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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook

Welcome to The Band guestbook. If you have problems reading this page, see the answers to frequently asked questions about the guestbook.

You can add your own comments by signing the guestbook. Please behave and follow the rules of conduct.

If you are looking for previous entries or posters, try searching the guestbook archives.


Entered at Sat May 23 10:23:55 CEST 2015 from (151.32.105.235)

Posted by:

Concetto edile

Location: Torino
Web: My link

Subject: Thank's

Thank's for yours music


Entered at Sat May 23 10:03:48 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Southern Accent

Regional divides. Al, you started me thinking again a process, that gets rustier, but never mind. I don’t think that in general “The South” feels aggrieved about “The North” in the same way as apparently The North does about the South.

I’ll go right back. Every region finds accents from other regions mildly amusing when imitated. So in a town full of holidaymakers in the 60s we got used to the fact that ice cream and beer involved different vocabulary, and we would joke about accents when we were selling ice cream. For example, Southerners would ask for “tubs”, Northerners for “cups.” But no one ever did it aggressively, which figures as in a seaside resort in the South, everyone’s mum and dad came from somewhere else, and most people’s mums and dads had regional accents from somewhere else too. I was extremely unusual in that my dad was born in Bournemouth too. But I guess we were surrounded daily by a range of accents.

But when I went to Hull in East Yorkshire, and we’re talking half a century ago, every single day on buses or in shops my Southern accent was mocked to my face. Maybe that’s why my best friend was from Brighton, also on the South coast. Sometimes it was friendly, more often it wasn’t and was for the entertainment of other passengers or shoppers. Maybe it was East Yorkshire’s isolation … I recall that my friend from Liverpool also had his accent mocked because in the days of The Beatles they seemed to find it funny… but there was always an edge of aggression to the mocking. In pubs a few times aggression to the point of “we’d better leave.” Now when I moved to Norwich, which in accent terms is Southern half (the line is a diagonal, not a horizontal), but also very different to Dorset, no one ever took the piss out of my accent.

People replied in mock stage Bertie Wooster to me last time I was in Manchester too. Do you think it’s a one way antagonism? Or simply that across the South due to population migration there is more accent mixture?


Entered at Sat May 23 09:52:44 CEST 2015 from (24.114.75.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

We have been fortunate in hockey with almost all of the major young stars having aligned themselves with decent agents and followed a path of just the right balance of respect for team loyalty, compensations demands and just plain ol doing the right thing in the eyes of most fans.......the way in which this situation has played out at Liverpool with Sterling has been unseemly from the player and agent side.........it was only Al's post that alerted me to this.......F1 it is over the next several months.....lots of greed granted but straightforward fun with less nonsense than so much of what surrounds team sports these days.......enjoy Monaco Fred - and Canada in two weeks !


Entered at Sat May 23 09:23:18 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Amen on Raheem Sterling. The headline yesterday was that he wouldn’t stay even for 900K a week. The sad thing is football is littered with stroppy talented players who get caught up with agents with ludicrous egos. The end result is an increasingly rapid succession of clubs, arguments with every one of them and wasted talent. It is a team game. The big-headed superstar will fail unless, for example, other players want to pass the ball to them.


Entered at Sat May 23 08:36:18 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Started reading the Jericho out takes notes lifted from this site and got halfway through before realising I wrote them!


Entered at Sat May 23 08:22:04 CEST 2015 from (58.104.6.59)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A boot of Jericho outtakes.


Entered at Sat May 23 04:41:19 CEST 2015 from (24.114.75.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I had to look up Boylan orange after seeing Mike's post.....and just came from the hoity toity McEwan's and just about every pasta dish was called Vodka something or other ...... I seem to have returned to another planet......anyhow, the reason I am here is I had wanted to tune in to the Zimmermen on stage now and the site was all cool with a count down and all - you know 0 days, 0 hours, 17 minutes to show time and then just as they were taking the stage the feed went out ! Perhaps Pat B is still cranky and pulled the plug! Last time I saw these guys doing The Band, it was great.....oh well, fuck it......the What's New section of this website has the details........Cheers Todd, I like the 6 year idea actually.


Entered at Sat May 23 04:37:56 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Jeff, just between you and me, keep it under your hat, figuratively speaking. Shhhhh!


Entered at Sat May 23 04:30:06 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.82)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike,you've raised various & various types of philosophical questions If a smooth rock falls............ (is it smooth after the fall? Or other questions you may substitute).

BTW, only one mean drunk per Band GB. We got ours, present or unaccounted for. I ain't buying you being a mean drunk....doesn't add up.


Entered at Sat May 23 04:25:39 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Complicated, Jeff.


Entered at Sat May 23 04:20:16 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.82)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

:-). Vodka Nomad.... or your brand would be Nomad Vodka.... No to go cups ( first heard that in St Louis, 1981), and great pizza, is best ate pronto, in the joint, in front, or as you're walking away. (The last choice technically is to go, but it ain't packed to go.... you know....)


Entered at Sat May 23 04:03:16 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Might I have a vodka pizza with that, Jeff? To go?


Entered at Sat May 23 03:44:21 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.82)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Blood Orange & Vodka Screwdrivers Mike :-). I had part of my girlfriend's in the bar at I think The Algonquin Hotel in Manhattan, back in 2010. To die for.


Entered at Sat May 23 02:18:03 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Make mine a Boylan orange, Todd. I'm a mean drunk.


Entered at Sat May 23 00:16:03 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.82)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Louis Johnson, one of the great funk bassists, session player extraordinaire, & 1/2 of The Brothers Johnson. has died at 60.


Entered at Fri May 22 22:57:03 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: a apolitical song

Another sad song for your weekend . . . .


Entered at Fri May 22 22:50:48 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Bob + Band : Hero Blues - Chicago '74

Hero Blues - Bob and The Band - Chicago concert 1974:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1F0teUlcSw&feature=youtu.be


Entered at Fri May 22 22:43:01 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Political persuasions/distinctions

I've more than said my piece - if not exactly made my peace - on this issue as those still reeling from the relentless monotony of my convictions will know.

So I won't drone on much more. But as it is, I see the seemingly disparate opinions of both Kev and Todd [and Pat] as both being entirely correct and justifiable stances.

I say that since I do not see their respective 'takes' on the broad issues concerned as being mutually exclusive. The fact is just because so many of the politicians themselves [as Todd alludes] have tended to morph into indeterminate hybrid manifestations in their hypocritically infused efforts to be all things to all men does not mean there are not still and always will be stark distinctions [as Kev alludes] between the 'self-serving' and the 'giving'.

In the UK the other week the 'self-serving' triumphed and a little bit more of the real decency in this shithole of a country of ours was eaten away.

PS Now I'll say what is really irking me just now. Fuck Raheem Sterling and his heinous self-serving cancerous agent who together render even the slimiest politicians as honourable.


Entered at Fri May 22 22:21:41 CEST 2015 from (174.236.4.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Life Advice

JQ, I will take your suggestion under advisement. Thank you for the life advice and enjoy the weekend.
If I might offer you some advice, it would be to take the opportunity to unplug your television and get some fresh air. You already know what they're going to say on those shows.

Just remembered that another tenet of the Unity Party will be a proposal to change the US Presidential term limits currently in place.
I propose a 6 year Presidency. One term only. Two potential 4 year terms up to 10 years, is too long for that type of concentration of power. With the current system they seem to spend 1/2 of the time fundraising and trying to get re-elected to a second term. One 6-year term would free up some time to better serve the Country. And if a candidate ends up being a disappointment, less damage can be done in 6 years as opposed to 8.
I forgot to mention earlier that the while the Unity Party will have a big tent philosophy, extremists on either end of the spectrum will likely be better served elsewhere. The Unity Party just may not be exciting enough for some. That should still leave approx. 80% of the electorate available which is a healthy number.

Thanks for the clarification Pat. I will put myself back on the active poster roster.

Kevin J., save a piña colada for me. And while you're at it, Mike Nomad looks a little thirsty.


Entered at Fri May 22 20:50:26 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, that second one wasn't directed at you.


Entered at Fri May 22 20:30:51 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Gorey behavior

Todd - I think you might need to grow up a bit. Unfortunately, discussing public policies is a different matter than personal policy and behavior. It's a question of how much hypocracy you can stand before that person loses leadership credibility all around.

I pay attention to a lot of right-wing media (I can't explain it - it was Christian TV before that - both fucking rackets) and they've been laying it on to Hillary lately. Perhaps it's all true to a degree. But I have yet to hear anything that is convincing enough for me not to vote her way.


Entered at Fri May 22 20:25:58 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Hi. Angie. Hi, Serge. Hi, Serenity. Hi there, Bob Wigo and David Powell. Hope you're enjoying the lovely spring weather. (Well, it's lovely here in Smooth Rock Falls.) Hi, Norm, you old bastid. Hi, Bumbles, miss your capricious wit and malevolent barbs. Hi, Ray in N.J., and Butch, too. Hi, thinking of you all. Havva good one, whatever that means.


Entered at Fri May 22 20:14:26 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Job Description: Gatekeeper GB Posters

Details: Easy, feet up on desk, piña colada in hand kind of smooth sailing – May 2015 through March 2016……..staring April 1, 2016, muscle, heavy muscle, long hours, no drinking, no fun, no life, no thanks, compensation appropriate.


Entered at Fri May 22 19:52:15 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob…..I seem to recall you were defending a friend….something that Norm would have approved as he had done it several times himself here…..no, I rather suspect that he is off somewhere at sea – perhaps watching and re-watching Stan Johnathon-Pierre Bouchard’s epic battle or even more likely preparing the definitive strategy plan for Justin Trudeau to win power in the next federal election…..or he could be conspiring with higher powers to keep the Canadian dollar at or below 80 cents to the US dollar in order to end the Black Hawks recent run as an elite team in the NHL ( long story that Pat might not be aware of but the 6 Canadian teams actually account for close to 40% of the league’s revenues and the massive and sudden drop in the CAN$ relative to the US$ will impact the CAP levels which in turn will impact the Black Hawks starting next year as they assign an unusually huge percentage of their teams payroll in just two players – great ones granted but it will affect how they will be able to assemble the rest of the team…)

Jeff……the deflate-true patriot line was very funny.


Entered at Fri May 22 19:21:38 CEST 2015 from (174.236.4.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Pat, I voted for and supported Al Gore, as well as Bill Clinton in prior elections. My criticism of Al Gore regarding his carbon footprint is sincere and from the heart, and is not meant as a roast. I simply feel that his reccomendations for how we should live, would hold more weight if he set a better example. I didn't call him names, unless you consider hypocrite a name. Perhaps I'm a hypocrite too, by pointing a finger, but my Grandmother taught me at a young age, that if you vote and participate in the process, then you have a right to complain if you don't like the way things are going.

She may have been a bigger influence on me than that, as she frequently split her ticket, as she believed that a balance of power served the interests of more people than concentrated power.

Not sure what you mean by cuing former posters, but although I don't make the time to post as much as I used to, I still consider myself active.
Who should the gatekeeper be regarding poster status?
Since I'm a big tent kind of fellow, I'd say that all are welcome....including me. ;-)
(winked eye - little nose - smile)


Entered at Fri May 22 18:57:23 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Oh, wait! Cue former posters to miraculously show up and complain how things never change around here.


Entered at Fri May 22 18:54:21 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, for not wanting to get involved in finger-pointing, you certainly seemed to enjoy roasting Al Gore.


Entered at Fri May 22 18:46:16 CEST 2015 from (174.236.4.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: The United Ststes

Subject: The Unity Party

Uh oh! Did I scare everyone away with my talk of unity?

Still have a lot if work to do on the platform, but I think it's a concept that's worth exploring, The status quo just doesn't seem to be optimal anymore.
Perhaps I'll try it out on the local level before mounting any kind of National campaigns.


Entered at Fri May 22 16:30:14 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: James Maddock again

Very nice, Bob. Thanks


Entered at Fri May 22 16:18:40 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: James Maddock

JT, check out this beautiful uplifting James Maddock song. Certain performers have had some success but compared to their talent have not received their just dues. On my list would be Garland Jeffreys, Michael McDermott and James Maddock.


Entered at Fri May 22 16:02:52 CEST 2015 from (32.216.240.188)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT - AKA - The Constitution State

Subject: The State of The States

I hadn't intended for my comments from the other day to come off as cynical as they seem. Try reading them again with the snappy breezy delivery of a Jon Stewart type of character with a slightly sarcastic wink and a grin, and it may actually be entertaining.

I don't care for the tone of politics these days, which increasing seems to favor style over substance, talking points, over reliance on polling data, pandering, and excessive indignation from both sides. That's what I was railing about, not the actual business of governing.

Ian W, Excellent suggestion regarding requiring prospective candidates to live in their chosen constituency prior to running for office. I'd even go a step further, and require them to live on a working/middle class salary for a period of time, send their children to public schools, stand in line at the post office and other government offices, do their own yard-work, laundry and shopping at the grocery store. In short, give them the opportunity to become familiar with the lifestyle of a large majority of the people they would ultimately be governing, rather than the posh lifestyle many of them have enjoyed as members of the 1%.

My comments were initially prompted by some of the exchanges between Peter V and Al Edge, and feeling discouraged that things can't be better. As a Country, they deserve better.

The politics of division has gone on for too long, and has become too dominant in the process. It's supposed to be the "United" Kingdom, the "United" States of America etc. Not the "Divided" States of America or the "Divided" Kingdom. At a certain level, our leaders (irrespective of Party) have failed us. (I'm not disregarding Canada, Norway, Finland, Germany, or any of the other fine Countries that are represented here....but the US and UK should at least live up to their names).

If I were ever to run for public office, I would run on a platform of unifying the Country and I would reject the traditional political posturing of the past that has poisoned the process. I would need to start a new party called the Unity Party, and it would be a big tent solution embracing the qualities that make us similar as well as the qualities which make us unique. There would be no such thing as a "White" vote, a "Black" vote, a Hispanic" vote etc. In this Country, it would be an American vote.

Of course, I'll never get a seat at the table, as I have no money, connections, or power base, but that points to a problem with the process as well. Our choices are too often limited to the rich, powerful, and connected.

I suppose that despite my protestations from the other day, I still care enough to complain and want things to change for the better. I'm just not going to fall into the usual trap of rigid party loyalty or finger pointing.

Kevin J., My point was not meant to be a liberal vs. conservative type of thing. Quite the opposite as I believe that's a big part of the problem. It had more to do with the preponderance of the wealthy ruling the non-wealthy. I would prefer to focus on quality people who can rise above those divisions. If it makes you feel any better, I voted for Al Gore in 2000, but had I known then what I know now, what hypocrite he's turned out to be, I would have to reconsider that choice. I don't believe that one can preach a low carbon footprint lifestyle for others while living in an opposite way. My personal carbon footprint is quite reasonable. I live in a modestly sized house, conserve energy, recycle, and keep my car tuned up and tires inflated properly. I would listen to someone like the actor Ed Begley Jr. He lives in a 1,500 square foot home, and has a bicycle that generates power hooked up to a toaster to toast bread. Now there's someone who is walking the walk....not just talking it.

As far as Patriotism is concerned, I vote, pay my taxes, and try to follow the laws that have been legislated to the best of my ability. I embrace freedom, but appreciate that my freedom ends where another person's freedom begins. In other words, my freedom can't impede another citizen's opportunity for enjoying their own freedom.


Entered at Fri May 22 15:43:24 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: James Maddock

Just looked up James Maddock. New to me. Thanks, Bob. I listened to 'Beautiful Now' on You Tube. Great performance. Mike Scot and James Maddock apparently co-wrote (as well as 2 other songs on "Modern Blues".


Entered at Fri May 22 14:55:06 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I've extrapolated as per your request. I see a mule turning to a horse and saying, "Those humans are too stupid to know that they're animals."


Entered at Fri May 22 14:37:39 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: education for an unknowable future

"CNN host Fareed Zakaria explains why a liberal education prepares people for the working world."


Entered at Fri May 22 13:22:07 CEST 2015 from (195.93.21.35)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Bob and Ed

Bob: "There was nothing left to say / the night we called it a day" (hope I've remembered the lyrics right) seemed a fair way to end his contribution to the Letterman show.

Ed: During the course of the election, a Conservative politician referred to Miliband as a backstabber (a reference to him standing against his brother for the Labour Party leadership a few years back). Miliband's immediate response (not vetted by spin doctors, I suspect) was to call the name-caller a "minion" of Cameron. This "minion" was the Defence Secretary. For someone seeking to be Prime Minister to regard ministers as "minions" of the PM was telling.

But, then, he is one of the "professional politicians" (on both sides of the political divide) that Peter mentioned - parachuted into a constituency in the north of England by the Labour Party central office in order to become an MP. Prior to that, he had no experience of living north of London of which I’m aware, no links with that part of the world that I can recall and, indeed, no involvement with anything or anybody outside of academia and metropolitan life. In that sense, he was inauthentic. This is surely one of the factors disconnecting politicians from those who might elect them. This occurs with politicians of other persuasions but it seems to me to be a more significant factor for Labour politicians. Where are the Dennis Skinners or the Alan Johnsons of this new century? (Incidentally, Johnson was another “parachuted in” to a northern constituency but at least he had worked in jobs that his constituents would have understood as “real work”).

Perhaps we should insist that prospective MPs live in their chosen constituency for a number of years (say, five years) prior to standing for election.


Entered at Fri May 22 12:50:23 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.10)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: What would Bob do?

Peter V: You and the missus should stick with what's working, but you might pass along Dylan's advice to any flagless neighbours facing the same challenge: Install an Inuit outside the garden and all the pigeons will run to him. End of problem, go for a nap.


Entered at Fri May 22 12:38:05 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Norm

Kev, I miss Norm's post also. I always enjoyed the sea stories and his thoughts on music and life. I feel bad because I don't think he's posted since we had some words. I'm real sorry about that.


Entered at Fri May 22 12:29:05 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Politics and the music / Animals (not the group, though) / Norbert's CDs

I feel sorry about you people in UK. Your political agenda seems to be from 1955. Here in Nordic Countries we have the Green movement - even in the government - but even better: we have feminism. Feminist Party in Sweden had the largest amount of established musicians backing their campaign, including ABBA-Benny.

As always Peter V has seen the light (see his post on animals in war below). Next political trend up here is said to be the animal liberation front.

They say that toilet seats and CDs are going to last millions of years. Imagine the "things" from the outer space finding toilet seats and Norbert's CDs after millions of years. What would their arceologists think? Some kind of a primitive religion where people sit on a toilet seat and worship the Highest Priest The Mighty Jan.


Entered at Fri May 22 10:45:58 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On patriotism. Just off Park Lane as you turn towards the US Embassy in London, there’s a monument to the animals who died in war. Mules, horses, dogs. It looks impressive and we were standing looking at it with British flags around it, and I thought, ‘Hang on, those mules and horses never knew they were British …”

Extrapolate from that.


Entered at Fri May 22 08:31:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Unpatriotic pigeons

Patriotism is the last refuge of the gardener. Our garden is currently ablaze with small British flags stuck in the soil. We have a raised bed for salad leaves – rocket, red mustard, mizuna etc. This year it’s been attacked by a group of pigeons who don’t even eat it. They just snap the plants at the base. We had a similar problem with pigeons four or five years ago, when they snapped off every crocus and daffodil at the base and stripped flowering bushes. Then our urban fox population increased and the we started clearing up pigeon feathers on a regular basis.

Some nasty bastard, I suspect, has been after the foxes. In two years we found a healthy looking dead one, then we had one staggering around the lawn as if drunk before dying. We contacted the RSPCA because it looks like someone has been poisoning them. But it would be very hard to prove or trace. Anyway, fewer foxes are apparent. So now we have the pigeon problem back.

We tried old promo CDRs on strings – they keep cats and foxes off, but the pigeons ignore them. We stuck sticks all over the salad patch, but they waddle between the sticks. Being Britain, we have no equipment to shoot them, the obvious solution. Then Mrs V found a large pack of plastic British flags left over from a kids party for the last royal jubilee. She stuck them all around the salad vegetables and we have unpatriotic pigeons. It’s done the job. But we do look a bit excessively patriotic to a casual visitor. But we don’t watch FUX NEWS so I think we’re OK.

I assume US or Canadian flags would work as well. I reckon it's the fluttering that does it rather than the design.


Entered at Fri May 22 05:51:46 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.21)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I appreciate your ruminations on patriotism. You're right that the misuse of the "last refuge of a scoundrel" line is an illogical pain in the neck (along the lines of "all elms are trees so all trees are elms"). On the same broad topic, have you ever thought through the opening lines of the national ditty where the country commands the true patriot love of all its sons? There's no mention of food that I can think of, though poutine may be implicit.


Entered at Fri May 22 03:52:11 CEST 2015 from (24.114.51.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: I don't know about True Patriot as asked as I am not sure what that means. I do know that the word patriot has been so hijacked and so distorted for so long that it seems to have moved a long way from simply describing a person that loves or supports their own country. That Samuel Johnson quote of patriotism being the last refuge of the scoundrel has also been misunderstood and misused by many.......interestingly, he was referring to the exact type of people that today support Fox News and are in so many ways phoney and exclusionary "patriots".......some months back, I watched an astonishing bit of television where the leading group of Republicans were asked if they believed the current President of the United States was a patriot - if he loved his country. None would answer yes......mind boggling when you think about that.

........all that said, I do know Bob, that you have been a most fortunate man to have such kitchen arrangements.......add in the box wine and Bob Dylan from the speakers and life well lived !


Entered at Fri May 22 02:40:43 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm fortunate to know Bob & his wife. And I gotta tell the rest of you, that while many mom's & wives may not share a kitchen easily, this is the case where family lives happily in harmony. That said, with the great Italian via Brooklyn cooking, you might expect them to be roly poly, but no. Bob looks like a Brooklyn longshoreman, and his wife is fit as a fiddle and thin. Gotta be the country living :-)


Entered at Fri May 22 00:10:47 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Capital P?

Bob, if you deflate your football , then you're a true Patriot.


Entered at Thu May 21 23:43:58 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Food for Thought

Kev, my mom and my wife shared a kitchen for many years. I've been eating the same Italian dishes for 60 years. This would make me a true Patriot then. Right?


Entered at Thu May 21 22:34:37 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I like the Chinese take on patriotism......“What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child?”.....sometimes this is translated as being "Patriotism is nothing more than the memory of your mother's cooking"....but whatever, it nicely sums up the reasons why so many feel the city or country they are from is "the best" or so much better than somewhere else. Apparently, a disproportionate number of traitors were poorly fed as youngsters or were forced fed boiled vegetables.


Entered at Thu May 21 20:19:23 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pat, I do not disagree with your statements, but I'm not certain that it is so much that Obama himself " has forced the country to confront the rather wide river of racism that runs through it" , as it was events & the fact that he is considered a black man, even though he's the same as all or most of us, a mongrel. I also think there are many areas where Obama fell short- but hey, that might be born out of the necessity of politics, or not........ but it comes back to business.......... Now, if the subjects of The Band and digital were so easy................


Entered at Thu May 21 19:55:13 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“The article suggested that while voters saw him as rich, posh and privileged, they also saw him as a happily-married family man and a majority (clearly) saw him as well-intentioned. So although far more privileged and wealthy than Ed Miliband, people saw him as a person as "less elitist." - Peter V………………Good God! Let’s pause then and realize it is not the politicians , it is a far more dangerous situation when the people are getting this stupid…….any time you read that someone voted for someone because well, he seems a sort that you could have a beer with….run for cover! Canada’s finest politicians have all be unpleasant, unmarried and definitely not the types you would want to have a beer with. Our current PM has a Calgary haircut, is partial to cardigans and has a wife that chews gum while meeting the Queen and rides motorcycles…. But, they’re a family and that must count for something….yikes.

Thank you Joan.


Entered at Thu May 21 19:31:32 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Connor Kennedy band

Bob F: thanks. Unfortunately, no Connor Kennedy band. A singer opened from upper Washington area. OK but .... Maybe another time. I'll watch for that band.


Entered at Thu May 21 19:27:52 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Kevin J

Amen to that. You have put in the whole story in a few paragraphs. When they began carrying on about Iraq I quickly realized it was all about oil and concurrently enriching Halliburton. We certainly have not left Iraq in a better place before we came


Entered at Thu May 21 19:15:06 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……Also worth mentioning that for those of us who live in countries where there are established and electable separatist political parties – like Canada - it matters very much how one votes.


Entered at Thu May 21 19:03:23 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

In a world of quick typing and double negatives gone awry………I have been wondering where Norm is – I miss him here.


Entered at Thu May 21 18:29:28 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, years ago I sent you one of the David Corley songs I worked on.


Entered at Thu May 21 18:27:49 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes and no (Always a let out). I have often said that Harold Wilson's sense in keeping out of both the Biafra War and the Vietnam War is why I and my friends have lived to tell the tale, so politicians obviously can and do make a difference.

BUT they also feather their own nests, and as a class the males are often gropers, because it's another expression of power. What I find most disconcerting is that we now have a "professional political class" in all parties who went into politics immediately after, or very soon after, graduating.

There were some interesting "post-election survey" comments on David Cameron in The Sunday Times last week. The article suggested that while voters saw him as rich, posh and privileged, they also saw him as a happily-married family man and a majority (clearly) saw him as well-intentioned. So although far more privileged and wealthy than Ed Miliband, people saw him as a person as "less elitist."


Entered at Thu May 21 18:09:32 CEST 2015 from (69.159.11.206)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I disagree strongly with Todd’s position on the hopelessness or resignation of it all. Let’s start with the that I have never been or would ever consider myself to be a Serf and prefer a position in the ruling class – which I am a part of even if the politicians might be unaware of my membership……and to anyone who does not believe Left or Right ( Liberal v Conservative ) doesn’t matter or make a difference, consider just these few points off the top of my head:

– had Al Gore been elected in 2000 and not the hapless George W with his gang of advisors led by the truly evil Dick Cheney, with certainty, we can state that 150,000-200,000- Iraqi citizens would still be alive and thousands of young servicemen and women would also be alive or uninjured. I am all for kicking ass when and where it is warranted and sometimes it is but Iraq had nothing to do with 9/11 and every thinking person knew they had no nuclear weapons……and thankfully the Liberal government of the day in Canada saw through the charade and said no. The current PM of our country - at the time, the opposition leader( Conservative Stephen Harper ) ran down to the US and apologized ! The Labour Party in the UK deserves to have its liberal card pulled permanently by being so reckless with the lives of its citizens during that period. Shame on Tony Blair.

- With the Supreme Court in the US being so influential in shaping the society and deciding how even the elections are carried out ( see the recent: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, where the Supreme Court decided to allow unlimited amounts of corporate spending in political campaigns ) can one really make the case that who you elect doesn’t make any difference ? Would a Liberal government really appoint an incompetent like Judge Thomas or someone as dangerous as Scalia ?

– Would so many US citizens have access to health care had Obama not been elected. Clearly not!

I could go on but the fact is, Left or Right makes a difference – a big one. And guess what - if you want the bare minimum of taxes and no hand gun legislation and no social net, then vote Right…That’s ok too, just don’t tell me how one votes doesn’t matter, because it does.


Entered at Thu May 21 17:43:09 CEST 2015 from (129.42.208.183)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Beautiful Now

JT, I'm glad you liked the show. Mike Scott and Steve Wickham always put together a great band to perform as The Waterboys. Beautiful Now is actually a James Maddock song that Mike Scott rewrote for the new record. If your not familiar with James Maddock, check him out. He's a wonderful singer/songwriter. Did you see The Connor Kennedy Band?


Entered at Thu May 21 17:24:39 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

It's one thing to stop caring about which party wins and another to stop caring about what is being done about what needs to be done.


Entered at Thu May 21 16:32:06 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I don't know about all that. Obama has transformed some pretty large and important segments of America to the benefit of the "serfs" and he has forced the country to confront the rather wide river of racism that runs through it. Not a lot of presidents leave the place better than they found it. He has.


Entered at Thu May 21 15:42:21 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Waterboys in Victoria BC

The Waterboys in Victoria/ UVic auditorium/20.5.15: Their entire recent album + a selection of material from previous albums. 'Beautiful Now' sung during one of 4 selections during 2 encores sung by Mike Scott with only Steve Wickham on violin accompanying was other-worldly outstanding. A stellar band. Even a selection from the Yeats album. We haven't been at many better concerts. They are on to Seattle tonight. A must see and hear!


Entered at Thu May 21 15:16:49 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I agree with the analysis. I agree that the war is essentially over. There are many meanings to the bare statement " I used to care, but things have changed." Even in the political context, it can mean, the speaker changed, or the greater circumstances have.....and as unchangeable as things are, meaning " I used to care, but things have changed" might mean fuck it. And though I'm not a political trailblazer or activist, you never know how things go.And you never know how bad things can get if we throw up our hands completely. That said:" I just want to break even. "


Entered at Thu May 21 14:22:37 CEST 2015 from (129.42.208.179)

Posted by:

Bob F

Great Post Todd. That's just how I feel. Perfect. It calls for more Bob Dylan:

"They say that patriotism is the last refuge

To which a scoundrel clings

Steal a little and they throw you in jail

Steal a lot and they make you king"



Entered at Thu May 21 14:06:07 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Very perceptive, very cynical, Todd. Very true. The application of your choice words can generally be made universally, IMHO.


Entered at Thu May 21 13:48:32 CEST 2015 from (32.216.240.188)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: We live in a political world

I've always looked at it as "which millionaire are you going to vote for?"

Many politicians, irrespective of party or ideology, go on and on about class warfare, and how they are the ones who will look out for the middle class, but the fact remains that there will always be a ruling class and the serfs (the rest of us). While many of us commoners get caught up in the game of liberal vs. conservative etc. the rulIng class is ultimately concerned with keeping their power first, and then the needs of the rest of us second.

Yes there will be lip service, and many of them do care, or at least did care at some point in their political careers, but getting and keeping power will always be their number one mistress.

As long as the serfs are busy bickering about ideology, the ruling class will survive. I read a comment recently, regarding the two party system in the US, and the jist of it was this. "We do not have a two party system....what we have is a snake with two heads."

I used to get worked up about politics, but in the words of Bob Dylan,
"I used to care, but things have changed."


Entered at Thu May 21 08:57:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Voodoo Children (A Slight Return)

British Politics (A Slight Return). The interchange a couple of days ago was amusing. Harriet Harman, interim leader of the Labour party, referred to the Conservatives as “posh boys.’ George Osborne, Chancellor of the Exchequer, gently pointed out that both he and Ms. Harman had attended St. Pauls School, the most elite public (i.e. private) school in London.

Meanwhile Chuka Umunna, undoubtedly the most personable and articulate leading Labour contender had to withdraw. One reason seems to be his membership of a London club which he went frequently during the election where the house wine is £300 a bottle which the newspapers knew about.

Meanwhile another contender is Tristram Hunt. The Sunday Times pointed out that as “Tristram” was the slang for aristocratic boys working for the BBC or other arts organization, his first name didn’t help as a Labour candidate (also a public school boy). Nor does it help that rhyming slang, which has always used “Berk” which is short for “Berkely Hunt” – you rhyme with the second word to get the meaning … has already switched to calling people “A Tristram.”

So I’ll amend that old saying “Whoever vote for you get a politician” to “Whoever you vote for you get a posh person.”

Googling these people briefly, I saw that George Osborne is heir to an “Irish baronetcy.” As Ireland is a republic this must be a pretty nominal position, but reading down he page there are three classes of baronet: Baronets of Great Britain, and Baronets of Ireland … and Baronets of Nova Scotia.


Entered at Thu May 21 07:56:31 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Co-ordinated posts

Nice one Norb!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 21 07:53:26 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: After reading the bio, I now know why

:-0)

Hey Pat - considering his heart exploded he's looking no worse for wear on that photo!!!

I must try to give it a listen later


Entered at Thu May 21 07:45:02 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Kev

You picked a good time to be away Kev - coinciding with me prattling away on my high horse!!

And thanks for concern mate. It seems I was lucky in that the course of steroids kicked in pretty fast to reverse the droop. I've heard of a few instances where the condition has not reversed and in one has required an operation.

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 21 07:35:58 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Scouse turkeys

Ha ha

Hey Jeff, I'm not going to deny that I've jived with a few in my time. Mainly at the Grafton on West Derby Road. Not a pretty sight. And I don't just mean the women!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 21 04:09:06 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.14)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Thanks. That's actually quite touching.


Entered at Thu May 21 02:05:35 CEST 2015 from (62.140.132.213)

Posted by:

Hilda Fernhout

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: ticketmaster

I haven't been here for a while so I scrolled back a bit and read that Peter V missed out on Southampton.... Day before yesterday two shows in Carré in Amsterdam were announced and tickets will go on sale on friday at 10.00 pm from ticketmaster... Fully seated...relatively small venue ... He never played there before... November 5 and 6.... Also one show in Eindhoven on nov 3....


Entered at Thu May 21 01:47:39 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: JT

Agree totally about Dylan.Did Bob sneer at Dave as he was attempting to get offstage while Dave was still talking?


Entered at Thu May 21 01:12:31 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Enigmatic Bob Dylan

As for Dylan, he is impossible to read. It didn't seem like he was overly pleased to be there though his performance (voice, band, etc) was exceptionally good. A long tour over and enigmatic as ever, this was what we got. Maybe a performance of one of his standards would have been welcomed by some, but for me any Dylan is good Dylan and this was great Dylan. Happy birthday coming /74/.


Entered at Thu May 21 01:08:58 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Waterboys

For all you Scots... tonight, in Victoria at UVic auditorium.... The Waterboys!!! And we are excited. Stay tuned.


Entered at Thu May 21 00:37:00 CEST 2015 from (24.114.70.226)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: I love Toronto.....an adopted hometown but one of the very few cities I know of that has gotten 5 times better as it has gotten 5 times bigger.......but I would never trust a person who could shake off the team they grew up cheering for and for me that was the Habs.....runs very deep but if the Leafs ever do find a way out of the wilderness, the only comfort I will take is knowing how happy it would make you and a few other fine folks I know in this town.......Thanks for the thoughts on Habs.....they just need some scoring. Everything else is in place.


Entered at Thu May 21 00:26:13 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Moses

Lets see if Mike can bring the children out of the wilderness. Kevin, at least there is a ray of hope. It will be slow and finally I think Leaf Nation (whatever that is) will have to learn patience like so many other teams have...not an easy task for hedonist Toronto, a place where everything good has to happen quickly. I'm going to enjoy watching the slow ascent. As for the Canadians, they had a good run and it is far form over for them. I still think their best days (for this century) are ahead of them.


Entered at Thu May 21 00:23:53 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, your probable misinterpretation of God knows what, & all this intrigue doesn't jive with the old scouse turkey :-I 0.


Entered at Thu May 21 00:09:28 CEST 2015 from (24.114.70.226)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: YouTube says no to old IPad's

Weird.....just tried to open a YouTube on my Ipad and got a message that if the Apple device is from 2012 or before, YouTube is not available. Are there that few older IPads, seems hard to believe.

Babcock to Leafs......makes me wanna cry. $50M over 8 years. Joel Quennville dreams just got richer. Babcock really wanted to be in Montreal - just a shame that the Habs GM couldn't find a way to can a coach that got 110 points. He should have and brought the McGill boy back.


Entered at Wed May 20 23:52:50 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I recorded with this guy 20 years ago, then I lost track. After reading the bio, I now know why. His first album, at age 53. If you like the Tom Waits side of things...


Entered at Wed May 20 23:10:19 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: 52° 18′ N, 07° 10′ W

Subject: the chosen ones

Never in history of mankind there has been better music then Dylan and The Band. And we, who witnessed all of these at the right moment are the lucky ones, the chosen ones. And we’re not 144,000 we are only 144.

Last night I made a copy of this complete site and the whole legacy of The Band, on one big CD. Greased it with Els’ hair gel, wrapped it in three layers of quality plastic and sealed this carefully but tight with 20m Duct tape.

This afternoon I buried the package 5 feet in the ground at the coordinates: 52° 18′ N, 07° 10′W

This was all done for just in case, as this earth has become a lump of ice and travels, at warp speed, through the galaxy …… one day ET can and will find us (hair gel smells).

Anyway know from now on we’re all, just like The Band immortal.

Sleep well, chosen one.


Entered at Wed May 20 23:05:40 CEST 2015 from (24.114.70.226)

Posted by:

Kevin J

A few things:

* Hawks win this morning.......what a game....Crawford made so many great saves in the OT periods, 3 or 4 in the first minute of the 3rd overtime period alone.......with the Habs out, the Hawks are the team I am cheering for.....and strongly. 3 Cups for this Toews, Kane and Keith led group will certainly put them into an all-time club.

* Al Edge: I am very happy to know you are feeling better.

* British Politics : Enough was written about the results of the election - and all very enjoyable to read. I will only add a comment about the television coverage of election night/morning after as I was in Hong Kong at the time and BBC World flipped to the actual BBC coverage which was quite a revelation for me.......almost like a turning of the clock back 30 years in terms of the presentation......the head anchor seemd a Ted Baxter character who asked all sorts of questions to a panel surrounding him but in a away I got to enjoy more and more as the evening/ morning went on, he quite clearly wasn't listenning to a word anyone was saying. The beauty point for me came when the cameras and screen zoomed in on a moving David Cameron Limo and the anchor deadpanned "Not sure why we are watching this - perhaps the Prime Minister's car will break down and we'll have some news".

* Dylan on Letteman: I taped it and was disappointed. Love him but the camera angles were all wrong and his tugging at his shirt and aimless wanderings were almost haunting. I thought a final song for an all time show wih an all time artist could have and should have been so much more.

* I have seen Bob 8 times. 6 Toronto, 2 Montreal. Other than 85 or 86 I think in Montreal ( the Forum ) all post 1990. One Fog show but every other one very good to great shows........a by the way, David Letterman was very welcoming to Robbie at every significant album release and to Levon always - even after a situation where Levon was famously a no-show !


Entered at Wed May 20 21:31:24 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: letterman

Calling it a day? Only Dave; not Bob.


Entered at Wed May 20 21:29:02 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Header

Prospect for Liverpool FC?

Went on much too late for my time zone. I couldn't even stay up to see Dylan on Letterman. Still a brilliant though understandably disallowed goal.


Entered at Wed May 20 19:34:27 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Dylan AND Chest Fever. Plus an epic Blackhawks win.


Entered at Wed May 20 18:11:23 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The solving of the big nose mystery

Ha ha

:-) versus :-0)


Entered at Wed May 20 17:51:09 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Pals/Letterman

I'm not sure Letterman has any pals! HA!Supposedly he's very private and has little relationship with any guest away from the show.Why would he befriend a manager? Unless the privacy thing about Dave is a myth too.Agendas may color perceptions in certain circumstances.Who really knows?


Entered at Wed May 20 17:02:13 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB, if he said it, it must be true. I bet Letterman and Taplin are pals.


Entered at Wed May 20 16:57:14 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: PSB

Assuming that the road manager is legit in his observation,that would be disappointing to hear.


Entered at Wed May 20 16:48:32 CEST 2015 from (72.78.40.161)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: re: Dylan on Letterman

Jed, according to a certain road manager, Letterman wasn't respectful of The Band or Levon.


Entered at Wed May 20 16:45:53 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, yes, the first show of the 74 Tour. That show was the 4th time I saw the boys.


Entered at Wed May 20 15:46:27 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan helps Letterman call it a day

I saw and heard Dylan 1965, 1974, 3 times in the 80s, 7 times in the 90s, and about 6-7 times since. Best show was Massey Hall1965 and the one at Masonic Temple on Yonge St. in Toronto when he had just released his unplugged album. He was very good in Vaughan at Wonderland when Paul James came on stage and his 3 shows at O'Keefe Centre in the early 90s were great. His performance on Letterman last night was exceptional and appropriate.


Entered at Wed May 20 12:35:53 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.89)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Less than 20 for me, probably 12-16.

Al, I'm clueless to what you allude to.


Entered at Wed May 20 10:31:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan performances

OK, bets on the table for who has seen most. My money's on Ian.


Entered at Wed May 20 09:59:37 CEST 2015 from (70.208.65.163)

Posted by:

Ari

Anybody notice that they played Chest Fever while introducing Bill Murray on Letterman last nite...go figure..............


Entered at Wed May 20 09:56:19 CEST 2015 from (70.208.65.163)

Posted by:

R.E.

Location: sag harbor

Subject: Salinger Brothers on Letterman

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vsHTlOuuUpQ


Entered at Wed May 20 09:52:02 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Nose size

Not having it that you've got such a dainty petite nose Jeff lad.

At least I'm honest about mine.

Wasn't Schnozzel Durante from your neck of the woods?

:-0)


Entered at Wed May 20 09:07:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

The Uncut Dylan special currently in stores has a long review of the Chicago 74 show which it has exhumed from the vaults. It's done album by album and vastly over rates Saved and vastly under rates Street Legal, but overall it is worth reading. I assume Chicago 74 is the one Pat meant!


Entered at Wed May 20 08:39:18 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

The game is hockey, and the Blackhawks have the heart of a champion.

I've seen Dylan somewhere between 20 to 30 times. Once with the boys.


Entered at Wed May 20 04:29:43 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.89)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

With the exclusion of PSB, Bob F. and his wife may have seen more Dylan live performances than the rest of us here combined. Bob's soft spoken, but he's been around :-)


Entered at Wed May 20 03:32:38 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bill Murray

The other guest besides Dylan,Murray is an outstanding performer-hilarious!


Entered at Tue May 19 23:20:45 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yeah, an excellent article. I have a vhs somewhere in my basement of the afternoon rehearsals.


Entered at Tue May 19 23:03:30 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: First Letterman Show

Pat B, that's a great article! My wife and I actually got in for the taping of that show. We found two kids on line who sold us their free tickets for 80 bucks. Crazy. We actually were the last ones let in. Standing room only. I would have cried like a baby if we din't get in after spending that kind of money. The kid kept saying "if your cops I'm not scalping these tickets, your forcing me to sell them". I think they were from out of town. They must have grew up on Mod Squad reruns. Silly what we spend our money when we're young and stupid. Great memory though.


Entered at Tue May 19 21:45:19 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan on Letterman

Letterman is the last of his generation and last of the Carson types that have inhabited the airwaves for decades.Lettterman has also been a huge supporter of great music,particularly supportive of The Band and Levon through the years.Dylan feels at home there and it makes sense.in addition to the many excellent musical guests,the house band can play anything,and they play everything very well.It's always been a very funny and very musical place.Dave is straight up,no BS-he's there to have fun and if you get in his way,watch out! His heart uniquely opened up to musicians.


Entered at Tue May 19 21:36:21 CEST 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

New song (in advance of new album) from Amy Helm. Nice!


Entered at Tue May 19 21:10:07 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

With Dylan appearing on Letterman tonight, a great article on Dylan's first show there more than 30 years ago.


Entered at Tue May 19 19:09:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Scalping agencies

I failed on Bob at Southampton (seated). Ticketmaster just emailed me offering a £70 ticket at £77 (as normal), but of course when I went through there weren't any available, just a link to "Get Me In" at £150.

I just couldn't countenance paying a scalper (actually or anyone) that much. (Unless it were to see Robbie Robertson). You can see why artists charge so much when people can buy them and charge double right away.

It's an epidemic on everything. The Daily Mail is giving away free LEGO if you buy your copy at W.H. Smith. A different model every day. My grandson wanted The Joker on Sunday so i went to W.H. Smith, and there were twenty people in line, most with multiple copies of the paper. I got my single copy and the LEGO model, but I'm told they'd all be on eBay by lunchtime when the store ran out. Record Store Day is worse.


Entered at Tue May 19 17:30:33 CEST 2015 from (32.216.240.188)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: These Days

Speaking of Gregg Allman, I've always liked his lovely version of Jackson Browne's song 'These Days'.


Entered at Tue May 19 17:01:14 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Sad song

Gregg Allman-Oncoming Traffic.There may not be any Allmans fans here but even if you don't listen to them,try this one from Gregg's solo work(just Gregg and his piano) It was originally on The Gregg Allman Tour album,a tour I saw when they played in Carnegie Hall.A beautiful song.


Entered at Tue May 19 16:27:45 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the weeping cowboy

A sad song from Ol' Eon . . . .


Entered at Tue May 19 16:14:14 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Walking Down The Line

This 1962 Dylan song didn't fully emerge until the Bootleg Series 1-3. I've been listening to Jackie DeShannon's 1963 cover on "In The Wind", an album which includes Blowing In The Wind, Don't think Twice and Baby Let Me Follow You "Around" as well. The interest is that she was apparently the first to cover it, as she says she was also the first to cover "The Weight." Good taste.


Entered at Tue May 19 10:42:11 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oh. My mum use to sing Tammy all the time. The melody is perfect whatever the lyrics. Instantly evocative.


Entered at Tue May 19 10:34:41 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M finally nails the scouse wimp

Okay Bill - you've finally outed me. I admit it. I was 6 at the time and have never gotten past it.

:-0)


Entered at Tue May 19 09:41:44 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: You'll never walk alone

while it may bring a tear to my eye I always found it more uplifting than sad. Great song.


Entered at Tue May 19 08:53:25 CEST 2015 from (122.176.166.220)

Posted by:

ESHRE

Location: Ue
Web: My link

Subject: ESHRE 2015

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Entered at Tue May 19 04:48:09 CEST 2015 from (86.148.228.181)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

How to play the guitar part in "Acadian Driftwood". In two parts and seems to be spot on.


Entered at Tue May 19 04:23:46 CEST 2015 from (86.148.228.181)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Norbert - Sorry my friend, I missed your question. To drop down to the next line just use a 'b' instead of 'n'.

Sad songs. Had to include "Pretty Saro" by Bob Dylan (link). Also "Insensatez" (aka "How Insensitive"), maybe the Getz\Gilberto version although the sparser the better because it lends itself to just guitar and voice. There's something about the Portuguese language. I was playing David Bowie's version of "Wild is the Wind" recently too.


Entered at Tue May 19 01:46:18 CEST 2015 from (58.104.15.64)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Well Peter, here is another reason for you to laugh when you hear the name Gerry Marsden, check out the go-go dancer on the right.


Entered at Mon May 18 21:54:50 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill M, OK, Leader of The Pack … but Honey is surely a step too far for anyone, even those whose wife won't start, the truck just died and the dog ran away with their best friend.


Entered at Mon May 18 20:51:00 CEST 2015 from (74.43.18.162)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: The Who 4th farwell tour

I saw the Who in Philly last night. I have to say - I really liked the show. Townsend was terrific, RD for 71 was also fantastic- there was some limitation to his range but he got there on more than a few songs. The song selection was great - if you get a chance to see this tour - you should - they definitely did not mail it in.


Entered at Mon May 18 20:47:54 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Dylan & Dave.

Tomorrow night Bob will be Letterman's final musical guest. That takes the cake for sad. We're firmly ensconced in a new, pitiful age of TV.


Entered at Mon May 18 20:18:10 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.1)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: When it comes to sad songs, I guess in most cases, if not all, we're projecting our own experience or cicumstances to some degree. I'm sure there are people who fall to pieces at the sound of "Teen Angel" or "Leader Of The Pack" or "Honey".


Entered at Mon May 18 18:35:44 CEST 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Sadness of the King

Elvis recorded some very sad songs at his final recording sessions in Graceland. The songs that really stick out for me are Danny boy, Hurt, solitaire and He'll have to go. I don't think Old shep can hold a candle to any of these performances.


Entered at Mon May 18 16:09:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Top 30 Funeral Songs

According to the link, You'll Never Walk Alone is #7 in the UK list, as is In My Life. Th numbers relate then go awry on the side. Press #11. Predictably My Way is #1. The ironic side is shown by Always Look on The Bright Side of Life (#2) and Highways to Hell (#30). I'm also not convinced Stairway to Heaven (#21) is appropriate!

Missing is "Sailin'" which I mention in the Rod Stewart Toppermost. I've heard that twice at funerals, and it works … one was an ex-navy guy, the other a keen recreational sailor.


Entered at Mon May 18 15:22:04 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: Gerry Marsden

You want sadness and tears? Hit the link.


Entered at Mon May 18 14:30:46 CEST 2015 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah MacLean

Subject: Still on sad songs ?

John Denver's Seasons of the Heart

Remember when most songs were about love?

Then came protest songs

Now we have smutty , misogynistic , racist , hate songs !

If I had a vote , I would cast it for a return to love songs , whether it be the thrill of love or the almost inevitable chill of love .


Entered at Mon May 18 12:53:26 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gerry Marsden

The paths of memories evoked by songs are all about context … You’ll Never Walk Alone has so many layers of context in Liverpool.

It was nice to hear Gerry Marsden’s voice over the speakers. Mrs V and I have a context thing with Gerry that’s quite different. For years we wrote Christmas pantomimes for the language school – all the host families and their kids were invited as an annual “thank you” and we ran three days. We found “I Like It” was a wonderful pantomime dame song. But then in the mid 70s we were persuaded to take part in an amateur film being produced by one of the older senior teachers. It was a dramatic story about a doctor attending an accident and finding his wife’s photo in the victim’s wallet. Mrs V played the wife. I did the interiors lighting (which is why we were invited as I had access to our theatrical spotlights store). The trouble was, the victim was named Gerry Marsden. The guy who wrote the script had never heard of him, and because he’d already filmed some exterior scenes with dialogue, would not change the name. Hence Mrs V had lines like “Oh, no! Not Gerry Marsden!” repeatedly, while our friend Nick, playing the doctor had to say, ‘Yes, Gerry Marsden!” while the rest of he cast had tears of laughter running down their faces, not helped by someone humming “I Like It” between takes and everyone asking her, ‘Great. I like it! How do you do it?” after every take. Then someone would add, ‘I’m going to Liverpool next weekend. What’s the best route?’ to which the inevitable answer was ‘Ferry Cross The Mersey.’ So in our house you only have to say “Gerry Marsden” and we start laughing.


Entered at Mon May 18 11:38:16 CEST 2015 from (58.104.9.217)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Speaking of sad songs, Steven Gerrard's send off on the week end was pretty touching.


Entered at Mon May 18 10:34:33 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Shell beach

Got me reaching for the tissues now mate.

Lovely sentiments.

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 18 10:29:22 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Solomon - thats a great find. would have been a great concert.


Entered at Mon May 18 10:24:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Walk Like A Man (Bruce)

Al, it would be my personal reaction. I hadn't thought about it … it always touched emotions for me, but it's personal. My dad died when I was 18. The favourite family place to go was Shell Bay beach in Dorset, and in the 1950s there was always a game about following his footprints in the sand because every so often a World War II mine turned up - they apparently feared an invasion onto the isolated beach. Obviously there was no hand on mine on my wedding day etc but it was missed. And there's "when I saw your best steps stolen away from you." And I need a tissue at weddings even when it's neighbors kids I don't know well.

It does bring up how songs resonate beyond what the writer was thinking though. There's something in the loping pace of the music and tune too.

I always feel a great sense of poignancy at Shell Bay now … it's right across the harbour mouth from Poole - a five minute ferry journey. One of the best beaches in Britain for kids (shallow warm water) as long as you don't go round the corner at the end. That takes you onto Studland Beach a naturist haunt. We used to think that beach a great walk out to Old Harry Rocks 20 or 30 years ago, but last time we walked it we found the presence of so many lone male naturists standing staring at each other unpleasant.


Entered at Mon May 18 06:18:25 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Interesting article about The Importance of Levon's Ramble At The Ryman

Linked. I never saw this before.


Entered at Mon May 18 02:21:04 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Atlantic City

Got to be right up there as one his very finest creations.

A perfect song but again Bill like with Pete's Walk Like a Man I don't quite 'get' the sadness. The bleakness, desperation and futility scream out but they don't make me feel sad for the protaganists. I guess pity but no tears.

Mind you Pete's bang on about Bruce's intrinsic gift of hitting the button. But whilst there's so many with high emotion I can't think any of his offerings that are out and out sadness. It's just the ability to connect with the human emotion in his writing and melody which is in him and flows out in so much that he writes.

Bar the obvious exceptions, emotion surges through almost everything. In fact, I d say he finds it hard to write a lyric that doesn't touch the emotions. I couldn't pick one as his most emotional but, looking at it another way, if you just take a listen to one of his more upbeat bouncy songs such a Bobbie jean [his ode to Steve van Zandt] he still manages to lace the bounce of the melody with emotion as the track reaches its climax. The guy's just a feckin genius.

:-0)

Off the top of my head I'd have Racing in the Streets, Backstreets, Stolen Car and The Promise as the most emotional wreckers.


Entered at Mon May 18 01:46:27 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Walk Like A Man

As you know Pete, Tunnel is my all time favourite Bruce album. It doesn't get the acclaim but for me it's so good it eclipses Dylan's corresponding reflection on broken relationships. As you rightly say Walk like a Man is a wonderful track and along with Brilliant Disguise and Valentines day is a highlight amongst what are a multitude of album highlights.

Got to say though I am puzzling a bit as to where you're finding the sadness in the song. Poignant in a reflective/nostalgic way but I don't feel the sadness. Don't forget his dad and those rough segged hands was alive and kicking at the time of his marriage and for a good 15 years afterwards so there's no sense of loss here.

For me it's Bruce recalling how the simple naive innocence of his early boyhood relationship with his dad and the idolising that accompanied that became as we know now a very tempestuous clash of personalities and ensuing distancing as Bruce entered his teenage years and beyond.

As he grew older he tried to reconcile the fact that everything he'd achieved he'd had to "learn on my own" but realised too how his father's depressive tendencies coupled with his unreliable working class life had effectively cheated him of the sort of life and aspirations Bruce himself aspired to and had prevented him from supporting Bruce. The opposite in fact.

Interested to know if there's something you've picked up on that I'm missing? Or is it the father/son wedding referencing. Are you one of those heart on the sleeve fellas that gets the tissues out as the knot is tied?

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 18 01:39:14 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Everything I own

Bill.

Yeah. It wasn't till years later that I found out it wasn't a typical lost love song. I think it might even have been when Ken Boothe did the cover in a ska/reggae style [which didn't work for me] and I read something about why Gates had written it.

Been a favourite ever since.

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 18 01:07:25 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.157)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Good call on "Everything I Own". Means so much more when you learn that it wasn't about Gates' girl or his dog.

JT / Peter V: the saddest Bruce song for me is his minimalist version of "Atlantic City". You know the hope is in vain - like much of Steinbeck, and also Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car", which also hits me. Our Guys' version of AC is great fun, so not on the same planet.


Entered at Sun May 17 20:36:03 CEST 2015 from (92.19.32.155)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Dr. John and Levon Helm at the Mardi Gras in the Superdome 1977

Levon reminds me of Al Jackson with the headwear.


Entered at Sun May 17 20:01:18 CEST 2015 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah MacLean

Subject: sad , sadder, saddest

"sad" being the operative word , Marianne's fractured voice and melancholy delivery certainly nails it !


Entered at Sun May 17 19:58:09 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Sad songs

Bonnie Riait I can't make you love me.n\ Simon and Garfunkel old friends


Entered at Sun May 17 19:31:12 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germay
Web: My link

Subject: The Ruhrgebiet

NorthWestCoaster, I bought a car in Essen, stayed in Dusseldorf and Köln, we don’t live far from Bochum (60 miles or less), drove many times past it. ….but never been there ;-).

Anyway The Kohlenpott ("The Coal-pit", as they call The Ruhrgebiet here) has something magical, agricultural idyll between heavy industries. Coal mines under the ground, thick heavy air above it and in between small happiness, chip & beer stands, allotment gardens, Opel cars and soccer.

You've seen The Rurhgebiet is almost one gigantic city, one of the biggest industrial regions in the world carved by eight lane high ways. But know, as all people who live and work there original came from elsewhere, they are very tolerant and friendly there. There’s no better place in Germany to stop and drink a beer.


Entered at Sun May 17 18:58:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Sarah, I don't think Marianne's is "better" just "sadder" if that explains it. It's her well-weathered voice. As on Down from Dover (linked)


Entered at Sun May 17 18:55:46 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Walk Like A Man (Bruce)

Good call on Bruce. The one that gets me every time is Bruce Springsteen on "Walk Like A Man." It's playing as I type and I can feel my eyes welling up already. It played in my head on my son's wedding day too. Incredible song.

Mind you, Bruce knows where the button is and how to touch it … The River, Highway Patrolman. It's not just a matter of lyrics. The music has to touch it too.


Entered at Sun May 17 17:57:37 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Songs from 'Nebraska'

Not quite' sad' but rather the emotions related to moral decisions are central and my response to many of these songs is 'sadness' for the places the people in these songs find themselves. The songs hit me hard.


Entered at Sun May 17 17:09:40 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Sad Songs: The one that gets me every time

David Gates - "Everything I Own"

Many still perceive it as a song of lost love. It's only when you context it as his poignant yearning to be re-united with his late father that its full unbearable sadness and beauty hits home.

The lines...

" The finest years I ever knew
Were all the years I had with you
"And I would give everything I own
Just to have you back again
just to touch you once again"

...bring the tears every time I hear them even now 30 years after my father passed away.


Entered at Sun May 17 17:05:01 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Hurt

I wasn't going to put this one up but after Carmen's (kill the pain) - "Hurt" - Reznor/9"Nails'/brilliant Johnny Cash cover to break your heart


Entered at Sun May 17 16:53:23 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Fallen Angel

and Broken Arrow - "I'll get to you if I have to Crawl"

and Between Trains - "I've done some killing, all I kill any more is the pain"

two very heart tugging line sung perfectly


Entered at Sun May 17 16:37:07 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, rule? You're wrong.


Entered at Sun May 17 16:17:35 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: A longstanding rule in songwriting, as in book-writing and movie-making, is that if there's a dog, the dog's gotta die. Which is why I believe a verse was chopped from "Me And You And A Dog Named Boo", though of course the early '70s was a rebellious time.


Entered at Sun May 17 15:56:05 CEST 2015 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah MacLean

Subject: " Sophie's Choice "

Being a Bluenoser , I am a bit biased .


Entered at Sun May 17 15:48:20 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

PETE, YOUR QUESTION: "What about the distinction between a “commercial tearjerker” where someone sits down to manipulate emotions in an obvious way and a “sad song”? Do you think that exists? ." is an important one. The distinction to which you point is not limited to tearjerkers. So that question takes on great import....How successful the writer, or craftperson, or manipulater is will vary. When they are really successful, you don't necessarily know they were being intentionally commercial....

Had i not seen Gross live,&..., & got a strong dose of his personality & work of the last few decades, etc, or had I not read the background, I would not have realized how intent(etc) he is. I think there was a lot of organic aspects to most of his earlier work, I'd have to go back & listen. But Shannon, in his interviews he may just want to impress people with his craftsmanship, or maybe he was of that commercial intent, or maybe not.... regardless of the possibly unknown fact of intent, to me, Shannon succeeded on a high level. The lyrics still tell a sketchy story, but, the music, the melody, all make up for that. While the album version is overproduced, it doesn't matter. I'm not sure if the radio version was or wasn't different. All I know is the song works for me. Bare, it is a heartbreaker. But the chords & rhythm guitar & melody, are as important as the sadness of the lyrics,the saddest being the chorus.


Entered at Sun May 17 14:39:05 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lucy Jordan 1990

The thing is Marianne's voice gets more distinctive and richer with age … so also check out the 1990 live one.


Entered at Sun May 17 14:38:02 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ballad of Lucy Jordan

I loved that version, beautifully sung … but link is to the Marianne Faithful version from "Blazing Away" with Garth Hudson. The Barra MacNeil's singer takes it beautifully without a slip, and I loved the backing, but there is something about the "non-perfection" of Marianne Faithful's voice. Which is the best version is a real Sophie's Choice, but in terms of "sadness quotient" I'd say Marianne wins. Then you've got Garth. But see the next post …


Entered at Sun May 17 13:57:24 CEST 2015 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah Mac lean

Subject: sad songs

The Ballad of Lucy Jordan by The Barra MacNeils . IMHO the best version.

The Barra MacNeils are from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia .


Entered at Sun May 17 12:44:26 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bochum Blues

Thanks Norbert. I had the good taste to visit Bochum already in 1967 (just drove thru, actually). The city had a Finnish connection until Nokia closed the factory down there, right?


Entered at Sun May 17 11:53:20 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Bochum & Glück Auf

Last night I got the English translation of the German song Bochum from Herbert Grönemeyer. He claims that he translated his song special for this GB (he is a Band fan too) and asked me to post it here …. anyway:

Note: “glück auf” (good luck up) is a miners greeting “The greeting also expressed the desire that miners would return safely from the mine after their shift.”

BOCHUM

sun still fighting

through smoke and steam

life here's better

than you could ever dream

life here's better

life here's better

i know you're no beauty

for work's lined your face

you don't like wearing make-up

you're an honest place

where the human race

isn't always in competition

your heartbeat's of metal

it hammers out through the night

the foundation of prosperity

you're a working town

don't let them put you down

you bloom in your own way

bochum i call you home

bochum you're in my bones

oh, glück auf - my home

you're not a neon playground

there are no fashion shows here

you're not a postcard for the tourists

here it's the heart that counts

not the size of bank accounts

you've never sold yourself away

bochum...

may your smile shine on forever

through the cold dust it gleams

be proud of your tiny gardens

proud of your traffic lights

proud of your chimney-stacks

proud of your football team!

bochum ...

oh, glück auf

oh, glück auf

oh, glück auf - my home

PS Simon how do you get those "br" breaks in here (instead of the backslash n)?


Entered at Sun May 17 11:37:14 CEST 2015 from (58.104.5.227)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

When it comes to tearjerkers you can't go past 'Wreck on the Highway'.


Entered at Sun May 17 10:52:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, got one! Slip Slidin' Away by Paul Simon. That evokes sadness every tme for me. Genuinely.


Entered at Sun May 17 10:51:10 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There were a few references, I didn’t look too far. What about the distinction between a “commercial tearjerker” where someone sits down to manipulate emotions in an obvious way and a “sad song”? Do you think that exists?

If it doesn’t, I’m putting up Tell Laura I Love Her, Leader of The Pack, and Terry.

Anyway, if I were the dog, I’d have lit out for the territories.


Entered at Sun May 17 10:43:39 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, the story Gross denies is the one about it being Carl Wilson's dog & actually did drift out to sea with an undertow...


Entered at Sun May 17 10:34:03 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete. It's confusing. You did not research enough. Gross denies that story.


Entered at Sun May 17 09:07:20 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Fallen Angel

I agree, that's number one.


Entered at Sun May 17 08:56:54 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tearjerkers

Sorry, the word I was looking for was "tearjerker" a song deliberately written to evoke sadness. I think that's different from a truly sad song.

I am reminded of that live Elvis version of "Are You Lonesome Tonight" where he breaks up laughing mid lyric because it's SUCH a tearjerker he can't hold it together.


Entered at Sun May 17 08:43:11 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Those Ebony Skies

I had never knowingly heard “Shannon” by Henry Gross, though it was a UK #32 hit I see. So I listened, and thought ‘This is really going to be sad’ what with mother feeling unusually tired and there was something they couldn’t tell her. The lump started to rise in my throat, then I started to realize the song appeared to be about a DOG! I looked up the stories, and indeed there was a tragic connection in that the woman who gave him the dog died of cancer, and then it linked in to Carl Wilson’s dog of the same name that got run over. Apparently it was the dog that saved Brian Wilson’s sanity.

But I don’t think that dog drifted out to sea, I think it got fed up because every time it tried to crap in the sandpit it found this big bloke in the sand pit with a grand piano. I think that dog just snuck off. I mean what healthy red setter wants to live with a guy who describes it as “a wonderful girl came into my life”? as Mr Gross does online. That’s gross!

Sad songs about dogs are only sad if your old truck won’t start and your wife just left you for a travelling snake oil salesman.

So that brings us to Old Shep by Elvis. Is that sad, or is it a send up? It teeters on the line. ‘One day the doctor looked at me and said, I can do no more for him Jim. With hands that were trembling I picked up my gun and aimed it at Shep’s faithful head …’

See! I can remember the words. But surely Old Shep is classed with Ebony Eyes by the Everly Brothers as a “deliberate manipulation” sad song, as is Shannon.

Pale Blue Eyes, This Bitter Earth, It’s Over, Trouble, Down By The Salley Gardens, Danny Boy … these are truly sad songs.


Entered at Sun May 17 07:52:57 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

And a show I attended in 1971. Taj Mahal opened.


Entered at Sun May 17 07:36:07 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Philly show the night before the Palladium show in 1976. They perform five songs from NLSC plus Twilight. Yeah, they just weren't behind that album at all.


Entered at Sun May 17 06:29:15 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Actually Bill M., Gross was in a period where he was trying to sound like The Beach Boys.


Entered at Sun May 17 05:51:39 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Of the sad songs mentioned that I know, I'll go with Carmen's suggestion: "I Don't Want To Talk About It" - believable even in the hands of His Rodship. "Shannon" is a reasonable suggestion, but as it's basically a doggified "Space Oddity", I'd go with the Bowie. "When Will I Be Loved" is truly weepy when sung by Linda Soon-to-be-Thompson on the Bunch album, but not in the least when sung by Linda Ronstadt. (Based on performance, the answer to Linda #1 would be 'Never' and to Linda #2 'Oh, 20 minutes'.) Much as I'd like to agree with our rarely spotted chum BWNWIT (still NW?), the Orbison is a singing telegram. My own suggestions: runner-up - the Everlys' "Good Love Gone Bad"; winner - Richard Manuel's "Whispering Pines". Christ, all he needed was the light from one star, and that disappeaared.


Entered at Sun May 17 05:40:52 CEST 2015 from (58.104.5.227)

Posted by:

Wallsend

When it comes to Hendrix, I always thought The Wind Cries Mary was a sad song. Little Wing also has more than a tinge of sadness to it.


Entered at Sun May 17 05:34:40 CEST 2015 from (86.148.228.181)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"This Bitter Earth" was one of the first that came to mind. I've linked to "Cause We've Ended Now As Lovers" by Syreeta. Until recently I'd only heard the Jeff Beck instrumental version.

"Fallen Angel" by Robbie, for obvious reasons.
"Pale Blue Eyes" by The Velvet Underground
"Drifting" by Jimi. Because of what was lost.

I enjoyed - if that's the right word - everyone's choices.


Entered at Sun May 17 03:58:55 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Tecumseh Valley


Entered at Sun May 17 02:59:24 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Fasten your seat belts..

lest you crash whilst listening to these 3 sad ones:

- Bridget O' Malley - Andy M Stewart/Manus Lunny

- The King Of Rome - June Tabor

- Poor Wayfaring Stranger - Charlie Haden


Entered at Sun May 17 02:50:47 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Now this is how to remember BB King.


Entered at Sun May 17 02:10:58 CEST 2015 from (32.216.240.188)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Sad Songs

Emmylou Harris - 'Red Dirt Girl' from the album of the same title released circa 2000.

Heard her do that live at a Ramble once at Levon's. Damn tearjerker of a song that one.
Had to go seek out the album so I could relive the sadness once in a while. Can only do it about once a year though.

Song at link above for your sadness listening pleasure.


Entered at Sat May 16 23:30:12 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Two great choices: This Bitter Earth and my favorite version of Down By The Salley Gardens. In fact so many of the great sad ones are Irish. Danny Boy did it for generations at closing time!



Entered at Sat May 16 23:24:29 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Warren Zevon

Keep Me In Your Heart - Warren Zevon


Entered at Sat May 16 22:46:02 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland.
Web: My link

Subject: Down By The Salley Gardens

'Down By The Salley Gardens', a poem by W.B. Yeats, now a popular folk song is sad. This is a great version by Maura O'Connell supported by Karen Mathieson. Give it a listen.


Entered at Sat May 16 21:58:27 CEST 2015 from (74.179.55.55)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Subject: Sad songs

I'd nominate Roy Orbison's "It's Over." Brutally straightforward. I've always thought it was almost laughably sadistic in its matter-of-factness. "You won't be seeing rainbows anymore."

I'd also include Robbie's mashup of "This Bitter Earth" and "On The Nature of Daylight" from the "Shutter Island" soundtrack, even though it does contain a small glimmer of hope in the lyrics.

Shout-out to "Spiritual" by Spain, too.


Entered at Sat May 16 17:52:11 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I saw Gross solo almost two years back. On most songs,including Shannon, his voice was still perfect. Shannon, down to guitar & vocals, those rhythm guitar chord changes alone are enough to cause a waterfall. I doubt there was a dry eye in the BBQ joint.


Entered at Sat May 16 17:42:03 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: More sadness

Shannon: Great choice, Jeff. I forgot about it. For evocative sadness, try 'Suicide is Painless' (Johnny Mandel. Anyone who has had a suicidal child will feel this one deeply.


Entered at Sat May 16 17:34:42 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tears In Heaven

No contest! 'Tears In Heaven'. Nothing is sadder!!! Lucretia tears up instantly with the first few notes. I just tried it.


Entered at Sat May 16 17:16:03 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.81)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sad Songs- I immediately think of Ballad Of the Green Berets ( Sgt. Barry Adler) & Shannon (Henry Gross).


Entered at Sat May 16 13:04:21 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Sad song

Cameron won the election and the thread is "sad song". Perfect, I'm in! - My entry is 'The Day the Bird of Paradise Looked Down Trough a Crack In the Cloud and Shed a Tear' by Blues Section. It lasts only 16 seconds which is sad, too.


Entered at Sat May 16 13:03:13 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dream dates & Sad Songs

Crispian – yes, he does sound a bit inebriated, but the YouTube video accentuates it because he looks it too. In the end it’s the backing rather than the singing I prefer on his version. Decca session guys I expect. I wonder who played the organ?

Just thinking. Jackie De Shannon looks the “Ideal Date” for 1964, and Francoise Hardy the dream date for 1965 which for me was folk clubs, long straight hair. It’s going to be Ronnie Spector for 1963 for me. I’ll link to my 1967 dream.

The ten sad songs link had some arcane but worthy stuff … Magnetic Fields and Sufjan Stevens. I agree that Long Black Veil is a send-up, not truly sad. Jolene was a weird choice … forget the lyrics, it bounces along too cheerfully to be sad. Marianne Faithful doing Dolly Parton's "Down From Dover" IS sad. Jolene isn't.

Trouble by Little Feat.


Entered at Sat May 16 11:48:18 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Al

Sounds Scottish, but I don't know any Gouldsons.


Entered at Sat May 16 07:22:49 CEST 2015 from (58.104.24.85)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Sad Songs

I would vote for Bob Dylan's Dream or Any Irvine's Time Will Cure Me.


Entered at Sat May 16 06:17:13 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: sad songs ....

what about The Night We Called it a Day from Bob Dylans latest?


Entered at Sat May 16 05:02:28 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: 50 saddest songs of all time.

Long Black Veil made the list but I think it is more funny than sad. What about It Makes No Difference, I Don't Want to Talk about It by Crazy Horse and Most of the Time by Dylan. Others?


Entered at Sat May 16 03:41:03 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Francoise

Droolin.


Entered at Sat May 16 01:48:37 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Another angel to drool over

The Gallic goddess

:-0)


Entered at Sat May 16 01:18:21 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Granby

Lisa - incredible stuff. Never knew about it. cheers.


Entered at Sat May 16 00:04:32 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, I rate Pied Piper pretty high but Crispian sounds a tad drunk on YWOMM.


Entered at Fri May 15 23:58:22 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: You were on my mind

It's the familiarity thing. I know the Crispian St Peters version, a big hit here and the Barry McGuire version. I've tried three We Five versions just now and they don't make it for me. I miss the sense of urgency on the McGuire and then the backing on the St. Peter's with it's 1966 organ. I'm sure like so many Golden Oldies it is the one that sparks the memory banks.


Entered at Fri May 15 22:24:58 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: BB, Dunc & city songs

BB thanks, you’re up with Blind Lemon Jefferson now, fly butterfly fly.

Dunc thanks.

City songs:

Bochum is a miner’s & steel city in the heart of the German Ruhrgebied, hard labor and coal dust. Not a touristic attraction, raw but honest ……. it has something like perhaps Manchester.

German singer Herbert Grönemeyer (Das Boot), who lived there, has written a beautiful song about it. At live concerts there people go crazy, it’s there town they're proud of it. Anyway city songs, my pick.

1) New York, Alicia Keys.

2) Bochum by Herbert Grönemeyer.


Entered at Fri May 15 22:21:56 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, they're playing live fer gosh sakes. Plus the geek on the left produced Billy Joel's Piano Man album and helped design ProTools for Digidesign.


Entered at Fri May 15 22:08:07 CEST 2015 from (174.1.48.234)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2015/may/12/assemble-turner-prize-2015-wildcard-how-the-young-arc

Al, I ran across this and thought you'd be interested.


Entered at Fri May 15 21:59:44 CEST 2015 from (24.222.133.194)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Jackie

Only reason the shop's open after five with the long weekend coming is that our local politico has indicated he'd like to drop by and settle his debts. Settlement gratefully appreciated.

Recent discussion has me listening to Jackie DeShannon and Dusty Springfield as I impatiently wait. Payment is for legitimate services rendered. Now I've got the Searchers "Needles and Pins' playing.

Always had a special spot for Queen Vic. Not to mention Jackie D.


Entered at Fri May 15 21:59:32 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Southampton

It's standing downstairs (£60) with a seated balcony (£70) - plus booking fee and so on.

There is a pre-sale fan allocation but I believe that's gone already.


Entered at Fri May 15 21:27:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hips

I reckon Jackie DeShannon has a better hip movement, Pat. The singer's nice, but the backing group were pretty weak. Do you know the British cover version by Crispian St. Peters? (Linked). He's not a great singer, and I prefer her moves, but the backing group is I think better.


Entered at Fri May 15 21:18:39 CEST 2015 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Dylan to perform on David Letterman's show next Tuesday!


Entered at Fri May 15 20:26:12 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Ian. Odd … Southampton Guildhall is where I saw Bowie start the Hunky Dory tour and Lou Reed on the Rock & Roll Animal Tour. 1750? We were there late last year for Seth Lakeman and for Bellowhead and my guess would have been 1000 maximum. Seth was seated throughout (probably more like 700) and Bellowhead had a standing area and about 20% seated. I suspect Bob will be all standing to cram in that many, but I will try first thing Monday just in case there's a seated area.

Just bought the UNCUT Dylan Music Guide. I only read them dissing Street Legal, my second favorite album and got annoyed.


Entered at Fri May 15 19:59:03 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Manfred Mann

"I arrange the music. I am changing the music. That kind of an artist. I don't write music. I am a keyboard player." Well, I think I got the answer to the question: "Why Dylan's demo tapes? Why you?"


Entered at Fri May 15 19:57:19 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill

Peter V: The cameraman appears to have had similar feelings, judging by the number of times the top of Jackie's head leaves the frame.


Entered at Fri May 15 19:57:13 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

After watching Jackie De Shannon do her thing, I'm reminded what interesting dance moves women lead singers had in the early to mid 60's. As a young man, I was smitten by Bev.


Entered at Fri May 15 19:30:57 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan coming to Southampton

This is mainly for Peter V.

In case you don't know, Dylan will be playing Southampton Guildhall on Friday, 30 October - a small venue (1750 capacity) at the end of the British leg of his European tour in October.

Tickets go on sale to the public on Monday (18 May).


Entered at Fri May 15 19:27:15 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.140)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Nah

Mike, I enjoyed the U.K. political discussion myself. However, I don't think it quite reached the level of a true GB brou haha. . Wouldn't even in a bar. Now, if Pat, Tennessee, & Norm were Southies, then, we'd have seen something. Really, all it would have taken would be for Pat to be a Southie, and then we'd have seen Al really engage. That PV/PB tag team woulda brought out the (Socialist) Scouse Scourge & had him dancing and jabbing, it woulda been a Scouse Street Fight for posterity.. "All things considered", "yaknow, yaknow yaknow, ya just ain't seen nothing yet."


Entered at Fri May 15 17:35:50 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: To our lads in the Isles . . .

Thanks, by the way, for that lively and spirited political/social analysis related to the recent U.K. election. It obviously would have been even more spirited (ouch!) were the locale to have been moved to a pub, and around a large round table with limitless brewskis flowing freely. But thanks just the same, this from a norte Americano living above the 49th parallel. Steve also would likely have approved.


Entered at Fri May 15 17:27:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Talking of Sweet Sixteen, that's how old I would have been when Jackie DeShannon did the Hollywood A Go Go clip that Al linked. I'm glad I wasn't in the studio audience. I don't think I could have taken that live.


Entered at Fri May 15 17:21:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jackie deShannon

You just posted my all-time favorite YouTube moment, Al. That will be leading off the Toppermost I'm sure. Did I post this before? It's the single version of "Sweet Sixteen" duetting with Van Morrison. When you've done that, try Flamingoes Fly, Santa Fe and The Wonder of You, all Van compositions from "The Lost Atlantic Recordings".


Entered at Fri May 15 15:27:42 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fords Halewood

I meant the decision to ensure that Fords second huge plant was located in South Liverpool, Pete. Wilson was Huyton [Stevie G's MP!!!] and I believe he did it by refusing them permission to build their new plant anywhere else.


Entered at Fri May 15 15:23:44 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Jacjie de Shannon

Long had a soft spot for Jackie de Shannon, though I do love just as much the Searchers versions of Needles and Pins and When You Walk in The Room.

Always loved this amazing rhyming lyric from WYWITRoom.

"I close my eyes for a second and pretend it's me you want
Meanwhile I try to act so nonchalant"

:-0)

Irving Berlin/Cole Porter/Hoagy Carmichael would be made up with that I'm sure.


Entered at Fri May 15 15:07:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Al, according to the film “Made in Dagenham” it was Barbara Castle rather than Harold Wilson who saved the jobs with Ford back then.

The Manchester thing is to promote it as the “other” major hub after London, the theory being that it will all spread out from there. I mean, give them a chance, we all loathe both their football teams.

But back to Ed Miliband’s failure to connect. Jeff may wish to come in on this one. Ed decided to take a photo opportunity eating a bacon sandwich (see link). I have non-religious Jewish friends who eat bacon, but as one said, for a prominent and successful politician of Jewish ethnicity to deliberately have himself filmed eating bacon was bad. The impression it gave is that the man has no backbone to either represent Jewish people with pride, nor to stand up to whichever “advisors” thought it a good idea. Famously, a Jewish comedian commented "I've eaten bacon, but I didn't inhale.


Entered at Fri May 15 13:55:03 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Scottish blood

I'm yet to explore it but I do believe I've some of your tartan running through my veins Dunc. My dear late mum's maiden name was Gouldson which to me always sounded like a Scottish name.

:-0)

If it was of Scots origin, the irony was her maternal maiden name was believe it or not Bull [as per john Bull].

I guess that name may account for much of what I write.

:-0)

The Lord Rockingham track is fondly remembered Dunc. A cracker and immediately brought to mind the B Bumble and the Stingers Nut Rocker [link].


Entered at Fri May 15 13:39:06 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Tory Blair

We agree on that particular aspect Pete lad. In league with Bill Morris [TGWU secretary believe it or not], Blair and his Tory impersonators failed to support the incredible solidarity of the Liverpool dockers [link]. He can never be forgiven for that.

As for the 2 billion package for Greater Manchester, it may well be a first step in the right direction but forgive me if I hold my breath not least as a rival Liverpudlian.

As it is, if Cameron and his crew really wanted to make a difference they'd announce their intention to decant 150,000 of the 180,000 London/South civil service posts to the deprived regions. Now that would be achievable over a reasonable period and make a substantial inroad into rectifying the current uttely indefensible and obscene imbalance.


Entered at Fri May 15 12:49:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hoots Mon is one I own on 45, Dunc. Lord Rockingham's XI (for our North Americans) were the house band on the early TV rock show, Oh, Boy! One of the mysteries about the XI is that there were thirteen of them.

Noted jazz writer Benny Green played sax and was said to be embarrassed to be seen playing rock and roll on TV. They were also a very early example of not only the Hammond organ in rock and roll, but it was played by a woman organist, Cherry Wainer. She apparently covered Money (That's What I Want) in 1960, but I've never found a copy. Cherry's speciality was having her pet poodle sit on the Hammond while she played. The Oh, Boy! sessions, a special recording, is now out on CD.

These early TV shows have appeared recently. The one you want is "Boy Meets Girls" a spinoff show. That features Cherry Wainer, Eddie Cochran, Marty Wilde, Gene Vincent … oh, yes, there's Track 32. Southern Love sung by Ronnie Hawkins backed by Levon Helm and the house band which featured Joe Brown on lead guitar.


Entered at Fri May 15 12:44:28 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RIP B.B. King


Entered at Fri May 15 12:15:13 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Lord Rockingham's Eleven

Peter, Al, Ian, Roger, Norbert and all my North American friends you need to listen to this song to take you back to your primary school days.

They don't make music like this any more. You have to listen to it right through.


Entered at Fri May 15 12:05:18 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

The Don Covay I bought was 'Mercy!' Last Covay album in the shop. That shop was up at the university, but there are four albums in the central Fopp shop. Many Japanese imports, good prices. 'She Who Must Be Obeyed' never let me browse because we were going out for lunch...at a Japanese restaurant.

Sadavid:The young make young decisions because they are young. Two years does seem a long time though.

It looks like that many of the polls were wrong because people don't like to admit that they vote Conservative. One nation Conservatism is back. What a joke! Bunch of Public Schoolboys.

You couldn't make this up. The Conservatives have now created a Lord, who was involved in the poll tax, to back up the only Scottish Conservative MP who was elected. This is not a popular decision up here.

A big part of the lead up to the election was that Murphy tried and failed to promote the independence of the Scottish Labour Party as opposed to being dominated by London. The previous leader resigned decrying Westminster.

A successful strategy that the Conservatives used was that the SNP were coming to dominate Miliband's Labour and hence Parliament, backed as usual by the right wing press. The SNP are coming tae get yeh. The down side of a policy like that is it alienates even more Scots. Be careful Peter - there might be a man with a Saltire painted face under your bed tonight singing that old hit 'There's A Moose Loose Running Aboot The Hoose'!

Anyway it's all going to be OK for you Al. According to Twitter you guys plus Liverpool, Newcastle, Leeds and Sheffield and surrounding areas are joining Greater Scotland. That would be interesting. Spent a week in Liverpool once and really enjoyed it, went to Liverpool v Spurs in the Fairs Cup and saw the great Gilzean.


Entered at Fri May 15 11:18:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Language viruses

I just got inspired to write an article on political language viruses (linked). It takes the form of a Radio 4 interview. Do comment on th article (under the article) if so moved.


Entered at Fri May 15 10:01:54 CEST 2015 from (58.104.1.137)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Larry Campbell on playing with Dylan, Phil Lesh, Paul Simon, Hot Tuna and Levon.


Entered at Fri May 15 09:59:02 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Talkin’ ‘bout my generation …

I’ll separate the academic education bit. OK, my generation went to university and did academic subjects. The universities were expanding so a whole lot of my friends got jobs in university education, which continued to expand and expand. The brightest of our generation went into academia rather than taking MBAs or plumbing qualifications, so made less money … but it propelled the extension of university education.

The plumber who did our bathroom was in his 50s. He had been a maths teacher, then decided to train in plumbing at 48, because he worked out he could make twice as much money. I will say we've had two leaks from his work in four years though.

On the buses in Bournemouth there’s a great big advert saying Bournemouth University has the highest level of graduate employment of any British university. Bournemouth specializes. It doesn’t offer the full range of subjects (I think a university should actually) but focuses on things like design, media (technical side especially) and tourism. Every time I meet a camera operator or a graphic designer, they studied in Bournemouth. I mentioned the success of Bournemouth to an associate whose husband lectures at Oxford. She sniffed and said, ‘Bournemouth? That’s a vocational university, not a proper one.’ Which is why kids leaving there are getting jobs. And jobs in the field they studied.

The only downside is they’ve started calling themselves BU, just as East Anglia calls itself UEA. That means if you get an MA from Bournemouth, you would presumably put BUMA after your name. (OK, I know, it should be MA BU)


Entered at Fri May 15 09:43:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yesterday we spent a lot of time in the car with Radio 4 (Mrs V preferred that to Jackie DeShannon unfortunately). So we heard how David Cameron had announced that shifting the regional imbalances in Britain to boost the north was one of the major priorities of the next five years, starting with assigning a further £2 billion investment to Greater Manchester.

Then we heard the pollster who got it right (the only one) analysing the results on the World At One, and he said a major factor in voting shifts from Labour to UKIP in the north (which allowed Conservatives wins in some places) was disaffection with the “metropolitan elite” who ran the Labour party. As he said senior Labour figures didn’t talk the same language on jobs nor use the same accents as northern voters. Northern Labour MPs were queuing up to complain, with another gripe being posh London Labour grandees representing constituencies in “safe” northern areas … like Tony Blair had in the north-east.

So, Al … it looks like the people trying to reverse the imbalance … mainly swollen 1997-2010 under Blair / Brown when London’s financial role increased so much … are Conservative.

The wise politician uses carrots, not sticks. What you seem to be suggesting is going in and sacking people wholesale in London and advertising their jobs in the north. I’m trying to think what large government depts. are still in London. All my official correspondence seems to be from Wales, Newcastle, Glasgow.

Also you started me Googling. The two cities with the best jobs growth outside London were listed as Liverpool and Edinburgh, with the worst fall being Bradford. I ran across that yesterday and just tried to find it without success, but that’s what it said.

Then they interviewed Yvette Cooper on Radio 4 as a candidate for the Labour leadership, and she spent 15 minutes sidestepping every question and must have used those awful politician-speak words “engage” and “challenges” ten times each. I think that anyone who gets on radio and uses the words “robust” “engage” or “challenge” should never be allowed back on. These three words should rate with “fuck” as unacceptable on radio. I used to like her but I have not heard so much politician waffle since Mandelson and Blair.


Entered at Fri May 15 08:36:26 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The largely futile state of so much of further academic education?

Can only agree with the points made.

Unless you perceive it as merely three extra years of '6th form school' education it does seem to have become so futile in terms of career development.

I do not personally know of a single soul in the 20 to 40 age group - including my own children - who have careers in the fields in which they achieved their university degrees. The nearest to doing so are those who opted for teaching.

As everyone seems to agree the reversion of the current 'degree' fixation and the corresponding expansion of technical apprenticeship programmes would seem to be the sensible and realistic way forward. Easier said than done though I guess because academic aspiration within a university ernvironment is such a huge attraction to so many.


Entered at Fri May 15 08:22:16 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: "Surely not in the selfish south?"

Food banks and caring souls in the south huh?

Amazing, Ian lad.

Whatever next?

Self-serving bastards in the north!?

Texans without ten gallon cowboy hats!?

Thing is Ian, no amout of strawman argument alters the obscene reality of the UK's wealth/economic/business/commercial imbalance between London/the South East and the rest of the country.

No amount of burying your head in southern sands alters the very real fact that such an imbalance is unique in the so called civilized western world.

The fact is that no amount of clinging to the equally obscene bolt-hole convenience of the lame notion that market forces dictate such an obscenity becoming an increasing inevitability alters two sobering and distressing realities:-

1] That successive governments and self serving vested interest have positively reinforced the imbalance [the creation of 60,000 public service jobs in our beloved capital city and a net addition of none elsewhere between 2010 and 2012]

2] That with the right morally based will, determination and fair hand a government - any government of any persuasion - could quite readily instigate an entirely fresh and unprecedented radical change of policy beginning with wholesale public service migration from the capital and south east and enforced restriction of any further development in the south east that would begin to see the restoration of some economic equality nationwide and ultimately reinvigorate those devastated areas of the UK that remain in such dire need of it.


Entered at Fri May 15 08:01:43 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.140)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

B. B. King has passed. Godspeed to the big gig with the big band in heaven.


Entered at Fri May 15 07:58:02 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.140)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Not much new but....

Read the linked article. It closes with a powerful moment in 2013.


Entered at Fri May 15 05:48:04 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.140)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

In the U.S. of A. a degree might get you an unpaid internship today. Some kids get lucky and actually get jobs after college. Others get zilch, others get unpaid internships. No joke. Girl i grew up with, her son, who had a impeccable record from a fine university, worked without pay for close to two years till he got a paying job. Now he's doing okay, but not great. At 28 or 29, his future is still bright :-)

Unfortunately, things are back to stacked against the poor bastard who ain't born rich. Street smarts, hustle, determination, used to overcome being born poor or average class. Not no fucking more. Intelligence don't do it too often no more either. Used to be you could fuck up, still get back on your feet. Not too often no more.


Entered at Fri May 15 00:22:27 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Love you all.


Entered at Thu May 14 23:12:47 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: more half-formed thoughts

Locally, we've recognized that we're short of trades and long on U grads, but we're slow to shift the emphasis. A few years ago, one of my sons wanted to pursue trades training but balked at the 2-year waiting list (having already frittered away considerable of his youth). He's just graduated from U business school, we'll see soon enough how far that gets one in the current labour market.

I think Rifkin is saying that some jobs migrate to low-wage localities before disappearing, others vaporize in situ. There was a news item the other day about a company that has automated fast food production, so the robots have claimed even the last resort of the Bachelor of Arts . . . .

A fundamental problem - maybe _the_ problem - with 'free-market democracies' is that there's a built-in structural focus on the next quarter, the next election, the next news cycle but the important social issues demand a much longer planning horizon. Of course, there's also the truth that maximum ROI to shareholders does not equate to the greatest happiness for the greatest number, but that's a rant for another day . . . .


Entered at Thu May 14 20:36:35 CEST 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: EDUCATION

I was going to write about apprenticeships and going to college to learn skills (electrician, plumbing etc) but wiser people beat me to it. The 'everyone has got to get a university education' tenet of the last 50 years does not hold up anymore and skills should be the direction in which we are sending our kids. The top 10% in school might consider a professional school (pharmacy, medicine, law etc) but for the majority, getting a BA or BSc etc (other than the knowledge obtained which is a good thing) does not contribute much to achieving employment in the job market. My advice today to a kid of 15 (if they even wanted to listen to an old guy like me) would depend upon their vision for the future and the practical reality of today's world.


Entered at Thu May 14 19:18:05 CEST 2015 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Dan Patrick Show

Dan Patrick's syndicated Sports Talk show this morning had animated whos'e better discussion of Neil Young and Rush, and then one of the Danettes McLovin' comes in with an impassioned blast of Band classics and The Last Waltz. As time elapses and the then Top 40 is relegated to its era, the Band's classicism keeps their music alive. The Last Waltz plays no small part in the exposure.


Entered at Thu May 14 18:05:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fopp is a great store. Interestingly wholly owned by HMV, but way more adventurous in stock. We always go to the London one in Covent Garden. Wish there were more of them. What was the Japanese import? I'm guessing either See Saw or Mercy Mercy.


Entered at Thu May 14 17:05:32 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

One good development up here is that there is a movement back to apprenticeships, often by young people who are capable of staying on to university.

Not sure about article Sadavid. Why did my brother's factory close down and start up in the Czech Republic and why do a lot of things I have say 'Made In China'.

I don't think there should be any food banks in Britain.

Just been CD collecting and bought my first Don Covay at Fopp. See Peter's Toppermost. It's a Japanese import and there are many Japanese imports in the Fopp shops - more in the Central Glasgow shop than the University area shop. Fopp is worth a look.


Entered at Thu May 14 16:46:17 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Food banks

Did you know that there was a European Federation of Food Banks? If not, see the link. Two statistics are higlighted in this link: (i)40 million people in Europe cannot put a basic meal on their table every day and (ii) 10% of Europeans cannot afford a proper meal.

Food banks are not confined to the UK. The statistics are much worse in Eastern Europe but virtually every country is affected. The figures in the chart are a few years old but look at Germany or France - or some of the Scandinavian countries. There was, a few weeks back, an item on the BBC World Service about soup kitchens in Sweden.

As it happens, one of the major UK food banks is based not far from where I now reside (as is one of the major charities supporting UK troops). Surely not in the selfish south?



Entered at Thu May 14 16:38:51 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the end of work

This article is 10 years old. The book was 10 years before that.

Education is great; everyone should get lots of it. Feeding your head is as much a basic human right as feeding your body.

The mistake is thinking that it's going to get you a job -- a growing number of grads chasing a shrinking number of positions is a recipe for heartache. Rifkin raised the alarm 20 years ago; Toffler pointed out in the 70s how change is accelerating -- but we stick with our parents' mental model where advanced degrees = success.


Entered at Thu May 14 12:31:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We could be off on another topic here, hopefully a non-divisive one. Dunc points out that 50% of Scottish graduates are working at non-graduate jobs. I believe the 2013 figure for the UK as a whole is 47%. It’s very simple. In 1992 17% of the population had been through tertiary education. In 2012 it was 38%. Graduates are about twice as likely to be in work (of “some kind”) as non-graduates.

If we go back to 1962, I believe 2% went to “university” which is admittedly a narrower area than “tertiary education.” When I went in the late 60s it had doubled to 4%. By 1992 it’s 17%. By 2013 it’s 38%. There are just not that many “graduate jobs.” In 2014, I believe we hit 49% in people going on to higher education. All laudable, but it’s partly a way of cutting apparent unemployment figures, and hey, the kids are paying. Or will pay.

It’s a bit like the debate on tuition fees. We could easily afford to pay for 4%. We could still afford 17% … but then the figures start stretching thinner and thinner. I had five years free tertiary education myself. The lot. Fees, food, accommodation, even the odd LP. I believe kids should not be saddled with debts … but 49%?

I’ll give you an example. When I graduated I wanted to teach film studies, then barely a subject, and I did teach it part time at an Art College while I was teaching English. I can do a great D.W. Griffith series. I believe film studies is just at useful in training the mind, critical faculties, research skills as any other Arts subject, and more so than some. BUT a few years back I saw an advert for a course at a very new university, and one with no prestige attached. They were offering 20 places on a BA course on FILM DIRECTING. Not film studies, but what purported to be a vocational qualification. That is a total con on the kids applying and going deeply into debt. There are not 20 jobs a year in the field, nowhere near, and they are far more likely to go to Oxford / Cambridge graduates with no “film” qualification, and yes, attending Eton won’t hamper those kids either.

So the issue is now that many graduates will end up in non-graduate jobs. 49% of the population can’t be university lecturers, brain surgeons or rocket scientists. And it’s not rocket science. I‘m not saying “cut the number in tertiary education.” Just tell them honestly that it doesn’t guarantee a job in the chosen field, but it will train their thinking powers, get them out of home. That’s for life.

On the North-South thing, in the 1960s, kids were positively encouraged to move away, far away, as part of the education process. Now, the debt burden is making more and more kids go “local” or not far away. In the late 60s, there was a strong feeling that Southern kids should go to Northern universities (as I did), and vice versa. It was right.


Entered at Thu May 14 12:13:08 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Ooops!

Eddie Boyd's famous blues is "Five Long Years", not "Four Long Years" like I posted earlier. Time goes so fast when you have fun!


Entered at Thu May 14 11:29:01 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Sadavid:Thanks, enjoyed the link. There has never been an election like this in my lifetime.

For many, things are going backwards in Britain. Poorer living standards, an inability to change the lifestyle of those stuck at the bottom, difficult for younger people to get jobs, poorer standard of living for our children's generation, 50% of Scottish graduates working at non graduate jobs, many people unhappy with the BBC - seems to run as a club, shortages of nurses - surely paid too little. I could go on, but I think it is shameful that in such a wealthy country we now have food banks.

Bill M: yes, Lieber and Stoller. Not an enjoyable experience for them or the band. Gerry stood up to them and insisted the album was not to be commercial. Big drinking sessions. Thanks to everybody else, who commented. Great music.

JT:I've been to Toronto a couple of times and enjoyed it. It's nothing like London. There's no hatred towards London, but it personifies the inequality in our society. London is seeing itself as the capital of the world.

Everybody knows that there are poor areas in the south, but without doubt there is a North South divide.

Westminster is tainted. It's seen as incapable of solving problems. And corrupt. Yesterday's news story was that many losing MPs bought iphones and tablets on expenses. Not breaking the law, but surely breaking the spirit of expenses.

Incidentally, Maura O'Connell tweeted yesterday that the greatest introduction to a song is the groove on Stevie Wonder's 'Superstition'.


Entered at Thu May 14 10:07:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: May we be forever young

Al, we crossed in the ether. We should have just met at Birmingham and done it over breakfast at a Welcome Break. In the end, it’s the fault of Liverpudlians. Not all Liverpudlians. Just the four of them. John, Paul, George and Ringo. Until 1963 we all thought London was pea soup fogs and men in bowler hats. Then came Swingin’ London and it was The Beatles fault.

I remember walking down Kings Road in 1967. P.P. Arnold walking out of a restaurant next to Dudley Moore. Eric Clapton wandering across the road in a paisley shirt. You felt the buzz. It felt like the centre of the universe. Where else would you want to be when you were young? In 1968 and 1969, I’d go up in the van with friends in a band when they played clubs, and our mouths would drop open in awe staring at the miniskirts as we drove through Knightsbridge, and yes, sexist and crude comments were uttered by the musicians with me. I undoubtedly remonstrated with them and urged them to be more respectful, but they were musicians. And one was a drummer. What can you do?

London went off a bit in the 80s and 90s. The vibe seemed to go. Other places had it … Paris just after the Louvre pyramid and Pompidou Centre were built. Rome after the centre got pedestrianized. New York never lost that vibe.

Then somehow it’s come back. The vibe. We have a week in London every year of intensive theatres and museums, and we realized there’s more to do and it’s more fun than any other city. It feels like it. Above all, there is a cheerful multi-ethnic vibe. More multi- and more cheerful than anywhere. In one day we had pleasant chats with African ladies on a bus, two Turkish students, an Egyptian guy, Italian tourists.

This has nothing to do with jobs … but it does. I wouldn’t want to live there year round, but the people moving to Britain (very large numbers of French, Spanish, Italian and Greek twenty-somethings) do. You can blame that on an economy stronger than our European neighbors, and yes, a lot of the jobs created go to new (and highly-qualified) recent arrivals from Europe. British twenty-somethings want to live there. I would if I were that age, though now the more sedate pleasures of Bath appeal more. But … walk along the South Bank on a Sunday, go past an ethnic event in Trafalgar Square, wander round Covent Garden. I am vehement that arts funding should go to the provinces … but think of being young. We sat next to two mid-20s girls in a coffee shop and eavesdropped their conversation. They had to share a one room studio apartment, because it cost them £1300 a month rent. But they loved just being there.


Entered at Thu May 14 09:35:10 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthwestCoaster

Subject: London

Al may have a point in this issue. - Manfred Mann who lives in London and part of the year here in this provincial town in Scania Northwest says that we have better music shops (2) here than in London. What a horrible judgement!

Four years to next election... I suggest a British blues: Eddie Boyd, Four Long Years. God save the gb for an early election ;-)


Entered at Thu May 14 09:04:43 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Lost in translation

Jerry. First let's be clear here. I have no hate for London or London people or the South or Southern people. I have many relatives/friends in those necks of the woods. No mate I am merely racked with a deep and pained sense of despair that a so called civilized nation like our own has permitted a situation of absurd disparity and inequity to evolve on the back of 'loaded market forces' virtually unchecked to the extent that we see today.

Read the article. There are swathes of similar researched pieces and studies which all say the same thing and point to the same absurdity. What I say is not simply my opinion. It is solid fact.

As for your own nation. Well I'm sure what you say is the case regarding such inter city tribalism. That is human nature to a large extent. But compared to the UK we're talking chalk and cheese of course in a country as vast as your own. As I say the UK is unique in how it and its successive governments have permitted its capital city and its hinterland to dominate so overwhelmingly to the detriment of huge swathes of that country, the very country it is meant to serve as its capital.

Besides, you have no such damning stark regional economic disparity. Ottawa is your capital. Toronto has in recent years just eclipsed Montreal as your most powerful economic centre whilst Vancouver to the far west is no slouch. Quebec - where would it be if Ottawa usurped all its public sector jobs?

Similar situations exist in most civilized nations in varying ways. I cited Frankfurt to render Pete's Berlin example as absurd. frankfurt is the SEVENTH most powerful financial location on the planet. Just another example of how things can be spread around a country if the will and determination to do so is present.

In our pathetic country such will is not present in the place where it needs to be. rather ther is an intrinsic self serving bias towards itself and its hinterland. The article I linked points to the overwhelming dominance of London public sector jobs recently created. Is that the mark of a capital/government that desires equity?

Is it bollocks. It's diametrically the opposite.

No, the UK is a unique case. And it is a sick and nigh evil case. It has both permitted and engineered a situation that is becoming intolerable. The fact Pete chooses to try and both dismiss and defend the inequity by virtue of a plea of market force evolution does not make the reality any less true, any less obscene or any less palatable.

Finally, apologies to Jan and all the fellow Band fans for going on so much about this issue which does not really concern any of you except for the fact that I guess any such inequity is wrong. It brings no pleasure to you I'm sure. And it most certainly brings none to me. Just pain to see an otherwise extremely intelligent, rational, sensible and decent fellow for whom I retain immense admiration particularly for his amazing work relating to The Band seemingly hellbent on defending the indefensible.

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 14 09:01:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

We’re 100 minutes by train from London, so the extreme edge of commuter territory so the edge of the magnetic pull. We can drive in for an event and drive back too. I continually moan about London-centric policies in the arts. If you care to read my bit on London-Centric Theatre, you’ll see my comments:

“To its residents, London may be the centre of the universe. To the rest of us, it’s more often the fundament of the universe.”

Al, as a result of my travels to French colleges on teacher training trips, I can affirm that parts of outer Paris has urban deprivation almost at a Third World scale, unknown in Britain, but Marseilles is bad too. That takes us into French colonial policy, immigration patterns and to the ineffectiveness of various French governments in doing much about it. Your point is that Britain has unfair distribution of wealth. Do you not think there is poverty and deprivation in London? They don’t all shop at Harvey Nichols and Harrods.

For urban deprivation … i.e, unaccompanied toddlers begging in all directions, Mexico City is off the scale of anything I’ve seen in Europe.

I’ve been to Berlin at three evenly spaced intervals 1990 to 2013, and been robbed there too. In those 25 years there has been a huge suction effect into the city with massive redevelopment – and London is almost starting to look like it (number of cranes in view) but Berlin still takes the biscuit. While the other cities gleamed before 1989, the sudden Berlin-draw is significant.

Greeks, Germans, French people will all say that “the capital has got all the jobs and money.”

I just don’t buy that various UK governments have deliberately created a monster in London. I think it’s a pattern with mega cities spreading and drawing in more and more young people. Where would you prefer to live if you were 22? The answer for most of them would be neither Liverpool nor Bournemouth. It’s not a Tory plot to deprive the regions. It just “is.” It’s unhealthy, and London’s infrastructure is overwhelmed. Yes, encourage moves to the regions. But then the location will often be chosen where the senior managers want to live and send their kids to school. So “out of London” might be medium sized towns like Bath, Norwich, Stratford, York, Harrogate… and Poole … rather than the larger older industrial cities. Those sort of places seem to be where the new developments are thriving. Again, not simply “north-south.”

And I think the National Football Stadium should have been built like the NEC at a motorway interchange near Birmingham, not Wembley.

Last word (LINKED) to Sandy Denny, music by Thea Gilmore!


Entered at Thu May 14 07:57:16 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Capitol Rarities

I don't know if this tracklisting has appeared before. If not, here it is. If it has, I apologise:

1 Tears Of Rage (Alternate Take) 5:32

2 Yazoo Street Scandal (Remastered) 4:02

3 If I Lose (Remastered) 2:30

4 Long Distance Operator (Remastered) 3:58

5 Lonesome Suzie (Alternate Take/Remastered) 3:00

6 Orange Juice Blues (Blues For Breakfast)(Demo/Remastered) 3:40

7 Key To The Highway (Remastered) 2:28

8 Get Up Jake (Stereo Remix/Remastered) 2:18

9 Rag Mama Rag (Alternate Vocal Take Rough Mix/Remastered) 3:05

10 The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Alternate Mix/Remastered) 4:16

11 Up On Cripple Creek (Alternate Take/Remastered) 4:54

12 Whispering Pines (Alternate Take/Remastered) 5:07

13 Jemima Surrender (Early Version/Remastered) 3:49

14 King Harvest (Has Surely Come) (Alternate Take/Remastered) 4:29

15 Daniel And The Sacred Harp (Alternate Take/Remastered) 5:02

16 Time To Kill (Alternate Version/Remastered) 3:26

17 The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show (Alternate Mix/Remastered) 3:05

18 Stage Fright Radio Commercial 1:06

19 Endless Highway (Demo/Remastered) 3:46

20 When I Paint My Masterpiece (Alternate Version/Remastered) 3:58

21 Bessie Smith (Remastered) 4:18

22 Don't Do It (Studio Version/Remastered) 3:54

23 Cahoots Radio Commercial (Remastered) 1:04

24 Didn't It Rain (Remastered) 3:16

25 Crying Heart Blues (Remastered) 3:29

26 Shakin' (Remastered) 3:31

27 What Am I Living For (Remastered) 5:04

28 Going Back To Memphis (Remastered) 5:02

29 Endless Highway (Studio Version/Remastered) 5:08

30 Twilight (Early Alternate Version/Remastered) 3:13

31 Christmas Must Be Tonight (Alternate Version/Remastered) 3:01

32 Twilight (Single Version/Remastered) 3:17

33 Georgia On My Mind (Alternate Take/Remastered) 3.51



Entered at Thu May 14 04:04:05 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Urban hate'

Just so you know, the entire country (except Ontario) has a relative 'hate' on for Toronto. All I ever hear in BC is how Toronto gets it all etc etc etc. Europe does not have a corner on 'urban centric' hate. The bad feelings against the city translate to a dislike of its inhabitants.


Entered at Thu May 14 02:08:36 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The obscenity of London and South east

I said I'd drop it but looking on the net there's a myriad of articles on this UK obscenity I've found on the subject. I've linked one. Just in case anybody thinks my outrage at what successive UK governments have allowed to happen in what has become this grievously divided godforsaken shithole of a country is misplaced by just one iota.

And just to lend perspective to the Berlin aspect you cited Pete - Frankfurt, Munich, Bonn, Hamburg, Dortmund, Dusseldorf are each infinitely more self sufficient economically and more vital to the overall german economy than any corresponding UK non-capital city.


Entered at Thu May 14 00:58:09 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bollocks

Q1: London is not unique in the Western World. My French nephew will say the same about Paris. My German pals the same about “New Berlin.” My Hungarian friends say the same about Budapest. It’s not desirable. But that centralization is happening everywhere. I don’t live in London, I complain about it too. It’s a fact.

Sorry Pete - that's utter bollocks. France is an entirely contrasting situation. The outlying suburbs of Paris have more deprivation than the rest of France put together. There's no regional bias. Why am I even answering this? And Berlin to Germany the equivalent of London to the UK!!!! Come on Pete lad.

:-0)

Q2: You can’t make people live where they don’t want to live.

You're an intelligent man pete. You know as well as me that your response makes no attempt to consider the validity of the principles behind the points I've made.

Q3: Defeatist? I don’t see that you can fight the forces of nature. The “hot spot” cities and areas continually change. It’s … oh, no, I’m finding myself forced into Osborne.Speak here, the result of market forces. As I said, in the early 19th century, Lancastrians would be bemoaning the suction effect of a vibrant and growing Liverpool spoiling their communities.

Bloodyhell. There's no longer any point in this.

Game over Pete. Let's return to Stealers Wheel and play nice eh.

:-0)


Entered at Wed May 13 21:58:36 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Long Ways to Tennessee

Now available for download (along with the rest of the "album") at [My link].

As Peter V. noted [http://theband.hiof.no/articles/demos_viney.html] this is the most Band-like track. For me, the accordion recalls the chanter of "Acadian Driftwood" -- by that association, it reinforces the 'economic migrant' theme.

Note also that sharecropping farmers of the sort we meet in "King Harvest" were usually migratory. Compelled to purchase the inputs to production (seed, implements) and other necessities at the company store (at inflated prices, on the never-never plan), their harvests often didn't cover their debts, so they had to decamp at dead of night from the places they'd sweated blood to build up. "Looks like this time I'm gonna get to stay" has a lot of pain behind it.


Entered at Wed May 13 21:33:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All this regional stuff

I might be personally responsible, Al. I hope I’m not, but you never know. Mrs V says I’m a bit of a bastard and she’s known me 44 years. And as a Southerner, I appear to be guilty.

Q1: London is not unique in the Western World. My French nephew will say the same about Paris. My German pals the same about “New Berlin.” My Hungarian friends say the same about Budapest. It’s not desirable. But that centralization is happening everywhere. I don’t live in London, I complain about it too. It’s a fact.

Q2: You can’t make people live where they don’t want to live.

Q3: Defeatist? I don’t see that you can fight the forces of nature. The “hot spot” cities and areas continually change. It’s … oh, no, I’m finding myself forced into Osborne.Speak here, the result of market forces. As I said, in the early 19th century, Lancastrians would be bemoaning the suction effect of a vibrant and growing Liverpool spoiling their communities.

Yes, London has all the good theatre, music, restaurants, vibe … I’ve railed against that for years. The Arts Council should indeed be diverting far more resources regionally. But the thing is, no amount of legislation could guarantee an even spread of “happiness.”


Entered at Wed May 13 20:20:51 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Long ways To Tennessee

Cheers for that S.

Not seen it before though I see from following it up that it's part of a research that you've done Pete.

Those words stir up very powerful and moving emotions


Entered at Wed May 13 20:13:09 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jack's alright but wot abarr us like?

Okay Pete I'll try and calm it down a notch as it must sound at times as if I'm holding you personally responsible!!

:-0)

But let me ask you a few straightforward questions, notwithstanding that Manchester's got these dead fab Uni doors and the best M&S food hall this side of the Gates of Eden.

Q1: Can the degree of wealth, power, commerce, jobs etc etc that is concentrated in one area of the country - a western world unique and indisputable fact in the case of the UK - be considered desirable for any nation as an entity?

Q2: If your answer is No [I'm presuming here that no right thinking person could answer Yes but I have been known to be wrong before :-0)], is it then defensible in any moral or equitable way to merely shrug shoulders and put that state of affairs down as inevitable economic/business development and by doing so write off those areas of the country so desperate for even a small slice of the cake that London and the South seem able to tuck into so effortlessly merely by virtue of their location as the capital city and their proximity to the capital city?

Q3: Or should we as a "united" nation [hmmph - pardon me whilst I choke] be hellbent on exploring every avenue of radical change and upheaval possible in a genuine attempt to redress past errors whence such corresponding disadvantaged and afflicted areas have been allowed merely to drift into decay with the defeatist notion that there exists no way of averting such decline?

I would just add - in connection with my earlier point about one possible way to redistribute resources/create momentum within dying areas - that London and its proximities have around 170,000 of the overall 380,000 civil service jobs. This, of course, is just one area of government employ. I understand there are around 2 million other Government employees. I've no idea of their spread but again it's highly likely I guess that a preponderance will be located in the same capital city and capital city proximity. Then, of course, there is the inherent power of government - tried and tested in the past as I've previously alluded to - to influence very heavily if not dictate where industry locates.

I guess my point in all this is that wherever and whenever there's the will, there most certainly is a way. The problem with the UK seems to be that there exists an inertia preventing such a will from being exercised rooted in a seemingly resigned acceptance that here's London and the Home Counties and that's where it's fuckingwell at.

I can never ever accept such a notion. For me it's pure self serving vested interest. If we use the analogy of one human body it's akin to the head and trunk of the body thinking all is well whilst the arms and legs are rotting.



Entered at Wed May 13 18:39:11 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.146)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I always liked "Stuck In The Middle" - better than "Baker Street" but not as much as "Open Up The Door". Wasn't SITM produced by L&S? In which case Rafferty shared producers with Robertson and Danko (the John Hammond Jr sessions for Red Bird, who also had Neil Diamond).

Peter V: The computer is the challenge as you say, but the enemy is our societies' (Cda, UK, US et many al) unwillingness to accept reality and take the tough structural measures needed to spread the money around. The Stockholm Syndrome often comes to mind.


Entered at Wed May 13 18:07:57 CEST 2015 from (184.66.164.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Gazinte

Its the teen angst that he captured. Simply and to the point. Solitary no more. A good song. Yes.


Entered at Wed May 13 17:39:40 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Neil Diamond ain't been Solitary a long time now. His most recent wife recently retired as his manager. A 40 ish knockout gazinte mamela blond.

Stuck In The Middle With You- always loved it.


Entered at Wed May 13 17:31:21 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Lobby Lud

Norman Tebbitt? Didn’t he used to play for Leeds United? ☺

Al just did a “Lobby Lud.” Should we explain a Lobby Lud? The Daily Mirror after 1945 picked up on a press campaign from much earlier where there was a picture of a seedy bloke, and if you saw him in the street, you could go up and say “You are Lobby Lud and I claim my £5.” This was when a reasonable wage was £10 a week. When I was teaching any sort of expenses was called a “Lobby Lud” as teaching adult foreigners on one month courses, we would finish the course with a class Friday night pizza and the teacher was given a “Lobby Lud” (probably more like £10 then) to buy each a drink.

Quick check, the DVLA (car tax, car licensing) employ 5600 in Wales. It’s not simply cosmetic. If you’re an unemployed kid in the South you might find it equally unfair that no government agencies have offices down here.

All service industries (government or private) are against the computer. They simply don’t need as many people. One person in Tesco runs 12 self-service tills, but they don’t give you a discount for using them. 11 jobs gone … and that’s in every store in every town in the country. The Times They Are A Changin. What are you going to do? There’s an inexorable population drift in most countries. Which is why cities like Nashville and Orlando in the USA are booming and growing rapidly while others decline. Yes, moving government agencies is only a sticking plaster, but you can’t say “unemployment must be at identical levels in every county.” It’s like water. It shifts. Sure you can try and direct the flow, you can encourage the flow in one direction, but you can’t do a King Canute and stop it.

It set me thinking about the last time I spoke in Manchester. It was in a lecture hall in the Manchester University Medical School and they had double doors … you entered through the outer one, it locked and you were searched and scanned with a metal detector before they opened the inner one. The car park opposite was a sea of broken glass, and on the roundabout, houses had metal shutters on every window. Then you go into the city centre and the department stores equalled anywhere in Central London, and it was the best M&S Food Hall (and most expensive) I've seen. That was a three mile distance. It isn't just "north v south".


Entered at Wed May 13 17:18:48 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Solitary Man

Good reminder … but which version? The single or live? That's the constant issue with Neil.


Entered at Wed May 13 16:13:28 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: crawl across Tennessee

Interesting comments from Al Edge, Peter V., Dunc et al. -- the rise and fall of industries, the human migrations that follow, and the miseries that always seem to accompany. No shortage of examples -- think of the folks streaming up from the U.S. south seeking opportunity on the assembly line, and their grandkids now lost in a city of used to be. Or the grandchildren of the Newfoundlanders who risked their lives following the codfish now risking their lives in the satanic mills and risking their livelihoods to the jackals of Fort McMurray. Like everything else, the process seems faster now that capital is more mobile, racing to the bottom where taxes are low and labour and life are cheap.

From "The Leaving of Liverpool" on, it makes for poignant songs; by coincidence, just this morning I first listened to the words to "Long Ways to Tennessee" (from the "album" yclept _Tombstone_):

The month of May won’t come on us too soon this year
The world’s changing way too fast
We take one look back at the Mississippi mud
Hoping maybe it won’t be our last

Cause the rich have got their literature and art
But those not so elegantly born
Let our outsides show the color of the sun
But inside the color of a storm

Cause the working poor can’t take no more
The banks won’t take their own bonds back for money
It’s a better life there’s got to be
As we crawl our ways across Tennessee

Well the owner came down with his friends crowded ‘round
And said things will get better soon
He had a face that was brought up to be facing the music
And making it play his tune

And everybody went home with a little piece of hope
To add to the small wage they get
Once the bosses learn the appetites of the simple man
The traps are so easily set

Well a good man said try the ballot box first
But time sure must be getting short
Cause I hear a lot of talk that the cartridge box
Is our next and our last resort


Entered at Wed May 13 15:04:06 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Humblebums/Stealers Wheel/Gerry Rafferty

I loved the song Dunc. Look forward to your piece.

Can't recall now how big it was but I'd always have placed it as a stone cold classic pop song.

I really got into Gerry Rafferty at the time of Baker street. I remember it must have been May '77 and we were traipsing through the streets of London on the Friday and saturday of the cup final against United. Baker street was playing in just about every store in London. Wall to wall.

:-0)

I guess it kind of channelled me into buying City to City and I loved it. My favourite track of all was Islands on City to City - beautiful sax intro and a gorgeous track amongst a few other gems too. His nasal tones were just perfect. Night owl I liked too but my interest did fade a bit after that. I also seem to recall i loved gallagher and Lyle around that time too. Or maybe that was earlier.


Entered at Wed May 13 14:37:06 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Stealer's Wheel

From this side of the ocean, be sure that in my neck of the woods Stealer's Wheel was popular and 'Stuck In The Middle With You: is a great song, standing tall and persisting. And its use in the movie was stunning and still evokes.


Entered at Wed May 13 14:34:04 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Solitary Man

"Melinda was mine

'Til the time that I found her

Holding Jim, loving him

Then Sue came along, loved me strong

That's what I thought"

Me and Sue, but that died too

These words rang true for a teen growing up in middle class Toronto. Rejection was the name of the game for a while as boys and girls found ways to hurt each other. Everyone has stories and they are etched. Neil Diamond, a young songwriter, knew this firsthand. In its simplicity, this song was a young man's emotions stripped naked. It rang true.


Entered at Wed May 13 14:32:05 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete and his inertia hang up :-0)

Okay mate. I've cracked it - you're Norman Tebbitt and I claim my £5

:-0)

I guess if you think everything's hunky dory with the ridiculously disproportional concentration down south of everything bar basic human understanding and compassion then there's little point in me banging on about a fissure that without being responsibly addressed minus vested southern interest by something altogether more radical than the cosmetic sops to which you allude will open ever wider.


Entered at Wed May 13 14:09:03 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: MUSIC!

Stuck in The Middle was hugely popular around here, and it still brings an instant smile to my face. Resist all pressure to avoid the "best known songs" - Stuck In The Middle is definitive. Love it and look forward to it.

GBers might like to know that the Toppermost I'm working on is their old favorite: Neil Diamond.


Entered at Wed May 13 14:05:34 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, I’m finding talking to Al, Ian and Dunc enlightening, so if the non-UK readers indulge us a bit more, we’ll keep quiet for five years.

I noted the “tax the South to provide more nurses for Scotland” after the first TV debate. It’s been quoted to me frequently here since.

Devolving government departments … they’ve been doing that for years. All car tax etc is done from South Wales, as is VAT. The Southern passport office is in Newport. Newcastle has a swathe of government departments. National Savings is based in Glasgow. It helps. The heads of the valleys in Wales are screwed, whatever. You can’t force people to move there, and those towns grew because there was coal, in spite of constant rain and difficult communication routes down narrow valleys. Until coal there was no natural geographical pull to those areas. My grandma’s family in Tredegar had moved from Lancashire for the coal mines. My Welsh granddad was from Pembrokeshire. My other granddad literally walked the 25 miles from rural north Dorset to get a job in Bournemouth. My mum moved to Bournemouth from Wales in the Depression. It’s always happened. If you go back to the 17th century none of the great industrial cities existed, and the thriving places were rural market centres like Norwich or Lincoln or Salisbury. The churches and cathedrals show where the population was.

I bet people in Stratford-upon-Avon spent the 18th century complaining that all the work had shifted to Birmingham and Coventry, and people in Lancaster couldn’t believe the growth of Manchester.

You can however sum up the problem. Half a mile from my house is a big roundabout with a huge Insurance Company building on it. So what is the name of this major company that relocated to Poole? Liverpool & Victoria Insurance. You can shift government offices. You can give major incentives to commercial companies. But you can’t force them. It might also be true that Londoners working for a particular government department don’t want to move to (e.g.) Sunderland, any more than people in Sunderland want to move to London. Every area has communities.

I agree about Boris and London. Also on my list of “loathsome politicans” Michael Gove competes for first place. Boris keeps going about building a new airport in the Thames Estuary, east of London. OK, if you live in London or Essex. For the entire rest of the country it means travelling round or through London. Insane.

On Liverpool, and off politics, I just spent 45 minutes at the dentist waiting for Mrs V, chatting to an elderly Liverpudlian (who now lives in Poole). He told me all about being evacuated to Anglesey in 1939, how he learned rude songs in Welsh which he can still sing, and the bombing when he went back to Liverpool … he was bombed out twice. He was a widower and was waiting for a “lady friend” and pointed out (with a broad wink) that if you can live to your late 80s, you’ll find women fighting to bake you cakes.


Entered at Wed May 13 13:43:49 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Clowns to the left of me

I always play my three Stealers Wheel albums, but have been playing them even more as it's my next project for Toppermost.

I think Stuck In The Middle is one of the truly great songs. Am I right?

But maybe Stealers Wheel and the three albums, which I love, were not as popular as I thought. Maybe more popular here in Scotland than other areas of the UK, Canada, USA and Europe?

Peter mentioned that certain recordings are played much more and have more success in localised areas. I did not think of this before, but agree with him, thinking back.

How popular were Stealers Wheel? Is Stuck In The Middle right up there? Comments?


Entered at Wed May 13 13:26:23 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.106)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Last post?

No problem, Peter. We're all friends and respect each other here. I thought I'd better stop posting on elections here because I think it breaks Jan's rules and I'm boring my North American friends. (I think I'm always capable of boring them anyway). I always liked Norbert's site where I saw it as a group of Band fans meeting in the pub and we discussed other topics like Steve's farm etc.

The nurse's comment attributed to Sturgeon, I can't find. I always find that comment attributable to Jim Murphy.

I don't see Cameron as Scottish. His wife's dad, Lord Astor owns a 20 000 acre estate on Jura, which he visits once a year. Like many Scots I'm against feudalism and I think this fact will lower his standing in the eyes of many Scots. It's not just envy. For example a neighbouring estate has been bought recently by a hedge fund owner and he has closed a garden, which is important to the tourist industry on Jura. Community buy outs, which are happening in Scotland, are important so that people own the small bits of land they farm, then the population of the island grows.

I think that Al puts it eloquently. Although just over 15% of Scots voted Conservative, there is no connection for many Scots with the Conservatives. They feel alienated and I think many people are saying let's solve Scottish problems ourselves. You can't just keep hitting the poor, the disadvantaged and the disabled.

The drift of jobs south. For example my son works in the sporting goods industry. There used to be three centres of the textiles industry in his field - Glasgow area, Manchester area and London. Glasgow has now closed.

I'm repeating myself, but you just can't have posh boys running the government, the civil service, the church and the BBC. It would take many Scots two year's work to pay those School fees. That's before school trips etc. The SNP are normal people. You can keep Michael Gove.

The two nations are becoming more different. Personally, I can't identify with the London, Boris Johnston wants, the capital of the world. How do normal Londoners survive there? And I once worked there forty years ago and loved it.

Ian, I agree with you re Salmond and Putin. He did go on to meet Scottish Ukrainians, but I don't know the outcome of that meeting.

I don't agree with you re Ian Murray. If you reread my post you'll see I said he was a good constituency MP and had taken a leading roll in saving Hearts, but he was up against an SNP candidate who was virtually disowned by the party.

The worst behaviour I saw during the referendum campaign was at the end when a group of Orange No supporters congregated in George Square and their behaviour led to arrests.

The sad legacy of the referendum is that there is evidence of families who have fallen out, but this is difficult to quantify. With your visits to Scotland, you'll know it's a passionate place.

I don't know how much Scottish news you receive down South, but yesterday Scottish Labour continues to implode. I thought Jim Murphy did a reasonable job at leading the campaign, but he was never going to change anything. A second Scottish parliament front bench opposition spokesman resigned yesterday because Murphy hadn't resigned. Two unions are calling for his resignation. Why would you vote for them. At close of day Ian Murray was asking for calm.


Entered at Wed May 13 10:18:33 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The blight of disconnection and division

All of what you say is fair comment Pete. As ever. You're a reasonable and decent fella so I wouldn't expect anything else. [Don't mean that to sound patronising by the way]

However, things are far more fractured than you seem to be aware of. Much of it beneath the surface, requiring more than what I might with respect term a superficial observation.

Take Liverpool itself. The city centre has seen a heartening renaissance. A variety of reasons for this - initially a Tory minister who developed a genuine concern for the city after witnessing its apalling post industrial/post Tocky riots decline, European Objective One status funding, Duke of westminster faith and money [the hugely impressive Liverpool One project]. Above all a designated public and private enterprise realisation that when it came to culture and heritage Liverpool had one hell of a lot going for it.

And so, the mix of its riverfront siting, its renovated Victorian/Georgian splendour and the infusion of a host of impressive modern redevelopments give it a WOW factor that no other UK provincial city comes remotely near to matching.

Yet look beyond that central majesty and what you have is an entirely different picture. Soberingly and shockingly different.

Sure the more affluent residential areas give no clue to this but large swathes of urban neglect and decay make for an unacceptable contrast across many of its outlying areas paryicularly the largely ignored northern stretches from whence I hail.

A broadly corresponding tale defines the South Wales to which you and I are blood/matrimonially bonded. Cardiff centre like Liverpool has seen great renaisssance. Yet in unacceptable contrast whole valley communities that radiate from it right up to the Heads of The Valley road are dishevelled. Blighted in pitiful decline. Decimated. The Rhondda, Rhymney and Sirhowy valley towns are hideous testimony to the 'alright jack' approach to which I allude that is, however you may wish to dress it up and sit comfortably with it, an unacceptably evil outlook on and approach to life.

You ask what can be done, more than what has been done by successive governments?

I'll tell you. Ooddles and fucking oodles. That's what.

An unprecedented radical transformation of the entire approach to the problems. Ditch the cosmetic sops and make real governmental effort to tackle the hideous carnage in our midst.

One huge change? Completely de-centralise every Civil Service department from their current south eastern lairs to the areas where their injection of genuine jobs could ignite a real new dawn to such areas. Move everything bar the useless fucking ministers themselves to the decimated communites throughout the country. Ensure large portions of the ensuing posts are given to local people after huge re-training programmes.

Another? Ensure not one more company can expand their southern enterprise by denying planning permission. Not a single one. Offer huge incentives for them to re-locate up north and south wales and Scotland.

harold Wilson did it with Fords and vauxhalls in Liverpool in the early 60's. It can be done. It merely requires the radical will. The genuine determination to make things better for as many folk as possible.

I could go on but I've not the time and certainly not the insight. As ever everyuthing i've said is off the top of my head.

However, my instincts tell me that everything I've said is morally right and practically possible and enforceable with the right minded will.

The problem is twofold - folks like yourself down south haven't got the faintest idea what it's really like in these deprived areas. That is not meant to be insulting Pete. It's merely staing a fact. My sister is the same. She lives in the relative affluence of Chester and is never exposed [or never exposes herself] to these abominations.

Out of sight. Out of mind.

The thing is though. They exist. And never has the divide been so defined. And never has the need for an unprecedented radical approach to heal that divide been so great.

As for America?

I'll cure all their many ills on another day

:-0)


Entered at Wed May 13 08:00:44 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Southern Soul

More thoughts …

For Americans … The regional voting patterns have been similar for my lifetime. The classical model was that the Northern and Welsh cities and industrial towns voted Labour; the South broadly voted Conservative. London divided between Tory north and west and Labour east and south. Wealthier Northern suburbs voted Conservative, the centres of industrial cities like Southampton in the south Labour (as it did this year). It was held that you won or lost the election in the Midlands where several constituencies changed and voted for the side that won. So the voting map hasn’t changed much. Though if you look at the results map (LINKED …scroll down)… the Conservatives did very well in Northern rural and suburban areas. Al mentions post-industrial decline. I drove through the mining towns of South Wales. Boarded up houses. Run down. The same is true in any area where the coal runs out. The oldest issue is a National Electricity Grid. Once you have that, new industry can locate itself anywhere. It has inexorably followed the climate, and chosen new sites not old ones. They preferred the drier sunnier South East to rebuilding next to a slag heap in the wettest part of the country. It’s happened in every post-industrial country. What’s the solution? No government’s found one. It’s the same in America.

Labour’s historical birth in the Trades Union movement meant it appealed in industrial towns. The Southern and Western rural poor, usually far poorer than the industrial working class, would vote Liberal, not Labour.

It’s pretty much as fixed in the USA … since the 1970s, the red states / blue states lines are fixed, with things won or lost in the states that switch.

Regional lines affect much, particularly investment. Al mentioned the South-East, and let’s say rather London. We were on a bus in London two weeks ago chatting to Americans. They couldn’t believe how much new building there was. Everywhere you look, prestige building projects are humming away. The magnet of the capital city works elsewhere … the same was happening in Berlin for twenty years, or before that Athens, Madrid, Paris. London is REALLY thriving currently. Friends visiting from Germany couldn’t believe that much of London looks better off than Germany. And London is sucking in a vastly disproportionate amount of money. I’ve written a lot about this is theatre reviews. They also get nearly all the good productions.

Going back, there have been efforts to move much of the BBC TV to Manchester. Travel agencies here were advertising trips to Glasgow … and indeed Liverpool … based on the regeneration after being “Cultural cities of the year.” That seems to be “party in power blind” too.

On the other hand, fifteen years ago, we couldn’t believe the amount of new building in Cardiff as the Welsh Assembly area was being rebuilt and the effect was rippling across the city. Labour generated investment in its heartlands.

Every party in power chooses where to invest. The Blair years left Poole as one of the towns with the fewest school places … my grandkids were offered schools eight miles away - in an urban area, passing 5 or 6 other schools on the way - because there are simply “no places” locally. Not “big classes” but “no places.” That pisses me off. The Poole Conservative MP who’s been raving about unfair government investment patterns for years, was one of the few to take over 50% of the vote (just).

Back to Sturgeon’s “tax the South for more nurses for Scotland,” another really major issue in the South is property prices. A young teacher married to a young nurse would not be earning enough to get a mortgage on a house in Poole, and nowhere near enough in London.

It’s uneven. There are many blasted and boarded up High Streets in the South too. That’s a national pattern.

UKIP … like the Liberals for decades … would easily have been the third party under a proportional representation system with 12.6% (Conservatives 36.9%, Labour 30.4%) They did well in several Labour seats. Like SNP they’re a Nationalist party. Interestingly we see SNP as left and UKIP as right, and while they loathe each other they have much in common, eating into vote share in both directions. UKIP do well in areas of high immigration. It’s not simply “right” … they didn’t do particularly well further west where there are fewer immigrants. They targeted the South East and some industrial cities with high immigration.

But in the end (a note here to Al), the British system works because about a dozen years is the most parties get until the electorate switch sides. “13 Years of (fill the gap) Missrule” has been a slogan twice in recent years. Switching governments is healthy. Surely a major factor in Scotland was disaffection with a party in power so long that it got lazy. That happened in local government down here where the Liberal Democrats ousted the Conservatives who'd thought their power base was automatic.

I wouldn’t demonize either Cameron or Miliband. As I said in the election debates article, they were the only two serious candidates. Like it or not, the economy is doing “less badly” that almost any other similar country. Mr Cameron, if you prefer, may be a toff, but I don’t think he has evil intentions. He’s not a Thatcher on a mission to change basic stuff. I find him personable, the sort of guy we'd probably all like if we got stuck on a train sitting next to him.


Entered at Wed May 13 02:49:16 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Disconnected souls

No real time right now for a full hit but cannot let all this pass without making a few clumsy bullet points. So please excuse the broad brush approach. Clearly there are exceptions to every rule but I'm not really arsed about them right now as I haven't the time to broaden it for the sake of full comprehensiveness and accuracy.

It’s the disconnection that bothers me.

First off, though, I must say I notice nobody commented on the remorseless pushing of the myth of Labour’s financial incompetence and Labour’s inexplicable naivety in failing to correct it with the truth which I attempted to crystalize in my other post and which was very probably the real reason why the middle ground of the nation [I mean south of the border since Scotland had its own agenda] swerved Labour.

But never mind the whys and wherefores, because very clearly it's the underlying principles that matter most here.

The fact is the sense of disconnection in the UK is very real. And very concerning. It is exemplified by the vicarious acceptance of the contemptible sentiment of “I'm Alright Jack” which has never been more alive, more insidious and more divisive and has never had more of a firm grip on so many ordinary folk’s collective and unwitting subconscious than is the case right now.

The contrast in voting between what happened in Scotland/the real Northern/South Welsh Labour heartlands and the majority of the rest of the country denotes a modern British nation more deeply divided than it has ever been.

The divisions are on many levels. The contrast between "the haves" and "have nots" is is top of the list of course and is as pronounced and distressing as it's ever been. But there is another division prevalent within those aforementioned voting patterns that speaks just as much if not more about the direction things are heading.

It is the wealth and opportunity imbalance between North and South. Again I’m speaking very broadly because there are clear exceptions to the rule. Indeed, perhaps the South to which I allude could be more accurately pinpointed as the South East but the prevailing principle is loud and clear.

Such a preposterous imbalance is something that has happened over many years of post industrial decline. There is no question it has done so largely organically. What reeks is the fact it has been allowed by successive Governments [including Blair’s] to do so. It stains the record of such governments who could have done much more – so much more - to balance it yet have paid it little more than lip service.

The simple fact is it is an obscenity and an assault upon common decency in a country that regards itself as civilized. The intrinsic outrage it invokes within those who are aware of it and - and this is the rub - actually have experience of it is entirely warranted and will inevitably result down the line in more and more of the fractures within the populace that we are seeing.

And so, what happened in Scotland was an inevitability. But let's be clear. It was not pure nationalism as such. It was not even really a rebuke of Labour, albeit Milliband's rejection of the offer to work together to defeat austerity clearly played a part. No, what it was, was a statement of defiant rejection, a proclamation from the 'passionate' and 'thinking' element of the Scottish people that “You Conservative cronies down in London have made it increasingly clear over time that you have got absolutely no connection with us up here. We up here feel alienated from you.”

It is a sentiment and proclamation which I endorse and applaud unreservedly and unequivocally.

I'm Scouse working class and am proud to be so and remain so. Since Thatcher first targetted this area as one of the expendable commodities that would pay the price the rest of the country needed to be paid in order for them to benefit long term, Liverpudlians as an entity – manifestly like decent Scottish folk now - have increasingly felt rejected, alienated and looked inwards for their affinity.

Forty years ago there was a sense of scouse identity sure, but a typical scouser was as proud of his country and felt a part of it as deeply as anybody.

Forty years on and the typical scouser is only proud of his city. His country scarcely figures except in the sense that he feels disconnected from it and cannot but help feeling intrinsically antagonistic towards it.

When Ian and Pete, you talk of the sort of national socialism sentiments/principles you abhor you might also take time to reflect upon the conditions amidst which those sort of feelings germinate.

Nobody - again speaking broadly - really wants any of this. But you can only eat shit for so long. "I'm alright Jack" is essentially evil in my book. It always was and it always will be. And whether an over simplification or not, it defines the Tory outlook on life to some degree or another.

In this regard it can engender a degree of bitterness and I have to admit, Pete, calling a man who is the very epitome of the self serving sentiment at its most heinous by his first name [Dave] as if to render him some alright kind of guy does not alter that fact. Nor does it alter him or what he is and the values he represents.

The fact is there is no decent substitute for fairer society. As Bruce is wont to say the only aspiration we should all have is that 'nobody wins unless everyone wins". It may well be an aspiration laced with futility, perhaps even a degree of hypocrisy but it’s a bloody admirable one all the same. In this divided nation right now the genuine desire to cherish such a sentiment - I stress the word 'genuine' here - would seem a non-starter except amongst those souls alienated from the self-serving mainstream like Scots and Scousers.


Entered at Wed May 13 00:58:06 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Good to know, Jeff. Thanks.


Entered at Tue May 12 23:41:44 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Peter V. That's what it was when I went to bed - when Labour was still 100 seats up(!) If it'd been here, we would have said that a herd of decent centrists moved to the Conservatives as the surest way to keep the UKIP out.


Entered at Tue May 12 23:25:52 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, it's pizza pie. Where the vodka comes in, i guess it must be in the sauce. Looks just alittle different than regular pie, and tasted different enough to know it's a different. Great vodka pie is a gift from God. I never had tried it, cuase it sounded like a novelty pie to me. then one day i was hanging with a friend, who loves Krispy's regular pie. I said man, it's good, not great. Another friend of his said, I'm with you on that Moe,but, their vodka pie is phenomenal. - at which point, i said to myself, i gotta try this vodka pie. that was about a year and 60 -70 slices of vodka pie ago.


Entered at Tue May 12 23:19:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

UKIP got just the one. Nigel Farage failed to get a seat, resigned, but then rescinded his resignation.


Entered at Tue May 12 23:00:51 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Before I got to Music, may I ask how many seats the UKIP won in the end.

Peter V: I went to the Jackie DeShannon link, butit may not be viewed, at least by me. So I tried other routes and found myself watching a bit of Jackie singing a dull version of "The Weight", which led to a disappointingly uninspired version by the Chambers Bros. But at least that got the brilliant "Time Has Come Today" running through my head; do you think the "Subway" they mention is the "Chocolate Subway" that Richard Manuel spoke of in TLW?


Entered at Tue May 12 22:10:22 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: General election in Scotland

Dunc, I tried very hard to express my concerns about socialism plus nationalism without raising the spectre that has now been aired here. That idea should be put to rest. I don't take a daily paper, nor follow the newspapers on-line, so was not aware that this had been raised. However, what I said was that "these two political strands have elements of zealotry which tend to the anti-democratic" and I would stand by that statement.

I was told last year by people who said that they had put a "No" poster in their window that they had been abused in the street and warned. They felt threatened. I'm not saying that this was condoned by the "high heid yins" of the SNP but these people felt that it was condoned and possibly orchestrated by local activists. I can only report what I was told.

As someone who lived in Scotland at the time and voted for devolution all those years ago, I think I can say that there was not the same degree of fervour then as I observed in Scotland last year. It concerns me, however, that Salmond would even suggest that he admires Putin to any degree(GQ interview, last year, as I recall). I know that he qualified his admiration and I understand that this was exploited in the tabloid press but he is an experienced, not to say wily, politician and I do not think he would make such a statement, however much qualified, without due consideration. I could prattle on about Putin's use of nationalism to stoke up support within Russia for his world view but I won't.

I think it's a bit rich suggesting that Murray owes his Edinburgh South seat to Sturgeon. Her intervention may have been a factor but I would suggest that you overstate it. Look at the figures. Murray's actual vote increased (from 15000 to 19000) and his share of the vote likewise(from below 35% to over 39%). Whatever Sturgeon said, the SNP share of the vote went up by over 25 points while, at the same time, the Lib Dem share of the vote went down by 30 points. The SNP and the Lib Dems switched positions in the table of votes cast, with the Conservatives remaining in third place (a drop in their votes of less than 1000).

I acknowledge that there was much political discourse in Scotland in the lead-up to the referendum. There was some down here, too, but to a lesser extent, of course. In fact, my wife and I travelled up to London for a one such debate there in the Guildhall. Amongst the speakers were Helena Kennedy and Danny Alexander. It was a very well attended event.

Of myself, I should perhaps say that, though a Londoner by birth and now a southerner by domicile, I have lived and/or worked in Scotland for many years, that I'm married to a Scot (who was very unhappy at not being able to vote in the independence referendum), that my children are all Scots-born and that I have relatives there. I visit Scotland fairly regularly if not always frequently. But, I shall be there for a two/three day visit in the not too distant future and that will be my second visit this year.

I would also add that, in a way, I envy those who always support the same party (of whatever political persuasion) because an election is so straightforward for them but I'm afraid it's not for me. No one political party embraces my views, so I'm a floating voter. For example, I did not vote for the same party this general election as the last.



Entered at Tue May 12 21:11:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sweet Sixteen

Link to Jackie DeShannon performing "Sweet Sixteen" with Van Morrison who composed it. This rare Atlantic 45 is on the new CD. Try it!


Entered at Tue May 12 19:09:40 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Vodka pie . . .?


Entered at Tue May 12 18:21:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jackie DeShannon

All The Love: The Lost Atlantic Recordings arrived today. There are the four collaborations with Van Morrison on there: Sweet Sixteen, Flamingos Fly, Santa Fe & The Wonder of You. I started with those four. Really, really essential!


Entered at Tue May 12 17:20:10 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: That was short by Al E standards, but nobody else's! I agree though. I suspect you cross the Malahat from time to time. If so, do you ever get to the fabulous Fascinating Rhythm record store in Nanaimo - assuming it still exists? For years it was in one of those malls in the sprawl north of town, but I was surprised to find it downtown our last trip out, maybe three years ago. See link for coordinates.


Entered at Tue May 12 16:58:50 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: V
Web: My link

Subject: The Treadmill

Jeff: The ONLY time I listen to music on my i-phone is when I am on the treadmill (it keeps me going and kills the boredom) .

To date, no one has handed me a phone to listen. I'm sure it will happen

To be fair, I am on airplanes often and am happy to be able to listen to my music during a 5 hour flight while I'm working at something on my computer. It is a sanctuary and I'm grateful for it. At home its different.


Entered at Tue May 12 16:44:38 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT, has anyone told you- listen to this - then handed you there phone to listen to a song? i wont do it. i tell em to send me the name of the song & artist, i'll check it out.


Entered at Tue May 12 16:42:04 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: C For Chicago, K For Kosher

Pete, re Margolin & Muddy & the general proliferation of Jews in Blues. You gotta remember, us Yids started out Krispy. Downright deep fried :-). The K in Krispy is for Kosher.

We got Krispy Pizza on 13th Ave in Bensonhurst. I once asked the counterman if the K in Krispy meant the pie is kosher. He didn't get it. By the way, they have to die for vodka pie, the best anywhere.

C For Chicago is a song by Brooklyn native Steve Freund ( from my hood), who spent decades in Chicago playing with the greats, household & non household names.


Entered at Tue May 12 16:33:53 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: a short diatribe

Bill M: Thanks for the Vancouver 'letter'. There are virtually no 'new' record stores anymore. If you want to purchase recorded music (cd, vinyl, rarely other), the only stores are dealing in both resales of previously owned material along with never-owned music. There are no record chains in most cities anymore. In Toronto, as you know (this is for others), there was Sam's, A&A, and many others. Now, only HMV still has a presence (but survives also on DVDs (I don't think music alone would sustain them). The future looks grim as this kid continues to download directly to his/her computer. Ditch and Lyle Records in Victoria are very good stores selling resales as well as new records. The vinyl sections are increasing in size (not sure how long this will go on.). It may be that the future of hard-copy recorded material will be at Amazon and other on-line resources for those who want to continue to have hard-copy. But the kids don't seem to care to own the cd or the vinyl. There is a lot of work to be done in owning a hard copy if you have lots of it. (sorting, making space, etc) and you have to actually get it and put it into or onto something to hear it (OMG!) And then it can be damaged. Go to I-Tunes, push a button and away you go (no fuss, no bother). Sounds perfect for today's generation (hard work is not in their repertoire). Nine to four (not five anymore) goes hand-in-hand with the demise of the 'record' store. If you love your local record store, visit it today and take photos. It'll soon be replaced by a Starbuck's or something. I must admit, I don't get there as often as I used to and flipping through the returns and new releases (something I always used to do) is less common. I'm increasingly swept up by the ease of technology but there is something sad about it all. You can't talk to the knowledgable record store clerks (there are still some) and the other visitors to the store when you go to I-Tunes or order from Amazon. So I think I'll go and visit Ditch in the next couple of days and say hi and go through the 'what's new in vinyl' bin (even if I already know).


Entered at Tue May 12 15:36:31 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Reccos from Emmylou

Linked


Entered at Tue May 12 14:55:00 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Here's the full text of a letter to the editor that appears in today's "Globe and Mail" newspaper, under the heading "Sounds like ...":

Overheard at a 'vintage vinyl' fair on Main Street in Vancouver on the weekend:

Young son: What’s that word again?

Father: Record.

Ken Grennan. Vancouver


Entered at Tue May 12 14:48:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Corey Harris was more interested in vocals, but on guitar, let's say Muddy Waters was happy to employ Bob Margolin.

Vocals … that leads to accents. Americans I was working with round in England in 1970 couldn't believe that Yorkshire black people had Yorkshire accents, and Liverpudlian black people had Liverpool accents. In London though, you heard a lot of Caribbean accents. But there wasn't a "Black American Accent" equivalent here then. However a British one has been created more recently to the fascination of linguistic experts. It was illustrated by Ali G's white rapper. That's a deliberate forging of identity. But yes, until 20 ago, Black British people in the regions had no unifying "black accent" or even "vocal tone."

What that implies is that what Corey Harris was talking about was as much learned as intrinsic.


Entered at Tue May 12 14:32:58 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

My answer to the Corey Harris article would include an answer that I once gave a black woman whom I had just met and pretty quickly asked out. The gal asked "What do you know about black women?" My response: "Some one upstairs just poured the wrong bucket of paint on me."
Yes, it worked.


Entered at Tue May 12 14:07:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I hope it’s not your last comment on the election, Dunc. It’s really informative to get a personal view.

Apologies for the “nationalism” + “socialism” remark, Dunc, but it wasn’t original, and as you know it’s been widely used in England. The SNP might not fly the word "socialist" but every observer places them to the left of Labour. But left wing populist nationalist movements all over the place don’t produce peace and harmony. Historically, a positive aspect of socialism has been internationalism, rather than nationalism. Everywhere you look, countries are breaking into sub-national groupings. In Czechoslovakia, the division into Czech Republic and Slovakia was harmonious, peaceful and worked. But it is the exception.

The “harassment” stuff on Labour was mentioned and complained about by Labour a good week or ten days before the Murphy / Izzard street incident, and the BBC News on that incident in my memory immediately added that there were accusations that Labour had deliberately set it up. So that was even-handed.

Has Sturgeon been treated unfairly? Without question the Daily Mail / Daily Express / Sun have gone for her (The Most Dangerous Woman in Britain was Daily Mail), but in the days after the leadership debate, the rest of the press was positive. You’d kind of expect those three papers to be unpleasant, and the Daily Mail put “Red Ed” in every headline about Miliband for weeks. And they didn’t like Murphy either. In fact I’d say Murphy got worse press than Sturgeon.

The feeling that the English don’t like the Scots? Cameron is of recent Scottish descent, as was Blair. Cameron is surely the classic Jacobite clan? One of the papers filled a page with photos of cabinet ministers from Scotland over the last 20 years, indicating that they were disproportionately successful in government, and yet no one ever complained about it. I don’t think Scotland was under-represented in government. I do think a lot of people disliked Gordon Brown. I was quite surprised talking to Glaswegian friends who’d been at university with him who spent an hour telling me what a great guy he was with a wicked sense of humour, so I’d probably been led by the press on Gordon.

But for example disliking Thatcher doesn’t mean that someone dislikes “The English” as you’d find large numbers of English people with the same view. With my ear to the ground, the referendum left England like the husband who’s just been told that what he thought was his loving wife had just filed for divorce. I.e. hurt, bemused, then resentful. We had two electricians from Aberdeen working here at the time, and both were very resentful that Scots living in England didn’t get a vote. They felt excluded.


Entered at Tue May 12 11:33:01 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.51)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: General Election Scotland

During the referendum, there were many great meetings in local village and community halls, the extent to which I had never seen before. There were reportings of bad behaviour on both sides . Democracy is very much alive in Scotland, Ian. There is a surge to the SNP, which I've never seen the likes of before. Swings of 34% and 35%. One swing in NE Glasgow reached 39.5% and broke the BBC's swingometer. The last party to win this amount of seats was the old Scottish Unionist Party back in the 1950s when Scotland was conservative country.

Douglas Alexander is not very popular with many people in his own constituency.

Ian Murray, the only labour MP, probably won because he is a good constituency MP, led the campaign to save Hearts and probably owes his seat to Nicola Sturgeon. His SNP opponent was exposed as a troll and Sturgeon hung him out to dry by saying that the voters would decide his fate.

Labour MPs were not harrassed in Scotland. The only case I can think of was Jim Murphy and Eddie Izzard in Buchanan Street. They were being harrassed by Sean Clerkin, a person who seems to be a compulsive harrasser. (look him up on you tube) He is not a member of the SNP and should have been arrested for his despicable behaviour. Nicola Sturgeon condemned the behaviour and suspended two SNP members in attendance.

I feel that Nicola Sturgeon and Ed Milliband were treated very unfairly by the English press.

'Meet the most dangerous woman in the world that America has never heard of' 'Queen Nicola of Scotland'. It goes on. Since the days of Gordon Brown, there is a feeling that many English don't like us. I've seen many comments over the years that border on racism. This plays into the SNP hands. The National Socialist comments now on this site are in poor taste. Few talk of Socialism up here and to imply the SNP are Nazis is not good.

The leader of the Scottish Labour Party is Jim Murphy, not an MP or an MSP. He can't resign because there is nobody to take his place. The leader of the Scottish Parliament, Kezia Dugdale is poor, and unbelievably has an SNP voting Dad, who tweets against her. The last leader of Scottish Labour resigned condemning National Labour.

There is disillusionment with Westminster. I don't get UKIP's appeal, but I see on programmes like Question Time and read in the nationals that there are many genuine English people, who feel that nobody is representing them. Just under 4m people voted for UKIP.

Finally Europe. I'm not sure how many people want a referendum on Europe up here.

That's my final post on the election, although I will continue to be very vociferous in the ongoing political debate up here in Scotland.


Entered at Tue May 12 07:30:23 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.172)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: The Connecticut Delta

Subject: Da Bluze

Just back ftom blowing harp down at my local I-IV-V shuffle night for white boys.

As a long time blues fan, I read the article by Corey Harris with some interest. Although I can see the point he is trying to make, I don't see a great benefit to society at large, by the type of segregation that he is proposing.

I will concede that I will never be the next Junior Wells, but I'll be damned if Mr. Harris tries to kill my life long dream of becoming the next big Mariachi sensation!


Entered at Tue May 12 01:55:16 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: General Election - result in Scotland

Sorry to come back to this but there were a couple of things I meant to say last time.

The total of the votes for the SNP in the general election was (roughly) 1.45 million but this is less than the number of people who voted "Yes" in the referendum on independence, which was 1.6 million. It is difficult, however, to draw any great conclusion from this because the turnout in the general election in Scotland (71%) was much lower than the turnout in the independence referendum (85%).

The complications of the vote may be exemplified by the one and only seat held by the Conservatives in both 2010 and 2015. The Conservatives actually increased their share of the vote slightly (from 38% to almost 40%) but their majority declined from over 4000 to less than 1000. How to explain this? Well, the Labour and Liberal Democrat votes fell substantially (probably going mostly to the SNP) while the vote for UKIP party rose (possibly gaining votes from the Conservatives). The overall effect, however, was to concentrate the non-Conservative vote in one party (the SNP) rather than being spread more evenly over several parties. The turnout, incidentally, increased from 69% to 76%.



Entered at Mon May 11 23:07:51 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: White Blues

While derivative,and interpreters,as much music is,the Allman Brothers Band are a distinctly unique white blues band.If you don't think so,then listen to Gregg Allman-tell me he's not one original sounding white blues singer.That was true in 1969 and it was until 45 years later when this era of the band ended things on 10/28/14.


Entered at Mon May 11 22:13:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Basehead

Corey Harris, from "Greens From The Garden". I never thought it obscure but I was just the 56th view on YouTube!


Entered at Mon May 11 22:09:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm very fond of Corey Harris and will play him tomorrow. But I rather suspect that Bob Dylan (white) can play the blues better than … say … Gloria Lynne or Natalie Cole (black). BUT Dylan … and Geoff Muldaur and Ry Cooder … while doing it right, don't do it "blackface." That's important. I also get annoyed by … well name three dozen British bands … who think they're playing Der Blooz.


Entered at Mon May 11 21:55:34 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ian, if allowed to think & prepare, i could discuss this all day long. Without going into detail, i don't know him, but I'm surprised. I am likely out of line, but i have to wonder if piling the current events with police in the U.S. of say the last year, on top of the past, and the current state of the blues music biz, and B.B. ailing, have had partial influence in the timing of this and the writing of the piece itself.


Entered at Mon May 11 19:59:51 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Harris's article

Whilst we can all understand the historical background and the hurt behind Harris's article, the logic is specious. It would mean that black people could never appreciate or perform classical music, opera, Shakespeare and any other art forms that are white, historically speaking. This is patently not so.


Entered at Mon May 11 18:57:05 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That article of Harris's could prompt another reason to return to college, another dissertation from me.. Quite a few discussions.


Entered at Mon May 11 18:23:44 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Corey Harris tackles the hard subject matter of the blues

See the link....


Entered at Mon May 11 18:20:38 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Before we move along to music (ho hum), note that the ever-fascinating topics of British politics and Cockney rhyming slang seem to have intersected in Dunc's list of reasons; the term 'numpties', surely was formed from 'humpties' or 'dumpties' or both.


Entered at Mon May 11 18:01:03 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Jeff. I will always take journalism with a pinch of salt, but it was pretty clear that Labour candidates in Scotland were being harassed, heckled, followed about. Posters were being defaced or removed. There were complaints about mass dialling in to block their phone lines. It was on TV … and I realize that might have been stage managed but it was widely reported. I found some Scottish Labour an unprepossessing bunch, but others weren’t, like Douglas Alexander (Labour), a person of gravitas, defeated by a 20 year old. Ian juxtaposed those two words “nationalism” and “socialism” and when you put them together you get National Socialism.

BUT on a lighter note, my study of daily headlines found the Daily Mail:

CAMERON TO MAKE ONE THIRD OF CABINET FEMALE.

It sounds like a series of pretty major operations, but there will be no shortage of volunteer amateur surgeons. I think they should televise the “deballing” of Michael Gove. It will attract a major TV audience, particularly among teachers. (He used to be Minister for Edukashun).


Entered at Mon May 11 16:39:11 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.211)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, I think it was you whom offered an apology earlier.... Far as I'm concerned, no apologies necessary at all for discussing U.K. politics. It's all interesting.


Entered at Mon May 11 14:35:28 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dunc's reasons

I agree with much of what Dunc put forward as the reasons behind the SNP success but would point out that several of the reasons apply equally elsewhere in Britain (decline in traditional industries, the right-to-buy council houses, the perception of the Labour party moving right and the Iraq War) and several of the reasons amount to the same thing (poor Labour leaders in Scotland and the bright Labour people going into Westminster, for example).

I know that the Labour Party used to get strong support from the Catholic community in Scotland (particularly in the West of Scotland) but, then, one could argue that the Conservative Party used to get strong support (maybe not as strong) from the Protestant community in Scotland. The Conservatives lost support in Scotland (perhaps to the Lib Dems and the SNP) but the effect was less catastophic for them. Labour relied to a greater extent than the Conservatives on Scottish seats to get into No.10.

This was a general election and, to succeed overall in a general election, parties have to appeal to a wider range of voters than their natural supporters. Labour failed to do this. Sturgeon's suggestion of a Miliband government on an SNP choke-chain (I paraphrase, folks) may have gone down well in Scotland but I can assure you that it did not go down well elsewhere.

Where I do disagree is that, even if the Labour Party was perceived to have swung right, Miliband had swung it back again and it was still seen as left of centre; the SNP was positioned further to the left again. I worry about that "further left" socialism when mixed with Nationalism, since these two political strands have elements of zealotry which tend to the anti-democratic. We saw this both in the referendum campaigns and in the election campaigns. When in Scotland for two weeks last year prior to the referendum, I was struck by the number of people who told me that they were scared to express their "No" opinion, scared to place a poster in the windows of their own homes. I met two Scots in London after the referendum who said exactly the same thing. All were casual conversations with strangers. The surge of interest in politics was welcome; the unwillingness of some to allow others to express a contrary view was not. The rise I fear in Scotland is not democracy (that is welcome) but political intolerance.

I am also not sure about effect in Scotland of the three main parties in Britain (if I can call them that) being unionist. The nationalists lost the referendum and, despite the electoral landslide, got about 1.5 million votes overall. Does is this translate into a wish for another referendum and a majority for a "Yes" vote outcome? I do not know.

Sturgeon resonates with voters in a way that Salmond does not. If that is her "strength", then I agree. However, the number of arguements Dunc put forward about the weaknesses of the Labour Party in Scotland suggest that these failures were at least as significant as Sturgeon's "strength".


Entered at Mon May 11 11:45:19 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.51)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Reasons

Again like many in this land - first two child houses were slums thencouncil house background, state schools like 94% of Scots and first to go to uni in the family. The reasons for SNP success are many but include.

Long term decline of the unions in Scotland tied with collapse of Scottish traditional industries-closely aligned with Labour.

Thatcher's remarkable success in right to buy council houses undermined Labour's former public housung fiefdom.

No first past the post system in Scottish councils curtailed influence of Labour.

Catholics voted solidly for labour as the party that would stand up for an oppressed minority. Integration has now meant this solid vote has been lost. SNP seen as a protestant party in the past - gone now.

The Labour party in England swung more to the right. New Labour not so successful in Scotland amongst traditional Labour supporters.

The Iraq War.

The SNP became the party of Centre Left - the default position in Scotland.

Poor performance of Labour in Scotland - five poor leadres in seven years.

Feeling that bright Labour people go to Westminster, numpties to Holyrood.

There is a rise of democracy here - momentum of ref campaign carried on.

Labour siding with Tories in the referendum debate.

Strength of Nicola Sturgeon.


Entered at Mon May 11 09:46:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: MUSIC!

I had a look at Mojo last night and a little review showed that Jackie De Shannon's "Lost Atlantic Recordings" CD is released today. Another legendary female singer album, along with Dusty in Memphis, Cher's 3614 Jackson Highway, Lulu's New Routes and Melody Fair LPs, and Petula Clark's Memphis. All great albums, so I look forward to the Jackie De Shannon.

BTW, we always run into my "released today" because it's Monday in the UK for new releases, Tuesday in North America BUT I read that from June, the release day will be Friday everywhere in the world.


Entered at Mon May 11 09:20:58 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sorry, a bit more politics …

Apologies again to American readers, but it’s interesting for us to chat to friends about these issues especially as we are geographically dotted widely across the UK. And I’ll read yours when the US and Canadian elections come with interest. My background is similar to Ian. Welsh mining family one side, Dorset rural poor the other, though one grandfather ended up as a crane driver in a steel works, the other as a train driver, so in Marxist terms, both solidly working class. I was also first in my family to go to university.

It must be heady and thrilling times in Scotland and the wave of excitement seems tangible. The Scottish Labour leader, Murphy, appeared to be a particularly unlikeable guy with poor communication skills in comparison to Sturgeon or Salmond. But I’d agree that the situation shaved several points off Labour in both England and Wales. But above that it’s been a hard five years, and I don’t think people wanted to reverse the achievements … as I said we have stood still or gained a tiny amount, but elsewhere in Europe standards have gone down.

Interesting chat with a Polish guy voting (with great pride) for the first time since citizenship: Conservative. Labour always had the idea that Eastern European immigration would produce a new batch of automatic Labour voters. Wrong. As he said, he grew up with socialism. That’s why he came to Britain.

But … on a unifying note, I watched the VE Day stuff on TV last night, with those be-medalled WW2 veterans in wheelchairs. The flags flying were British. Not English. Not Scottish. Those veterans fought together for Britain.


Entered at Mon May 11 03:50:25 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.63)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry,4 to 1 is rough odds.


Entered at Mon May 11 02:51:49 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "The truth, the whole truth, nothing but the truth."

I couldn't have said it better, Ian. I thought of writing something and pulled back. Then you wrote, Ian. Thank you.


Entered at Mon May 11 01:51:04 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: British political commentary

I rarely comment on politics, particularly on-line, but I'll make an exception.

There is no doubt that, in terms of seats in Scotland, it was stunning win for the SNP and Sturgeon may be popular in Scotland but she did not succeed in locking Cameron out of No.10. /n You may argue that, even if the situation had been reversed and Labour had won all but three of the seats in Scotland, it would still not have gained entry to No.10. This is true but the voting figures indicate that the Sturgeon factor swayed more voters down south to vote against Labour than for Labour. Let me give you an example.

Up until a very few years back, I lived in the largely working class city of Carlisle which, for most of my 25 years there, had returned a Labour MP. In 2001, the Labour majority was was 5700 and, in 2005, it was almost 6000 (actually, a slight swing to Conservative in a growing city) but, in 2010, it reversed the pattern and returned a Conservative candidate, with a majority of roughly 850. This year, despite five years of austerity, the Conservative candidate was returned with a majority of over 2750. Yes, the electorate had grown but the turnout was almost identical each time and the Conservative share of the votes increased from over 39% to over 44%. Speaking to friends in the city, there was a great deal of concern that, had Miliband become Prime Minister, Sturgeon would have pushed the whole country to the left and undone the work done in the past five years - in short, that the austerity suffered would have been in vain.

I should add that I come from a council estate labour-voting background, attended a local primary school and a state secondary school and was the first in my family to attend a tertiary education institution, though not a particularly well regarded one. My political record indicates that I am a floating voter. I have no political axe to grind and am not "tribal",a s the politicos say.

Politicians lie - that is the simple fact - not ouright but, if the test was to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, they would have committed perjury over and over again. They are slippery and cunning people - Sturgeon and her predecessor included.


Entered at Sun May 10 23:01:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That widens even more if you extend it from "one school" to add "Oxford University" because then you take in the Labour leadership too. And Blair and Wilson. And "boys" is the operative word because males dominate. And I agree it's extremely unhealthy. Add the senior judiciary … BTW, the USA isn't that different in the narrowness of background of the elite.

I would say I have heard admiration for Nicola Sturgeon down here, but most people I know this far South express extreme dislike at the same time as admiring her acumen. She played a deliberately divisive card with "tax the South" and it played well for her, but no one in the South is going to like it obviously. She could have said "more nurses for everyone in the UK" but she chose not to. She was clear, "more nurses for Scotland." You could argue the South of England is statistically healthier due to a warmer drier climate, but what about South Wales or North-East England, which have similar climactic challenges? I place Sturgeon with Farage as extremists … Ed Miliband clearly wasn't an extremist in those terms , in spite of what the Tory press said. In my article on the leadership debate I said Cameron and Miliband were in a different league to the others. Neither "scared me" as potential leaders. They're both highly privileged boys whatever, and I reckon Dave was simply judged the more competent posh bloke.


Entered at Sun May 10 22:11:27 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.51)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: North/South divide

Readers of North America - what you see in Peter and Al's posts is the North South divide.

And, although I count Peter as a friend, I'm solidly with Al. I don't want to be governed by posh boys. The prime minister, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the future king, the Mayor of London, the assistant political editor of the BBC (who had the leading BBC role in reporting the election), the head of the civil service...I could go on all went to the same school! Can't stand them. I don't want the House of Lords.

For many reasons, including the pathetic performance of Scottish Labour, which Peter and Al don't see, there has been a surge to support for the SNP, the likes of which has never been seen before anyplace in the world before. all of Scotland's MPs apart from three are nationalists. They used to weigh the labour vote up here.

The buzz up here is amazing and Nicola Sturgeon's popularity is unbelievable. To paraphrase one political commentator: one third of the electorate love her and the other two thirds think she is brilliant!

She is actually the most popular leader in some polls in England and Wales.


Entered at Sun May 10 22:09:14 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Amos Garrett

Ian: Check out Amos Garrett (re Dirty Shames).


Entered at Sun May 10 21:40:06 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Toronto in the mid-1960s

A friend recently sent me the Septemeber 1966 issue of "HOOT", a folk music magazine out of Toronto. It has an article on Joni Mitchell, reports from that year's Newport Folk Festival and another from the Mariposa festival.

Perhaps of more interest to some here would be the full page adverts for two record shops ("Sam the Record Man" on Yonge Street and Record World in Avenue Road, north of Yorkville) and also the adverts for a couple of the clubs.

There were two one-page adverts for the Riverboat. One was for its "Hoot" night (Monday at 9 pm) that included the names of some of those who had performed at the club - presumably not on "Hoot" nights in some cases. The other was for the performers scheduled to be there from mid-October 1966 to the end of January 1967 (including Judy Roderick, Joni Mitchell, Tom Paxton, Eric Andersen and Gordon Lightfoot). The only performers not known to me were The Dirty Shames - their press photo shows neatly dressed and rather conventional-looking people, neither dirty nor likely to be regarded as shame-inducing.

There was also a small advert for "The 7 of Clubs" on Hannaford Street. The news column reported that the Gangrene Boys, Arlo Guthrie, Ritchie Havens and Chuck Mitchell would each be doing a week there between early October and early November.


Entered at Sun May 10 18:14:51 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Excuse us, North America … we have a lot to chat about!

Al, in Poole Labour got 12% of the vote, and only that much because Liberal collapsed so comprehensively. Yes, Cameron, Osborne and Johnson, along with David Dimbleby were all in the Bullingdon Club (see the film “The Riot Club” or the play, POSH which I’ve linked my review of) But I do prefer Dave, a toff, but at least we know it; to Ed, a North London academic toff pretending to be a worker. I don’t think Dave is insincere, and I would place him well to the left of Thatcher. If you look back, victorious Labour leaders like Wilson, Callaghan, Blair were centrists. Ed was in the Kinnock / Foot division, and they didn’t win either. It’s the same the other way … Duncan-Smith and Hague on the right of the Tories got dumped too. Yes, it was a world crisis, but hardly helped for the UK by Gordon Brown having dumped our gold reserves right at the bottom of the market.

Where I think we were saved was that a Cameron defeat would have put the populist Boris Johnson in charge of the Conservatives, and that’s as frightening as UKIP. More really, because he’s a very popular character and would have won the next time. I mean would you paint “Mayor of London” on every bit of public anything in London, rather than (say) “London”? You know what a right wing figure with a working people’s vote is called.

A significant moment, which everyone I speak to remembers down here, is when Nicola Sturgeon said blatantly that she would tax the “wealthy South” to provide “more nurses for Scotland.” Now if she had said “more nurses” many people down here would have said “OK, fair enough” but she didn’t say “more nurses” (the South is equally short of nurses) but “more nurses for Scotland.” That meant the “fear of a Labour government controlled by the Scottish Nationalists” card really worked. In fact, the South may have a greater problem recruiting nurses because the wages are the same, but property and rental costs are far higher down here. I also suspect that Ms. Sturgeon might not be that unhappy privately to see a Conservative government who might well devolve more powers in return for “English votes for English issues” in Parliament.


Entered at Sun May 10 11:46:07 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV - us disconnected Northern souls

Interesting to read what your buddies said re Ed Milliband Pete.

As you can imagine up here in Liverpool you could times that particular sentiment by 10 in the sense of us not being able to reconcile with our own experiences the 'working man' message which a 'silver spoon' Islington academic was attempting to hammer home time after time.

And yet as an entity, folks like myself up here had no problem with it whatsoever. Milliband may not have 'worked' in the true sense but I and those I know had absolutely no problem in recognizing the deep sincerity and conviction behind his message.

Cameron in sharp contrast. Oh dear. I look at the man and shudder. Contempt rises to the fore in an instant. Just as it did with Thatcher.

In one sense, I guess to judge by appearances was not the way we were brought up in this neck of the woods. However, when it comes to self-serving silver spoon I'm Alright Jack Tory bastards like Cameron, Theresa May and their cronies you simply know your instincts are bang on.

As for the Tory victory it was won I believe on the back of the fact that the huge swathe of ordinary people floating voters [many of whom would seem to vote Lib Dem] fell for the 'myth' that a Labour Government would not be equipped to handle the economy.

This 'myth' in turn was I believe based upon the corresponding 'myth' that it was Labour's ineptitude and not the worldwide financial crisis that was responsible for the huge debt rise that was left by the last Labour government under Gordon Brown .

The truth, of course, is that whilst mistakes were made by that Government the outcome of excessive debt was overwhelmingly down to the worldwide financial crisis and banking irresponsibility. The borrowing to avert disater took place in the final few years of Labour rule and it was a borrowing that would have occurred whichever Political party had been in power during that period.

The fact was up until the crash the Labour Government's record with the economy and 'debt' management had been reasonable.

Why the Tories, Lib Dems and UKIP peddled the 'myth' to disconcert and frighten the electorate regarding what they ranted as representing cast iron proof of Labour's inability to manage the economy is as clear as day. And nobody can blame them for it.

Why Labour did not spend the last 5 years attempting to educate the same electorate as to the harsh economic financial reality of what actually took place under their regime speaks more about the competance or otherwise of their 'think tank' than any actual inability to handle the economy of the country any better or worse than any other party.

But, whatever, here we are. Stuck with these bastards for another 5 year term. Let us hope for the sake of decency and fairness that the Labour party 'think tank' learns from their ridiculous blind spot oversight.


Entered at Sun May 10 04:23:10 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fighting for what is right

Jeff. That is a great story. Thanks. Here's one from me. You'll appreciate it. Walking along at age 13 or so in Jackson's Point, near Lake Simcoe, 50 miles or so north of Toronto. A beautiful summer day. With a girl from the tribe from Cleveland. Jackson's Point, near Sutton, was a place where people went to cottages for the summer (like Cape Cod for Boston etc) and the tribe invaded the locals (in the thousands)

4 punks come up and say and I quote "Jewish whore. Bet you go down for nickels". I asked the one guy what he said? He repeated it and then broke one of my ribs with a punch and then a kick (I'm pretty sure/it hurt like hell for a while) on the right side. I got in a lick but lost the fight, but in my mind, I won the war even though it hurt a lot. Good on that politician. The right thing is always the right thing. Today you don't do that. He might have a gun or a knife. There was no switchblade that day in Jackson's Point or I might not be writing this.


Entered at Sun May 10 03:39:20 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.201)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Modern Day Brooklyn Barroom Politics

Read The Link!


Entered at Sat May 9 22:15:39 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Fluorescent drum sticks

Saw them lightning the place last night.


Entered at Sat May 9 20:52:50 CEST 2015 from (166.216.157.60)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bobby Irwin (Robert Treherne) RIP

1953-2015 Nick Lowe and Geraint Watkins' drummer. Likely others too -


Entered at Sat May 9 19:02:15 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: I got whited

For years my wife asks me to paint our house white. I never gave in, but last month in a moment of weakness, I said …..“Ok”. ….after the first second I started painting I regretted the whole thing, but by then it was already too late already. What a fucking boat load of work!

I was a fool to give in. Here there are a lot of softies like me over here, easily recognizable by the color of their house. There is even an expression for it in Holland: “You’ve got whited”.

There are only two types of houses over here, white houses and red houses; those who are whited and those who will be whited.

Have a nice weekend all.


Entered at Sat May 9 15:01:00 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Player piano superiority

You can't fool people that you're performing a wax cylinder.


Entered at Sat May 9 14:43:06 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Peter V: you're soooo technologically behind the times!


Entered at Sat May 9 14:28:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wax phonograph cylinders? Luxury! Whatever happened to player piano scrolls?


Entered at Sat May 9 12:19:49 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Elections

Peter, enough of elections! Soon it will be Eurovision Song Contest. You will get a chance to vote for a Finnish Down's Syndrome punk band. And I mean a Down's Syndrome punk band _for real_.


Entered at Sat May 9 11:43:57 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Things Will Change - The Prowse Brothers

Me and and my bros - with a reasonably Band inspired song


Entered at Sat May 9 10:25:44 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Polls

JQ, like all polls it depends where you stand and who you ask. One poll used computers and email. My 90+ in-laws don't have computers. An unknown query to me would have been spammed. When you do your age, gender and ethnic balancing, let alone area and occupation balancing, even a 20,000 poll is liable to be slewed. A 1500 person poll is extremely crude, to me.

I think people - certainly among my pals - don't like to admit voting Conservative, if they do. In some areas the leading choice was Conservative v UKIP, making Conservative the choice to the "left." Conservative had a difficult sell. More or less,

" OK, you don't feel any better off than 5 years ago. But on an index of countries, the economy is currently one of the most successful. So although you don't feel life is better, if you lived anywhere else in Europe, you'd be feeling life was worse. So don't vote for the people who screwed it up 7 years ago."

But I reckon in the end, at the poll booth, people thought, 'Yeah, probably true." The other factor was Ed Milliband. I was chatting to two pals who'd voted Labour all their life, had been trades union reps too (as was I as a teacher). They just couldn't identify with a privileged member of London's intellectual elite classes rabbiting on about "the working people." One of the most acid questions he got, the day before the election, was "You keep talking about the working people. But you left university and went straight into politics. So as the rest of us understand "work", you have never been "a working person."' Manifestly true.



Entered at Sat May 9 09:10:18 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

All this talk of CDs & vinyl.....pshaw! I say bring back the wax phonograph cylinder!! Now there's yer perfect sound. : )


Entered at Sat May 9 04:39:56 CEST 2015 from (79.97.31.127)

Posted by:

Sean

Location: Ireland

Binaural analog recordings, self-made on good equipment from the perfect stereo position work for me. Digital can be better sometimes, but 'loss' can be total...

Selfie stick? Too hard to focus...


Entered at Sat May 9 03:42:18 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, I'm not sure how to feel about that comment :-). Maybe I'm now GB Bar Mitzvah :-)


Entered at Sat May 9 00:18:11 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Dunc, Jeff is ok.


Entered at Fri May 8 21:14:49 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Oh What A Night, cont

Peter V - There's something going wrong with polling recently. A similar result as England's happened in Israel a month or so ago too. Whereas here, as recently as 2008, Nate Silver got his picks nearly 100% correct; far less so in 2014. The pollsters are claiming they were defrauded by the lying of those polled... there aughta be a law!

But I wonder if it isn't that a certain number of those publicly and admittedly (at least to pollsters) liberal, just can't vote that way anymore in the privacy of the voting booth and instead vote what they think is best for their more selfish interests. Or their race. Or has the right-wing so demonized liberalism for so long that it has finally stuck and been persuasive enough to scare those less certain of their beliefs? It sure seemed that way in Israel with BiBi blatantly trotting out the fear card and humiliating the pollsters there -


Entered at Fri May 8 15:44:38 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Stephen Fearing, Tom Wilson (Lee Harvey Osmond), and Colin Linden - BARK

I have been listening to Stephen Fearing, Tom Wilson (Lee Harvey Osmond), and Colin Linden as independent musicians. They all have cds out independent of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. I want to bring attention to these since all 3 are excellent and I regard them highly. Look them up on you tube and see what I mean. I have seen Stephen in concert a number of times. If he comes around your area, don't you dare miss him!


Entered at Fri May 8 12:46:56 CEST 2015 from (31.48.6.221)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Uptown Gal

Enjoyed the laugh, Jeff. According to what I know about New York culture (little), should you not be looking for an 'Uptown Girl'?

My great headphones, Grado, were made in Brooklyn.

Thanks, Jeff.


Entered at Fri May 8 11:19:16 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Oh, what a night! (May 2015)

I lasted till 3 a.m. An extraordinary election. What I really, really didn't like this morning was the odious Caroline Lucas (Green Party's only MP) on the radio saying (rightly) that the first past the post system was unfair to the Greens and UKIP, but then adding "So we'll have to take the argument to extra-Parliamentary action." Hmm. Democracy, Caroline. It's spelled D-E-M-O-C-R-A-C-Y.

So many big names have fallen. I was particularly sorry that parliament is losing Douglas Alexander (Labour) and Danny Alexander (Lib-Dem), two consistently articulate and sane voices on the weekly political "Question Time" TV program me. Others I'll be glad to see the back of.


Entered at Fri May 8 10:04:59 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Erroll Brown

RIP. As I have said many times, in the mid 70s we saw Santana one week, Hot Chocolate the next. Hot Chocolate were so much better live, they would have blown Santana off the stage. They hit a perfect groove and errol's voice was extraordinary powerful. Plus great songs.


Entered at Fri May 8 09:10:30 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: CD

To younger gbers: Compact disc (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format. It has the same size as a McDonalds pancake. It is as thin as well.


Entered at Fri May 8 01:52:06 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: I Believe In Miracles - You Sexy Thing

Hot Chocolate's other big hit. What a voice, great song, & great combination of influences..... a lot happening in a seemingly simple presentation......


Entered at Fri May 8 01:47:18 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Errol Brown

Linked , the original Brother Louie, of which he was a cowriter


Entered at Fri May 8 00:55:27 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

J. Souther has a new record. Go to the show linked, you get one. Looks like about a 150 bucks a head minimum.... jackets reccommeded for the men... small, intimate classy space, fine food..... thing is, that's what it costs today. Add in that the only places to play apparently are more interested in selling their food than most anything else, it's tsurres.


Entered at Fri May 8 00:14:21 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, i like that whole concept, & "houses will become musical and rock with rise out of the walls" :-)


Entered at Thu May 7 23:20:20 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Again, not fully expressed or developed: This is an exceptionally complicated subject. Good points are getting expressed by people. I've always said the industry served a great purpose. Big labels and small labels, businessmen may have & did rip off artists various ways, but music got made. Music got promoted, and many musicians did make various degrees of good livings or fortunes. Many got ripped off. But people made a living and great music and good music got made, promoted, heard , & enjoyed.

I'm in NYC surrounded by the greats and we could be making music all day long.People spin their wheels trying to find a way to get work, or get heard. ... We can't get gigs, can't get paid, can't get recording deals, and we're talking about names that all of you know. You know the records they played on, you know the bands they were in, and you know the artists they toured with. You sing the songs in the shower, you know the parts these guys played. Few are making money, few are playing out regularly. and when they do, it's usually for next to no money. .And everyone wants to play. I repeat.. People spin their wheels trying to find a way to get work, or get heard.

. It is impossible to Keep WRITING GREAT SONGS & MUSIC,, produce your own, run your business- book gigs, promote, book rooms & travel, do radio appearances. run your publicity, try to get deals, try to collect on your recordings, return calls , return e mails. do social media, and build the following you need before a label will dream about talking to you or a a agent will, or a publicist, or a booking agency.. all the fucking things you got to do today, & write great songs & music, produce a great record?

So, in the midst of people trying to get by, & trying to get what they're doing heard, we're trying to find new ways to accomplish on our own, but it still comes down to certain factors. But if three of us have to sign checks, at least we can't screw each other or no checks get written...

so what is mostly left is people who can find away to promote themsleves cause they look a certain way etc etc but most of em create schlock..... when they have a following some kind of label or some kind of promoter comes along and promotes them further

Money & quality used to work together. the digitization of music removed the money from the music, which lead to the removal of ...., which lead to...which lead to.... which lead to..... and so begins forty years in the desert......


Entered at Thu May 7 22:29:19 CEST 2015 from (58.104.14.33)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The ten greatest music moments in the movies of Martin Scorsese. This was linked over at Robbie's Facebook page.


Entered at Thu May 7 21:45:18 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittnetly

Subject: Human

Your talking about 'stoking the star maker machinery behind the popular song'. Lots of stokers back in 'the day'. It was described as 'the music industry'. Today it is a different world. And so the middle men and women have indeed been dramatically reduced in number and anyone can direct himself/herself square on the technology and give it a shot. I have mixed views on this. Music is human and probably does best when humans are involved in all aspects of its production. I sound like a luddite. I appreciate what is possible now technologically but like so much that is wrong with so much, the extremes should give way to moderation to bring this cultural form its best shot.


Entered at Thu May 7 21:34:10 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: analogies . . . digital democratization

With "analog" technologies -- print media, vinyl records (and wood siding?) -- the creator needed to interface with a whole industry in order to reach an audience / market. A rock 'n' roll band, for example, would need to sell themselves to a record company that had the means of production to sell them on to the radio cabal, the promoters, the public. Same for an author or journalist. And within those industries -- record companies, or publishing houses -- there were some craftspersons (producers, engineers, editors etc. etc.) distinguished by their skill and taste. Even in the early days of the Internet, you needed the insider knowledge of craft (coding) to build a presence in the form of a web page.

Much of the role once played by the intermediary industries has been "automated" so that today just about anyone who wants to can publish their book or their byline, show their film, broadcast their music. Many of the crafts are gone (more good, creative jobs lost to software), along with the barriers. Cue the rise of the "discovery" websites, the marketplaces-of-ideas the audience visits to try and discern what's worthy within all this mass of stuff.


Entered at Thu May 7 21:09:45 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittnetly

Subject: Thrasher

I forgot. for vinyl siding, we'll need a 'needle and the damage done'.


Entered at Thu May 7 20:14:09 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: correction

Michaelfuckingyonkelo.

************************************************************

The correction was to myself....

Mike Nomad, Dr. Jeff has a ring to it, but Dr. Fucko works too.


Entered at Thu May 7 19:57:52 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Vinyl

Jeff, when I bought my house from the builder some 43 years ago it came with vinyl siding in a a pale yellow which I found lovely. I have not had to do anything but paint the trim and 40 some odd years. It looks great it holds upbeautifully and I'm a very happy camper with it.


Entered at Thu May 7 19:55:42 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

RR on the radio.


Entered at Thu May 7 18:54:29 CEST 2015 from (74.12.194.203)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Dr. Jeff

Another 15,000 words, Jeff, and I believe you've got your self a thesis. Good luck.


Entered at Thu May 7 18:52:50 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Treble clef

Jeff A: Do you think if we use the vinyl LPs as siding the 'vinyl siding' houses will become musical and rock with rise out of the walls into the ether? We won't need buskers anymore. The streets will be filled with music. What a wonderful world that would be.


Entered at Thu May 7 18:43:28 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Side A

Jeff A: Hilarious! Side A for sure. And you can dance to it.


Entered at Thu May 7 18:32:37 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Vinyl Is Final.

I am coming back to the front end of this to apologize in advance for my poorly & hurriedly written treatise on a non musical situation that is correlative & analogical, to this discussion , and also representative of many of the social, philosophical,intellectual, and blue collar dilemmas and fucking quandaries the world and the people in it face every day these last 40 some odd years...,In the end of the seventies, beginning of the 80s, when Mastic came on hard with vinyl , their promotional phrase was Vinyl Is Final. They were full of shit about vinyl siding - it sucks. But despite the best efforts of superior salesmen and dedicated talented installers, we lost the battle and vinyl siding has ruled the market. Basically eradicated the use of steel or aluminum siding. And i gotta tell ya, pvc clad metal is far superior and far more expensive to purchase wholesale and far more time consuming to install. (Incidentally, aluminum, steel, or vinyl siding would never go on a house of mine. Wood, only wood siding. Unless we're taling brick or stone). Now despite the fact that i hate vinyl sidng, once the chasm was too wide to overcome (late 80s), i became a superior vinyl siding salesman.( i had previously presented all three, i often had 10 sample cases in peoples homes) but honestly.i explained that it was garbage but logically showed them why'd they'd get the best garbage and the best installation of it from me.) And i also became a meticulous vinyl siding installer, which is a hard thing to do, but i & my guys did artwork with vinyl siding . And of course the metal trim. Call me Michaelangelo.... Michaelfuckingyonkelwitz....(Two requisites, using the best possible ,and being willing to go nuts to make snaky wall almost straight. So Vinyl ain't final.....

whoops, almost forgot. the proliferation of Vinyl siding also eliminated the need for greater attention to detail in measuring, cutting, and hanging siding. Working with metal, was truly an art. And the first thing you learned was to respect the material. and to think, to have patience, to problem solve, and to handle material carefully. you also develeoped claws, hands of steel cutting siding all day. especially steel- you couldnt do a cross cut on a guillotine, hadda be by hand... but any one with a pair of snips and a hammer became a vinyl siding installer, its easy to cut, you can over cut, you can undercut, you can slap pieces in, force pieces in,and even to this day, 95 % of the guys out there hanging vinyl siding don't know the first thing about what the fuck they are doing, nor do they care, and the work sucks. But one hot season or one seasonal change, and the work might suck even more.... there's some tragedies.... But, the reverse analogy is ironic. Vinyl siding singlehandedly ruined the siding market, & the talent pool, & skill set of siding installers. It lowered the profit margins on the industry wide level in the siding market, and also creAATED AN OVER ABUNDANCE OF POOR, lesser skilled, less knowledgeable INSTALLERS, BUT THE digital presentation ( streaming, USB drives, and digital download) and disk presentation of digitALLY presented sound, has done the same in the music industry. I'd love have the time to expound further, in greater detail, over 13 years now i;ve said it many ways many times but am faced with leaving my typos, other errors, and unthoroughly completed or presented comments on the state of society, but the reverse palcement of the word Vinyl in the analogy of social/economic/ work force impacts in the siding and music industry was too great to not notice or present........I didnlt even truly get to the aesthetics ansd what that means for the world, beauty, art, culture. Oy fucking vey, i may have to go get a B.A so i can go write a masters paper on this. the world is coming to an end.when they start giving PHDs in the social impact of vinyl siding and streaming mp3s it;s all over folks.


Entered at Thu May 7 17:43:14 CEST 2015 from (92.18.172.218)

Posted by:

chuck

Subject: music

I'm a USB man! I just got a car with a USB port recently and just fill my memory stick with thousands of songs. I always hated jumping cd's and scratched vinyl - maybe I just didn't take care of them.


Entered at Thu May 7 14:57:12 CEST 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: cd vs vinyl

I'm a cd guy. I switched over in the early 90's and haven't looked back. This is a great time to buy cd's. The price of used cd's has fallen dramatically. I'm finding lots of great titles for $2-$5 in record stores and less than that in flea markets and library sales.

I'm encouraged that younger people are becoming more interested in a physical medium (vinyl) and getting away from downloading. I'm sure that some will switch over to cd when they start seeing how much further their music dollar can go.

Peter, I've picked up a bunch of $2 used Sinatra Reprise cd's recently. Good stuff. I think all of the Sinatra releases that you're seeing now are due to this being the 100th anniversary of his birth. An official box set was just released which covers his entire career for the first time.


Entered at Thu May 7 14:45:33 CEST 2015 from (74.14.4.151)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Again, "If music be the food...play on"

Listening to music: My listening is confined to times when I am confined and much less commonly to times when I am relaxed (early AM is such a time on most days - I get up early. I do the majority of my listening in an Air Canada seat. That limits my opportunities. CD/vinyl - I do have fairly good equipment and very good headphones. I agree with the comments regarding engineering and pressing already made here. The practical issue for me is opportunity. Most of my listening is confined to headphones and my cellphone or computer (iTunes). I'd say that makes up 90% of my listening. For anyone who has to go somewhere to work 8-10 hours a day (no complaints), and loves to listen to music, the development of portable listening has become a godsend, a gift of technology, for which I am ever grateful. I avoid the car as much as I can (prefer subway in Toronto and walking in Victoria)...so listening in the car is uncommon since being in the car is equally uncommon. I am still buying 'hard copy' of cds and vinyl (both) for artists to whom I have an absolute commitment (call it obsession if you want..I wear that like a badge when it comes to The Band and Dylan) but for the newer artists, with exception, I buy from iTunes increasingly. That's my personal take on the practicality of music in my life in 2015.


Entered at Thu May 7 11:44:20 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The CD v Vinyl issue isn’t simple. It’s not just the medium but the mastering, compression etc. Like all rituals, the ritiual of taking an LP out, perhaps cleaning it, or using an antistatic brush, placing it on the turntable etc means you’re more likely to focus than slipping a CD in the car stereo or computer. It’s way less casual.

There are a minor flood of out of copyright 180 gram vinyl versions of classic rock by Little Richard, Bo Diddley etc. I suspect some are the CD remixes. Then a lot of CDs were mastered crudely and in a hurry. I was amazed at the difference between an old CD of BST II and a newer remastered one. The new one sounds SO much better. So yes, there’ll be cases where the CD or vinyl sounds better.


Entered at Thu May 7 09:17:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Politics

Just back from voting. I should correct the impression that I drove for the party of Jeremy Thorpe - it was the short lived Social Democrats before the parties combined! i.e. the party of Shirley Williams, the nicest British politician of the last 50 years.

My belief that you should be able to chat to the other side may come from my family … my dad was an ardent Conservative, my mum was staunch Labour.


Entered at Thu May 7 05:13:40 CEST 2015 from (58.104.13.26)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Robbie's autobiography is scheduled for release in April 2016.


Entered at Thu May 7 04:40:22 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.172)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: CD vs Vinyl

Sadavid, Interesting article on the some of the differences between digital and analog. A lot of it we've heard before, but one thing that I thought was helpful, was the opinion that the skill of the engineer, and how either format is handled throughout the process, can be as important to a quality result, rather than only focusing on "A" is better than "B" because of it's technical potential, which seems to be the focus of so many other articles on the subject.

This article is somewhat timely for me, as I've recently revived an old turntable, with a new belt and stylus, and have been playing some old albums that I haven't listened to in analog format for many years. In many cases I'm more familiar with the sound of the digital (CD) versions now as I had replaced many of my favorite LP with CD's over the years.

The interesting thing is that there are some albums which I've thought (from memory) that I preferred the LP versions, and others where I thought I preferred the CD versions. Now that I've revisited many of them over the past month or so, I find that there are several LP's that provide a more pleasing sound to me, and others where the CD version sounds superior.

In the case of a couple of The Band's albums, my LP version of 'Music From Big Pink' (Capitol rainbow label) sounds wonderful and is a more enjoyable sonic experience than my CD version. On the other hand my CD version of 'Stagefright sounds better than my LP version (Capitol orange label). Probably comes down to the quality of the pressing, but that's how it sounds to my ears.

My general assessment is that yes, CD's do sound better than vinyl.......except in the many instances that they don't.

There. Settled that!


Entered at Thu May 7 03:42:17 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc- a dollar gal is a gal who got dough and spends it on you. i learned that courtesy of a bar owner named Ernie Bledsoe ( RIP) in St.Louis. I sold Ernie a window job in late 97 or early 98. Ernie picks out windows with custom etched glass, big bucks.... First year I\ was back in st Louis i worked for a big outfit for a little while till i knew i was staying and opened my own joint again. Despite my best efforts to spell out exactly how this job needed to be done, the office did not tell me the job was going in, had me out selling, so i wasn't there to make certain the crew listened and installed the way i specified. So they fucked it up to a good degree. Ernie wouldn't have known, but i knew. The company was tired of me going to bat for the customers. i went to bat for Ernie and got the crew back once, again when i wasnt there... and they did nto correct all my issues. So I wrote out each item I wanted corrected, and i wrote out a dialogue for Ernie, i told him how to get to the owner of the outfit. what to say and how to say it. So we sit down and i tell Ernie what to do, and he looks at me. Says Jeff, you mean you want me to give him da bluz? I said Ernie, we're gonna give him the blue fucking meanies. Wayne ain't gonna know what fucking hit him. Ernie loved it.


Entered at Thu May 7 02:12:16 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc :-). I 'm wearing down Dunc. One ale for lunch ( with one of the baddest bass players to ever come out of Brooklyn) and one glass of Kedem for dinner ( 2 slices of sicilian fresh mozz pie for the afternoon snack), and i'm looking for a "comedy gal." When i find her, i'll let you know what that means. You gave me a new purpose in life. Thank you.


Entered at Thu May 7 01:27:06 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

sadavid, you won't get shot for telling the truth.


Entered at Thu May 7 01:08:08 CEST 2015 from (31.48.6.221)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Sorry, Jeff

I enjoy the Brooklyn posts, Jeff. Humble apologies for my misreading!


Entered at Thu May 7 00:58:42 CEST 2015 from (32.216.242.172)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Negativity and attacks surely must have existed in the political process prior to the formation of the United States. Or are we to believe that the worldwide process was pristine prior to 1776?

The real problem is the enormous amounts of money from questionable sources that seems to be a domInant factor in politics these days.


Entered at Thu May 7 00:18:48 CEST 2015 from (67.84.77.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc,:-) I managed to get through the glaze & type that post with a minimum of typos, or syntax or grammatical errors, & there you go & hallucinate on me. Comely gal, not "comedy gal." Or, couple that with enjoying my posts, *Do I amuse you? Are you saying you think I'm funny? Do I look like a funny to you? Do you think I'm a funny guy? * Or maybe you're hitting those single malts :-)

Now, regarding your subject line,:-) when I'm part of the subject, The Band is always there. It's something goes inside, never leave, Like my lyric from The Blues Don't Knock - "The blues never leave, they just go deep inside. When you really know em, they always on your side. See the blues never leave, they just go deep inside.", it's the same for the Band..... at the rehearsal for a show last year the drummer said, I'm beginning to see some recurring themes. If i live long enough.....


Entered at Wed May 6 22:08:40 CEST 2015 from (84.215.166.230)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

New book and new, original song from Robbie.


Entered at Wed May 6 21:55:36 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: digital v. analog, again

A longish article wherein a number of folks with golden ears explain how CDs are better than vinyl (*please don't shoot the messenger).

Quotes from, among others, Bob Clearmountain and Bob Ludwig, who briefly mentions the example of _Music From Big Pink_.


Entered at Wed May 6 19:11:22 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just looked at amazon.uk - they have a 16 album set and a 15 album set and BOTH are different to the one in HMV.


Entered at Wed May 6 17:28:16 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gotta have money in the bank Frank

I would guess the series of £5 remasters is linked, but as to the 12 CD / 16 album + 63 bonus tracks edition, I'd have guessed "out of copyright" opportunism - they don't reproduce original AW, a loophole to combat out of copyright chancers as art has the artist's death + 50 years, as with books.


Entered at Wed May 6 16:49:58 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter V, I believe the Sinatra release is tied into the recent premier of a four hour Frank doc on HBO here.


Entered at Wed May 6 15:34:18 CEST 2015 from (82.9.30.73)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Not the Band, Jeff

Enjoyed your posts on pizza, Jeff, and life in New York. What's a 'comedy gal' Jeff?


Entered at Wed May 6 14:43:35 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: politics . . .

. . . used to be relatively respectful here in Canuckistan as well, until the strategists saw the success of attack ads in U.S. campaigns . . . .

On a positive note, our friends in the province of Alberta (think Texas north -- cattle, oil, reactionary rednecks) elected a (slightly) left-of-centre New Democratic majority yesterday to end 44 years of Conservative governments.


Entered at Wed May 6 14:12:39 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, yes, that's how it should be, need be, but, ain't no more. And unless you got noticeably big buckaroos, or a lot of votes very noticeably in the balance, or a circumstance quickly & easily translatable to influence, a politician won't know you're alive.


Entered at Wed May 6 12:43:07 CEST 2015 from (76.69.46.166)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Frank Sinatra

For the record, I have been a Sinatra fan for years and have had a few of his recordings and listened to them long before Dylan put out this album. My interest has been the older recordings. I never liked "My Way" as a song but I love his delivery of that song. Some of his live albums led the way for how vocal jazz with a band backing should be delivered. He could get 'sad' out of a lyric better than almost anyone and his exuberance when the lyric was positive was infectious. I understand why he reached so many for so long and why his impact continues.


Entered at Wed May 6 10:13:45 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More Sinatra

… as well as 16 Capitol albums there are 63 bonus tracks from the period added to the CDs.


Entered at Wed May 6 10:10:03 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Value of Music

It's not only streaming. Yesterday in HMV I saw "Frank Sinatra: The Capitol Years". Box set, 16 albums for £14. Next to it were official reissues at £5 an album … it seems the Dylan collection has awakened new interest in Sinatra. The box set is not EMI., so I assume it's an out of copyright collection. But the set includes Come Fly With Me, In The Wee Small Hours, Songs For swinging' Lovers, Close To You … classics at less than £1 each.


Entered at Wed May 6 10:02:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Politics

Politics … big day here tomorrow. A worrying aspect of this election is a sudden departure from a British sense of fair play. It’s been heavily reported that Labour posters are being defaced in Scotland, and Labour politicians there being followed around by groups of SNP hecklers and harassed on the phone etc.

Down here in the South, I had a drive yesterday that took me through three parliamentary constituencies. Here only three parties have posters: Conservative, Liberal Democrat and UKIP, even driving through the poorest area I didn’t see a single Labour poster (but a lot of UKIP ones which is worrying). But the worrying and new aspect is the defacing of the “other side’s” posters. I don’t remember that before. Conservative suffered most, but I think that’s because they put photos on posters, which is tempting … moustaches, glasses, black teeth abound. Putting up photos is a dumb thing to do especially as the old saying “Politics is showbiz for ugly people” is manifestly true. But I saw a few torn or defaced UKIP ones too.

I recall twenty five years ago, when our neighbour and friend was a Lib Dem candidate and because I had a 7-seater minibus I spent the day driving elderly voters to polling stations for him. It was personal … I think he would have made a great MP. I had a lot of standing around at the polling stations, and chatted cheerfully to the Conservative and Labour supporters doing the same thing. Zero animosity. Even shared biscuits with the coffee. Surely that’s how it should be?


Entered at Wed May 6 00:49:52 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Grit & Gluten

Pete, I'm certain i've written it here before. My father's father mother was Mongolian. i tell people I'm a direct descendant of Genghis Cohen & Chaim Khan. I might be

Norbert. looks like i'll have to concencrate ( that's the proper spelling) to give your writngs their proper consideration & due. Today started out with a politician handing me a selfie stick, but, i stopped in a good old ale house where i was one of the younger gents, then hit a prehistic pizzeria i always walked past. There was a comely gal sitting on a stool at the open streetside window counter. Comely gals are getting older ya know.Anyway, she's a neighborhood person regular, the present owner is serving a life sentence having been born into the joint. We had a fucking ball. And then another old school Brooklyn pizza joint, with another old school owner, also around my age. So i'm a pint of ale, 3 glasses of red, and three slices of great pizza ( today was good that way) further into a carb cholestrol attack leading into a diabetic coma. But it was a great day in Brooklyn, and i'll read your posts properly when the booze, cheese, gluten, & grit wears off.


Entered at Tue May 5 21:02:58 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan call

"Still positive I was being clowned, and waiting for the punchline, I mentioned that he and I have – or rather had - a mutual friend. Rick Danko, former bassist and violin player for Dylan protégés the Band, had been married to the sister of my editor at Soundwaves magazine, an east coast entertainment rag I write for. Having met through Soundwaves, Danko and I occasionally got together and corresponded, plus he’d sometimes request feedback regarding audio tapes he’d send me with songs from projects of his which rarely seemed to go anywhere. "

check the link


Entered at Tue May 5 20:25:30 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Come to think of it, my Kazakhstan could well be Dylan’s family and Bob a direct descendant of Genghis Khan.


Entered at Tue May 5 20:02:33 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The Russian Connection

Jeff :-), but seriously, didn't Dylan’s family came from Russia?

Anyway, Dylan visited Russia in 1985, read also the link (it should hold 6 photo’s? I can’t see only the first one).

"You know, [Dylan] flopped here. I invited him and what happened to him was very awkward. It was 1985, and a big evening featuring international poets was to take place in a stadium one day before the opening of the World Festival of Youth and Students. The bad idea for this date belonged to [poet Yevgeny] Yevtushenko. It was a bad idea because no normal spectators had any chance of seeing Dylan or anyone else that evening. Everybody was afraid of provocations &mdash there was no advertising of who was on the bill, the stadium was blocked off, and busloads of 'trusted' spectators were brought in. I went out and saw that the hall was half full. This would have been a first &mdash if they had hung out posters saying 'Dylan, Yevtushenko, Voznesensky,' etc, that place would have been packed. But Dylan went out there and sang 'Blowin' in the Wind,' and the audience at least got into that a little. But then he got angry and offended and began singing new songs &mdash and it was a total flop. Nobody knew English and they didn't have the vaguest notion who Dylan was. Afterwards we went to my dacha and he wept there &mdash he thought that all Russian audiences were like that. Later, he was sent to Tbilisi where he gave a closed concert at the Writers House. At that time he was already feeling hounded &mdash afraid somebody would shoot him (after Lennon, they all were afraid of that). Anyway, the local youths [in Tbilisi] got hold of his car and lifted it up. He was frightened, crawled into a corner and asked them not to do that. The sad thing about it was that he wanted to go from Moscow to Odessa, which is where his grandmother was from. But he wasn't given permission. As I understand it, he did get to Odessa from Tbilisi."


Entered at Tue May 5 19:22:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Genghis Cohen? Sounds like he should be the drummer in Kinky Friedman's band!


Entered at Tue May 5 17:53:31 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.214)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, I almost forgot to mention, you name the khstan, we got loads of em here in Sheepshead Bay. I doubt there's a khstan or a stan, or a hstan we don't have. They substitute Uzbek for short for Uzbekhstan here, they figure you gotta know what they mean. And there's a 400 pound Jewish Genghis Khan ( Genghis Cohen) that is an owner of one of the fruit & vegetable stands/ delis two blocks from me. Pony tail and all. Big mutha. But i doubt he could ride a horse. Know the Band? ya never know.I'll have to investigate.


Entered at Tue May 5 17:33:15 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: fading in a suburban room

Meanwhile, a court has named Joni's pal as her "conservator" -- for treatment, but not finances.
Health status remains a mystery, which itself seems cause for pessimism.


Entered at Tue May 5 17:18:34 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: BB King

Looks like the fight over BB’s money has already started.

Jeff thanks.


Entered at Tue May 5 16:07:48 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: and yet another

A hooky little showcase for Martin Belmont and Brinsley Schwarz . . . .


Entered at Tue May 5 15:12:55 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: More intros

Another soul classic intro, though this one manages it in 15 seconds.


Entered at Tue May 5 14:32:52 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In my Tuesday morning secondhand record browe I saw a few Beatles Canadian singles. All were in sleeves labelled "First With he Hits From America." Did this cause any note at the time?


Entered at Tue May 5 14:15:40 CEST 2015 from (173.71.90.80)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Chicago Blues

Jeff, this movie sounds very interesting. I have the 'Chicago Blues Reunion' cd/dvd set which is mentioned in the article. That is a very worthwhile set. The dvd on that set covers the same territory as the documentary in the article.


Entered at Tue May 5 07:33:01 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.243)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: New Movie: Born In Chicago

See the link


Entered at Tue May 5 03:30:11 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.20)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: intros / Suomi

Peter V intro'd me to this Steampacket number and its fine intro, which is powered by Mick Waller's drumming.

NWC: Our Saturday paper had an interesting article about the popularity of a certain kind of lamb hides in Finland. A wonderful thumbnail sketch of your country was provided by one of the Afghanis who'd travelled to Helsinki with the goods: "Winter is too cold, officials don't take bribes and (animal cruelty) protesters shrieked at us in an incomprehensible language."


Entered at Tue May 5 00:50:51 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.243)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, that was pretty fucking funny :-).

Todd, both those joints were better than Di Fara's. And they were clean. Di Fara's is a pig sty. And I swear, the decor was old & worn in 1971. It's unchanged.

Al, with all due respect, you mind another pizza schmooze? get yourself a selfie stick :-) Todd, I;m with you on White Room.
Whilst i missed the beginning of this discussion, & did not notice it till Al woke me up,i'm guessing you guys are pondering songs with great intros? two intros that always grabbed me, and not only are they wonderful intros for the songs, but also, are the first is an amazing intro for the entire live album. It sets the pace. And the second keeps it up, as does the whole record. Neither intro is standard fare, & in it's way this is still one of the most unique live albums of the rock and roll era. It certainly must be either the highest energy live album ever , or tied for that honor. And it is one fine fucking album.
I Guess You Made it, track 1, and C'Mon, track 2, on Deliverin, by Poco.

Another intro that grabs me, The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down... King Harvest. ..... Cripple Creek.

Al, was the question more narrow than my guess, or more involved than my guess?


Entered at Mon May 4 23:25:03 CEST 2015 from (58.104.14.22)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Robbie playing Blue Suede Shoes with Paul and Eric.


Entered at Mon May 4 23:08:37 CEST 2015 from (32.216.255.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Intro's

I've always thought that 'White Room' by Cream sets the table nicely for the cacophony that follows.


Entered at Mon May 4 21:50:03 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the greatest intro short list

"Crazy River" ain't bad either . . . .


Entered at Mon May 4 21:05:50 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Thge Kazakhstan Bangd Fan

Yesterday I met a Band fan from Kazakhstan (he heard The Band thru my car stereo). He lives thousands of miles east of Moscow in a 3 million city I never heard of. He was tough but not tall, his skin was like brown wrinkled leather, little funny eyes under sleek black hair, put a pony under him and he rides with Genghis Khan. Thge Bangd!, Thge Bangd! was all I could understand.


Entered at Mon May 4 20:29:54 CEST 2015 from (184.66.101.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Intro

Joe Cockers 'Feeling Alright' The intro turns me into a dancing fool in my car.


Entered at Mon May 4 19:40:21 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: another intro ...

As does this ...


Entered at Mon May 4 19:36:36 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: intros

This one always gets me ...


Entered at Mon May 4 19:12:17 CEST 2015 from (107.211.249.187)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

Subject: great intro

Great intro, followed by (what I think is) an unlistenable song: Monkey Man, Rolling Stones.


Entered at Mon May 4 18:27:17 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Please. The greatest intro ever.


Entered at Mon May 4 17:40:52 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.245)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: intros

I'll see your "Stir it Up," and I'll raise you a "Concrete Jungle." Never gets old, this one. The great Shakespeare on tasteful minimal bass, and a killer guitar solo about 3 mins in . . . .


Entered at Mon May 4 16:49:59 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: EC-70th Birthday concert

Eric's tone was brilliant and clear,but the concert was a pretty big disappointment.Ive seen EC numerous times and each time was well worth it.Last night,besides excellent sit ins by Derek Trucks,Doyle Bramhall,and Jimmie Vaughn the concert was dull,never took chances(as EC has with the Cream reunion,the Eric/Derek/Doyle/Willie Weeks/Steve Jordan bands,sit in with the Allmans,Crossroads festival,with Jeff Beck,Steve Winwood,etc. in recent years )and was uninspired.The very loud,shredder John Mayer sat in demonstrating that he,once again,was no Derek Trucks.Steve Gadd is a great drummer for EC's poppy material,not for his harder edged music.And he's no Steve Jordan.Nathan East,who sang(butchered with dullness) Can't Find My Way Home,and whose bass playing thumped along with little creativity or feeling(he's a far cry from the greats,like our own genius bass player,Rick)-well,he's no Willie Weeks.On and on.For $300 a ticket we got Andy Fairweather Low as an opener.A snoozefest.But a nice night out with the Wifey!


Entered at Mon May 4 16:38:39 CEST 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: reading the GB entries backwards

Subject: here's another comment, Al

Can't resist. I've been working 60+ hour weeks lately and hadn't read the GB in days. Usually I scroll down to where I left off and read chronologically, except this morning I was lazy and just read from the top. Al's initial entry in the "greatest intro ever" department gave me pause. I'd seen and heard Ian McLagan's Bump Band do "Stay With Me" many times over the past decade and felt honored to hear one of the original players (alas, silenced 5 months ago) still playing this rave-up. I also got to see Ronnie Wood's band (almost the same lineup as he used in '74) do it live in Atlantic City in April 2012 and got the chills at that rendition some 40 or more years after The Faces recorded that monster track. But the best was seeing The Faces induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April 2012 (viewable on YouTube) recreating this anthem dead on. Although Rod took a primadonna whim to not join in, Mick Hucknall aptly handled the vocals while we were treated to Woody, Mac and Kenney Jones scorching through this old friend as if it were still 1971! It caused me to gasp and give thanks and praises.


Entered at Mon May 4 16:30:43 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: One for BEG

The Specials brought this one to mind. Funny, 23 seconds seems an optimum time before vocals come in.


Entered at Mon May 4 16:18:15 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Intros

I lke this one: Walter Huston's September Song, the original from 1938. I'm not certain if it's considered an intro, maybe more like a prologue -


Entered at Mon May 4 15:57:56 CEST 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: in response to Al Edge's "memory joggers" post

Al's link takes us to Sly & the Family Stone's "M'Lady" on YouTube. Great piece. On the same page are other YouTube recommendations, including Steven Bernstein's Millenial Territory Orchestra doing a deliciously greasy version of the same tune live on WFUV. I spot the Levon Helm Studio's Midnight Ramble Band's Erik Lawrence among the players. Coming back to Band connections always feels good.


Entered at Mon May 4 15:23:24 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Another Intro

I really like the intro to It's Hard To Be A Saint In The City...original studio version or any live performance..


Entered at Mon May 4 15:03:40 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: For the Leonard Cohen fans


Entered at Mon May 4 15:01:25 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Intros

I'm partial to this intro...The Special's Rude Boys Outta Jail.


Entered at Mon May 4 13:57:45 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: memory joggers

Littel Stevie's intro reminded me of this little belter from Sly.

Love this.

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 4 13:30:21 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

That's the beauty of threads like this it brings great music right back to you.

I guess the irony of that one is if you were feeling a mite uptight before listening to it you sure ain't once it blows you out of your seat.

what an opening!

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 4 13:18:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Great intros

Sorry, Al! We got taken away on the Pizza Express. Must be some kind of Domino's effect. So here's my contender … rocks less, but the groove is essential.


Entered at Mon May 4 12:55:15 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Cheers Si - As Gene'd say I feel a whole lot better

:-0)

Got to say I'm still trying to figure out what all this talk of pizzas has got to do with great intros.

Guess I must be missing somethin'

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 4 08:47:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The stuff of pizza

When we do our week of theatre in London once a year (though this year we’ll do a second one later on … it’s a play a day) we stay near Borough Market in Southwark in a self-catering apartment. It’s also right by Shakespeare's Globe and a riverside stroll to the National Theatre, then 10 minutes inland to the Old Vic and Young Vic theaters. The South Bank of London is where it all seems to be happening in recent years,

I guess three days we live on the ingredients of pizza and eat before the theatre. Borough Market is the best place for food in London and we get black and green tomatoes fresh from Sicily, Sicilian sheep cheese, “music paper” bread from Sardinia (very thin) or just bread, a bunch of basil, and a pack of wild hedgerow salad (dandelion leaves, wild garlic, rocket etc). Add a bottle of red wine. But the real secret is “single variety” olive oil from Istria (they do four kinds) over everything. Istria is mainly Croatia now, but historically was part of Venice then Italy. The olive oil is sweeping up awards.

Is it healthier than pizza? I guess you miss out on lycopene which comes from cooked tomatoes rather than fresh, but I guess more vitamins and fibre.


Entered at Mon May 4 02:32:54 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Famoso

There is a pizza chain (unbelievable as that seems) called Famoso in Canada which makes great thin crust pizza. We've been to both the location in Toronto and often in Victoria. Delicious.


Entered at Mon May 4 02:31:02 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Grazie and Sotto Sotto Toronto

Speaking of carbs and pasta, when we go to Toronto (often) we immediately go to Grazie on Yonge St.(evening of arrival usually) for their Fracesca pasta (linguine, pine nuts, slight onions, tomato and raisins (sounds weird, but delicious) and later in the week Sotto Sotto on Avenue Rd for capellini alfredo (parmigiana sprinkled liberally on both and salt and pepper). Both worth the trip to Toronto. Pizza Prima Vera in Victoria very good and Falesca in Toronto for pizza. There has to be Italy in my ancestry, I've always believed. Delis are disappearing in Toronto compared to 20 years ago, but Pickle Barrel still very good corned beef and pastrami and Kaplansky also very good (on College St.). New York City (Carnegie et al) and Montreal (Schwartz's) still win in this regard.


Entered at Mon May 4 02:19:37 CEST 2015 from (32.216.255.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Apizza

Golly Jeff, I guess you should have gone to Di Fara's! Just kidding, as I know you think he's overrated. Never been there myself, but you'd think it was the only place in Brooklyn based on the reviews.

Of course I don't have to worry about such matters, as New Haven, CT has always had great apizza, thanks to it's large numbers of immigrants from the Amalfi coast south of Naples.

Too bad that you skipped the bagel for breakfast. You could have followed with the pizza for lunch, and then gone for the carb trifecta with a big plate of pasta for dinner.


Entered at Mon May 4 00:55:56 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.243)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I agree Peter. I actually did skip the bagel, only had coffee at breakfast. To leave room for the pie. Pizza is serious business. I had one slice of fresh mozz pie at a pizza place (also known in the past here as a pizza parlor). Then we went to a more of a restaurant type joint, had a margherita pie. Which is or almost is the same as a fresh mozz pie. Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, near The Verrazanno Narrows Bridge, is still one of those neighborhoods with pizza places stacked on top of pizza places. Neither joint knocked me over, but both were very good.


Entered at Mon May 4 00:20:35 CEST 2015 from (82.25.178.222)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Levon Helm on TV here

I was away on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, getting back mid-evening on the Saturday. Back home, I was looking through the latest edition of RADIO TIMES (for those overseas, this is a weekly listings magazine which devotes more space to TV programmes than to radio programmes) only to discover that, earlier that day, the Sky Arts 1 channel had shown "Levon Helm: Ain't In It For My Health".


Entered at Sun May 3 21:03:05 CEST 2015 from (165.120.7.108)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Peter - There's a Blur compilation called Midlife that looks pretty good. Amazon has it for £4 (plus it's a double). It contains some album tracks as well. "Badhead" is one I remember fondly but it doesn't contain "To The End" (which came in two versions IIRC, one with Francoise Hardy. I think that was the single version.

I've linked to the video for "The Universal" ... as chance would have it I heard this in the local Morrisons a few days ago so Blur have been on my 'must reinvestigate' list. This song and the sentiment does seem ahead of its time. Great droog-ish vid.

Congratulations to yourself and Roger. Al, I hope you're feeling better.


Entered at Sun May 3 17:45:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: 10,000 Maniacs

Look out for "Twice Told Tales" subtitled "Traditional Folk Songs of The British Isles Revisited." It's released tomorrow, but as sometimes happens with amazon, my copy arrived yesterday. It's got the classics lined up … Death of Queen Jane, She Moved Through The Fair, Marie's Wedding, Wild Mountain Thyme, Dark Eyed Sailor, Song of Wandering Aengus, Carrickfergus. Actually it's got more Irish than anything, but it's all taken like early Fairport plus a great string section.

Link is to Carrickfergus, because that's what's on YouTube, but I'd try Dark Eyed Sailor or Death of Queen Jane first.


Entered at Sun May 3 17:26:56 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Carbs are the enemy!

Peter: Yesterday. shared a bagel for breakfast 7 AM: then 2:40 PM 1/2 a thin-crust pizza shared again. But your right! Carbs are your enemy. Keep them down.


Entered at Sun May 3 17:09:05 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bagels then pizza. Too much starch, Jeff.


Entered at Sun May 3 16:52:22 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry :-) we crossed. You know i'm fucking around i hope. Running out. Bagels at the diner with friends from grade & high school, then pizza with other friends from high school.


Entered at Sun May 3 16:50:07 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Enjoy the day everyone :-).

Half fucking full NWC. Cause the pollutants got it to the fucking line. But half fucking full with conditions, or disclaimers, or some such fucking things.


Entered at Sun May 3 16:46:11 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mea Culpa

Sorry, Jeff. That's what happens when one gets old. Please accept my apology. I'll get the selfie stick. Mea Culpa.


Entered at Sun May 3 16:34:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Incidents and accidents

Al … my dad supported Bournemouth from their admission to the Third Division (South) in 1923. They were the team who were there longest without ever going up or down. As a kid, I was taken to every home match.

Two memories. In the late 50s the goalkeeper was the Republic of Ireland international, Tommy Godwin. He always walked out wearing a cap, and smiled at the terrace behind the goal. Then he removed his teeth, placed them carefully in the cap and put it at the side of the goal. He wasn’t going to let anyone put a ball across his precious teeth, though clearly someone’s boot had in the past.

Another was 1957’s cup run. In the fourth round, Bournemouth left-winger Reg Cutler decided to head the Wolverhampton goalpost instead of the ball, and broke it. The game was stopped while it was put back together, but Cutler cheerfully played on. Our woodwork teacher at Bournemouth School was a Mr Cutler, and was known as “Reg.” I assumed it was his name, but many years later it was explained slowly to me. Cutler … woodwork … so we called him Reg.

Al, this is what it was like down in the lower reaches. We reach back half a century for memories of incidents. Though the Harry Redknapp era was another fine one. Over to you, Roger …


Entered at Sun May 3 16:32:40 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC, i amend my post to you. It's go fucking fuck yourself :-) Jerry, you got a short fucking memory. Think the fuck back to the last fucking go fuck yourself episode.



Entered at Sun May 3 16:21:17 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Write a song as only you can

Jeff A: nothing anatomical from me. (?) (not sure who?)

It was a song I suggested, with sweet wine, ex and reheated pizza in Brooklyn on a Saturday afternoon. What a song that would be.


Entered at Sun May 3 16:09:53 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, i hope I'm not alive if MM ever got elected President. In my opinion, she doesn't even speak well or think logically, & isn't qualified for the position she holds.



Entered at Sun May 3 15:20:04 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Half Full or Half Empty?

Maybe it depends how you ate your fucking pizza that day. Or if you think you know every fucking thing, etc etc.

NorthWestCoaster: Go Fuck yourself. With a selfie stick.

Jerry, your commentary that it's anatomically immpossible just now inspired me to think of - with a selfie stick. Apparently the wasteland of social media can help solve the great social or philosophical problems.

NWC- Go fuck yourself if you don't get it.


Entered at Sun May 3 14:56:51 CEST 2015 from (31.48.6.221)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: What do you buy?

I had three mediocre collections of vinyl and cassettes(remember them) - the one I had at the parental home with my brother, the one I formed at university and the one I had at home - about 250 albums. Gave them away. I really fell away from music from the late seventies until the early nineties.

I made a mistake of buying too many greatest hits cds when I got back into music in the early nineties. I rectified that - for example buying all three Stealers Wheel albums after buying the greatest hits, which was really a waste.

Some greatest hits really work - for example the soul collections, which are collections of singles.

There were certain bands, the Beatles, the Byrds, Stones, Dylan, Micheal Marra, Tom Waits the Band etc where I collected all albums.

So my advice would be buy an album, not the greatest hits, but only if you think you're going to value it.

Incidentally my daughter tells me that Fopp has a Don Covay section, so I'll give one a go, but I won't buy the greatest hits.

But who am I to tell anybody. Some great collectors on this site.


Entered at Sun May 3 13:34:48 CEST 2015 from (87.144.163.42)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Marilyn Mosby

In 25 years from now a little black girl will go thru The Band archives here and read that someone already in 2015 predicted that Marilyn Mosby will be president of the USA someday.

But bolder and of more significant I’ll also say to you now that Mosby is, or is to become a Band fan too and that’s why that little black girl will go thru the archives here.

If only for this testimony this GB has to stay alive for all time to come.


Entered at Sun May 3 13:22:22 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Up the Cherries

Ooops! Sorry Rog - heartiest congrats to you too mate!

:-0)


Entered at Sun May 3 13:10:30 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bit of fun

What is the greatest ever intro?

I'm cheating a bit by going first

:-0)


Entered at Sun May 3 13:07:54 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bournemoth's just a Blur

Heartiest congrats Pete.

Arguably one of footy's great moments to see such a small fry smash through all the shite that footy has become since gazza's tears and pavorotti made it fashionable. I love such moments that invoke the real beauty of football.

Can't advise on Blur. My daughter loved them in their early days and I know there were some great tracks but I couldn't tell you what. Then again so did the Oasis stuff she played.I do think Damon Albumen is an artist in the true sense of the word. No yolk.

:-0)


Entered at Sun May 3 12:41:08 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well Bruno took that line from Paul Kantner, who is usually acknowledged as the originator of "If you can remember the SIXTIES, you weren't there." I have also heard it ascribed to David Crosby, but I think it's Kantner.


Entered at Sun May 3 12:34:14 CEST 2015 from (83.249.189.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Remember that great Nils Lofgren band from the 70s....?

... asked Jeff A., gb's own pessimism consult. Let me answer with the cryptic words of a Swedish beat poet, Bruno K. Oijer: "If you remember the 70s, you weren't there!"


Entered at Sun May 3 12:21:07 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Chronology?

On Al and Dunc’s discussions on approaching an artist chronologically …

I was in Rough Trade Records last Saturday, naturally for well over half an hour. An album was playing throughout and I thought, “This is really, really good.” Anyway, when I bought my vintage soul purchases, I asked what the album was. The Magic Whip by Blur. Now this is a BIG band. Coincidentally, Alex James attended my old school, though many years after me. Blur are so big they even featured in the British stamps series on classic albums. Of course I’ve heard bits, but I’ve never listened to an album. So a perfect example. I love the new album. It’s just so wide-ranging in style and expertly played. I bought it. So do I just leave it there? Or do I buy the “Best of Blur” which is £5 in the local Tesco supermarket, or should I investigate chronologically as suggested? Or look up reviews and work from highest rated to lowest rated?

My opinion is to invest a £5, not even two cups of coffee in London, and see if I like their “Best of” before looking further.


Entered at Sat May 2 22:45:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bournemouth just won the Championship. Premier League next year. We'll be seeing you, Al!


Entered at Sat May 2 19:28:25 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

A recently surfaced 1975 Van Morrison show. My gosh, he is on fire.


Entered at Sat May 2 16:57:53 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: reheated pizza et al

Kedem, ex and pizza reheated: Time to write a song, Jeff.


Entered at Sat May 2 16:33:15 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Obits,Illness and Birthday-we're all getting old.

The volume of losses is becoming a bit much to handle,it seems on a daily basis.Great impaired post Jeff A.I can't drink that sweet wine-kudos to you that you can handle it! B.B.-Ive seen him in concert so many times.I still recall the shows in the mid to late seventies when the crowd was made up of primarily black people dressed in their church clothes and the four of us:white,jewish,long-haired,bearded,stoned out hippie boys.We always had a great time and it was the sweetest music.I'd spend hours trying to play some of BB.s great leads-the classic,do,do,do,dohhhh,dohhhh///da da da,ta ta da ta dahhhh.In the meantime Derek Trucks,Doyle Bramhall were some of the guests at last nights Clapton's seventieth birthday concert.EC hasn't lost any of his playing chops and its great to see him looking so fit.


Entered at Sat May 2 15:59:47 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: David Vest, not Vent

Now that I (JT) have totally botched his name, let me correct it. It is David Vest, not Vent!!

My absolute apologies for this error. Too early in the morning after a great evening. Everything else in the missive one before this one is accurate. Please forgive.


Entered at Sat May 2 15:41:21 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: David Vent

We went to hear David Vent yesterday. Vent is a piano player extraordinaire and played with Big Joe Turner and many others over the years. Last evening at Herman's Jazz Club in Victoria, he played as part of a trio and more than tickled the ivories, conjuring up Ben E. King, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, John Lee Hooker, and many others. He was smokin' and flames were rising from the keys. His vocals were great. His Dylan interpretations of 'I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine', 'Señor' and ' Seeing The Real You At Last' were a revelation. CDs are available on line at the usual sites. Give him a listen. You won't regret it. He's been here all along and we were fortunate to have the opportunity to hear and see and meet him. Herman's is a great little club, like Hugh's Room in Toronto. The room was full and music came alive. The stories David told as he introduced his songs reminded us of the rich experience of so many that needs to be written down before it is forgotten.


Entered at Sat May 2 11:21:26 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, the obituaries section in the monthly rock magazines now runs to several pages on a regular basis. There was this sudden flowering in popular music from the mid 50s on, and 1955 is 60 years ago, so the pioneers would probably average 20 or so then. It figures.

I did wonder looking at Ben E. King obits this morning what it must be like to have everything written about you refer primarily just to one song, Stand By Me. A long career, family, other achievements but it all gets rolled into one song … admittedly that's because it was a major hit for a younger generation on the back of the Levis adverts, number one in the UK in 1987.

Other news this morning. A huge record collection is coming up for auction in lots. The 27,000 45s are expected to reach a mere £8000. Admittedly the collector, who died, was intent on buying every record that charted, and big hits tend to be of less value than rarities. But if the collector bought reasonably widely, there should be a few 45s in there worth over £100, assuming they're in good condition, though if they were bought secondhand they might not be.


Entered at Sat May 2 04:50:33 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.166)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Run for fucking cover

I imagine most of you are aware that B.B.Kings website presented a message from him that stated he is in hospice care at his home in Las Vegas.

We are living in an odd time. Most of us have broached a time that included the last part of the great true rock and roll explosion, the birth of folk rock, the birth of country rock, the unwitting birth of Americana by The Band, the last part of the true blues, and the popularization of blues, real Bluz with the big lip, and other kinds. Including blues rock. Now we are witnessing the death of all the artists that didn't die young, or die naturally earlier. And we are witnessing the loss of the music, as a both a social form and as an economic form. And we are witnessing the death of the music as a readily available form of cultural/ philosophical/ social commentary. There's more. Much fucking more. But a big chilled bottle of Kedem Wine ( post Passover it's cheap as can be. Manichevitz holds it's price) , a cheap ex girlfriend, and a reheated pizza impair my posting. B. B. would approve. So would Ben. Not a good time for Kings. Which brings to mind Sonic Prince. Remember that great Nils Lofgren band from the 70s....?


Entered at Fri May 1 23:27:24 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ben E. King

RIP Ben E. King.


Entered at Fri May 1 19:33:35 CEST 2015 from (31.48.6.221)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Gaining knowledge of an artist's work

Al and others - here's how I came across an artist, gained knowledge of her catalogue and developed a life long love of her singing.


Entered at Fri May 1 19:26:02 CEST 2015 from (31.48.6.221)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks Al

Great article, great album, Al. I think all of the early Beatles material is compared unfavourably to the latter material.

As you've probably noticed I champion 'A Hard Day's Night' on this site, among friends and anybody who'll listen.

Thanks for the effort.


Entered at Fri May 1 17:43:54 CEST 2015 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Web: My link

Good news regarding the missing sign from Rick's old stomping grounds (see link which hopefully works)


Entered at Fri May 1 17:30:58 CEST 2015 from (174.50.91.92)

Posted by:

Drifting

Subject: Twist & Shout.

I stumbled upon a live clip on YouTube of Levon & the Hawks in Port Dover 1964 wailing Twist & Shout. Give it a listen and shake it shake it shake it baby.


Entered at Fri May 1 14:51:49 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Into the Library …

Into the library with that, Al. An essential essay.

Please Please Me too. I'd choose it among any "Beatles Top 5" because of impact alone. Maybe you had to be there when it was new, but the range … who else did girls group covers like Baby It's You, Boys, Chains and couldn't even be assed to switch the gender? Takes confidence. Twist & Shout was the hardest rocking thing I'd ever heard, including the complete works of Elvis and Little Richard. Two singles on there, Love Me Do and Please Please Me, which is what you'd expect from the era (two hits per LP) but then they go and open with I SawHer Standing There, the best track they had of original material, and they never even put it out as a single. Add Ask Me why. Another great R&B cover in Anna. Then they go and cover A Taste of Honey and match it with an original, Misery. And to top it off you get two songs designed for the weaker side of Merseybeat, Do You want To Know A Secret and PS I Love You.


Entered at Fri May 1 12:38:54 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Me and my polemics - Album appreciation in hindsight

Someone on our footy website has pointed out a review of Big Pink I did on the Amazon site. Some of you who managed to stay awake long enough may have already read some of what is contained in the piece

It was clearly sparked by something going on at the time regarding album appreciation, specifically the Beatles first album Please Please me.

Anyroad, just skipping through it I'd say that for any real music fan there's at the very least some interesting food for thought as to how we absorb an artist/album both contemporaneously and in hindsight.

Here it is anyroad....zzzzzzz

:-0) "As a fan right from the start I will attempt to explain how and why Big Pink came to represent something of a watershed to many of us who were exposed to it for the first time back in 1968. Why and how it has come to carry such significance to us. Why so many of us rank Big Pink alongside The Brown album at the very pinnacle of The Band's recorded musical achievement. Why we perceive those who do not see it in such context as failing to see the entire picture as lucidly as they perhaps should. Why - in so far as history must surely end up judging - such a contention actually goes to the very core of what The Band represents.

I'll begin with a broad perspective on how I believe we formulate judgements on these sort of things.

Let's take somebody who has just latched onto a particular artist. Any artist of significance. They naturally rate this artist highly and are genuinely earnest about acquiring a completely balanced perspective on this artist.

In such an instance which would constitute the most reliable way for them to become acquainted with the catalogue of that artist?

I guess it would be to do so as chronologically as possible. Clearly, not always the easiest way - nor the most affordable. However, in order to formulate a truly objective appreciation of a particular artist's development, both in its own right and in relation to its peers, surely the best and most complete way?

In other words, you can certainly have your favourite snatches of any artist but unless you have viewed everything through the appropriate objective lens then such favouritism remains merely that.

I'll venture a personal experience where I perceive relying on mere favouritism can tend to obscure such judgement.

I have spent many an hour on various websites defending the magnificence of the Beatles first album, 'Please Please Me'.

What I have tended to find is that many of the Beatles more recent fan base are invariably only too eager to dismiss the - shall we call them in hindsight - rather naive and simplistic qualities of that first album. They compare it with the sophisticated intricacies and resonances of subsequent Beatles offerings, such as Revolver, The White Album, Abbey Road or any late sixties/early seventies Rolling Stones classic album and declare poor old Please Please Me a non-starter by comparison.

In doing so they are - in my opinion - overlooking what simply has to be a crucial part of any such judgement. That is the comparison with what else was on offer at the relevant time.

In the Beatles case this is straightforward enough to demonstrate, of course. Or at least it is for those of us who happened to be around at the time. We take it as read the pivotal importance Please Please Me occupies in rock history. Before it, for example, no other popular artist had self-penned so many songs purely for an album. Further no other popular artist had so successfully merged pure pop with R&B and R&R. The fact is that at the relevant time - namely early 1963 - Please Please Me was simply staggering in its consistent quality. It was, comfortably, the best pop/rock album up to that point in time. The best, in fact, until The Beatles next album - 'With The Beatles'.

Indeed, as a little 'test the water' gauge on this, one needs only look at arguably the joint weakest track on that second album.

The track "I Wanna Be Your Man" was given to The Rolling Stones by John and Paul and became the Stones' - up to then - most successful song. It also convinced Mick and Keef that they could try their hand at songwriting. A prompting of some significance I'm sure most would agree.

Thus, in the case of The Beatles, it would be extremely flawed reasoning to form a judgement on Please Please Me - or its follow up - without placing such judgement in its historical and wider context. Also without taking cognizance of all the ensuing limitations of what at that time the Beatles' peers were creating or, indeed, what it was humanly possible given the technology available for any contemporaneous popular music artist to create.

......Moving onto the case of The Band, we find things are significantly different.

The Band's creative arc never mirrored that of The Beatles. True, their musical development did not begin an awful lot later than The Beatles - possibly only a matter of a few years or so at most. The crucial difference was that by the time The Band formally released their first recorded offering in 1968, namely Music From Big Pink, they were already comfortably the finished article, possibly as tight and accomplished as it was possible for any combo to be. What's more, they were able to dip selectively into the full repertoire of rock music's, by then, already formidable legacy and marinate it with their own vast range of contemporary and traditional musical influences. By so doing they created a sound that, whilst in itself no more unique than that of The Beatles, carried a maturity that was entirely unique.

A major part of that maturity evolved from an instinctive democracy that seemed to permeate every pore of that first album. Each tiny part of Big Pink appeared to exist simply to serve the whole. It was as if each vocal, each harmony, each instrument - in fact each and every contribution - was teetering on some invisible tightrope between dominance and subservience; competing frantically for every available space yet never less than complementary or utterly accommodating to the other.

Meanwhile, the products of these precarious balancing acts [the ensuing finished album tracks] - no matter how memorable and distinctive they happened to have been - were, in effect, always going to be there as merely a part of an integral whole. It meant Big Pink was not simply a collection of outstanding yet ultimately disparate songs. Rather, like the group who'd created it, the album was a genuine entity where everything fused together seamlessly to create a whole that was simply magical.

The instinctive `metaphorical' jettisoning from this notional entity of This Wheel's on Fire and I Shall Be Released by some fans - myself included - was to come later. As it stood at the time of its inauguration, it was to be little wonder that The Band's contempories had never before heard such a sound, let alone that they were never able to approach the mark it set.

Nor was such unmatched accomplishment the only quality that distinguished Big Pink from anything else around.

Possibly even more distinctive and defining was its inherent authenticity. The sound conveyed everything about where it was from. The singers and performers on Big Pink sang of their everyday life; the everyday trials and tribulations of the community they were so clearly an integral part of. Crucially their words and sentiments were not mere posturing. In contrast to the vast majority of their white contempories with their - by comparison - sometimes limp offerings, these fellows were the real deal. True representatives of their own bretheren.

This was not Joe Cocker asking you to lend your ears for him to sing you a song or Eric Clapton waiting for some mystical love to shine in. It wasn't even John Lennon dissecting the pitfalls and/or merits of a revolution. Rather these were ordinary Joes, country cousins and kinfolk singing from all corners of their front parlour - often at the same time - in some deliciously raw and previously unheard yet unmistakable harmony of the rural American community they had emanated from. The music they were making was simply an extension of that community.

Earthy yet heavenly; bleak yet uplifting; stark yet comforting.

Significantly, too, they were also inviting you, their audience, to become a part of what that music - their music - was offering. Its joys and heartaches; its mundanity and its mystery; its suffering and its healing. Even if it were only for the magical interludes when you were listening to them extolling it, then it was still more than enough for it to sink its teeth into your psyche and draw you right in to its very heart.

"Come let me show you how...to milk a cow" was no idle aside. Rather this was a fully blown invitation for you to get those city hands of yours carressing those cow's teats for all they were worth.

Forget anyone else, this was the nearest to complete Soul - and, for that matter Blues and Gospel - that any white artists had ever got; have ever got. The community they extolled was opening up before your very ears - and eyes. Imprisoned in some inner city bedroom you simply couldn't ask for more from a piece of long playing plastic than for it to transport you heart and soul into the backwoods and homesteads of rural America.

Big Pink - and its successor The Band - were a reflection of an artistic entity at the very zenith of its individual and collective power and sensibility. They were performing and singing about - and within - an environment in which they had become steeped; about which they were genuinely passionate.

And boy did it show.

In every note, in every chord, in every pause came evidence of that conviction. It may not have been the easiest listening music in which you'd ever attempted to immerse yourself. It may not have contained a solitary moment of what we might term pure pop or rock hooks. However, once you had allowed its rhythms and pulses, its front parlour harmonies and sentiments, its craftsmanship and sheer mastery of the idiom to invade your own sensibilities then you could not help but become convinced that you were in the presence of some unique musical entity wherein the sum of the constituent parts amounted to far more than seemed at all humanly possible.

Not surprising the attachment grew stronger with each play. And there were hundreds and hundreds of those playings. One after the other as the album's ambience entered your every orifice. And lingered for all time.

You'd find yourself reading the words of the back cover over and over again searching for some hidden clues as to what these fellows were about, which bit of the respective songs each of them was singing, where they had come from, where they were going. Frustratingly, you'd find little to quench your thirst. All you had to go on was the music and vocals spitting out from what seemed like different parts of that little mono record player before you. There was a complete absence of fuss or hype. It left you craving for the merest snippet. Your intrigue at the stark simplicity of their collective name would soon cede to a glaring realisation. What else, after all, could these guys possibly have been called?

Then there was the utter appropriateness of their own names - Danko, Manuel, Garth, Jaime and Levon. 'Levon' for Chrissakes!! You just couldn't make this sort of stuff up, so authentic did it all sound. And then the few brief sentiments uttered by the guy on guitar, Jaime 'Robbie' Robertson, about them enjoying it all 'just enough to smile at one another when we're playing'. It was like some snatched insight into the mental rigeurs of a bunch of musical geniuses.

What else would they do, you'd reflect knowingly, smiling to yourself at the logic of it all. Not only was all this so utterly convincing. For those to whom such things mattered - and as you might expect with these sort of things that was regrettably a minority - it was intoxicating, enchanting. In short it became vital.

Meantime, the downside was there as well, of course. Invisible, undetectable yet nevertheless looming all the time in the background.

Not surprisingly, The Band as a collective power could never surpass such an epiphany; such bona fide genius. With Big Pink and its bedfellow The Band they had succeeded in establishing a ceiling that nobody before nor since has reallu managed to get near.

Their achievements had soared beyond merely the sound their music had created. Somehow, the innovation and the sincerity and sheer downhomeness of their songs and performances on those albums had married together to create an aura of ordinary folk community, rustic life and American history that had resulted in something unique. An art form within an art form as it were. What's more, they had taken it as far as it could go. In the process they had set a mark that was to become unattainable not only for others but also for themselves. Thereafter, inevitably, they, their music and that art form would never be emulated. As unerringly as an arrow falling from the apex of its arc, they - and we - were all destined to head towards planet earth.

As they and, hence, their music grew away from the very togetherness and lifestyle that had helped forge it; that had created and sustained it. Inevitably, inexorably it was to gradually lose its substance. The integrity and purity of Big Pink and The Band - those albums' very essence - had been but a tangible manifestation of what was a living breathing entity. Now the inherent pressures and trappings of fame meant The Band were struggling to hold that together.

Sure, their subsequent offerings were still of the very highest order. Fact was even at their lamest these fellows were peerless musicians and vocalists. Many individual tracks were remarkable. There still came moments of exquisite beauty.

Stagefright, their third album contained a string of magical songs and performances that were a testimony to artists of such stature. Rock of Ages was ludicrously accomplished and unleashed My Brother Jake for goodness sake. Moondog Matinee was a nostalgic delight. Northern Lights, meanwhile, presented luscious textures that just soothed the soul.

The difference was in the tales these subsequent albums told; in the windows they opened.

No longer did those tales carry that indefinable authenticity of Big Pink and The Band. No longer did those windows open up to reveal a consistent cinematic landscape. What had once somehow sucked you into its tapestry until you had felt an integral part of it, now merely enthralled you with its isolated layers of brilliance.

That validity which had singled those masterpieces out; that had set them apart was - understandably - gone. Those very ingredients that had made Big Pink and The Band such complete entities, once so available, were now proving more than elusive even for these multi-talented folk.

The sobering fact was no longer did the new material speak for an entire breed of people. Rather it spoke just for the singers and performers and - while that made perfect sense for someone in their position and could still sound at times like heaven - it was simply no longer enough to sustain the aura. The Band's first two creations had made them immortal. Now, manifestly, they were showing they were not. Remorselessly, life was calling in its dues.

A sense of duty is an instinctive thing. Mostly we display it in respect of family and those closest to us. The need to protect them and defend them. To be responsible for them. It is part of the bond.

To feel something akin to that for what is merely a rock album is most probably a preposterous notion. Nonetheless, that I feel such a bond for 'Music From Big Pink' is quite evident from what I find I've written here. This is not least in response to what I have perceived since first discovering Jan Hoiberg's Band website as a tendency of some to relegate the importance of Big Pink. The intensity of my sentiments may or may not be shared by others. And in the overall scheme of things that, frankly, matters not. What does matter, as far as I'm concerned, is that what I see as the unique majesty of Music From Big Pink has now been represented in a manner which I hope has done it some form of the justice I believe it merits.

:-0)


Entered at Fri May 1 10:59:44 CEST 2015 from (92.18.213.89)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan & George Harrison 05/01/70 Columbia Studios B New York, NY

Looks like Bob and George did more than just pose for pictures.


Entered at Fri May 1 10:17:55 CEST 2015 from (219.89.33.229)

Posted by:

Rod

interesting comments from GH about Bob's "nervousness" about the Bangledesh concert. Similiar to what happened at TLW


Entered at Fri May 1 03:01:17 CEST 2015 from (174.1.48.234)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Painting

Is that the original painting on the cover of MFPB behind George and Bob on the wall in the last photo?


Entered at Fri May 1 01:21:58 CEST 2015 from (58.104.17.85)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Photos from Behind the Locked Door.


Entered at Fri May 1 01:17:48 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

George went to Woodstock in November of 1968.


Entered at Fri May 1 00:05:30 CEST 2015 from (108.30.208.110)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cool Pic

Love it.Definitely the Woodstock woods,perhaps near or on the property of Dylan's house.I'd have to think they're not dressed warmly enough for a Catskill winter.


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