feel as he did at that time (complicity included), it is still hate. And hate is the emotional cancer of humanity.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 14:46:05 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Every blow that laid him low

Yes, I did read the last line, Al. Look at today's Sunday Times - whole front page and a 16 page supplement on Ali (BTW, this means the press were expecting it). L:sat night, BBC1 dropped its schedule for a tribute. Everyone in Britain remembers Ali on the Parkinshow show too.

Al linked the New Yorker, which has exactly the comments I half-recalled.

QUOTE (for those who don't follow links!):

Ali was not blind to the hypocrisies and brutality of the “game” that had been his professional life. The source of his fame was a sport in which race was often an ugly element of its history, a contest in which one man tries to beat another senseless, tries to inflict temporary brain injury (a knockout) on another. Ali reaped millions of dollars from the fight game, and yet he was, at times, ambivalent about that history and the lurid spectacle of one man fighting another, particularly one black man fighting another.

Ali had seen how fighters before him had been sponsored, managed, and exploited by Mafia thugs. He remembered from childhood how Joe Louis’s handlers gave him a set of rules to avoid alienating white America.

“They stand around and say, ‘Good fight, boy: you’re a good boy; good goin’,” Ali said, in 1970. “They don’t look at fighters to have brains. They don’t look at fighters to be businessmen, or human, or intelligent. Fighters are just brutes that come to entertain the rich white people. Beat up on each other and break each other’s noses, and bleed, and show off like two little monkeys for the crowd, killing each other for the crowd. And half the crowd is white. We’re just like two slaves in that ring. The masters get two of us big old black slaves and let us fight it out while they bet: ‘My slave can whup your slave.’ That’s what I see when I see two black people fighting.” It was almost as if Ali, at the height of his fame, was hinting that we were all complicit in something fallen and dubious, even as we were rooting him on.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 14:30:26 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hate

I guess what I'm saying is that I cannot 'whitewash' the past. I do acknowledge it when someone says 'I'm sorry for what I have said or done' and then one can try to forgive... but forgetting hate (or in some cases (not his) cruelty ) is impossible.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 14:24:37 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Transcending perspective

Al: I appreciate the point you make. You note The Beatles and I agree. But when hate enters the picture, a new reality exists.

These icons are human. There are others who have existed on this planet whose name is known by all. I won't speak their names but you know who they are. Some in the past were beloved for a while by a nation. One is even living now and everyone knows who he is as he continues to rise via the media in the public consciousness.

Transcending perspective is not possible for me. It may be a fool's reasoning, but I can't and don't forget.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 12:53:12 CEST 2016 from (83.249.137.42)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania nortrthwest
Web: My link

Subject: Norbert: "That famous piece of asphalt between Paris and to the South, ‘Le Route Du Soleil’"

A piece of guestbook history (WHICH PETER V STILL SEEMS TO REFUSE TO DOCUMENT!)

I don't have this email from Norbert anymore but it is still in my heart. Something like this: "... funny, I got the idea to my Band guestbook from your humble site..." Thank you very much Norbert. The site is not on-line anymore but I have a few pictures in the site I created for gbers just for this historical purpose. http:\\citroensoleil.123minsida.se or The link. Any "Norbertologist" shoul take a look in what inspired Norbert to save this place to all of us.

Sorry Peter, it was posted here and not in your The Band Guestbook History. Blame yourself. ;-)


Entered at Sun Jun 5 10:58:38 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

I’ll give you this Jerry – you’ve never once to my knowledge forsaken your principles regarding the whole notion of ‘absolutes’ and perspective.

I recall our e-mail discussions from nigh 20 years ago on the very subject. For you there’s never been a ‘best’ or ‘greatest’. A sense of perspective were your watchwords back then – even in respect of ‘Big Pink’ and The Brown album – and it would seem you’ve not wavered since. So kudos to you and who really can argue against the fact that such a stance in normal circumstances has a huge amount to commend it, especially amidst a media/popular opinion onslaught fixated with the notion of 'who's best'?

The problem in maintaining that perspective when addressing unprecedented worldwide phenomena such as The Beatles and the force of nature that was Muhammad Ali is the sheer uniqueness of the ‘force’ they constituted and constituted them.

When you reflect upon the fact that at one time Muhammad Ali was the most famous person on earth and that some 30 odd years after his last fight he is still known by nigh every man, woman and child and revered by a large proportion of them from impoverished beggars to world leaders, it’s surely kind of telling us all that normal circumstances have long left the building and that in such context the usual considerations and perspectives are rendered obsolete.

Of course, in Ali’s case as with The Beatles, it doesn't mean there weren't downsides to these icons. There always are. With Muhammad Ali, the cruel taunting of opponents most notably Joe Frazier was often despicable, despite the mitigation that it was invariably merely a tactic to gain advantage in the forthcoming contest.

Like it or not though, Ali's peerless iconic immensity – as with the fab four – surely negates any efforts to apply perspective. These guys were simply off the charts when it comes to the usual perspective analysis. Or attempts at comparisons. So much did they transcend their peers from any walk of life in how they impacted upon world consciousness. Attempting to rationalise them and their impact by any normal criteria is surely a fools errand. And as with most on this GB you are far from that Jerry lad.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 10:41:57 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Tom's - or is it Jerry's - new album

From your comments and the reviews it seems like it's a must buy/listen Pete.

BTW Pete, did you read the final para of the New Yorker article I linked? Must have been an amazingly poignant moment for all present including the travelling minstrel.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 10:09:32 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Poor eyesight

I mentioned Pul Simon's new album "Stranger to Stranger" more than once as "Stranger than Strange". I got the latter from a pre-announcement somewhere and thought it so apposite that it stuck even through listening to the album and title track several times. But it is Stranger to Stranger. Pity, the wrong title was better. Yesterday's 5 star review in the Telegraph is even more fulsome than the 5 star review in the Guardian the day before. Yes, it's that good. Annoyingly, the Telegraph has just switched to subscription views only - especially irritating for me as I always read its theatre reviews online.


Entered at Sun Jun 5 05:55:01 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.204)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Muhammad ALi brought to mind BLind Boy Paxton. Black Muslim ibrings to mind the Black Cajun Jew.

Jerry, you asked me a coupe of times about new or newish Brooklyn bands that i like.the last time was a few weeks ago. I wrote you a long answer almost right away, that i did not have time to finish. Or edit. then a week or so later i added to it. Still never read it through to find msitakes, poor writing, confusing ir unclear statements. but, i recall that one thinG i wrote was that there are talented performers, and a lot of talent. Which solo, or in a band, is very different than bands than i like. And I worote about Blind Boy PAxton, Hubby Jenkins, and Ethan Leinwald.

the link is to an article about Blind Boy Paxton. He was born in Lops Angeles, to a family of Black Cajun Jews from Louisiana. Keeps Kashruth as much as he can, and bakes rugelach.

He;s one of the good ones.

There is also Hubby Jenkins, another very talented young man with A LOT OF POTENTIAL. Hubby is a Brooklyn native, a solo performer, and a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops.

Ethan Leinwald is a "blues piano preservationist", or something like that. YOung guy, moved form Connecticut to StLouis to immerse himslef in the spirits of Walter Davis. Roosevelt sykes, Scott Joplin, James Crutchfield, Henry Townsend, Johnnie Johnson,,others. He hit StLouis afetr i left in 2013, Anyway he manages to get to Brooklyn to perform solo and to collaborate with people regularly. Ethan has a lot of talent & potential too.

all thAT SAID, A LOT OF POTENTIAL THAT GOT REALIZED YEARS AGO, WOULD NEVER HAVE THE SAME OPPORTUNITES OF DEVELOPMENT TODAY. i;VE DISCUSSED IT FOR YEARS, I DISCUSSED IT AGAIN IN THE POST I WROTE AND DID NOT POST. nO time to go through it now.

I'm leavingh all my typosd in honor of Norm. Norm, you shoudl feel comfortable when you return.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 18:26:24 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Life, death, and the media

The good, the bad, and the ugly. Glorifying a life and conveniently forgetting what is bad and ugly. I guess it makes us a little more comfortable. The media does it best. It requires an ounce or two of patience. I try to never forget the totality of a man's life to keep perspective.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 17:54:38 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cassius Clay

As most know, Mr. Dylan has had a positive relationship with boxing. It goes back to the 60s

Not 'Visions of Johanna' but fun!

" I Shall Be Free No. 10"

"I was shadow-boxing earlier in the day

I figured I was ready for Cassius Clay

I said "Fee, fie, fo, fum, Cassius Clay here I come

26, 27, 28, 29, I'm gonna make your face look just like mine

Five, four, three, two, one, Cassius Clay you'd better run

99, 100 101, 102, your ma won't even recognize you

14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, gonna knock him clean right out of his spleen"


Entered at Sat Jun 4 17:50:23 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The uppity N

Ali 1966 - An uppity, draft-dodging Islamist. But, of course, a corageous, highly intelligent and highly principled hero. I suppose there's been some decent progress since then - makes me wonder if the black lives matter leaders will be seen as heroes in 20 years. And those that disrupt Trump rallies; like the heroes that disrupted Mussolini rallies in the 20's.

Perhaps the lesson is to attempt to view the present from the POV of a place some years in the future; it's an old story I think.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 17:13:36 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Un Belle Histoire

Bill, Michel Fugain’s "Un Belle Histoire" is a song wrapped in a blanket full of nostalgia and melancholy. It’s 1972 the hippie era, melancholy, men walk with ‘elephants’ pants ….. women wear wide Indian dresses, refuse to wear bra’s anymore and the whole BRA industry implodes like a plum pudding.
The front man of this procession is the drum major of the new age; Michel Fugain.
The song; a girl travels up to the North, a man travels to the South. ... they meet at a grizzled gas station .... look each other deep in the eyes and make love in the wheat field next door. .... come back out of the field again, give each other the hand and say; "That wasn't too bad..."
This is free love in practice, but there's more to it. .... this song is not only a homage to free love but also an homage to that famous piece of asphalt between Paris and to the South, ‘Le Route Du Soleil’. ... it’s a song about nostalgia but at the same time it is a French time document, an observation of an era a photo for all Band fans.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 17:09:44 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill, I know you don’t care about credits, that’s why I often use your older posts (only to keep Peter awake). Love your French, but that’s ok (you've posted this before too).


Entered at Sat Jun 4 14:14:56 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: I'm so fast that last night I turned off the light switch in my hotel room and was in bed before the room was dark

My own favourite amongst a litany of his amazing sayings - half of them hilarious, half profound.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 14:02:25 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Muhammad Ali - the Greatest

If it was The Beatles that provided the musical worldwide backdrop for your average baby boomer then it was Ali who did the same in a worldwide sporting sense - and so much more besides.

Of course, white folks cannot begin to envisage just how much more the man meant, nay, symbolized to your average black person.

Still, the linked article is certainly a decent attempt at beginning to represent the magnitude of this uniquely incredible man.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 13:47:34 CEST 2016 from (86.171.25.33)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Dave Swarbrick

So sorry to hear of death of Dave Swarbrick. Although I knew he was ill, got a bit of a shock when I read that, Peter.

Still play 'Unhalfbricking' and 'Liege and Lief' regularly. Great albums.

Love Dave's fiddle on 'Si Tu Dois Partir' - one of the great covers of Dylan. Still remember being enchanted by this song, when I first saw it on Top of the Pops about one hundred years ago.

Away to watch three year olds play football. When Saturday comes!


Entered at Sat Jun 4 10:33:07 CEST 2016 from (210.86.95.103)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Roger Daltrey kind of echos me.

unfortunately Roger is right. Whats the point in recording an album thats going to be ripped off on YouTube or paid a pitance for via streaming. I know that there are some of us older folk who will still buy CDs or legally download entire albums but we are an ever increasing minority. As I have said before though the model has changed. Artists now need to look at recording new stuff to attract people to their live shows rather than touring to support an album. I don't know if there is money in that - maybe it's just enough to make a reasonable living like the rest of us have to.

The worry is that there will be less great music created. My solace is that there is a lot of great recorded music that I have not heard yet.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 08:55:51 CEST 2016 from (92.22.73.169)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Muhammad Ali

RIP Muhammad Ali. I always loved the Greg Trooper song about Ali.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 08:53:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… and Mohamed Ali. The last time I was ever interested in boxing was Ali. When you look at most of these boxers, the conclusion has to be to ban boxing. I know gladiatorial contests always appeal … my son teaches martial arts and has every level of black belt … but you score points in boxing with hard blows to the head. That has to be wrong.


Entered at Sat Jun 4 00:33:42 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Another one gone. RIP Dave Swarbrick, a great and influential violinist. I last saw him a couple of years ago with Martin Carthy. Also a fine raconteur.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 23:23:00 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.204)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Love / Trump

Of course Mike Love is endorsing Donald Trump.

More sensibly: Brian Wilson is performing Pet Sounds in Brooklyn, with Al Jardine & Blondie Chaplin in the band.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 22:42:47 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.159)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: bridge over troubled enunciation

Peter V: Good to hear that Paul Simon's back at the top of his game.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 17:50:35 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon

Stranger Than Strange- 5 stars in today's Guardian. "Best since Graceland" competes with "Best ever". It is an extraordinary album, right up with new sounds too. Incredible rhythms. Lyrics are as ever, as good as you get.

The voice is improved over 5 or 6 years ago. Then he was developing a slight "slush" on some words, very tiny, but I noticed it. A lot of older singers get it. I suspect expensive dental work since. Anyway, it's back to normal. And he articulates lyrics more clearly than anyone.

5 stars is an under-statement.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 17:18:28 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.204)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good one Pete.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 16:55:39 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.26)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Close, but my notes of the discussion make it clear that Charles' words were "Ma chanson n'est pas une chanson, c'est un photo". This was picked up by Vigneault and turned into his brilliant, "Mon pays n'est pas un pays, c'est l'hiver". (He failed to credit any of us, but that's okay.)


Entered at Fri Jun 3 13:18:48 CEST 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Paul Simon continues to do that great work

A marvel: Paul Simon continues to write and sing and perform . The new album is a pleasure in all the ways that Paul Simon has always made his albums a pleasure. I don't know quite what happens to some vocal cords as they age (nodules,narrowing, etc) but Paul Simon sounds like he has always sounded and that is good. And the world rhythms are still there and the nuances of the music combined with his voice make this group of songs something special.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 13:03:07 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: La Boheme d'Aznavour

La belle epoque, Paris 1900 wedged between two world wars, exciting new inventions every week. A unbridled provincial travels to Montmartre. How did a record store look like in 1900? One thing is still the same; you go in through the front door and ask the man behind the counter: "Pour moi si vous plaid: La Boheme d'Aznavour". He takes the order on 33 blistering carbon papers …. shouts through a hole in the wall to the back room, "La Boheme!" and there, there in that little room is a band ready to play. And they play their heart out for you…..you wait 4 min and 51sec. and you will walk away with a unique, only pressed for you version of La Boheme. That's all in Aznavour’s song.
What’s interesting of this typical French chanson; it’s a Polaroid, it is a story told. We see in the beginning an artist arrive in Paris ….. we see his Studio appear ….. we see the nude women that pose for him…….and as that polaroid, just like a real polaroid, is fully developed at the end, the song is over.... "La chanson c'est un photo" as Aznavour once told me.
A chanson is poetry and nostalgia meets song. The French word ‘lyric’ holds the music instrument already, music and poetry are intertwined Bill.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 12:17:40 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, if you're thinking of such a one as a rock star as well, "Star-with-six-points" might do.


Entered at Fri Jun 3 08:47:15 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.204)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Lighten this place up.

I was thinking of a good name for a fictional Native American Orthodox Jew & cane up with Schlomo Flowing Payahs.......... From there it was just a step to Canadian Native Indian Jews & Chaim Two Rs. Steve is laughing in the spirit world.


Entered at Thu Jun 2 18:06:19 CEST 2016 from (24.85.174.91)

Posted by:

Giles

Location: Coast Salish Territory
Web: My link

Subject: God Bless Charlie Watts

Also, Charlie Watts is 75 today! God bless that man. Follow the link above to find out at least one reason why.


Entered at Thu Jun 2 17:28:48 CEST 2016 from (24.85.174.91)

Posted by:

Giles

Location: Coast Salish Territory
Web: My link

Subject: Band tribute in Vancouver

Check the link above, tribute show next Friday June 10 here in Vancouver (the Canadian one!) Cubby-Hole Artists presents... *** A TRIBUTE TO the BAND *** Featuring: Khari McClelland + Rich Hope + Lydia Hol + Dustin Bental + Kalissa Landa and Ashley Grant - Evangeline + Kenton Lowen + Karina Morin + The Paperboys. All backed up by Acadian Driftwood, featuring: Scott Smith, Eric Nielsen, Tom Landa, Darryl Havers and Liam MacDonald June 10, 2016 at IMPERIAL (319 Main St.) What time the doors open: 7:30 What time the show starts: 8:00 Ticket Price Advance: 20 Ticket Price Door: 25 Where to Purchase Tickets: Highlife, Red Cat, Zulu + www.ticketweb.ca


Entered at Thu Jun 2 17:04:44 CEST 2016 from (70.193.166.64)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Who

I believe three different CSI spin-off shows used Who songs in their openings. All three are still aired in syndication in addition, GM is using an instrumental section of a Who song in a pickup truck ad that has constantly been aired for the past year on almost every TV network.


Entered at Thu Jun 2 11:01:55 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On the other hand …

I have observed concession stands at gigs closely the last few years. New artists with a new album (like Fay Hield) shift loads at gigs. But when you look at (let’s call them politely) “heritage artistes” the pattern is different. Take the Manfreds gig this year. Everyone was buying their “Greatest Hits Live” double CD, but there was far less interest in solo new albums, or recent albums of new material. This is the pattern for heritage artistes, so their best bet is “Live last year with the same band doing the stuff you know, love and have already” (a great CD title).


Entered at Thu Jun 2 10:38:31 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Who's next cancelled

Roger Daltrey interview: of course he’s right, though the article itself displays the worst of the internet. It’s very short, but three times a Ford UK advert took over and I found myself looking at pictures of vans, and trying to get out. This annoys the viewer in reference to Ford, as a few years ago loads of Russian fake posts with links took you to Audi and VW dealers. You just think, well, screw Ford, Audi and VW.

Anyway, Daltrey is right, though The Who are in a rare position of being able to do something about it. Pete Townsend has his own studio, and I thought it was commercially rentable level rather than in the garage. As the classic Who sound is guitar, bass and drums, with later a touch of keyboards, it’s not like recording a string section or a horn section. Also Townsend apparently demos stuff to quite a near-finished level, so it’s not like The Stones composing in the studio for days.

They could do it, and just sell it at gigs. How many people will see them this summer? They’re playing huge festivals. They could sell a lot of CDs direct. The current folk guys in the UK have own labels and are happy to stuff CDs in envelopes and stand in line to mail them, but The Who could afford to use a mail order distributor. My distributor overheads for DVDs are 20% and they take orders, mail them and send one account a month to me. That’s a reasonable cut, better than giving amazon 50%. You could still give stores an old-fashioned 33% because you could dictate your own terms. Take it or leave it. They could afford to set up their own website with a shop (and pay someone to warehouse and mail them). You could in the words of Paul Kantner "Hijack the starship" and bypass the system, and it would be good to see someone like The Who doing it. Isn't that why Paul McCartney works with Starbucks rather than EMI?

But it’s a lot of effort, and they’re all older than me. I take his point entirely.


Entered at Thu Jun 2 01:42:18 CEST 2016 from (67.84.76.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Roger Daltrey kind of echos me.

See the linked article. Daltrey simplifies & summarizes what I've been discussing in far more detail & with far greater scope than he. Also, we have reached different conclusions.I disagree with not making records though I do see & have certainly felt the incisive futility of it. I do certainly understand the refusal to work without getting paid, & the refusal to pay to play. Yet, he & Townshend have the ability to go out , tour, & make a living. Roger is used to recording with expansive budgets. If they went in prepped, The Who could make a record more economically at high levels of quality, than most. They have the experience. Pf course, then there's a lot more expense & responsibility & a whole new business enterprise that would result if they decided to open their own label, rather than let a label perform modern music industry surgery on em. Which is worse than B.D. ( before digital)music industry surgery.


Entered at Wed Jun 1 18:43:18 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: BTW Bourgeios Town for those who like rockin' Dylan

The sound is there, isn't it.


Entered at Wed Jun 1 17:37:46 CEST 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Mike Nomad's post

On a serious side. - Illuminati has hang-around clubs just like criminal motorycle gangs. After WW2 my father was a succesful in economics and these people tried to get him to join. He refused, which made him potentially dangerous. All went well until we moved to a "bourgoise" town which was controlled by them. I was a kid and didn't undertand it then. Now I do. My father was afraid of them. They ruined his career and later on he took his life. He always blamed himself because he ruined even my future in this "bourguise" town, which I left for forty five years ago. Lucky for me, tough. Funny thing is that these hang-around people _still_ control the town when I was there earlier this year. - A burning cigarette was placed in the air-condition of my car. Just to remind, I guess.


Entered at Wed Jun 1 17:28:57 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Most Famous Unknown BAND!

I got home for one day! Jerry and Kevin you behave like very kind gentlemanly fellows......You can't fool me...I know better!...:-)........from last time I was here.

You guys take a look at this band! I bet you didn't even know some of these people do what they are doing here.


Entered at Wed Jun 1 16:16:34 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.51)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Has anyone joined up with the Illuminati yet?


Entered at Wed Jun 1 10:37:23 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: A song for Wednesday

This one's for Bill M, Al Edge and Norbert.

Al will remember it best, I suspect. This was what we had in Britain in those days.

A taxi driver told me a story about the singer. He used to live in Bournemouth, about a mile away from here. The taxi took him from the station to his home and stated the fare.

"I've never paid for a taxi" the very famous singer said, "They all take me free."

"OK," said the driver, "So you sing me all three verses of the song (linked above) and the ride's free."

The singer declined and handed over the fare.


Entered at Wed Jun 1 06:09:47 CEST 2016 from (74.12.48.215)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Scanning Al E's posts over the past few days reminds me of when we first met him standing at the side of the road in southwest Holland. Apparently he'd been kicked off the Magic Bus from Amsterdam to London for his over-exuberant behaviour. With us he was okay at first as long as we kept him off the topic of soccer, but then he started to go on and on about this great cassette he had - "Bruce 'n' Rosie", I believe it was called. He had the damned thing with him and insisted on playing it for us. This might have been okay had he not simply yanked Kevin J's copy of "Nashville Skyline" out of the tape deck mid-song. I thought there was going to be blood on the upholstery, but we got them settled down - no thanks to Mike, who pretended to be asleep. Good times!


Entered at Wed Jun 1 03:50:03 CEST 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: 3 Amigos. Hope this works.

/Users/carlgraham/Desktop/That Magical Session On Stoney Lake With Ronnie Hawkins, Gordon Lightfoot & Kris Kristofferson — Ptb.webarchive


[See the guestbook archive for more]


[History] [Members] [Library] [Discography] [Videography] [Filmography] [Pictures] [Audio Files] [Video Clips] [Tape Archive] [Concerts] [Related Artists] [Merchandise] [Guestbook] [Chat Room] [Search] [What's New?] [Main Page]

Webmaster