The Band
Home

History
Members
Library
Discography
Videography
Filmography
Pictures
Audio files
Video clips
Tape archive
Concerts
Related artists
Merchandise
Guestbook
Chat Room
What's New?
Search

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 02:53:02 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I imagine that in your explorations of Jeff Healey videos you've bumped into one of him performing "The Weight" in a bar in Hamilton in 2007. Turns out he included a studio version in his "Mess of Blues" CD for the Stony Plain label. It was recorded shortly before his death in 2008. It's not very interesting, unfortunately, though his take on "You Are Like A Hurricane" is. I didn't know about it until yesterday, when I attended a music festival and found it at the True North label booth (i.e, BaRK's label, and also Bruce Cockburn's). $10 each or three for $20 so I also bought Cockburn's "Bone on Bone" from last year and John Baldry's great "It Ain't Easy" (which will replace an LP I've had forever).


Entered at Sun Aug 19 20:30:48 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lisa

Lisa thank you so much for that link. Great!


Entered at Sun Aug 19 20:09:55 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: I love the link, mainly for the repros of posters, etc. Noe that the setlists, including Toronto and Vancouver, are identified as 'unconfirmed', which I believe should be taken to mean 'same as last time, we think'. And sometimes you'll have to back up a long way to get to a setlist that has been confirmed.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 18:27:33 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Thanks for the correction. Getting to play TSIT on the 15th might have been very special to the Hawks, as that's when the CHUM Chart was dated.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:45:49 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Set lists

If you scroll to the top of the link I posted yesterday titled "Still on the Road" there are links for "Previous", "Next" and "Back to". This site details Bob's career from beginning to present (I think anyway, I didn't actually click past the 70s) - everything is there, including posters, photos, ticket stubs (I obviously paid $3.50 for my ticket in March 1966!), some reviews, every concert and recording session, often with notes on them - just a huge amount of info. So Bill and John, if you click on the "Previous" page to the one I posted, you will find the two November 65 Toronto concerts and the set lists, plus reviews, etc.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:01:54 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Stones I Throw

I reckon if they flipped the single and put He Don't Love You as the A-side, it could have been a major hit in the UK in the era, just as "Keep On Running" was for Spencer Davis. Lee Dorsey was big here and it sounds like Lee Dorsey. As they put He Don't Love You on the earlier box set, they might have come to the same conclusion. It was on ATCO, and in the UK on Atlantic - a major prestige label for a white group. Ace's "AT the Club" compilation of mid-60s Atlantic club grooves includes He Don't Love You. I never heard it in clubs, but presumably Ace were working on knowledge of the scene in London.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:00:09 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dyal Hawks Bill M

No Big deal Bill; but I was at the first show and Jerry was at the second and once again thank you for your support. Maybe by the second night Bob let them do it; but it wasn't done the first night. Lisa said she saw the show in March; therefore that show must have been in 1966 Lisa?

From an anonymous donor I just received a copy of the MONO CANADIAN version of Blonde on Blonde and I just finished cleaning it up this morning; from pops and clicks from an album that goes back to '66. I've wanted this for years and nobody seemed to have it. Thank you again Vinyl Donor. I feel like Abraham finding the lost sheep.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 15:40:47 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

PSB notes that Butch Dener couldn't have seen Levon with Dylan in White Plains because that concert took place long after Levon had flown the coop. Perhaps Butch was concatenating his memory of seeing Dylan's Levon-free White Plains concert with a memory of some earlier concert in the NY area that did include Levon. Would Newark or Hartford have been reasonable places for a young White Plains-based Dylan fanatic to have travelled in those days?


Entered at Sun Aug 19 15:13:28 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: short-term pain for long-term gain

Peter V: I don't know that Levon ever explained it that way, but it sounds like the truth to me, especially if you add, "Plus we get booed" at the end. To Rod's point, the association with Dylan obviously paid off in the end, even for Levon thanks to the other guys' spirit of forgiveness.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 11:30:06 CEST 2018 from (210.86.90.140)

Posted by:

Rod

I think Levon also said "I've been wrong before"


Entered at Sun Aug 19 10:29:50 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wasn’t one of Levon’s grievances, causing him to leave, that their own career was just taking off with the Canadian hit, but they were throwing it away by not being there to promote it?


Entered at Sun Aug 19 07:09:20 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Subject: TSIT on the CHUM chart

The link is to the first chart with the Hawks in the top 50. You can follow the song's progress by changing the last digit of the URL from 3 to 4 to 5 to 6, etc. If you change the 3 to a 2 and look at the photo of the chart as opposed to the list of songs on the chart, you'll see that TSIT is picked to click - on the week of Nov 15, exactly when they were taking the stage at Massey Hall. Conspiracy theorists of the time no doubt went wild theorising why the upward trajectory turned into a brisk plummet - off the charts altogether in just two weeks.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 04:28:45 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

This is a really interesting site about the 1966 tour and Blonde on Blonde. It goes by calendar date, so so recording sessions for Blonde on Blonde are mixed with the concert dates. The Vancouver concert was March 26, and the set list there is pretty much what I remember. This site has a LOT of info, fascinating!


Entered at Sun Aug 19 04:21:32 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

JWQ: thanks for the vote of confidence. Yes indeed, TSIT did reasonably well on the Toronto charts. It would have made perfect sense for them to ask Bob to let them play their song before a hometown audience, especially as it was already on the charts. And if the one guy we've heard from who was at the first of two Toronto shows heard it played at the show, then why wouldn't we believe it, absent conflicting testimony? Just like we accept the word of John D that it wasn't played at the second Toronto show, which he attended? (In 1971 I attended the first of two ELP shows in Ottawa; they didn't do their huge hit "Lucky Man", though I understand they did it at the second show.) As for Vancouver, whether on not TSIT hit the charts, Vancouver would hardly count as a hometown crowd for our guys.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 01:50:08 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: The Stones I Throw

I'm pretty sure they didn't do that song, although you have to realize back then that if you didn't have all the records, you didn't know the music, so I wouldn't have known that song in any case. My memory is that in the second half of the concert with Bob and The Band they only played Dylan songs, and I don't remember The Band doing anything on their own, though I could certainly be mistaken - it was a long time ago.

Once years ago I wrote about that concert for brown eyed girl who asked me about it. I'd dig it out if I knew how, but I'm not even sure what year it was and I've never had any luck finding anything specific in the archives. Does anybody know the way to do it, if there is one?


Entered at Sat Aug 18 23:38:22 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JWQ

Best explanation is in the film, Muscle Shoals; but one of the horn players flirted with her and Aretha’s husband was infuriated. Jerry Wexler took Aretha and her husband back to their hotel. Rick Hall followed them over there and all went sideways. Wexler took Aretha back to New York vowing never to return. He later sent for the MS session players to come to NY. to finish the album. However watch the film; which is photogenically amazing.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 23:19:21 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Stones That I Throw

Bill, Jerry and I had that discussion a few times. I went the first night in November of 65 and Jerry went the second night. The only one singing night one was Bob; with the boys singing backup in the second half; therefore TSTIT was never performed.

Lisa saw them in Vancouver on that same tour. Lisa do you remember The Stones That I Throw being performed? Jerry was lucky enough to see them at the Concord many times. Now I don’t want to second guess Jerry; but he may have heard it there; or at the Friars as Levon and The Hawks.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 22:40:54 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JWQ

Subject: PSB and the Canadian hit parade

Could it be that the tune was more popular in Canada then and even made their charts, given the lads were more well known up there at that time? I’d take Bill M and John D’s opinion on that first -


Entered at Sat Aug 18 20:36:04 CEST 2018 from (71.162.205.110)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: White Plains and other wrong stuff

Dylan's show in White Plains was February 5, 1966 and Levon was long gone. The drummer for the show was Sandy Konikoff. "The Stones That I Throw" was anything but a chart climber, it didn't go anywhere near the charts or record stores for that matter.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 14:11:11 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think there is an interview somewhere with Sebastion where he talks about the tele and the modifications it had because he had been playing it.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 12:37:57 CEST 2018 from (210.86.77.204)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbies guitar

Robbie seemed to be right into modifying his guitars...both that Tele and the red strat. The strat got a fancy tremolo at some stage after TLW and I wonder if the Tele got its tremolo then as well. Ricks ampeg sold on eBay a few years back for around 30k. His sunburst Ripper has vanished from site though there is a picture of him playing it with Paul butterfield ...probably not long after TLW.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 04:50:20 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Wallsend: Thanks for the suggestion about the Butch Dener interview (see link). What struck me was Butch talking about seeing Dylan and the Hawks (with Levon still in the group) in White Plains NY in '65 and making it seem that Levon did some singing. (Or maybe he was just jumping ahead in his mind to seeing Dylan guest with the Band years later.) Jerry T (RIP) remembered seeing Levon and the Hawks singing their then-current chart-climber "The Stones I Throw" at their show with Dylan in Toronto, but I don't recall any other talk of anyone aside from Bob singing.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 02:55:18 CEST 2018 from (70.30.45.165)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks, Wallsend. Butch, I see, still has a marvellous head of hair.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 01:15:58 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is quite an interesting interview with Butch Dener on the University of Arkansas website.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 00:04:49 CEST 2018 from (2605:6000:8b4c:e800:e46c:ccbd:c14b:2f37)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: 5 for Friday

Here are my recent listens: Bob Dylan: Oh Mercy / Joni Mitchell: Don Juan's Reckless Daughter / Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers: Southern Accents (with Richard, Garth & Robbie helping on "The Best of Everything" track) / The Who: Odds & Sods / The Doors: Morrison Hotel / plus remembering Aretha - listened to Rare & Unreleased Recordings.

Have a nice weekend.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 20:09:06 CEST 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Aretha

Enjoying her Fillmore West concert from 1971. Of interest to Band fans--a terrific cover of 'Share Your Love With Me', a year before The Band's. Try 'aretha franklin fillmore west' on YouTube.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 11:00:01 CEST 2018 from (89.242.94.106)

Posted by:

Jack

Subject: Richard Thompson on Big Pink

I went to Big pink last year,which was great fun.Someone I know was renting it,so they invited me along to check out the basement.It's got a vibe to it! It's a fairly small space,supports sticking up in the middle,but there's a vibe. You get the idea. Here's where Bob used to sit,here's where Garth used to have his keyboards,Rick Danko was over here...It's a way outside of Woodstock too,about 20 minutes up a fairly obscure road.You couldn't stumble across it by mistake.It's a pilgrimage,you have to do it.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 04:05:02 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Legends

It was made note today that Aretha died on the same day as Elvis. Well there was another legend that died on this date. Robert Johnson August 16, 1938.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 02:56:34 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::7d)

Posted by:

JWQ

Subject: Aretha and Muscle Shoals

I don’t really know or remember the story of what went wrong for her down there Anybody? My memory is that those cracker players sort of scared her off?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 00:19:55 CEST 2018 from (92.54.175.179)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Gets played at least once or twice a week here. RIP.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 20:01:48 CEST 2018 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Twillingate

Bill, thanks for the heads up.

I'm still enjoying live music a couple times a week.

Music NL are having their annual showcase in our harbour town this year. October. I should just be back from an Irish vacation in time to volunteer.

We had an incredible show last night. SRO. Newfoundland is actually a band from Ireland that's found a ready market for their talents right here. Local performers like Juno winners Ronnie Power and Darcy Broderick and the amazing Mike Sixonate opened.

I'm too old to stay up for the after party jams and whatnot but most of the musicians seem to find their way to my place the next morning for coffee. Live music alive and well down here.

Slainte.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 18:26:48 CEST 2018 from (2605:6000:8b4c:e800:354f:43f2:bf46:d2f8)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Aretha, queen of soul

She covered "The Weight;" she covered a lot of great tunes. What a voice! What a career! She's going to be missed.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 17:46:42 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter WV: As usual, I go for the simplest answer - that the theatrical equipment store had a sale on overstocked backdrops. Those things are usually so expensive that some crews simply go out and film al fresco - but where's the art in that?


Entered at Thu Aug 16 09:22:46 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter W V

Subject: Vera

We saw a couple when it was first on - with so many good shows you need to see three or four to get hooked. Will re-investigate. We are feeling a gap currently with no more Poldark on Sundays, and no more Versailles on Mondays. Though I started to wonder in Poldark why the route from any point in Cornwall to any other point meant going along the same cliff top path.

I'm piling up late 60s films to re-watch - though we are in a heavy theatre spell again for the next couple of weeks.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 02:08:30 CEST 2018 from (104.175.202.187)

Posted by:

John S.

Subject: Richard Singing

Don't know - another question for Garth? "Minstrel Boy" was also on that disc, but it doesn't quite read like the Isle of Wight set list. I'd think they mainly rehearsed for the show when they got there and the ideas may have changed. Sadly no tapes of that - with Beatles sitting in...


Entered at Thu Aug 16 01:50:11 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JWQ

Subject: Vera

Hi Peter V - Do you know this program? We've been burning though it. It's on Acorn, although season's 3 & 4 aren't on there? Any idea on that? Top notch I'd say; Brit TV series are just so much better than most of our fare here.


Entered at Wed Aug 15 20:59:25 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

John S: Good thought. I wonder if there was an idea to have Richard co-sing the thing at the IofW?


Entered at Wed Aug 15 19:31:47 CEST 2018 from (2606:6000:6281:3200:70ff:1c6f:10cf:2f0d)

Posted by:

John S

Subject: One Too Many Mornings

Assume some of those last songs were rehearsals for the Isle of Wight Festival - just before they jetted over...


Entered at Wed Aug 15 14:23:56 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Was listening to a disc of Basement Tapes last night for the first time in a while. For the first time it struck me to ask why the guys did "One Too Many Mornings" - one of very few songs from the back catalogue that were revisited during that period (judging from the surviving tapes). Maybe Garth didn't tape over it because it has Richard singing the first part?


Entered at Tue Aug 14 23:29:45 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

A follow up to my previous post, I see Robbie/Bob's guitar sold for $490,000. It seems a bit sad that he sold it.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 16:28:33 CEST 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Garth playing at Huichica East Festival

Hi all, Garth Hudson is listed as a featured artist at a New York State music festival next week not too far from Woodstock. I think he is playing infrequently these days, so nice to see! Web address: hudson dot huichica dot com slash lineup will get you there. Bettye Lavette (playing Bob songs!) is also on the bill.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 12:25:47 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is an interesting video of Robbie talking about the telecaster he used to use. If you look at the same site there are brief clips of him playing Up On Cripple Creek and Don't Do It. You can find it by googling: Historic Fender Telecaster-Robbie Robertson/Bob Dylan Music Icons 2018


Entered at Tue Aug 14 02:49:44 CEST 2018 from (67.70.148.155)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joe J: I've reposted the Jay Smith / Bobby Starr number just in case. It occurred to me that I should have mentioned that Eugene Smith (Jay's real name - see eugenesmith do ca for a decent history) is still going strong and is in fact currently on his way to your island by car and ferry. As his last gig before he left was a festival with Alan Doyle, and both of them are sociable, music-loving, music-playing guys, I would expect them to hook-up in St Johns if it's at all possible. So if you hear of an Alan Doyle gig later this week or next ...


Entered at Sun Aug 12 08:49:43 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Large fingers and iPads and QWERTY keyboards meant pressing Q and W together I suspect.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 05:06:12 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: JWQ

PV - why the added W? Wanker? Hmm.. it’s been said..


Entered at Sat Aug 11 23:35:00 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

Thank you Peter. Look forward to it.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 23:19:23 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hi John, I am also underwhelmed by the Copyright Collection - it's all fine, but there are other versions of the songs that are just as good. No revelations. Still listening though.

On MFBP, I ordered it. As far as I can see the only unreleased track is a "vocal only" I Shall Be Released. Is that a different version,or the normal one with the vocal tracks isolated? Will definitely comment once I get it.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 17:43:26 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V Dylan/MFBP

Peter I would be interested in a full review of Bob's live new CD. I have listened right through; but so far have not been overwhelmed. Perhaps a few more listens. Also Peter something I was hoping you would comment on; was my mentioning awhile back of the new release of MFBP. My comment was I will probably buy it; but my complaint was the releasing of a release of a release. You know what I mean. I'd be interested on you commenting of product that has been released a few times over. Yes I know each re-release brings changes but.... Thanks Peter.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 22:39:45 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Then,of course,there’s Levon who could play anything with anybody and it was always perfect.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 19:54:57 CEST 2018 from (2600:1017:b81b:2e92:3ded:ac7:c142:7c54)

Posted by:

Jed

Since 2005 and even earlier the large majority of EC’s live shows have not focused,beyond brief acoustic sets, on his singer-songwriter side. That’s the reason the choice of Gadd by EC often surprised me.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 19:19:20 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The question is what Clapton wanted to do on a tour … Steve Gadd would be wasted on one of the Albert Hall several days of blues series where many strong, crisp drummers would do the job, but Clapton also has a significant singer-songwriter side, and then the talents would come into play.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 17:01:06 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Drummers

Agree about Ringo-he’s sensational and underrated. It’s more about fit.Gadd fits with all the musicians you mention,Peter,but they are all “softer” artists.Backing a hard rocking/bluesy Clapton,particularly when he’s with a second guitarist requires a different sound and approach than what Gadd brings. There’s a reason Clapton played the way he did in Cream and Ginger Baker was a monster on drums.With Derek Trucks and Doyle Bramhall,Steve Jordan and at times,a second drummer made sense.When Clapton returned to playing without a second guitarist(after age 70) he went back to Gadd-he had a softer,less aggressive approach and thus Gadd made sense.Playing drums for James Taylor may require a different type of drummer with different skills than playing for Clapton.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 15:21:30 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I also recall a recent discussion. I don't know which musician said it, but you can identify so many Beatles songs if you isolate Ringo's drum part and hear only that.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 15:19:13 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: The Sandy Nelson Appreciation Society

Steve Gadd gets my vote. There’s his range from Van McCoy, Herbie Mann to Chick Corea to Paul Simon, James Taylor, Steely Dan, Kate Bush. But he also does remarkable and memorable things, and like Robbie, plays for the song and interprets it … hard for a drummer. Like Levon, he does things you remember and which are highlights of the song. Jim Keltner is simply a great drummer, but he doesn’t stand out in the same unusual ways to me.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 13:03:52 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Last 5

All Garcia yesterday 23 years since he passed. Special mention for Jerry doing Dylan-tremendous. Also,worth rereading Dylan’s eulogy for Jerry-quite beautiful and profound.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 13:00:24 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jim Keltner/John D

Keltner is old reliable and always able with anyone for sure. EC does quite well with Steve Jordan. Gadd is great but historically EC has way more umph when he has more challenging, tougher edged drummers.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 09:26:44 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JWQ: Charlie Haden's "Liberation Music Orchestra" has just moved to the top of the pile of "harder stuff." Recorded in 1969 with a band including Howard Johnson on tuba (Band link), Carla Bley on piano, Don Cherry on cornet. It's been sitting on the desk for a month. I found it in a charity shop for £2. Today it gets played. "El Segadors" by Charlie Haden has been on my "Relaxing" playlist for years.

Norm! You have certainly heard of Bob Dylan and Cannonball Adderley. We can move on from there …


Entered at Fri Aug 10 06:22:06 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

I picked up one of Clinton Heylin’s books on Dylan’s songs a few weeks ago, I’m not sure why, and have been leafing through it, starting with his coverage of “Lo And Behold” and “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere”, but looking in on a couple of others as well. I’ve come away annoyed and may not go back to it. First, I don’t get how anyone perceptive enough to clock in the fact that Dylan would do pastiches of songs he liked (“4th Time Around” for “Norwegian Wood”, “Clothesline Saga” for “Ode To Billy Joe”) not have noticed and made something of the fact that, as I’ve said before, the opening lines of “Lo And Behold” are the mirror image of the opening lines of “The Weight”: “I pulled out for San Antone, I’ve never felt so good” versus “I pulled in to Nazareth, I was feeling about half past dead”.

Of the two, Robbie’s song seems more natural, and Bob’s more like making fun – which would suggest that Robbie’s lines came first and that he had at least a start on “The Weight” a long time before it was completed – apparently as something for Levon to sing once he’d reentered the picture prior to the recording of MFBP. So, further evidence for Robbie writing songs for the Hawks while Dylan was writing songs for his own use (on “John Wesley Harding”) and for everyone’s use in the Basement.

And with “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere”, we have Heylin focusing (as I would) on version 1, but not the lines that are clearly directed towards at the Hawks, but on the lettuce line – and how there should be more like it. Those lines earlier on about the Hawks not just being basement noise and seeing them just going out there (i.e., onstage) and doing it suggest to me that either the guys had just gotten their own deal (or were on their way to doing so) or that some of them were feeling deflated about their apparent lack of success.

It’d be interesting to know how the recording dates of those songs line up with other events: the day Dylan asked Richard to write music for “Tears Of Rage” (just to cheer him up?; Dylan was pretty good with writing music); the day Dylan asked Rick to write music for “This Wheel’s On Fire” (ditto?; ditto); the date record companies started to show interest; the dates recording contracts were signed; the dates Hawks demos were recorded; etc.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 03:31:05 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I surrender!!!

OK Peter! this is it. I have never even heard most of this stuff yer bragging about. I think you are doing it on purpose just to fuck me up:-)

But anyway let me give you guys some history. Dan Seals, (who died of cancer at 61 a few years back) very sad he was wonderful. Wrote many great songs, (but you got to like a little country).

He was "England Dan" of England Dan & John Ford Coley, a pretty hot duo. He was nick named "England Dan" by his brother Jim Seals of "Seals & Croft" because he was such a fan of the Beatles and tried to give himself an English accent.

Now this song of Dan's (which was a million seller), "Everything that Glitters is not Gold" he wrote with Bob McDill. There has to be some people who know who Bob McDill is. This is the saddest rodeo song you'll ever hear.

If you want to hear it put on your youtube search, Dan Seals with Jerry Douglas & Marc Oconnor - "Everything thst glitters is not gold". Jerry Douglas mournful and so perfect dobro on this song is haunting.

Try to watch, (as the camera shows you) Dan Seals play his 12 string guitar, left handed, upside down and backwards. His chord formation is pretty unique.

Bonk! I still haven't found that article. I wish I had put it on my favourites, but! It was by Jimi Hendricks.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 02:41:14 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::80)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Charlie Haden and his triplicate daughters

PV - I’m a fan of his too, although I don’t recognize the record you’ve referenced. Apart from his bebop playing he’s also a singer. Two songs that he does very well are Shenandoah (his home town) and, particularly, his take on Wayfaring Stranger. He doesn’t have a strong voice but it’s highly emotive. His triplet daughters are singers too, with lovely natural harmonies. They did an album produced by Ry Cooder in 2014 which I like a lot. Charlie also made the record Rambling Boy calling upon his early youth as a part of his family band. He was a true artist with a lifetime of creative competence.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 23:30:22 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, the thing I like about that Robbie interview was that he actually seemed engaged with what he was talking about. When he does interviews promoting his book, cds etc you can tell he goes into 'performance' mode and just tells the stories that he thinks people want to hear.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 20:44:06 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jed Steve Gadd

Jed, have to disagree. Steve Gadd; behind anybody makes the front man sound great. Although I have to admit that Jim Keltner is my go to guy anytime.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 18:20:32 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last five … I’ve been listening to Eleanor McEvoy in the background all day – four albums, but largely in the background. So I won’t count it.

Planet Beat: Shel Talmy from the vaults. An Ace CD in the songwriter / producer series. Lots of unknown or only slightly known Merseybeat era bands. Many play well, but it proves that unless you have a good writer, and most didn’t, you’re doomed to obscurity.

Chuck Prophet: Bobby Fuller Died For Your Sins. Because I’m going to see him soon.

Resistance is Futile – Manic Street Preachers. I bought the LP for Mrs V who simply wanted the cover to frame – one of the earliest Samurai photos. It has a CD inside, which saved making one before confining it to the frame.

Bob Dylan Live 1962-1966: Rare Performances From The Copyright Collection – 2 CDS. So both. Making five

Then I have a little pile on the desk. Stuff I want to hear, but it’s not background, it’s not in car, it’s not headphones at night. It requires sitting down and paying attention. It’s building up.

Mike Westbrook Concert Band: Marching Song. I saw them back in the day doing this live.

David Axelrod: Song of Innocence

Cannonball Adderley – Soul Zodiac.

Charlie Haden Liberation Music

All require more focussed attention than I have right now … maybe as the summer wears away.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 18:08:25 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm not sure what Robbie and Bunuel have said on the subject, but I would say knighthood is more attainable than sainthood, so not "impossible." Enjoyed the Robbie interview in spite of much repetition.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 17:30:03 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the possibility of knighthood

Peter V: Good addition. And they say that flattery will get you nowhere!


Entered at Thu Aug 9 14:19:40 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just came across a really interesting interview with Robbie, maybe the most interesting one I have ever seen: Rock and Roll; Shakespeares in The Alley; Interview with Robbie Robertson


Entered at Thu Aug 9 09:52:29 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, and Paul added that Her Majesty's a very nice girl, which got him a knighthood. In The End.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 02:42:23 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the possibility of sainthood

I also thought I'd put this out (again), as the songs too were running through my head: /n Taken together, "Carry That Weight" and "The End" on the Beatles' "Abbey Road" are Paul McCartney's answer to "The Weight" by the Band. We know that he liked the song, as he borrowed a line for use in the long outro to his SmosBros performance of "Hey Jude". I surmise that he was dissatisfied with the Band song's morality - the poor do-gooding bastard left endlessly carrying the weight - so rushed in to assure him that, in the end, the love he shows others will be returned in kind.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 02:28:52 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Too Much Monkey Business

I always liked this cover, by Little Daddy and the Bachelors, with Tommy Chong of all people on guitar. It was running through my head, so I thought I'd share it. You're welcome.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 00:10:18 CEST 2018 from (174.203.28.186)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter

Absolutely agree with you and did recall your prior review. Hearing the cuts from Fuji might lead us to believe Dylan ain’t got it anymore. More reasonably,at Fuji,Dylan still got it but ain’t bringing it or showing it. I hope.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 22:11:11 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan - Copyright Collectio

Now here's an anomaly. The recent Bob Dylan "Rare Performances From The Copyright Collection" 1962-1966." Disc 2. Tracks 10-12. They list the musicians - Bob Dylan, Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson, Rick Danko, Mickey Jones … but fail to credit Richard Manuel on piano, though you can hear piano clearly. OK, we know Dylan played piano on "Ballad of A Thin Man' (because it's tentative) - but it's Richard Manuel on Baby Let Me Follow You Down and I Don't Believe You.

Richard just never gets the credits …


Entered at Wed Aug 8 16:16:12 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: THE WEIGHT 2012

I'm sure we linked this before, but it's worth watching. 2012 Americana Music Awards. The Weight. A very good arrangement, with just Amy Helm, Theresa Williams & Larry Campbell for a verse … then it lal breaks out … fabulous lead vocals from Emmylou Harris, John Hiatt, Brittany Howard and Bonnie Raitt. Richard Thompson and Booker T are in there too. This shows how you approach vintage material.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 16:03:53 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bud Dolan

Link to my 2017 review of Bob Dylan & "His Band" which is largely positive, Jed. I said the best I'd seen since 1992. But when he's bad, he really is incredibly bad, as on those various Fuji 2018 extracts on YouTube. I wonder what it's like for proficient players to stand there behind someone who is giving an appalling performance, which is probably what Levon thought when he quit in 1965. What sort of job satisfaction is there in being part of an ensemble whose overall impact is so bad? It was out of Levon's then comfort zone. He later changed his mind, but he wasn't prepared to play stuff he didn't feel was good. But listen to that 1975 link, and then listen to 2018. On a night like that it really is a raised finger to the paying public.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 14:00:33 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Steve Gadd

The perfect drummer for James Taylor and the worst dummer choice for Clapton.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 13:59:08 CEST 2018 from (100.38.159.168)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan’s band

Surprised to hear Dylan’s band trashed out,and for good measure,Bob too. I saw them last year and for a bunch of years before that and the band and Bob were excellent.i did listen to Masterpiece and agree it sucked. But,it would be shocking if Masterpiece is representative of the all the live shows and songs of this part of the tour.Also,the reviews I’ve read have been very good.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 09:54:17 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great to hear Robbie's addition in good sound. We're into the choices on both "Hard Rain" and "Bootleg Series Vol 5: Rolling Thunder." The booklet says they decided to restrict themselves to only the stuff recorded on 24 track so that it sounded "a whole."


Entered at Wed Aug 8 09:50:23 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: James Taylor's band

James Taylor's band is listed in my review of the show, linked here.

I was somewhat harsh on Bob's band - I enjoyed his 2017 show, and they're all ace players, but are they doing themselves any career favours when the overall sound at that Fuji 2018 concert is total mess? OK, it's Dylan's fault. As I said in my review of 2017:

"We had a switch to acoustic bass for To Ramona but I felt that the balance and the drumming, though excellent, reminded me of seeing the great American bluesmen in the 60s and 70s with British backing bands. The bands ironed out the vagaries of the old blues guy by steamrollering them into a strong rhythmic pattern, and I felt we had this churning relentlessly through Highway 61 Revisited and Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ – though it suited the latter. This band was pushing rather than reacting."

Leonard Cohen in contrast had Roscoe Beck leading the best backing band I've ever seen - and I saw them three times. Cohen, Simon and Taylor all have a set of backing vocalists in place. Essential at their ages.

I re-listened to that 2018 Masterpiece. That is truly dire.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 01:36:23 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Starr

Joe J: Hope you found both sides of the Hawkins / Hawks 45 on YouTube. That was '65, and here is Bobby Starr in '64, when he was with Jay Smith and the Majestics.

Hawkins was into insurance, so when he concluded that our guys would be leaving soonish (maybe three months before they actually flew the coop), he hired Robbie Lane and the Disciples (with Domenic Troiano on guitar) as apprentice Hawks. In '64 the Disciples did a record of their own and another with Hawkins. Then Troiano left - at which point the Disciples hired Terry Bush (who could but didn't play Robbie-style) and Hawkins hired Bobby Starr from the Majestics to be his 'personal' guitarist (against the inevitable day that the Disciples would move on). And that arrangement got through four 45s in '65 - two by Robbie Lane and the Disciples (without Starr) and two by Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks (with Starr on Robbie-guitar; the non-Robbie-guitarplaying could have been Terry Bush or it could have been producer Fred Carter). That's James Cotton on harmonica and Stan Szelest on piano on "Diddley Diddley Daddy" and "Goin' To The River". When the Disciples did leave, Hawkins called in something of a band of local all-stars - Bobby Starr on guitar, Bobby's fellow former Majestic, Jay Smith on vocals, Stan Szelest on piano, Gord Fleming from David Clayton-Thomas and the Shays on organ and Sandy Konikoff on drums. Not sure who was on bass back then, possibly Ken Kalmusky from Richard Manuel's old group, the Revols.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:12:01 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:d8e4:3c35:1bf2:5883)

Posted by:

Pat B

I had the vinyl boot of the Hurricane concert, an audience source that was pretty bad. This is the best board source I've heard.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:09:36 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Jim / Bob / Len

Peter V: Thanks for the link to James Taylor. "Fire And Rain" is absolutely timeless, even if he dumped a short-a 'a' in favour of a long-a 'a' (pronounced eh) a la Levon. Aside from Gadd, who else did he have providing such sympathetic backing?

Re Dylan (and thanks for the link, Jon L), I didn't think the band was totally crap, and I did think it'd be much more challenging to back Bob sympathetically. Who'd know what he was going to do, show to show? I couldn't've told you what song, never mind what words, Dylan was singing, but I do think there's still a place for him out there - or maybe IN there, meaning a studio. His voice still hints at greatness, but a tired greatness like the aging Leonard Cohen's had. However, those two rank with Oscar and Felix as the brackets of fastidiousness.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:06:25 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:d8e4:3c35:1bf2:5883)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

And the subsequent song with RR doing his thing.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:03:51 CEST 2018 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Diddley Diddley Daddy

Hadn't heard it before.

OK that's Bobby Starr???


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:02:54 CEST 2018 from (2602:306:c586:d0c0:d8e4:3c35:1bf2:5883)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Listen to the last minute for the interesting intro.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 22:36:32 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I meant "band" but I can't see any of them getting paid work with James Taylor, Paul Simon or Bonnie Raitt!


Entered at Tue Aug 7 21:34:02 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Is it just me, or is Bob's current bad total crap too?


Entered at Tue Aug 7 17:58:14 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Fire & Rain

Just to emphasise the contrast, James Taylor at Hyde Park doing Fire & rain. Steve Gadd right behind him.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 17:47:58 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bob & Masterpiece

Found it and linked it … Smartphone a long way back. However that was true of the Paul Simon & James Taylor footage from Hyde Park and the comparison does Bob no favours. I thought he was truly awful. Confirmed my opinion that he is WAY past his sell by date for live gigs.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 15:45:39 CEST 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Bob in Asia

Bob Dylan just finished a short tour of Asia, and I was delighted to see "When I Paint My Masterpiece" was played at every show. A real rarity for him, and with an unusual number of reworked lyrics. Try 'bob dylan masterpiece 2018' on Youtube.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 14:52:11 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Marcus has more factual errors early on- wrongly attributed singers from memory.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 14:51:07 CEST 2018 from (2a00:23c5:3a10:fa00:5507:a38:e5fe:a583)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Band bibliography

I think 'Million Dollar Bash - Bob Dylan, The Band, and the Basement Tapes' by Sid Griffin is a must.

I was lucky enough to see him give a talk on the subject while playing parts of songs to make his points. He was accompanied by Rod Clements ex Lindisfarne. At the end, it finished with a question and answer session and I silenced Sid (didn't mean to) when I asked 'Who wrote the songs?'

I think the recent Uncut 'Bob Dylan and the Band' is good for what it is. Really good articles from the time, but reviews of individual Band members' albums are mixed. But this makes me think - are we here in the GB critically honest when playing them? Or are we fans with keyboards to use a cliche. I think it is a well produced magazine - and perhaps will lead others to The Band.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 13:07:14 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: The "Time" cover story was my introduction too. I was in grade 9 and read it in the school library. A revelation - not their music, but that a Canadian group could be so significant. (I hadn't heard of them, the appearance of "Up On Cripple Creek" on the charts still weeks away.) A friend gave me a nice copy wrapped in plastic a few years ago. He'd also turned me on to this place 20 years ago - so a very good friend.

As Pete V said, the interesting factual stuff in "Mystery Train" is in the Appendix - which gets longer and more interesting with each edition. The only factual error that I can thing of appeared in the second or third edition, when Marcus took the word of a UK bootleg and mistakenly credited a mid-'60s Hawkins record, "Diddley Diddley Daddy" / "Going To The River" to our guys. Made sense, as the label says it's by Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks, and the solo on DDD is the frighteningest Robbie studio guitar work of all time. All reference to the record was expunged from the next (and subsequent) editions because the truth had come out. The Hawks on the record were the new, replacement Hawks, aka (Robbie Lane and) the Disciples, and the stunning Robbie guitar work was by the amazing Bobby Starr. (I've had the record for forty years, and the solo still stops me in my tracks.)


Entered at Tue Aug 7 12:46:40 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is a short interview with Levon I haven't heard before on Youtube: WKIK - Levon Helm Interview 1983


Entered at Tue Aug 7 10:01:57 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Down To Old Dixie & Back

The 1970 Time article by Jay Cocks is in the Library here. I've linked it. I have the feeling that the Rolling Stone ones used to be here, but I can't find them. Fortunately I have paper copies gradually biodegrading into dust.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 09:59:42 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Time

Yes! Forgot that one. I bought it and kept it. Probably the most important early resource.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 09:55:41 CEST 2018 from (2600:387:4:802::45)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Time Magazine, January 1970

That was the first piece I recall reading. I’ve no nemory of what, if anything, was reveled. They were on the cover too, looking like country freaks.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 09:43:38 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, both Hoskyns' book and Levon's book mined and repeated bits of the 1969 Hawkins interview.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 09:41:47 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The main document on The Band before Hoskyns (apart from Marcus) was The Last Waltz film’s spoken bits, together with the 1969 Ronnie Hawkins Rolling Stone interview, and Robert Palmer’s “Portrait of The Artist as Young Hawks” for Rolling Stone, plus various Robbie interviews, again mainly for Rolling Stone.

The myth making by Grossman was certainly with the Band’s participation. A European agent told me about meeting with The Band in 1970 to discuss possible work in Europe (with Mr Grossman) and they all sat in a circle silently in Brown Album get up. He had a feeling at the time that it was theatre.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 03:35:39 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Oh, I agree Bill, but that kind of was the myth they put forth all those years, and they never really denied it (or maybe didn't care to) - it did fit quite nicely into his Band essay. I guess it started with Albert Grossman originally, but maybe it also ended up being convenient for them too.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 00:01:48 CEST 2018 from (75.157.168.91)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: Last five

Just drove down from Port Hardy, BC to Victoria. About a 6 hour drive. And who the hell do I bump into working on his boat in Port Hardy? Ole Rockin Chair himself. Norm Jones. Gave me a tour of his boat then invited me down to his home in Port Alice to meet the good wife Susan. Beautiful spot and country. Thanks Norm. The five I listened to on the way back. 1 - The Norm Jones Band. Pretty dam good and boy, can that Jones boy sing. 2 - Best of Joe Cocker 3 - Songbird by Eva Cassidy 4 - Brown album 5 - Best of BB King. So Norm. Who wrote All along the watchtower?


Entered at Mon Aug 6 21:11:49 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: You're certainly right in saying that the Band chapter in "Mystery Train" concerned mythology rather than facts, but I would say that it wasn't so much the mythology of their being, but how the group fit into Greil Marcus's mythological construct of American history. I thought he did a terrific job with everyone else, but only a so-so job with our guys. He presents them as blank slates who crossed the border to learn the ways of the world. And that pretty much became the accepted progress of the group - of pilgrims rather than, say, migrant labourers. I can't think of anything in print that corrected that picture until Garth was extensively quoted in Bob Mersereau's "Canada's 100 Greatest Albums" (or similar title). Marcus, much as I admire him, continued to be the worst offender, choosing to write "Weird America" as if the Hawks had absolutely no influence in the "Basement Tapes". He quotes Robbie suggesting they did in an oblique sort of way, and ditto Garth, but gives no sign that he took it in.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 19:43:19 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

The actual chapter on The Band is very much concerned with the mythology of their music, rather than a factual account of their progress as I remember. I have the 3rd revised paperback, so I'm not sure what was in the original.

Wallsend, that quote was from 1989 - a lot of water under (and over) the bridge since then ...


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:59:15 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

In the first edition of Mystery Train, the interesting factual stuff on The Band was in the appendix rather than the chapter, from memory.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 17:40:23 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Actually Bill, Mystery Train has a whole chapter on The Band. It was the first Band book I bought, and Bill Graham's book came next. I only discovered The Band in 1989 (through Carny), and immediately started "research", haunting libraries - find a likely book, turn to the index and start searching. It was so much fun, hot on the trail! There were Rolling Stone articles and some other magazines too, but not many. It was like being a detective, finding little nuggets of information here and there, and gradually building up a picture. Then came Across The Great Divide and This Wheel's On Fire, which I recall as being published one right after the other, just a couple months apart, and that seemed to be the beginning of the bad feeling.

I know computers have made research a piece of cake compared with what it used to be, and there are all kinds of resources that weren't available before, but I have to say, it's not quite as much fun as it used to be.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 08:17:54 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I haven't read Ronnie Hawkins book but came across the quote below on the internet the other day. I am sure other posters are already familiar with this but it was new to me and it seems quite insightful especially because it was published in 1989 and before Levon's book came out:

'Later on I think Robbie had to work a lot harder then the rest of them because the rest of them were having too much fun. At the very start, though, Levon was the boss the way John Lennon was the leader of the Beatles. Levon called the shots, but after a while he started having too much fun and so it was left to Robbie to take care of the business. Gradually it became Robbie who ran The Band. But that can mean a lot of pressure. Eventually Robbie became tired of the road. He was tired of the business. It's tough when everybody's not pulling their weight. It's tough when everyone else is having too much fun all the time and people aren't able to go on because they are puking in pianos and fainting and falling offstage. You can't do that if a band is going to survive as a band.'

'I was on their case for years, but of course they wouldn’t listen. I saw a lot of money wasted, a lot of money they wish they had now. It think they lost control. They had too much money, too much fun and not enough work. Sometimes now they get mad at Robbie, because he's done all right. But they shouldn't. He took care of business. He was rough and tough when he started out but he was the one who most wanted to learn. I kept pushing Robbie, making him work harder and still harder, because he had the spirit. It paid off for him. He probably only has one-tenth of what he should have. but still, that's enough.'


Entered at Mon Aug 6 03:07:00 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: You're so right about the scarcity of available information on the Hawks, especially the pre-history before the internet. A footnote in Greil Marcus's "Mystery Train" was about all there was to go on when I started nosing around. I had no idea of Scott Cushnie's role, or even heard of Stan Szelest or Rebel Paine or Peter Deremigis until Scott mentioned them to me in maybe '76. And until Ronnie Hawkins' own book (with Peter Goddard) came out there was nothing about them in print except for one or two articles in obscure UK rockabilly magazines. And so many mistakes were made by everyone (me included) because there was no practical way to fact-check what people told you. Almost nobody ever lied to me, but dates would be out by years, and chronological sequencing was haphazard; as a general rule, everybody remembers starting to play rock and roll professionally at 14 (when the correct number is 17 or 16) and everybody has a false memory of being at it before Elvis - or before the Beatles if it's '60s guys.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 01:46:50 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Sorry I didn't chime in sooner - not that I would have had anything helpful to say. I certainly appreciate the info from those who did - PSB, Lisa and Peter V.

Re Dylan and acronyms like BOB being short for Blonde on Blonde, there's also From A Buick 6, or FAB 6. The Fab 4 we know, the Fab 5 coulda been the Stones, and the Fab 6 coulda been Dylan and the Hawks but for the fact that the song's from before they hooked up. Unless of course that's why he chose them.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 18:34:41 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Small Town Talk had far too much on the early stuff of no musical interest. Yes, I devoured Across The Great Divide in two days. I thought it very good and also deeply depressing … I was four chapters into a book on The Band. That killed it. Then Levon's followed about a year later.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 18:19:56 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Small Town Talk

I did buy this book when it came out, but had a really hard time getting into it and ended up losing interest and not finishing it, which is very unusual for me. So I'd have to agree with you, Haso.

When Across The Great Divide was published it was still back when Band info was relatively scarce, so I grabbed it as soon as it was available. I still have a vivid memory of being downtown shopping for a grad dress for my daughter, which can be a little ... fraught, and sneaking surreptitious peeks while she was trying on dresses. Couldn't wait to get home and really get into it! The good old days.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 13:50:24 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Five

Eleanor McEvoy: I'd Rather Go Blonde

Eleanor McEvoy: If You Leave.

Ray Davies: Our Country, Americana 2

Beverley (Beverley Martyn): Where The Good Times Are (LP) - 1966 & 1967 tracks, with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Nicky Hopkins, Alan White backing. Interestingly, some tracks use piano AND organ - unusual before Big Pink & Procul Harum.

Bobbie Gentry At The BBC, LP - still hooked on this. Songs from her BBC Tv series.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 03:55:40 CEST 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: 5 & books

A day late & a dollar short, but ol' glenn and Norm are keeping up some 5 lists. Here's my last 5

Bob Marley & the Wailers: Anthology '69 to '78, Trenchtown Rock, disc 2; Los Van Van: Bailando Mojoa (dancing wet); Alison Krauss + Union Station: Live, disc one ...yes a repeat from just a few weeks ago/chosen by mi esposa on a road trip; Neil Young: Living w/ War... from 2006, full of polemics/I can't begin to imagine where his head would be at now; I Believe to My Soul: session 01.

This last is a compilation of covers and the like that I bought a few years back on Frenchman St. just off the French Quarter. It was recorded mostly at Capitol Studios in LA, featuring Ann Peebles, Mavis, Billy Preston, Irma Thomas & Allen Toussaint. Especially noticed the organ work throughout and Ann Peebles clarity/delivery (vocal) on Dylan's "Tonight I'll be staying here w/ You".

Just started Joni's recent biography after finishing my other Hoskyn's book: "Hotel California". Anyone here read either this or his Woodstock expose (Small Town Talk, if memory serves)? I had thought "Across the Great Divide" pretty decent, and if he visits here, I'm sorry I'm no expert, but both of these other books seem like no more than gossip, name/dropping and gave me a hard time finding any point to their having been written. Yeah, rock stars are promisicuous, egotistical and consume large amounts of drugs; do you have anything else to say?


Entered at Sat Aug 4 22:31:54 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Here's a really detailed description, if you really want to dig deeper.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 20:24:31 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Blonde On Blonde Canadian Mono

From the pages from Blonde On Blonde On the internet

The late Sam Visser had a copy of the C2L 41 Canadian mono 2LP set which he believed was an earlier mix than the US mono album, this is confirmed by Roger Kornovich who has a copy of the same album. The discs are of heavy vinyl (Sam thought around 180gm) and have matrix numbers: Side 1 - XLP113761-1A, Side 2 - XLP113762-1A, Side 3 - XLP113763-1A, Side 4 - XLP113764-1A. Roger Ford says it is different on all four sides from the "final" mono mix used on the Sundazed reissue, and different on sides 3 and 4 from the earlier mix used on UK/European mono pressings.

I really notice the difference on “Most Likely You Go Your Way” and “Sooner or Later.”


Entered at Sat Aug 4 20:14:39 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: PSB & Lisa

PSB thank you so much. I have all of that. Thanks again.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 18:42:44 CEST 2018 from (100.14.12.215)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Blonde On Blonde

John D, all the takes from Blonde On Blonde along with all the takes from Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61 Revisited are on "The Cutting Edge," Bootleg Series Vol. 12. All of Blonde On Blonde with the exception of "One Of Us Must Know" were recorded in Nashville. Robbie's guitar is easily identifiable on the tracks I mentioned in the thread Peter posted.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 17:12:13 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Great Titles

To start a thread … great amusing album titles. I just picked up Eleanor McEvoy's "I'd Rather Go Blonde."

Another great one is Status Quo's "In Search of the Fourth Chord."

And a classic from Caravan, "Cunning Stunts" based on the old tongue twister.

Any more?

Bill - will check out V of J later.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 15:50:46 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Are you out there Bill. Just wondering if you know the answer to my question?


Entered at Sat Aug 4 15:47:26 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lisa Blonde On Blonde

No Lisa I never did find it. Interesting that when it was mentioned to Rob Bowman he was not even familiar with it. But the mixes are totally unique than anything I have ever heard before. The Al Kooper organ is mixed higher and sounds great.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 02:39:26 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Five Alive for Friday

To start - one of the best rockers Canada ever produced TOM COCRANE - "Life is a Highway"!

The first million seller of "Eagles" and by far the best singer - Randy Miesner - "Take it to the Limit"!

Still listening to a lot of "Foreigner" - Lou Gramm - "I want to know what love is"!

Playing for Change - "All along the Watch Tower"

Dan Seals - Dan has long been gone now but his music is still powerful country. There is a youtube vid of Dan singing this song with all the peers and country greats sitting with him on one of these Nashville shows. The tears and looks for this song and how they share it and revere it with him is heart felt- "Everything that Glitters is not Gold".


Entered at Sat Aug 4 01:54:29 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: 5+ for friday

Hello GBers. Here are my most recent listens. Van Morrison: Philosopher's Stone (disc 2); Marvin Gaye: What's Going On; Emmylou Harris: Angel Band; Paul McCartney: Chaos & Creation; Joni Mitchell: Hejira; The Who: Quadrophenia; Stevie Wonder: Fullingness' First Finale


Entered at Fri Aug 3 23:14:14 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

John, did you ever find the Nashville mono original recording you wanted?


Entered at Fri Aug 3 21:45:17 CEST 2018 from (86.153.52.59)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Hugh's Room, Tony McManus

Hi Bill M, I saw good gigs, big and small, on my two visits to Toronto and made the visit to Massey Hall.

But I wish I had made a visit to Hugh's Room. (Never knew about it) Recently, I found a mesmerising acoustic guitar concert given by Tony McManus at Hugh's Room on YouTube. I really wish I had been there. Breathtaking guitar playing.

I feel that Tony McManus is carrying on that tradition of great British acoustic gutarists. Might not be your thing, Bill, but well worth a look.

It was Davey Graham, back in the day, who stimulated my enthusiasm for this genre. Attending the first concert I saw of him was a really new experience. He never sang.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 21:35:49 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Blonde on Blonde Nashville vs New York Bill M

I should know this; but are the New York sessions on a box set? I know I should know this. The album itself was all done in Nashville. Yes? Professor Bill you always make it so easy to explain. Thank you in advance.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 15:00:40 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Lisa and Peter V. I'll go with PSB's take too - though the appearance of two 'probablies' makes me wonder if the rest are educated guesses as well, or are based on session logs or first-person reminiscences. Certainly hats-off to Robbie if that's him on the original album version of VoJ (i.e., the Nashville version). Peter V: How does the alternative (NY?) version compare - same guitar-as-punctuation approach, or more typical Robbie fills (which often seem to channel Pop Staples, I've thought)? So you know, all I have is the standard issue CD, with both LPs on a single disc.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 10:09:32 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Note on Lisa's Link, the definitive list is our own PSB. We discussed this years ago and someone simply asked Al Kooper. Robbie on Visions of Johanna does something special that both he and Garth do (Al Kooper can also) which is comment on the lyric with the musical fill. I once had this discussion with tywo guitarist friends, both Robbie fans, who descibe V of J as quintessential Robbie. Robbie has also said the tracks he was "most pleased with" on B o B are V of J and Just Like A Woman.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 05:58:21 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

I got it now, Bill. And that's a good one!

Anyway, what did Robbie play on? Here's one thread.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 05:13:04 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: hot off the press: "You'll Go Your Way And I'll Go Mine"

“Hi Bob. Typing again?”

“Hi Robbie. Yup, just finished this one. [Pulls page from typewriter and holds it out]

“Hmm. Looks pretty good – good verses, strong chorus. No, what’s this? ‘See who had fell and who is left behind’. You can’t say ‘had fell’ - really bad grammar.”

“Don’t get hung up on that, man.”

“Yeah, but what would Rimbod and those guys’ve said, or even Allen.”

“It’s pronounced Rambo and he wrote in French. And Ginsberg wouldn’t give a rat’s ass. It’s like Orwell said: You gotta follow these rules – but break any of them to avoid writing a piece of shit.”

“Orwell. Had to read Animal Farm in grade 9. Did he write poems too?”

“Nah – just books. The big one was Nineteen Eighty-Four.”

“Never read that one, but I know about Big Brother.”

“God – don’t even mention that – gives me the willies. At the end they make the good guy so afraid that rats would chew his face that he comes to love Big Brother.”

“Christ. Until now it just made me think of that band we saw in San Francisco. Chick singer with sandpaper lungs.”

“Janis Joplin. I told Albert that he should sign her, but only if she dumped the band. I really don’t love Big Brother.”

“And I really don’t love ‘had fell’, but maybe it’ll come in handy sometime. Got any more new songs?


Entered at Fri Aug 3 02:48:44 CEST 2018 from (24.114.69.108)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: First, ignore Johnny's advice on where to put the password. Second, retrieve Jan's note with directions on how to post a link. Third, click on the link embedded in that note, which provides an alternative route to the GB - and blank fields for a) your link, and b) your password.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 02:23:36 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Where do you put the password? I can't seem to find the right place, and nothing works.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 01:19:02 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Blonde on Blonde

I know I found something more comprehensive than this at one time but now it's gone, or I can't find it anyway. But there's this from Expecting Rain even though it's old.

Oops, Johnny again. I have a password and have actually posted links before but it's been a while, and I can't remember the first step, help!


Entered at Thu Aug 2 18:34:12 CEST 2018 from (209.216.151.185)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "Blonde on Blonde" personnel

Seems an odd thing to be asking about at this stage, but I will. This site's discography - the albums with Bob Dylan subsection - has Robbie and Rick playing on "Sooner Or Later", but nothing else on BoB. I've always thought, and other online sources suggest, that Robbie's on a lot more. One source - I think Wikipedia - suggests Robbie's on guitar on "Visions Of Johanna" and Joe South's on guitar, though the stellar guitar on VoJ seems more South than Robertson to me. Thoughts?

Also, typing BoB got me thinking that Bob was simply having fun with acronyms when he was pushed to name the album something, anything. (Todd seems to have taken a different approach when faced with the same push.)


Entered at Thu Aug 2 17:07:43 CEST 2018 from (209.216.151.185)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Funny - if you'd stayed at Eatons and I'd gone with Simpsons, we may well have ended up working together when Sears had absorbed both chains. But as it turned out, you changed my life through other means: You played some old Toronto record on your CHUM-FM show and I called to ask where I might find this sort of thing. You directed me to Don's Disc's, a new secondhand store at Queen and Parliament. Must've been late August 1974, as I checked it out after registering on my first day at Ryerson, the day after Labour Day. A whole new world opened up - piles of interesting 45s and a tiny store throbbing with older (i.e., 30 years old!) experts in R&B and rockabilly. Fortunately, all the serious collectors were after '50s material, and the stuff I wanted was from the '60s - so most of it was going for a dime a disc. I took a gulp and spent $1.20 that Tuesday and went back for more on Wednesday. Got my first copy of "The Stones I Throw" there.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 15:36:09 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Movies of the 60's....Again

I wonder who may know the movie "King Rat"? As I used to read a lot of books in the teen years, I first read the book. Imaging it was quite powerful. Then it came to life with George Segal.

Quite incredible how a corporal could take over an entire prison camp and having officers doing his bidding.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 15:17:06 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Yes Bill, if it weren't for radio beginnings in Oshawa, I may have stayed at Eaton's. However that didn't last long and my Father desperately wanted me to follow in his footsteps and be a printer. That shop also folded many, many years ago.

By the way some of you might have seen my article on Johny Mercer a few weeks back. I was so blown away by the biography that my wife and I just returned from Savannah the childhood home of Mercer. Drove down to Moon River; where he had a beautiful home. Just sold for over 1.2 million dollars. Nothing to do with Mercer; but visited Mercer-Williams house that was featured in the book The Garden of Good & Evil that Clint Eastwood directed. With the exception of the heat it was a wonderful southern hospitality holiday.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 12:23:20 CEST 2018 from (86.153.52.59)

Posted by:

Dunc

Bill - my best of Traffic on CD is on Island. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 10:50:09 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Petulia

Continuing the series of retrospective reviews of those 1968 films … Petulia. Julie Christie. George C. Scott & Richard Chamberlain … and Janis & The Grateful Dead.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 21:49:49 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill, I think that first Winwood's Greatest Hits comp was on UA too.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 21:48:04 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

On Born To Be Wild, organist Goldy McJohn insisted that he used a Lowry ala Garth with the Leslie sporting a blown 15 inch speaker.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 15:27:46 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

The link is to an interesting article on the making of the song "Born To Be Wild" - really separate interviews with the guy who wrote it, Mars Bonfire (nee Dennis McCrohan, aka Dennis Edmonton) and the guy who sang it, John Kay.

John D: You'll appreciate Dennis's line that if it weren't for that song, he'd be back home (in Oshawa, Ontario) working at the GM plant. GM - there but for fortune coulda been you, coulda been me - though I always tell people that if I'd taken my father's career advice, I would recently have lost my job as manager of the shoe department when Sears closed its store in the Oshawa mall.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 05:16:36 CEST 2018 from (74.12.33.62)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Dunc: I remember that the Mulberry Bush soundtrack album was on United Artists, unlike Traffic's albums. Maybe that's why the title song wasn't on any of your Traffic best-of albums. Nice song to listen to, though more difficult to watch on YouTube.

In his later years, Jeff Healey seemed to invest his time in his strong interest in old-time jazz. Had a band in which he played trumpet and didn't sing at all. Got good gigs on the back of his name, but preferred to keep more in the background on stage. The singer I remember was a woman, Alex Pangman, who is still around town. I don't think she sang with Jeff and Garth Hudson at Healey's club, but more certainly Terra Hazelton did (and Terra's still around too).


Entered at Mon Jul 30 22:18:21 CEST 2018 from (129.97.124.30)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: the impossibility, the impossibility ...

Lisa: I had the same feeling of revulsion with violence towards animals when I saw a movie made by one of the great Euro directors of the '60s. Now I can't remember which, but it must've been in French because I was in a six-week French immersion course at the time. I was 19, so very black and white in my thinking, and decided that I'd never watch another movie by that guy again. I probably haven't, but can't say for sure because I don't remember his name - just that I knew his name at the time, and as I was an 19-year-old bumpkin, he must've been famous. But I do recall the scene, which involved a lamb being slaughtered in from of the girl who the film revolved around and her friends. I realised that it probably took several takes, meaning several slaughtered lambs - for what?

Anyway, a Nazarin - Nazareth link makes sense re "the Weight". I've been thinking along similar lines for several days, ever since "The Magus" came up here. Awful book from start to finish, but I read the whole blessed thing, I think in the hope that the protagonist would at some point see through and turn the tables on the manipulator - but he was credulous right to the end. And now I realise that that was Fowles's fun - manipulating me and others to do what the protagonist did - continue to hope that things would change. Guess what, chum - things don't always end well! Life, or just phases of life if you're fortunate, can be just a series of really tough challenges. The old testament has all sorts of stories like that, Job being the obvious one. But taken as a whole, the whole history of the Israelites as set out in the OT is the same thing. They're not '60s movies at all, but two of my favourites, "Stunt Man" and "The Truman Show", are Magus-like - though the proponents get away.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 21:34:37 CEST 2018 from (86.153.52.59)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Bill M. Still watching Jeff Healey on YouTube.

Thanks Pat and Roger. Really enjoyed the clip, Pat. Have been watching clips of 'Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush' on Youtube. It took place in the new town of Stevenage, which made me think this influenced Bill Forsyth to shoot Gregory's Girl in Cumbernauld.

For some reason I don't have Here We go round The Mulberry Bush on my 'The Best of Traffic', but other important to me singles are 'Paper Sun', 'No Face, No Name, No Number', 'Hole In My Shoe' and 'Feelin Alright' (I think this was a little later). Singles were so important to me until I was about eighteen.

The reason Bil Forsyth withdrew from film making was the real failure of 'Being Human', which bombed badly. He made Gregory's Two Girls, which I saw about 2000, but it got mixed reviews. He was appearing at the Edinburgh Film Festival recently because he is involved in Local Hero becoming a play.

So I'll watch one of your two reviewed films, Peter, and forget about the other.

I enjoyed Herbie Mann's version of 'Pick Up The Pieces'. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 19:04:49 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I've seen Local Hero, and one or two other Bill Forsyth movies. Lovely, quirky little movies. I don't know why he wasn't more prolific. His movies put you in a happy space, unlike Bunuel's. I can see why a man like Martin Scorsese who is so attracted to violence would study Bunuel, and influence Robbie. I've seen a few of his films and they really leave me cold, but visually they can be stunning. You tend to be left with a lot of stark images (whether you want them or not), very composed style of filming. Possibly the specific movie that might have influenced The Weight is Nazarin, about a priest who tries to help someone out and things go downhill from there. I did see it back when I was tearing through everything I could find about the Band, but it was on TV, subtitled, and you miss a lot visually when you're reading them unfortunately. Bunuel's movies are generally very anti-religious (he himself had Jesuit schooling background till he rebelled) and early on he was very involved with the surrealist movement, right in the vanguard. This shows in his movies, at least the ones I've seen - they just don't make much sense to me. Things happen arbitrarily - maybe that's the point? That nothing much does make sense?

Anyway, I don't like his movies, or their messages, and I once read something about his treatment of animals that turned me off him for life, as if his movies weren't enough. Yet he is a revered filmmaker and I'm sure his movies will always be studied. Just not by me :-)


Entered at Mon Jul 30 18:48:01 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live at the BBC

Just re-listening to Bobbie Gentry Live at the BBC- an LP for Record Store Day, based on her BBC TV series in the late 60s. I listened when I got it, then misplaced it. The live band sounds great … notably Danny Thompson or Herbie Flowers on bass.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 14:06:42 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Last five

Catching up on some LP finds.

Herbie Mann: Discotheque (great version of AWB's Pick Up The Pieces - Steve Gadd on drums, Tony Levin on bass).

Taj Mahal: Music Keeps Me Together. Outstanding instrumental 'When I see The Sea Beneath My Soul.'

Chambers Brothers: A New Time A New Day, notable for great soul on I Can't Turn You loose, but probably the worst recording ever of Where Have All The Flowers Gone? done as a soul / gospel song.

From Nowhere … The Troggs. Bought because it was £10 and in great condition, and it's listed as worth £70. Hmm..

Lee Dorsey: Ya Ya, CD of the original album. A bonus track is Lil Liza Jane, recorded in 1961 or 1962 … a further Hawks / Lee Dorsey link.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 11:35:12 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I watched most Bunuel way way back. The only one that I remember clearly was the one where people defecated in public (take a load off?), but went into a cubicle to eat. That was an era where I saw my future in Film Studies and watched a lot of Pasolini and Godard too, which I recall better. I'm not into Art House film. I still think Last Year at Marienbad might be the worst film ever made.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 01:23:52 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Has anybody watched the movies of Bunuel that Robbie said inspired The Weight? I cannot say I have myself.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 20:12:57 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.120)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Local Hero

Hi Lisa - If you like Gregory’s Girl you’ll love this one. Same director - he was on a roll then but I don’t know where he’s been for the last 25 years. Gregory has a small role and with a Mark Knofler (sp?) soundtrack.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 18:26:21 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

JQ yes, TCM is a staple here too. I always check out the movies they're showing - you never know what will turn up, and often it's gems you haven't seen in ages. And I suppose it's kind of odd, but I've always liked black-and-white movies - so atmospheric. And I agree about Kirk Douglas. He's on my list of actors I dislike so much I won't watch anything they're in (unless it's really good, like The Manchurian Candidate. I'll watch that even with Laurence Harvey in it). And Gregory's Girl has got to be one of the most charming little movies ever made - wish they'd show that one more often. Haven't seen it in years.

Is anyone else passionately interested in how music affects movies though? I'm talking about the dramatic underscore, not using rock or other well known songs in the soundtrack. For instance, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner just wouldn't have the same punch without John Addison's score. Actually, he did the scores for so many of those "kitchen sink" British movies - the music adds so much it's hard to imagine them without his scores. Other composers I particularly admire (in no particular order): Henry Mancini, Jerry Goldsmith, Bernard Hermann, Elmer Bernstein, Alex North, George Duning - many others too, those are just the ones that come instantly to mind.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 17:11:47 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Flicks of the 60's

My three favourites from the 60's in order.

The Great Escape - with a cast of starts that was huge

The Dirty Dozen - Again many stars, (and Donald Sutherlands first chance at becoming one of the biggest stars. Last time I looked he had done more films than anyone.)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance - As well as a great cast, Gene Pitney's hit song of that name.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 15:52:09 CEST 2018 from (147.188.254.132)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The Chase

Norm - I too loved The Chase. Made by Arthur Penn shortly before he made Bonnie and Clyde. Great cast and a great story. I’m going to look for it now. Dunc - I too was a big fan of Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush though I fear it won’t have aged well. Unlike Gregory’s Girl.

Peter - your three favourite books in 1968 are still all on my Desert Island list. I rushed to see The Magus when it came out. I wouldn’t trust Michael Caine’s judgement. He’s made much worse films. Quite a lot of people know that.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 05:55:38 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.120)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hi Lisa

Did you watch Lonliness of the Long Distance Runner on TCM? It was there a few days ago (my go-to station). The nuns played this for us when it came out. We were only 13 so between the accents and our stupidity it didn’t work too well. Since then I’ve seen it a few times and liked it but I think I’m over the whole anti-hero thing, Cool Hand Luke, Butch Cassidy, etc.It was good in its era, maybe even necessary before the culture could progress. I just watched Paths of Glory on TCM. It remains my favorite of Kubrick’s but it too has been done so often since then (Mash was in that genre for years) that now it looks too heavy-handed. Brilliant though in its delivery and performances, except for Kirk Douglas; I’ve never bought into his whole acting catalog. I don’t think he could possibly ever do anything like humor.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 05:51:34 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Flicks of the 60's

A particularly notable movie of 1966 and I had a winning on this movie. In the early 90's on CKWX radio for a while they had a little contest called "stump the red head". The red head being Red Robinson our well known DJ. You could call in with clues to a movie. If Red couldn't guess what the movie was you win! I won some tickets to "Block Buster" for movies.

The movie was "The Chase". I still have it on VCR. Bubber Reeves (Robert Redford) escapes from jail. His wife is Jane Fonda. Marlon Brando is the sheriff. His wife is Angie Dickinson. The texas town tycoon is EG Marshall. There is a host of actors who went on to be huge, including Robert Duvall.

This movie really stereotypes the Texas rednecks of the sixties. The night this takes place the towns people are having a drunken party. Their children are having a drunken party. By the actions it's hard to tell whose wife belongs to who. Jane Fonda is having an affair with EG Marshall's son. Robert Duvall tries to get on EG Marshalls good side by ratin' the kids out.

One line in the movie by a very drunk woman when she hears Bubber Reeves may shoot this guy for sleeping with wife, the woman says. "Shoot some body for sleepin' with another guy's wife? That's silly, half the town would be wiped out". It may not be for everyone but it is drama that is very well played by some very excellent actors.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 22:42:57 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: 60s films

What an era it was, and so many great films to choose from. I'm looking forward to these reviews - so many of those movies really affected me. I did see The Magus back then, and not having read the book was even more mystified than most. I really had no idea what it was about, but it cemented in my head that I couldn't abide Anthony Quinn.

Then there's the scores - favorite movie scores? Again, so many to choose from. I don't think I could pick an actual favorite, but way up in the lead would be Lalo Schifrin's Bullitt score.

It's always revealing watching a movie you saw when you were young many many years later - funny how forty years or so changes your point of view. I just saw The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner the other day. Way back when, I felt much the same as Tom Courtenay's character at the end of the movie. Now, it just makes me think, "You fool, you just threw away your one chance to make your life better." Though I suppose that was the point of the movie. One thing I particularly noticed at the end was the look of hurt and betrayal on Michael Redgrave's face before it turned to anger. Still a powerful movie.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 17:42:45 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Magus

I've decided to do a series of reviews of the films of the late 60s. This week is "The Magus" so reviled back in 1968.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 02:48:33 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: 5ive for Friday

5 + 2

Emmylou Harris & Linda Ronstadt: Western Wall / Paul Simon: Rhythm of the Saints / Bob Marley: Kaya / Elvis Costello: Get Happy!!! / Steely Dan: Aja / Tom Petty: Highway Companion / U2: Zooropa

Have a great weekend everybody!


Entered at Fri Jul 27 21:17:56 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

As of this morning, for $5 the local Walmart will sell you a copy of the "Canada 150" compilations CD with "The Weight" by our guys and "Somewhere Down The Lazy River" by one of our guys. Also Nick Gilder, Nellie Furtado, Bryan Adams, Shania Twain, Tom Cochrane and Bachman-Turner Overdrive. (And other Canucks.)


Entered at Fri Jul 27 20:32:27 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: Ranks up there with "Dandelion" by the Stones, which I was listening to this morning. Both are nice but dated - and nothing I'd want to spend much time with.

Dunc: Jeff Healey was huge, especially in hometown Toronto, but also across Canada and the US - the latter thanks largely to his band's appearance in the movie "Roadhouse". Started out, and mostly stayed, a blues band, but did great covers too, notably "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". The link it to Healey and Stevie Ray Vaughan.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 19:49:17 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Dunc, you made me think of this.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 18:52:21 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

A fine live version of Acadian Driftwood by Shawn Colvin is linked. i've been listening to her Uncovered album recently, and she adds this to her excellent version of Twilight.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 17:53:01 CEST 2018 from (86.153.52.59)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Bill M. I returned to the Jeff Heally Version of 'Stuck In The Middle' this week. Really enjoy this version and I appreciate the work of both guitarists. I know nothing of either.

When I did my Toppermost on Stealers Wheel, it confirmed that Stealers Wheel were a partnership of equals with Joe Egan contributing as much in writing as Gerry Rafferty. Joe Egan retired quietly from the music scene. I play regularly 'Out of Nowhere', his first solo album. He only made two then retired. If you have time try the song 'Back On The Road', which has a good number of hits on You Tube for a song which seemed to get no publicity.

I enjoyed the review of 'I'll Never Forget What's Is Name'. I read it at half time at the match on Saturday, Peter. I needed something. The film I always think back nostalgically about is 'Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush'. Probaly dated.

Uncut is an edition on its own, Bill. The shock is how poorly many of The Band's solo albums are scored. The good thing is the articles from the time and that maybe more people will find the Band.

Missed souls. I miss a lot of people on here. A great thing about the GB is the number of people, who write well.

Five for Friday.

Bob Dylan 1965-66 'The Best of the Cutting Edge' Bootleg Series Vol 12. I've stopped collecting them at this point.

Solomon Burke - 'Make Do With What You've Got'. I really like his version of 'It Makes No Difference'

'The Velvet Underground' - actually played all four albums, but maybe I'm not an ideal fan as I like the tuneful stuff the best.

Joe Egan - 'Out of Nowhere'. Love this album.

Steely Dan -'The Very Best of' - I have all the albums these songs are on, but I like this colllection of hits.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 22:21:39 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David P and Jerry T. I raise a glass in their memory. Fine people.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 05:07:25 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: I agree on both counts - David and Jerry.

I think of David at least every week, generally when I like the guitar or bass on some record or other and wonder who was playing, but quickly realise that there's no longer so much point in asking here because the guy who'd know is missing.

And Jerry came to mind just yesterday evening when I attended the unveiling of some historical plaques dedicated to two defunct Yonge Street bars: Friars Tavern, where Dylan and the Hawks first me and practiced; and the Le Coq D'Or, where I met Levon during a break between sets with the Cates brothers. Afterwards the 'ceremony', a couple of us were sitting around and someone mentioned playing in the 70s at the Running Pump, the local watering hole for my grade 13 classmates that Jerry's father bought after selling his interest in the Concord Tavern.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 02:40:08 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Comin' Home

Today I worked hard! Getting this big boat finished while I have the weather. I came home to an empty house as Susan went down to Nanaimo to visit her sister for a couple days.

I thought, I'm going to have a drink, (I earned it)! I poured me a drink, sat down in front of the computer, (it's so easy now a days) play me some of my music. I hit on Joe South (Don't it Make You Want to Go Home Now). I so much loved his music and every thing about the guy. I'm sure y'all know he did a lot of work with Dylan.

But, the last conversation I ever had about Joe was with another boy from Georgia. David Powell! he was such a great volume of music and a wonderful human being. He could say things to, set you straight, make you feel better, and make you understand. I laid back in my big oak chair and reflected on many years here and the many very fine people who have passed and left us. I'm sure many others here missed people who were here and a lot of fun and a lot of wisdom. I so much miss Jerry Tennenbaum. Some of these people I'm sure helped me see life better.

That's all I have to say.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 18:50:35 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, you can get a Lego Yellow Submarine kit. And figurines. They have permission.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 18:33:11 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

I've been on the lookout for "Uncut", with its article on our guys, but have been unsuccessful thus far. I did spot one of those glossy Time/Life magazines titled something like "1968: The Year That Changed Music". It has a little something on the Band, and says that MFBP has been called "the most influential music in rock history".

Next shelf down was a Newsweek glossy dedicated to Lego, "The Toy that Changed Our Lives" or some such. Whatever. Clever cover though, with Lego figures arranged like Sergeant Pepper's, but not like enough to be infringing. We wouldn't want that. I flipped it open, at random, to a photo The Yellow Submarine in Lego.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 21:57:13 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Shrink wrapping albums

A short article on the debate on shrink wrapping LPs and CDs is added.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 21:08:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, I think anything other than "You are the word's best magazine ever" is a waste of typing time.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 19:58:20 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I hope you'll share your feelings with "Uncut" and its readership via a letter to the editor, and not just us.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 18:38:28 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncut: Bob Dylan & The Band

Picked one up today. Some bizarre opinions. Very harsh on solo albums. Well worth it for the original Melody Maker & New Musical Express reviews and interviews from the time of the events. Otherwise I have my doubts.I particularly feel, looking at particular bits of research in there, that failing to credit the band.hiof.no appropriately is a major fault.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 17:34:55 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Johnny Mercer

Nothing to do with the boys; but I'm currently reading Philip Furia's Skylark: The Life and Times of Johnny Mercer. I haven't been able to put it down. Certainly one of the greatest lyricists of all time. I didn't know that McCartney got in touch with him the year before Mercer died and wanted to collaborate. Mr. Mercer was suffering from brain cancer.

Johnny & Bobby Darin did an album back in '61 called "Two of a Kind." Johnny was having a little trouble with the title song and called Darin. Bobby added one line to the song and perhaps a couple of words. When the album was being released he noticed he had 50% of the writing credit for the song.

He told Mercer he didn't understand. He had only given him a line. Mr. Mercer said, "Thank you for the inspiration." Class act.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 16:13:32 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan box

Is there no end?

At least half the Statesboro Blues stuff is true.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 15:58:39 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: New Dylan Box Coming

New Dylan Box on the way.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 15:13:26 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Myth???

Harrumph!! I thought everything Peter said was true! You mean he's a story teller?


Entered at Tue Jul 24 11:05:57 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Few people know the true story of Statesboro Blues. The city of Statesboro is the home of Georgia Southern University, whose sports teams wear blue and white. Early on someone realized that Oxford and Cambridge Universities in England award a "blue" to anyone who represents the university in a sports team. Light blue for Cambridge, dark blue for Oxford. So they hit upon the idea of awarding "Statesboro Blues" to prominent jocks. Move forward to the 1920s when itinerant musician Blind Willie McTell was in town. In a bar one night he heard some people yelling, 'Hey! we've got the Statesboro Blues!' Being blind, Mr McTell could not see what they were referring to, but as he was feeling somewhat low due to a romantic dispute decided to adopt the title for the famous song.

From "Rock Song Rumours, Myths and Bullshit" by Peter V.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 05:09:51 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: Are you saying that the good burghers of Statesburgh are bourgeois? If so, good - it makes perfect sense. Your mind is not blown after all.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 04:21:02 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: Are you saying that the good burghers of Statesburgh are bourgeois? If so, good - it makes perfect sense. Your mind is not blown after all.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 19:07:54 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Bourgoise Blues / Statesboro Blues

Just for the records: Taj Mahal's number in 'Rock Machine...' is 'Statesboro Blues' and nothing else. Sorry.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 19:01:57 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Cannes yachts and Peter V / (others scroll!)

Peter V, sorry, your Sunseekers are only "bourgoise"! I am talking about "Royal Regata" in Cannes in September. You can easily shave yourself by using the brass details as a mirror in the boats.

Musically, by all means listen to Taj Mahal's 'Bourgoise Blues' which can be found on 'Rock Machine Turns You On' which we have discussed before.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:17:41 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Poole is where Sunseeker yachts are made, NWC. We have a harbour full of them.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:14:24 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Eleanor McEvoy

I've been playing Eleaor McEvoy's "The Thomas Moore Project" solid for two days. Link to the First track "Oft in The Stilly Night." Thomas Moore wrote / collected classic Irish folksongs and Eleanor McEvoy has recorded eleven of them. Very little on YouTube, but it's all wonderful, I'd sample "Though Humble The Banquet" if you can find it on streaming or iTunes.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 17:42:47 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Jon Lyness

Yesterday as in so many times before I was on surfers' beach in LYNAES harbour. (To tell the truth I surf only in my bath tub!) Suddenly it hit me that I have seen this name, Lynaes, here in gb. Anyway, this seems not to be the case. - For a few years ago I saw a luxury yacht from Poole in the leisure yacht marina in Cannes in southern France. It was almost near that I went to shake hand with the skipper.

This gb has really blown my mind.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 15:30:48 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

I was in a coffeeshop over the weekend. Really good music in the background, including Bessie Smith's rendition of "Nobody Knows You (When You're Down And Out). The reference to the eagle grinning (meaning the arrival of money) made me think of two great songs that made brilliant use a very similar metaphor.

There's the well-known "Stormy Monday Blues", with "Eagle flies on Friday, On Saturday I spend my pay, On Sunday I go to church, And get down on my knees and pray". And there's Ian Tyson's less-known "Long, Long Time To Get Old", with "Eagle flies tomorrow, Mosquito biting me today, Take a bus to Toronto, Highway 2 all the way/ Take a walk down Yonge Street / Where good times are bought and sold / Remember this children be the good lord willing / Live a long, long time to get old".

There must be others - suggestions? (I've never heard "the eagle flies" in everyday conversation, but I have heard "the eagle shits" - and I'd accept suggestions that employ that wording as well.)


Entered at Sun Jul 22 05:14:03 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Toronno

Dunc: Thanks for the suggestion re Jeff Healey's cover of "Stuck In The Middle". I see there's a few versions on YouTube. The two I looked at both have Pat Rush on second guitar. Rush was Healey's right-hand man for a long time, and an excellent guitarist in his own right. The two appeared together with Garth Hudson when Healey booked into his club in Toronto in the early 2000s. Every organist in town was there, as was Brown Eyed Girl (who I met there and who told me that another long-ago poster, Wittgenstein, was there too).

I'm guessing that Waddy Wachtel jammed a few times with our guys during the Linda Ronstadt / Band tour of '76. He was with Ronstadt when the tour came through Toronto in the late summer.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 04:55:52 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: cover of "Evangeline"

I was looking on YouTube for something else, and unexpectedly found this C&W cover of "Evangeline". I think the 45 did well in western Canada, where they're from.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 03:30:58 CEST 2018 from (69.203.125.109)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Last five playlist

Joan Baez -- Whistle Down The Wind

The Beach Boys -- Love You

Leonard Cohen -- Live in London

Squirrel Nut Zippers -- Beasts of Burgundy

Paul Simon -- YouTube clips from his recent Hyde Park show (cheers Peter).


Entered at Sun Jul 22 01:12:42 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Waddy

Yeah Pat. It is all there on wiki. If you guys can take a minute or two, watch the video on youtube of Buddy Guy and the Playing for Change bunch play that song of Buddy's "Skin Deep". A lot of it is in Chicago Pat. Waddy's little part is special. He does such beautiful slide.

I've just ordered that latest CD of Playing for Change it is amazing the sounds those folks put together. I need to have it in my truck.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 01:02:25 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Look up Waddy's connections with the Cowsills.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 23:55:47 CEST 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Waddy

Big fan of Waddy here. It’s all there as you said,on Wikipedia. He’s got that particular crunch and growl mix that a rock guitarist should have.I guess that’s why I enjoyed his playing most when he worked with Keith.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 17:20:51 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Waddy Watchtel

I been meaning to ask who has noticed Waddy before. He plays some real sweet slide guitar with the Playing for Change folks. I don't remember seeing him before so I looked him up.....well holy achorns! He's mostly a session man but just look at him on Wikipedia. The bands and rock stars, (and country) that he has backed is endless. He was a very sought after guy and still is I guess.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 16:43:43 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: No Pounds!

It doesn't work Peter. I asked my computer so there are so many codes it's mind boggling. There shows every damn currency sign for main countries and the codes none of them work for me. Some say you have to drag and paste. To hell with it!...........driving me crazy - er


Entered at Sat Jul 21 14:44:56 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Football

Salford City are a novel concept. Some ex-Man United players bought up a very minor teamand move through four minor leagues in four years. Now they're in the "Fifth tier" but still what most of us call non-league. It's an odd move for Adam Rooney … even in their wildest dreams it would have to be five years to the Premiership, and their stadium is only 5000 capacity. Surely Adam Rooney is basically saying goodbye to a career?


Entered at Sat Jul 21 14:32:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I'll Never Forget What's 'Is Name

I finally found a DVD of a 50 year old film that I've been trying to find for decades. Michael Winner's I'll Never Forget What's Is Name. Though I avoid reviewing films from DVD, we spent so much time discussing it afterwards that I thought itworth an article (LINKED). A fascinating look at Swinging London 1967 with a great cast, and even more distinguished cameos.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 11:39:09 CEST 2018 from (86.190.25.86)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

JQ - love the film too and there was a time when it was seen to be greatest British film. Like a little boy, I made a pilgrimage to the big wheel in Vienna to get on it.

Well I'm off to see Sunderland today, my first game of the season. More Scots go to football as a percentage of the population than any other country in Europe. But it's all about the money. A big story up here is that Aberdeen, our second club just now, has lost their Irish striker, Adam Rooney, a decent player to one of England's fifth tier clubs, Salford, because they will pay him £4 000 a week.

Juventus announced that they recouped half the fee for Ronaldo in the first few days through selling shirts with his name on them... and they were still selling shirts.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 10:16:35 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ronaldo

Norm, the £ sign should be ALT 3 on a Mac. On a UK keyboard 3 and £ share a key and ALT 3 gives the # sign, on a North American keyboard ALT 3 is £.

Ronaldo will be earning this £500,000 A WEEK for four years at Juventus until he's 37. FIAT own Juventus, and a few workers went on strike to protest (but very few) while jobs are being cut. On the other hand they say Juventus' share price went up 33% which might cover it.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 10:11:31 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last five (post Hyde Park getting into Johnny Flynn):

Johnny Flynn: A Larum

Johnny Flynn: Been Listening

Johnny Flynn: Sillion

Ray Davies: Our Country, Americana II

Bobbie Gentry: my own playlist of selections, with heavy replay of Fancy, Come Away Melinda in particular.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 05:10:55 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Five Alive!!

Johnny Winter...........Suzy Q

Jimi Hendrix.......... Hey Joe

Buddy Guy ..........Skin Deep

Dooby & Playing for Change ......... Listen to the Music

Jeff Beck .......... Little Wing

Keep on Rockin


Entered at Sat Jul 21 05:00:12 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Great 1-off albums

Bill M - I was thinking that certain tribute or multi-artist thematic LPs might apply. I’ve been listening to one that I like a lot called Poet, songs by Townes Van Zandt.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 04:13:50 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cristiano Ronaldo

PETER!!! Gawd damn son! You see what this kid is going to make next year for kicking a football around?? 99milion pounds, (we don't have that sign for pounds on our machines. You think he can get by?

I see he left a hotel crew a tip of 18,000 pounds in Greece. It apparently worked out to 100 pounds per person. That's cool I guess. So the hockey players and football, baseball players work for peanuts I guess. :-)


Entered at Sat Jul 21 03:50:52 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Glenn T: Good idea. There are many great one-off albums, and I suspect that most of us has a few among their favourites. Mine, off the top, Brahman (on Mercury), Lucifer (Invictus), Mood Jga Jga (WB), Simon Caine (RCA), Influence (ABC), "Miss America" by Mary Margaret O'Hara (though there was also a soundtrack), Great White Cane (MGM) ...


Entered at Sat Jul 21 01:14:29 CEST 2018 from (108.49.130.12)

Posted by:

Joe Meehan

Location: Massachusetts

Subject: The Band

Listening to a selection of hits by the band. Tremendous writing. Wish we had them around now to help unravel these fascinating times we live in. Glad to have grown up with them.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 19:26:53 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Third Man Theme

Coincidentally I just watched that movie again, there’s no telling how many times I’ve seen it. It’s in my top 10 of ever. And it’s still the only time I’ve ever heard a zither.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:49:48 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: 5 for Friday

Paul McCartney: Flaming Pie / Bob Dylan: Oh Mercy / Van Morrison: Moondance / David Bowie: Reality Tour Live / Tom Petty: Wildflowers

Have been thinking of doing a week of double albums: Beatles' White Album, Elton's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Fleetwood Mac: Tusk, Dylan: Blonde On Blonde, Stones: Exile, and there are others (Physical Grafitti, Songs in the Key of Life, Springsteen's The River). Another possible theme for listening: best one-off albums, ie: Blind Faith, Hindu Love Gods, Thunderclap Newman....does Derek & Dominoes count (they did put out a live LP)? What other artists only put out one album?

Have a great weekend! Stay cool....here in Dallas the forecast highs for today-Monday: 106, 108, 107, 105. Tuesday will be cooler: only 99 degrees : )


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:35:24 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Odd. That YouTube footage of Paul Simon looks much too steady for a Smart Phone. It would be ahead of us, but not that far ahead. Also, the crowd of 60,000 was singing softly and you can't hear much of them on the video. I wondr if it was someone on the camera or sound towers!


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:29:59 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon too

Next to it, up popped Sound of Silence. A much steadier hand on the phone. This was the last song.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:28:03 CEST 2018 from (67.243.85.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: These days there's a lot of visitors to West Saugerties, home of Big Pink

Although he blew it the first time it came around on the guitar, Rick performed a terrific All La Glory at the infamous SummerJam 1973, Back to Memphis was also on the show.

All la Glory appeared at the show at Wooster Tech, Wooster, Ma., November 7th, 1970.

Never heard Jet before 1982 (Levon at Joyous Lake, but it was Steve Forbert guesting who performed the song, and he was absolutely awful.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:27:48 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: James Taylor at Hyde Park

Wobbly SmartPhione footage of James Taylor last Sunday has appeared on YouTube. Sound very good as Smart Phones are. You've Got A Friend.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 13:46:41 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: October Road

James Taylor- at Hyde Park (as in 2015) it was all live with Steve Gadd powering on drums, and two from the Apple album … I guess by first two you mean Sweet Baby James and Mud Slide Slim - the Apple album was hard to get for years. I would highly recommend the "October Road" album. When I saw him around that time he did three or four from it, but not since. Link is to the title track. Worth listening to September Grass on Youtube from the same album.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 13:32:37 CEST 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: John Scofield

The diversity and excellence of Sco’s music is noteworthy. Sco played with a varied list of greats from Miles to Mule to Lesh to Medeski,Martin and way more.His sonic approach,tone,jazz dissonance and deep understanding and feel of the music is incredible. Been a fan for many years now and always amazed. Felt I had to mention Sco since he’s currently on my cd player doing Kind of Bird into Afro Blue with Mule. Was wondering if The Band was into jazz at all? If so,who?Never really heard a jazz influence in their music.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 12:58:41 CEST 2018 from (86.190.25.86)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I would have liked James Taylor, Peter, but for some reason I really only know the first two albums, though I also have the live album with Carole King. But when I saw him live, I saw the concert where he used a laptop with a middle aged choir on it for backing musicians. It was a pleasant evening - great songs, but maybe needed a bit of oomph or better interaction with the audience, but he is an honest guy. But I was maybe comparing all the reviews together. and I wish I had seen Paul Simon. I've been lucky enough to see him twice, both brilliant evenings.

Unlucky, never got tickets for Paul McCartney...sold out in minutes with many tickets going to 'sister' sites. I can't be bothered with the hassle and my hatred of touts stems from football matches. I remember at one cup final, about eight of us 'encouraged' the tout to sell us tickets at normal prices.

Sorry JQ, missed your comment. I'm living outdoors just now. Yes, that version is from Beck. I think it's great. It's a brilliant double album. Great versions of songs from bands I only really know by name.

Five for Friday...well 7

Rolling Stones - 'On Air'

Rolling Stones - 'Get Yer Ya Yas Out'

Rolling Stones - 'Blue and Lonesome'

Michael McDermott - 'Willow Springs'

Robbie Robertson - 'Storyville'

Nic Jones - 'Penguin Feet'

Rab Noakes - 'Red Pump Special'

Bill M , I was Stealers Wheeling, Rab Noaksing it on YouTube, when I came across a great version of 'Stuck In The Middle' by the Jeff Healy Band. Brilliant. \mHave a nice weekend everybody.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 11:35:51 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Third Man Theme … yes, a thought. Mind you, so many different versions live, different every time, that he might have used a few bars.

Back to Memphis but not The Promised Land is odd. Rick Danko solo did The Promised Land on some tapes, but not The Band.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 11:28:22 CEST 2018 from (210.86.88.24)

Posted by:

Rod

Thinking about it it's strange they never did The Promised Land live but did do Back to Memphis.And Garth never worked The Third Man Theme into the Genetic Method.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 21:05:53 CEST 2018 from (208.181.174.115)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The secret conclave

Peter I guess you are not up on the latest. After the big meeting with Putin well Putin suggested Trump should send some people over to Russia to be interrogated. In particular the guy who was ambassador to Russia. Trump was going along with this.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 17:44:58 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

They don't have to interrogate you, Norm. Just film you in a compromising position so they can rig an election, get you to be president, and do their bidding.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 16:45:26 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: White House - Soap Opera

Awright boys! I am sending six of yuz over to Russia to be interrogated by the Russians........now who wants to volunteer?


Entered at Thu Jul 19 15:56:59 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good find. Actually, does Moondog Matinee count? Dave H left it out.

Holy Cow appeared on the first date of the 1974 Dylan tour, in Chicago, but I think that was the only time. Then Saved and Share Your Love were on the 1973 Jersey City dates. Mystery Train comes later in 1974, after the Dylan tour. That leaves a few.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 15:20:23 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, you would have enjoyed James Taylor - like Paul Simon, perfect sound.

Also, I reckon you'd love Johnny Flynn.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 14:45:11 CEST 2018 from (86.190.25.86)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Uncut

Uncut has produced an 'Ultimate Music Guide' entitled 'Bob Dylan and the Band' and it has an introduction by Robbie Robertson. They are normally done well. Just bought it.

Thanks for reviews, Peter. I would have liked to have seen Paul Simon, but that's about it.

Thanks Haso and Glenn. In addition to the Los Lobos collection, I have 'The Town and the City'. Paul Simon took me into Los Lobos.

Some temperatures, Glenn. I have experienced such temperatures abroad, but never had to work in them.

Bassmanlee, are you performing open air summer gigs?

I'm loving this freak Scottish weather. Beautifully warm with gentle breezes from 4.30 in the morning until 11.00 at night. It's never been like this for forty years. Listening is done on my Sony Disc player with my Grado heaphones. Away to read 'Uncut ' magazine


Entered at Thu Jul 19 11:40:37 CEST 2018 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: pursuing the horizon

Thanks Pat Brennan.

I'm wondering how a delicate gem such as Hobo Jungle would have worked on stage. Not, I'm afraid.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 02:04:43 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Pat: Thanks! Interesting find.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 19:36:49 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

For Dave H and everyone else.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 19:00:12 CEST 2018 from (158.39.169.250)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: OQ songs never performed live

Thanks for the contributions. Song list sent to the artist in question. Should at least be a gig for the die-hards...


Entered at Wed Jul 18 08:58:45 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan, two All La Glory in 1970 in the Tape Archive.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 05:57:13 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Haso and also Los Lobos

Thanks John, hope you are liking the Playing for Change music. Those last ones I told you of are on their newest album. I'm finally going to break down and buy their CD, and join the movement as it is something I really believe in.

If you have a few minutes, and any body else for that matter. call up on youtube, Foreigner's 1985 performance on Farm Aid. Lou Gramm's performance singing "I want to know what love is" is probably one of the best most emotional performances one could ever see. They put together a singing group behind him for his choruses as he sings. I don't know how many hundred thousand people were there but he got them all into it. Quite a show.

Amazing how that guy survived brain cancer surgery and came back again to sing.

Glenn, it would be hard to imagine any one here abouts not knowing Los Lobos, but I suppose there can be some who have missed out. One very excellent show on youtube, I can't remember the year or where at the moment but they are playing with Derek Trucks and David Hidalgo is superb.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 05:13:22 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Garth & Los Lobos

Just remembered that Garth plays on several tracks on Los Lobos "The Ride" album. Los Lobos are a mighty fine band. Been playing together since 1973. That's 45 incredible years! David Hidalgo, Louie Pérez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano, Steve Berlin - what a great team. If you don't know their music, please check them out. They play with an integrity and togetherness that recall The Band. A great, great group.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 04:23:12 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Bonnie Raitt didn't do "Let's Talk About Love"? Also, is there any sign of Ricky Fataar having hung / recorded with Band guys like Blondie Chaplin did?

The Flame, before they moved to the US from South Africa, recorded as the Flames. I have a clear memory of finding the empty cover of one of their South African LPs at a Sally Ann thrift shop in Toronto in the mid'70s. No record inside, unfortunately, so I didn't buy it. Now I would have, especially as the price was 75 cents (and that's Canadian!)


Entered at Wed Jul 18 03:41:50 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Levon & Los Lobos

Levon played mandolin & sang on 2 tracks on Los Lobos "Neighborhood" album: Emily and Little John of God.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 03:18:41 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: Addendum to Addendum 2

Evangeline and the Last Waltz Refrain were both played live once by the OQ, albeit in rudimentary form, at the Last Waltz concert itself. So technically, neither should make the list...


Entered at Wed Jul 18 02:34:11 CEST 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: PfC

Norm: good choices, those, on the Playing for Change. What I actually told the recipient of my wedding playlist contribution was that they could probably find any one of about 50 or more tunes very adequate to the occasion on that website. I think they know of it anyway. Interestingly, as progressive as PfC is in some fashion, it was a rather regressive ("Trump's pretty good") aunt of the almost married one that connected this outfit to PfC.

Dunc: On the Lobos, the crediting is in the accompanying booklet w/ that collection. At the bottom of about the 3rd to last page: "To our musician friends who have contributed to our records over the years: [right in the middle] Levon Helm". Jim Keltner, T-Bone Burnett, Mitchell Froom and John Hiatt were the only other names that I definitely knew of.

Good discussion on... never played live.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 01:43:58 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: Addendum 2

Forgot about the "Last Waltz Suite"! So add: The Well, Evangeline, Last Waltz Refrain, Out of the Blue...



Entered at Wed Jul 18 01:35:45 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: Addendum

Not sure they ever played Last of the Blacksmiths either....


Entered at Wed Jul 18 01:29:41 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Here's my best guess for the never-played-live list; corrections welcome:

Basement Tapes: Orange Juice Blues, Katie's Been Gone, Bessie Smith, Ruben Remus, Yazoo Street Scandal, Long Distance Operator (LDO was played at least once with Dylan singing on 65-66 Dylan/Hawks tour)

MFBP: Lonesome Suzie

Brown Album: Whispering Pines, Jawbone

Stage Fright: Sleeping, Daniel and the Sacred Harp

Cahoots: When I Paint My Masterpiece (can this be right?), Where Do We Go From Here, 4% Pantomime, Thinkin' Out Loud, Moon Struck One, River Hymn

NLSC: Hobo Jungle, Jupiter Hollow, Rags and Bones

Islands: (Everything but Georgia on My Mind)


Entered at Wed Jul 18 00:00:10 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: not played live...

ah, but Smoke Signal is on Live at the Academy!


Entered at Tue Jul 17 23:33:49 CEST 2018 from (84.209.137.43)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Band songs never played live...

So far we have (I think):

Sleeping
Daniel and the Sacred Harp
Jupiter Hollow
Whispering Pines
All La Glory
Jawbone
Moon Struck One
Hobo Jungle
Katie's Been Gone
Volcano(?)
Smoke Signal(?)

Must be more tracks from 'Islands', yes? All input appreciated, gig of "never-played" songs approaching fast.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 22:40:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D: Surprisingly the loos were OK (at least earlier) - proper WCs rather than metal portaloos and a team of cleaners.

However, we both said "couldn't do it again" then thought "But who would we do it for?" I decided I'd do it for Robbie Robertson solo, though I wouldn't do the whole day just go in 30 minutes before and leave right after!


Entered at Tue Jul 17 21:44:15 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V Review of Paul Simon

Peter V writes.

"It’s been a long, very hot day in Hyde Park, pushing past 31°C in the afternoon, and there’s no shade. The queues for food are impossible – 45 minutes long (fortunately we had had a vegetable paella at 1 p.m. and an ice cream at 3pm, but nothing after that). You can get tap water, but even queuing for a drink twixt James Taylor and Paul Simon looks impossible. Hot, hungry, thirsty and tired. As Paul Simon is about to start, we realize that as people crowd in and fill the gaps it’s time to take our blankets from the ground and stand. We’re exhausted after eight hours mainly on our feet in what is extreme heat for England."

Peter your a better man than me! I couldn't have done it. No shade, water impossible. You didn't mention how one was to get to the loo.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 21:11:03 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Record Store guys

The opposite was Virgin in Chicago. I wanted the new Hubert Sumlin album.

ME: Have you got the new Hubert Sumlin album?

GUY: Never heard of him.

ME: Played guitar with Howling Wolf …

GUY: (The guy calls over a young African American kid with dreadlocks) You heard of Hubert Sumlin?

KID: Nah

GUY: You heard of Howling Wolf?

KID: Nah.

This was in the alleged "blues" section in CHICAGO.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 20:34:32 CEST 2018 from (107.211.249.207)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

Peter, thanks for the story about the record store guy, in your Bonnie Raitt review. I think I've met that guy a couple times myself.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 18:50:03 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ward Thomas

My Hyde Park reviewing marathon comes to an end with Ward Thomas. They describe themselves as "British country pop" and were the first British country at to get a UK #1 album with "Cartwheels" in 2016. Think First Aid Kit, Webb Sisters, Sugarland / Jennifer Nettles. Lots of video links in the revie


Entered at Tue Jul 17 17:33:13 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Shawn Colvin

Yet another Hyde Park review. One more to go after this one.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 12:17:24 CEST 2018 from (79.75.184.172)

Posted by:

Solomon

Nice version of It Makes No Difference by Jimmy LaFave over at youtube.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 11:29:25 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Johnny Flynn link

My link didn't go through. Here it is.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 11:28:33 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Wit

Review of Hyde Park - more on him than on the show really. He didn't do "The Detectorists."


Entered at Mon Jul 16 23:52:50 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: PV's reviews

Thank you Peter, for sharing your concert (and theatre and movie) reviews. Really appreciate the time you take to convey your thoughts and note the song list and musicians. Glad folks didn't melt in the summer heat. Here in Dallas we're in a stretch of daily highs in the 100s (that's 39 and 40 degrees celsius)...that's the forecast for at least the next 9 days. Glad I don't have to wear a suit to work. Birthday suit would be okay : )


Entered at Mon Jul 16 23:23:17 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bonnie Raitt at Hyde Parl

Link to Bonnie Raitt review. I will get to Johnny Flynn …


Entered at Mon Jul 16 20:48:35 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.52)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Johnny Flynn

Hi PV - I noticed that he was part of the bill for that event. Presumably he played The Detectorists theme song? You’re a true fan to hack the heat and that size of a crowd. Human sweat and dirty bare feet is all I can think about. Fussy geezer here!


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:25:06 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: James Taylor at Hyde Park

Keep your eye on the prize. Bonnie Raitt and others to follow.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 16:39:48 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon in Hyde Park

My review of Paul Simon in Hyde Park yesterday. 2 hours 20 minutes, with astunning sub-set accompanied by "Y Music." The alleged last concert of the Farewell Tour. Will go on to review the rest of the acts.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 16:03:46 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A new Day

To start my day, I got a cup of coffee and put on my head phones and listened to old Buddy Guy and a lot of Playing for change folks sing Buddy's old song, "Skin Deep".

It is up lifting. Try and spend a whole day living your life treating people as Buddy recommends.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 03:05:12 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: While yer-at-it!

Watch the "Playing for Change" vid of "All Along the Watch Tower". It's the best I've ever heard this song done.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 02:53:09 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: To finish my five!

I been really busy on these boats, but I have a lot of programed music on my computer in my big boat.

I been listening to a lot of old "Amazing Rythmn Aces" and Doobie Brothers.

Now I found something on youtube. Do yourselves a flavour! Pull this up on youtube and listen. Playing for change. They have Tom Johnson and a lot of the original Doobie Brothers and many players and singers all over the world. A guy in India does a solo on Sitar that is WOW! One of the greatest songs you'll ever hear. "Listen to the Music"!


Entered at Sun Jul 15 19:17:17 CEST 2018 from (89.40.114.103)

Posted by:

Abelino

Subject: Vive la France!

Levon - May 25 1971 L'Olympia, Paris, France ! Honest like Levon not Slippin' And Slidin like Neymar. Merci.


Entered at Sun Jul 15 13:38:59 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Never say never

Never played live: yes Peter V, 'Daniel And The Sacred Harp', for sure... and what made you ol' internet friend to think about that :-)

About 'never' outside of the music. - 1. There was a motor rally team in Finland with the name 'Never Heard Drivers'. 2. My favourite clothing brand is 'Bondelid - never established 1956'.


Entered at Sun Jul 15 09:48:26 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The tape archive only gets you so far … I thought they did Volcano at the 1974 Wembley gig. But their sets were conservative. Maybe it was Smoke Signal. Looking at James Taylor over the years, he always has some deep catalogue additions to every tour … well, it's a huge catalogue.


Entered at Sun Jul 15 09:38:40 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

See the Tape Archive here. They played All La Glory on two of the 1970 shows listed there. There's a Shoot Out in Chinatown later, not one they did a lot. Yes, they avoided Richard ballads. That would be partly stage dynamics.


Entered at Sun Jul 15 00:37:17 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Seems to me a set list of songs the OQ never played live would be very centered on Richard-sung ballads: "Lonesome Suzie," "Whispering Pines," "Sleeping," "Moon Struck One," "Hobo Jungle," "Katie's Been Gone," etc.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 23:56:42 CEST 2018 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

The Band played "When You Awake" on the '74 Dylan tour. I'm not aware they ever played "Jawbone" live though.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 23:17:40 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Six from Cahoots, three from Moondog matinee. It’s not difficult to check.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 23:08:51 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Never played by OQ

I will have to think and check the live tapes on this site, but immediately three of my favourite Band songs come to mind: Sleeping, Daniel and the Sacred Harp and Jupiter Hollow. Without checking, I woulld add Whispering Pines and When You Awake. I think All La Glory too.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 22:41:12 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Stormbringer

Hi Dunc - Is Beck’s take on that song off the tribute you mention? I’ve always liked that one, just not sure of where I got the mp3 -


Entered at Sat Jul 14 20:12:53 CEST 2018 from (195.35.236.150)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Songs never played live

OK, who can help out here: This well-respected Californian guitarist, band-leader and composer is planning to do a gig of Band songs that the OQ *never* played live, from Big Pink to Islands. Could we compile a list (if there is one.?) ASAP? Thanks for your help, old- and new-timers.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 15:38:58 CEST 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Last 5

Phil and Friends live shows from 2005 and 2017;The Band-Cahoots;Grateful Dead-American Beauty;Bob Dylan-1966 live;Barry Goldberg-Two Jews Blues


Entered at Sat Jul 14 12:43:01 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last five … I'm basically playing nothing but Bonnie Raitt, Shawn Colvin and James Taylor ahead of tomorrow's concert in Hyde Park. I checked setlist com and made up playlists of the likely setlists from recent ones. Hadn't listened to Shawn Colvin in years. Sadly her two great covers, Twilight and Viva Las Vegas, look unlikely.

It's fun doing a party playlist, Haso. I did a four hour one for my party last year. I noticed excitement is caused by "unexpected retro" (The Shadows Wonderful Land on my list), an infectious piece of reggae, you have One Love on there. My buzz of singalong came with Jimmy Cliff's Wonderful World, Wonderful People. Then you need a big pop hit that everyone of all ages likes … Dancing Queen by Abba was on mine, also Barbados by Typically Tropical and We've Only Just Begun by The Carpenters.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 11:26:21 CEST 2018 from (86.190.25.86)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Last five played

Thanks, Haso. I play that Los Lobos collection too, but I had never noticed the reference to Levon. Hope wedding goes well.

Thanks Bill M. Will seek out and play those songs.

Last five played

'Storyville' - Robbie Robertson. Interesting that there is a Scot on this album, Paul Buchanan of the Blue Nile, and part of the album was recorded in Scotland. Love 'Breakin The Rules'. Recently in one poll, one of the Blue Nile albums was voted greatest Scottish album. But they are not my era.

'Red Pump Special' - Rab Noakes - iconic Scottish album. He should have been bigger. This would be on my list for greatest Scottish album.

'Anyway' - Family - Family has a place in us British musicos' hearts. Peter's mate, John Wetton was in this band. Brilliant.

'Johnny Boy Would Love This...A Tribute To John Martyn'. Great tribute album. Really like the Syd Kitchen contribution, Nux. Hope you are well.

'Mysterious Boundaries' Tony McManus. New buy for me. This is a stunning album of acoustic guitar playing, a genre which I'm continuing to enjoy immensely.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 06:01:53 CEST 2018 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: seacoast NH

Subject: Fri - 5

Before I forget, I mean to check out your BWMcT suggestions, JQ. And Jan, thanks for putting all that Jeff A current work on the What's New column; when time permits I'll definitely visit that.

Here's what my notes say. Yeah, at this stage I'm happy to remember where my keys are so a revisit of recent you-tubes or dips into the travel cd case sometimes get a note in the Daytimers. Plus w/ a child about to get married, I was asked to add some choices to their playlist. I think it was the cooling out period after the ceremony, the after-the-clambake/before-the-ice-cream period and finally the dancing time. Unlike 5 for Friday, I'll just run off what I can remember suggesting and we'll see what actually gets used. I will say our boys don't do a lot of weddingy stuff, it seems to me. I did suggest All La Glory, When you Awake and Cripple Creek. Also: Se a Cabo, Bound for Glory (Tedeschi Trucks), Higher Ground and One Love (Playing for Change versions), Soul Vaccination, Caravan (TLW), Tupelo Honey, Court & Spark, Free Man in Paris, Paris (Ooh La La), Ophelia/Daytripper/Little Martha (Larkin Poe versions) and a good deep cut: Butter's So Far So Good, plus a bunch more.

Hey, they asked. Had a hard time stopping.

5:

Sir Paul up on top of the marquee of the Ed Sullivan Theatre before a David Letterman Show.

Larkin Poe on Audiotree Live, 8.28.17

Dylan and the Hawks, Bootleg Series vol. 4, disc 2: this was actually selected by a 19 year-old neighbor/ though I'm not sure that they knew what they were in for.

Los Lobos, Just Another Band from East L.A. (collection), disc 1: a couple of observations. At the bottom of the credits and all that, "to our musician friends who have contributed [to what the wolves do]... Levon". And I always wondered if Cesar, the rhythm guitarist was sort of extraneous... well if you really listen to all the best Mexicano-tinged and historic-type tunes, it's his tenor voice that stands out, majorly. Yeah, like Bob Weir was extraneous too!

Seldom Scene, Live at the Cellar Door.

Enjoy the Saturday and Sunday soccer this weekend, plus Wimbledon for some of y'all. It's wild blueberry time around here so there's some picking to do at a local lake from the seat of the kayak. Ok, glenn t and dunc, it's your turn.


Entered at Sat Jul 14 04:19:34 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Five?? I'll come up with the rest!

I've been listening a lot to Foreigner. Lou Gramm with out a doubt had one of the most amazing voices, "I want to know what love is". They were one hell of a band, (still are) but I surely miss Lou.

Some John Mellencamp, "Pink Houses", Cherry Bomb and a few others.

Van, Days like this and a few more from "Pay The Devil".


Entered at Fri Jul 13 21:00:20 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.16)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Recents - False-Hearted Lover Blues and Blind Willie McTell

I’ve been listening to a few versions of the former: Kelly Joe Phelps does it hauntingly, Ralph Stanley more angrily and Levon’s is a bit of both with his unmistakable drumming style pretty high in the mix. I don’t think either of these story songs are in a typical blues format. Perhaps Dylan did that because Willie McTell wasn’t a conventional blues writer, singer or player. I think both are really well-penned with congruent imagery delivered poetically. On the song BWMcT: of The Band’s, Rick’s live versions and Dylan’s; I think I’d take Rick Danko’s. I’m a big fan of both songs and there’s likely versions of both that I still haven’t heard.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 16:36:41 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I can't imagine that I ever scored a goal in soccer. The highlights of my career in organised sports came from my two years playing Squirt-level softball - so when I was 8 or 9. I once hit a single, and I once scored the winning run (after getting on base by walking). And that was it!

Come to think of it, I did have a somewhat more recent memorable sporting moment - in '84 in Mecca - when I got an assist in the only game of soccer I've played since 1966. Oddly enough, it was in proper government-built professional-level stadium. Two corporate teams - a Lebanese engineering firm versus somebody else, likely Siemens - so no fans. Some of the players - mostly the British and Germans - were pretty good; many of the others - Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Lebanese, Somalis and Yemenis - were okay, and certainly enthusiastic; the remainder were largely hopeless, but perhaps in the right place at the right time.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 16:07:13 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Don't believe it. Evidence of head injuries and brain damage, however incontrovertible, will not be allowed to stand in the way of buck-making. (Or, as we've been seeing, politics as played at the highest level.)


Entered at Fri Jul 13 14:20:25 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I read a while ago that American football may not survive long in its present form due to such strong evidence of head injuries and brain damage because of / in spite of the helmets. At least a rule change or two may be needed, so it said. Soccer is the future … you may even get to call it "football" like the other 210 nations in FIFA.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 14:06:41 CEST 2018 from (99.227.168.67)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M & Soccer

You brought back some memories Bill. I never played hockey but I did play baseball; however only at school. The one organized sport I played was soccer. I was raised in Courtice Ontario; just east of Oshawa. Courtice had their own team and we would play other rural soccer teams. Hampton, Tyrone, Enniskillen etc. Some of these rural teams had BIG farm boys on their roster and when you got hit you were airborne. Did score once off my head. What? Thanks for bringing back the memories Bill.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 01:27:41 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northest

Subject: Football means Soccer

Bill & JQ. No Bill I didn't watch the game but saw the high lights. I don't watch international soccer much. I played a lot in high school. Our climate out here we played all winter, as in the little towns I grew up in, we had no hockey arenas. I can't understand why you would be trugging around in the snow. You should have been playing hockey.

JQ, I don't think when we were growing up that many people in the states even knew what soccer was. It is the same as rugby in that if you don't know the rules it looks chaotic. Soccer tho', is more physically demanding than football or hockey really. There is more stoppage of play in football and hockey than in soccer. Having played all three the wind you use in soccer is far harder on the chest and lungs than any.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 00:56:01 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.49)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Soccer

Hi Bill M - To this day I’ve never kicked a soccer ball. I came up in the 50/60’s and it was all baseball and football, at least where I was in SoCal. I still wouldn’t say I’m fan; all that running around just seems so random. That said, I like what it does for people worldwide and I’m optimistic about its future here. I think my point was that for certain conservatives here it’s something nearly dangerous. It might have been said here, and I think it could be true, that elsewhere it’s a blue caller sport and here it was a more east coast, white collar thing when I was growing up. I don’t think that’s the case now; soccer hit the mainstream in the early 70’s here.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 22:36:02 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: Did you play soccer when you were a kid? In my day, the early '60s, soccer was THE game all fall in elementary school. We played it before school, after school, and at lunch and recess. And there was an inter-school league with home and away games involving bus rides. But after grade 6, soccer simply disappeared from school life - and private life too as far as I could tell.

All spring it was baseball - really work-up softball, where you started as sixth (or whatever fielder) and worked your way up over the lunch hour through all the positions to pitcher then catcher then batter then back to sixth fielder. There were senior and junior school teams playing in inter-school leagues, but there you played set positions (not that I would possibly have made the team).

In between fall and spring there was a long, dead, no-sports period where you just shuffling around in the snow and slush, hands in pockets, trying to stay warm. The only time of year that you fervently wished for lunch to end so you could go inside.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 19:41:16 CEST 2018 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: WC

Even without the US, I believe this has easily been the most popular World Cup here ever. Seems that happens every time it’s played now. The demos can be generational and political: It’s most popular with younger people and liberals. Older and conservative and Trumpist folks much less so. That sort of makes sense to me. The most listened-to radio prick here Rush Limbaugh has refused to mention it at all, except to say, early on, that it’s un-American; he’s such a grand and influential twat.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 18:50:50 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: Croatia-England was the only game I've seen so far, and there's only one to go. Did you see it? Croatia was so leaden in the first half, and their passing so hopeless, that I started thinking that their vengeful Russian hosts must've salted the team's food. But it turned out okay in the end. I was very impressed with Ivan Perisic, who I'd not heard of before - but then, I probably couldn't have named more that three players before yesterday, and will no doubt forgot them all by the weekend. Unfortunately, 'my' Portuguese bar has changed hands so I had to listen to the coverage in a language I understand. I really dislike play-by-play, and colour commentary even more so. Lots of harking back to the storied days of yore.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 16:24:29 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: When the Dust Settles

Does anyone know if Peter is still alive since England's loss to Croatia? I can just hear some of the words Al Edge used. :-(


Entered at Wed Jul 11 03:05:57 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.134)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: I will certainly listen to the song about the fox and the eagle. Thanks for the tip. The title reminds me of "The Beaver And The Eagle" from Crowbar's third LP, "Heavy Duty". Except it's political rather than magical. Must listen to it again in these Trumpian days.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 02:07:13 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I am the Eagle

I'm wondering if any of you folks have heard this song of Rhett Davis. from the 70's. Peter's talk of the "Eagle and the Child" put me in mind of this old song.

Rhett Davis wrote this song and produced and recorded it in Nashville. He used some of the top line session musicians as you will note if you listen to this. It is a beautiful piece of music and the lyrics are wonderfully different.

About a lonely Eagle who sees a very frightened fox who thinks he will surely eat her but he takes her for a ride on his back because he is lonely. It's magic!


Entered at Wed Jul 11 01:35:48 CEST 2018 from (75.98.19.134)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend: You never know with John Simon. In '70 he provided "Rolling stone" readers with a loving, song-by-song insider's view of the not-quite completed "Stage Fright", and a few years later he was in the same magazine, disavowing any involvement in said album. Depends who's asking, it seems to me.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 00:00:50 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

It seems John Simon has been talking about his book for quite a while but nothing has materialised. Still, he has done quite a few interviews over the years so we already know his take on things. If you put what he has said next to what Jonathon Taplin wrote it gives quite a full picture of a critical phase in The Band's development.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 21:28:26 CEST 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Location: I'm Back
Web: My link

Subject: Joe Frey

Here's alink to John Simon singing and talking about the upcoming book.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 19:41:51 CEST 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: John Simon

Thanks John and Wallsend. joe


Entered at Tue Jul 10 18:36:03 CEST 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Links

I know Peter. I had the whole set up; until this morning. Password and all and now it's gone. Jan writes above. where it says Name required.

"Note: Posting of clickable links has been disabled due to abuse." I have written him back as it says above; but still it does not show up on my Guestbook page.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 17:43:14 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Links

John D: If you contact Jan, he will send you information on how to link stuff. You need a password.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 14:50:32 CEST 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joe Frey

Joe; just Google the title of the book and you will see all kinds of options. I can't send you the link; as that option has been disabled.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 14:34:26 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

CS L

Peter V: An sofa in the study - luxury!! I was there for many of those bouts at the Eagle, but there I was, a literary lion, relegated by my witch of a wife, to a child's cot in the wardrobe.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 14:30:01 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: Here's the SB&Q song I mentioned. Brilliant pop-wrock. Deserves a spot on the untimate genre compilation - along with Dwight Twilley's "You Were So Warm", the BoDeans' "It's Only Love" and a batch of others. BTW, the SB song "The Arms Of Mary" was a decent hit here, though as covered by a Vancouver group, Chilliwack.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 11:11:16 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

Link to a review of something someone else might actually have seen … Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 10:26:13 CEST 2018 from (109.147.126.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Really enjoyed the Rolling Stone MFBP article. Thans, Pat.

Thanks Glenn. Re 'Big Country' - 'The Skids' have been getting a lot of publicity, recently.

Wallsend - Tony McManus is touring Australia in August. Check out his website for details.

Todd - Sounds great

Thanks, Bill M. I don't know that song, but I've been streaming Sutherland Brothers and Quiver. By the time they joined up, I think I was into babies. Started early.

Last five played

Songs of Leonard Cohen

Songs From a Room - Leonard Cohen

Songs of Love and Hate - Leonard Cohen. I think 'Famous Blue Raincoat' is brilliant, but maybe this album is the real bedsit album. I noticed no songs were played from this album, when I finally saw him live.

Ten New Songs - Leonard Cohen

Live in London - Leonard Cohen - I saw the Glasgow concert. Absolutely brilliant in every way.

Away out in the sun, again. What an amazing Spring and Summer we are having. Sunny from 5 in the morning until 10.30 at night. Baggies on - surf's up. I could never understand the effect of her daddy taking the teabag away. How was that gonig to be an effective deterrent - stopping her morning cup of tea?


Entered at Tue Jul 10 10:12:23 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Eagle and Child is genuine in Oxford. I have been there. Here's a surmise … when J.R.R. Tolkien staggered home, pissed on ale and unsteady from whatever weed he put in his pipe, Mrs Tolkien said sharply "Where have you been?" "Been? Er … Me? Ss … me? to the sm-sm-Eagle and Chil' …" Henceforth "Sm-eagle" meant a night spent on the sofa in his study, so he assigned it to an evil character.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 01:58:57 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yeah.....But!

What about Smeagle?..........my pressious!


Entered at Tue Jul 10 01:25:57 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Another Robbie post

For anyone with access to Canada's CBC Radio, morning (and repeat in the p.m.)"q" (that's the name of the program) host Tom Powers will have Robbie on tomorrow's program. Interview about the Big Pink 50th I assume ... I tried to find it in the schedule, but they don't seem to have tomorrow's programming listed. Or, I can't find it anyway.

q isn't a program I listen to much, but I believe many of the interviews are also videoed and shown on CBC-TV. If anyone's interested I'll keep an eye out for it.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 01:02:40 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Give me 1o minutes Bill, and I’ll do Gandalf and Bilbo.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 00:34:19 CEST 2018 from (24.114.80.240)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Amazing - you can't make this shit up!


Entered at Tue Jul 10 00:22:09 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pippin & Merry

Few people know this, but while working at the Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford, Dr IV (Pippin to his friends) regularly stopped for a beer at the Eagle & Child pub, where he would share a beer (or "ale") with J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. Hence the name Pippin in The Lord of The Rings. Merry was named for Tom Merry, a character in the Billy Bunter series of books. Frodo gained his name when the fan belt on J.R.R. Tolkien's Austin 10 car broke and he noticed the brand name "Ferodo" on the replacement.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 23:09:57 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Thanks for the link. It's almost embarrassing that I didn't even know that the group Nazareth took its name from "The Weight". I wonder if Fanny did too.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 22:20:34 CEST 2018 from (1.42.214.171)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is a radio interview with John Simon which seems to be a promo for his book. You can find it if you google: Listen: Legendary Record Producer John Simon


Entered at Mon Jul 9 19:41:08 CEST 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: John Simon

I saw a newspaper article that mentioned John Simon's new book: Truth, Lies and Hearsay — A Memoir of a Musical Life In and Out of Rock ‘n Roll. However, I can't seem to find any reference to it on the internet or in Amazon.

Does any one have any info on the book's availability?

joe


Entered at Mon Jul 9 18:35:32 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

MFBP seems to be making quite a splash on its 50th.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 17:49:04 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pip

s'matter with you guys??..........Pippin was one of my heroes in "Lord of The Rings".


Entered at Mon Jul 9 17:24:49 CEST 2018 from (207.236.37.163)

Posted by:

Henry V

Subject: the understandably short reign ...

All true, but we mustn't gloss over the family skeletons. Pip's unconscionable misuse of the bloodstream drip severely damaged a tormenter from his school days, putting an quick end to Pip's tenure as head of the fraternity of medical students.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 10:38:45 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pippin IV did so well academically, overcoming that dreadful nickname "Shorty" at High School. He was top of his class in medical school, and invented the method of putting fluids directly into the bloodstream via a drip which was named after him.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 04:53:34 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Henry V

Yes, Pip had a lot of trouble with that name. Pippin's bad enough, in my view, but people simply didn't have a clue about the family name. Really it was pronounced Ivv, but most guessed wrongly, leading to a lot of teasing all through highschool, with kids singing his name to the tune of "Poison Ivy".


Entered at Sun Jul 8 21:36:36 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John Steinbeck wrote one about my cousin Pippin IV.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 18:58:36 CEST 2018 from (24.114.75.243)

Posted by:

Henry V

Peter V is my brother. Someone should write a play about him too.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 15:43:05 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Who is PeterV ?


Entered at Sun Jul 8 15:15:47 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Pressure

Our three days of theatre included "Pressure" by David Haig (linked). I know some here are very interested in WW2. It's the story of how a weather forecaster saved Operation Overlord and the D Day landings.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 15:13:39 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: World Cup Luck …

We had theatre tickets for Saturday afternoon. Missed the quarter final. We have a party of four for Wednesday for theatre during the semi finals. If England get to the finals next Sunday … we'll be at Paul Simon / James Taylor in Hyde Park. We book theatre 6 months in advance. Even in my wildest dreams, I would not have thought "Better check World Cup dates in case we reach the semi-finals and finals." IF we get there I hope Hyde Park will knock fifteen minutes off everyone's set and show it! We're there from 1 to 10.30 after all. Or will my iPhone battery last long enough for me to stream it?


Entered at Sun Jul 8 10:09:50 CEST 2018 from (210.86.95.227)

Posted by:

Rod

Was never a huge fan of The Band is Back - though I do like Richard's numbers. When I listen to The Band I really want to hear Rick playing bass and Levon playing the drums. It all seemed a bit lazy to me.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 04:20:18 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

NwC: Well spotted. Ten number signs and an ampersand, which has Nine letters. Maybe it was something you Ate.

Just back from the east end, where we went to see unfairly overlooked (for 50 years and counting) R&B singer Johnny Wright at his weekly matinee. As usual, the songlist included "The Weight". But this time it also included a powerful version of TNTDODD. Outstanding and surprisingly moving. Next up was "Oh Darling", which I'd never heard sung by anyone aside from the Beatles - and it too was very soulful. It occurred to me that if our guys hadn't gone with Dylan, they may well have been singing "Oh Darling" in bars. Richard singing lead, I imagine.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 14:22:07 CEST 2018 from (83.250.89.187)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Conspiracy theory ? "Entered at Thu Jul 5 08:17:35 CEST 2018 from Peter V"

Conspiracy theory? - I counted 10 (ten) "#" symbols in PETER V's post. It refers probably to Moses' ten commands in Old Testament... which refers to Zion's Wises... which refers to ... eerrr... to the fact that I forgot to take a handful of vitamin B this morning.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 05:43:42 CEST 2018 from (67.189.245.210)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT (Currently Cape Cod, MA)

Subject: Shark Week

Well, I'm happy to report that I've not been eaten by Sharks, although the shark warning flags have been flying at the beach this week near Nauset Inlet. Saw several seals while swimming in the ocean, but they left us alone. Great surf and great weather for the most part although today was pretty windy.

In between giving my brain a good salt water rinse, I read a pretty good amount of Robbie's book. There were a few things mentioned in the book, that were new information to me, and once I get home, I'll attempt to remember what they were, and probably post here for discussion. In general, it was good to get his perspective on things, as well as some details on the sequence of events, especially in the period of time between the Basement Tapes, and Pink & Brown albums.

One thing I hadn't been aware of, and it's evident from reading the text, is that Robbie is a bit of a car buff, or at least has an appreciation for nice automobiles. I'm not sure why that matters to me, but for some reason it was was comforting and a bit of a connection for me, aside from the musical bits.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 04:56:56 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The only five

Otis Redding's version - A Change is Goin' Come.

The Four Seasons - Walk Like a Man

John Mellancamp - Pink Houses

Bob Seger - Against the Wind

Gordon Lightfoot - Christian Island


Entered at Fri Jul 6 18:56:22 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: 5 for friday

Have a great weekend everybody!

Bob Marley: Confrontation

U2: Songs of Experience

Levon Helm: American Son

Grateful Dead: Best of

Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band: Live in St. Louis (23 August 2008) - available at his website (I was at this show - tremendous!)


Entered at Fri Jul 6 16:51:59 CEST 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: The Band is Back

John, I found the last used copy on amazon a couple of weeks ago. I certainly can share it with you if you like.

joe


Entered at Fri Jul 6 16:03:39 CEST 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joe Frey

Joe where did you find a DVD of "The Band Is Back" that is playable in North America? Thank you. I've never been able to find it.


Entered at Fri Jul 6 14:17:57 CEST 2018 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Post Robbie

Recent chatter here about "The Band is Back," led me to pull out some post Robbie Band.

I watched that DVD and listened to High on the Hog. After a number of dormant years of not including them in my Band rotation, I was very happy with what I was hearing and watching.

When I stopped trying to compare it to other records/concerts, I was able to better enjoy them.

At first I thought that their work with the Cate Brothers was overkill, but not anymore. Good stuff. I am glad I overcame my bias, now I have more to enjoy. joe


Entered at Thu Jul 5 20:51:58 CEST 2018 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Robbie's birthday - is it 74 or 75 (1943 or 1944, I've seen both) - anyway, Happy Birthday Robbie!


Entered at Thu Jul 5 15:28:13 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Tramp

Word meaning (sometimes so many). The lady who took a tramp in the forest.

Thanks for that Bill and Peter. I remember reading those stats on this song way back then. I wasn't surprised where it went in the UK, but it some what surprised me in Australia. I don't know why.

At the time there was a lot of controversy over OC Smith's recording. I suppose I noticed it more as I was more in to country. Some die hard country fans said he destroyed the song. In fact the man's very powerful voice and his session men took the song to a new level. Even Merle Haggard's version didn't measure up. I used to love singing that song back then and still do.


Entered at Thu Jul 5 14:56:44 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Hickory Holler and its tramp

Peter V: A bit of research and now I know for sure the TSoHHT got to #5 in Toronto in March '68. I attribute its astonishingly fast fall from grace to the word getting out around the meaning of 'tramp' in this context. Mother's Day was approaching and no mother would want to receive a card in which innocent Junior had scrawled "Thanks Mom - you're a total tramp. Tommy xxoo".

Looking at the other songs on the charts at the time, especially "Sweet Inspiration", I came to the surprising realisation that I must have been listening to CHUM pretty diligently by then, whereas just yesterday I would have sworn up and down that I didn't discover pop radio until that fall. Still, I have no recollection of the Who's "Call Me Lightning". Maybe I'll recognise it if I hear it.


Entered at Thu Jul 5 12:47:11 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronna

Peter V: "Hickory Holler's Tramp" was most certainly a top 30 hit here, though I can see it doing even better on C&W charts. "Fancy", the only Bobbie Gentry record I've every owned, did hit the charts too, but likely not the top 10. I liked both of them at the time, but haven't heard either for decades. Ditto / ditto for "Harper Valley PTA".


Entered at Thu Jul 5 08:17:35 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Son of Hickory Holler's Tramp

The Son of Hickory Holler’s tramp (link to the song above).

O.C. Smith’s recording was a massive British hit … #2 in the official charts (#1 in a rival one). I just Googled and it was #4 in Canadian Country and #3 in Australia, but it was a lesser hit in the USA (#40, but #32 R&B). As a black artist singing a country song by Dallas Frazier, and recording it at Muscle Shoals, it’s an example of “Country Gets Soul”. It’s comparative minor success in the USA (and just in the Country chart in Canada) is possibly down to the way charts divided into three main categories: Popular, R&B and Country. It was harder to place for radio play. Britain didn't have category charts then, having still a BBC radio monopoly and no specialist radio.

It’s O.C. Smith’s only British hit, though the same year his ‘Little Green Apples’ overcame the chart division and was US #2 / R&B #2. It did nothing in Britain, where Roger Miller’s original had charted (#19).

Does that give us a “better taste award”? Hickory Holler’s Tramp is way the better song and recording.

It sits in with Bobbie Gentry's "Fancy" - a song that should have been as big a hit as "Ode to Billie Joe" but wasn't - though it was #1 in Canadian Country! (Better Taste Award, there).

1968-1969 also saw "Harper Valley PTA" by Jeannie C. Riley, written by Tom T. Hall. I guess lyrics were getting more explicit with strong female roles? All three songs are favourites here.


Entered at Thu Jul 5 05:47:22 CEST 2018 from (97.33.65.135)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Independence Day

Thanks S.M. I'm on vacation this week, and spent the day on a beach in Caoe Cod, Massachusettes, not far from where the Pilgrims first set ashore in the new world, looking for water.

As I bobbed around in the cool waters of the Atlantic Ocean, admiring the seals, and keeping a wary eye out for any Great White sharks that are known to hunt in the area, It was not lost on me that a couple of hundred years ago, there was plenty of uncertainly in this land that would ultimately birth a new nation.

The American experiment, as it were, is still somewhat of a work in progress, and Lord knows, we've had our stumbles and missteps along the way.
But I still have hope that there are better days ahead, and today I celebrate the good things we've achieved, and hope for the best for our future.


Entered at Thu Jul 5 03:57:57 CEST 2018 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The way of Life

Finally just home from the ship yard, (work that has to be done). As we had supper Susan talked away to me , as she likes to, (we miss each other), about what she has been doing and watching.

Susan is a person who likes to watch a lot of shows about what make people tick. She was telling me about this woman whose father had left her at an early age and she became an alcoholic and she would sell herself just to get wine. She had a stack of bills that she wouldn't pay because she was worried she wouldn't have enough money to buy wine.

Finally her father found her and he apologized to her and explained he didn't realize how much he hurt her. It was all she needed to hear. She cleaned herself up and got sober. This reminded me of the song I'm coming to.

I said you know Susan that kind of thing goes another way. The song is "Hickory Hollers Tramp", by O.C. Smith. I'm sure some have heard it. From 1968. Ther are so many people from our generation who experienenced the life time of hurt from a broked childhood. If you play this song on youtube and read the comments, this song had a very profound impression on many people.

A woman whose husband left her with a houseful of children to raise and she humiliated herself in those days and did what she had to do to feed and raise her children. The lyrics in this song are without a doubt some of the simplest and best ever written.

Oh the weeds were high, the corn was dry, when Daddy took to drinkin'

Him and Sally Walker, they up and ran away,

And Mama shed a silent tear and promised 14 children,

I swear you'll never see a hungry day.........


Entered at Wed Jul 4 23:34:05 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paradox

I got the Neil Young CD. I know it's a soundtrack of sorts, but it veers over such a wide stylistic range that I found it hard to imagine many liking all of it. I found that I liked about a third, was indifferent to a third, and actively disliked the other third.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 14:18:51 CEST 2018 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Neighbours

Wishing a glorious Fourth to our American neighbours .


Entered at Wed Jul 4 11:16:34 CEST 2018 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Neil Young

Anyone like Neil? He’s done some solid live shows with Willie’s kids as his band.They are solid and wild. Last night he streamed his live show from Detroit on his archives site and he was great. The show was solo acoustic and he hasn’t lost a step.Tremendous. He’s got it now,Robbie!


Entered at Tue Jul 3 21:16:06 CEST 2018 from (107.211.249.207)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

I've got enough versions of MFBP. I'm happy to own the 2000 CD version, which rounded up extra tracks like "If I Lose" and a longer version of "Long Distance Operator." "Key to the Highway" was a disappointment when I finally heard it. MFBP took a long gestation for me before I thought it was anything but a mid-level record, and I don't play it when someone else is sitting in the room, though I would play the second, self-titled record. To me MFBP is now like a well broken-in chair, though my first impressions of it (after I had read about how great it was) was that the record was mostly aimless and tuneless, aside from a few exceptions, and it took Rock of Ages to make sense of some of the songs, at least for me. My wife once made me turn off Chest Fever, which she had never heard in the MFBP version, when the middle section arrived with its dissonant horns. The ROA live version swaps in a shuffle section there, which probably even the guys in the Band knew was the only way this would go over in front of a live audience. I like the record just fine now, and it shows up in my rotation, but if I had to point to a record as an example of something that "grew on me," I'd point to MFBP.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 16:17:06 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: scottish

dunc, i'm not sure how big the proclaimers are here in usa, other than "i'm gonna be (500 miles)", but i like 'em. 'course my grandfather's from edinburgh. i saw them in st. louis touring with canada's barenaked ladies. and my mom's from canada; so there you go. and of course annie lennox is great. i should have played some big country too, i guess. i certainly hope to visit scotland someday!

thanks to all for sharing your latest listens; love to see what others are listening to. come on everybody - tell us what's on your ipod or stereo!!!


Entered at Tue Jul 3 15:43:04 CEST 2018 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: MFSB at 50

Well. Let's see. I believe; between vinyl and CD, I must already own 4-5 versions of this CD. Will I buy this new one in the end. Probably; because I am a completist. However I have to say I really resent, no matter whom the artist, re-buying the same album over and over again. I don't care about a book or pictures anymore.

It's a known physical fact that; after the age of 30 your hearing starts to change and now at my age, will I be able to hear whatever frequency changes they have made. Quite honestly it's another way for the record company to make more money once again.

But; in the end, I probably will buy it. If I had Peter Viney's money....maybe two copies. Insert smiley face here.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 14:05:09 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc / Joe J: "Copper Kettle" is very near the top of my favourite Dylan songs.

Dunc: "Sailing" is a gorgeous song, but for me the stand-out Sutherland Brothers song is "I Don't Want To Love You But You've Got Me Anyway" (done with Quiver). FM radio here played the hell out of it back in the day, but couldn't push it onto the pop chart.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 11:19:39 CEST 2018 from (109.147.126.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Last Five

Joe J - I really like Copper Kettle too.

Penguin Eggs is really good. Thanks, Peter.

Two Scottish artists, Glenn. I'm surprised the Proclaimers have an influence there. Saw a great open air concert of them. James Corden gets emotional about the Hibs fans singing 'Sunshine On Leith'. Look it up on YouTube Glenn.

Last five played - albums with the following five iconic Scottish songs.

Sailing - Sutherland Brothers

Reflections of My Life - Marmalade

Stuck In The Middle - Stealers Wheel

Mull of Kintyre - Wings. Paul McCartney came back to Bute to marry his daughter, Roger. I think it was in the pub at Port Bannatyne that you went to.

Pick Up The Pieces - Average White Band


Entered at Tue Jul 3 11:02:08 CEST 2018 from (109.147.126.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks PSB

Thanks PSB. Really enjoyed the article. It would be about 1973 before I heard MFBP. Rag Mama Rag was my introduction to The Band.

On the Basement Tapes my introduction would be 'The Mighty Quinn' by Manfred Man, 'Si Tu Dois Le Partir' by Fairport Convention, and 'This Wheel's On Fire'by Julie Driscoll, which is sheer brilliance, as Peter says. Julie Driscoll was the height of cool.

And again a Scottish dimension. 'I Shall Be Released' by The Marmalade, the B side of Butterfly, written by the Gibbs, which was not a hit. This would be the first version of 'I Shall Be Released' I heard. I still play Marmalade's version of 'I Shall Be Released'. Marmalade were a really good band.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 10:02:49 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Pink Super De Luxe version

I enjoyed PSBs reminiscences on Music From Big Pink. I've said all this before, but never mind!

I still can see myself examining the cover (the sadly single fold UK cover). It was in the windowless record department upstairs at W.H. Smith, Bournemouth, and it was in the row furthest from the stairs – where A, B, C etc was. It’s a photo implanted on my brain, and I didn’t even buy it that day. W.H. Smith Bournemouth features heavily in my life. It was outside the shop where I arranged to meet the future Mrs V for our first date.

My main exposure was the juke box at Hull University Student Union, where I read the free newspapers every morning. Three plays for a shilling … The Weight … White Rabbit … I Shall Be Released. Sometimes My White Bicycle by Tomorrow (featuring Steve Howe) replaced White Rabbit.

On The Basement Tapes, the first I noticed was The Mighty Quinn by Manfred Mann in January 68. They had first pick from the acetate in the UK, following their hits with If You Gotta Go (UK #2) and Just Like A Woman (UK#10) as well a #1 EP featuring With God On Our Side. Dylan liked them! As one would with those sales. This Wheel’s On Fire by Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger and The Trinity in came in April 1968. I still recall that when I got to hear Big Pink, I thought The Band's This Wheel’s On Fire wasn’t quite as good. It was an opinion I recanted, but recently, playing a lot of 1968 stuff, my initial impression returns to me. I think Julie Driscoll nailed the song with the best version.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 05:20:47 CEST 2018 from (64.229.204.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

PSB: Thanks for the link to your fine article. Charmingly written - in what I think must be a very accurate imagining of the 50-years-ago you. I especially like the second paragraph with the Hank Kimball-like self-corrections: "Well, not actually the first thing ..." Come to think of it, given their early image, it's a wonder our guys weren't enticed into doing some hayseed walk-ons on "Green Acres" and its corporate cousin, "The Beverly Hillbillies". Sort of along the lines of Chad and Jeremy showing up on "Dick Van Dyke" and elsewhere.

One thing: I don't think that's musician wearing a bowl, it's a pot-head, presumably a reference to one or more of the Bengali Bauls (whose imaginary elephant Dylan also captured).

Apropos of nothing in the article, an introduction yesterday to Nina Simone's Newport version of "Li'l Liza Jane" showed me where our guys got their Atco version of the song from - though they'd been doing the song, if not like that, for a couple years by then.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 01:58:27 CEST 2018 from (100.14.12.215)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Big Pink at 50

Howdy all, A few thoughts from me on the half century mark for Music From Big Pink.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 23:43:48 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jeff's music project …

Follow the link to Jeff Alexader's kickstart project for a new album and have a good look and listen. Check out some great songs with great bands … e.g. Maria Muldaur on Grab A Slice. There are a couple of songs on there that would have been absolutely perfect for Rick Danko too plus jump blues, straight blues. Well worth exploring in detail. I know Jeff has been busting a gut on this for years working incredibly hard. It's getting close to completion. I spent a happy hour on this today.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 23:03:39 CEST 2018 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat b

Go to the band store. There’s a link there


Entered at Mon Jul 2 22:49:24 CEST 2018 from (107.77.97.107)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Recents -

Chicago Transit Authority.

Chris Smither - Leave the Light On; Origin of The Species is a good one.

Johnny Flynn - Theme from The Detectorists. Just that one song. PV - We always foist the show on our guests and it’s always a hit! I still watch it regularly, over and over, and admit that I’ve looked up detectors on the web; we’re 10 acres of rural property here which would keep me at it for a good while! But I need a buddy to talk bollix with.

Buddy Emmons - Steel Guitar. 1975. If you’re a fan of that instrument there’s nobody I’ve heard that’s better.

Nick Drake - 5 Leaves Left.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 20:48:48 CEST 2018 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Twillingate

Last 5

Bob Forrest: Bootlegger

Dylan: Copper Kettle (w/o strings)

Pogues: Whiskey, You're the Devil

Pogues: Kitty

Dubliners: Fields of Athenry (current earworm) We're going back to Ireland in October. Doing some prep right now.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 20:22:46 CEST 2018 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Pat, how can I find the MFBP reissue teaser you refer to on YouTube? When I search for 'music from big pink deluxe' etc, I just come up with old versions of the tracks and promo clips containing no actual music. Thank you kindly.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 17:48:47 CEST 2018 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Pink Super De Luxe version

Can't resist a new mix. In anticipation, I played the last one really loud in the car today. The "bonus tracks" were on the last remaster, and the only new one is an acapella I Shall Be Released, which is hopefully not just the original vocal tracks lifted off. But the new 5.1 mix sounds interesting too. Hey, this is certainly one of the ten greatest albums of all time. it seems something you have to do …


Entered at Sun Jul 1 03:06:31 CEST 2018 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: just 5 this time...

Van Morrison: Inarticulate Speech of the Heart

Little Steven: Soulfire

Gene Clark: Sings for You

The Band: Northern Lights Southern Cross

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers: Long After Dark


[See the guestbook archive for more]


[History] [Members] [Library] [Discography] [Videography] [Filmography] [Pictures] [Audio Files] [Video Clips] [Tape Archive] [Concerts] [Related Artists] [Merchandise] [Guestbook] [Chat Room] [Search] [What's New?] [Main Page]

Webmaster