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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, May 2014


Entered at Sat May 31 20:27:31 CEST 2014 from (86.160.31.40)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Between Trains

Ben, 'Between Trains' isn't a Band treasure, despite the contributions of Garth and Richard. It's a JR Robertson missing masterpiece. It would have been wonderful as a Band production; as good as anything on NLSC. But that didn't happen.

I wouldn't compare the original quintet with the post 82 revived Band. The former was for me the best music I grew up with, the latter - a decent tribute band. I saw both outfits live and was thrilled to see the 90s version in London in '96. And I loved that concert - although it was flawed. But while my heart beat faster when Rick, Levon and Garth walked on to the stage, I knew this wasn't really The Band I'd grown up with. This is not to criticise any of the 80s and 90s members but the original five had the magic. That, for me, is the difference between genius and just being very, very good.


Entered at Sat May 31 19:22:53 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Peter, I'm a aware of the Band live in tokyo cd and dvd. I have both versions. The cd is fine, the dvd is fair. From what I recall there is tracking issue with the video. It's basically a grey area release and is listed in the bootleg section of this site.

Frankly, I don't really understand the lack of interest in a set of unreleased Band recordings from the 80's and 90's. It's mind boggling to me that people who claim to be fans of The Band are not interested in this, while people clamor for the release of 'Between trains' on cd as if that was a holy grail

It seems to me that it would be in Capitol/UMG's interest to engage in this project with Garth and Levon's, Rick's and Richard's estates. Who know what Garth or Levon's estate might have in their archives for one of the other projects (Festival express or royal albert hall). The fact is that Capitol licensed material from multiple labels for the musical history box set.

Do I think a release like this would be a huge seller, absolutely not. But I continue to believe that a large part of The Band's history goes under apreciated and should be collected and officially released.


Entered at Sat May 31 18:38:25 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Some wishes come true …

BTW, Ben, The Band Live in Tokyo 1983 has appeared on amazon.co.uk with a new sleeve dated 2011, and both as a 2 CD set, and as a DVD - but the DVD is Region 2 (Europe). It's credited as "The Band & The Cate Bros."


Entered at Sat May 31 18:19:51 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben, Capitol is part of Universal Music Group. Sony-BMG is their rival. While labels license odd tracks to each other for compilations and retrospectives, Capitol is part of a conglomerate and there would be nothing in it for Capitol, whereas the original stuff is legacy, prestige, brand image. An article I was reading yesterday, an interview with Maxine Brown, said it. In the old days there were committed record people … she names Morris Levy (believe it or not) and Clive Davis … who knew the artists. Let’s add Lou Adler, David Geffen, Berry Gordy, Ahmet Ertegun, Chris Blackwell. Nowadays as she clearly points out, these companies are run by lawyers and accountants. Morris Levy may have been dubious, but he did know who the people who made the records were.

Also we assume that Pyramid and others also have rights. Sorting it out is a long tedious and unrewarding office job. I would have thought LHS were the people to put anything that can be put together together. as they must know the deals and contracts to a large degree. I can’t see Capitol doing all the work for them, or them doing all the work for Capitol.

As to anyone outside LHS or Garth having an interest in doing it, you’re talking about months of work for little or no reward. And then probably criticism for changing stuff, or claiming for your coffee at lunch or whatever.


Entered at Sat May 31 16:58:01 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Obtuse.


Entered at Sat May 31 16:53:14 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Read it three times? How long did that take? Most of the day?


Entered at Sat May 31 14:25:16 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band archival releases

Peter, you've brought up some good points as always. My response would be that the model for this type of release already exists. Rick's 'Cryin' Heart blues' contains material from Rick's aborted second album, later studio material and live tracks. This cd came out on a small label, other People's music. It seems to me that if Robbie and Sebastian care as much about Richard, Rick, Garth and Levon as they say they do, they could use their influence with Capitol to get this project going.

After all, since Robbie has said wonderful things about the four of them on his pr blitz for a 'Musical history' and 'Academy of music' box sets, you would think he would support Capitol releasing this material. Also, Capitol did work with Levon's camp on the 'three of a kind' set, obviously they didn't have to do that.

So, I would propose to Sebastian that along side the festival express and royal albert hall projects, you add a project to compile unreleased studio recordings of the Band from the 80's and 90's. If you truly hold the other members of the Band in the high regard that you claim to, you should want this material to be released, to embellish the full legacy of the greatest rock and roll 'band' ever.


Entered at Sat May 31 12:08:32 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

Anonymous poster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: New live releases

Hi. I have a friend who wishes The Band Christmas Album. I wonder if he is normal.


Entered at Sat May 31 11:03:26 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just to add, projects which didn't happen are usually harder to revive than projects that did happen then died. In the latter case, contracts and arrangements can be revived. If you're starting from scratch with lots of participants, you're assuming a lot of goodwill (probably easy enough) but you also have to get everyone to agree to everything. In my experience, 'fair distribution" can be harder to get agreement on with estates or legal representatives than it would have been with the originals in a room.

I've run into a couple of situations where people have said "why don't you re-do this or that" but it would involve (say) several months work for me, I would only get 50%, and the rest would go to an estate I've had no contact with in ten years. That sounds curmudgeonly, but you are talking about working full time on something for months.


Entered at Sat May 31 10:48:55 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Band demos

Link to the article on 80s / 90s demos Ben mentioned.

Yes, there's definitely a lot of interesting stuff. There are several questions.

1) Who owns them? Are the "Sony demos" owned by Sony? Do Sonyactually have them? How would anyone get past the corporate wall? It's easier at most levels in corporations to say "No" to requests and get back to the co-worker assessment sessions.

2) Do the masters exist anywhere at all? If not Sony, but if LHS had them, did they survive the fires?

3) There is a huge admin job in getting all the various permissions etc. Capitol can justify that with the original quintet as a prestige project: they had 50s Sinatra, The Beach Boys, US distribution of The Beatles and they had The Band. It all contributes to solid brand image. So worth doing work without an immediately obvious return. Someone would have to do it, but the potential proceeds are going to be shared a lot of ways.

4) There's remastering if the tapes still exist. The demos are mainly not "ready to go" though some sound as if they are, and in the light of Neil Young's lo-fi A Letter Home, rough 'n' ready might be OK.

5) They must have access to 90s live non-album stuff like Blue River, Driftin' Away, Deep Feeling. Many Rivers To Cross … I would think a live album would be more easily assembled and viable.

6) Whoever puts in the work, in the end, has to look at sales of "Jubilation" or "High On The Hog", split it between those involved and work out how much the one who does all the work gets for their input.


Entered at Sat May 31 06:50:50 CEST 2014 from (68.199.209.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: I read it three times to make sure i wasn't seeing things

Todd! The "post LW thing" got a promotion. Good thing Jan didn't buckle and close the GB.

Now, i think i better ask- is there more than one Pat B posting here?


Entered at Sat May 31 03:47:48 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I'd be happy with festival express or royal albert hall. But, I would really prefer for material form the 80's and 90's to finally be released. It doesn't make any sense to me that 2/3 of The Band's performing career is virtually undocumented on cd. In addition to the live recordings, there are several documented sessions from the 80's and 90's that haven't seen the light of day. Peter Viney wrote an article on some of these sessions, which is in the library section of this website.

I think at this point that the recordings of the original quarter has been well documented with multiple box sets, reissues of all albums with bonus tracks, audiophile versions of most of the albums, etc. I would really like to see the release of live and studio recordings from the later years, 1983-98. I think this period is generally undervalued and really deserves a re-evaluation. For example, I just watched a dvd of the 12/31/83 performance. It's a strong performance, Better than the Tokyo dvd recorded a few months earlier. Richard was in better voice than he was for much of the '76 tour.

There's a tremendous amount of live material in circulation among traders and bootleggers. I think it's long overdue for this material to start being officially compiled and released so that this period of The Band's history is documented and readily available.


Entered at Sat May 31 03:28:33 CEST 2014 from (67.167.233.21)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: compare the Tapes

On the tribute thing... I thought the "Endless Highway" CD was pretty darn good, a couple of clunkers maybe but it really grew on me by and by. Anyway, I am re checking out the "Big Pink" masters. I didn't pay much attention to the bonus tracks because they were mostly from the official BT release. Anyway care to do a compare and contrast of these to the originals? While they are new songs, and different versions, the BT songs seem to be different in almost all cases expect for "Katies Been Gone." What do you think?


Entered at Sat May 31 02:22:47 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.36)

Posted by:

Adam

Sebastian - I'd just like to say thank you truly for the work you're doing, and for releasing the LIVE AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 1971 box set.


Entered at Sat May 31 02:18:30 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.36)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: archive releases

I can be very, very passionate about the things that move me. I can be a little too intense for some at times. But, it is that passion, drive and perfectionist mindset that makes people capable of great work.

I am extremely proud of my work as a music archivist... locating Woodstock 1969 and Festival Express 1970 video outtakes, creating the current edition of Syria Mosque 1970 from scratch, locating the Paris 1971 video track, assembling the complete list of existing official/bootleg ROCK OF AGES material (coming soon). The goal is always to preserve the music of this incredible group, and to completely cut out the bootleggers who try to profit from others' work.

I really hope the "Royal Albert Hall 1971" and "Festival Express 1970" projects are full speed ahead. Again, I'm not trying to ruffle any feathers, just being my passionate self and discussing possible releases from the group we are all in love with! I read something about Jimmy Page hearing a Zeppelin bootleg, then scouring the planet to get the original tapes, and is now releasing it. It is that passion and drive to locate and preserve material that I would love to see. There is most likely full show footage of Syria Mosque 1970 in the Dutch TV/VPRO archives, as well as soundboard audio and footage of Paris 1971 in the BBC Radio 1 archives. If the right people were really dedicated, they could be located. Apparently Historic Films planned on releasing a "Festival Express, Vol. 2" DVD with Band footage, but they were denied the rights to use them. I'm thankful though that the right people are aware of where the outtakes are, and hopeful that the legal entanglements can be overcome.


Entered at Fri May 30 19:25:50 CEST 2014 from (98.99.251.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US
Web: My link

Subject: Complete 1976 Band performance posted at No Depression

Perhaps old news to you guys. In today's No Depression email. (Sign up. I think it is worth it.)


Entered at Fri May 30 18:15:12 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Another tribute to one of the few people who played lead guitar for The Band.


Entered at Fri May 30 14:31:22 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: If we consider emulation as tribute, then tributes to the Band, and the proto-Band Hawks, go back to the very early '60s. Even Garth was part of one of those when he was still with the Capers.

If "Tiny Dancer" had a appeared a bit earlier, the reference to the seamstress might have been seen as the tailor referred to in the title track of Jack Bruce's brilliant first solo album - who had been, I believe, associated with Fairport Convention in its early days as well as Cream.


Entered at Fri May 30 13:22:09 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: "Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued"

Most of you will be aware of this, I guess:

http://www.americansongwriter.com/2014/03/t-bone-burnett-helms-star-sequel-bob-dylans-basement-tapes/

You will note the reference to a film by Sam Jones. His company is currently canvassing film production companies and film archive organisations for interviews and similar material to add to what they have so far - which is believed to be the selected performers talking about The Basement Tapes and their specific contributions (plus them performing the song(s) they have recorded).


Entered at Fri May 30 10:29:18 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

and "Hit Record" by Ronnie Hawkins.


Entered at Fri May 30 09:53:48 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The list has to start with Fallen Angel, obviously.


Entered at Fri May 30 09:40:10 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Javelin "Garth Hudson"

YouTube link, where it's 1 second longer. I assume "tribute".

What is a tribute? Take Listening to Levon by Marc Cohn, not so much written as a tribute as evoking a time and place and love of Levon's voice in a great narrative song (and he might have lied about the car).

Then you get Levon from Madman Across The Water, which is not "about" Levon but uses his name at a point when Elton and Bernie Taupin were totally immersed in The Band.

Then was "Tiny Dancer" on the same record the "L A seamstress to the band" or "LA seamstress to The Band" though Elton seems much more likely to have engaged the services of a seamstress as The Band were never renowned in sartorial matters.

I reckon you'll need two categories, "Tributes" and "Namechecks."

OK, third category … "Deja Vu" album cover with the brown dimpled card was another "heavily influenced by" as was "Tumbleweed Connection" … but I digress.

In many ways the entire albums Workingman's Dead, Tumbleweed Connnection and many others are quite conscious "tributes to The Band."


Entered at Fri May 30 00:53:58 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "Garth Hudson"

Looking for those tracks earlier, iTunes showed a 1 minute 12 second track by Javelin from their album "Hi Beams" with the track title "Garth Hudson". It is a synth instrumental. whether by Garth or in tribute to Garth, I don't know.


Entered at Thu May 29 23:28:12 CEST 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: "Lost on the Way to Levon´s"

New Levon tribute, linked above. About time to get that ultimate list of Band (members) tribute songs compiled for this site -- there are loads of them out there now. Who´ll create ver.0.1, then?


Entered at Thu May 29 22:29:00 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: At The Movies

Let me second that on "Between Trains" - an "At The Movies" compilation is screaming to be done, and I'm sure the track list has been suggested a few times. I think it's a double album by now.


Entered at Thu May 29 22:19:33 CEST 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Between Trains

Hi Sebastian - while you are talking with your dad - can you ask him to make Between Trains available in some sort of electronic format. Thanks


Entered at Thu May 29 20:11:45 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Royalty payment issues?

I have no idea if this still applies but didn't the USA (and maybe Canada) have a different way of counting royalties - which explained, in some cases, the shorter LPs in the USA compared with Britain (by which I mean the fewer traclks per LP side)?


Entered at Thu May 29 18:13:56 CEST 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Al Edge/Adam

That is super cool Al. I sent it to my dad.

Adam, we get it, you want to see Festival Express. :) I think you made yourself clear after the first 7 posts about it. This is a larger scale project that will certainly take some time/years to put together but you can rest assured that it is on the top of the list.


Entered at Thu May 29 16:30:48 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's only the Canadian imports, Bill. Other CDs are are a normal £9.99


Entered at Thu May 29 14:33:41 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Can it be a coincidence that Url Dotcom in London has chipped in with some financial advice right after you complained about the high cost of CDs in the UK?


Entered at Thu May 29 09:59:30 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Same in the UK. Both tracks are on amazon.co.uk for download at 69p each if you go to the albums, which are on sale at a whopping £25 and £21 for Canadian import copies. Neither are on iTunes, and nor are the albums BUT the albums have not been released in the UK, which must be the key to their absence (and follow to the USA iTunes too).

I guess iTunes knows where you are from your log in rather than location - try hypothetically downloading to a Smartphone on the bridge at Niagara Falls. Amazon operates differently - I opened a Canadian and a US amazon account to get stuff in the past. I guess that's why you get them on amazon.

It will come down to licensing. When I've licensed music or photos or illustrations, you can normally opt for "World Rights" or "World Rights Excluding USA and Canada" with the latter being about half the price, and for ELT our choice, because if need be, there would be a different American edition (and the US branch of the publisher would do that).

But the surprise to me is that they're separated … USA and Canada are normally linked in licenses. You also wonder why two x 10 track short editions replace the original 18 track.


Entered at Thu May 29 03:31:51 CEST 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

"Whispering Pines" @ the link.


Entered at Thu May 29 03:30:10 CEST 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

"Million Dollar Bash" @ the link.


Entered at Thu May 29 01:13:42 CEST 2014 from (108.217.93.87)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: canadian celebration - extra tracks

those 2 extra tracks were available in the u.s., at least for a while. i found them on amazon (u.s.) last june, and i believe they were available on itunes as well. do you have any contacts in canada? perhaps they could help.


Entered at Thu May 29 00:22:58 CEST 2014 from (100.34.3.106)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives

Subject: iTunes: Won't Cross the Great Divide?

Speaking of garthhudson.com...

A while back, I was perusing the site and noticed that there were versions of "Garth Hudson Presents A Canadian Celebration Of The Band" that differed from the CD I have-- IIRC, there was a "Volume 1" and "Volume 2".

I can't find the page there now, so I may be remembering this wrong. But I definitely remember that there were two tracks listed that I didn't have: "Million Dollar Bash" and "Whispering Pines" (can't remember the artists either).

Anyway, there were "buy at iTunes" links, so I promptly went into iTunes to add these two tracks to my collection.

Experienced, knowledgeable iTunes users probably know what's coming-- but I learned the hard way that these tracks were only available on iTunes Canada.

It was a Catch-22; my iTunes login only works on iTunes U.S., but those tracks aren't available on the U.S. site.

I finally gave up, and I can live without these tracks. I'm boring you with all of this because if anyone can explain this frustrating circumstance, it's GB regulars with considerable knowledge and expertise in the music biz.

My question is why the hell is iTunes set up in a way that won't let me pay good money for good music? My guess is that there's some kind of commercial twist, similar to the way DVDs will only work in certain regions.

But I just can't see who gains by restricting sales of iTunes tracks based on geography. What am I missing-- besides those two tracks? Whatever it is, it sucks.


Entered at Wed May 28 20:09:36 CEST 2014 from (174.94.30.108)

Posted by:

A. Warner

Knowing Serge, I wouldn't doubt it, but can say for certain, always had a little nickname for everyone he knew. As a child he called me kid, like it was my name. "Hey kid!" with a hug and kiss.


Entered at Wed May 28 20:03:25 CEST 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link to June 13 show feat. Eric Andersen, Larry Campbell, Teresa Williams.


Entered at Wed May 28 17:19:59 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A. Warning … wasn’t Serge the guy who liked using a range of different punning names?


Entered at Wed May 28 14:23:26 CEST 2014 from (174.94.30.108)

Posted by:

A. Warner

Location: London,ON

Subject: Sorry AL

Didn't mean to leave you reeling Al, I felt the same way. Spent my childhood weekends listening to the various arrangements of B.W.Pawley & Plum Loco, always loved when Serge sat in. Do you know Serge?


Entered at Wed May 28 10:12:55 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Born in the USA

So there's more to this music business than meets the eye eh Bill?

:-0)

Meantime, whilst reeling from the GB memories induced by the reference to Serge I'm also mightily impressed by your use of the adverb 'puckishly' which has now been absorbed into the otherwise limited Edge lexicon.

:-0)


Entered at Wed May 28 02:05:23 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: TLW- different vsersions

In case anyone missed this:

http://johannasvisions.com/the-last-waltz-different-versions/


Entered at Tue May 27 23:03:35 CEST 2014 from (174.94.30.108)

Posted by:

A. Warner

Subject: Serge Daniloff

So nice to find these pictures of Serge today. A great friend to my family. I need to hear that harmonica one more time....


Entered at Tue May 27 21:45:23 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Springsteen for a day

Al E: Topic hopping, CBC radio was playing Aaron Copland's "Rodeo" the other day and I took the opportunity to say the little I know about Copland's political background to the captive audience in the car seat beside me. All of it picked up from a read of Sean Wilentz's excellent book, "Bob Dylan in America" (as if). Her response: "So you could say he was the Springsteen of his day". Puckishly, but not without justification.


Entered at Tue May 27 21:07:19 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RAH 1971 - 100% reliable eye witness to its unique majesty

Bob Adcock was amongst other things Tour Manager of Cream between 1966 and 1969. He listened to the acetate of Big Pink alongside Eric Clapton and like EC was completely captivated.

Bob is a huge LFC fan and is back home in Liverpool after all his years on the road.

I asked him for his take on ROYAL ALBERT HALL 1971. This was his response.

"It's difficult for me to reply without sounding like a prize twat, but your question got me thinking........

First, please understand that by '71 I had an unbelievable collection of live concerts under my belt.

Countless Beatles' shows in Liverpool when I was in my teens. Every concert performed by Cream for obvious reasons.

Untold shows by legendary west coast American bands who shared the bill with Cream at the Fillmores (east & west) like The Doors, Buffalo Springfield, Steppenwolf, Janice Joplin, Vanilla Fudge; far too many to mention.

I had seen James Brown at the Harlem Apollo, Elvis in Vegas & Stevie Wonder, Jeff Beck and Free in Detroit. Pink Floyd at The Perfumed Garden. Untold gigs by Led Zep & The Who. Hendrix at the IOW. The Stones all over the place. I was very lucky, I know.

But that gig at the RAH blew them ALL into a cocked hat. 40 years have taken their toll on my memory banks so I can't remember the set list, but the overall feeling of "That's exactly how a music show should sound" stayed with me for many years after and I have never seen a better concert since.

It was magical, and that wasn't just the drugs talking!

Over to you SEBASTIAN

:-0)


Entered at Tue May 27 17:16:15 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bachman Turner and Barney Bentall

We saw Barney Bentall and his band open for Bachman Turner last night at the Royal Theatre in Victoria BC. Barney was great and Randy Bachman is a great player and performer. A great show. "Got Somethin' To Live For" is still a great song and "Takin' Care of Business" closed the show with style.


Entered at Tue May 27 10:23:59 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Adam meant the "De Luxe" edition.

Then you have the Gold Collector edition with the DVD, three vinyl 180gram LPs and a download code.

The Platinum Edition would have DVD, three LPs plus 3 CDs for those who argue (as I would) that CDs are better in the car than MP3 downloads. That would probably have a download code anyway so you can put it on your portable device without ripping the CDs into iTunes.

I might stop at Platinum, as the Super Platinum would add a hardback book with 80 photos. Don't know.


Entered at Tue May 27 10:05:11 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I'm normally too cheap to buy these deluxe editions but I'd make an exception for FE if it is what Adam suggested. This was before Stage Fright - so Time To Kill would be a "new" song - right?


Entered at Tue May 27 01:54:08 CEST 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

And a toast this fine evening to Mr Levon Helm who would have been 74? today. Perhaps bourbon or coca cola would be more appropriate but I have neither so that Lagavulin's going to take another hit.

As great a sanger that Mark Lavon was, my Levon thrill is still his drumming on 'Tears of Rage'.


Entered at Tue May 27 00:54:48 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.2)

Posted by:

Adam

Peter, you win... I will settle for a Super Deluxe Edition "Festival Express 1970", with DVD footage of each song, and CDs of all three shows...


Entered at Tue May 27 00:45:30 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Adam I disagree, in that my record store pals tell me it is the De luxe super editions that actually sell nowadays. Those who want the basic issue are content with a download. Those who buy want the full thing with a good booklet etc.

It will be interesting to see how Neil Young's spectacularly Lo-fi A Letter Home sells. It is very good.


Entered at Mon May 26 23:50:25 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.2)

Posted by:

Adam

Let's use LIVE AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 1971 as an example. I'm still absolutely in love with that set. But it's a very big set. 2 discs of Clearmountain takes/mixes, 2 discs of soundboard takes/mixes, a DVD with 3 tracks of footage.

Since that set was obviously well received and it presumably sold well, imagine how well a more scaled down, non 'Super Deluxe Edition' product would sell. The die hard fans and automatic buyers of the ACADEMY 1971 set would absolutely buy it. And for the fan demographic who thought the Academy set was too large, too costly, too many repeat performances and not enough video footage?

"Live At Festival Express 1970". A single disc DVD/Blu Ray. I have a very strong feeling it would sell an outrageous amount of copies.


Entered at Mon May 26 23:38:47 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.2)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Festival Express 1970

Here is that "Festival Express 1970" petition that the Richard Manuel FACEBOOK page created awhile back. This was when Historic Films started previewing some of their outtakes... Chest Fever, Jemima Surrender, etc. "This is a petition for CAPITOL RECORDS and EAGLE ROCK ENTERTAINMENT to work with HISTORIC FILMS in order to release a complete document of "THE BAND - FESTIVAL EXPRESS Live in Canada 1970" CD/LP/DVD/BLU-RAY set in 2013/2014/2015, Re-mastered in High Definition and 5.1 Surround Sound"

Tracklist would include Long Black Veil, Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever, Slippin' & Slidin', Chest Fever, Time To Kill, Don't Do It, Rockin' Chair, Jemima Surrender, The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, Across The Great Divide, Up On Cripple Creek, The Weight, I Shall Be Released...

So just stating my opinion. I would love to have a "Royal Albert Hall 1971" release. But do you guys really want that over Festival Express footage? 14 tracks of absolute prime Band, beautiful color vintage footage, like the running length of The Last Waltz but recorded at the peak of their career, and by themselves in all their ragged glory. Something like a Band "Festival Express 1970" concert film would just do so much for enhancing their recorded output and legendary status in the rock history books.


Entered at Mon May 26 23:38:38 CEST 2014 from (75.34.44.2)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Band archive releases

Thanks again to Sebastian Robertson for asking our opinions/wishes, and to everyone for responding about the archive releases. I fully agree with everyone that "Royal Albert Hall 1971" should be officially released on CD. If there is going to be one AUDIO ONLY release, it should be RAH. However, I still maintain that if we're talking about a larger scale release, a "Festival Express 1970" DVD/Blu Ray would be the ultimate release in the group's history. It's just simply the number one source of live Band footage existing, recorded at a blistering peak in summer 1970, in Canada, with their first 3 albums in the can. Beautiful color footage survives, and considering we're blessed that ANY survived, the fact that The Band has the most footage out of any of the acts is a godsend.


Entered at Mon May 26 16:18:37 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Kinney speaks

I just listened to an interview with David Kinney. Very grounded sensible journalist with a balanced view who 'gets it' when it comes to artist commitment. He likens 'overfandom' without obsession (my words) to commitment to a sport and says that in the main (clearly when one reads the book, there are exceptions), the people he writes about are at that level. He talks about going to 80 baseball games a year to see one's favourite team as a comparable experience to some of what people do at home when they listen or read about Dylan. He also comments about following a Dylan tour and implies that the sports enthusiast will often do the same (and they do), travelling hundreds of miles to be part of the team experience. I think that this comes close to being a valid comparison (though I am aware of Dylan fans who exceed the bounds of what most sports team 'followers' do). In the main, my sense of the scope of Dylanophiles did not change after having read the book and I saw the Dylan-committed landscape before I read the book in much the same way as after completing it. The value of the book was its affirmation that the art was appreciated by many grounded individuals who did not obsess but in fact treat the entire Dylan experience as a cultural and academic diversion that enriches their lives but does not rule their lives. (exceptions noted in the book were the cause of sadness, but they were few).


Entered at Mon May 26 16:18:17 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Concert Vault: Levon Helm Band in Newport, 2008

This arrived while I way typing.


Entered at Mon May 26 16:14:38 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Anybody know which "Drivin' Wheel" song Levon is listed as singing on the new (or upcoming) live album listed in What's New - the Junior Parker, the David Wiffen, or some other? I was listening to Tom Rush sing the Wiffen song last night, on an '80s live audiophile LP that I picked up a couple summers ago in Tofino (of all places) but then tucked away and forgot about. Interesting that the organist on that is the same Ray Colcord who happened to be on the CD in my car player, Lou's "Rock and Roll Animal".

In the same uncovered stash was a mid-'80s Stony Plain LP of tapes of singer-songwriter Bob Carpenter that Brian Ahern had recorded for WB between '71 and '74. An interesting gaggle of backing singers / instrumentalists: Emmylou Harris, Anne Murray, Lowell George, Bill Payne ... Emmylou recorded Carpenter material, as did the aforementioned Tom Rush, notably "Gypsy Boy" and "Roll Away The Grey" on "Merrimack County". As far as I know, Carpenter's first credit was the b-side of a '69 45 by the Humble Sponge, a minor north Toronto group that included a guy who went on to be a respected city councillor and another, Eddie Baltimore, who went on to do studio work as guitarist and engineer with Garth Hudson.


Entered at Mon May 26 03:42:05 CEST 2014 from (99.109.12.141)

Posted by:

Chris

Subject: Band 1967 demo tape

Does anyone know where this demo tape from 1967 ended up? And will we ever hear it? http://recordmecca.com/item-archives/the-band-unreleased-1967-demo-tape/


Entered at Mon May 26 03:24:36 CEST 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: S. Twilly

Subject: song and dance man

I'm toasting him with a drop of Lagavulin while playing Tell Tale Signs. Have heard similiar adjectives re its taste and Dylan's voice.


Entered at Mon May 26 02:52:45 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Song and Dance Man turns 73 yesterday

Bob Dylan 73 years old: Happy Birthday to the Song and Dance Man. I listened to 'Full Moon and Empty Arms" today again. How wonderful an interpretation is that! Looking forward to the new album in August.


Entered at Mon May 26 02:04:12 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Bill M

Just sent you an e-mail. Cheers, Carl


Entered at Sun May 25 22:30:03 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: ruminations

For whatever reason, I was struck be these lovely lines from "Too Soon Gone":

"Last night the constellations
Watched me one at half past twelve
With some people you don't see the whole picture all at once
Like you fill in the gaps in the stars all by yourself"

In keeping with what we've been talking about of late, the thought entered my head that Jules Sher may have been watching the sky through a crescent-moon-shaped hole in the door of his outhouse on the outskirts of Woodstock, the world capital of designer rusticity. (The alternative, that he'd simply left the door wide-open, doesn't bear thinking about.)

Anyway, doesn't the shared rustic simplicity and lack of pretence make the Band the outhouse of late '60s rock? With the simple outhouse, the risk is that it'll unexpectedly turn up in "Better Homes and Garden" and everything will change - new paint, new fixtures, vinyl siding, air freshener, new seat-uo / seat-down rules, etc.

And the brings in a thought borrowed from Mike Myers, in an article in the NYT:

"It occurred to me that fame is the industrial disease of creativity. There's a toxicity to fame that will have reproductive harm." _


Entered at Sun May 25 18:42:28 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Kinney Dylan

Just finished David Kinney's "The Dylanologists". Well written and interesting. Like a visual analogue scale for pain, there are so many levels of interest in art. Reading about that interest puts one's individual place into perspective. I particularly found interest in those who came and went and re-arrived. Having listened from the start and having revelled in the best of times while hanging in there in the lesser times, it was good to read about other people's feelings through it all. There were feelings of sadness as I read but the overwhelming sense at the end was that a performer offers his art to us and we are the fortunate ones who get to receive.


Entered at Sun May 25 09:34:06 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Yes! The Festival complete package!


Entered at Sun May 25 00:11:43 CEST 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 2-holer

The height of luxury and a signal of wealth in outhouses, so I was told by my kin of 1 generation past. An ever-ready Sear's catalog and some loose cobs only added to that perception.


Entered at Sat May 24 21:27:22 CEST 2014 from (173.3.48.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Songwriting, Streaming,Pandora, Spotify, and Abba

Linked up. One dickhead chief at Universal Music Group reputedly claimed songwriting is part of the recording process.


Entered at Sat May 24 19:51:30 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Luxury

Just as we abandon our outhouse theme, my 3 year old granddaughter was on the phone. She had spent a couple of hours in Accident & Emergency after a "foreign object in the nose" incident and wanted to tell me about it. I learned that Doctor Suzy was lovely, so I asked what the hospital was like. She thought the hospital had a lovely play area, except that it had a boy in it. But then … luxury … the height of loveliness … "It was REALLY lovely. They got two toilets in the same room."

I suspect one was a bidet.


Entered at Sat May 24 18:53:40 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Confused? I will be …

Having found some good 45s yesterday, I was scanning the sleeves for the book on record collecting. I just scanned Willie Dixon's Crazy For My Baby, and the image was on the desktop. I'd been playing folk, but thought "I'd like to hear the Willie Dixon" now, and clicked on the scan thumbnail, and sat there wondering why it hadn't started playing.


Entered at Sat May 24 18:03:37 CEST 2014 from (173.3.48.80)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rog,i did not participate during that discussion. Wasn't me...We did have outhouses here, at the locale of our country homes, while my father and uncle were building their homes. Outhouses here also were called latrines.


Entered at Sat May 24 17:27:34 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Thank you, Peter

Thank you, Peter. It almost makes one feel like one was there. Daniel Lanois from Hamilton, Ontario has been a favourite of mine and Emmilou Harris is superb.

I don't really understand why the "I, Me, Mine" philosophy permeates concerts. Performers choose to present themselves in any manner they choose. There is no written contract when we, the public, buy a ticket and attend that we are going to get what we want. In fact, for me it is the surprises that are most welcome. But that's me. Anyway, it is rude to accost the performer with negative screaming and vocal insults. I remember that happening for the first time in my presence at Massey Hall when Simon and Garfunkel performed in the later 60s. I was aghast and I was only 20 or so and knew how to speak out. That type of behaviour is demeaning to the screamer and is destructive to the entire experience. Those individuals should stay home and scream at their respective cd players.

As someone else said in the past 24 hours, this GB is returning to its former self and I'm pleased about that.


Entered at Sat May 24 17:09:45 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Emmylou Harris & Daniel Lanois

Link to my review of last night's Emmylou Harris concert on her "Wrecking Ball Tour" with Daniel Lanois at Brighton Dome.


Entered at Sat May 24 13:37:09 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Not Dylan; just Toronto

Sorry for the title. Nothing to do with Dylan. It just appeared and I didn't catch it!


Entered at Sat May 24 13:35:54 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Toronto Dylan 15.7.13

And finally, and I promise I'll stop now, it was around 1969 or 1970, and I was walking on Yonge St south of Bloor, and out of the this shop comes blasting "Open My Eyes" and I go in and say "Who is that?" and she says "Nazz" and so my affair with Todd Rundgren began. They also need a review as does Todd.


Entered at Sat May 24 13:31:51 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: San Diego

This happened another time. It was San Diego and we again were attending a meeting. Walking in a mall and shopping, I decided to buy 1 or 2 loud print cotton short sleeve shirts with big prints and lots of colour and in the store as I was buying, they are playing brilliant music that I had never heard before. So I said "Who is this" and she said "Pinback". And the rest is history. I think its time for me to write a Toppermost for Pinback.


Entered at Sat May 24 13:26:58 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Stockholm

You reminded me. 2002. We are attending a meeting in Stockholm. As usual, we are tour-walking on a beautiful sunny day and walk near a record/cd store and blasting from the speakers is a sound we had never heard before. So we go in and ask and its The Hives. And as usual, I say 'Who are these guys" and she shows me and the rest is history. The song was "Main Offender". As Roger says and I paraphrase because he said it best. Don't worry about the music. Keep your ears open and your eyes peeled because what you hear and see is creativity that has and is and will always be. And that is from those who were and are and will be.


Entered at Sat May 24 12:57:36 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: How to become a successful guitar player.

This is a Mrs. NWC anecdote on Sweden's most successful rock band. - It was formed in the cafeteria of the college where she was a teacher. After the historic moment the original two went home and passed a pub. A heavily drunk Finn (a mason) came through the door and landed in their arms. The original two needed a guitar player so they asked: "Do you want to play guitar in the band which someday will be the most successful band in Sweden?" He said "yes" (or mumbled something which they believed was "yes"). And that's it.

Footnote: I checked their official biography and I found it even there. It _must_ be true!


Entered at Sat May 24 12:24:41 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Royal Nobby Hall

Sebastian - Al's post says it all. If he could have added flowers he'd have done so and I'd have chipped in. RAH it must be. And thanks so much for asking us for our votes. This site has once more swung 180 degrees in seven days.

A few days back, in between the discussions about bathroom facilities, locations and fittings and the cesspool rant, someone commented (Jeff?) that today's music was in a trough. We saw Chris Wood last night in a small venue. Chris Wood is a Brit guitarist / songwriter who's the heir apparent to Martin Carthy - with whom he's worked a good deal. I guess once I'd have called him a folkie but he's far too eclectic for that. He's an ace guitarist and songwriter and he played a killer version of "I second that emotion". He talked about working with a young, white, Brit hip hopper named Dizraeli. I looked at him on Youtube and, while not to my immediate taste, he's clearly a talent. Then I think of artists I've seen or heard this year; Simone Felice, The Deep Dark Woods, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah and lots of others and I'd have to say that, while music's evolved, there's still great stuff out there. Coming up there's The Jayhawks, Richard Thompson, The Waterboys... it goes on. Then there's the DJ stuff with which our honourable host will be extremely familiar. My son has long been my mentor in contemporary music and currently listens chiefly to DJ mixes and I'm beginning to understand the quality of that music. Then of course we've still got the greats - Leonard, his Bobness (I've been listening to Tempest a lot this month), Van, James Taylor, Paul Simon and so forth. I'm not going to moan about today's music today.

And Peter - I envy you Emmylou and the Wrecking Ball crew. Daniel Lanois - I'd missed this!

Oh and did I mention RAH coming up!!!


Entered at Sat May 24 03:09:16 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just looking at the Daniel Lanois website and he is playing Banff on August 10th with Garth Hudson!


Entered at Sat May 24 02:51:01 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Royal Albert Hall will assuage the guilt at missing it that me, Al Edge and Ian W have been feeling all these years.

Just back from Emmylou Harris with Daniel Lanois. So a Last Waltz connection AND a Robbie connection. She said that "most of my ten favorite songwriters are Canadian", and as she finished with My Songbird she was probably counting Jesse Winchester as an honorary Canadian.

Review tomorrow - 1.49 am and knackered after 100 miles back from Brighton.


Entered at Sat May 24 01:35:50 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The next 'live' BAND release

Sebastian - it is clearly in the hands of your goodself, your dad and presumably Garth and perhaps other relatives to decide on your next venture.

However, I have lived with deep regret these past 44 years for not managing to get to that sacred night at the Royal albert hall when our five masters enchanted an audience comprising it was reckoned some 50% fellow musicians with their peerless live recreation of their studio recordings.

I here and now before my pitiful PC screen get down on my hands and knees to implore you to make the Royal Albert Hall your next venture. It is meant with no disrespect to young Adam in spite of all his capital letters - as he will well be aware ;-0). However, time is clearly on his side whereas the likes of myself have been craving a possibility like this for 44 freakin years!!!

Walk on

:-0)


Entered at Sat May 24 00:58:23 CEST 2014 from (75.34.48.60)

Posted by:

Adam

Sebastian - Simply wonderful news. Thank you for your efforts! The Band at Festival Express is my NUMBER ONE release wish. It is just screaming to be released! The Band in summer 1970, one of their finest years, playing some of their wildest, wooliest and most authentic music, for their hometown crowd in Canada, with BEAUTIFUL FOOTAGE of so many songs! SLIPPIN' & SLIDIN', THE WEIGHT, I SHALL BE RELEASED, ROCKIN' CHAIR and LONG BLACK VEIL have been put out on DVD. Pair those with the outtakes Historic Films have previewed... GENETIC METHOD / CHEST FEVER, JEMIMA SURRENDER, and the ones that surfaced on bootlegs like TIME TO KILL, DON'T DO IT, LOVING YOU IS SWEETER THAN EVER... I am just chomping at the bit.

"Festival Express 1970" DVD/Blu Ray, "Royal Albert Hall 1971" CD. How about that?!


Entered at Fri May 23 19:11:38 CEST 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: The Band - Live

Thanks for the input. Currently digging into the Royal Albert Hall tapes. The performances are stellar. We've also considered the Festival Express complete package. I think with all the comments pointing in that direction I'll move this way up on the list.


Entered at Fri May 23 18:28:21 CEST 2014 from (171.159.192.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I find the comments about the post Robbie Band material being off limits to Capitol a bit far fetched. After all, Capitol licensed Ronnie Hawkins, Levon & the Hawks, Dylan and the Hawks, and Dylan and the Band tracks from various sources for previous releases as well as Last waltz material from Warner Bros. They also included 'she knows' credited to Richard from the mid 80's on the first box set.

If Capital is going to start releasing a series of Band concerts, I would strongly urge them to consider shows from the 80's and 90's as well as the 4 mentioned by Sebastian. The fact is there are far more high quality shows from this period. I remember there was briefly talk about one of the 'Mountain Stage' performances being released many years ago, but unfortunately that never happened.

I was listening to the KBFH cd from '76 in the car this morning. I haven't listened to this show in some time. It's overall a strong perfomance, but Richard does sound extremely ragged on 'Tears of rage'. I'm sure there are better performaces of this song from other shows on that tour. Maybe a best of '76 box could be assembled.


Entered at Fri May 23 14:49:28 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: Nice list. I saw precisely none of those people. (I also got precisely none of the '90s album covers - possibly a worse score than Joe J's.) I did, however, get my own record player (a Sony stereo package) when I was a mere 20, though I had managed to install the family's portable unit in my room when I was 18, and I don't think anyone even noticed. I know for a fact that the very first record ever played on said Sony was a mint promo copy of "The Stones I Throw" by Levon and the Hawks, which I'd bought at an oldies store for $2.50 half a year before but didn't want to ruin by playing with a three-pound tone arm. Hearing that was true luuxury.


Entered at Fri May 23 11:51:40 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: 1960s quiz

1960s quiz - 11

Some of the sleeves I didn't even recognise, I'm afraid but (WARNING: Four Yorkshiremen revisited, here) there was no means of playing records in my home when I was growing up and I didn't get a record player of my own until I was 21. Of course, I listened to the radio a lot and, as you may have gathered, compensated by going to see performers live as much as I could. As well as pubs and clubs, I could afford the cheap seats at concerts - usually well back or, occasionally, seats on the stage behind the performers - many of them jazz concerts - Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington(twice), Jimmy Smith, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Roland Kirk (also twice), Woody Herman, Charles Lloyd (including Keith Jarret) come to mind. As for blues artists - Sonny Boy Williamson II, Muddy Waters, Little Walter, John Lee Hooker, Sleepy John Estes, Rosetta Tharpe, Willie Dixon, Sunnyland Slim, JB Lenoir, Shakey Horton, Buddy Guy, Roosevelt Sykes, Fred McDowell, Big Mama Thornton, Hubert Sumlin, Lightning Hopkins, Otis Span - I could go on.

People remember London then for the "Swingin' Sixties" but I remember it for a much wider range of music.


Entered at Fri May 23 07:05:54 CEST 2014 from (92.18.198.250)

Posted by:

Solomon

Any new Woodstock video footage would be great! I always thought The Weight was well filmed.


Entered at Fri May 23 05:04:40 CEST 2014 from (76.28.98.146)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Sebastian's ?

A bit late to the party on what more we'd want to hear from the vaults, not to mention being no where as well versed in these topics as many here. I'd echo the inestimable (or is it "estimable", I'm not sure of the term... either way it's meant to be complementary), Peter V: we'd like all of 'em. Plus anything more from Festival Express that could be arranged.

My votes would be

1. Royal Albert

2. W. Glen

3. Palladium

Sebastian: for my part, Royal Albert would be more for the time period involved than the specific set list. As your dad has said, they were really hitting on all cylinders in '71. Didn't they also play there w/ Dylan in '66? I figured that's the time that George Harrison references seeing them w/ his boys. Of course it's too much to think much of anything from that whole seminal time is bouncing around in record company or promoter archives, I suppose.

An aside: just noticing in last Sunday's NY Times ads and such about Newport... it makes me curious to see how,(or if) next year's festival marks 50 years since Dylan went electric. Wouldn't it be interesting, if done appropriately to have him back w/ Al Kooper, etc. Perhaps Robbie and Garth to boot, (I acknowledge that they weren't there as Forest Hills was a few months later) since they certainly lived through all the rest of Bob's re-set of popular music.

I have to put Watkins Glen 2nd... as a fairly typical American youth of that time, I've always thought the 3 bands you'd most want to see, especially w/ an extended timeframe on-stage would have to be the Band, Allbros and the Dead. I actually think I would have rather been there than Woodstock despite W-S's cultural cache. Alas, I was a dumb college student in the sleepy Midwest at the time and missed it all (live). That said, I still remeber the "wonder-of-it-all" when the W-S movie came out.

Anyway, good luck with your efforts, Sebastian.

BEG: next time I'd like to hear more from you on why there's such a gender-disparity in the GB. I don't think it's specific to the Band, do you?


Entered at Fri May 23 04:16:20 CEST 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

11/11/8.

Not even going to try the 90s.



Entered at Fri May 23 00:59:19 CEST 2014 from (98.66.251.61)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: Thunder On The Hill

Pat, thanks for the "Look Out Cleveland" link. Excellent audio & it's great to hear Richard's piano so evident in the mix, which is all too rarely the case. It showcases how important his rhythmic style was to their sound. If there is more of similar quality in the vault from that show, I hope it surfaces some day.


Entered at Thu May 22 16:53:27 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Report: Paul McCartney hospitalized


Entered at Thu May 22 15:16:55 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I only got 8 right in the seventies quiz without the clues and with the clues. I was listening non-stop at the time to Dylan, Louu, Bowie, Rod the Mod, Woodstock, Marley from mid-seventies and then punk/new wave from late seventies to early eighties.

Edgey...Alright now......alright now..... :-D

Song of the day! I'm at my brother's home and all of a sudden this song comes on. I can stop speaking to someone just like that if I really dig a song. I say where did you get that song?! I don't have that one and we both dig this group! He tells me that this DJ friend of his makes all of his mixed CDS. Ohhhh......So he's the one who arranged for you to feed all those musicians who toured Waterloo U back in the day like.....The Clash, Annie Lennox, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Simple Minds, Alice Cooper.......He doesn't even dig some of these groups and yet he fed them well. Unbelieveable!


Entered at Thu May 22 14:14:51 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: To Hull and back

Nice tale P. happy days eh mate.

Reminds me of a mate from Hull back in the early '80's. John Longden - terrific fella prematurely grey - in fact shock white by the age of 30. He was a huge Hull rugby league fan. besotted with them and their upcoming prospects and never failed to bore us all shitless with his aspirations for his team. It was at the time they were on the rise and were signing top New Zealanders. Can't recall the players names just now.

Anyroad Hull were playing one night at St Helens which is just down the road and after what seemed like eternal pestering he persuaded a bunch of us to go and watch his beloved team.

Well, I have never in my life witnessed a man so demoralised by the events of a night. St Helens had a giant of a man playing for them called Mal Meninga. The expression men against boys doesnt begin to do justice to what mal meninga did to Hull that night. The sheer carnage that took place before poor John Longden's disbelieving eyes.

His team of budding Kiwi reinforced rugby champions were trounced 64-0. At first he attempted to shrug off the opening salvos of tries but as it became clear this was no mere opening salvo and each of the ensuing dozen or so tries went over you could see poor John lose an inch or so in stature with each one and his already shock white hair turn even whiter.

By the end of this anihalation he lay prostrate on the terrace leaving us no choice but to carry the poor fella open-mouthed completely traumatised to the nearest alehouse for some artificial resperation - that's Greenall whitley best bitter.

I seem to recall he took up gardening soon afterwards.

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 22 14:15:31 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Neuralgia was never really that good

Ian - I too was in London - for the lat three years of the 60s. I was a regular at the Bull at Barnes listening to Bill Le Sage (who IMMSMW) played the Hopbine in Ealing on Sunday lunchtimes where we'd go. After church of course as long as Peter's preying didn't go on too long. I used to do singer's night at Bunjies regularly through 1970.

Peter - not everyone was part of a package. Peter, Paul and Mary played the Winter Gardens in October '65 without support.

And Al - Llanna grew up in Bournemouth. He should know where his loyalty lies.


Entered at Thu May 22 14:13:26 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 90s

I got three out of ten. I own one. I guessed the other seven and didn't manage one correct guess either.


Entered at Thu May 22 13:54:56 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Best come clean

5/15 - 80's [two correct guesses by deduction]

2/10 - 90's [two correct guesses by deduction]

:-0(

Completely out of my depth by the looks of it! Though not entirely sure if that's a good or bad thing.


Entered at Thu May 22 13:51:39 CEST 2014 from (70.53.203.222)

Posted by:

Landmark

10/12 for the 60's. 9/15 for the 80's. I guess I was too busy for new music in the 90's as I don't dare attempt it.


Entered at Thu May 22 13:49:31 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nostalgia isn't what it used to be

Al, on the “negative” fan, going to watch a team regularly in the hope they lose, my Evertonian pal had some excuse. There were seven of us living on the same floor. Four were from the South … Bournemouth, Brighton, Swindon, Portsmouth, one from Liverpool, one from Lincoln, and one from Manchester. The Mancunian wore carpet slippers, looked and talked like Alan Bennett (though not quite so macho as Alan) and had daily closed door visits from his young priest pal. I guess they were praying. The rest of us started going to the football, when Hull played one of our teams (I don’t think they played Bournemouth), but if they were playing Swindon, we’d all support Swindon, because one lad was from there. We were also all united because the folk of East Yorkshire in those days had the impolite habit of taking the piss publically out of anyone with a “stranger” accent. The south and west was easy for them to pick out, but so was Liverpool, so he had common cause with us. He would moan about the absurdity of going to a football match with four Southerners, and used to say, ‘That’s the goal over there, the thing with white posts’ but he came to enjoy supporting the opposition.

Mind you, I know two people who live near AFC Bournemouth who were hoping Bournemouth would not make the Championship play offs (we only just failed) because they thought invasions of Premiership fans would spoil the neighborhood. .


Entered at Thu May 22 13:42:22 CEST 2014 from (70.53.203.222)

Posted by:

Landmark

The 70's: 11 out of 15. The 4 I missed I never saw, back in the day.


Entered at Thu May 22 13:31:38 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1980s

Eleven out f fifteen. But only because they chose some I don't know. If they'd chosen 15 I knew I would have … hang on …


Entered at Thu May 22 13:26:33 CEST 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Covers of LPs

This tells you something about what I know.

10/12 60s ,

13/15 70s,

12/15 80s,

4/10 90s

If they had to 21st century, aside from a few indie albums and some of my favourite longstanding performers, I'd be a bust.


Entered at Thu May 22 13:15:25 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Try the '60's Ian

Linked


Entered at Thu May 22 12:51:17 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Score

1970s - 9


Entered at Thu May 22 12:42:49 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The music quiz

Have you had a go Ian?


Entered at Thu May 22 12:33:16 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Nostalgia - not what it once was

Who's saying this Ian?

You'd never get people saying such things years ago!

Blasphemers! Bring back the birch I say

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 22 12:11:11 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: '60s gigs

I was London-based in the 1960s and music was just everywhere, as Peter says. I used to check out the columns in MELODY MAKER to see who was on where (and for how much). I still have a couple of my Marquee membership cards and a ticket (even) for something at The Troubadour.

Went to folk clubs in north London, central London and south-west London.

I never went to Eel Pie Island, even though it was the closest to where I lived. A friend from school kept encouraging me to see The Stones there but, as a subscriber to BLUES UNLIMITED back then, they just weren't "authentic" enough for the young me.

And I went to jazz clubs (such as Ronnie Scott's "Old Place") and places like the Bull's Head in Barnes. For a while, I lived in digs in North London (outside toilet and no bath in the house) but it was within walking distance of Cook's Ferry Inn, another notable venue for music. I went there quite a lot.

The range of music available was amazing - Dylan at the Albert hall on one night, The Animals at Cook's Ferry Inn the next - Pink Floyd at a college dance and The Clancy Brothers at Kilburn State also on adjacent nights - Julian Bream at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in the afternoon, Bert Jansch and John Renbourne at the Three Horseshoes the same evening.

The only packages I attended were the blues ones and there were two or three of those but there were the annual "jazz" festivals. I saw Cream on their first major gig at the 1966 one in Windsor - they weren't eve called Cream, just three individual names on the handbill - which I still have.

And they say nostalgia's not what it used to be.


Entered at Thu May 22 11:39:06 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sukiyaki

Ha ha - love that coincidence Fred!

Funnily enough I find myself humming the tune and haven't heard it in 50 years!!!

Fred - you've no idea. I'm getting werse as i get more ancient. I'm checking the Newsnow page once every two minutes to see if we've signed the players we need - at least 4, at best 6 - for the Champions league.

So far we've signed a new cleaner for the player's creche and a new gateman for the training ground - presumably things will start to pick up now - I hear Joe Cole's been spotted in town!!! AAAAGHHH

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 22 11:25:57 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: I owe all my success (at Guardian quizzes) to clean livin' and a healthy dose of rock 'n' roll. No sukiyaki, but plenty of sashimi. Raw eggs: yuck; raw fish: all right. ; )

Oddly enough "Sukiyaki" (the song that is) was #1 on the US Pop Charts the day I was born. Fate?!?

PS Tell Mr. Rodgers to beef up that defense for next season, eh? ; )


Entered at Thu May 22 11:19:41 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Another one

Bobby Collins!!


Entered at Thu May 22 11:18:05 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Everton phenomenon

Your mate wasn't untypical Pete.

If you recall they were the Mersey Millionaires backed by John Moores in the early '60's whilst we were poor relations just up from the second division.

A list of some of their expensive signings back then - all established internationals - tells the tale as to why your mate and lots like him held that sort of perspective - Roy Vernon, Jimmy Gabriel, Gordon West, Alec Young, Billy Bingham, Alex Scott, Tommy Ring, Tony Kay, Mickey Lill, Alex Parker, Denis Stevens - and they're just off the top of my head.

Thinking back they were actually worse than Man City for buying the league championship!!!!


Entered at Thu May 22 11:05:03 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Everton, Dylan & The Walker Brothers

Al, it was computer marked. If I’d been self-marking it would have been 13 out of 12. BTW, the pledge of allegiance to Everton reminded me of my Evertonian friend at Hull in 1967 and 1968. He still claimed Liverpool were “basically a second-division side on a lucky run” even so many years into Bill Shankley’s glory years, and five years after their promotion. He used to go and watch Hull City religiously and always support the opposing team. He was that sort of guy.

This started me thinking about excuse notes for May 1966. You know, those 1965 and 1966 shows by Dylan were highly unusual – everyone else was doing packages, not whole shows. I looked up April / May 1966 tours. Johnny Cash – part of a package. The one that came to Bournemouth (April 30th) was Roy Orbison with The Walker Brothers and Lulu (and two other bands!). It was one of those embarrassing ones where by Bournemouth it was THE WALKER BROTHERS plus a lot of noise during the other acts as the audience was almost entirely female, and there for them. They had had two number 1 hits and a #3 in quick succession in the UK and were huge. At Bournemouth their limo, in Beatles styles, reversed to the stage door, scraping the entire side against the brick wall, to get them out, by opening the back door straight into the open stage door. In my memory it was a Rolls-Royce, but I expect it was merely a huge Austin Vanden-Plas limo, as used by funeral companies. Whatever, they wrecked the whole side.

But it was all packages until at least late 67. On Excuse Notes, we didn’t think of travelling to see Dylan 66. We just grumbled at the lack of South Coast shows … many packages did Bournemouth and Brighton, again the seaside resorts which had the big venues, NOT the larger cities of Southampton and Portsmouth.


Entered at Thu May 22 10:50:01 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hmmm

Well in Fred lad. Impressed mate. All that Sukiyaki has clearly worked its magic.

;-0)

Pete - I'd have expected nothing less than 13 out fo 12 for you mate. A tad disappointed you only managed 12.

:-0)

I only got 9/12 for the '60's. And two of those were guesses. disappointed no Moody Blues or Procul harum. Still - if we get lallana it'll more than compensate for my failings!


Entered at Thu May 22 10:42:44 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Look Out Cleveland - RAH June '71

Just so much to relish. Impossible to pick a highlight. Rick straining so touchingly as only he does to get those notes whilst underpinning the thing down in the basement workshop. Levon driving the thing along like heaven on wheels with his rhythmic magic and cast iron safety net vocal. Garth embroidering it all on the Lowrey like some Renaissance master painting the Sistine ceiling. Richard tinkling and crashing those ivories in all the right places. Robbie arriving in the nick of time from God knows where as if to save the day with each of his uniquely exquisite fills.

Above all the peerless blend of all five welding an integrated whole beyond the reach of anything else we've ever heard. Each frantically fighting for space yet each managing somehow to never for a solitary moment forget the object of their exercise being to create a whole more consummate than seems humanly possible. And succeeding beyond the wildest dreams of mere mortals.

A joy.

Boy - do I envy you Rog!!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 22 08:52:46 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1970s

Just remembered! A key venue in the early 70s might be the Rank Bowling Alley. At least our local one did. Two I recall there were Jonny Otis Show (with Shuggie Otis) and the very first Roxy Music tour.


Entered at Thu May 22 08:47:08 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 60s gigs

Multiple gigs … the first people I knew who did were 1963, but that was an unusual event because The Beatles did a week (two shows a night) at the Bournemouth Gaumont cinema. Generally we expected bands to come to us, and never thought of travelling to see them. Because it was a big tourist resort, Bournemouth had the Winter Gardens for big tours, the Pavilion and Pier Theatres for summer shows (with the likes of Frank Ifield) and several clubs. Then the Gaumont cinema could convert to a rock venue.

When you look at 60s tours, it’s amazing how many ABC and Gaumont cinemas appear as venues in the UK. They must have designed them to double up. The huge Southampton Gaumont was where we saw the touring Peter Brooks’ A Midsummer Night’s Dream. That’s now the Mayflower, a musical type theatre.

I’d hitch to London, but generally we did the folk clubs, and it was ‘going to the Troubadour’ or ‘going to Eel Pie Island’ not going to see (e.g.) The Young Tradition, or Ramblin’ Jack Elliot. We didn’t even know who was on. Same with The Marquee a bit later when I was in London, we’d just “go to the Marquee,” Then get there and say “Who’s on?” and they’d say “Some band called Yes.”

Then at college, and at university, there was at least one "dance" every week with three bands, plus a folk club, a blues club and a jazz club with things on most weeks. Live music was just "there" so seemed an unlimited supply.

We had an indoor (upstairs) and an outdoor (downstairs) like many 1930s houses when I was a kid. Gradually, the out door one got connected up by adding on conservatories or extensions. Even though our toilet seats were indoors, I had to envy friends who were working (so had money) when I was 16 to 18 and at school, because they used that key time to get to London and see the mighty soul tours of the mid 60s. I really regret not having seen James Brown at his peak. Having heard them wax lyrical about it, that was the show not to miss.


Entered at Thu May 22 08:19:24 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Ten out of 15 on seventies

Twelve out of twelve on 60s, though having virtually all of them helps. But I don't think number 12 is the original UK cover, or at least if was it got reissued soon with a different one. However the photo is clear.


Entered at Thu May 22 06:09:32 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: 1980s album cover quiz...courtesy The Guardian

Scored a whopping 12 out 15.

Why can I remember most of these album covers (60s/70s/80s) yet forgot to buy toilet paper when I went grocery shopping an hour ago (after being repeatedly told by the Mrs to not forget to buy toilet paper)?


Entered at Thu May 22 06:02:24 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Those Guardian quizzes

Al: I beat you by two in the 70s quiz! Yeah for me! However I got 8 out 12 on the 1960s quiz. I'm about to try the 80s LP cover quiz. I'm confident I'll do well....I'm on a roll. : )


Entered at Thu May 22 02:03:55 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Edgey

Subject: Outdoor bogs and all that - the real Northern version

Hey Angie - I had my very first indoor shit for my fourteenth birthday just after we were rehoused. Up to then it was the old trek across the back yard to the place where you knew every spider by their first name. Come to think of it one of them was called Angelina. She was the nicest and friendliest spider of them all with a warm smiley face.

:-0)


Entered at Thu May 22 01:44:22 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Fun Quiz - 70's album covers

Jeez you fellas had it easy - even the Viking marauders. Before we could make the RAH back then we had to swear allegiance to Everton FC.

Nobody made it needlesss to say.

Mad jealous of you Rog. I've still got the Nick Logan NME review which I treasure to this day. I'd been down there a month earlier for the FA Cup Final [the one where Charlie George robbed us] and got all the lads to trudge to the RAH just to see where the boys would be appearing. I intended to return for the concert but it was a return journey that never materialised. I still chew the same pillow of regret to this day.

:-0)

I got 9 from 15 in the quiz btw of which 3 were guesses.


Entered at Thu May 22 01:16:51 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The first time I experienced an outhouse was in 1972 in Europe. The relatives we were staying with for six weeks did have indoor plumbing. A family friend was also in town with her older brother (looks like Jagger) and were in the countryside one town over. I decided to visit with them in the other town for three days.....and it took three days.....to have the experience!


Entered at Thu May 22 01:11:01 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

jh, was there an outhouse on your dingy?


Entered at Thu May 22 01:05:28 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Subject: RAH '71

I just knew someone would pick up on the "Four Yorkshiremen" sketch. "You try and tell the young people today that... and they won't believe you".

And Peter is right about expecting performers to come back here the following year. I missed Dylan in May 1964 (spent my money that month on the "Blues and Gospel Caravan" with Muddy Waters, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and others), caught Dylan in May 1965 (got 80 tickets for that show, not my money, but that's another story) and gave May 1966 a miss (because I was "bribed" to go on holiday with my parents and, anyway, "he'll be back next year"). Sadly not.

And the other thing you didn't get then was going to multiple shows. At least, I never knew of it. The first I heard of this was when a friend of mine went to an Emmylou Harris and the Hot Band concert here in 1975 and enjoyed it so much, he went to another show on the same tour.


Entered at Thu May 22 01:05:16 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Photos of Levon and Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks by the one who was also thanked besides Robbie in Garth's speech at the RRHF. Some photos are on this site.


Entered at Thu May 22 00:39:31 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The Band at the Royal Albert hall

I'm pleased that the RAH concert looks like it's currently topping Sebastian's poll of live shows to explore releasing. I was there and remember an overwhelming feeling that the live sound exceeded my expectations. I also remember being knocked out simply by being there. The Band had been masked in the shadows of anonymity from the outset and I knew little about them as individuals beyond what could be gleaned from reading record covers and the all too occasional article in the Brit music press.

So let's get those vaults opened; as Peter said yesterday to Sebastian - we'd like it ALL!


Entered at Thu May 22 00:02:08 CEST 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Don´t even get me started on the rowing trip across the North Sea to get to the RAH in time for the gig. Dodging tankers in the tidal section of the Thames was quite a challenge, mind you.


Entered at Wed May 21 23:27:54 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yeah, BEG, that vid has been available at Wolfgang's Vault for quite a while. The audio was broadcast as a King Biscuit thing in 79 or so. Brilliant performance of a brilliant song.


Entered at Wed May 21 22:24:16 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Coming from Scotland? Luxury! We hd to drive across the New Forest beset by brigands. King William Rufus got shot there with an arrow, and that's the gauntlet we had to run to get to London. Then there was Surrey! Bankers everywhere. On reflection, my 1953 4.2 litre Humber Super Snipe was bought a couple of months after that, so on June 2nd I was Car-less (and bible black).


Entered at Wed May 21 22:20:57 CEST 2014 from (76.65.207.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Hey Westie...Yes I had previously linked Van and Dylan (Crazy Love, One Irish Rover) but this time they were jammin. Btw I showed imagezulu new photos. Now he's telling me that he saw The Hawks mid to late sixties!! I said wrong!! Then he changed story to ok I saw the Hawk in late sixties at Le Coq D'Or....lol


Entered at Wed May 21 20:51:02 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: a car - Luuxury!

Peter V / Ian W: You two came perilously close to sounding like retired Yorkshire miners - who had the farthest to go, who had the oldest and wobbliest car ...


Entered at Wed May 21 20:40:26 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jon, it's from AMH.


Entered at Wed May 21 20:06:29 CEST 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Look Out Cleveland RAH

Wow. First time I'm hearing, and it's amazing. Every member of The Band shines on this one. More, please!


Entered at Wed May 21 19:59:43 CEST 2014 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: After the fact

Brown eyes! I had meant to comment on your post and link, (Bob & Van) jamming in Greece. I saw that a long time ago. I guess I assumed everyone had probably seen it, so never bothered any more. It was great, and what a beautiful setting they had.


Entered at Wed May 21 19:39:45 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.107)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ain't no words for that.


Entered at Wed May 21 19:34:04 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

As a reminder...


Entered at Wed May 21 19:28:28 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Excuse Notes (1971)

Another aspect in those days was you thought, 'Ah, well, they'll be here next year,' because bands had to earn a living and there were a lot of bands I'd seen three or four or half a dozen times, so you just assumed they'd be back. I must have seen Family five or six times, Zoot Money dozens of times, Alan Bown half a dozen, Long John Baldry several times. We didn't know that these things were rationed by time.


Entered at Wed May 21 19:28:33 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, why don't you contact whatever entity might control these live recordings you seek?


Entered at Wed May 21 19:23:02 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Cleveland from RAH sounds pretty good to me.


Entered at Wed May 21 18:43:58 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: RAH 1971 definitely

The Royal Albert Hall in 1971 would definitely be my choice.

The RAH acoustics back then would not worry me. If you can get a more than half-decent bootleg recording of Dylan and The Hawks at the RAH in 1966, an official recording of The Band from the same venue in 1971 would surely be acceptable. For me, a touch of "boxiness" in the sound would be more than compensated by the enjoyment I'd get.

I, too, did not attend. At the time, I lived in Scotland, so it would have meant an even longer drive to London, in a car even older than Peter's and at a time when the motorway system was less extensive - not to mention having much less money to spare. I can recall reading a review of The Band's Paris show (I think)in MELODY MAKER and I guess I felt a slight tinge of regret (envy even) but I'd hazard not much. It's just the way things go sometimes. To hear one of the shows now in good quality would be terrific.

I may even still have that MELODY MAKER review (and some of the other articles from that visit) in my files somewhere.


Entered at Wed May 21 17:59:25 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: one good turn deserves another ...

In his home somewhere in Finland
Sits the man called Northwestcoaster
Writing lines in second language
Just to share his love of music
While he plays his old LPs


Entered at Wed May 21 16:19:07 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWC

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Thanks Bill

A little piece of poetry to thank Bill for his insider information in epic form.

Everybody loves 'Stage Fright'
But not our Bill
He loves 'Time To Kill'

(And it rhymes, too.)


Entered at Wed May 21 15:32:39 CEST 2014 from (125.2.203.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

BEG, I can listen to endless versions of The Shape I'm in etc, thanks to Garth. He manages to start with a completely clean sheet, night after night.

Ben, I've said before that I doubt there will be any official recordings of 1980's shows released, as The Band were not signed to a label that might record them during that decade. By the 90's the quality of bootlegs was pretty high anyway. I enjoy shows from this period but I suspect from a marketing point of view they don't have anything like the mass appeal of the vintage stuff. That and their target audience have already downloaded the FM-quality MP3's so may not be rushing to the ATM just to pay for some liner notes.


Entered at Wed May 21 15:13:43 CEST 2014 from (125.2.203.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: I Might Be Released

Well, my take on the live recordings Capitol have on hand.

Woodstock: Even people with the dimmest awareness of classic rock know the great historical significance that one word beholds. Historically significant for us, too, as it's the earliest Band show we are likely to see officially released, but in some ways it's not them at their best. Partly they may not have settled in to live performing - they were much more comfortable and suited to theatres than the biggest festivals in the world - and in interviews Band members don't recall the experience fondly. Some of it is great, some of it seems a bit of a scramble. Reasonable board tapes are in circulation but if you want to hear how the official source cleans up listen to "Don't Ya Tell Henry" on the Watkins Glen CD, that is from this show. Video-wise it seems the concert was very tightly lit, and the cameras can only film what is lit...so lots of extreme close ups but very few general group images, if any. If the existing footage of "The Weight" or "Tears of Rage" is anything to go by, Robbie and Rick are quite visible, but they struggle to pick out Levon through his cymbals, Richard is shot in silhouette from upstage, and Garth is only briefly seen when he comes out to play piano. The same seems to apply to still photos of the show.

Royal Albert Hall: Definitely a great show. It's more than likely Capitol taped the two consecutive nights, too, so that would give a choice of takes to make a complete set. The only downside is the notorious acoustics of the venue. They make the bootlegs sound pretty bad, and sadly they still to haunt the officially mixed tracks, so these tapes are always going to sound a bit harsh, especially compared to the loveliness of ROA. Agree with Pat, Look Out Cleveland was mighty, so not questioning the performances.

Watkins Glen: I've said my piece on this before, great marketing potential but not the best of gigs, possibly quite the opposite. Why do you think the official release included so little of the actual show?

Palladium: A great show, as many of the 76 tour's were, if a little two-dimensional compared to the artistic heights of earlier ones. I'm surprised Capitol have multitracks of this, the officially released "Forbidden Fruit" sounds pretty much like the FM bootleg, very heavy on the brass. Richard's voice may not be as many of us would like to remember it, the same goes for the Asbury Park concert.

Ben mentioned the Syria Mosque show from November 1970, a legendary boot which was filmed, at least partially. While Capitol may or may not have this show, they seem to have a St Louis gig from a week or so before this, as "Slippin' and Slidin'" was included in the ATGD box set. I would love to hear the rest of this show. I also strongly suspect that there are many more live shows in the can, but what can you do?


Entered at Wed May 21 14:27:06 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Song of the day from 1979!!!!!!! If my memory serves me well it's one of Pat B's favourite. :-D

Bonk and Westie...sent email as requested.


Entered at Wed May 21 14:22:08 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Photos of Garth and Rick and Rick and Robbie from Roxy Theatre 1978?


Entered at Wed May 21 14:10:10 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Peter. I think Ben and I would like to see more than what's apparently available in the Vault. I personally don't need to hear the same The Band songs over and over again from different shows. If they had very different set lists.....different story. Or if they changed the groove of the song. Here's where Dylan and Van Morrison and The Band differ greatly in that Bob and Van change things up so much you don't even know which song they're performing right away. Some people don't appreciate the creativity that takes place here but once I have the original; I really admire the reworking of songs . Any other thoughts? I also think that if you don't have a great sound system to play all of these recordings......

As far as Rick's first solo CD*. Yes, everyone should have it in their collection. I have no idea why we had to pay about 24/26 dollars here for Rick Danko solo by import only. Being a Band fan and a completist at the time.....I did. I expected Rick to continue to write and put out more recordings....which I have, but only one other really gets played here.

Danko/Fjeld/Andersen
Ridin' on the Blinds
In Concert
Live on Breeze Hill
Times Like These*
One More Shot

I also have a cassette with Rick that Amanda sent from a NYC show either at O'Tool's or Lone Star Cafe. I sent her the video of Robbie's performance at the Olympics as the Americans didn't see the complete performance as we did due to constant talking over the performance by broadcasters. It was a huuuge deal because it was the first time in ages.....that we saw Robbie perform live!


Entered at Wed May 21 14:05:12 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I guess the Asbury footage would fit with the 1976 Paladium Show … same tour?


Entered at Wed May 21 12:25:06 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As Adam pointed out, the thing about Royal Albert Hall, is that we have just The Band, without the horns of Rock of Ages. That's what makes it intriguing.

Sebastian was talking about the Capitol tape vault. So 80s and 90s doesn't apply.


Entered at Wed May 21 11:42:30 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band wishlist

I'd prefer for some live shows form the 80's and 90's to finally be officially released. I've said it many times here before, I find it very strange that there have been multiple Danko shows, multiple Levon shows and a Richard show released, but nothing from the Band covering 2/3 of their history. To start with, Mandell Hall, '83, Lonestar cafe 2/8/86, Pittsburgh, grafitti club, 86 .

Of the 4 shows that Sebastian mentioned, I'd like to have an official Watkins Glen release. Maybe Capitol cold allow people to send in the fraudulent 1995 cd and receive a credit towards the new release. I'd also like to see The Palladium show released, I do think it's a better performance that the last waltz. Woodstock is ok, but it's a very short performance and several songs have been offically released already on the woodstock box from '94 and across the great divide box. Royal Albert hall is good, but it's close to ROA in terms of setlist and date. Something from 1970, Pittsburgh would be welcome.


Entered at Wed May 21 09:25:49 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Where were you when …

Roger, weren't you at the RAH Show?

I can't believe I didn't go, but I was working and June 2nd 1971 was a Wednesday, which would have meant working till 10 pm, because it was the night we did our shows for EFL students, and June would be a capacity audience. I checked my old 5 year diary. We were dong a full play, A View From The Bridge, a performance, one of Mrs V's first with us, which I mentioned only last week in my review of the play.

In those days, I would never have thought of going the 100 miles to London on a weekday for a show, even though sleeping on a friend's floor was an easy option. Nowadays, we do it several times a year, but I guess roads are far better, and cars more reliable. In 1971, the 1953 car I owned might not have got there. The train was faster than nowadays, but then after a show, the last sensible train was before 11 pm, and the next was the 2 am "milk train" which arrived at 5 a.m., not an option with work the next day.

Why am I making excuses 42 years later? I still can't believe I missed it. I know that our normal thing after one of our shows was to go to a friend's house and I bet we listened to Stage Fright (which I played obsessively in mid-1971).


Entered at Wed May 21 08:15:45 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I'd go for the Palledium show.


Entered at Wed May 21 07:54:47 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I'd vote for anything we don't already have with The Band and Dylan.
I have just about all, but a lot of posters here don't have Robbie soundtracks as Van has two volumes out.
Robbie with other musicians like Buddy Guy, B.B. King, etc. at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame various performances as well as Robbie solo with Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival.

Anyone still interested in Robbie and Sebastians' Legends, Icons and Rebels? One copy left at Chapters on John/Richmond street. They are having a close out 50% sale until end of month.
I bought a book on Etta James' life among other books.


Entered at Wed May 21 07:01:36 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sebastian, do you have the multi-tracks? I'd vote for RAH 71 for the songlist, based particularly on the incredible Look Out Cleveland from AMH.


Entered at Wed May 21 04:36:21 CEST 2014 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Festival Express - Calgary

Last Thursday & Friday, Susan and I had to stay on the Rockin Chair, while we finished cleaning out our house. And that ain't so hard to do!

As we have no cable or internet there, I took some of my free time to listen to some of my favourite music. For an hour or so one day, I stuck the Festival Express DVD in the player.

Watching Richard sing, "I shall be released" always puts a lump in my throat. To watch such an incredible talent, sing with so much emotion, and now knowing what his final end would be, is gut wrenching.

To find that his demons got the better of him, so that he couldn't handle it any more is hard to take. I always loved "Rockin Chair" so much, but that song, is as good as it gets, any where, any time with the BAND as far as I am concerned.......God rest yuh Richard, we'll always love you.


Entered at Wed May 21 04:04:28 CEST 2014 from (99.141.57.118)

Posted by:

Adam

"Royal Albert Hall 1971". A classic Band performance, showcasing only them at their finest. ROA was them at their peak, with Allen Toussaint's horns added. Royal Albert Hall is them at their peak, alone, period.

I would like to see a various show live box set alongside any single release. So if there's a ROYAL ALBERT HALL 1971 single release, there's also a box set containing that and all the other shows. I don't really want to see Palladium 1976 released on its own, as the setlist is so much like TLW and we already have it in great quality. The same could be said for Woodstock 1969, but DVD footage should be at the top list of priorities.

I still maintain that a CONCERT FILM/BLU RAY/DVD of "THE BAND AT FESTIVAL EXPRESS 1970" could be one of the defining releases in the group's history. It could be mind blowingly incredible. More footage exists, to be blunt, we need Robbie, Capitol Records and Historic Films to all work together, work out legalities, collect everything and do it. It would be beyond amazing.


Entered at Wed May 21 02:43:17 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa / Roger: Thanks.


Entered at Wed May 21 01:01:44 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Was it Rolling (before) Bob?

As I can see the Isle of Wight itself if I walk half a mile … Another Self Portrait's Dylan / Band set was so well remastered. Were they running tape in the Band set? Even if the intention was to record Dylan, you'd think they would have tested levels etc on The Band set. There were audience tapes but they were the definition of really bad audience taping from a long way away sitting among noisy people with a built in cheap mic.


Entered at Wed May 21 00:57:23 CEST 2014 from (70.66.250.161)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Brown Eyed........BABY!

Brown Eyed Girl........you better e mail me, just in case Jan really does get annoyed enough with this crap to close up shop, tugmanatshawdotca.

I'll send you pictures of what goes on out here. I have to leave in the morrow to move a logging camp. To understand what those are, and what we do, I'll send you pictures.

Billy Bad Ass Munson already has an album full.

It's pretty over whelming for Susan to try to organize even a fraction of the stuff she has into this condo. I've taken 5 truck loads to thrift stores and I'm afraid that's just the beginning. She was about in tears this morning. She said, I'm beginning to think about the poor people that have nothing and looking at all I have.........so .....more trips to the thrift store -:)


Entered at Wed May 21 00:50:53 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Nice one Bill

Excellent post Bill M.


Entered at Wed May 21 00:49:10 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live albums

All of them obviously … but …

The Royal Albert Hall June 1971 one most of all (I have the original Guardian review stuck in a sleeve somewhere), because the 1971 shows had a lot of songs that never re-appeared after the 1972 break. Royal Albert Hall had King Harvest, Strawberry Wine, Rocking Chair, Look Out Cleveland, We Can Talk + Lovin' You and Slippin' and Slidin'. That set list puts it first. It's bootlegged, but the boot is not great, so it would be a brilliant one in good quality.

Woodstock is heavily bootlegged and very good indeed. I suspect a lot more people have a decent copy of this, but Woodstock is an iconic event and I think it might attract casual fans too, or just old hippies. The Weight was on the Woodstock Extras VHS years ago, and then on DVD. The Weight film was pretty good footage, I thought. There should be more surely, as wasn't the decision not to be in the movie made after the event? As Robbie has said, the untampered Band set is a whole lot better than the CSN set, even if they were not happy with it at the time.

The Paladium 1976 is a great show, as often discussed here. There are several who say it's better than TLW in that it gets back to The Band. The set list is standard 1976, also like the King Biscuit Live 76, issued in Italy as Washinton (sic). At the time, live shows couldn't be copyrighted in Italy, so it was technically a legal recording … it wouldn't be now. The King Biscuit Radio Show CDs of that show came in three versions, each differing by one track.

Watkins Glen - well, slightly embarrassing given the previous one. I had a tape of the very different real show. But I reckon the second Jersey City Roosevelt Stadium show a couple of days later is better if that's in the vaults, though if you have the first Jersey City show, I'd lose it! I thought the real Watkins Glen was a bit ragged, as their first live show in eighteen months.

Haven't they got Wembley 1974 in there smewhere? Given the DVD footage. There was a Graham Nash interview where he said a 1974 tour box was due from CSN. There were hints that the whole of Wembley had been recorded … which would be a great Various Artists box.

Have they got more of Festival Express? That was rumored, that complete audios had been made apart from the filming.


Entered at Wed May 21 00:48:49 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The vaults

Sebastian - my fourpennorth - Royal Albert Hall. That has some clout as a concert.


Entered at Wed May 21 00:22:41 CEST 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: The Band - LIVE

There are a few things in the Capitol vaults that have come up for discussion lately. They are The Band live at Woodstock, Royal Albert Hall, Watkins Glen and The Palladium in 1976 (the tour leading to The Last Waltz)

Of these shows what would you all like to see released? Only Woodstock has video footage and what of that footage that is usable is unclear at this point. There is footage from 1976 Asbury Casino floating around and we're trying to obtain that. What are you thoughts?


Entered at Wed May 21 00:07:58 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Bill M, so that was you! Very, very funny stuff, I love it!

When I first learned to use a computer (about 15 years after everybody else) The Band was the first thing I looked up, and the GB was the first thing I found. I've been a daily reader ever since. I really dislike the term "lurker". Kind of conjures up an image of some nefarious person in a trench coat slinking around in the background, up to no good. Though in some cases I guess that could apply. I don't know, Faithful Follower? Maybe that's a little too dog-like. But I'm sure there are lots of people like me who love The Band and their music who would feel the loss of this Guest Book very much.

A couple days ago I was afraid that Jan had indeed decided to shut it down. Lil wrote that she disliked what the GB "is becoming", but surely this has happened periodically many times over the years? It would be a terrible shame to let the trouble-makers destroy this place. It's very special.

The only other blog I follow daily is Norman Lebrecht's "Slipped Disc", which deals mostly with the classical music world, and things occasionally get pretty heated over there, too. He redacts it, though, for legal reasons I suspect. Even though things can get ugly here from time to time, I've always thought this site for the most part has a real sense of friendship and comaraderie among the posters, even when they disagree. So I hope the odd bad apple doesn't spoil it for everybody else.


Entered at Tue May 20 22:10:36 CEST 2014 from (208.97.78.122)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Ahhh...So you're the one Lisa was thinking about re dialogue? I used to get Bill M mixed up with another Bill until he set me straight. "Sometimes the wrong train will get you to the right place." The Lunch Box..must see film!!!


Entered at Tue May 20 21:41:47 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: turning points in Band history, #5

"Ah, Jamie Robbie Robertson, I presume. Now, what can I do for you?"

"Yeah. Hi doc. Not sure, really, but I'm having trouble with my nerves. Stage fright, one of my buddies says."

"You're an actor?"

"Guitarist mostly – in a band – but playing guitar never bothered me. The nerves thing has to do with singing."

"Why don't you just let someone else sing?"

"Oh I do. We've got three of the world's best singers in the band, but one of 'em keeps wanting me to sing too. And it doesn't feel right. Especially on stage 'cause you can't hide and you can't redo the part."

"But you must have been afraid of things before now. How did you overcome your fears then?"

"Well, a while ago, in San Francisco, they called in a hypnotist to get me out of bed. And they said I didn't have to sing my song and that they'd turn off my mike. But now Rick's – that's my buddy – is after me again."

"But when you were a child …?"

"When I was really young my blankie got me through a lot. You know, it's funny but I haven’t thought of it in, like, forever, but it was pink and my stepfather made me get a blue one 'cause I was a boy – and it never worked anymore. It never worked!"

"Well …?"

"Well obviously I can't turn up at gigs with a pink blanket!"

"No, I suppose not – but maybe you could get away with a pink scarf instead?"


Entered at Tue May 20 21:12:50 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Who'll Stop The Rain

Those Weight rehearsals led me into the John Forgerty rehearsals, then to the performance with Robbie and Bruce. Linked.


Entered at Tue May 20 19:31:00 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Toilet humour

I've been away for a few days and, since I was last here, there have been posts about toilets. This (true) story is a bit different.

Last year, we spent some time in Romania and revisited Sighișoara. At one point, we had to go into a supermarket we hadn't been into previously and one of the items on our shopping list was toilet paper. You know the way it is in a supermarket you don't know - nothing is where you think it should be. Up and down the aisles we went and, eventually, we found the right shelves. And the brand sold by this particular supermarket was called "Gran Finale". Now, who thought that up as a name for toilet paper?

Well, we found it funny anyway.


Entered at Tue May 20 19:14:16 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Kerrin: It was interesting watching the conversation between Rick's heart and Paul's brain. Robbie seemed to recognise that both were right and didn't want to come in in any kind of heavy-handed way, and Eric just wanted clear directions.

BEG: I sent my parents off to see the Toronto production of Godspell in the early '70s, and ended up with the program. Backing the cast (Gilda Radner, Martin Short, Eugene Levy et al) was a band that included Paul Shaffer and Eugene Martynec (Lou Reed, etc.)


Entered at Tue May 20 18:21:42 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....another rehearsal with Van and Bob! We've previously seen them together performing "One Irish Rover" and others but here they are jammin'.

"Van and Bob "jamming" in Greece in 1989. Copyright lyrics and music Exile. (Vision is pretty poor quality due to old tape.) "It stoned me" originally from the brilliant "Moondance" album."


Entered at Tue May 20 18:05:59 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

One of the concerts in NYC I couldn't make.....was when Dylan was on the same bill as Van the Man at MSG!
I've seen Dylan with Joni on the same bill.....just the two of them at MLG......and...they did their own sets but didn't even share one song together.....Ha!
I had downloaded Van and Bob singing "Tupelo Honey/Why Must I always Explain?". I couldn't find both of them performing this one, but here's Van......so good!!!!!!


Entered at Tue May 20 17:56:01 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Landmark. Steve and I had reggae and pink politics in common. He even wanted to meet Bumbles even though they didn't always see eye to eye....that alone told me everything about him. I also valued how he'd speak up about the party we both were drawn to as I get too emotional....well even more emotional then when I talk about music? Maybe the same? I don't know what he'd think now as the Liberals are moving to the left......Mama Mia!
I miss Bumbles because he had huuuuge knowledge about RnB and soul music. He was always a gentleman via of email. We mostly talked about Louuuu as he saw him at the Fillmore....or was it the Bottom Line?

Bill M....We were out of town for the long weekend and luckily missed both hockey games but I'm still their biggest cheerleader!!!!!!! While away a few of us went into an Inn and heard a local band. The singer was singing like Joplin and her partner could really play guitar. They were covering Joplin, The Allman Brothers, Rory Gallagher, etc. At one point I was just standing around and someone started talking to me and told me that she always goes to Peterborough to see the Weber Brothers. I told her that I knew them too and have so much fun when I do get to see them!!!! Then a guy kept wanting me to sit beside him and I said I was just fine groovin' where I was. He wouldn't let up so finally I said.....(Ok, everyone....I confess that I'm a music snob but that I dig many kinds of musicians and still watch The Voice.....Go Christina Grimmie!!!!!).....So I said with only having had one glass of wine..."Look, you know when they peformed "Whippin' Post. they were really good....but......I saw The Allman Brothers perform it at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival, ok?" He never bothered me again. I think some people just can't deal with not everyone being drunk, drunk, drunk....It's especially not pretty when you're middle-aged.

Edgy...Yup, some pour it all out on the stage....some of us in public forums. I really appreciated you sharing that song. I've read a few books on Bruce and the latest one he shares about his bouts with depression. Those of us who also have struggled know that you have to keep trying different modalities....and then the depression doesn't last as long. Thank you again.

Kerrin....Thanks! I like to see what's behind the scenes. Paul is from Fred's hometown? I thought it was Bur.....lington or maybe you were born in one town and then moved to another one? I was also reminded of Garth's acceptance speech. He only thanks one Band member?

Check out these photos and eventually you'll see the Robbie t-shirt I'd like to have. You were going to wear your zebra print t-shirt Jed? I was going to wear this one if I could find it or my Marley one so you'd recognize me right away. As I've posted before....I gave my The Band t-shirt to my partner to wear when we were in Simcoe for the first Rick Danko Tribute because it was too large for me. He only wore it once and then gave it back. I then gave it to my older brother (same age as partner) knowing that he doesn't dig the Band either but he liked Bob's art work. When he does wear it; he tells me that someone always comes up to him to talk about the Band! Wrong person but he did see Robbie in the restaurant he was working at......and....never called me! He said, Nooooo, you'd stalk him!" lol


Entered at Tue May 20 17:45:38 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, RIP, Steve. I really miss his interventions, and his stories about the farm, and his passion for fairness.


Entered at Tue May 20 17:13:25 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Landmark: Thanks for your note about Steve, who is truly missed. I though of him on the drive in this morning, listening to guitarist Gaye Delorme's wonderful "Borderline" CD. In the '60s Delorme was in the Famous Last Words (with Hans Staymer) who moved east from Edmonton and regrouped as something like the Bards of Ayrescliff after their new home-base on the outskirts of Montreal. I don't think Steve was old enough to have seen them, but he certainly knew the Ayrescliff bar they played at, and I had the impression that he'd done a certain amount of carousing there in his younger days.


Entered at Tue May 20 17:04:52 CEST 2014 from (92.18.197.100)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: The Mandolin World

Levon talking about his Mandolin.


Entered at Tue May 20 16:49:27 CEST 2014 from (92.18.197.100)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Guestbook

Garth has good it spot on when it comes to having a good Guestbook. Check back very soon! How about ten years from now? ;)


Entered at Tue May 20 16:32:31 CEST 2014 from (70.53.203.222)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

A more important anniversary, it would've been Steve's 60th birthday today. Truly too soon gone.


Entered at Tue May 20 15:06:19 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: an important anniversary

My morning paper informs me that today is the 141st anniversary of the patenting, by Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis, of blue jeans. "Let it be known that the first pair of jeans were in fact dad jeans: high at the waist, roomy through the thigh, narrower at the ankle and worn with a tucked-in shirt." This now sounds right to me; my flares have been placed in a bag and are awaiting disposal.


Entered at Tue May 20 13:53:20 CEST 2014 from (125.2.203.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Subject: A Post Apocalyptic Post

For those who haven't seen it: Eric Clapton, Robbie, Rick and Paul Schaffer rehearse for their R'n'R Hall of Fame performance in 1994. Only a glimpse of Garth, but we're used to that! The show was on January 19th, this is presumably earlier the same day or the day before, as the ballroom at the Waldorf-Astoria is being prepped in the background.


Entered at Tue May 20 10:34:03 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bo Diddley

This might be of interest … Bo Diddley on Toppermost. Free yesterday, Country Joe & The Fish the day before. Do have a look and comment there.


Entered at Tue May 20 10:14:16 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Maybe we all failed to reach the Ideal Standard. (This will only mean anything if you understood Armitage Shanks post!)


Entered at Tue May 20 00:01:15 CEST 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Fear not Rog

Bruce will be there to catch us all as we fall.

There are times when words are so apt but a performance is simply beyond words

:-0)


Entered at Mon May 19 23:42:52 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The time is out of joint

I've looked in this GB nearly every day since May 1996. I can't recall a time when not a single GBer has posted. I've looked fairly regularly at Lil's site - but that's now gone. It's like the end of the world here. Oh - but that might be just Birmingham for you. Anyone at all out there?


Entered at Mon May 19 13:02:26 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Tester

Location: UK

Subject: Test

Just testing!


Entered at Sun May 18 23:37:10 CEST 2014 from (188.29.56.31)

Posted by:

robert

The cyberpsychology of the humanoid of is very intriguing.


Entered at Sun May 18 20:30:52 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Peter M

Very sensible post. A little humor makes things better


Entered at Sun May 18 20:21:55 CEST 2014 from (68.196.242.105)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Remember Calvin Fuzz Samuel, the bassist in Manassass, and other great projects? here's his website, linked above.


Entered at Sun May 18 18:42:30 CEST 2014 from (68.196.242.105)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

My personal opinion of all internet forums is that they are a good thing to avoid. That said, people can make some contacts that prove valuable, possibly personally, artistically, or business wise. In general, i still say the devil is digital.


Entered at Sun May 18 17:05:32 CEST 2014 from (67.83.171.31)

Posted by:

Ray

Thanks Jan. My apologies to you for the cesspool comment and making your GB a less pleasant place.


Entered at Sun May 18 16:14:06 CEST 2014 from (100.34.37.27)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by The Pond

Subject: never heard Pete Seeger play Dueling Banjos

This net is your net. This net is my net. From the gulf stream waters, to the New York island. 1.Do not use the guestbook for personal messages. 2.Think before you post. Don't post anything you would not dare to say to someone face to face. 3.Do not post serious insults, personal attacks or too many four letter words. 4.Respect that this is a web site in honour of The Band and their music. (At this time, insert Canadian Content here) Good day, eh?


Entered at Sun May 18 16:00:25 CEST 2014 from (67.83.171.31)

Posted by:

Ray

Very well said, Lil. Thanks as always for the BFB and your sense of fairness.


Entered at Sun May 18 14:26:01 CEST 2014 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Peter, both yours and Lil's posts were very well written. Nice reading for a Sunday morning. OK. Tune up the banjos. I feel a Pete Seeger song a comin'.


Entered at Sun May 18 14:05:22 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hi Lil, Norbert started the other one, and paid for it and enlisted me to moderate. I was the hired help. I wasn’t the one who said BFB was set up “hate” this one, but there have been concerted efforts over there to tell people to come here to complain, I think, unjustly. And there has been a continual thread of sniping at people from this one, as you will know. In the age of Google and Smartphones, it is extremely hard to run a site that no one can look at. I think people over there had the erroneous idea that it was “private” and they were talking behind people’s backs.

I think it’s great that there are different forums and that people discuss what they want with friends. As I say, I accept people not liking me in public. I don’t much admire those who snipe behind the back though.

This site is a kind of historical and critical record. I really don’t like it being sanitized, Bowdlerized or censored and have always said so. I just don’t see Rick or Levon as censorious types. You know better than me, but I guess from the stuff they’ve said about themselves that they wouldn’t have lost any sleep over anything said here.

There are and hopefully will be young posters to whom stuff is fresh and new and interesting. It’s also true that with any creative artist, biography impacts on their work. So yes, biography is interesting. As to getting on track, there are two types of track, a railroad track bound by iron lines that can’t be crossed, and a meandering country ramble along a dirt road. I think the latter, in the end, will prove the best tribute to The Band, and on that kind of track, there will always be cow pats, and dog crap that we step in along the way. But the sun is shining, the birds are singing in the trees at the sides, and the walk is worthwhile, even if our boots sometimes stink a bit. Sometimes I get worried by the sound of dueling banjos in the distance though … and a voice howling "Squeak, Piggy, squeak!" from the bushes.

And thank you too, for a clear, and sincere post.


Entered at Sun May 18 13:44:01 CEST 2014 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

As the late Richard Manuel once said, "I just want to break even." Happy Victoria Day weekend everyone. My wife informs me it's time to get back to real life. She's right. Jan, thanks for making The Band known to others who wouldn't have crossed their paths.


Entered at Sun May 18 13:36:36 CEST 2014 from (24.105.242.177)

Posted by:

Lil

Peter: Just to clarify, BFB was started (not by me) when Jan closed this place years ago. If I remember correctly, you started one too (was it you and Norbert...? It's been a long time...). The person who started it decided she didn't want to do it anymore and I hated to see it just die out, so I took it over. My main reason for doing so (as I've told you before) was that it was simply smaller and more intimate than this big Band GB. Also, I missed Rick and it was nice to have a smaller forum to share some of those thoughts.

I rarely post here anymore. I think the last time was when Mike Hayward passed away, figuring some people here may have wanted to know. There are a lot of people here that I always have respected. and others not so much. That's just the nature of the beast as they say.

What bothered my yesterday was not the fact that people were looking in to BFB, but the fact that someone posted that it was set up for the sole purpose of "hating" this GB ( or something to that effect). I don't now.. and never have.. hated this GB. I posted here for a lot of years, regularly, until I just decided I didn't want to anymore. When this place first started, there was an intimacy that I appreciated, and when that felt gone, my desire to post here went with it.

I do read here, not everyday, but at times, and I find a lot of the posts interesting and some of them humorous. Some of them I just shake my head and laugh at their ridiculousness. I have never "hated" this place, although because of many recent posts here, I do hate what it's becoming. Do I really, truly want to see Jan close this place again? Probably not. But I would like to see it be more of a "tribute", as it was meant to be. It's very disheartening to read some of what's posted here lately. None of it is secret.. it's all public knowledge.. but why rehash it over and over? I think there's a point of pure saturation, and I guess I feel that maybe this place has reached that.

In closing, I don't "hate" anyone and BFB was not set up for hatred. It was setup to share stories and memories about The Band (and music in general), just as this place was. I hope this GB gets a little more back on track with what it was meant to be. There are some good and decent people here with a lot of knowledge, and I'd hate to see that lost.


Entered at Sun May 18 10:54:13 CEST 2014 from (68.196.242.105)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Drummers are smarter?

See the link to an article re drummers, bassists, and intelligence.


Entered at Sun May 18 10:48:22 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

For those who don’t know, let’s explain what’s bubbling under the surface. There is another forum, Book Faded Brown, started by Lil, but now run by Ray. The posters are mainly people who had, or claim to have had, a personal knowledge of “Band members” by which they mean the 90s three. It has run parallel for years. From time to time, anger has been caused by comments on the open forum here which usually results in exhortations to Jan to “shut this place down.” Recently they mention Robbie, but believe me, historically these guys never objected to negatives about Robbie.

Yesterday’s ire was caused by various dropped hints that we had had reading access to their forum, so knew the vituperative comments being made about people here. You can Google it. You’ll get through until you’re “banned” and your ISP blocked. For years, several people occasionally dropped in to look (and laugh). It is true as said below that it is at times aggressive and personally threatening in a way we haven’t seen here for a number of years. But some is about guitars and general friendly stuff. No one I know ever suggested it should be “shut down”, though remarks about me and others verge on the obsessive.

Some post on both sites. But some only turn up here to berate or suggest closure. I kind of accept people who are nasty about me on both sites. It happens. I am shocked at David P saying nasty stuff there, assuming it’s behind my back, which he never said here. It’s called “two-faced.”

John D, a man I admire and respect, is worried about libel or slander to Band members. OK, slander is spoken, so does not apply to a written forum. I'll give my amateur opinion, though as a writer of non-fiction books, I have been to seminars on libel. Libel consists of defamatory statements. However, a statement is not defamatory (there is an “absolute defence” against the charge) if it is true, by consent, entirely accidental or privileged. We’ll knock out the last two … in the UK anything said in Parliament or a Court of Law is privileged. It’s similar in the USA.

“By consent” means the subject allowed it to be published. Therefore repeating anything in Levon’s book, or in interviews with a Band member is not libel. You can extend that to an interview where the interviewer added other comments without being contradicted, and to something published prominently years ago (the Rolling Stone Ronnie Hawkins interview) which no one had objected to or tried to stop. We could assume too, that they had looked at the Cathy Smith book and took no action to contest her statements.

“True” means an established fact, so if someone was convicted of something in a court of law, then it is held to be “true.” The only possible “libel’ I can see cropping up revolves round the suggestion that Robbie did not write the songs alone, as there is no proof whatsoever in the contrary direction; or that Robbie “took all the money.”

In the USA there is a controversial defence that “X is a public figure” so open game for more or less anything anyone says. That would cover the Band members, but NOT in the UK, where that defence is not accepted, which is why many Americans have chosen to try libel cases through the English court system, where a prominent defendant has more chance of winning.

The other areas, apart from libel, which should be considered, and certainly are here, are racism, sexism and homophobia. I think the women will agree that trying to eliminate sexist comments in a site devoted to male rock musicians is pretty much a lost cause. Racism and homophobia rarely crop up, though I will point out that “Peter is a slime” is merely opinion, “Peter is a slimey Brit” is borderline but “Peter is a typically slimey Brit” is racism. Substitute “Brit’ with other races to test that.


Entered at Sun May 18 09:45:38 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

What I had originally tended to post tonight was a bit about Storyville. Just listened to it for the first time in a few years. It's almost like Robbie's "Beautiful Noise" and it has some similar musical ideas. My favourite tracks tonight were the last two - Resurrection and Rainbow which is strange cause I didn't really like those two much before.


Entered at Sun May 18 09:37:03 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

This site isn't a cesspool. It's just people discussing their favourite music. the best thing is that it isn't an "official" site so we don't need to spend all our time regurgitating press releases. That may upset some insiders from time to time but that's life. I suspect that some insiders were using this site as a sounding board. Thats's ok but that's a two edged sword. (and that rhymes).


Entered at Sun May 18 07:16:38 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

The irony of this entire situation is truly mind-boggling.


Entered at Sun May 18 05:02:08 CEST 2014 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bonk's Free Speech

I'm about to put on my professional hat. I'm not a lawyer; but I am a Broadcaster of almost 50 years. The term "free speech" is a wonderful idealistic term. The last time I checked Bonk, you still can't wonder into a movie theater and yell "FIRE." You have no idea how many times I have sat in a board room with our radio stations lawyers discussing this subject. Free Speech?

Here in Toronto for example you can have your lawyer go after the server and web site to track down the offender of slanderous or libelous comments. They have to comply or be shut down. Now listen closely. The majority of people on this site are wonderful people with insiteful posts. Some need to "think" before they post. There is something about the World Wide Web and using anonymous names that let people think they can say anything. Wrong. For those who haven't been around this site for a long time, Lil is right. Jan has closed this guestbook before when he's finally had enough.


Entered at Sun May 18 04:46:21 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: Ray!

I just checked out that other site and I have to say you got MORE bad mouthing going on there then I've seen here in a long time. Some of it is just vicious. Some people just can't accept, and you seem like one of them, that what they say is not gospel. If you hate OUR site so much why lurk here and then post on the other one. Oh, I know why!


Entered at Sun May 18 04:30:55 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jon L: Thanks for the link. I love that entire album, and especially "Tennessee Blues". I could listen to Garth and Amos playing as at the end all day - and they sound like they'd've been happy to oblige.


Entered at Sun May 18 04:04:07 CEST 2014 from (67.83.171.31)

Posted by:

Ray

Yes it was a serious request that Lil made, Bill M. Lil is a great person and made the post out of frustration. Jan will of course do as he sees fit but at least Lil has the guts to speak her mind. Personally I agree with Sebastian Robertson... this place is a cesspool.


Entered at Sun May 18 04:02:54 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: Jan H

I agree with Bill M. Sorry Lil, but I don't agree with you but I do respect what you're saying and your right to say it. In my mind it's free speech and I wish you, as a long time GBer, would jump in here more often.


Entered at Sun May 18 03:03:49 CEST 2014 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Charles reissue

Nice UK article on the reissue of Bobby Charles' self-titled LP. "At times, like on 'Street People,' 'Up on Cripple Creek's cousin, or the gentle, drop-dead gorgeous 'Tennessee Blues,' the sessions sound like The Band amid hearty rounds of red wine." Sounds good to me!


Entered at Sun May 18 02:53:19 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jan H: That didn't sound like a serious suggestion to me; in any case I hope you don't adopt it.


Entered at Sun May 18 01:30:29 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Adam

Thank YOU! I got the pleasure of listening closely to a really fine guitar player playing my favorite music.


Entered at Sat May 17 23:58:47 CEST 2014 from (99.141.57.118)

Posted by:

Adam

Special thanks to Jed for his awesome compliments. Thanks man!


Entered at Sat May 17 23:58:08 CEST 2014 from (99.141.57.118)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Happy Saturday, guys!

By special request of the TDPRI Telecaster website, I created this video demonstration of my custom Robbie Robertson ROCK OF AGES replica Telecaster.

This is the official album take of "Don't Do It" (Clearmountain mix), with the right channel removed and my guitar playing in its place. I use the neck/bridge pickups together (volume/tone rolled off) for everything but the solos, which use the bridge only (volume/tone full). I’m also using a flatpick and two national steel fingerpicks.


Entered at Sat May 17 22:45:39 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Then there was Ros who was a pain but awfully spirited. It's the beauty of an open forum--a lot of wonderful stuff and a lot of stuff you don't like and don't agree with but you accept because, well, because it is an open exchange.


Entered at Sat May 17 22:12:19 CEST 2014 from (24.105.242.177)

Posted by:

Lil

Seriously Jan.. it may be time to do what you did years ago.. shut down the posting here and keep this place as an archive tribute to The Band.. which was your vision to begin with. It's really sad to see what a cluster-f*ck your hard work and dedication has been turned into.


Entered at Sat May 17 22:03:54 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: did you mention Carol near Perth (Australia), Hilda the Dutch Dylan fan, Kristie, Julie ...?


Entered at Sat May 17 21:22:28 CEST 2014 from (67.83.171.31)

Posted by:

Ray

How bush league can you get!


[s**t stirring entry deleted]


Entered at Sat May 17 19:40:55 CEST 2014 from (24.114.37.222)

Posted by:

Lisa

Well, I'd be happy to carry the torch, but I just don't have the extensive bank of knowledge most of the posters here do, so I'm totally in awe of them. But I guess we all have little pieces of the jigsaw puzzle here and there, so if I have a chance to contribute, I will.

There have been some great posters in the past - some very clever people and talented writers. Offhand I'm thinking of things like Mary Bear and the duck, the Saga of the Last Waltz Fly, and another guy whose name escapes me just now, who used to write very funny scenes in dialogue, like a script. The archive is a treasure chest.


Entered at Sat May 17 15:06:43 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ohhhh....and then there was Deb. Wow....She's another one who knew her music and who was always worth waiting to see what she posted here. Again, I miss all these women who still communicate by email with posters here but chose to leave or rarely post again. So Lisa and Joan.....It's up to both of you to carry the torch as Brooke Sluder gave it to me. Catbalou was before my time but Ilkka really digged her. Btw, I know for sure that some of my students will make their presence felt in this world. How's this from a grade one student, "I was away Angelina because I needed a wellness day." Okkkkk. ;-D

Garth's piano playing once again on Joseph Arthur's best song on his latest CD "The Ballad Of Boogie Christ".


Entered at Sat May 17 14:51:09 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Lisa. The other really articulate women who posted here were Bama Belle who saw soooo many shows and would share with all of us. She was the one with Bashful Bill who wanted all of us.....to meet in Woodstock in the past. Then there was Jersey Girl. She can say so much in a few sentences and not ramble on like myself. I'm always in awe of her. When one of the pitbulls attacked she was the one who had the guts to go in there and tell him off as I did myself. I harp on this as it's basement behaviour....cyber bullying. And then there's Claire who already knew how to make long links short and who also is very articulate and kind-hearted. We were all hoping to meet in Woodstock with others from Ontario, Canada and Florida....NYC could still be a possibility.....or......Let's all meet in Chi-Town and see Pat B! I've never been to the windy city except for the airport recently.

Off to the area where I saw Jerome Avis perform with Buzzzz and other Hawks for the long weekend. Enjoy today's hockey game as I will miss it. I still can't believe that P.K. Subban was probably born the year I taught at the same time as his dad. We never taught at the same schools but we were both at former City of York and his reputation was well known as not many males at that time taught elementary.

I see on Robbie's Facebook page the photo I sent to this site a long time ago that I found on tumblr for the boyzzzz.


Entered at Sat May 17 11:32:42 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

Armitage Shanks

Sorry Rog.


Entered at Sat May 17 10:50:13 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: A place with modern plumbing

Subject: What's happened to the Band GB?

I was looking for the Band Guestbook in order to research probate law in the USA but I keep landing on this site which details the history of western sanitary fittings.


Entered at Sat May 17 09:47:56 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Hey Jan, we had out houses to. Had to walk out to a shed right next to the bush and listen to strange sounds like possums and whatever else was scurrying around. Fortunately the NZ wildlife is quite benign. My older brothers use to sneak out there and smoke.


Entered at Sat May 17 08:35:06 CEST 2014 from (94.118.7.153)

Posted by:

Peter V

At the British Museum"Vikings Exhibition" last week, the centrepiece is the remains of the longship found in Denmark. There are only a few bits, but they've had IKEA or someone extrapolate the shape in gleaming metal spars. It's the biggest one ever found and they say it had forty oars on either side, or maybe it was more. It was a lot. A lady near us wondered how toilet facilities were provided for such a large crew on such a small boat. It must have been 'direct to ocean' but I did think that sitting on the side in a howling gale, you really would have to trust the guy holding your feet. This may be the origin of the multi-seater Jan mentions. My son says in Chinese martial arts schools, a long multi person pole at the side of a pit sufficed eight years ago, though no longer.


Entered at Sat May 17 02:24:27 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jan H: I plan to scout out those refernces, especially "Med hjerte i døra. Et bidrag til doens historie". I'm sure that everyone here will join me in applauding your decision to invest your time, and your college's resources, to the Band rather that the dunny. Still, it would be fitting if your past included the sort of five-seater that would have accommodated our guys.


Entered at Sat May 17 02:00:43 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

The SEAT is the key though, Jan. Your outhouse remains civilised however rustic it seems with hindsight.


Entered at Sat May 17 00:22:26 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

When I grew up, we still had the "outhouse". Seriously. Some of them were multi-seat. And no telephone, no TV (AM radio was good, though), no car. No shower, but a hot tub bath every Friday. Then we struck oil in the North Sea....


Entered at Sat May 17 00:09:50 CEST 2014 from (94.118.35.87)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Japanese toilets

Mrs V says that while most stores have signs for "Toilets" and "Western Toilets". She found twenty people in line for the Western Toilet and just elderly ladies using the other one.


Entered at Fri May 16 20:38:55 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Rob and Joan, I just replied to both.


Entered at Fri May 16 20:16:51 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ben/ Pat B

Rick's CD is often on Ebsy,but I agree it is pricey, bu worth it

Pat,I sent you my address Did you get it? If not here it is motus2aterolsdotcom


Entered at Fri May 16 19:52:17 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pat and Bill M

Guys, I just sent you an email. Think I remembered your addresses right!


Entered at Fri May 16 19:49:39 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Rick Danko's self titled LP

Masterpiece. By far and away the best Band "itch scratcher" (if you will) of OQ solo LPs IMO.


Entered at Fri May 16 18:20:39 CEST 2014 from (171.159.64.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Subject: Rick

Jed, Rick's solo album is a gem. Defintely one of the best solo albums. The cd has been out of print for years and used copis go for big bucks. It was supposed to be re-released a number of years ago with some bonus tracks, but got canceleed at the last minute. I've been listening to 'Cryin hear blues' recently. That is a fine collection of studio and live performances. The live cuts with Butterfield at the end of the cd are very fiery. I would welcome an official release of a Butterfield/Danko show.


Entered at Fri May 16 18:06:57 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rick-12/17/77-Capitol Theater

Watching a you tube of this concert.I think it's been discussed here.Just wanted to say that sweet Rick's voice was at the peak of its powers in this show.Very emotional watching this.I believe Terry Danko is playing,but no clue who the rest of band is.I love experiencing live,with a full band,the songs from the solo album-reminds me how beautiful those songs were.Going to go on amazon and get a cd ,if its available.Used to own the album,tape,cd.


Entered at Fri May 16 18:02:16 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I finally read the 33 1/3 book MFBP. I thought it was very good. I understand it has been optioned for a movie. The writer has gone on to quite a career.


Entered at Fri May 16 17:39:21 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: test

just checking after blocking some ad IPs


Entered at Fri May 16 15:49:16 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Thanks for the very big laugh - so early in the day, too! Nevertheless, the story that has musical legs is the one about the drummer and his missing gold tooth. Couldn't help but think of Steely Dan ("Roll out your gold tooth and see how it runs"), which, even if inaccurate, made me think of "Eleanor Rigby" ("See how they run").

Speaking of potty training and rigid societies, my hobby before record collecting was short wave radio, and back then almost all the Eastern Block countries transmitted to Canada and the US in English during prime time. I would write to the stations and get boatloads of glossy pro-us magazines in return. The ones from Radio Bucharest had lovely photos of the mountains and fields of Romania, but also one of dozens of kids in daycare, all sitting on their potties together.

Funny, but I recall hearing very little music on any of those stations - except Radio Luxembourg, which had a pop show that introduced me to the Hollies' excellent but unsuccessful immediately post-Nash 45, "Hey Willie" (see link).


Entered at Fri May 16 14:08:11 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Peter V: Don't be so hard on yourself, your Lordship, I've always thought of you as a first rate hack.

Hey, new YT uploads from the Love for Levon concert, including this rather special Genetic Method. This is pro shot, not the phone footage that appeared a few months ago.


Entered at Fri May 16 12:48:11 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Brown Eyed Girls teaching profession

Sorry Lisa, it is not so simple. If (and when) someone in her classes turns out to be a mega star in the future it is not the one who dances reggae in front of chalkboard. It is the one sitting in the corner who murmurs "Dylanosaurus!". So it is and so it should be. There is a word for it. Actually two words: progress, evolution.


Entered at Fri May 16 12:16:36 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Angelina: tsk tsk tsk such potty-based humour is unbecoming in a young lady such as yourself. I'm shocked. : )

"I knew you'd plop in"....HA HA .good one! : )

Family is fine: my daughter after having spent a month in Canada last summer wants to go back. It's been "Canada this, Canada that" in almost every conversation since. I guarantee she'd be singing a different tune had she spent a month in Thunder Bay this past winter. ; )


Entered at Fri May 16 11:52:17 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

LOL LOL LOL l'm cracking up like Nick Lowe!!!!


Entered at Fri May 16 11:43:26 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Peter, I too have experienced the shelf variety but at least you sit upon it. And you must, for if as a chap you try and "strain the greens" traditionally, by standing in front, flow hits inspection shelf and makes a spray not quite as impressive or directional as Mrs V's incident with the Japanese device, but equally as unhelpful.

So you have concluded that you aren't a second rate hack, then? Good. Any update on your lordship over the UK community?


Entered at Fri May 16 11:11:24 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Fred! I knew you'd plop in. These Brit boyzzz....toilet humour and all.
While in NYC I asked where the bathroom was and I was looked with suspicion. Ok I said you know where there is a toilet......Oh the restroom. Yes the washroom thank you.
I majored in Sociology with a major in Political Science and became a specialist in child development so don't get me started boyzzzz. lol
Hope your family is well. How about an updated photo?

Jeff A. When I wrote poetry I never rambled on. It was quite short like......

I could be dead and you'd still be busy.

My partner's latest buy is Howlin' Wolf's Smokestack Lightning The Complete Chess Masters 1951-1960


Entered at Fri May 16 10:53:27 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: German history

Peter V: I majored in History (specifically the rise of fascism in Germany, Italy & Japan) and I too remember reading something to what you mentioned in your post (re: potty training & the rise of nazism in Germany). This was back in 1986/87. I pointed this out to my German History professor during a tutorial and we both had a laugh about it. And he wasn't prone to laughing so quickly.


Entered at Fri May 16 10:46:26 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Potty talk

RTO: while state-of-the-art Japanese toilets do exist and are becoming more common place in public establisments, l feel obligated to point out that in many of said places (mainly department stores & schools of all levels) the squatter prevails. So if you're ever planning to take a trip to the Far East, keep that in mind.


Entered at Fri May 16 10:29:06 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Raiding the tone

Rob, I do think it important to raise the tone from time to time. I fear that others will be combing through your post, brows furrowed (there are some long words in it), seeking potential offence to any Band family members, out as far as third cousins. The Band’s visit to Paris Olympia in 1971 is a problem (Discount 1966, because as Levon was not present, there is less chance of offence). Are you saying that a Band member couldn’t piss straight perhaps? Which one? Levon could always hit his mark within a millimetre, you will be told. Or are you suggesting that one of them might have emerged with shit on a shoe? Which one was that dumb? Or worse, inebriated? Or is there a hidden meaning lurking that Robbie, being able to speak French well (French is a foreign language spoken in France, one will explain in his otherwise cliché-ridden diatribe) would have found his way to a disabled facility with a proper toilet pan? Thus leaving his companions slipping in the mire. Elitist bastard! You are skating on thin ice. I worry that replies will suggest you making oral contact with fundaments of various ethnicities.

Nevertheless, let me add to the discussion. I’m not sure how useful this will be. Some days I wake up and think "Am I a second rate hack?" But then the feeling passes. In Germany in the 1970s, we were disconcerted by the German toilet pan which had a flat “inspection area” with the water behind it. I asked German friends who told me it was considered medically sensible to peruse your stools daily. In fact, they added, when in Britain, they found the disappearance of their stool into water disturbing and frightening. In the 60s, I did a politics option on the rise of fascism in Germany, and among a long list of reasons (geographical position, economic downfall etc) there was “early toilet training” which apparently was quite obsessive in the early 20th century, leading to over-obedience in adults (Seriously! This was given as a reason.) In my recent visits to Germany, the hotels have had “normal” UK / US style toilet pans, so maybe they’ve got more relaxed, or maybe it’s that hotels nowadays are either French, Spanish or American chains.

A musician I knew, who had spent much time in Germany, used to keep drum sticks in the toilet. I asked innocently if he liked to practice whilst at stool. It turned out he had swallowed a gold tooth, and daily sought for it using the drum sticks as implements.

Italy is difficult. Due to their love of innovative bathroom design, I have spent ten minutes trying to find the control, be it handle, button or chain, that actually operates the flush.

My most memorable encounter was at the opposite end of the toilet scale in Tokyo. The state-of-the art electronic toilet in our hotel bathroom had an array of buttons. You could switch on a flushing sound or music to cover unpleasant noises. You could perfume the air, and you could perform the functions of a bidet with hot and cold buttons. Mrs V retired to enjoy the luxurious facility. Suddenly there was a loud scream from the bathroom. Fearing an Oriental insect of gigantic proportions had found its way to the 23rd floor, I rushed to open the door, whereupon Mrs V leapt off the toilet and a jet of hot water, designed for other uses, flew a good six feet, and hit me square in the face.


Entered at Fri May 16 04:58:01 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Tittle-tattle, Tele, Toilets....

I see it's still nigh-on impossible to have any kind of discussion that involves sensible criticism without people's personal friends pitching up with a load of pejorative vitriol then? Jesus. "You weren't there!" my arse. Can we not just agree that Levon Helm was a fantastic drummer and singer, and that Robbie Robertson wrote unequalled songs, but neither are above healthy critique? I thought that was the whole point.

Adam, good work on the Tele. Now make a Blonde-era Fender amp clone with harmonic tremolo (fake vibrato) so you can play the intro to Time To Kill, the solo from The Rumor and the entire part to All La Glory....

Just been away for a week: started with a couple of days in Locarno ("Switaly") and to Verona, for a five day base with trips to Desenzano and Sirmione on Lake Garda, and down to Mantua. All good. But there are still a few of those bastard squat toilets knocking about in bars there. If the EU was worth anything, they'd be outlawed.

Here in Blighty, those accursed devices were referred to as "French toilets" mainly due to us being an island and for many Brit folk their first taste of international travel was generally a trip to France, the nearest bit of mainland Europe. Such nasty contrivances never reached the UK in any quantity and thus France got the association. A "quiet word" was had by teachers about the differences in facilities likely to be encountered before a school-trip, and it was suggested that we all partook of our ablutions before leaving the UK and kept our bathroom usage to "spending a penny". But this is 2014, nearly thirty years since that fateful trip to Boulogne-sur-Mer (when, out of curiosity, a few of us strayed into a seaside public toilet just to see if these far fetched tales of other-worldly bathroom fittings were simply “bogey man stories” and discovered to our horror that not only were they true, but the tales hadn’t mentioned the lack of proper taps on hand-basins, and the predictable ten minutes of faffing before one of us wondered if the funny foot-pedal on the floor might turn the water on). Thirty years later, still the sodding things are to be found.

France, of course, were never happy with being credited for this foul contraption and refer to it as having Turkish origins, and indeed they are still the norm in Eastern lands. The French were never sufficiently unhappy with this accreditation to stop using the bloody things in public facilities, mind. German-speaking nations, and the Netherlands are generally free of them so it was a surprise that the Alpine end of Italy still had a fair share. I'd have been less surprised, say, from Naples down to Sicily.

In Britain there is an undercurrent of distrust of Islam on some sides these days. Such folk who feed/are fed by the tabloid papers are barking up the wrong tree altogether when they cite extremist terror, Sharia law or attitude to women as reasons to fear a stronger Islamic hold on the nation. An upscaled adoption of squat toilet pans would be quite adequate without getting carried away with ethics or pacifism.

But there. I guess we can learn from that, especially those who may be in the bar or cafe trade. Tourists coming in to use the toilet without so much as buying a drink or a snack must get on your tits after a while. Maybe these Italian bar owners know that people won’t make a habit of it once they see what awaits them!



Entered at Thu May 15 23:57:47 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Bob Dylan & The Band's Basement Tapes Influences (CD)

By coincidence, only yesterday I was briefly introduced to the guy that runs the label, Chrome Dreams. It was at the Dylan Night for a "Hendrix and Dylan" exhibition at a photographic gallery.


Entered at Thu May 15 23:01:02 CEST 2014 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen gambone

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Hope for the future of Music

Jonathan Wilson - fantastic stuff -


Entered at Thu May 15 22:52:50 CEST 2014 from (187.127.159.26)

Posted by:

Cleviton

Web: My link

Subject: Too crazy dream

Too crazy dream The dream was pretty crazy ! all buses were fruit all boat vegetables all train animals all tickets were birds By these four copies from east to west I went through four lines the first sewing the second crochet the third to cram stingray on Wednesday to fish that caught a shark a whale, a shark a seal , a dolphin ! all buses were fruit : caja I drop in Pirajá ! cajarana traveled to the puma ! of Peira I went to the beach of the river ! vegetables every boat : rowed pumpkin sailed passed by an orca ! started the engine of potato stepped background! ... one of there told me : hey where are you going with this chip? did not care ! ... the guy was all asshole ! ... lol got the beet I did it the same as one Sufi makes the waves the hawaii ! called me very mad ! and the height of my folly ? is that it was all in Abaeté Lagoon ! lol all train animals : traveled in suburban platform to Paripe , being a donkey and a donkey load , a giraffe and an elephant , hippo, rhino, the cars ! ... the driver a chimpanzee , wanting to be a gorilla , and I know that would be terror? played every corner of two! ... remained the golden lion tamarin ! ... took me to Africa ! ... from there to America? all tickets were birds : went eagle , hawk ! ... took a ride in peacock ! ... carcará not want me no! ... Urubú passed away ! I was concerned ! stayed in mystery ! wondering why of it all! ... not finding my answer inquiry? ... I came a craving for nuts , what my dream too crazy ! result? wake up and get real ! so was only a dream ! ... was a crazy dream! lol this is a work of fiction ! any resemblance to the case real, to persons living or dead ? ... is purely coincidental ! lol Gunpowder Acoustic Neon http://www.7underground.com.br/


Entered at Thu May 15 22:03:56 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan: I had the “Dylan & The Basement Tapes: Influences” 2 vinyl LP set in my hand yesterday. It was a Record Store Day 2014 release with a sticker. I was tempted by the cover, then I thought (a) I could compile it myself (b) I very nearly have done … 80% anyway. It’s “European End of Copyright 1962” stuff, but well-packaged.

SPIN and the Carter-Barron Show, which was released legally on Italian CDs as “Live in Washinton DC” (sic). Dunno. The Italian CD, legal because of a law on live shows dating back to Mussolini, was notable for the credited drummer, Lee Von Helm. Which sounds German to me. It’s a good show, as you say, recorded for King Biscuit.


Entered at Thu May 15 22:00:58 CEST 2014 from (173.3.48.184)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Well Angie, male dominated site? You are far too modest...Even now, people could disagree with that and be on solid ground. Based on word count , or post count, you may well be the dominant poster :-) Add in veracity or persistence, you probably are a Triple Crown Poster.

Amanda and Kay both are Bandoleros. Where they stood on some issues had nada to do with ISTA this or that. But even so, want to call em Levonistas? or Bandoleros? Neither is something that precluded Dankette status for the purposes of the GB.

It's kind of a silly conversation, but, was worth responding to for clarity.


Entered at Thu May 15 21:04:04 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Lisa BEG Dankettes

Lisa, what a wonderful post about BEG.She is a treasure. an amazing person I echo your sentiments..

I still "communicate with Carol via Facebook ,She is doing well


Entered at Thu May 15 20:54:27 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those of you who will celebrate Queen Victoria Day with us this long weekend. Hope you're doing ok Serenity!
"We're the future. No future."

Allez Allez Habitants this weekend too!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Thu May 15 20:21:37 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Richard Manuel....The super sensitive one in The Band who shared his soul with all fans and everyone he met....I heard he was really funny too.

I wish we could hear more of his unpublished music. Surely Van has some music and he's too miserable to share! ;-D


Entered at Thu May 15 20:02:45 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan & The Band's Basement Tapes Influences (CD)

What about this, then? Official and legitimate? Hm.


Entered at Thu May 15 19:59:14 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks again Pat! Maybe Joan you were at this show?


Entered at Thu May 15 19:55:40 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: "New" live album?

Is this the first official release (not counting the radio/DJ disc(s)) of the heavily bootlegged July 1976 concert, that was broadcasted on the King Biscuit Flower Hour the same year? Spin is a proper label, yes?


Entered at Thu May 15 19:10:49 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Amanda and Kay....I had to think real hard. Nope, they were hard-core Levonistas. Strong, passionate women who stood for something. Amanda and I were at the best of times planning to meet up in Tennn? to see Levon. Kay didn't dig me at all 'cause of my Robbie posts and made it known publicly. Strange thing is that I never received anything like a guitar pick or anything from Robbie so why would I be called a psychophant? I still prefer those days when there were more women here. Just because we're the same gender doesn't mean that we'll agree on anything but I think deeeeep down we knew that we were women that maybe got under each other's skin....but there was a special recognition that we had the guts and passion to post here in a male dominated site.

Me I thank God for my bad memory.


Entered at Thu May 15 18:35:04 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, I knew I could count on you to make that connection.


Entered at Thu May 15 16:11:30 CEST 2014 from (72.78.33.234)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Re: Guardian article on Dylan and Sinatra

The Guardian article wasn't bad except the writer Michael Hann screws up right at the beginning when he says "The Times They Are A-Changin'" was Dylan's 1962 debut album. Of course it was his third album and released in 1964.


Entered at Thu May 15 15:19:34 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Blame It On The G-G-Gospels, The Boook Of Love

Pat B: Yes that is exciting, though my first thought upon reading your reference to the original six was that you meant our guys plus Jerry Penfound.

Peter V: I dutifully read the Bob/Frank article and it didn't seem all that must-read. Not like, fer example, Sean Wilentz's massively enlightening book-length study, "Bob Dylan in America". However, I did like the insight that where Bob moved to christianity, Frank moved to bossa nova. Bob should thank his lucky stars that he was stalked by AJ Weberman rather than Edie Gorme.


Entered at Thu May 15 14:33:42 CEST 2014 from (173.3.48.184)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Angie, ya can't forget Kay, whose close friendship with The Band guys goes back to their earliest days as The Band. Or Amanda. Both valued Dankettes. Neither been heard from in this GB in quite some years.Since the great Dankette purge maybe.I'm friends with both of them and bet people would be glad to know they are both doing well and leading very interesting lives.


Entered at Thu May 15 14:00:34 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Adam

Some first rate playing,Adam-outstanding! As for the guitar-great action,superb tone.Its got that great sound that roars like an electric guitar should.Gets right into your skin in a powerful way.Enjoy that instrument,Adam and I'd love to hear more of your playing Band guitar parts.


Entered at Thu May 15 13:37:26 CEST 2014 from (75.34.35.80)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: my Robbie telecaster

Hey guys, here is a recording of my beautiful Tele in action! This is The Band "Don't Do It", Clearmountain remix, with the right channel (guitar) removed and my own guitar playing added. I really wanted you guys to hear this guitar. It's just a rough take, so be kind...

"DON'T DO IT"

I used the bridge/neck pickup for everything except the solos. Guitar plugged into a Guitarport/Gearbox set up for a vintage Bassman tone...


Entered at Thu May 15 11:36:03 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Pat, Is there a single show in 76 where The Band played all of the songs you listed from NL-SC? I don't think so. They typically played 3 or 4 out of a 17 or 18 song set. I'm a fan of the 76 tour. I have 4 or 5 shows in my collection, but I stand by my contention that The Band changed their setlist more in '83 then they had in '76. I believe that they played on average of 5 or 6 different songs in '83 that they hadn't played before, some were from Rick and Levon's projects and some were covers. Once could put together a great album of songs performed by the Band in the 80's that were never released, I'm steppin out, by the rivers of babylon, kingfish, the battle is over, one more shot, blaze of glory, caldonia, milk cow boogie, willie and the hand jive. Of course these were not all played at the same show, this is just a partial list of songs performed by The Band between 83 and 86 off the top of my head. There are many other songs that they performed which were not part of the official canon.


Entered at Thu May 15 09:24:52 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Right, Rod. Rehearsals are usually punctuated by the drummer suddenly deciding to work out how loud the crash cymbal is, mid-conversation and without warning too.


Entered at Thu May 15 09:15:28 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

thanks for the link Solomon. Reminds me of so many rehearsals I been to (minus the stars). Usually a lot of talking and not much playing. The gutarists doing all the talking while every one else looks bored. Be great if something similar existed for TLW.


Entered at Thu May 15 08:15:01 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan & Sinatra

The Guardian has a first rate article on "Dylan & Sinatra: Twin Titans of American Music" by Michael Hann, which is linked. It starts with Dylan's new recording and draws some fascinating parallels. It really is a "must read."

I liked the mention of "Watertown" which Frank recorded the same year as My Way. There is also an embedded video of "Restless Farewell" performed by Bob at Sinatra's 80th Birthday Gala, as a request from Sinatra.


Entered at Thu May 15 05:45:16 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Dank a doodle day.

Angie, you were right on the money in your mention of Abby, Julie, Amy, and Carol. The Dankettes were, and are, great gals. I'm friendly, in contact with 3 of the 4, lost contact with Amy though. Why they stopped visiting here, I've never asked em........but I'd expect it was more than the posts of one person. Maybe it was the treatment of the "post LW thing." I dunno. Maybe it was the general tone of the majority here. Maybe they all got pregnant, or took second jobs. I never really asked em..but they all seem well. Life's regular ups and downs....

Funny too. Regardless of how some people want to portray a person, or a thing, or even a musical act, someone else, or others, will portray the same thing totally differently. One person might say a horse trampled some person, someone else might say the someone dove under the horses hooves. Another someone might say that the person was attacking the horse or it's mother, the horse was defending it's mother..... look at the Solange and Jay Z thing, one article has a headline that Jay Z attacked Solange, yet the body of the story never refers to that, but concentrates o what appears to be more factual, that Solange attacked him. But the headline, the headline of the story was Jay Z was the attacker...


Entered at Thu May 15 05:35:18 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

3 of the Original 6 in the two Finals. Pretty cool.


Entered at Thu May 15 04:43:20 CEST 2014 from (62.84.152.187)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cashmere Cat

JH: Cashmere Cat post did not go unnoticed. L of course checked out Wiki and got the info. Congratulations on adding to the music fold. You should be proud.I don't think I'll be in TO that week.


Entered at Thu May 15 04:37:33 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Happy Irie Belated Birthday to P.K. Subban (yesterday was his birthday)!!!

We'll work something out Bonk. Anyone else who is interested in hangin' with us and celebrating the passion we have for The Hawks and The Band get in touch with Bonk! No one is excluded even if we differed on this site. This is not high-school. We're all adults now. ;-D Oh and some suggestions Bonk is to visit the Hard Rock so you can see The Band and Dylan memorabilia.....Robbie's Walk of Fame, Robbie's Childhood Home, definitely a night of music would be great like Paul James, Weber Brothers, Blackie and The Rodeo KIngs, etc. Just suggestions Bonk.....

Hey Jed!! Hey Lisa!! Come up and visit us Northerners as we're friendly and passionate and fun, fun, fun!

Thanks Solomon...In case you haven't seen the three performances with Robbie, Fogerty and Springsteen after the rehearsal check out link. I looooove Robbie's guitar playing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! He's got that feeel and he just knows how to make good music!!!!! Check out "Green River", "Born On The Bayou" and "Who'll Stop The Rain".

Thanks Joan. I asked imagezulu again as to why he digs Donna The Buffalo and not The Band. He said it was because of Tara's voice......yeah sure. lol He then surprised me and told me that he would see The Band live but not interested in their recordings. I get this as I really dig Blackie and The Rodeo Kings and Paul James live but their recordings aren't played much here....

Lisa...Thank you so much. I think generally as women we communicate somewhat differently than men.

As far as teaching goes I always tried to make sure they all knew the music of The Band, Dylan, Marley (well a lot already knew via of their parents), and Robbie solo. The year I lost my Ma; Robbie's "Shine Your Light" came out and helped me tremendously deal with the grief. I somehow taught this song to my older class who were very creative and bright but like myself....Don't like to be told what to do.....lol......Anyway, they were arguing constantly as to where they should stand in line and all that petty stuff that I just didn't have the strength at the time to get them ready for our Concert. Well....Like myself they were so painfully independent that they surprised me at the Concert and performed Robbie's song!!!!!!!!!!!! I ran into one former student and I apologized to him as this class was really difficult for me and I felt I let them down. His initial response was, "Oh no we had fun in your class. Thanks for teaching us "I Can See Clearly Now" (Jimmy Cliff).

The other thing I always tried to teach was that it is important to feeeeeeeeeeeeel loved. It is not enough for someone to say they love you. You have to feeeeeel it. Another student from another school just drove me craaaaaaazy!!! I give out Kidzzz Help Line cards to each student that gives a Help Line number in case they're having problems and no one will listen to them or they don't know what to do because they're being abused. Well....One of these difficult students phoned the Kidzzz Help Line on his mom because she wouldn't allow any friends to visit. When she came to the school she yelled at me. I thought.....Well....If you haven't done anything wrong....nothing to worry about. Anyway, I ran into this student and when I saw him on the street I thought for sure he'll avoid me. Oh nooooo.....He came up to me and walked with me to the subway station. He told me that he still had the birthday card I gave him and that no one had ever given him one. It had been five years since I taught him and he still kept the card! I give every student a card and the really young ones a birthday balloon as well. I knew why he was drawn to me.....He drove me craaaaaazy but I never gave up on him and.....He knew I was a huuuuge Marley fan and his family was from Jamaica! I think as educators we tend to teach in areas that we ourselves needed further development if you get my drift. Anyway, aren't young people great?....They forgive so easily.......

When there were a few more women on this site it had a different tone. Some left because of a pit-bull who also attacked me as well. He still hasn't apologized privately or publicly. Others I'm not sure but this site can take up a lot of time so I do take breaks or I'd never get anything done in my other life. I really miss the Dankettes. Everyone of them was sweet to everyone.....just like Rick Danko! If you're out there Julie, Amy, Abby, Carol.........We miss you all!!!! :-D


Entered at Thu May 15 04:35:03 CEST 2014 from (62.84.152.187)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: DYLAN news

New Dylan song (old Sinatra song cover) and album apparently forthcoming! Content? so far. Go to bobdylan.com and check it out. Never fails to surprise

I am usually in Victoria BC but come to Toronto at times.


Entered at Thu May 15 03:28:01 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Cabbagetown/Salt Spring Island

Subject: BEG, Bill M, John D, JT et al

Hey Angie. Thanks for trying to get something happening when I'm back. If you let me know a little in advance I'll make sure I'm around for it. I guess most folks work during the week so I'm open to weekends. Geez, I'm open for any time if a bunch of us can get together. Of course I have to do the kids thing, the grandchildren thing and the million friends thing but that's OK. Some kind of music thing would be great! By the way. My kid brother lived right across the street from 193 in the early 70's and always referred to it as Jamies place. But he always referred to Robbie as Jamie. I plan on going walkabout in Cabbagetown for a lot of hours. Many, many memories from that part of town with lots of music. Going to try to hook up with some old friends like Clay Borris and his brother Gerry. Oh my goodness, do I ever have a lot of stories from Cabbagetown and Yonge Street back in the day. Oh yeah. Tried your old email and nada. My new one is carlgrahamatmacdotcom or lightningpressatshawdotca Cheers!!!


Entered at Thu May 15 02:48:13 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Because accuracy is so important, the 76 Tour included: Ring Your Bell, IMND, Ophelia, Forbidden Fruit, Acadian Driftwood, and Twilight (a NLSC outtake). However, I know little or nothing about the Band so take that with a grain of salt.


Entered at Thu May 15 00:57:06 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "Travel Ontario" advertising display

I spent the day in London on a few Dylan-related matters and was mightily impressed by the "Travel Ontario" advertising at Euston Station. It covered all of the walls along from the Tube (subway) ticket concourse and up the escalators to the main railway station concourse. I never normally notice these things but it caught my eye. I was in two other mainline railway stations today (St Pancras and Waterloo) and saw nothing there that grabbed my attention as much.

Just thought you Ontarians might like to know where your money is going.


Entered at Thu May 15 00:22:15 CEST 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band

I'm a fan of the entire career of The Band. I don't see any reason to dismiss the work of the post last waltz Band, as some people here do. Robbie had every right to retire in his 30's from the impossible way of life, but there's no reason for the others to do the same. And the criticism of The Band of the 80s and 90s as an oldies act doesn't really fit with the facts. On the '76 tour, they were playing primarily material from the first 3 albums, they only played 3 or 4 songs from NL-SC, when they returned in '83 they had changed their setlist more, I believe they added 5 or 6 songs and and they would continue to change their setlists through the 80s. Sure, there was a core of songs that they played at every show, but there were many other songs that were played, sometimes only a few times. I would suggest that people who dismiss the Robbie-less Band actually listen to the music. There are many quality live shows from this period to be listened to and enjoyed.


Entered at Wed May 14 20:07:34 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, a condo might be real large adjustment for you, hopefully the benfits make it a pleasing one. This change should give you some time that you hopefully use to kick back and relax, schmooze with yer friends and loved ones.

Having been raised in a big house, and often lived in big houses totaling more than half my life, i've found many inconveniences when i live in apartment buildings, be they 6 story, or two or three story, rentals or coops. People can get stoopid.At the same time, you can have great neighbors, etc... Hopefully, you will, and good property management, and no one gets hurt.


Entered at Wed May 14 19:11:51 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Movin on

Thanks Brown Eyes......moving day Friday, got to unplug for a few days.

Going from a 5 bed room - 3 bathroom, family room, music room, to a 2 bed room 2 bathroom condo. No yard work, no fire wood to cut, Just got to get on that Rockin Chair. Go fish crabs and explore.

The condo has a nice little barbecue deck about 200 feet from the Courtenay River, watching it roll by. About 10 minutes from the marina where the Rockin Chair lays......still after living in my own big houses forever, I'm a little scared of a condo.

Bill M, couple days ago, I walked right by, "Bop City Records". That little hole in the wall is still going. Maybe one day you'll be by here again.

Later gang........


Entered at Wed May 14 19:12:18 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lovely post, Lisa, saying so well what most of us (all of the good ones) feel about BEG!


Entered at Wed May 14 18:57:52 CEST 2014 from (92.18.180.97)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: John Fogerty, Bruce Springsteen & Robbie Robertson rehearsal

John Fogerty, Bruce Springsteen and Robbie Robertson rehearse for the 1993 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony.


Entered at Wed May 14 18:49:09 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

It's nice to hear the welcome mat will be out in Tronno for a get together of Band fans. I hope John D shows.


Entered at Wed May 14 18:46:03 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Talking about Toronto: Guess who´s playing there next month (link above)... not exactly the kind of stuff that The Band would have played, but he *was* in Woodstock and at Levon´s barn with his old man in November last year, and enjoyed the experience, the music, the brilliant musicians, and the good vibes up there.


Entered at Wed May 14 18:39:23 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: BEG

Sounds like your mom had a real sense of humor!

You wrote recently about your struggles in your family with feuds and forgiveness, then added that it might be too much info. For my part I can only say that I really admire your willingness to share your life here - it is also extremely brave of you, given what happens here from time to time. I found what you wrote about past grief people on the GB have given you hard to comprehend. I'm just so glad you've managed to rise above it and still continue to post. Your posts are always a bright spot for me, and I've been following the GB for a couple years now (also read the archives - like I said a while ago, the good, the bad and the ugly!).

I also think the kids in your classes are so lucky to have you for a teacher. Not only because of your wide range of knowledge, but especially your unquenchable enthusiasm. When I think back to school only a few teachers stand out among many, and I'll bet anything you're one of those special teachers to your kids - one you always remember with affection and gratitude for what they gave you. You go, girl!


Entered at Wed May 14 17:54:25 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi ya Rockin' Chair. They talk about you whenever we get together. I'm really hoping they can join us but they're a few hours away and Northern Boy is very busy with his art.

Here are some Band buttons I scanned and sent to the site. One button is now in the hands of Northern Boy and one in Peter's hand and one in mine. I was going to put it on my knapsack but nah.....someone would take it.


Entered at Wed May 14 17:46:25 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Bonk...Kevin J is also here in TO. Now's your chance Kevin. We can discuss music and sports and....no....not politics! ;-D

Many thanks to Bill M once again for informing us that Robbie actually lived in Riverdale not Cabbagetown! We could visit his home where the Hawks would go to have some fine meals prepared by Robbie's Mom. Here are a few photos I took just in case you don't have the time. Uggggh. When I look at my photos now I realize why they're not very focused as my telephoto lens was loose and it kept slipping on me.

Anyone else interested from Toronto or nearby....Nomadic MIke??!! Contact Bill M. We don't care who your favourite Band member is as we all dig the music of The Hawks....The Band!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Wed May 14 17:41:52 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Old Friends

Brown Eyed Girl! if you see Chris & Theresa again soon, be sure to say hello for me.

They took a long drive one day a few years ago to come and meet me when we were playing music in a legion. Really genuinely nice folks.


Entered at Wed May 14 17:27:33 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bonk; Great idea. BEG's aleady on the case!


Entered at Wed May 14 17:01:26 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Joan, drop me an email. I have something you need to hear.

pjlbrennanatmindspringdotcom


Entered at Wed May 14 16:19:02 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey PSB. It was sooo good to hear that the Waterboys do not disappoint. I saw them in the eighties with Karl Wallinger and it will always be one of the best shows ever!!!!!! I love how they incorporate a lot of violin in their music and his writing....You know how I dig writers.

Cabbagetown Boy...Sounds good to me. What do the boyzz think? I'll also see if Northern Boy and Northern Girl can come to TO as well. I met them in Cabbagetown at the Pear Tree. We have become friends and I have visited them a couple of times in cottage country. I think they are the only ones who have met my partner in Cabbagetown as well. You will see the hood has really changed. When I first lived here the working women were right outside my door. Now you have to look a little harder.....but we are surrounded by a lot of shelters for men and half way houses. Generally it's a cool mixed vibe here but definitely the scene changes when you go two streets over from where we live. Danny Marks still lives here and I think back in the day Toller Cranston lived here.

Lisa....About Dylan. LOL My late Ma would make fun of Dylan's singing especially on the song....All I Really Want To Do.

I don't want to fake you out
Take or shake or forsake you out
I ain't lookin' for you to feel like me
See like me or be like me
All I really want to do
Is, baby, be friends with you.

She would try and imitate him. And....I would always hear "be like me" to "pee like me". She would also try and imitate Jagger singing "Angie".
One of my friends is a music teacher and she digs Neil Young's singing but not Dylan's. I really like the interview where Robbie was asked who he liked more.....Miles or Armstrong and he said that both are great but that one of them to his ears might resonate more. I dig Dylan and Neil's voice but when I want to hear a really skilled singer and writer.....Garland Jeffreys!


Entered at Wed May 14 04:20:21 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: BEG, Bill M, John D, JT et al

I'll be in Toronto for the 1st time in 8 years if anyone wants to do a mini Guestbook get together. Would love to put some faces to names. Can't wait to see what my old Cabbagetown neighborhood looks like. I lived at 405 Carlton Street from 1959-1970. Booze Can and all!


Entered at Wed May 14 04:19:27 CEST 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: BEG, Bill M, John D, JT et al

I'll be in Toronto for the 1st time in 8 years if anyone wants to do a mini Guestbook get together. Would love to put some faces to names. Can't wait to see what my old Cabbagetown neighborhood looks like. I lived at 405 Carlton Street from 1959-1970. Booze Can and all!


Entered at Wed May 14 01:48:01 CEST 2014 from (72.78.33.234)

Posted by:

PSB

BEG, I saw the Waterboys last fall by a stroke of luck and it was a truly amazing, incredible concert.


Entered at Wed May 14 01:04:52 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jan/Joan

Thanks to both of you.


Entered at Wed May 14 00:22:43 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks, Joan. When i mix and master the project, including the electric version of Brooklyn In My Bones (think that organic, loose, kick ass rock and roll of early 70 Stones), it'll knock everyone on their tucchases.


Entered at Tue May 13 22:31:28 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tribute

It is nice to see Jan very respectfully and plainly confirm what his site is for. A tribute to the greatness of the achievments of the BAND and their music. Not a place to gleefully sate "Look what I found" and print things here that everyone can do without.

I'll never understand the "need" to know every detail about anyone's personal life. Some of these guys should start up their own site, and as a confessional print every detail of every sordid thing they've done, and every mistake they've made. Who would be interested?????


Entered at Tue May 13 21:15:49 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: BEG Jeff Jed Peter etal

First off, let me apologize for my cryptic posts. I've got Parkinsons and some days my typing sucks. BEG I loved your confessional . Perhaps your friend thinks Donna is prettier than the Band :-)

Jeff I just re listened to Brooklyn. It is really good

Jed and Peter Well said. I guess my yardstick is "is it kind and would you say it to my face"


Entered at Tue May 13 21:06:08 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: "Danko/Manuel"

Some times, while beachcombing, you come across nice things like this: An absolutely lovely live version of the Drive-by Truckers' "Danko/Manuel" (link above), by former D-bT member Jason Isbell (lyrics and more here). Enjoy. And, maybe, the next time you beachcombers come across something not-so-nice, please consider finding another place than a tribute site to publish your findings. Thanks.


Entered at Tue May 13 19:33:05 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Plain and Simple

Angie, any meeting in NYC has to include a visit to V & S Pizzeria, in Sheepshead Bay. I gotta show you folks, including that Connecticut Yankee Todd, what real pizza is all about.


Entered at Tue May 13 18:58:46 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG/Peter

BEG-I didn't catch any negative reference to Peter in Butch's post.If he did make negative reference to Peter I strongly differ with that.


Entered at Tue May 13 18:31:51 CEST 2014 from (199.19.138.101)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: That New Book About The Band

It's nice to stop in here and see a lot of the old, familiar names. I wanted to see if I could find any comments about that new book about The Band, and I did find a few including some helpful ones from Peter V in particular. I guess I'll pick up a copy of that book. All the best to my friends here.


Entered at Tue May 13 18:21:49 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: A Big OY!

I don't envy your route or time of travel, Peter. Downtown Brooklyn to Newark during rush hour! If you leave at 6 A.M, you might get there in 30 - 40 minutes, or 90 minutes. Or worse. If you leave at 8 A.M. you might make it in 90 minutes, or you might need 3 hours.. It's a complete crapshoot.

Fort Greene- an area of Brooklyn that has seen great huge cycles of change. Going way way back. Forever. Adjoins The Brooklyn Navy Yard and docks...Magnificent brownstones.... Tough place to grow up in the 50s, 60s. In the 70s, 80s,90s almost an impossible place to grow up. Today, shit still happens, but it's more likely a fur wearer gets attacked by a PETA member than a honest citizen gets mugged.

The next time you're here and have time, if I'm here, I'd like to say hello.

Junior's Restaurant, it's still there at DeKalb and Flatbush now, but will likely be gone by the following time you're here. The family sold the building and property for 40 million bucks. They 've been turning down offers for years, Trying to keep the family legacy going, as it is....But how do you say no to 40 million? Luxury condos going in, that no average Brooklynite could afford if their income was multiplied by ten... Juniors...Great looking building, you might want to take a picture in front, or of it. The food has been up and down for ages, once was wonderful years ago. The cheesecake, still very darn good, but not like dying and going to heaven like once upon a time. A delicious, moist, homemade Jewish Cheesecake, or delicious, moist, homemade Italian cheesecake, can whip it. There's pics I took of Junior's, and the windows of cheesecakes, in the video...


Entered at Tue May 13 18:01:29 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks for your response Jed. I chose you as the ref because I think I can reason with you. When I met some Levonistas in Canada and the US it was exactly as you suggested a meeting would be between adversaries on the GB. Here's how it went down. Our mutual buddy said to me, "brown eyed girl don't say a word about Levon because he's a Levonista (referred to Robbie as the robster on this site) and he's been to his home." I've admitted that I have been critical of Levon's book because it is here that the public record feulled the fire. Robbie was willing to work with Levon again. The Eagles never forgave Felder for his tell all book which I haven't started yet. Heck, I still have 150 pages to go with the 700 page bio on Neil Young.

Anyway, he then tells his buddy, "Look brown eyed girl is a huge fan of Robbie so don't say anything negative about Robbie." Well, as soon as we met....I broke the ice by asking him where the heck is First Avenue in Cabbagetown????? I read this info in Levon's book that Robbie lived there and I live in Cabbagetown and I can't find any First Avenue!!!!!!

One of them said, "Why is it that you can't like both of them without having to take sides?" I said, "I only took sides when I opened this GB and saw Robbie being brutally attacked." I took the hits many times but when I'm clear about something I'm fearless. In the end I realized that I was drawn to the ffffffff because I lived in a feud in my household so it was familiar to me......not pleasant but familiar. I think I mellowed out with age and wisdom. Also, as I've previously posted I forgave a family member when my mom passed.....twenty eight years after the fact......It really helped me to change as a person....gradually as I was similar to Levon in that I became a very bitter person who couldn't let go of grudges and emotional pain....Once I did.....I felt lighter as a person and became thick skinned.....Sorry, probably too much info here but that's how I roll.

I'm a passionate kind of person so I can seem really dramatic at times but I never went after anyone just for the sake of being mean-spirited. The one time I went after someone was Butch when I OD on sugar!!!! And it was the time Robbie was playing in Ottawa and I wasn't able to attend the function. Maybe Butch you were having a bad day on Mother's day? I had just met you on the Blues Cruise with Levon and Johansen and Sumlin and Vivino and I went right up to you because the late Paul Godfrey told me to tell Levon hi for him. Your face dropped when I introduced myself maybe because you had sent emails calling me a moron. I did however respect that you never went after me in public only privately. lol...I was really surprised when you posted that I should have stopped Barrie and you when I saw both of you walk past me to see The Rascals in NYC. I thought you really disliked me because I was a Band fan who "evolved" in to a Robbiesonian....I never refer to Robbie as Robertson so I've never been a Robertsonian....LOL.....

I'm apologizing now Butch as I won't be at the Woodstock gathering or I would apologize in person and yeah.....that photo that Wallsend posted of you and Garland.....yeah.....made me look at you in a different way...lol......."I would apologize if I could see your eyes" (Joseph Arthur)......maybe Barrie told you that I was emailing her about the painting that ZZZZZ was selling of Rick Danko so money could be raised in your honour for your surgery? I even have the same blood type as you and was considering helping out and then someone in Levon's camp told me that Levon's buddies should be doing that! I never posted on this site about your surgery because when I do that very small group of people that believe I'm evil like Robbie would say I'm not sincere that I'm being phony, etc. I'm thick skinned now.....I just don't dig the gossiping on public sites about my character especially when those posting have never even met me. I'm cool with someone not liking me but when they try and get others to feeeeel the same way....says more about them....imagezulu will tell anyone how difficult I can be but I'm not a mean-spirited person.

So you can see that this GB and the other off shoots are all dysfunctional and the divisions are deeeeep....with a small, very small group of people.....Many thanks to those who stay neutral or who don't add to the fuel.......I was naive to think that our love of this music would heal all wounds. I could write a book about this site but I'm not a writer.........Butch....It was mean-spirited what you posted about Wallsend and Peter. Peter has contributed his time and energy and passion to this site. He deserves respect. Wallsend contributed photo that helped me to apologize to you publicly..He can't be all bad. lol

Ok everyone on a lighter note.....Could any of you tell me why oh why does imagezulu dig upstate NY's Donna The Buffalo but not Levon or any Band anything??????? Another suggestion Jed is to meet in Rochester on the long weekend in August as this might be the one show I can get him to go again. He introduced them to me. Back in the GB it was.....hmmmm.....He's from NY area I think....Dr. Pepper? who brought up this group to our attention as well.

Peter!!!!!!!!!!! Are you kidding me? You're going to be in Brooklyn now instead of.........Ahhhhhh.......Ok let's meet in Norway then! :-D


Entered at Tue May 13 17:42:18 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, Jeff and others - a non-Band question. How long would you reckon it takes from Fort Greene area of Brooklyn to Newark Airport for a 10 a.m. check in? i.e,. assuming a lot of luggage, so a cab, what time do you reckon it takes? 100% selfish – we're flying into NYC then straight out the next day but one after visiting my son, and our flight out is from Newark. Weekday morning.


Entered at Tue May 13 17:34:28 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Reunion?

The natural place to celebrate a web site is the location of the web site itself, Halden. We can grill fish on Jan's weary server. (I'd go fishing anyway.)


Entered at Tue May 13 17:04:48 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend: thanks for sharing Rick's quote about Robbie's singing (and thanks to Harris too). I wonder if Rick sang "Stage Fright" with the idea in mind that it was about Robbie himself - in part at least.


Entered at Tue May 13 16:47:32 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG

Reunion? NYC is a fine place to meet,although a ref won't be needed.When people meet face to face they either lose their nerve or act righteously by not pushing topics or issues that might upset the other person.In fact,I've seen Internet"enemies" meet,spend quality time together and never mention the topics that got them going in the first place.If I knew my words would hurt RR's friends or family or Levon's friends or family I wouldn't say those words and I doubt anyone here would.We'd probably behave with compassion and understanding noting the distinct hurt of family and friends.Anyone can dig dirt up on anybody in life or death.Kindness might preclude such behaviors.So,no need for a ref.The Internet brings out some our worst characteristics sometimes and we need to remember our words affect real people.And,no I am not in Levon's or RR's "camp"(whatever that means)-I'm in The Bands camp.


Entered at Tue May 13 15:44:02 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you PSB. I am waiting for my copy thanks to the gift cards of my former students. :-D Tell the truth now.....Isn't this cover the absolute best ever? I just adore Mike Scott and his musicality....When he interjects with talking....I can feeeeeel him right beside me. Music is all about connecting and feeeeeling.
My favourite place in the world.....where there is music.
Btw, are you going to share your interview with Bob Marley? I'm still waiting......... :-D


Entered at Tue May 13 15:32:04 CEST 2014 from (72.78.33.234)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Harris etc

BEG,yes there are unpublished photos all by Harris except for the shot of the cover. There are no photos of Robbie, evidently paying for a photo was not in the budget.

Peter, it seems the review copies of the book were sent out at the end of April. I received another copy and a friend of mine, another well known music journalist received his first copy. He randomly opened to a page and immediately found something wrong, in fact something I'd missed. For the remainder of that night, he sent me 16 more emails chock full of additional wrong facts.


Entered at Tue May 13 15:28:36 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Kieran Smith Portrait of Levon Helm
Pencil on paper , 2009
61cm x 87cm
View close-up


Entered at Tue May 13 14:50:40 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, from Flatbush and Bergen the fastest train ride to Coney Island is to walk to 7th ave and Flatbush, grab the Q train, direct, or if it's running, the B express to Brighton Beach, transfer to the Q. Don't bother with starting out in one of the stations down there..... Driving down from Connecticut, going through Manhattan via the FDR, over the Brooklyn Bridge, is more direct than the Triboro to the BQE, And if the FDR is not backed up, definitely much faster. Odds of the BQE being a mess are greater than the FDR being a mess.

Pete, no one's blanket statements apply. Especially wet ones. Truth is truth. Over and out.


Entered at Tue May 13 14:45:21 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Joan/Peter/Ari and anyone else who has Harris' book on The Band: Are there really 16 unpublished photos? I didn't order Landy's latest photo book as I already have two others and the new one was very pricey. At the time I saw a lot of concerts last year and spent money that I normally wouldn't have so I had to say no to something. lol

Wallsend...Thank you. I enjoyed the song you shared. When you said that it would be an Indian song I thought it would be Native, but as soon as I heard the sitar.....South Asian is the politically correct term now. The song was very relaxing. I will add it to the songs I have for meditating.

Uhhhh Jed....Do ya see now.....why you'll have to be the ref if we all get together in Woodstock? If it's true that some of us are not welcomed; we could still meet in NYC and see Bob F's daughter perform...Amy Helm, Garland Jeffreys......David Johansen.....I'd really like to see Patti Smith as I've never been to one of her shows. I"ve been to Woodstock with imagezulu but he just doesn't get it......snob jazz guy and all. I could give you the Levon cards I brought back from my last trip so you could bring to the gathering and share with everyone.....

You were wrong about there being too much testosterone at Eric Clapton's Guitar Fest as the female fans.......were fans.....and not just tagging along with their guys. When I also saw The Rascals on this trip I couldn't believe that some of the women at the show were only there because their partners were fans. They didn't even know who The Rascals were. As far as the performers having too much testosterone.....yes, yes, yes.....I couldn't believe that Susan Tedeshi sang back up and didn't even pick up a guitar!!!!! Jeff Beck's bassist.....She was great even though I find Jeff's music brilliant but cold....Robbie's playing as you know is so emotional....In person he's not warm and welcoming like Garland......I'm quite reserved at first also if you don't know me but very quickly I'm friendly and your girl next door...but with a definite edge as I can snap.....

The other day I was at one of our local church rummage and bake sale....and I couldn't believe it!!!!!!! Once again I missed out by a minute looking through all these CDS....especially for imagezulu as he's always looling for jazz and blues CDS. This guy had about 70 CDS. He told me that he took all of the jazz....ha, ha, ha. I immediately looked for my partner as he was working that afternoon......and found Jimmy Smith and Webster. Anyway, then he tries to get a deal and asks if he can only pay 60.00. I turned around and said, "How greedy can you get? You took practically all of the CDS which you will probably sell for more money and the money is going to this church and you can't afford one dollar for a CD???!!! He quietly says that the money is not going to the church. I ask the volunteer where is the money going? She tells me it's going to Estonia for an education program for girls. I just glared at this guy.....'cause he told me earlier that he'll be listening to some of this music.....I know what he'll be doing with the rest.....

Anyway, any thoughts Jed about NYC? The others who were going to try and join me in Woodstock could all meet in NYC instead. It's all good....really.


Entered at Tue May 13 14:21:45 CEST 2014 from (108.195.5.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Digging

Putemup, Thanks for the info on the guitarist for Mavis Staples. Seems like a real feel player, and suits the music well. Sorry to hear about your trouble with the hooligan in the neighborhood. Gotta be on your toes at all times I suppose.

The travel time in Brooklyn can indeed be lengthy at times. I have a friend who used to live at Flatbush and Bergen, and one time we took the subway down to Coney Island. It felt like we were on the train forever, and I couldn't believe that we had been traveling the entire time in Brooklyn heading basically due South.

I've had some long drives on the BQE as well. When I would drive into Brooklyn from Connecticut, depending on the time and day, I found it was often quicker to drive into Manhattan, and take the Brooklyn Bridge back into Brooklyn, or one of the tunnels, instead of dealing with the Triborough bridge and the Brooklyn Queens "Expressway".

Wallsend, It may seem like I missed the point of your post, or didn't give you the reaction that you were looking for, but you essentially posted a quote from Rick that was complimentary towards Robbie. I then posted something that was positive about Rick, and made the point that it was consistent with Rick's character to be positive in that way.

It would be neat and easy to lump everyone into one camp of another, but I think it's important to remember that many people who post here are fans of The Band first, and don't necessarily need or want to choose sides. Many people came in through the "enjoyment of the music" door. Sure, many people have their personal preferences and leanings, but that doesn't mean it has to be a completely divisive situation.

I realize that these men were public figures and put themselves out there, but I don't personally feel the need to look at Robbie's tax returns, or read the legal briefs from his divorce, or know what is in his medical file. It's really none of my business, and wouldn't add to my enjoyment of the music. I guess I'm not that kind of "historian".


Entered at Tue May 13 11:53:27 CEST 2014 from (58.104.25.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The thing I don't understand about the people in the 'Levon camp' is why they think it is OK to use the most vile and disgusting language about other people but are so easily offended if anyone offers up an opinion they don't happen to like even if it is phrased in the most moderate way. It just seems like bullying to me.


Entered at Tue May 13 10:59:43 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

well said Peter.


Entered at Tue May 13 10:24:37 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Oh, alright …

I was intending to leave this …

If only it were a “discussion” rather than seeking agendas and getting huffed up. Basically, there will always be a divide between the close friends of the later Band, mainly quite geographically defined in the north-east of America, and the rest of the world. Many years ago, those friends started their own forum. That makes sense because their view will always be different.

The Band sold millions of records, and that wasn’t enough. I used to track and note references in the magazines and never a month went by with fewer than three or four. Add the download era. I was in a secondhand vinyl store the other day, 5 or 6 customers, all under thirty, and we were talking about The Band.

The Band is an important part of music history. There is interest way beyond Woodstock and way beyond a restricted era. The friends lobby are very sensitive about sex, drugs and rock … no, not rock … but financial and legal issues. As I’ve said repeatedly, the primary source for the “dark side” is Levon’s own book. Add Ronnie Hawkins interviews, and Robbie has had quite a bit to say in interviews too. So there’s a whole load of information out there, readily available. I think it is indeed more productive to discuss the music than the other stuff, and the other stuff has probably been raked over, and wrung dry here, let alone anywhere else, but I really can’t buy that discussing it would suddenly upset family members, who must have read it all twenty years ago.

I don’t get the “ban this bit of discussion” or “censor this” or Jed saying “I’ll probably get banned but …” Why would he get banned for stating an opinion freely? He wasn’t being aggressive or threatening. I am also fully aware of what’s said about me whenever this comes up, as an element of the old friends have taken a violent dislike to me. A lot dates from the Little Pink era, when discussions got really, really nasty and stuff got deleted. On both sides of the argument, I hasten to add.

Part of the issue back then is that the “Levonista” element was always more aggressive in stating their views than the “Robertsonian” elements (and actually, The Dankettes were the nicest people, which might reflect back on those comments on Rick’s good nature). You do pick up insights from reading stuff. Years ago, in a legal dispute, I mentioned that I thought my lawyer could be more “on my side.” He said, ‘Believe me, the last thing you want is a blindly-partisan lawyer wading in firing on all guns.” Reading Butch’s comments, I wonder if Levon was best-served by having deeply loyal but intensely partisan friends? Sometimes “Sorry, old pal, you’re flogging a dead horse with that line” is the best advice.

I like to hope that we’ve all mellowed … I have. The arguments here are tetchy rather than the violently aggressive of a few years ago.

I counsel everyone to read the rear cover of Ruben & The Jets. Are we (in Frank Zappa’s words) “Just a bunch of old men with rock & roll clothes on sitting around, mumbling about the good old days.”

I will change Zappa's "men" to "people". But if so, we could at least mumble nicely even if we're never going to agree.


Entered at Tue May 13 10:11:25 CEST 2014 from (58.104.25.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

PutEmUp, sorry to hear you had some strife on the street. That kind of thing is very nasty. I have got nothing but good will to all Band fans. Just because you have a different opinion to someone doesn't mean you have to dislike them as a person.

Rod, Thanks for that, I will check it out and see if I can find the original source.


Entered at Tue May 13 10:05:10 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I think that quote from Rick about Robbie's singing was from a Rolling Stone article written when one of Robbie's first two albums came out. I wasn't there but I believe it's true.


Entered at Tue May 13 09:31:32 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend, you're either a babe in the woods, or just a beginner spinner. You don't want to know from any kind kind of real life defensive or offensive action spurred by an emotion of a equivalent power as malice from my corner. I don't have malice in me (anyone can portray me any ficticious way they want,and many have done so when they can't hold up an argument fairly, it don't make it so) , but can pull out other things when necessary. That would get saved for a real threat, or someone attempting to do me or mine real harm. Happened on the street here exactly a week ago. Kid bout half my age, tried picking a fight in the street. Went far out of his way, came at me. . I tried laughing him off at first, but the guy wanted trouble. Came at me and went straight for my glasses. . Was obviously looking for someone he thought he could hurt, or intimidate. Kid found out quick he made a big mistake in judgment. Ended up in jail too,through central booking, and got let loose by da judge. Neighborhood punk I never seen before, but he's very local, so now i gotta be on the lookout all the time.

See, you ain't no real threat, yo can't even try to bust my glasses. Like steve used to say, what can happen, can someone jump through your computer? You just want to be a minor nuisance to people. Get under our skin... No big deal....

BTW, i doubt Todd missed what you wanted him to notice. but, like i said, you're posts are just a minor nuisance. There's all kinds of ways to answer people. What makes you think anyone really wants to or will give you the satisfaction you seek? Many of us been ignoring you for a long time, and I'd expect many are probably going to go back to just that. The GB can be a lot of fun, or it can be a real waste of time. But when people avoid talking about The Band, it's usually to avoid the kind of nonsense you want to perpetuate. so you are just defeating yourself, cause the people who you want to engage, well, they'll go bacl to ignoring you again. You'll only lower the property value here for everyone else. Sayonara.


Entered at Tue May 13 08:16:38 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have a project on that gives me little time to read the Craig Harris yet, but that Rick Danko quote made me open it and I'd read four of five pages without noticing. Really just 81 to 85, but I was pulled along even though I knew it mainly!

He lets it speak in quotes, which is good. He has found good quotes too from a variety of sources. There are slips of fact … Richard singing Caledonia Mission, and slips of language. "Acclimated" is surely "Acclimatized." I thought it like so many books in 2014 … no one thought it worth paying a good editor, who would surely have picked up both. EVERYONE needs editing, believe me.

The margins are the normal size for a paperback novel, but I'd increase them for this format. Again, the text design is not great. Too little white space to break things up. In close text, the use of double quote marks is unusually old-fashioned. Single quotes look cleaner. There are too many quotes close together to use italic though. I think a professional text designer would have improved the book enormously. The first thing they would have done is add 32 pages to the extent and let the text breathe more. BUT 32 pages costs money. It's already priced high compared to major publishers, and 32 pages more hikes it higher. I would still have done it.

Anyway, it IS readable, and i thought the general content of those four or five pages was OK too.


Entered at Tue May 13 08:08:52 CEST 2014 from (58.104.25.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Todd, going through garbage bags is old school, easier to use the internet. I am sure Rick was a lovely guy but I think you missed the point of the quote.

PutEmUp, thanks for the advice, I very much appreciate the spirit of malice with which it was given.

Kerrin, I think Cathy was right. The playing is good but where is the originality?


Entered at Tue May 13 05:05:25 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, i believe Rick Holstrom is still Mavis's guitarist and band leader. She has often said she hears alot of Pops in his playing.

I'd have liked to have seen that show... Williamsburg is a rough get to these days. Sign of the times...traffic, density, etc etc. From Sheepshead Bay, if you get unusually lucky,and sail through the Belt and BQE, you can get there in twenty minutes .These days, the odds are one in a thousand of that happening. It's more likely that no matter how you drive there , even through the streets, knowing every short cut possible, it's a hour to hour and half trip. Or more. Then you gotta deal with parking. OFf times, occassionally not a big deal, even now. But, often or usually, it's a treasure hunt. By train, it's an easy 90 minute to two hours from sheepshead bay.Involving three or four transfers.Late at night,getting back from Williambsurg by train, it could be a two and half to three hour ordeal. Specially with the post Hurricane Sandy work still being done on the train lines... So, do you suffer driving and parking there, or suffer with the train? No joke. Last week i trained it to wiliamsburg, met a friend in an old school bar that no hipster would have the balls to walk into. Old school, real Brooklyn. Williamsburg natives, and if someone wasn't from Williamsburg, they were from a Caribbean or Central American Island. It was a 90 minute train ride each way, but well worth it. Ice cold beers, cubes frozen to the bottles, good people, mostly 50 and up, and no nonsense muthas. Real Brooklyn ain't disappeared yet. 15 years from now, if the world is still around, real Brooklyn will be mostly a memory. Just about extinct except in the personalities of some people. Hey, things chnage. Just how it is.....


Entered at Tue May 13 04:29:47 CEST 2014 from (108.195.5.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Jeff, I suppose I was loosely considering the post LW years as starting in 1976 and going until the late 1990's. But what's a few years either way among friends, eh?

I wasn't at this show, but apparently there was a good time going on in Brooklyn this past Friday night. Mavis Staples was in town and Amy Helm guested with her on a fun and funky rendition of 'The Weight'. I really like the sound of her band.......especially the guy playing the tasty Tele licks.

And, a nice surprise to hear Amy take the Crazy Chester verse! Good times, and should warm the hearts of even the most grizzled GB veterans. Had a smile on my face the entire clip. Linked above.


Entered at Tue May 13 04:25:38 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Yeah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Tue May 13 02:41:36 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, i was temporarily unable to add or subtract, It's 16 years. 83 to 99. Unless you count some of or all of the other years in between 76 and 83. What you just wrote about Rick,is so true, he elevated everyone with his personality. Every time. In dozens of encounters and conversations over the years, that's always how it was. And in everything I ever observed. Every time. Not a bad natured bone in the man. And in talking with other people. you won't find anyone who will say anything bad about the man. He had his faults and issues, but he was a good man, never hurt nobody. If you knew him at all, you could see his idea of living was to make anything he could better.


Entered at Tue May 13 02:31:34 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend, the best advice i could give you regarding your posts is that if you intend to continue on your chosen path in life, you should take a ride to Chicago and learn from De Master Bater. (Baiter) You extend too much effort. I'm always impressed how effortless it seems for Pat to deride The Band of the 80s and 80s. There's Coca Cola, and there's R.C. Cola, Then there's Kirsch. Pat's the Real Thing. You're still the cocoa nut pal. But, there's hope for ya. It's about summer time, good time for a drive. Or you could just keep checking in here, and pay close attention to Pat. Seriously, the man is an artiste. You have a chance to learn from the best. Kinda like a ten year old getting drum lessons for Levon. No small thing.....

Pat, hat's off to you. I have to appreciate your artistry.


Entered at Tue May 13 02:16:55 CEST 2014 from (108.195.5.212)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Jeff, I'm not sure about the actual years. I was in a hurry earlier and trying to do quick math in my ever slowing mind. Let's just call it the better part of two decades.

Wallsend, I think one of Rick's special qualities was his way of elevating everyone he came into contact with. In the relatively brief one-on-one time that I was fortunate to spend with Rick in 1988, I felt better about myself and walked away with the feeling that I had made a new best friend. It's a combination of his natural charisma, and his genuine fondness for other human beings, and I'm sure that's one of the dynamics that helped to make The Band as special as it was. I'm not surprised that he said that about Robbie's singing. On another day he may have named Richard as one of his favorites.....or Levon. Rick was a real team player.

Pat B, Condolences for the loss of your musical friend and colleague.


Entered at Tue May 13 01:09:19 CEST 2014 from (58.104.7.237)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Nice one BEG, I liked that. I think the trick with putting songs together is to take familiar elements and rework them so it is something new. Easier said than done. I liked the individual playing and also liked how it built up towards the end. I have another one with an Indian feel for you.


Entered at Tue May 13 00:23:50 CEST 2014 from (58.104.7.237)

Posted by:

Wallsend

PutEmUp, I thing you are right. When it comes to posting nonsense I think I still have a lot to learn from you guys. I don't think I will ever be able to top Butch's last post. I have taken a screen shot of it, framed it and put it above my computer. After all, I am just some random guy on the internet but that was written by the former road manager of The Band.

I know I still have a lot to learn so I would appreciate any feedback you might have on this potential post:

“Robbie was always one of my favourite singers, but he was always shy of the microphone, might have been an element of stage fright there. He would sing the parts for us and we would reproduce them” Rick Danko, quoted in Craig Harris, The Band: Pioneers of American Music, New York: Rowan and Littlefield, 2014, p.81.


Entered at Mon May 12 23:18:31 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: The Real Thing

Todd, I think old Pat just had to show the new kids how a pro fertilizes the field. They really are amateurs, just pesky...Pat, now Pat's Coca Cola.

I agree, the reemergence of The Band was very enjoyable and for me, filled with great highlights, many amazing shows, many partially amazing shows. And i am an extremely tough customer when it comes to music and performance. Connected to that, I have ears that still amaze engineers. "The post LW thing" also marked some wonderful personal times, with friends from various walks of life. The Band continued being important in my life, and they were The Real Thing ..... I think the time frame was longer than 21 years -didn't "the post LW thing" span from 83 till Rick died in 99?


Entered at Mon May 12 22:59:38 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Cellophane City


Entered at Mon May 12 21:34:34 CEST 2014 from (174.252.33.179)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Post TLW

Jeff, I can only guess that "the post LW thing" refers to the vibrant and productive 21 year career of The Band that many of us enjoyed after Robbie's early retirement in 1976.. It seems that there was also a "pre LW thing" that spanned a comparatively brief 16 year period that many of us also enjoyed.

I'm still not sure why we're not allowed to enjoy both eras of the "thing".

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to rejoin my pal AJ Webbernan. He says he's got a bead on some bags of garbage that were found in Malibu.


Entered at Mon May 12 20:20:19 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat- what is "the post LW thing" that you referenced twice in your post about Pete Special's death?


Entered at Mon May 12 19:50:16 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: For Peter V

Peter, the unexpected thing about the Ernest Lough recording (and, other than hearing on the radio so often when young, one of the few things I remember about it) is that it was made by HMV's mobile recording van. I'd've thought that unusual for that time.


Entered at Mon May 12 19:31:55 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Pete Special was a great guitarist and a great human. He was in Big Twist and The Mellow Fellows, one of the best bands ever, anywhere. They opened for the post LW thing at the Auditorium in Chicago in 1983. Pete spent some time with the post LW thing and played guitar on a number of live dates-one or two are in the tape library. He and I did one of the Tributosaurus Band gigs and we had a lot of laughs over the years. He passed Sunday morning.


Entered at Mon May 12 19:21:26 CEST 2014 from (24.161.13.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: Beautiful West Saugerties, New York
Web: My link

Subject: This discussion

A Big Band fan here, just down the road a piece from Big Pink, well over 425 Band and directly related shows under the my belt, Rick used to joke with me that I knew more fans of The Band than he did himself. That's my stage pass from The Band opening for The Grateful Dead at their last show(s) in Chicago, 1995.

Some of the posts over these last couple of months from people afar have just plain left me forlorn, and frankly disgusted. To this life-long Hudson Valley resident, I thank Mrs. Claire, my fourth grade teacher who taught me just because I CAN say something does in no way imply that I SHOULD say something.

When Mr. Dener and Mr. LoBue are on the same side of a discussion, they can both count on me to be in their corner of the ring. (A Band family community note, only they caught on).

Many years ago, the American Baseball manager was having a problem with a young know-it-all pitcher. Earl Weaver took the young wise-guy, who was killing team morale, aside and said, "It's what you learn after you know it all that counts."

Whether it be "super weed" or long lost and forgotten contracts, cool it, please, you're hurting The Band and it's community.....you're only serving yourselves.


Entered at Mon May 12 18:55:58 CEST 2014 from (80.31.32.113)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: "The Band" Embroidered Baseball Cap

Back in stock, order now from levonhelm.com! They go fast...


Entered at Mon May 12 18:13:24 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I do believe in your hexagram …

On disputes, I opened a book of graffiti this morning (an alternative to the I Ching, I guess) and saw "Suppose they held a war. And nobody came."


Entered at Mon May 12 15:04:13 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Historians

Butch is right, so is Jeff and so is Jed. You might as well say that the loonie people who write National Enquirer are historians. That's probably what these two guys read.

It amazes me what satisfaction these guys can get digging thru some one's dirty laundry and spewing it out here to try and show off what great historians they are.

I said it a while back. There are people who look in here who are friends and family of these band members. Very obviously these guys are too thick between the ears to understand the effects of what they are saying. It was remarked on before by the host of this page. I expect that he is trying to be fair with "freedom of speech", but this sort of crap is constantly pushing the envelope.

In the 10 or 12 years I've participated on this page, I don't think I've seen anyone who wants to be the dog nawing on the bone so much. It's not entertaining or insightful.


Entered at Mon May 12 14:15:40 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.51)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kerrin, you might think you're making a quilt, but it's a collection of incongruity, and will never keep you warm.It's always gonna be rag tag, full of holes,pieces that are too thick, not shaped appropriately, smelly and moldy. Wallsend, either word, you are wrong. Lisa told a story. That's all she did. And in her story, her family had to participate....But hey, if you enjoy being incorrect, you're doing a thorough job. Have a party man, live it up!

Fact is, you guys are always going to do your thing. .. ...Play ball, all you like, beach comb, sew, have a party. But, in the end, it don't mean a thing if you ain't got that swing....


Entered at Mon May 12 11:28:25 CEST 2014 from (110.32.178.245)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

PutEmUp, one definition of 'suggestion' is 'The sequential process by which one thought or mental image leads to another.' I think in those broader terms, my use of the word was appropriate but I am happy to replace it with 'idea'.


Entered at Mon May 12 10:46:35 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Solomon

Solomon, those SNL clips were the business! I'm too lazy to go looking, but when someone was discussing Chasing the Dragon a few months back, they quoted Cathy Smith telling Levon after an early TV appearance with the RCO All Stars that it was crap, that they clearly weren't ready and he shouldn't have done it. Is this the show? Really??


Entered at Mon May 12 10:44:44 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Absolutely, Rod. 99.999% of fans didn't have a personal (or even professional) relationship with Band members. I don't make the connection that acknowledging their financial situations is somehow besmirching their names, but I guess I've become more objective as I've grown older and just see it as a sequence of historical facts. To me, interesting ones. That objectivity may escape those who were closer, I can totally understand that, but they are in the vast minority and this is a discussion page for fans sharing information. PutEmUp(Friend0 I think said you can't make a quilt, but that is exactly what us amateur historians do. One piece at a time, newspaper clippings, Google searches, and input from people who post here. We will never know it all, but we know far more than we used to. One thing this page is not is a megaphone for telling dedicated fans to "jerk off all alone".


Entered at Mon May 12 09:48:58 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Butch??? This is a Band fan web site we discuss The Band - good and bad. I get kind of p*ss*d when people start saying "you can't discuss this 'cause you weren't there". That would be death to history.


Entered at Mon May 12 08:40:10 CEST 2014 from (92.18.181.31)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Levon Helm & The Rco All-Stars - Ain't That A Lot Of Love (SNL 1977)

Kerrin, I never noticed it was on the same website. Thanks.


Entered at Mon May 12 07:53:08 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Radio

I’ve got it wrong by a year, Ian. I was told it was one of the early broadcasts on the Bournemouth transmitter, which was one of the earliest batch of BBC radio stations. BBC radio started in 1922, and I’d guessed Bournemouth was then, but I checked and it opened as 6BM on 17th October 1923. He was a choirboy and I assume it must have been before his voice broke, so 11 in 1923. The Ernest Lough, the first EMI million-selling record was 1927. So he missed his chance! There was a famous early recording by Melba from 1910. 6BM was what made the reputation of the BSO (Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra) in the 1920s, and the old Winter Gardens (where I did lights) had a recording studio control, room under the stage.

Apparently the one act version of A View From The Bridge was in verse. The two-act version we know is said to have had major input from director Peter Brook … one of the all-time greats.


Entered at Mon May 12 07:33:47 CEST 2014 from (100.34.37.27)

Posted by:

Peter M

Location: East Coast Zydecoligical Observatory & Turtle Ranch

Subject: Jed, Butch (outch! sounds too much like "Jed Bush" too me)

As we say in the zydeco, "Yeah, you right!".


Entered at Mon May 12 07:13:53 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.244)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend, strictly for the sake of trying to highlight and hopefully end the constant need for many people here to alter other people's words, Lisa did not suggest anything of the sort. Lisa told a story about something her family did when her kids were teenagers. Your idea to extend the practice to this GB on a voluntary basis may be fine, but Lisa made no such suggestion.


Entered at Mon May 12 05:44:56 CEST 2014 from (58.104.2.69)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

How about we pick up on Lisa's suggestion and each offer a piece of music that we like that other people may not have heard. Linked is my recommendation.


Entered at Mon May 12 03:22:12 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Genius may well now be an overused word, but we live in these times so might as well get used to it. I'm comfortable with the ideathat our guys were and/or are, individually and collectively geniuses.

Wallsend: I appreciate your beachcomingand your willingness to share your discoveries, even if I don't always like / accept / agree with your 'gloss' on certain situations. I also think that that it's not necessarily unreasonable to connect thing 25 years apart. Just look at the housing market in many places over the decades. It doesn't seem fair to blame all of those laid-off industrial workers in the rustbelt for having failed to foresee the global economic trends.


Entered at Mon May 12 03:11:21 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Great finds, Solomon. Sing Sing Sing sounds fantastic with the shuffle feel. I presume this is how Dr John wrote it, and Levon adapted it shortly after for the RCO album.

Here is the video link for "Ain't That A Lot Of Love".


Entered at Mon May 12 01:44:37 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Butch

Can't just sit back here and ignore what the man said.He spoke truth.And I've been too chicken of getting banned here to state my views,but after reading Butch's words I feel ashamed of my ongoing silence.Perhaps it's worth being banned but I've felt uncomfortable coming here since this witch hunt initially began (beach combing my ass) and since this recent round of witch hunting started again.Besmirching under the guise of innocent inquiry.Relentless.Waits in the brush for awhile and then re emerges for the hunt.I have no bad feelings and none of Levon's feelings about RR but this pit bullish crap of finding any opportunity to knock the guys is so obvious.Someone asked this person,what is your purpose? I think it's self evident.To rehash addictions,bankruptcies and trash,why? To pretend to be interested in other topics to cover up for a return to tearing down our guys.Why? Not looking for answers to whats clearly known,but felt obligated to at least stand by Butch's words. I'll retreat again.


Entered at Mon May 12 01:44:01 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Peter V

Peter, was that before or after the Ernest Lough recording?

My wife pointed out that A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE, whilst most commonly staged in two acts,was originally written as a one act play.


Entered at Mon May 12 00:03:24 CEST 2014 from (87.205.213.55)

Posted by:

Tomas

Web: My link

English Waltz is the best hands down : )) this is very very nice site. I congregate videos materials about music and dance with English Waltz I hope you will like it :)


Entered at Sun May 11 23:11:40 CEST 2014 from (92.18.217.29)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Levon Helm & The Rco All-Stars - Sing Sing Sing (SNL 1977) Disable Adblock Plus to watch.


Entered at Sun May 11 22:58:13 CEST 2014 from (92.18.217.29)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: RCO All-Stars

The RCO All-Stars sing “Ain’t That a Lot of Love” I would love to find this one! Another performance from three very talented performers with the drummer taking over the vocals this time. This is even better than the first song with some great vocals, instrumental work, and it all equals out to be one of the great performances in the season so far. A+ Season 2 Episode 17, 19 March 1977.


Entered at Sun May 11 22:49:12 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Bob's singing voice

Peter, that seems to be the effect Dylan's singing voice had on parents at the time. This is a quote from Al Kooper's highly enjoyable musical memoir "Backstage Passes":

"I also quickly discovered that if I played a Bob Dylan album too loud, it would bring my mother storming into the room in exactly twelve seconds. 'Who is that? That's terrible. It sounds like a fingernail on a blackboard. Turn that crap off.' His singing definitely struck a discordant note in parents; they were extremely intimidated by the sound of his voice. This helped it all make sense to me (and to millions of others my age, I'm sure, as well."


Entered at Sun May 11 22:35:51 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa, lovely memories. My dad was very proud of being an early singer on national radio aged ten, when one of the few BBC radio shows came from Bournemouth and he sang “Oh, For The Wings Of A Dove.” We have a photo in choir surplices. 1922.

Unfortunately this early experience made him a self-appointed musical expert and the two things that annoyed him most were The Four Seasons “Walk Like A Man” which I could not stop playing for days, then on LP, “Freewheeling” where he painstakingly explained that Bob Dylan could not sing.He was neither the first nor the last to make this point.


Entered at Sun May 11 21:13:56 CEST 2014 from (198.41.247.3)

Posted by:

RJ

Location: Ulster County

Never have I read such self-serving, immature drivel. No wonder they cut you off. Jeez.


Entered at Sun May 11 21:13:13 CEST 2014 from (58.104.2.69)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Adam

The guitar looks great. How about a few more photos. How is the sound? I guess to get a Robbie like sound you are going to have to play it through an appropriate amp.


Entered at Sun May 11 20:55:12 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mom's and Lisa

I like your "family music nights" t reminds me of sitting around a friends house playing the newest,Dylan or Joan Baez etc. Heady times those were.

On another page, Happy Mothers Day. My favorite Hallmark holiday.


Entered at Sun May 11 20:49:42 CEST 2014 from (58.104.2.69)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, I never thought of doing that with our kids but I did encourage them to take as much interest in music as I could. I hope I have planted a seed that will grow in the future. I was once talking to a guy in a music store and I was saying how I love music but I was frustrated because I have a weak sense of rhythm and a weak ear so my playing wasn't very good. He said, that's OK, even being able to appreciate music is a talent. I am sure he only said it to make me feel better but it is true. Lots of people go through life without enjoying music. I may not be very good when it comes to playing but I think I am a genius when it comes to appreciating music as is every one that listens to The Band.


Entered at Sun May 11 20:09:18 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Music/generations

In an effort to lighten things up a bit:

When my children were teenagers, we used to have music nights, where each of us would pick a piece of music, and the others would all have to listen to it, and give it serious consideration. We took turns, and any of their friends who happened to be around were invited to play too. I occasionally cheated a bit by playing something lengthy, like "Acadian Driftwood", but of course they were welcome to do that too. It was a lot of fun, and a good way to listen to music you normally would discount or dismiss.

When I was a kid I never heard popular music till I was about 11. My parents were musicians (professional, in my dad's case) and, while they didn't consider pop and rock the devil's music, they definitely thought it was second-rate and beneath their notice. When I asked for a transistor radio for Christmas they thought I wanted it to listen to Saturday Afternoon At The Opera, bless their naive hearts. But a few years later, I played "Alice's Restaurant" for my dad, and he liked it so much that he in turn played it for his dinner guests (also musicians) one night. They loved it! And he was impressed by Ginger Baker when I played his long drum solo from "Fresh Cream", too.

My mom was definitely more of a musical snob and never did learn to like contemporary music, but I distinctly remember her dancing around the living room with my baby brother in her arms to "Here, There, and Everywhere".


Entered at Sun May 11 19:02:48 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ringo

Jeff, you’re right about Ringo. I was thinking much the same. He did have some charisma thing (which he still carries) as well as being a great, solid drummer. Obviously he didn’t write much, and he was a pretty poor singer, but when they list multiple intelligences, and assign musical genius to Garth, and spatial intelligence to a footballer like Wayne Rooney, Ringo has some special sort of thing, and maybe it was partly down-to-earth likeability. Whatever it was some sort of glue, the last part in the equation.

I don’t think of Billy Joel as a genius either (I do Randy Newman), but there was something about his love of soul music and range that made him come to mind.


Entered at Sun May 11 18:49:31 CEST 2014 from (24.168.42.194)

Posted by:

Butch

Ok,,, enough of this bullshit,,, I dont know how perfect all your lives have been,, but that old adage of " walking a mile in someone else's moccasins" still holds true in my world. This wallsend putz has gone far enough. First of all, Levon and the men are Fathers, Brothers and friends of human beings and this constant hideous attack is just hurtful. Sorry that you arent as Blessed as I was, as Friend-o was to be close to the boss, but shut the fuck up. You know Nothing of this man, or the others in The Band. I was with Levon every second of his money troubles and his legal woes,, it was not fun nor pretty, but it was " Life & Life Only" . You wanna suck on Robertson's hind tit ,, so be it,,,but not ar the expense of my friends. Levon and Rick were sweet generous, to a fault, and others like Taplin, and other parasites took huge advantage of their good nature. I retained Attorney friends of mine to assist the Helms in times of need, at my own expense,,when i couldnt afford it either. Out of Love, Respect and devotion to the Music & the Music Makers. Jeff did what he could, Donabie, too The situation was not fun but much of Life's challenges are not fun, are they, wallsend? You should be ashamed of yourself, if you have any decency, but i doubt you are capable of it. Slam me if you want to, but i will go to my grave defending my brothers,, We Band fans and friends sit back and let the tiny, tiny " minds" of this page rant and rave on, but to bring up hurtful events, long finished, is needless and spiritually hurtful. As for your previous attempts on my reputation, i said i was not a politician, then you made a complete asswipe of your self linking to my Campaign page? I am a citizen trying to improve my Community. I ran for Legislator& Town Justice, Because the incumbents were politicians of the lowest order. I put myself & my life on hold to try & make lives better. Politicians only care a out their $$$people and their agendae. No one will ever be able to say that about the ( retired) Road Manager of The Band. So kiss meine tuchas, Viney, Wallsend and the other toads here,, You other true fans should rise up and defend our Men against these dweebs and trolls,, but they are vicious and nasty so i dont blame you all for cowering behind your computers. When those who i attacked here, today, come back after me,, i will be gone. Sorry,,, ( NOT) ! Your impotent and immature retorts will be reported to me, as they always are, by True Band Fans, but you will be forced to jerk off all alone. As i am sure you do,often,,,hahahaha,,, I will be here near Woodstock, Big Pink, The Barn, and Levon & Rick's Final Resting Place ! Happy in the knowledge of my life's contributions to The Band Legacy, and continue to further the Name of Levon Helm, in my own unique way. See ya, suckas,,, LMAO,, Bd


Entered at Sun May 11 18:15:20 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.244)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Genius

One thing I am certain of. No one will ever accuse any of us of being a fucking genius.


Entered at Sun May 11 17:43:01 CEST 2014 from (67.87.216.244)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pete, I need to revise my evolving position in this discussion.

To me, a huge part of genius lies in the effect of one's work on the people to whom it has been exposed.... i think genius must knock you on your ass, alter you..... whether or not it has been consumed en mass has nothing to do with it....

The Band, well ,The Band was genius. And what the 5 men accomplished together was, both the 5 playing on their own together, and with His Bobness. And you could hear it after they were together, in their individual or different combo performance too, in their accompaniest work too. In their individualunique genius, once they achieved it together, it was theirs, sometimes it was pulled out, other times not, but very damn often you could hear the genius in Rick's voice, or a run, same goes for Levon, Richard, Garth, since he's not a singer, in his playing.

...Garth i believe would have achieved genius all alone. I wonder if the other would have. Odds are yes, cause their genius was so unique, so personal. But you still have to wonder. But all i know is the effect those guys had on me, when i saw them play, together, and alone, plenty of genius moments. Genius moves, genius leaves one body and changes others, it leaves one soul, and changes others, it effects people, indelibly, in a huge way. It's not necessarily saying that people enjoy genius, which they might. But artistic or social genius (MLK) has a massive effect on those exposed to it. And they don't need to know they just dealt with genius. scientific- The light bulb, does it make you happy? The polio vaccine? But we all are effected by Edison's and Salk's genius..

At the same time,Genius can exist in a vacuum...

As talented as Joel and Newman are, as great as their work and body of work are, even considering their appeal, I wouldn't consider either a genius. I'm not saying i do or don't consider the rest of your examples geniuses or not. The Beatles, that was genius. Would Paul, George, and John have accomplished Genius on their own, without each other. Would The Beatles have achieved Genius had Ringo not joined? Once they achieved that though, it never left any of em. I wouldn't say there's genius in Ringo's solo work,but there's definitely something way beyond charisma in him ever since The Beatle days, I don't know what it is,but Ringo was an integral part of genius, and maybe that is it. It had to change him. And he changes people.


Entered at Sun May 11 13:13:40 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wooooow! It just finally sunk in......I know that name Subban!! PK's dad was a former teacher from former City of York where I taught as well....He later became a principal....now newly retired. Wow, wow, wow....small world! Bob Marley and all of the caribbean (father from Jamaica and mom from Montserrat) would be proud of PK's (turns 25 on Tuesday May 13) skills and showmanship!!!! He's the reason I'm watching the Habs.


Entered at Sun May 11 12:30:40 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

A Song For Mama


Entered at Sun May 11 12:19:43 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm and Me

Photo found in Cathy Smith's book of Levon watching a baseball game.


Entered at Sun May 11 12:02:06 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sonic Storm

Just another Blogs.poughkeepsiejournal.com site


Entered at Sun May 11 11:56:25 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Shawn Thornton Sprays P.K. Subban With Water, Sparks Latest ‘Controversy’ (Video)


Entered at Sun May 11 10:45:56 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Genius … I chose Shakespeare and Dylan, as unmatchable. Actually as time rolls on, Leonard Cohen and Paul Simon are pretty close to Dylan, and I’d argue both have done more interesting stuff over the last 30 years, but Dylan’s overall achievement does stand alone, like the Bard’s. BARD'S rather than BAND'S.

On The Band, you could probably take them one by one and match abilities. Is Robbie a better lyricist than Cohen or Simon? Is he a better guitarist than Ry Cooder? Is he a better tunesmith than Brian Wilson? Is Garth better or more original than Joe Zawinul? Is Rick better than Paul McCartney (bass, vocals, multi-instrumental)? Is Richard a better pianist / vocalist than Randy Newman? Though for some reason., Billy Joel (who I’m not a fan of) came to mind. Is Levon a better drummer than Steve Gadd? Is Levon a better rock / R&B singer than John Lennon? I’d say they’re equalled in most cases. But the clearest other example of putting them ALL together to create a greater whole, is probably The Beatles. At least for me.

On the younger generation. Fatherly, Jeff, not grandfatherly. The people making a serious impact (avoiding talent / idol shows) are more like 30 than 20. In the 60s and 70s, musicians could achieve the heights in their early twenties, and if you think about The Band, “retire” after TLW at thirty-three. Education and development takes longer … there are exceptions like Paolo Nuttini and Amy Winehouse, but generally it’s later. The “young” musicians I’m seeing are 35-ish.

The reason I mention folk. Yes, there are venues. Full of tribute bands they are too. If I go back to 67, 68, 69, friends in semi-pro soul bands were playing four or five times a week within a 30 mile radius, and would have been distraught if fewer than 400 had turned up to see them on weekend nights. Then the first pro-bands were playing smaller clubs and colleges, but five nights a week was common. This is not “a tour” which is wht we think of today, just regular working weeks, everything booked as a single date by the agency. Every college in the country had at least one regular weekly “dance” (the dancing had stopped largely by 69) with at least three bands on the bill. The third slot was the training ground.

Nowdays, a lot of “folk” is not really folk at all … I’m thinking Jon Boden solo (the original stuff is different to the folk stuff), or Seth Lakeman. But acoustic guitars, violins, melodeons and stomp boards plus a couple of small amps and monitors can be put in the back of a small van or large car. It makes the 60-100 person venue or slightly larger “arts centre” more viable financially.

Just three without thinking further. I think Jon Boden, Simone Felice, and Seth Lakeman would all have been major festival acts if they'd been working in 1971.


Entered at Sun May 11 05:49:07 CEST 2014 from (75.34.56.135)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Here is a photo of my new "Rock Of Ages"/Robbie Robertson tribute telecaster. It is incredible! Nobody will ever touch RR in 1971, and THIS was his greatest axe...


Entered at Sun May 11 05:14:33 CEST 2014 from (58.104.18.164)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The difference between greatness and genius. There is a lot to discuss there! Of course there is variation in terms of people's personal opinion but also attitudes change over time. Even Bach wasn't fully appreciated in his life time and after his death his style of music fell out of favour. Different musicians have different kinds of skills. I think the thing that impresses me most - and I wouldn't call this genius, just something I think is incredibly impressive - is when people can play anything. There is the scene in TLW when the guys aren't sure what Bob is going to play and Rick and Robbie are looking at Bob and you can just see they are waiting to see where he is going to take it. In that regard the piece that was posted a couple of days back about Robbie and Van was interesting. Robbie going out to play with Van's band when he thinks he knows what they are going to play and in turns out to be something different. In that regard there is a big difference between rock and jazz players. Jazz players have a much more sophisticated understanding of music than rock players but I don't think that necessarily makes the music better. I think the kind of musical knowledge jazz players have makes it easier for them to adapt to any situation.


Entered at Sun May 11 04:37:45 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.29)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

There is an aspect to the genius of Band members i have to wonder about...Garth, absolutely a genius no matter what path he took....but, you gotta wonder, had the other 4 guys not had all the other members as long term foils, would they have fulfilled the genius that they all so heavily displayed? Can genius sometimes need a catalyst to proceed from greatness to genius?


Entered at Sun May 11 04:23:53 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.29)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend- great music, well, it's relative of course. Given that, i did not discuss great music, I referenced musical genius.... Which could also be relative to different people's taste, but i should think less so. Genius and great- two different things. For example, Pat B. probably is a great keyboard player,I don't know, haven't heard enough. But Garth is a musical genius. I know a lot of great drummers. Lots of em. Levon was a genius on drums, and musically in general. ....I know amazing bassists, one i'd consider a genius. Rick was an all around musical genius....Richard, Robbie were too.


Entered at Sun May 11 03:29:13 CEST 2014 from (58.104.18.164)

Posted by:

Wallsend

PutEmUp, my knowledge is restricted to what is on the internet which tends to be rather limited. I am interested in every aspect of the history of the Band and would love to hear anything you would care to relate.

On the topic of the young folk and their music, I don't hear much that appeals to me but I think that is natural. I remember what my parents said about rock music back in the day. I hope I am a bit more tolerant. I think there is great music being played now and will be in the future, just because it doesn't appeal to us old folk doesn't make it bad.


Entered at Sun May 11 02:24:25 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.29)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Wallsend, i don't begrudge your beachcombing. On a universal and general level, I don't agree with your statement, "I would have thought any financial problems people had in the '90s were caused by things that happened in the '90s not something that happened 25 years before." I'm not commenting on the money argument, you are, I m responding in general... In my own life, i can find links to things that seem innocuous and disparate, but link tightly from 37 years apart. Things can go back in time different ways. But you like to work on that one money argument , that's for sure.....


Entered at Sun May 11 02:11:49 CEST 2014 from (58.104.18.164)

Posted by:

Wallsend

PutEmUp, I agree with you completely. We are all human and we all have our strengths and weaknesses. I am sure you know much more about all this stuff than what I do. Recently I just got in to the habit of searching stuff up on the web just to see what is out there. Kind of like beach combing, you come across some interesting things. In that Craig Harris interview I thought it was quite annoying, actually quite disingenuous, when he went from talking about the first two albums in the late 60s/early70s to the financial problems the guys had in the 1990s as if there was a direct causal link between the two things. I would have thought any financial problems people had in the '90s were caused by things that happened in the '90s not something that happened 25 years before.


Entered at Sun May 11 01:52:25 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.29)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0.

Peter, there are plenty of venues. In my recent experience, Brooklyn, Manhattan even, and St Louis, have a good supply of venues that can support instrumentation. even the Hudson Valley has its share. There is lack of musical economy though. I do disaggree with your assessment on other terms. As a positive statement, in my unrequested and unqualified opinion, i think in a nice, grandfatherly way, your musical opinions of the newer generations have become very forgiving.


Entered at Sun May 11 01:33:34 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, I think the world will continue to turn and produce musical geniuses, even if paths to public acclaim change. OK, the Shakespeare or the Dylan may never be excelled, but I see evidence of a lot of good young musicians turning up, geniuses even. I think the lack of venues for bands with lots of gear means a lot of talent is going into folkier stuff with acoustic instruments though.


Entered at Sun May 11 01:06:08 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.29)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Peculiarly Strong Muthas

Wallsend, i'm not about to tell you not to dig, but, i am sure someone could spend a lifetime trying to piece together the facts. And i can also assure you, that there's not a lot of point in doing it, and that no one will ever get a full picture. No one is gonna make a quilt... Why anyone would want to, i don't now. There's people a lot closer to all of this than i. There's people who knew these guys much longer and better, and participated in a lot of the proceedings. There's people with first hand knowledge, second hand knowledge, third hand, and on down the line. I lived up there, and at other times, went back and forth up there. Knew some of em, and was close enough that I heard stories first hand, some second hand, some third... When you are a regular of sorts, involved with some, people talk to you without prompting. For various reasons, sometimes just for good conversation and becuase they love em too, sometimes other aspects, but it always was exciting and usually very interesting or funny conversation. Sometimes other...... Without prompting there are people happy to spill the beans. Maybe the beans are fresh out of the ground, maybe they been refried a few times. but, there's enough beans to make too many burritos, and no one is ever going to make a gourmet dish of all this.... It's complicated, it's deep, lots of people involved,lots of perspectives, lots of angles, lots of personalities... Everyone was unfailingly human......The most unfortunate part of all this, is that musical geniuses like the men in The Band, are not being born and bred no more. The world ain't growing musical geniuses and characters like the men in The Band no more. With all their faults, with all their peculiarities, addictions, and Achilles Heels, I'd take The Band and the members in The Band every time. I'd wish better for four of the original members, there's much i saw that i wish was different, but, all these men deserve our respect and our love. And our acceptance of their humanity. And our admiration for their strength. With all their humanity, and what comes with that, Rick, Garth, and Levon were/are exceptionally strong men. Richard, i couldn't say and won't speculate..His memory and legacy deserves our love.... True to my initial point, this post of mine isn't close to a complete presentation of how i feel about this...... From the beginning to the end, the Band's story, and the story of the five men, is so so deep and layered, so complex, it could take a good historian and music lover decades to get it halfway close to right.


Entered at Sun May 11 01:00:18 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Where artists and writers get screwed is sub license deals they have no control over, such as EMI licensing 50 tracks including the Weight on an ultra cheap compilation. Sub licenses may be at the whim of a junior employee in a foreign country. I have suffered ones where rights were given for a pittance because a local office wanted to curry favour, or do a tit for tat deal unrelated to me.

The trouble is the initial contract gave away the rights to let the label or publisher do that so you have no comeback. The classic is where the contract splits a license income 50/50 with the publisher. They then sub license it to a subsidiary overseas which they happen to own, and split the proceeds with the artist, who has just had the royalty halved.

Allen Klein got the Stones and The Beatles on his reputation for forensic accounting. It sounds good, but often you can't do anything about deals.done by the label or publisher.


Entered at Sat May 10 22:06:31 CEST 2014 from (58.104.18.164)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

If you scroll about two thirds of the way down the linked page there is a statement by Mike Pinsky, Levon's lawyer. Partly it reads

... In the fire, Levon and Sandy lost almost all of their possessions, along with many of Levon’s contracts and financial records. The insurance proceeds for the rebuilding of their home and Levon’s studio were $100,000 short of what was needed. They went into debt, and remortgaged their home. Conflicts over finances with management and professionals for the reunited Band eventually boiled over into litigation. Multiple lawsuits were filed against Levon, Sandy, Rick and Garth, leading to a default judgment eventually vacated as improper. In the meantime, Levon’s royalty checks, then his primary source of income, were seized to satisfy that judgment and have never been returned.

It would be interesting to know what all that was about. Perhaps we will find out in the Harris book.


Entered at Sat May 10 21:45:32 CEST 2014 from (58.104.18.164)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

There is a summary of the case on the linked page. I don't get the impression this had anything to do with Robbie. It seems that after Royalty Recovery found money owed to Levon he didn't want to pay them their cut. Levon won on a technicality. According to the contract he didn't have to do anything except receive money but Royalty Recovery was asking him to help identify people who might owe him money. This was outside the terms of the contract so the contract was declared void. That is my reading but I am not a lawyer.


Entered at Sat May 10 15:51:19 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Wallsend

Wallsend, you've turned up some interesting stuff. The Robbie interview was surprisingly great, I wasn't planning to listen to it all but did. For nearly 80 minutes they track his early influences, then The Hawks, Dylan, and how it all led up to the songs that were written for the second album. They don't go further than that. Very enjoyable.

The Levon vs. Royalty Recovery suit is also interesting. Reading between the lines - and there are a lot of them - I can only imagine that Levon contracted Royalty on the presumption that they would take 40-50% of any monies they could win on his behalf. It would appear that they began sending him bills rather than cheques and the relationship soured somewhat. Levon then decided to cancel the contract which, according to Royalty was "irrevocable", however the court took one look at their shoddy contract and ruled in Levon's favour.

This may have been nothing to do with Robbie, Levon had worked on many projects - other artists, movies, advertising - that he could have been owed for. What was interesting is that Royalty Recovery claimed they were waiting on the outcome of a number of suits on Mr Helm's behalf. It would be interesting to know what these suits were, and their outcomes (if any).

I'm not the best at deciphering the legalese, does this seem like a reasonable summary of the document?


Entered at Sat May 10 13:54:59 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

NWC: Not to worry. The judges are astute enough to know that if you hang out here, you're insane by definition. That some refuse to see it in themselves is a caution to the rest of us. Bottom line: the GB must still be ranked the favourite.


Entered at Sat May 10 13:13:39 CEST 2014 from (58.104.9.204)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The link is to an interview with Robbie I hadn't seen before.


Entered at Sat May 10 12:38:55 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: The Prize

Polar Music Prize made me remember another Swedish prize: Nobel. Even if I have lost my hope for Literature Prize for this gb as the first internet based quality forum I still believe in getting Medicin Prize because everyone seems to be insane. Unfortunately WALLSEND posted this line:

"...it was only Dylan that kept me sane..."

Our chances are gone! Think before you post.


Entered at Sat May 10 10:46:53 CEST 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Pat and Mavis

Great video Pat. Mavis Staples is playing at a soul festival in our local park next month.


Entered at Sat May 10 09:11:32 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I couldn’t resist dipping into the Craig Harris for a minute … to be fair on comments on the video interview, he does correctly attribute the remark “rebelling against the rebellion” to Robbie in the text.


Entered at Sat May 10 09:09:09 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mavis Staples

Great performance … I enjoyed the keyboard playing especially, and as we know from TLW & Festival Express the camera never favors the seated position at the keyboards – just a 2 second flash! Thanks for sharing that one, Pat.


Entered at Sat May 10 00:27:37 CEST 2014 from (58.104.9.204)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The link is to a judicial ruling concerning a legal dispute between Levon and a company called Royalty Recovery. With regard to the contract Levon signed, the document reads:

To say that the Agreement is rife with spelling and typographical errors is an understatement (see e.g. foot notes 3-7); the Agreement also contains ambiguous provisions, such as the following: “Helm hereby irrevocably appoints Royalty Recovery as Helms’ (sic) attorney-in-fact for all mater (sic) relating to this agreement and in Helms’ (sic) name and to execute and deliver any documents and/or otherwise that Royalty Recovery may deem necessary.”

The errors in the contract would suggest that Levon signed it without getting it checked by a lawyer, or at least by one that could spell.


Entered at Sat May 10 00:19:41 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Seems like yesterday I got to play with Mavis. Hard to believe this video is 14 years old.


Entered at Fri May 9 23:01:00 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

When I saw Pops Staples with The Staple Singers (free outdoor concert) I don't recall this one by Curtis Mayfield but it sure stands up to this day along side "I'll Take You There". Btw, I saw Mavis solo a couple of times and the last time in Kitchener, Ontario I was right up at the very front at an outdoor free concert and she was singing right to me as I sang along. She's so fine....so fine in every way.

Thanks for the correction Joan. I hope Robbie mentions this site as the various posts and contributions move a lot of product and help keep the Band legacy alive.


Entered at Fri May 9 22:20:08 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"A new book details the life of one of the most enduring artists in popular music: Mavis Staples. We revisit a conversation with author and Chicago Tribune music critic Greg Kot about his biography, I’ll Take You There: Mavis Staples, The Staple Singers, and the March Up Freedom’s Highway. Read an excerpt from the book below."

There are about ten pages on The Band and one photo of Levon and Mavis as well.


Entered at Fri May 9 22:04:59 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

meet simon warner, author of text and drugs and rock n roll

Book cover features.....Robbie Robertson and others


Entered at Fri May 9 20:41:52 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Robbie's excellent recollections: Pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) or both

Only 20-30 chapters to go. Robbie's book has to be detailed and full. He is prolific and with a long career. Don't leave anything out, Robbie. (the good, the bad and the ugly, when that is necessary; we can only know the 'good' best when it is distinguished from the 'bad' and the 'ugly'.) - from the time you told my dad which guitar I should get to start playing(at the Concord: he was amazed by you) when I was 14 years old or so to the current time when you continue to amaze and produce. We are looking forward to the book and to your continued work.


Entered at Fri May 9 20:18:40 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Robbie

Over at Facebook, Robbie has posted that he has just finished chapter 12 of his autobiography. I'm looking forward to the publication as I am sure many others are


Entered at Fri May 9 19:00:41 CEST 2014 from (92.18.176.69)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Craig Harris

I suppose he's got to come at it from a different angle and add something new to the story of The Band. I'm sure the book will have as many positive comments about the music as negative ones about the personalities in The Band.


Entered at Fri May 9 18:32:57 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Ian W

Ian, I thoroughly enjoy your posts. You are clearly the guru for a period that I am less familiar with! I don't know if Dylan's PA gear was built by Fender but it's possible. Certainly the amps for the three guitars were all Fender, and Dylan gave Rick a new Jazz bass when he recruited him. In some pictures you can see the onstage monitors, but there are no nice obvious Fender scripts. They are built into plywood roadcases with "Handle With Care" stenciled on the sides, so after the show a front cover would be slapped on and out they go to the truck. Note they are not visible in photos of the American shows Oct-Dec 65, so one must assume that the system was a work in progress, and the onstage monitors were added at Dylan's (probably quite frantic) request.

Wallsend suggested that the Grateful Dead may have pioneered the true stadium sound system, but I don't think so. I think Monterey was the first "proper" rock festival and whatever they built for that set the standard, and in fact made possible, the flurry of massive outdoor events that followed. Apparently when the Beatles played in the Auckland Town Hall in NZ in 1964, the promoter provided a guitar amp on each side of the stage as a vocal PA. In fact, one was a guitar amp and the other was a bass amp, so if you stood on one side you got no bass and on the other side very little else but bass. To go from that to Monterey three years later is, to vastly understate, significant progress. The Dead's system was something of an oddity, with dozens of speakers all behind the performers. This would have been in spite of contemporary wisdom and must have had the technical crew shaking their heads in dismay. But then that was normal for engineers who worked with the Dead, from what you hear about their studio explorations.


Entered at Fri May 9 18:25:25 CEST 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Speaking of Dylan and gospel, the Staple Singers' unique take on "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" is a must-hear.


Entered at Fri May 9 18:03:08 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan's Gospel

A further mention of "Dylan's Gospel" by The Brothers and Sisters. Lou Adler's 1969 take on Dylan with the cream of session singers … Merry Clayton, Clydie King, Gloria Jones, Brenda Holloway.

Merry Clayton, just weeks before "Gimmie Shelter" opened each side of the LP, with Times They Are A-Changing and The Mighty Quinn respectively. I had The Mighty Quinn 45.

Anyway, having spent the morning with it, I opened The Guardian (Sorry Rob the Organ, but it's Friday with the music and film reviews!) and they had a whole page Merry Clayton interview on the reissue. She mentions doing backing on "Sweet Home Alabama" and singing it "through gritted teeth" a song she "actively disagreed with." She sang with Clydie King. She says:

"I said we're going to sing the crap out of this song. They have the nerve to sing Sweet Home Alabama! That's the white interpretation of Alabama. It's not sweet home to black people. It's not sweet home AT ALL. We're going to sing it like a protest song, like we were really angry. We're going to sing your song, honey, but not because we want to - because it's necessary.' (Merry Clayton)

Dylan's Gospel is SO much better than "Saved" - a gospel sound, Dylan, but decent songs and lyrics.

The Band link is I Shall Be Released and The Mighty Quinn … and it also reminds how organ + piano is such a gospel sound.


Entered at Fri May 9 17:04:08 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: another CD with Rick Danko ...

I recently picked up Lori Yates' 1994 "Breaking Point" CD because I noticed that Richard Bell and Colin Linden (and most of Blue Rodeo) make appearances - and in fact Linden produced. But now I see there's Rick Danko and Jim Weider on songs too. I didn't see it on this site's discography, so you can see it on the link above. Yates is still active, and has her own informative website at loriyates.com


Entered at Fri May 9 16:02:21 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Craig Harris book

Copy arrived about an hour ago. I won't get a chance to look at it for a few days though. Design wise, the margins are too small, but I like the hardcover with printing directly on it.


Entered at Fri May 9 15:54:28 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

And Penguin didn't dig bats, cats......
I also saw penguins in Capetown, South Africa. It was so cool to be walking around with them on the beach.....but if you ventured too close to their homes.......ouch!!!!!!!....said my friend's daughter.

I decided to buy Craig's book with my gift cards from the kidzzz. If you go to Indigo Books online you'll save a lot. I agree with Wallsend and Kerrin. The DJ showed in the interview that he wanted to be neutral in all things controversial.

When Craig said he only liked Robbie's Native American recording the DJ reminded him that others did like his solo recordings (like brown eyed girl!).

He said that Levon was never a nice person until he reinvented himself.

When he spoke about Rick it was about his great harmonizing skills or how he got out of rehab and went right for the drugs, drugs, drugs.

When he talks about Robbie being the robster......The DJ reminds him again that he doesn't want to get into what's been controversial and Craig said that's how the music industry worked in favour of the writer but.....I felt he wasn't drawn to Robbie out of all the Band members....His bias was shown and even though we all have biases or we're not honest....or we aren't aware of them; I thought that if you write a biography on someone/group that you're not supposed to be so blatant about your biases. I can accept Craig not digging Robbie's solo music just as he or anyone else not liking someone else's music that some of us might really dig......but.......I felt he just didn't get Robbie here......Why would he want to sound like The Band??????? Personally my favourite Robbie solo recordings were Red Boy and HTBC. I get that someone might not like Robbie's singing or that he doesn't sound like The Band....but Craig was so dismissive of his solo work.....

The first time I met Robbie I told him to keep on making some noise in this world and I dig that he doesn't sound like The Band....There was only one The Band anyway! Robbie is a creative person who likes to move forward and he's influenced by many things from films, to art to many genres of music and he's proven time and time again that he can write. His memoir could be called....I (mostly) write the songs! ;-D He's writing his own memoir as we speak.......I think I saw on his Facebook page that a couple of chapters are done. I'm keeping the rest of my gift cards for this one.

Levon Helm cards that I have to share.......


Entered at Fri May 9 14:25:08 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Craig Harris interview

Wallsend, thanks for linking that interview. The whole program sounded interesting. The DJ was great, sounded very knowledgeable and had seen a lot of shows himself, Band and solo/duo stuff. Obviously a real fan who was irked by Craig's boneheaded insistence at talking about how Robbie ripped everyone off then made terrible solo albums, and thwarted him as best he could. Craig should stick to talking about himself, that's clearly his forte. Peter V, has your copy arrived yet? Maybe I shouldn't judge a book by it's author...


Entered at Fri May 9 14:04:49 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Southern Hemisphere

There are many different types of penguins. The only ones who are indigenous to the northern hemisphere are led by a man with 87 on his back.


Entered at Fri May 9 13:54:24 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Birds that want to fly (maybe)

Penguins are all over. I saw them in South Africa. They are also in Pittsburgh.


Entered at Fri May 9 12:52:58 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: 2014 Polar Music Prize

The legendary rock 'n' roll pioneer CHUCK BERRY will receive this year's Polar Music Prize. I saw him first time in 1970 (plus minus one year) and found him extremely old. Now he is 88, not old at all. When BOB DYLAN received the Polar Prize the legendary gber and dylan-hater RAGTIME asked: "Was it penguins who voted?" What a stupid question. Penguins live in Antarktis, not in Polar area.


Entered at Fri May 9 09:32:22 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: David Crosby

David Crosby today on Toppermost. See link.


Entered at Fri May 9 00:50:20 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: thanks.


Entered at Thu May 8 22:51:38 CEST 2014 from (58.104.9.232)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Link is to an interview with Craig Harris on WMBR in a program called Lost and Found on May 6. Not really worth listening to but the DJ does a good job of stopping Harris from trashing Robbie.


Entered at Thu May 8 18:39:10 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Beatles/Elvis

Both concerts took place at Empire Stadium, which is an outdoor sports arena. But both were in the summer time - the Dylan concert was in early spring, which, as anyone who has spent much time in Vancouver knows, is usually wet, wet, wet.


Entered at Thu May 8 17:40:12 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: thanks for the Jesse Winchester link. Good stuff, aside from the fact once again "draft dodger" is given precedence over "songwriter" and "singer" in his list of attributes.

Re Vancouver, when Elvis played there in the late '50s, where did he play? The Beatles?


Entered at Thu May 8 15:48:18 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Real Time Analizers

In my several years of experience playing in some fairly big clubs, we hired sound men, (not to be there all night) that was a little too expensive for our budget.

However, our guy would always come in the afternoon when we set up and use the real time analizer, and blow "pink sound", sounds like a jet taking off, and set the eq graph on my board, a 16 channel Peavey, by the analizer. He would come for a while in the first evening when the room started to fill with people to tweak it a little. He taught me where the kick drum was on the graph, and mics etc so to tweak it a little if it needed improvement.

Now after learning a little about that, I had opened a new club in 1987 in Coquitlam called "Boone County". I have mentioned some time back how Ian Tyson came and did a show one night, and him and I discussed the room with his sound man. It had a very high ceiling. So Ian's sound man was helpful.

Some time after that, Ian was playing out doors at a fair in Langley. I went to say hello to his sound man, while Ian was on stage. His sound system had a real time analizer built in. I asked him does it work out here in the open. He said yes quite a bit when you get a crowd like that all standing in front of the speakers. That kind of surprised me.


Entered at Thu May 8 15:35:23 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: A View From The Bridge

We just spent a week in London, seeing five plays in six days. The reviews are all up on my blog now, but some of you may be interested in A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE, linked, especially with all this talk of Brooklyn where it is set. I'd be interested in any comments / corrections … it is a greatly applauded and very different production.


Entered at Thu May 8 15:22:58 CEST 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the march of human progress

Re: concert sound -- I've mentioned this documentary series previously; the linked episode shows a little of the technology available to the sound technicians, and discusses how they prepare -- and rehearse(!)

One of the other episodes shows a tech climbing to every seating section of a particular venue, listening and measuring while they tweak the physical orientation of the speaker stacks to cover weak spots. One of the guys mentions how much the room sound is affected by the construction of the building (and the seats) etc. -- and that summer crowds are much more sonically reflective than winter crowds (short sleeves versus long sleeves).


Entered at Thu May 8 13:43:40 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beverley Martyn

Spent the morning listening to her new one "The Phoenix And The Turtle". Something of Lucinda Williams or Marianne Faithful there, with lovely insidious guitar. Try "Nightime", "Reckless Jane" or "Potters Blues" if you want to sample it … or just buy it!


Entered at Thu May 8 13:28:18 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A radio interview with Robbie from October last year.


Entered at Thu May 8 12:57:20 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

This may be of interest to Paul Butterfield fans or to young folk who want to know what life was like in the late '60s. Not sure what the broadcast date is but maybe 67 or 68 by the look of it.


Entered at Thu May 8 11:01:20 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Jesse Winchester courtesy of the CBC

Perhaps some of you will be intereseted in this.


Entered at Thu May 8 11:01:15 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Some info and photos of Amy Helm and Levon Helm

"Atlantic City" 2008 Merlefest


Entered at Thu May 8 10:39:18 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

1960s Music In American Culture


Entered at Thu May 8 10:36:23 CEST 2014 from (195.93.18.3)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan and The Hawks - 1966

Just to clarify, Dylan and The Hawks did have their own sound system, trucked from venue to venue. Indeed, the show following Vancouver (Spokane on 27 March) was cancelled because the truck broke down.

The magazine report to which I referred in my last post, said that Dylan’s “$30,000 custom designed sound system filled eight large crates with equipment”. Probably laughable these days but nevertheless. I don’t know but I’ve always assumed that, when Dylan started to appear in Fender adverts, playing a bass guitar, it was Fender that had designed and provided the sound system. Does anyone know?

Anyway, the magazine reporter said that the equipment “could never have filled this gigantic shed (he’s referring to the Agrodome in Vancouver) with clear sound”. Even during the acoustic half, the sound was “patchy, in some spots … perfect, in others … very bad”. Dylan and The Hawks did sound check in Vancouver, however, as I believe they did at all venues on the tour.

Incidentally, showtime for Spokane was unusually early, being late afternoon and at least 4 hours earlier than most shows on the tour, so there would have been logistical problems getting the equipment disassembled in Vancouver, packed, trucked all the way to Spokane, and reassembled on stage in time for a sound-check, let alone a the concert. In Vancouver, “the sound man sweated and twirled his knobs but it was no use”. Dylan got too close to the mike, which didn’t help either. At one point, Grossman ran up to the stage to tell Dylan to stop “eating the mike”.

Incidentally, THE NEW YORK TIMES, reviewing an Ian & Sylvia concert in New York in February 1965, said that they had “an electrically exciting group sound” and that “their performance was obviously abetted by special microphones and a speaker system” .

I suspect that, in Dylan’s case, it was a mixture of factors: he wanted The Hawks to play loud, the sound equipment was not really up to the task, the venues were not suited, the audience was not used to that volume of sound, Dylan’s lyrics were paramount to his audience at that time, his microphone technique was not that good in the 1960s, not to mention those that resented the sight and sound of electric instruments anyway and those that resented his move away from topical or protest songs. It was a fairly volatile cocktail.


Entered at Thu May 8 10:32:02 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Encyclopedia of Bible and Theology

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Bob Dylan World Tour 1966


Entered at Thu May 8 10:28:19 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"The year many regard as Bob Dylan's best, with the famous World Tour spanning North America, Australia and Europe and the recording of one of the best rock albums ever, BLONDE ON BLONDE. In July Bob Dylan's life life was saved by a motorcycle accident."

I saw Santana in the mid-seventies as well. All I remember is he either played "Europa" or "Samba Pa Ti" lol.....one of my favourite Santana songs ever. I don't recall it being too loud. I would have loved to have seen him perform again at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival as these songs are magical as Robbie's guitar playing with Aaron Neville's cover of Van's "Crazy Love".......beyond beauty.....beyond....beyond.

The one concert a date took me to was Steve Miller Band. The laser show turned me off. When I saw laser shows are our now no longer Planetarium......yes, but I remember walking out of Steve's show thinking I'm glad I didn't pay to see this one.


Entered at Thu May 8 10:19:59 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

PNE Agrodome

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

26 March 1966

1. She Belongs To Me
2. Fourth Time Around
3. Visions Of Johanna
4. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
5. Desolation Row
6. Just Like A Woman
7. Mr. Tambourine Man
8. Tell Me, Momma
9. I Don't Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Have Met)
10. Baby Let Me Follow You Down (Eric von Schmidt)
11. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues
12. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat
13. One Too Many Mornings
14. Ballad Of A Thin Man
15. Like A Rolling Stone

1–7 Bob Dylan (vocal, harmonica & guitar).

8–15 Bob Dylan (vocal & electric guitar), Robbie Robertson (electric guitar), Garth Hudson (organ), Rick Danko (bass), Richard Manuel (piano), Mickey Jones (drums).

9 Bob Dylan harmonica.

14 Bob Dylan piano.

BobTalk: Comments relating Tom Thumb & painter's 'Blue Period' (before Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues). Praising Steinway pianos as he begins playing one. (before Ballad Of A Thin Man).

Notes. This setlist is taken from memory. Song 2 possibly Fourth Time Around. Song 6 possibly Just Like A Woman. Song 15 possibly Positively 4th Street. Thanks to ch'an bodhi cede!

Session info updated 13 March 2009.


Entered at Thu May 8 10:11:05 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Must be the same Santana tour … it was distorted as well as incredibly loud at Bournemouth Winter Gardens and all that percussion over-amplified made for a horrible mess. Oddly, within a few days we saw Hot Chocolate at the same venue … almost a jokey decision to buy tickets, and they sounded extremely good indeed.

I'm still thinking about a separate sound channel for each string of Phil Lesh's bass. I can hear the conversation.

Phil: Hey, Jerry … just saw a six-string bass in the music store.

Jerry looks down, 'You don't need a 6-string bass, Phil.'

Phil: Might be kinda interesting …

Jerry: I'm going to have to be straight with you, Phil … we can't afford an extra truck for the gear you'll need for two more strings.


Entered at Thu May 8 09:59:36 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I had a similar experience hearing Santana in a concert hall. I wouldn't say the sound was bad, it was just LOUD. My head was ringing for about an hour after the concert. I couldn't imagine how they could put up with that volume day after day. The link is to a piece on the Dead's 'wall of sound' from the 1974 tour.


Entered at Thu May 8 09:47:27 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bad sound works both ways. The worst sounding band I ever heard was Santana, mid 70s, with a stadium ready wall of speakers in a 2000 seat classical concert hall. We left after about 20% had walked out already.


Entered at Thu May 8 09:08:28 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sound systems

Sound systems were generally awful in the 60s as the PA for vocals lagged well behind the quality and power of guitar amps, and monitors were primitive and such a source of feedback that few bands bothered.

Dinky Dawson’s “Life On The Road” is the memoir of the Fleetwood Mac roadie who went on to develop sound systems for hire. He first saw decent PAs at the Fillmore East in late 1968, which is the first time he saw the sound crew mixing from out in the audience area. The issue was the electronic hums and noise picked up by long cable runs, but the Fillmore had got over it with transformers. Fleetwood Mac were the first to do this in the UK in 1969 (after I saw them I guess). The first band I ever saw do it was Yes (we’re talking first album era Yes) at Croydon or Kingston in 1969, and we were blown away by how good they sounded while still being loud. I remember discussing it with the roadie from a friend’s band, and he said “I wouldn’t fancy mixing from out there. You’re too isolated if the crowd turn nasty.” Which tells you a bit about the 60s!

Back in 1966, even mixing was rare. You walked around and decided on levels in an empty hall, and in the biggest halls, first the travelling PA was probably too small, and the house PA was awful. The sound guy was at the side of the stage (IF they had one), relying on an assistant to wander round the hall and report back.

I saw the Flying Burrito Brothers in 1970 or early 71, and they were the first I saw to use little Fender amps mic’ed up into a massive PA system, and were far and away the best sounding band I’d ever heard in a technical sense.

Even so, people did get good sound in the 1960s. The Shadows were pristine, but of course as they didn’t sing, the whole messy microphone element was removed from the equation. There is a live recording of Cliff Richard & The Shadows from 1962 (not released until 40 years later as “Live at the ABC Kingston 1962”) which shows that a good balance and sound was possible, but it was very dependent on the acoustics of the venue … and how much time you took on the soundcheck. This is still true even with modern systems. The Royal Albert Hall was notoriously awful until they fitted huge baffles in the dome a few years back.

Nowadays the problem again and again is over amplified drums, and loud drummers directly behind the vocalists so drums are all over everything. This is why bands are beginning to put Perspex boxes round the drummer. But you know for years I wondered about the Band’s odd set up with Levon on one side, instead of in the middle. I always thought he should have been centre on a riser so you could see him better, but on reflection, his position meant he wasn’t drumming right behind the other mics. Possibly why their early 70s sound was so praised!


Entered at Thu May 8 03:04:48 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

With the benefit of hindsight we tend to look back and mock the people that booed in '66 but venues and sound systems were incredibly primitive back then. People may have had good reason to boo if they couldn't hear anything. I remember the Grateful Dead came out with a really massive PA system in the early '70s that was actually intended to be suited to the venues they were playing. Were they the first to do that?


Entered at Thu May 8 02:46:35 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Agrodome

Oh dear, poor Bob. I'm sure he was right, but really, the Agrodome was a venue for horse and agricultural shows, not rock concerts. As I recall, they had removed all the tanbark from the floor of the show arena and installed seating. It's still basically the same today, too - where the PNE horse shows are held.

In 1966, big rock concerts didn't really have a place to play. Acts that came to Vancouver either played the supper clubs like the Cave and Izzy's, or theaters like the Queen Elizabeth Theater, so it would have been difficult for the promoters to find a suitable venue, I guess.

Another concert I remember seeing around that time was Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention. This was held at the Kerrisdale Skating Arena, and all they did was put plywood down over the ice as a floor. I was so cold I literally can't remember anything else about the concert, unfortunately!


Entered at Thu May 8 01:39:25 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan and the Hawks in Canada in1966

Sorry this is a bit belated.

To confirm Lisa's memory, the local press reviews of the Vancouver show made no reference to any booing. One headline ran, “No screams, no riots, no hysteria” and the reporter said the audience members were “orderly and quiet”. A rep of the promoter is quoted as saying, “I was very much surprised there was no demonstrating or even individual screaming”. The VANCOUVER SUN referred to Dylan standing on a “raised platform, dressed in a dark suit”. In respect of the second half, the reporter said Dylan “allowed the sheer the sound of his combo to obscure the greatest asset of his song: their lyrics”.

The latter may refer to the acoustics in the Agrodome – circular with lots of reverberation and open at one end, allowing some of the sound to drift away. Also, one of the stage monitors wasn’t working. A magazine article, published in the summer, had Dylan complaining bitterly about the acoustics in the Agrodome: “That was worse than Ottawa and Ottawa was the worst hole in the universe”. In case you’re offended, he was referring to the venues not the cities, but he did go on a bit, “That was really worse than Ottawa and Ottawa was the worst, terrible, miserable hole in the entire universe”. This was repeated, with minor variations, at least twice more.

The reviews of the Ottawa concert made reference to the bad acoustics in the hall, particularly with that volume of sound. The OTTAWA JOURNAL said that “The Hawks played as though they were the featured attraction. They had a great sound but you can be good without being loud”. The OTTAWA CITIZEN started by saying that, “... the traditionally poor acoustics made reception difficult” and, later, went on to say, “If perception was difficult in the solo stint, it was nigh impossible during the second half of the show with the big sound of the Hawks of Toronto as a backdrop”.

It was much the same in Montreal. The MONTREAL GAZETTE said of the second half: “At first, it seemed that the amplifiers on the accompanying instruments had accidentally been turned up .. for it was impossible to hear anything he sang, or rather shouted”.


Entered at Thu May 8 01:21:17 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, yes, it goes without saying that all three albums are brilliant. I liked the earlier albums as well but those three have a personal intensity all of their own. A kind of intensity that was reflected in the 66 tour it seems. In terms of songs, I would rank Hard Rain along side Desolation Row and It's all Right Ma. Although people think of this as a 'protest song' the flow of metaphors is just like the other two. A few years ago I participated in the team teaching of a course on world literature. One of my classes was scheduled the week before a semester break. Usually not many students turn up for classes before breaks so I thought I would indulge myself and teach a bit of Dylan. My idea was to link Dylan back to Woodie Guthrie and through that to John Steinbeck. The class was OK but when students wrote essays lots of the kids wrote about how Dylan had written 'protest songs' against the Vietnam War. It was a natural mistake for them to make. Dylan wrote 'protest songs' in the 1960s and the Vietnam War was in the 1960s so they just put the two things together. If I had taught the class again I would have emphasised the chronology more but it is hard to understand things unless you actually live through them. I think Dylan said a similar thing in Chronicles when he was talking about his parents' generation.


Entered at Thu May 8 00:51:04 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Highway 61

Wallsend, I know what you mean about Highway 61 - it has the same sort of flow and progression from song to song that the Brown Album has for me. But I love all three of those albums so much, and so many of the songs resonate in a very personal way - they were the background and anchor of those years for me. People forget how repressive the times were back then, and Dylan was like a gale-force wind that blew all that repression right out of the water. No matter what was happening in your life, you could always find some glimmer of hope, or at least an outlet for anger somewhere on those three records.

It's funny now, watching programs like "Mad Men" trying to recreate the 60s - they try hard, but ultimately fail - they're all too young to remember it, and the world has changed so much since then (and in many ways it's even worse now, I'm afraid). But I suppose you've got to give them credit for trying ...


Entered at Thu May 8 00:17:50 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, now I have to track down that version of Moondance.

Blonde on blonde every time for best Dylan album. Note RR on guitar.


Entered at Thu May 8 00:07:59 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks to the late Mike Hayward again who reported on all The Band members.
Here is his contribution for the late Levon Helm found on his Plochmann Lane site.


Entered at Wed May 7 23:48:54 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Neil Young - The Squires, Massey Hall and The Last Waltz

Shakin' All Over - Canadian Pop Music in the 1960s (2005)


Entered at Wed May 7 23:43:50 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Richard Manuel, Arlie Manuel and Elizabeth Grafton Danko (1980s)

Wallsend...Queen Jane always resonated.

When your mother sends back all your invitations
And your father to your sister he explains
That you’re tired of yourself and all of your creations
Won’t you come see me, Queen Jane? Won’t you come see me, Queen Jane?


Entered at Wed May 7 23:32:47 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lisa and Joan... :-D

Levon Helm...paintings, drawings and photos


Entered at Wed May 7 23:23:59 CEST 2014 from (58.104.20.94)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Pat B, that RR-Van post was really interesting.

Lisa, for me Highway 61 was the only perfect Dylan record. I love the songs on Bringing it all Back Home and Blonde on Blonde but I don't think the songs on those albums hold to together as a cohesive whole the way the songs on Highway 61 do. Desolation Row was the perfect way to end the album.


Entered at Wed May 7 22:26:55 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Dominique Robertson was a journalist.

Linked is RR's induction of Van Morrison into the RRHoF. Quite interesting.


Entered at Wed May 7 22:04:28 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Lisa

Great posts-most grateful.


Entered at Wed May 7 19:51:29 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: Sad about Farley Mowat. Just about the last of the Ontario literary establishment of the early '60s that Neil Young got to meet when they visited his parents' house - Robertson Davies, Pierre Berton, Margaret Laurence, et al. I was first taken in the mid '60s by his teen books ("Black Joke", "Lost in the Barrens", "Curse of the Viking Grave") but progressed to his string of important books on man's inhumanity to man and to nature - "Never Cry Wolf", "People of the Deer", "The Desperate People", "Sea of Slaughter", "No Birds Sang" ... It's amazing that he could also be so funny and irreverent. The heart, the skill, the happy-warrior mentality - maybe that rubbed off on his Neilship.


Entered at Wed May 7 19:48:42 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Lisa et al

Thanks everyone. especially Lisa and BEG.. for all the great posts.It has been very interesting lately.

Someone asked about Band wives. I don't know about Elizabeth, but Sandy was a teacher when she met Levon


Entered at Wed May 7 19:18:53 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One more passing

I would say it is definitely a shame that Farley Mowatt has passed away. A very important part of our history was this little man. Another Ontarian.

One of the last pieces of work that he was most involved in that I very much enjoy, is his walks with "Charles Marin Smith" in watching the making of Mr. Smith's film, "Snow Walker". Charles took pieces of Farley's work and wove them into a very wonderful film.

This film starred, "Barry Pepper" a young star actor born out here in Campbell River on our island. Barry has become a real heavy weight actor, and in this film he does a great job along with the young Inuit lady who stars with him.

I have been a great fan of Charles Martin Smith, ever since "American Graffitt".....remember Toad?

This film, and the many writings of Farley Mowatt are a great legacy of Canada.


Entered at Wed May 7 18:22:37 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Lisa, well done.


Entered at Wed May 7 18:13:02 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: Just saw your posts - wonderful stuff.


Entered at Wed May 7 18:04:25 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: Thanks for the heads-up re Ronnie's Order of Canuckistan. Let's hope Garth's next in line. I was pleased to see the estimable Louise Forestier on the list of recipients as well. The link's to her singing "Lindberg" with Robert Charlebois, who presumably got an OC years ago.

Charlebois and Hawkins both sang on "Tears Are Not Enough" with Richard and many others. The French lyrics that Charlebois sang were written by Rachel Paiement of the band CANO, whose guitarist was Dave Burt from Merryweather (NB Pat B).


Entered at Wed May 7 17:37:53 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Dog food & Peter V

Peter V is better in reviewing Shakespeare plays than reviewing dog food. IMHO.


Entered at Wed May 7 15:52:23 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Wed May 7 15:49:29 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Put the Boot In:"Twilight"-The Band 9-18-1976 The Palladium NYC

"Slowing down the performance a bit the group begins the emotive introduction to "It Makes No Difference", the horn lines contributing drama to an already emotional song. Always a spotlight for Rick Danko's vocal abilities, this performance is the first glorious peak of the show. Rick's lilting "country" voice, similar to Levon and Richard's golden throats, evokes a wise old sage, deeper meaning in all of his words. The sweet waiver, cracking falsetto, and well timed caesura's contained in the lyric, "These old love letters, well I just can't keep", exemplify Rick's knack for expressing lyrical content. There could be no one else in the world so tailor made for interpreting Robertons's lyrics. Similar to other performances, like in "The Last Waltz", the conclusion of the song is where Garth and Robbie trade solo's between guitar and saxophone. Like that performance, this one is inspiring with virtuosic performances by both Robertson and Hudson."

" During the encore break the announcers reveal that after the performance that The Band are going to record their spot for "Saturday Night Live". I have included a link for one of the SNL performances below as to give a visual context for the concert review above. As The Band takes the stage to a jubilant crowd, they give them the gift of a textbook version of "Up On Cripple Creek' that sways like a old front porch swing, and smokes like a winter campfire. Levon Helm steps to the microphone to announce another encore song to the crowd as well as a special guest appearance. Paul Butterfield steps from the wings to add some roaring harmonica to a definitive version of "Life Is a Carnival". The horns, harp, and Hudson whip into a disorienting vortex of sounds that skip across Levon's chiming cymbal hits and Danko's gutteral slides across his fretless neck. An incredible display of chemistry and talent on display. Since the "Chest Fever" explosion late in the set, The Band has played with a virtuosity and intensity that even on recorded tape is an amazing joy to hear. 3,500 people have been brought to their feet and whipped into a euphoric tizzy. The band finally concludes a marathon performance with a similarly hot "W.S. Wolcott's Medicine Show" which "shakes the windows, rattles the walls" and brings the performance to a fitting end. The breathless announcers exclaim that they may have witnessed one of the best performances of their lives. I can honestly say that I concur, and I have only heard the recorded version!"


Entered at Wed May 7 15:39:55 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Talk From The Rock Room
My rambles about music, bootlegs, vinyl, and the happenings in the "rock room".

"One of my personal favorite songs on the LP is the version of ‘Searchin’ that Hawkins pulls out, the bluesy shuffle accentuated by possibly the dirtiest guitar you will hear on a recording from 1961 (when this number was recorded). Robertson peels prickly sections of sound from his guitar that moan, this is serious stuff here. Helm and Danko sit back locked in a stone thrown across water cadence, in which Hawkins raps the syncopated tale."

"The album concludes on the slow burn of ‘You Know I Love You’ with Robertson making up for a missed opportunity on the previous song with a sharp and unique opening riff that slides in sensually. The lick is absolutely shiver inducing in conjunction with the silvery bell chimes on Helm’s drum kit. Hawkins swings like a slightly inebriated playboy, Mr. Dynamo charming the ladies right out of their skirts, even though they ‘don’t even know his name’."


Entered at Wed May 7 15:21:13 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Perseveration to correct spelling

JTT - no its JT. Sorry Sadavid but I did correct it.


Entered at Wed May 7 15:18:47 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The 'Safety' Dance

Lafleur, Orr, Richard, Beliveau, Neely , Cohen: Somehow, it all fits together so nicely. Thanks, Sadavid, for providing this. I turned on the game last night a little late and missed it. The meshing of this lovely song with slo-mo excellence at its finest probably would have pleased the Field Commander immensely. Next up- who knows- Men Without Hats of The Box?


Entered at Wed May 7 15:17:57 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The 'Safety' Dance

Lafleur, Orr, Richard, Beliveau, Neely , Cohen: Somehow, it all fits together so nicely. Thanks, Saddavid, for providing this. I turned on the game last night a little late and missed it. The meshing of this lovely song with slo-mo excellence at its finest probably would have pleased the Field Commander immensely. Next up- who knows- Men Without Hats of The Box?


Entered at Wed May 7 14:32:10 CEST 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: propaganda

Peter V: thought you might enjoy this video of last night's lead-in to the broadcast of the (ice)hockey play-off game from Montréal.


Entered at Wed May 7 14:21:39 CEST 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: (bi)national treasure

One Ronald (Respectable) Hawkins is to be inducted as an honourary officer of the Order of Canada, at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, later today. The citation reads:

Ronald (Ronnie) Hawkins, O.C.
Douro-Dummer, Ontario

For more than 50 years, musician Ronnie Hawkins has demonstrated a strong devotion to Canada’s music industry. Often referred to as the “father of Canadian rock n’ roll”, he was a key player in the 1960s rock scene, with his band The Hawks serving as a launching pad for a host of Canadian musicians. In addition to producing scores of singles and albums, he has performed in support of many charitable causes, notably the Peterborough Flood Relief and the Schizophrenia Society of Ontario.

Honorary Officer of the Order of Canada


Entered at Wed May 7 08:49:59 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the recollections, Lisa. The show was pretty fixed in 66, so a guess would be Mr Tambourine Man in the acoustic set. I saw Michael Gray (Bob Dylan Encylopaedia) talk, and he played the Manchester "Mr Tambourine Man" as his choice of Dylan's greatest moment and one where the harmonica "worked." It was a talk in Borders on a wet cold night (I now realize I have told this story before), and an old tramp (hobo) had wandered in out of the cold, saw the seats and sat himself down. He was entranced by the long harmonica section, and afterwards went up to Michael Gray and said "Well done. You're the best harmonica player I ever heard."


Entered at Wed May 7 07:38:21 CEST 2014 from (100.34.37.27)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by theTurtle Pond

Subject: BEG's Dixie Hummingbirds post

Angie, thanks once again for another stirring post. The photos of Levon in the "I Bid You Goodnight" video so perfectly capture our friend doing what he loved best. Working with Ira looks like a most fulfilling time to him. This cat was never starstruck and had no truck with any BS rockstar posing. He lived always "in service to the song", and it shows in the photos that accompany your clip. He looks like a man doing what he loved, and I'm so glad that he got to strip off everything that was non-essential in his 2004 to 2012 ride, his "victory lap". He loved working with these guys, Alexis, Mavis, Jimmy V, Larry, Brian, Howard,the blues men like Hubert, Sammy, Mac and Johnny Johnson. And, to anyone who was there to catch a loving glance between Levon and Amy as they hit a sweet spot, it was magic. The photos in the clip are a beautiful testimony to this. Loved the shots of Ira and Levon firing the potato gun. Now, if anyone has the shot of Mavis shooting off this Aqua-Net powered thang, it would make my day complete.


Entered at Wed May 7 05:40:10 CEST 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Many a tear has to fall....but it's all in the game

I've never ever been a Montreal fan, "the world city of hockey". However I was a great fan of "the road runner".."the pocket rocket".....and John Beliveau the gentleman of hockey. But I really hope they kick Boston's ass!

Now I hear this story, you guys have to enlighten me. Has Rob Ford now done a Jimmy Hoffa, never to be seen again.......just years of speculation? Who will get to play him in the movie. I mean Nickolson couldn't do it....he's about 150 pounds short. John Candy is gone. He'd be perfect, but would probably be too insulted. Now come on guys, I need some input here. Brown Eyed Angelina could probably play a "Moll" who lured him away and probably had some of that Toronto Mafia that regularly hangs out around here rub him out.......I guess.


Entered at Wed May 7 04:48:40 CEST 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: 1965-1966 and the Dylan-Hawks world explodes

Lisa: Way to go! Reminded me of some of the impressions I had watching Dylan and the Hawks in Toronto at Massey Hall 15 Nov. 1965. Why they didn't hit Toronto again in 1966 when they went to Vancouver, Ottawa and I think Montreal is unknown. Anyway, I very much enjoyed Dylan solo but, like you, the Dylan and the Hawks was something from another world even in 1965. As you note, it got louder and wilder as time went on. Others should share their experiences as you did about some of these early shows. We all want to read about those heady times.


Entered at Wed May 7 04:22:03 CEST 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Theft in Montreal

Kevin J: (and anyone else who cares) I agree with P.K. Cary Price 'stole' that game. He was beyond superb!!! P.K. played a great game but the Bruins were the superior time and if not for Cary there would have been a very different result. There are many ways to win. When a goalie wins a game as the major factor, it is a thing to behold. Now if only King Henry could do the same tomorrow and get that one tied 2-2. The Rangers have to pick their game up or they will be left out in the cold yet again.


Entered at Wed May 7 02:18:54 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

You're both so kind - thank you very much. I've been reading the GB daily for a few years now, but it's taken a long time to get up enough nerve to post. And so many of the long-time posters are so completely knowledgeable. I'm not on that level at all, but from now on I will write if I think I have anything useful or interesting to say.

Wallsend, that's what makes music so special and personal to each of us in its own way. How would we have survived especially our teenage years without it? And I've always thought there's a place for every kind of music, there's room in our hearts for everybody, so it's demeaning to the music to take sides, or think that one kind is better or more important than another ... but for people who grew up in our time, Dylan was so special. He managed to articulate the chaos and turmoil of that time, and I for one related to his songs more than anyone else's. Desolation Row was almost like a real place to me, one where I thought I would be a lot more at home than at, for example, my high school, which I thoroughly loathed.

BEG, thank you so much for the Cat Stevens song - I'd never heard it before, and it's very beautiful.


Entered at Wed May 7 01:20:12 CEST 2014 from (58.104.12.178)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Lisa

I agree with BEG, that was a great post, maybe one of the best I have read here. I had a really hard time when I went to high school and it was only Dylan that kept me sane. I used to sit in class and just have the words to 'It's All Right Ma' going through my head. Because of Dylan I knew I wasn't alone in the world. I think that is why I still have such a strong emotional attachment to that music.


Entered at Wed May 7 00:36:19 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I'm so glad I checked in again Lisa!!!!! I can't tell you how much I appreciate your recollections of a time that means so much to me. I was in Jr. School so too young but I was always a huuuuge music fan but not of the Hawks at that time, instead I gravitated to Motown, Beach Boys, Beatles. But when I began High School I think that was the first time I heard Dylan's "Just Like A Rolling Stone" and that was that! ;-D It was the same thing when I first heard Marley and The Wailers.......something just clicked in my soul.

Your memory really serves you well Lisa. The fact that you can remember so many songs that Dylan and The Hawks performed. I think at the time Bob was using speed like Louuu wasn't he to keep up with the pace of the tours? Notice how thin everyone was in those days? The speed and later coke diet works all the time. When you shared about your parents......Gee.....Growing up with one parent I really did what I wanted to do but it wasn't until mid-seventies I saw my first big shows.

I love how you articulate your musical experiences. I can't tell you enough again how much I appreciate when we hear more from female fans. Sometimes I wonder why The Band doesn't bring out many women here even in its time when we only had one place to discuss The Band and music.....not that many women felt comfortable to share anything let alone about music.

Again, thank you very much for taking the time to share and I hope you'll find the time again to share more.....about anything! You'll be like the Mary Martin of the GB! If you could see my huuuge smile now. :-D

I saw the film Le Weekend and it was slow until the couple who are spending a weekend in Paris from Birmingham to reignite their relationship of 30 years.......One of them is groovin' to Dylan's "Like A Rolling Stone" and then the film keeps moving forward......Lisa, I think you'd like this film.

"Nick and Meg are a long-married British couple revisiting Paris for the first time since their honeymoon in an attempt to rekindle their relationship. During a two-day escapade, diffident, wistful Nick and demanding, take-charge Meg careen from harmony to disharmony to resignation and back again as they take stock of half a lifetime of deep tenderness -- and even deeper regret. A surprise invitation from Nick's old friend Morgan, an amusingly boorish American academic with a fancy Parisian address, soon leads them to an unexpectedly hopeful vision of what their love and marriage might still become."


Entered at Tue May 6 23:56:26 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: 1966 Dylan/Hawks

Oh, I know that photo. That's the scene at the truck stop from "Carny" ...

BEG, this is what I remember. I was still in high school back then, and was actually rather surprised that I was allowed to go to this concert. I guess it had a bit to do with the fact that my parents hadn't a clue who Bob Dylan was, or that he was largely responsible for my increasingly alienated and cynical teen-age point of view. I went with my best friend (whose parents were equally ignorant), and she had the foresight to bring along a pair of opera glasses, so we took turns gazing in awe at our idol. That's why I remember he was wearing a pin-striped jacket. The first (solo) half of the concert was very quiet and acoustic. I wish I could remember more of what Bob sang, but I wasn't really into "folk" Dylan, and a fair amount of the first half was earlier music, though I'm pretty sure he did "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", a song I loved. And "Desolation Row" of course - I was just like you, I totally related to and loved that song, and at the time was impressed that he could reel off such a long song flawlessly. I knew every word myself, and believe me, he didn't miss a word. The really memorable feature of the first half of the concert, though, was his remoteness. Like I said in the first post, it was as though he were singing to himself; there was no connection to the audience, absolutely no attempt to engage, no talk or introductions - he stood there and sang, and you got what you got. Which was okay by me - it suited my image of him.

It was a completely different story in the second half, when he came out with Hawks. He was on fire! Now, in a press conference with Robbie Robertson I attended in 1993, he said that the audience in Vancouver booed, just like everywhere else. I honestly don't remember this being the case at all. There may have been the odd obligatory boo here or there, but it wasn't noticeable where we were at any rate. They were loud and wild, but also very tight and professional. Bob was all over the place, reeling around often with his back to the audience. He seemed much more engaged with his band and the music they were doing - we were just incidental, or that's how it seemed to me. I was young enough at the time that I didn't understand what was going on - I thought he'd gotten completely drunk during the intermission, so I felt a little disappointed in him. But the second half was terrific in spite of that. I remember them doing "Maggie's Farm" and an absolutely chilling version of "Mr. Jones", with Bob just spitting out those vitriolic lyrics, brrr! The other thing I specifically recall about the Hawks was how impressed I was by Robbie in particular. He was just right beyond my sphere of experience of what a musician could be, and I'd never heard anything like him. And yet, he was so cool and professional about it - no jumping or running around for him. He stayed totally focused on Bob and the rest of the band.

So my lasting impression of that concert was that it was a total experience I'd never forget (true!), but also that it was mainly for them, a trip they were all on together, and we, the audience, could be there or not, and it wouldn't matter much either way to them.


Entered at Tue May 6 22:57:06 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lisa!!!!!!!!!!! You have to share more about Dylan and The Hawks!!!!!!!!!!
In my hopeless days I listened to "Desolation Row" constantly. I even bought an art book with just this single CD included. I sold that one too as I used to be a completist but not anymore.

I still have my Dylan and Louuu (Velvet Underground and Nico to Ecstasy) lyric books. I did sell my first Dylan lyric book with some of his drawings because I'm downsizing and the newer one imagezulu bought for me is more up to date but still lagging....1962-2001.

I received from Book Depository Don Felder's story with The Eagles....I guess they don't believe in forgiveness. When I saw The Eagles last year yes his replacement good play guitar.......but no.......He wasn't Don Felder and he wasn't there when the music was created. :-((((

Kevin J...I thought we'd really like Dr. John when he was here with Rollie's buddy Carlos Del Junco but we didn't dig his set at all......funky but boring I'm afraid. Oh well......


Entered at Tue May 6 22:52:15 CEST 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Wallsend.....

..........and thank you for that link with Paul Butterfield and Levon this morning………..Dr. John always sounds great but I don’t think I had ever seen him looking as good as he does in that clip……Butterfield looked in fine form as well.


Entered at Tue May 6 22:23:20 CEST 2014 from (58.104.12.178)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Kevin J, I thought the funny thing about that article was how she interpreted Levon doing the interview in his underwear as I sign that she had his trust. She obviously didn't get the message from the poison ivy and still hadn't go the message when she wrote the article.

Lisa, Unfortunately I never had the chance to see the '66 Tour but we have the recordings. It surely must have been the strangest tour ever. The contrast between the first and second halves is amazing especially considering this was still only 1966.

The link is to a 1978 performance by Rick. It has a lot of hits so I guess it is known here but I hadn't seen it until yesterday.


Entered at Tue May 6 21:57:24 CEST 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Maud is a musician - and that's a job.....God...those words don't mix well - do they?


Entered at Tue May 6 21:50:49 CEST 2014 from (38.113.85.40)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band Wives

Regarding Band Wives... I know that Dominique Robertson (now ex wife) is a therapist in California. Arlie Manuel (widow) ia a yoga instructor in California. Does anyone know if Elizabeth Danko (died 2013) had a profession? How about Sandy Helm? Maud Hudson appears to have an illness that would prevent her from holding a job.


Entered at Tue May 6 21:38:57 CEST 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The Blues………at the moment………………….having Liverpool and the Montreal Canadiens as teams you love…..ahhhhhhh! Looking more and more like Chicago-LA might just be the real Stanley Cup final this year………………enjoyed “Hazel” linked at Expecting Rain this morning.

Justice: That snotty reporter highlighted in Wallsend’s attachment that thought it a barrel of laughs when her assistant made the koo koo sign about Garth……..well, well……..good on Levon to walk her through some Poison Ivy.

Tele travels: Isn’t is odd that Robbie would have had it with him in 1989 at the Horseshoe in Toronto? I had thought he had just flown in for the Juno’s from LA and thought he would have travelled light - especially to the party on Queen Street after the ceremony.

Anyone else getting tired of that red headed just a little too articulate and not sad enough lady that is on CNN 24 hours a day talking about her husband lost on flight 370…………I am starting to think he may have set the whole thing up just to get away from her !


Entered at Tue May 6 21:27:44 CEST 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Elvis on Levon (etc.)

E. Costello interviewed at Levon Helm studios -- on working with Levon, discovering Big Pink in Liverpool, etc.


Entered at Tue May 6 20:11:46 CEST 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Lyrics

I saw Bob Dylan and the Hawks when they played Vancouver's Agrodome in March, 1966. This was when the concert format was first half/Dylan, second half/Dylan with the Hawks. I can still remember Bob in his navy blue pin-striped jacket, standing alone in the single spotlight, eyes closed, almost as though he were singing to himself. To close the first half, he sang "Desolation Row", and never missed a word.

When the second half began, a completely different Bob appeared. He seemed quite wild to me, careering around all over the place - at one point crashing into a little table with glasses and a pitcher of water and sending it flying off the stage. The intermission had been quite short, and I couldn't imagine what he had consumed to change so radically. I wasn't familiar with the music they were playing at that point unfortunately, as access to new music was completely different then, but I remember being absolutely amazed by the Hawks - I'd never heard anything like them!


Entered at Tue May 6 19:21:06 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Book of (Dylanknowledge)

Pat B: I knew that you weren't criticizing. I thought I might say something 'pithy' to keep the conversation going. As for the lyrics book, that is interesting and I had never heard that, but it makes sense. If I had a catalogue like his, I'd use all the resources I could.


Entered at Tue May 6 19:08:24 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

JT, I wasn't criticizing the singers for their lapses. I was just saying that that happens a lot. Btw, Levon says he was dosed that night the rather famous boot was recorded. I think it was Sam Shepard who said Dylan always had published music books of his songs backstage to refresh his memory.


Entered at Tue May 6 18:54:33 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: To err is human

LARS is not easy! Even after you've sung it a few hundred times. I quite enjoy the variations even if they are mistakes. To err is human! To forgive... well, you know. Bob's mistakes are better than most of what is said in ernest. Let him continue to get lost for many years in the myriad of his thought dreams.


Entered at Tue May 6 18:20:20 CEST 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: words and music

I've been mightily impressed with the _Live at the Academy_ set.
Discs 3 and 4 (a large thank-you to Mr. S. Robertson) are my new favourite The Band album -- the best band, playing the best songs, captured with clarity at the peak of their form. Pure confidence, swagger, in the zone, complete mastery.

And then Bob shambles onto the stage.

It's amusing to hear (what you can of) the negotiations between tunes -- I get the impression that Bob the great experimenter wants to maybe try a few things, but the band is exhausted -- let's do one more, don't care which one, and get the hell out of here . . . .
Not at all surprising that Levon can't recall all the lyrics to "Don't Ya Tell Henry," they're nonsense anyway . . . but I was surprised when Bob lost his place so completely in "Like a Rolling Stone."


Entered at Tue May 6 18:04:38 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Singers famously mess up words all the time. Lennon was noted for his on-stage lapses--messing up Things We Said Today on an early tour was typical. Dylan messed up LARS at IoW. Levon on Don't Do It at the Hollywood Bowl. Richard had all kinds of problems. Jagger's been using a teleprompter for years.


Entered at Tue May 6 17:12:49 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I have Lil Wayne's "How To Love" downloaded so last night when Christina Grimmie from The Voice showed her artistry and made it her own......Wow, wow! I think I truly understand The Band....I embrace all musical genres with an open heart and mind.

Also, I think rap artists are in a category unto themselves....Ha, ha.....as the amount of words they have to memorize in a free flow is out of this world. Louuu had to use a teleprompter for Dylan's "Foot of Pride" and even his own songs.....not a problem for me as I have a lot of difficulty memorizing lyrics. Whenever I taught a song to the kidzzz; I had to work so hard at home to learn the words before I shared the song. I had students who could hear a song once or twice and just go with it....not me, but then I could share great music that is timeless so it's all good.


Entered at Tue May 6 16:56:45 CEST 2014 from (68.199.208.16)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

when you're a singer, you remember the words to songs. If you are working on a song, singing, rehearsing, performing, you memorize the words, consciously or out of usage.. Just how it is. Singers have to remember. OF course, memory wears in us all, as they age performers are bound to start to forget some lyrics. And at any age someone can have a lapse....


Entered at Tue May 6 16:54:09 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Words

Was it 140 songs on the list Tom Petty said Dylan might call? And 120 for Van Morrison's band? Many performers do use a teleprompter on stage, but I don't think either of those two do.


Entered at Tue May 6 15:49:40 CEST 2014 from (70.30.113.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Slow Down

Nice find, Wallsend. Levon, Butterfield and David Sanborn, too. Uncould be better.


Entered at Tue May 6 15:02:17 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lyrics

Regarding words and remembering them night after night in concert: I always said that about Bob Dylan. His lyrics were often complex and so seemingly convoluted. I wondered how he remembered. It occurred to me that Dylan, and I assume these rappers, have 'ownership' of these lyrics, as complex as they are. They don't get it absolutely 'right' all of the time, and heaven knows, Dylan had changes over the years (some by accident; others likely on purpose). Practice of course with recurrent performances enhances the experience. And they often rehearse and 'get used to' the lyrics. Nevertheless, it is somewhat amazing but these are professionals and the best of them get the privilege of standing up on a stage and doing this thing as well as they do.


Entered at Tue May 6 14:59:14 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm joins Greg Gattine on the Morning Show on Radio Woodstock 100.1 on 11/26/08. (29.10)


Entered at Tue May 6 14:49:42 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Tue May 6 14:38:28 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Good Morning Wallsend....or I should say Good Afternoon to you. Your link brought me back to this one that I forgot about where Levon begins by whistling and at the end of song he has an interview where he claims it was a good idea at the time to have TLW.

I saw an interview where Toronto Raptor DeRozan listens to Jay-Z, Lamar Kendrick, Drake and Kanye. He also said he'd like to start to listen to some old music.......I like some of Drake's work because I can hear all the words and he sometimes sings before he raps. Again.....I am completely fascinated how rappers can remember their exact words every night and the way they can put words together.......


Entered at Tue May 6 12:20:19 CEST 2014 from (58.104.4.26)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across this which I hadn't seen before.


Entered at Tue May 6 12:01:54 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Rod

And you're right about the Broadcaster being in TLW interview scene (where Rick talks about having too much fun), along with Levon's electric mandolin, and something that looks like the bastard love child of a National guitar and a bouzouki...


Entered at Tue May 6 11:53:49 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Subject: Rod

I found that picture! Strangely, for an article about The Band, they ignored the avalanche of photos available and picked this rare one of Rick and Butter. The sunburst Ripper was permanently retired around this time, stolen maybe, and replaced by a blonde version. Now, someone will recognise the backdrop and tell us all what gig this was - maybe a TV appearance?


Entered at Tue May 6 09:38:38 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

thanks for the picture of RR and the Tele. I think it's the same one that is hanging in the background in TLW and also in some more recent pictures of RR in his studio.

the other day I found a picture of Rick playing his sunburst Ripper with Paul Butterfield - the only time I've seen him play it since TLW. I think it was on facebook somewhere.


Entered at Tue May 6 09:32:54 CEST 2014 from (58.104.31.185)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across this on e-bay. It might contain some useful information if anybody wants to come up with the $15.


Entered at Tue May 6 07:30:56 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Wallsend: no, the magazine cover was taken at Frost Amphitheatre, Stanford Univ, June 26 1976, on the opening date of the final tour (see link). I don't think the Broadcaster pic is from that show as Adam suggests, but could well be from the Santa Barbara County Bowl on June 28th. Robbie favoured that outfit throughout the tour and many outdoor festivals were played, so it's hard to be 100% certain. But, it's worth pointing out that they began this tour with Robbie standing nearest Richard, a change for them. From what I can see this didn't last long, and he and Rick swapped back to their usual spots. The arrangement of Garth's speakers and the trees in the background, as well as Robbie's position onstage do suggest June 28th.

As to which song...well, I didn't think they played Unfaithful Servant that year, it's place in the set had been permanently replaced by IMND as Rick's default ballad. Acadian Driftwood, to my knowledge, didn't appear until later in the tour - Greek Theater is the first I have of it. So my theory is that the Broadcaster was maybe a string break guitar, or Robbie just felt like playing it that day - briefly.


Entered at Tue May 6 06:46:29 CEST 2014 from (58.104.17.252)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Mike C

To say nothing of the fact that Rick didn't die of a drug overdose. It gives you some idea of how things get mis-reported. She learnt enough to do the interview but not enough to get things right.


Entered at Tue May 6 05:56:12 CEST 2014 from (98.66.252.49)

Posted by:

Mike C

Wallsend, that is a weird piece from the Columbia Journalism Review. I would trust her journalism more if she hadn't described Levon as "guitarist" for The Band. Now we all know that he does play the guitar, but if one were to link Levon with a single musical instrument, that sure ain't it.

Thanks to Kerrin for the photo of Robbie with the Broadcaster, and to Adam for linking it.


Entered at Tue May 6 05:26:56 CEST 2014 from (58.104.17.252)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Is that the photo of Robbie that was on the cover of the issue of Guitar Player magazine from way back which featured interviews with Robbie and Rick?

Linked is a rather strange piece on Garth and Levon from the Columbia Journalism Review.


Entered at Tue May 6 02:11:42 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

*1951 Fender Broadcaster


Entered at Tue May 6 02:09:19 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Kerrin's photo of RR

Now here is a super rare photo. Robbie playing the 1951 Broadcast listed on his site, live with The Band - in 1976 no less! This is from a series of photos from June 1976 at Frost Amphitheater, Palo Alto, CA. This must have been for "Unfaithful Servant" (alternate tuning, low bass to F#, what he used the ROA tele for in '74), or "Acadian Driftwood" (unknown tuning). The saddles are brass current day, but look steel in the photo. http://robbie-robertson.com/gear/test-15/ Thanks to Kerrin!


Entered at Mon May 5 23:19:58 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Give the dog a bone

My experience of London 2014 continues. Today we saw "organic vegetarian gluten-free" dog food on sale. Another sign of too much money. One hopes that the dogs forced to eat textured soya protein fart noxiously upon their owners .


Entered at Mon May 5 18:30:34 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

beg, Bill M is correct. You can have my prize.


Entered at Mon May 5 17:22:33 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

BEG: That Trebek guy was unfair to you, since you used the correct question format and even supplied additional info. Listening briefly to the Roxy show at your link, I was struck by how much alike all badly muffled rock musicians sound; the Wailers on that tape sound a lot like the Hawks did on ancient tapes that I've heard. The Toronto show at link, which I'm sure you know well, is much clearer.

Speaking of Alex Trebek, I'm sure that you, like me, grew up with him as the host of the CBC "Reach For The Top" TV show. Before that, at the start of the '60s, he was the host of CBC's "Music Hop", whose houseband included Robbie's teenage buddy Peter Traynor on bass. (Traynor's spot was later taken by John Stockfish, who then moved along with Music Hop guitarist Red Shea to Gordon Lightfoot; Red got jobs like that because his brother was a CBC variety producer.)


Entered at Mon May 5 17:08:23 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Alex T

Pat B: Close enough, even though you didn't ask "Who is Bob Marley?". Help yourself to the charity box at Peter V's garage.


Entered at Mon May 5 17:05:26 CEST 2014 from (38.113.85.40)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: People Magazine

People Magazine 1986


Entered at Mon May 5 14:56:28 CEST 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Basketball

Being a Toronto person, I have a natural inclination towards my teams and wish them well. When a Toronto team gets to the playoffs, even though I am not a basketball enthusiast, I get somewhat interested.

These are very gifted athletes and they have enormous skill at doing what they do.

The problem is that it is too easy to score and so you get what you see. Scoring after attempts occurs more often than not. The game often (not always) goes back and forth with almost tie scores and then... with 1-2 minutes left, it gets interesting. The team which wins is about equal (as was the case yesterday) in skill and ability to the team that loses.

As in most games, it should not be easy to score points. It is difficult in football; it is difficult in baseball; it is difficult in hockey; it is not difficult for these very tall individuals with superb skill to put that ball through the hoop. I find it difficult to understand why so many can appreciate this but, that's what makes the world go round. For me, it is boring for the majority of the game though I admire the skill set of these players.

Congratulations to Brooklyn for edging out The Raptors. Its always nice to have a winning team but from what I hear, the winner will have a daunting task with the next team.


Entered at Mon May 5 10:31:42 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I Bid You Good Night

"Photos from the recording of "Diamond Jubilation", the 75th Anniversary album of The Dixie Hummingbirds. Produced by Larry Campbell. Ira Tucker and Levon Helm have bid us goodnight."


Entered at Mon May 5 10:21:50 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Concert begins with Trenchtown Rock.....The very first song I ever heard by Bob Marley and The Wailers. I was completely taken over for life. :-D

"Live at the Roxy is a two-disc live album by Bob Marley & The Wailers, released in 2003. The album contains a complete concert, recorded on the 26th of May 1976 at The Roxy in West Hollywood California, during the Rastaman Vibration tour. This concert was originally broadcast live on the KMET radio station in Los Angeles. Because of the radio simulcast, this concert became widely bootlegged beginning in 1976. In 2002 the Marley family released the concert on the reissued Rastaman Vibration: Deluxe Edition, with a previously unreleased single "Smile Jamaica".


Entered at Mon May 5 10:07:18 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Old mechanics

On that, about ten years ago my daughter's car had a stuck electric window on the driver's side. Of course only dad deals with cars, so I took it the Renault main dealer. They said it would need a new motor, they only came in pairs (passenger side too), and with labour at £120 an hour (then!) it would cost £400. Plus tax.

I told my daughter she didn't need an opening window, but then took it to my mechanic. He sat in for 10 seconds.Operated the opposite window from the switch next to it, thought for a moment and took out a screwdriver. He hooked out a small stone from under the switch that was vstopping it going down,

'Done' he said.

'How much?' I said.

''I can't charge you for two minutes work. Just put something in the charity box over on the counter. But if it's less than £5 you can fuck off and not come here again."


Entered at Mon May 5 10:04:54 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Who is Bob Marley and The Wailers.

"One good thing about music
When it hits you feel ok"

"...The ripples of excitement generated by these concerts quickly spread further down the coast, in advance of the Wailers' prestigious shows at LA's Roxy Theatre between July 9-13.......Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens, George Harrison, Ringo Starr and members of the Rolling Stones, Grateful Dead, and the Band attended the Wailers' shows and the buzz surrounding the Roxy concerts wouldn't begin to fade until Bruce Springsteen played the club in October. Harrison told Melody Maker that Marley was the "...best thing I've seen in 10 years. Marley reminds me so much of Dylan in the early days, playing guitar as if he's so new to it. And his rhythm is so simple yet so beautiful. I could watch the Wailers all night."

The Story of Bob Marley's Wailers Wailing Blues by John Masouri

Robbie Robertson: "I saw Bob Marley and the Wailers in 1975 at the Roxy in Los Angeles. Never had I experienced a ritual of spiritual rebel music like this in my life."

Legends, Icons, and Rebels
Music That Changed The World
Robbie Robertson, Jim Guerinot, Sebastian Robertson, Jared Levine


Entered at Mon May 5 09:58:08 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cars are cars

My dad used to teach motor vehicle maintenance sometimes at evening classes. He had taught it in the army after the war too. (Age: my generation means WW2 by "the war.") One result is that he hated getting his hands dirty with engine oil, but also having taught most of them, trusted very few mechanics. He'd drive a long way to a good one, but then insist on standing in the workshop to watch the repair, and offer helpful suggestions.

I used to take my car to a mechanic who was in his 70s. A good sign of confidence was that he'd always emerge from the engine with a cigarette in his mouth. If anyone suggested this was dangerous, he'd say "I been smoking over engines more than fifty years and never got blowed up yet." I fear the Health & Safety brigade would have him out of business in 2014.


Entered at Mon May 5 09:50:39 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Saucy stuff

Words are crucial. In a British restaurant when ordering breakfast, they might ask 'Do you want sauce with that?' by which they mean either Tomato ketchup or Brown sauce (like HP Sauce, Daddies Sauce ). Both come in a bottle, or more likely a single portion packet. A friend broke up with a new guy the first time they had breakfast in a restaurant, and he asked for "red sauce." This was seen as a sign of ignorance and weak vocabulary. It's brown sauce, or ketchup.

Also no gentleman puts ketchup on a traditional English fried breakfast. It's brown sauce.


Entered at Mon May 5 05:42:18 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bob Marley.


Entered at Mon May 5 04:50:56 CEST 2014 from (173.3.50.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, it's good that Uncle Ciro and Aunt Annabelle are close by family. I understand about driving to your mechanic. In the fall of 09 i was working in and staying up in Albany. But, when i needed a rack and pinion job I drove to Da Bronx, to Lenny and George, to get the job done.

Hey, it sounds like you got Aunt AnnaBelle's gravy or sauce too.We always called it sauce, i never heard "gravy" till spring of 86, when Charles Terzano the Second and Charles Terzano the Third, from Bensonhurst, started working for me. It's a neighborhood thing, more people said gravies in Bensonhurst. "Macaronis and gravies" Once I heard gravy and gravies, that's what i started saying. Spaghetti sauce sounds right, but macaronis and gravies sounds like fun. However, this is sensitive aubject, people would kill over sauce versus gravy.


Entered at Mon May 5 04:32:19 CEST 2014 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Jeff, my Aunt Annabelle is still cooking for him so he has the gravy covered. They moved up by us about 20 years ago. For the first 10 years he was up here he'd drive his car down to his mechanic in Brooklyn for oil changes and repairs. How's that for loyalty. I'm going to get him one of those "Brooklyn In My Bones" shirts.


Entered at Mon May 5 04:02:32 CEST 2014 from (173.3.50.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, give us any good reason and us real Brooklyn guys are loyal to a fault. And, it's about class. Ya gotta have class. And ya gotta speak English, not act and speak like a thug, with slurred words and not enough words to make a sentence.. Paul Pierce seems okay. But, ballplayers should have to act like adults, speak english the way adults should....One of the things that amazes me about the the female turkish immigrants around here, is how amazingly well most of the women speak English. With great grammar and syntax, and great vocabularies. It makes a good impression. You know me, I'm all for slang, but you have to make sentences and communicate...I watched part of a interview or statement by Kevin Garnett the other day and he spoke like a modern day street thug. May not be a great way to judge a basketball player, but man, how i miss guys like Willis Reed, Earl Monroe, Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley, Cazzie Russell Walt Frazier,, who dazzled you on the court with their talent and heart, and then would turn around and give intelligent, entertaining, and funny interviews. With class. Ya gotta have class.You gotta live with class. The Dodgers were a class act.

i haven't really seen enough of The Nets yet to judge, but I hope that the day comes that they are worthy of having their team named for Brooklyn, or having Brooklyn in their name. . If you ask me, that's different than representing Brooklyn. Representing Brooklyn is a complicated subject. No team will ever do it the way the Dodgers did. It's a different world now, different Brooklyn, and getting more different every day. and me, honestly, I'm uncomfortable with the idea of a team representing Brooklyn. These Nets aren't Brooklyn, , there's no connection , no sense of history. They have Brooklyn in their name, and they 're here. I hope they become worthy, as players but even more importantly as people. But the Dodgers, well, The Dodger's were Brooklyn when Brooklyn was Brooklyn...

Brooklyn today- is very different than the Brooklyn of twenty years ago. but the Brooklyn of twenty years ago was no where near as different from the Brooklyn of forty years ago. It was somewhat different,Brooklyn is always changing... but Brooklyn of 20 and 40 years ago were not a galaxy apart. This Brooklyn, and the Brooklyn i and your Uncle Ciro grew up in , maybe separated by 20 or 30 years , are galaxies apart.

The world changes. But Uncle Ciro don't have to like it or sponsor the change. As long as you can still get good gravy (sauce), you don't need baseball.


Entered at Mon May 5 02:49:53 CEST 2014 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Old Timers

Jeff, you sound like my Uncle Ciro. He hasn't watched a baseball game since about the time the Dodgers left town. What is it with you Brooklyn guys?

BEG, I'm a life long Knick fan. I hate the nets. With the Knicks out, I root for Miami. Lebron James is the greatest basketball player I've ever seen and a class act.


Entered at Mon May 5 02:31:11 CEST 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Alex T

Subject: 1975 American Rock Concerts for $100

"Nevertheless, the Stones skipped a party in their honour to attend the first of the Roxy shows. Also in the audience were two of the Beatles, George and Ringo, the Band, the Greatful Dead, Billy Preston, Herbie Hancock, Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens, Buddy Miles, Bob Dylan's wife and a lot of movie stars."


Entered at Mon May 5 02:23:11 CEST 2014 from (173.3.50.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Angie, it was heartbreaking. As a human being, I'd have like to have seen the Raptors win...Lowrey and DeRozan are tough customers, lots of heart. First time i watched almost a full game of basketball in a long time. i only saw bits and pieces of the series, but in what I saw, i didn't detect any thug attitiude or b.s on the Raptors part. Like i said, i didn't watch a whole helluva lot, but i didn't detect any real thug b.s on the Nets part either, but, there's a hint, maybe i missed some?..... i didn't like the chest bump shove Garnett threw on Lowrey today. that was uncalled for, bullshit and thug b.s. ... i didn't see any provocation.... my team was the Knicks, till the 70s, maybe ealry 80s a bit. Can't say i followed since the days of dean meminger, henry bibby, might been the last time.....


Entered at Mon May 5 01:31:54 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Nomadic Mike...And on the seventh day she posted before she went to work. Yup, of all days I had to go to work. I didn't see the game until the last twenty seconds or so outside of a bar while walking to a store after work. I did get a chance at times to listen online and check scores on my phone. A real heartbreaking moment/moments....as well as sheer pride and love for the Toronto Raptors!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.....As coach Casey said that if you don't feeeeeeel this way......You don't know basketball.

Congrats to Bob F, Jeff A and any other Brooklyn Nets' fans here and of course to the Brooklyn Nets who have more experience than us!!! I really thought we would at least win this round.

I just love this Raptor team but some of those other players have to step up as DeRozan and Lowry cannot make the plays all the time. In any case, I liked how DeRozan apparently told Lowry that he was always the player to have the last shot and I liked how the players are all stepping up for Coach Casey. I look forward to more hoops next season. This is Lowry's team so more than likely the Raps will pay him to stay as he's made it clear that he's never felt as close to any other team. Good......because I and everyone watching a 6 foot player with as much heart and skill and tenacity as he has.....should be inspired by him and I want him back!!!!!! Thank you for a fun, exciting season!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
:-D


Entered at Sun May 4 22:27:52 CEST 2014 from (173.3.50.172)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Toronto almost taught The Nets real humility. Had em scared to hell. Right now The Nets are just a hair deeper talent wise and experience wise.And they have more muscle. I give the Raptors a AAA for heart. And I wish The Nets organization would use grammar, syntax, and full sentences in their advertising and internet publicity.

I also long for the days that NBA players gave intelligent answers during interviews, and the interviewers might ask some worthwhile questions. Basketball hasnlt been the same since the 70s. the late 60s, and the 70s, those were the great days of basketball, at least in my lifetime...


Entered at Sun May 4 20:51:30 CEST 2014 from (70.30.113.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Angie

And on the seventh day, she rested.


Entered at Sun May 4 15:24:56 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Vintage Guitar Magazine
Robbie Robertson
The Many Sides of
By DAN FORTE

"When you’re learning sort of generic rock and roll, it’s typically too early to cite someone as an influence, but who eventually influenced you into forming a style?

You know, I just stole anything I could from anybody I could at that time. I would see other guitar players, grown-ups, and I would just see what they did or ask them to show me something. These guys played more of an older style, like ’40s vamp. Lots of chords. But they knew some tricks, and I would pick up on those and learn some things about electric guitar – because I went to electric guitar very early on. I was not a folk musician at all. I really appreciated beautiful acoustic guitar playing, but I moved on, just because of rock and roll and people like Carl Perkins. I thought, “Man, Carl Perkins writes the songs, he plays the guitar solos, he sings!” That’s even better than just somebody who strums the guitar to accompany themselves. And Chuck Berry. Look at that! I was more fascinated by those guys.

Then as I started learning more about those kinds of things, I was very much impressed by the sound of guitars. I thought Les Paul & Mary Ford’s early recordings were a breakthrough in music. They really jumped out and tapped me on the shoulder. And you know who else? That guy Joe Maphis – and the Collins Kids [featuring Larry Collins]. What did they play, Mosrites?

In the Rhythm Chords days, what kind of electric guitar did you have?

I had a copper-colored Harmony [H44 Stratotone]. That was my first electric, and in that band, the guy playing lead guitar was Pete Traynor, who makes Traynor amplifiers. He taught me a lot, and his brother, Steve, also played in the band. It was a little bit before people had basses, so he would play a low boogie part, to be kind of equivalent to what a bass was. In the beginning, it was hard to find electric-bass players.

After the Harmony, I found probably a ’57 Strat in a store, and I got a pretty good deal on it. But I had to pawn it about a year later to pay for my ticket to join up with Ronnie Hawkins & The Hawks in Arkansas. He said, “You don’t need a guitar; just figure out how to get down here, and we’ll get you a guitar.” So when I got down there, we got a Telecaster. I played Telecasters for years.

Even though you’re most associated with the Stratocaster, your tone and attitude seem more like a Tele player – like a James Burton.

That’s from being influenced by these people like Fred Carter, Jr. and Roy Buchanan. This style, according to them, comes from “The Lousiana Hayride.” That’s where guys were first mixing country music and blues together.

At what point did you realize that you had developed your own stamp and identity on guitar?

When I was playing with Ronnie Hawkins, in the beginning. At that time, there weren’t a lot of people playing that style of guitar – like James Burton and Roy Buchanan. They were very unusual and unique in the beginning. And I learned a lot of their tricks from Fred Carter, Jr., and then from Roy Buchanan. Most people played a different style, and when I first was playing with Ronnie Hawkins, I took what they were doing and made it more raging. On those first recordings I played on with Ronnie, and just from us playing wherever we played, guitar players were coming from all over to hear me do that.

First of all, they didn’t even know about moving the strings down and using a banjo string for the first string. They thought I was doing that with regular guitar strings, because there were no “light-gauge” strings back then, right? So the fact that I could bend this thing, and in the particular way that I did it, it was like, “Oh, my God, the world’s coming to an end.” Then playing a lot of harmonics, and from Ronnie Hawkins’ influence, a lot of the music became quite explosive and violent. So the feedback from people told me that I was doing something unique."


Entered at Sun May 4 15:00:21 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Two young artists channeling Yoko and John.....Love her easy peaceful vibe...even when she's speaking. Thanks to Drake I downloaded her EP.

Jhené Aiko - Bed Peace (Explicit) ft. Childish Gambino


Entered at Sun May 4 14:54:10 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson and his Epiphone Howard Roberts in Guitar Aficionado

Adam...You never cease to amaze me. In praise of younger The Band fans! You too Ari!


Entered at Sun May 4 14:50:18 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Basement Tapes


Entered at Sun May 4 14:48:41 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon photo


Entered at Sun May 4 12:07:05 CEST 2014 from (79.150.184.129)

Posted by:

Miguel López

Location: Madrid / Spain
Web: My link

Subject: New book about The Last Waltz

Only for information and not for sale, there´s a new book about The Last Waltz. It´s written in spanish. The book is on line. More information: https://www.facebook.com/imposiblevivirasi


Entered at Sun May 4 11:47:52 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbies guitars

How many Fender guitars did RR actually have? From the recent discussion it sounds like the ROA Tele was the same Tele he used for many years - just refinished. A bit like the red/bronzed strat.


Entered at Sun May 4 06:14:44 CEST 2014 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Preview of the lead track off the upcoming Midnight Ramble Vol 3... a collection of 2005-2010 live performances from Levon & friends.


Entered at Sun May 4 06:08:35 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Adam

Adam, I don't have a photobucket or similar account so can't link to that photo, but if you drop me a line happy to send it. Without spaces: worsfold family at g mail dot com.


Entered at Sun May 4 05:31:16 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

Or was it before the Junos?


Entered at Sun May 4 05:23:53 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

Kerrin - where in the world is that photo of Robbie playing a Tele in '76? I would absolutely love to see that. Please post it...

You're exactly right... Robbie played that ROA Tele in the 1989 Danko/Hudson club appearance, after the Juno Awards. Awesome to have a shot with those active pickups.


Entered at Sun May 4 04:53:30 CEST 2014 from (124.25.162.225)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

Subject: Teles

Adam, you're half right, the ROA Tele was used at Rich Stadium in 1974, along with the red Strat. He possibly used it on other dates on this tour, who knows. I've got one photo of Robbie playing a blonde Tele on the 76 tour, but it has a black pickguard and appears to have the stock neck pickup, so not "your" guitar.

BUT the ROA original was used again onstage at least once, in 1989. See the above video from 6.23, these are the active pickups Sebastian was talking about.


Entered at Sat May 3 23:42:57 CEST 2014 from (99.120.168.64)

Posted by:

Joe Medwick

Location: Austin , Texas
Web: My link

Subject: Joe's Funky Folks hittin' the home stretch

Hey Everybody! My Funky Folks record project kickstarter campaign is hittin' the home stretch....thanks to all my dear friends of The Band for all your help on this lifelong dream project so far....we're gonna make it happen one way or another eh!....please check out the video (stay to the end for some gorgeous Garth magic) and tell your friends if you can...a whole lotta Garth, Little Feat, Albert Lee , David Lindley, Gary Mallaber, Tony Braunagel, Texicali Horns and many many many more either already on Funky Folks or about to be....and Levon too...in spirit for sure....thanks from the bottom of my heart...Joe in Austin...(Ducky Joe to Lee and the guys)...furthur on up the road and long live The Band...


Entered at Sat May 3 23:20:15 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan

Hmm. 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10 for me!


Entered at Sat May 3 20:41:29 CEST 2014 from (98.66.252.49)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: Fenders

Congrats to you, Adam & good luck with your Telecaster project. Would love to see pics of the finished product.

I'm pretty sure that Robbie played a '51 Broadcaster for awhile & I assume that was what he played with the Hawks before hooking up with Bob. Anybody know any details about that guitar?


Entered at Sat May 3 19:16:38 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ahh, the Palladium show. Breathtaking. Of some note is the DJ outro.


Entered at Sat May 3 19:03:06 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

Robbie's ROA Tele is very historic, when you really think about it. It was a 1965 black telecaster, which Dylan sometimes played on the '66 tour, and which Robbie played on The Basement Tapes, MUSIC FROM BIG PINK, THE BAND, stripped it of it's finish and did STAGE FRIGHT, and probably CAHOOTS and MOONDOG MATINEE before his switch to Strats in late 1973.

Robbie's ROA Tele was present at the 1965/'66 Dylan tours, The Basement Tapes, the first three masterpiece albums, and major gigs like Winterland/Woodstock/Isle Of Wight 1969, Festival Express/Syria Mosque 1970, Europe 1971 and of course ROCK OF AGES, and Watkins Glen/Roosevelt Stadium 1973. There's one pic of Robbie using it in July 1974, and that was presumably the last time on stage.


Entered at Sat May 3 18:53:32 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: JT

Love your post on Dylan.I try to listen daily to whatever clips are posted on expecting rain and saw the Hawaii clips.His voice sounds excellent.But,I'm sure someone will find a way to add themselves a new category to your list!Let the groaning and moaning march forward.But,what really bugged me about those clips-the talkers-the reason I've restricted my attendance at live shows.The cellphones,talking,socializing-got to wonder why bother paying to talk all night?


Entered at Sat May 3 17:18:51 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

brown eyed girl probably would "fit" into number 3 category even though she had three shelves of books on Dylan and saw him at different venues in Toronto. Last time was at the Ricoh Coliseum.

14:44 minutes with BOB ....."Bob Dylan Interview and a very revealing one at that. For those who have researched into the common theme amongst public figures about Channelling and possession, it's a must watch."

May the best team win tomorrow at the Air Canada Centre! I'm hooked on the Raps and plan on buying tickets next season as we get a corporate discount. Brooklyn has Beyonce and J-Z but we have Drake (apparently they're feuding via of rap songs). Yup. It's not always about being on the Court. ;-D

Go Raps Go Raps! It's hard to believe that 13 points stood between these teams in the regular season? and yet Brooklyn has more talent. No matter what happens on Sunday.....Thank you for the sheer joy of watching you do your thing. Basketball is not easy or we'd all be playing. Yes, the very tall players can get easy baskets at times but every time a team misses a basket the other team doesn't always capitalize by rebounding and then taking it down the court and then getting in the paint and then shooting the basket in! If it was so easy the score would be much higher and higher and higher......just thought of Sly Stone now! Oh and those three points....such a turn on!! LOL The one player that really gets under my skin on the Nets.....going blank here.....The one who has ankle problems......He's very good......but so are DeRozan and Lowrey!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Everytime I look at Valencunias I see imagezulu's nephew as they're around the same age as well. Come on gentle giant!!!!!! As I posted before I used to be a huuuuge fan along with hockey back in the day of Karrem Abdul Jabbar and Tiny Archibald and Reggie Miller!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Btw, grandpa and I would watch wrestling as well but nooooooooooo.........never again! ;-D


Entered at Sat May 3 16:48:36 CEST 2014 from (209.153.208.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Bob Dylan again

There are many types of Dylan fans.

1. The folkie, who couldn't get over the 'sell-out' at Newport and thereafter.

2. The 60s fan who couldn't get past 'Blonde on Blonde'.

3. The 60's-70s fan, who said everything after 'Blood On The Tracks' didn't stand up.

4. The 'how did he lose it to Jesus' fan.

5. The 80's was crap fan.

6. The 'renaissance' fan who admired the newer material and hated everything in between

7. The concert goers who only want to hear the 'hits' and walk out or leave unsatisfied because they don't get enough (those who want the Dylan of the 60s to stay in the 60s because their nostalgic selves are not represented in that concert well enough).

8. The 'what is he saying' fan who can't understand the lyrics and didn't know them well enough to follow along

9. The 'he can't sing anymore' fan (not to be confused with the 'he could never sing anyway' fan).

10. The 'I'm never going to another Dylan concert' fan who didn't get the thrill he/she got from past concerts.

To all of you I say, listen to Dylan in Japan or Hawaii on line streaming and reassess. Don't write off Dylan. He is going strong. He is current. You won't get too many hits but he stands up there with the best of what is happening today. This is no 'retro' show; this is NOW!


Entered at Sat May 3 15:39:18 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

30 amazing unsung bassists (in no particular order)
MusicRadar puts them in the spotlight
Ed Mitchell February 25, 2013

Rick Danko...4


Entered at Sat May 3 15:27:40 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

How to Danko: A Lesson in the Style of Rick Danko by Rob Collier

APRIL 1, 2012 BY ROB COLLIER

"The Band’s bassist, Rick Danko, had a remarkably unique approach to his instrument. But when you listen to him, it’s hard to put a finger on exactly what his style was all about. Danko doesn’t dazzle you with speed. His lines are often melodic, but that’s not quite the allure. He often plays somewhat angular or unusual lines, but that isn’t quite it, either. There’s something about his feel and his phrasing. The way he scoops into notes. The space he leaves in his lines. A friend of mine describes playing this way as “Danko-ing.” There isn’t really another word for it. It is Rick Danko’s individual style as a bass player. So in this article, we will discuss how to “Danko.”

As mentioned above, Rick Danko often “scoops” into his notes. In the transcriptions below, I’ve notated these scoops with grace notes; sometimes these scoops are slides, sometimes they are hammer-ons. It’s almost impossible to notate all of them. The staff would be a mess of grace notes, slurs, and slides. An interesting thing about these “Danko scoops” is that they almost always occur right on the beat. Most players, if they were going to slide from a C on the 3rd fret of the A string up to a D on the 5th fret, would start the slide just before the beat. Thus, they would hit the target note D right on the beat. When Danko scoops into a note, he starts the slide on the beat and reaches the target note after the beat. So if it’s a D chord, he’s actually hitting a C on the downbeat of the chord, then quickly sliding up to the root.

Central to Rick Danko’s sound, especially on the earlier records, is a very “thumpy” bass tone—flatwound strings, most often played with a pick. He regularly played a Fender (Precision and Jazz) or a Gibson Ripper with foam under the strings to mute them. After The Band’s first album, Music From Big Pink, Danko acquired a fretless Ampeg Baby Bass. He would use this bass for several years and on a lot of recordings. (The aforementioned scoops become more frequent, not to mention more difficult to notate, once Danko goes fretless.)"


Entered at Sat May 3 09:38:11 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Don't want to steal Adams thunder - that's a great project. I just bought an Ampeg bass copy .. after searching for (too long to mention).

Those Paladium songs sound great. To me it proves that the TLW was a good representation of how The Band sounded at the time. Love Butterfield on Carnival.


Entered at Sat May 3 04:20:40 CEST 2014 from (121.211.87.72)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: ADAM!!! You're FAMOUS!!

Looks great: I didn't read the names, just the discussion (because usually the names mean nothing anyway!) Do keep us posted, and if you happen to make a second, postage to Sydney is relatively cheap! ;)


Entered at Sat May 3 04:08:02 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks Ari!

Chris Hillman opened and The Band come on with Ophelia....First time in New York since playing with Dylan in 1974, September 1976 at the Palladium where I saw.....The Pogues in 1991!


Entered at Sat May 3 02:47:31 CEST 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Icebound rock
Web: My link

Link is to Dylan/Band doing 'Auld Triangle'. All about Garth.


Entered at Sat May 3 02:14:41 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ari, that's a great find.


Entered at Fri May 2 23:22:52 CEST 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Correction it was 1974 not 1976.


Entered at Fri May 2 23:14:01 CEST 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: The Band without Manuel

Something very interesting:

A concert on August 31, 1976 by The Band. Bill Graham opens up the concert explaining that because of an illness, Richard Manuel will not be performing tonight. It's interesting to hear The Band play their set without him. I find it sad that they could play without him and they'd still sound really good, but that was the reality at that time in The Band's career I guess. Listen for how Rick opens Dixie since there's no piano.


Entered at Fri May 2 22:40:23 CEST 2014 from (58.104.12.125)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Linked is an article from Vintage Guitar magazine featuring Robbie and some of his guitars. Adam, I can understand your enthusiasm for the ROA Tele. When ROA came out I thought it was the coolest thing ever, not just the sound but I loved all the little photos on the cover. The only problem is going to be it will be harder to copy Robbie's playing style than it is to copy the guitar. Good luck!


Entered at Fri May 2 21:25:43 CEST 2014 from (75.34.57.131)

Posted by:

Adam

Dlew - the guy that is building a Robbie tele is ME! Yes, I started that thread and the guitar will be finished in a week.


Entered at Fri May 2 19:32:37 CEST 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: T shirts

Someone will buy that shirt and maybe 2, They were obviously some au courant designer, By next year they will be found in the local thrift shop, and someone will be putting out "the latest"


Entered at Fri May 2 11:07:11 CEST 2014 from (121.211.87.72)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: For you tech heads out there:

Some guy is building a replica of one of robbie's teles. There's an interesting discussion at the link.


Entered at Fri May 2 10:31:54 CEST 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: "Slighty" over-priced T-shirts

A sadder fact: somebody will buy that T-shirt.


Entered at Fri May 2 09:42:20 CEST 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Sounds a little bit steep to me Peter. Did you try Marks and Spencers?


Entered at Fri May 2 00:51:32 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: World Gone Wrong

In London today. We passed a shop with a white T shirt in the window. It looked good so we thought about a present for one of our sons and went in to ask the price. As T-shirts start at £10, it was nicely cut and we expeted say £30. What? £295, or nearly $500. For a T-shirt? Thoughts of social injustice were fuelled by looking at the price tag on some pyjama bottoms on the way out. £695, or about $1000. This is the sort of thing that led to 1789 or 1917, I muttered darkly on our way out.


Entered at Fri May 2 00:47:23 CEST 2014 from (31.221.110.50)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rolling Stone front page today: "Obama & The Hawks" so I was about to buy it expecting a Presidential appreciation of our favourite band's early years. Turned out to be about politics!


Entered at Thu May 1 14:58:51 CEST 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Nelson Wilbury

This is a story Mrs. NorthWestCoaster keep on telling after a glass of French rose wine:

Gordon Murray whose dream was to have a wineyard in the south af France was a keen Fender guitar player. "Gordon who" asks the average gber. Gordon was the Chief Engineer in F1-team where Nelson Piquet Senior was the "numero uno" driver, a three time World Champion. GEORGE HARRISON, the Beatle and Gordon's friend, used to hang around with the team. Nelson and George became befriended, what else. Then, when Traveling Wilburys pseudonymes were defined, George said... "ehhh... Nelson!" - You'd better believe it. I do.


Entered at Thu May 1 14:00:14 CEST 2014 from (24.71.131.117)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: J.J. Cale and Bob Dylan

Back to music. Eric Clapton and friends will be soon releasing a tribute to the songs of J.J. Cale. He is said to have been under appreciated overall. Not by me and LvdB. She had his 'NATURALLY' when it was released and played it incessantly. We have repurchased it on vinyl. what a treat.

And, speaking of excellence, there has been some criticism of some of the Dylan 'up singing' in 2012-2013 but if any of you have listened to some of the offerings on line of the recent Japan tour of 2014, there is a return to form for Dylan in this regard. The band is tight as usual and Dylan sounds good. The reviews of the shows have reflected this repeatedly and Hawaii was no exception. Like sports, comebacks are what its all about. Keep on listening and never write anybody off. Its 'life and life only.'


Entered at Thu May 1 13:49:49 CEST 2014 from (24.71.131.117)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Brooklyn basketball and LA miracles and the Rangers

Hockey is my passion in sports. We all need diversions and commitments. I liked to play basketball in high school, but was never a fan in the sense of going to games or watching regular season games on TV. But, I have to marvel at this basketball playoff. I'd have no interest whatsoever except that our Toronto Raptors are in it with Brooklyn as the adversary. What a game last evening. Toronto with a 26 point lead and then Brooklyn comes back all the way to tie 101-101 and the final at 115-113 for Toronto. Are you kidding me? I don't like the game but admire the profound skill of these athletes. Too easy to score and too many successes make it boring until the end. But wow! You have to admire the comeback! It made for as much drama as sports can offer.

Much like Jonathan Quick and the LA Kings coming back from a 3-0 deficit to take their series last night 4-3. And since we are talking about success, congratulations to the the New York Rangers for overcoming the Broad Street gang and moving on with a good team effort all round. Playoffs make you remember how good sports can be at their best. Now if only the Habs can do what they must against a very good Boston team.

Sports- the great escape. The soccer fanatics know what I mean.


Entered at Thu May 1 07:34:13 CEST 2014 from (68.199.209.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Angie, :-), you're welcome. It's been a good, fun conversation..Thanks for sending the song to GF... i have a lot to add to our conversation. It's all good and I'm certain you'd enjoy reading it.. I'm trying to whittle it down to a megillah.


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