The Band
Home

History
Members
Library
Discography
Videography
Filmography
Pictures
Audio files
Video clips
Tape archive
Concerts
Related artists
Merchandise
Guestbook
Chat Room
What's New?
Search

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, April 2011


Entered at Sat Apr 30 22:57:49 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Well done Jan. I will get you the second draft of that article over once I have matched all the corrections I posted here onto the original document!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 22:36:03 CEST 2011 from (91.42.253.83)

Posted by:

Norbert

I'll pay $10.- of that.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 22:28:36 CEST 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Danish idiot

The cut-and-paste-guy posting links to fetish sites in Denmark has been blocked. We're currently tracking him down, as he now owes us $3000 (check link above) for publishing links to ads at The Band web site.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 21:03:30 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the pristine woods of NY

Subject: Who's to blame for it all?

Norbert- the guilty party who stole your GB pages ALSO tried to ruin TLW, sits inside Ben Barnake's middle ear and whispers, "just print more money!!!" AND controls Red John. It's THE FLY again!!!!! (loud, alarming music)!

We all have to stuff flyswatter handles down the back of our bluejeans and swat flies whenever we can. And, if you're up to it, go after the squirrels as well.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 20:54:54 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: San Francisco, New Year 83/84

Restored on Wolfgangs Vault...but WTF? What's the extra bass player all about?

(Apologies if this is well documented but I'm not terribly up to speed on the early days of the reformed Band. Is this the Cate Bros era?)


Entered at Sat Apr 30 20:42:01 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S..M.

Subject: RR

I think always what Libby Titus said about RR: "He was good to his mother, his wife, and the other guys." That says it all!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 20:42:06 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Norbert, Soylent Green is PEOPLE! They are making our food out of people. Next they'll be breeding us like cattle. The oceans are dead, the plankton's all gone...Soylent Green is people.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 20:16:11 CEST 2011 from (98.229.113.186)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: Ramble with Mavis Staples

Howdy, Guestbook. Just popping in to see if any other GB'ers will be at the Levon ramble on June 3rd? I'm making the rock and roll pilgrimage and thought maybe some of y'all were, too. All the best, LDO


Entered at Sat Apr 30 20:14:35 CEST 2011 from (91.42.241.81)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Hackers

My 2 cents, I agree it could be RR, if you’re audacious enough to steel songs, what in the world would prevent you from stealing a guestbook? Or is it a cry for attention from one that needs help?

It only confirms my belief that RR closed my GB (run by Peter) too (I honestly must say I’m still a bit proud about that one (I never brag about it though) and will take it as a fact till some proofs the opposite).

On the other hand I also never trust keyboard players, Garth, RTO, or Pat B, why not? It’s 2011.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 19:50:30 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV re hackers / Kevin re JA

Thank you for confirming what I thought, PV. All from the same IP address, always a post from David or I. Must be cut and pasted and manually put in as you say. Kevin, you are quite right. Who needs fetishes when you have Grace Slick?


Entered at Sat Apr 30 19:24:18 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: hackers

This had to be done by cutting and pasting and then choosing to tick the box. It's too much trouble for most, but some will do it. I find this on my own work site, that people will type out seemingly relevant comments to avoid the very good Wordpress SPAM filter. I don't mean the generic bullshit about liking a blog and asking how to build similar. It's hard to see why it's worth it, but I haven't known them cut and paste other's comments before.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 18:41:13 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Carol

As expected, Carol Caffin has done the best interview I have seen from Robbie. She managed to get him off the "party line" of answers. Way to go Carol!

The hacker is weird. Went to a lot of trouble to post links I can't even understand.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 18:00:58 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.47)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: It's all Robertson's Fault

Trust me on this one Rob...... there are no doubt low-lifes out there that at this very moment are thinking it is RR that has taken your posts as his without proper attribution......the finance link was apparantly the one that confirmed it for them.......they also believe he used his influence with the uppers echelons to get Obama into Harvard and to forge his birth certificate......Hang tough we all know your fetishes don't extend much further than Jefferson Airplane.....


Entered at Sat Apr 30 17:49:56 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Jeb Stuart

I believe RtO is picking up some cash on the side.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 17:02:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

It's not just me, Fred - one of David P's got done yesterday. All from the same IP address and with a selection of links involving finance, babyware (or something) and now what appears to be a well-rounded fetish site catering for many whims.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 16:59:09 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A WTF Moment

Why are selected RTO's posts being replicated and reposted under different names with links to Lord knows what? Is this some part of a nefarious plot to destabilize civilization as we know it?


Entered at Sat Apr 30 16:57:27 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Yep, we're hacked

"Shane" has just copied a post of mine and linked us to a fetish site!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 16:30:45 CEST 2011 from (89.150.181.130)

Posted by:

Shane

Post deleted. F**k off.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 15:21:15 CEST 2011 from (76.66.125.166)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

RTOOO! I forgot that Brins plays sliiiiiide on this one!

Ok, I'm off to a Math Seminar at my old school UofT with "Mr. Maximus" who is a Master's of engineers. We'll go just about anywhere for a free lunch. ;-D


Entered at Sat Apr 30 15:09:02 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG

Nice one! The flak we gave Brins for playing a pointy guitar in the 80s.... You gotta love the Farfisa organ for songs like this. Many find them too shrill, but for certain sounds nothing comes close. Best use of that kind of organ (Vox, Farfisa etc) is Augie M in the Sir Doug Q. Played it a bit like an accordion, phrasing wise, and it worked every time.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 15:01:16 CEST 2011 from (79.202.188.125)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

forgot to say, when Daniël Loheus fromed his blues band and wanted to take them to Holland, one of the musician insisted to take his mother along, and so they did .... she went with them to all gigs also, ha! ...


Entered at Sat Apr 30 14:58:59 CEST 2011 from (76.66.125.166)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and here's one for RTO and and another one for JQ!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 14:47:42 CEST 2011 from (76.66.125.166)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garland Jeffreys!!!!

I hope his upcoming CD "The King Of In Between" (June 7) has some love ballads and songs of social justice as well...and some reggae grooves too!
Give thanks and praises to Garland Jeffreys!!!!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 14:24:53 CEST 2011 from (91.42.250.177)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: 'The crossroads where the devil took Robert Johnson back

Empty, as you speak (or understand) Dutch, here a clip (link 2/7) of Daniël Looheus searching the blues (band) in the Mississippi Delta, visiting the crossroads where Robert Johnson was poisoned. An passant he becomes philosophical about crossroads, about fear he states: fear is just for the moment, regret lasts a life long, isn’t he right? Actually he later found great musicians, formed a blues band, took them to Holland and toured The Netherlands (2 years ago). I saw Loohues yesterday in Enschede; about his blues drummer from than: sometimes he got lost in drugs, according to the man the devil took him sometimes. On a Sunday he made him some “snert” (soup) with all kinds of meat in it (a lot). The drummer liked it very much, only the “green sauce” he wasn’t so fund of ;-).

Anyway doesn’t the devil take us all from time to time? Like Mayer sings:

Gravity, stay the hell away from me

Gravity has taken better men than me

Just keep me where the light is

Anyway it’s “Queens day” over here and the weather is great, I’m going to light the BBQ this afternoon and pop a bottle of wine, have a great weekend, regards.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 14:24:13 CEST 2011 from (76.66.125.166)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Oh Carol!!!!!

Thanks for your email.....I had a feeeeeeling you've been busy. I'm glad it was a great experience for you.
You always acknowledged his Birthday on your site...showed a sense of fair play.

"Robbie Robertson on His New Album, Past Projects, and the Band Rumors that Won't Go Away"" -- great article/interview by Carol Caffin, from Crawdaddy."

Crawdaddy via of Carol Caffin!: How would you want the Band to be remembered?

Robertson: I would want the Band to be remembered as a real band. There was just a wonderful balance in this group, the way the whole thing worked. What Garth [Hudson] did was completely unique. Nobody else in the world was able to do anything near what Garth would do in the group. Rick, his singing and his playing—god only made one of those, and he broke the mold after that. Richard Manuel could make you cry in a second with his singing, and he was also just an amazing, beautiful soul, too. And Levon is one of the most talented people I’ve ever crossed paths with in my life. Levon taught me so much and is the closest thing I’ve ever had in my life to a brother. So anyway, I just have such warm, fond memories of the Band, and I would just want that to be passed on.

Crawdaddy!: And how would you like to be remembered?

Robertson: I just want be remembered as somebody who was really passionate about what he did and who loved a good challenge.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 13:32:09 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Calvin...

I think we're singing from the same hymn-book, but I wouldn't say the Kinks' Music Hall tradition was particularly evocative of Americana. I think Bill was alluding to their Englishness showing through in the same way the Band wrote new songs that were riddled with Amer..err...Canad...err..Transatlantic heritage.

Of course, America has vaudeville, but that's not really a folk heritage. Give it twenty years and will be though.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 13:13:27 CEST 2011 from (72.196.146.10)

Posted by:

Calvin

Sometimes I think the reason the Beatles dont really connect with me, as well as others who listen to a lot of music, is everything they did has been so wonderfully copied. There have been a number of successful bands who really mined the Beatles sound and because of that made the Beatles sound just a little less impressive in the "Oh, Ive heard this is a million times sense". I think Miles Davis often suffers the same way. What they did was sooooo impressive, but years after the fact it doesnt seem unique any more. Although some of those songs are simply amazing. n\ I think RTO is right Bill, even though the kinks 66-71 output does have a sound that sort of smacks of Americana, its coming out of a British Music Hall traditions. Similiar, but certainly different. With the Kinks you can date the sound as emerging in 1966 with Face to Face. The groups were vastly different though, Ray's music had a sound that was truly nostalgiac for the past and his Dad's music hall tradition, and at the same time had a biting sarcasm in it. The Band's music was never sarcastic.

Scarlet Pimpernal Bill? The Swedish Band? Kind of boring really.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 12:50:47 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Superb job Carol! I have a tough time reading for any length on the computer but had zero issue staying with your piece - wish their was more. You did a beautifully fluid job with getting into the Band material stuff - top rate!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 11:36:13 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just heard from amazon.co.uk that the Rick Danko live CDs are delayed by at least a week.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 08:44:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Carol Caffin has done one of the best interviews with Robbie. Very good indeed. It was revealing and Robbie was explicit about something I always felt. I wrote for ten years with someone who wasted at least two hours of every working day blasting accountants, lawyers, editors and the design of the coffee cups in the take-away sandwich shop next to our office. There was a stream of vehemence and blame. When I stopped writing with him, within a year I found myself the subject of it, but, after we stopped writing together, he never wrote a thing on his own. That's why, since this GB started and Levon's book came out, I found myself empathizing with Robbie, (while still buying everything Levon did and enjoying it). Robbie said exactly what I'd assumed in Carol's interview. She is a brilliant interviewer in bringing people out of themselves, and what a refreshing change to see no questions about booing in 1966!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 04:27:56 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.15)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Mike......Not exactly what you are asking but some background........Regulars here will recall that when Sebastian Robertson made his first vist here a year or two ago, I urged/requested that he get in touch with Carol for a chat. He responded within short delay that contact had been made and that they had agreed to do an interview......As time went on I was beginning to think that the promise was broken........Alas No.....and thank goodness for that as her interview is hands down the best - most real one conducted on this tour......As with all her interviews, she has a special talent for getting her subjects to loosen up and go places that they might not have thought they would when the chat started........Dignity and Hardball do not have to arrive on seperate tracks....A shame most interviewers don't understand this........And dig the second to last answer RR gives.........Has a Band mate ever described the other four so beautifully and accurately.......Bravo Carol...


Entered at Sat Apr 30 04:00:53 CEST 2011 from (70.26.121.186)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Carol Caffin

Nice work. I'm assuming the interview was done face-to-face. It would be interesting, too, to know how the interview session was set up and where it was held, plus a few other incidentals — such as the mechanics of reaching RR's people to set it up and RR's willingness to partake etc etc. Carol mentions the interview's agreed-to time period was extended twice. By Robbie or "his people"? Overall, it was such a good interview that, personally, I'd just love to learn more details. Good job!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 03:57:09 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Hacked II

RTO: you forgot to mention that post by "Frank"...a replica of one of yours.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 02:56:11 CEST 2011 from (99.141.48.246)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks Jon.

Carol Caffin's Robbie interview is really good.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 02:50:00 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: I think we're hacked

Somebody called Tyler has just duplicated David P's earlier post to me about mono JA releases. The link is about some kind of baby products. Avast ye hacker! May the yuletide log this December slip from the fire and burn your house down!


Entered at Sat Apr 30 02:38:52 CEST 2011 from (24.236.77.125)

Posted by:

Deb

Web: My link

Very nicely done Carol! This is probably the best interview I've read in the recent articles on the HTBC release.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 02:36:38 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: no'theast

Subject: carol

And a damn fine interview it was too. Carol never shied away from asking questions. Robbie never shied away from answering. Just wish she would have pursued the fly issue.


Entered at Sat Apr 30 00:47:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bob Geldorf says charity events only run without backstage rancour if Sir Paul is present, because then there is no argument about who is top of the bill. Unless they resurect Elvis that will remain the case.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 22:33:42 CEST 2011 from (166.205.141.47)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Garland Jeffreys

Anybody have an opinion on his latest: The King Of In Beetween?


Entered at Fri Apr 29 22:28:18 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.113)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Carmen: In the case of Elvis - chalk that up to just being a gentleman.......As for Paul - that is a bet I would advise not taking........as I strongly doubt there is an act that has ever existed in the rock/pop world that he would be worried about following on stage.............In addition to being sensational live - no act has ever had a song list to pull from that can match his........


Entered at Fri Apr 29 21:43:50 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: Sorry

Subject: Beatles Spelling

The Band is easier to spell too!


Entered at Fri Apr 29 21:41:39 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Band vs Beetles

I read once that Elvis said he would never follow Roy Orbinson on stage. I would bet McCarthy would say the same about the Band!


Entered at Fri Apr 29 20:37:14 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: He will bring happiness in a pipe; then ride away on his silver bike

David / Peter: Prompted by our talk of JA, after years of meaning to I had a listen to Donovan's original (well, actually the live version from Donovan In Concert) "The Fat Angel" for the first time today. Of course, this was the tune that JA were namechecked in a chorus, and themselves used as a springboard for a live jam on occasions including the Fillmore shows that BIPLH came from.

Any clue as to who "Captain High" who I assume is also the Fat Angel in the title refers to? Garcia used "Captain Trips" but wasn't overly fat then....


Entered at Fri Apr 29 20:31:32 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: insert [big organ] joke here

watched a bit of the wedding coverage with my morning bowl of soylent just a little before dawn today . . . much impressed with the gloss they'd achieved on the Roller fetching fetching young Kate -- I think it was maroon, but honestly it was so shiny it was hard to make out the colour.

Also much impressed with the shot of the pipe array to the organ (Chest Fever!!!) . . . see [My link], fourth photo down, for an image of the operator's station for this beast. Note the ignition keys at lower left, TELEX terminal at far right, iPod dock to the left of the manuals, sno-globe at upper right . . . .


Entered at Fri Apr 29 20:29:54 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jon L

Jesus, whoever he is that guy Robert Walter is good. Don't care too much for jazz, but the organ grinding is first rate. Btw, Jon - your surname isn't Lord, is it!!!!


Entered at Fri Apr 29 20:07:26 CEST 2011 from (41.97.149.243)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: correction

Mister Giorgina

chaufe Marcel chauffe


Entered at Fri Apr 29 18:43:00 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Garth and Al Kooper

Just saw this: Al Kooper, Garth and others will be featured in a show at BB King's NYC club on June 29. "A celebration of the Organ, bringing together old school and new school backed by an All-Star Band." Sounds like a good time.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 18:35:33 CEST 2011 from (90.239.100.88)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Nordic Countries

It should have been _three_ kingdoms and _two_ republics. Sorry.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 17:57:41 CEST 2011 from (90.239.118.98)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries (four kingdoms and one republic)

Subject: Watching Royal Wedding on tele.

How can a nation which is able to produce such a wide range of terrific ladies' hats and festive classical music with heavenly lightness and eternal brightness... How in earth(pooh)... I mean how can you produce poor RINGO STARR as your internationally best known drummer?!


Entered at Fri Apr 29 17:22:50 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Thanks. I then went to the follow-on link (above) to hear "I Shall Be Released". Listen to how Richard sings the word 'lonely' - his unfortunate specialty, it seems.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:57:40 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Lonesome Suzie

The lyrics might be a bit over-the-top, admittedly. But the ache in Richard's voice makes the song indispensable for me. A line like "She's always losing so she sits and cries and shakes" might look flat on paper, but just listen to what Richard does with it. One of his best vocal performances ever, in my opinion.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:48:06 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: The Band, The Beatles

Adam, enjoyed your posts as always. I'm 38 and my musical tastes have evolved much like yours...hit the Beatles hard in high school, and still do like them very much but OD'ed on them somewhat and don't revisit them quite as often these days. Discovered the Band in my early 20s, and boy, that was it for me. It's an apples-to-oranges comparison, but the Band quite hooked me in a way no other band has...and the timing was fortunate, because I've had the pleasure of seeing Levon and Garth in various shows through the 90s and 00s, and even caught Rick in club shows a number of times in the 90s before he sadly passed away. I continue to find new meanings and shadings in the Band's work, and get a tremendous amount of enjoyment out of the various post-1976 projects as well as the OQ albums.

One other thought (re Band vs Beatles) is that the spicy blend of musical genres that the Band's music represents strikes a particular chord with me...there's a breadth and depth to their musical influences that I find uniquely compelling, and it's turned me on to countless other talented artists that I likely would never have known about.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:47:20 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: A blast from Festival Express

See this link and be amazed that just 6 short/long years later The Last Waltz happenned........Imagine if Peter had been so upfront to ask "So Your Majesty, is is Eleanor Rigby or Lonesome Suzie then?"


Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:36:21 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Calvin: Thanks for the correction re "Village Green", which I was muddling up with "Muswell Hillibillies". Interesting timing re VG and MFBP though, suggesting that neither influenced the other. (I'm assuming that the Wikipedia article on VG is largely accurate.) What's your take on the Scarlet Pimpernel?

Brien Sz: I think pretty much the same about the Beatles as you. Like most of their middle and later stuff, love some of it, own very little of it, and listen to very little of that - and like you partly because you still can't avoid hearing them in this culture. I'm happy to accept that "Eleanor Rigby" was a sonic milestone at the time, but I've never really liked it. My point yesterday about McCartney tying up the loose ends in the last verse, plus the idea that that's pretty much how he addresses the ambiguous morality of "The Weight" in "Carry That Weight" / "The End", got me wondering if that was/is a general propensity of Paul as songwriter.

sadavid: My very favourite bit of "Elenore" is the use of "et cetera". Brilliant!

Even those of you non-Canadians who are aware that we're in the closing days of a federal election up/over here will likely have found BEG's political post yesterday (the one about Bob Rae and the NDP government in the Province of Ontario 20 years ago) to be way too "Inside Baseball". I'm here to made a Band link for you: the Ontario Legislature is housed in a large pink sandstone building that is called by many of its denizens - including me back in the day - The Big Pink. Rae's leftish Minister of Finance, Floyd Laughren, was widely known in the press and on the street as Pink Floyd.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:20:22 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: HM The Queen / Todd & Simon

I must admit I didn't watch the wedding but that was because I stayed up thru most of the night mixing some album stuff and slept in very late. But Peter is quite right: when the old planes turn out, there's a moment to be savoured, for me not only because of my nationality but because my paternal Grandad was the shop foreman at Hawker! A fine Kingston-upon-Thames institution, now sadly (but inevitably) knocked down in favour of poxy apartment blocks

I am not particularly Royalist (more so that my father in law who passed away this week though; he timed that right to avoid enduring what he would have called a crass waste of taxpayers money!) but like many have nothing but good things to say about our Queen. She does still have the requisite gravitas and seemingly can bring joy to the world by smiling at it. Great that at 85 she still seems as robust as ever - it's only when negotiating stairs or standing for a long period that some "effort" is visible, a gentle stroll seems as natural as ever.

Todd/Simon: Eric Clapton seems to be a common ground among those that end up liking music of (generally) an earlier age group. Layla used to be the theme tune to the Jasper Carrot show, and I remember asking Dad what it was at about age 11 or 12. To wean me of the (I almost shudder now) Iron Maiden albums that my friends and I were into he triumphantly produced his old copy of Wheels of Fire and the die was cast. Dad also encouraged me to listen to the Stones, Johnny Winter, Bloomfield etc and from there I started buying my own stuff - in fact Dad got the bug again and bought all the Hendrix, Stills, Young and suchlike stuff he'd never got around to in the 60s/70s and I "discovered" San Francisco and Traffic (hence my bug for, and eventual adoption of the Hammond) because Dad was far more of a blues purist. One common ground we shared was Hot Tuna and the Dead - we each bought stuff by them. I think it was my liking for the Dead's WD & AB that convinced him it was time to break out the brown Band LP. At a time when most kids would shun their parents, my Dad and I were out in force emptying record fairs of stock, to the point where one day Mum said "oh, I wish you wouldn't encourage him". To me!



Entered at Fri Apr 29 16:17:14 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jefferson Airplane Mono LPs

Just a clarification -- With the mono LP versions of the early Airplane albums you won't hear drastic differences or alternate vocals & instrumentation. What you get is a more punch & focus, especially with Jack Cassidy's bass. Also, the mono version of "Surrealistic Pillow" has a tad less reverb than the drenched stereo version. It is with a couple of the mono singles that you'll hear a few significant changes. I haven't done a direct comparison between the 45s & LPs, so I don't have complete list of variances. With you do lose with the mono mixes, of course, is the spacey stereo effects bouncing from channel to channel.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 15:20:40 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Smiles from the Queen...been there, done that : )

Peter: Her Majesty & I exchanged smiles (and waved to each other) when she drove past my home in the 70s. It was a rainy June day, she wore a green (I'd never seen that shade of green before and haven't since) outfit with matching chapeau, I was waving and grinning like any little kid is want to do in such a situation. Or eyes meet and ...well, a gentleman never tells. : )


Entered at Fri Apr 29 15:14:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Wild Tymes

RTO: Yes, the early Airplane LPs were available with dedicated mono mixes, not fold-downs of the stereo versions. In addition, some of the mono singles featured slightly different mixes than the counterpart mono album versions. For instance, the single version of "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil" begins with a different feedback sound.

Kevin: I can still remember a listening session where I played MFBP for some of my college dorm mates at the University of Georgia in the fall of 1968. They never heard it before and were blown away. We were in my friend's room in the basement of Reed Hall, which is located in a quadrangle behind Sanford Stadium, listening on one of those portable stereo record players that were popular at the time. That I still have vivid memories of this is a testament to how much that record influenced me & my friends at the time.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 14:41:48 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Royal Wedding

You get swept up in it. The music was magnificent, mainly Parry too. The pageantry, everything. We watched from 9 a.m. to the balcony kiss. Now off to a party. The fly past too. I don’t think anyone who isn’t British really understands how we feel when those three planes, the Lancaster with the Spitfire and Hurricane either side fly low over London.

Back when my oldest son was a baby, the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh visited Poole to open the theatre. We were right at the front and he was dressed in red and could wave vigorously. The royal car stopped right by us. The Duke looked at us and pointed out the baby waving to the Queen. He got the full direct royal smile and a personal wave. And her full smile lights up the day in a strange way. However cynical you might be or have been before, there’s a magic in it. A lot of people got that magic today.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 13:40:38 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.99)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Highlight videos of the other Royal Wedding.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 13:29:41 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.99)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

One's life is for sharing...

Kevin J!! The NDP is a party for organized labour, small business, intellectuals...Yes, there is a left-wing caucus. It has always been my party. If it was truly a socialist party; it would be called one. Former NDP leader Bob Rae did a lot of damage when he implemented the Social Contract. As a teacher my yearly increments for three years were frozen. One colleague calculated that we lost 10 grand in the total scheme of things. He broke a contract between organized labour, albeit a professional one. I ran into him at the Eaton Centre one day and he said he was sorry.....Well, not about the contract....hee, hee.....He really did bump into me. imagezulu's Ma on Easter told me not to vote NDP; I told her not to vote Conservative!! She's from Eastern Europe so......We'll never see eye to eye.....and that's ok. In my own family, while growing up, my beloved Grandpa who I lived with would vote Liberal federally and NDP locally. I vote NDP because I'm left of centre and that's that! Btw, Layton and his partner Oliva Chow used to live in a Co-op on Jarvis Street. A lot of the people in my Co-op will be voting for Jack again. I find in general the Liberal party will implement many of the Conservative policies in the end. At least with the Conservative party you know what you're getting.....They are pro big business and pro profit at the expense of working people. Some of my friends vote NDP as well, but some vote Liberal and Conservative too......Yikes!!!! imagezulu votes like his Ma!!!! I guess we're like Mary Matalin and James Carville.....except we're farther apart politically....


Entered at Fri Apr 29 13:17:11 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Any chance they'll be dancing to Rag Mama Rag at the Royal reception?


Entered at Fri Apr 29 11:40:08 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Adam2: like the music you like

and never, ever, ever, worry what others think of you. And if you're ahead of your friends, you'll be there when they catch up. And if they don't catch up, you'll have enjoyed the ride, and met others along the way. and that's a great experience too.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 11:11:37 CEST 2011 from (41.97.144.60)

Posted by:

Empty Now

or more modernly, a most relevant occasion to broadcast it. George Harisson is at the back of the group standing at 3:25-3:27 in the clip; 2 posts below


Entered at Fri Apr 29 10:49:40 CEST 2011 from (41.97.144.60)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: revised version

Norbert : thanks for the link
------- --------- ---------------

Translation of selected verses – Leo Ferre, "Mister Georgina" [song linked above]

You play every night for wages that make no noise
Because your job is to make them dance, not to make them think

….

The only friend you got is your bagpipe, You play Schubert it's more expensive

….

A piano is like the horizon, It is played all horizontal
You your piano and its blaring You fuck them on the vertical
On comparsita

…..

It made us a bit sore ... finished! Music! IN YEAR 2000 NO MORE MUSIC
and yet it was beautiful

* georgina is an argotic Italian (Roma) word for accordion


Entered at Fri Apr 29 10:42:42 CEST 2011 from (41.97.144.60)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

1 - Something particular in life randomly catches my attention
2 - Above a certain level of catchness, I start observing patiently this something
3 - then I ponder for a while whether what I am observing is truly that which is observed
4 - I search the human words which express the most clearly and the most accurately both observations
5 - there's always a most relevant occasion to diffuse the whole thing

-------- ---------- ---------------

in the linked above clip, if one observes patiently he recognizes q,ong the crowd George Harisson (of the Beatles)

Band Connection: where Clairvoyance is, Charlatanism promptly follows


Entered at Fri Apr 29 10:33:51 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks for the encouragement guys.

It's awesome being around for all this recent Band activity. Robbie's new album is great. Every time I hear Won't Be Back, I just automatically hear the ghost of Richard Manuel (the late, 1978 growling Richard voice). The Band lives on.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 08:34:15 CEST 2011 from (68.145.189.105)

Posted by:

george morenstein

Web: My link

Homestead Industries of Calgary did my roof and they were not only the best price i received, but did a fantastic job. Just ask for George Morenstein 403-389-6780


Entered at Fri Apr 29 05:44:03 CEST 2011 from (69.177.200.206)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: My amp goes to 11

Adam, I was 22 in 1988. There were not many in my social circle at that time that were listening to 60's and early 70's music as I was. A friend of mine called my listening tastes 'Throwback music". Didn't bother me too much. The funny thing is the 60's music seemed older then than it does now, and much of the 80's music now seems very dated. A lot of the 60's classics have become timeless.

I played in a few groups back in those days. Mostly with friends who I already knew. There was one fellow who I met with a few times to play. He was not a friend. He wanted to start an Eric Clapton tribute group. I really had no business trying to play Eric Clapton.....above my ability really, but I figured that I could probably handle the rhythm guitar parts and he could play lead. This fellow was quite a few years older than me, but was the type who was still living in his Mom's basement. Nice enough guy but a little quirky. His pre-jam / rehearsal ritual was to drink a pot of black coffee before we even picked up the guitars. I was happier with a couple of beers, so we would sit quietly....him drinking coffee and me drinking beer. Once the caffeine kicked in he would strap on one of his many guitars and the jamming would commence. He had a bunch of guitars lined up in a semicircle around him as if he was at a gig....even though we were only in his Mom's basement. And he had a Marshall stack. I on the other hand had one guitar and a small 60 watt amp. Loud enough for typical basement jamming, but it was no match for his tower of sound. It really bothered him that my amp was so small...but we soldiered on. Mostly I would play the two chords to Clapton's song 'Cocaine' or the chords to 'After Midnight' forever while he played endless solos. There was no bass, no drums, and no singing. It was pretty sad.

It only lasted about three sessions before I lost interest. OK I really lost interest after the first session, but I was trying to be polite. He really wanted me to be able to lay louder, and my little Roland Cube 60 amp just wouldn't cut it. Wonder if that dude has any hearing left.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 02:09:40 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Adam, it IS tough when you are out of synch with your times. I'm 36 and was discovering Jefferson Airplane at around age 15 in senior school - during the Guns & Roses heyday, but you become a stronger player for that because you have to do so much for yourself. Hang in there.



Entered at Fri Apr 29 01:18:15 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

My absolute love for the Band has only grown now that I've started to experience playing with other musicians a little more. The thing is though, NOBODY my age (22) is ever on the same page as me musically. I have a close friend whose favorite band is the Grateful Dead, and he comes the closest. I remember how we were performing music recently in his basement, with another friend of ours on drums. The drummer is into much heavier rock, punk rock, some metal/thrash or whatever you call it, that sort of thing. Quite a combination of musicians there. So the three of us will be playing, and my friend and I will be trying to convince the drummer that if he stops messing around with ridiculous drum fireworks, and actually LISTEN to the song and to what us other two musicians are playing, that it will be so much better sounding and so much more rewarding. I specifically remember one instance where we got him to go along with that mindset. He played a very restrained, appropriate drum groove that laid the foundation nicely, but gave him a little bit of room to do some creative things. My friend added a nice bass line to fit with that (on his fretless bass - a purchase inspired by Rick), and I seasoned the remaining space with some tasty Robbie/Steve Cropper type sparse rhythm playing and a bit of lead. The whole jam was brilliant. We could all hear the space between our instruments, and you could just hear the notes suspended in the air as we played. And FINALLY, it was about creating music, creating an even blend between our instruments, and putting thought and care into the final live sound. That specific time was WAY different than the usual jams that go on over there - mind-numbingly loud and explosive drumming (courtesy of "drummers" or "musicians" who think their duty is to play as excruciatingly loud and inappropriately as possible), which always causes the bass and guitar to be forced into jacking up the volume and the playing. Of course by that time everything has gone to hell anyway. I just remember when we finished that great, restrained, well-performed jam I described first, and we were telling the drummer how great he played and how much BETTER everything sounds when you play that way! He wasn't convinced, of course.

Last weekend I had another small jam at a Saturday night party I was at. Same crew almost - my Grateful Dead loving friend was much too drunk to play, leaving me with the previously mentioned drummer friend and another guitarist/drummer (who is also into the punk/heavy/thrash stuff). We actually had some fun jams with my friend playing drums, and the other guy playing guitar. I was beyond excited to play, as I'm not as into the whole party scene as others are (the possibility of playing music was the reason I went in the first place, really!) Not that I didn't have a few refreshments myself. But at the end of it all, a few people were discussing guitar playing and the heavy metal kid who I was playing alongside said to me "You know, these guys are saying how they love my guitar playing, that you and I are both great guitarists. But honestly Adam, you are the much better guitarist. I'm into the metal and heavier stuff, but you just lay back and fit right in the groove. And then when you come up front, you get right into their heads and then just f**k 'em!" It was honestly one of the best compliments I've ever gotten, for someone with a completely different taste and approach to music recognizing what I was trying to pull off. All that week I had been listening to the Band and Robbie in particular, and that night even I knew I really pulled off some great guitar work. I got in some excitingly raw blues playing and bending, just emotional work that I got straight from Robbie. So for someone else to recognize and respond to that in such a way, it really moved me.

So in situations like that, I don't even consider any other bands that have as gigantic an influence as The Band. I'm honored that people would be impressed with my musicianship at all, but when they are, I can say confidently, 100%, that I got that from The Band.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 00:56:06 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M

I always equate The Kinks to music hall - a theme that appeared a lot in UK pop as the sixties went on. Fairport, on the other hand, embraced deeper folk heritage and did something with it - like I view the OQ. You could think a Fairport tune was traditional when it was an original, and the same with (say) Rag Mama Rag. I'm not sure the Kinks fall in that category?


Entered at Fri Apr 29 00:47:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV/Adam

I've often said to myself that the Brown LP and Abbey Road would do me if times got REALLY hard!


Entered at Fri Apr 29 00:43:09 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I have great admiration and respect for what the Beatles did - there is simply no denying the impact they had on music. But since I only own Revolver and Let It Be and neither one gets any great play and I've heard much of the rest of the cannon, I will always prefer 90% of the Bands music over the Beatles. I've made many a person drop their jaw in aghast at this and despite their stutterings and stammerings that I need to listen to this and listen to that (and have), it just has never really blown me away. It's not to say I don't like them, I just have no great need to listen to them. Maybe its overexposure as well as the fact that at any time I can find a song of theirs on the radio or simply dial in 104.3 at noon and hear them and the fact that so many people essentially gave them walk-on-water status that they are not big on my list - they simply just don't "rock" the way I want a lot of my rock music to sound. Like I said though, top of the list as far as importance and influence, more towards the middle as far as preference.


Entered at Fri Apr 29 00:38:07 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

I have to be careful when discussing the Beatles, because as I said, they're my dad's all time favorite band. I went through a huge Beatles obsession in my early teenage years, but as I got a little older and discovered the Band, my allegiance quickly shifted completely. The conversations are entertaining though. As much as I have to admit that the Beatles broke the door open for bands performing original material and their creative accomplishments, I have to be true to myself and always say that the Band were every bit as amazing as the Beatles. And some, like my dad, would even have trouble admitting that, so I have to remain conservative when I talk about it!


Entered at Thu Apr 28 23:57:49 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Marge......David.....Sadavid

David P: Re: The Dawes – we can only hope………though I do doubt it………….Your description of hearing the opening sounds on MFBP sent me back for a listen – thank you……Just wish I could transport myself back to 1968!……….I was only a few years old, single and in addition to the glories of MFBP……The Montreal Canadiens were about to win the Stanley Cup!!

Sadavid: Amongst all the gobbledygook written here lately on songs - you managed to write an original take…….not easy to do - so bravo……… But really, even Peter was being unusually soft-shoe in describing a likely verdict as “overwhelming”………..A Band fan might well prefer “Lonesome Suzie” over “Eleanor Rigby” but in terms of rating the better song, I would be shocked if the number was not 100 out of 100 for ER if such a contest were to be held.

Marge: A tear for the sad loss of the Canadiens last night but Steve is likely doing somersaults up above in anticipation of Canada possibly having a real socialist as Prime Minister………………Folks are jumping out windows on Bay Street here in Toronto at just the thought of having Jack Layton run the country at some point after May 2.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 23:30:02 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Adam, you should devote a few days to late Beatles. No one does it better. The Band are as good, but not "better." Side Two of Abbey Road on replay?

Volunteers just shades Crown of Creation (as I said to RTO) but Volunteers is their ultimate album for me.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 23:03:46 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David (again) re: Mono mixes

D, are the mono Airplane albums completely different mixes? The first Traffic LP (Mr Fantasy) in mono has wholesale changes: different guitar solos, different vocals here and there. Please confirm that this isn't the case so i don't have to spend $100 on a mint mono original of ABAB!

Funnily enough, along with your comments and the "official" mono status of Beatles albums that became prominent again in the recent remasters, I find that Mono is good for Cream. The horribly compressed muddy production of Disraeli Gears just isn't there in Mono.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 22:59:08 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David P

David, you are not alone. Baxters is my favourite JA release too! I always used to love Jorma's "Last Wall of the Castle" when all I had was a cheap Castle Records 2-LP set compilation.

Then I bought a copy and my idea of a truly psychedelic album was never the same again. Pepper? Bahhh! Fairground effects? Give me "Spare Chaynge" or "Two Heads" any day!

Peter and I spoke on the phone about JA the other day and we both agreed that Bark wasn't one we dipped into that often. "When The Earth Moves Again" has a certain "oh, shit! People like The Band not our cosmic schtick these days" feel about it, and this trend had started on Volunteers (I'm sure PV won't mind me adding that he offered that as his favourite JA album) and there's even more of that on Long John Silver. I do sometimes crank up the closing "Eat Starch Mom" on that album if I have a midweek day off from work and am doing the household chores. And I MEAN crank it!


Entered at Thu Apr 28 22:34:08 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: After Bathing At Baxters

RTO: As strange as that album is in places, it's still my favorite Airplane album, along with "Surrealistic Pillow", particularly the mono LP versions. Recently I've been enjoying two Baxters mono singles -- "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil" b/w "Two Heads" and "Watch Her Ride" b/w "Martha". It's nice to hear standalone cuts, with their unique mono mixes, without the cross-fades linking the songs together.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 22:32:44 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

Sometimes the different opinions here are so varied! I would never think that the alternate take of Lonesome Suzie would somehow spoil the song for some of you guys. I mean it's just a work in progress, an idea for the song before it blossomed into the beautiful album version. I love the alternate take, just because of the glimpse it gives us into the working process. But that aside, I just can't see choosing Eleanor Rigby over Lonesome Suzie. Richard's passion and soul just covers the entire track, the haunting vocal and the loneliness. It's such a passionate performance - the drumming, Garth's expressive organ, Robbie's beautiful Curtis Mayfield-type guitar. Richard's vocal just gets more and more desperate and sad, you feel the pain shared between the two characters and feel the emotional weight of the story. It's just so much more personal and emotional than Eleanor Rigby. Plus that song's music just doesn't do anything for me. It was ahead of it's time and all that, I know, but I know I don't ever feel the urge to hear it. Even if I did rank the Beatles as highly as the Band (I don't), it would never be a favorite. Lonesome Suzie, in many ways, is one of the defining tracks of Music From Big Pink. Simply beautiful.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 22:24:59 CEST 2011 from (79.202.185.40)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Music as a wapon

"Music is adaptable, so the melodies, beats, and dynamics can be adjusted to reflect its message and enhance its impact on the listener. For example, politicians use musical fanfare at public rallies to build the momentum of the crowd and generate an emotional response in support of their causes, as is seen in political campaign songs and the protest songs of the 1960s and 1970s. In this way, music provides a weapon of social change which can be used to achieve specific goals because the lyrics, together with the melody and rhythms, take on different and more significant meanings than those that appear on the surface. By promoting ideas and, often, inviting the listener to sing along in groups as a shared experience, music helps achieve the goals of the propagandist. Besides the instantaneous generation of emotions, the most effective propaganda songs have qualities that make them memorable while relaying their messages in a fashion that is not too emotionally extreme to be accepted. (War Songs, 1) Music permeates the spirit in ways that written words alone cannot do. It is readily retained in memory; therefore people who seldom engage in reading can be reached by music."

"If He Can Fight Like He Can Love, Good Night, Germany!"

check the link for an interesting read.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 21:40:52 CEST 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

I agree that MFBP isn't particularly psychedelic ("In a Station" could've been with a different arrangement, perhaps) and would wager that acid wasn't the mind-bender of choice for the Hawks/Band. Compare Lennon, Hendrix, Garcia etc. who were semi-permanently tripping between '66 and '68: it showed in the music. (And the album covers.)


Entered at Thu Apr 28 21:21:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: What is psychedelic?

When I said unpsychedelic about MFBP I used the term to distinguish it from two kinds of album: 1) Sgt Pepper, whose recurring themes, bubblegum keyboards and general "not just four scousers with three guitars and a drumkit" and which, until MFBP came along, remained the most influential LP even over a year after release, and 2) The USA's own (far more guitar-centric) take on psychedelia, most notably the acid rock from Frisco.

To me, After Bathing at Baxters or Anthem of The Sun would be classed as psychedelic albums. Not just the material, but the approach to instrumentation (long jams and improvised passages) and recording (both feature a mix of live and studio material woven together).

MFBP does have some qualities of the era but I wouldn't say this is necessary evidence of psychedelia. Robbie's opening guitar figure on ToR has modulation, but this is something that a guitar amp gave you as early as 1961, or by the late sixties you could get a preamp that would match a guitar to a Leslie speaker. I believe the actual ToR sound was achieved by using a kind of leslie simulator that Garth made, but you could get roughly the same effect by using the vibrato channel of a Vox AC30 or a Magnatone amp like Buddy Holly used. Nothing new there.

Garth's whacky organ pitch pends - are they psychedelic? Not really; Lowrey sold demonstration records featuring this "glide" effect as they called it, where a straighter-than-straight organist would showcase all the features of a Lowrey, usually the flagship Festival model like Garth had. I've got a very early sixties LP by an American organ player who used a Lowrey rather than a Hammond (Eddie Baxter is the guy) and he uses the effect to create big-band like arrangements with implied trombone.

Rock had changed; twangy guitars and little reedy "96 Tears" organ tones were over the hill. Its fair to say that about 1966-68 the modern instruments, amplifiers and other sound-changing accessories that took rock and pop away from the twang era were either first released, or the increasing experimentation with existing equipment ushered in the "new" rock sounds that we still hear today. Marshall amps, keyboards like the Mellotron and Baldwin harpsichord, wah pedals, fuzztones - you name it. Now, the psych era happened to occur in this same period, and the "anything goes" attitude of the creative forces of that era guaranteed that many of these new sounds would become part of rock vocabulary. And many stuck.

I think that is the case with MFBP - there are then-current SOUNDS used so it remains contemporary. But Anthem of the Sun it is not!


Entered at Thu Apr 28 20:37:33 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Win RR's "HTBC" collector's set on "Wolfgang Vault."


Entered at Thu Apr 28 20:26:28 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Eleanor, Suzie -- and Elenore

No argument that "Eleanor Rigby" is iconic; it's one of those that grab the ear in the first half-second (and takes you back to where you once belonged) even on the thousandth hearing. Arresting images -- I'm still a little horrified about the face in the jar -- and kudos for what I take to be an anti-church statement. On the other hand, even back in the day it struck me as trying-too-hard-to-be-literary.

It's full of nice hard nouns that make the images -- dirt, church, socks, face. "Lonesome Suzie," by contrast, has hardly a noun that's not a pronoun, and these exceptions are concept nouns, and relationshippy at that: friend, problems, understanding. It's all internal, could've been written by a blind man, where "E. Rigby" is all surface. "Lonesome Suzie," for me, has the great virtue of sincerity. It's really too bad about the alternate take, which always intrudes on (and seems to have permanently fouled up) my appreciation for the original.

And let's spare a thought for the other "Elenore" which in a galaxy far, far ago I had on 45 rpm b/w "Surfer Dan" (if memory serves). I don't know if Flo, Eddie or both was / were responsible, but there's a lot of skill in those sly, stupid Turtles lyrics: "Elenore, gee I think you're swell / and you really do me well . . . ."


Entered at Thu Apr 28 19:53:32 CEST 2011 from (72.196.146.10)

Posted by:

Calvin

Dave,

Thanks for the Info on Doug Sahm, its a unique experience at this, mmmmm, level of experience age wise to run itno an artist with such a deep catalouge who you 1) Like what youve heard so far and 2) had only known by name and 2-3 songs up to a few weeks ago. Its a wonderful thing.

Bill,

I seriously doubt if the Kinks Village Green's Presevation Society was an Echo of the Band's first three albums considering the Village Green tack was recorded in 1966, as were a few songs on the album, and they went into the studio to finish the album in May of 1968, before Music From The Big Pink came out.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 19:39:41 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thinking a bit more about "Eleanor Rigby" in light of your last post ... It's in the third person, which was more of a Robbie than a Richard thing. It's also sketch plus a bit of moralising / philosophising, unlike "Penny Lane", say, which is just sketch. Eleanor is also one of those highly structured songs that tidy up the loose ends even if they aren't circular (like Joni Mitchell's classics, "Where Have All The Flowers Gone", "Looking At A Baby", etc.)


Entered at Thu Apr 28 19:30:49 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Eleanor and Suzie

I agree that they are about lonesome women, but for me the comparison ends there. My feeling about Eleanor is it feels more like "reportage. kind of like this is a description of the lives of the lonely people in our society. Lonesome Suzie has more of a song of love and sympathy. I can feel Richard's own pain and his sensitivity. "Why are you so sad and I am there for you if you want me to be. Its just how I feel it.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 19:17:16 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: MFBP

Don't forget Robbie's otherworldly guitar sound on the opening track. That's the first thing that caught my ears when the needle dropped down on side one, after I bought the LP when it was first released. The guitar was played through a "black box" designed by Garth, which generated a rotating Leslie-like effect. That may not be described as psychedelic, but it was pretty far out.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 19:01:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tried it. Eleanor Rigby is 2m 07, half the length of Lonesome Suzie at 4m 04s, but gets in way more story and paints more pictures. It's a superb lyric, even if I agree that McCartney alone often managed to say little in lyrics, this one is a masterpiece. The string arrangement is remarkable and for the time, totally unexpected. I enjoyed Richard's soulful tale of Suzie again, but you have one of the greatest songs of the 60s against a moving and very good one. Eleanor wins hands down. If you played both to 100 non-Band fans, I think Eleanor's lead would be overwhelming.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 18:56:40 CEST 2011 from (217.5.150.250)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Jethro Tull and The Band

The only comparison I can see is that both groups were insulated from what their peers were doing at the time and they blazed their own unique musical trails. The Band were also darlings of the critics whereas Tull have never been. As for Dharma for One and Cat's Squirrel? Bleh! I can go without This Was personally. Long time Tull bassist and Fairport Convention member Dave Pegg is on record as a Rick Danko admirer and said if he could be in any group of his choice it would have been The Band.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 18:50:23 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Elvis Mystery Train

Link is to the Elvis version of Mystery Train.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 18:46:58 CEST 2011 from (90.239.84.164)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Near Empty

My paper fax machine says: NEAR EMPTY. Any relative of yours?


Entered at Thu Apr 28 18:44:03 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Julie, Suzie, Eleanor, Elvis & Paul

On MFBP, “not being psychedelic”. remember that the best-known track on release was This Wheel’s on Fire. The Julie Driscoll version (UK #5) with its spacey vocal was definitely classed as psychedelia at the time. Wiki says:

With its use of distortion, the evocative imagery of the song's title and the group's flamboyant dress, this version is closely associated with the psychedelic era in British music.

So I don’t think we saw MFBP as a “reaction” to psychedelia.

I’m not the first (or the second or third) to compare Lonesome Suzie and Eleanor Rigby. I thought it was pretty much a standard critical opinion. Later, I’ll listen side by side. I don’t think I’ve ever done that. Eleanor Rigby was a major departure in music, and in lyrics too.

Greil Marcus’s “Mystery Train” was the first book with decent essays on The Band. Full of minor error, but at the point it appeared, the best we had. And he could still write in a comprehensible way. He sees Mystery Train. Elvis’s last Sun recording as a pivotal performance. Forget the arrangement and backing. That’s all irrelevant. Elvis is singing it, and if we were all sitting in a bar discussing this and Levon were with us, I have a strong feeling he’d be in my corner on that one point. Elvis flat out on Mystery Train is untouchable. No, I can’t think of any 1960s or 70s or 80s performances as good as The Band’s take on Mystery Train. That wasn’t my point. Neither Levon with The Band, nor Rick solo, touch Elvis on this one. By the time The Band came along, Elvis was too far gone to compete. So, the fragment of Elvis doing “I Shall Be Released” is dwarfed by The Band version.

Paul Simon … I’ve been listening to the “Live 69” bonus CD today. Interesting. They took along LA’s finest (Blaine, Osborn, Knechtel and Carter Jnr), but in the most impressive bits used only Paul Simon on guitar, or only Larry Knechtel on piano … only Garfunkel and Knechtel play on Bridge Over Troubled Water, weeks before the LP came out, and it’s stunning. They didn’t seem to need the band at all, and started and ended without them. In fact, one track only, Mrs Robinson is near unlistenable. That’s because there’s a horrible high pitched beep sound punctuating bits on the right speaker. Whether it’s misguided guitar, or misguided keyboard or a fault, I don’t know, but it sounds horrible. As Roy Halee had fully recorded three concerts, I’m amazed it’s on there, unless it was on all of them. I’d have electronically removed it. But they don’t play it well either. I suspect that they hadn’t integrated themselves into playing live with a group. The band are fine elsewhere, because they’re understated and subtle. Audience applause is high volume and too long and too obtrusive … easily solved, I’d have thought.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 17:33:51 CEST 2011 from (41.97.221.13)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: sorry

indeed English is human language, too human


Entered at Thu Apr 28 17:21:46 CEST 2011 from (41.97.221.13)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: How I Became Clairvoyant

This is the mental scheme of perception of the real, I remember I adopted for ages :

1 - Something in life particularly catches my attention
2 - Above a certain level of catchness, I start observing this something
3 - then I ponder for a while whether what I am observing is exactly what I observed
4 - I develop the best way to express both observations in human words
5 - I translate it in English, and post in The Band GB
6 – if Illka Jauramo likes the thread, the whole thing is to be stamped under the sign of Clairvoyance
7 – if Illka Jauramo finds the thread trivial, the whole thing is to be stamped under the sign of Dirt Farming
---- ------- -----------

It started with an ancient saying I heard in Constantine "After Passover, the sky is clear forever"
linked above, un article "The Sukkot-Passover Rain Continuum" by Jason Elbaum, Copyright © 1995 - 2011 Aish.com, it's not the perfect document, but the best document currently available on the net
this makes a good "break point", not the final point on the question
------- --------- ----------

WARNING : no reason to restart the feud, notice that a career of Dirt Farming is far from being less honorable than a career of Clairvoyance Preaching


Entered at Thu Apr 28 17:05:23 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NY

Subject: Phoebe Snow

BEG, thanks for the link to Phoebe Snow doing You Send Me. In 2000, I went to a Levon and the Barnburners show here in NY, and Phoebe Snow did a surprise guest spot with a performance of Bring It On Home To Me... and blew everyone away with it, as you can imagine. She had such a fondness for those early soul gems. I had no idea who she was at the time, but was immediately hooked, and it was wonderful to see her return to live performance in 2008-9. Todd, agree 100% re Into the Mystic... won't ever forget that.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 16:44:57 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

sadavid: The out-of-print MoFi silver CD of "Live in Japan" is also quite good, although it sells at a high price in the re-sale market. Fortunately I purchased it when it was still new and sold for under $20.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 16:25:15 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Formerly Bros.

David P: that looks like a winner . . . the lead review on Amazon sez, "If comparisons are helpful, I had the same sense of "This is it!" . . . as I did when I first heard . . . "The Brown Album"--many years ago."


Entered at Thu Apr 28 16:19:17 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Regarding "Lonesome Suzie", I'd say that if Paul McCartney ever writes or sing anything as feeling(ly) as that, then he'll deserve to be as self-satisfied as he seems to be. While I do see that both "Lonesome Suzie" and "Eleanor Rigby" are about lonely people, I'd suggest that a better comparitor is Runt's big hit: "We gotta get you a woman, and when we're through with you we'll get me one too" versus "I guess just watching you has made me lonesome too; why don't we get together - what else can we do?" And then there's the fact that Todd worked so closely with our guys.

RtO": Back to 3MiaB, who can read the part where they encounter the corpse without thinking of Ophelia of Hamlet, Millais and NLSC? (On a lighter note, who can read about the dead dog without thinking of gourmet night at Fawlty Towers?)

Sticking with literature, I will trot out my theory that the literary hero of the young and foppish Ray Davies was Sir Percy Blakeney, aka The Scarlet Pimpernel. Besides the look of the guy, there's "Dandy", there's "A Well Respected Man" and there's the capper, "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" with a borrowing straight from the book: "They seek him here, they seek him there ...".

RtO again: Sticking with the Kinks, a case can be made that their arc, circa '64-'71, was in some ways closer to the Band than Fairport's was. We have a little blues and R&B band that evolves into something all its own, focussing on their real and imagined cultures within a wavering sense of time. While I don't see anything Kinksish in the Band's music (unlike, say, the Doors with "Hello I Love You"), I do hear the concerns of the Village Green material as an echo of the Band's first three albums.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 15:34:52 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Calvin: And I almost forgot to mention the Doug Sahm / Better Days link -- He recorded a couple of albums with Amos Garrett (and Gene Taylor), "Return of the Formerly Brothers" and a live in Japan recording.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 15:22:11 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Doug Sahm

Calvin: Check out Doug Sahm's 1995 album "Last Real Texas Blues Band" for some smooth blues stylings. Even earlier, one of my favorites is his cover of T-Bone Walker's "Poppa Ain't Salty" from 1971's "Return of Doug Saldana".


Entered at Thu Apr 28 15:09:05 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Mystery Train

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band recorded a fine version of "Mystery Train" on their eponymous 1965 debut album, featuring some blazing lead guitar from Michael Bloomfield.

Scotty Moore borrowed some of the guitar licks on Elvis' cover version from another "Little Junior" Parker song, "Love My Baby", which was the flip side of the original 1953 Sun recording of "Mystery Train" (see link). The great Floyd Murphy (brother of Matt "Guitar" Murphy) played guitar for Little Junior's Blue Flames.

Todd: Thanks for your concern. We were lucky in the metro Atlanta area and dodged a bullet last night, but others suffered devastation.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 14:44:36 CEST 2011 from (72.196.146.10)

Posted by:

Calvin

Ive never been a fan of Butterfield's vocal-but Im enough of a fan of his music to have 6-7 albums. BTW, the short lived Better Days group is seriously underrated.

I was thinking about the definition of Blues lately. I was on sort of a Howlin Wolf binge last month and the last few days Ive been discovering the catalouge of Doug Sahm-who is frequently described as a blues artist. Unless i havent got to that period of his career I just dont see it. But that's possible as the Sir Douglas Quintet/Doug Sham/Texas Tornadoes Discography is somewhere in the mid 30s original release wise.

Anyway, just musing this morning and wondering if anyone else has spent much time with Doug Sahm.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 14:23:21 CEST 2011 from (69.177.200.206)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Mystery Train

Well, I'm a sucker for good blues harp. Mystery Train was always a favorite of mine from TLW. Butterfield's vocal may sound slightly under rehearsed as far as being in sync with the others, but the energy and harp playing is top notch. I don't think of Elvis at all when I hear it. It becomes it's own thing.

Loved and still love 'Lonesome Suzie' from MFBP. I think it's stock dropped a notch when the alternate version was released on the Band CD remasters. The alternate version was novel to hear, but is weaker, and sounds watered down in it's passion and intensity. But the original I still rate highly, and it along with 'Tears of Rage' is what really pulled me into The Band experience way back when. 'Eleanor Rigby' is a haunting Paul McCartney song with nice orchestration from George Martin. Richard's 'Lonesome Suzie' is up there with Sam Cooke and Otis Redding. To me it's at a whole other level.

Hoping that David P. and others in the Southern U.S. are riding these storms out OK. Some pretty nasty weather recently.

B.E.G., Thanks for the photography link. Some very interesting street photography there.

A shame about Phoebe Snow. A few years back she did an amazing live version of 'Into The Mystic' with the Levon Helm Band. "And when that fog horn blows I will be coming home".....her voice and those horns......goosebumps.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 14:09:59 CEST 2011 from (193.35.132.43)

Posted by:

RTO

In self defence (!) I would add that I agree with Simon that a train-themed song should sound train-like. But isn't that exactly what a "regular" version of MT does sound like? Songs like that, Folsolm Prison, all that sort of feel are aiming at a train sound rhythm. To this day, those sort of songs at a gig if called, you tell the drummer "train beat" and he'll get it.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 13:54:10 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Mystery Train

levon's great, rick's great, richard's great, robbie's great, garth's great... butterfield: not so great...


Entered at Thu Apr 28 13:28:28 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.79)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Now, if I want to hear the bluezzzz.....I'd rather hear Phoebe Snow's "Just To Be With You"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
G.E. Smith and Johnnie Johnson are here too! You can't miss Johnnie's trademark large ring as he plays.....just as I saw him perform with The Weber Brothers at Toronto's Silver Dollar.
We've all lost Phoebe Snow as a singer-songwriter. Amy Helm has lost her Godmother......


Entered at Thu Apr 28 13:06:18 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Thanks as always BEG

And you were, as always, exactly correct. Sorry i didn't post earlier.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:54:59 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.79)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

PHOEBE SNOW!!!!!!!!

"..........and then she opens her mouth and the music just TAKES her and the true power and beauty--the heart and soul--of this woman come POURING out, ensnaring you until all you see is gorgeous everywhere :)"


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:54:32 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

Like I said, which other rock performance from their era can top The Band's? The only better version is their own live version with Butterfield that was just mentioned.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:48:22 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.79)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The mystery of The Band. I just cringe everytime I hear the words "Mystery Train". I don't skip Neil Diamond's "Dry Your Eyes" but I skip "MT" at TLW and everywhere else. So what makes me tick or tock?

"The best lack all conviction
while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity"
"Now you figure out where I'm at"

Louuuu channelling W.B. Yeats

I posted yesterday an absolutely outstanding and moving example of Phoebe Snow's vocal range in her cover of Cooke's "You Send Me". She performed with Jools Holland, David Sanborn and.....??? Check it out again as you watch the faces of the other musicians who are there with her. No one commented.....I could have highlighted her most famous song "Poetry Man" that some thought was about Jackson Browne, but wasn't.....Instead I chose a song that really showed what Phoebe Snow was really capable of.....I could watch that video over and over again......

GARLAND JEFFREYS' GIGS

Saturday 4.30 New York, NY
Highline Ballroom

Saturday 5.7 Woodstock, NY
Levon Helm's Midnight Ramble!!!

Friday 5.13 Buffalo, NY acoustic co-bill w/ Graham Parker!!!!
Kleinhans Music Hall

Tuesday 5.24 Teaneck, NJ
Bob Dylan Birthday Celebration w/ Professor Louie & The Crowmatix, Soulfarm
Mexicali Live

Friday 6.10 Fall River, MA
Narrows Center for the Arts

Sunday 6.12 Annapolis, MD
Rams Head Tavern

Saturday 6.18 Northampton, MA
Iron Horse Music Hall

Wednesday 6.22 New York, NY
The Bottom Line - New York on My Mind w/ Loudon Wainwright, Roseanne Cash, Willie Nile & more
River to River Festival

Saturday 6.25 Sellersville, PA
Sellersville Theater

Saturday 8.20 Wespelaar, Belgium
Swing Wespelaar Festival

June 7 is when Garland's "The King Of In Between" CD is available

From The New Yorker: "The material is as uncannily fresh and forceful as the songs on his début record, from 1973. The Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, native specializes in an endearing snarl over an insistent, sinuous beat, and when he sings “twenty-two stops to the city,” on the new song “Coney Island Winter,” you’re on that train."


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:44:30 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

Also giving Robbie's album another listen. I gave it a break for a couple of weeks, and listening to it again, I still think it's a great album. I think it's David P who doesn't like the acoustic solo on He Don't Live Here. I really love it. It does sound like an overdub, but it also sounds really soulful and well thought out to me. It sounds like kind of a warped Western movie soundtrack or something, the way the guitar wooshes in and the flavor and everything. I love Robbie's playing on the whole album. The Right Mistake is the very best track, to me. Those who like She's Not Mine, I'm telling you, listen to the iTunes alternate mix. It's much better - a straightforward folk-rock sound, with much more Winwood organ and co-Clapton vocals.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:15:46 CEST 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Wolfgangs Videos

Looks like the Whole Last waltz is up and some from 83 tour.. interesting.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 12:10:22 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Of all the versions of Mystery Train I have heard - The version from the Last Waltz, to me, is by far the best. It flat out rocks with a boatload of kick ass passion. I've heard good versions of it but for some reason the best one that is burned into my mind is the LW one - so if little green men come a calling one day and they ask about this Mystery Train, I'll have'em sit back and get ready to be cranked out of the room.

As for Lonesome Suzie being a poor mans Eleanor Rigby - I would have never made that assumption or connection. Don't see/hear it.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 11:19:51 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

And Peter - I really don't mean to go against the grain just for the sake of it - not at all. But I really disagree completely on Lonesome Suzie. I wouldn't even think to compare it with Eleanor Rigby, but I really don't like that song all that much in the first place. My dad's favorite band of all time is the Beatles of course, but I know even he personally doesn't rank the song all that high on his list. But that aside, even if you do compare them Lonesome Suzie is very different, so soulful and hauntingly beautiful, so much more natural and heartbreaking. Garth's shaky organ, the moaning horns slowly rising in the mix, how Richard's voice is just so fragile and wounded. I'm getting chills thinking about it! I could never say I don't love Lonesome Suzie. It's beautiful.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 09:26:46 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon - will he be forgotten?

A strange review, but for the simonistas out there, you may find it interesting...


Entered at Thu Apr 28 09:19:45 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

The thing to compare would be other rock covers of Mystery Train from 1968-1978. Does anyone have a version in mind they think betters The Band's? Because I can't think of one.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 09:09:26 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

Really interesting comments Peter. The thing with Mystery Train is how I see all of The Band's covers though. The song itself has been interpreted differently right from the beginning - Junior Parker's slower, smooth blues version and Elvis' rockabilly/Sun version. So it's not like the song itself was locked into a specific arrangement. But those versions are the originals, from the American roots artists themselves. In my mind, I always separate them from the "rock period", if that makes sense. So my point of view is, the originals are the originals. The Band's cover doesn't compete with them - they're a rock band covering the American roots classic. I just feel like The Band's covers are kind of misinterpreted, if that makes any sense. I don't think anyone should feel the need to compare with the original, because it ISN T the original. It's like how the process for Moondog Matinee was discussed in the box set. With all their covers, it's like they're saying "Here's a classic song. We all know and love the original, so we're not going to compete with that. Here's how it would sound if it was our song." It might be because of my age I guess, but I'm just completely open to separating a song from a later cover version and not feel the need to compare them at all. It's just like what Robbie said about Moondog Matinee - that is was misunderstood in a way, that people shouldn't be comparing it to Music From Big Pink or any of their past work, because it's not trying to compete with those at all. That's how I feel about the covers. Hope that makes sense at least!


Entered at Thu Apr 28 08:48:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mystery train again

BTW, I don't think any of the five Band members would disagree on demonstrating Mystery Train. See Levon's narration on the Elvis documentary. I can't see that covers try to top the original. They're tibutes, homages, stuff people love to play and to hear.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 08:45:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don’t think The Band sounded “unpsychedelic” at the time particularly. Robbie made a lot of that in the RS interview, and RTO should be advised never to read his comments on “West Coast bands” while eating breakfast. Mainly in 1968 The Band sounded really weird and different. My power plays on that late 1968 college juke box were The Weight, I Shall Be Released, White Rabbit and My White Bicycle and we all seemed to think that was OK as a combination. Look at the stuff around The Weight on the “Easy Rider” soundtrack. If Six Were Nine? Don’t Bogart Me? I think they were seen as the “anti-psychedelic” really from the brown album. Not that any of us could spell psychedelic in those days, or classed things as psych or non-psych. It was just the stuff that was around.

Criticism? Yes, that’s the point of debate. When I started teaching ELT / ESL in 1971 we also played songs in the language laboratory because stereo headphones were still a novelty and students loved hearing music through them, and we always devoted ten minutes to a song. Mainly it was Simon & Garfunkel (unrivalled clarity of diction) and Beatles, but among the tapes someone had done was Blood, Sweat & Tears version of Lonesome Suzie. I used it a few times, then swiftly replaced it with The Band. I used that a lot, which is maybe why I started to go off it. But I think really it was getting back into The Beatles again much later in an intensive way, and it really did feel like the poor man’s Eleanor Rigby.

Mystery Train? It’s like every Band cover. Very well done, i.e. if I wanted to demonstrate the joys of Mystery Train to a Martian, I’d be torn between Junior Parker and Elvis. I wouldn’t even consider playing The Band.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 06:24:47 CEST 2011 from (75.34.38.166)

Posted by:

Adam2

RTO - Another excellent point. I agree with you as well.

I agree with how you said Big Pink and The Band are just such high quality. For me, I put those (along with Stage Fright!) on a higher level, just superior albums that transcend time. I just don't look at the rest of the catalogue as "not as good" as those first three. We were blessed to get those first three albums... the rest is just gravy! And as dlew said, I don't get disappointed that the other albums aren't as amazing as the first three. Those albums confirmed The Band were human. It's just that those first three were so amazing, beyond the talents of anyone else (even themselves perhaps).


Entered at Thu Apr 28 05:42:23 CEST 2011 from (203.10.47.15)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RTO; Adam2; David P...

RTO: agreed - it's a sort of - after all, JT are English/Scottish and the Band are North American, and JT were able to ride certain waves successfully (prog rock, folk, et cetera.)

Adam2: I take it that when someone says 'x' song is 'awful', it's still far more awesome than many other artists' works.

David P. (SPOILER ALERT): I always love the story of the writers of 'The Big Sleep' writing to Chandler asking him who murdered the chauffer. After a long period of time, he wrote back with some irritation stating he didn't know...


Entered at Thu Apr 28 05:37:02 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Guys, I think you have to remember once again just how unique and standard setting the first two releases are. Lightning did well to strike twice, and whatever happens some folks are going to be dissatisfied with at least something after. And it's a cleft stick - were Stage Fright and Cahoots of similar quality and character to the Brown LP, then there would be those who say "one trick pony". Can you win? No! Look at Neil Young who has changed shape a few times, Some folks like that and laud it. Others might say "ooh, I never play Trans with all those silly synths" or "I wish he'd just stick to making electric music with Crazy Horse". Someone's going to not like something.

I agree with Simon about finding individual comments fascinating. I find that it is interesting to see what makes who tick (we know that Peter doesn't care for reliance on blues standards; you know I don't like things too polished and perfect etc..) and I think that not only is there so much about the OQ that folk can get their teeth into different facets of it, but moreover it is healthy that, among people with a common interest, the OQ are NOT above criticism. A bunch of sycophants all patting the same back day in and day out would be sickeningly naff. Keep the debate (that may well include some criticism) coming, I say.

I must admit I find the fact that Big Pink seems to be mentioned as an album of some dissatisfaction a surprise, but there! My admission of not only disliking Mystery Train but also never playing NLSC more than once every two years also raised a few eyebrows higher than Roger Moore's. Great. Some discussion. Other than that, we may as well all pack up other than add our names to a list of people that says "We, the undersigned, think The Band's back catalogue is flawless and beyond criticism" and say good night...(which is exactly what I will say because it's half past four in the morning here and I only got up for a pee and a drink of water, but noticed I'd left my laptop on while I was in the kitchen!!!)

Seriously, all - what is a forum without debate? A few choice revelations and questioning of what is regarded as messianic by some and just a bloody good rock and roll band by others gets people talking. Let's keep that.

Good morning!


Entered at Thu Apr 28 04:46:12 CEST 2011 from (99.141.48.246)

Posted by:

Adam2

Simon - Great post. I really agree with you. A lot of people seem to be unsatisfied by a lot of The Band's music, as you said. But this is a Band forum! People have been telling me how obsessed I am with The Band, and I don't care at all. They were the greatest band of all time. I think that for many of the members who have been around here a long time, discussing The Band's work gets old and tiresome. I think that's a big part of the attitude toward some of their work. I mean - cutting the final 3 tracks of Music From Big Pink? The varied opinions on the Stage Fright album? The Band-only tracks from Rock Of Ages weak? It's madness! Like I said, discussing the Band probably gets old for a lot of people, so eventually they may feel the need to find flaws in even their classic work. Lonesome Suzie is a beautiful treasure of a song. Their cover of Mystery Train is one of the most unique and creative tracks they've ever done. I haven't discussed the Band for as long as a lot of you guys have, so I'm constantly interested and ready to analyze their work. When it comes to the OQ, I am disappointed with very little of their work.


Entered at Thu Apr 28 01:36:08 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

Heavyweight post that last one Si. With you every step.

Posts that good, that insightful, that incisive don't come around that often.

Scousers here, scousers there, scousers every fuckin where, Na na na na na na na na nah

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 28 01:24:29 CEST 2011 from (99.141.48.246)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter - just picked up a copy of that Mojo issue today. I thought it was the March issue due to the mention of Richard, so I figured my stores got rid of their copies awhile ago. But there was a bunch of them there. It's a good tribute and I'm glad to have a copy. Good interview with Robbie too.

There's another photo from London 1971 in the Robbie interview. I can't wait for the Royal Albert Hall live album. I'm so excited.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 22:59:13 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: setting the tone

Jed: this one's pretty good . . . poor Derek (II) might as well have gone for coffee . . . .


Entered at Wed Apr 27 22:20:41 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Simon--RR's Guitar Playing

Part of the problem I have when listening to RR's guitar playing is the matter of expectations.Like you noted the ambiance of the music on Big Pink,there was more there then met the eye(or ear,in this case).Well,the same is true for RR's playing--the folkish,yet clearly electric rhythm or the stinging,piercing leads--it illuminated & brightened the world.It wasn't a rebellion by not playing long drawn out leads,but an evolution of the power of the guitar,sometimes demonstrated by the way one holds the pick or moves the fingers.And,RR was the master of the detail in his playing,always setting the tone perfectly.So,it's difficult to accept watching or hearing RR out of sync & the expectations are high--that he'll blow the place away simply through one or two notes & how he bends them just so....no,he couldn't do that @ Crossroads,but he's done it often @ the RRHOF jams.I'll never forget watching Paul McCartney watching RR play some really wild leads...Paul was stunned & RR was milking it in a nice way!


Entered at Wed Apr 27 21:20:08 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Simon, Fred & Bill M

Simon: thanks for that. I was wondering what you were on about with the Small Faces WBTYM until I played it just now - and there are the Chest Fever intro chords (not the organ fugue; the intro of the song 'proper' with a slightly different feel taking the song out. So, yes! Actually, I was trying to find a way to factor the two Immediate Humble Pie albums into that piece; there's stuff there definitely. That lovely Wurlitzer piano tune "Cold Lady" springs to mind, as well as stuff like "Shaky Jake", the non album B-side "Wrist Job". But like so many, there's a very British side to them as well, like "Silver Tongue" and that infuriating baroque middle section in what would be my favourite "As Safe As Yesterday Is".

Fred - Likewise (ie thanks for the feedback), and yeah, the archive site is a goldmine, eh? I often pick a date at random and find a Dead gig! Not too random, though - '66-'72 is my rough tolerance. Haven't heard any Little Feat but have enjoyed a couple of NRPS gigs on there.

Bill, sadly I missed out on the Jerome Klapka Jerome period here. But just knowing that it WAS discussed at some point gives me faith in humanity again.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 20:28:44 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Other Hawks

Film history trivia time -- What movie featured two Nobel literature prize winners in its credits? The answer is "To Have and Have Not", directed by Howard Hawks. The film, co-starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall, was loosely adapted from Ernest Hemingway's novel, with a screenplay co-written by William Faulkner. Mr. Faulkner also co-wrote another screenplay for Mr. Hawks, an adaptation of Raymond Chandler's "The Big Sleep", which also featured Bogart & Bacall.

Kevin: So Dawes is going on tour -- An excellent opportunity for Robbie to pop in to play a guest set on just a few dates, without having to spend a lot of time on the road.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 19:57:21 CEST 2011 from (41.97.222.233)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Peter V

Peter V : thanks for the excellent mark, the character Lee [Goodwin] is a bootlegger, the dominant mood of Sanctuary is "the impossibility of sainthood"



Entered at Wed Apr 27 19:29:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Southern Gothic

Peter: We are in the middle of wild turkey hunting season here in Georgia, but that calls for shotguns with special birdshot loads rather than rifles.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 19:21:37 CEST 2011 from (86.167.242.183)

Posted by:

Simon

Kevin - Fair enough and that's my fault for not reading the posts more carefully. On the other hand I do sense a kind of jadedness recently in the GB. I'm surprised at the casual dismissal of sizeable chunks of Band music, and I'm not referring to your good self (And I suppose I'm just as much to blame when it comes to slagging individual tracks i.e TSII, but that's just the one case for me). On the other hand it's also quite fascinating ... for example Rob's comments on how "Mystery Train" is a waste of time, when I think it's one of the most subtle things they ever did and a great example of Garth's genius and invention. The whole track reminds me of "Monaurail" by the JBs ... when the song is about a train then make it sound like a train.

As regards MFBP I think that for those of us who were introduced to the Band via that album it's a bit like a first love situation. As Al said years ago in the GB you have to take it in the context of it being the only music by them you'd heard at that point. I also don't quite agree with the assertion that MFBP was defiantly unpsychedelic ... that's not the way I hear it. I sense a kind of inky, dusky, slightly futuristic sound (mainly from Garth's innovations), a sort of Stonesy, 'British mid-range' thing (as it's sometimes called). Lyrically cryptic but in a good way that drew you in. I also detect a fair bit of Motown influence too.

I remember Bumbles making a great point about how younger listeners coming to the Band tended to see them as standing in opposition to acid rock/psychedelia when really they were just kind of standing off to one side and mooching, faintly amused but absorbed in their own thing. I'm sure they donned the odd floral shirt/tripped out in the woods/listened to Hendrix/Cream etc., maybe just not as much as everyone else at that time. And I don't doubt they were just as committed to being as good as Ray Charles, Bobby Bland and whoever else they doted on [paraphrasing Bumbles].

But I'm still genuinely intrigued how two people can hear something in a totally different way. Like Jed's gentle insistence that Robbie's performance at the Crossroads benefit gig was a stinker. I went back and revisited that clip and I think it's pretty damn good ... sure he hesitates a little but then gets down with some real exciting cutting tone and stringbending. Again, interesting how people can have different takes on something.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:48:54 CEST 2011 from (193.35.132.22)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: DLew

David, I like a bit of early JT too but can see why your Band comparisons raised an eyebrow. Your reasoning is true but I can't help but remember the half hour live versions of Dharma for One and general UK trait of riff-mongering that would compel me to side with your sceptics. Let's also not forget Cats Squirrel, a reworking of a blues tune favoured by a certain act who a certain guitarist broke up because they were nothing like The Band...


Entered at Wed Apr 27 18:39:19 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Crackling pines

David, be careful. I've seen enough films with a Southern Gothic setting to fear those might just be rifles.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 18:34:40 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: name game

Imagine Shelby Foote talking about JRR's new band - he'd have to spell it out before you'd realize it wasn't The Doors . . . .


Entered at Wed Apr 27 18:21:05 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Simon……..I believe I said that “The Weight” and “I Shall be Released” were the only two songs that I still listen to rather than the more foolish only two good songs…………..’Tears of Rage” and This Wheels on Fire” to name just two are clearly great songs but as performed by the Band on MFBP no longer move me the way they once did……………..Neil Young and The Sadies brought TWOF to fabulous heights on Garth’s brilliant “Celebration” album of last year and I would take that version one hundred percent of the time………Contrast this to the Brown album which is an untouchable on just about all levels and still gives me the same level of excitement and amazement every time I listen to it……………..I stand by the comparison of MFBP to the film “Citizen Kane” in that Kane influenced all the great directors and films to follow but it, in my view, does not hold-up as a standalone film…….many films bettered it as I believe many rock albums bettered MFBP………………..I don’t believe any rock album has bettered the Brown album……………Good to see your post by the way…..


Entered at Wed Apr 27 18:14:03 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Jeb Stuart

Shelby Foote had high regard for the Band, especially TNTDODD.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 17:54:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fred Carter Jnr

I had to buy my 3rd or 4th copy of Bridge Over Troubled Water today, to get the "Live 69" so-called bonus CD. Virtually all people buying the set will already have the theoretical main attraction of Bridge and be really after the Live set, produced by Roy Halee. The Band connection is Fred Carter Jnr, who joined Hal Blaine, Joe Osborn and Larry Knechtel in the band for the 69 tour.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:59:18 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: In the Pines

Bill M: Unfortunately, due to the weather patterns of late here in the South, the pines are snapping with a sharp crack, akin to the report of a rifle.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:54:34 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: I was thinking the same thing (what a chore sitting through the first 55 minutes of that show – though eh!)………………nothing like practising to play and then playing to knock that rust off……..The Dawes are heading off soon on a tour of their own so this whole thing will be coming to an end…….Too bad as with just a little augmentation of say a Mary Margret O’Hara for “Out of the Blue” and a perhaps another addition to cover “The Weight” and a few other signature songs that he should not even attempt to sing ( just as Keith Richards would not sing “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” or “Satisfaction” if Sir Mick were not available ) an 18-20 song set with mini tour would have been great to see………………….as let’s face it he ain’t going back on the road in his 70”s – so that may well have been the last or one of the last live RR’s we are ever going to see.

Regarding BEG’s links to the Kurt Anderson interview (yesterday’s GB)………………..In addition to his comments on making albums with attention being paid to listening to it from beginning to end……………whether it changes anyone’s views on the work is of course a personal thing but at least one does know that an effort was made to have the thing hold together in that way which is more than can be said for a majority of new releases these days ( How did he put it…”No one ever asks you what your favourite chapter of a book was just whether you liked the book or not”….)………………….The point that stood out for me in the interview was his comments on the Band checking the tapes out on that 1966 tour with Dylan out of concern that they really were not playing that well at first….and that it really did take some time for them to get their act together with Bob………………also a bit startling when Anderson makes the comment about the Band being so mature by the time Big Pink came out and Robbie corrected him by saying he was just 24 at the time.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:26:49 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Just saw Jethro Tull live...

Fantastic. split into two halves - with a 20 minute interval, the first half was really good. The second half kicked. Just marvellous stuff... Martin Barre played the electric guitar like a sitar in one song co-written by Anushka Shankar. Anderson blew the flute like a man possessed. A great bass player (Goodier), and a marvellous drummer and unbelievable keyboardist.

I've said (and was sort of shot down in flames, but I stick by it) that in some ways JT are the English equivalent of the Band: eclectic, traditional, yet unique. the closer 'Locomotive Breath' nearly brought the house down...


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:17:49 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks, though I have to point out that you, with your Stated expertise in pines, would know that they don't murmer, they whisper.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 16:12:39 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Murmuring Pines

Bill M: And, for Band connections, there's that other epic from Rodney Dangerfield's favorite poet, Longfellow's "Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie".

"This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight..."


Entered at Wed Apr 27 15:40:06 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Thanks for the list of books, some of which I've never heard of, most of which I've never read. But I can see how any of those that I have read - "Mr Biswas", "Lot 49", "Catch 22" and "Cuckoo's Nest" - could have influenced the Band's early work. Naipaul for the sepia-toned tragi-comedy of the early scenes, Pynchon for the Pony Express motif, Heller for the upside-down morality and Kersey for the hall-of-mirrors approach to the not-so-great divide between nuttiness and sanity.

RtO: Were you onboard the SS GB a few years ago when "Three Men in a Boat" was discussed? Oddly enough, though it's English, I found more Band in it than Fairport. Looking at the Penguin edition, the first full paragraph of page 179, starting "But the river, chill and weary ..." is clearly in the rhythm of Longfellow's "The Song of Hiawatha" - as is the preceding paragraph to a lesser degree. (I looked it up at the time, and the rhythm was actually borrowed from a classic form of early Finnish literature, and Norwestcoaster will surely confirm.) Longfellow and Hiawatha both strike me as more Band than Fairport. As does the banjo in 3MiaB, which brought in mention of Maugham's "Cakes and Ale", in which appeared a banjo-playing old man, supposedly based on author Thomas Hardy.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 15:32:33 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Shaking Off The Rust

Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer" is a quintessential New Orleans novel. I re-read it a while back following hurricane Katrina. Mr. Percy was a lifelong close friend of Shelby Foote, the noted Civil War historian. Of all the authors on that Time magazine list, Mr. Percy, along with Richard Farina's friend Thomas Pynchon and Ken Kesey, at one time might have listened to "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down".

Robbie & Dawes really played a cranked-up version of "He Don't Live Here No More" on Jimmy Kimmel's late night show early this morning. It was the best rendition I've heard so far, even the guitar solo seemed to flow smoother. Shaking off the rust, it's evident that the more Robbie plays with this group, the better they sound. Who knows, maybe soon they'll take the opportunity to play a full set of songs.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 14:18:11 CEST 2011 from (86.167.242.183)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: The Blitz / Rob's essay

bob - I'll drop you a line in the next few days. Hope all is well with you.

Al - Thanks very much for the Dixie piece (I almost typed "post" ;-o)) ... great stuff and much to ponder and mull over. Thinking about MFBP I can also recall you posting an excellent tribute to that album ... I've got a feeling you posted it during that period between Christmas and New Year but I'm not sure which year. That might be something to repost as I'm getting the feeling that some people don't really care for the album. I mean, Kevin J claiming it's only got two good tracks on it! (No offence Kevin but surely you jest?).

Anyway here's a true story about the Blitz, something that I only discovered about ten years ago. The Wiki page on the Liverpool blitz cites the most serious single incident when a hit on an air raid shelter in Durning Road caused 166 deaths. I found out from my mum that on that very evening my gran had discussed with another family in their street - the Shapiros - whether or not to use the Durning road shelter (it was about a hundred yards away from their Nuttall Street house) or to go elsewhere (a school about half a mile away). My mum thought that they may have drawn straws as they often did or perhaps my nan just had a hunch to mix up the routine. Anyway the Durning Road shelter took a direct hit - one of those parachute devices - and a lot of the poor souls who died were scalded to death as they were huddled around a boiler in the basement. Every time I pass Durning Road it always gives me pause for thought.

There's also a nice documentary about Sir George Martin currently on the iPlayer and he and Ringo discuss the bombings. It's a nice tribute to the man and he's quite frank and honest, especially with regard to his hearing problems.

Rob - Sterling work old chap. An excellent read. If I may also make a couple of additions ... you mentioned "Wham Bam Thank You Mam" by the Small Faces. This is just my speculation but I've always thought that track displayed a slight Chest Fever influence: slightly cryptic lyrics with possible references to exotic nookie. Or maybe not.

Here's something from a Mojo Special "Led Zeppelin and the story of 1969", from a piece by Nick Kent:

" ... the most acclaimed debut of the year by far was The Band's Music From Big Pink. On his boathouse in Pangbourne that summer, Jimmy Page listened carefully to the album, and was impressed enough by what he heard to later incorporate the baroque organ sound featured prominently on one track, Chest Fever, onto one of Led Zeppelin's earliest recordings, Your Time Is Gonna Come."

John Paul Jones has also confirmed that Chest Fever was one song they rehearsed but I don't think it was captured on tape. I'd also cite the Leslie'd guitar solo on Good Times Bad Times as being influenced by Robbie's sound on Tears of Rage. That's just a guess though.

All in all great work, Rob.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 13:55:26 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Program: Tavis Smiley
Episode: Rock Icon Robbie Robertson
Rock icon Robbie Robertson explains why he's so transparent at this point in his life and describes his new CD, 'How to Become Clairvoyant'-- one of the most talked about projects of the year.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 13:35:01 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

RTO: I enjoyed reading your mini-Opus.

I don' t know if you know about this, but if you click on the link above it will take you to a site that has Grateful Dead shows available for listening. Until a couple of years ago, the shows were downloadable, now they're only streamed. From what I heard it was Mrs. Garcia who put a stop to the free downloading (I can neither confirm nor deny if that is true or not)

If you dig around the listening archives in the site a lot of other stuff is downloadable. Don't know if you're a Little Feat fan, but if you are they've got some good stuff uploaded (the Ultrasonic shows from 1974/1975 are very good).....and it's all free.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 13:32:04 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

You Send Me Phoebe Snow


Entered at Wed Apr 27 13:21:30 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Kevin J...Thanks for the heads up.
Robbie Robertson Performs "He Don't Live Here No More" on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Phoebe Snow did a duet with Garland Jeffreys...."Reelin'" from his "One-Eyed Jack" recording . Both of them soared on this song as they're exceptional singers.
She will join the other angels.....


Entered at Wed Apr 27 12:34:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Queen of Hearts

Aren't they wonderful, though? And she's eight months pregnant. Imagine a two hour show of this, which I've seen twice this year.

Brien - on a new language, the repeated line in the song is "What shall I do?" I'm reminded of my editor fifteen years ago from NYC saying categorically "The word "shall" is unknown in American English." I suggested she might like to read the Constitution (which is actually a different use, but never mind!)


Entered at Wed Apr 27 12:19:19 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I feel like I've been learning a whole new language;)


Entered at Wed Apr 27 11:05:59 CEST 2011 from (99.141.48.246)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks Peter.

I love Go Down Moses by Faulkner.

Also, I think the release of The Band's 'Royal Albert Hall 1971' live album is coming soon. On The Band's Facebook page (which I think is run by Robbie's son?) mentioned the rumored release, and said that more details should be known in a few weeks. I took note of the date, and 2011 is indeed the 40th anniversary of the Royal Albert Hall gig, so I think that's a pretty good sign. So June 3 2011 release or announcement? Hopefully, let's keep our fingers crossed.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 10:21:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brilliant find, Empty Now. There's that line "I don't serve Lee's customers," which does Levon and Robert E. Lee.

Faulkner's "Go Down Moses" is the one that shouts out. But Robbie mentions reading Faulkner somewhere. I'm inspired to re-read "Sanctuary."


Entered at Wed Apr 27 10:13:11 CEST 2011 from (41.97.222.233)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Go down, Miss Moses, there's nothin' you can say / It's just ol' Luke, and Luke's waitin' on the Judgement Day

The drinking man knelt beside the spring. "You've got a pistol in that pocket, I suppose," he said.
Across the spring Popeye appeared to contemplate him with two knobs of soft black rubber.
"I'm asking you," Popeye said. "What's that in your pocket?"
The other man's coat was still across his arm. He lifted his other hand toward the coat, out of one pocket of which protruded a crushed felt hat, from the other a book. "Which pocket?" he said.
"Dont show me," Popeye said. "Tell me."
The other man stopped his hand. "It's a book."
"What book?" Popeye said.
"Just a book. The kind that people read. Some people do."

[… … …]

Popeye stood in the door. His hat was slanted across his face. He took a cigarette from his pocket, without producing the pack, and pinched and fretted it and put it into his mouth and snapped a match on his thumbnail. "There's a bird out front," he said.
The woman did not look around. She turned the meat. "Why tell me?" she said. "I don't serve Lee's customers."
"It's a professor," Popeye said.
The woman turned, an iron fork suspended in her hand. Behind the stove, in shadow, was a wooden box. "A what?"
"Professor," Popeye said. "He's got a book with him."
"What's he doing here?"
"I don't know. I never thought to ask. Maybe to read the book."

William Faulkner – "SANCTUARY" First published in 1931


Entered at Wed Apr 27 10:05:43 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It must have been Mojo, because it was one I don't buy automatically, which I do with Uncut, The Word & Record Collector. It was a page with John Till. I don't think there was anything you wouldn't know. I'll look later.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 09:57:35 CEST 2011 from (99.141.48.246)

Posted by:

Adam2

Hey Peter, what magazine did you say had the Richard Manuel tribute awhile back? Was the content good enough to track down a copy of it?


Entered at Wed Apr 27 08:44:27 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jools Holland / The Unthanks

This is the way to start your day. The Unthanks performing "Queen of Hearts" on Jools Holland last night. ( It's also "accent training" for phoning SPIN CDs in Newcastle for Brien.)


Entered at Wed Apr 27 08:36:05 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: On your mark, get set, google.

Surviving Beach Boys Members have reunited for a single to benfit Japanese Tsunami Relief efforts.

Bruce , The Boss, spent the week working with American Idol singers, teaching them how to deliver a song confidently.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 08:19:29 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: everywhere

Subject: Holy shit, Mavis at a Ramble!

Just announced 8 hrs ago, Ms Mavis at a special Friday night Ramble, June 3rd. Down to standing room only seats already...


Entered at Wed Apr 27 07:47:20 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Completists

A decent article on the subject.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 06:24:13 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

Ari; Agreed. RTO

What article?


Entered at Wed Apr 27 06:20:33 CEST 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

I'm really glad Serenity posted that, I always love those little updates.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 05:26:28 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: R&R History

Haven't done this in a long time, so hope some of you guys enjoy it.

This Week in Rock History:

Bruce Springsteen Breaks Into Graceland

By Stacey Anderson

April 25, 2011

This week in rock history, Bruce Springsteen trespassed on Elvis's property, Joy Division played in concert for the final time, rock critic Lester Bangs died, the Eagles reunited in style and TLC diva Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes passed away.

April 30, 1976 - Bruce Springsteen hops the fence at Graceland

Anyone who's attended a Bruce Springsteen show knows that the man can talk a blue streak: his legendary three-hour sets are littered with long anecdotes, and there's no story the Boss loves telling more than the time he got booted from Elvis Presley's front porch. In 1976, while in Memphis on their hugely successful Born to Run tour, 26-year-old Springsteen and his E-Street Band cohort Steve Van Zandt decided to pay a 3 a.m. visit to Graceland. When he saw lights blazing inside the mansion, Springsteen climbed over the wall and ran to the front door; just as he was about to ring the doorbell, he was intercepted by security. Explaining his newfound rock fame and his recent covers of both Time and Newsweek, Springsteen poured on the charm and begged to be let inside – but instead, the unimpressed guards told him that Presley was out of town (which was true) and escorted him promptly to the sidewalk.

Elvis died at Graceland the following year. Regardless, he is united forever with Springsteen on the cover of Born to Run, where the Boss's guitar strap proudly bears an Elvis fan club button.

April 25, 1994 -

The Eagles perform their Hell Freezes Over reunion show

In the Eighties, whenever pressed about an Eagles reunion, frontman Don Henley always retorted, "When hell freezes over" – to no great surprise, because bad blood ran deep in the L.A. rock band's breakup. Their 1980 live album, Eagles Live, credited numerous attorneys alongside the terse liner notes, "Thank you and goodnight" – and after its release, the group split and each band member embarked on solo careers for the next decade and a half, to varied success.

The last active lineup of the Eagles (singer Don Henley, guitarist/singer Glenn Frey, guitarist Joe Walsh, guitarist Don Felder and bassist Timothy Schmit) reunited in 1993, in presence at least, for the music video for country singer Travis Tritt's cover of "Take it Easy." One year later, they reformed to record the Hell Freezes Over set on MTV, which was quickly released as a live album and debuted at Number One on the Billboard charts. The companion tour was also a runaway success, as were the album's two Top 40 singles, "Get Over It" and "Love Will Keep Us Alive." Hell Freezes Over has now sold over six million copies.

April 25, 2002 - Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes dies

The spitfire rapper and "L" of iconic R&B trio TLC, Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes was a flashy fixture of Nineties hip-hop. Her rhymes brought both humor and poignancy to the trio's many hit singles, including "What About Your Friends" (on 1992's Ooooooohhh... On the TLC Tip), "Waterfalls" (on 1994's CrazySexyCool) and "No Scrubs" (on 1999's FanMail). Lopes was easily the most controversial member of TLC: she picked feuds with her bandmates in the press; burned down the house of her boyfriend, Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Andre Rison; and often wore condoms over her left eye (in homage to her nickname and also safe sex). She was the founder of the Lisa Lopes Foundation, a charity for neglected and abandoned youths.

Lopes died in a car crash while vacationing in Honduras. She was 30. Her grave at Hillandale Memorial Gardens in Lithonia, Georgia is visited annually by hundreds of fans, many of whom leave coins at the base of her the sculpted likeness – for reasons that have never been explained.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Apr 27 02:56:50 CEST 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Phoebe Snow

I only got to see Phoebe Snow in concert one time--in the summer of 2008, shortly after her daughter had passed away. It was a very emotional, amazing concert. She greated fans after the show and seemed to be a lovely person. I know she was a friend of Levon and a lot of Woodstock area musicians. She will be missed.


Entered at Wed Apr 27 00:45:23 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Thanks to all

Guys, thanks a lot for a warm reception to my article. It's a funny old world when you are English but like to listen to and indeed perform American music.

It's easier with blues, somehow - I think it is a colour thing because everybody knows it is black music that white folks play - on either side of the pond.

With stuff like The Band, it's a whole lot different. It's not dissimilar to owning a 30s house and stone cladding it if you don't go about it the right way!


Entered at Wed Apr 27 00:35:58 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Norbert/PV

You'll be up all night? Spare a thought for me as I try to find a Fairport link to Three Men in a Boat...


Entered at Wed Apr 27 00:11:16 CEST 2011 from (32.177.195.113)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Southern Gothic

If this is the broad category that turned them on, consider the stories of Flannery O'Connor and Eudora Welty. And then add in a Faulkner novel.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 23:56:40 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It’s a good list … I haven’t read Bowen. I haven’t even heard of Walker Percy, nor have I read the Doris Lessing or V.S, Naipaul. Perhaps the secret lies in those four. The others I have read … I’m sure Lars could find a Catch 22 connection. The easy starter is We Can Talk/ Confessions of Nat Turner (no need to slave, the whip is in the grave). I’m pretty sure with a little ingenuity it could be done.

The Sot-Weed Factor to brown album must have something. Ebenezer Cooke, Poet Laureate of Maryland.Pirates? John Smith? Pochahontas? Rude stuff with eggplants? It's still escaping me. I bet he mentions the Flying Dutchman somewhere in his odes on 18th century sea travel. I'm off to bed and will no doubt wake frequently trying to puzzle it out.

Pizzas were easy.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 23:03:48 CEST 2011 from (91.42.240.164)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The books that influenced MFBP

If it wasn’t the pizza’s let’s take a look at the books. From TIME’s pick of the 100 best English-Language novels from 1923 to the present, the period: 1958-1968, the decade before MFBP. Our band member must be influenced by these books? These books give us inside in the Band’s songwriting? (or where it just the movies from that time? Levon's stories?). Anyway while putting this list together I noticed that in 1968 there is NO masterpiece book listed ....and there is MFBP ….

1958 A Death in the Family (1958), by James Agee

1958 The Death of the Heart (1958), by Elizabeth Bowen

Naked Lunch (1959), by William Burroughs

Things Fall Apart (1959), by Chinua Achebe

Rabbit, Run (1960), by John Updike

The Sot-Weed Factor (1960), by John Barth

To Kill a Mockingbird (1960), by Harper Lee

Catch-22 (1961), by Joseph Heller

The Moviegoer (1961), by Walker Percy

The Golden Notebook (1962), by Doris Lessing

A House for Mr. Biswas (1962), by V.S. Naipaul

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1962), by Ken Kesey

Pale Fire (1962), by Vladimir Nabokov

A Clockwork Orange (1963), by Anthony Burgess

Herzog (1964), by Saul Bellow

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (1964), by John le Carre

The Painted Bird (1965), by Jerzy Kosinski

The Crying of Lot 49 (1966), by Thomas Pynchon

Wide Sargasso Sea (1966), by Jean Rhys

The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967), by William Styron

1968 non listed --- MFBP


Entered at Tue Apr 26 22:37:15 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: A Musical Journey

It's revealing how Robbie describes his new album in the interview with Kurt Anderson. For him, it's not just a collection of songs. He espouses an old school premise, at odds with the younger generation's penchant for downloading only the bytes & pieces of an album that catches their fancy after an initial cursory streaming through computer speakers.

"I like albums...This record that I just made is to me a musical journey. Put it on at the beginning and it's a ride until the end. It isn't about "Oh here's a couple of good ones, the rest of the stuff doesn't really seem to matter.' It is really the journey."

In light of my unfavorable first impression, maybe I need to listen to HTBC with this approach in mind.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 22:28:18 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: RR on Jimmy Kimmel Live tonight?


Entered at Tue Apr 26 21:18:14 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The Kurt Anderson ( of New Yorker magazine fame ) interview with RR is worth taking in…………………finally an explanation as to just why “Rag Mama Rag” is the song RR is most proud of……………………..I had never really thought of it that way or ranked the song but I shall mow think of the humour side of things when next listening to it………………For what it is worth……I prefer the Little Feat version.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 20:11:34 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Joan: Thank you for restoring some dignity – at least to my immediate mind – to the term Jersey as knowing you and Phoebe are from there helps erase some of the damage popular culture has recently done with horrific things like the TV show “Jersey Shore”

RTO: Thank you for taking the time to write that piece on the influence of MFBP…………………I usually learn something when I read what you write – in this case about pre-Dudes Mottt the Hoople……………….

Ray P: Appreciated your thoughts on Dylan in Vietnam………………..agree that it is hilarious the way some folks gets into a tizzy over things they don’t understand…….or even care to learn about.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 19:47:23 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Phoebe Snow

RIP Phoebe Snow. We grew up in the same town. Both "Jersey Girls"


Entered at Tue Apr 26 19:07:10 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.218)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: For the record :

right now - Constantine 54°F - Oslo 59°F

it will quickly change


Entered at Tue Apr 26 18:59:02 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.218)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

weather of Oslo, the one in Norway


Entered at Tue Apr 26 18:52:49 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.218)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Re: Bill M -- did you ever heard about Ftira ?

Bill M : like this old regular of the same show, I ended believing to have rights over my host to use his GB for bookmarking links of very personal concern and extra The Band interest. When it happens to have a GBer specially the one called Bill to share it, I am simply flattered

I once posted about an "abnormal" for the season, but regular very localized weather phenomenon in Constantine. The popular name of this weather is "Ftira", at the origin the local name of the flatbread Jews do on Passover.
Cold temperature, rain, snow in some years, in the midst of a Mediterranean spring. But also the ultimate cold weather of the year. "After Ftira, the sky is clear forever" (proverb).
This very local phenomenon has a metronome regularity, whereas Passover dates vary over the years. Ftira is always punctual for the rendezvous.
Moreover, the last decade perturbations of global weather didn’t perturb the local rule, see the link : Constantine weather today, it's in real time – compare with the temperature in Oslo for The Band connection

As everybody knows in The GB, my interest is popular linguistic: Passover == Flatbread == localized weather phenomenonm the 3 have only one name in Constantine : Ftira

. Another unpleasant side of my recent posts is the reediting aspect [but youtube/wikipedia improved] . At the light of this regularity, likely that 3000 years ago they relied on cooking to count time, or in modern and technical terms, to calibrate and size the hourglass : "Akhenaton, Akhenaton, stop pouring the sand and close the glass! Itzak hade done it flat"

Thanks Bill. I started suspecting that pizzas have more success than matzos in The Band world


Entered at Tue Apr 26 17:45:13 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Phoebe Snow..

DAVID P: Thanx for the link. Here's an additional obit/bio I received in my inbox this AM.. May she RIP...So sad, as she was a great lady.

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Phoebe Snow, a bluesy singer, guitarist and songwriter who had a defining hit of the 1970s with "Poetry Man" but then largely dropped out of the spotlight to care for her disabled daughter, has died. Snow, who was nominated for best new artist at the 1975 Grammys, died Tuesday morning in Edison, N.J., from complications of a brain hemorrhage she suffered in January 2010, said Rick Miramontez, her longtime friend and public relations representative. She was 60. Snow's manager, Sue Cameron, said the singer endured bouts of blood clots, pneumonia and congestive heart failure since her stroke.

"The loss of this unique and untouchable voice is incalculable," Cameron said. "Phoebe was one of the brightest, funniest and most talented singer-songwriters of all time and, more importantly, a magnificent mother to her late brain-damaged daughter, Valerie, for 31 years. Phoebe felt that was her greatest accomplishment."

Known as a folk guitarist who made forays into jazz and blues, Snow put her stamp on soul classics such as "Shakey Ground," ''Love Makes a Woman" and "Mercy, Mercy Mercy" on over a half dozen albums.

Not long after Snow's "Poetry Man" reached the Top 5 on the pop singles chart in 1975, her daughter, Valerie Rose, was born with severe brain damage, and Snow decided to care for her at home rather than place her in an institution.

"She was the only thing that was holding me together," she told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2008. "My life was her, completely about her, from the moment I woke up to the moment I went to bed at night."

Valerie, who had been born with hydrocephalus, a buildup of fluid in the brain cavity that inhibits brain development, was not expected to live more than a few years. She died in 2007 at age 31.

Over the years, Snow found time to sing on Paul Simon's song "Gone at Last" and tour with him, as well as perform at the Woodstock 25th anniversary festival in 1994, as part of a soul act that included Thelma Houston, Mavis Staples and CeCe Peniston.

Snow was also recruited by Steely Dan's Donald Fagen to participate in the New York Rock and Soul Revue, which took her, Charles Brown, Michael McDonald, Boz Scaggs and others on tour and into New York's Beacon Theatre to record a rollicking live album in 1991.

"Occasionally I put an album out, but I didn't like to tour, and they didn't get a lot of label support," she told the Chronicle. "But you know what? It didn't really matter because I got to stay home more with Valerie, and that time was precious."

She was born Phoebe Ann Laub to white Jewish parents in New York City in 1952, and raised in Teaneck, N.J. Though many assumed she was black, Snow never claimed African-American ancestry. She changed her name after seeing Phoebe Snow, an advertising character for a railroad, emblazoned on trains that passed through her hometown. Snow quit college after two years to perform in amateur nights at Greenwich Village folk clubs.

Her first record, "Phoebe Snow," came out in 1974, and showed off her songwriting chops on a selection of tunes that spanned blues, jazz and folk. Hit-bound "Poetry Man" took the record to No. 4 on the album charts, but her success was uneasy.

"There are turning points in everyone's life where you decide if you're going to sink or swim. My insecurity wasn't serving me well at all. It was really a stumbling block," she told The Associated Press in 1989.

Rumours abounded that Jackson Browne was Poetry Man. "No, no. It's somebody you wouldn't know. People just thought Poetry Man was Browne because he was the first act I toured with," Snow told USA Today in 1989.

After 1976's gold-selling "Second Childhood," Snow's subsequent albums found smaller audiences. Through the 1980s and into the 1990s, Snow sang commercial jingles — for companies including Michelob, Hallmark and AT&T — and performed live here and there.

Inexperienced in the music business, she broke a number of contracts with record companies and others, and found herself embroiled in a number of lawsuits and severe financial problems. Snow's husband, musician Phil Kearns, left her while Valerie was still a baby.

She sang the theme for NBC's "A Different World" and the jingle "Celebrate the Moments of Your Life" for General Foods International Coffees. She also sang at radio host Howard Stern's wedding to Beth Ostrosky in 2008 and for President Bill Clinton, who asked her to perform at Camp David during his presidency.

In 2003, she released the CD "Natural Wonder," her first album of new, original material in 14 years. Her other albums include 1989's "Something Real," and 1981's "Rock Away." In 2008, she released a live album titled "Live" and a best-of CD in 2001.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Apr 26 17:04:48 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: acknowledging a topping

Peter V: I know you're busy, but please accept my thanks for the calzone idea; it improves things immensely.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 16:47:14 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NY

Subject: Phoebe Snow

David P, that is heartbreaking news. RIP Phoebe, you will be sorely missed.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 16:44:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tuesday's bullshite speculation

If the Band were pizzas … Garth would be the Four Seasons, laden with every rich possibility in the book . Levon would have to be the Americano with pepperoni and chili. Not that he’s peppery or hot-tempered or anything, but because he’s American. The Levonistas think there’s something slippery about Robbie, so would choose the Marinara. But I’d choose the “Custom” because it inspires creativity even if it’s three anchovy toppings, one artichoke and some rocket (rugola). Rick would be the Margherita. Straightforward. A down to earth balanced blend. Richard would be Calzone. That’s folded over with the topping in the middle. That’s because while you can cook one side of a normal pizza on an iron, the cheesy side blocks up the steaming holes and you ruin your shirts.

I have to stop this and do some work!


Entered at Tue Apr 26 16:34:45 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronna

RtO: Yes, "Country Girl" got a fair bit of FM airplay here when it was released. Likely the last Brinsley Schwarz song that did. From to "Ballad Of A Has-Been Beauty Queen" to "Indian Woman" to "Country Girl" - yes the Dylan/Band influence is apparent in just the titles.

Speaking of Band influences, here's a quote from a book of mostly jazz reviews by Gene Santoro (who he?): "Tim Berne slamdunks postpunk noise, soul-music alto, and Ornette into an unban-hipster argot. Bill Frisell bleeds post-apocalypse raunch into a keening pedal-steel longing for a big sky. Wayne Horvitz swirls The Band and Monk and Sonny Clark together. Marty Ehrlich jumps off from Muhal and Braxton." Muhal is Muhal Richard Abrams; an earlier article in the same book mentions that Abrams' pre-AACM Experimental Band had Charles Stepney on vibes; Pat B will appreciate that there's also another tangential connection to Rotary Connection - a mention of Minnie Ripperton's piano-playing brother. Speaking of AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians), I saw a CD reissue of a '60s (?) concert of theirs and was surprised to see that the personnel included Fontella "Rescue Me" Bass.

Empty N: I wonder how they counted out 18 minutes 3000 years ago? Imagine the scene: "Rachel, Rachel, stop cooking! The Pharoah's coming and we must run for our lives." "Stop your fussing, Itzak. He can't possibly make it in less that 20 minutes and I have a new recipe idea that can get us out of here in 18." The rest is history.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 16:33:25 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Phoebe Snow

Phoebe Snow passed away early today from complications resulting from a brain hemorrhage she suffered in Jan. 2010. Ms. Snow made several guest appearances with the Levon Helm Band in recent years. Her beautiful, soulful voice will sorely be missed.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 16:16:41 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RTO and Big pink

You already know I loved it Rob but it deserves mention on here.

You've taken on an ambitious task and come out with a really fine piece that I'm sure enhances the perspective of most of us as to the significance of The Band's impact.

I think the piece has oodles of really informed, insightful and interesting snippets and takes on stuff which I'm sure will be new to many - including yours truly - Chas Clarke - who'd have thunk it. Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit. But I do love the slant you've deduced on that aspect. Nice. Unique take and compelling.

Nice one Rob


Entered at Tue Apr 26 15:22:29 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

See web page for Band related artists putting out new CD's.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 13:22:44 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.218)

Posted by:

Empty Now

for the year of 1971


Entered at Tue Apr 26 13:15:22 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.218)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: RAH

only 2 events worth archiving in The Royal Albert Hall official TIMELINE linked above :

1 - HM The Queen, 29 March

2 - Muhammad Ali, 19 October


Entered at Tue Apr 26 12:44:25 CEST 2011 from (76.67.19.210)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

THE BATTLE OF DIXIE & ROBBIE ROBERTSON
Friday, April 15, 2011

"People are now denied the use of the song because the ‘politically correct’ say that it is offensive. It’s a form of cultural genocide."
— South Carolina State Senator Glenn McConnell on “Dixie”

American Icons: Dixie
"This is the tune the nation brought to war."

"It’s been a century-and-a-half since a minstrel tune called “Dixie” debuted in New York. The song went viral, and soon North and South alike were whistling “Dixie.” With the outbreak of the Civil War, “Dixie” became an anthem of the antebellum way of life. And today we are still..."

Bonus Track: Elvis Sings "Dixie"
Bing Crosby sings "Dixie" video

Marc Goodman from Toronto
"Finally got around to listening to this episode featuring Robbie Robertson (and indirectly an homage to Bob Dylan) and then the story behind "Dixie". One of the best versions of Dixie I have ever heard was in what has to be one of the quirkiest films ever to come out of a camera. "Masked and Anonymous" features kick-ass version of Dixie being played and sung by Dylan." http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0319829/
Apr. 21 2011 10:21 PM


Entered at Tue Apr 26 11:44:43 CEST 2011 from (76.67.19.210)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

ROBBIE ROBERTSON GOES NONFICTION

Bonus Track: Kurt Andersen's full conversation with Robbie Robertson

Bonus Track: Robbie Robertson discusses his favorite The Band song, "Rag Mama Rag"


Entered at Tue Apr 26 11:38:31 CEST 2011 from (76.67.19.210)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"SANTA MONICA, Calif., April 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Robbie Robertson's How To Become Clairvoyant (429 Records/Macro-Biotic Records) debuts at No. 13* on The Billboard 200 today, marking the highest debut and highest chart position for Robbie's solo works in his career. The album also debuted in the Top 5 of the Top Internet Albums (No. 4), Top Current Rock Albums (No. 5), Top Independent Label Current Albums (No. 5) and Independent Small Chain Core Stores (No. 2) charts and ranked No. 12 on the Top Digital Albums chart.

The New Yorker called it "thoughtful, as intimate as an Elliott Landy photograph"....

I brought HTBC for my friends to hear yesterday while we drove to the far east end of the city. They saw Robbie with me at Toronto's Canadian Music Week.....not much reaction one way or another. I think one of my friends has never forgiven Robbie for not having a meet and greet the way Daniel Lanois did......


Entered at Tue Apr 26 11:24:48 CEST 2011 from (76.67.19.210)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson and pals triumph, and more

...."his departure from The Band in “This Is Where I Get Off” — offering up answers to questions that must have plagued him most of his life. Not a great deal is revealed, though the album offers Robertson’s pleasant growl, some gentle, bluesy grooves and a whole lot of tasteful instrumental work. In many ways, How to Become Clairvoyant is at once Robertson’s most honest and least overtly ambitious recording. It’s the reassuring voice of an old friend counting his blessings way down the road. And that’s worth a listen."

Greg Quill...Who Bill M, Blind Wille McTell and I saw perform with Garth Hudson and others

Hey RTO...imagezulu does most of the cooking as well. Since Easter Monday was a holiday for some of us; I took over. I went out with friends later and by the time I came home for dinner, he had almost finished barbequing. Most of the men in my family, also are the cooks in their households.
Btw, when we make pizza, sometimes we make it on whole wheat naan bread with tomato garlic sauce. My favourite pizza in Ontario is in Port Hope. I hope one day to finally visit Italy.....Also, my older brother used to cater to some musicians when they came through Kitchener, Ontario. He told me that Stevie Ray Vaughan wanted a chicken meal. Hmmm....Simple Minds and Annie Lennox? When he saw Robbie in a Yorkville restaurant, he couldn't remember what he ordered but did remember he tipped well like Keith Richards? At the time I was disappointed he didn't call me. He didn't want me to stalk Robbie; I said nooooo.....I would just be reporting to The Band site. ;-D

Now when I saw Lowe, Costello and Minke DeVille....Was Dave Edmunds at the same gig? I was really there for Mink DeVille and Elvis Costello.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 10:14:29 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Be that as it may Peter, the more I've learned about the Brinsleys is that there's every chance they might have f**ked off down the pub and returned in time to play with an unreasonable notice period for the GD to move their stuff!


Entered at Tue Apr 26 09:48:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Isle of Wight 1969

The Band were part of one of the slowest changeovers. According to the Isle of Wight website (linked) they came on three hours after the previous act, and then had a 40 minute gap between them and Dylan. Apparently, they were unsatisfied with the sound. Well, it was a field.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 09:34:51 CEST 2011 from (41.97.176.193)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

no Band connection in the link, a must reading


Entered at Tue Apr 26 09:18:08 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, no, I said "wanker" was far too mild when Brinsley Schwarz called him a wanker in 1972. The issue was declining to move your gear back so your support act didn't have to stand holding electric guitars singing into mics in the rain. "Wanker" describes ineffectiveness, inefficiency and uselessness. I said a far stronger word would have come to mind in the situation.

The last two years, hand over from support bands to headliners has been pretty seamless, with twenty minutes sufficing at shows I've seen. That's how it always used to be, because both road crews would wade in and help move everything. Then we entered a long era where one crew watched until the first finished, then started. The difference stems from more complicated equipment obviously, but also "band education". In the late 60s / early 70s, all the big college gigs in the UK (on a weekly basis) regularly had four bands sharing a modest sized stage. Crowds were fast to start a slow handclap or boo if crews were poncing around switching over. And in those days, each band would likely have its own small PA system and mixers, rather than a huge rented in board and system working for everyone.

I also think that some bands have become more savvy about support bands and gear. Trembling Bells and Unthanks used the same drum kit for example … not that many drummers would like that.

My reaction to the GD is that there were always "unco-operative" bands who didn't give a shit about the other band. That was a powerful (and dangerous) example. It also would be coming in from outside the "system." There were motorway stops where bands and crews regularly mixed at 3 a.m, and if a local band had behaved that way, they would have been "remonstrated with". As I've pointed out before, so thin were late night food places in the 60s (once you were off the far fewer motorways) that there were known milk dispensing machines where you'd find three Ford Transits parked in the early hours. Instead of truck stops, there were "ice cold milk" machines on the street, with a machine dispensing Cadbury's Dairy Milk chocolate next to them. The milk came in plain or strawberry flavour. There was one between Bristol and Bath. Another on the main road out of Southampton. I could still point out the exact locations. It's hard to believe now, but bands would detour ten miles to get to one. Around London, they'd drive out to Heathrow Airport where you could actually eat.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 03:07:41 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Ari: I mean Nameless.. Most talented member...

I can't separate it - Robbie brought songs, and earthshattering guitar. Rick bought a voice, bass, fiddle. And as Ronnie Hawkins said, those danko boys have different (or whatever he said) ears. Richard - drums, piano, voice, song. Garth... Garth.... Levon: drums, mandolin, voice...

With a gun to my head, Garth, but I'd change my mind anyway later.


Entered at Tue Apr 26 02:40:17 CEST 2011 from (66.81.243.198)

Posted by:

Elkhorn Slim

Location: The River
Web: My link

well Im not sure about becomming claiavoante but mayb my Dog Virgil Cane dose ,


Entered at Tue Apr 26 01:34:51 CEST 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Garcia a wanker?

Just checking in to find pizza being revisited in guestbookland and Peter calling Garcia a wanker. I can only imagine what that's about, but some years back I recall posting here that on that Pizza Tapes version of Long Black Veil Garcia doesn't even sound like Garcia. He also sings a nice Amazing Grace and Man of Constant sorrow. I also recall them doing House of the Rising Sun on that album, but I don't think Garcia sang it. I'll have to dig it out, I recall really liking it when they released it but I don't think I've listened to it since. Garcia really seemed to shine whenever he played with Grisman. They usually played stuff which both of them loved and I think he was very relaxed when they got together to play


Entered at Mon Apr 25 22:54:39 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Bill, that's a howler - I've seen it before but failed to notice how they shrunk Ian Gomm! Did that get a lot of airplay too? That was the opening cut of "Despite It All" and even from the first tune you could see the improvement over the first LP. In London Country we have played the Country Girl arrangement but sang You Ain't Goin' Nowhere as the similarities are pretty transparent; the slightly more solid, upbeat feel, however, suited us better than The Byrds YAGN.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 22:36:18 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

RtO: I forgot all about "Country Girl", another Brinsley Schwarz record that got a fair bit of FM play when it was new. The linked video's well worth a watch - and hang in there a bit. When it comes to "Indian Woman", do you think they saw her wearing a sari or deerskin?; I'm thinking the latter.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 22:33:46 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Yes John D they were of the same time and era. As I recall in those "Pre-Rock/ Mantovani FM" days, the evening deejay was the big wheel whereas nowadays, it is the "morning man" who brings in the big ratings and ad dollars. I could be wrong about that however I am are dealing with old memories. Fond as they are but possibly faulty as well.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:47:06 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Landmark

Dean Hagopian!! A man I never met; but I knew enough people who did and they had nothing but the greatest respect for him. I heard he was a giant in the business and a real character. I did however work with a good friend of his who was a legendary DJ at CFOX and that was Dave Boxer. They were of the same era I believe. When I was with CJFM on Mountain street in the 70's, Ted was downstairs at CJAD. Another wonderful character and a fine newsman. I don't have any stories; but I know people who do; from that time.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:46:18 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

Bill, I'll take your word for it. I know the song you mean and always turn it off after the first thirty seconds!

Interestingly enough, they had a song called "Indian Woman" that got left off the first LP (linked) but which survives for posterity as a German TV performance. I can think of at least - oh, ALL of them - songs that could have been pulled in favour of this. And this isn't THAT breathtaking - but good in a sub-"Wooden Ships" kind of way. Bob Andrews' organ playing is particularly good and Brinsley gets particularly Stills-like at 3:50!

I think you hit the nail on the head by suggesting that something was just not there in the early days but got an awful lot better quite quickly. I would suggest that it applies to BS in general rather than just Nick as a bassist. You have to remember that the night of the Fillmore hiccup, they were opening for Van Morrison who had his "Moondance" band on and was in stunning form. They had a crash course in "good" and put it into place immediately.

If you let the clip play out it should take you to another performance - this time from 1975 and covering Clover's "Love Is Gone"; the difference is staggering; THAT'S the no-frills, classy American sounding act I was writing about a few days ago.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:25:11 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: Listen to Nick wandering around the beat on the long song, "Ballad Of A Something Something". I'm sure he got really good really quick, but he wasn't there, it seemed to me when last I heard it.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:23:13 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Forgive my sudden outburst...

Sorry to jump down your throat on that one, Peter. It is no mean feat trying to defend two of your favourite acts at once when either one of them could have behaved like multiples of the epithet that Brinsley hurled at Jerome!

Your point about electrical safety is well taken and endorsed this end 100%. The Leslie cabinet - a fine, unearthed piece of equipment that has no direct mains connection and relies on the organ to power it - is a known killer and were I more spiritual I would offer prayers of thanks after every outdoor gig I have ever done.

I'm sure that Garcia was as capable of acting as described on some days. I don't know if I could handle being the unwitting messiah for every stoned fungoid in every town I rocked up in just to play some music. By the same token, nobody wishes the Brinsleys had made it bigger more than I - but if you drill down it is not difficult to understand why sometimes, and it has nothing to do with the quality of music.



Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:11:13 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Wanker

No, Peter - I said that Brinsley CALLED him a wanker. I didn't confirm anything about Captain Trips' status as an onanist whatsoever!

It could well be that the Brinsleys pissed off down the pub for most of the afternoon and came back in sufficient time to give the Grateful Dead about 30 minutes notice to move all their gear - and we all know how much tie-dyed Fender equipment the GD were toting from the many pictures of the Euriope '72 tour (ie lots!). That's exactly what they did (meaning "went down the pub all afternoon") when supporting Wings - Macca made a point of ensuring the support act got time for at least a basic soundcheck every day and the Brinsleys threw it back in his face by going down the pub and not bothering.

Thus, Garcia should be considered no more of a wanker now than he was before my post, Mr V!


Entered at Mon Apr 25 21:01:54 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Pizza Tapes

Tying a couple of discussion threads together brings the mind the 1993 recording featuring Jerry Garcia, David Grisman & Tony Rice. Mr. Garcia's copy was apparently stolen by a pizza delivery guy and later bootlegged. Mr. Grisman later released an official version on his Acoustic Disc label in 2000 appropriately entitled "The Pizza Tapes". This acoustic set from three great musicians includes a cover of "Long Black Veil".


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:49:18 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Alexis P. Suter Band with Garth Hudson

BEG's clip of Alexis P. Suter with Garth led me to this one -- Alexis' band covering The Shape I'm In with Garth on piano. Looks like he's having fun. Check it out!


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:48:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Deep crust pizza is poor. Stuffed crust pizza is disgusting. But we did that thread several times.

Jerry Garcia – you confirm via Brinsley that he was a wanker. I always suspected as much. How many died through 240 volts in a mic or guitar? 99% of British musicians would have used the “C-word” for a musician forcing his fellows to play electric in rain. Indefensible attitude. “Wanker” is far, far too mild. I only wish Jerry had expressed that reluctance to Led Zep’s crew in that era. That would have been the end of him. And good riddance. I know people who died from unearthed equipment. Not funny. I now put Garcia down as "total arsehole."

In general, road crews in that era co-operated. No doubt the GD didn’t understand the score in the UK. Because agencies booked bands in blocks, most crews knew each other and found co-operation the best move. Brinsely Schwarz would have had a crew of two at most, I suspect. The GD, like Hawkwind who copied them, would have had lots and lots. Two working and ten wankers (or more). Hawkwind’s crew spent most of their time trying to steal stuff from other bands (leads etc). They were loathed on the circuit. Lemmy turned it into a career.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:42:39 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

There's a Dingwalls Concert that was (kind of) a second volume of Greasy Truckers (see link). Looks like Gong fulfilled the Hawkwind role on that one (ie for the hygienically challenged)!!

Well the webmaster may have castigated you for the besmirching of Nick Lowe's bass work, Bill! No sympathy! As an occasional bassist myself, if a few more people played bass like Nick Lowe and less like Jaco Pastorious, i'd be well happy. IMHO the music world went to pieces the minute the rhythm section felt they were entitled to a bigger share of the action. Give me Ringo and Nick over Jon Hiseman and Jaco any day of the week!!

That said, the first BS album is "BS"! Surprising that it was the widely played LP over the water as on home turf it meant nothing. "Despite It All" was the first one that people generally bothered with and remains one of my favourites.



Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:30:44 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: Yes, I did see that, but don't know the deeper catalogues of either the GD or BS to be able to comment intelligently. What we heard on FM in the early '70s by BS was mostly "Shine On Brightly" and a couple songs from the painted pony LP, which I love except for the bass-playing (which our esteemed webmaster castigated me for when I called it 'the world's worst' some years ago). But my very favourite BS record is the "Peace Love and Understanding" 45, which I picked up for 15 cents in a junk store in '74 or '75. As for the Greasy Trucker's thing, I heard it at a record-collector's house. Wasn't there a volume 2? Did Quiver have something to do with that?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:18:03 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I was very disappointed that Steve Winwood, one of the great voices in rock, only contributed organ on several cuts but no backing vocals! Along those lines, I was surprised that the 2-LP version did not include the musician credits for each song or the lyrics for that matter. Here you have a nice gate-fold album cover with plenty of space to insert a booklet for this, but only a notation to go to Robbie's webpage for these credits & lyrics.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:16:29 CEST 2011 from (91.42.238.7)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: those pizzas formed the band

p.s. come to think of it, remarkable that one can trace the musician’s personality back over the kind of pizza he eats and vice versa. As they say, you are what you eat.

Anyway those pizzas formed the band. Listen closely, with an open mind to their giant legacy and you’ll find all those Marina’s and Margherita’s back in Garth organ, Levon’s beatings on the drums, Rick’s bass, Richard’s voice and Robbie’s guitar solo’s.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:09:47 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Joan

Joan, thanks for the feedback and I'm with you on thin crust, all day long. That's how you get them in Italy, and despite the fine efforts of NY or Chicago.....you get my drift!


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:04:03 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Peter V/ RTO

Peter. Pizza without tomatoes and cheese? Wouldn't that be just plain flat bread? Didn't we have a great GB debate as to who had the best pizza? Chicago deep dish or NY thin crust? I vote for thin.

Rob, greet article. Thank you for posting it.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:00:40 CEST 2011 from (91.42.238.7)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: pizzas & the feud

Lars,

There have been bigger mysteries revealed .... my guess (and please correct me):

Robbie: the veggie pizza [Robbie is the guy for such a thing ]

Levon: the bucket of KFC Chicken [just to tease Robbie? Did the feud begin over a pizza and a bucket of chicken?]

Richard: the sausage double cheese with black olive [all or nothing, could be even frozen as Bill M suggested]

Garth: the plain cheese one[Garth]

Rick: plain cheese [this one I’m not sure about, maybe Levon and Rick shared some chicken, or Rick had Garth switched pizza]



Entered at Mon Apr 25 20:00:38 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I lived across the street from the Forum, on Atwater for many years. The Moustache was long gone by then. As Bill would remember, I saw "All The Young Dudes" there which featured Bob Segarini, who came from the band, The Wackers, which also featured Randy Bishop, who worked with the GB's very own Pat B. Thanks for the memories.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 19:44:21 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Landmark....thanks by the way as through you last week, I did find a link to my favorite Garfield song - above link......thinking of Montreal……My first serious girlfriend lived on Lincoln Street (2324 as I recall) which was right behind the old Montreal Forum and also just a 30 second walk to a crazy/sometimes great rock club called The Moustache – caught a few interesting acts there in the late 70’s early 80’s………………….


Entered at Mon Apr 25 19:42:11 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M

Bill did you see my earlier reply about GD/Brinsley Schwarz? I kind of buried it by posting another lengthy piece!


Entered at Mon Apr 25 19:36:08 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Empty N: I'm belately doing my annual listen to Fairuz's "Good Friday: Eastern Sacred Songs" CD. It must've been because of RtO's discussion of Fairport Convention that Fairuz's "El Yom Ollika" made me think that she would've made a dandy replacement for Sandy Denny.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 19:20:42 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Easter doldrums indeed! Dean Hagopian has been around since I was a little tyke, if not longer. I do not know if he has a show or slot these days, the last I recall, he hosted a Sunday night oldies show. He still does plenty of radio commercials and if you know his voice, you will recognize it on countless phone directories (Purolator for instance). I recall he hosted a television special that was a reunion of Montreal musicians from the mid-60's era, Corky Laing being the best known. The name Ted Blackman brings back memories as I knew him personally in the late 70's. He was a columnist for the Gazette, starting in the sports department. He also was a broadcaster for many years on CJAD and a noted bon vivant in his day. I had money invested in a pool when he got his own morning show on CFCF. The pool was based on who could pick the correct day that he would miss his shift (5:30 AM). I thought I nailed when I saw him, fall ass over backwards inro a snow bank while a snowblower made its way down Crescent Street. Not to be as he managed to sober up and make it in. He later was living with one of the McGarrigle sisters, which one, I can't recall. If John D. is lurking about, I'm sure he could flesh out things further and chip in his own memories, as he once mentioned that he was in town in the mid 70's


Entered at Mon Apr 25 19:15:16 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Unlike say a L. Cohen or perhaps a Ray Davies ( though certainly not solo Ray ) where one could always tell of the great care put into all lyrics…… Robbie has always had that big swing in quality of lyrics …..Rick Danko was a master at turning some pretty plain lyrics into things of beauty……..I agree HTBC is not A + RR all the way through on the word front and “This is Where I Get Off” in particular could have been a mini masterpiece had more care been taken with the words ……..but I do disagree on the melody front as unlike the limp Ladder 49 offering of a few years ago……to my ear, there are a whole bunch of lovely melodies on HTBC…………………Only song I skip is “Fear of Falling”……..I recall you wanting some “Ditch” from him and it is there on the ‘Straight Down the Line”, HDLHNM and “Axeman”…………..more than one might expect from an Armani wearing 67 year old…..


Entered at Mon Apr 25 18:52:42 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: While I do like the sequence of notes in the guitar solo on HDLHNM, I still think the execution itself is not polished to the high standards of Robbie's capability. Otherwise, I do like a lot of the guitar work & intrumentation. So far, it's the lyrics & melodies that I find lacking. Maybe its Robbie manner of recitation that conveys a detachment from any emotional involvement in the songs. At times the atmoshperics only seem to cloud any fire at the heart of the songs.

Like most, I was really looking forward to Robbie's return to recording, only to be disappointed. After reading about the long process of the project, I wonder if there was too much emphasis placed on the technical aspects of recording all the cool layers of music, diluting any spark of spontaneity captured in the heat of the moment in the studio. Even the aforementioned acoustic guitar solo on HDLHNM sounds as if it was a Pro-Tooled overdub.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 18:42:44 CEST 2011 from (41.97.252.252)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Al Edge / Peter V

Thanks for the precious informations

Al : so YOU WERE IN RAH ! this is a great mark

in reality behind the melting of fun and seriousness of my previous post, its presence alone in this forum is a proof of where I would have been 6/2/71 if I had to chose (with the obligatory Super 8 mm Camera in hand and a suffiscent supply of film loads)

[arms crossed in shield over my head to counter random items thrown by the GBers]


Entered at Mon Apr 25 18:05:11 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Third and final part...so far!

PART 3 – CREATING NEW MUSIC INFUSED WITH TRADITIONAL ROOTS

(PREAMBLE: One thing that Anglo-Americana had in common with the earlier blues boom was very simply imitation of a music with absolutely no ties to the performers’ own heritage. Industrialisation of the UK had led to member nations, particularly England, less reliant on the land and with that the decline of the extended family set up to work the farm and bring the harvest home. In places such as the USA and Germany, that homely scenario of a hearty communal meal after a hard day’s work, often with a little too much to drink and the inevitable breaking out of some musical instruments for a sing-song would thrive far later than in the UK, and the old songs (and dances) were largely forgotten until Cecil Sharpe set about collecting them as is well-known. Unlike many of their American contemporaries, many UK pop and rock musicians first picked up an instrument to imitate the Elvis, Hank Marvin or, inevitably later on The Beatles. By and large, the skiffle movement is the nearest the UK ever got to the kind of evensong that was the norm in land-working nations, and is a different entity as it encouraged novices to have a go. Thus, the folk club was the only route to hear traditional English music; even then, played by revivalists rather than by individuals who had known their native folk music through childhood and it was deeply ingrained to the bone that by the time they made electric music, it was there subconsciously. Jerry Garcia (bluegrass banjo) and the Wilson brothers (barbershop acapella vocals) are just two examples of successful American rock/pop artists that went into their careers with a solid grounding in a folk music of some description. There was, to my knowledge, NO UK equivalent outside of liturgical music, where an understanding of our own folk music was naturally bred.)

This case study is almost exclusively about the formative years of Fairport Convention; a unique example of an act that could see the value in what The Band achieved and applied it to their own situation, rather than simply copying the end product.

The Muswell Hill band, formed in 1967 - with key players Richard Thompson, Simon Nicola, Ashley Hutchings and Martin Lamble already in place early on – always set out to be different to the average blues-based bands so prevalent in 1967 London. Admiring the dynamics of Jefferson Airplane, the band added one male and one female singer to ape the format of Marty Balin and Grace Slick. These were Ian Matthews and Judy Dyble, and the band recorded one album in this format for Polydor records in 1968.

In 1968, Dyble was replaced by Sandy Denny who brought a new standard of musicianship to the band – a veteran of the folk clubs, Denny had worked with The Strawbs and solo, working to much tighter standards than the rest of the band had hitherto. Denny also brought a love of traditional English music from her club experience and this would prove crucial in marking Fairport out from the crowd over the next year or so.

Due to their working relationship with American producer Joe Boyd, the group heard many of the “Basement Tapes” songs and other pieces of semi-obscure or unreleased Dylan. “I’ll Keep It With Mine” was tackled on “What We Did On Our Holidays” (their first album featuring Denny and also their first for Island Records) and Richard Thompson particularly was struck by the first two releases from The Band. Already a blossoming songwriter, Thompson’s growing ability and inspiration from MFBP led to some great moments on their third LP “Unhalfbricking”. “Cajun Woman” from Thompson showed early evidence of Americana filtering through (Matthews left Fairport around this time but they gained veteran folk-club fiddle/mandolin player Dave Swarbrick) in the use of fiddle allied to a rock beat, not to mention the Cajun lady in the song title. The album included fine versions of Dylan again: “Percy’s Song” (a 1963 outtake; Matthews still in Fairport when it was recorded and he provides a fine lead vocal) and (of more relevance to this piece) basement sessions song “Million Dollar Bash”. Fairport were getting better and better with each album; on their next they would finally hit their stride. Sadly it would take a fatal road accident (that claimed the life of drummer Martin Lamble) to shake the band up and get them making some decisions for the future.

The addition of Swarbrick, allied to Denny’s own folk roots and the impressive emergence of Thompson as a creative source dominated such decisions. The Band, they rationed, had demonstrated that you could create a body of songs that were informed by native folk values but was a new music for the rock album generation. This decision was well taken as Anglo-Americana, simply apeing The Band, was not making use of their UK folk influences, while simply playing electrified versions of traditional tunes (which had already been done by Steeleye Span) denied their creative input. This blueprint demonstrated a better understanding of what went into MFBP (and especially “The Band” that followed it) rather than, like so many, simply taking the end product and imitiating it.

With new drummer Dave Mattacks on board, the band delivered “Liege and Lief”, their seminal masterpiece. This still featured some traditional tunes, but reworked so extensively that they simply sat among the superb originals in a seamless body of work. Opening cut “Come All Ye” setting the pace and the scene so effectively like “Across The Great Divide” does on “The Band”, Fairport had nailed their goal big time – to do for English music what The Band had done with American. To this day, many people consider that the album has never been close to having an equal. Certainly Steeleye Span were far more traditional; one exception is possibly Lindisfarne’s debut “Nicely Out of Tune” although the original material is without the Band influence so readily tangible and lacks the gravitas of Fairport (or The Band).

Denny and Hutchings left Fairport Convention in late 1969, the band still very much in emotional turmoil after the crash. Denny formed Fotheringay before embarking on a solo career that ended along with her life, tragically early in 1978. Hutchings remained active in folk rock and founded The Albion Band among other projects.

Thompson stayed for one more album, “Full House” and the band again pulled out some fine examples of English rock that you could (like “Rag Mama Rag” or “TNTDODD”) be forgiven for assuming to be traditional standards. “Doctor of Physick” echoes the often crude message of many an old English song of a girl’s loss of innocence, whereas “Walk Awhile” is a good spirited rocker with another Band trademark of shared verses employed in a native framework. The loss of Denny was regrettable at a time when Fairport should have capitalised, but this first all-male line-up delivered a more muscular sounding (due in part to the far more solid bass work of new man Dave Pegg) collection of songs and if anything took their Band influences a step further: for the first time they were “self contained” in that the instrumentalists shared the lead vocals; Denny’s fear of flying had also cost Fairport the chance to tour extensively and it was the 1970 all-male band that first played the USA. With a growing body of original songs, blistering electrified jigs and reels and even the odd Chuck Berry encore, Fairport Convention were never more on fire and ready to be reckoned with as a live act. They took England to the American stage just as The Band themselves would take America to the Royal Albert Hall the following year.

And there we leave the story, as Richard Thompson would also depart before completion of the next Fairport album. The band would last for many years more and despite a brief hiatus still hold their place in folk-rock royalty. But after the departure of Thompson it can be argued that they were never as innovative again (despite a fairly strong follow up in “Angel Delight” and a credible attempt at a concept album in “Babbacombe Lee”; both 1971; remaining founder Nicol quit thereafter), and certainly more content to play more traditional music. Thompson remains one of the most respected writers, performers and guitarists to this day - perhaps due a solid understanding of English and Celtic roots music led to his own emergence as a strong writer – but whether the young guitarist and fledgling songwriter infatuated by The Band and, unlike so many, intelligent enough to understand the formula rather than the outright answer would be the same man without this most American of influences is another story!



Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:47:53 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dean Hagopian

Bill….our posts crossed……….I don’t know about any Dean recordings…...As a teenager, I helped out at a telethon of some sort late 70’s and he was there and seemed a great guy……….I mentioned this to my brother at the time and I recall him telling me that Dean was one of the great Montreal radio guys of all-time………I would catch him on some AM shows from time to time while in Montreal but obviously missed out on his times as an influential music DJ………………I do recall memorably catching a show that an excellent Montreal sports radio personality Mitch Melnick did with Ted Blackman and Dean Hagopian and they discussed music……It was jaw dropping stuff as their collections and taste ( all three ) was off the charts………………..not the usual cretins that occupy most sports call-in shows to say the least.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:39:20 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Oh, a few things

BEG: There is NOTHING like the remnants of a Sunday roast. I too refry all the leftover roast veg (beleive it or not I am the cook in our house) and agree that they make the best home fries there are.

I'm also a firm believer that the best Cottage Pie is made with by mincing the remnants of a roast beef joint. Although there is only Mrs RTRO and I, we generally buy large meat joints as you just don't get any gravy out of small ones. Mondays, I'll cut a few slices of the cold beef to serve with the home fries as a quick meal, leaving time for mincing the rest, chopping an onion, and dicing any leftover boiled carrots or swede and then frying that in a little oil a with a touch of black pepper and italian seasoning. Hey presto - freezable portions of mince and veg base that you can make a cottage pie, chilli or spag bol with as your mood dictates, with minimal extra ingredients on the day of usage. Convenience food CAN be home fare, I firmly believe.

Your pancakes sound delicious but I'm still recovering from the homemade Key Lime pie that my dear mother made for us yesterday. Very nice it was - used condensed milk, freshly squeezed lime juice and zest and a dark chocolate biscuit base. Mmm-mmm.

Enough of cuisine! Bill M, there is more than the evidence of Shining Brightly to see the GD in Brinsley Schwarz. Don't know if you are aware of it but over here there was an event commemorated on a 2-LP set called "Greasy Truckers Party" in 1972. The event featured Hawkwind (who I am with Peter on; too loud and basic - best thing about them was Stacia), Man (our Grateful Dead!) and brinsley Schwarz so was basically a UA records event for charity. It was a limited release so the vinyl is rare (I paid £30 for mine over fifteen years ago) but the CD release has the complete sets from all bands. And voila! Brinsley Schwarz doing "Going Down The Road Feeling Bad". (Spotify URL attached). There is a bit of guesswork on the lyrics ("Ain't gonna be treated this-a-way" is replaced with a different line) - my guess is that they did it off the cuff but it is a good rendition.

Sadly there is a less happy tale regarding the two acts. Brinsley told me he had a row with Garcia at the Bickershaw festival later in 1972, after the Dead set their gear up so far forward that the Brinsleys (who were on immediately prior to the GD) gear had to be set half in the open in front, on a very wet day. They appealed to Garcia to get the crew back and just move the gear back a touch but Garcia (who no doubt had given the crew the afternoon off) was evasive and all "Aw, shucks..." about it. Brinsley called him a wanker (and if you've ever spoken to BS you'd know he is not one for bad language; very well-spoken) and the band played on with an electrical shock risk ever looming, but the afternoon brightened up.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:31:39 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Ulster

Subject: The Band's favorite pizza

In a catering rider from 1996, the following was to be provided to the tour bus for the trip home:
Bud & Beck's beer (in bottles only), Coke Classic (in bottles only) & Evian spring water;
One bucket of KFC Chicken;
Four Pizza Hut thin crust cheese pizzas with following toppings: 2 plain cheese only;
1 veggie pizza;
1 sausage double cheese with black olive.

I'd love to know who preferred what.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:28:36 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: would you like starch on that?

Norbert: As much as our guys may have been pizza purists in the early days, one must admit that by the mid '70s at least Richard had turned to the frozen variety - which he of course ironed.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:27:30 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Just read in full your post on Lance Anderson…….great stuff….one finds a number of these things when you sit down and actually write out a recording…….


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:21:08 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: factoids - but no moneyback guarantee

Kevin J: Well put, re HTBC. Not only does volume show off the brilliant guitar work, it also lets you hear Winwood's remarkable work on organ - as noted here last week by another poster. Richard Bell was kinda like that: he'd play this amazing stuff at what were to me frustratingly low volumes. I guess both Winwood and Bell came to the conclusion that the organ was a colouring instrument rather than a lead one. And thanks for the Hagopian tidbit - news to me. I believe that Hovaness was with Walter Rossi when I saw him at the ElMo, with Angelo Finaldi on bass. Because it will wake Landmark out of the Easter doldrums, I will also mention that Dean did at least a couple of his own 45s - one with the Regals (a Staccatos feeder group) and a later one or two backed by the Staccatos themselves. Am I absolutely right on that?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:17:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: History of pizza

I've got a book on pizza history. Apparently both the Greeks and Romans had pizza, it says, but without tomatoes. Or cheese.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:14:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

MUSIC: And I think Sir Paul has mentioned Let It Be as being influenced.

FOOTBALL Al. Glenn Hoddle. Well, he thought with his feet. I was ignoring his dumb pronouncements on life, the universe and everything, and thinking only of his ball distribution which allowed others to shine. Also, didn’t they say as England manager, in training he liked to demonstrate skills that none could emulate? But it’s all regional bias. Harry Redknapp lives down here in Poole, as does Jamie, and Darren Anderton, and Tottenham tend to be the local team of choice. Harry is a local hero as the best manager Bournemouth ever had. Also now Southampton is in the same division as Bournemouth, we’ve deserted 30 years of supporting them and gone back to hating them.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:07:16 CEST 2011 from (79.202.187.173)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Band and their favorite pizzas

Brown Eyed Girl thanks for the receipt, let me, in return, define something about The Band and their lust for pizzas, real pizzas. Due to the fact that the young Band (Ronnie Hawkins & the Hawks, The Hawks & Levon and the Hawks) were on the road a lot, it’s no secret that they ate a lot of fast food but their favorite however was: PIZZA (Across the Great Divide: “He wrote the first lines on a greasy box” (that must have been a P.B. [Norbert]) This Wheel’s on Fire : “slices of Pizza” , Mystery Train “Pizza boxes piled up against a pink wall”).

There are only two (original) pizza recipes: 1) the Marinara & 2) The Margherita (which is the luxurious version of the Marinara). Richard, Rick, Levon, Garth and Robbie knew this and they refused to eat any other pizzas, cause they aren’t real pizza’s, pineapple or shish kebab doesn’t belong on a pizza (I'm proud the knew that back then already). A fine pizza is formed by hand (and hand only), backed in 60 sec. at 500 gr.C (905F) in a stone oven above an oak fire. That’s what I like about our Band, not only talented musicians, but they knew to pick their pizzas too.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 17:05:31 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Link - Encore of the best soccer/football bit ever

Todd: As good a description of the talent quotient as is possible I would think…………….

MFBP: Take any 100 music people and play MFBP and Brown Album back to back…..my position is that 95-98 out of 100 would choose Brown as the superior work…..the 2-3 that didn’t would be because of an overwhelming love for “The Weight”……Desert island…..and the Briown album is in my top 5 always……..MFBP doesn’t make top 100 if the island was so accommodating.

David P: I have been playing HTBC in the car for a few weeks now………………Loud It just gets better Where the first album had the U2 clunkers that killed momentum and Storyville had great songs but not enough guitar……….The guitar on HTBC is exquisite throughout and I find the instrumentals perfectly placed in sequence………Interestingly, “She’s Not Mine” which I had first thought far too murky - really reveals itself after repeated listens………………………..and again, I repeat that the guitar solo in He Don’t Live here No More” is to standard rockers what MFBP was to the “hate your mother” rock scene of 1967/68.

Bill M: Another interesting tidbit is that the drummer in Moonquake was the brother of a well-known and great Montreal radio man – Dean Hagopian


Entered at Mon Apr 25 16:40:33 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J / Landmark: My favourite Moonquake song is "Don't You Try To Be My Baby" from the same album. 3:30 at the link above. Jakob August Geisinger was in a great little Montreal instrumental combo with Bob Parkin and Wally Rossi in the early '60s. As Bob and the Messengers they did just one 45, "Splash Down" in the "Telstar" mode. Then they signed on with Wilson Pickett, whose drummer was Buddy Miles. Then they left Pickett and added some other guys and recorded a brilliant LP for ABC in New York - Influence. They also moved to Toronto and became part of the Yorkville scene, which is why first Geisinger (replacing Bruce Palmer) then Rossi were called into the reunited Luke and the Apostles. August is on that group's one 45, the brilliant "You Make Me High", which is well worth finding on YouTube. Then it gets confusing, as Rossi, initially with August and then with Prakash John, completed a post-Luke Apostle album that eventually came out as Charlee, while also reuniting with Bob Parkin and Buddy Miles to record Miles' great "Them Changes" 45, and August joined Canuckistani pop-rock megastar Michel Pagliaro before hiving off with fellow Pag bandmembers as Moonquake.

Here's an interesting tidbit about "The Weight" that organist / producer Lance Anderson (whose Band-related credits include Garth's "Live at the Wolf" CD and the "2B3: Toronto Sessions" album):

"I was watching the Bravo special on the early T.O. music scene, and thoroughly enjoyed it. Great vintage footage. I am proud to say that I have played with at least 80 percent of those wonderful artists.

"Seeing The Hawks reminded me of something Garth Hudson told me when we were working on his Live at the Wolf CD. He went through all the lyrics of The Weight and told me the back stories to Carmen, Anna Lee, Nazareth Penn. etc. and then he let it slip that the missing beat in the "and, and and' section at the end of the chorus was actually an edit that their producer John Simon had done. He cut off one beat. (If you count it from the first "and" until they come back in, it is seven beats.)

"This made me laugh as I had played this tune many times, and it always gets screwed up at this section. especially if you do a solo because no one is sure without the vocals when to come back in. I played a short series of concerts with Garth and one night for an Encore he said "Why don't we do The Weight, but let's do it straight." Luckily I knew what he was talking about, because when the Band performed it live they usually did it as two 4/4 bars. In the Last Waltz they relearned it as on the record, but it never felt right to them.

"So there you go. for all you people who have got lost in that tune .... it was an EDIT !!"

RtO: Thank you for that most-excellent work! A few things came to mind. One is that not only the Brinsleys channel our guys, they also channelled the Dead, especially on "Shining Brightly". Another is the group Mapleoak, which was initially - on their one 45 - Kink refugee Peter Quaife and three Canadians in London who Quaife had hooked up with on the basis of their R&B prowess. (As a sidenote, two of them had been in a post Neil Young version of the Mynah Birds with Rick James that was renamed the Flying Circus when they decided to go with their new guitarist, Bruce Cockburn, while James was sidelined.) When Quaife left, the others dumped R&B and recorded, still in London, for Decca, a Band-ish country-folk-rock LP that includes a couple of otherwise unrecorded Cockburn numbers, including "Flying Circus". A third regards Mott the Hoople; a song I heard frequently when I started to listen to FM radio in the early '70s - - was Hoople's decidedly non-Bandish "You're Too Fucking Slow". I loved it but they disappeared from view until Dudes. Fourth, and by far the most significant, is the Beatles; I'd say that the song "Get Back" was very much influenced by MFBP, and that the morality of "The Weight" is spread across two songs on "Abbey Road" - "Carry That Weight" and "The End".


Entered at Mon Apr 25 16:33:02 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Quot homines tot sententiae

When I think of Garth I think of Spock - if he was so smart- why wasn't he Captain?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 16:15:54 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Speaking of organs. While I'm making a country breakfast for my bunny, I'm listening to John Patton's organ from "Blue John"...first song is "Hot Sauce".
So this one's for Rozzzz.
I'm making blueberry/dark chocolate chip/banana pancakes, home fries from roasted potatoes, scrambled eggs with tomatoes and bell peppers and parmigiano-reggiano cheese. I can't believe we're out of red onions! Oh well.....I'll just add more cheese.

How To Become Clairvoyant, Robbie Robertson's New Album, Debuts At No. 13* On The Billboard 200, To Become The Highest Chart Debut Of His Solo Career

Thanks Todd. Check out my link for a female photographer that didn't even want to be known....Vivian Maier Her Discovered Work. As for the cover of HTBC....It works for me as I'm into "new age" things myself. I think he's trying to say that he's living a more wholesome life now and the fact that he's opening up some old wounds; he's releasing the toxins in his body and moving forward. Again....Ooops! This is a The Band site....I shouldn't talk like that! ;-D I don't like every song on this record, but it satisfies my soul. An acquaintance who cuts my bob hair cut had Adele's latest "21" (I've downloaded 4 songs and have her first solo "19") playing in her salon and told me that she'll be buying HTBC. She's 50 and has always been into music like myself. However, she was more into the Queen Street scene where I was never trendy and liked many genres of music.

Levon's last two recordings didn't do the same as I've said before....only two songs on each solo recording are on my Nano. I've always been into universal themes in music...not Americana....I'm a different The Band fan.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 16:14:33 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV

Peter, the Hoddle comparison for JRR is a bit unfair. You have to remember that unlike JRR, Glenn Hoddle is as thick as shit.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 15:52:21 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: How To Become Clairvoyant

I obtained a copy of the vinyl version of Robbie's "HTBC", a featured release from last week's Record Store Day. The good news is that the 2-LP gatefold edition, mastered by Ron McMaster at Capitol Studios, sounds great from a technical standpoint. The 180-gram vinyl of my copy is dead quiet between the grooves and, by spreading the cuts out on four sides of the two records, presents a full dynamic range void of any grainy digital anomalies.

After a few repeated listenings, however, I have to admit that the songs themselves fail to really grab me on an emotional level. I'm reminded of the films of Robbie's friend Martin Scorsese. They're visually stunning and crafted with great care but, beneath the surface, they seem lacking soul. They take the viewer on a complex journey, ultimately draining, rather than imparting emotions.

Perhaps the album's Macro-Biotic label says it best for me, as it portends some sort of regimen of whole grains, vegetables & beans. As a meat & potatoes type of guy, I come away from the servings with a gnawing hunger for more tasty substance and less bulk. Robbie, who in the past displayed a great narrative gift, now seeks clairvoyant insight. Maybe the album will bring more fulfillment after repeated listenings but, so far, I find mundane reflection rather than keen perception in the lyrics. After a 13-year wait, I expected much more than this.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 15:16:53 CEST 2011 from (69.177.200.206)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Talent

Levon is the most rhythmically talented
Robbie is the most conceptually talented
Rick is the most harmonically talented
Garth is the most experimentally talented
Richard is the most soulfully talented

But that’s just the beginning of their collective talent

I believe they each would have achieved some success and would have hooked up with other talented musicians. It wouldn’t have been the same unique combination that gave us The Band, but they all would have had musical careers of some sort. The cream always rises to the top, and these guys had music in their bones.

B.E.G., thanks for the info about Robbie’s album cover photography. I agree with Robbie that Anton Corbijn is a great photographer, but HTBC is a not great example of his photography. I realize that Robbie was probably trying to go for something different, and didn’t want a cookie cutter glossy headshot, but at some point, a portrait of a person should be a portrait of that person. That photo is not a portrait of Robbie Robertson. It may be a character study of a mysterious figure, but I thought that one of the points of this album was that it was a little more autobiographical and that Robbie was telling us a little more about himself. He was “letting us in” so to speak. That cover doesn’t achieve that goal. It’s a very approachable album on a human level. It’s not a very approachable cover.

It’s not horrible photography, but it misses the mark.

Click on the above link for a gallery of photos from Arnold Newman, one of the greatest environmental portrait photographers of the 20th century. Many fine examples of photography that are unconventional in many ways but also achieve uniqueness and tell us a little about the subject. Arnold Newman passed a way a few years ago, but the style that he pioneered is still valid.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 15:12:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jay walking

I guess we were all a bit pissed Pete.

It was the '71 final [Charlie fuckin George... spit]. I'd persuaded all the lads to go on a reconoitre of the Albert hall in advance of the concert on that morning we'd landed.

Maybe it was 10 hours. Too many brown mixed.

:-0)

as for the team. Garth in goal, blocking it with his mighty organ. Robbie midfield maestro centre stage :-0). Richard crooning his way up one wing. Rick on the other talking to the crowd. Levon centre half thumping seven kinds of shite out of Johan Cruyff like he was a bass drum.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 15:04:40 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, as soon as I pressed SUBMIT, I thought Levon would in the Billy Bremner role. The tenacious terrier. Robbie? More Glen Hoddle mastermind, elegantly passing the ball (vocals) to other team members. I can’t cast the others myself, but back in those days the lack of random drug tests would have been beneficial to them. Wasn’t that still the days when half-time meant a slice of lemon and a ciggie?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 14:55:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Albert Hall to Wembley in two hours? Is that allowing for traffic lights? You have to wait for the green man signal to cross all those multi-lane London roads. You could have taken the tube of course. Never done it. I’d allow 45 to 60 minutes if I had an appointment.

If they had played, which positions would they play in? Over to you, Al.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 14:50:34 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hammond soul

Yes, and Earl Van Dyke plays on the Motown Revue Live in Paris, which I found last year. Another classic instrumental is "Ain't Too Proud To Beg" by J.J. Jackson.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 14:48:29 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Speculative bullshitting continued

I reckon all five would have signed for Panathanaikos and by an amazing yet simple twist of fate [note the clever Dylan link] :-0) appeared in London that very same night that they actually did appear.

BTW - Empty - you'd never have made it - it's a 2 hour walk. The game would have been over before you got to your seat but why would you have gone anyroad when they were actually playing for Panathanaikos?

Good fun this :-0)


Entered at Mon Apr 25 14:45:04 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: "Hammond Karaoke" for PV / Most talented Band member

Peter, the ultimate example of replacing the vocal with a Hammond part is surely the Motown LP "Earl Van Dyke - That Motown Sound" (see link). Very collectable, and unlike many rarities worth every penny for the music itself!

Garth is the most talented member of The Band. Not only is he as essential as the others to the OQ, but can dowse for water.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 14:02:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Speculative bullshitting again …

Brien prompted it! What ifs are fun. If The Hawks had gone their own way in May 1966, or like Micky Jones stayed on salary but not gone to Woodstock, I think three at least would have had a pretty fast track to success. Robbie was already known as a hot shot guitarist. Blonde on Blonde enhanced that. He’d have got plenty of invitations. I just thought about that Bill Wyman session with John Hammond. The Mick Taylor slot? Whether a job as lead guitarist would have nurtured his songwriting is a different question.

Rick was the only guy to have sung with the electric Dylan, which got him noticed. A great bass player who could sing like that? Invitations. I reckon both would have ended up in high profile bands. They never had a bass player … it could have been CDSN or CDSNY. Probably a country-rock band. Flying Burrito Bros to Eagles?

Garth is such an unusual genius that he’d have ended up as a producer, or in something like Weather Report. Richard, it would have been luck. He seemed backward about pushing himself forward. It would have been ‘Will someone notice his talent?’ But then again, all the Canadians knew it already, as well as people who’d seen them in the South. Levon, having missed the highest profile bit of the Dylan tour, may have found it more difficult to get noticed again. But he might have drifted to LA, met up again with Leon Russell etc and made it that way. Would his singing have got him noticed without the material Robbie provided, though? Or would he have been a trio of most wanted drummers with Jim Keltner and Steve Gadd?

I don't think any would have been anonymous, but I doubt that their careers would have been so spectacular at the start without each other.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:46:31 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Four Photos of Robbie Robertson
'The Late Show with David Letterman' at the Ed Sullivan Theater - Arrivals. New York City, USA - 05.04.11.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:33:48 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Like many people who are talented and obscure or unknown to us, I believe the individuals members of the Band, on their own, would have been anonymous in history but their individual talents in the collective that became the Band gave those wonderful gifts an opportunity to soar. Their talents are equal for if it wasn't for the whole we would have never been blessed to know about the individuals.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:33:26 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wow. I haven't seen Tavis Smiley since he was on BET network. Robbie really gets around these days! He's covering all his bases.

Robbie Robertson transcript on Tavis Smiley Show airdate April 22, 2011

Tavis: I want to talk about your storytelling in just a second. Hey, Jonathan, put this cover back up for me. I love the music on the project, obviously, but I love this cover and I love the title. Tell me about the title. Tell me about this cover. I love this shot.

Robertson: This is a friend of mine who took this, Anton Corbijn. He's one of the great photographers of all time, in my opinion. He did a lot of work for this project. He did a lot of things. One of the things that's really enjoyable about working with him too is he takes these pictures in 30 seconds. You know, a lot of these guys are in there, they're having you bend over backwards and do stuff. This is nothing. He just does it and makes it happen.

He took a picture of me that I had - there's this magazine. Then there was another that I had and it said on the magazine, "Become clairvoyant." So he said, well, let's use that. So all of these pieces to the puzzle started fitting and that's why I wanted to work with him.

Tavis: You referenced earlier in this conversation, Robbie, the notion of storytelling. I note, obviously as your fans do, that you do that awfully well in your writing, number one. But I also read the other day that you've signed a three-book deal with - as a matter of fact, I just saw Jon Meacham the other day at Random House.

You got a three-book deal with Random House and they think that you are, obviously, a pretty good storyteller to give you a three-book deal. Talk to me about your process for storytelling and what makes a good story, what makes a good storyteller. Just talk to me about storytelling.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:19:18 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Alexis P Suter and Garth Hudson Photo


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:17:12 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

vidgirl26 on Jan 20, 2011
Garth Hudson Joined Alexis P. Suter at The Falcon in Marlboro NY


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:13:58 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.13)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I hope every bunny had a hoppy Easter.

Robbie Robertson The Band Man Plays On
Wilhelm Murg from Indian Country Today Media.com:"When do you think your next solo album is coming out?"

Robbie:"I don’t know. I’m just trying to stay in the moment. I’m just trying to do what I do today really well. Making this album was one of the most enjoyable musical experiences I ever had, so I do have a thrust for more of this. If I had my way, all I would do for the next couple of years would be to write songs for a new album and write my autobiography, but I have many other things I’m working on. So I’m just going to have to see how it all rolls out."


Entered at Mon Apr 25 13:07:27 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Most talented

Rick Danko was the most talented bass guitarist.

I was going to type ten more sentenceslike this (two each) but got tired.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 12:39:45 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A collective of interdependent talentedness...comrades : )

Does there have to be "a most talented" member of The Band? Aren't all 5 talented enough to be crowned "the most talented" simultaneously?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 11:18:39 CEST 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

ari

Subject: MOST TALENTED BAND MEMBER

I asked my roommate, who knows the Band quite well at this point for I play them incessantly has said many times that Levon is the most talented band member. I told him Robbie wrote the songs, he is well aware. He said "how can anyone sing and drum like that". His favorite song from Last Waltz is Such A Night. He is of Japanese-Mexican descent.

I won't say who I think the most talented member is but I want to hear what everyone else has to say. I love them all by the way.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 10:56:47 CEST 2011 from (41.97.252.252)

Posted by:

Empty Now

this first cup was coached by Rinus Michels not Stefan Kovacs, on the Athenian side the coaching is credited to Puskas ...THE Puskas ?


Entered at Mon Apr 25 10:42:01 CEST 2011 from (41.97.252.252)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: a set of tedious questions for the elite of the GB

On a Wednesday 2nd June 1971, or The Band-RAH versus Ajax- Panathinaikos

1 – in London, UK, what is the distance between the Royal Albert Hall and Wembley Stadium ? (please forward both numbers : in miles and in minutes, if possible)

2 – at what time GMT started The Band concert RAH ?

3 – at what time GMT started the match Panathinaikos vs Ajax 1971 champions league/european cup final ? [link above]

4 – In case the two events were simultaneous, where would you liked to be ?

I often evoked the thread in the GB. I think if I were in London that evening, I would have been in RAH for "Rocking Chai"r then go quick to Wembley for the goal of Van Dijk then back to RAH for "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" than Wembley for Haan goal, etc…


Entered at Mon Apr 25 09:32:03 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: UK affection for the Hammond

In 1966, “Anne Mason with Little Mac and The Boss Sounds” released an answer disc to Wilson Pickett’s In The Midnight Hour, called You Can’t Love Me (In The Midnight Hour). Like the original 1965 hit it’s credited to Pickett / Cropper. The B-side, In The Midnight Hour, is the same backing track with her vocal replaced by a Hammond line. In the UK, with its love of Hammond driven instrumentals, it was flipped so that the throwaway B-side became the A side. Not only that, ‘Mac’ became ‘Mack’ and Anne Mason not only suffered the indignity of relegation to the B-side, but had her name erased altogether.

The instrumental A-side is considered a Northern Soul classic, and appears on Ace's "Where it's AT" series of Atlantic rarities (as do Levon & The Hawks). I've had that side on the CD for years. The original disc with the female vocal B-side is hard to find … I found one at a Record Fair on Friday at a reasonable £3 (it has a fair bit of surface noise … mint, it goes for £20 or more). I started trying to find out about it. Google reveals very little, except that a lot of people love the record. And no one knows anything about Anne Mason,


Entered at Mon Apr 25 08:33:39 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: UK bands 1969

I saw Mott the Hoople in Norwich either late 69 or early 70. I remember they did two 66 Dylan covers … one was Like A Rolling Stone, the other I'm not sure. Ian Hunter went into a long intro about Norwich railway station and being stoned that stuck in my mind. They were very good. A friend and I used to correspond on bands we'd seen and we swapped the letters a few years back, which are a useful memory aid. I just looked. Rob's connection is there. I put "the piano player (i.e. Ian Hunter) sounds like Mike Harrison and sings like Greg Ridley" (both Spooky Tooth). I noted they did Laugh At Me (Sonny Bono) and made it "sound like Dylan"and as an encore … for the Kinks connection … You Really Got Me.

I was used to Hull, where we had social secretaries choosing the bands who later became major rock managers. The social secretary my last year was Ed Bicknell, later to manage Dire Straits and play in the Notting Hillbillies. When I moved to UEA at Norwich, the selection of weekly bands was noticeably much poorer. Edgar Broughton, Piblotko, Screaming Lord Sutch & The Savages, Keef Hartley, Graham Bond's Magik. All I remember as dreadful. I'd seen Graham Bond a few years earlier and he was brilliant. By the Magik line-up the effects of drugs and madness were all too apparent. Keef Hartley was dull. Edgar Broughton ranted "Out Demons Out." Or maybe it was just a different year and it was fashionable to stumble about stoned playing badly. A year later, it was even worse with Principle Edwards Magic Theatre, truly the most laughably incompetent crew ever to stand on a stage advertised as a "concert." Oh, and Hawkwind. The smelliest and loudest band I'd seen.

Anyway, Mott the Hoople stood out, and I was into The Band and made the connection, even though at that point I don't think the 1966 boots were around. I first got "Royal Albert Hall" as it was called early in 1971.

Actually, the best band I saw that year was Raahsan Roland Kirk on the "Volunteered Slavery" tour. That's one of my dozen best concerts.


Entered at Mon Apr 25 02:05:59 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Seeing as Roger asked...

Roger, I've only just thought - you mentioned Fairport without having seen the whole piece. You will LOVE part 3! But for now...

PART 2 – THE WHITE AMERICAN INFLUENCE ON SMALLER UK ACTS

(PREAMBLE: The influence of black American blues music within the UK was legendarily rife in the sixties and continues to this day. From Leadbelly via Lonnie Donegan, through Jimmy Reed via the Stones and ultimately the instrumental workouts of Freddie, B.B. and Albert King(s) via Mayall, Cream and Fleetwood Mac (or, indeed the organ stylings of Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff and Brother Jack McDuff via Georgie Fame, Graham Bond, Zoot Money & Brian Auger), you don’t have to look too far to find an example of the gritty, urban sounds of Chicago and Memphis that appealed to British teenagers, soon to become leading lights on the UK music scene. Far less common was the influence of white American folk music (assuming Elvis Presley is considered to be negro-centric) and MFBP changed this in a big way, especially in the post-Sgt Pepper music scene and the aforementioned singles/albums divide that remained in its wake.)

To return to the UK, post Sgt Pepper, there were further choices if you took the route of an “album” act. Blues, thanks mainly to early Cream and Fleetwood Mac, had evolved from twangy Bo Diddley covers into mature, sustaining attempts at Freddie King’s “The Stumble” and that ilk. Armed with a Les Paul and a couple of Marshall amps and speaker cabinets, you were laughing. You could be a “heavy” blues band. For the more arty and intrepid, some of the trappings of psychedelia, albeit knocked into 1969-shape were still available if you went “progressive” – add a mate with a Hammond organ who could play quasi-classical runs and a singer who could regurgitate the works of Tolkien into lengthy, multi-part “suites” and you were good gear for the times.

Enter MFBP as the saving grace of more melodic acts that didn’t play blues, didn’t have progressive inclinations, but were certainly not a pop singles act. For the first time, a blend of American country music with a rock-savvy approach had been shown as an alternative discipline. This was a lifeline to many such British acts that were simply a good live act but didn’t fall into either of the neatly determined “album” demographics mentioned above. Country rock – a classification The Band hated – had hit the UK and made for danceable music that nevertheless translated into concerts and albums rather than singles vying for chart placement.

Mott the Hoople, a struggling Midlands act previously known as The Silence, added front man Ian Hunter in 1969, and found they had a huge Dylan fan as their singer and main writer. The heritage of The Band and their former mentor was well documented and currently favoured, so when Mott the Hoople released their debut album in 1969, they delivered (amazingly for those that only know of their commercially successful releases that commenced with Bowie’s gift of “All The Young Dudes” in 1972) one of the most accurate reconstructions of 1966 Dylan that there is. Hunter, then mainly featured on electric piano, would front the band and sing his songs in a very Dylan-influenced manner, with the Al Kooper/Garth Hudson like fills of organist Verden Allen very much to the fore. (organ and piano again – still not a widely adopted template). Mott the Hoople would show further American stylings on their next two albums, most notably “Wildlife” in 1971 where (future Bad Company lynchpin) guitarist Mick Ralphs would step more to the fore and his own love of another American act – Buffalo Springfield – showed clearly. The group would come close to splitting in 1972 until Bowie showed an interest – and the rest is history.

Many who took up this newfound Anglo-American approach were disenchanted singles acts trying to escape that circuit and break into the world of album artists. The perfect example is former Parlophone act Kippington Lodge – through with the pop singles world having fared less well than hoped – and to underline this shift in direction, changed their name, to that of guitarist Brinsley Schwarz. Through the years with Kippington Lodge, members had come and gone. By the change of style in 1969 the nucleus was Schwarz, organist Bob Andrews (original organist Barry Landerman having disagreed with the abandonment of pop and thus accepted an offer to join Vanity Fayre). Drummer Bill Rankin had recently joined the ranks, which were completed by bassist/vocalist and former school chum of Schwarz – one Nicholas D. Lowe.

Having been burnt already at the false hope of pop chart success in Kippington Lodge, it is ironic that one of their first actions as Brinsley Schwarz was to answer an advertisement for a band (“with own songs”) and pass the audition. The agent was Famepushers Ltd and the long and convoluted tale of building a pleasure resort, funded against an Omar Sharif movie (fronted with Omar’s money), to repaid by a successful rock music venture that leads to a contrived launch showcase at the Fillmore East that goes horribly wrong is one of the best known in rock music legend. Thus, burnt twice, Brinsley Schwarz returned to the UK licking their wounds and vowed never again to have anything to do with hype or showbiz. Their status as fans of The Band already is proven – United Artists Records A&R man Andrew Lauder witnessed them covering “Chest Fever” long before the Fillmore trip. However, as The Band reacted themselves to the psychedelia, Brinsley Schwarz gained from their heroes an example of a no-frills act that played their music, their way. The group immediately cut excessive instrumental passages from their music and began to find their own style. By 1971’s “Silver Pistol” LP, Nick Lowe had emerged as a prolific writer with a Band-inspired blend of Anglo-Americana, underpinned by economical instrumentation and, like Garth Hudson, flourishes and colours of organ by Bob Andrews. They would refine this approach over time and by 1974 were churning out such classics as Lowe’s “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace Love & Understanding” before calling time the following year. Schwarz and Andrews would play their Band-inspired instrumental roles out one more time as key members of Graham Parker & The Rumour. At last, they had found their Dylan!

Former Chris Farlowe guitarist Albert Lee formed Heads, Hands and Feet with (near veteran, even then!) Chas Hodges, formerly of Joe Meek stable act The Outlaws and thereafter club circuit favourites Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers. Songwriters Tony Colton and Ray Smith were able to provide mature, quality material and in Lee they had an unusual advantage: one of very few UK guitarists to eschew blues in favour of fluid country phrasing. With Hodges more than able to swap from bass to piano (where he is best known in latter days) and rattle off some fine country fiddle, the group provided some of the most breathtaking Anglo-Americana that ever there was. Lee’s status as one of the most in-demand country guitarists led him to work later with such names as Emmylou Harris and The Everly Brothers. Higher praise for an Englishman trying to perfect American music cannot be imagined!

The 1972 “First Album” by Regal Zonophone artist Roger Morris (backed by sundry Grease Band-ers and other “heavy friends”) is a curious disc. It has been cited as a spiritual cousin to Brinsley Schwarz’s “Silver Pistol”, though your author found it to be a far more authentic Band pastiche and thus arguably far more derisive than the work of Lowe and company. But it has a charm and Morris’s originals do hold up. On one hand you can play “guess the Band song” (“Poor Lucy” is a near-facsimilie of MFBP-era and eventual Basement Tapes cut “Katie’s Been Gone” set to a shuffle beat; “Golightly’s Almanac” is “W.S. Walcott” lyrically) but other tracks like “Trail of Tears”, though showing some paint-by-numbers Band-inspired harmonies and melodic influence, are nevertheless quite impressive.

The acceptance of MFBP (and “Basement” bootlegs, of course) led to the searching out of other American music for inspiration. The Byrds “Sweetheart of the Rodeo” was another well-received LP, as were the early releases of the Flying Burrito Brothers. If anything, the last named act gave a flavour of purer country by including, rather than organ or mandolin, the genre-defining pedal steel guitar into the UK rock-buying scene. The instrument gained further notable exposure thanks to the cameo from Jerry Garcia on the far-reaching CSNY song “Teach Your Children”. By 1970, both UK acts Cochise and Matthews Southern Comfort began to use the instrument as a key ingredient to their sound, and this resulted in some of the most American sounding music to come from British soil. Cochise, arguably the lesser-remembered of the two named examples, featured B. J. Cole on the pedal steel, dobro and cello, and their self titled debut shows a curious and endearing mix of the instrumentation of country allied to original songs. Guitarist Mick Grabham, like the members of Brinsley Schwarz had been in an outright pop act (Plastic Penny in his case) and sought to create more rewarding, original music. The group would record three albums in total with such notable guests as Steve Marriott and ace guitarist Caleb Quaye stepping by to lend a hand on their second and most successful release “Swallow Tales” in 1971.

Matthews Southern Comfort were probably the most successful in the period discussed here, as Mott the Hoople would have to leave the style behind to find success. Fronted by ex-Fairport Convention vocalist Ian Matthews, the group was formed after his amicable departure from Fairport due to his desire to explore American music more closely than the native folk heritage of the UK that Fairport were heading towards (more of this later). Veteran pedal steel player Gordon Huntley was central to the sound of this very American sounding band, who of course scored a hit with their arrangement of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock”. The song, Huntley’s steel work and the CSN influenced choruses (ironically CSNY’s own arrangement of the song was far harder edged) was pure California in all but blood.

There were others: Brinsley Schwarz labelmates Help Yourself took a slightly more West Coast approach than strict Band - but British sounding they were not. Respected vocalist Jess Roden fronted the band Bronco whose debut “Country Home” is a treat for fans of Anglo-Americana. To close this section, it may be worth noting that while many of the acts named either had a short lifespan, failed to find commercial success or had to change direction to achieve it, most of the protagonists of the Anglo-Americana period remain afloat in the industry, arguably far more successfully than those of the blues or progressive boom (outside of the very elite: Clapton, Winwood etc) or at the very least went on to bigger things. Cochise guitarist Mick Grabham joined Procol Harum in 1972, drummer Willie Wilson joined Quiver (just prior to the lucrative hook up with the Sutherland Brothers) while bassist Rick Wills co-founded Foreigner alongside stints in the reformed Small Faces and bass duties on old pal David Gilmour’s (all but recent) solo outings. From Brinsley Schwarz, as well as the Schwarz and Andrews forming The Rumour behind Graham Parker as previously discussed, both Ian Gomm and Nick Lowe have enjoyed some success as solo artists, most notably Lowe who has, at last, achieved not only commercial reward via an unexpected cover in a lucrative movie score, but found a late elder-statesman style that has captured the imagination of the public. Albert Lee and B. J. Cole remain standard setters in their instrumental fields, requested by name. Perhaps the biggest irony is the runaway success of Chas Hodges as part of the recently retired duo Chas N’ Dave – ironic in that one so well versed in American music should find their biggest rewards from reverting to London “knees-up” style songs. Or is it ironic? A Londoner born and bred, Hodges has possibly done exactly what The Band did and, slapstick ingredients aside, created original music with definite local roots. That is the other facet that the success of MFBP provided, and where we are headed in the closing part of this article…



Entered at Mon Apr 25 01:54:56 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Roger (Kinks)/Brien Sz (Newcastle)

Roger, thanks for your kind words. MPBP on Ray Davies is a funny one, eh? Because he was so profundly English, he did have that "native" sense as you say...but of course there is "Muswell Hillbillies" with a slightly more Transatlantic style, isn't there!

To round up Roger's antics with The Guardian, here is a link to a page by Viz (the esteemed Bacons) that was done for The Guardian back in 2009. Linked so that Brien can limber up for his phone call to Newcastle. There is a bit of colourful language but it does illustrate the accent "porfectly"!


Entered at Mon Apr 25 01:18:35 CEST 2011 from (62.7.176.46)

Posted by:

Roger

Subject: The Band, Fairport Convention and The Kinks

Excellent article Rob, with a fascinating focus. I'm looking forward to more. MFBP came out shortly after the Basement Tapes began circulating in London. They had a combined impact. Fairport Convention were clearly influenced by both. Further, after the awful tragedy of their van crash in May '69 (an incident which took the life of Richard Thompson's girlfriend - who designed clothes for Cream and was honoured in the title of Jack Bruce's 'Songs for a Tailor') Fairports, after nearly splitting, holed up in Big Pink style in Hampshire for months while working on Leige and Lief.

Some have compared the Kinks to the Band in the way they have developed an English equivalent to Americana. Hasn't Ray Davies said something to the effect of: 'The Stones took Route 66 but we kept to the M6'. Any indication of the impact of MFBP on Ray Davies? Almost finished the crossword (they're all available online) watching The Bee Gees...


Entered at Mon Apr 25 00:48:38 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Calling in Garth fans...the ultimate home accessory!

Mine was £485 over here (where they are allegedly rarer). I think it is optimistic for the price but would have happily paid twice the amount I did.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 23:52:00 CEST 2011 from (77.31.3.231)

Posted by:

Jerry Dignos

Location: Saudi Arabia

Subject: Pledging My Love (The Hawk)

I am an avid fun of Ronnie and I have some music collections of him. However, there is one thing I've missed and I seemed could not get it anywhere... the song title: Pledging My Love! I really love it but I find no way to get it from any of the following: iTunes, Amazon, Napster etc.. because I am not residing in the United States of America or UK. I hope by the Grace of God I would have this ONE. Really I am extremely desperate as I could not get it. Thank you very much and God Bless You. Jerry Dignos


Entered at Sun Apr 24 23:12:39 CEST 2011 from (79.202.166.214)

Posted by:

Norbert

Rob Millis, thanks.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 21:44:02 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Article - part 1 of 3

You can all blame Al for this, friends - he suggested I post it to the GB in three parts so here goes. Any feedback much appreciated, even "absolut drivel"!!!

Enjoy, Rob Millis (there you go Roger).

THE BAND: INFLUENCE ON THE LATE 1960’S UK MUSIC SCENE AND THE BIRTH OF ANGLO-AMERICANA

That “Music From Big Pink” had a profound influence across the rock/pop music world upon release in 1968 is a given; spearheading – along with the more singles-orientated work of Creedence Clearwater Revival – a return to structured, often traditionally-influenced songs and a move away from the trappings of psychedelia. In the USA, even acid-rock ringleaders like the Grateful Dead (who delivered two of their strongest and – crucially – most accessible albums in Workingman’s Dead & American Beauty) and Jefferson Airplane (key members Jorma Kaukonen & Jack Casady formed side project Hot Tuna and gradually devoted more and more time to it as the parent band ran out of steam) saw the sense of a return to the simple values of a good song, and the requisite ensemble approach to deliver it.

Psychedelia was all but over by the end of 1968 anyway, and as an interesting aside it is perhaps worth noting that the members of The Band never really embraced it. It is documented that it was rejected out of hand by several members who didn’t care for the self-indulgence of the loose, improvisational styles of the era, and nor did The Band see the value in short-lived “fads”. Moreover, in 1967 when the movement was in full swing, The Band was holed up in Woodstock, writing for themselves and still heavily involved with Bob Dylan. It would be interesting to have seen the results had Dylan not suffered the famous motorcycle crash. His reaction to the acid-rock scene, by way of a 1967 album release, is forever denied to us. Having recently blazed a trail around the world with The Hawks creating some of the most electrifying, mercurial rock music the world had ever experienced, a 1967 Dylan album and tour could have pushed rock music in a very different direction, whether it be an earlier return to structured songs, or a psychedelic Dylan that may even have denied the Big Pink & John Wesley Harding period as we know it.

But what of the influence of Big Pink (hereafter referred to as “MFBP”) on the United Kingdom? Considerable. Interesting, too, that several different approaches came in reaction to this inspirational music by the time it hit the UK. Let us now explore these varied and disparate strands that all spring from Music From Big Pink.

PART 1 – THE UNTOUCHABLE HEAVYWEIGHTS

(PREAMBLE: The UK scene of 1968 was still very much reeling in the aftermath of Sgt Pepper and thus it is doubtful that anything less powerful and anti-rebellious as the distinctly unpsychedelic MFBP could have made such an impact. The album versus singles band divide had occurred, with “hit parade” pop gradually going the way of the chicken-in-a-basket circuit and the album bands, with psychedelia itself waning, looking to the replacement scenario: progressive rock. Often retaining the lengthy instrumental approach that psychedlia had ushered in and also gaining a heavier sound, the progressive scene ensured the divide between a singles and album band widened almost daily.)

Of course, this didn’t affect some people – the “royalty”. That the Beatles and the Rolling Stones made singles AND albums was never anything but expected. It is therefore fitting that arguably the first influential instances of the abandonment of psychedelia occurred from these two giants of rock & pop. Famously each adopting white covers, “The Beatles” (known rather more widely by the colour of the cover) and “Beggars Banquet” both showed a return to simpler rock and roll and bluesy values. While the Beatles release still contained some avant-garde moments, these mostly reflect the mood of John Lennon at the time, although he also contributed much of the return-to-basics material (“Revolution”, “Yer Blues”). McCartney led the way back to rock & roll with “Back In The USSR”, while George Harrison, enigmatic as ever, was the member publicly raving about MFBP, an opinion that he held strongly thereafter.

The Rolling Stones are little harder to pin down in terms of MFBP influence. An oft-cited explanation for the move towards simpler, rootsier music is their embarrassment at their botched attempt at the harder-edged, gutsier take on Sgt Pepper that was expected of them. Amid a year rife with drug busts, “Their Satanic Majesties Request” limped out in late 1967 to little fanfare (despite the now-collectible holographic sleeve) after a plethora of delays and cancelled release dates. Put simply, psychedelia was not the Stones, yet it was harder for them on many fronts: the traditional rivalry between themselves and the Beatles put immense pressure on them for a big splash of their own after Pepper was released; their stronger ties to the counterculture, use of drugs and general “bad boy” personae were such that very few would even consider they were not capable of a psychedelic heavyweight.

But the Stones were a far bluesier act than the Beatles, so in many ways were better placed to make a recovery. And recover they did – “Beggars Banquet” considered to this day to be not only a return to basics but one also to match-form. “Parachute Woman” showed a distinct reunion with the bluesy shuffle, and yet there is more sophistication to post-1967 Stones; witness the mandolin on “Factory Girl” and arguably a far whiter American influence in “Dear Doctor” than previously shown by the guys that aped Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed. This, if there is any, could be evidence of MFBP infiltration, as one thing The Band never were (post Levon & The Hawks days where they rubbed shoulders with Sonny Boy Williamson and introduced more R&B to their own act at the expense of Hawkins’ rockabilly) is a black American styled act. After Dylan, their black influences would never be as transparent again until their covers LP “Moondog Matinee” in 1973 where Sam Cooke, Lee Dorsey and Clarence “Frogman” Henry were all represented.

For the ultimate claim of MFBP impact on the UK’s upper echelons, the well-known tale of Eric Clapton obtaining an acetate, even visiting The Band amid hopes of being asked to join, remains the best concrete example. Already disenchanted with Cream (who at the time were falling apart on a personal level) MFBP was the breath of fresh air Clapton needed and ushered the end of his days as the ear-splitting Gibson-toting virtuoso. He didn’t quite get this return to basics in next venture Blind Faith (including ex-Cream drummer Ginger Baker pretty much guaranteed that the idea Clapton had to collaborate with Winwood* on shorter songs and simpler values would fall to bits, both during sessions for the sole LP and more than ever in their ill-fated concerts), but his collaborations with Delany Bramlett (with George Harrison often in tow) paved a way for this MFBP influence to prevail, and by “Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs”, the transformation from guitar god to well-rounded songwriter and performer was complete.

(*Winwood, too, after the collapse of Blind Faith set about his solo debut that manifested into the reformed Traffic for “John Barleycorn Must Die”. The inclusion of a folk tune as the title cut, and a far more structured approach even allowing for some instrumentals very much suggests the work of a man whose best friend Eric had enthusiastically shared his MFBP acetate! Closing cut “Every Mother’s Son” in particular shows the chorale influence of “Tears of Rage”. Winwood’s high vocal register and prowess as an organist made for a fine showing at this post-MFBP style.)

It seems a long time ago now that Sir Elton John was a relative newcomer to the album market, but in 1970 he wore his Band heart on his sleeve more pointedly than most. With long-term lyricist Bernie Taupin also an admirer of The Band, “Tumbleweed Connection” was a premium quality slice of Anglo-Americana from the beautifully appointed album sleeve through to the grooves on the disc inside. No matter – one J. R. Robertson has been known to enjoy the record, John’s third solo album and one which proved a crucial milepost in his ascension from anonymous covers album sessioneer to solo superstar (and Knight of the Realm!).

One interesting point regarding UK heavyweights is the relationship of influence between The Band and Procol Harum. “A Whiter Shade of Pale”, though it transparently includes the work of Bach (of whom, Band organist Garth Hudson recommends as daily chorale reading for any serious piano student) showcases the (then) little explored combo format of organ and piano plus just one guitar versus the norm of one keyboard player and a couple of guitars. Some of Procol Harum had seen Dylan backed by The Hawks in 1966, but the early, big-hitmaking days of the British act pre-date any major public exposure to The Band in their eventual guise. By taking the combo format behind Dylan that night - themselves lacking a Dylan-style front man despite having Keith Reid as lyricist, but having a fine singer in Gary Broker, in the Danka/Manuel “range” - it is just possible that Procol Harum gave the world the first taste of what The Band would sound like, long before any leaked acetates were knocking about. Judging by the first taste – to wit, MFBP opener “Tears of Rage” – they did a pretty good job!

It could even be the example of Procol Harum that inspired Island Records act Art to add a second keyboard player (Gary Wright – who is American) and become Spooky Tooth. Procol or not, it was to MFBP that Spooky Tooth looked in 1968 for a non-album 45 cover of “The Weight”. Aside from this, their next LP “Spooky Two” would feature several songs showing an American influence (try “I’ve Got Enough Heartache”), however Spooky Tooth were still inclined to riff it up with the best of them and thus are slightly beyond the focus of this piece.



Entered at Sun Apr 24 21:19:44 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Roger

Oh, it was Pete Feenstra and he was trying to plug a duo I did with my dear friend Gary Brewer. Those who remember the London live scene in the early eighties may remember Gary from the act "Little Sister".


Entered at Sun Apr 24 21:17:12 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Roger

Where does it say that? It's very kind but not remotely fair. I have done about six paid sessions in my life and spent the rest of my organ playing career in London blues bands.

Is it Araucaria today? The wife will be disappointed as she hates to miss one of his/hers.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 21:05:14 CEST 2011 from (62.7.176.46)

Posted by:

Roger

Subject: Tales from the cryptic

I'm sitting here struggling over the Guardian holiday crossword and I found myself diverted by RTO's RM references. Hello Rob Millis. The google page I checked with says:"Rob is one of the top Hammond sessioneers on the circuit". And Ian Mclagan's on in Winchester in August, not June....

back to Auracaria...


Entered at Sun Apr 24 19:25:12 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jan H

Jan, be prepared to find my lengthy ramblings about the influence of MFBP on the UK music scene when you get back to work! I emailed it to you yesterday to do with what you will after getting a rudimentary thumbs up from Peter V that you would probably be interested. Didn't think it appropriate to post it in chunks here.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 18:09:22 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Happy Easter to you all..

Have a good day. Mine will be very busy with family.

Here's a snipit from my e-mails. So nice of Emmy Lou.

TORONTO - Emmylou Harris says that late Montreal folk legend Kate McGarrigle was "one of the most extraordinary musicians" she's ever known.

McGarrigle died of cancer last year at age 63, and Harris's new disc "Hard Bargain" — which comes out Tuesday — has a delicate tune devoted to the memory of the captivating singer-songwriter called "Darlin' Kate."

"I really do miss Kate a lot," Harris said softly during a recent interview in Toronto. "I think she was one of the most extraordinary musicians I've ever known. Her playing, her guitar playing, was exquisite. Obviously piano, organ, banjo. ...

"Her songwriting, just so beautiful, and her singing. And the two of them together just made a sound that thrills my soul. But really, this song was about losing a friend."

Over a wispy acoustic guitar and piano, Harris sings a simultaneously hopeful and mournful tribute, which ends with the line: "If there was one name I could consecrate/ It would be yours, it would be Kate."

She said she met the McGarrigles — sisters Kate and Anna, whose diverse songwriting earned plaudits from around the world — back in the '70s, when they shared a record label.

They grew closer in the late '80s, when Harris invited the sisters to sing on her 1989 album, "Bluebird," which also featured a cover of the McGarrigles' "Love Is."

She also invited them to work on her Grammy-winning 1995 album "Wrecking Ball," which was produced by Canadian Daniel Lanois.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXOX


Entered at Sun Apr 24 16:09:13 CEST 2011 from (41.97.222.172)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Most talented band member :

GARTH HUDSON

by birth?

they are all brilliant – WRONG – some of them are all brilliant


Entered at Sun Apr 24 16:00:41 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

CBS Sunday Morning doing a great piece on Mavis Staples as I type this. What a beautiful lady. Great to see some vintage footage of Pops performing. Mavis telling tales of Sam Cooke singing from the trucks of the local produce hucksters in the neighborhood where she grew up.

A brief reference to her relationship with Bob Dylan and his proposal. Pops approved. She was concerned about what Dr. King might think. Above all, Mavis said she simply wasn't ready to be married.

Hard to believe the Staples never won a Grammy. Mavis won one for her recent work with Jeff Tweedy.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 14:35:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: MFBP keys (Peter)

Peter, the piano part of The Weight - done properly - most certainly is no picnic and it is no surprise that Garth & Richard swapped for that tune.

As a part, it is often imitated to give a flavour of The Band, particularly the big octave climbs that sit under the chorus. I often chuckle that these folk probably don't realise that it is virtually a one off scenario and they would be better off with a steady piano and some "gurgling" organ if they want to nail a potted snapshot of the OQ. Live versions of Look Out Cleveland (particularly the RAH 71 performance) showcase my favourite interplay between the two keyboards: GH pulls out some runs that are almost funny and RM's (great initials for a keyboard player) piano is solid as rock underneath.

But you are right about the bedrock of piano on MFBP and in general the organ and piano complement each other better than on any other Band LP. I've said it thousands of times before but even just the intro to We Can Talk is enough to have made me glad I bought that album.

And, indeed - the drying up of RM (great initials for a songwriter) as a creative source is the biggest shame of the OQ history for me. Listen to "Sleeping" and weep, friends...


Entered at Sun Apr 24 13:28:31 CEST 2011 from (91.42.243.170)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: war engines

Whilst typing the previous post, my colleague Theo dropped by. He’s a motorman by birth (always black edged fingernails), and although not a mechanic, he has restored several old motorcycles. Now he had with him a beautiful 1942 English military Ariel (Theo in style with a suitable, long, green military jacked and pot helmet). On request Theo kicked the 350cc engine alive, after several brutal attempts and some oil spill on the driveway, a magnificent one cylinder sound POW ….POW filed the quiet Eastern German street, at every lamppost a giant blast. Ignition to set “for” or “later” by hand, max speed about 60miles (but 50 miles is more than enough on such a machine).

Those war engines didn’t have a piston spring as they presumed those motorcycles wouldn’t survive long, but this one did, now almost 70 years old. It was left by British soldiers in Belgium, than used for years by a Dutch doctor and from his grandson Theo bought the machine (it was stored in the bedroom of a flat on the second floor for years, they dragged it all the way up there by hand). Anyway which 4 cylinder 250bhp Honda can top that?

The link is a 1942 Harley, although another motorcycle it looks like it (from a dsitance).


Entered at Sun Apr 24 12:01:13 CEST 2011 from (79.202.170.116)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Return to Big Pink aka Following The Recipe Of Ancient Greco-Syrian Magicians

Peter, Happy Easter read thank you, although we part at Julie Driscoll's, but at Julie's Tube I found Constantine P. Cavafy's (who doesn't know the man) " The Recipe Of Ancient Greco-Syrian Magicians" and that's fair enough.

Said an aesthete: "What distillation from magic herbs

can I find - what distillation, following the recipe

of ancient Greco-Syrian magicians - that will bring back to me

for one day (if its power doesn't last longer),

or even for a few hours,

my twenty-third year,

bring back to me my friend of twenty-two, his beauty, his love.

What distillation, following the recipe

of ancient Greco-Syrian magicians, can be found

to bring back -as part of this return to the past- the little room we shared."



Entered at Sun Apr 24 11:28:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Deserters Songs

Uncut reviews the reissue of Mercury Rev's "Deserters Songs" this month, and includes a Q&A with Jonathan Donahue.

UNCUT: Approaching Helm & Hudson to play with you must have been nerve-wracking.

DONAHUE: Yeah, it was. Nobody wants to be rejected by somebody that they feel inspired by. It was Amy Helm, Levon's daughter, who whistled on the outro of "Opus 40." She gained a certain whistling fame from this and went to whistle on a burger chain TV ad which she claimed made her hyndreds of thousands of dollars.

(That's what it says. I don't discount the possibility that Amy was taking the piss out of Donahue, or Donahue taking the piss out of UNCUT).


Entered at Sun Apr 24 10:49:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Return to Big Pink 2011

On reading all the new Band articles, I had a few hours in the car on Friday and decided to go through MFBP very loud, and try to imagine doing it with fresh ears. I was trying to remember how it felt when I first heard it and there was little information about The Band. There is major interference from later knowledge, and that’s inevitable.

First off, when I first heard it, I assumed Tears of Rage, To Kingdom Come, In A Station were all the same singer. I thought Robbie on the second was Richard. The first different lead was apparently Rick on Caledonia Mission. I’ve castigated myself for cloth ears since … but it was a reasonable conclusion. Then comes The Weight which was already very familiar when I first heard the album in a booth at W.H. Smith. That was a different voice again, and a Southern accent. And it was the single. The run of Band charting singles then mainly featured Levon lead vocals.

On to Side Two, and Levon’s oft-repeated statement that “Richard was our lead singer” is borne out, though Rick takes two leads and they all join in on We Can Talk. As Side Two kicks off, I remember that We Can Talk hit me as the obvious second single at the time. It never happened. They weren’t good at choosing singles.

Back to Rick for Long Black Veil. Here later knowledge kicks in. We know Levon had just returned and that The Weight was the last song written. So he got the lead on three out of five verses. The other bit of later knowledge would lead to the assumption that they’d thought it through to a degree and assigned the lead vocals before Levon got back. That led me to think “casting director” a role Robbie claimed he was doing with vocals by the Brown album. So Long Black Veil. Levon had the most obvious “cowboy” voice. As a casting director, you’d have assigned it to him, I think. Except that one suspects Rick brought it to the table … remember he’s reading “C&W Hits” on the cover of Moondog Matinee. Also, you know that Rick can carry off the seemingly sentimental with assurity evry time … as he was to do with It Makes No Difference. But Levon’s voice gets blended in on verse two, which gives the required effect.

Chest Fever is great, very familiar etc.

Then you get that closing run of three. The one that people have said they skip. Lonesome Suzie was a favourite of mine at the time and that affection lasted two or three years. Now I don’t like it. It’s too clearly sub-Eleanor Rigby, but not as good, lacking the full jump in instrumentation or the lyrical quality. I realized how often I’ve skipped it myself since about 1972.

This Wheel’s On Fire? I keep saying the 90s Band were mad not to feature it. BUT, I prefer the Julie Driscoll version. I know, I know … it’s just that her icy voice nailed the song and defined it for me. I do know when I first heard the album, I thought her version better.. When I finished with MFBP, I had to pull off the road to find her version on my iPod. I still prefer Julie. Also, I think the Byrds did it just as well, or even better than The Band. But the Band should still have done it.

I Shall Be Released? It falls in a group with Tears of Rage / In A Station / Lonesome Suzie … 40% on Richard on slower gentle stuff. It got killed by all the events it was sung at. It was the B-side of The Weight, and for a year, I played both sides on the jukebox at university while I read the free morning papers and had a coffee, so incredibly familiar.

The thing that stood out, as well as the best rhythm section I’d ever heard, was how prominent piano is throughout the album, and how well it’s played … not the fill in rhythm piano of later years. But Garth took the piano for The Weight. Is it harder? The tragedy of the lost talent of Richard Manuel screams out. He was Robbie’s equal as a composer on that album, he was the most highly featured singer, and his instrumental work was great. Even by the Brown album, it was slipping past him fast. And it wasn’t just “Robbie taking over”. It was Levon getting far more lead vocals – rightly, as it fitted the mood, he deserved it and it was equal share out time rather than coming late to the party. Our Robbie-Levon duality, the two competing controlling forces that are the powerhouse in getting groups into prominence, was back in force.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 10:17:31 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Those three Rick Danko-related releases from RetroWorld … I’ve been thinking about them, because I’ve been busy with DVD replication recently (reissuing some stuff I did a while ago). How many would you produce? 1000 would be the lowest sensible figure for replication (rather than duplication). Would you produce more initially? Once you’ve done a replication you can get more very fast.

How would you negotiate rights? They’re virtually all with estates … Danko, Manuel, Butterfield, Gene Clark, Skip Battin. You’d have to assume that you were dealing with one entity in each case. You have fixed expenses with mechanicals on the songs, but you don’t have to negotiate those. Then how much is left after the massive discounts amazon take?

I conclude that it can only be done as a labour of love, rather than a profitable exercise, and that the amount left to pay the performers would be small. I’m delighted someone is getting them out there.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 09:32:27 CEST 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Nameless

Subject: I Know There Is An Answer

Most talented band member? Though they are all brilliant. I'd like to know what some people think. If anyone gets angry, that'd just piss me off.


Entered at Sun Apr 24 02:29:23 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Southside
Web: My link

Subject: Keep On Running

Link to Spencer Davis Group. With Finnish subtitles? Ilkka please. Lots more of this concert available with little Stevie on both guitar and organ.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 23:54:24 CEST 2011 from (24.124.99.203)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence Kansas
Web: My link

Subject: Zimmerman in Vietnam

Most, perhaps all of you know that Bob Dylan played his first concert in Vietnam. You may also know that his performance there, similar to his gigs in China, generated criticism because of the human rights records of those nations and the charge that the Chinese and Vietnamese authorities "censored" or at least screened his set lists before granting permission.

I, like a fairly large number of Americans including a great many Vietnam War veterans, have visited Vietnam, officially known as the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. In 1995 I spent one month there. It's a beautiful country and the people are even more beautiful. Vietnam is also desperately poor and developing.

My hosts during that visit included two brothers from California who served as Marines during the war and had set up an English language school in Ho Chi Minh City/Saigon. These men told me they received a warmer welcome when they returned to Vietnam in comparison to how their own country treated them after the war.

Ronald Reagan's administration made the first serious overtures to Vietnam for normalizing relationships even though Bill Clinton officially normalized them (and got lots of flak for it). The Vietnamese have been very, very accommodating, by just about all credible accounts, in helping with the Missing in Action/Prisoners of War issues. I wonder if the US would be so accommodating to the Vietnamese if the situation was reversed? And I wonder why so few people know or even care what Agent Orange did to the Vietnamese and their country? It took decades for this country to care about their own veterans and Agent Orange, but its effects continue in Vietnam, and for people who had nothing to do with the war.

I am not going to make apologies for Vietnam's government. All I know is that the Vietnamese people are good people who have a lot of pride in their country and their culture. I have never encountered people who are more hospitable than the Vietnamese. And while they are not pleased with many things about their government, they insist on running their own affairs, after having been given orders by outsiders for centuries--China, France, Japan, the US, and the USSR all tried to control Vietnam and they all failed.

You can tell I'm a little fired up by this. I'll get to the point. I think that most of the criticism leveled at Dylan for playing in China and Vietnam is some of the worst hypocrisy I've heard, especially when it comes from someone like Maureen Dowd of the New York Times--a corporation that you can be sure does plenty of business with China.

The US business community decided long ago make China a major partner. Vietnam was admitted to the World Trade Organization recently. I know very, very few people who don't own lots and lots of Chinese-made goods. And Vietnam is making more and more of the shoes and clothes sold in the US.

Before anyone in the US goes putting down Dylan for playing in China and Vietnam, they ought to take a quick look in the mirror and an even quicker look around their homes to see if they might be part of whatever problem they have with those countries. I am not saying that people shouldn't criticize China and Vietnam--they should. But that criticism won't mean much until someone figures out a way to make it louder than the sound money makes when it talks.

I should also point out that the NY Times has had a couple of stories about Robbie in the last month, one of which advocates an end to "the feud," and that these stories have of course generated their own feuds on the message boards. Goodness gracious, this is tiresome, and so are these people.



Entered at Sat Apr 23 21:15:13 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In conversation, Rachel kept asking me to repeat what I said. Then she said, 'Sorry, I just can't follow Southern accents." So it works both ways. Essential download "Fareweel Regality" by The Unthanks. Just trust me and spend 79 cents.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 21:11:36 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Brien Sz

Brien, just get yourself a copy of UK "adult" (in a sense of being fairly explicit and/or "toilety" rather than level of intellect) comic Viz and read "The Bacons". It is written in such away that you read it in a Geordie accent ("flowers" is written floo-ahs, "no holes" as nee hurls, "turkey" as torkey etc..). Then, when you've done that for a while, phone up and order with confidence. Ah, Tyneside on a Saturday. Good cheer, plenty of ale...Rachel Unthank clog dancing....


Entered at Sat Apr 23 20:10:52 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Future competion for Robbie & Eric

These kids are amazing.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 19:54:56 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Joan - lol


Entered at Sat Apr 23 19:38:17 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Brien Sz

Arr you impugning the "Lawn Giland" accent? We make ourselves totally understood, even in Brooklyn. :-)


Entered at Sat Apr 23 18:58:30 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Yes - I forgot that I have the option to buy overseas - duhhh. And RTO, I think they have a better chance understanding me if I put on a thick Long Island accent than if I tried to replicate how you would have me say it.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 18:15:46 CEST 2011 from (130.244.196.90)

Posted by:

Ilkka jauramo

Location: The waterfront

Subject: PV

FYI RTO. For ten years ago when I was a deputy we had a regular named PV.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 17:09:04 CEST 2011 from (86.173.160.144)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Brien

Brien just say "Hoy canny lad, can you hoy us a Rick Danko CD oot in the purst?" and they'll oblige, I'm sure.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 17:05:53 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brien: They're about two weeks away. I suspect they've done a deal for Europe only - that happens. Try ordering from amazon.co.uk direct (I order from amazon USA if it's not available here), or try www,spincds,NO SPAM,com (without commas or NO SPAM!) in Newcastle UK (+44 191 281 5451). They're advertising it in Record Collector and are very helpful people. You may find the Newcastle accent unusual at first, but you'll get used to it!

If that doesn't work, e-mail me and I'll order you one from the UK.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 16:28:45 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter V - just checked Amazon here and that Tin Angel Show is not available. That is a recording I would be very interested in as my wife and I were at that show and it was the last time we had an opportunity to speak with Rick. We also met Carmen at that show.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 16:01:49 CEST 2011 from (86.173.160.144)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV/Permissions trail

You do have to wonder sometimes; I remember working in a record shop when Sundazed put out Jefferson Airplane's complete Monterey festival set. It didn't last long and apparently that was "grey". That is not to impugn Sundazed as a label who I believe are totally above board.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 15:53:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

By the way, being on amazon (and two mail order pages) we have to assume they're legal, not bootlegs. You do wonder what the permissions trail is, though.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 15:47:13 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rick Danko CDs

There's a little flurry of releases in this month's Record Collector. All are on amazon.co.uk.

Rick Danko: Live at the Tin Angel, 2CD live, Philadelphia 1999

Danko / Manuel / Butterfield: Live Lone Star, NYC, 1984

Byrds Tribute Band: Flagstaff, Arizona, NOT the much bootlegged "Star For Every Stage" from Evansville.

Quite a surprise to see them all advertised today.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 15:30:16 CEST 2011 from (41.97.138.114)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: part 4/2

.... national hero by whom came moments of joy and pride, felt in both languages


Entered at Sat Apr 23 13:13:00 CEST 2011 from (41.97.138.114)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

C O E X I S T


Entered at Sat Apr 23 12:57:35 CEST 2011 from (41.97.138.114)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Location: part 2/2
Web: My link

this song give me the chill - Salvatore Adamo


Entered at Sat Apr 23 12:54:47 CEST 2011 from (41.97.138.114)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: siamo tutti neri (we are all black) - 1/2

They were called "Italian immigrants" in the beginning, “Italo-Belges” during the mid of the 20th century, today they are simply called “Belges”

I lifted the post title from a commemoration of one century of Italian immigration in Belgium organized in 2006 by the Institut Jules Destrée; whose motto was “We are all black! Going up from the bottom, all minors are also black: Belgians, Italians, of all nationalities ...
-------------------

A la moutouelle is the Italian distorted pronunciation of Mutuelle == “The Mutual Insurance”

a popular satiric (cynic) song, the tune is evocative of “O Sol Mio” sung since in the past by the low class people of Wallonie who, as everywhere in the world in similar situation, consider the immigrant

. full of ethnic clichés and far beyond the condoned bounds of what the Americans call Political Correctness, portraying the average Italian immigrant as a mass of social opportunists

rough translation every word is Italian distorded, original song linked

A la moutouelle, life is beautiful
I left my beautiful Italy
I worked only two years
I got sick, it's wonderful
I'm still under therapy

La moutouelle is a good deal
Imagine it is, I became employee
When it comes to my retirement age
I will sell ice cream, spaghetti, chestnuts

I'm paid for, I break no p****
In my country it’s impossible
Not that I am dishonest
But I take advantage of the situation


Entered at Sat Apr 23 12:52:51 CEST 2011 from (91.42.241.75)

Posted by:

Norbert

Lars, welcome back and give'm hell (but not on the head though, always keep in mind you're part of the civilized Band family)


Entered at Sat Apr 23 12:01:55 CEST 2011 from (86.173.160.144)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Al

Hi Al - got your email yesterday evening and responded. Enjoy!


Entered at Sat Apr 23 10:00:40 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: It's not the shotgun, pistol and a baseball bat....

...that's worrying me. It's the ghost of Floyd P.

aaaaaaaahhhhhh!!!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Apr 23 04:24:41 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Country music

Good show for those who enjoy country music. All the women are being honored by fellow performers, who perform their songs. So nice to see John Fogerty again. He gave tribute to the Judds. Wynona and John sang "Rollin' On The River". Great performances for 2 hours. At least you don't hear them [some, that is], screaming their heads off.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Apr 23 03:08:13 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link is to a fantastic cover of 'Positively 4th Street' by Johnny Rivers.


Entered at Sat Apr 23 02:01:44 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Not saying

Subject: Sitting around with my back to the wall

I dunno, Norb. Al's being VERY quiet. I'm already holding a shotgun, pistol and a baseball bat.

For anybody who can make it to the Falcon (Marlboro) in an hour, Garth is supposed to be sitting in with the main act tonight. It's probably going to be packed, though.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 22:59:57 CEST 2011 from (79.202.172.27)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Lars

Lars, I'm sure Al will forgive you.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 22:10:05 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Brien Sz(etzer!)

Brien, it is Setzer that gave me a hankering for an old school "upright" cocktail drum kit for the studio. Check out Bernie Dressel's sterling tubsmanship in the link above.

Mrs RTO does not share my enthusiasm and is unmoved at the claims that the upright format will mean it can tuck neatly away and you wouldn't know it was there. She'll soften, though...


Entered at Fri Apr 22 19:07:17 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.62)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

See link for another review of HTBC and the comments from Sebastian on the Net strategy.....of which we here were somewhat aware.....

Al: Permission to post "Stay with Me" daily if you so choose - love it!


Entered at Fri Apr 22 18:32:23 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Good Friday to you all, and the "fighting" marines..

Hope your day is going well. My link is a goodie. It will make you smile/laugh. Hope you like it??

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXOXO



Entered at Fri Apr 22 17:49:31 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Workout Music - Brian Setzer Orchestra. Its mostly all upbeat and jamming. Ac/Dc has never failed either. Currently I'm taking on the P90X workout - really intense stuff but no need for cranking my own music at this time.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 17:38:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Summer of 76

My mum told me that every winter in the 1920s, the snow was over the window sills in the Welsh valleys.

1976 … we'd just bought (or got a mortgage on) our first flat. It was in a village in the New Forest over a motor bike shop, which got broken into every Saturday night by squaddies from the local army base. I don't wish to impugn the intrinsic honesty of British armed forces unjustly, but that's what happened to most of the shops in the village. Anyway, the New Forest was a tinderbox, and on our second week, we found the road home closed by the police because there was a major forest fire. Being stupid, we took a back way in through a farm. When we got there, we saw armed soldiers on the street (the first time in my life), and were told to get the car off the street. There were buses lined up, and ambulances. Little did we know that the army base was the biggest strategic petrol dump in the country, and that fires had started on three sides simultaneously. We were told we would be evacuated. The soldiers said it was an IRA attack. We went to the pub and found ourselves speaking to two very frightened Irish guys, who didn't dare go outside because of their accent. Anyway, the fire got controlled a few yards from the first petrol store. It turned out to be arson … but by three twelve year old local kids. I'm sure I told this story before.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 17:09:03 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Location: Rod

Yeah, I noticed the Gibson bass. A bit token, no? I guess at kleast they didn't go for the Ampeg which would have been milking it. I mean, it's not as if I own two Lowrey organs, so...oh, hang on...I'll get my coat


Entered at Fri Apr 22 16:50:32 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The woods
Web: My link

Subject: The war was over and the spirit was broken

AL- You know I love you and I'm too tired to hurt anybody, anyway. If my post came off as a macho-bullshit- testosterone rant, them I apologize. I just look back at some of the stupid things I did as a young man and I wish I could borrow some of that energy now, to work on my lawn. All of it "seems like a dream now, it was so long ago."

I guess if I had it to do all over again I would have fled to Canada instead of joining the Confederacy.

The link is to my favorite Band song "Acadian Driftwood." from "Night At the Palladium." I couldn't find the original on Youtube.

The rain is moving in tomorrow...I gotta get the lime down on my lawn. Slowly.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 13:51:52 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Howard Johnson '80s commercial.

Great six-minute collection of '80s commercials posted by Tony LoBue on facebook. Approx three-minutes into the video is Howard Johnson (RoA, TLW & Levon Helm Band) pushing Lite beer. Very cool :). Some other great commercials, including '84 cars w/ CD players.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 13:29:23 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

RR on Tavis Smiley.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 12:56:44 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Snow and sun

Wow. is that Wisconsin joe?

Hard to imagine right now as believe it or not we're in the middle of a heatwave over here.

Talk about unpredictable British weather. I remember one Easter when we were down in south wales valleys at mag's folks and we got snowed in with 5foot drifts. Pete will recall it i'm sure. think it was the same year as the long hot summer of '76.

On balance I think I'd just about opt for being here Joe. ;-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 22 12:25:49 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Eyesight among other things Al. Among other things

We had a big dump of snow last night. Got to drag out the shovel again. This diggin in the snow is getting preetty old.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 12:01:35 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Has a rock intro ever bettered this?

The Faces of course.

:-0) So good he posted it twice. [Actually being honest it's for the benefit of joe whose eyesight is clearly failing. I don't mind not getting credit for most things or even being slagged off but I draw the line at not being credited for a killer link like this] :-0)

Great posts Empty and Lars. Dark horses. ;-0)

PS If it had have been Lars who mis-credited the Faces link I clearly wouldn't have pulled him up since I value keeping my head on my shoulders :-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 22 11:51:22 CEST 2011 from (41.97.233.76)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Fred

Thanks, you hit the point. (I was at a parsec lower level), but Fausto Coppi was the mythical hero and example to follow for this generation (in Belgium) I stopped practicing as I reported below around 68? Eddy Merckx was unknown or at least not at the same legendary level

correction : GITANE without "s" is the bicycle brand, with "s" it's a cigarette brand


Entered at Fri Apr 22 11:39:22 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A voice from in back of the peloton

Empty Now: where you the Faustino Coppi, the Gino Bartali or the Eddy Merckx of Constantine? : )


Entered at Fri Apr 22 11:13:13 CEST 2011 from (41.97.233.76)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the eternal beginner with his fleeting knowledge

Lars . Thanks for the post "Music while training". You Are Full Of Energy

I often posted about football, tracks athletics, rugby, and even base ball. However it might surprise some of you to know that the only sport I practiced at the competition level was cycling, with the all the folklore which goes with it as teenage dreams of championship and glory, though bicycle race is the less remunerated sport.

This is how the story ended. My ultimate last road race was also the first I almost won. At the final sprint short before the arrival line, I was ahead, then I slightly looked back to appreciate the distance beyond the pack and enjoy the euphoria of the first victory. The handlebar turned to the right in the course of the same movement, (It is the elementary error that no beginner commit, at the time the bikes were not self-stabilized, you loose the handlebars the front wheel doesn't follow a straight line, it was a "Gitanes") and fortuitous coincidence, my left foot came out of the stirrup and slipped forward between the spokes, blocking the forward wheel, at 30 km/h. Some who witnessed the scene told me that I did a somersault me and my bike along, landing on the bismuth. I retrieved my spirits long after, with a shirt all shredded, bandages, etc.

Band Connection : just as what happened for The Band, the GBers first discovered my sporting career through the last public appearance

In the link above : Marc Herremans "Johnnie Walker" tells his take of his own experience and amazing personality. Amazing is also the song selected for the clip. This is actually The Band related, various are The Band related situations


Entered at Fri Apr 22 08:38:25 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Dawes

From what I've heard of the Dawes on Youtube I like their sound more than Robbie's new album. The Gibson Ripper is a sure give away of their Band influences


Entered at Fri Apr 22 08:28:19 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Top of the POps

One of the pleasures of Top of The Pops in the 70s was seeing what The Faces would get up to. They weren't the only ones, but they'd switch instruments for the mimed bits and generally fall about. A good time was had by all.

I blame the size of a hit that "Sailing" was for Rod's plunge into lack of cred. It was just TOO big. In fact, last time I heard it was at the funeral of a neighbour who was a sailor in WW2. It seems to have become the rule for nautical send offs. In fact, the words fit well.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 06:04:40 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.36)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bill M & Landmark and Joe: Having some fun on a Friday night inspired by that Garfield........enjoy my favorite Montreal album by Jack August and friends....Still rank the Moonquake album cover as one of my all timers......and this song as simple as it is never fails to hit the mark for me......enjoy the link...


Entered at Fri Apr 22 05:57:43 CEST 2011 from (24.124.99.203)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/fmr home of wm. s. burroughs/lawrence kansas
Web: My link

Subject: not bad review of HTBC, Aussie via Austin

Deceptively terse but admiring and accurate. Shows that the impact of the Internet/sound bites/text messaging on prose doesn't always have to nauseate.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 05:43:03 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Music while training

When I was young and full of energy I used to box as a light heavyweight (amateur, of course). I trained in three different gyms during my three years. The first one wouldn't allow music because they said it weakens you, which I thought was nonsense, but I followed the coach's instructions. I spent a year just getting my body parts in all the right spots as I threw the punches-- he was a perfectionist.

The second gym was in Florida and the ex-boxer in charge let me play music in the cassette player nearby the heavy bag. I'm not a BeeGees fan, but I found "Edge of the Universe" was good to work out with. I like the way the punches slapped the bag as I listened to that song.

The third gym was after I quit boxing for a few months, the headaches were bothering me. My third coach was Floyd Patterson and he wasn't as nice as he seemed to be when I met him in the streets of New Paltz, where we both lived. Very strict and sometimes sarcastic, yet still likable. He used to stand behind the heavy bag and after I'd throw a right hand he said I never got my glove back to my face fast enough. Sometimes he'd wait for a right hand to land, then he'd reach around with his left hook and slap my right cheek with the palm of his left hand. Real loud. "I TOLD you to get your right hand back faster."

It made an impression. But Floyd was a good man; he just had a harder side to him than most of the public got to see. We were still somewhat friendly when I gave it up for good.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 04:04:36 CEST 2011 from (68.58.62.171)

Posted by:

Steve L

Location: Chicago
Web: My link

Subject: Dawes-New Album

I received an email notice for Dawes announcing their upcoming release. They mention backing up Robbie in London and on Letterman. The album cover art on the attached link had me thinking of Levon and "The best seat in the house". Free download of a track available as well. Happy Easter to all.


Entered at Fri Apr 22 03:30:47 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Subject: The F@#$ng Treadmill!

Joe I can sympathize. As someone who joined a gym for the first time, several months ago, I am finally getting around to putting together appropriate music for the treadmill and elliptical machines. I have essentially thrown out just about everything I ever listened to in order to get the the music I wish to work out to. So far my quest is allowing me to re-discover plenty of Motown and soul. The song I have linked is the building base to my workout music. So whether you work out or not, give it a listen and enjoy. This song always brings out a big smile for me!


Entered at Fri Apr 22 01:45:52 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Links

Right on right on right on. Loved it Landmark. It's been a long time. Loved the 'Stay With Me' link too RTO. Really the first music I've listened to all week. Except for that mix tape. I thought I was being so effin smart when I bought that treadmill. I never counted on the music she might play. I'm thinking bad thoughts . So help me God, if there is a God.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 23:33:20 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

How is "ping" Band related, Norb? Are you texting your friend a rough interpretation of how the intro to "Shoot Out In Chinatown" goes, note by note?


Entered at Thu Apr 21 23:10:11 CEST 2011 from (91.42.232.162)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Ping

I just opened my blackberry messenger, selected the contact, viewed the menu, and selected "Ping Contact." The contact was immediately receiving a message that said "PING," the phone executed my personal settings.The ping was Band related.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 22:57:38 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Landmark: What a great way to end the week……..Thank you and we have missed you around here………………In this day and age when no one can disappear even when you wish they would………..Garfield French apparently has. I really liked that band especially the obscure “Reason To Be” album……………….

Bob F: I stuck it out through “A Night on The Town” but it was hard to take after that though the first side of “Footless and Fancy Free” was very good as I recall with “You’re Insane” a particular favourite at the time ……………RS was a glorious talent for a period – 1968-1975 - and for me the best rock n roll singer on the planet for some of it……………

“Stay with Me”: Agree Al………no band ever fell about better……………….makes one want to puke at the pretentiousness of some of the new bands on the scene….I mean really…. It’s just rock n roll…………have some fun………..In their own way that is what I love about Arcade Fire……..they have fun live at the same time delivering very good music.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 22:11:32 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Hey Kevin,Have you found this one on your own?


Entered at Thu Apr 21 22:04:13 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Influence of The Band on the UK scene

Peter, I have sent you a rough for you to giggle at and smother with red pen! Al, I'll send you a copy when you ping me a mail.

I take it that if it is 8 pages of 12pt Times NR (which it is) I ought to trim it slightly?


Entered at Thu Apr 21 22:01:38 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Small Faces

Tin Soldier and Afterglow for me, with Plonk's Song of a Baker trailing by a nose. In a hooligan kind of way, Wham Bam Thank You Mam is one I often dip into, musing what Humble Pie might have been with Mac on the organ...


Entered at Thu Apr 21 21:06:35 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Soul 66

The 1966 DJ is still a good friend.On my playlist "All or Nothing" sits between Satisfaction by Otis Redding and Um, Um, Um, Um. Um. Um by Major Lance. Not far away is Ride Your Pony by Lee Dorsey and Mercy, Mercy by Don Covay. Few white artists made the cut among this company … Chris Farlowe with Out of Time. Let's Hang On by The Four Seasons … and … He Don't Love You by Levon & The Hawks.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 21:00:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All or Nothing

I have a Playlist entitled "Le Kilt" after the disco I haunted in the mid 60s. Among the greatest soul stuff, Stevie Marriot on "All or Nothing" sits so seamlessly that you don't see the join. As does Spencer Davis Group with Keep on Running and Somebody Help Me. The very best of white soul. (Well, add The Box Tops).


Entered at Thu Apr 21 20:14:35 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Razorbacks

Thanks for that clip Sadavid. I wish they would have pointed their camera at the stage when Rick was singing instead of the buffet table.

Jeff, that Bob Weir clip was sort of pathetic. It just kind of "sat" there. No one looked like they were having any fun. I think the drummer was yawning at one point :-)


Entered at Thu Apr 21 19:21:34 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Has a rock intro ever bettered this?

The Faces of course.

:-0)

PS I'll be in touch Rob asap.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 19:01:21 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Bill,the photos you're talking about were from the Arms concerts from the mid 80's. They were a series of concerts to help purchase hyperbaric chambers that Ronnie Laine claimed to get relief from, after the onset of his MS. The big draw was the fact that the three lead guitarists from the Yardbirds were all together on stage. I believe I once posted a link from the original Albert Hall show of Jeff Beck singing "Hi Ho Silver Lining" here. As for the Small Faces, I've always been partial to "The Universal" whcih was Steve Marriot singing in his garden with over-dubs put on later as well as "Afterglow".


Entered at Thu Apr 21 18:09:16 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: razorbacks and bobwire

A contemporary CBC-TV news feature on the Clinton Inauguration and "Ronnie Hawkins' excellent American adventure."
Cameos from most of The Band (Mk. II 3.b.iv).


Entered at Thu Apr 21 17:53:30 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

When I see talk of the support that Ronnie Lane from Britain's rock royalty, I think of a photo that graced the British edition of Rolling Stone at some point in the '80s showing Lane with a bunch of them, including Beck and Paul Rodgers in addition to the obvious one. They all looked so old, and that was a quarter-century ago.

Kevin J: I'm sure the biggest chunk of Baldry's medical bills were paid by people like you and me - which is as it should be. Which is not to undermine the value of Rod's contributions or intentions. Medication can be hellishly expensive.

RtO: I too love Marriott's voice, though I don't see how it can be characterised as 'black'. My personal favourites are "Itchycoo Park", "All Or Nothing" and the live 45 version of "Tin Soldier" (which is positively exhausting), all by the Small Faces, though there are times when Humblie Pie delivering "Thirty Days In The Hole" live hits the spot. I almost saw him/them in Melbourne in '82, but bailed for reasons that I don't recall. (I also don't recall if he/they were billed as the Small Faces or as Humble Pie; I do recall that my reason for even considering going was that the keyboardist at the time was Goldy McJohn of Steppenwolf.)

BEG: I posted that TLW tribute info a couple weeks ago - maybe when you were off on March break or something.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 17:12:42 CEST 2011 from (86.183.225.185)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jeff

Oh well, "I Know You Rider" was never the most interesting song, was it? Just something to hang off the end of "China Cat Sunflower".

Forgot to respond to you about NRPS the other day; totally agree that the debut is the one to get excited about.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 16:02:33 CEST 2011 from (86.183.225.185)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Brien (Weir)

I see what you mean, and if the new venture is completely different then so be it. I was referring to at least three recent ventures that are, with varying original member involvement, thinly veiled attempts at providing a surrogate Grateful Dead. One of which, (The Dead) to my ears and sensibilities as a Deadhead, was perfectly acceptable and didn't need changing.

For my money, Lesh "and Friends" is the way to present solo projects as in terms of membership and content, the format is infinitely variable according to his whim!


Entered at Thu Apr 21 16:00:38 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, my feeling is weir is wise to try new things, but he needs to choose those things wisely.... He'd be wise to find songs that he can actually sing. Maybe that is part of what this new band is about, but if so, why not feature that,instead of i know you rider. Vocally, The ending of the song was pitiful. The man can play guitar, seeing him ina smaller unit where he is going to do more of that is kinda nice. But. let them actually stretch out and play. A Few times they were starting to get cooking.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 15:50:06 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: The Faces

Kevin J, your absolutely right. The Faces were Rock Stars in the best possible way. The first time I saw them was at The Capital Theatre in Port Chester, NY. They were the headline act on a bill with The Grease Band(without Cocker) and Savoy Brown. I saw the 11:30pm show. I had never seen anything like The Faces. A true "oh my God" moment. I loved everything they did and everything Rod did up to and including 'Atlantic Crossing'. The last thing he did that didn't make me sick was his version of 'People Get Ready' with Beck.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 14:45:26 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Creative Expression

Maybe the reason Weir doesn't do as has been suggested is because he's been down that road and now, with enough money and security locked up (one would imagine) he can once again venture down the path less taken and work on other forms of creative expression. Or maybe he just feels like working with other people. If you have the means and confidence as well as the creative aptitude to continue making new music and musings - why not. My goodness..., to just perform the same dog and pony show over and over again would be boring. I understand their is a fan base that needs to be fed but as is evidenced, there is a plethora of work available to explore and these guys tend to come around from time to time to appease the beast but because the incarnation isn't of ones particular liking doesn't mean that the efforts cannot be enjoyed. It often is on the individual to tear down their own walls of perception and enjoy what is presently being offered.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 14:11:17 CEST 2011 from (86.183.225.185)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jeff & Peter

Jeff, I don't know why Weir doesn't stick to Ratdog, and for fuller reunions why this whole Furthur thing seems to have replaced The Dead. Why you would opt for a band with a tribute band Jerry and a different drummer instead of basically the GD with Jeff C on organ and Warren Haynes ably filling Garcia's shoes with a pretty well balanced mix of Garcia's signature licks and his own strong personality is beyond me. Ratdog, Phil & Friends for individual projects and The Dead for bigger reunions. Simple!

Peter, we MUST see Mac, indeed. I want him to sign the "Everything Mac" booklet I got with my computer! I'm sure he'd laugh at that.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 10:52:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RTO, we must remember than Ian McLagen is playing The Railway in Winchester in June!


Entered at Thu Apr 21 10:39:30 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: By the pond

Subject: Plonk, Ronnie Lane, Woody, Keith and Mac

Peter, Bob F, Bob W, Todd, et al... I hear regularly from Ian McLagen, and he's right about Ronnie Lane (yeah, it was Woody in The Birds). Mac feels that Plonk was left out in the musician/songwriter hall of fame. In Mac's shows for the past couple of decades, he's always spoken to his audience about what a treasure Lane was. All you have to do is go back to the "Rough Mix" album. Everyone who played in any of their friends' bands weighed in, with a contribution or two from Rabbit Bundrick, Pino Pallidino, Clapton (on not just guitar, but subtle stuff like the dobro). What a gem of a record! Mac plays half a dozen beauties from that album at various times that he plays outside of Austin. I've heard both written reports, and firsthand, about who paid hospital bills. Keith and many others were involved in this beautiful human's end stage fight against MS. And Mac is Ronnie Lane's biggest fan and supporter.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 10:29:54 CEST 2011 from (41.97.201.229)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: great movie, great director, great all

stop the picture at exactly 2:25 (link above, with the Pause button), examine it enough time. The look and the expression in the eyes of Marlon Brando alone epitomizes the fundament of everything that must be understood in the rest of the story, this image also provides the pictorial quintessence look-and-feel of the English man of always, in all his greatness. For sure Marlon Brando is not an English, he is a great actor

at 2:52 - the first encounter between Marlon Brando and Jose, the anthological phrase "Your Bag Senhor"
in the Ialian original version, it was "Sacchetto Massa", that which should translate as "Your Bag Massa" in the American dubbed version, the local consumption criteria prevailed on the authenticity of the fiction


Entered at Thu Apr 21 08:49:10 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Yosemite

RTO,and anyone else interested, Weir has a new band Scaring The Children with Jackie Greene, Rob Wasserman ( who is amazing) and Jay Lane. On this page there is a vid of them doing I Know You Rider. Don't expect a lot ,and you won't be disappointed.

While I admire his career, talent, and fortitude, I do think Bob is way past the point he should have tried adapting to the limitations time has placed on his vocals, and I would include making different choices of performance material in that adaptation. I also think that unless sometime soon he's auditoning for a film role as Yosemite Sam, hwe's way past due for thinning out that stache.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 08:47:44 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ronnie Lane- I picked up a couple of his singles on the GM label from 1973 / 1974, How Come and The Poacher. This was in his ‘travelling circus’ period. Ronnie was the most strongly featured artist on GM, getting picture sleeves, rare in the UK in those days, and also having the only GM hit records … How Come was UK #11. The relevance of GM is that it was owned by Billy Gaff, Rod Stewart’s manager. Kenney Jones also had a single on the label, as did Long John Baldry who Gaff also managed, a Stewart-Baldry connection running back to Steampacket. It was an interesting minor label … Chaz Jankel was there in 1974, as was Chris Jagger.

Nothing new … but the Pete Townsend clip (talking about The Faces) reminds me that The Who and Rod stewart & The Soul Agents both played my local, the Disques A Go Go, a cellar club within weeks of each other. The tale I’ve repeated here since reading Ian McLagan’s autobiography is how Keith Moon “took out a contract” (Sopranos style) on McLagen, and “Uncle Pete” as he called him, paid them more not to do it.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 03:16:47 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG / Al Edge / Kevin

BEG: Nick Lowe dabbled in journalism; he fancied himself as a war correspondent but became disillusioned when all he seemed to get were flower shows. Elvis Costello came from the background of operating the new fangled computer at Elizabeth Arden cosmetics! "Punch The Clock" tells that tale.

So we are agreed that Marriot ate Rodney up for breakfast and spat him out then? Good! People rave about Eric Burdon, Steve Winwood and both are great - but for me the most convincing "black" UK voice was always Marriot, no question. Like Ronnie Lane, a sad, sad loss.

Al: thanks for your kind words! Can you email me at rob millis 74 at hot mail dot com (less the spaces and...you know). Inspired by your own efforts, I have half written a piece on the influence of MFBP specifically on the UK scene. Would be interested in your thoughts as don't feel it appropriate to unleash it here yet

Kevin: I'll check your link tomorrow, as want to rattle off a bit more of my article first. Sadly, blinkered as I am, I doubt it'll change my opinion of Rod Stewart. His refusal to participate in the Faces reunion is understandable enough for his own reasons, but the knock on effect was that (spit!) Mick Hucknall fronted them, For facilitating that, wittingly or no, Rod should be (Mussolini style) hung from a tree upside down and stoned to death, IMHO!


Entered at Thu Apr 21 02:17:30 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.83)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

RTO......The above clip is Townsend's take on who was paying the medical bills........enjoy......I'm doing my fu*king taxes.......what was it Bill Preston once said.....


Entered at Thu Apr 21 01:54:07 CEST 2011 from (76.69.84.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

If I want to listen to The Faces, I have to put on "Itchycoo Park" and "I Don't Need No Doctor". We're repeating ourselves again.....

RTO...Graham Parker evinces sarcasm in his voice....delivers very insightful lyrics. I kind of saw him as the Dylan of England....He also liked reggae which was a bonus for me. Again....I'm mostly drawn to writers in bands who sing in an idisosyncratic manner. I knew the name Brinsley Schwarz but didn't know anything about him. When Costello first came to Toronto and played at The El Mo.....It was extremely hard to get tickets. I had to wait until he played a larger venue at Massey Hall. Willy DeVille ragged on them in the papers for not dressing cool. I also saw him and his band at our Heat Wave Festival in 1980....along with The Pretenders, B 52's and many others......"My Aim Is True" was his masterpiece. He was really able to craft his lyrics (I think he was in journalism before?) here and the epitomized the energy of New Wave....He had it all.

For the reggae fans out there.....I only found out recently that in October....Gregory Isaacs (known as "Cool Ruler" and "Lonely Lover"...Lovers rock - style crooner..."passed. He was only 59. I bought a cassette of his called "IOU" while in Jahmaica. I also would tape music from the radio and you could go into shops and have them make cassettes for you. The third time I was there, I finally found Dennis Brown's cover of "My Girl". I didn't have iTunes then. His huuuuge hit was "Night Nurse".

The first time I visited Jamaica in 1989; my friends took me everywhere for the two week holiday.....Montego Bay, (crystal blue water and absolutely stunning foliage), Kingston, (their family had homes in both places).....Uhhhhh....Things were a bit tense here even though everyone saw me with my black friends. Unfortunately the day they took me to Marley's first large home on Hope Road where PM lived....it was closed on Sundays!!! Ugggggh!.....Savannah Lamar, (great spice factory), Ocho Rios...(Dunn's River Falls)....another friend had an establishment here where there was also a skating rink inside....and we visited the countryside where my friends grew up......no running water and electricity in one home but a lot of sensimillia growing everywhere....lol Yup, one of my friends' nephews would smoke a spliff as long as Marley's.....His grandma kept telling me to not bring anything across the border going home.....The scary thing was that when we arrived in Toronto.....The dogs were out as we were in line at Pearson International Airport....I was afraid they'd smell the ganja on my clothing.....Now my NYC friend did smuggle.....once.....and .....The partiers gravitate to Negril where there are kilometers and kilometers of breath taking beaches (just like in Vardero, Cuba) where the young can have their fun.....I was checking out the culture myself.....Well....We did have children with us too.

I hope everyone has a peaceful long weekend whatever you celebrate.....


Entered at Thu Apr 21 01:16:26 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kevin

I don't think we actually know if Rod Stewart was ever a "mate" of Mac - he may well have just tolerated him as a token Marriot replacement!

Interesting though - I thought that Keith Richards paid Plonk's medical bills?


Entered at Thu Apr 21 00:24:13 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Al, I guess I have a bit of a natural affinity for Liverpool as my mother's family (Killen) lived there for several generations after making their way from Ireland to England. Still haven't unearthed all the details.

As for Ronnie Lane.....what a wonderful and unique musicality he brought to every one of his songs. He was a very special musician.

Simon, hoping you are well. Drop a line when you find time.


Entered at Thu Apr 21 00:14:39 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: A song for April

Ronnie Lane & Pete Townsend


Entered at Thu Apr 21 00:07:18 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Love that 'Rough Mix' album which also features the guitar stylings of Eric Clapton, otherwise known as one of the HTBC dynamic duo.

At the Costello Spectacle taping last year, Elvis talked about Nick Lowe's production style on the early EC & the Attractions albums. When they were having trouble getting a certain sound that Nick wanted, Nick told Elvis to "make it sound like Dinosaurs chomping on cars."


Entered at Wed Apr 20 23:12:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Doh!

Thank you, Ronnie WOOD. There's a Slim Chance of me getting anything right these days.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:44:45 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Faces

RTO: Rod Stewart has done some whacky things in his day…….but my take on class includes things more than just making a guy pay storage bills on gear…………………or sending Elton John an ice box for Christmas when the slightly more extravagant Elton had sent him a Picasso………………….please know that Rod Stewart without any fanfare paid Ronnie Lane’s medical bills in the last years of his life and also completely unknown to most paid all of Long John Baldry’s medical bills during the last part of his life…………Not a bad guy after all……………….As to Ian McLagan – slagging an old mate from stage is bad form – at least in my book.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:42:52 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: I wish that I knew what I know now, when I was younger...

I've always been a big fan of the Faces, from back when they were "Small" with Steve Marriott, and later when they got larger recognition with Rod Stewart. Last month I picked up a copy of that great 45 single "Itchycoo Park" b/w "I'm Only Dreaming" on the Immediate label. My favourite Faces song has to be "Ooh La La". And don't forget Ronnie Lane's collaboration with Pete Townsend -- "Rough Mix", another classic album!


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:25:44 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RTO

Enjoyed your posts Rob.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:24:21 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bob W: Itchycoo Park

Many many thanks for the ian mc video Bob. Not seen it before.

How beautiful and moving to see the depth of love he had for his great mate. Those words of Itchycoo Park - I simply never realised they were about those South East london debris's. Funny you should put up those videos about the Liverpool bombings. We literally grew up on debris's just like those Ronnie and Ian did.

Ronnie lane was the Gene Clark of British pop/rock music. Criminally underrated. I play his stuff all the time Bob. Can't wack a bit of kuschty.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:20:41 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Maybe I'm Amazed - The Faces

….and the Pulitzer Prize for reporting on all things the Band for 2011 goes to Mike & Kim…….great stuff all around….and Clips of the year to bob w and RTO…….didn’t ya just love that Dutch interviewer when he asked “So which one is Rod Stewart?”………The Faces were my favourite band during those great years as a kid when stuff like that mattered ……………..the great days when rock stars looked and dressed like rock stars and not trash collectors….

JQ: Robert Plant has demonstrated good taste dating back many years ( indeed even in the might Zep he championed Joni Mitchel and others of that ilk and helped steer a more interesting path than might have been the case otherwise…) and he really is to be applauded for his last few studio efforts and tours……….but my oh my what a millstone that Zeppelin catalogue is to him with respect to touring other material…………………..


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:14:44 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bob

Yes, and that's not the first time Ian McLagan (a Hammond hero!) has voiced similar concerns.

When Mac wondered where his Hammond B3 had gone, Rod apparently sent him a bundle of storage invoices to pay before he could get it back. The point being that Mac didn't even want it put into storage and HAD wanted to take it back with him all along...class act Rod Stewart.

But let us not let this ruin our enjoyment of An Old Raincoat or Gasoline Alley, eh?


Entered at Wed Apr 20 22:14:53 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Relix names The Last Waltz as #7 out of the fifty top concerts starting in '59.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 21:59:48 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Here's the clip.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 21:55:02 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

RTO, I recently viewed a clip on YouTube that had Ian McLagan lauding Ronnie Lane. He said Lane left Faces because of so few opportunities to sing his own wonderful songs. McLagan comes off as not so fond of Rod Stewart and mentions Stewart's recent decision not to join the reunited Faces after keeping them all waiting a good while.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 21:47:13 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bobs W & F

Ronnie Lane, what can you say? "You're So Rude" ranks as my favourite Faces cut, and "How Come" is always a delight to hear again (see link). My good pal Steve Simpson (in the video playing accordion and gingerly tapping his feet!) and Charlie Hart have recently slung a version of Slim Chance back together again to celebrate the music of the late great man. Steve plays guitar and mandolin in this as he did later in Slim Chance; the linked clip is early and features Graham Lyle on mandolin. The great Geraint Watkins handles piano and accordion duties in the reformed band so it should be a treat.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 21:37:32 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG

BEG, the Nick Lowe/G Parker/Costello circle (ie the heavyweights that came good out of "pub rock") hold a very special place in my heart. For starters, I have dined out shamelessly copying the style of Bob Andrews on the organ for years (ie playing "songs" like Bob/McLagan/Garth/Al Kooper rather than the jazz-blues of Jimmy Smith style). Secondly, Nick is a hero as a songwriter and is finally getting the accolades he has long deserved.

Costello, with Nick producing, turned out "the best album Brinsley Schwarz never made" in My Aim Is True. Elvis was a never less than upfront and blatant admirer of the Brinsleys whose earlier pub pand "Flip City" allegedly went as far as including EIGHT of Nick's B Schw-era songs in his set. Thus with his hero at the helm, and Clover doing the duties behind Elvis (or Declan if you prefer), the great USA-influenced sound allied to a "more Nick than Nick!" songwriter was bound to result in a masterpiece. For my money it did, and although it sounds a little mean spirited given there have been some great moments, Costello never bettered the debut for me.

The Band, of course, have links with Brinsley Schwarz due to their visit for a rehearsal but also, much like Elvis and Nick, the wide-eyed admiration of the group that the Brinsleys had. It was conversation about the OQ that got me talking to Brinsley and was the common ground that got his guitar out again, albeit for a short-lived and ultimately fruitless venture. But it was fun. To come full circle - along with the OQ, the original four piece Clover were a big hit on the Brinsleys turntable back in the day. Brinsley himself turned me onto their great album 'Forty Niner", well ahead of the Huey Lewis era and much more rustic and downbeat. I still play it lots!

It took me a while to get into Graham Parker, but I did. Were it not for the presence of Brins and Bob (two of my favourite instrumentalists as I have said) I may not have bothered, but with hindsight I would have been the one who missed out. Like Dylan, you have to dig deeper than the vocal delivery!


Entered at Wed Apr 20 21:36:49 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

I'm sure Peter meant to point out Ronnie Wood as the featured member of The Birds.

Bob F., I am a huge fan of Faces and Ronnie Lane. "Debris" is also atop my list of great Ronnie Lane songs. They (Faces) were a brilliant rock and roll band in their day.

Always loved "Cindy Incidentally" {link}.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:49:49 CEST 2011 from (41.97.216.167)

Posted by:

Empty Now

the description of the guy in youtube (show more) is more expressive than mine

"Slaves on vast Portuguese sugar plantations are ready to turn their misery into rebellion - and the British are ready to provide the spark. They send agent William Walker (Marlon Brando) on a devious three-part mission: trick the slaves into revolt, grab the sugar trade for England...then return the slaves to servitude"


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:39:42 CEST 2011 from (41.97.216.167)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: error

to free the island from the portuguese


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:36:57 CEST 2011 from (41.97.216.167)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: related : Queimada (Burn)

Gillo Pontecorvo used to make films very near to real history. Queimada (screened under Burn! title in USA)

1- by the end of the 19th century a British agent (Marlon Brando) lands in the fictional island of Queimada in West Indies, then a Poruguese Possession
2 - he cleverly forms a slave (Jose) to lead a revolt and to free the portuguese from the Island
3 - the slave turned revolt leader, next head of State, fails to govern the Island for lake of handleness over the international sugar trade
4- he asks help from the British allies, the British help and own everything
5 - too late Jose starts a 2nd and failing revolt against the new and much far skillful occupier : Great Britain

there's a strong quote from Marlon Brando when the British Army arrests Jose and discuss the way to execute him "Jose was a revolution hero, he is now a charismatic leader for his people, if you execute him, you will offer them a martyr and a legend, the legends are eternal. The best profit for the Empire business is to make Jose return to the unsignifying poor life from where i brought him" again the anonymous"

what actually happend in the following


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:27:14 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Robert Plant

I've read somewhere that Moby Grape are RP's lifelong favourite band. In more recent years it all starts to bear fruit!


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:22:59 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: The Birds

Ronnie WOOD, surely Peter?


Entered at Wed Apr 20 20:04:14 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: BEG/ Tracy/The Doors

BEG thanks for posting that Garland Jeffries. I love the NY skyline. Every Time I drive over the Bridge into Manhattan, I still get the same thrill

Tracy What happened? I think this place has been very calm and respectful lately. I hope you'll reconsider. You have a lot to add to this place.

I like the Doors. In 1968 "Light My Fire" sounded like nothing else that was around. It was kind of a stoned sound, and I think a lot of us were there at that time. Most of it hasn't held up, but it sure had an excitement for the times. Morrison was your quintessential "Mood bad boy". He basicly was petulant/arrogant but it had its effect. He was different.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 18:46:03 CEST 2011 from (166.129.205.40)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Robert Plant/Band of Joy

We saw these folks last night. Most of it was straight off the record with band members Buddy Miller & Patty Griffin taking a couple of their own. Lots of Southern Gothic & gospel sounds. He covers Richard Thompson, Townes Van Zandt & Barbara Lynn. A number of songs featured top notch harmony singing (5-part) - one of the best I've heard with regard to the vocal clarity at volume. The Led Zepp medley was the low point but it quieted down the lager-louts.

If he follows the popular progression I'd say a new album of country standards will be next

Recommended.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 18:44:00 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Numerous Nick DeRiso blog posts about The Band members over recent yrs.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 18:42:50 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Recent Bob Margolin interview w/ Q & A about Muddy's '75 Woodstock album & working w/ Levon & Garth.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 17:59:06 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Ronnie Lane

Peter V, I was just listening to Ronnie Lane. He wrote so many great songs. I think The Faces song 'Debris' is my favorite of his.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 17:50:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Birds

A week or so back I mentioned the British band "The Birds" which featured Ronnie Lane. They were doubly unlucky. They started out as The Thunderbirds, and had to change when Chris Farlowe & The Thunderbirds objected. So they shortened it to The Birds, and had three Decca singles and were just starting to get somewhere when the success of The Byrds wiped them out. I picked up a CD last week "The Collectors Guide to Rare British Birds." It's good, R&B boom stuff with attitude.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 17:28:07 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Garland and The Rumour

The Rumour played with Garland after they split with GP. They were part of the band on Escape Artist and did the tour for that record. Wonderful shows! Garland's new song 'Coney Island Winter'is so good and available from Amazon.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 17:13:05 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Tracy?

What happened? I'm confused...


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:45:57 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: False follicles

Are you saying RR dyes his hair?


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:37:19 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: More Doors

I like the Doors. I like the fact that Morrison (like the BAND) was differant than the rest of his peers. He was wearing Black when everyone was wearing flowers. He was his own man.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:29:54 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Moonlight Drive

Peter V., Re: ‘Moonlight Drive’ I’m not familiar with the early version, but I can’t imagine that you would like the final version much better....same band..same singer. The version that I’m most familiar with is the original single, which I have on a 45.

Funny, I listened to it again last night and still like it, but not as much as when I was 15 years old. I also revisited the album ‘Morrison Hotel’ last night and now think that might have been one of their best. ‘Peace Frog’ is a funky little number, and ‘Land Ho’ is a lot of fun. ‘Maggie McGill’ is pretty heavy. They were definitely shifting more towards a blues based vibe by that point (I’m know that milieu will not convert Peter V.)

It struck me that a lot of their early vibe reminds me of Jefferson Airplane. I think Grace Slick is the better singer, but the Doors musical ideas were more consistently expressed. i.e.: less experimental, but having stronger continuity.

I didn’t know Morison personally and have actually not read that much about him, so I can’t speak to whether he was pretentious or not. I mostly know him from the albums and the occasional magazine write-up. I’ve heard that the Oliver Stone movie is full of inaccuracies and shouldn’t be viewed as a documentary. My feeling is that he’s probably no more pretentious than Van Morrison or Mick Jagger or any other number of rock stars.

What I do think that he did well was to incorporate music and poetry, and I think that his motives were pretty pure as far as trying to keep some integrity as a poet. I don’t think he ever really saw himself as a singer. And supposedly he turned down offers to use the Doors music in things like automobile commercials in the early days even when others in the group wanted to do it. Like them or not, they had a pretty clearly defined sound and identity and kept it going longer than anyone probably thought was possible.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:30:07 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

Beg - thanks - I have them all -

Regarding RR and his ability to attract a younger population - just put a few younger names like Morello and Reznor on your CD and who knows? I would never have looked into Morello if he was not on the CD so it works both ways.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:21:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: No Touch of Grey

Brien: At least the hood covers the hair, as Robbie must have good genes, or he doesn't agree with Robert Hunter's take on aging:

"Every silver lining's got a touch of grey"


Entered at Wed Apr 20 16:10:26 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

How does a 60+ year old man appeal to a younger demographic? Usually when a 60 year old tries to look young, it looks like he's trying instead of being - with the end result being silly. Just be who you are.., unless of course Robbie has turned to hoodies as his current fashion trend. I'm not sure why record execs would fool themselves into thinking that Robbie has younger demographic appeal? Any good PR person would know the target audience isn't under 40 (for the most part) and even less so for under 30. If you gave this cd to 30 folks under 30, I would venture to guess that 25 of them would never listen to again. 3 would accept it and two might get hooked. Do the same with the 50 plus crowd and I'm sure you'll get far more favorable returns.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 15:52:37 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: How Not To Become Flamboyant

It seems obvious that the cover photo for Robbie's new album is aimed at the younger demographic. When it comes to attire, Robbie can't seem to please, as I can remember a time when he was criticised for favouring pink scarfs and Armani suits.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 15:51:09 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Lester Bangs's basement"

Article purports to discuss "what it means to have all music instantly available."

For sure times ain't now nothing like they used to be, but I read the piece and Im still not sure what it means.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 15:37:11 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: The Doors

PV, I too have a handful tunes by the Doors on my iPod. Songs I genuinely like but ultimately wouldn't miss if they weren't there. Moonlight Drive IS one, then a couple of other cuts from Strange Days and the rest from LA Woman. Not many to start with and all from two albums.

It IS Jimbo for me too. Pretentious arsehole indeed. The organist in me also has an issue with Ray Manzarek having that awful Gibson/Vox/Farfisa sound long after everybody else switched to a "proper" organ. Why I cannot fathom - a very gifted player, no question, but the wheezy old combo organ surely was ill-advised once the budget for something decent - and a crew to handle it - was there, especially when the band were trying to set their trademark dark and brooding atmosphere and in comes Ray like chipmonks! Later on, of course, he would use an electric piano more and more and I think it suited the latterday band and individual player's style a whole lot better (there - the opposite of what I said about Keith G in the GD!) and hence my liking of LA Woman a lot more than most of their earlier output.

Robbie Kreiger definitely at his best when the bottleneck is out, no question. I'm sure I read that in early rehearsals, Ray set a groove and a bassline going and Robbie made the most fearsome sliding wail with his bottleneck that Ray said "there's our sound, right there!"


Entered at Wed Apr 20 14:45:27 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Great job, Peter!


Entered at Wed Apr 20 14:07:10 CEST 2011 from (76.68.81.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yessss RTO! The times I've seen Garland solo and with his band either in NYC or Toronto...no Brinsley......but Al Freedman who is a real sweetheart. Now I did see Nick Lowe and Elvis Costello and Mink DeVille at Massey Hall around this time too.....I've been so lucky seeing so many great shows in Toronto and NYC.
I also really dig Graham Parker! I had a fantastic time seeing him and his band at our Masonic Temple Lars in the late seventies or early eighties.

Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur Form New Band “Fistful of Mercy”

Ok, I'm gone like the wind....but I will be back again....


Entered at Wed Apr 20 13:56:02 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG (Garland J)

And "his band", as is often the case, appear to be The Rumour! That's definitely Brinsley on the left, and bassist Andrew Bodnar next to him. I guess Graham Parker was doing his laundry that evening!


Entered at Wed Apr 20 13:41:00 CEST 2011 from (76.68.81.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Taken from a German TV special from the late 70's, this clip features Garland Jeffreys and his band performing the hit song 'Matador' live. You notice Garland's dreadlock style? :)"
....and he talks about feeeeeeelings!

Hey Carmen. I can burn those songs for you if you'd like to exchange some music? cabbagetowngirl at hot mail dot com


Entered at Wed Apr 20 13:28:28 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

BEG- I had Shine Your Light in my bakers dozen for sure. Every time I listen to HTBC, I come away with something else. Winwood does not get the credit due for his playing on this CD. She's Not Mine is also a standout track for Winwood's playing.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 12:26:03 CEST 2011 from (76.68.81.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and this one for all you NY'ers out there!!

"New York Skyline" says it all. My city - the city I love. I don't know who loves it more - me or Lou Reed, but it's a hell of a town. It's taught me everything I know and perhaps, everything I need to know. Of all the songs I've written, this is one of my favorites and the album that it comes from, Ghostwriter, will always be uniquely special to me. The song sure does bring back memories.
All the Best,
Garland


Entered at Wed Apr 20 12:19:25 CEST 2011 from (76.68.81.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Tracy. What's up? The only thing I could think of that's troubling you is your post re thank you's on CDS? After your post some posters were teasing you about who should be thanked. I don't think they meant any malice.....but they did go on too much. Am I right? Anyway, I always thought you didn't post as much as you used to because you're too busy writing books! I really enjoyed your first book Tracy.... If you are really done.....Why give those people the satisfaction that they got to you? Post more or ignore... Please let me know what's really bothering you. You gave so much of your time and effort to your Robbie site at one time. I sense there are some things that have really disappointed you...... I'm lucky that I genuinely dig Robbie's solo work. Some of his performances on TV shows demonstrate that his voice is totally shot from soooooo many interviews and years of smoking but his voice on HTBC is fine.....for me. Hope to hear from you here or by email. Now all you testosterone filled boyzzz who were teasing....Get back here and apologize! As Edge said Tracy.....You're waaaaaaay beyond all this....waaaaaay beyond.

Thanks Todd. I only have Ollabelle's first recording. I prefer them live, but the song that's showcased got to me. ;-D As for Robbie's marathon interviews....pretty soon, instead of saying we were on the road for sixteen years; he'll be talking about that one year where he answered so many questions about The Band and his solo work....the same questions over and over and over.....that he burned out.

"Surrender was released on Epic records in 1982, as part of the GUTS FOR LOVE album. The version you're listening to was recorded in my studio apartment for French TV.

I liked the makeshift way of recording while the cars were passing by the open window." Garland Jeffreys

Garland with Levon Helm on May 7 at Levon's Ramble.....Now, not only is he a great writer who stands for something.....but he's a very warm and affectionate kind of NY guy....and.....can he sing, sing, sing....in the spirit of Frankie Lymon and Bob Marley.....How's that Edge? Can ya feeeeeeel all the gush, gush, gushing on your screen?! :-D

Bill M....Why don't you post the info re The Band Tribute in Port Credit this Saturday? Levon's Godson Jerome Avis and Lance Anderson who've I've also seen perform with Garth and Maud in Barrie will be performiing? I remember he wore some pretty colourful socks....lol If I do show up it will be with "Mr. Maximus" and his partner and if imagezulu doesn't have to work; you'll finally get to meet him. He's completely the opposite of me....very similar dynamic with NB and NG who've you also met like myself.....but just as passionate about music.....but digs other genres of music more.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 11:54:13 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I thought the artwork for HTBC is pretty good - it could have been great if it weren't for the dreadful cover. In relation to the booklet, it seems out of place. I have to say that over the years I've enjoyed the artwork of Robbies stuff over the post LW Band's. High on the Hog was dreadful, Jubilation was slightly better. I thought Jericho was pretty good.

I have enjoyed the bonus tracks very much. I arranged them on my computer to double up with the final versions. I enjoy listening to these evolutions in the making and find them highly entertaining as well as interesting. The track Houdini is very good but I can see why it was left off the final product as the flow of it seems different than the other songs - I don't know why but its a sense I have, maybe RR wasn't quite able to figure out how to fully complete the work but thought highly enough of it that he wanted to share it in some fashion.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 11:34:38 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Tracy

Not sure what's gone on Trace but the GB's most seasoned comer and goer would heartily implore you not to leave on what seems a sour note. You're way way way beyond that.

Besides, you'd be way too much missed with your fine writing.

Just looked for your last major post but couldn't locate it. Maybe you'd be kind enough to re-post it so I can have another read.

I recall thinking at the time it was a really fine considered read though if I'm correct it wasn't gushing about Robbie which kind of makes it a rarity round these "Tronno" parts. :-0)

As I've not heard the album yet apart from three songs I can't say one way or the other if I go along with your take but I'm all for having a mixed stew of diverse views. I mean Jeez, Trace, would you believe there's actually some folks on here who think I talk shite.

Me included.

:-0)

At least, get it off your chest Trace. It won't do any harm and it'll likely do you the power of good.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 10:39:18 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Moonlight Drive

Todd: What I actually have is "Moonlight Drive (early version)" from the Elektra box set. Should I download the final version?


Entered at Wed Apr 20 10:29:02 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, I thought the same about the centre section of HTBC sleeve: it’s much better than the front. I don’t like the hoodie. We discussed this. I know it’s a designer hoodie, but it still looks like “mutton dressed as lamb”. Robbie generally looks well-dressed and is in good shape for his age. Why cover it up? Sartorial matters apart, I agree that two songs less would improve it. Tango for Django is lovely, but a different album altogether. One he should put out too, with some of the film pieces, and hopefully soon. It’s a bit “deliberately eclectic” here. Axeman, I ‘m beginning to press “skip” so is the next candidate. Fear of Falling is a bit dull, but it has grown on me.

Just played Moonlight Drive. You see, I do listen to advice here! I’ll never get past Jim Morrison’s voice, a bit like Mrs V with Neil Young. She loved Simone Felice’s live version of Long May You Run last week, but wouldn’t give the original a chance. Same with k.d. lang on Helpless, Cowboy Junkies on Powderfinger, Prelude on After The Gold Rush. She likes Neil Young songs as long as somebody else is singing them. In Morrison’s case, the more I read about him, the more he sounds like a pretentious arsehole, so unfortunately it’s not just his voice, it’s his entire personality.

Hello I Love You, however, is brilliant. What they manage to do is recreate garage band … Louie Louie, Hang on Sloopy, 96 Tears (especially 96 Tears), but it’s just a few years later, so it’s a deliberate re-creation, but sounds like the real thing. I like Light My Fire by The Doors. I heard the Jose Feliciano hit version the other day, but it’s a bit like Richie Havens, I don’t know why I don’t like Jose Feliciano or Richie Havens, but I don’t. In Feliciano’s case it was the excessive praise he garnered from old showbiz types. Kind of rock for people who really don’t like rock. And he always used to walk around with that dog with a sign "Blind dog." I watched it on TV once and I reckon that dog could see perfectly well. Richie Havens attempting Just Like A Woman and Here Comes The Sun was similar, and to be cruel, his speech defect just grates. I lump them together in my mind.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 07:00:32 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: This and That

B.E.G. The Ollabelle song where Glenn sings about Angie, the Brown Eyed Girl, is titled ‘Call On Me Brother’. The video is from the house where they did some recording for the album “clubhouse style” up in Athens, NY by the Hudson River. It’s about 30 miles Northeast of Woodstock.

Thanks for the link to the John Wilson interview with Robbie. One of the better interviews I’ve heard lately. Robbie sounds pretty relaxed, and his answers don’t have the canned feel that they sometimes do, when the same questions have to be answered again and again.

Sadavid, the article on timing was pretty fascinating. Interesting stuff with the research on drummers.

PSB, Thanks for the review. You supplied good perspective for those who may not have followed Robbie since the Band days. I’m still mulling over the album myself. I keep coming back to my thought that it could have been 10 songs instead of 12. The only thing that’s really starting to bother me about the album is the cover art. The photographer Anton Corbijn is known for his solemn style, but maybe it’s a little too moody for my taste. Maybe it’s the hood……

What I do like about the artwork is inside the gatefold of the CD that uses a Hawks era photo of Robbie that has sort of an Andy Warhol treatment combined with some Mondrian influences. It’s pretty effective.

Peter V, recently you were wondering why ‘Moonlight Drive’ by the Doors was on your iPod. That may have been my doing. Sorry. I remember pushing that one a couple of years ago to you, and you mentioned that you didn’t have it at the time. Guess it didn’t really impress?

The thing about ‘Moonlight Drive’ I like is that it really encapsulates in one song, the strength and personality of what Jim Morrison brought to the Doors. ‘Light My Fire’ was the hit, but to me that’s more of a Robbie Kreiger construct. ‘Hello I Love You’ is just too choppy and simple. Almost like a machine. But ‘Moonlight Drive’ features Morrison as poet, but still in control….none of ‘The End’ shenanigans or Lizard King pastiche. There’s something pure about ‘Moonlight Drive’.

“Let's swim to the moon
Let's climb through the tide
Penetrate the evening that the
City sleeps to hide
Let's swim out tonight, love
It's our turn to try
Parked beside the ocean
On our moonlight drive”

It may not be Shelley or Keats, but for Rock & Roll poetry it’s not too shabby. Robbie Kreiger’s bottleneck guitar adds some ambiance. But if Morrison isn’t your cup of tea, then there’s probably not much that will change your mind. In my younger days I listened to a lot of The Doors. Not as much once I discovered “The Band”. The albums that I feel have held up well are ‘The Soft Parade’ and ‘L.A. Woman.’



Entered at Wed Apr 20 03:01:00 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Tracy, sorry to see you go.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 02:40:11 CEST 2011 from (75.34.39.48)

Posted by:

Adam2

Couldn't disagree more about the Last Waltz comment. Setting up the performers with interview segments was very well done in the film. Levon talking about the ingredients of rock & roll, followed by Muddy Waters. Levon and Robbie talking about early showmanship in rock & roll, followed by Van Morrison. Robbie talking about his fears of staying on the road, followed by Stage Fright. Garth talking about the healing powers of music, followed by Ophelia. The guys talking about the Sonny Boy Williamson meeting, followed by Mystery Train with Butterfield. The film is pretty perfectly structured.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 02:38:20 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject:

Tracy: ... and that lesson is ...?


Entered at Wed Apr 20 02:25:58 CEST 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Subject: done

I am proud to say that I am done with The Band Guestbook.

I have learned a life lesson.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 01:05:02 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.241)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Peter for the heads up!
Here's Robbie on BBC Radio 4 on Front Row today.
John Wilson interviews Robbie at around 11:50.


Entered at Wed Apr 20 00:37:42 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.241)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Helpless"...Buffy Sainte Marie

Many thanks to Peter Stone Brown for a very fair and well written article on Robbie's HTBC.
It was a real treat to read an article by a singer-songwriter who has actually been a part of The Hawks and The Band's history as well during The Band members solo work.
Lucky you Peter Stone Brown!
I don't need to search for anymore articles.

"They get slightly better on “She’s Not Mine”.
I disagree here as I really look forward to this particular song. They get a lot better here.....The song just rolls along for me and the atmospheric music and personal details in lyrics and Robbie's raspy and sexy voice....love it!


Entered at Tue Apr 19 22:26:30 CEST 2011 from (72.78.36.246)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Answer to Bill

Bill, I was talking about the introductory stories in the film that usually led up to each act. The ladies thing, for Joni Mitchell, the whatever it was for Van,and most of the rest of the intro's. They seemed manufactured. I always felt they ended up detracting from the film instead of adding to it. i thought the only one that really worked was having Ferlinghetti right before Dylan. They should have done what they did at the show and have Tura Lura introduce Van.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 22:22:25 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

PSB: A pleasure to read a review by someone who you KNOW has actually taken the time to listen to the disc……..and your pinpointing of the perfectionist chip in RR that can sometimes - perhaps most times – cloud but not obscure otherwise lovely tunes is an astute observation……Perhaps that perfectionism combined with the other-worldly talent and abandon in Rick, Richard’s and Levon’s playing and voices is the actual formula that made the Band great…………………Oh and imagine being the guy tapped to tell Bill Graham that you wanted turkey, ballroom dancers………….but hold the Dylan, Young and Morrison as one sentence nods from the stage would be ok…..the man was, after all, known to go ballistic with good news!


Entered at Tue Apr 19 22:16:42 CEST 2011 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low Countries

PSB, great to see someone writing down exactly what I was thinking. You must be clairvoyant. I could have said it myself, errr, well, less eloquently than you, that is.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 22:03:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: A Mighty Gap & the Not So Invisible Republic

Bill M: Actually I believe Peter's point was that "mighty gap" of creativity was four years, as NLSC was the first album of new material since "Cahoots" in 1971. In comparison, during the three year period between 1968-1970, they had produced an album of new material each year. Decades later in 2001 Robbie would reappear in tv commercials for the GAP clothing retailer (which also owns the Banana Republic).


Entered at Tue Apr 19 21:36:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: EC - "Fear of Falling"

Really Peter? You do surprise me! Two lead guitarists get together on something and the result is the long-winded indulgent tune of the album? There's a thing.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 21:35:28 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

PSB: superb review. Thank you.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 20:26:22 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

PSB: My main thing that I don't understand in your otherwise crisp and clear article is "It’s the one thing about The Last Waltz I never understood. I always felt it would have been just as impressive if not amazing to simply say, and then we worked with Van Morrison or Neil Young or Dr. John, or Muddy Waters." Just as impressive as what - having those people sing their songs onstage right in front of you? Also, it was vaguely amusing to see the anachronistic reference to the mighty gap leading up to NLSC - two whole years!! It the '70s a two-year silence meant it was time for a "Whatever happened to ..." article, but in the 21st century it's closer to the time it takes to get the drums right.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 20:20:53 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: PSB

Excellent review.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 19:52:29 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PSB

Fine piece of writing that PSB. Illuminating.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 19:28:58 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / sadavid: Plus, child-free people like me need a full complement of youngsters at work to support us in our twilight years. I'm already looking at Freedom 85 and have no wish to move it back to three digits.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 19:24:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, with immigrants the money goes round. They work, they get hungry, they earn, they need to eat, they spend. Slaves only work. This is pretty heavy competition for the poor whites who wanted to be paid (then again, indentured servitude in the colonial era is a whole other story.)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 19:18:14 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RR on Front Row

Robbie Robertson is on BBC Radio 4 "Front Row" in about an hour from now (19.15 BST). May well be streamed.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 18:54:09 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: serving up a Peaches 'n' Cream complexion ...

Al E: Yes - I think Clapton dabbed it on before writing "Anyone For Tennis".


Entered at Tue Apr 19 18:49:49 CEST 2011 from (72.78.36.246)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: My take on Clairvoyant

Here's my review of the new Robbie album.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 18:28:01 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M

Ha ha.

I heard it was Eau de Billie Jean King that was all the rage over there

Something in the water, so they say. :-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 18:09:27 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: drummers have different brains

Scientific studies of Time and The Brain.
If you're impatient to get to the part about drummers, search on "London."


Entered at Tue Apr 19 16:27:38 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

It's nice to see peace breaking out amid all this talk of war. As a clairvoyant I see Peter V driving a smitten Al and Michelle north to catch the ferry over to Lewis, where Dunc awaits in a little chapel with his Gaelic choir - accompanied by RtO of course.

Al: Eu de Cologne may be fine for some, but our guys favoured the earthier Eu de Billie Joe.

Peter V: "You can't raise a Cane back up" sounds vaguely related to "Ain't no more cane on the Brazos", no? And for other reasons we're able to point to the term 'raising cane' (meaning the same as 'raising hell'), and so Springsteen's 'Adam raised a Cane'.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 16:23:07 CEST 2011 from (95.147.182.218)

Posted by:

michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Humble Pie

Thankyou Al, has made me feel a bit better about my rant! yes, Brown Eyed Girl, does seem a little male orientated here, bit scary! Sorry Al but I am from Ascot in lovely rural Berkshire,do not have any horses in the paddock, not yet anyway, and I do not eat croissants! a good Ascot Ale wood do nicely,I do have roots elsewhere though, hey my cousin is from Simcoe, Ontario! enjoying all your comments especially regarding American Civil War, fascinating stuff. I will let you know, Al, which comments in your article jarred with me, thankyou for giving me chance to explain! best regards, Michelle


Entered at Tue Apr 19 15:44:40 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks Bob W for posting the link to Mr. Sia's photos. The June 13, 1970 photos of the Allman Brothers Band and Frank Zappa were taken at a day-long concert at Atlanta Stadium which was called the Cosmic Carnival. I attended that concert and the pictures bring back memories of the event. Flo & Eddie were performing with Zappa at the time. I believe the 1970 photo of Steve Winwood was also taken there, where he performed with Traffic. It was a rare, cool June weather in Georgia due to rain early in the day. I distinctly remember that the sun broke through the clouds during Traffic's set in the afternoon.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 15:36:56 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Ollabelle CD

B.E.G., I think April 23rd is when the funding for the project closes. I think they'll still need to master it, do artwork, and produce the CD's. My best guess is that it will be at least a couple of months before actual CDs are ready to ship.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 15:29:23 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Virgil Caine as ultimate dupe

Peter V: I'd agree generally that most soldiers are dupes, because the croissant-eating classes con the gruel-eating classes into fighting the formers' battles. It's less clear that the "system necessarily drove down their own possibilities of earning a decent living" - because every economist that writes in the popular press tells me that more labour (e.g. more immigrants) makes more prosperity for everyone.

On "Yazoo Street Scandal," the phrase "Cotton King" sticks in Levon's throat a little; it ends up sounding like Senator Hammond's "Cotton Is King."


Entered at Tue Apr 19 15:18:25 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Trivia

It's a little known fact that Alexander Stephens (who needed thick sneakers to reach a height of 5' 6") was a friend of Abraham Lincoln's before the War. Lincoln once beat Stephens 21-0 in a game of one-on-one basketball. Stephens was livid. Some historians consider this one of the causes of the American Civil War.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 14:27:48 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.193)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I will read this article later.....The Abolition of slavery

"There are many different reasons why slavery was abolished. Some of the reasons were economic; some were the actions of the black slaves; some were the actions of white working class people, and some were the actions of the white middle class people. I will explain how each of these things contributed to the abolition of slavery in 1833."

Read more: http://socyberty.com/history/the-abolition-of-slavery/#ixzz1JyIIISJR


Entered at Tue Apr 19 14:19:34 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Some nice photographs of The Band and many others.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 13:58:22 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.193)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie is here in PBS American Roots Episode 4: Chapter 4: Native American.

Steve and Amy would love episode 6? which features Gillian Welch and others.

Hey Carmen...I forgot to add to the list Robbie's "Shine Your Light" and "Reflection - Adagio" from "Ladder 49". Yikes!! How could I have forgotten the songs that really helped me deal with grief....also hearing Steve Forbert's voice as well.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 13:37:31 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.193)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie, Paul Simon, Dawes, Scottish lass Amy MacDonald, Foo Fighters and Patti Smith are showcased here.

Hi Todd...I think the Ollabelle sight said we'd be getting our CD on April 24. The first time I heard Glenn Patscha sing the tune featured (name?)......I almost fell off my chair......cause he's singing about Angie his brown eyed girl! Thank you Glenn! ;-D

My understanding about slavery was that it had to finally be abolished 'cause the north was becoming industralized and needed free workers for the factories. Also, some of the crops in the south were becoming cheaper to buy abroad. Bluezzzz music originated here.......

Hi Michelle....As you can see....There are not many female posters here and we need some new voices here! Al will protect you if the pit bulls come out.
Claire and Jersey Girl.....Where are you??


Entered at Tue Apr 19 13:25:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Buttered croissant? We have our figures to watch down here, Al. Olivia organic low fat spread croissant.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 13:22:15 CEST 2011 from (59.101.33.77)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Brien Sz.. good point...

but... would slavery have been abolished anyway? We can go over this adn over this... (and that's what makes it so enjoyable!)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 13:01:02 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: If

Yeah but Pete on the plus side we'd have possibly had the kaiser [Franz B] alongside Bobby Moore at the back plus Gerd Muller alongside Geoff Hurst up front. The 1970 World Cup would have been a cinch. Then there's the umlauts over our 'U's'.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 12:54:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The crucial application of Eau de Cologne while delicately nibbling a buttered coissant

I knew it.

Just knew that's what you'd be up to Pete. LOL :-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 12:26:43 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Levon at UPAC in Kingston, NY

Levon and company doing a special birthday bash ramble at UPAC in Kingston on May 27. Special guests announced so far include Donald Fagen, Natalie Merchent and Marc Cohen.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 12:22:33 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Was the CW because of states rights or slavery? We can contemplate that question forever. Yet if we ask, Would there have been a Civil War if slavery had been abolished at the Constitutional Convention? I think gives you a much clearer (albeit not 100%) answer.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 12:06:27 CEST 2011 from (75.34.43.81)

Posted by:

Adam2

Can anyone confirm or deny that Ray Charles contacted Richard Manuel to compliment him on The Band's 1976 single of "Georgia On My Mind"? Please let me know.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 11:56:52 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Flashman

George MacDonald Fraser's historical research was always meticulous. The two to read are Flash for Freedom (on slavery) and Flashman & The Angel of The Lord (on John Brown and abolitionism). As an aside in other books, Fraser says that Flashman fought on both sides at Gettysburg, and has a few other references to the civil war.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 11:37:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

South in a namby-pamby poncey sense? Bloody hell, Al. When I read that I was so annoyed that I dropped my talcum powder, and it went all over my Armani jeans. I was angry, I could hardly eat my croissant.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 11:33:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: If The South Woulda Won …

(Al, Hammond might have buggered the South totally by saying that in 1858, leading the North and Britain to stockpile cotton in advance). Abolitionism? George MacDonald Fraser is the fictional read there.

The Civil War is of international interest, because it’s one of those points where theories of history clash. To the economic historian, the South had no chance and the war was a foregone conclusion. Few realized that the USA (meaning North) was already one of the most powerful industrial economies in the world. In Britain the romanticists who equated the South with the Cavaliers in the English Civil War certainly didn’t. Fortunately, the other view held.

For military historians, the excitement is the Hannibal factor where through tactics and determination the weaker side prevail. The ultimate expression is held to be The Battle of Britain. Going back to Al on the blitz yesterday, if Hitler had continued attacking the airfields, Britain would have lost that battle. Churchill cleverly bombed Berlin railway station… a gesture only, and Hitler in fury ordered the full out attack on civilians that diverted his resources from the airfields. But would Britain necessarily have lost the war? Though militarily, Germany was more powerful, Britain had all the human support and natural resources of a huge Empire, and crucially economic backing through lease-lend from the USA, which enabled it to win the Battle of the Atlantic. The economic historian would say the odds were still in the Allied favour, then once the “better late than never” flat-out military aid arrived, it was a foregone conclusion.

So on that “turning point” in history, is it true that if we’d lost the Battle of Britain, we’d all now be driving VWs, Mercedes, Audis and BMWS, cooking in Siemens ovens, making coffee in our Krups coffee makers and watching German football teams outplay England on our Sony and Panasonic TVs.

Hang on a minute … that’s happened. Feck. The economist would point to the crippling effect on our economy of repaying our huge lease-lend debts to the USA over fifty years. While we repaid, the “losers” got rebuilt.

I’d be interested to see if our Civil War experts here believe that the “Hannibal / Battle of Britain” factor could ever have given the CSA victory?


Entered at Tue Apr 19 09:57:26 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dave H

Thanks for your take on the 'slavery' aspect Dave.

Now I really really really am confused.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 09:54:52 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sentimentality clouds your rational thinking!!

You sound just like me on a good day Michelle

:-0)

Why don't you point out the stuff that jarred with you. I'm sure it would add to the interest on here. I take it you're "South" in a USA sense and not poncey namby pamby UK sense....

....says the big hard case from Liverpule ;-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 09:43:23 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: And...

Many thanks for that post Pete. But is there any chance, for the less historically informed knobheads such as myself of you possibly interpreting both the overt and also the veiled yet clearly implicit implications of what you've posted in terms of the over simplistic and very likely incorrect 'slavery abolition' crusade that history has duped the likes of myself with.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 19 09:28:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: HTBC

I scrolled back, and can't see if I posted this before … last night I was struggling to e-mail, check the GB and find stuff on my iPad while waiting for an hour in a pub.

In UK shops, the DeLuxe edition (£12.99) with 12 tracks, plus the Deluxe disc with five "songwriting versions" and Houdini is more prevalent than the standard one (£9.99). The LP is a double LP set with an "Audiophile" sticker at £25, and has three tracks per side. I can't exactly remember, but I don't think it has the bonus tracks. At three tracks a side, it should be close to 12 inch single impact and quality.

I'm very struck, the more I listen to how it falls into two distinct halves (each too long for a first quality LP though). Tracks 1 to 6 hang together and have a definite consistent feel. 7 to 12 (from She's Not Mine) are diverse, and are possibly more innovative, but don;t, I think, flow smoothly, because the styles change.

Eric's Fear of Falling is the Crazy Mama of the set, a bit too long and too unvaried. I thought it the weakest track initially. Surprisingly to me, I took to it much more in its demo version on the bonus disc, then when I went back to the main disc, it no longer sounded weak, and I like it.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 09:14:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: King Cotton

Dave H: exactly. I tried to post a comment on how the Virgil Caines or Kanes were the ultimate dupes, fighting to preserve a system that necessarily drove down their own possibilities of earning a decent living. I was on my iPad and gave up trying to insert backslashes from the third keyboard level down. The Wiki article on “King Cotton” is short, and clear. It gives the quote I half-remembered from James Henry Hammond:

HAMMOND: Without firing a gun, without drawing a sword, should they make war on us, we could bring the whole world to our feet... What would happen if no cotton was furnished for three years?... England would topple headlong and carry the whole civilized world with her save the South. No, you dare not to make war on cotton. No power on the earth dares to make war upon it. Cotton is King (1858).

The rest of what I was trying to say is also better said on Wikipedia (a statement I never thought I’d make) so I’ll cut and paste :

WIKI: Britain did not intervene because it meant war with the U.S. as well as loss of the American market, loss of American grain supplies, loss of Canada, and loss of much of the British merchant marine, all in the slim promise of getting more cotton. In spring 1861 warehouses in Europe were bulging with surplus cotton—which soared in price. So the cotton interests made their profits without a war.The Union imposed a blockade, closing all Confederate ports to normal traffic, so the South was unable to move 95% of its cotton. Cotton diplomacy, advocated by the Confederate diplomats James M. Mason and John Slidell, completely failed because the Confederacy could not deliver its cotton, and the British economy was robust enough to absorb a depression in textiles in 1862-64. As the Union armies moved into cotton regions in 1862, the U.S. purchased all the cotton available, and sent it to the mills. Production of cotton increased in India by a factor of 700% and also in Egypt. Because the South's long-range goal was a world monopoly of cotton, it devoted valuable land and slave labor to growing cotton instead of urgently needed foodstuffs. (END)

As I said in TNTDODD article, one of the subtle points was placing Virgil in a border state, Tennessee, where slavery was not the main basis of the economy. All in all, look at the map at the start of most editions of Huck Finn, because all the border states / down the river stuff is in that book. I knew I’d work The Duke & The King into a post.

Sugar cane (CANE) was the other major slavery-based crop in the Americas (though not USA). I don't think that had struck me before! British teen sensation of the early 60s, Eden Kane, has no link whatsoever to anything though.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 08:27:06 CEST 2011 from (75.34.43.81)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Clairvoyant deluxe editions

There are a couple different versions of How To Become Clairvoyant: the standard edition, the Best Buy bonus disc edition, and the exclusive deluxe edition from Robbie's website (which I referred to as the "millionaire's edition" a few weeks back).

The Best Buy bonus disc has 6 tracks. The exclusive deluxe edition (from Robbie's website) includes all of those 6 tracks, plus 2 additional tracks (from the iTunes & Japan editions). Finally, the exclusive deluxe edition includes 2 tracks that are unavailable anywhere else.

I will buy the standard edition as well. The exclusive deluxe edition from Robbie's website gathers all the existing bonus tracks, plus 2 exclusive tracks (10 tracks total). I would gladly by that version, but since it is $300 and I really don't care about any of the packaging/vinyl/artwork, I'll just get the standard edition. This is where downloading is very valuable. Hopefully all the tracks from the exclusive set show up online.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 07:17:04 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: CD Shopping

B.E.G., I’m also looking forward to the new Ollabelle CD. I hope that it gets released soon. I think it’s pretty cool that they’re going to self-release it. They’ve been on Sony and Vanguard, but I think this could actually work out better for them, even if they move fewer units.

You mentioned ‘Wang Dang Doodle’ a few days back. Coincidentally, the first time that I met Amy Helm, I expressed my enthusiasm for her performance with the Barnburners of that song. But by that time, Ollabelle was on the front burner. I think they were just starting the Down From the Mountain tour, and ‘Wang Dang Doodle’ was kind of the previous chapter by that point. I still wish that a Barnburners CD had been released including that tune as well as others from their repertoire. Saw some good shows back in 2000 and 2001. I also like the version of ‘Shake a Hand’ that Amy used to sing.

Regarding the various version of HTBC, I stopped in our local Best Buy a day or two after the release date because I had read that they were going to carry a two-disc deluxe version as an exclusive for $13.99. I couldn’t find anything in the store and eventually asked someone for help. The 20ish year-old kid working there gave me a blank stare when I mentioned Robbie Robertson (I didn’t even bother bringing up the Band connection). But he offered to look it up for me on the computer. He said that the disc was listed in the computer, but that there was no record of them in the store. It didn’t sound like they were sold out. It sounded like they hadn’t arrived yet. I thought it was strange since it was a day or two after release, and I was actually wondering how they were going to sell any if a motivated customer specifically looking for a title couldn’t even find one to buy. (And they wonder why Brick and Mortar record store sales are struggling…Hmmph!)

Anyway I ended up buying the 40th anniversary deluxe edition of Derek and the Dominos Layla album. Because they had that. This now makes 5 versions of the album that I own. Original vinyl LP, Original 2 CD release, 20th anniversary edition, Single CD Remastered version, and now the 40th anniversary 2 CD deluxe edition. I may have to do an inventory and see if I have more multiple copies of ‘The Weight’ or the song ‘Layla’…..could be close.

After that, I scuttled on over to my local Barnes and Noble to see if they had HTBC. They obviously didn’t have the Best-Buy exclusive version, which I had been kind of interested in, but they did have the single CD version for $14.99. So the copy that I own is the standard 12 track CD release. On a positive note, the 20ish kid at Barnes and Noble not only knew who Robbie was, he brought me right to where the CD was, and mentioned that he had seen the Letterman performance. So a much better purchasing experience at B&N. I would have tried our local Borders, but it’s closing this month, and they are not bringing in any new product. I miss the days when we had smaller independent shops around with knowledgeable staff. It’s just not the same going into a place that also sells washing machines (Best Buy). Barnes and Noble is a little better because they also carry books, and seem a little better informed, but it’s still a big box store.



Entered at Tue Apr 19 06:38:04 CEST 2011 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

It's true that the CW was fought in a sense over economics, but it was an economic conflict because slavery itself was an economic system. Slaves were by far the South's chief economic asset, and any threat to the continued existence, if not expansion, of slavery was a threat to the wealth of the southern planter class. That the Virgil Cains of the South fought and, by the thousands, died for this cause despite in many cases owning no slaves themselves is one of the many tragic ironies of the war. But it was a war over slavery nonetheless.


Entered at Tue Apr 19 06:29:19 CEST 2011 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Quoting the Vice President of the Confederacy:

"Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth..."



Entered at Tue Apr 19 02:32:54 CEST 2011 from (59.101.1.2)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Slavery...

It's pretty well attested that the Civil War was about conflicting modes of government and economic issues, rather than slavery... slavery became an issue but only because it was easier for people to 'get'... though there were plenty of people in the South opposed anyway. Lincoln used slavery pragmatically, though I think (THINK) he was probably genuinely committed by the start of the war.



Entered at Tue Apr 19 00:14:40 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those of you who weren't able to see our Juno Awards show.
Apr 10, 2011

"The 2010 Juno Awards were chock-a-block full of great musical moments -- check out our Juno Show page on RockPeaks, which has a list of all the currently available streams on it. For our money, it was the Robbie Robertson introduced segment that celebrated four Canadian greats -- Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Gordon Lightfoot and The Band -- that proved to be the evening's highlight, drawing together the timeless music of those greats with outstanding performances from relative youngsters like Sarah Harmer, City and Colour, and The Sadies among others."


Entered at Tue Apr 19 00:12:29 CEST 2011 from (95.147.182.218)

Posted by:

michelle

Location: berkshire

Subject: 'absolut' drivel

Al, my apologies, I did not mean to be so rude, I do respect your comments and share a love of the band and the music with you, I could not understand the phrasing of some of your comments, I am from the South! and yes I did miss the 'e' from absolute! must have been having a very 'off' day!, sometimes when you are passionate about things sentimentality clouds your rational thinking! anyway, i am sure you are a great guy and will forgive me! look forward to yours (and others) comments, best regards, Michelle


Entered at Mon Apr 18 23:29:06 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Free church singing

This post is a link to Free church Gaelic singing. I feel that this is related to soul music certainly, and some people claim the blues.

There is no doubt that the musical link is because of the Scottish role in the slave trade. A couple of years ago I 'internet researched' and found churches in the South of the USA very similar to Western Isles of Scotland churches except there was a back door and gallery for slaves. I also found found an article stating that the last Gaelic speaking African American community died out at the turn of the century.

I've read about how artists like Sam Cooke moved from gospel to soul.

In the singing I've linked there is improvisation within limits. I can't explain because I'm not a musician.

Personally the last Gael in my family was my gran's dad who was a shepherd and died. The family moved to the town for work. I have no Gaelic links, but like Bob , my heart's in the Highlands.

I'm not religious, butI think the music is beautiful. But is there a link with soul?


Entered at Mon Apr 18 22:58:15 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: what happens when you f__d

"The language of Ayapaneco has . . . survived the Spanish conquest, seen off wars, revolutions, famines and floods. But now, like so many other indigenous languages, it's at risk of extinction. There are just two people left who can speak it fluently – but they refuse to talk to each other."


Entered at Mon Apr 18 22:41:23 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bill M...It was my Jamaican friends who took me to their tropical paradise (for those who have...) three times who first told me about their herstory (the Jamaica Maroons) and why they may be "different" than other Caribbean groups. (see link). I think you get what I was trying to say about "ourselves as a people". I get what Kevin J believes as well. A couple of examples how Toronto is compared to NYC and not the other way around....We're the "little apple"....and it's not because NYC has half of our population....We're around 32 million. While in school as a student, Canada was always referred to as a branch-plant economy of the US. Our most famous musicians had to leave Canada due to economics and......The Canadian music industry in general seems to give accolades....only when the US south of us embraces them as artists. The last time I saw Louuu in Massey Hall; he commented on how if things were so great here why did Joni and Neil have to leave town? Truth be told.....I was more ticked off that Louuuu didn't menion the four Canadians from The Band!

David P...Do you see why it's important for Robbie to write his own story from his perspective then? There's Levon's truth.....Robbie's truth....and the "real" truth? Both of them remember the "facts" from their own biases and life experience.....as we all do.

My understanding is that the deluxe version that joe j has bought has the alternate takes. I only have the regular one at 14.99 (paid for by a gift card one of my students gave me for Christmas) so that I could meet with Robbie again and have him sign my CD. I asked Sebastian here if he could show us what the lithographs look like for the "millionaire's" version but no response. I've seen a clairvoyant twice....First time I was high, high, high for about a month. I think I was just entering a new decade and my life was looking up. She used Tarot cards, analyzed my hands down and up....She even commented on the way I dressed and how I needed to wear more colour....I used to wear a lot of black and the way I write my name....I noticed Robbie likes to take the last letter in his name and swoop the last letter on top of his name. She told me that I needed to change that.....not good for your spirit....I wasn't taking any chances.....lol.....My signature is not so loud anymore. The real clincher for me that something was happening here was when she told me what happened in my life which was a turning point when I was 28.....I knew then that she was the real deal. I also tried past life regression with her as an acquaintance (also a huuuuge music fan) used to see her weekly....but it didn't resonate with me. I'm a seeker.....always trying to understand myself and move forward.......Sometimes I get lost along the way, but I've always had a strong spirit or I wouldn't have survived many traumas in my life.....I'm also very lucky that I learn a lot from the students I've encountered over the years. I always tell them at the end of the year...."Thank you for the time we've shared together", as time waits for no one. My oldest student would be 29 years old now.

Robbie's HTBC came at just the right time....I was hungry for some real music where music is written and played by musicians that can reflect about their lives and can play their own instruments and write their own songs and music....and not just hooks or as Robbie commented at our Canadian Music Week talk....fluff.....or did he refer to some of today's "music" like a tissue...I will have to check my cassette.....Shoot! I should have bought it as a CD but I'm always trying to save on costs....lol There was no way I wanted just a download of his latest and maybe last piece of work (not including memoir here).....It's like how I still want to read books in my hands and see my books on my shelves....It's not the same for me to read on the internet. I have more fun finding links than reading the articles in this format.

This morning when I left home...The first song that came on my Nano was by Rollie! At the end of my work day.....Levon's "Blue House of Broken Hearts was the first song that came on....One of his all-time best vocals.
I'm sorry that I said some negative things about Levon in the past on this site.....I was very angry that his words in TWOF were seen as the gospel truth about Toronto's Robbie Robertson and the one who knew the Grand River like I did.......It was very disheartening to discover a fffff that until I found this site....I didn't know existed. I got caught up in the ffffff.......The only person I should be standing up for....is myself! Okkkkk.....I tend to blah, blah, blah......too much....I'll leave you with Levon's "Violet Eyes" playing right now......


Entered at Mon Apr 18 22:21:55 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Bill, no thankees. And somehow I'm ok with that.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 22:07:19 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Al Edge

Al, better to have watched Shenandoah and find yourself talking about a lengthy self-written piece on TNTDODD and the Civil War, than to have watched Straw Dogs and started chatting to some Cornish people!!!!!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 22:04:10 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M/Kevin/Adam/Jeff

Bill, I hear you about Chest Fever and We Can Talk - the same eccentricity and "awkwardness" that gives them such an endearing quality, and a lasting one at that. It's the lack of this character that puts me off NLSC type material - the "maverick" spirit was all but gone, replaced with flawless quality for its own sake.

Kevin - absolutely right to avoid the GD best of. Hang on for American Beauty, although if you pass a shop without that one but they do gave Workingman's Dead, just pick that up first.

Adam, Keith G was a great pianist, I totally agree. Replacement for Ron McKernan? Absolutely not. I don't listen to much GD post 1972, let alone 1974 so sympathise there. But I stand by my opinion that KG held the Dead back a bit because the lack of a tether to earth such as Pig (Danceable songs, dollops of quite nice harp and Hammond organ) resulted in the light, jazzy period that I can't get into at all (sorry Jeff!). Eyes of the World and all that - leaves me cold. It's not KGs musicianship I question - his work on the '72 tour with Pig still on board is, as I said before, exemplary piano playing. From that Wake/Mars/Allah period, only U S Blues is on my iPod.

Plus you got Donna with Keith! What was all that about? Added absolutely nothing, and when you consider that the GD are often derided for the quality of their vocals, you'd think that in the blend she might have tidied things up a touch. Not a bit of it! Ordered the "Steppin Out..." CD set which arrived today; namely the UK leg of the European 1972 jaunt, but unlike the original 3LP set, not "tidied". Donna comes through as the worst singer in the band!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 21:27:18 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Emotion

Todd. Despite my manifest ignorance as to the full facts concerning why the Civil War happened, it is certainly the one war which really hits me on an emotional level so I can see why it might connect in such a way with anyone visiting the sites or attending re-enactments.

As far as I am concerned this, of course, is very surprising since my own father and so many of my own family fought in the Second World war and one uncle died in it.

I can't say exactly why a war 150 years distant does connect so powerfully. But it is the case and despite me mentioning Jonny Reb in the piece mine is an emotion that is stirred by the utter waste on both sides.

Perhaps, I really shouldn't have watched 'Shenandoah' all those years ago. :-0)


Entered at Mon Apr 18 21:09:12 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bob W: Yes, but did the $3.99 get you the apparently closely watched list of thankees?


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:58:26 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Jazz FM just played Joni Mitchell’s “Carey”………………programing lines are being blurred everywhere except classic rock stations it seems…………….too much singing on Jazz FM though Joni is a treat to hear any time anywhere……….My version of HTBC is the normal edition……..funny story though as the record store guys ( HMV ) were referring to the deluxe edition and I said that – yes I was aware of this and it apparently had vinyl and tarot cards, etc. included and was very expensive……..they all looked a little bewildered…….I now realize I was thinking about the 2500 copies of the limited edition….which is quite different than the deluxe edition which in itself is quite different than the normal edition………bob w had it right and had enough left over to buy more music! Let me revisit that superior/inferior subject!! All told – it is a bit amazing to think that a former member of the Band has one of the 2 or 3 best-selling rock albums in the world in 2011…….only a few places down from Britney Spears – yikes…

Anyone catch Saturday Night Live this week…………………quite an extraordinary performance by an all female band with a black male singer……….have never seen anything like it…


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:54:56 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Looking like a plonker with your trews on the ground...

There's a guy here in Atlanta that's already written a hip-hop song called "Pants On The Ground", criticizing the current trend of young men wearing pants that sag well below the waistline. After performing it at an audition for American Idol, a video version went "viral" on the internet.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:44:42 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: A Small Price To Pay

Bill, I'm fessin' up to taking full advantage of the $3.99 download from Amazon. Twelve tunes...no paper.....no plastic.....and no hunting when I want to hear it.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:12:40 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Well to the south of the Northwest Passage
Web: My link

Subject: Iron Men and Wooden Ships

I find myself drawn back here every hour or two. A chain saw sits on a stump at the edge of my backwoods. 15 bags of garden lime sit in waiting at the entrance of my garage. And the driveway needs patching from all the rain we got this past week. Thank God for priorities.

This linked song is considered by many to be a source of pride for Canada, sung by Stan Rogers and, in my mind, dedicated to Sir John Franklin and the 128 men who vanished in the high arctic in the 1850s. After their ships had been frozen in the ice, no one survived the long walk south to Hudson Bay and civilization.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:08:40 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Get Yer MacYaYas Oot

sadavid: I feel a Jagger/Connolly mash-up coming on - "You wouldna want me trews ta fall down now would ya?"


Entered at Mon Apr 18 20:05:37 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: King Cotton

Bill M: At the outbreak of the Civil War the South was producing 2/3 of the world's supply of cotton. Textile factories in the North relied on this supply, as well as textile industrie in England & France, with 3/4 of the European supply coming from the South. So, in this way, this agrarian product of the South, rather than in decline, was on the rise, fueling the increasing demands of the developing textile industry throughout the world.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 19:58:17 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Trews take 2

The Trews (drafted by G. Hudson for "Move to Japan" on _GHPACCOTB_) won 2x awards at last week's East Coast Music Awards: DVD of The Year for _The Trews Acoustic_ and " Bell Aliant Fan's Choice Video of the Year" for "Highway of Heroes." The last inspired by the untimely death of the principals' erstwhile high-school classmate Nichola Goddard, the first Canadian female combat soldier killed in combat.

"Trews," by the way, appears to be a contraction of "trousers," which was the band's previous name. You need to use a highlands accent to get the effect. Which reminds me to mention that the recent French-language leaders debate (in the throes of our latest in what seems to be a continous string of Parliamentary elections) was highly entertaining television. They used simultaneous translation in voice-over, and the Liberal leader sounded like he grew up in the same neighbourhood as Billy Connolly. Our socialist guy had some kind of Irish / Welsh accent. Both the totalitarian and the separatist were gay, I think.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 19:42:36 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Your post reminds me of the 'deluxe' business. What's that about? I didn't even know there wasn one, evn after I apparently bought one totally unaware. I found myself at Yonge and Dundas a couple of weeks ago so decided to walk up the west side to Bloor for old time's sake. Got to the Sunrise south of Gerrard and realised that it would be a good opportunity to support them while at the same time pick up the new Robbie. It wasn't in the Robbie Robertson section (though everything else was) and it wasn't in the Band section. I figured it was an Indigo-only thing but told the clerk what I was looking for when he asked if he could help. He said something like, "Yeah, we should have that" and looked all over the new-releases wall. Looked puzzled, then found a stash in the display area behind the counter and pulled on out for me. Sticker price: $13.99. I kinda wondered why nobody here was talking about the second CD with song-sketches, but then Adam2 (I think it was) mentioned buying "the millionaire deluxe version". I thought at the time that that must be some sooper-dooper thing that I couldn't possibly even consider, but chats with friends yesterday lead me to believe that the 'normal' Canuckistani release is the 'deluxe' everywhere else. So, what Robbie songs DOES $13.99 get you in the States?

Re the BEG vs KJ thing, I'd say you're both right, in that deep-seated feelings of inferiority are often manifested in extravagant claims of superiority. And Steve, when exhibiting a superiority complex here, was, I'm sure, just chasing cars to have fun / pass the time til the laundry cycle was finished. On the internet, nobody can tell that your tail's wagging.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 19:06:31 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: "The Whole Person" magazine.

Website for what appears to be the magazine RR is holding onto for the cover of his "HTBC" album - "The Whole Person" formed in '78 & based out of Santa Barbara, CA.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 18:28:01 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: PutEmUp(Friend0

Think I saw those off red poly knit pants,perhaps during the same period.They had a hideous glory about them.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 18:00:06 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

BEG: The reviews for HTBC have been overwhelmingly positive…….no need reprinting the sort of nonsense written by every two bit blogger……that was the type of stuff that prompted me to write that post on song writing a few weeks ago……..why give forum on a Band website to those that do not even understand the basic differences between song writing, song publishing, group decisions on investments, etc………………………….also, as to Canadians being “a people that grew up with an inferiority complex”…….Say What? This certainly does not describe me or any one I have ever known……quite the opposite I would say as just about every Canadian I have ever known seems to have a built-in chip that automatically goes to the rather annoying “Canada is the greatest country in the world” mantra ( citing health care, crime rates, disproportionate successes in music, athletics, etc. ) whenever engaged in a conversation of country of origin……….Steve ( forgive me Marge ) was perhaps an exaggerated example of this and while most Canadians make their pride evident with less vigor than he did…..I quite honestly have never met anyone who has felt inferior by virtue of the piece of geography in which they were born or resided…….rather it the feelings of superiority that are more troubling…….

American Beauty: Interesting weekend as I popped into four different record stores in Toronto. No American Beauty….only Grateful Dead was a “Best Of” collection…………I passed and will wait on the two 1970 albums as recommended………………Interesting though in that in all but one location “How To Become Clairvoyant” was sold out and the one location that still had a copy ( Yonge & Eglinton ) had only one and were sold out of the deluxe copy…All the sales guys repeated that it is amazing how quickly it is flying off the shelves…………………….Driving around on the weekend – the song “She’s Not Mine” was the one that kept growing on me………a lovely number with a few lines that like Dylan’s work just pop out as describing a feeling we have all had in relationships.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:34:13 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

The Pate article seems overly simplistic, and I think his ‘Acadian Driftwood’ comment misses the mark. Besides, wasn’t it brought up here a month or so ago that Robbie wrote that one while Luc Plamondon and his buddies from Quebec were chilling out at Robbie house in Malibu.

From Robbie’s response to Levon’s claims:
“He didn’t write one note, one word, nothing.”

I suppose this refers to the songs that are credited only to Robbie (although he could be talking about co-writes as well, since he only refers to being in the same room at the time and being supportive.) He’s specifically referring to Levon in that quote, but I suppose this could also refer to the other 3 for the songs that are only credited to Robbie. That they didn’t write “one note, one word, nothing.” (for the songs that have sole Robbie credits). I’m not sure when that quote originated, but I wonder if he would reword it today.

Just out of curiosity, what would being in the same room being supportive entail? Making coffee, fetching tea and cookies, keeping Robbie supplied with sharp pencils, tuning his guitar? If Robbie had sung more lead vocals, it’s starting to sound like this could have been a John Fogerty situation.

Al Edge, thanks for your Civil War / Dixie / Brown Album ruminations. As it happened, I went to a Civil War encampment and Battle reenactment this weekend, so your thoughts on the subject as well as the song were fresh in my mind. It was my first time attending such an event, and it had an interesting way of bringing some of the experience to life in a way I hadn’t really felt before. I was just there as an observer, not a participant, but the experience has a way of hitting one emotionally in addition to the history lesson part of it.



Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:31:33 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One of the things about Carribbean slavery versus American slavery is that sugar cultivation and cotton cultivation had different mortality rates. That puts an English-speaking one (Jamaica) on a par with Latin American systems. This is all vaguely coming back to me from 40 odd years ago. I spent days in the British & Foreign Anti-Slavery Society records going through microfilm, compiling lists for my then American history tutor. But I've not kept up with research in the intervening period at all.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:20:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'll look forward to the series, but it's a contestable point. North American and British slavery was chattel slavery, equating the slave legally with objects, possessions. Latin American slavery differed in that once the slave embraced Catholicism, the slave was legally a person, albeit with limited rights. The "chattel" aspect was supposed to be why British / American slavery differed from Greek, Roman, Latin American slavery.

Whether one can draw much distinction between different brutal systems is another point. it's like "comparative atrocity," probably hard to tell the difference if you're in it.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:18:09 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: and now for something completely different ...

Another thing that struck me this morning is that in some ways, "Chest Fever" and "We Can Talk" are cut from the same cloth. For whatever reason a line from the latter wheeled through my brain - "But I'd rather be burned in Canada than to freeze here in the south" - but my brain then added "Very much longer", and it seemed natural. Then I realised that a good number of lines from WCT can easily take the place of the swirling "It's long long when she's gone ..." bit from CF, which would easily fit WCT.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:05:45 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the history corner

Those interested in the institution of slavery might wanna check out Henry Louis Gates's PBS series beginning tomorrow: _Black in Latin America_. Brazil, for example, was the destination for almost 1/2 of the Africans shipped to the New World - nearly 5 million. And they were treated far worse than they were in North America - because the sea routes were shorter and the Portuguese had a better supply chain, it was cheaper to replace a slave than to feed and care for the one in situ.

Pynchon's _Mason & Dixon_ is a wonderful book; not sure how historically accurate, but feels authentic enough (altho I admit I understood maybe 70% of it) . . . .


Entered at Mon Apr 18 17:02:31 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Lars, the entire album, "Sailing to Philadelphia", is wonderful.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:48:19 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The Woods
Web: My link

Subject: The Mason Dixon line

I had to go all the way to Norway (Stord) to visit one of my former exchange students, to discover this Mark Knopfler song about America.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:38:51 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Perhaps Stephen Pate's article was an April Fool's joke - I didn't check the date. Not only do the four guys not named Robertson deserve more writing credits, but Levon wrote "The Widget", UOCC and TNTDODD. This must be so because nobody in the history of literature or song has ever written anything all by his- or herself that was about things that took place somewhere where he or she wasn't born. Gotta love that sentence that BEG repeated: "The closest Robertson comes to authenticity is Acadian Driftwood and even then the real impact of the song is Cajun not Acadian, again from Levon Helm." Which would mean what - that Pate liked Levon's accordion-playing?

BEG: Speaking of Acadia, I trust you know that a considerable contingent of Maroons chose the option of moving to Nova Scotia after their revolution in Jamaica sputtered. And most of THEM opted for Sierra Leone after a couple years, I understand. Winter'll do that to you if it's not in your blood.

Given the apparent lack of agreement around the 'real' reasons and aims for the US Civil War, even after 2011-1861=150 years, what do you think the chances are of sorting out the 'truth' about the more recent invasion of Iraq any time soon? While I have no reason to dispute Peter V's assertion that the US South was a declining agrarian economy that would eventually have lost no matter what, a newspaper article last week pointed out that cotton was the basis of the bulk of the US economy antebellum. If that's anywhere near true, it seems worth noting that the rapacious Northerners did an apparently counter-intuitive thing is blowing apart that economy, which they now 'owned'. If the war wasn't about the institution of slavery to a large degree, then how come the end of the institution of slavery was such a big part of the outcome? I'm just asking on the basis of thoughts that came to mind this morning.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:38:15 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Jed, i caught a Bearsville show, back in the early90s or early mid 90s, at which Rick was wearing polyknit pants that were on the darker side of the red family. Not quite burgundy, still red. I had a couple, three pair like that during high school, and even the first year or two of college (started sept 75). Rick wore a dunagree jacket with em, and was particlaurly funny that show. Was having trouble tuning his guitar,stated that he was a plumber during the day. One of those acoustic shows, her, Marshall Crenshaw, Jules Shear and either Foster or Lloyd, from Foster & Lloyd. they did 2 shows I saw there over the years, Crenshaw & Rick were on both, i tihnk only 1 of the other 2 made the second. Did an amazing Duke of Earl.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:36:13 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: no apologies necessary.

My perception of the tragedy suffered by civilians during wartime was always limited what my mother went through during WWII in Canada (nothing harsher than meat, sugar and gasoline rationing) and what my father (prior to seeing combat at 18 he worked on the railways when the strafing of trains by the RAF began) and his relatives went through in Northern Italy. Or to what I read in books (History major).

Living over here has given a different perspective to things. Every now and then at some construction site they still find an unexploded shell. Last year we had to evacuate the neighbourhood for an afternoon while the bomb disposal unit came in to get rid of a dud from 1945, found a short distance behind our apartment building.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:28:20 CEST 2011 from (71.43.66.106)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

I read Al Edge's article with interest given the current movement by some educational authorities in the USA to sanitize Huckleberry Finn. Excising language to divorce a literary classic from its times is misguided. The strength of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down is that it captured the Civil War so as to be relatable to Americans, including Richie Havens and Joan Baez. Seen in the context of the album, or its being adjacent to The Weight in The Last Waltz, the Band played a musical and visual role in integrating America without covering up any symbols, backgrounds or influences.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:16:32 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Pics of Rick/Richard

I still smile every time I see a pic of Rick or Richard,often with my mouth wide open in shock @ some of their clothing choices.Very funny,but sweet memories.Here was the greatest Band ever dressed in the same weird polyester outfits! Some bands spent alot of time focusing on how they look & their individual styles--The Band seemed too busy with music & other things & picked up whatever was lying around,match or not! Very endearing! It's important to note that some of my favorite bluesman also relied on polyester suits,but they tended to match the outfits,whereas The Band just threw stuff on!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 16:11:02 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Internet - a force for the truth

Bob W - thanks for the You Tube nod. Clearly the internet is now beginning to reveal stuff previously not seen I guess unless you really went delving. Those I saw show the city centre areas. The Bootle bombings were far more intensive as that was where the main docks were located. Couldn't find any on that. I'll look again.

Fred. Apologies. The Japan bombings are clearly unimaginable. Seems trite to say it but I guess the British World War II mindset is clearly fixed on conventional bombing tragedies.

Rob. Great post on current album uniformity.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 15:57:47 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

I'm always amazed that my mother-in-law and her brother survived the Battle of Okinawa. I can't even fathom the scale of violence and destruction they were subjected to and witnessed. Sadly her mother and younger sister didn't, they died of starvation.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 15:31:51 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The hog is in the tunnel...

BEG Angelina: In a strange twist, Robbie's return to recording and the attendant promotional campaign has resurrected discussion of Levon's accusations. Almost every review of his new album includes some mention of what long ago became known here as "the feud", and like the civil war that began 150 years ago, feelings of bitterness won't subside with time. It's as if the history of The Band as a performing group begins & ends at Winterland, a Fort Sumter without a resolution at Appomattox.

The latest volley from Stephen Pate begins with the misquote of Hunter S. Thompson, which has entered the world of urban legendhood. As I pointed out here in the GB not long ago, what Dr. Thomspson actually wrote was:

"The TV business is uglier than most things. It is normally perceived as some kind of cruel and shallow money trench through the heart of the journalism industry, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free and good men die like dogs, for no good reason."

He went on the add:

"...Mainly we are dealing with a profoundly dengenerate world, a living web of foulness, greed and treachery...which is also the biggest real business around and impossible to ignore. You can't get away from T.V. It is everywhere. The hog is in the tunnel."

These quotations originally appeared in a newspaper article entitled "Full-Time Scrambling" published in the San Francisco Examiner on Nov. 4, 1985. The piece, in which Dr. Thompson describes the TV satellite dish (with 200 channel capability) at his Woody Creek redoubt, was republished in his 1988 collection "Generation of Swine / Gonzo Papers Vol.2: Tales of Shame and Degradation in the '80s" (Summit Books).


Entered at Mon Apr 18 15:10:15 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Al, there's also quite a bit of video available on YouTube. Some of it very stark.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 14:47:22 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Liverpool Blitz

Actually, further to what i've just written about the concealment I'm pleased to say pertinent stuff does now seem to have been added to Wikipedia on the matter. Well done that person. Long overdue but better late than never.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 14:37:16 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: What's New

Just seen that Jan has put the 'Dixie' piece up. Once again, humble thanks Jan for taking the trouble to dig it out. It's an honour to have something up on this unique site.

Also thanks for the kind words of so many GB'ers - David P, Joan, Fred, Dunc, Rob, Kev, Bill ;-0), Dlew, Lars, Angelina.

It was the least you could do after the feckin effort it took ;-0).

That last sentence was a joke btw Michelle. :-0)

Just to clarify a few things. First Angelina. No I'm not a professional writer. I'm flattered you could think it but no I never have been. Before doing the footy book now some 15 years ago the only things I'd written were songs. I've written loads of stuff since but the only pro stuff was a humorous football column for the Independent which lasted for around 8 weeks until they sacked the sports editor who'd asked me to do it. :-0)

That last line was not a joke btw

As for the matter of slavery. Lars, I'm simply dealing in a perception of ordinary Brit ignoramuses like myself. I realise the likes of yourself with more intimate knowledge can pinpoint the inaccuracies of such perceptions and I do apologise if in this instance my slant on it doesn't convey the true picture. The saving grace, I guess, is that it was incidental to the broader picture I was trying to convey.

Fact is nobody knows more than we Liverpudlians how history - even relatively modern history - can lie. Forinstance most recently the heinous Hillsborough lies were right around the globe before the truth could get its boots on. And many have stuck even despite their being proven to have been nothing more than outrageous sickening lies and smears perpetrated by establishment forces attempting a cover up and since publically discredited and retracted in their entirety.

And going further back, just try looking up World war two blitz on Google to see if you can unearth how North Liverpool and Bootle [my home] was decimated by German bombing and you will not find any evidence to convey that it suffered infinitely more bombing, deaths and damage than any town outside London.

By concealing the actual impact of the German air raids on the port of Liverpool and maintaining that their raids had had little or no effect on what was the key entry port for the crucial supply line from the USA and Canada, the Allies had a twofold objective.

First was to maintain morale in the rest of the country so they would not feel cut off from North american aid. Second was to convince the Germans that all their efforts had been fruitless.

The reality, of course, was thousands dead and wounded and the most intensive destruction of the war per square mile other than Dresden.

History lies and distorts. Fact.

Even so, many thanks for the points you made Lars. I promise to read up on it to correct my blissfully over-simplistic take.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:42:54 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson inducted into Hall of Fame
but did he really write those songs
Stephen Pate
April 4th, 2011

"The closest Robertson comes to authenticity is Acadian Driftwood and even then the real impact of the song is Cajun not Acadian, again from Levon Helm."


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:35:53 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

NY Times
April 12, 2011
Memories From Big Pink: Robbie Robertson to Write His Life Story
DAVE ITZKOFF

“I come from a family who prided themselves, both sides, on memory,” he said. “And I was told growing up, constantly, that I was born with a really good memory. Then I became concerned when it seemed like it was cool to forget things. ‘You’re so cool you don’t remember this stuff.’ And I thought, God, I remember everything, and there’s nothing I can do about it now.”

His years of collaboration with Mr. Dylan will probably be one of the focal points of the memoir, but Mr. Robertson said he was not concerned about how Mr. Dylan might react to his portrayal in the book.

“I just have to tell these stories through my point of view,” he said. “I just can’t drag that kind of baggage with me. I really have to feel a sense of freedom in my storytelling. He could tell some of the same stories, actually, if he remembered them. I don’t know if he remembers them as good as I do.”


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:30:20 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan and The Band
Feb. 14, 1974
Forum in Inglewood

(l-r): Robbie Robertson, Dylan, Rick Danko, Richard Manuel and Levon Helm.
Credit: Kathleen Ballard / Los Angeles Times.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:24:59 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson: A good sense of direction

“He was very affected by the direction I wanted to go in, musically. I had done my guitar wailing with Ronnie Hawkins, with the Hawks and with Bob Dylan,” Robertson said, referring to two high-profile pre-Band employers. “When I was first doing that, it was really unusual. It was unique. Very few people were playing the way I was. By the time everybody caught up with that – including Eric and a ton of other people – it just started to feel obvious to me. I wanted to go in the opposite direction, where it was really about subtleties and emotion in the playing.

"If I could play one note that hurt you more than someone else playing 20 notes, that’s what I wanted to do. Eric said to me, ‘That’s it. That’s where I want to go.’ ”


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:20:28 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Lars, thought you might enjoy this story.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 13:12:31 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.71)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Al....You can't take seriously what Van's missus posts! ;-D

Peter....Jamaica Maroons explains it.

Heather Reisman's One!
The Backstage Pass on Robbie Robertson's "Superfans"
Posted by ZoomerStaff
April 8, 2011
Includes Video and photos

"In her gushing introduction, the Indigo owner — recognized in 2009 as one of the world's top 50 businesswoman by the Financial Times — noted the "pleasure" she had in listening to the album for the past two months. "I've listened to it well over 75 times, maybe more. It is absolutely perfection — it's like he's arrived at a moment of time to make this incredible music."

"You know what I think is interesting? Look at the crowd of people who turned out. It's clearly quite cross-generational... I think what is happening with people in our age group, is finding ourselves in this moment where there are a lot of cross-generational things going on. We got our history and what we're looking forward to, and we can mix it up with people with less history and more to look forward to, and still see something interesting happening."

Nomadic Mike...Gordon Lightfoot's there too.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 12:13:26 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred

:-0)


Entered at Mon Apr 18 12:02:05 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Alan: Stop being so modest, it wasn't merely drivel, it was "absolut drivel" : )


Entered at Mon Apr 18 11:39:04 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Drivel

Cheers Michelle.

Well, that's certainly the last time I ever get the Missus to pass comment on anything I've written.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Apr 18 08:36:19 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Slavery … in everything there is a plurality of motivation. There was a major abolitionist movement in the USA, with religious overtones, and pointing to the abolition in the British Empire and elsewhere … England in 1772, the slave trade in 1807, slavery in the colonies 1833. There’s a new book on the brutality and excesses of Jamaican slave owners that I keep meaning to look at. They seem to have been a particularly vicious bunch, even by the standards of slaveholders, which might be why Jamaica is still more volatile than other ex-British colonies in the area. France abolished it in 1794, then its its colonies in 1848. Canada was 1793 and 1803. Mexico 1810. Dutch empire 1814. The Northern states had abolished it one by one. By 1861 it was “The Peculiar Institution” and outside the norm. No one was trading. It was hard to see any viability for the system. Wiki has a good timeline that I just checked.

There were people in the north with commercial interests, and people with political expediency in mind, no doubt, and it’s a moot point whether Lincoln was in the second group, but all these states had actively chosen abolition, so there must have been widespread popular disapproval at the mildest, or revulsion at the strongest. Religion was a major element in abolition. Slavery hung on in Cuba until 1898. It’s still widespread in all but name in parts of Africa, and there have been a run of high-profile cases in London involving slaves of ruling families from the Arabian peninsula who have been brought to Britain. Well, the claim in court is they’re not slaves, but they’re not paid, worked around the clock, kept locked up, and abused at will. I feel strongly that we have to take off the blinkers and revive abolitionism. Our political expediency in turning a blind eye to it happening in our own country is deeply shameful.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 07:54:59 CEST 2011 from (75.34.43.81)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Keith Godchaux

Keith Godchaux was an amazing musician. Since I don't listen to any Dead from after 1974 anyway, I can't comment on his contributions from 1975-1978. But his playing from 1972-1974 was wonderful. Rick Danko and Keith play 2 songs together at the beginning of the Watkins Glen "Encore Jam". A Change Is Gonna Come and Raining In My Heart. Wonderful performances.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 07:48:21 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Hah! Gone To Heaven and Shakedown Street suck! That period, inclucing live shows, had to be the low point in The Dead's history. But, I must say, Wake Of The Flood and Blues For Allah are masterpieces. You need to get past the relative dullness of the recording of Blues For Allah to appreciate it Rob. Must say, the live shows of that tour that i saw, i think i was 16, were amazing. As usual, somewhere, I have actual reel to reels of one of the Beacon Theater shows I attened,. WNEW broadcast it later,and I taped it.

Yeah, in the early days I was not a big fan of Mydland's. but, i was on hiatus from Dead shows also, couldn't stand what i was hearing.

Wake Of The Flood, is essential Dead. And yes, Ace is one motherfucker of a record.

New Riders, Rob? First record, Powerglide, Panama Red, all wonderful records.First one might be my favorite.

Tuna- Burgers- another amazing record form that era/scene. I used to catch Papa John's band sometine, in The Lone Star,& in Uncle willy's in Kingston. Caught one show , in the very late 80s or very early 90s i guess, where he did a show with Jornma and Jack. There was one or two years where they did some killer stuff, a show with Paul Kantner I caught, the aformentioned with Creach, another with David Bromberg. All things of uncommon beauty, beginning to end. I miss that, not enough gorgeous live music anymore,,, or maybe i;m just in the wrong place or too goddamn old to get out and catch it most of the time...used to be nothing to either postpone work or drive up to three hours each way without sleep. Or just stay wherever the show was. Today, the shows are far fewer,and I don't travel as easy.

On Mitterhoff, I agree, he is a talented gy...but, all the people Jorma's teamed with outside fo Tuna and brought along, a white heaired kid named Joey Ippolito or Joey Iaccone, big kid, was the best. Jorma had him around for years, mid and late 80s, then he disappeared.

Night, folks


Entered at Mon Apr 18 07:17:50 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jeff

Agreed. Mydland was a breath of fresh air after Keith Godchaux, who was GREAT on Europe 72, Ace..all that period. But the lack of B3 in the Dead from 73-79 was criminal; acoustic piano had never been a part of their sound (unless you include Constanten's avant-garde prepared stuff!) and though the two instruments together - neatly illustrating another great facet of the Band! - was fantastic around '72, the Dead needed organ. Look at the other part-timer guests they used: the great Merl Saunders, Howard Wales, Tom Constanten - all B3 men! Ned Lagin is the only marginal case, but like TC more of an electronica mate of Lesh's than a rock'n'roll pianist per se.

Godchaux alone, well known for refusing to play anything less piano like than a Rhodes (and even swapping an acoustic piano for that on a strictly "must" basis) cost the Dead a few years of their sound, IMHO. That's possibly why a few of us here (some even more than I, it would appear) would plump for a Garcia/Saunders disc not Wake of The Flood or Blues for Allah.

Sad indeed that Mydland succumbed to the well known curse of the GD keyboard player as he was proving a major part in latterday GD operations. Great bluesy singer, great organ player - the slightly more instrumentally proficient replacement for Pigpen they should have had in 1973! You mention that his death came just as he was hitting his stride - is this because you think he wasn't so strong earlier on? I don't think even Billy Preston or Garth could have rescued Shakedown Street or Gone To Heaven!!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 06:47:32 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob. I was a big fan of Weir's, but haven't liked anything he's done in ages.As in the last thing was Ashes To Ashes. I can tell you he may be a class act. For about a year and a half, Johnnie Johnson was a member of Rat Dog. Bob loved him. When Johnnie died, he, Jay Lane & Jeff Chimenti jumped on a plane and attended Johnnie's wake and funeral.From what I understand Weir canceled a couple of Rat Dog gigs so he could be there. There's a lot of people who shoulda been visitng Johnnie when he was ill, or recuperating, and shoulda been at that funeral, that weren't. Weir showed.

Aside from Bob, obviously, for me, Cobham, Johnson, & Cochran made The Midnites work. Although he has his moments, I never was a big fan of Kelly's, and Mydland, well, sadly he was getting much stronger as a writer and singer before he died.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 04:28:00 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Adam2's Van M link

I think it only fair to the lady (and to Van's taste!) to illustrate that Ms Lee IS quite a pretty lady and not quite so Pete Burns like as the Adam's link story showed!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 04:07:49 CEST 2011 from (75.34.43.81)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

This is the correct link. This one's a doozy for Van.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 03:59:12 CEST 2011 from (75.34.43.81)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Subject: "Van and his mini Van: the true story of Van Morrison's love child at last" article


Entered at Mon Apr 18 03:40:15 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bobby & The Midnites

Wow, never really bothered with them; you generally didn't see their stuff in the UK. (Copies of Ace and Kingfish turn up far more often). Nice tight band, though - organ player is happening; lovely little fills and colouration. Thanks for that link guys!


Entered at Mon Apr 18 02:52:30 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Bobby and the Midnites

Bob W. Thanks for posting that like to Bobby and the Midnites. I was a big fan, caught two shows around the time of those videos' always enjoyed Weirs solo stuff especially that first Bobby and the Midnites record.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 01:26:46 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: In defence of Lars from a non-American...

Lars, you might be interested to know that, as a Brit, I can't help but feel after all the civil war material I have read (which is about four books, so not a great deal admittedly, but very varying tomes) that slavery WAS a convenient "angle" for the Union to go under the cover of. I know what you are trying to say 100% - as a remote, distant unaffected person with no lineage ties whatsoever.

That ushering in the end of organised slavery was a by-product of the Civil War IS one of the happiest events of world times, but I can well believe that it WAS a by-product, lower down the pecking order than retention of the Union.

Let's face it - we are talking about Governments here. All over the world, day in and day out, if they can find a public acceptance angle to get something else higher in their own priorities through, they will do that. And they always will. I think that is the truth of the matter in this and many cases and reported as such offers no slant on the good, everyday civvy folk of the Union OR the Confederacy. Probably not the military either. It is the Governments that can be criticised, and that'll never change, friends.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 01:06:00 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

putEmUp(Friend0

Lars, the spirit of your point is correct, but you may, or may not have, meant global or intergalactic treasue. wed can't cliam Garth just here in the U. S. and to classify him as being a North American Treasure also seems restricting.


Entered at Mon Apr 18 00:44:14 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The Woods

Subject: What if there was a war and no one showed up....something like that

I have to admit that my last post was a bad idea and I already regret putting it in. I believed what I said, but it was a knee-jerk reaction to Al's excellent article that had one point in it that I found fault with. I'll give it an A-minus, Al. Good job.

This GB has been stellar recently. I don't want to sidetrack anybody. Just because I was in the Confederacy in a previous life is no reason for me to take it out on you fine people.

On the subject of Garth (a ways back), he was in fine form at the High Falls Cafe last weekend. He's one of our national treasures.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 23:49:41 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: The decline of the military base as a gig circuit, and the knock on effects on musical standards

Another month and another round of monthly music magazines, each with a free sampler CD. Another round of interviews with another round of hopeful 21-40 year olds, bearded and be-plaid-shirted, often looking not unlike our beloved OQ, in a log cabin or similar timber rehearsal/recording space, dare I say “clubhouse” (not unlike our beloved OQ) and sometimes pictured with an esoteric collection of guitars, other acoustic folk instruments, organs and pianos (not unlike our beloved OQ). “Oh, their hearts are in the right place!” you say, “I’ll be sure to give their track a spin”.

Some, fair and square, you don’t care for upon listening so they lose that round outright. Others, though, captivate you and you try and hear some more of their songs – or if feeling particularly rash, even purchase an album on the basis of one track. Gosh!

At this stage, how many of you have had the same experience as I? Namely, that the rest of the album, or a rather large percentage of it at any rate, simply does not “do it” for you? Sometimes, the track you heard is simply a head and shoulders above the rest – not a new phenomenon: the strong lead song (“single” it used to be called, didn’t it?) and a lot of filler. But all too often in latter years this isn’t the problem. The issue is that the rest of the album sounds exactly the same. It is not a sense of quality that is at fault, nor composition, nor musical ability. A basic lack of DYNAMIC variation is the root of the ill.

Such was the backdrop to a conversation that my dear wife and I had in the garden of our local watering hole last night. Fleet Foxes were the example she picked, quite rightly, to illustrate this point. Track after track of first-class original material, allied to impeccably crafted arrangements and topped off with truly flawless (almost baroque) harmonies of such a standard that would have our guys and CSN patting them on the back with fatherly pride and the Grateful Dead simply bowing. But there is track after track of it, and you wait for the heads-down foot-stomper. It never comes.

We rationed that there are two reasons for this. The first is the snobbery and pigeonholing that being in a band with a record deal and a following entails now. The craftsmen such as FF wouldn’t include a rocker and nor would a rock band include a baroque moment or two. Compartmental correctness gone mad!

The other reason, we concluded, is the lack of experience in reading a non-tailor made, non-“home” crowd. Indie clubs cater for indie fans now in the same way as jazz clubs, folk clubs. The scenario of a large unknown crowd of people being entertained by a random act who are expected to “read the crowd and get on with it” has all but disappeared. The last stab at that was the old military base circuit that has dried up. A staple for British acts wanting overseas experience and boy did they get it – a hall full of drunk GIs demanding some good rock and roll for their Saturday night off. Like LHs Hawks circuit tales, the skills of dynamics and variety were beaten into rookie acts and they came home far more seasoned.

The lack of this kind of gig is, IMHO, having an impact on younger musicians who have been denied this workingman’s course in bandsmanship that simply being a great writer, virtuoso instrumentalist or having your marketing/PR well under control does not provide. Add this old fashioned skill-set back to people as talented as Robin Pecknold, the Low Anthem guys and a few others that spring to mind and you truly would start to see some flawless masterpieces again.

Right, I’m off to make a cup of tea after all that. Anybody else want one?


Entered at Sun Apr 17 22:14:00 CEST 2011 from (32.177.146.70)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Civil War motivation

Lars - I think if you read further you would find that some Union soldiers, particularly those from the NE where the abolitionist sentiment was strongest, could easily have carried an antislavery & save-the-union motivation as their cause. I see your point (it's an old argument), but I think it's way too black & white.

I think that if you dig into the "soldier's letters home" data you'll sometimes find that opinion. Those letters are just so well written anyway that they are worth it for that alone -


Entered at Sun Apr 17 21:11:01 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Southern Ulster County

Subject: The opening shot after reading Al's critique of "Dixie"

"Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States that by the accession of a Republican administration their property and their peace and personal security are to be endangered. There has never been any reasonable cause for such apprehension. Indeed, the most ample evidence to the contrary has all the while existed and been open to their inspection. It is found in nearly all the published speeches of him who now addresses you. I do but quote from one of those speeches when I declare that I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so. Those who nominated and elected me did so with full knowledge that I had made this and many similar declarations, and had never recanted them." --Lincoln's Inaugural Address, about six weeks before the Civil War started.

I'm not questioning the motives of some abolitionist who fought to free the slaves. And I'm not questioning that the Union armies, in the process of preserving the Union, led to the freedom of the slaves in those southern states who were trying to secede from the Union. But I AM questioning that the Northern armies entered Virginia and the Confederacy for the purpose of freeing the black race from its bonds. They fought to preserve the Union. If freeing the slaves furthered their cause, then it was a by-product and not an initial goal.

"If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union." (Lincoln's Letter to Horace Greeley, August 22, 1862).

Make no mistake, slavery was an evil and I'm thankful it was abolished, but I don't believe the average soldier on either side thought he was risking his life to abolish or preserve the institution of slavery. The North wanted to preserve the Union. The South believed they had the right to nullify the Union (state's rights). That was the basic conflict.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 19:57:14 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link


Entered at Sun Apr 17 19:51:10 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Norbert, Garth has been rather trim for a while now. I've seen him choose his dinner selections wisely, and also seen him choose for taste too. Almost a couple years since i've seen him , but he was still trim then.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 19:46:06 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Garth is very strongly Canadian and has retained his Canadian citizenship.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 16:21:34 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Obesity

Rotund Robbie will soon not be

A slimmer RR I do see

Mark the date one year hence

You'll all laud my clairvoyance


Entered at Sun Apr 17 16:17:15 CEST 2011 from (76.66.126.63)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Acoustic Street Video: Dawes, "If I Wanted Someone"

California natives Taylor Goldsmith, Griffin Goldsmith, Wylie Gelber, and Alex Casnoff (current videos show another member was added?) performed on November 3rd for WGTB's video series, Rolling.

"I want you to make the days...move easy."

Dylan and The Band helped each other grow musicially and lyrically and now it may happen for Robbie and Dawes. Did Sebastian turn Robbie onto Dawes? Apparently it was his manager who's radar was finely tuned?


Entered at Sun Apr 17 15:51:31 CEST 2011 from (76.66.126.63)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I think this one wasn't included with the other songs shared previously.
Robbie Robertson Ancestor Dance (Live)
Country; Italy
City; Regionale Di Agrigento.
With; Robbie Robertson Red Road Ensemble Coolidge Ulali Special
Guests: John Trudell (and bad dog) Buffy Sainte Marie American Indian Dance Theatre

Hi Al. You're a professional writer, right? Yeah, for those of us too young in 1968 to really appreciate The Band....Although, I know this is a sacriligous statement for some of you but I do remember that it was actually Joan Baez who kept the spirit of The Band alive in the mid-seventies on FM radio. The Band were always there for me but.....probably like some here of a certain vintage here, it wasn't until 1978 when things changed.....It was when I saw TLW at our Elgin Theatre two times in a row!......as I was totally blown away and mesmerized by The Band and all the other performers who were at the top of their game. It was Rick Danko who really caught my eye at the time as I was attracted to the "bad" boyzzz back in the day.....Robbie......Oh yeah.....His presence was felt....but he was out of reach emotionally.

As far as not caring whether four of the members were Canadian......CANADIANS DO CARE! ;-D
We're a people who grew up with an inferiority complex due to being sandwiched between a former super power and one now...although losing ground......
Robbie has not given up his Canadian passport...not sure about Garth as he's married to American Maud. Yes, Robbie's gone hollywood since the seventies.....It's his life. He only has to answer to himself and his higher power or creator or....

I can see more and more why artists have to have a huuuuuge ego....With all the critiques everyone has of their guitar playing, singing, songwriting, how they carry themeselves in public....without a huuuuge ego....or a very sensitive temperament like Richard Manuel......very difficult to survive.....and more importantly to actually live your life out of the constant spotlight and constant scrutiny. I'm very thankful that the members still alive are working and are healthy and I can still hope.......

Hei Norbert. The coke, smack and speed diet keep you real slim, whereas ganja has the opposite effect. Also, for most people as you age, your metabolism isn't the same. imagezulu reminds me all the time that he's still wearing the same jeans since he saw CCR in 1969. I know....It's time he changed those jeans!


Entered at Sun Apr 17 15:48:31 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Norbert / Al & dlew

I know how these guys do it, Norb. It is called "having a home studio" and the associated sitting on your ass for long periods of time. I have PILED it on since I started work on my own project.

Al, I thoroughly enjoyed your article too. Nailed it, just as Dave Lewis said. It's not as if it's the fact that we are both Brits because I'm a Surrey kid and you're a Scouser, so there is a culture change there, and Michele, who wasn't keen, also reports a UK base. Thus, you must have nailed it. Maybe the prevalence of correct punctuation, Capitalisations and general respect for correctly formed sentences put Michele off, if the post naysaying the article is anything to go by!


Entered at Sun Apr 17 15:21:41 CEST 2011 from (79.202.180.122)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Weight: Obesity Bands

Not that it matters, but it's a fact that bands, formed between 1957 and 1992 have gained a significant amount of prevalence overweight weight, particulary from 1987 to 2008 ("the fat years"), although Elvis did it sooner. Also be aware that The Band, but for Levon (- 1,34 pounds, = about 2,89kg), makes no exception on this!

A quick incidence statistic obesity artist scan scan reveals the following trend:

•58% of male lead guitar players are overweight 1987-2008

•67.6% of male bass guitar players are overweight 1987-2008

•34.4% of male drummers are overweight 1987-2008

•88.9% of male keyboard players are overweight n.y.-2008

Obesity Bands:

•88.9% of rock ‘n roll bands are overweight 1987-2008

•91.9% of country bands are overweight 1957-2008

•12.9% of head bang bands are overweight 1999-2008

•64.5% of metal bands are overweight 1987-2008

Total costs for overweight bands: $0.13 billion

Anyway, obesity Bands should visiting their local grocery store, purchase fresh fruits and visit their regular doctor, get their blood pressure checked and walk to their gigs.

p.s. hats off for the Stones: total band -3,21 pounds (-2.31%).


Entered at Sun Apr 17 15:05:22 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR Clip

The RR Clip of The Right Mistake vaguely reminded me of Sheryl Crow's My Favorite Mistake,allegedly written for Clapton.Has the circle closed?! RR sings pretty decently there & it's a nicely done song,but think how it might have sounded with Richard Manuel oozing out the real flavor from the song.Would've been interesting.As for RR's leads,and in light of my usual fascination with RR's "mathematical" playing(as Dylan called it),I found the lead lacking the routine sparkle that has made me love his playing.Similiar to his weak live performance with EC @ Crossroads,his playing just seems to lie there & lacks the energy I'm so used to hearing.Perhaps,he's just not as comfortable playing live since his leads on the album,albeit rare, are pretty good & his rhythm playing on the album was excellent.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 13:19:12 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Bobby and the Midnites


Entered at Sun Apr 17 12:33:16 CEST 2011 from (76.66.25.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Course Profile English: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices, Grade 11

Audio/Video
Duncan Campbell Scott: The Poet and the Indians. National Film Board of Canada, 1995. 56 min.
First Nations: The Circle Unbroken. National Film Board of Canada, 1998 (Series).
Robertson, Robbie. Contact from the Underworld of Redboy. EMI, 1998.

Aboriginal Voices Magazine – www.aboriginal voices.com
Robbie Robertson Songs–hollywoodandvine.com/robbierobertson/songs

No mention of The Band Website??!!


Entered at Sun Apr 17 12:20:13 CEST 2011 from (76.66.25.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ministry of Education
The Ontario Curriculum
Grades 11 and 12

Native StudiesAboriginal Voices in Media Works
By the end of this course,students will:
–identify and assess forms of oral presenta- tion (e.g.,storytelling,poetry,music, CD-ROMs,video performances) that develop,maintain,and affirm Aboriginal relationships;
–analyse images of relationships reflecting an Aboriginal world view in the works of Aboriginal creators (e.g.,Dan Prouty, Robbie Robertson,Buffy Sainte-Marie)


Entered at Sun Apr 17 11:57:35 CEST 2011 from (76.66.25.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011
Robbie Robertson – How to Become Clairvoyant
A critic's darling.

"How else would you explain the attention given To Robbie Robertson’s new release? Appearances on Letterman, The View, Jools Holland? Even an NPR review.

Who is this guy?

Now, 13 years after his last clunker, (*I don't agree here as REDBOY is my favourite Robbie solo because of the Native grooves fused with rock and techno and it's his most rebellious recording.) with current one due to themes explored and more guitar than usual.) he’s released something much better…

… for long time fans. Sure it’s listenable music to an unfamiliar audience, quite listenable, actually. But it’s the lyrics that set this apart from his songs over the last 20 years. Robertson has always been known as a story teller, and this CD reads like a logical extension of his work with The Band. A couple of the tracks even sound like he had a 70’s groove in mind (“When the Night Was Young” and “The Right Mistake”) in part due to the complementary backing vocals from Angela McCluskey, who unfortunately isn’t featured on more of the disc.

However, he no longer has the volume to rise above the din of the instruments. Accordingly, the music has to lie low, whether the band is in full momentum or even during a lead guitar duet (as opposed to a duel). It’s all good, but the mood is affected, likely positively for those who appreciate Robertson’s gifts and frustratingly for those who would prefer more evident musical payoffs."


Entered at Sun Apr 17 11:25:56 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbies CD store promotions

I much prefer Dave Rawlings approach - where he actually gets up and plays.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 10:18:00 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: "Absolut" is a vodka

Alan: a very good read.

JQ: thanks for the Nick Lowe link.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 09:33:09 CEST 2011 from (59.101.1.2)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Al Edge: terrific article

As, like you, an outsider to the US (though I'd visited the south as a teenager), Dixie explained it to me perfectly. You didn't have to agree with the sentiment to get the sentiment. It's great history, and great narrative. Your article nailed it!


Entered at Sun Apr 17 05:00:33 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: JQ / Carmen & Jed

JQ, yes good news about a new Basher album, although I must say "At My Age" wasn't up there with the previous three for me. It'll be interesting to see if this is a return to late form. And as for the low-rent Ricky G imitation, if we led that style of humour in, we can damned well lead it out again!

Carmen/Jed - if there's one GD solo album I do play as much as the parent band, it is Bob Weir's "Ace". Now that IS a corker, n'est-ce pas?


Entered at Sun Apr 17 04:36:14 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Angie, Thanks! But can you do something about the volume? At full blast it is a whisper. Defintiely makes it all very mysterious, but I'd prefer if magically, the volume would rise.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 03:26:47 CEST 2011 from (76.69.84.40)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson 'The Right Mistake' On Later With Jools Holland 2011.mp4

I sold The Greatful Dead's "American Beauty" and "Workingman's Dead".


Entered at Sun Apr 17 02:23:27 CEST 2011 from (166.205.140.101)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: NL interview

RTO - that guy seemed like a R Gervais wanabe, just an unfunny interrupter to me; but then you guys lead in a lot of new humor styles, so I let it go.

Good news about a new record, eh?


Entered at Sun Apr 17 01:05:01 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Garcia Solo

Jed - I agree - I prefer Garcia solo to the Dead. Garcia play Dylan is a great CD.


Entered at Sun Apr 17 00:50:13 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: JQ

Nice one JQ - Nick on good raconteur form as ever. Two things spring to mind, though:

1) Somebody comments that "he is like to music what Barrie Cryer is to comedy" and follows this by suggesting neither are much cop in their own right but know all the right people. The gambit is well said, but the explanation is an abomination. It's bad enough Nick being thought of like this, but Barrie Cryer? That would have scored no marks in a scientific exam, where the workings out are more important than a correct answer!

2) Isn't Mark Ellen a complete tosser! Disappointingly cringe-inducing.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 22:44:35 CEST 2011 from (166.129.173.125)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Nick Lowe

An interesting, funny and informative interview from yesterday -


Entered at Sat Apr 16 19:38:56 CEST 2011 from (95.150.139.108)

Posted by:

michele

Location: uk

Subject: al edge

absolut drivel, have read through your comment several times and cannot make any sense of what you are trying to say?


Entered at Sat Apr 16 19:09:55 CEST 2011 from (41.97.211.73)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: 3 statements on a Saturday of outstanding knowledge

Anyone who ever visited this website inherently revealed a sign of veneration of The Band [including Robbie Robertson], for the reason that this site is THE BEST SITE dedicated to The Band in the internet

Anything ever posted or linked by Empty Now is inherently The Band Connected [Robbie Robertson included], for the reason that Empty Now is a Certified Origin fan of The Band

guitar solo [ 3:21 — 4:23 ] credited to Tim Renwick


Entered at Sat Apr 16 13:37:11 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.164)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson at Indigo Bookstore...The video of Robbie meeting fans is from chapters.indigo.ca.
April 15, 2011
Toronto

There was definitely a real buzzz when I was there waiting in line to see my favourite guitar player and one of a handful of favourite songwriters....
The others being Bob Marley, Van Morrison, Garland Jeffreys, Bob Dylan and Louuu.

I very quietly told Robbie that I was brown eyed girl from The Band Guest book. I wanted to show him all the scars....I didn't have much backbone in the early days here.....but instead I showed him my smiling face...He was all smiles as well.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 13:13:04 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.164)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I still can't access (not available in my area) Robbie's performance of "The Right Mistake" last night on Later...Jolls Holland but here's the short video interview with Jools.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 13:07:14 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.164)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Few photos of Robbie and with other guests on Later...Jools Holland.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 13:02:42 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.164)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
April 17, 2011

Robbie Robertson has a sense about 'How to Become Clairvoyant'

Bashful Bill...I've posted the download of "BT" many times...I guess after awhile we all repeat ourselves over and over again.

"But it didn't play out that way after Danko and Helm made solo albums and Hudson started working as producer of another group. "I remember going to the studio one day, and there was something we needed to finish up for another thing that we were doing together. I remember going to the studio and sitting there and thinking, 'Oh, I guess everybody's running late.' And I finally realized: Nobody showed up. And it was a sad moment for me. I thought, 'OK,'" — he said, taking a long pause, adding, — "I get it.'"

The sadness is evident — an emotion undoubtedly amplified by Manuel's suicide in 1986, and Danko's death 13 years later. But so is the pride Robertson holds for the body of work that started with "Music From Big Pink" in 1968 and continued, albeit with less consistency as the rigors of life on the road eventually caught up with the group, through its final formal studio collection, "Northern Lights-Southern Cross" in 1975."


Entered at Sat Apr 16 11:19:48 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Supporting the local shop

MIKE and KIM:Thanks for recent links, and, indeed, all your efforts. Could you flag up when the new film on Levon Helm is available on DVD? I, obviously, would love to see it.

Still waiting for my copy of HTBC from local shop. But am now familiar with three tracks, which I think are great. Thought Robbie was very good on Jools.

SEBASTIAN:Is your dad going to do any radio interviews over here? I can't find any notification in press.

BOB W:St Andrews and, indeed, all of Scotland looked fabulous in the sunshine last weekend.

ROGER:Thanks. Got tickets for Paul Simon.

BEG:Thanks for links.

SERENITY: Hope your daughter is getting better.

Al Edge:Thanks for your efforts. Really enjoyed your article.

Thank you all posters. Have genuinely enjoyed GB recently.

Have moved from playing the Impressions to Infidels by Bob. Really enjoy the guitar playing on this album - Mark Knopfler and Mick Taylor. Just a thought. Does Bob personally write all the guitar licks and there are many fine ones on this album?


Entered at Sat Apr 16 02:26:00 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BONK

...or Mary Cavette, Bruce Bruno, Jerry "Ish Kabbible" Penfound...even the bloke that cooked the barbeque chicken in Helena was left out...Colonel Kudlets....Harvey Brookes the bass.... a right old "half-a-job" dedications section if you ask me.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 02:21:01 CEST 2011 from (76.67.16.77)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For now....Here's Robbie Robertson / The Right Mistake (Alternate_Version ). This version is not as polished as the one on the record but I love the groove here....again...The drum beats transport you to a Native Pow Wow. Crank it up! Yes, I am a card carrying "silly" Robbie fan.

Levon did it his way....Robbie is now.....doing it.....his way.

"You have your way.
I have my way.
As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist."
— Friedrich Nietzsche

"Without music, life would be a mistake."
— Friedrich Nietzsche

Two trips with the kidzzz today. First we were at an Ecco Show and then to Roy Thomson Hall with Toronto's Symphony Orchestra. "From Bach to the Future (The Beatles).....I said to one of my students that instead of hearing "Yellow Submarine".....We should have heard "TW". This student's gift card from Indigo Bookstore paid for my "HTBC" CD as well.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 01:59:19 CEST 2011 from (76.67.16.77)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

LATER... WITH JOOLS HOLLAND
BBC TWO
April 15 (just awhile ago)
Legendary Canadian songwriter and guitarist, Robbie Robertson, chats to Jools Holland. See below video shown.

Video of Robbie performing "The Right Mistake" is there too but I can't access it here....yet....maybe in US? GB for sure! lol

There were so many hits on "Don't Do It" from four years ago because some of us saw it then and loved seeing it again! Some videos get taken down and then put up again. The same thing happened with Dylan and The Band at the Isle of Wight.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 01:53:15 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Deb/PV/Bill/RTO

...or Lou Miles and the shoeshine boys in front of the Brown Derby!


Entered at Sat Apr 16 01:29:00 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Thanks for all the great links guys and especially Mike & Kim for that rockin video of 'Don't Do It'. Had to watch it twice. Levon, quite the man.


Entered at Sat Apr 16 00:59:25 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Deb / PV / Bill

..no mention of Teddy the Hungarian or Freddie McNulty either. Haw haw haw!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 23:29:44 CEST 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Deb

You forgot the fly.......


Entered at Fri Apr 15 23:09:57 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Blues

Spent today listening and playing the blues.Muddy,John Lee Hooker,Lightning Hopkins,Howlin' Wolf,Albert King & B.B. King.Very nuanced music--you can really see what The Band took from listening to these blues.The beat,the textures,the stories,the feel & not overdoing the jam to the detriment of the song.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 21:56:21 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Amateur video that includes supposedly one of Rick's last live performances. Rick appears approx 6 mins 40 secs into the video.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 21:27:43 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Martin

Martin Scorcese appears in the artwork in the cd booklet(which I just got today) - better than a thank you in the notes I think.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 21:19:57 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

sadavid, thanks for the Mix magazine link. It has been a while since I checked in there. I'm sure many of the posters here would find the "Classic Tracks" feature articles very interesting. I linked their piece on TNTDODD.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:44:14 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jed

I think some Garcia solo stuff is excellent - particularly the first LP for the mix of electronica and such chestnuts as Sugaree, Deal etc. And Keystone, of course. However, my lack of enthusiasm for most mid-seventies Dead also applies to quite a bit of Garcia stuff. The cleaner, jazzier approach and the curse of Keith & Donna! That said, It Must Have Been The Roses is a corker, a near-standard setter!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:39:30 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: _How to Become Clairvoyant_: the making of

_Mix_ magazine's article on the album's production. Marius de Vries is quoted as saying some of the initial work with EC dates from 15 or 20 years ago - maybe why one track reminds me of "Tears in Heaven" or something of that EC-ballady ilk.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:35:06 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Fred Carter

Bill M: Yes you're right, Mr. Carter started out in Nashville around 1959-60. After establishing himself as a first-rate session musician, he also got the opportunity to produce up & coming artists, no doubt thanks to the experience of working with Mr. Atkins and other established producers like Owen Bradley. When Dean Martin recorded a couple of songs he'd written, he gained even wider exposure. In 1968 Mr. Carter bought a 16-track studio in the Nashville area from the legendary Opry bluegrass duo Lonzo & Oscar. This led to even work work as a producer.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:28:51 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Thank you's

……and selfishly……in contrast to Tracy’s plea……wouldn’t we all want to NOT thank Martin Scorsese……..I sometimes think that while we would most certainly be deprived of having the greatest rock n roll concert film ever made in our homes……..we also most likely would have seen 2 or 3 more RR albums over the years and more than likely some very good to great Band projects with contributions from the pen of Mr. Robertson……………………..Just think how a reformed Band would have been better promoted………..I was thinking about this as a clip played recently on local radio where Robbie was quoted – in response to a question on his concept for a First Nations Broadway play…as saying something along the lines of “No…No…this would be bigger and better than anything Cirque du Soleil do…….this would be much better than anything the world has ever seen……” Not an exact quote but something along these lines and it strikes you that he is referring to THE Cirque du Soleil that just happens to be the consensus best in the world at what they do……..Now no matter what you think of the man…….it does take a certain confidence to say such things……

Love these discussions of the session scenes back in the day……….I had not known there was ever really a pre- Tele period…..Hadn’t really thought about it but great stuff……….Guitar Player magazine has been featuring session stories with Steve Lukather in recent months and they are always fun to read………..Remember as a kid and the camera guys on the musical performances on TV never showed the hands – would drive me absolutely bonkers………..they would show Glen Campbell’s hair ( parted on the wrong side – my Dad used to always point out! ) for the full 3 minutes but not the hands!!!!!!! Notice the clip of Don’t Do It” had some hands of Robbie but no face…..very pre celebrity television……


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:13:56 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Oran Mor

I may check that out Peter. Oran Mor is a beautiful building with paintings by Alasdair Gray (the guy who wrote Lanark).


Entered at Fri Apr 15 20:04:30 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Fred Carter

David P: Fred Carter may not have been first call, but he was something of a Nashville player by '63 or '64. He wrote, and maybe produced, Willie Nelson's "River Boy" around then, and also produced a couple of things, '62-'64, for a Ronnie Hawkins protege, Doug Lycett. Hawkins thought enough of him to import him back to Toronto to produce (and write songs for) artists on his short-lived Hawk label. I suspect it was also Hawkins who later ('67 or '68) sent Kelly Jay to record a pre-Crowbar 45 with Carter in Nashville.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 19:42:34 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Nashville Cats

Peter: The established "first call" Nashville Cats at the time were the older guys like Floyd Cramer, Grady Martin, Hank Garland, Harold Bradley and of course Chet Atkins. Around that time, former Hawk Fred Carter, Jr. got his foot in the door when he caught Mr. Atkins' attention, who began giving Mr. Carter work on sessions he was producing at RCA. Believe it or not, Mr. Carter's specialty was his tasty Telecaster licks. At the time, the Tele was more a part of the Bakersfield sound, and hadn't been used much by the a lot of the older Nashville guys.

In addition to Charlie McCoy, Kenny Buttrey and the other Nashville Cats on "Blonde On Blonde", another group of younger musicians included the original Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, Jerry Carrigan, David Briggs & Nobert Putnam, who left Rick Hall's FAME studio and relocated to Nashville. As the story goes, Mr. Briggs got his first big break there when Floyd Cramer was running late to a session for Elvis and Mr. Briggs got the call to sit in.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 19:40:39 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Peter, I think it's better form to save God for awards shows, but I take your point.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 19:38:55 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I would've thought that a handful of co-writing credits, a number of lead-guitar credits and the chance to sing a verse with full acknowledgement would've been enough for God.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 19:33:22 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Credits

I’m appalled that you missed Al Kooper, John Hammond Jnr and God, Deb.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 18:45:14 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Levon's "Ain't In It For My Health" rated one of best new rock docs.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 18:41:57 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Subject: gratitude

I don't recall our subjecting any other solo efforts by Band members to such scrutiny, but by all means let's not stop short. The ingrate also neglected to thank: his mother, his father, his stepfather, the plucky little sperm that found the ovum in the first place, the doctor who delivered him, the Iroquois Confederacy, Ronnie Hawkins, Wanda Hawkins, Stephen Hawking, Bob Dylan, Jack Ruby, the owners of Tony Marts, Le Coq D'or, and countless other places he's played,the guys who swept Yonge Street, the bus drivers who took him south, Levon's mama and daddy, Spike Jones, the guy who drives the St. Charles streetcar in New Orleans, and scarf makers everywhere. BTW, did Levon thank the Band on Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt?


Entered at Fri Apr 15 18:34:27 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

NY Academy of Music "facebook" pg created by Michael Rocker. He is seeking input & pics from folks who attended & / or worked @ the venue, especially in the early to mid-'70s.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 18:13:15 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Garcia

As a huge deadhead,I always preferred JGB or Jerry solo work.More consistent.tighter & sweet as can be!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 18:04:19 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Levon Helm Band with Emmylou Harris, 7/18/11, Central Park Summerstage

Tix just went on sale. Can't wait. (Fingers crossed for "Evangeline"!)


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:46:32 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Kevin, it is a shame the Dead's erratic reputation is such a large part of Garcia's legacy. He was an incredibly inspired musician and a masterful guitarist. I was lucky enough to see a wonderful Grateful Dead performance in the mid 70's at the Civic Center in Philly and a fabulous JGB show at the Tower Theater in the early 80's. He could soar.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:11:45 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronna

I think Peter V's largely correct about the function of cover tunes as played onstage, but it must be a different thing when an artist decides to cover a 'standard' on album. Presumably they believe they have something to add - and often they're right. "Moondog Matinee" seems to be another kettle of fish. Why bother? is an understandable response, but I'm sure solid reasons must exist. I suspect that they lie more in the internal needs and workings of the Band and its members than in the commercial po-tential of the product. Perhaps we could see it as a prelude to TLW, where Robbie offers up a Gipper-like exhortation to "reach back to your/our roots on Yonge Street when we were young and tight and ruled the roost playing these kind of songs ... with the added bonus that you already know them backwards and forwards so won't have to labour over learning new songs. It'll be a walk in the park for pros like us. Let's get out there and show 'em what we're made of!!"

The thought occurred to me a couple of minutes ago that another of my departed classmates told me, as we drove out to some ex-urban field trip in '75, that he saw the Band as the world's best bar-band. (He was more of a prog-rocker at heart, and saw Spirit as the best overall.)

I'd like to thank ...


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:11:06 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: One Of Us Must Know- and it's David

Sorry, careless - association of One Too Many Mornings with Rick is natural. It's fascinating that in "Bob Dylan In America" Wilentz actually got to listen to the between takes chatter proving once and for all that Rick was present.

The other thing that surprised me (and this time I did bother to walk upstairs and check) is the ages. Both Al Kooper and Robbie seem to indicate that these were older, experienced session guys and paint themselves as the the young rock guys walking into the studio of hardened C&W session players. As Wilentz points out, Kenny Buttrey was twenty-one, two years younger than Robbie, and Charlie McCoy only a year older.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:07:19 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

If credits are handed in months before release…….how would one thank the “promo” department before you know whether or not they have promoted the disc well or not………besides you sign with one company over another precisely because of commitments made to promote……….in the words of RR himself “they are just doing their blankety blank jobs are they not? Only thing that matters to me really is that the musicians are properly credited……………We all remember the fiasco of Rod Stewart’s on the great ‘Every Picture Tell a Story” album where he thanked the “mandolin player for playing the mandolin” …………………..the poor guy had to sit in a thousand bars over the years and say that’s me on “Maggie May” and not a soul could go home and verify he was telling the truth……..sad really….

bob w: Thanks…………….Interesting thing that it was actually the release of Festival Express a few years back where I started to think that I might well have short-changed Jerry Garcia……….something about the vibe he gives off in that film tells you that there is a bit more than just a little something going on with him.

Great clip of “Don’t Do It”………………….Marty was apparently on a smoke break as the camera sure finds everyone but Robbie!! A couple of great from behind the kit shots ……..and for the wordrobe inclined……….Richard did have a certain “je ne sais quois” did he not?


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:05:25 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Nah Calvin, now that i think about it, it is a mystery.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 17:00:03 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Blonde Credits

Peter: The missing credits from "Blonde On Blonde" would be from "One of Us Must Know (Sooner or Later)", as the title seemingly predicts the situation regarding the musician credits. Along with Rick, also missing from that New York session are Paul Griffin on piano, Bobby Gregg on drums and possibly Bill Lee on acoustic bass. The Nashville musicians, however, in the past almost never received liner credit on albums, and were used to being ignored. The inclusion of their names on "Blonde On Blonde" therefore came as a pleasant surprise and opened up new opportunites for session work, especially as more & more non-country artists came to Nashville to record in Dylan's footsteps. Since they were the up & coming sessions guys in Nashville, rather than the older A-list musicians, this certainly helped catapult their careers.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:48:49 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Jeff)

Calvin, I'm surprised you have to wonder.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:40:50 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Rockin' Chair -- live 1970, Festival Express

Beautiful.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:36:57 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

My point was obvious. I could care less if RR put The Band in the credits.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:27:17 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, you finally solved the pink scarf question. I wish (as I so often do) that Steve could have read that solution.

The "thank you" routine is ludicrous on many albums nowadays. With film, it's a little different as every credit goes on IMDB, and listing your credits is important. On CDs it doesn't mean much. As we know, in the 70s people who guested on sessions adopted false names, or (like Rick on Blonde on Blonde for One Too Many Mornings) never got credited at all. It's gone too far the other way. It's interesting to compare the credits on my British ESL / ELT books and on the American versions. There are no credits on the British ones and most UK publishers rule that employees (editors, managers, marketing) cannot be credited, nor can free-lancers as they are doing paid work. They make an exception for illustration and photography because they retain intellectual copyright. The American versions take up a page listing everyone who had even the most peripheral involvement. I note that the author doesn't compile this, and I'd guess the musician is asked what THEY want, then other stuff just gets added.

I suspect that on movies, the hundreds of credits are partly promo saying "Look how big our production was." That might run over to CDs too. It happens with educational publishing where they print massive listings of educational establishments where it was "trialled." I know this often involves sending a proof copy with a sheet of tick the box questions. People tick all negatives, say it was crap, then find themselves credited in the trial. My main publisher, I'm pleased to say, never used this fake trialling ploy.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:12:24 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

The same Don't Do It live video clip was uploaded on youtube almost 4 yrs ago. It would be cool to see more from those shows.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:11:23 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

I'd like to thank sadavid for that last post, and Tracy for having sparked sadavid's last post, and Jan for having built and maintained this playpen for us, and Vint Cerf and Tim Berners-Lee for services without which, and all the faceless/nameless cableguys and telecomguys whose wires carry this stuff too and fro ...

Peter V: Interesting that TLW came out in '78, 33 years ago. My graduating class of '78 got itself together for the first time in 33 years just this past Sunday. Maybe a dozen didn't make it because they're too far away or were busy watching the Masters or something; another three didn't make it because they've passed away. One of those three is the friend I took to see the fancy premiere of TLW - at which John D (who I'd won the tickets from) and his fellow DJs turned up in tuxes. Years later the same friend, then in serious decline, got to go backstage to meet Garth and Maud (and Bill Avis) at BARK's TLW tribute.

Peter V: Speaking of TLW, they must've been really short of blue scarves if they'd already run out of them by the time they got to the Rs.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 16:08:53 CEST 2011 from (76.188.58.111)

Posted by:

Calvin

With all do respect Jeff if RR's "targeted audience for the record is starved silly Band fans", it wouldnt see squat.

Actually I sort of wonder how RR has stayed on the radar as is getting so much play on AOC and getting all the press it has. He isnt exactly a household name among music fans under 45.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 15:41:44 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: American Beauty Rosebud

The Band connections with "American Beauty", apart from the influence upon the Dead at inception, include Rick's cover of "Ripple" (with Levon & Garth) from "On Times Like These". In addition, Amy Helm, Teresa Williams & Larry Campbell, have worked out a beautiful arrangement of "Attics of My Life", which they perform at Levon's Rambles. (Link above to one such performance with guest Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead). The Grateful Dead were among the groups, along with The Band, that joined the Festival Express tour of Canada in the summer of 1970. "American Beauty" was recorded shortly thereafter, and the Dead previewed one of the highlights of the album, "Friend of the Devil", on the tour. I would suggest this would have been a great song for The Band to cover in later years. (Sorry, I couldn't resist the Citizen Kane reference in my subject line.)


Entered at Fri Apr 15 15:31:46 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: consonants R and B; credits

Thanks, joe j. Thanks, Haywards. Lovely. That Roosevelt boot sounds very tasty indeed. After all these years, it still amazes me how Mr. Helm can simultaneously play those patterns and belt out a great lead vocal . . . . The difference between The Band and M. Gaye is just the difference between R&R and R&B (or Soul, if you prefer) and the preference is sometimes a matter of mood (calzone or lo mein for dinner) and somewhat, generational. Start your disco crowd with some Stones and CCR and then see who votes for The Band . . . .

This business of thank-yous is a bit out of hand -- when there's thirty names on the roll, it's not sincerity, it's purely obligation (and lubrication). And why would you thank the PR person? Their "thanks," same as mine same as yours, is their paycheque. For service above and beyond, possibly a bonus, pad the resumé, on to greater more glorious accounts. Much of the success of the promo effort on this thing (no denying it's a tour de force) is due to the principal's willingness to get out on the road, press the flesh, do the same frickin interview a hundred frickin times.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 15:21:39 CEST 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

NUX

Web: My link

Interesting link,hope it works.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 15:04:11 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Yes, Yes, Yes - Thank you, Thank you, Thank You! Mike and Kim for sharing that link - what a way to get into the day!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 14:46:40 CEST 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa. NY

Subject: thanks, Mike&Kim, & Angelina, too......

I ended yesterday with Between Trains and started today with Don't Do It.........


Entered at Fri Apr 15 14:33:35 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Consonant problems: I always thought it unfortunate that so many students I taught from the Middle East were sponsored by BP. Nothing against the company, just that it always came out as BB or PP, but never as BP.

My tales of the pink registration card started me on a “whatever happened to Turner, Wilson and Wood?” train of thought. I checked on Friends Reunited and it seems they all did well. Malcolm Turner runs a successful chain of hair salons, and looks ten years younger than me in the photo in his Mazda sports car. Ignatius “Iggy” Wood is a Bishop, and William “Willy” Wilson describes himself as an “all round entertainer.” I didn’t think you could get stilletto heels in size 12, but apparently so. I’m glad the registration cards didn’t direct the course of our lives.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 14:14:34 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Video

It makes one wonder how much more video there is of that show?


Entered at Fri Apr 15 14:11:20 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thank you, Mike and Kim. Great stuff.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 13:34:41 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Don't Do It (12/28/71) live video from the Academy of Music shows.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 13:06:59 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RTO

I blame butterfield, not Levon...


Entered at Fri Apr 15 12:56:06 CEST 2011 from (86.185.231.206)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Covers

I can see it both ways with the covers. Holy Cow is my favourite MM cut by a dozen country miles; likewise Don't Do It and generally the Rick and Richard covers. Levon, for me, shows early signs of the default blues band laziness we have discussed recently in I'm Ready and Ain't Got No Home, although the organ grinder in me adores his take on Didn't It Rain.

The turkey for me, the real "missed the whole point" scenario is Mystery Train. Good rock and roll turned into turgid, lumpen white funk with extra verses? Nah! Can it really be the same group that turned in a blistering Slipping & Sliding just three years earlier while the cameras rolled? THAT showed a true grasp of good rock & roll.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 12:49:37 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Suvla ???

Sorry, but the subject of my last post seems to have nothing to do with the content. It was intended for a rebuttal of some of Al Edge's comments re Big Pink that'll have to wait for another day.

Got my deluxe copy of 'Clairvoyant' yesterday. I'm saving it for a quiet time, maybe tonight.



Entered at Fri Apr 15 12:41:48 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Suvla.... MFBP

Link is to a short article on Band boots.

My younger brother has more or less committed to spending the next ten years working on the MacKenzie River in the Northwest Territories and has decided to put his island home up for rent. Last weekend I had to get the place rent ready which involved hooking up the water from his gravity flow well, replacing the hot water tank etc. I also had to move a lot of his personal possessions to storage. That includes his (country) music collection. That's when I discovered the s.o.b. had nicked a dozen of my old records. Surprisingly he seems to have secret liking for sweet soul music: Main Ingredient, Chi-Lites, Pips. He also had my old copy of 'Cahoots'. Call me crazy but this is the first time I've heard the record in at least thirty years and it sounds so much better on LP than CD. I guess you can say that about most recordings but nevertheless...



Entered at Fri Apr 15 11:04:31 CEST 2011 from (41.97.234.220)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

...and the color of the register card


Entered at Fri Apr 15 11:00:29 CEST 2011 from (41.97.234.220)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: there's always something of interest

that captures one's attention in The Band GB

Mr Peter V : your Daphne friend have almost the same surname as I, excepted the first letter which is B in mine

as you know B and V are close consonant pairs, which in many languages transcript in function of the desk where somebody wants to sit in the classroom ;-)


Entered at Fri Apr 15 10:32:16 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

I can see your point of view Peter. I also wasn't responding to that article specifically, I know it's been discussed here before though. But I still just love their covers, and how passionately they can deliver them without worrying whether or not they compare with the originals. Especially when the original material dried up, 1972-1974. It was great to hear them do their versions of classic songs. Rob Bowman actually did put it well when he said how they just delivered the best versions of the songs they were capable of. It's just what Holy Cow, or Share Your Love, or The Promised Land, or Don't Do It, etc., would sound like if they wrote them. So I love them for those custom touches they added, their classic sound, to those songs.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 09:24:42 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Moondog Covers

Adam, I guess you’re talking about my Moondog Matinee article. It’s historical context. I was around when Holy Cow by Lee Dorsey was fresh. I was there when Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever by The Four Tops, and Baby Don’t Do It by Marvin Gaye were hot releases. I don’t for a moment think The Band thought they were bettering the originals, nor was that the intent. Apposite covers have a special function in an act. Levon did say they did Lee Dorsey (as well as / better than) Lee Dorsey, and while that might apply to He Don’t Love You, it doesn’t apply to Holy Cow, good as their version is. They get nearer to nailing it than they do on Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever which had the “cover encore” purpose. Many people do it. Simone Felice did Long May You Run, The Duke & The King do Helpless, Steeleye Span do To Know Him Is To Love Him, The Unthanks do Starless & Bible Black or Sexy Sadie, John Wetton Band did God Only Knows. The key is to be just slightly unexpected, change it to your style, and for it to be familiar to the audience. You’ll notice Loving You was never on any official release at the time.

Try this test. Get in a discotheque dance situation as a DJ. Put the lights low. Play a couple of great soul songs to warm up, I suggest Uptight by Stevie Wonder and Ain’t Too Proud To Beg by The Temptations. Then put Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever by The Four Tops on, and see it fulfill its purpose and fill the dance floor with people singing along. Repeat the process with The Band version. You will then see exactly why old Motown fans consider it feeble in comparison. With Holy Cow (which as I said, they do a lot better than Loving You), you’d put on sympathetic tracks from the era. I’d say Down Home Girl by Alvin Robinson, and Working in The Coal Mine by Lee Dorsey to go first. You really will see what I mean!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 09:10:12 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Credit where credit's due.

For anyone new to the Dead who likes The Band, start with American Beauty. I know several people who would only give house room to American Beauty and Workingman’s Dead and nothing else. American Beauty is definitely the most accessible.

Credits. Paul Allen comes first on HTBC, but he is alphabetically advantaged. As we Vs and Ws can tell you, alphabetical disadvantage is so often overlooked in society. We languish at the end of lines, get lost in small print. At my primary school, in the first year, the girls had pink cards, the boys had blue cards in the register. This was the early 1950s when there were only the two genders. Anyway, in my first year, they ran out of blue cards, so all the boys with T, V and W names got pink cards, which followed them through the school from age 5 to 11. By age 11, with changes in classes etc, this was a daily horrible embarrassment, and the source of much cruel banter. It’s amazing I turned out as nearly normal as I am. I can’t tell you what Turner, Wilson and Wood suffered, but I’m sure their lives were horribly blighted.

I agree that the promotion person deserved a major credit. The press coverage, select TV dates etc are all just right. I see it was in the “Major releases” section at both small HMVs I visited this week, with multiple copies.

At least there’s no Prince-style “Thank you God” which is arrogance masked as humility, letting everyone know that you were selected for success by the deity, being one of the elect, “one of the chosen few who will march in the procession.”

Jeff, why would The Band be credited? This is an album by a man who finished with The Band when the TLW film came out in 1978. He was then 35, and already 20 years into his career. Another 33 years have passed since. In career terms, his post-Band life is more than 50% longer than his Band life. But I would personally like now to give thanks to Daphne who shared a desk with me at primary school when I was ten. When cruel jibes descended on me for having a pink register card, Daphne would say, ‘Don’t listen to them. I know you’re not a girl.’ To Daphne, I owe everything. Next time I write a book, she will be in the credits. But as we sat in alphabetical order, she was also alphabetically challenged (Venables), and I will shift the order to put her first. I haven’t seen her since I was eleven.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 07:06:22 CEST 2011 from (184.151.127.158)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Kevin J: guitar

Hey Kevin, It was actually a Norman, quite beautiful. Alas, I do not play. It was a Christmas gift from me a few years back, and Steve picked it up to play pretty much every day. He was really getting good. I miss hearing him play and sing, and laugh. Best to you.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 06:25:34 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Tracy, you left out The Band. For all I know it's there, i haven't gotten the cd yet.but if no thanks was given to The Band, that is a shonda. The targeted audience for the record is starved silly Band fans, and anyone who has heard TNTDODD, or The Weight, UPOCC.IMND, and others, and did not know who they were listening to. Anyone who saw TLW , and the now realized this Robertson guy being promoted was part of The Band in TLW.Also children and nieces & nephews of Band fans.you get the picture.

A huge thanks should go to The Band.The Band been promoting this record endlessly. And for any of you who are wondering, that defintiely includes the 80s & 90s Band. BTW, Jim Weider,Blondie, Earl Cates, should also get thanked. Fuck, all The Cates band should get thanked.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 04:12:24 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Moondog Matinee / covers

Following up on my previous Moondog Matinee post, I think the album and the covers the Band did are incredibly under-appreciated. Some will feel the need to "rate"/compared them to the original versions by the original artists, but to me that is completely missing the point. Moondog, and all their covers in general, were played to compliment the originals. The Band versions are how they heard them and were influenced by them. For cover versions, the original is always on a different level than subsequent covers by other people. "Holy Cow" by Lee Dorsey - is the original version the definitive version? Well, yes. It is the original version. Is The Band's version better or worse? Well, it's neither. It's not "better or worse" than Lee Dorsey's because Lee Dorsey's is the original, and the two should really not be compared side by side in the first place. The Band doing "Holy Cow" is The Band doing their version of "Holy Cow". The live covers often come up here, and many seem like they don't even enjoy them because the originals are "better". Again, that's not the point. When I listen to The Band's "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever", I'm not disappointed because the track isn't "as good" as the Four Tops' original. If I wanted to hear the Four Tops version, I'd listen to that. It is on a different level than any subsequent covers. I listen to The Band's version to hear how the song sounded to The Band. I don't want to hear the Four Tops' singing or the Motown production when I listen to their cover. I want to hear Rick's country soul vocals, Levon's fat and solid drumming, Robbie's economical guitar work, Garth's wild card of sound, and the gloriously ragged backwoods harmonies of the three vocalists. The covers found on Moondog Matinee, and the ones they played live, are fantastic. Anyone who quibbles about this song or that not living up to the original version is missing the point.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 04:05:00 CEST 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Web: My link

Subject: Boston benefit for Morgan Huke

If anybody on here from around the Boston, MA area is looking for a good time, good music, and lots of fun, look no further than the Regent Theatre in Arlington, MA. We are putting on a benefit concert for music promoter Morgan Huke of Gloucester, MA. who has been affected by cancer and a rare disease called Binswangers. He is a tireless advocate and hardworking man who does not let any of his illnesses bring him down. He's always promoting new bands and working on schedules for locations. We absolutely adore Morgan. I have a stake in this too as he helped me put together a special event. Without him, I don't think I could make $3,000 for the safe driving fund possible.

Food and drinks will be provided, along with a teacup raffle we're still getting items for to ensure participants they won't be sorry in spending money on raffle tickets. There will be a giveaway for two airline tickets good for anywhere in the US. I will be making chocolate guitars in 50 varieties for the occasion. You get your choice with exotic flavors as peach cobbler, key lime, cheesecake, and banana split among the usual white, dark, and milk chocolate.

Music will be provided by Morgan's longtime friend James Montgomery, Andy Pratt, Charlie Farren, Erinn Brown Band, Henley Douglas Jr., Lisa Marie & All Shook Up, The Elle Gallo Band, Mia Dyson, Heather Rose, Ed Robinson, Diane Blue, Hirsh Gardner, Lydia Warren, Paula Karahalis, Summer McLaughlin & Frank Hawks.

April 22, 2011 at 6PM. Regent Theatre $20 for tickets. $30 for night of the show.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 03:05:04 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: ROBBIE,etc,

Hi Guys. LINK is to ROBBIE's writing his memoir. Should be a goodie.

JOAN: Thanx for your concern about my baby [40 yrs.old]. She's coming along slowly. If she could only eat something it would help her, but she's stuck with baby food, and anything soft. Haven't heard about the biopsy, and that's what worries her and me. Thanks to FB, as it's the best way for her to keep in touch with me.

BRIEN SZ: I am a huge fan of the Civil War. I have the Ken Burns' docu set, but still watched it when PBS had it on last week. I have everyone of Danny Glover's "Civil War Journal" which was a great docu series from awhile back. I think it was on A&E. ROBBIE was right when he said it was a very "romantic time" in history.

BEG: Wonderful links from you and others..... Will send my addy very soon. A friend taught me how to delete all addy's to help control SPAM, so that's why you don't see it.

Keep up the good work you guys, love ALL the posts.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Apr 15 03:01:45 CEST 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Subject: Give credit where credit is due

Okay, so I finally broke down and got a copy of "How To Be Clairvoyant." As usual, I went straight for the credits. It's a normal past time of mine with everything albums, tapes, CDs. A few things of mention regarding credits and the CD sleeve.

I see there is now a VIP credits section in the gatefold containing the likes of Paul Allen, Arm Candy Andich, Larry Gagosian, and a few others. I'm a little surprised Jann Wenner didn't make the roster as Robbie seems to be a guest at many of his events and at the same table during the RRHOF inductions.

Also noticed in the inside credits of the CD some of the familiar names are listed such as Tony Berg and Penny Lambert. Along with those is "A very special thanks" to the Robertson children and ex. My question is, why isn't Martin Scorsese in the credits. The guy has been one of Robbie's closest friends for what thirty-five years and gets no mention while Gagosian gets a VIP credit? Scorsese is pictured in the CD booklet too, but no name given.

Nathaniel and Elsie are listed but not their famous drumming father, Russ? Did they have something to do with the album?

Who is Mr. No-paparazzi with his hand up, taken by Nimi Ponnudurai? Why is he there when this is a Robbie record?

I will admit that a big disappointment in all of this is not seeing a credit for PROMOTION. Whatever Judi Kerr has done can not compare to the individual who has relentlessly and passionately put their tail on the line in promoting. Everything from Robbie's website, to Facebook, to MySpace, and various other areas on the net which has made a ton of difference. I sure as hell hope Robbie appreciates the effort this individual has given. Tirelessly, lovingly... Shame on whoever put this CD together didn't think of this single credit for which I believe all of the fans who bought this latest record from this person's EFFORT! Congrats to that individual, hey and I never said I play nice, but one has to give credit where credit is due. Robbie's climbed the charts because of you. It's one thing to come up with a product, it's another to let an audience know it exists! Bravo! They should be Robbie's manager instead of Mr. Levine!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 01:50:18 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kevin / David / Bill

Bill, I hate to disagree (I'd pretty much have said the same thing had I not dwelt on it) but having listened to them both again tonight, it seems that American Beauty is the one for the uninitiated. One classic after another seamlessly - Box, Devil, Magnolia, Operator, Candyman - whew!. Then side 2 and Ripple, Brokedown, Till the morning, Attics and Truckin', no messing.

Kevin, the general advice that BOTH 1970 LPs are the ones still stands. but I reckon that if a one-disc purchase is the way, make it American Beauty.


Entered at Fri Apr 15 01:06:23 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Winterland website

Not sure if this link has been posted before but a pretty good comprehensive history and lots of photos of the Winterland Ball Room including its demolition (some crazy inside shot taken while being ripped apart) sad..


Entered at Fri Apr 15 01:06:15 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: The link I mentioned and forgot to post below!


Entered at Fri Apr 15 01:02:42 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Richard Manuel MFBP/SF

Like Bill and Al have said, Lonesome S is a thing of beauty. For me the bittersweet sound of it is, sadly, the best metaphor for what I consider the biggest tragedy of all the OQ history - the drying up of RM as a songwriter.

Those who have known me for a few years will know of my particular fondness for We Can Talk. Never better was the dual keyboard role served than in the sheer joyous gospel of the introduction of that song; the early trademark "shout a line if you can" pseudo-shambolic vocal approach, the quirkiness (who else goes from straight feel into a clippety-clop shuffle for a middle 16 bars?). Unwittingly more psychedelic than anything Frisco!!!

In A Station, the "George Harrison" song. Isn't it just! Indian feel to the call and response harmonies, those ambiguous chord voicings. A treat!

It is not for nothing that Dylan chose to collaborate with RM more than RR. Tears of Rage will always be the "one song I'd love to open every gig with if only I could hit the vocal" for me. If I were Ray Lamontagne (see link), of course - it wouldn't worry me.

If I think of The Band in general, I think of myself in my early teens when Dad would put his copy of the brown LP on, and always associate ATGD and "that voice" as my potted snapshot of the Band. Even now. And RM's role on that LP is well enough documented not to dwell on here.

But "Sleeping" is the real gem - a gem that makes you yearn for the more which never came. That was it; the source was depleted. Tragic.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 23:48:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The right Mistake

Thanks, Sebastian. Hard disc recorder set for Jools Holland - it screens either side of midnight and I have a 6am start on Saturday, so it'll be the recorded version on Sunday evening. Looking forward to it.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 23:23:01 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Bill M: Lonesome Suzie is a really beautiful song of Richard's. Though the song does describe the lonely, hopeless feeling of the girl Richard is talking about, at the end a real ray of sunshine comes out. "I guess just watching you has made me lonesome too / Why don't we get together, what else can we do?" The song seems to really be about seeing someone else in such pain and sadness, and relating to it so strongly that in the end, the two characters end up getting together and making a connection. It's such a beautiful song because Richard could really be either the narrator or the poor soul described in the song. A heartbreaking song for sure, but when it concludes I feel like the two hurt souls find peace in the company of each other.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 23:15:16 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: A Musical History liner notes

Sometimes it seems like Robbie is a clear-headed guy who doesn't deserve all the "pretentious" tags he's been given by some over the years. But almost just as often, he can lay it on a little thick. I was looking over the A Musical History liner notes for Moondog Matinee. Rob Bowman appropriately and surprisingly enough mentions Rick's involvement in Bobby Charles' 1972 album. But Bowman refers to "the opening track Small Town Talk". Has he even heard the album, or is he just assuming that is the opening track because of a renamed CD issue of the album? Or maybe it's just a mistake. Ok, that's fine I guess. But then he goes on, for about a whole page, to deeply analyze the "long rumored 'Works' project", about as uninteresting and unimportant lost Band projects could get. Robbie is quoted extensively (as he is throughout the liner notes to the box), explaining how he had the creative brilliant idea to do things with more avant-garde classical song structures, and how the other guys "just didn't get it and eventually I threw up my hands and said 'What the hell, I'll just write another song'." (paraphrasing). Robbie can really lay it on thick sometimes, and though I try to remain neutral, you have to admit it's pretty ridiculous to read stuff like that in there. I wish Rob Bowman was more objective in his notes and didn't resort to serving Robbie and turning out light-weight fluff a lot of the time.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 23:07:11 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I guess it was Al's brutal dismissal of MFBP that caused me to put it on again. For whatever reason, "Lonesome Suzie" was what was particularly striking this time - "Anyone who's felt that way could tell me what to say" and "Why is it she looks my way every time she start to cry?" Richard's invitation to "use me" of course brought to mind the Bill Withers song, even though the use of 'use' leans more to "Lean On Me". Ain't no sunshine in the song, for sure.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:47:27 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Kevin, along those same lines I've always enjoyed the linked Jerry Garcia Band live album. One look at the setlist and you will have a good idea why.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:46:02 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: For all time.....my band favourite song

Hello Marge, so nice to hear from you I hope you are able to accomplish things the way you and your children would want them and be as comfortable as is possible.

Hi Jan, I really don't bother with that Facebook too much at all. I find myself coming to the desk less and less these days. Can't seem to get interested lately. Perhaps because I have a lot of other interests going on. I share some of the opinion expressed here, but not all. Some of my opinion may not be that popular and it doesn't interest me that much to pound away here at it.

Some good song ideas guys thanks. I liked that video Kevin.

This video I've put up I'm sure many have seen before. For a lifetime of listening to this song, this sound is as good as it ever was or will be. To see it live with the enthusiasm and talent displayed here at this time of our life is as good as it gets for me. Levon smiling and sounding as good as he did 40 years ago after what he went thru. Larry Campbells riff, and the horns bring it all to life.

At the same time, I've liked everything Robbie has done. His lifetime of creativity, musical scores and all has been great. I've always liked his singing. His self abuse with cigarettes for so long just took all the power from his vocals, and he didn't have a lot to begin with. Joe Cocker, Kenny Rogers, Bob Seger Lee Greenwood are all singers with that whiskey voice. Some with troubles from smoking, and as Kenny Rogers said in an interview I watched years ago, poor monitor systems, that cause you to strain and holler. I knew exactly what he meant, I've experienced that.

But Robbie Roberton is spot on with his phrasing in his vocals and his voice is a style that doesn't appeal to lots of people. There are power house voices with much more control, voices that are really an instrument. So you appreciate them all. If you look at the critics on Amazon.com of Robbie's latest work, there are a few negative ones, (for whatever reason), but far more 5 star reviews of people who have bought and are happy with what he has done. At the end of the day those are the ones that count, they sell more records.

I'm just going to fade back in to the wood work, and crank up Ophelia, and I'll be happy. Good for Levon that he can look and sound that good.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:27:00 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

None of us can be 17 again and sit around with a group of friends over a case a beer and take apart what everyone is listening to but this GB is as close as it gets………….fabulous!..... thanks a lot RTO – always appreciate such good detail and also to David, Bill and sadavid……….I do a lot of driving between Toronto and Montreal May to September – so some Grateful Dead is going to be added to the playlist to be sure….


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:10:11 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David P and I can't BOTH be wrong?

Kevin, I see that while I was doing an Al-style post mortem, David arrived at the same conclusions. There you are, then: "Workingmans", "Beauty" and "Europe 72". Off you go, then....


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:08:44 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I'm with David P, though I'd urge you toward "Workingman's Dead" as the most Bandish. And I guess I plump for "Live Dead" over "Europe '72" for the concert experience. Or at least I think "Live Dead" is the one with the latino instrumental vamp that you'll recognise from Zep's great "Fool In The Rain".


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:07:16 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kevin's initiation to the Grateful Dead

Kevin, happy to help and I'm sure others will pitch in. Let's start from the first LP:

THE GRATEFUL DEAD (1967): A charming LP IMHO, but often considered unrepresentative, certainly rushed - in short, the sound of a freakout band in the hands of a record company straight guy. Very bluesy in places - founder vocalist Ron "Pigpen" McKernan in those days very much the frontman, not Garcia. Awash with loud guitars and Vox organ. Probably not a best first choice, but in a funny kind of way my favourite album. Maybe!

ANTHEM OF THE SUN (1968): Weird. Very trippy. Side one is a complex sound collage of studio recordings augmented by live tapes, and side two is the opposite, some raw live recordings spliced together and some studio passages added (not cheating though as not offered as a live LP per se). Essential listening from an Acid point of view but I'd recommend at least three titles before trying this. It is NOT a more sophisticated version of the debut, for sure.

AOXOMOXOA (1969): Still weird, but the acoustic guitars are starting to get dusted off and we are virtually back to shorter "songs". Except for a sound collage with Garcia chanting through a Leslie speaker ("What's Become of the Baby?") this does, in a funny kind of way, usher out the old psychedelia and in with the newfound shift to more regular songwriting - first LP with Robert Hunter involved. An engaging listen, and "Dupree's Diamond Blues" will be played at my funeral!!! A favourite, but again maybe not the best choice to kick off with.

LIVE DEAD (1969): The quintessential 2-LP sixties closer, jam packed with blistering guitar from Garcia and the band all on peak form at the Fillmore in 1969. Get it early on in your Dead-listening, but don't make it your first purchase.

WORKINGMAN'S DEAD & AMERICAN BEAUTY (both 1970): Now we're getting into territory that (for someone with a mutual liking for The Band) I would go for. Shorter songs, nice arrangements, psych tendencies all gone in favour of tuneful songs, pedal steel guitars, superb (by GD standards!!) harmonies and a fine body of work from Robert Hunter lyrically. Difficult to recommend one over the other (my favourite is American Beauty, but...) because these are very much like Revolver/Rubber Soul - a body of work with one only slightly more advanced than the other if you really dig deep. Definitely worth picking the pair up as a solid entry to The Dead for Band fans!

LIVE LP aka "Skull & Roses" but confusingly officially eponymous like the debut (1971): Not bad at all; opener "Bertha" has a place in my heart. More back to basics stuff with a couple of extended workouts. It's only problem is that the next year they released....

...EUROPE '72 (1972!): A document of that tour, 3-LPs and very good too, Has some favourites but also contains some great songs that would have been on the 1971 studio LP had the band recorded them: He's Gone, Ramble On Rose etc. Highly recommended.

In short: Get the 1970 studio LPs first, then Europe '72 and either the debut or Aoxomoxoa, and work from there. After 1972 it all gets a bit jazzy and clean for me; Pigpen died and the band lost something, despite his dominance waning over time and his organ playing being solid rather than special like the talents of Lesh & Garcia, Pig was very much part of the soul of the band.

Any help? Hope so!


Entered at Thu Apr 14 22:00:28 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: bring out your Dead

Kevin J: in memory of recently relocated cosmic pharmacist Augustus Owsley Stanley III, alias Bear, why not try _History of the Grateful Dead, Volume One (Bear's Choice)_, alias The Grateful Dead Live At Fillmore East.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:58:03 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Guest Book of the Dead Choice

Kevin: Either of their 1970 albums, "Workingman's Dead" and American Beauty", would probably be the most accessible place to start. For a more adventurous sampling, featuring live cuts, I'd recommend the "Europe '72" 2-CD set.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:50:52 CEST 2011 from (75.82.11.95)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Jools Holland

Robbie is gonna perform The Right Mistake tomorrow on Jools Holland. Very excited and curious to see how that translates live.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:41:20 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill M: Hello, I Love You, Light My Fire and Moonlight Drive. In retrospect, I'm not sure why Moonlight Drive is on there. I'll listen again later. A candidate for delete?


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:34:57 CEST 2011 from (79.202.185.194)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Groupon The Band

Since Groupon is booming and since we have this great Band group here at hand, groupon the daily Band deal please, share, spend, give, receive and save@2011

link: "Sensational Bass Toss Courtesy of Krist Novoselic" (Nirvana)


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:25:00 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Mike & Kim: Quite something to debut at 13 on the vaunted Billboard 200……..this will no doubt be the biggest selling album of his career……. well-deserved as I believe it to be his best since 1975………….. Previously it was thought that he made more money from Rod Stewart’s cover of “Broken Arrow” alone than the entire Band catalogue put together ………..another $250 bottle of rain on the way – gotta keep Tracy hopping over “Goin’ Hollywood”

Two of RR’s better songs were written for fallen friends…….“Between Trains” as a tribute to "Cowboy" Dan Johnson, an assistant to Scorsese on King of Comedy and of course “Fallen Angel” for band mate Richard Manuel………………as to production on BT…..yes a bit of that dated feel but the songs still works well for me perhaps because of the added knowledge of the emotion involved – on and below the surface……..a bit like the someone did me wrong line on “This is where I get Off” on HTBC....and no Bill M - I do not hear Richard's voice on lead........remember RR's cop on Richard on demo to "Twilight"

RTO/David P: Interesting in that I had planned on asking RTO today where one would go if given just one choice from Grateful Dead to get one properly initiated………..I have tried a bit in the past – they are a band my older brother loved but at the time I was getting into music, I just didn’t hear anything that grabbed a hold of me………as years went on……I also confess to being turned off the band for reasons that sometimes turn me off Springsteen – that is: the make-up of the fan base – tie-dyed right wing conservatives in the case of Grateful Dead and square headed simpletons in the case of The Boss………a bit silly I confess because at least in the case of Springsteen I really do love a good bit of his work…….Nebraska and The River especially…

Ignoring all that……..Is it the first allbum then?

Sadavid: Thank you….never has a jacket had a better run……..even recall an appearance with the late great Tom Snyder……..would you not have loved to have seen Snyder do RR………”So tell me young man……….this Band thing…..”


Entered at Thu Apr 14 21:16:24 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Link to yesterday's Crown Publisher's RR autobigraphy press release.

Book will include childhood, Dylan & going electric & The Band.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:54:43 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Perception of Doors

Peter V: I keep forgetting to ask what three Doors songs you - in a monumentally surpring move - chose to include on your iPod. Off the top, mine would be "Light My Fire", "Roadhouse Blooze" and "You Make Me Real". But then there's "Touch Me" ... Maybe I'd dump LMF on the assumption that I'm bound to hear it on the radio (which is one reason not to have Beatles records).


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:32:36 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Between Trains

BEG: Thanks for the song. I'm sure that the verse, except maybe the first line, after the instrumental break - say 1:35, is sung by Richard and the he and Robbie trade lines and share lines back and forth for the rest of the song. As I said, more than BGVs.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:44:05 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

RR's best solo effort according to the Canadian charts.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:43:49 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Al Edge

Great post! I could feel the excitement and wonder you felt on discovery. You've got my vote to post.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:40:55 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: bondage, and other disciplines

Jon Lyness: thanks for that link, one of the less cookie-cutter among the recent spate of interviews. And my first exposure to "Houdini," which is a lot of fun.

It strikes me that there's a thematic parallel between "Clairvoyant" and this tune . . . in "Clairvoyant" the plea in the chorus is "just tell me where to sign, and point me where to go." The kicker, of course, is that it ain't that easy.

In "Houdini," the protagonist asks his uncle to share the tricks of the conjuring trade, "but the number-one rule in this here game is to never divulge your secrets."

Pity about the riff that's just _too_ similar to Sly's "Thank You."


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:20:05 CEST 2011 from (208.83.120.147)

Posted by:

Calvin

Thanks David, for whatever reason Ive spelled Skip's name wrong for 20-30 years now-everytime. But yeah, I know who he is-and that in Byrdland he is generally thought of as the worst Byrd ever.

So am I the only one that finds Still Between Trains a tad dated with 80s sensibilities?

I was thinking about Reunions, talking about Robbie/Levon and the Byrds, and wonder if it jsut isnt a bad idea. As it probably wont live up to expectations and at worst you could get something like that god awful Byrd Reunion album. Franklly the MCH Albums were better.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 20:05:33 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Raising Cain

We have the stories of Cain & Abel, Charles Foster Kane and Virgil Caine, all citizens of different milieus.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 19:39:12 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: New Robbie interview with the UK's Telegraph

RR interview at the link. A few nice quotes I hadn't seen before.

"I started playing with Levon when I was 16. We were together seven or eight years before we made Music From Big Pink, out there honing our skills, travelling around, gathering music, stories and characters. So when it came time for us to really do our thing, there was a depth to that music. This wasn’t some guys that got guitars for Christmas."


Entered at Thu Apr 14 18:51:48 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Link: Keith Richard "Love Hurts"

Music From Big Pink: I have always thought that a good comparison is the renowned film Citizen Kane. Citizen Kane was revolutionary on a number of fronts and set a new standard for direction……..and while the film hipsters, for years, before contrarian thinking became fashionable, fell over themselves to rank this film first on all “Best Of” lists…………I have always felt that it is a film that is ranked way above where it should be………………Perhaps had I been of the age where sitting through year after year of predictably made films, I would have been sufficiently knocked out by Kane to forever give it a place among the best of the best…but by the time I saw it I had already seen many films that were as good – technically and otherwise.

Similarly, I came to the Band by way of ROA in the late 70’s……………..I didn’t know anything about too many tie-dyed shirts or hate your mother lyrics but can imagine had I been in that orbit as Clapton and Harrison were then most likely I too would have been massively impressed by Music from Big Pink as they were…..But……As it stands, other than The Weight and I Shall be Released, I have trouble staying with any of it and no longer play it at all…………………As to the second album….take out the Jed Clampett reference and multiply everything else Al Edge said by two as it is simply one of the 2 or 3 true masterpieces in the history of rock n roll……….( Al: my vote would be that you re-release everything except the “song writing” one as a we really just concluded our annual debate without too much blood being shed. )

Cigarettes: talked to a singer last night and she claims Robbie’s singing is much improved live these days due to his quitting smoking years back……………have no idea as to any of this personal information in RR’s case but Tom Petty and Dylan are two singers that have really been hurt by prolonged association with tobacco…….a btw, the only two places where cigarette smoke should be mandatory: Basement jazz clubs and strip clubs…………….Pubs also seem to have taken a turn for the worse now that the non smokers have stepped in in bigger numbers.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 18:03:43 CEST 2011 from (86.185.231.206)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David P / G Dead

The mono reissue of the debut is tempting. Though considered (with some justification) rushed and unrepresentative, I love that LP and always will.

Just unpacked my first issue used copy of Aoxomoxoa that eBayed its way to me. Looking forward to hearing the original mix judging by web comments.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 17:52:56 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Where Civil War Meets Civil Rights

Al Edge: I really enjoyed your post, which was especially timely coming on the heels of the 150th anniversary of the opening shots of the Civil War. I was recently doing some research of the history of Atlanta in the decade or so following the end of the war. Many of the prominent citizens, who served as officers in the Confederate army and who survived, were still addressed by their rank preceeding their name, rather than as Mr. throughout their lives following the war. Ironically, modern Atlanta is now known as a city that literally grew out of the ashes of the Civil War and later, through the courageous efforts of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. & other leaders, has become known for its place in the history of Civil Rights.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 17:35:52 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Simon Felice in der 'pool

Cheers Pete. Sorely tempted but not easy just at the moment. Tickets are cheap as chips though.

It's at a place called the Shipping Forecast. Not been but it sounds ace. Maybe Si knows it.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 17:22:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bob – great. There is that “moment in the sun” point. He was quite unkempt (looking very Neil Young like) and apologized saying he’d been holed up in Woodstock all winter, chopping wood, and it was his first time out in the sun. He then said he’d arrived at the weekend, thus hitting the sunniest early April in England in memory. So he said he’d come to England and right away picked up a sun tan. So it was a double “moment in the sun.” A good example is “One More American Song” which I have in two versions, on the first Duke and King album, and again on the solo vinyl LP. We’ve been playing both today, and neither hit anywhere the intensity of seeing it done live. There was a new song too which was totally chilling.

I thought of suggesting he could at least have gone round and helped Lars with a bit of wood chopping if he enjoyed it so much. I could have done … the whole thing was so informal. About half way, he stood up (he performed from a bar stool), said, ‘Sorry, I have to pee,’ and went off for two minutes. At the end he was by the door and shook hands with everyone going out. Honestly, I’ve never seen such an ovation from an audience that size and he seemed genuinely moved.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 17:05:42 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Simone Felice at Byrdcliffe Thea.

Peter V, I'm reserving my seats for Byrdcliffe. You have great taste in music. If he's half as good as your saying it will be a show I don't want to miss! I know what your saying about seeing performers at the right moment. In the past few years I've felt that way when I go see Josh Ritter or Carrie Rodriguiz. The Lovin' Spoonful captured that feeling best in "Do You Believe in Magic". Thanks for the tip.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 17:05:41 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Between Trains

Thanks BEG - I do have a copy on CD as well created from an LP. I would just like to get a great remasterd version along with all of his other great movie work that you mentioned. He has an entire CD's worth of movie music that is some of his best work.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 16:41:38 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: THE BAND'S GIFT: DIXIE AND BEYOND

Thanks for promptings Jeff and both Pete's.

;-0)

This first one sort of deals with my own connection to The Band's music back in late '60's Liverpool. It's basically me trying to understand what the music meant to me and why it resonated so powerfully.

It may also convey to younger guys like Rob and Adam who weren't blessed with the opportunity to acclimatise to the music within the context of those vibrant and changing times why the first two albums carried such an impact for the likes of myself in terms of their underpinning theme essence just as much as their musical brilliance.

I should add that a dozen or so plays into 'Big Pink' back then I rarely ventured beyond lonsesome Suzie as to me the final two tracks simply never seemed to fit the bigger picture that was revealing itself to me.

Finally, I'll repeat for Jan. If you feel it's worthy of making permanent then I'd be once again honoured.

THE BAND’S GIFT; DIXIE AND BEYOND

What becomes the inevitable human tragedy of any war is a sentiment surely shared by all.

There are, of course, some who consider The Band's 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down' to be a song actually romanticizing – from a purely southern aspect – what were the unimaginable horrors of the American Civil War. For me, the song does exactly the opposite to romancing the subject matter. Indeed, I’d go further and proclaim 'Dixie' as one of the ultimate anti-war songs precisely because it manages to convey in such rare and authentic style the numbness felt by just one innocent victim of a war just as that war was drawing to its bitter and bloody end.

Through the song’s authentic sound; the simplicity and frankness of the protaganist's reflections we are somehow afforded a lens into the bleak realities the war has inflicted upon him and his kin. I find this far more the case than when listening to some angry outside commentator passing judgement a la, say, dear Bob Dylan.

Sure there's always a place for the more overt protestations about the evils of war as found within the likes of Bob’s polemics or Edwin Starr’s and Brucie’s anthemic condemnations. And I really do applaud the efforts of these artists. But give me rather the subtleties of The Band's reflections affording the listener space to determine the degree of his or her own condemnation.

As for the 'southern' aspect. Yeah, the song is penned from the perspective of the vanquished Confederacy. Yet as much as anything else, that is surely what provides it with its intrinsic poignancy.

The thing is whether or not factually it was a million miles from the reality of the struggle and whether or not we support the North's perceived banner of slavery abolition and/or oppose the South’s perceived support of that heinous practise, as far as the neutral observer is concerned it remains time’s own slant on history that has firmly established its own truth. And that truth is that the poor lil’ ol’ downtrodden South was mercilessly overwhelmed by the ruthless war machine of the great big bad heartless North.

Whether we like it or not for the majority of us it is Johnny Reb with his bandaged head and crutch for whom we all feel that tinge of sorrow.

But I’d like to set aside justified/misplaced loyalties for any side. For there is another aspect to 'Dixie', too. It is one that I’d rather concentrate upon and one I feel makes it inappropriate to begin to judge 'Dixie' outside of the broader context of the musical canvas The Band were creating back then.

I originally purchased the single 'Up on Cripple Creek' on its black Capitol label from Myerscough's record shop in South Road, Liverpool when it was first released in 1969. From memory, this was a month or so prior to the actual release of the Brown album.

When I got home and played it in the solitude of my tiny boxroom I can recall thinking to myself something along the lines of … "yeah, not bad, that fellas. Okay, so maybe not quite as good as 'The Weight' but you'll do for me boys...probably grow on me anyroad."

Following a few plays of ‘Cripple Creek’, I can recall turning the disc over and playing the song on the flipside. It was the one with the title that seemed far too lengthy and cumbersome to fit into any conventional song.

And stone me. How right I was. As it crackled and soared out of my Dansette like some 45 rpm history lesson, I was left stunned.

Now let’s be clear about the nature of my stunned reaction here. This wasn't in that typical 'bowl me over' sort of way you tended to get from hearing for the first time contemporary gems such as 'Heard it Through the Grapevine', ‘Hey Jude’, 'Like a Rolling Stone', 'Honkey Tonk Women'. Or other mind-blowing stuff like that.

No, this was altogether different. This was more of an enveloping of the sensory system.

Indeed, my initial thoughts were a sort of …”Now just whoah there a minute fellas!”. You can’t be doin’ this… you CANNOT do a song like this... nobody can…it's just not the way these things are done".

If you get my drift.

For starters it was far too sober and austere. And, even more to the point, too sobering. Far too profound, also. And too historical. And too clinical. In fact it was way too fuckin precise and perfect for the sort of rock song that lay within the basic human right expectations of your average keen rock fan.

And yet – bizarrely – it was, at the same time, also far more outrageous than any rock song you might ever care to name.

In Rock’s Bizarro universe, of course.

In this instance, the outrageousness stemmed from the fact that a young rock group could actually manage to create a song that sounded so mature; so battle hardened and world-weary.

Sure 'Big Pink' had kind of prepared us to expect rock music of real quality and maturity. Softened us up a mite. But it had not quite prepared us enough to expect this level of accomplishment. This was the musical equivalent of Sir Walter Scott for fucks sake. Its authenticity was ridiculous. And the sublimity and solemnity of its execution verged on the Berlin Philharmonic.

More than anything else, it really did sound like the men singing it had just trooped away from the horrors of Gettysberg. Or some other nightmare of the conflict. These were guys that were staking their testimony as to what had actually happened; or more pertinently to what they had actually witnessed happening.

Listening to their story as they chewed resignedly on their tobacco was infinitely more real than if you'd watched a score of films or documentaries on the subject. You could sense their angst; feel their weariness; share their pain. That the war had ripped them and their families apart was a given.

And, of course, when a while later the album did come out and you saw that brown sepia cover, you just knew that your inkling had been proved right. These guys WERE indeed straight off that famous battlefield.

Reflecting on why The Band's music so captivated me back then I can now see how the process must have transpired.

What 'Dixie' did – along with but undoubtedly more so than any of those other flawless songs on 'The Band' album – was to form for me a complete whole with the songs of the preceding 'Big Pink' album. It brought a certain symmetry to the proceedings.

By making the link, it afforded me the opportunity to begin to absorb – instinctively [most certainly not consciously] – the statement these fellows were trying to make.

That message was not so much a lien to preaching. Far from it. Rather they were merely to telling it the way it was. The way it had always been. The way they had been told it. They were relaying their heritage and, I suppose more to the point, proclaiming in a way what they and their kinfolk had stood for.

Sure, on their own, that first clutch of songs on 'Big Pink' had been something truly wondrous. In itself it was like nothing else that preceded it. The sheer togetherness and democracy of the sound had pulled you in and wrapped itself around you with its warmth and humour, its candour and its mystery. At the same time, its almost cavernous looseness had lent you the space to find your way into the songs alongside these master craftsmen. Paradoxically, their unparalleled tightness had made you gasp in awe. No feeler gauge in existence could ever get between these fellows.

Then there had been the voices, of course. These truly were dead ringers for something like you ain't ever seen…or heard. Why old Jed Clampett himself sounded positively Queen's English in comparison to these fellows. The thing was, you never knew who the differing wails belonged to.

The rot gut moonshine lead of one would melt into the proverbial country cousin drawls of two others till they all welded seamlessly. Then another would suddenly appear from round the corner to throw in a counter harmony like some friendly neighbour dropping in. And yet another would pop up his head as if through some underfloor hatch with some throwaway back-up line. At times it was as if half the entire neighbourhood were chiming in and out. You simply couldn't keep track.

It was great fun to try, though.

And the bottom line was, 'who cared if it said on the album sleeve notes that four of these fellows were from Ontario?' As far as their "you've got to keep the engine churnin" inflection evidenced, these guys were country bumpkin American. Pure and simple.

Yet, as the more delicately crafted delights of the 'Brown album' unfolded, things became that bit clearer. A fuller picture started to emerge. You got to piece together from just where all that homeliness and sense of community you had felt with 'Big Pink' had originated. Precisely why it had all sounded so authentic and so real.

The fact was The Band were actually offering you a thick slice of an American way of life that was in danger of slipping off the mainstream’s radar. And a huge dollop of American culture and history to boot. Sure, you never quite understood it all but one thing was for sure. You knew instinctively you were on pretty safe ground with these boys. These fellas were not out to dupe you. What you were hearing was no false trail.

In a nutshell it was an America that for quite some time had been obscured by events elsewhere. Events that had taken everybody else's eye off the ball. All except these sturdy fellows.

In my own case it was an America I really knew very little about. These were not just the Davy Crockett or Buffalo Bill Cody characterisations with which every kid in Britain was familiar. This was not simply Mississippi riverboats and lonesome tumbleweed blowing through some Wild West ghost town. We weren't just picking bales of cotton or hunting bison here. Nor was it simply a rehash of all that wonderful American popular music that had gone before. Sure there were snatches of all of these things. With The Band, though, there was so much more besides.

For this, rather, was the whole deal.

In other words, this was about the ordinary folks, the ordinary places and the ordinary music of those people and places. This was the ordinary everyday things. Not just the celluloid heroes or the stellar music or the glamorous settings. Sure they had their place too. They were all part of the same American melting pot.

The Band's take, however, was real – the America that lies within the heart and soul of every American. That sense of identity that must only come when a people come together in the way Americans have. Not so much a patriotism but more of an extended community.

It was a rare commodity, indeed. Who knows, perhaps unique to America. Certainly, we over in Britain do not have it on a national scale. Sure there exists a patriotism but nothing like this extended American neighbourhood. That American feel.

The Band's second album in tandem with their first, in particular the haunting and brutal honesty of songs like ‘Dixie’ managed to capture vital strains of that feel; much of the essential spirit of what that broad American community possibly meant. It made outsiders such as myself feel as if we could connect with it, too. Quite what it must have done to ordinary native Americans I can scarcely imagine – though clearly the delicious irony of the Band's achievement has not been lost on Jaime Robbie Robertson in the intervening years as he has sought to make reparations to natives even more indigenous whose ancestry he shares.

Whether the boys in The Band set out with such an idealist target in mind must remain open to conjecture. At times I believe they did. At other times, I'm not so sure. Of course, I know what I want to believe.

Sure people who are blessed from the heavens with such talent as they possessed would have harboured high artistic ideals. Inevitably, too, they were always going to retain an integrity consistent with those ideals. However, to entertain the notion that they were going all out to capture the very soul of their [four fifths] adopted homeland on vinyl is possibly stretching credibility. Then again, maybe it's not.

When all's said and done, perhaps they were simply doing their darnedest to be true to the gifts that had been bestowed upon them. The fact that their best was enough to create two artistic monuments to their country to rank with any others is simply Americans' good fortune.

And the rest of us mere mortals too, of course.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 16:38:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I see it's sold out, but anyone going to Levon's Birthday ramble on the 21st May could see Simone Felice on the 20th at the Byrdcliffe Theatre! What a couple of days that would be.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 16:33:56 CEST 2011 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Subject: Facebook

Hey Westcoaster, haven't seen you on Facebook lately . . . . where ya been?

J.F.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 16:24:37 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Garland at The Ramble

BEG, my wife and I are going to see Garland at The Ramble. The week before on 4/30, he's playing in NYC at the Highline Ballroom..


Entered at Thu Apr 14 16:00:23 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Mono Road to Unlimited Devotion

RTO: One of the titles slated for release on Record Store Day this Saturday is a Rhino LP reissue of the rare mono mix of the Grateful Dead's eponymous debut album. I already have an original Warner gold-label LP, but may pick up the reissue.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 15:53:43 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon

As I said, the UK release has been put back to June 13th. Yesterday "amazon resellers" were offering to ship it to the UK. They were all gone today. Then I tried to order it on amazon USA (shipping double the price of the CD) and it came up as "There is a slight problem with your order" and declined to continue. It looks as if they not only delayed UK release, but have somehow market blocked it. I'll get my son to mail me one.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 15:30:59 CEST 2011 from (66.102.79.162)

Posted by:

Nick

Location: KW

That's the first time I've heard Between Trains, finally...I've been listening to it on repeat...I love it because it's unlike so much of Robbie's solo work--the vocals aren't too subdued or too polished. It's got a little rawness to it that all of his solo stuff lacks


Entered at Thu Apr 14 14:55:16 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: So Beautiful or So What

I have to say that I'm really impressed with Paul Simon's new album "So Beautiful or So What". After repeated listenings, it's hardly left the CD tray.

"Between Trains" was a glaring omission from the 2-CD compilation "Director's Cut: Music from the Films of Martin Scorsese". The only song from "The King of Comedy" to make the cut was the needledrop of "Back on the Chain Gang" by the Pretenders". However, Van Morrison's cut "Wonderful Remark", featuring Robbie on guitar, has turned up on "Van Morrison at the Movies", as well as a couple of other comilations.

Brien: He may not be Levon, in the words of Sir Elton, but that's the great Jim Keltner on "Between Trains".

Peter M: Years ago, when I got to speak to Levon briefly backstage before a Barnburners show at the Cotton Club in Atlanta, I looked over my shoulder to see Bobby Keyes warming up on sax in the adjacent dressing room. Those same words you uttered immediately came to mind, but luckily I didn't shout it out embarrassingly.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 14:17:59 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Just listened to Between Trains (thx BEG). It's been quite some time since I've listened to it. It is a song that could have very well been on Northern Lights. It has a lot of that sound. I think the song suffers some in that some of the sound is dated. The Garth textures are great but as on NLSC some of 'that kind of sound' is dated. Also, the drums are the least Band like of that song - not that it has to be Band like but since the tune itself has such a heavy late Band sound, a more Levon sound would probably make it stronger. Personally, I think Robbies later stuff is better for the most part. Like I said, it's a good song, just not one I would rush out to purchase.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 14:08:32 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.156)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

What Would Levon Helm Do?: A When You Awake Guest Mixtape

Filed under: Mixtapes, Original Mixtape Series | Posted by: jody


Entered at Thu Apr 14 13:55:34 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.156)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Carmen....Here's "Between Trains" from "King Of Comedy".
I originally had on cassette but here it's from vinyl to download. It's on my Nano as well.

I have most of Robbie's soundtracks except for "Carny". From some of Robbie's work on soundtracks I really dig....

Any Given Sunday Volume 2 : "Carry Me", instrumental version of "Out of The Blue", instrumental version of "Amazing Grace" (better than Jeff Beck's version because you can feeeel his emotional guitar playing, whereas Beck is a technical genius)

Jimmy Hollywood: "Bad Intentions", "The Far Lonely Cry Of Trains"

Phenomenon: "Crazy Love" (one of his best guitar work ever) with Aaron Neville

Scrooged: "Christmas Must Be Tonight"


Entered at Thu Apr 14 13:35:25 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Al's 58,000

Send it to Jan, Al. I'm sure most of us can take 58,000 words. That's too short for a novel, after all.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 13:32:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To reiterate, when I saw David Bowie's band three years or four years before he took off, and they were a regular band around here, there was absolutely not a sign that he was going to be a star. They were one of many bands passing through. Good enough to go and see certainly, but not as good as The Alan Bown Set or Simon Dupree & The Big Sound or Zoot Money's Big Roll Band. In fact I think they were the support to a couple of those. You sometimes catch something just at the point. I think that was true yesterday.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 13:26:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A prophet nor known in his own country

I'm not joking … Mrs V and a friend who has seen ten times as many concerts in his life as me were of exactly the same opinion. The Felice Brothers were OK. I listened to them. It wasn't Band-like. Some was weird. There were always a couple of outstanding ones (from Simone Felice). There was nothing to suggest that any of them were major artists.

Then move to the Duke & The King … two first-rate albums in rapid succession. People were raving to me bout how good Simon Felice solo was and I didn't believe them.If you look on their site, they got "best foreign album" awards in France and Italy last year. The UK press is raving about them. In retrospect, the last Duke & The King was the best album I bought last year. The charisma was outsanding, as was the 100% passion and commitment put into every song.

I saw Bowie (who I had seen before as Davey Jones & The Lower Third), just as Hunky Dory was released, at Southampton Guidhall, a modest sized venue and you knew "this guy is going to be a major star." I saw him again five or six months later, and he was the big star etc (and nowhere near as good). But I saw him right at "take-off" time … and remember he had been trudging the circuit for six or seven years at that point. As had Rod Stewart and Elton John when their careers shot skyward. I genuinely see him at that point, though his image is very much more Neil Young, and like Neil Young, he has the band and he has the solo stuff. The guy I was talking to said "This must be just like seeing Neil Young on his early acoustic solo shows." I think that sums it up. He's playing Woodstock on May 20th - check it out.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 12:58:20 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Simone Felice

Peter V, your comparing Simone Felice to David Bowie, Lou Reed, Neil Young and BOB DYLAN. I've never seen Simone Felice solo but I've seen The Felice Brothers several times. I don't know what to say. At this point you've written the most over the top post I've ever read. If it was April 1 I would be positive you were joking. Simone Felice in the same league as David Bowie, Lou Reed, Neil Young and BOB DYLAN? Wow! I really don't know what to say....


Entered at Thu Apr 14 12:32:19 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Scouser, back in the day we had some good rows in here. Of course you were fighting the good fight long before i lost wha was left of my good sense & joined the party. And once I opened my mouth, was i ever sorry I did. I still curse Big Joe for sending me here.

Post the fuckers, maybe one day at a time..... Next thing you know, we'll be having GB Feud reenactments.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 12:22:01 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond

Subject: Jool's show

I'm a really big fan of the Kuti family, from Fela, through Femi and Seun. Took all of my family to see Femi last summer. They all loved it! I only saw Robby's portion of Jools' show. Wish I had the opportunity to see Seun! Will watch for it elsewhere.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 12:12:00 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond

Subject: Barnburners and stuff

I tried to post earlier, but it got lost in the ethers. I meant to say that I bought the soundtrack featuring "Between Trains" many years ago, and that the whole enchilada was worth it for just that one song. To balance it out, I also mentioned that I was a hardcore Barnburners fan. At one Barnburners show that my wife and I attended at Philadelphia's North Star Bar, I embarrassed myself. When the band was coming out, I yelled to my wife, "That's Bobby fucking Keyes!" just as the sound man cut the pre-recorded music. My shout out was loudly heard in the room just after the pre-game music was cut. But the band seemed amused by it. Had to testify. But didn't want to take it THAT public!


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:58:52 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond

Subject: Yo, Al

I'd love to hear your thoughts at that time. If you are up to it, feel free to send them my way... ninosaurus at comcast.net Bring it on.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:54:41 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: My Clairvoyant Stanley Cup Prediction

one team will win it all.

Remember you read it here first. : )


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:40:15 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Between Trains

Great Song - I just wish that is was for sale in a ditigal format! RR is hot right now - getting strong reviews and good face time. Now is the time to put out a RR at the Movies CD so he can capture all of his great movie music on one CD similiar to what Van Morrison did.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:16:44 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.156)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sorry....I meant it was when I saw Ollabelle in New Jersey that I asked Amy about her cover of "WDD".....Thanks to Crabgrass who encouraged me to meet all members of the group. It was actually at The Silver Dollar where I saw Levon and The Barn Burners.....great show!

It Was a Fantastic Night at The Songwriter Hall of Fame
By madeline Apr 4, 2011


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:13:57 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Band Stuff

Band Stuff is a file in which I've kept most of what I've ever written on The Band. I've just managed to retrieve it from an old e-mail site whilst looking for what I've previously written on the topic of the songwriting creditation.

Believe it or not - and I know some on here will - :-0) the word count is over 58,000.

Anyroad, apart from the songwriting stuff - which is part of a huge piece I must have done on the feud as an entity - there are other big pieces which I think are interesting and may - or may not - merit a permanent place on What's New.

However, I certainly don't want to put such lengthy pieces up if my posting of such long pieces gets up the nose of any fellow posters. They've languished for so long now in my own e-mail ethos it's not going to break my heart not to put them up. But if anyone wouldn't mind seeing them then of course I'd be delighted and honoured to post them and let Jan decide if they're suitable for a permanent place.

BTW - If I don't get any response one way or the other then I'll take that as a nod of approval and post the feckers anyroad. So speak now or forever hold your piece.... or, rather, my pieces

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 14 11:08:49 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.156)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Radio Interview: Ron Bennington Interviews Robbie Robertson

You can also stream full interview via same link.

Hey Serenity. Could you send an email? I seem to have lost many emails lately.

Todd and Ignatiious! Yeah! We'll have the new Ollabelle CD real soon thanks to the Kick Start program. Uhhhh.....Do either of you have Amy Helm singing, "Wang Dang Doodle" from the days with Levon and The Barn Burners when they played an outdoor gig in New Jersey? I asked her if she would ever sing that one again....but she said it wouldn't really fit in with Ollabelle's music but still......I'd love to hear her cover again!


Entered at Thu Apr 14 09:25:53 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Felice Brothers

I really love their self titled album - the one with Frankies Gun. I always thought the drummer looked a bit like Levon.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 09:06:50 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Simon Felice

Rob, I thought just that until last night. Really, this guy is SO good solo and the space so intimate that it doesn’t feel stripped down … just ‘personal.’ The Duke & The King are in the UK for the Suffolk Festival and for the Truck Festival in Oxford in the summer. And one for Jan … after the first part of his UK tour, the whole band appear in Bergen on April 29th,.

Rob, 2nd May he’s doing Bush Hall Music in Uxbridge … you should shift everything to get there.

Dunc, Glasgow is the 22nd at Oran Mor. Roger, Birmingham is the 26th at the Arcadian. Al, Liverpool is the 18th. The venue doesn’t come up when you click on the button … you just get a Google 3D map of Slater Street focussed on “Easy Snax” which is boarded up.

For the USA: Philadelphia 13th May, NYC 14th May, Fairfield CT 15th May, Woodstock 20th May.

Also, another for Rob. Ian MacLagan does The Railway, Winchester on the 8th August. I guess that will be in their rock venue “The Barn” rather than the acoustic space, “The Attic.” I say this because I was looking at the Ian MacLagan flier after ascending the narrow winding stairs, and said “I wouldn’t fancy getting an organ up this lot” and someone told me about their other room.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 02:10:52 CEST 2011 from (76.66.127.62)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

30 Minutes with Robbie Robertson at ExploreMusic ! pt 1 with Jefffffff Woods.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 02:07:43 CEST 2011 from (76.66.127.62)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

30 Minutes with Robbie Robertson at ExploreMusic ! pt 2

Jeff Woods from the Legends of Classic Rock chats with Robbie Robertson

Hey Joan! I hope you're doing well these days. You were able to a attend a show awhile ago?!

Those of you who will be attending Levon's Ramble with Garland Jeffreys on May 7.....Now that would be the one for us to attend Northern Boy and Northern Girl.....but not in our cards this time around.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 01:34:14 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV - Simon Felice

Did he fix you with those eyes that say "I disembowelled a whole mail sack of ginger kittens for fun", Peter? Had it have been the full on Duke/King band I was going to make the trip down and see you there.

I get really pissed off that in the UK we have to make do with sodding cut down versions. Yes, logistics and touring costs, I know all that...but given how often it happens now I wish MTV Unplugged had never happened. I want drums! And valve guitar amps just slightly breaking up! I do NOT buy into the philosophy that acoustic = pure, adult and sophisticated like is made out to be. Bollocks! Zager & Evans or Johnny Kidd and the Pirates?

That said, you probably had a great night and I am not surprised as the mad-eyed one seems to have quite a dollop of talent. It's just that when you sent me a link to them originally, that lovely tremoloed guitar and loose-tuned drums were what made my heart go zing.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 01:02:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Simone Felice

Just back from seeing Simone Felice solo at the Attic, an upstairs acoustic venue in Winchester. It's a tiny venue that sold out very fast indeed. We were second row, ten feet away? For quality, intensity and performance this guy has the charisma I still remember from David Bowie, 1971, or Lou Reed 1972. He's at the Neil Young / Dylan (well, some time ago Dylan) level. The most powerful intense singer I've ever seen that close up. Long, long ovations from a packed room where everyone seemed to know every word of the songs. Every song a gem … every song as good as the record or better. He put absolutely everything into every one of them. A great new song too, with lines about the New York Times. Don't know the title. Long May You Run as the first of three encores. This year I've seen two of the best dozen concerts of my life … Simone Felice tonight, and The Unthanks last month. Even the Decemberists, phenomenal though they were, are not this good.

If you have any chance to see him solo, or with The Duke & The King, grab it. With the right promotion, he really will be in the very first rank.


Entered at Thu Apr 14 00:03:45 CEST 2011 from (193.35.132.15)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kevin

Funny, as you can probably tell I have made April a Grateful Dead month. Your comment about sharing the wine and name swapping happened just as I was listening to Jack Straw off Europe 72: "We can share the women, we can share the wine / We can share what we got of yours, cos we done shared all of mine"...


Entered at Wed Apr 13 22:49:18 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: for Kevin J

. . . a carpenter orders another four fingers of whiskey in a noisy bar . . . .


Entered at Wed Apr 13 22:13:02 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Marge

Sadavid: Apparently RTO is sharing his wine with Joan as our names keep getting interchanged……………..and a btw……..Is Gwynne still wearing that brown leather jacket – surely you know what I am referring to……

David P: I don’t disagree with you on the spirit of” Between Trains”………..and Rick’s voice on “Sonny Got Caught by the Moonlight” also elevates that song.

Marge: I recall that you had put a really good guitar in the hands of Steve some years back – a Larrivee I believe – wonderful instuments but delicate and extra fussy with humidity changes………hope that you are playing it and best to you and the family.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 21:25:55 CEST 2011 from (41.97.213.33)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

"Tell me Ragassuolo do you know a certain Mario who lives here around ?"
"People named Mario are one hundrerd here around"
"The Mario I'm looking for is a thief."
"They are still one hundred"

shortest-finest humour in Cinema -- Mario the character played by Renato Salvatori, in the movie "I Soliti Ignoti" (Big Deal Big Deal on Madonna Street) of Mario Monicelli (1958)


Entered at Wed Apr 13 21:13:44 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

By the time I've finished reading all the posts lately, I have forgotten half of what I wanted to respond to. We sure are "wordy' :-)

Sadavid, re your comment about Celine Dion and song credits. I heard a Dolly Parton interview once where she talks about Elvis and Col Tom Parker. Early in her career,Parker come to her and said Elvis wanted to do one of her songs. She was so flattered until he informed her that the writing credits and residuals would come to Elvis. She objected, but he said that was the way it was done. Needless to say, she refused

Peter V: Fantastic, Wonderful! :-)

Marge, nice to hear from you. I think about Steve often when I'm on the GB. He is missed. I would have loved to hear his take on all of this. Thank you for checking in. Be strong!

Serenity I hope your daughter is OK.

BEG thank you for all the great "finds"


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:58:48 CEST 2011 from (91.42.246.188)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The furtur is inside of you

Just heard a man say it on the radio .... he could be right.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:53:40 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: The creative process and other matters

Bill: Yes, that was a good take on "Fanny". And plausible - the Grateful Dead's opening number on their first LP ("The Golden Road To Unlimited Devotion") was allegedly named after a fanzine that a Frisco girl started; the first verse was about her. "See that girl, barefootin' along / Whistlin' and singin', she's a carryin' on..."

As for swapping ideas and when it starts to be songwriting, let's not forget that RM contributed the "two bits a shot" line to LIAC and even then didn't get a co-credit; ironically one where Levon did.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:41:59 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Byrdwatcher

I was lucky to get to see both the White/York/Parsons and White/Battin/Parsons lineups with McGuinn in concert from an onstage vantage points. The first performance was right after the release of "Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde", where I got to sit behind the amps at the back of the stage area. That's when I first noticed how Clarence White's string-bender mechanism worked.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:40:36 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Who begat who???????

Sounds like one of those crazies in Monty Python giving the "Sermon on the Mount".

Who are you callin' big nose??? I'll smash you rbleedin' face oy wiw!........Well'e does 'ave rather a big nose.......


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:33:10 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

So David,you & levon agree as well. One way art is created: reality is lived, absorbed, life enters into creation, life begets life, art as in this case, is an often life is an extension of life. I believe part , of what you are saying.... you imply to take that a few miles down ... the lives led, the reality of The Band songs came out of the lives of The Band. Including living / WORKING ON SONGS together, including the life their lives and efforts gave those songs.

Angelina, All these marvelous videos you link, Louu, Clark, Rick, The Band, Garland, one school teacher,.....school day,how do you do it? No doubt, it takes a lot of effort.... naw, I doubt... well, ya never know.... sometimes... do you give the search out as a class assignment? Maybe extra credit. Now that would be fair, a extra credit assignment. Everybody wins! Don't tell, it' ll take the mystery out of it. Sure been fun though, RR vids have contributed a lot to the discussion lately.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:24:24 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

And way before that he was half of Skip and Flip, who had a hit with "Cherry Pie" (later a minor Canuckistani comeback hit for Crowbar). Flip was Gary Paxton, who used future Byrd Clarence White and future (post-Levon) Hawk Hugh Brockie on many of his recording projects in the mid '60s. If only Battin and Paul Cotton had teamed up.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 20:17:45 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Byrd Burrito Rider

Calvin: That would be bassist/singer/songwriter Skip Battin, who played with McGuinn's last Byrds lineup for 3 years & 3 albums along with Clarence White and Gene Parsons. The late Mr. Battin also toured & recorded with later versions of the Flying Burrito Brothers and New Riders of the Purple Sage.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 19:42:27 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al: Thanks. I hope RtO enjoys that Fanny line as much as you. As for my other post, Todd has a better sense of my intention, I'd say, though I still mostly agree with myself on the question of credits. If you're recycling a cliche, I don't see there being an expectation that you credit the person you first heard it from, e.g, "As Country Joe so wisely puts it, I feel like I'm fixin' to die. And how are you doing today?"

Peter V: Yup, carnivals is Robbie. Don't forget the one at the edge of town, as Robbie so nicely put it in KH(WSC). I would think that a carnival in the south would have been MUCH more exotic - and thus memorable and write-aboutable - for the young Robbie than Toronto's Ex ever was or could have been.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 19:16:57 CEST 2011 from (72.196.146.10)

Posted by:

Calvin

Even more Bizarre, the men who played with Mike Clarke as the Byrds kept on going as the Byrds for almost a decade after Clarke's death, led up to 1997 by Skip Baitlin and who was the Byrds Bass Player for a few albums in the early 1970s. I do believe Gene Parsons and John York joined them for a short time as well. They didnt stop until 2002 when David Crosby bought the name from them. Since then they have toured as Younger than Yesterday, the group is basically led by a couple of guys who have played in this tribute "band" since 1988 and had played with Clarke, Gene Parsons and York, a very odd history.

But they arent the only ones, Thin Lizzy and a version of the Temps, as well as others Im sure, are on tour with a minor member and 3-4 guys who were never in the band proper.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 19:12:24 CEST 2011 from (90.239.129.11)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: 1.) Kerouac, Ginsberg, Pound etc didn’t get cut in on Dylan. 2.) More Greatest Hits and Dunc

1.) I agree. Dylan is overrated at this point. 2.) I happen to have this double LP since the very beginning. HAPPY TRAUM's banjo playing made me to start with banjo. Good music from "New Morning" period as well. I have started to give away my LPs from 60s and 70s even to complete strangers but sorry Dunc, I'll keep this one forever!


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:50:51 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Diamonds in Her Teeth

In the book "This Wheel's On Fire" Levon shares some stories about attending Saturday night tent show performances of F.S. Walcott Rabbit Foot Minstrels as a child in Marvell, Arkansas.

"Our favorite act was 'The Lady with the Million Dollar Smile', F.S. Walcott's big featured singer, who'd come on in the third quarter of the show. She was an armful. She wore bright dresses and had all her teeth filled with diamonds. She sang on all those real get-down songs like 'Shake A Hand'."

"I'd stare at the drummer all night because with those horns and that full rhythm section, the drums always looked like the best seat in the house. The sound of the cymbals and the snare drum popping with synonymous in my mind with Saturday night and good times. F.S. Walcott had a fantastic left-handed drummer, who I studied closely as I could from my seat...The left-handed drummer sat on my right, which put his tom-toms between me and him. So he's working the snare drum in front of him, favoring the band, and as he's getting ready to roll he's coming right around toward me. I'm sitting two rows back at the most. I'm probably in the front row, in fact, studying what he's doing for the whole two-hour show. I'm naturally right-handed, but people have always told me that I play left-handed. I have a technique, that's where it comes from."


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:42:21 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: De-luxe

I'm enjoying the outtakes on the deluxe edition which finally turned up today. But I can see why Houdini is an outtake. On Houdini / W.S. Walcott / Life is A Carnival / Carny, one is led to think that carnival images: Robbie.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:40:22 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Moo

Al, I don't think Bill was missing the point. More like deflecting it. But he illuminates the finer issue of why were some songs were co-credited and some weren't. Who made that determination. Was there any grey area?

Yes, Deb, the entire Mississippi Delta should be credited! Although I doubt they were all able to fit into the big pink house at the same time. Now it's time for me to bang my head on a rock. But I think I'd better avoid that flat one over there by the Dairy Farm. Skies are looking a little cloudy.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:34:30 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M's Time Machine and Fannies

:-0)


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:30:57 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Not so subtle sarcasm

Nice try Bill. But my radar picked it up by the third word of your second sentence. Oh and by the way you're completely missing the point Todd and me and possibly Jeff are making. Mind you, you're by no means alone in the esteemed company on here.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:16:33 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Peter, I loved the Virgil Cain story. That's exactly the difference between stories and reminiscences. And Bill M, I think you're right about some of the colorful idioms and stories coming from Ronnie Hawkins and I doubt that they were all original to the Hawk. For instance, I've heard "raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock" all my life, from multiple sources, none of whom would know The Band from a bale of hay. If you ravel that thread out to the end, I suppose Robbie should give a co-writing credit to the entire Mississippi Delta -- or the Ark-La-Miss, as TV weathermen and their ilk refer to the region. Irritating as that designation may be it did give rise to a great band name -- Monroe, Louisiana's Kenny Bill Stinson and the Ark-La-Mystics.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 18:07:54 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Yes Jeff, I figured you were in a hurry. And I do try to avoid the use of the word mysterious whenever possible. However, "voodoo witchdoctor swamp boogie" has been know to creep into my vernacular from time to time. But only when there's a full moon.....and the fog starts rolling in from the bayou.

Bill M, I was thinking that some of those shared story / swapping ideas around moments may have ended up as some of the songs that have co-writes. But I was really wondering if there were any that didn't. Maybe some slipped through the cracks? W.S. Walcott (previously known as F.S. Walcott) for some reason seems like it could be a likely candidate.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 16:50:24 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Between Trains

Bill M: I've always thought that Richard probably laid down his vocal track first and Robbie later added his, using Richard's as a reference. So it's quite possible, as you suggested, that Richard sang a complete take of the song all the way through, and then Robbie sang over it, but Richard's vocal overpowers his at some points.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 16:05:46 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: I can imagine Band members sitting around swapping ideas and lines. That might even have something to do with some songs having multiple writers credited.

David P: Re the wonderful "Between Trains", I continue to believe that that's Richard's voice doing some of the lead singing. I also continue to believe that Robbie only sang at all because Richard couldn't come up with what was required in the time allowed, suggesting that there are likely full takes of Richard's attempts in the vaults somewhere. Wouldn't they be nice to hear?!

BEG: Was that Bill Dillon alongside Lanois on "Testimony"? I see he's on one song on Clairvoyant, keeping his run of Robbie records intact. Was surprised that he wasn't mentioned at all in Lanois' very interesting autobiog, "Soul Mining".

Peter V: I see you've put Robbie's clairvoyance lessons to good use. Well done. Also, re turns of phrase, I can't help but suspect that some of Levon's come from Hawkins, just like some of his stories in WoF.

RtO: Your reference to 'Fannies' got me thinking. Maybe the infamous Miss Fanny was really nothing more than the administrator of some fan club, and had asked the poor guy to collect some autographs for her while in Nazareth - and be sure to give them all my regards, will ya?


Entered at Wed Apr 13 15:57:12 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Byrd, Byrd, Byrd, well-a Byrd is the Word

Calvin: Around 1990 Crosby, Hillman & McGuinn filed a lawsuit in Federal Court seeking an injunction preventing Michael Clarke from using the Byrds name with his various touring groups. The judge ruled in Mr. Clarke's favor, citing that he had been using the name with his groups for years and the other three original members, apart from an appearance at a Roy Orbison tribute concert and a couple of other dates, hadn't played together live using the name. So, from a legal standpoint, the three couldn't prove that they suffered actual damages from Mr. Clarke's actions, and I guess the incidental damage to the reputation of the group name wasn't a determing factor. I believe that both factions had tried to get a trademark/tradename registration at the time, so the original lineup evidently had not done so years before.

All the original group members put aside their differences and appeared together when they were inducted into the R&R Hall of Fame in 1991. Sadly, however, Gene Clark died of heart failure several months later and Michael Clarke died of liver failure in 1993.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 15:42:17 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Current Rolling Stone issue features article on Robbie Robertson.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 15:35:22 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Kansascity.com article on RR.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 15:29:43 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Article on RR & his Random House memoirs.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 15:10:55 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Artsbeat article on RR.

Memories from Big Pink.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 14:59:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Completism … a very short list Calvin. Just The Band, all five members of The Band, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, The Beatles and all solo members of The Beatles, The Beach Boys, The Everly Brothers, Marvin Gaye, Paul Simon, The Byrds, Jefferson Airplane, Leonard Cohen, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, k.d. lang, Joni Mitchell, Eddie Cochran, Chuck Berry. But I am trying to stop myself. I avoided the last Neil Young and the Springsteen box of outtakes.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 14:19:33 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie...Testimony with Lanois 1988


Entered at Wed Apr 13 14:12:27 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I'm glad Youtube put this one back up with Robbie on Letterman from 1988.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 14:01:35 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

My favourite performance with Robbie and Dawes would be on Letterman's show. The lighting brings on a club-like atmosphere and it was their first live performance that we were able to witness....Somewhat more energy, confidence.

I was walking in the sundown
I was heading for the breakdown
When you're sleeping on the cold ground
Too far gone

Runnin on a red light
Lookin for a street fight
Higher than a lost kite.
Too far gone

Others weigh in....

"Yup. Love it.

Cathyelliott 3 days ago
@Cathyelliott ....you don't have to sell me....I love the song!! Plan to add it to
my daily drum practice!!

MrTreknation 3 days ago
I've been saying for awhile that Dawes are the closest thing to the band out there today. They were up at big pink in the fall (i visited a week later). The song is ok but I'm not going to hate on Robbie, he's 40 years past his songwriting peak...what do you expect? Always one of my favorite guitarist but not one of my favorite personalities.

vh84dlr 4 days ago
@vh84dlr ...you do realize that his new album "How To Become Clairvoyant" is a collaboration with Eric Clapton & that Clapton, Steve Winwood, Trent Reznor & Tom Morello play on it...This song is from that album....and how do you ever become 40 years past your peak...I don' t get that??

MrTreknation 4 days ago
Good fucking song. Love the band and drummer.

dunskie 4 days ago @dunskie ....opps...just realized the drummer is Taylor Goldsmith's brother Griffin!"

I was reading up on Gene Clark....one of thirteen children who seemed to always be trying to kill the pain.....


Entered at Wed Apr 13 13:53:36 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Civil War Op-Ed

The link is for the Civil War buffs. I just read it this morning and thought some of you might like to read it.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 13:30:17 CEST 2011 from (72.196.146.10)

Posted by:

Calvin

As a couple of men cursed, or gifted, with a similar mania Peter I have to say I found it funny you decided to confess to having completism on Dylan. As if it was on him alone.

Gene Clark's camp always floated the story that he never intended the Clark/Clarke/York grouping with Rick/Richard, Blonde and Rick Roberts thrown in to be billed as the Byrds. As the most he was OK with Byrds Tribute. Supposedly clubowners and such were lazy or whatever and just said Byrds. Who knows, but I always got the sense Crosby/Hillman/McGuinn always had a whole lot bigger mad on for Mike Clarke than Gene.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 13:04:17 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Re-watched it. You're right. It's the strongest of the three performances, relaxed and assured. I hope they have another song on Friday.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 12:59:14 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jools Holland’s show has several bands set up simultaneously in a circular area, so that all the bands are standing there all the time. The whole studio is designed for that.

Straight Down The Line. Interesting. Sean Wilentz traces all the many quotes or lines or book titles Dylan used in songs, often with changes, like Koestler’s “Darkness at Noon” to … Darkness at the break of noon …

What I was saying about stories yesterday, or trying to, is that few Robbie lyrics can possibly translate as “a story he’s been told.” I always thought the influence of Levon’s stories would be phrases or expressions, as Levon has a great store of memorable ways of saying something. Ever since I read his account of Watkins Glen, I think “raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock” rather than “raining cats and dogs” or whatever. Expressions and turns of phrase are something Dylan used frequently … Wilentz traces the ones from Kerouac, Michael Gray traced ones from Pound and Eliot. My guess is that is what some of it boils down to at least some of the time with Robbie and Levon. Kerouac, Ginsberg, Pound etc didn’t get cut in on Dylan.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 12:54:56 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: RR on Jools Holland

The link is to RR's performance on Jools Holland's show. Couple observations - first, the camera work on this show is far superior (movement and framing) than on either the Letterman show or the View. Since I know nothing about Jools I can only suspect that his show is setup to showcase music more than the other two. Also, the look of the studio setup allows for more cameras and movement. Second - it seemed the backing vocals were played up more on this version than the other two. Third - the lead had more punch here than in the states. 4th - of the three versions I think RR's vocals were best overall on Lettermans show.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 12:42:58 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Serenity, best wishes to your daughter for a positive result and a speedy recovery.

Jeff Newsom, we keep you in our thoughts and prayers.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 12:26:53 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Relix...3 page interview
Published: 2011/04/11
by Bill Bentley
Robbie Robertson: Seeing Around Corners

“I used that in the first song on the new record, but I got the title [“Straight Down the Line”] from the movie Double Indemnity, where Fred McMurray tells Barbara Stanwyck when they’re planning to kill her husband:

‘Yeah baby, don’t worry. We’re gonna do it straight down the line.’ Those kinds of lines never leave you.”


Entered at Wed Apr 13 12:06:25 CEST 2011 from (76.66.26.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

HOW TO BECOME CLAIRVOYANT: A CONVERSATION WITH ROBBIE ROBERTSON

MIKE RAGOGNA
THE HUFFINGTON POST

Robbie even comments on current world politics....


Entered at Wed Apr 13 10:58:09 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan completism

Dunc, I have to confess to completism on Bob. I've lost track now because of various bootleg series and compilations, but for years the Australian 3CD set "Masterpieces" was heavily imported because it had a couple of hard to find tracks … the B-side Rita May, and George Jackson (Big Band version). I thought you needed the George Jackson single to get both sides, but I'm sure they're elsewhere by now. Then there's film stuff like Band of The Hand. This is an affliction. But if you're missing odd tracks like that, just send me a list.

Don't miss "Folksinger's Choice" - a great early radio show, released on CD last year.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 10:27:18 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Complete Bob Dylan Help

I've only got a few albums to get to be complete on Bob.

I think I'll go for it.

I don't want to collect all the versions of the Greatest Hits. Are there any other albums other than More Greatest Hits (blue cover) which I'll need because there is new music on it?


Entered at Wed Apr 13 10:20:36 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Sometimes I wonder if I don't get it, Peter, because of age. Glasvegas are respected up here. But I do think I'm not catered for musically on TV in Britain.

I think you've predicted what the interview will be like on Friday. A couple of times I've read Garth say that the one thing he doesn't want to happen in his life again is to be asked another question about Bob Dylan.

Al. I play my Birds albums, Gene Clark Flying High anthology, the double The Fantastic Expedition of Dillard and Clark and Through the Morning Through the Night regularly.

Rob The Organ:Enjoyed the story. How's the album going?

Frustrated waiting for the local shop to get my album.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 09:43:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RR on Jools (continued)

Al, back to Jools Holland: If the Beatles were reincarnated and did his show, he’d squeak “And now the fantastic the wonderful Beatles!’ which is all he ever says about anyone. I don’t like his Battle of the Bands format. Glassvegas were so poor, with dreadful material, that it dropped the level of the show. Seun Kuti was pretty good. I thought Ce Lo Green’s first number weakish, but the closer was the strongest performance on the show. It’s not a comfortable format. He doesn’t know how to speak to people either. He had Bootsy Collins on, talk only, for what? 45 seconds? Earlier I’d wanted to send a friend the YouTube Letterman with Robbie (they’d asked me whatever happened to The Band), and the YouTube Letterman with Levon doing Tennessee Jed, so I watched both again.

Letterman is a vastly better show host than Holland and knows and likes The Band. We used to get his shows a day late. They’re probably still on, but I don’t know where.

Anyway, he did say ‘More of that on Friday!’ (the extended edition) directly after Robbie. That might mean a 45 second chat. I have used my time machine to bring it to you in its entirety three days early:

Jools: Fantastic! Wonderful! So you were in The Band?’

RR: Yes, I …

Jools: Fantastic! Wonderful! And you must have some stories about Bob Dylan?

RR: Bob? Yes, he …

Jools: Fantastic! There’s a song on the new album about leaving the Band. Why’s that?

RR: Well, Jools, we …

Jools: Great! That was the fantastic wonderful Robbie Robertson, ladies and gentleman! Now another song from the fantastic wonderful Glassvegas!

… or hopefully a second song. The best way to get time from Jools is to let him accompany you on piano, which is not a problem, because that’s something he’s good at.

The show to do in Britain is Graham Norton, though it’s not on right now (British shows have 12 week runs, rather than go continuously), and he tends to go for younger artists than Robbie. But then he invites them to join the guests and speak a bit, which is a better format for Robbie.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 08:41:04 CEST 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

I heard someone mention Rozz a while back..If you're lurking, hi to you hun...Everytime Sling Blade is on I remember you turning me on to it all those years ago...

Jeff Bridges and Rick Danko, I can see a little of that ...How about Owen Wilson and Rick ?...I think that was a Rozz thing too...

Some great reading and learning in here latley, and for a novice like me it's all good..

I'm glad REM gets a nod in here..Great band even after they lost Bill Berry..


Entered at Wed Apr 13 08:42:51 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: three for all

First time i saw Blondie with Rick, 1977? . I was attending UC Davis that year,my calcualtions say it was fall or early winter 77. COulda been spring 78, but i doubt it. Danko opened for Tom Petty, who was having a hit with Break Down. I believe Butterfield played part of the show with Rick too.

Rick, Blondie and Butterfield were a trifecta of trouble , as in the too much fun kind of trouble. Big wally, the late "art" dealer ( really paintings)from Woodstock, used to tell the story of his being dispatched to keep the car keys, the money, the credit cards, in order to attempt to keep the threesome in check. So they get a chick to snuggle up to wally, dose him to sleep. and they make off with the convertible, the money , the credit cards and wally's clothes. leave him stranded.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 08:27:23 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

worth watching in its entirety

yes todd.hurried, parched, spending time correcting typos rather than returning to your post to see what you wrote.
knowing your diplomacy in these matters all these years, and employing part of my memory, you likely wrote that the songs were probably good anyway, but the efforts of the other 4 guys probably uplifted them from the realm of the ordinary , or good, to the realm of the extraordianry and magical. I doubt you would use the word mysterious here.

Never did notice or recall you write nothing about santie clause though.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 08:26:58 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

worth watching in its entirety

yes todd.hurried, parched, spending time correcting typos rather than returning to your post to see what you wrote.
knowing your diplomacy in these matters all these years, and employing part of my memory, you likely wrote that the songs were probably good anyway, but the efforts of the other 4 guys probably uplifted them form the realm of the ordinary , or good, to the realm of the extraordianry and magical. I doubt you would use the word mysterious here.

Never did notice or recall you write nothing about santie clause though.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 07:36:54 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Axman

Thanks Calvin. I guess Dave Davies wasn't the songwriting monster that I thought he was. I'm getting sloppy. I used to research things a little better. No time lately.

On that note, thanks to David P. for supplying the credit info for Dylan's 'Can't Leave Her Behind' 'Rainy Afternoon' efforts. Seems in that case that he was the sole writer. I always wished that he would have finished it and recorded a proper version. Still one of my favorite things from him. Interesting that both Rick and Richard had co-writes with Dylan, but not Robbie. Maybe because Dylan and Robbie were both very strong on lyrics. Rick and Richard may have contributed more on the musical side of things which is where Dylan would get the most benefit. Guess Dylan is another guy who could weigh in on the songwriting thing. But ever since Dylan claimed songwriting credit on Modern Times for Rollin' and Tumblin' and Levee's Gonna Break, I've been a little wary of some of his accounts.

On the subject of Robbie's memoirs, I've heard him mention multiple times in recent interviews how good his memory is. I've always thought that musicians in general have pretty good memories with all of the words, songs, and musical ideas that they have to remember in the course of their work. I recall around the time of AMH box set, Robbie saying that they consulted with Levon about some of the song details and who played what etc, and that Levon had the best memory. I guess they either both have great memories, or Robbie forgot complimenting Levon on his memory. It seemed very sincere when he said it, so I imagine that he meant it.

Jeff, thanks for the support but I don't think that I said the songs would have been dull. Just that any contribution the guys might have made could have turned a good song into a great song. But I don't want to call it dull. Might sound like I have an axe to grind.....and all I have left in my hand in an axe handle. Now where the hell did the axe part go?


Entered at Wed Apr 13 06:02:57 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bill, I agree, Blondie lent a lot to The Band.Every time I saw themwith him. He coulda been tha guitar player vocalist/ songwriter. .. one helluva sognwriter, very versatile as such as well. Blondie brings alot to every band he works with,, countles over the years. The few originals he is known for, like Semolina, a copuple others including Sail On Sailor, do not do trhe scope of his writing justice. I have tapes i recorded stored away, from his Skollie days, some killer material. Also tapes of Rick shows with Blondie, Skollie shows with Rick. /.

The Band, Tuna, Roger, many bills together, the ones I saw all after early 85. McGuinn, Rick, Richard crossed paths many times, including The Me & You Go Way Back video, and the performances they did with all those guys round that time. Cavaliere, Havens, Sebastian, wasn't Ronnie spector in the video and maybe some of those live performances. There was a PUBLIC Tv special as well.
Tuna and The Band, an endless association.

Al, I also saw Clark a bunch of times with McGuinn, Clark, and Hillman. Another fine unit.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 05:37:56 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

For the reasons he states, David makes a very valid point about levon's feelings on the subject deserving at least equal respect as does Robbie's.

Another point David makes from a fresh angle is that of expectations. My feelings and my written opinions on this entire subject haven't changed in the aprrox 9 years I been here. I always considered expectations. But in a very strong and hard context, David verbalized what I always considered just something taken for granted, that The Band may have actually been consciously working on songs some of the times Levon was telling his stories. sorry Pete, while I agree that it is valid to hear a story and write a song from it, the story telling thing is not dead. (First of all, you consider who told it to you and why. Then you decide if the person should be offered a chance to collaborate.Especially in The Band, for the reasoins i discussed yesterday) What David points out very solidly, actually gives Levon's position new dimension and it is something worth asking Levon ,Garth, or RR about directly. Doesn't mean anyone would give a yes or no answer, but it is a possibilty that can't be ignored. Thank you , Mr Powell.

St louis, end of feb 2002,breakfast of sorts before the first School For Fools session. Joe or Levon was having tea and toast, i, coffee. The subject was not The Band, it was not songwriting. levon was looking at a lyric sheet. Says, * In the Band, we were just trying to make the syllables work out* or * In The Band. we were just looking to make the syllables line up* To be honest, I did not go home and write down exactly what he said. After long weeks, It had been a long day, begun in the remains of the prior days blizzard, driving Smokey to the vet to put him to sleep. He was dying of cancer, it probably woulda been that day while i was gone, or the next. I had a friend lined up to dog sit, but wouldn't be fair to let him die like that, suffering badly..Though he was a fighter and tough, he had already begun to waste away. First time I ever left home with one dog, Bandit knew what was up, didn't try to come, These two were joined at the hip. Then driving a second 45 minutes in snow roads to meet levon & Joe. And the next day was a nother sesion. so i didn't write it down, and over the years there been so many times guys & gals have said things that I wish iwrote down on the spot. but, no, that ain't life.

Todd makes a good point, that as time went on, probably more and more of the songs developed in more & more isolation.

Todd, one of the points you have been working out, more & more each time, is approaching one of the somethings I've been saying probably from the day i entered the discussion on this subject. As people contribute to a song, in the kind of environment the guys were working in, the entire nature, the entire course of the song can change. Or, if it doesn't alter course, it may be evolving from a point) One writer, working alone, `can come up with something that takes him in a whole nother driection. several times. It some times take awhile to nail down where or how the main thrust or body of the song is going to work. You may try the same idea or main content several ways till yu get the way.Some songs you get halfway through a song, change the whole goddamn song.When you have 4 guys contributing in ways, who's to say that the entire directions of songs did not alter. Who's to say how many times one guy other than RR, or different guys contributed to a song and how much.Who's to say that RR did not go halfway, hear something someone said or played or sang, then go back to square one, or square two. Alotta coulda wouldas, yeah. Just Like is there a santie clause? Hmmph

On the other hand, RR coulda been the sole writer of lyrics and something, and, like Todd suggests, maybe be melody is mostly where the guys contributed. Maybe the songs woulda been dull on their own, like Todd suggests.

Levon's case is very reasonable. And life and entanglements, and creation, and money and business,get complicated. Once you are into soemthing, it's hard to get out. These guys were all in deep. they had been together a long time.At that point, if you are any of the other 4, How do you dissolve The Band because RR beat em on royalties on the first 2 records. ? How do you start legal proceedings over copyrights and splits?. there are concerts, there are record contracts. of course, for all but Garth, there were drugs and booze, and for some, women galore, it is very feasible that as levon stated, the subject was raised, a response was made, and nothing happened and they continued that way cause that was what they knew how to do, and there was money, but the resentment grew. And also the partying magnified too. No doubt. But , that would not negate the truth if the truth is as levon tells it. It might just make RR feel more justified in not having given a different split. but people get stuck. Look at peoples lives.. think abouy how many people have to stay in careers or at jobs they would likr to be better, or different, or leave entirely even, but don't. Why, because this is where they are, the bills are paid. or this is what they know how to do. Or they likr most of their coworkers, even if they think they are getting underpaid or screwed by the boss they work for. Now, imagine you are getting paid a boatload of money, have legal contracts to fulfill, are country boys working for big outfits, love most of your coworkers, have one who is screwing you, but the perks of your job are wine, women, and song. being famous and amongst the most loved and admired in your field., Hanging out with Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo, Keith Moon. Having gorgeous women at your beck & call 24/7. Do you sue, do you say fuck it and leave or do you roll another joint, snort another bag, bang another groupie, play on another record with Neil Young and hope for the best,? Or maybe RR is telling the gospel truth.

Goddam mystery.

Only Levon, RR, & Garth left to say.

David, One Too Many Mornings post,, abzafuckinglutely.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 05:25:34 CEST 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Beg's link + the Blondie period

All my old Band and Band related cassette boots, except two, are boxed away. But I have one of those Byrd's Anniversary shows and Richard's on it. The "real" Byrds - that is the ones who held the rights - of course took issue with the tour(as did some critics. I thought Rick and Richard being billed as Byrd's, even for an obviously quickie moneygrabber tour was a bit hokey and not in the best of taste myself, though I listened to and enjoyed the tape a number of times). However, a Band show which I didn't recall until after my memory lane trip the other day was a show in Syracuse when Blondie was playing with The Band. I'm almost certain that Richard was still with them, but I'm positive that Hot Tuna and Roger McQuinn opened. There was an overall redundant and unnecessary jam with EVerybody joining The Band at the end, but I recall it being one of those nights that I really enjoyed The Band's set, Blondie's playing and harmonizing in particular. The question is - was this before or after that Byrd's Anniversary tour? For some reason I'm thinking it was after, in which case McGuinn seemingly had no ill will towards Rick or Richard.....


Entered at Wed Apr 13 02:45:35 CEST 2011 from (76.66.127.198)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Gene Clark & The Byrds Tribute – Columbus Ohio 1985
20th Anniversary Tribute To The Byrds
East Dallas Nite Club, Columbus, Ohio – May 16, 1985

Gene Clark, Michael Clarke, John York, Skip Battin, Sneaky Pete Kleinow, Rick Roberts, Jim Goodall, Greg Harris, Blondie Chaplin, Rick Danko


Entered at Wed Apr 13 02:18:15 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Dunc

Dunc, I was born in the right era for "The Fannies"(!) as Teenage Fanclub were affectionately known. In my late teens, I bore a strong resemblance to frontman Norman Blake and in the end, particularly if having a mooch around the guitar shops up in Tin Pan Alley, did get asked for autographs. After a while I did sign a couple of autographs because I was fed up with the "no, actually..." routine. No harm done, I thought - it wasn't like i was pretending to be George Harrison and multiplying the value of the CD booklet I was signing...!


Entered at Wed Apr 13 01:57:50 CEST 2011 from (76.66.127.198)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson
He Don't Live Here No More
Jools Holland Later Live April 2011

Hi Serenity! Hi Deeeeeeeee! Hi Claire!

Westie...Nomadic Mike doesn't live in T.O......He lives in Storybook Gardens land.

Todd....I used to listen The Cure too......but I only had their Greatest Hits.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 01:53:21 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Byrds Tribute Band

I caught two of those shows, Feb 85 with Rick, and one with Rick and Richard in May or June 85. Both shows were excellent but they did get slammed in the press unfairly I thought.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 01:37:52 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Great posts & links

LINK: BAND mentioned in RS history...

WOW!! You guys are really posting a lot of goodies, but then you guys are never boring.

Glad to hear that ROZ is doing well too.

THANX for all the great links.Glad to see you NORM post a lot too, and BEG, you never fail to amaze me.Thanx for your links. Always a good thing to get into them.

I haven't finished them all, as my daughter went through an operation this AM, and I have to keep my mind on my e-mails to wait for the results, and to find out how she is.

Keep up the good work, and will read the postings as soon as I can.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXOXO


Entered at Wed Apr 13 01:15:11 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hyperbole

Forgive me Calvin.

Ever since discovering the man's greatness, his huge talent and legacy, his virtual anonymity has become a source of deep frustration. He's even more unknown over here than on your own shores. I doubt if a Gene Clark record has ever wittingly even been played on UK radio. Hence my desire to champion his corner at any opportunity and promote him as something more than a damn fine songwriter.

But, of course, I'm aware what a huge fan you are. And I ponder with green gills at just how marvellous it must have been for the likes of yourself and jeff to see him so often in the flesh.

:-0)

As for Robbie. Him and the group performed well. Prettywell identical performance to letterman as pete and Dunc said. I've never really taken to the Jools Holland show format. Nothing against him but in that role the man is far too glib for my liking. I swear if John and George were reincarnated and joined on stage on his show by Paul and Ringo he'd barely give them the time of day.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 00:48:04 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Nux,Sorry to hear about the death of Syd. I spent an afternoon googling and enjoyed your music also.

I thought Robbie did well on Jools, a difficult show to play. Whatever your genre, poor bands show up because of the competition.

Al, Teenage Fanclub are very well thought of up here, but sadly I'm not into them. Born in the wrong era.

Ray Davis is a great show to see. Great songs.

David P. You blow the money, you're used to a certain standard of living, your music is not selling the quantities it once did, by far. You've got a story to sell, but publishers want a product which will sell...so the brakes are taken off. Am I naive David?

Marge. Glad you are coping. Genuinely miss Steve. I had a calf named after me.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 00:41:27 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hi Marge. Good to hear from you; also songwriting

Steve is still missed here.

Wasn't it Ricky Martin who couldn't tell an interviewer what key a song he supposedly wrote was in?



Entered at Wed Apr 13 00:33:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie on Jools

Very good, though the same song as the two US shows. As Robbie finished, Jools squeaked "And more of that on Friday." So, more timers to set.


Entered at Wed Apr 13 00:01:35 CEST 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Norm's set list

Norm, how about 'That's How I Got To Memphis'.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 23:47:37 CEST 2011 from (208.83.120.147)

Posted by:

Calvin

Todd-Ray far outshined Dave as a songwriter, especially the beginning. In the first 4 US releases had 32 or so song credits and dave had 1, a co-credit with Ray. In 1967-68 Dave had a couple of Hits, Death of a Clown and Susannah's Still Alive-during their 80s resurgence Dave always did Death of a Clown and an 80s tune called Livin on a Thin Line during his section of the Kinks Shows. But he never came close to Ray in songwriting output.

Serious Al? I get called to task for saying Gene's solo stuff was better than the Byrds because that isnt giving him enough praise. I have a whole lof of Gene Clark Boots if you are interested-and yes, he is among my 3-4 favorite musicians of the rock era.

I have a couple of the 85 shows BEG, and Richard was a member of Clark's dream band.

BTW AL, if you hear a show Chaplin was out in fron a lot Ive heard that was because Rick and Gene were sort of "out of sorts".

I saw a very unique show during that tour. WMMS in Cleveland had something from around 77-88 called the Coffee Break Concert on Friday afternoons wherein acts playing that weekend would do a mid day show at a local club. As it was small performers would often come down solo instead of bringing their band. I saw Rick and Gene together alone there.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 23:22:59 CEST 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Josh Ritter

Anybody out there listen to Josh Ritter? Wonderful young singer/songwriter. Great performer with a great band.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 23:21:16 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Norm

Teardrops on your letter!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 23:18:04 CEST 2011 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Marge,

Please e-mail me: jan_at_home atsign verizon.net. No spaces before or after the @ sign.

Jan F.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 23:09:29 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Between Trains

Kevin: I believe that "Between Trains", which I consider Robbie's best post-Band recording, owes some of its charm due to the fact that it does feature 3/5 of The Band, with Richard on background vocal & Garth on synthesizer. Additionally, Robbie's vocal seems to benefit from having Richard harmonizing. Ironically, the closest thing to a full Band reunion with Robbie in the studio, to my knowledge currently remains unavailable on CD.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 22:45:08 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

I don't doubt that Dave Davies can write a song; I just think he's a waste of space, air and water!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 22:18:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Please keep checking in, Marge. We all miss Steve here. I'm sure he'd have had a TON to say about the world these last few weeks.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 22:15:28 CEST 2011 from (184.151.127.216)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Just checking in; Hello Westcoaster!

I just wanted to respond to those of you who have inquired as to how I'm doing, and let you know that I really appreciate your concern. I am hanging in there. I am happy that this winter finally seems to be at an end! I miss Steve like crazy, and doubt that life will ever return to normal. For the time being, I am grateful to have family (and friends) helping me with the farm and the cows, as it would be impossible to manage otherwise. The long-term farming decisions remain to be made. One step at a time... The Canucks have been great, but I'll still be rooting for the Habs!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 22:11:41 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: To the rescue

NORM- "Freebird."


Entered at Tue Apr 12 22:10:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Alternate History Bollix

I love alternate histories, but the consensus among economic historians about the Civil war is that the North couldn't have lost. Military prowess, generals, campaigns and stuff is all irrelevant. The north was already an industrial power fighting an agrarian power. Foregone conclusion. No economic historian would write the result any other way.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 21:51:46 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: "TNTDODD"

Woodstock Radio linked this video of Civil War pics w/ The Band's "TNTDODD" in the background from its facebook pg to commemorate the war beginning 150-yrs ago.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 21:46:53 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Westcoaster Request Line

Butch Hancock - "If You Were a Blubird"....see above link.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 21:27:15 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

For Calvin.......something I posted a few weeks ago:

…….commenting on a possible Kinks reunion recently, Dave Davies had this – among other things - to say about his brother:

"I sometimes think that Ray was only happy for three-and-a-half years in his life. And those were the three-and-a-half years before I was born," Dave admitted. "[He] is a vain, egocentric, narcissistic arsehole. [But] I won't have anybody call him that except me. Because I love him to death."

per David's confirmation, song writers usually know when not to take creditation......often the non writers do not.....the cheeky Celine Dion - or rather her manager/husband - some years back actualy asked for song writing credits on some songs due to their powerful influence over what they knew they could do in terms of sales.........imagine the position this put some of the little lnown songwriters in.......comfort for life traded off against integrity.....a tough one but word got out and the situation was dropped.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 21:10:01 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Open minded REALLY open......theres nothing there

Awright! I'm working on music for the gig I gots to do this weekend. I need some set lists now........c'mon hep me out here gawd damn it!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 20:58:04 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: I Can't Leave Her Behind

Todd: Dylan's songs are currently registered with the performing rights organization SESAC (as opposed to ASCAP or BMI). "I Can't Leave Her Behind" and "On A Rainy Afternoon" (featured in "Eat The Document") are both listed with Robert Dylan as the writer and Dwarf Music as publisher.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 20:19:49 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the night they failed to drive Old Dixie down

On the hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary of the beginning of the War of Northern Aggression, columnist Gwynne Dyer summarizes the alternate history according to Harry Turtledove.

I know there's some Gwynnophobics out there, but you gotta appreciate a guy who's named his latest tome after a Graham Parker song.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:46:55 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: FBB

I always liked Chris Hillman, too.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:42:39 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Process

Peter, I don’t know where the stories came from. I’m sure that Levon had his hand in some of them. But I don’t think that I’ve personally ever pushed that as a focal point. If the Band’s creative dynamic was exactly the same as your situation editing other writers, then I think we can declare the feud officially over. But I have a feeling that it wasn’t quite the same thing. So it seems that you are trying to say that The Band edited Robbie’s work. Perhaps it was the other way around…maybe Robbie edited the Band’s work…..took their ideas and concepts and organized them. Or maybe it was a little of both. Who’s to really know how much back and forth there really was?

In ‘Eat the Document’, there’s a scene where Robbie and Dylan are in a hotel room working on / playing ‘Can’t Leave Her Behind’ in 1966. It remains unreleased to this day, but I think I’ve seen it credited to Dylan & Robertson. I should probably check that first. I would bet money that Dylan came up with the lyrics and basic structure. The melody seems to change in the various versions of it as he sings it. At the link above there is a transcription of some of the dialogue from that process as Robbie makes some chord suggestions etc. There’s a lot of back & forth. Is Robbie simply editing Dylan’s work? Or is he making significant contributions? Since there’s no official “final” released version, and I don’t think that it was ever published, it’s hard to say for sure. But it does give some insight into the back and forth that went on. Can you imagine a similar process going on as The Band worked on songs? Doesn’t seem too much of a stretch.

Did you read Al’s post? Doesn’t solve anything, but I think it gives it some perspective rather than simply: written by Todd edited by Peter. Besides, we don’t even live in a big pink house up in the woods together….and anyway, it’s your turn to wash the dishes….Garth needs a break.

Kevin, thanks for the REM info. I’ve been a fan of them for years and have most of their albums, but know very little about them beyond the albums.

The songs of Robbie’s that you mentioned are all great songs. Well, I could do without ‘Crazy River’ ……a little too talky for my taste. I genuinely like a lot of his post band work. But I don’t think any of them could replace what’s on Pink and Brown. Well, maybe ‘Broken Arrow’ sung by Richard. That would be something to hear……sigh.

I agree that Lennon, McCartney etc. solo, for the most part never really bettered what they did as part of the group. And that’s kind of my point. There’s strength in numbers.

David, i was also thinking about that verse from 'One Too Many Mornings' while thinking about this issue. Maybe this is one of those situations where there are three sides to every story.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:40:57 CEST 2011 from (216.165.95.66)

Posted by:

Ari

Really thought the Jeff Bridges comparison to Rick was a good one.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:22:46 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: One Too Many Mornings

Trying to understand Levon's point of view, I posted a few thoughts on the songwriting issue. In the end, I guess after all these years, it's still hard for outsiders to figure out why he feels the way he does. As a veteran of the music business, he has intimate knowledge of how things work. One thing is clear: he's bitter about how things worked out for everyone in the group besides Robbie. Since he was there and we weren't, he must have his reasons, which deserve at least the respect equal with Robbie's position. We can speculate, but that's pointless, as it won't change a damn thing about how they feel. And, it's obvious from the various reviews & interviews resulting from Robbie's new album, it's an issue that won't go away until things are resolved among the two principals involved, which sadly may never happen. I'm reminded of the Dylan song:

"You're right from your side
I'm right from mine
We're both just one too many mornings
And a thousand miles be-hind"

And you can almost hear Rick harmonizing on the next to last syllable.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:21:04 CEST 2011 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: still in D.C.

Subject: Lurking

Great post about "Dixie" Peter.

And . . . I love Chris Hillman. As Charlie Young and I found out a little over a year ago (right, Charlie?) Chris Hillman could have been a college professor also. His "lecture" on R & R history (at the Library of Congress) was wonderful and I hoped he would go on and on. Not one bit of it dull.

J.F.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:11:06 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….….and Todd…….by the way, the drummer of REM wrote one of the group’s biggest hits “Everybody Hurts”…………and the one certifiable nut job in The Ramones Dee Dee wrote most of their great ones…………….it is what it is even if fans have a hard time accepting it………………I am not a fan of group attribution……Though interestingly, the 3 groups that I know of that do it…REM, U2 and the Tragically Hip have all remained together and profitable for 25 years or more.

Keep in mind……..Roger Waters never made another Dark Side of The Moon, John and Paul never matched Beatles ( 62-70 ), Fogerty never matched CCR prime but all wrote songs solo that could have fit on any group album……..If there is anyone out there that thinks “Sonny Got Caught by the Moonlight”, “Between Trains”, “Broken Arrow”, “Somewhere Down the Crazy River”, and at least ½ of Storyville wouldn’t fit comfortably with the Band catalogue…….then the output is simply not being fairly reviewed….and I guess never will be.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 19:05:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bass players

Hillman is great, and every time I have a prolonged Byrds session, I think, 'Why did I never notice it at the time?' As I mentioned last week, Rick Kemp with Steeleye Span is well worth watching. Chords, playing with just the left hand, taking the main melody. The bass playing was the best bit of the show for me, but I always watch the bass player.

The Duke and The King guy is excellent too.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:58:20 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bass Player Deluxe ......annd

A naked girl out of a cake? I'd probably have a jammer now-a-day.......gawd damn cut it out David!

What I'm wantin' to say here, (I meant to some time back, but I think I forgot). That's a song! I forgot to remember to forget! Moving right along, bass player Carmine Rojas, who was Rod Stewart's bass player and musical director for many years. When I spotted him playing those concerts with Joe Bonammassa & Eric Clapton, like at Royal Albert Hall. Well, hell that just looked perfect. That guy is a wicked bass player. He just kind of isn't heard of a lot, but you look at the people he has worked with, and spent a lot of time making their music sound great. I'm impressed!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:48:49 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, no more on Levon being the source of the stories, then?

OK, adding an idea or two to the vocal melody? The last couple of months I’ve been editing a series of stories by other writers. You get into the stories. Often I’ll think of a line, sometimes I’ll think of a slight plot twist on the story. A couple of times I’ve suggested time shifts in the storyand additional incidents. Being British I don’t just write it in (as American editors often do without asking), but I say “How about …” and it’s up to the writer. Usually they’ll say ‘OK’ and incorporate the idea. Sometimes it’s “no.” Fine. That’s what’s called editing. I’ve worked with editors for years. They don’t see it as co-writing, nor do I.

Also, when you write a script and you’re there with the actors, they often come up with a change in a line, or an idea. If you have sense and it’s better, you incorporate it. No one expects a co-writing credit. It’s what actors do.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:44:36 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Icing On The Cake: The Byrds' Younger Than Yesterday

The Audio Fidelity label has just released a CD reissue of the original mono mix of the Byrds "Younger Than Yesterday". This is the album that marked Chris Hillman's expanded role as a songwriter & singer in the group following the departure of Gene Clark. Mr. Clark co-wrote "So You Want To Be A Rock 'n Roll Star" with Jim McGuinn and contributed "Have You Seen Her Face", "Thoughts and Words", "The Girl With No Name" and "Time Between". With this mono version, mastered by Steve Hoffman, featuring the power of full bandwidth without the bass filter employed in cutting the original LP, one can also better appreciate Mr. Hillman's skills as a bassist. As Mr. Hoffman has also noted: "[T]he mono version is a sure way to hear clearly that a lot of thought went into the mixing process of this album." He further pointed out on his website forum that: "Notice on songs like 'So You Want To Be A R&R Star' how the music layer is warm, almost thick sounding and not so much top end while the vocal layers are thinner so they pop out of the mix like a naked girl out of a cake?"


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:32:16 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Dave Davies

Yes Kevin, I'm not a Kinks expert, but it was my impression, especially from listening to the BBC series CD of theirs, that Dave was actually the one who had the early success in songwriting and that Ray was the one who had to keep up...at least initially.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:21:06 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Al, this part of your post really encapsulates many of my feelings:

"This was not a normal group. It was not even merely an outstanding group. It was a milestone in popular music that has simply never been matched. These were not simply songs that a songwriter member threw into the laps of the other musicians. This was a magic stew, a unique broth that took the kernel of songs and turned them into two entities that transcended what went before and has gone since."

I like the part about the magic stew. I may have referred to it as a gumbo a couple of weeks ago. But magic stew sings better. And maybe can be served as one of the meals on the Magical Mystery Tour that Jeff is promoting!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:15:51 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Thanks to Peter, Bob, Joan, Norm and PSB for the kind words………and Norm, as usual, you put things in a fine perspective by noting the glories of just living one’s life in the best way we all can…..even if troubles and challenges are present…….Rollie is a great spirit – even if he can’t type – we all know he is having some fun and spreading some joy……………….I play his cd regularly and love it.

Stop the Silliness: Dave Davies was an essential part of the Kinks…………….”Death of a Clown” and “Living on a Thin Line” are just two examples of songs that stand along side Ray’s best…………….His guitar work was also inspired and I will forever love the man for my favourite quote in rock n roll history of …….”It wasn’t called heavy metal when I invented it” – Dave Davies…………………some of that early guitar alone deserves a place in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 18:14:50 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Songsmiths

Al Edge & Jeff, Thanks for your recent thoughts in response to my speculation about The Band dynamic. I’ve never though that the issue was purely Black & White or Good vs. Evil as it is sometimes portrayed, and that like any enterprise involving humans, there could have some grey area where misunderstandings occurred. I should add that while I do think that there are some songs that benefited from the group dynamic in the creation stage, there are probably many others that can only be legitimately claimed by one person…..especially as the years went on.

Peter, I wasn’t talking about just adding a note or a chord or even a guitar part (arranging). I was referring to instances where a significant contribution might have made to the original melody that changed it in a way that could be considered as a writing contribution. And I think that if this were to have happened, it would most likely have been in the vocal department.

Al, I don’t know too much about the inner workings of REM, but I get the impression that most of the songs came from Buck (music) and Stipe (lyrics). But I could very well be wrong, and the group as a whole might contribute enough in the writing stage. Mills provides some very McCartney like melodic bass, but most of the drumming sounds pretty straightforward. Although I think I remember reading once that the drummer Bill Berry came up with most of the tune for ‘Driver 8’. So who knows? But the arrangement has seemed to work for them for many years…..at least until their drummer retired. But I think that they’re all still friendly.

BEG, After being a very blues & rock oriented guy for much of my youth, a friend turned me onto the Smiths & The Cure among other groups while I was in college in the mid 1980’s. “Viva Hate” is a great Morrissey album. ‘Everyday is Like Sunday’ and ‘Suedehead’ are two favorites from that album. I also like the Morrissey album “Your Arsenal” quite a bit. ‘The National Front Disco’ is a great driving song. ‘Shelia Take a Bow’ from The Smiths is always a fun one. It’s been a while since I listened to them though. Maybe I’ll take them along this afternoon for a listen.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 17:38:41 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I think I'm goin' back …

McGuinn must have thought success lay in covers. Fast forward to that row with Crosby over whether to have his Triad or Going Back on Notorious Byrd Brothers. McGuinn was probably right. Jefferson Airplane improved Triad (Grace Slick just having the right voice for it). And The Byrds version of Goin’ Back is wonderful. I was moved to listen to The Byrds in my hour of driving about today. My iPod is all the main ones really. They did justice to This Wheel’s On Fire. The fact that McGuinn might be an alien does help give atmosphere on some stuff. As ever, Chris Hillman’s bass playing is great. Understated too.

Al … Sky Plus? Luxury! I'll be on the bike (tthe one with the wheels off) in the garden trying to generate enough electricity to crank up the 12 inch 405 line set so I can watch Jools through the window. Hope it doesn't rain.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 17:18:10 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Harlan Howard

Y'know I remember that part about Harlan, David. That was really good, (your post). He was one of my heroes.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 17:11:22 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Three Drinks & A Riddle

westcoaster: The great songwriter Harlan Howard once described country music as "three chords and the truth". There's another variation, however, best characterized as a riddle, wrapped in an enigma, best solved by three drinks of wine, whiskey, or beer. And, as Merle Haggard has taught us, love lost brings pain when the bottle let's you down. :-)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 17:07:51 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: On song writing - Spontaneous - or - Creative work project

The "magic" is defined by Lacy J Dalton in her song "16th Avenue"

And then one night in some empty room where no curtains ever hung,

Like a miracle some golden words roll off of some one's tongue.

And after years of being nothing they're all starin' right at you,

Then for a while you go in style on 16th Avenue.

Now with some one like David Foster, there is some magic, but researching subjects and having a theme to start with and build around is the different process from spontaneous magic, (but that still creeps in here and there).


Entered at Tue Apr 12 16:43:52 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It don't make NO sense

I've always tried to figure it out. If lonely women make good lovers....how come their so gawd damn lonely????


Entered at Tue Apr 12 16:30:46 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gene Clark

Gene Clark's songs were featured as the B-sides of the first three Byrds singles, so Mr. Clark earned royalties on the sales. ("Mr. Tambourine Man" b/w "I Knew I'd Want You", "All I Really Want To Do" b/w "Feel A Whole Lot Better" and "Turn!Turn!Turn!" b/w "She Don't Care About Time"). Back then I remember that I was impressed with Mr. Clark's songwriting & singing style and couldn't understand why his talents were overshadowed by Jim McGuinn and David Crosby. When Mr. Clark's "Set You Free This Time" was released as the A-side of their next single it didn't achieve much success, which wasn't helped much when Columbia quickly began promoting the B-side "It Won't Be Wrong", one of Mr. McGuinn's songs.

The title song from the hybryd album "The Roadmaster" was actually written by Atlantan Freddy Weller with the legendary Spooner Oldham. The two also wrote Bob Luman's big country hit "Lonely Women Make Good Lovers." Mr. Weller worked with Billy Joe Royal and Paul Revere & the Raiders before achieving solo success as a country artist on the Columbia label. Mr. Weller's cover of "Up On Cripple Creek", featuring his stringbender Telecaster, remains one of the best interpretations of that song.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 16:22:27 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: About.......David Crosby

Quite a lineup at the Vancouver Island Music Festival this year. David Crosby, Rodney Crowell, Allison Krause & Union Station..........annnd.......some one else I forget. You can google Vancouver Island Music Festival. Guess I better do that huh??

Hockey......for just a second.......shit I wish Steve were here. We could be in a great fight. How are you keeping Marge? The Vancouver Canucks finished atop the league this year. They actually have a pretty good chance at the cup this year. This is for Bill, Kevin, Mike and Brown eyes....etc. You know why the cup is kept in Trana??????? So Toronto fans get to see it now and then......aaaaaawwww hahaha!


Entered at Tue Apr 12 16:16:29 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Scouser, your memory is failing you.... Gene clark been one of my favorites forever. Voice , love alot of his writing too. seen 7 or 8 shows he & Rick did together. some with that kiler lineup,the first round of those being shortly after I moved back to NY from St louis (left st lou jan 10, 85). some just Rick , Richard & Gene. ALso caught a few that were Gene & jon York & Blondie, at Folk City. One time I remember seeing just Gene & Richard on stage, if you could call it that, at Folk City. The stage was the floor, in front of one or two rows of chairs,tables usually too, and some backs of booths.

Gene & The Band, well, if they kept themselves working, yes sir, I agree with you. And of course, the creative juices flowing again, the new resolve, and the shared financial rewards could have spurred Richard, & Rick, maybe evben Levon, on to writing more lyrics. The more musical you are, the more musical you are. And when your efforts are renumerated it makes you want to contribute. There are real life non musical parallels I could make, but shan't.

Gene collaborated some with The Flying Burrito Brothers Al, Great stuff. the songs/ music is to be found on the final semi original Burrito lineup release, just called The Flying Burrito Bros. ( Hillman, Roberts, Leadon, Kleinow, Clarke M), the album that contains Colorado, White Lone Fever & Juanita. Also, some never before released stuff ( till this circa ealry mid 70s release) on a compilation titled Close Up The Honky Tonks.

not a big fan of roadmaster, though haven't listened to it in 25 or more years. So who knows how I'd feel about it today.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 15:31:45 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Watching the YouTube Tambourine Man, the ad on the top right screen is for How To Become Clairvoyant.

Live at Brandeis University … the bonus disc with the mono box set, in a "strictly limited edition". I tried hard to find a copy of the set with it and failed. I just got the new Live at Brandeis CD for £4.93. So next time there's a strictly limited edition at a premium price …


Entered at Tue Apr 12 14:02:19 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....just one more! First.....So sorry for posting that last one due to poor quality bit I get so excited when I see Rick Danko and Gene Clark during that time as I still can't remember the show I saw with Rick and Levon in 1983.....but....I can remember meeting Louuuuu's drummer Pentii Glan...and other things that I won't be sharing here. lol

Here's a real treat....Dylan with The Byrds.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:59:46 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: I guess that will be the only time that both are names are up together

Hmm - I don't know Angelina. You play your cards right and who knows down the line....

;-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:56:43 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Gene and Rick

Thanks for that Link Angelina. How great does Rick look in that.

Just to show I'm not the only Clarkophile on these shores, Ive linked the wonderful Teenage Fanclub playing their tribute song to Gene. Not great clarity with the vocals but you can get a real taste of the Fannies amazing guitar sound and a sense of the vocal harmonies which permeate all their albums.

If anyone digs, I'd highly recommend the albums Grand Prix and Songs from Northern Britain. Not sure what Dunc thinks but for me they're one of UK's finest ever bands let alone Scotland's.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:53:19 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

and "EMH" with Gene Clark and Rick and Blondie....He's from Nux's hometown of Durban, South Africa.

I agree with you Calvin....Rick and Gene together.....not a good combo as to extra-curricular activities!

Edge....I guess that will be the only time that both are names are up together....LOL....I had a roommate while in University from Aberdeen, Scotland who's name was Robbie.....He wasn't into music at all, and he was five years older than me.....now maybe a little bit he liked....The Smiths. I actually really liked one of Morrissey's solo recordings called....."Viva Hate".


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:36:47 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Gene Clark and his "dream team band" (sometimes dubbed the New Byrds) comprised by Rick Roberts (Flying Burrito Brothers, Firefall), Michael Clark (Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Firefall), Rick Danko (The Band), Blondie Chaplin (Beach Boys), John York (Byrds and late collaborator with Gene)."

"Silver Raven" 1985 is on my Nano with this group.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:36:46 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Robbie and Angelina

Don't worry Angelina - it's set recorded on Sky+

I'll be rooting for him with Pete and Rob and Roger and Simon and Dunc and anyone else I've missed out from over here.

;-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:33:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Flying High

The truth surrounding what happened is murky. The flying fear was certainly the 'official' line at the time I understand but many of those who have since championed gene's work and made sure it has been kept alive - such as The Flying High' and 'Gypsy Angel' compilations - do tend to challenge the flying fear as the reason.

I guess shit often just happens. Which it will if I don't stop talkin shite and get some feckin werk done!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:28:39 CEST 2011 from (76.68.82.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

BBC Review
There’s much to marvel at on Robertson’s first LP of the 21st century.
David Sheppard

"Conceived in conjunction with old six-string compadre Eric Clapton, who guests alongside organist Steve Winwood, pedal steel player Robert Randolph and, bizarrely, Trent Reznor on ‘sonic textures’, it’s an album as rich in tonal layers as it is strewn in guitar solos. Arguably, Robertson’s signature guitar style, all slippery Curtis Mayfield licks and slyly funky, tremolo string bends, is more in evidence here than on anything he’s released since demise of The Band. The fourth-best singer in that group also puts his serviceable baritone to surprisingly effective use, particularly on the mooching, soulful title-track and Won’t Be Back, a gently mournful, lovelorn ballad that might have been tailored for the larynx of The Band’s Richard Manuel.

While there’s much to marvel at, not everything convinces. Lumpy blues efforts The Right Mistake and Fear of Falling (partly sung by Clapton) feel phoned in, titles from central casting in search of a coherent song. And while sonically the shimmering, cavernous She’s Not Mine recalls Robertson’s eponymously titled, Daniel Lanois-produced 1987 solo debut, it also sounds like something a particularly hymnal Deacon Blue might have knocked up. A rock’n’roll eminence grise deserves better than that."

LATER with Jools Holland
LIVE! TONIGHT
BBC2
10PM
CEE LO, JOSH T PEARSON, GLASVEGAS, ROBBIE ROBERTSON, SEUN KUTI, GREGORY PORTER


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:25:31 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Idling

Shit. Just seen the time. Better do some feckin work.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:23:44 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just looked at the Wiki potted history of the Byrds (the Johnny Rogan book being far too long to consult).I'd forgotten the exact where's and when's. Like Brian Wilson, fear of flying finished Gene Clark with the band, although Wiki notes that already his songwriting income had made him easily the wealthiest, which caused resentment. It's always the same story.

But until Eight Miles High, the hits were mostly covers. I reckon that McGuinn's distinctive voice, always sounding spaced out (probably on Eastern religion), garnered the attention. Gene Clark was wrong to let himself be landed with the tambourine, which always makes a vocalist look something of a lemon when someone else is singing lead and playing guitar. If he'd played a further rhythm guitar (as he obviously could), it might all have been different.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:23:02 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jim mGuinn and DC

Don't get me wrong Pete. I admire Roger McGuinn and Dave Crosby for their wonderful Byrds and CSNY music and their inbuilt ambition and drive.

However, I was picking up on Brian's point about those who have talent to kill for yet simply don't have that 'gene' that is able to project that talent to the levels it possibly merits.

I think both RMcG and DC have since virtually admitted their early resentment - if that's the appropriate word - of the gifts bestowed upon Gene if not the additional songwriting royalties they provided him early on. and that they 'sort of' engineered his departure.

It's a matter of pretty established fact that apart from the Dylan songs the only real gems on their first two albums plus 8 Miles were all Gene Clark material - Set You Free, Here without You etc.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 13:02:53 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Now one of my best pals was a dedicated McGuinnite and would be appalled at the Clarkist view. But when it comes to harmony, I’m sure we’re all Crosbyistas. (Mind you, he might be thinking of Michael Clarke.)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:52:24 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gene's top 50

Just for the record Pete. From 'Through the Morning/night' there's only the title track and the achingly beautiful 'Polly' that make the cut.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:48:31 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Standing at the back

Bri - I agree totally. Salesmen rule the world in a financial sense whilst true spirits tend to languish and many are ultimately forgotten. The example of Gene Clark in The Byrds is arguably one of rock's finest examples. The main songwriter, the finest vocalist and yet most think of Roger McGuinn and dave Crosby simply because they pushed to the forefront and one wore trendy specs and played the meanest Rickenbacker ever heard and Gene simply wasn't the sort to push himself. Bit like Rick - just a real nice guy who happened to be able to write songs few others could ever dream of.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:39:43 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: New Dylan cd

I don't know if it was mentioned but Dylan has a new cd coming out: Bob Dylan in Concert — Brandeis University 1963 This performance happened just weeks before his first album made him a star.

Westcoaster: I remember now that the hosts of those shows held up vinyl versions

Was never a huge Kinks fan. I knew some people, when I was in High School, that loved the Kinks. They had their hits here but I don't recall them ever being a "big" thing. I do recall that DJ's used to say they were underrated. I was always indifferent to them. Didn't 'not' like them or like them.

Saw U2 on the Achtung Baby Tour - they were great. Always liked U2 until shortly after that point. I thought they started to get a bit dull after that.

When you are in the business of writing, you sometimes have to fight for your voice and make sure you get credit for what you contribute. In these team affairs, at times, you have to make sure your creativity gets credit or the business of it all can trample you. Having worked in writing departments in tv, it was strange how your name can get lost in the shuffle. Honor takes a back seat to business unfortunately and if you decide to wait for that virtue to triumph you'll go broke and unrecognized.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:24:32 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just went to get "The fantastic Expedition" to play while I'm working and found "Through The Morning Through The Night". I'd get some of those memory pills if I could only remember what they're called.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:16:04 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fantastic and No Other

Hope you enjoy Pete.

I think the album 'Fantastic' is partly that though for me it does pay a mite too much homage to Dill's bluegrass which is fine but not really for me. I think Gene's real self still shines through on his strong tracks.

No Other is a mixed bag for me. 'Fool', 'Raven', 'Phial' 'True One' and ''Lady' work beautifully but the other tracks - no. Though 'No Other' on his live Silverado striped right down does work for me.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:08:29 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Memories

Ha ha. Pete you and me both. Younger folks may think it's funny but reaching the top of the stairs and pondering 'what the hell did I come up here for' is actually no laughing matter. Especially when you then traipse down only to remember once you get to the bottom.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 12:04:27 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was going to offer to burn you one. In fact the memory's declining fast. Amazon prompted it. I have the Fantastic Expedition of Dillard & Clark, and No Other looks very familar. It might be hiding somwhere unloved and unplayed. I'll have to look. Just ordered Roadmaster from amazon.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 11:48:48 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gene

Pete - Calvin kindly sent me boots of those shows years ago. Haven't played them for a while but I seem to recall Blondie dominating. Also it was after Gene's stomach op I think so his voice is not shown in its best light which at its finest was as sweet as it gets.

If you are going to explore him then the most accessible is probably Roadmaster.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 11:43:39 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Unique

Borrowing a line from Todd's post lower down

""" This was a unique Band making unique music. It's not a stretch to think that there was something unique going on that might have differed in some way from the conventional processes of other groups.""""

Haven't the time at the moment to expand on Todd's point. I did in a lengthy diatribe I did around 8 years ago. I'll try and dig it out if I can.

For the moment, suffice to say I'm quite firmly in Todd and Jeff's camp for the very reasons they have touched upon. I know Peter's points backwards by now and I fully understand why he maintains them. I think by 'normal' criteria he and Kevin have it just about right [great post btw Kev and I fully take on board your 'deciding John Simon vote' criterion]

However, I simply don't accept that anybody can judge the first two albums by 'normal criteria'. Stagefright - most definitely. But those first two albums were totally unlike anything befor or since. They simply could not have managed to achieve the levels of artistic perfection [minus, of course, Wheels on Fire and I Shall Be Released from the first album] that they did without some unique alchemy taking place.

This was not a normal group. It was not even merely an outstanding group. It was a milestone in popular music that has simply never been matched. These were not simply songs that a songwriter member threw into the laps of the other musicians. This was a magic stew, a unique broth that took the kernal of songs and turned them into two entities that transcended what went before and has gone since.

I would throw in here that the same 'sharing principle' and 'uniqueness' also needed to be applied to Richard's songs - yes even Suzie. Hopefully that will put off Pat from throwing that one in to negate the 'shared' argument. ;-0)

It would take Solomon to determine what the real split should have been and manifestly Robbie merited the lion's share as he was overwhelmingly THE songwriter and thereby the underpinning creative drive. However, in this unique instance some aspect of the songwriting credit was also clearly due to the remaining four members - in whichever way Solomon sought to apportion it.

The Band's music defied the convention at the time. It's hardly the most challenging concept to realise that in the face of the unique product that flowed from that defiance of convention so should a corresponding defiance of the convential route of dishing out royalties.

Fuck me, nobody's hands were actually tied together.

Incidentally - the group with the nearest proper BAND philosophy to that which The Band perhaps should have aspired, was REM - arguably the finest group since our boys.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 11:35:15 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Gene Clark

Funny, Al, I had almost exactly the same comments on Gene Clark yesterday afternoon from a secondhand record store guy, who asked me how many Gene Clark albums I had, and fell over backwards when I said none. He said almost what you said, started rooting through his stock to sell me some, but didn't have any. But he hadn't heard "A Star For every stage" the Gene Clark- Rick Danko-Richard Manuel- Blondie Chaplin - Rick Roberts bootleg. See link. I consider it a civic duty to burn him a copy. He sold me a copy of Kathy Dalton's "Boogie Bands and One Night Stands" for £2 on the grounds that it's Little Feat + Carl Wilson and Sneaky Pete backing her.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 11:08:11 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gene Clark - A Damn Fine Songwriter

Calvin.

Have to respectfully disagree with your tag.

In my humble opinion Gene Clark is THE most undervalued and underappreciated TRULY GREAT AMERICAN SONGWRITER.

I have everything he's done. I have whittled it all down over the years to what I consider to be his 50 finest songs. These take up three blank cd's. Not one of the songs is skippable and believe me there are very few of the innumerable top flight artists whose work I treasure with whom I could compile 50 songs that I would NEVER dream of skipping during a listening session, let alone crave to listen to again and again after so many years.

He was inspired, he simply oozed delicious melodies like few others, he was poetic like only the few true great songwriters and nobody exposed his inner self like Gene. Not even Joni.

I will say on what might be termed the 'downside' he did tend to be limited to what we'd broadly term 'love' songs. And this likely limited his appeal amongst folks seeking artists with a broader canvas to their music. But, as we all now so well on this GB if the song is good enough then even if it is only about lost love, It Makes No Difference. :-0)

Miss you Gene

:-0)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 10:21:24 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Story telling

We’re shifting from “telling a story” to a chord or a note here or there. OK, let’s look at telling a story, and the often quoted The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down. Is someone contending that Levon said”

‘Hey, Robbie, did I tell you about this guy Virgil in Tennessee? Served on the Danville train. Until Stormont’s calvary came and tore up the tracks. There was so much cavalry there, that’s what I heard. Brother got killed in the Civil War. So he was back with his wife, Joan, there and they saw General Lee passing through on a riverboat. Darn riverboat was called the Robert E. Lee too. Confused the shit out of them. You gotta mention General Lee with respect. Anyways, Virgil’s standing looking at this mud … or mebbee it was blood … can’t recall rightly …on the ground. Lot of it in Tennessee whatever. Shit, says Virgil, you know, it’s a bastard, war is, they should never have taken the very best.”

That would be telling the story that led to the song. And that’s still not songwriting. I don’t think the storytelling was like that.

So, take it further. I say to RTO, or PSB, or Jeff or Pat B, or anyone of the songwriters here.

“Hey, guys, did I ever tell you about Old King Harold? Got shot in the eye with an arrow at the Battle of Hastings. 1066 it was. They rang all the bells in Hastings that night. “

So, all the writers say, ‘We kind of knew that story already.’ But willing to humour me, they go off and compose five meticulously crafted verses with a lovely melody, seen from the viewpoint of Piers the Plowman, who got drafted in as a shield bearer. He's remembering it later in his hovel in Sussex, and how his third cousin, Lear, got a spear through his ear and was petrified with fear. Their idea, not mine. Are they going to cut me in? They’ll have just two words for me. And the second is “off.”

On the other point, songs written since TLW, I’d contend that Robbie has written at least a dozen at his flat-out Band quality rate. Crazy River and Fallen Angel are performed as well as they could be too. I’d concede that the lovely Breaking The Rules would have been way better sung by Rick, and Soap Box Preacher would have been better sung by Levon and Rick and Richard.

Then you get a dilemma. Take When The Night Was Young. Rick would have done it superbly, sung it like a bird. But there’s expression in Robbie’s version that is equally as valuable. (Both singing together, in an ideal world.)


Entered at Tue Apr 12 09:56:08 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: song writing vs arrangements

Not taking any sides here . Have a listen to the outtake of Jemmima on the Brown album re-issue. Then have a listen to the official version. The former is flat and goes nowhere while the latter is a bit of magic.The difference - the arrangement. This song of course was co-written by Levon.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 09:21:53 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Impressions

Thanks, Peter. I would know these three songs as mentioned, but I would not have known that it was a band called the Impressions who had recorded them. Don't have the Spencer Davis Group recording, but ironically play the group's greatest hits regularly. It was Superfly, perhaps like most, many(?) Britons where I first heard the name Curtis Mayfield. Now quite a little collection building up...perhaps a little late.

Not a U2 fan either.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 06:23:35 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: If RR were to tour, I have the prefect title for it,

Hearing a story, writing a song... valid. But, as David pointed out, if the intent was to write a song to start with, that ls different.Especially since they knew they'd be working the music out together, and especially because the already been splitting everything 5 ways for 8 years. This is speculation about the intent of telling the story, yes. BUT, thgese guys been splittign everythign 5 ways for 8 years. They were about to make records... Going back forever in here, I was always of the opinion that what the Other 4 Guys contributed was proabbly was far more than just arranging, and because it was the intial version of the songs, and key to their success and appeal, and cover value, it should have been treated differently. And it is completely feasible they had just assumed they were sharing. or even hey, we have to get back to work on that song. Hey guys, let's finish working on that song, or hey., we still have thAt bridge to knock out, etc etc. RR has said that they all brought things and Garth took the songs new places mucially. Well, what iS that? These were unrecorded songs.They were not paid for arranging. Had they a legal agreement that made what they contributed other than songwriting going in , my opinion be different. Old system, new system. when you been sharing equally for 8 years old system wouldnlt make sense.Unless you make it legal and agreed to up front, Unless you say, hey guym here it is. Im writing these, you are arranging em, I get this, you get that. Far as Richard's songs being copyrighted in his name alone, levon did make the position that the copyrights surprised them all. Why would that not include the copyrights on all the songs? Obviously, The Band did not fill out the copyrights or talk about it, Levon's case was the Other 4 all had an expectation and were surprised.

the actual facts will never be known. Only way to ge a real read would be to have Garth, levon & Robbie together to discuss it face to face. not happening. Not to anyoen;s adavntage to do it at this point. Woudl make for a helluva reality show.

Levon's case that they all had expected the songs to be shared is valid. And continuing to work full steam ahead for the second record, even though they did not get copyrights the way the expected on the first is still reasonable. they were already in , and the second record songs probably in the works by the time the first record was released.

When you are in , you are in,. After a while, it is normal to pull back when you feel you are getting yantzed.And taht is what levon wrote happened. The expression goes, Fuck me once, shame on you. Fuck me twice, shame on me.

Again, noone is perfect. Not Levon, Not RR. but this is very believable.

Rick taking Levon's position in that 95 interview, well, Rick wasn't easily influenced in regards of this nature. Not the type.

The qwhole things is sad, tragic, could have been avoided. and it is real possibel that the guys did bring itup, and Rr just avoided it bwecause it was easier to avoid uit, and he thouight he was right.Again, those early Band records, not much in this world comes close to that kinda beauty. 5 guys. yes. Robbie's tour:

The Magical Mystery Tour.... what else could it possibly be called?


Entered at Tue Apr 12 05:57:47 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Kinks

I've got the Kinks BBC sessions 1964-1977. It was my impression that a lot of the early songs were written by Dave Davies. Can't recall if any of them were hits, but it seems like Dave came up with a lot of material.

When discussing singers voices last week, Ray Davies was mentioned as being someone who is not really known for his singing, but can get the job done. A day or two later I heard a Kinks song on the radio, and it struck me that Ray's voice is actually quite beautiful as an instrument in it's own right. Distinctive? yes. Quirky? Maybe. But his really is the perfect voice for so many of his songs.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 05:42:33 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Back in the Saddle Again

Hey Norm, I've gotta keep appearances up!....especially when you throw down the gauntlet like that. Now I've gotta get back to helping Deb find her birth certificate.

Calvin, those are valid questions. For the record, I'm not mad at anyone. But I would like to know more about the Band's creative process rather than: (Insert name______) dictated songs to the guys and then they played them. I think there was more going on. I think the other generalization that pops up here from time to time is assuming that every single song was derived at or arrived at in the same exact way each time. (I know that you're not suggesting that). I mentioned the other week about wanting to know more about the Band's creative process, and I wasn't just referring to songwriting or arranging. Sadly Rick and Richard aren't around anymore to comment. We know where Levon stands. Garth said in an interview once that he just thinks of silly things to put in (I think he's seriously downplaying his role). So that leaves Robbie. I hope that he deals with it in his book, and comes up with something more than "I don't know where songs come from" and "It's magic". Personally I feel that there is SOME magic involved, especially in certain songs. But that is a story that I would like to hear Robbie tell in greater detail. Especially if there is anything in the process that happened between the writing of a song and the arranging of a song.

This was a unique Band making unique music. It's not a stretch to think that there was something unique going on that might have differed in some way from the conventional processes of other groups. And it's that kind of fine detail, between the grooves, that I'm interested in at the moment. We'll have to wait and see what Robbie's book has to offer.



Entered at Tue Apr 12 02:46:50 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: BASEBALL FANS!!!!

Just for a minute......I just went in the other room and turned on the tube to see some sports news.

Did y'all know? Tommy Lasorda was presented , "The Order of Japan", by the Emperor of Japan for his contribution since 1965 to baseball in Japan. I knew, that Tommy had been involved in promoting baseball there and finding recruits. I didn't know the depth of his involvment and the love they have there for that great old guy.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 02:25:15 CEST 2011 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Another question you might ask Todd is why nobody else brought anything to the other 4 to "arrange" other than Richard at the beginning.

And for that matter why is nobody mad at Richard for taking compelte credit of his songs?

I disagree RTO, if you take a look at Dave Davies' One song per Kinks Album output there are some gems in there. As one reviewer of a Dave Solo Album commented he had the misfortune of being a good songwriter in a band and family with a great songwriter. And the man did some cool stuff on the guitar over the years.

Of course another reviewed, of his book Kinked, commented the question after reading it isnt why Ray treated him so badly bu how Ray managed not to beat the whiney little jerk within an inch of his life years ago.

AS for songwriting credits-the only other group I can think of that shared songwriting credits were early Poco-But in that case Young and Cotton are on record as saying they dont deserve a dime of songwriting royalties and only get them because Richie Furay is pretty much the nicest guy on the planet.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 02:19:17 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mind blooogggling

Todd..................I think.........you're a few spokes short of a wheel:):):):)

Isn't that speculating ever fun. It's sort of like......is there really a Santa Clause???????


Entered at Tue Apr 12 02:08:55 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Long Drawn Out Speculative Post Ahead!

I agree that John Simon should be considered as a fairly reliable source, especially as he was very involved in the production on their first two albums. He also goes on to say that there were two ways of assigning credits, and that Robbie was using the method that had traditionally been used by independent songwriters who wrote songs FOR groups, as opposed to the more group-centric approach where the songwriter(s) wrote songs WITHIN groups.

(By the way my all caps are for emphasis….I’m not shouting…I promise…..I wish I had italics……) :-)

One detail that never seems to come up in these discussions is the phase of the process that MAY have happened in between, or simultaneously with the (lyrics/chords/melody phase), and the (arrangement phase). The only people, who would know for sure, are the people who were intimately involved with that process, and maybe Simon can speak to that in some instances, but probably not all.

I don’t doubt that in many cases, Robbie came in with lyrics/chords/melody (regardless of where the inspiration for the song came from) to share with the group and then they all worked together on ARRANGING it. I also believe that there was ample opportunity – especially in the “clubhouse” days – for other contributors (especially when working out the vocals and possibly chords) to supply MELODY to Robbie’s basic song structure BEFORE the final arrangements were worked out. In that scenario (and yes I am speculating) it would be difficult to say that 100% of the melody came from one person. Now perhaps these additional contributions to the melody were not large enough to warrant writing credit. But perhaps they were enough to make a good song into a great song not even taking the arrangement into account…just strictly considering melody and maybe even new chords, that would even be present in new arrangements of the songs done by other artists as well as The Band.

Is it possible that Robbie could have come in with a melody that went (1,2,3,4,5) and then after the group worked through things they ended up with a melody that went (1,8,7,4,5)? Would that be considered a new or improved melody? And if Joan Baez or anyone else got her hands on it a year later and her version also went (1,8,7,4,5) instead of (1,2,3,4,5) assuming that she only heard it AFTER it went through The Band’s process, would she be doing Robbie’s song, or The Band’s song? She could even do a different arrangement, but I think the key thing would be if it still had that (1,8,7,4,5) melody which didn’t exist in the song’s rough form.

So I guess the question is: were The Band merely arrangers, or did they also make contributions to melody and/or chords and/or lyrics (on top of Robbie’s foundation) that could be considered important enough to the DNA of the song to warrant co-credit? Obviously at the time they weren’t concerned enough about it to make a noise, or maybe they didn’t want to rock the boat and destroy whatever chemistry they had at that point (the old cut off your nose to spite your face concerns).

The argument that the O4 (other four) didn’t write anything on their own after Robbie left, has been brought up before. But what of the argument some have made that nothing that Robbie has written without the O4, has equaled what he did when they were together? Even while working with other talented arrangers, producers, and singers..

I just think that there was more to the process than: “Here guys, arrange these lyrics and chords into something that sounds good.” At least for some of the times that they struck gold. And maybe some of those times occurred between the writing and the arranging. And maybe that’s where some of the magic lives. But as John Simon says, The Band was using the old system. And I don’t think that Robbie felt he was “ripping off the other members of The Band”. I think he felt that he was doing the lion’s share of the heavy lifting, and the others were merely doing their jobs. BUT at the same time pronouncing that it WASN’T a John Fogerty situation…they were five equal spokes of a wheel etc. etc. But also perhaps that maybe, just maybe, one spoke was carrying the load a little more than the other spokes….but that all the spokes were equal…sometimes….sort of….depending…..mostly….. But then later on, after many many miles, when the other spokes started to lay back a little, maybe feeling unappreciated, one spoke REALLY had to carry the load…then the ride wasn’t as smooth, and anyone watching the wheel bump down the road could tell that something had changed.



Entered at Tue Apr 12 01:46:47 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: boston
Web: My link

Subject: The Band's first concert as The Band

42nd anniversary noted in Rolling Stone


Entered at Tue Apr 12 01:40:56 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Calvin...

...I must thank you. It was while looking for the latest piece of needy whingeing from DD in a UK mag that a complete lyric about Dave Davies came to me. I'll give you one verse as a taster:

Here's brother Dave, doing his thing / Totally devoid of the joys of spring / He hasn't been well, we'll allow him that / But he's gobbing off again like a first class twat / Like a stuck disc spinning at 33 / It's all "Do-Re-Me-Me-ME-ME-ME-ME!" / Won't have it that he's one of the also-rans / But if it wasn't for his brother he'd be labelling cans...


Entered at Tue Apr 12 01:37:37 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: "All I'll say on U2 is that there are three tracks by The Doors on my 160 GB iPod, but not one by U2. Regular readers know my opinion of The Doors, which is that three times as good as U2. Dire band. Dire people. the only thing I've ever disliked about RR's solo stuff is the tracks with Boring Bono and the Born Agains."

LOVE it Peter! Do you think Calvin will like my song about Dave Davies?


Entered at Tue Apr 12 01:31:55 CEST 2011 from (208.83.120.147)

Posted by:

Calvin

Not too turn it into the Kinks GB. But they are an odd lot. RTO. Yes Dave tells some pretty bad stories about Ray-but he is always willing to play with Ray whenever the chance arrises. Dave also was the one who pushed Mick out of the band, and was never as close with Pete and Ray was. While Ray has said frequently in interviews he wishes he would have allowed Dave to be more creative, write more songs, and generally treat him better-almost to the man, anyone who has written/commented on Dave Davies considers him a somewhat charming, well meaning idiot whose rants shouldnt be taken the least bit serious as Ray doesnt.

Like I said, Dave was the one who pushed for years for the original four to reunite. And of course there is the fact he cant decide if the voices in his head are aliens or spirits chanelling through him. Or at least that is what he said for years before he came out with a concept album about government implants in our head.

He's Nuts.


Entered at Tue Apr 12 00:41:05 CEST 2011 from (72.78.119.104)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Re: Songwriting - the final word

Yes to Kevin J, in fact exactly. As a songwriter who's had a bunch of bands, I write a song, the band plays it. Someone else may write a song, the band plays it. Someone can put a guitar part on my song, he did not write the song. I can put a guitar part on someone else's song. I did not write the song. The guitar player leaves and takes his song, another guitar player puts a part on it. One time my roommate who worked in a record store and played in a rockabilly band came home and told me a story about this guy coming into the store and all the people who worked there got on his lead singer's case because this guy had it all over his lead singer in terms of rockabilly image. And it turned out the guy who came in the store was also the lead singer of a rockabilly band. I took that story and wrote a song about it. My roommate didn't write the song. He just told me the story. And when both bands heard the song (which totally lampooned their rockabilly schtick) at a gig we happened to be sharing, they fell on the floor laughing. The reporter who wrote about Hattie Carroll didn't turn it into a song. Bob Dylan did. Same for Woody Guthrie and "1913 Massacre," and a million other stories that were turned into songs by the songwriter who wrote them.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:48:19 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: I thought the subject was songwriting, not publishing. Beyond the standard five-way split (in the Band's case), I don't see anyone expecting a special cut of publishing for a song they're not getting a songwriting credit for.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:32:58 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Put it in writing!.....the song or............

I'm not ambitious enough to go chasing after the facts right now. Read Levon's book. In many cases, (not relating to song credits of work of the BAND), but long before that time, Levon refers to consultation with his lawyer for many different reasons. So there is no way that if he was feeling he was being short changed on any work written or performed he would have been high tailing it to his lawyer screaming for retribution. The fact that he talks about his lawyer so much in his book, makes it clear he was not some dumb hillbilly who was being shafted through his ignorance.

Levon Helm worked at the music industry his whole life and grew up in the business. He cannot have worked at it all that time without become "street smart" of how that business worked. There was ample opportunity at any time to put the brakes on and say "hold it here" we need to get some understanding. To whine away and close the barn door after the horses were all gone is a bull shit attitude taken by many people.

Good example is getting back to "Eagles". Having an incorporated company that receives money it has to be recorded. Incorporated companies are required to be audited. So when Don Felder asked for an audit to know where the money was all going, as a share holder he exercised a "right". So showing some ignorance, Frey & Henley trying to "fire" him, (is quite funny really). So they shot themselves in the foot, which was probably millions.

Even if Levon Helms claims are true, at the time probably with out realizing what those songs would become, it was poor business on his part. It's like saying if your neigbour wins the lottery with one of his tickets when we both bought tickets, well you should give me some, 'cause we're buddies. The fact that nobody knows what went down there, makes it just a lot of speculative bullshit.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:26:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You'll recall that Sebastian assured us the others were cut in on the publishing.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:25:30 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

All I'll say on U2 is that there are three tracks by The Doors on my 160 GB iPod, but not one by U2. Regular readers know my opinion of The Doors, which is that three times as good as U2. Dire band. Dire people. the only thing I've ever disliked about RR's solo stuff is the tracks with Boring Bono and the Born Agains.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:10:22 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: The songwriting issue may not that cut & dried, as I believe Levon has contended that he raised the issue at one point and was told that things would be ironed out. Songwriting wasn't the only jawbone of contention, as Levon has also raised the issue of whether income derived from publishing and other group partnership interests has been equitably distributed over the years.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 23:01:44 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David P / PV

Indeed, the fact that RR was prepared to credit all of (spit!) U2 only rubs salt into the wounds! They must have fancy kit, though, if they split the writing four ways. I've never come across a digital delay that takes four people to operate, and let's face it - that's their entire signature sound!!!


Entered at Mon Apr 11 22:26:17 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson "Relix" interview.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 22:15:13 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Nice theory, but seems unlikely that Levon would have been so business-like as to pitch in the first place but then so slack as not to make sure the credits accurately reflected his contribution (by the second pressing at the very latest).


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:46:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: Your analogy is a bit faulty if we're talking about a direct collaboration in which one collaborator comes up with the story concept and the other helps flesh it out into a final form. What if Levon wasn't just telling a story off the top of his head, but was pitching it as an idea for a song as the group prepared to record an album?


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:22:24 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… but also U2 really are crap.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:20:00 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Someone Told Me The Story

David P:

Wuthering Heights. Someone told me the story and I wrote the song. (Kate Bush).

PT 109. Someone told me the story and I wrote the song. (Marijohn Wilkin).

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll. Someone told me the story and I wrote the song. (Bob Dylan).

A Day In The Life of. Someone told me the story and I wrote the song. (John Lennon).

The Boy in The Bubble. Someone told me the story and I wrote the song. (Paul Simon).

So what was the point you were making?


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:14:32 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Joan: U2 is one of those bands in which each member receives songwriting credits. I thought it was interesting that when Robbie recorded "Sweet Fire of Love" he was equally generous in sharing co-writing credits with the entire group.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:12:43 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: You Must Believe Me

Dunc: we have to go into where soul (and reggae) sold in the UK. Trojan Records claim several reggae / ska singles that sold 60,000 to 100,000, enough for a high chart placing, but were never counted. Same with soul to a degree. Many copies were sold from barber’s shops (next to the Durex) or grocers’ shops. So stuff that sold a lot may not have charted. (For our American readers, the juxtaposition of Trojan and Durex may cause comprehension problems. Trojan were 7 inch 45 rpm records. Durex were 6 inch condoms).

The only official chart single placing for The Impressions is 1975’s “First Impressions” on Curtom. Curtis Mayfield had a major hit with Move On Up (1971, Buddah, #12), and minor hits with othr singles including Superfly (reissue). The only reason Superfly and Freddie's Dead were not major 45 hits was that everyone bought the albums.

I don’t think listings by the makers of a dark frothy stout beer (Guinness) comes anywhere to noting the influence of The Impressions. Down here at least, every band did People Get Ready, Amen and Gipsy Woman. Check out the Spencer Davis Group version of You Must Believe Me, to me, the Curtis Mayfield composition I couldn’t be without.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:01:52 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Todd and Calvin

Todd, thanks for your kind words. When the right situation happens (ie Jorma Kaukonen & Jack casady as Ramble guests, with Garth dropping by as well!) I'll be on the plane.

Calvin, Dave "Sour" Davies was having a right old go at Ray again this month in one of the UK monthlies! I wish he'd just admit that thanks to Ray he isn't stacking supermarket shelves and be a bit bloody grateful....I'll try and dig the mag out and report further after dinner, which I suppose I ought to dish up..


Entered at Mon Apr 11 21:01:13 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Kevin/ Treme

Thank you Kevin for your post. We could endlessly fight about song credits,, but what's the point? I think its pretty obvious that Robbie did the "heavy lifting" when it comes to actual song writing. I'm sure the others contributed s lot,, but post OQ belies the theory he wasn't the main writer. Some groups share writing credits with all, but that wasn't the deal or the case with The Band. The idea that Robbie and Levon will ever play together is to quote The Man of La Mancha" "The Impossible Dream"

To the folks who enjoyed "Treme" on HBO with all its great New Orleans music, it will be back with new shows April 24.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 20:56:00 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Vinyl

Brien, in case you hadn't noticed, the interesting thing is, both on Letterman, and The View David Letterman had the vinyl in his hand while talking to Robbie, and so did Whoopie.

I thought about that because generally now-a-days when promoting recorded material people are usually showing a CD.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 20:18:47 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All La Glory

"What I really like about the Band thing was that everybody made up their own little element of it that all added up. Everybody contributed something to it; it wasn't like there were two guys doing everything and we had these other guys along for the ride. It was never like that; it really was a unit and the way we disbursed the musical responsibilities seemed to work."
--1985 Ruth Albert Spencer interview with Robbie Robertson

"Yeah, but on the other hand a good deal of the inspiration on the songs that Robbie wrote came from Levon's personal experience."
--1999 Lee Gabites interview with John Simon

"And the W.S. Walcott Medicine Show -- that's an actual story that Levon told me -- he told me the story, and I wrote the song."
--Robbie Robertson in Melody Maker May 29, 1971


Entered at Mon Apr 11 20:16:43 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on Vinyl

Robbies Facebook page posted the availibity of Clairvoyant on Vinyl. I know some Gber's are faithful to the pure school of vinyl and in case you didn't know it was available in that format, see the link.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 19:29:02 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Peter and Beg. Looking forward to Jools. Looked through a lot of radio but couldn't find anything about Robbie.

Went to Fopp today and saw HTBC in the West End of Glasgow on the shelves, but walked past it because I've ordered it from the local and last CD shop in my small town. Fopp had a selection of Band albums on display...wait for this at £3 each. It's a good shop Fopp.

Peter could you help me, if you've time. I bought Definitive Impressions Volume 1 last week after buying Volume 2 after discussions, which included Bumbles, on the GB a few years ago. To be honest it was Superfly when I first really listened to Curtis Mayfield. Did the Impressions have any hits in the UK? I have googled but could not find anything.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 19:22:07 CEST 2011 from (166.129.194.14)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Short note on Dylan in China, from New Yoker


Entered at Mon Apr 11 18:52:59 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: voice of the _People_

That acknowledged authority, _People_ magazine, has accorded _Clairvoyant_ three and one-half out of four stars (and a very meagre paragraph of 'criticism').

I was going to post that 'review' regardless, but I couldn't find it online. What I did find is far more intriguing: _People_ caught up with young JRR (it musta been after dark, or he wouldn't have been able to open the door) at the time of an "unsettled period" in his marriage, when he was "bunking" at Marty's place on Mulholland . . . .


Entered at Mon Apr 11 18:35:37 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The last word!

As the two last posts attest Kevin you have nailed it with a well written, not long drawn out post. To the point and stated with the straight goods, in stead of a lot of sour grapes heresay.

Too bad it is lost on those who just want to continue to chuck shit, "the con man, drug addict". I guess you just have to take it where it comes from. Surprising tho', from one who is a self proclaimed expert on everything from song writing to marine insurance.

Whether one's tastes and loyalties run from the guitar player to the drummer, good on both of them to maintain their health, and be able to put forth worthwhile and enjoyable projects that must bring them a lot of satisfaction and feeling of self worth. Garth as well, in his quiet way keeps the fire of his music burning. Showing up and playing with the Bush Brothers. Lars has a great picture on his Facebook of Garth and the bros. I hope Garth is around for a long time to come. It will be a sad day to loose the magic he has brought for a life time.

Whether any one likes or enjoys what Robbie has done or not, consider the horrible things that befall us, like "Rollie", Jeff's plight, and give thanks that "there but for the grace of god go I".

It was good of Peter Stone Brown to take the time to bring us some news of Jeff. Gentle souls whose purpose in our midst is to bring music and happiness. Yet each day we have to watch the plight of people in places like Lybia and many of those countries with blood on their faces.

Some very good thoughts set out here resently in keeping with the music. Remember what our mothers used to say when we were kids. "If you can't say something nice, don't say nothin' at all".

You did a good job Kevin.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 18:26:54 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: automatic songwriting

About one-third down the page at [My link], there's a long audio clip of an inteview w/ Neil Young & Daniel Lanois, conducted just post-_La Noise_, I think. I haven't got thru the whole thing yet, but it was interesting to hear Neil say (I paraphrase) that his songs come to him completely as inspiration. Anytime he's set himself the task of sitting down to write a song, the results are rubbish. He says something along the lines of "I have those, but you'll never hear them." (I do like Neil's speaking voice because it is so similar to my own: high-pitched, cranky, impatient.) I do wonder if the interviews from L. Cohen, G. Lightfoot, Kristofferson, Cash et al. mention their musological methodologies.

I caught a bit of _Viridiana_ on the tube the other day. Original-language w/ French subtitles, so I can't say I got the full effect, but it was plenty weird enough. It's amusing that the bad guy, the novitiate's uncle, is named "Don Jaime."


Entered at Mon Apr 11 18:12:16 CEST 2011 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

For all the fighting that went on in the Kinks, Dave Vs Ray, Dave Vs Mick, Pete vs the rock n roll lifestyle-Other than Dave occassionally whining the Ray never let him forget who was the older brother and that he is a control freak, they always speak well of each other in the press.

Ray over the last few years talked about one of his biggest regrets was the fact he stifled Dave creatively. And he has always said the Kinks ended when Pete left, after that it was another band-and one by the way who anyone other than the orginal 4 simply got a paycheck and were never a real member of the group money wise.

A whole lot of fights in that group, even ones that broke out on stage-but there was also this weird sort of circle the wagons us against the world mentality.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 18:01:30 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Kevin J's Post on Song Writing

Kevin J, your last post on song writing was perfect. Please save it and repost everytime the subject comes back up.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 17:33:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Perfectly stated, Kevin J. I also think that Dirt Farmer is great because Larry Campbell had a big say in it, and steered some of the choices, but apparently a lot was Amy Helm's idea. As an honorary 'ornery stubborn ageing crittur myself, I can see that a daughter would be more likely to influence decision making processes than just people you work with. Success meant on Electric Dirt that Stuff You Gotta Watch got resurrected (but in fact it was much improved, so fine).


Entered at Mon Apr 11 17:24:22 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Damn it, Al. That's it. You been feeding Patty rye whiskey again. Don't you know drinking & dreidling is not kosher? Even in Liverpool!


Entered at Mon Apr 11 16:53:13 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: If you still don't have the album you're not going to appreciate it, but I was just saying that the first few notes of "This Is Where I Get Off" sound like "Everybody Wants to Rule the World" (which is by Tears for Fears) as if being played by Steely Dan. Start listening at about second 10 of the link above.

In other news, the first couple verses of "She's Not Mine" strike me as a bit of an update of "Up On Cripple Creek" (with maybe a hint of "Rag Mama Rag" thrown in.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 17:07:56 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Song Writing - The Final Word

He might well have hurt some old mates along the way and been insensitive to others ( one would have to be one of the O5 to know this – my experience is that the guy standing closest to the accountant usually does have the longest pockets and shortest arms ) BUT enough of this song writing talk already!….The final word on this is as follows………….and.a nod to the always wise Deb…….in that it strikes me that the exact same mentality that characterizes the insane “Birther” crowd – is present in the song-writing argument……..The one guy who was there and knows and is a perfect witness in that he doesn’t even like RR as he is sure he was short-changed financially by him is the Band’s Producer/6th member – John Simon……..who stated categorically some years back that:

“ Robbie was the one who wrote the lyrics and wrote the music. Wrote the lyrics on legal paper, or whatever he wrote it on, and figured out the chords to the song and dictated the melody and chords to the other players”…………………………………………..Repeat that kids…..”dictated the melody and chords to the other players”

………………………..anyone here who has written songs knows how difficult it is and also knows how much help more accomplished players and especially singers can help bring what was written to life……………..George Harrison elevated so many Beatles songs to things of beauty that I could write about it for a full month…….he doesn’t get a song writing credit on any of them (other than his own compositions of course) and this is entirely correct……..adding textures or helping with arrangements is not song writing…………to be quite rude and in the words of the not always so humble or tactful Robbie Robertson…. “they were just doing their fu*king job”…………………………………..If that isn’t clear enough, check out the number of songs that were written by the other guys since 1976……………..I have 4 Levon albums dating back to 1978 and not a single self-penned song (and only 2 or 3 co-writes)……..Rick had only ONE song that was self-penned and sadly “Sip the Wine” was not even his song………………Richard was the one guy who was a songwriter and he admitted himself to having completely dried up creatively by 1971! And he got full song writing credit on the songs he did write for the Band……………………….”Dirt Farmer” might well be the most enjoyable album by any member of the Band ( I still play it regularly ) but it is a “covers” album – done brilliantly by quite simply one of the most talented/soulful musicians this industry has ever known………….No other singer alive can put me in 1850, 1920 and 2007 all within the space of 10 minutes…….but if I read another blog/review that has at its heart the “fact” that RR ripped off his band mates by stealing their songs – I think my head might explode.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 17:02:17 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Kinks 66

Ah! In the same 1966 issue the headline is:

KINKS Ray & Dave Davies v Mick Avory and Peter Quaife. THIS SPLIT IS NOW OVER.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 16:59:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sooner or Later

I’ve been collecting old copies of New Musical Express and today’s find is almost exactly 45 years old, 8th April 1966.

The review of One of Must Know, released that week:

(QUOTE) FOUR MINUTE DYLAN FORMULA AS BEFORE

One of Us Must Know / Queen Jane Approximately (CBS)

Another four minute plus track in the familiar pattern we’ve come to expect from Bob Dylan. Rather slower than usual, but with a more comprehensible lyric about lovers parting. It opens with solo harmonica – then Bob takes up the tale in his most plaintive mood, with organ, piano, guitar and crashing cymbals. Nothing very original about the melody. We’ve heard it all before from BD.

FLIP: Annoying that we have to keep putting up with LP tracks on Bob’s “B” sides. This has an odd lyric to match the peculiar title. (END QUOTE)

How strange that “the familiar pattern we’ve come to expect” was to cause such shock and horror over the next four weeks in Britain!

The only two records “tipped for the charts” in that week’s review are Petula Clark on A Sign of The Times, and Mitch Ryder on Little Latin Lupe Lu. Petula Clark made #49 for one week. Mitch Ryder didn’t chart at all in Britain. Bob, not tipped at all, made #33.

In the same issue, Paul Simon confides “No matter how successful we are, I’ll quit in a couple of years … the main thing I want to do is write. In between performances, I’m always writing, trying to develop characters so that I can do the Great American Novel.’ And so, forty-three years after his retirement date …


Entered at Mon Apr 11 16:56:05 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

For Calvin in particular......and all fans of The Kinks....a brand new official website. In my opinion, Ray Davies sadly remains one of the most underrated singer/songwriters of his generation.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 16:26:00 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Thanks Bob F

I have to agree (as I was trying to kind of say, I guess.)


Entered at Mon Apr 11 16:08:20 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan in China

This person wrote a brilliant response to that silly article in the NY Times.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 15:36:20 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan, china...

Obviously disappointing to some fans: seems to me Dylan has never tried to meet anyone else's standards, what he does he does...


Entered at Mon Apr 11 15:21:39 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jools Holland / Robbie Robertson

Brilliant, BEG. I hadn't found it … but I foolishly trusted the BBC TV search engine! Yes, Robbie is on Jools Holland Tuesday 22.00 - 22.30. The same show features Ce Lo Green and Egypt 80. The hard disc timer has already been set.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 13:32:15 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: WOW

Some truly memorable heartfelt posts and posts of real wisdom and insight from so many.

No time to add anything but the GB is certainly mining a rich vein right now.

And Statler and Waldorf especially. Keep it going. Double please. One for each of you. I doubt if either of you realise what a joy it is when you open up.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Apr 11 13:09:08 CEST 2011 from (76.67.16.128)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"The next week Robbie will head over to the UK and will perform on the prestigious Later with Jools Holland on Tuesday April 12."

“It's a work that drips soul on a production that is as finely cut as a diamond.”
THE AGE, MELBOURNE, April 2, 2011 – Review of the Week

“a deeply personal collection of 12 tunes, bolstered with performances by Clapton, Steve Winwood, Robert Randolph, Trent Reznor and Tom Morello...
This soulful record is Robertson's best yet."
GOLDMINE, March 30, 2011


Entered at Mon Apr 11 12:49:25 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

The songwriting discussion is interesting and it brought back memories from my bass playing days in the late seventies through mid-80's. I was in a band and we wrote our share of originals. We thought they were catchy, simple, mostly hard rock oriented numbers. We had a tremendous guitarist friend who happened to be held back by the rest of us who were average players. Our finest moment came when another artist, Joe Walsh, ripped off one of our songs that we had written about 2 years ealier (we know he didn't really rip us off). When Joe Walsh released the song The Confessor, we were floored (our song was called The Master). We couldn't believe how exact it was to what we had written and for the longest time thought he had to have been driving through our neighborhood and heard us jamming in the garage or backyard (of course niether I'm 99.9% certain). Still, it brings a smile to my face to think that we were able to write something (well Joe Walsh wrote it/but we know the truth now ;) ) that became a minor hit and in retrospect an even more minor footnote in musical history.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 12:16:14 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I submit for your consideration

In the "shoulda coulda woulda" discussion last week about hypothetical replacements for Robbie I forgot to put forth the name of Al Kooper.

Whaddya y'all think....good idea or bad?


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:43:58 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: So Many Roads

Looks as if the RECORD STORE DAY Robbie Robertson release on Saturday is a limited vinyl LP of "So Many Roads" with John Hammond. There's also a live Decemberists CD. It's really annoying because on Saturday there's a big ELT conference which I have to be at all day. Can't they organize these things to avoid Record Store Day? It's in Brighton which has good record stores, but unless you're in line at 9 a.m. you're not going to get the good stuff. And I won't be … lunchtime is my best bet. Not that I want another copy of So Many Roads. It's The Decemberists I'm after.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:38:57 CEST 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Subject: Gig with Blondie

Hi there all Band people,did a wonderful gig with Blondie Chaplin on Friday,some pics on my facebook site.What an honor.We did a few Band songs and it was great fun!


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:35:09 CEST 2011 from (41.97.165.133)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: 2 from Roz, i often remember

On cleverness

In Canon a 2 per Tonus, from Bach's "Musical Offering." The top voice plays a version of the tune given to Bach by Frederick the Great. The other two voices are in 2-part canon, with the bottom voice leading and the middle voice following a measure later and a fifth above. The canon is designed so that it modulates up a whole step each time through; thus, after six times through, the music returns to C Minor where it began, but an octave higher. This recording uses the Shepard Tone technique, meaning that a lower octave is constantly being faded in for each voice while the upper octaves slowly fade. Thus, by the time C Minor is reached again, the lower octave has taken over; so we're back exactly where we started…………
In short this and alternate sources proved that JS Bach brain is 10 times more powerful than A Einstein brain, thus I once posted that JSB brain made music and AE brain made nukes, as an attempt to develop the doctrine in The Band GB that music is definitely superior to everything else. Roz replied with a correction “A Einstein & JS Bach both of them made nukes, the first which explodes, the second which implodes”
I adopted this quote and quoted it on many occasions in real world

On political correctness

Following my burst of ethnic jokes I posted lately, and once upon a time in The Band GB in the midst of a hot debate about ethnic minorities, Roz put a term :
“the only ethnic group in all the counties which can be insulted without infringing any moral laws are the white protestants”

Sorry Roz if it’s not reported word by word , I retained the idea

WARNING : The stereo effect didn't transfer to YouTube.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:29:57 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

More Googling … Robbie Robertson came up among a list of artists with a "release for record store day on April 16th". Ah! So what's that? It usually means a vinyl single …


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:26:25 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: UK

I Googled a bit, Dunc. You quite quickly turn up an 18 year old Robbie Robertson from Dundee who was arrested in 2009, and an Air Commodore Robbie Robertson who died recently. The reference with the highest hit rate was "Eric Clapton News." All I can find is that he's visiting the UK and he intends "tasteful" promotion.

It's one of those tricky things. Last year I was just driving along listening to Radio Two, and Lionel Richie appeared, and stayed there with the DJ for half an hour with great Motown / Commodores touring tales between tracks. Totally unpredictable.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 10:15:51 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Robbie

Robbie is off to London now. I don't know if there is a signing. Are you going to see him Peter? Are there any TV or radio appearances? Jools Holland? I can't find any details.

Enjoyed the GB recently. Thanks, eveybody.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 08:55:20 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: Clarification

Just to clarify, The Woodstock Playhouse is about a half mile down the street from where the Center for Photography is.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 08:45:57 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: RTO

RTO, astute commentary this:

"I think you have to remember what an IMMENSE body of unique, textbook-standard work the OQs early releases are, and not judge any of the members for not living up to it again, be it while together from '72-77, in various combinations since, or totally solo. Lighting struck three times - a rare event in itself - and to expect a fourth or fifth bolt is ambitious."

I'm only about 8 years older than you, and wasn't old enough the first go around to experience a lot of this first hand, but I feel pretty lucky to have seen some of the original members of the Band live in the 1980's, the 1990's, the 2000's, and the 2010's. And to think that all of this started for me in the decade following their retirement party at the end of their 16 year career together. It almost seems like several lifetimes. The fact that we have new music from all three surviving members over the course of the past couple of years is pretty stunning. And it's vibrant and unique from each of them in their own way.

I understand the point that you make about the expense and logistics of getting to a Ramble. I'm only about 80 miles away, and I can't seem to get there as often as I would like. But the key I think, is to leave your expectations behind. I don't know exactly how many I've been to anymore, but it's probably around a dozen or so. I've never been disappointed. Some have been more blues oriented, and some have been more roots oriented. Many of the early Rambles didn't feature any Band songs, but the more recent ones usually have a handful. And if you're lucky, you'll catch a night when Amy, Larry & Teresa do their achingly beautiful version of 'Attics of My Life'.

I don't know if this will ever happen again, but one of my favorite Ramble moments was when Emmylou Harris was a guest. She did many tunes on her own and also some with Levon and company. I had a great seat about 6 feet from Levon's drum kit. Seeing and hearing her sing 'Evangeline' with Levon was a moment I'll never forget. Hearing 'Angel Band' with Levon, Amy, and Emmylou singing together was unbelievable. The icing on the cake for me was hearing Levon do 'The WS Walcott Medicine Show' for the first time in many years. By this point everyone in the barn was on their feet, clapping and singing along. I glanced to my right, and realized that Emmylou was standing right next to me also clapping and singing along, experiencing that moment as a fan, in real time along with the rest of us. I haven't been to every Ramble, but every Ramble that I've been to seems to have had moments like that. But there's no way of knowing ahead of time. That's part of the fun!

If I were coming from overseas, and considering the expense, I would try to make a little vacation out of it. Spend some time in NYC, and spend a couple of days in Woodstock. Try to go when the weather is nice.....early summer or early Fall are the best. Check out the scenery. Find a couple of Band sites. Stop up at Big Pink and take a picture or two from the driveway. Stop by the cemetery and pay respects to Rick. Have dinner at The Little Bear restaurant. Take a stroll on Tinker Street and stop by what used to be the Cafe Espresso and try to imagine Dylan sitting out in front playing chess (it's now know as the Center for Photography at Woodstock). The Woodstock Playhouse where they recorded 'Stagefright' has been rebuilt since the 1970's but it's in the same location.

Lighting may or may not strike again, but it's pretty cool to visit the place where some of it did strike and imagine what it must have been like back in the day.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 08:03:25 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Tracy

Oh my, now where did that come from? After all these years, i still have no understanding of songwriting.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 07:14:12 CEST 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Uh, Jeff? Don't know if you realize this but you yourself just came up with a genius line of song writing yourself.

"Took a ride to the stars, never returned."


Entered at Mon Apr 11 07:04:10 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

It's so weird to think that people are "pro-Robbie" or "pro-Levon". Though I refuse to "take sides" or actively dislike one of the members for this reason or that, I could never imagine "choosing" Robbie's solo career over Levon's. I know people will say that Garth was the heart/"center" of the group (if there was one), but really... everything Levon is doing these days is the closest living representation of what The Band was all about. It just boggles my mind to think that if some had a choice, they would be happy to listen to just Robbie's solo work and chose him over Levon. There's not a doubt in this universe that I'd choose Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt over anything Robbie's done. But I'm not anti-Robbie, and I enjoy his better releases.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 04:46:02 CEST 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Anybody think Jeff Bridges has many of the same mannerisms as Rick Danko. Yeah, I've always seen a similarity.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:49:10 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

BTW Rob, for a wee lad of 36, you have great musical taste.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:48:07 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob FFF...My favourite is the very first one of Louuu's that I was exposed to in my first year of high school via an older brother....."Rock and Roll Animal". I thought he shared a lot about himself with his "Ecstasy" recording as well. A lot of his recordings like Dylan and Van are not consistent in quality....Some gems and a lot of throw aways....Still....would love to meet him for many reasons.

Another reason I'm a Robbiesonian is that I actually like and value his solo work......especially REDBOY and HTBC. I've posted many links on ALL BAND MEMBERS.....but it's Robbie's words....music.....that I'm most drawn too. It's like.....Why am I especially drawn to Pat B, Tenn, Peter V, Nomadic Mike, Ray Pence, Bill M, Bumbles......It's really magical, isn't it? ;-D

BTW, I really respect and admire the posts of Jersey Girl and Deb.....So articulate and intelligent.....I'm in awe of both of you. I need to pass the baton soon.....Please post more....

For those of you who aren't specifically mentioned....I'm glad that you appreciate the links I post as it's fun and a challenge to find all the latest news. It's so good to see more people are picking up the slack like sadavid and Mike and Kim.

The posters who have caused me the most grief.....I've learned to forgive and move on. I've also learned that my passion for The Band and other musicians is my shield and that no one.....no one....can make me go away.....I'll move on.....When I want to move on. The "heat" has only made me look for more links. Ha! ;-D


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:47:25 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, one small thing, Levon's blues, which you may not actually be familiar with, never was white boy's blues.Alot of people only know Leovn and blues from some Band recordings, soem Ramble recordings. It'd be necessary to see him live with the right people or hear other things he'e done.Some of those Barnburner shows, while I was never a big fan, Levon and a great bass player, playing old school blues, was gawddamn heaven. When vivino particpated, or Hubert, it went up. Jimmy's white, but he ain't all white either. Give him an instrument, he's a black italian. Music is color blind, blood and soul, love, is color blind. I know you know this. White boys blues over there is differetn than it been over here, but maybe that is proximity. and mow that the old black men are very almost gone, it's going to become more diluted all he time. there are plenty of guys and gals in their 50s who learned from the greats, and they go so deep. guys like Steve freund, Doyug MacLeod,Vivino, but it is going to get diluted.There some young newcvomers, a young gasl Nam eof Kirtine Thien, listen to " Please drive"it's exceptional, but part of that is Hubert's guitar work.

if you like pick up a record of Ronnie Earl's, Ronnie Earl & friends. Singers were Kim Wilson ( not my favorite though a real singer and generally accepted as one of the best blues singers around), Irma Thomas, Luther Guitar Johnson. Levon was the drummer. Killer blues record. Levon's blues go deep. Put him in with the best, watch out. Ain't white boys blues. Levon is a multi racial mutt in many ways. That's a high compliment coming from me, also a mongrel, and actually a mongrel. Mongolian great grandma.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:20:45 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Actually Pat,what you call a lyrical "pop", and what follows, is exciting and fun as hell. I discussed it before. but it's not a mystery or is it magic. It is as much fun as I've had in my life, but it ain't no mystery.

I do disagree with an earlier statemt of yours, I did not extensively explain the craft of songwriting at all. I only discussed some points that are in relation to what you insist i wrote that i did not, and what RR actually said. All n relation to that lyrical "pop". and the fact that RR said he has still no understanding of songwriting at all. Phooey.

I really get the feeling you are holding back. Not telling us all of your accomplishments. Were you once an attorney? Maybe were one of those lawyers who defended big tobacco, or the gun industry, maybe represented high society types in divorce cases. if not, you missed your calling. You possibly attended law school for awhile. You have this tremendous propensity for stating things that were not written and attributing them to some one you are debating with. A very Repubican or Tea party type quality. The only democrats I know who could live with themselves after doing such a thing are lawyers.

Writing that soemoene wrote or said something, when they did not, does not make it so. But when you can't establish your position as correct and victorious honestly, you follow that strategy. It's a poor quality Pat.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:20:22 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

RTO - I can understand where you're coming from. Early on (around 2004, for example) Levon's Rambles were more like you initially described. But they've really grown musically. Levon's live shows in support of Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt (2008-present) are amazing, though I'm really worried that Levon's voice is getting too worn down again after the heavy couple years of touring. A third Levon/Larry Campbell studio album would be a blessing, and I hope they can continue to build his recent solo career and keep his voice healthy.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 02:03:23 CEST 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Lou Reed

BEG, your right Lou is from Brooklyn and also one of the all time greats. My favorite records of his are Coney Island Baby and Berlin. The last time we saw him was a few years ago at UPAC in Kingston. Great show!


Entered at Mon Apr 11 01:59:44 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PutEmUp / Adam2

I think we are roughly singing from the same hymn book, and having never had the chance to see the reformed Band (I'm 36) I am prepared to believe from the experience of others that there were times when some magic was there on tap. The presence of Richard Manuel alone would be enough for me - if he were still with us, even with the worst pick-up band imaginable and in croaky form himself, you can be assured of one thing: if he visited Europe, I'd be there come what may!!!!

It is somewhat tragic that Levon's voice is deserting him after some very strong solo releases; as a Deadhead, his take on Tennessee Jed was like Christmas for me! Larry Campbell is indeed a worthy "catalyst" ensuring a fine end product; if he has just finished a Tuna album I'm definitely looking forward to that. Once again a Dead connection: the version of Pigpen's "Operator" that Jorma and Larry collaborated on the American Beauty anniversary shows (seems to have disappeared from YouTube) was awesome. The current Tuna with Barry Mitterhoff added on mandolin is a treat enough in itself, so if you add the Campbell magic to that stewpot, I'm sure something extremely tasty will emerge.

I have tried NLSC, God knows I've tried!! I just can't take the lack of spontaneity compared to the first three, and even some of Cahoots. I don't like my music too polished, hence why I'm not big on Steely Dan either. My problem not theirs!!!

Adam, I stand corrected on the "harp-led" issue, then - was only going by advice I have received considering the undertaking (and expense, let's not be coy) it would be for the wife and I to get to a Ramble. If you were a Londoner, and a live musician on that circuit, you would understand that there is only so much straight white-boy blues a man can take in a lifetime. I've exceeded it. The average London gig-goer - 44 years on from the era - cannot see further than John Mayall/Fleetwood Mac and after a few years IT SUCKS A BIG ONE!!!! ;)


Entered at Mon Apr 11 01:48:38 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Mon Apr 11 01:43:56 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jeff, your interpretation of inspiration sounds like lawn care.


Entered at Mon Apr 11 00:26:46 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, Performance wise, and recording wise are two different things regarding the post first three recordngs and the OQ. Cahoots has some fine stuff, and to me, Northern Lights Southern Cross is a damn fine record. But, I think you woud find the OQ live performances mostly mind blowing. Of course not always. I bet they had a bad night occassionally.

Every time I saw The 80s Band with Richard was amazing, those Lone Star shows were mind boggling, don;t think I ever saw them anywhere else with Richard. Aside from the video tape, never saw them with the full Cates Brothers contingent. Occasionally one Cates bro, early on, on geetar with Weider. Blondie also, occasionally on guitar, with weider. I think weider was always there in the Lone Star shows, I could be wrong, there may have been some that were Cates & Blondie, or just one of em. but every show, every night, was killer, no room for a smidgen of dissatisfaction.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 23:50:47 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, Levon has participated in some projects that as you put it take him further away from "Bluesville". As a featured artist in Will The Circle Be Unbroken,Vol 2 with Nitty Gritty is just one.Dirt Farmer is another. His Rambles cover a wide range of music and are quite entertaining. My point is you are correct that it can be done, but i will also make the point that there are/ were a lot of people around who could potentially do it. Not just RR. A few people did do it. Atlantic City is another example. The Hooters guys brought that in. There are songwriters, producers, who could have accomplished alot with Helm. Getting Levon to do things is not always the easiest thing to do.That was an issue in 80s 90s Band. Whether or not his voice will allow him to cut more records is questionable now, but if he is able to, you can be99% sure it will be another project produced by Larry Campbell, now a two time Grammy winning producer. The material chosen will enter through that portal. Larry just produced Hot Tuna, don't be surprised, if that can fit into a slot, it could make three Grammys somehow.

RR on the otherhand, what you write about him needing Levon to return humility to his music, well, that collaboration is as likely as a Mid East peace agreement. But you are correct. RR took a ride to the stars, never returned.

All that said, your point that lightning struck three times already, is well taken and not very different in spirit from something I wrote recently. Something to the effect how much can you expect from some one ? Artists are people, human, flawed. Be they Levon or RR.

One more point. Fucking up is a lot easier on you when you have a full piggy bank.Why someone does or doesn't have a full piggy bank can be for a lot of reasons. That cuts both ways in this tale. Your own lifestyle & choices, and past dealings included. Anyone can extrapolate anything they want to from that.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 23:24:04 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Some people here act like Levon's solo career has been nothing but generic blues. Have those people actually heard Dirt Farmer, Electric Dirt, and the current live releases (MerleFest Ramble 2008 and the upcoming Ramble At The Ryman)? Levon's recent Vanguard solo recordings are remarkable. And his Rambles provide far, far more wide-ranging musical styles than just a bunch of "harp-led blues".


Entered at Sun Apr 10 22:40:55 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, no need for an autopsy. Pat took issue with posts of mine a while back, and therein began the discussion.As I've repeatedly written,I don't feel that the "pop" as Pat has now titled it is magical. I think the "pop" has origins or connections that songwriters are aware of. I tihnk people's brains work all or most ofthe time, and I think life is a web. If you are paying attention, you rmind is bombarded with information, How people process it is different, and the results can be interesting. But writers know where stuff comes from. May not want to admit it, there is no mystery or magic in that. And that is a sell. Robbie's selling. And Pat,I don't buy that that "pop" was all that RR was alluding to in the several staements he made, or you were in the earlier part of this discussion. Now that it's been ground down, you are taking a different stance than your initial.

Al, Ros is doing well. She found me on FB awhile back, and seems to be at a good point in her life. Pat, all I had known about you as a songwriter was Ros asking if you still composed music for the Food Channel. And you mentioned once attending a writing session with a member of one of those alt country bands. Checked out your All Music Page then,. Just looked again today. if you been getting songs recorded, it wouldn't hurt to send in an update to your allmusic page. It has you credited with only one published piece. a prelude. Of course, what one writes and publishes, and lists on All Music can be very far apart. And one may not care about the allmusic page either.The BMI or ASCAP statement is far more important than the All Music Page. Peforming Rights statements get you paid for your scores,documentary, commercial, & jingle work getting exploited, played. Listing a score on All Music, well, doesn't pay you. All Music has plenty of music credits for you, including cello, viola, violin. Didn't you record with Otis Clay? If so, your appearances on Otis Clay recordings have disppeared.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 22:29:14 CEST 2011 from (41.97.223.88)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

on the other hand this link has no Band connection; judt to recall that the player bearing "9 who launches the attack at 2:32 is called Pedro Waldemar Manfredini , and he was very famous a long time ago for playing in A.S. Roma for seven seasons, and he won the Coppa Italia in the 1963–64 season


Entered at Sun Apr 10 22:20:14 CEST 2011 from (41.97.223.88)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: link to BBC News

Dylan plays his first gig in Vietnam

10 April 2011 Last updated at 16:14 GMT


Entered at Sun Apr 10 21:25:48 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jed

I'm sure you can be one of the demographic you described. I'm not a million miles away myself, although not exactly the same. My manifesto as a Band fan is even more controversial - I think the same criticisms that get levelled at the reformed band could equally apply to the OQ after 1972. Never the same after we saw Cahoots as a mild disappointment, IMHO.

I'm not a Levinista but neither to I care for JR2's solo work, and on the SOLE subject of his use of TLW as launchpad for himself, I must admit I do have a chuckle and raise an eyebrow at some of the post OQ JRR moments. Bits of his new release (couldn't even tell you what it is called) I have heard so seem more my cup of tea than his previous outings, to be fair. And the same for Levon - his "Dirt" era is happening. But in truth the only post OQ stuff I ever pull out semi-frequently is Danko's 1st LP, the odd track (mainly Remedy) from reformed Band titles and the odd moment from RM's live offering Whispering Pines (usually Grow Too Old).

I think Levon HAS milked the feud dry a bit now. I think we all know also that Levon needs JRR to take him further away from Bluesville, and JRR needs Levon to bring humility back to his music. Both men have their shortcomings, but boy do they also have something the other needs.

I think you have to remember what an IMMENSE body of unique, textbook-standard work the OQs early releases are, and not judge any of the members for not living up to it again, be it while together from '72-77, in various combinations since, or totally solo. Lighting struck three times - a rare event in itself - and to expect a fourth or fifth bolt is ambitious.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 20:21:08 CEST 2011 from (70.26.121.186)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Cobourg

I know that wasn't you on stage, Angie. What was it that the Robin Williams character said in Good Will Hunting? "I was being ironical."


Entered at Sun Apr 10 20:14:37 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The bottom of Ulster County

Subject: The Band and the "heartstrings" attached to it

Al- Interesting idea. I would fall in the "C" category. I like the music of the OQ better than the Reformed Band, yet I feel a loyalty to both configurations. Living an hour's ride from Woodstock probably has something to do with it. The Band of the '90s played a lot of shows I could get to. I never saw the original Band in concert; I'm one of the many who was first exposed to The Band when I saw TLW. And it's a shame that some people (namely Levon) say, "You know, TLW was a crock of shit."

Kind of reminds me of being a kid and listening to my parents quarrel. You love them both and you just wish they could love each other.

In the last 15 years this GB has taught me a lot. It started out somewhat awkwardly, then became a battleground until the last few years when for some bizarre reason politics entered into the posts and nationalism became a problem. For the last few months it has become a very peaceful place to visit and some of the younger posters have brought back The Band as the central topic of discussion. And the "veterans" have come back to The Band, as well. It's like a large soap bubble that's floating through the air and, for some reason, it hasn't popped yet. I give all the credit in the world to Jan Hoiberg and Gopher Rollins, the founding fathers. I wish all the best to Levon, Robbie, and Garth. I cherish the memory of Rick and Richard. Long may their music run.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 20:03:36 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Can one be a Levonista 65%,a RR supporter when he was with The Band & we knew little of anything of feuding,a fan of the 80',90's Band,and a RR,Rick,Garth,Levon,Richard solo or in any combination fan? Life is so confusing.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 19:53:45 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Anyone here can go back and read the archives. With that in hand you can make your own determination on the D's and the E's and the level of discourse. Certainly don't rely on my word or Jeff's.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 19:22:59 CEST 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: What a busy Sunday morning in GBland.......

I love Al's post and Pat's follow-up. Pat's post reminds me of a couple things : a) some years back I read a book about The Eagles titled To The Limit. I forget the author's name but he also wrote books about Walt Disney, which I read, and Springsteen and Phil Ochs, which I didn't. I think it's near the very beginning of the book, perhaps even the introduction, he meets Don Henley at his house up in the hills and they drive down into the valley and they go to what what used to be either The Troubadour or The Whiskey. the bartender asks them what they want and Henley wistfully says "I want it to be 1969". b) I saw The first reformed Band with the Cates twice. The first time was outdoors with maybe a thousand or so people on Memorial Day weekend and, other than Rick not playing bass, was a fine show. I had seen the OQ a number of times and remember being surprised at how happy and healthy Richard appeared to be. The second time, I think only 4 or 5 months later, was just bizarre. They opened for the Dead in a huge venue with close to 30,000 people(Levon even mentions it in his book). To my eyes, Richard was already obviously starting to fray, and not only was Rick still not playing bass but Garth probably only played half the time. He literally spent half the set(spread out at different times) sidestage either talking or watching! The next time I saw the Band, only 2 years later, was the last time I saw Richard and the first time I saw Jim Weider and they were reduced to opening for CSN, played 7 hits(opened with Walcott and ended with the Weight)though I heard that the night before, in Saratoga,NY they'd played a much longer and more imaginative set. About a year after that I saw them only 2 months after Richard's death asa quartet, and not looking very happy(I recollect it being such a strange feeling hearing a guitar intro into Stage Fright). If you're still reading, I was with Pat on the initial elation that "The Band is Back" and struggling, over and over again, with every change of lineup and with every tragic fork in the road, with what once was. I saw Rick several times, and Levon a couple times, and they were fine shows but didn't see The Band again until the Billy Preston tour. Again, I wouldn't have chosen to be anywhere else that Sunday afternoon 2 1/2 hours from home but at the same time it was hard for me. I saw them a few times right after Jericho and those were the closest they came to being "back". I'd even describe a couple of those shows as as good as it gets, that Rando/ Weege/ Richard Bell lineup had really jelled. But then a couple shows after HOTH Rick didn't seem to be fitting in and WTF was up with covering En Vogue?!?! One final Band show for me while Rick was in Japan with the then version of the Crowmatix filling in - enuff said. I saw Rick a few times, always very good shows yet sad - how could he be playing neighborhood bars with 30 or 40 people? Of course I read Hoskyns' book and TWOF after hearing and reading bits and pieces of the story for years and finally discovered this site less than a year after Rick left us. The moral of this rambling little trip down the lane triggered by Al&Pat : nope, it hasn't always been easy being a post LW fan, nor as a card carrying member of Jan's guestbooks as well as, afew years back, managing to straddle both Peter's LP and Lil's BFB sites. It isn't always easy, but I wouldn't rather not do it. and, I don't wish it was 1969 or 1971, or 73 (when I think Pat and I were both at Watkins Glen) though sometimes it;s tempting to wish that. I almost envy people who can "go to a happy place" and feel better there(stress on "almost").......


Entered at Sun Apr 10 19:10:27 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Songwriting

What's the need for an autopsy? You can't bottle it. Some write with great pain and effort, others rattle off an album in a week. Some get a germ of an idea and make themselves see it through, others will store that germ away somewhere/how and maybe come back to it. Can you learn to write songs by reading a book? Maybe you can. Maybe not. Lyrics to fit to a groove, or a groove to fit around some lyrics? Either. Then...to nail the point home....full lyrics written quickly after reading a book set to a germ of an idea for a groove...or........enough said.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 18:39:27 CEST 2011 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Al, I love Gene Clark-when he was straight he was a pretty damn good songwriter. Some of that early 70s stuff is better than the Byrds in my opinion.

I saw Rick and Gene together in a solo date, they were fantastic. But they had similiar style, and a lot of people in the know tell me similiar personalities in the sense of their lifestyles. Im also told, and I believe Rick Roberts commented on it in an interview once, Rick and Gene brought out the absolute worst in each using wise.

so no, it would have been a bad idea to have Gene join the Band


Entered at Sun Apr 10 18:17:20 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, I'm C. And my loyalty to the 80s 90s Band is a direct outgrowth and evolutionary result of my loyalty to the Orginal Band. ABC. Al,the beauty of the first two Band recordings and many of the live recordings of the orginal, undiluted, full strength, concentrated Band is as fine a representation of The Lord's creation as a perfectly healthy newborn baby. And, despite the differering chemical reactions,as fine a represntation of.. as Sophia Loren exiting the water with that dress clinging to her in that movie along time ago. The pleasure and appreciation that the 80s & 90s Band and it's members provided did not have to have anything to do with any knowledge of them as people. But anyone who went to enough shows would get a glimpse of Rick, Richard's and maybe even Garth's persona.And that would have nothing to do with loving some of the music at those shows. (Separately-But music played is a partial representation of some kind of something of the makeup of the musician making it. Some kind of something). Rick & Richard were out and about, sometimes Garth was too. Levon mostly would head straight to the bus.

I am aware that you did not consider me as a Levonista in that post. I never thought you did.

Glad you pointed out that hard core Levonistas have disappeared from here... they couldn't stand the heat, the personal attacks. Some Bandoleros have disappeared too, because they couldn't stand the heat either. I've been around most, not all, of the time, because I refuse to allow things to be completely one sided and presented in a fictitious manner. Maybe one day I'll be able to let it go. But, i have a better sense of humor, and a higher tolerance for misery than most people, so I repay my debt to the Other 4 Guys by seein g the truth gets told here.

BTW, i was not friendly or had any association with Levon during the 80s or 90s. I did live down the road from him for a while in 89 ,90, and in 99 lived in the house just past his property on Plochmann for about 2 months, but had no personal association with him in those days. Other than a hello at shows, kept my distance, it just seemed like the perfectly reasonable thing to do.



Entered at Sun Apr 10 18:12:41 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Ray - I bought the digital download and cd from RR's site. My digital download did not include Houdini - maybe my cd will. I think I'm getting that bonus edition.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:54:28 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jeff, as a musician I write songs, music, soundtracks, jingles, etc. As a writer I write ads, long form for media; and books and articles about the American Civil War. I've served as a historical consultant on a number of documentaries, and I'm on the editorial staff of two magazines. I've spent a bunch of time in songwriting in Chicago and Nashville working with other writers. I have no idea how many albums I've played on.

Presently I've just finished writing a four hour show that follows two regiments through the Civil War, one Yank, one Reb. Kind of a Band of Brothers from both sides. I also am the head historian so the research for the producers is ongoing. I'm also developing the music themes and textures for the show and will score it during the summer.

In the meantime I'm writing a chapter for a study of the Siege of Petersburg that focuses on the Battle of the Crater.

I have no idea what RR's work flow is, but his explanation of where the song comes from made perfect sense to me. No one then asked him, "RR, after that song arrives from nowhere, do you have to craft it?" And he would say, "Of Course it takes time to finish it, sometimes a lot, sometimes, not so much, but that pop where all of a sudden they first appear, that's magical." Maybe then you would have been satisfied and not called him con artist/drug addict and then been forced to repeat it, because based on your extensive explanation of the craft, you seem that you credit the weird "pop" that RR referenced.

Al, very perceptive as always. At different points in my life I've been all 5. Of course, being an A in the day seems a prerequisite. As I've posted before, I recall talk after a 71 show that RR dressed much nicer than the others and seemed a bit out of place on stage. Then in 82-83 all the A's became B's because the boys were back. No talk of the fued divisions at the time at all. But by the end of 83, a couple of things changed. You were happy they were back, but the new version with eight guys and three keyboardists and two drummers was quite a jump from the balance of the OQ. And if you hung around you heard about what a jag RR was. All of a sudden, your memories of the OQ with its balance and beauty and songs seem like the glory days of youth, while this new thing, as thrilled as you are to see them again, has some odd baggage that sours what you thought the OQ was.

Then the 8 piece becomes a five piece, and Richard dies. And you see them without Richard. Something happens, and its not good. Levon's book places the whispers front and center, and in an addendum he blames RR for Rick's death--at least that's what I've been told since I won't read it. By that time, the honorable Jan Hoiberg has taken this site on line and all of a sudden we can go back and read period material on the group, you, know, stuff that was said at the time in regards to the basis for the fued. And the material keeps growing and the understanding deepens. And you realize it's all there for anyone who wants to know. And I really wanted to know.

A long time ago I used to feel connected to the fued for a number of reasons. I don't anymore. If someone came on this board and called Levon names, I'd defend him just like I defended RR. I know all the talk about both of them, almost all of it firsthand. And you know what it's gotten me? It's made me wish is was 1969 and the Brown album had just come out and I had tickets for a late autumn show with The Band.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:38:36 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Roz

Wow. Shamed to say I'd forgotten all about dear old Roz. I know she didn't see eye to eye with eveyrone but boy was she a card. Hope she's ok.

What about Diamond Lil, too? She was always a sweetie.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:35:19 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff

Did I get it bang on jeff?


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:34:17 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: FFFF?

I think I can get two of the effs - 'effin and feud. But what's the other two 'F's?

:-0)

Anyroad, good for you Angelina. You do your fellow Ontarian proud.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:25:34 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend)

Pete, quick is not magical or mysterious. Quick seed ideas still have roots, origins, explanations. Ask most songwriters about the origin, etc, they'll know. Some may prefer to paint something as magic, but, that's probably just paint.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:22:13 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ron Bennington Interviews: Robbie Robertson

What’s next?

Robertson talked about his plans to write an autobiography.

“I feel like doing a little storytelling…I’ve got a lot of stories to tell and I come from that kind of a tribe that tells stories. And so its time now that I write these down and pass them on while I can still remember them.”

He believes that his new album, and writing songs that were more personal, opened the door for him to start his autobiography. “I’ve had an extraordinary ride and I feel comfortable now just saying…here’s what happened.”

He and Bennington end talking about how ultimately, much of life’s experiences end up as a game of chance. “You can definitely pull a bad card. And that’s why this record is called How To Become Clairvoyant …cause I’m working on that real hard…all the time.”

While listening to Neil Young yesterday....Herbivore eatery in Kensington Market....baby spinach, barbequed tofu, avocado, grilled cauliflower, orange/purple/yellow carrots, artichoke....I miss Roz always talking about food in this GB at times.

Ok off to the West end to meet up with friends as imagezulu working again....maybe Daniel Lanois will be there? :-D

Sebastian....For the millionaires' package....Could we see what the lithographs look like?

Al Edge!!! You missed the category that I belong to on this site.....It all began when I found this site while staying at a friend's place in Newmarket, Ontario and.....the FFFFF was on! Robbie bashing galore! My first post had some of the female posters bashed away at me too. Anyway....that's when I became a......ROBBIESONIAN. lol


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:15:48 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Robbie Review

Meant to thank you Ray for that fine Robbie review [I realise from the next post you'd already posted it Angelina ;-0) ]

A link in it referencing that Spanish film maker referenced in relation to his influence on Robbie's writing for Big Pink took me back to The Weight article by PV on this site. And shamed as I am I have to admit for the first time I read it for the first time.

Wow. A tour de force that one Peter. Kudos mate.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:11:37 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What's happening with Paul Simon's new one? Original release date was tomorrow, but amazon.co.uk have it delayed until June 13th. Surely they're not daft enough to wait for the UK tour? Amazon USA is showing it as Tuesday.

I also listened to Bridge Over troubled Water and Bookends albums yesterday.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:05:58 CEST 2011 from (74.82.68.37)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Backtracking

With a new Paul Simon album on the horizon, I've been backtracking this weekend by listening to some Simon and Garfunkel Columbia mono 45 singles. Among some recent finds at the used record store, purchased for a dollar a piece: MRS. ROBINSON b/w OLD FRIENDS/BOOKENDS, THE BOXER / BABY DRIVER (with picture sleeve), THE ONLY LIVING BOY IN NEW YORK / CECILIA (radio station promo) and BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER / KEEP THE CUSTOMER SATISFIED (with picture sleeve). BTW the mono mixes of these songs really pack a boxer punch. :-) Also spinning on the turntable is a Geffen German import copy of Robbie's STORYVILLE LP. No CD rot here!


Entered at Sun Apr 10 17:06:58 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: S & G

Cheers for that Brien. Fascinating to think Paul Simon being overruled re Bridge arrangement even though it was his song. Can see why that might have been a major cause of their rift. Then again a song of that majesty defies any real categorization I guess.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:58:49 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson Hires New Live Band: Dawes"Recording with Robertson was a lifelong dream for Goldsmith. His band became one of the only groups to play in the basement of Big Pink since Bob Dylan and the Band recorded there in the late Sixties. “I had never met Robbie, never thought I would,” he says. “I felt like the luckiest guy in the world when I got [the call] to go there. I was thinking, ‘Okay, I’m gonna sing background vocals on a song, Robbie’s not gonna be there.’ But I go and he’s there, and we hung out the whole time and he said he was really happy with what I did.”

SXSW 2010's Best Video: Dawes

They met again a few weeks ago when Robertson asked Dawes to meet him at a West L.A. rehearsal space to jam. “It was funny walking down the halls and hearing young metal bands and cover bands rehearsing, and we’re waiting for Robbie Robertson to arrive,” Goldsmith says. They jammed on three new Robertson tracks. “There were moments where he’d go into his guitar solos and I’d realize, 'Whoa, nobody else plays guitar that way.'”

Dawes' 2009 debut North Hills is full of rich harmonies and stripped-down instrumentation. Last year, when they played at Big Pink, Goldsmith told the small crowd his band wouldn’t exist without the space. “I got Music From Big Pink first,” he tells Rolling Stone. “Then once I got their [1969] self-titled album, and it became one my top three records ever… The romance of the guy that writes the songs and the other guys sharing the lead vocals, you got to know each guy on a personal level through their performances.”

Hi Ray. I paid 14.99 to have Robbie sign my CD.....worth every cent. David P....Listen to Robbie's acoustic guitar playing on "HDLHNM" when you get hold of the LP and then discuss.

Yesterday while eating a power salad (gives me energy for finding links and posting...lol).....Neil Young's music was playing....Finally, young Canadians are appreciating their own talent.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:54:49 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge [A]

Subject: Calvin [Boot Camp] ;-0)

Ha ha. Take your point Calvin. And I know you're the original mister boot from the gene and Rick stuff you kindly sent me.

On another tack - and an aspect I know you're well clued up on - do you think that Gene could ever have integrated with the originals [minus robbie] to replace Robbie as the creative songwriting force?

One of favourite listens for some time now has been Live at Silverado - it's on now as I'm working - and I just keep hearing snippets telling me Gene might just have pulled it off and helped take it to very interesting areas alongside the boys.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:51:05 CEST 2011 from (24.124.99.203)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/fmr home of wm. s. burroughs/lawrence kansas

Subject: "houdini"

I've not read anything here in response to "Houdini," perhaps I missed something. Perhaps not, since the song is available on the 2-CD version of HTBC, available only at BestBuy for $9.99 (reg price $17, discount good till May 5, I believe).

Don't buy CDs much anymore and I'm not alone there, judging from their dwindling presence in the stores. But I'll make an exception for Robbie and other Band members, especially since this was such a great deal--would rather have the "material thing" with 2 discs, a nice booklet and graphics, for $10 than just the download for $3.99.

This "Houdini" is a splendid number, a funky gem that I like more than a couple of the songs that made it onto the official version of HTBC. There have been complaints about the quality of Robbie's current lyrics on this GB; I think "Houdini" shows him at his best. A vivid bio of the great escape artist in miniature, made me wonder if Robbie was inspired by E.L. Doctorow's "Ragtime," which featured Harry Houdini (real name Eric Weiss?), but who was cut from Milos Forman's very uneven film adaptation.

Not only do I like the lyrics, Robbie's delivery of them works like a charm. Voice is right for the words, words right for the voice.

You should hear Robbie's "Houdini." Lots of people should. Breathes new life into an old legend. Would like Robbie to do an album made up of similar vignettes/bios. The man has a gift for that, he's one of our most cinematically-minded musical creators.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:44:44 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: something in the air

I too have been listening to Breeze Hill often these days. It had found a spot on the rack to collect dust for quite some time but a few weeks ago I pulled it out, smiled at the memories it brought, and put it in the car cd player for regular circulation - it's been very nice to listen to.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:25:18 CEST 2011 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Well Al, For me Id guess Im in the not care club. While frankly the first two Band Albums are the best work any of the 5 have ever done I often enjoy Northern Lights more. I understand it isnt the artistic achievement, I just like it more.

Same with the post Last Waltz group. Its a whole different group-sure 4, and on the albums 3, of the guys are the same but they are a fun barroom band. And they are very, very, very good at being that sort of outfit. So I view them often as two seperate entitities both worth of praise.

As for the solo stuff, I listen to them all and have every solo record. And I for the most part enjoy them all. The first two Robbie albums sound very dated to me though, and I loved them when they first came out. Levon's stuff hasnt ever sounded dated to me, but as someone said, he stayed the same-traditional is traditional.

Truth be told I listen to a lot more Boots than any album other than the first two, Northern Lights, or Live on Breeze Hill


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:24:53 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Art Garfunkle Interview

Link is to an Art Garfunkle interview.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 16:23:32 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Troubled Waters

The link is to an article about the upcoming Simon and Garfunkle documentary.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 15:51:40 CEST 2011 from (79.202.179.151)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Paris-Roubaix

In the poor, monotone, gloomy and grey flat lands of Northern France, where poverty, unemployment and alcoholism walk hand in hand, where nothing but potatoes will grow and even animals leave within a day. There where no one wants to live or comes for holydays, where the blur is more then enough to speed up whilest driving through. Almost exactly on the line where a hundred years ago a whole generation of young men was whipped away in muddy red trenches once a year becomes the center of France once a year becomes the place where heroes are born. The abandoned farmland wakes up for one day from its unconsciousness, becomes the heart of France: Paris-Roubaix, the toughest bicycle race on this planet; 170 miles cobblestones, sand and mud, a hell that tears men apart, most even don’t make it to the finish, but if you do, if you do, when you win, you’re a hero in France forever.....

It’s on the TV now, don’t miss it.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 15:43:50 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge [A]

Subject: Jeff [C] and [B] & [D]

Apologies Jeff. Mis-categorized you in the heading.

I am not a capital letter. I am a free man.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Apr 10 15:15:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge [A]

Subject: Jeff [B] and [D] & [E] ?

As I see it - though I stand to be corrected - Band devotees can fall into five camps or else an assortium of several. The distinctions are very often blurred but occasionally they have been quite distinct.

Hence my point concerning some of the rancour that existed when the GB had a larger bretheren of Levon devotees. Personally, I've no qualms about any of the categories or where anybody feels most affinity. But the fact remains there are distinctions and there most certainly was unpalatable rancour at times.

There's:

A] Pre-split Band devotees - I'm deeply embedded in this group. My devotion to the work of the original quintet is unequivocal and none of the work of any of the boys as individual artists has come within a million light years of stirring me like the work of the original quintet. Not that I have any problem with that. I know it does with some. But the fact is the original body of work will always sustain me and I can still occasionally pick and choose any of the individual's work that happens to take my fancy at any particular time - which is principally that of Rick and Richard. This is mainly owing to the craving like I have with say Sam Cooke or Stevie Wonder so as I can soak up the majesty of their vocals. Which does rather tend to put Robbie's work at a slight disadvantage, though I must admit I have been listening a bit more this past week or so and enjoying some of the original album and particularly Storyville.

B] Post split Band devotees - in a piece I posted around 10 years ago when a GB newcomer I commented that seeing the post-split version was simply not the same as seeing The Band. This caused huge offence to many on the GB at the time. Any offence was entirely unintended as I'd simply assumed every Band fan would feel the same as I had done. It was, however, not the case as I immediately came to realise. And thus for the very first time the existence of these fine all-weather Band folks was revealed to me. Respect to their devotion, though emphatically not my own personal bag.

C] Pre AND post Band devotees - see post-split note. Some devotees do genuinely seem to be ambivalent when it comes to where their devotion lies

D] Levonistas - no explanation needed. Again - other than where the taking of sides occasionally invokes rancour - not a problem for me.

E] Robertsonians - see last

Reason for post? I guess to clarify the point you raised about my earlier point and to say I believe you to be firmly in category C] with also a noticeable propensity towards B] and D] due to your personal association with Rick and Levon during that incarnation.

I know, maybe every poster can prefix their name with an appropriate A] B] C] D] or E] or a combination of one or more so we all know where we stand.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Apr 10 15:16:10 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob FFFFFFF......You forgot that Louuu was born in Brooklyn too.....grew up on Long Island. If memory serves me well....His dad owned an accounting firm that Louuu had no interest in. Check out his "Bells" CD for heartbreaking reflections with his "Families" song.....or not.

Btw, one time Louuu dropped into Joe's Pub in NYC to sing a song with Garland! I had seen Garland at the same place when Garland had his 60th birthday celebration. It was that night that I was given a second invitation to one of his private parties at the Jazz Standard on 116 East 27th Street, New York .

(How's the family)
(How's the family)

Mama, you tell me how's the family
And papa, tell me how thing's going by you
And little baby sister, I heard that you got married
And I heard that you had yourself a little baby girl, too
And here's some uncles and some cousins I know vaguely
And would you believe my old dog Chelsea's here, too
And would you believe nobody in this family
wanted to keep her
And now that dog's more of a part of this family
then I am, too
I don't come home much anymore
No-no-no I don't come home much anymore
Mama

And mama, I know how disappointed you are
And papa, I know that you feel the same way, too
And no-no-no-no-no I still haven't got married
And no-no-no there's no grandson planned here for you
And by the way, daddy tell me how's the business
I understand that your stock she's growing very high
No, daddy, you're not a poor man anymore
And I hope you'll realize that before you die
Because I don't come home much anymore
No-no-no-no-no I don't come home much no more
But daddy

And please-please-please-please-please
come on let's not start this business again
I know how much you resent the life that I have
But one more time, I don't want the family business
Don't want to inherit it upon the day that you die
Really, daddy should have given it to my sister
You know Elisabeth, you know Elisabeth
she has a better head for those things than I
She lives practically around the corner
That's really the kind of child you could be proud of
But papa, I know that this visit's a mistake
There's nothing here we have in common, except our name
And families that live out in the suburbs
Often make each other cry
And I don't think that I'll come home much anymore
No-no, I don't think I'll come home much again
Mama
Papa
Families
Often make each other cry
No, I don't think that I'll come home much anymore
(How's the families)

Btw, Louuu struggles with dyslexia but stiil writes more than most songwriters and still tours. He's also been married three times. When he wrote "Families"....He was in his forties when he was in AA and NA. He's a survivor and beyond.....He has inspired me since 1970.....Oh and most of my friends and the people I run into will know of Louuuuu more than they know about The Band.....I guess that says something about the people I hang with.....lol......I don't have to sing any songs by Bob Marley, Dylan and The Beatles.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 14:02:00 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bayou sam... I'm still not convinced...; and songwriting...

But I'm a stubborn S.o.b...( silly old brat...)

The number of great songs that were written in about the time it took to play them is about the same as the number of great songs that were sweated over. I think Eric Bazilian (and could it be in Carol's Band Bites?) said you shouldn't take more than 20 minutes to write a song... I don't quite agree, but... certainly... On the rare occasion i've written a song, it's come out quickly. Then the rewrites start... then you give it to a band.... then you play it a few times... then someone else plays it....


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:56:40 CEST 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Garland Jeffreys

The return of the Ghost Writer. Greatest two artists to ever come out of Brooklyn are Sandy Koufax and Garland.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:40:10 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Album Review: Robbie Robertson's 'How To Become Clairvoyant'

"Like Bob Dylan, Robertson’s one of those artists who talks— or snarls— as much as he sings, but it’s always in a low-slung, sexy way that makes you want to lean in closer to hear what he’s saying. A bit of mystery hangs around the edges of his songs."

He remains a spare wordsmith, needing only a few choice phrases to express his point and create a mood, even when the commentary is as deliciously elliptical as “And I also enjoy levitation” at the end of the title track."

Hey Fred.....When I was little we'd go to your hometown for our picnics with our ethnic community no less....I still can smell the water from a water pump in Buuuurlington.....smelled like rotten eggs!


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:20:14 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, it's the same with any kind of writing, I think … textbooks, stories and scriptwriting. Once you're into something you then get additional inspirations during the process. The "seed" idea is often quick though.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:19:03 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Clairvoyant peek inside Robbie Robertson

“It’s the most personal record I’ve made,” Robertson declares, although he’s as baffled as to the motivation behind this sudden soul baring.

“I don’t know — it’s a bit of a mystery of how things come about when they do,” he says. “I don’t have a scientific explanation for it. Sometimes when you’re writing a song, you don’t know where you’re going. I was always more comfortable writing mythical songs that disguised personal feelings, and this record wasn’t like that — it was personal, almost a relief.

“Now it feels very comfortable, like good medicine.”

“But when you line up all of those things, there’s nowhere to go without the song. And I first and foremost, I put that at the top of the list for me of challenges, so that’s why this award in particular really pushes a button.”

"Robertson’s future plans reveal a full plate: in late May, he’ll return to Ottawa to finally receive the Order Of Canada he was awarded in 2007. Then he’ll start working on his memoirs for Random House, something he credits How To Become Clairvoyant for stirring up his interest."

For those of you who don't dig Robbie's recording much....Well....It's because of HTBC that he's been inspired and open enough to want to write his OWN memoirs.....Afterall....He is a writer....At least he'll be writing HIS story which should be available in a couple of years. So many people I've met who've read Levon's book take his side on the FFFFF....soon we'll see Robbie's side.....Maybe Garth should jump in too...

Nomadic MIke....I took the photo so no.....I'm not on the stage.

I agree with you Carmen...I really like "She's Not Mine" as well....I like his singing here....I like that the groove justs rolls along.....I like that it's personal.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:12:53 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Angelina: if my calculations are correct I've been on this side of the big pond for almost....drum roll please....almost 23 years. I arrived and the country began it's slow and painful slide from it's top spot as an international econmic powerhouse. : )

Burlington was never the same since I drove by it when I was in 4th grade : )


Entered at Sun Apr 10 13:01:50 CEST 2011 from (76.66.24.248)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Which is appropriate as the album is intensely personal often to the point of sounding confessional, its songs demonstrating Robertson at his most reflective and self-aware, to which the music in general complements with soulful, groove-rich subtleties. In fact, the arrangements alone are so moving that the entire work could have comprised instrumentals — two appear, in “Madame X,” penned by Clapton, and “Tango for Django,” both fascinating compositions — and still succeeded.

That’s not to take away from the narratives, though, as Robertson delivers them like a seasoned storyteller. And while the circumstances he addresses will at times likely serve as a bone of contention for some — arguably none so much as on the aforementioned track, “This is Where I Get Off,” in which he lays out his reasons for breaking up The Band after The Last Waltz — but his rendering of them into the songs heard on How to Become Clairvoyant is as poignant and powerful as anything he’s produced in his solo career."

Hi Fred. I'm glad you're all ok. How long have you been living in Japan now? Burlington hasn't been the same since you jumped ship. ;-D

While in Kensington Market yesterday I kept hearing The Band songs being played. A few days before, a friend and I were having lunch at Yonge/Eglinton area and as we were leaving, "Don't Do It" by The Band was playing. I told my friend who was playing as she doesn't know The Band's music....She's 62 and missed out on the music scene as she had children at a very young age......She didn't know who Robbie was either....but.....She's a huuuge jazzz fan. lol

As for the Yonge/Eglinton area in Toronto.....If you travel west along Eglinton to where the Jamaican area is.....Black Uhuru wrote a song about this area called, "The Youths of Eglinton"......


Entered at Sun Apr 10 12:52:00 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pete, songwriter teams can both write lyrics.and work the form ,and even the direction and sound of the song up together- separately maybe, but either way, together. Passing back & forth to an extent, changing, offering new direction or thoughts, comments. My recent ex couldn't write a completed poem or a song worth a darn..but she would come up with some brilliant lines and sections. I would extrciate them , write songs around em. Took a while, and of course, would show her what i was up to. She made some suggestions that were valuable, others that were rubbish. Wasn't able to learn or digest how to do this on her own, but some of the "poems" she has written & might write occassionally have some extraordinary stuff a songwriter can have a field day with. It can work so many different ways.

Far as inspiration and graft... who is to say that after the intial light bulb goes off, working at something can't be enjoyable or escorted by inspiration? Working the idea out, extending it to other ideas, and making a song out of it is the joy, the craft , the practicing of the craft is fun. And when you get what you need, it;s a wonderful feeling. It's work, but it's great work. And the fun doesn't stop till you finish the song, and then thats a lot of fun right there too, cause you have it!. Then you record it, or work the music out in more detail, then record it. all fun. Work, complications, drama maybe, but all fun! I havne't run into amy other betterkind of work yet. People lucky enough to make a living at it, are blessed.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 12:36:16 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Yes Pete, that is why I wrote "...as you are aware..."

Far as disliking the song goes, well, it's RR's song. Only he has to like it. But if he is that guy that wrote the majority of the lyrics way back when, i think the man is capable of far better lyric & music writing. I think he just took the easy way out, and if his side of the story is rooted in reality, & he actually went to work, coulda done himself, his story, and his feelings a helluva lot better. Just my opinion, for what it is or isn't worth,depending upon who you do or don't ask.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 12:27:46 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: When it comes to J2Rs*...

it does seem, quite often, that some people do dance to the beat of an angry drummer.

Just an observation.

*That one's for Steve.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 11:55:00 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don't mention the war

Jeff, I didn't mean that criticizing the record made someone a Levonista, I had just noticed the number of reviews that zoom straight in on "This is Where I get Off" and make a negative comment about leaving The Band. It's why Robbie was probably wise not to even mention it in past songs.

On writing of any kind. Sometimes it's inspiration. Sometimes it's graft. In most writing, I think the inspiration is sudden, but doesn't get developed without graft. Jagger-Richard once suggested Oldham locked them in a room and wouldn't let them out till they'd written a song. That counts as graft.If you have to graft until you get something done, two writers are often better than one … which is why so many successful scriptwriters work in pairs. I don't know about songwriting, where most often a pair means a melody / lyrics split.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 11:38:38 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, i;ve occassionally dealt with HSBC as the mortgage holder on losses tied to property damage claims. Insurance proceeds are processed through the loss/draft department of the mortgage holder. Getting HSBC to release funds is not unlike trying to get a banana away from a gorilla.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 11:34:24 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pete, as you are aware, people don't have to be Levonistas, Levites, HelMets, or Levitational to dislike or criticize HTBC or This Where I Get Off. After seeing that our Celebrity Scouser friend alluded yesterday to things being rougher here when there more hardcore Levonista's around I almost posted, including the following point. I'm a Bandolero.Not a Levonista.

Speaking generally, many Bandoleros seem to get tagged as Levonistas round here.

Regarding Clairvoyant I listened once all the way through while doing other things. Some of the songs i had already heard , some I had just heard snippets. There were songs I strongly disliked, and some MUSIC that i did think I would enjoy upon deeper listening. I'll probably buy the record just to buy the record and be able to listen better. But, in my book, the lyrics Ive read and heard so far, and the songs that have gotten pushed, fail to float my boat .

Pat, in response to your statement, it is fair to ask, what kind of writing you do that supports your family?

I recall you speaking of a Civl War book you wrote. Have you written books or are you writing books on songwriting? There are tons of em. Songs about songwriting, and songs about how to write songs. Quite a few by varyingly commercially successful writers. Personally, i think people should learn by doing it, listening, feeling, working on it.Getting feedback. Making what they are writing work. I never been much for how to books when it comes to creating. I've never read anything that offers instruction on how to write songs, and i've only read one about songwriting, that book "Songwriters on Songwriting". Was a pretty good read. All interviews with name songwriters.

"Most find the discovery of a good song fairly inexplicable. You can work forever on what you think is a great idea and it never comes together, then you're driving around, something pops in your head, and five minutes later you're finished." Your statement, Pat.Well, if you haven't kep a record, saying most is a guess. But aside from that I would still disagree. Things thast pop into people's heads, come from somewhere. Thoughts are reactions, be they intellectual, or reactions to neural or other sensory stimuli. One thought can lead to a song, or lead to another thought that is a strong tangent, and ends up leading to a song. There can be several tangents of thought. But ideas have origins and most songwriters can tell you the origin of their process for particular songs.. You can see a sign that leads to a offshoot thought, that leads to a song, that is connected or is an offshoot again.Lyrics especially. Music only, whole nother deal. if it's music first, also another deal in a big way, then not necessarily another deal.

This statement, of yours, taken separately from the entire paragraph, which i did not fully quote, well, take this statement on it's own merits and yes , it can happen."You can work forever on what you think is a great idea and it never comes together, then you're driving around, something pops in your head, and five minutes later you're finished." Doesn't mean it haopens often. It is the rare case that 5 minutes or 20 minutes later anyone is finished. And yes, someone could work forever on what they think is a great idea for a song and it never come together, but people start to build houses they never finish also,. Every now & then , someone, builds a house in a month. Using hand saws and dowels to frame with. Imagine that!

Pat, thank you. You crack me up sometimes.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 09:58:37 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: HTBC

Sounds like a British bank (HSBC).

Disappointing two star review in The Sunday Times today. I’m getting into it. This Is Where I Get Off seems to be a magnet for criticism, especially for those of a Levonista view. It’s a pity, because I think it’s (a) a lovely tune (b) personal, this is where “I” get off, not an attack on the others.

A couple of people (including Mrs V) complain that it has a somewhat “samey” feel as it goes along. This is probably due to having just played The Duke & The King in the car with its wider range of styles yesterday, then moving to it. I put the sameyness down to the volume of the bass lines. They’re very good, but especially in my car system, quite dominating. This helps it to sound 21st century, but they also make it sound “studio.” We have a natural sense of bass – guitar-drums balance, which is presumably based on all we’ve ever heard, but will go back to an unamplified string bass next to a wide acoustic guitar, which is what producers would have been emulating, even if unconciously. A young generation is used to the differently balanced bass of recent years of course and would probably not think it dominating. It's odd as that 1927 acoustic sounds wonderful.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 07:34:27 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

I believe he played piano on W.S. Walcott.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 07:31:30 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat B - Garth sat in at a Ramble on February 26. Brian Mitchell mentioned it on his facebook page.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 07:21:59 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, what is the Steely Dan song of which you speak? TFF's Seeds of Love CD is definitely a desert island keeper.

Nick, when did Garth last play at a Ramble?


Entered at Sun Apr 10 07:12:07 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jeff, since I write for a living, I've spent a lot of time talking with others (writers, musicians, producers, engineers) about this sort of thing. So not really a poll, just around 40 years of experience. Most find the discovery of a good song fairly inexplicable. You can work forever on what you think is a great idea and it never comes together, then you're driving around, something pops in your head, and five minutes later you're finished.

Dylan once said Van Morrison didn't write Moondance, he pulled it out of the air. I believe VM said the same thing about Dylan's Just Like A Woman.

Bill M, to be honest, I haven't heard RR's new album yet. I've only heard snippets on the inet and the Letterman performance which I thought was great. The song became an earwig for at least two days and still surfaces, although the We Five's version of You Were On My Mind is presently making itself felt.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 06:13:46 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: I vaguely recall reading an interview with Jesse Winchester in the '90s, talking about his then-new approach to lyrics. The gist, as I recall, was that he was no longer trying to write terribly literate lyrics and set them to music; he was now writing songs with a groove. That's how Robbie's new album strikes me - brilliant production,brilliant playing, wonderful grooves built around or alongside perfectly suitable, though not especially poetic or insightful, lyrics. Speaking of Steely Dan, do the opening notes to "Get Off" sound like Dan lighting into "Everybody Wants to Rule The World" to anyone else?


Entered at Sun Apr 10 05:15:52 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob F.
Levon did split that time way back when. He never has stopped playing music though. Nor has Garth. Nor did Rick or Richard. There really is no better way to live your life than doing what you love to do. Music business is rough & trying, brutal, but to get to do what you love to do is a blessing. I know a guitar player on a TV show, says "I get to play music every day". L


Entered at Sun Apr 10 04:05:33 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat, then I guess you've spoken to most songwriters... asked questions, took a head count. A poll, that's it, Pat you took a poll.

The way it generally works,the more musical you are, the more musical you are. The more you write,and the more music you create, the more you write. Of course there is an ebb & flow, but if you want to talk in generalities, the more you write, the more you write. Other things interfere, but when it;s there in front of you, you stop, put the world on hold and run with it,if you can. Or You can also write down your thought, go back to it.when you can. Songwriting is a skill, you develop it, you become more proficient, It is a disciplie and an art, and the more you do it , the more you accomplish. Is there magic and mystery?, no more or less than any other aspect of a songwriter's life, and many lyircs come from life, soemthing you've lived or observed or thought about, but songwriting ....things can fall together fast, or over time... you can get a song in a sitting, or a song can take 9, 11, any # of months or years till everything is in place, kinda same as life, ( difference is life is never fully settled). How many times has something in your life come back later, and the earlier episode made so much more sense and is so much more understandable because of the time you've lived in between. And you go from there.Pieces fit together. A song is no different.


Entered at Sun Apr 10 01:19:01 CEST 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Adam2/Levon

Adam, great post earlier today about Amy Helm and Levon. I've always felt the RR lyrics that most describe the way Levon has lived his music life were ironically in 'Acadian Driftwood'. "And some stayed on to finish what they started They never parted, they're just built that way."


Entered at Sun Apr 10 00:14:24 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Lowrey organ sounds

Here's a nice clip of a chap playing an all-tube Lowrey Heritage (the small spinet brother to the Festival organ like GH used early on) illustrating some of the areas where the tone isn't quite the same as that of a Hammond. To put the clip into relevant context, GH is well documented as saying that his eschewing of the Hammond was due to limitations it has compared to the Lowrey.

There's tons of cheesy home organ clips out there but this one is nice because the guy (who has a touch of the blues and isn't reading) sticks to a 12-bar and thus something we've all heard a Hammond do in a soul-jazz type combo. Most obvious difference is the harsher, more trumpet-like sound of the lower notes; from the middle of the keyboard upwards it all starts to get a bit more flutey like we know and love from a Jimmy Smith type Hammond tune.

Also just about audible (the guy switches a tab on the bottom right of the organ keyboards as a clue) is the unique and patented AOC ("Automatic Organ Computer") feature that was Lowrey's big boast - it added certain harmonics from the chord your left hand played on the bottom to the solo melody you played on the top. Cheating? No, progress! VERY impressive with analogue wiring as any dischords and inappropriate juxtapositions were simply omitted.

Naturally this feature was aimed at the home beginner to fatten the sound up and flatter the novice - as ever it is ironically in the hands of a pro, used sparingly, that such a feature really shines.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 23:31:35 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Tape echo

Peter, you might be amused to learn that such things are still available. See attached link for the very nice Fulltone unit, yours for a gnat's cock under a grand....


Entered at Sat Apr 9 20:18:12 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rob, you'd break your fist on a Binson Echoret. The noise is satisfying on a Watkins Copicat and this was the 70s, so they were readily available and cheap. Try doing it gently.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 19:47:21 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV ("bringing your fist down on a Copicat...try it")

DON'T. These things, or at least some versions of them are worth a fortune now. Don't do it to a Gibson/Maestro Echoplex either, and ESPECIALLY not to a Binson Echorec.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 19:46:39 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sorry, Jeff, no interest in the fued.

As to RR having to work hard to write songs--unlike when the Band was committed to producing an album a year--I agree that would be different than sitting back and letting it come like he has done since 1976. Most songwriters feel just like he does.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 19:40:24 CEST 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Robert Johnson

dlew919 - thank for the reply to the Robert John son photo story. They've gone further with trying to cinfirm the stroy (see link). I think it looks like him. One of the key things I agree with are his fingers. He had great fingers for the guitar playing he did - even without help from the devil :-)

I'm trying to find a good version of this third photo somewhere on the net. If you can get your hands on the latest issue of Guitar World magazine you can see a nice full page photo. That's where I saw the story.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 18:52:54 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

John D., I was experiencing some of the same issues and decided then to digitize every CD I own. It was a time consuming task but I managed it over several weeks. I'm sure your collection is extensive and the time it takes is certainly a consideration but the benefits are substantial.

In addition to quality concerns I found that keeping my collection in good order and fully accessible had become a futile mission. As a result we weren't enjoying our music as fully as we would like. I have everything now in my iTunes library and backed up to an external hard drive. I have stored my CD collection but can access them readily if need be.

The new 160GB iPods are terrific and allow for a pretty complete collection to be organized and stored conveniently. Depending upon size of the files you can likely load something close to twenty thousand songs and have them at your fingertips. I don't go down the analog vs. digital road so I leave those considerations to those who have concerns in that area. If the task of uploading and organizing your collection is overwhelming enough to have you look for help there are services that will handle the chore for you. Not inexpensive but a nice luxury if you can afford that route.

Give me a call when you have time and we can catch up. All the best to you and Ala. Stay well, my friend.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 18:51:42 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: She's Not Mine + Morello

She's not Mine is in my opinion as good as anything RR has written.

I cant stop watching the Bruce / Morello vide. His guitar work is unbelievable. He transforms that song and brings it to a whole new level. This guy is as good as I have ever see/heard.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 18:40:50 CEST 2011 from (70.26.121.186)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Say, Angie, is that you in the background of the Cobourg photo? Just curious.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 18:31:56 CEST 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: GB entries restored

GB from March 15 to April 3 back again. Thanks, Nils.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 17:31:51 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Uhhhh....I don't know about that Nomadic Mike.
Here's Levon's Godson instead. We had a chat in Cobourg, Ontario. Hmmmm....not sure what happened in this photo. imagezulu has absolutely no patience with a slow learner like myself. lol Same day I met his dad....Bill Avis.

Off to Kensington Market and then to Yorkville to hear some more jazzzz again. I can't believe that I'm starting to dig jazzz now.....only goes to show that if you have an open mind and heart.....anything is possible.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 17:25:42 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: CD rot

It's definitely worth trying different machines. Car players and portables often have stronger error correction than static machines (which is supposedly not so good in some ways, but it means they'll play CDs with problems). If you have a dodgy one, record it onto CDR from a portable - that can work.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 17:02:47 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Tom Joad Soup

You know I've just rescued this CD from the bottom of some stack where it's lain unplayed for a long long time. The recording didn't do anything for me at the time of its release. Low-fi muttering and a certain lack of melody and sameness to the songs. It's one of these albums (like Storyville) that I've always felt a bit guilty about not getting it. Anyway I'm past that now and I've played it a ton in recent weeks, in the car and at home and it's certainly a grower. Some music just has to simmer on the backburner for a while like my missus' split pea soup.

Still waiting on 'Clairvoyant'. I heard it a couple times on NPR last weekend. You can hear Paul Simon's latest right about now I believe.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 16:59:18 CEST 2011 from (70.26.121.186)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

OK, Angie, now let's have the other one — of YOU and Robbie ensemble.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 16:42:12 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

A quick photo of Robbie signing CDS as I left Indigo Bookstore.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:59:32 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Loved Crowbar, loathed Louu. Yet everyone with the exception of Charley Young will be making faces as well, since I've gotten into a big Zappa Roxy and Elsewhere/ One Size Fits all phase. While you're all pondering that, I have included a clip of an annoying earworm in my head along with a funny clip from a noted Aussie film that I hated except for two scenes. Discuss amongst yourselves.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:38:28 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

"She's Not Mine" is the track I've been skipping on Robbie's album. I don't like the atmospheric, soundtrack-like production on it. It turns out that the early version of the song, found on iTunes and on the deluxe millionaire's edition for sale on Robbie's website, is much more stripped down and straightforward, with acoustic guitar, clear vocals, and a more significant organ contribution from Winwood. Fans of the song should hear this version.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:38:09 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Crowbar hit to be inducted into Hall of Fame
....and for those of you who don't know Crowbar's "Oh What A Feeeeeling".


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:33:22 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Landmark....Did you know that Tom Wilson goes by Lee Harvey Osmond as well? I can't keep up! LOL
Bumbles was always a gentleman when he emailed.We usually talked about Louuuu....now stop making that face! ;-D


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:18:01 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Landmark

Hi.

Where Bumble be?

:-0)


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:12:12 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Hey BEG, just a little miffed as you and everyone on the GB knows that it was always I, who championed "When I Die" by Motherlode on my Thursday "Canuckistani Top 5" lists, back when I had a bit more time to post on a regular basis. As you recall, that song was the one constant, that it even piqued Bumbles' interest. He found it and expressed approval, stating in his words: "It sounded so good, he didn't believe it could be done by Canadians".


Entered at Sat Apr 9 15:02:25 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie with Colin Linden and Daniel Lanois.

As far as songwriting being magical and all.....Marley always said that his words came from Jah and when Scorcese interviewed Dylan.....He couldn't explain either.....

Bill M...."DIVINE BROWN & FRANCINE RAYMOND join CROWBAR for a medley of ‘Wildflower’, ‘When I Die’ and ‘Oh What a Feeling’ at Canadian Songwriters Hall Of Fame.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:29:12 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Nick - Matamoros banks

Beautiful - Black cowboys. I think anyone who can get to the end of Matamoros with dry eyes.....


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:26:17 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: CD's

Sorry john - that was me. Hope you didn't think you'd posted without moving your fingers!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:24:45 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: CD's

Hi John. Good to see your name in lights again. Hope all's well. I've experienced something similar. I don't understand it but I've found they usually work in another device.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:12:42 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Postscript on CD's

I've been told that the newer CD players have changed the bit-rate of earlier machines and that might be one of the problems. Got to find me a vintage CD Machine I guess.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:11:24 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....and the video I posted a long time ago of RATM's "Guerilla Radio" on David Letterman's show filmed outdoors.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:09:02 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: CD's

I hope I'm not repeating myself here. Realized the other day that I was missing 3-4 Johnny Cash tunes from my iTunes collection. No problem, I go to my CD wall and pull out the 3 CD set of "The Johnny Cash Collection" on Columbia. Into the computer it goes and the skipping begins. Track after track, unusable. Now I have a very, very large collection of CD's. This is not the first time it has happened. It really worried my how much of my collection is no longer functioning. Never had that problem with vinyl.

I can't afford the time to listen to every CD I own; but I could be sitting on a junk heap; over the next few years and that's a whole lot of money and memories gone. By the way I tried them out on different machines. I guess no one promised they would last forever; but forever is not here yet!


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:08:40 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

NIck

Subject: Devils and Dust

awesome! Love Black Cowboys especially!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wvi4H836eA


Entered at Sat Apr 9 14:07:38 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

RATM's cover of "Maggie's Farm".

Lead rapper of group...
Zack de la Rocha (born January 12, 1970, in Long Beach, California) is an American rapper, musician, poet, and activist of Mexican-American descent. He is best known as the vocalist and lyricist of Rage Against the Machine and is currently the frontman of the music duo One Day as a Lion.

Early life and childhood
In his early youth, de la Rocha's father Roberto de la Rocha (known as Beto)?a member of Los Four, the first Chicano art collective to be exhibited at a museum (LACMA, 1973)?suffered a nervous breakdown and took his religious ideals to extremes. Beto destroyed his art and when Zack visited him on the weekends, he was forced to fast, sit in a room with the curtains closed and the door locked and help destroy his father's paintings. After a while, he was unable to cope with this lifestyle and moved in with his mother.
Yikes!! And I thought I came from a very dysfunctional home!


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:57:50 CEST 2011 from (76.68.83.84)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Some of you had Pete Seeger (also Harvard educated as is imagezulu's niece!).
We had The Clash....
They have Rage...as they're referred to by the younger fans of RATM.
I have "Maggie's Farm" and "Guerilla Radio" on my mixed CDS.

Some info on Morello who has also played with Audioslave and The Nightwatchmen...and.....a guitar lesson!


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:57:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Tom Joad

Agreed Nick. It's a beautiful piece of work. The lyrics on some of the tracks break your heart.

On reflection I do wish it had limited itself to its main theme of the mexican immigrants plight. Two tracks off Devils and Dust - the incredible Metamoros Banks and Siver Palimino perhaps even Reno, too - would have slotted perfectly into the mood of TG whilst My Best was never good Enough just doesn't.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:54:48 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

NIck

Subject: RR's inteview

To hear him talk on and on about his projects was ok but honestly those Midnight rambles of levon's are what it is about! Seen dozen's and it really is magical. It would be nice to see RR show up with an acoustic and play some. Like garth does from time to time. Those rambles aint no BS. It's truly amazing. I have seen some amazing stuff there but I guess RR and Levon don't get along. If they did people would forget about all this Dreamworks hi-falutin stuff...


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:36:38 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Tom Joad

Love the whole record! Simply great!


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:31:08 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Ghost of Tom Joad

Lookin up the lyrics to put on here I just realized why Tom Morrello was doing it with Bruce. Clearly his own group have covered it. Presumably in similar style and with a similar arrangement. I'll clearly have to dig out Rage against The Machine.

Anyroad, to back up my statement about where the song stands in the pantheon, here's the lyrics for anyone who's not that familiar but might wish to reflect. BTW the background to the album of the same name is the plight of the Mexican refugees crossing into the States south west border and Bruce clearly parallels it to the Okies dustbowl flight. Any sucking eggs and grandmas - do forgive me.

:-0)

First verse

Man walkin' down the railroad track

Goin' someplace there's no goin' back

Highway patrol choppers comin' up over the ridge

Hot soup on a campfire under the bridge

Shelter line stretchin' round the corner

Welcome to the new world order

Families sleepin' in their cars in the southwest

No home no job no peace no rest

Chorus

The highway is alive tonight

But nobody's kiddin' nobody about where it goes

I'm sittin' down here in the campfire light

Searchin' for the ghost of Tom Joad

Second verse

He pulls prayer book out of his sleeping bag

Preacher lights up a butt and takes a drag

Waitin' for when the last shall be first and the first shall be last

In a cardboard box 'neath the underpass

Got a one-way ticket to the promised land

You got a hole in your belly and gun in your hand

Sleeping on a pillow of solid rock

Bathin' in the city aqueduct

Chorus

The highway is alive tonight

But where it's headed everybody knows

I'm sittin' down here in the campfire light

Waitin' on the ghost of Tom Joad

Final verse

Now Tom said "Mom, wherever there's a cop beatin' a guy

Wherever a hungry newborn baby cries

Where there's a fight 'gainst the blood and hatred in the air

Look for me Mom I'll be there

Wherever there's somebody fightin' for a place to stand

Or decent job or a helpin' hand

Wherever somebody's strugglin' to be free

Look in their eyes Mom you'll see me."

Chorus

The highway is alive tonight

But nobody's kiddin' nobody about where it goes

I'm sittin' downhere in the campfire light

With the ghost of old Tom Joad


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:29:22 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Nick

Ha ha - yet another majestic Bruce giveaway

Nice one Nick. If ever music could be said to ooze out of someone's pores then Bruce is that person and those are hos pores.

I take it you've got The Promise double album with all his unreleased pop gems considered not quite up to the mark for Darkness? Unreal.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:24:13 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Clapton

Is great! At 65 he still comes through. To criticize EC is just wrong, Great tone, fantastic playing and total respect for other players. BTW, can you name a better? He has done his work, great on all fronts and is just simply a legend.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 13:17:05 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Gary U.S. Bonds- Springsteen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdRw_igdHrM&feature=related


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:58:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Morello

Have to say as a bit of a pseudo Springsteen purist [as I guess I'm compelled term myself :-0)] and with the time restraints we all have at our age I do tend to flick through the innumerable live links that I get sent of Bruce with Uncle Tom Cobley and all.

Don't get me wrong, most are fine but having seen him so many times, it's really the man himself I crave seeing each time in the flesh [btw no I'm not gay - or at least not in that sense].

This Tom Morrello link I can remember. I can recall for all Bruce's opening sermon sincerity I just wasn't too happy with the song leaving the womb of its acoustic arena. Tom Joad, dustbowl.....electric? Nah Bruce - you managed it with Youngstown. But that was industrial decimitation. This is rural. Rustic. It's fine where it is. Acoustic and harmonica. So I never followed it through. Possibly even stuck on the Tom Joad album in silent stoic protest.

As ever I was wrong. One hundred per fuckin cent WRONG.

So many many thanks Tracy for posting this utter gem. [And whilst I'm at it thanks for your terrific album review - can't say if I agree or disagree as I haven't bought it yet but when did fine writing never merit its own accolade - and yours read so lucidly]

Anyroad, if I didn't really pay any heed to the Morrello hype before now then feck me I do now.

Of course, the base platform does have to be there. And in Bruce's Ghost of Tom Joad we have one of the finest platforms our own era music genre has ever seen. Fit, indeed, to rank with the finest delivered by the fellas who provide inspiration for this board.

Anyroad. Back again to Tom Morello. I have to say - as with all avid Band devotees - virtuosity for it's own ends has never been my bag. But this simply incredible guitar virtuosity of New York's Morrello just feels right in the moment. What we see and hear is stunning. One priceless moment is near the end to see Patti and Stevie's eyes popping out as they witness Morrello's pyrotechnics from 2 yards.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:30:03 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Broooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooce

Someone mention Brucie.

:-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0) :-0)


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:28:23 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

I really do enjoy Robbie's album and I think everyone would listen to his solo work for very different reasons than Levon's. But Levon's recent work really is amazing, and it speaks to me in a much deeper way than any of Robbie's releases probably ever will. I just watched the clip of "The Weight" from Levon's live DVD I just mentioned, with John Hiatt and others at the Ryman. And when the "Catch a cannonball" verse came up, you could see Amy Helm looking towards Levon and singing the higher harmony, just like Rick did in the old videos of the OQ. And you can just hear his ghost in her voice, and you realize that he'll always live on through the amazing music. Some people aren't that into Levon's band I guess, but I think they're really amazing. It's the closest to The Band that I and many, many others will ever get.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:25:55 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa

Subject: boss/Morello video

I was always a Springsteen Fan (he is in my top 5 for sure) I always liked the Tom Joad CD but that performance (Thanks Tracy) was just fantastic. I never really knew of Morello until now and I am not a fan of many of his causes but he can play a mean guitar.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:17:25 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Maybe it's because I've been listening to RR's latest on my computer (and not cranking it) while working that I haven't been able to dig into all the sounds on Clairvoyant but this Clapton edge or influence is escaping me. Outside of the song EC sings, I really haven't heard all the outside forces that have been mentioned - and it's fine by me. As I hear it, it's an RR album - the song stylings all have that RR thing to it. I guess when I listen to it in more depth when the cd arrives I'll pick out the stuff people have been going on about but the criticism doesn't sound all that much different than it did on RR's first when he used various talents to their strengths to create 'his' vision - I remember Fallen Angel being looked at as a Gabriel tune, it wasn't, it was RR's with a Gabrielesque feel or the two U2 contributions that had their flair but they were RR tunes through and through. I believe RR has a great knack for letting artists sounds flourish within the framework of his pieces. If one doesn't like the nuance of a particular artists - well that is on the listener. I for one, find it rather unique that an artist can open his music to work around others sound rather than try to pound his sound on others.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 12:03:27 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

It would be great to see all 3 current Band solo projects on Jan's front page. I don't know if that would be hard to do though, so just a thought. Although you'd have to be careful who you put at the top. Or more logically, put Garth's "Canadian Celebration" on top.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 11:52:51 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Subject: Levon's upcoming live release

Levon's "Ramble At The Ryman" CD and DVD is coming out on May 17. It's been listed on Levon's site as being released May 3, but the Vanguard Records official site seems to have the correct info and press release. There's also 3 more tracks than before listed on Vanguard's site, so perhaps it was pushed back to add those. I hope the full 15 song track list is correct.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 11:05:09 CEST 2011 from (41.97.207.114)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Here is the mythical scene [in the link]

A general rule of thumb all along the work of Marcel Pagnol is that the primary school teacher, the teacher of the youngest pupils, as well as the act of teaching the youngest pupils, is sacred, not only because his father was "instituteur public". A common expression is "instituteur a la Pagnol" – all along his work "Monsieur l'instituteur" is portrayed as the most serious character, the most important in the society.

0:12 – " My dear children, we have entered a fabulous century, where miracles, those born of science, shall be in the everyday, and they shall bring joy to the poorest, the most humble"

at 0:35 is the anthological OOOOOHHHH, followed by some explanation

"this phone that shall allow you from here to talk, without disturbing and without shouting, to people who live in Aubagne or even in Aix-en-Provence"

to which one of the pupils responds with a typical expression from Marseille : "Fan de pied !", in the English subtitled version of the movie it was translated "Stone the crows !"

last but not least. at 1:06 –

" and the worker shall have one day of rest per week "

definitely, I am a man of the 20th century


Entered at Sat Apr 9 09:42:43 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Clapton's work on the album is great. I am definitely not a big Clapton fan. But he's a real team player on this album. He's obviously very close friends with Robbie, and him being there is very beneficial to Robbie I think. You hear how the two guitarists are different, and Clapton seems to bring out the best in Robbie. A well-produced, more slick "Clapton-esque" rock album suits Robbie pretty well. I'd say all Robbie's albums are pretty experimental, but this one is more straightforward and it's a good sound for Robbie. I'm just really impressed with his playing on the album.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 09:36:00 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Robbie's guitar playing with Robert Randolph and Tom Morello is pretty great. When I first listened to the album, I thought how there was barely any guitar on it. As I listened more closely, Robbie's guitar work began to shine. Listen to his wonderful, sharp lines on Straight Down The Line. People say Randolph and Morello's talents are wasted on the album. How would Robert Randolph's live playing fit anywhere at all on this album? He is perfect on Straight Down The Line. It's is Robbie's album here, but after he does some lead work on the track, he DOES let Randolph really tear it up. Listen to that solo, and how Robbie plays great rhythm guitar right alongside him, backing him up and letting him get some playing space. Same thing with Axman. Robbie's guitar starts off the song, and instead of playing really aggressively 1974 style, Robbie downplays guitar fireworks and let's his playing cry, wail, and speak. When Morello comes in, it's awesome. Totally unique and original. And that's why the track is great. It completely allows the two guitarists to fully express themselves, without resorting to cranking out cliched licks.

As for the lyrics in Axman, I thought they were very poor at first. But I enjoy them now. The first part shows well-known guitarists who had their own unique voice, and died tragically. Duane Allman, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix. Robert Johnson in there kind of confuses me, as his style owed quite a bit to the earlier Delta bluesmen. But fitting "RJ" into the lyrics is easier than "Charley Patton". I can look past not including some of the guys who actually taught Robbie. How could he have fit Roy Buchanan, Fred Carter Jr., Hubert Sumlin, and Curtis Mayfield into the lyrics? It's still a good track.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 09:16:18 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Same Interview Quoted

"What was your reaction to Levon's book?

Robbie: I didn't read it, because I heard it was a lot of sour grapes, and I thought, oh well, whatever. I've got too much else to think about for that kind of stuff. It's just been so long. I mean, I love Levon dearly and I always will, for all the tremendous times we had together, but really, you'd think he'd have more interesting things to think about in his life by now. I guess he blames me for breaking up The Band, and I suppose that's partly true, but he didn't say why. I didn't do it on a whim, believe me. You know, I called him up a couple months before the book came out, rather naively, to talk about the box set, and how we should get together and play some music together, and he said, "Yeah, that sounds good to me," like everything was hunky dory. He didn't say, `Hey, look, I've got this book coming out....."

Rick: When The Band broke up in '76, it was just time to bring the old ship in, and grow a little bit. Robbie wasn't the only one who wanted to do other things. Before The Last Waltz, I signed a production deal with Clive Davis to do my solo shows. Sometimes it breaks my heart when I remember that, in '76, Warner offered us a $6 million dollar deal to do an album a year--and we passed. But there's more to life than being able to live off your royalties: Ego is a funny thing, and after the first two or three albums, The Band pretty much became a Robbie thing, so there was conflict there.

Since you brought it up, Levon also claims that Robbie took total writing credit for songs that he says you and the other guys contributed to. Is that the way you remember it as well?

Rick: Yeah, there was a lot of that. A lot of those songs were Levon's stories, without a doubt. And as far as the music, yeah, it was very much a collaborative effort on those first two albums. So there was a little greed there on Robbie's part--a lot of greed, actually. But that's behind us now. It really seems like that was another time.

Robbie: Listen, I begged the guys to get involved in the writing, because I was the one who was up all night banging my head against the wall trying to write this stuff. And just because someone's in the room when a song is being written, that doesn't mean they helped write it. Don't get me wrong--Levon and Rick and Richard contributed tremendously to the arrangements, and to the sound of those records, and there's no way to explain how important Garth was in terms of taking us to new places musically. But, I'm sorry, it's just not true. And in a few cases, I thought I was more than generous when someone was in the room while I was writing a song."

Aside from all the statements made in that interview that are rather pertinent to the discussiosn we've been having, Robbie makes a statement that pertains directly to one fo the reasons I have described what he has been stating in interviews a few days back as something that could only come out of the mouth of a complete and total con merchant or someone still doing hard drugs.etc etc.I was responding to a print interview, the CanoeCa toronto sun I think."

Since he has been promtoing this record, Robbie keeps referring to songwriting as myterious and magical, something he still has no understanding of at all.OH my, where did that come form, etc etc. I tried going back and finidng the quotes in The Gb, but apparently a server failure took out twop weeks worth. I don't have the time to go back finding & searching the articles & videos now.

But, back in 1995, in this interview , he states "I was the one who was up all night banging my head against the wall trying to write this stuff."

What he is pushing now, magic & mystery, do the hokey pokey, well, he wasn't saying that in this 1995 interview. Does anyone reading this GB acutally believe RR when he say that songwriting is still something he really has no understanding of at all? Read the Canadian Songwriter's Hall of Fame Interview again, it's what he said. Then again, when I read or listen to the lyrics, maybe he has no understanding now. but he sure used to.

Pat, sure hope I'm still your hero.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 08:43:23 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat, that warms my heart. BTW, I'm sure you are on top of it, but, it's that time of year The Registrar of Dreidlists collects their fees. You don't want to be late.

Pat,what actually would have been closer to what I wanted to express, would be *Maybe the arguments can continue more rooted in fact, without spins, and sidewipes at the posters particpating.*

Pat, my opinion is that both in print and on broadcast, RR interviews as I described. That is a straightforward statement of my opinion. You may disagree. But to my eyes, ears, and brain, it is how the man comes off.

I remain in awe of RR's work with The Band.



Entered at Sat Apr 9 08:25:27 CEST 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

That RRHOF performance with Morello helping Bruce out on The Ghost of Tom Joad is one of my favorite You Tube finds...As many times as I've seen it I never get sick of hearing it again..You can feel the passion that Tom and Bruce display on that one...Always get a kick out of Tom wearing his Industrial Workers of the World ball cap..He played at a Labor day rally in front of a couple thousand union folk a few years ago up here, and was well recieved...If memory serves me right Tom thought about going into politics but was turned off by the deal making that went along with it..What a great player he is and I can see why RR would want to see what he could contribute..Tracy, Agree with seeing the other RR, Robert Randolph in the flesh..He is amazing...


Entered at Sat Apr 9 08:07:53 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bridge v Bookends

Ben, that's a hard one. The pleasure, as so often, is trying. Some of Bookends … Fakin' It and Save The Life of My Child sounds very dated now, but he says he'll be playing stuff on the new tour he's never played before or hasn't played for years. But Bookends has America. Then Bridge has The Boxer.

I still think Fakin' It brilliant (and under-played for years). The shop bit was probably a mistake, being unrepeatable live.

I couldn't listen to Bridge for years having been stuck in a house with only that record, working (cutting a Hammond in half in fact!), with torrential rain outside for three days. It was on constant replay.It killed it. Then when we did theatre shows for EFL / ESL students we had a backing band as part of the show, and one of the guys in the show could do Garfunkel almost perfectly, so did The Boxer and The Bridge alternate shows. That's when the drummer discovered that you can produce that big Moog BOING on The Boxer by bringing your fist down hard on a Watkins Copicat echo machine. Try it.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 07:59:56 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jeff, I admire that you can say "sophisticated con merchant" then plead for "arguments more rooted in fact without spins and sideswipes" in one paragraph.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 06:01:23 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bayou Sam - at the crossroads

I set the Vanity Fair article your page links to as reading in a course I teach on roots music..

It is fascinating. I'm not convinced it's Johnson. It's almost certainly (99.995%) Johnny Shines. It's certainly not BB King (Johnny Shines is a little young for it to be BB King, but the face is all wrong anyway.)

I sent a copy of the article and the two authenticated pictures to a very good friend of mine who is a genius artist, specialising in portraits, caricatures, et cetera. (I do not use the term genius lightly.) He has no interest in music, so knew nothing of Johnson, or BB King, let alone Johnny Shines.

He had a look and said 'the authenticated 2 are definitely the same fellah. I'm not sure about the third - I wouldn't have spent 2200 bucks on the photo if I was after a picture of the bloke in the first 2... but it could be him...'

I'm inclined to agree that it's not Johnson (but can be convinced otherwise). Note, my mate didn't discount it entirely - he just couldn't commit to it being one way or the other: I suspect (and if you read the Vanity Fair article, the man who owns it is rather protective of it) the owner may run some biometric measurements which will deny (if not confirm, leaving the ambiguity) the picture.

But it's a fascinating story. It's a shame Johnny Shines isn't still alive: he might have been able to clear it up. (Circumstantial evidence would suggest it is. Perhaps sharper eyes than mine could confirm the guitar is the same make as the one that Johnson plays in the other two...) (And my doubt to fully discount it is seen in the fingers... though long fingers on guitar players are not too rare in any case... (Check out Eric Clapton's hands, for example...)


Entered at Sat Apr 9 05:11:35 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lydia Andich

Thank you Tracy!! I was hoping Tom Morello would also sing on Robbie's latest. I was one of the first people here to even talk about Rage Against The Machine. I was drawn to some of their songs because of their left wing politics.....and Morellooooo.....Harvard educated.....so fine to the eye and...Robbie was right! He has no idea how Tom plays his guitar. lol

I agree about Clapton having too much influence on this record but I gave him a pass as I thought Robbie wasn't such a control freak as usual....but since maybe this will be his last record.....He should have taken control. Winwood? I also wanted more organ and guitar from him! Maybe he should have just had Dawes back him up on every song on HTBC.....Having said that.....Since I'm probably at least a decade older than you.....I didn't find most of his songs schmaltzy at all......Uhhhh....Ya see things differently when you're in your fifties and sixties and seventies.......Yeah.....You do....Anyway, I really appreciated your well thought out review Tracy. You used to have a Robbie site so I know how much his music means to you....me too.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:32:40 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson and his ‘right mistake’

Last part (sorry I didn't post in the right order.) from APTN.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:27:27 CEST 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Web: My link

Ray, thanks for the link! After reading the review on Pop Matters, they said the same thing I was thinking. Indeed "Fear Of Falling" sounds a lot like Clapton's "Change The World." Just can't believe somebody else thought that! I've been trying to listen to this album and I can't get into it. For what everybody put down Robbie's first solo album for (over-produced or guests too prominent) I find exactly wrong with this record. It's too much Clapton. He's all over it to the point, he should have taken lead vocals on more than just half of "Fear Of Falling." For sure "Won't Be Back" would be better off as a Clapton tune.

Where oh where is Winwood on this record? Did you know that he can really play some soulful guitar? Did you know he could play a variety of instruments besides a Hammond B3?

Robert Randolph? Go see him live. Then tell me what you think of his playing on here. Regarding all of the love songs? The lyrics are rather schmaltzy. They don't sound right. This is the same guy who gave us "Out Of The Blue", "Broken Arrow", and "Day Of Reckoning?" It sounds like a Bogey looking for his Bacall. Wait. No. Um, a Michael Douglas in search of his Catherine Zeta-Jones? Perhaps an Eric Clapton in search of his Melia Mcenery.

I've never paid attention to Rage Against The Machine or Nightwatchman. So when I finally saw him on the recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25th Anniversary concert I was blown away by his style of playing. It's definitely a different way of playing a guitar. That's for sure. The sound is awesome too. I'm far more a fan of Springsteen when he's with the E Street Band (I know some here might object) more than his solo releases. I was already familiar with "The Ghost of Tom Joad." When hearing Morello with Springsteen on it though was incredible. (...I LEFT A LINK UP...) The song was lifted to somewhere off the charts! Hearing of Morello being on Robbie's latest, I immediately thought, "Wow! Now this is going to be fantastic!" Those two styles mixed together? That will surpass the Springsteen collaboration!" Um, not so. I find "Axeman" to be a big bore. It's name dropping of guitar players without any awesome guitar licks. Rather bland. Then Morello comes in with his style and he winds up sounding a bit out of place on this nearly easy-listener. I do have to say Robbie invited him thirteen years too late. Morello would have fit perfectly on "Contact From The Underworld Of Redboy" especially on something like "Rattlebone" or "Take Your Partner By The Hand" with it's Hip Hop flavored record scratches he can easily duplicate with guitar no less!

"Madame X" is rather bland.

"This Is Where I Get Off" is an exception. It is PERFECT. It's not overly schmaltzy Claptonized drivel. Maybe it's because the subject matter is truly from the heart and did bother Robbie enough to address it. Everything works for this. Yes, even his back and forth with Eric. Very tasteful and some Clapton in retro action of how he used to play. Kind of a throwback in a "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" way. The lyrics are subdued but to the point.

"Tango For Django" is EXCELLENT! Needs to be on a soundtrack. Also, with this instrumental it makes me want to scream, "PLEASE DO A RECORD WITH THE GIL EVANS ORCHESTRA!!!" How I love "Slo Burn."

I don't want to take away any honors of length from Al Edge, the master, so I'll end it here.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:25:28 CEST 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny
Web: My link

Subject: Robert Johnson

Don't know if this has come up in here already, but I figure that it would interest a few of you. A third photo of Robert Johnson has apparently been discovered, which is incredible news to blues fans. See link.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:23:57 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Part 3 with APTN

Robbie Robertson’s Six Nations musical roots


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:20:02 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson in conversation with APTN (another clip)


Entered at Sat Apr 9 04:14:31 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Especially for S.M.

APTN National News
The seventh annual Songwriters Hall of Fame gala took place Saturday night in Toronto.

Music legend Robbie Robertson was at the centre of attention.

Robertson has roots in Six Nations territory and that is where he says he also found his musical foundation.

APTN National News reporter Donna Smith was there.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 03:59:49 CEST 2011 from (76.69.85.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Ray. I post positive and negative reivews as well as I'm just playing the role of the heavenly messenger. I linked the same article you did as well. Here's another one from American Blues News.

Btw, I saw "Jane Eyre" with the fabulous Mia Wasikowska today with a heap load of high school students. Even some of them clapped at the end of the film.

Thanks to sadavid for the link to the entire interview with Steve's favourite interviewer. Hmmm...I feel some ghosts here....Steve would have said a lot about Robbie's voice, huh?

I first posted the link (I hear Bumbles here...."I was already all over it.") to Bettye Lavette singing "Rain On Me' as I only discovered here a couple of years ago via imagezulu.....So I searched the net and voila! Glad bw and KJ dig it as much as I do....We're hoping to catch her in Serenity's home town in August!


Entered at Sat Apr 9 02:24:47 CEST 2011 from (24.124.96.239)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence Kansas
Web: My link

Subject: Useful, readable, smart and evenhanded review of HTBC

I often link things that bug me, so here is an article that I find to be a winner--evaluation of Robbie's return by www.popmatters.com. The reviewer knows what he's talking about, knows who he's talking about, and provides a constructively critical appraisal that will get people to truly listen to the record/CD/download. Proof that Internet scribes can put the focus on the music and not on their own cleverness and snark if they want. Also proof that one can be respectful of Robbie without being worshipful--a tough but consistently fair-minded review.


Entered at Sat Apr 9 01:04:53 CEST 2011 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Complex Simon

Well, a strange twist of Fate will be bringing the Pikester to a Paul Simon Show this month, his first since the "Still Crazy" tour, so long ago he can't even remember if he had Los Incas with him. Anyway, I also happened to pick up the latest "Bridge Over Troubled Water" extras reissue, with the TV Show "Songs Of America" included, not seen since it was on TV ONCE, back in the day. It did trigger the memory of the first broadcast of "Bridge Over Troubled Water" played over footage of MLK. It's a clumsy film, but deeply moving. And I think I finally agree that "Bridge" is better than "Bookends."


Entered at Fri Apr 8 23:54:43 CEST 2011 from (12.25.140.82)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Very interesting interview that David P. referenced

Yes Pat, there were missed opportunities. BTW, it is not clear that the deal The Band turned down was Post Last Waltz, as you stated.Since the year ends less than 5 weeks after Thanksgiving, it is 11.75 times more likely that The Band turned that 6 Million dollar deal down Pre Last Waltz in 1976.Guess what, everyone has missed opportunites.. It's life. No one is perfect. I'm glad for the shows I saw. Would I have liked life to be easier, business more lucrative, for The 80s 90s Band, yes. It's past, nothing can be done about it. I'm glad for what I saw that was enjoyable and moving. Is the whole damn thing tragic? Abzafuckinglutely. but that's life, life has some tragedies, tragedies have beauty in em, The beauty is one reason why tragedies hit you in the gut, and HURT. BTW, goes without saying, tragedy was right there in alot of the great Band songs. In the lyrics, the music, the sound, the vocals..... there it was.

Neither RR or Levon are saints, neither are without fault, neither are perfect. RR says one thing, other guys have said other things.Some of us rather listen to levon's solo work more of the time, some of us rather listen to RRs solo work more of the time. Some might think RR sometimes reminds them of a high level sophisticated con merchant these days soem of us dislike his recent songwiring and dislike his voice, some of us love his recent work and singing, some of us think levon was the main, root cause of The 80s 90s Bands shortcomings. Can we maybe leave the arguing somewhere round there? I don't expect the arguing to stop, but maybe if we all acknowledge this will never get settled, and there are many valid points, but the past is the past. Maybe the arguments can continue more rooted in fact, without spins, and sidewipes.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 22:50:58 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: RR
Web: My link

Subject: PA

See another interview where RR wished Levon well


Entered at Fri Apr 8 22:28:41 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Lars…….and I remember well a story Ezra told about Mr. Fagen getting particularly cranky with Brian May as May had jumped in to help with a live number and was temporarily lost……….Fagan in recounting the story would just roll his eyes and say “Oh those Rock Guys”…………….


Entered at Fri Apr 8 22:18:21 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Steely Dan

Peter Viney knows I'm on shaky ground.... five years ago I admitted that I didn't know a THING about Steely Dan. But when Ezra and I started talking on the phone twice a week, he FLIPPED when I asked him who Donald Fagen was (I thought maybe he was a second baseman for some last place team). So I looked him up on the internet and I felt relieved that I had heard of Steely Dan. When I told Ezzy that I knew about Donald being in Steely Dan, his response was, "He IS Steely Dan!!"

Ezra gave Walter Becker (I hope that was the name, I've got a terrible memory for names) credit for being Fagen's partner, but from the way he explained it, Walter and Donald were the "core" of Steely Dan and they just hired musicians to fill out the rest of the band when they needed them. I never bothered to look it up and for all I know they've been using the same drummer since their inception, but that's not the way it was explained to me.

One interesting story was when Donald was about to start a show and the new guitar player asked him a question about the first song. Donald exploded, "Put a capo right THERE (pointing to a fret) AND JUST PLAY!!!"

So I came away with the impression that Donald could be cranky with the hired help at times. The bottom line is that I enjoy Steely Dan's music, even though I'm not really up on who they are or what kind of people they seem to be. I would guess Donald Fagen is a very talented musician who you don't want to cross.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 22:18:22 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Robbie Robertson UNCUT"

The unedited version (40:03) of the interview by Jian Ghomeshi from yesterday's _Q_ radio program on CBC.
Plus a couple of minutes of video.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 21:32:13 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: (perhaps not) The Hawks' Finest Hour

1966.
Hook-handed drummer Moulty of The Barbarians sings "Moulty."
Backed, they say, by The Hawks.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 21:13:11 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Steely Dan wouldn't tour because the principals didn't think they could reproduce their studio excellence live--they thought there were too many technical limitations to performing live. Once they felt they could do it--hire great players, bring Roger Nichols on the road, pump audience reaction into their in-ear monitors (really)--they began to tour. They are one of the few live groups that rivals the OQ for live sound quality, odd because the Band dealt with much worse sound systems etc. The Band would soundcheck for hours, usually longer than the actual concert would last.

David P, as Rick and Richard both noted, the post LW Band missed out on a lot of big money opportunities, and certainly not just the ones that have publicly surfaced.

Another repeat: Storyville would have been a great Band album. A lot of it remains a great Garth Hudson document.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 21:11:10 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson "revealing" CBC interview.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 21:06:54 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

....and the Youtube one of Beck and Imelda May.......to all music fans out there......I cannot recommend highly enough the DVD of Beck's tribute to les Paul......a huge departure for those perhaps uncomfortable with Strat Jeff.......simply the most enjoyable DVD I have watched this year.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 20:27:33 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cryin' Heart Blues

Ray:

"Sometimes it breaks my heart when I remember that, in '76, Warner offered us a $6 million deal to do an album a year -- and we passed."
--Rick Danko (from a May 1995 Guitar Player magazine interview with Robbie & Rick)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 20:00:53 CEST 2011 from (41.97.184.246)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Re : Worldwide Footbots

interesting virus

NB however my link above is safe (and funny)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 19:59:32 CEST 2011 from (129.237.222.1)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/fmr home of wm. s. burroughs/lawrence kansas

Subject: the conversation continues

"This is where I get off" is accurate in the sense of being consistent with Robbie's statements in at least a couple of interviews that he did in the late 1970s--the plan, according to him, was that the Band would continue to make records as a solely studio unit. On Warner Bros., right? And weren't some of the songs on side 6 of the original Waltz LP the evidence of that?

If that indeed was the plan and the other original members agreed to it, I for one am sorry that it didn't work out. A string of strong Band studio albums, even without touring, into the 80s at least, is something I would trade for the post-Waltz careers of all 5 members, as much as I like that solo/pair/group work. Plus, who knows, Robbie may have gotten over his antipathy toward touring--no one expected Steely Dan to go back on the road after setting what lots of people, me included, think is a gold standard for studio work. But return to the road they did, and I still have not had the chance one of their shows--which have been stellar, according to most accounts.

Without getting into the incompatible attitudes toward touring that Levon and Robbie held (and let's note that Levon disliked the 1966 tour enough to depart, even though he was a much younger man then), it is fair to say there were at least 2 strong precedents for making The Band a studio-only ensemble: The Beatles and Steely Dan. I'm probably leaving out some others but those strike me as the best examples.

I don't recall where I read it, but I want to note one last thing about touring and its toll, in reference to George Clinton. Someone, I don't remember who, made the point that while lots of folks praise George Clinton for continuing to tour so frequently, they should know that he still tours because he has to tour if he wants to eat--he's been ripped off so much, that the road grind is his job. Nothing romantic about it, not in his case at least.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 19:57:18 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Unfortunately, my hair let me down.......but that is a story for another day. Have a great weekend all.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 19:07:55 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Rock and roll lifestyles

Talk about rock and roll! I'm sitting with colour charts the wife got choosing a Tuscan green for our spare bedroom. Have just called PV who is now off to make sausage and mash for his grand kids. We know how to let our hair down...


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:46:33 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

And thanks to Jed for the link to the Jeff Beck/Imelda May performance on Leno's show last night.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:41:51 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

bob w: Thank you my friend……….you have made a good day even better………………….that is the clip - wonderful……………Amidst all the drama we get up to here sometimes (and who can help getting into the odd punch-up over fueds and clairvoyance, etc………and I‘m afraid I am about to add to it soon!!!!!) seeing something like this is what makes this GB a treasure........It ain't The Band folks but dig it.....


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:31:29 CEST 2011 from (92.40.67.185)

Posted by:

Worldwide Football

Web: My link

Worldwide Football, We Got It Covered

We aim to give you all the latest on the global game but we need you to help us out so if you hear a rumour, or want to rant and moan because your manager ...


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:25:34 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Kevin, Beck was great as always. Probably will pop up somewhere online. I'll have a look around.

Was it this video? {link}


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:19:39 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Beck on Leno-Imagine if Jeff Tried to Sing This!!

http://theaudioperv.com/2011/04/08/jeff-beck-wimelda-may-remember-walking-in-the-sand-47-leno/


Entered at Fri Apr 8 18:07:38 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

bob w: I’m afraid I keep “bankers hours” as it relates to this GB so missed your heads-up on JB and Imelda May last night………I am sorry I did……….Thank you………………….and if I might: You posted a performance of a lady doing a Who song at some sort of gala many months back…..it was jaw dropping stuff but for the life of me I can’t remember the details……….Do you recall this?

Jed: While I respectfully think you are seeing insulting behaviour where none is intended re: RR’s answers to some questions….…….you make a most excellent point with the Jeff Beck tasteful use of vocalists in recent years……….I truly believe that RR would be much better served and better received had he “cast” singer the same way he masterfully casts players on his solo outings………………….Keep a “Somewhere Down the Crazy River” or “Right Mistake” to himself as he kept “Out of the Blue” in the Band years………………but make a star out of someone doing “Won’t Be Back” and go on Letterman and knock the thing out of the park………………..rather than run out the one song on the album that is a by the numbers rocker ( HDLHNM ) because it might be the easiest on to do live………………Again though it must be said that the guitar solo in HDLHNM is to guitar solo’s in standard rock songs what Music From Big Pink was to the psychedelic era……………


Entered at Fri Apr 8 17:28:01 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PutEmUp

Jeff, that's exactly it about Jerome John, there is a "friendliness" to it, you are drawn to listen and "trust" the singer. I still wouldn't have taken a cup of water that had been anywhere near him, mind!

In the classic albums DVD Anthem to Beauty, Robert Hunter makes a valid point when he says he never understood why Garcia got flak for his voice; he thought it glorious - but adds that maybe he had to believe it to write for that voice.

Ironically, the only singer in the Dead I never liked was Donna Godchaux - the only "proper" singer they ever had. Wasn't the same band at all, IMHO. In fact either of the Godchauxs have always been a dilemma for me - loved Keith on piano in '72 in tandem with an ailing Pig on the organ, but on his own - not sure.



Entered at Fri Apr 8 16:50:41 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

I just heard that John Oates (of Hall and Oates) is including a cover of Fraser and Debolt's magnificent (and Bandish) "Them Dancehall Girls" on his upcoming solo album. It's a small world: Fraser and I once worked together selling home insulation door to door, and the first land that Steve farmed before he and Marge bought their own place was the property that Fraser and Debolt had just vacated after many years of residence.

Peter V: You mentioned kd lang. Did it occur to you that Robbie on Letterman (assuming you saw it) looks like kd is likely to look 15 or 20 years from now?

Ray P: Re Rush, I find it interesting that their first record was a cover of "Not Fade Away", a song that had been part of our guys' reportoire back in the early days. Must bug you that they've taken the title so seriously.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 16:47:29 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: This Is Where I Get Off

Bill M: Perhaps the most poignant line is the song, by tragic accident rather than clairvoyant design, is the opening:

"The earth keeps on shaking
But I'm still standing still"


Entered at Fri Apr 8 16:23:59 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Duane

Duane Allman was another spellbinding guitarist who sang on only 2 songs & @ 1 concert when Gregg was unable to sing.While the timbre of his voice was sweet,he was clearly a guitar guy who was trying to sing,but not a singer.I say that despite the fact that Duane is my favorite guitarist.But,in thinking about this stuff,it is possible that those musicians who played &/or wrote songs(e.g.EC & Garcia) & who sang regularly became more acceptable to the ears given how accustomed we became to the sound of that artist singing.In RR's case,not being used to,over the years,hearing him sing possibly makes the sound of his voice both unusual & difficult to accept.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 16:20:04 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I've never minded Robbie's voice, but his phrasing on some songs (at all stages of his solo career, including now) grates. I dunno, comes across as insincere on some songs, though he's surely no more insincere in reality than any singer singing almost any song at almost any time. I haven't listened to the new album enough times to say for sure, but so far I'm most impressed with his guitar playing - great stuff on most songs. "Straight Down The Line" is a terrific performance of a very good and interesting song, even if Danny Brooks has written even better songs, and sung them amazingly well, built around a number of the same elements. I was struck by how much the rhythm section sounded like Boz Burrell and Simon Kirke on that one song but not the rest. As for "This Is Where I Get Off", while I don't find it as lame as David P does, I certainly don't see how it can be characterised as "a quiet meditation" by anyone not crossing his or her fingers behind his or her back.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 15:50:29 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO (RTG)

Subject: Todd

Todd, I play organ mainly in blues and soul bands. My first instrument (if you dismiss school lessons on the Euphonium) was guitar and I started playing the Hammond in my late teens out of necessity. Could we find a Hammond player for our college band? No. Did we know dozens of guitar players? Yes! So I bought one, and set about learning it. I am totally self taught, never had piano lessions any of that and there are my strengths and limitations. I can make all the organ noises on your favourite records, but can't play ELP stuff. Think Ian McLagan with a bit more blues soloing copped from Gregg Allman.

It is since I started writing songs that I came back to the guitar; I always had a Telecaster knocking around and more recently have indulged myself in a guitar related hobby of collecting vintage "Harmony" instruments, as well as the chance to buy a couple of those old Lowrey console organs that GH used so effectively for tones you can't quite get from a B3.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 15:47:18 CEST 2011 from (158.39.165.122)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Server problem

Hm. Looks like all guestbook entries from March 15th to April 3rd have been wiped off this web server's disc. Maybe someone should do a little maintenance of that 10-15 year old code that's still running behind the scenes here... We'll see if it can be recovered from backup.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 14:30:44 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Subject: Subdudes.

You're right, Bob W., the Subdudes is a cool band. We saw the Subdudes open for the Traffic reunion tour back in '94 in MA (same wkd as the Woodstock '94 occurred).


Entered at Fri Apr 8 14:01:09 CEST 2011 from (59.101.30.31)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Freddie, Robbie...

Peter V: you probably need to listen to gorgeous album tracks ... It's Late, from Jazz for example, or My Melancholy Blues, or Fairy Feller's Master Stroke, or Brighton Rock (from Queen 2 and Sheer Heart Attack respectively)... /n robbie says some really nice things about Richard and Rick in the Latest Mojo with the Ramones on the cover... If I get time, I might type them here....


Entered at Fri Apr 8 13:54:47 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR,Neil Young,Dylan--Singing

All a matter of taste,but Dylan is an original & his phrasing alone is worth the price of a ticket!I love his voice throughout his entire career.It is evocative & seems to wrap itself around a song like few are able to accomplish.Neil Young is a beautiful singer,most certainly a unique sounding tenor.The problem with RR is he is simply not a singer--as he said he's a songwriter & guitarist & sings perhaps no differently than if Jeff Beck or Derek Trucks tried to deviate from their guitar playing genius to horrendous attempts to sing.Ouch!! RR is a gifted song writer & one of the greatest guitarists ever.So,to try singing on his part is somewhat absurd.And,to suggest,as RR did in the View/Geddie interview that he didn't sing with The Band because he was already writing & playing....well,he's gotta be kidding.He didn't sing because he can't & he had the 3 of the best voices in music in The Band.Finally,someone suggested that a critique of RR's singing is a gratuitous cheap shot(I think that's what was said!).The only response to that is that if RR wants to avoid cheap critique he should avoid singing.Kinda like Jeff Beck does--he hires singers.Just like RR & the evolution of The Band which never seriously included RR as a singer.This does not diminish RR's awesome talent,but argues that he focus on what he can do not on what he can't.All subjective opinion on these matters & I fully understand how others may have a different perspective!


Entered at Fri Apr 8 13:02:47 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ken Dodd's Dad's Dog's dead

Just correcting that earlier headline Pete.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:53:25 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Robbie Robertson interview: New solo album, The Band, Levon Helm, Eric Clapton and more
Published: Friday, April 01, 2011, 5:00 AM

"In the song you sing “Walking out on the boys was never the plan” It’s true. When we did “The Last Waltz,” the idea was let’s close this chapter, we’ve got some issues that we need to sort out – some health issues, some personal things that were going on inside the group. Not a big problem for us as a group, but there were individuals having problems. And we thought, let’s get out of the way for a minute here. Get everything sorted out. Let’s see if we can’t help take care of one another a little bit. And then when we come back together, we’ll have a freshness and we can go in and really do some good work, we can help one another do some good work. In a band like The Band if one of the wheels is flat it just throws everything off. It’s not like, “Hey we’ll just storm right through this.” This is not a singer and a guitar player band. It really was called The Band because everybody did something quite extraordinary in it.

So this was an opportunity to do that and all the guys were talking about different projects they wanted to pursue. Garth had something he was doing called “The Queen of Angels” with some artist in Los Angeles, and he did some beautiful things with that. Rick wanted to do a solo album and Levon had talked about that as well. I had some other things I was experimenting with. So we thought, good, this is a good way to shuffle the deck, we’ll do this and when we come back we can get these things sorted out. And everybody went off to do these things and nobody came back. But over time it looked like I put together this idea of breaking up The Band and that’s why I’m saying that was never the plan at all. We did try some things together after that, and I just found that nobody was in a hurry to show up. And I thought, well you gotta read the writing on the wall here. If everybody just has other things to deal with or mental issues that they’ve got to straighten out with themselves, it’s going to take whatever time it’s going to take. So, for that you just say o.k., let’s get out of the way and let things take their natural course. And the natural course was that nobody was pushing in that other direction, which was the plan.

Q. Do you have any kind of relationship with Levon now? And if not, have you made any efforts to try and improve that?

I don’t have any issues with Levon. This is his own thing. I don’t have any control over that. I’m fine. These guys are my brothers and you can’t take that away. I did, some time back, I called Levon and we had a little talk, and he said he was going to call me back but I didn’t hear from him. So I just figured whatever’s good for him is fine with me. But I’m o.k. with all of the stuff. He said some things that aren’t true that offended me at the time, just about me not writing the songs or something, it’s just ridiculous. What are you gonna do?"

"Speaking of “Big Pink” will the entire “Basement Tapes” ever be officially released – the whole thing?
Y’know, I don’t know. With Bob, they seem to be releasing everything. So I can’t imagine that isn’t on their list too.

You mentioned Richard, I’m not sure if you realize that he died 25 years ago today, March 4, 1986.
Oh my God. I didn’t realize it, wow. Oh (voice trails off) my God that changes my whole day.
I’m sorry, I…
No, I’m so glad you reminded me of it. (At this point the interview paused for a moment before carrying on)"


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:51:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Robbie's croak ;-0)

Carmen. Probably agree on Out of the Blue. It's sung deliciously by Robbie and suits his style, range and delivery so perfectly. However, as for his fitting seamlessly into what we have come to expect from a more orthodox Band studio song, we'd surely have to say that his efforts on 'To Kingdom Come' attain the sort of vocal perfection we all so cherish from The Band.

And whilst on 'Kingdom' I've just noticed whilst re-checking it really is Robbie on lead vocal that Rick doesn't get any counter harmony credit on this site's playing credits for the song. Is this correct? I may be mistaken but it sure has always sounded like dear Rick counter harmonising to me?


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:46:28 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Stones doing 'Watching the River Flow'


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:18:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Great man

Pete, Ken lives half a mile from our house. The warmth of feeling for him locally speaks for itself.

You're right I think he genuinely does merit the mantle of comic genius. Once he gets you you're well and truly at his mercy and the gatling gun deliveries however daft inflict knock out after knock out till you simply have to put your hnds over your ears to avoid further laughter punishment.

It's funny you say he avoided the 'blue' material. You're right, of course, but my uncle [by marriage] whom I can now clearly see was somewhat of a sanctimonious twerp [attending mass twice daily - not that that was why he was so po-faced] used to say many many years ago his act was disgusting. I never did get to discuss Billy Connolly's act with him years later. :-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:10:42 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

“The Right Mistake,” which includes guest Steve Winwood, has its own interesting keyboard signature. Whirling and then crunchy, it recalls the angular quirks of Garth Hudson’s work in the Band. The song moves past those easy cliches, though, as Eric Clapton (who co-wrote three of the tracks here and plays on seven of the 12 tunes) dances through the deep exhalations of a scorchingly sensuous female backup singer. With this lacivious purr, Angelyna Boyd makes it utterly clear what the right mistake would be. Robertson digs deeper into that lost relationship with his former partners in the Band on “This Is Where I Get Off,” a quiet meditation on leaving things behind — but not being able to completely shake them. The solo, watery and lonesome then angrily incisive, goes further even than Robertson’s words in showing the hold that time still has on the now 67-year-old.

"Ultimately, too, tracks like “Won’t Be Back” simply ache for the open-hearted sentiment of the Band’s departed vocalist Richard Manuel, who would have been 68 this week. There was a reason that Manuel, Levon Helm and Rick Danko were the featured voices on those old records. If anything, age has made Robertson’s already-weathered voice more brittle."

Hi Dunc...Angela McCluskey on HTBC is Scottish born. Perfect voice for Robbie's songs here.

Alternate take on "The Right Mistake" in link as well.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 12:01:33 CEST 2011 from (41.97.152.98)

Posted by:

Empty Now

correction - the best promises of the 20th century


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:52:16 CEST 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Dear Katie It's Been Good to Hear You

Revisiting the Basement Tapes has been a hugely enjoyable recent experience. Some great guitar playing and arrangements. The beautiful three voices on the Band arranged 'Aint No More Cane'. In my humble opinion one of the great singing songs of popular music and what great accordion playing.

Richard's singing on 'Ruben Remus', 'Orange Juice Blues', the hauntingly beautiful 'Katie's Been Gone',and the backing on 'Tears of Rage' is brilliant. Has it ever been bettered?

Is Robbie a lead singer? No. He's a brilliant songwriter and guitarist and I can't wait for the album. We know what his singing is like... he gets there like Leonard, Tom Waits, Paul Simon, Ray Davies. But I'd rather listen to them than many singers. Everything I've downloaded has been interesting and enjoyable so far.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:51:58 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Out of the Blue

should have said - Hard to argue that OOTB is "NOT" RR's best vocal.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:46:30 CEST 2011 from (41.97.152.98)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: when you hear the beep it will be three o’clock she said that for over an hour and I hung up

From Marcel Pagnol's "La Gloire de Mon Pere" (The Glory of My Father)
The primary school teacher exposes to the class the best promises of the 19th century "We shall have telefon !"
the pupils more astray than ever, all opened wide eyes, as expecting demystification.
"with the telefon, you will be able to speak with somebody who is in Aubagne, without shouting"
Marseille–Aubagne distance = 11 miles …The pupils amazed "wowhhh"

Joke - Rings the newest handset of Nokia of her cheating husband, who's in the bathroom meanwhile, the brave woman naturally reply to the call on his behalf.
A feminine voice at the other end of the line, domestic scene started by blowing the handset to smithereens, followed with calling her man with all the names of birds. The husband get out calmly, then skillfully explains
"you bedouin mujere ignorant, you know nothing on advanced high technologies, what mistress ? I have no mistress ! the gentle woman talking is a sympathetic gal who knows everybody in Sahara, she's called Misses Congestion"

Band Connection – In relation with the recent evocation of yodeling in The Band GB, the yodel was developed in the Central Alps as a method of communication between alpine mountaineers or between alpine villages, which sometimes are distant of 11 miles, this explains why the newest handset of Nokia knows lesser sale-rates in Alps than in Sahara


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:45:37 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: vocals

BEG- Hard to argue that Out of The Blue is RR best vocal.

The reason I like, Dylan, N Young , RR and I will add Roger Waters is because of their unique vocal sound. It is real - when they sing they make you feel it. Bob Marly has this affect on me too but I dont think anyone would say his voice is a pure song voice. This is nothing against Richard, Rick, or Levon - they have the best voices in Rock and Roll IMHO.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:42:34 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant
By John Garratt
8 April 2011

"Since the man is in his late ‘60s, it’s only natural for him to mix the autobiographical with the spiritual. He keeps picking at religious themes in his songs, not unlike the Bunuel-inspired Band songs of old. “Inside of the belly of the whale” is the metaphor of choice for the life of excess, though the summer of love was more pure with “tent show evangelists and Luke the Drifter”. These same travels go down cynical paths when Robertson laments “Sign reads God bless America guns and ammo / I’m not sure that’s what He means / Sign reads repent the end is near / I’m not sure that’s what we need”. A female protagonist feels spiritually overwhelmed in the title track by trying to weigh the hard facts of “Benedictine sister to Isis and the black Madonna / Mistress of magic, goddess of the Nile”. And most glaring of all are cautionary musical advices from old blues men and gospel singers on the leadoff “Straight Down the Line”: “I do not play no rock and roll / I would not be moved to sell my soul”. But where The Band could drive this stuff home with a hard-edged gospel/flower rock collision in swampland, Americana, a majority of How to Become Clairvoyant just kind of sounds like Robert Cray with a starched collar. Just like his photo on the cover, looking like he’s avoiding the paparazzi (I must remain incognito!), Robertson’s harsh whisper makes it sound like he’s going out of his way to sound easy-going."


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:31:27 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I really wish there was a video of Robbie singing here with The Band.

Adam2...Totally agree with you. It's because of the guitar playing of Robbie on "This Is Where I Get Off" that it's one of my favourite songs on HTBC. I'm a sucker for guitarists bending notes.....It makes you feeeel how Robbie was so conflicted at the time. Also, I like how he gets more emotional in his singing when he emphasizes how he knows where he went wrong.....and.....how someone done him wrong. Lastly, his willingness to address the dissolution of The Band without really giving it all away....at least until he writes his autobiography.....and because.....I find this song inspirational in my own life as I'm having to make some decisions myself.....


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:06:12 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

"This Is Where I Get Off" seemed like a melodramatic, somewhat weak song at first. But I've really changed my mind about it. It seems like a really heartfelt statement. Robbie's part of the twin guitar solos with Clapton has to be his most intense, emotional playing since the Last Waltz "It Makes No Difference". The way he makes his guitar cry and shake, and especially that one long, bent note he plays. After all these years, he still has that amazing vibrato technique. Really stunning playing.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 11:04:14 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Not Knotty Ash

Subject: The Diddymen

Argh! Al, I told everyone I know never to mention the Diddymen. They were a group of pre-teen stage school girls ,dressed in furry suits, all of whom were outstandingly obnoxious. Nearly as obnoxious as the stage school mothers standing in the wings. Many of the stagehands would ruminate cheerfully on the potential results of the entire lighting rig crashing down onto the stage during the Diddymen's routines.

I've mentioned this before, but during the two minutes we had to wait before his big finale entrance he would tell me the jokes which were too filthy to use in his stage act. He said the first night "Stop me if I ever repeat one." In six weeks of twelve shows a week he never did. The man is a genius, a very odd sort of genius, but one nevertheless.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 10:51:16 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ken Dodd's dad's dead

Pete, I noticed you stopped short of dissing 'We Are the Diddymen'. Must say I'm pleased about that. I always felt the boys would have managed a killer version of that with Robbie on lead vocal.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 10:22:03 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: My earlier rant-thingy

I'm not saying it's about good/bad, like/don't like (or as I categorize things: Me Like/Me NO Like), everybodby's taste is different. Difference and difference of opinion is a good thing. My beef is more about the quickness with which people will harp on the JRR's singing. You know off the bat that vocals aren't his forte (sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, sometimes it's good, sometimes it isn't), so the complaining just seems like a gratuitous cheap shot.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 09:29:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Powderfinger

On Neil Young being the best interpreter of his own songs, see The Cowboy Junkies version of Powderfinger. Once you get into it, there is no other.

I also find Prelude's "After The Gold Rush" a great (if guilty) pleasure!


Entered at Fri Apr 8 09:24:44 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sangers and singers

Leonard Cohen only got a passing nod in the mention of songwriters who aren’t “natural singers.” He’s certainly in the A list of the category.

I empathized immediately with the comment on Freddie Mercury, a man with a tremendous voice, that I always avoid listening to. The best “powerful natural singers” I saw in concert were k.d. lang, Raoul Malo, Judy Collins, Tom Jones. You had the feeling any of them could have sung anything, and Raoul Malo and k.d. lang could both sing Roy Orbison numbers, which is a major feat.

The only singer in that category in The Band was Rick Danko. Both Levon and Richard are among the greatest singers in rock, but both are quirky. Few singers carry as much of their accent through to the song as Levon. Few choose to sing how Richard sang. I have a feeling that only Rick could have sung It Makes No Difference. But their strengths were three contrasting singers (although Rick and Richard could sound like each other when they chose … see the long debates on Holy Cow.) Robbie also has a quirky, character-full voice. I can’t see any of them doing Somewhere Down The Crazy River (or most of the Native American stuff) as effectively. He does have to strain, which is why live he needs the female vocalists of the Native Americans era, or ideally, as was said earlier, Peter Gabriel, who can do the Richard Manuel stuff that is in Robbie’s head. See Fallen Angel.

One of my vacation backstage jobs (yawn, I know I’m repeating myself) was the Ken Dodd show. Ken is a British comedian (still going too) who had a series of big 60s hits with covers of stuff like “Tears”, “8x10”, “Still” and so on. One of my tasks on that show was to escort him up a series of long risers behind the backdrop (it was a symphony concert hall outside the summer seasons) because he was “night blind”. This was after his main singing section, the dancers came on, and he had to enter from the top of the risers for the finale when he sang “Happiness” (Happiness, Happiness, the greatest gift that we possess, I thank the Lord, that I’ve been blessed, with more than my share of happiness). So I watched him sing close up twice nightly. He could hit any note perfectly without effort. He was hugely competent natural singer with the goofy face of a clown. But he had absolutely zero taste and chose the worst possible shite on the face of the planet to sing. And did it with the expression of sincerity only comedians can muster for their serious bits. In the words of Ian Dury (another quirky singer who passed his accent through, like Levon), What A Waste. However, it was the year of the notorious Ronnie Hawkins Rolling Stone interview. He saw me reading it, and had heard vaguely of Rolling Stone and wanted to read it. He took my copy away and quoted Ronnie Hawkins lines at me for the next week. He loved that interview and asked me to buy him a copy. He was a very likeable guy.

Robbie has something to say, and delivers it with emotion. I succumbed to not waiting so am getting into the downloads while I wait. So far the leader is When The Night Was Young, which I can’t stop playing.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 08:10:13 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - I haven't emailed you yet. I've been getting really lazy with my chord studies, but I'm going to try and get working on them again in the next couple days. Thanks a lot for offering your help! I'll post here when I send you the first email.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 08:03:47 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Not sure if it's a coincidence or someone has it out for me, but that previous post by "adam" wasn't me.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 07:29:05 CEST 2011 from (174.113.135.92)

Posted by:

adam

Web: My link

awesome site :)


Entered at Fri Apr 8 07:11:35 CEST 2011 from (69.177.214.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Sangin'

Fred, I get your point, but I think there’s more to it than good or bad, or like or not like.

At Dylan’s peak, his phrasing was untouchable. And he made his bones interpreting and creating the phrasing for his own songs. Literally a one-man band at several points of his career. While it’s true that he “borrowed” some of his melodies, he’s really in a class of his own as a songwriter and interpreter of his own songs. He’s also missed the mark vocally many times, and much of his singing doesn’t work for me. But the stuff that does work with his singing is above and beyond what anyone else could do with it. The 1974 tour and The Hard Rain album in particular aren’t among my favorites of his singing styles. Too shouty for me. The odd thing is that I do like a lot of the Rolling Thunder time period which was in-between those shouty periods…especially his killer rendition of ‘Isis’ from the 1975 tour. I know that Hard Rain is not too long after that, but something changed.

Neil Young has always been an acquired taste. Most people either love it or hate it (his vocal style). But again, probably the best interpreter of many of his own songs.

Robbie’s in a different situation, because most of the songs that he is known for were brought to life by other singers. Their contributions to the vocal phrasing and melody to varying degrees are integral to the songs.

As far as his current work is concerned, I think there are some songs where his voice is the most appropriate one. There’s at least two on the new album that are perfect for his voice. For some reason there’s always a couple of his where I think Peter Gabriel should be singing it. If Robbie does tour, he should partner up with Gabriel somehow.

I’ve been a Clapton fan for longer than I’ve been a Band fan, but I think the tune on the new album where Clapton handles the lead vocal pulls the listener out of the experience a little bit. Clapton’s singing is fine, but all of a sudden it starts sounding like a Clapton album. And not classic Clapton, like ‘No Reason To Cry’, or 'Derek and the Dominos' (which I have on the box at the moment) but late 1990’s ‘Pilgrim’ era crooner Clapton which borders on bland.

Jerry Garcia is interesting as a vocalist. Like Dylan, I think it’s his phrasing that makes it work……an there’s something about the tone of his voice…at least at his peak…..he sometimes sounded like someone singing through a Green Bullet harmonica microphone……it was his ‘US Blues’ voice. It suited him.

Just as an aside to RTO, I do enjoy reading about the guitar talk. Although I do play a little, and understand the basics of pickups and such, I’m not an expert. But since I originally associated you as an organ man, I’m always a little surprised when you have so much knowledge of electric guitars. I suppose the guitar talk has a wider audience for chatting, rather than delving into the idiosyncrasies of the inner working of organs, but I frequently do a double take when “Rob the Organ” starts talking guitars. Please don’t stop though…I usually learn something, and others usually join in and it leads to good conversation, but I think I’d have a similar reaction if Garth popped in here to post someday and started talking about the windings on single coil pickups vs. humbuckers.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 06:46:11 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, i enjoy Richard Thompso's singing quite alot sometimes. Jerry, when he sang well, whch was a whole damn lot of the time, his voice had a warmth and friendliness that is uncommon, Just a wonderful sound.

Back in the day, The Dead actualy pulled off some wonderful harmonies. Both on record, and live. I saw shows in the 70s, and 80s where their singing was amazing. Also saw shows where it wasn't. Been at shows where the first set was good, the second set was out of this world and the singing was gorgeous. When The Dead were on, man it was powerful.

Not a one of the vocalist sin The dead coudl be described as a great singer. But when they sang great, they sang great. And I loved the sound of Jerry;s voice. Weir, when he sang, as opposed to growled, also , loved his voice.

Furay, Clark, Rick, richard. levon, Gram, nother league of singer.

Rob, did you get the feeling Garcia was a big guy? I alwsy thought so. Met him on a food line at a post show party once. He seemed to be barely taller than I.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 06:13:29 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

adam2, watch it. Don't try to get between me and BEG. btw, I never heard from you. Did you try to email me?


Entered at Fri Apr 8 06:00:18 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PutEmUp

..but notwithstanding my last post I also see Jeff's point about regarding some folk (generally regarded as questionable singers) as truly expressive because his "ears like it". Richard Thompson and Jerry Garcia are both people I love to hear sing a song. Figure THAT one out!!!?????


Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:55:46 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: RR as a vocalist vs Dylan and Young

Of the three, I think it is fair to say that RR has shown the most maturity over the years when it comes to "knowing his place" as a vocalist. And it must be hard - to have written all those classics and yet still selflessly give them over to the right voices (when your artistic soul cries itself to sleep every night in a "should'a been me" vibe) shows a healthy command of a bigger picture and the utmost respect for the composition. Hats off to RR, big time.

Why? Because he had Richard Manuel to hand, and if that didn't work Rick Danko would certainly cut it. And Levon for the swampier moments.

Neil Young had Richie Furay and Steven Stills, even Dewey Martin could crank a tune out respectably. Then after a while, Stills again AND Crosby and Nash! Unlike RR, still he sang - despite being arguably the weakest vocalist in at least two name acts (make it three - I quite like Danny Whitten's voice!)

Dylan is Dylan. The biggest entity of the three, and his start as a one-man act rather set the eternal frontman (not to mention "spokesman") pattern. And what else could he do, anyway - his instrumental style is very much geared to accompany himself. Robbie was a hotshot guitar player; Neil Young (and this is a debate in itself!) err..also presented himself as a lead guitarist, albeit with a quirky style. Thus RR & NY are both better equipped to provide the material and yet have another job to be getting on with.

Let's not forget also that Robbie cut his teeth backing a ready made Rock & Roll star singer. There is no Hawk in the chronology of the careers of Dylan or Young. Dylan always a solo turn and NY always a contributing vocalist.

So who wins? NY & Dylan for caring nary a shite about what critics thought of their delivery, these were their own songs and they would sing them? Or RR for seeing the potential in the composition and thus also an unwillingness to compromise on the quality of this vision? I say RR wins by a mile, but you can see why the other two gravitated more towards being a self-contained act, having never done the solo turn plus crack band routine of Hawk days.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:53:32 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

BTW, I would also say that Bob & Neil were 2 of the finest lyricists & songwriters of the past century ( i have a long list). I would also say that I would not include Rick, Richard, Garth, or Levon in that list. I would include them in a different category of songwriting however..


Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:47:51 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Fred, in my opinion. Neil Young and Bob Dylan, WERE two of the most expressive, most wonderful singers of the past century ( i have along list) . Not anymore though, but once upon a time.Like most things. No, RR never was, & is not in league with them as a singer. No yardstick, just what my ears like.



Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:40:09 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Kevin, if you happen to be lurking out there right about now......Jeff Beck and Imelda May are on Jay Leno's show tonight.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:38:09 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Hey where did the "R" go?

I noticed that in my last post my name's missing an "R"...it's the price one pays for going on a mini rant. ; )


Entered at Fri Apr 8 05:10:13 CEST 2011 from (76.71.9.173)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Broken Arrow
Somewhere Down The Crazy River
What About Now
Breakin' All The Rules
Ghost Dance
Golden Feather
Makin' A Noise
In The Blood
This Is Where I Get Off
She Won't Be Back
Shine Your Light
Crazy Love with Aaron Neville

Lydia and Robbie...I saw her name on a list as one of Toronto's most eligible single women who now lives in NYC?


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:57:50 CEST 2011 from (99.141.41.141)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat ain't the only one representing Illinois here. And I totally agree that Robbie uses his voice in cool ways. He's going for the similar Tom Waits/Dylan talk-singing thing, and he does it fine. I don't expect him to try to sound like Richard Manuel. Everyone has their own voice, and Robbie uses his (aside from his other voice, his guitar playing).

Totally disagree with those not impressed with his gut string guitar solo. Where have you heard Robbie play like that before? It's a new twist for him, and for the track, and it's brilliant.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:51:22 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fed

Subject: Just to be clear on the point

I like Bob Dylan. I prefer Neil Young. I don't care how well or not they sing. But you (the generic "you" that is) can't go on about how Robbie is bad at singing while NOT applying the same yardstick to the other two. It doesn't make any sense. Mini rant over. : )


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:48:41 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

ray, I've been listening to Love And Theft a lot lately which puts any criticism about RR's voice in perspective.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:37:52 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: FRED

Thank you Fred. A long time ago (30 years) I stopped listening to Dylan because his voice was so bad and without conviction. But I did go out and track down his lyrics and I have to say he is one of the greatest wordsmiths in history. So is Robbie-so is Waites-so is Neil- blah blah


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:37:34 CEST 2011 from (24.124.96.239)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/fmr home of wm. s. burroughs/lawrence kansas

Subject: the subdudes/robbie's singing/picking the favorite solo robbie songs

bob w: agreed about the Subdudes, even though I've not heard them in years. They'll always have a special place in my heart and mind since they used to play in a bar called The Ranger in Laramie, Wyoming, where I earned my BA in English (establishing me as an elitist who has never come close to making $40,000 per year), right before they broke into the big time. Those were very good times. I danced to them as they closed down the bar one night, accompanied by some friends I recall fondly. This was in the late 1980s.

I am a big, big fan of singers with "bad" or limited voices. The singers I detest, the ones I find unlistenable, are the ones like Geddy Lee of Rush, a terrible Canadian band with borderline fascist lyrics (what is that "Trees" sewage?) and I don't give a damn how well they can play their instruments or what range Lee's voice has. That is the kind of music rock and roll was invented to prevent. Too bad it didn't work in that case. (I also want to leave any room in which Queen is playing, particularly Bohemian Rhapsody and We Will Rock You/Champions, though they are far less offensive than Rush).

Give me Leonard Cohen, Randy Newman, Kristofferson, Dylan, Young, Hendrix, Robertson instead. Although I won't lie--I do think Levon, Richard, and Rick are the best interpreters of Robbie's lyrics. But that is not happening and it won't and I don't expect Robbie to sound like anyone but himself. And he doesn't disappoint.

I don't have a copy of the Native Americans soundtrack handy so my list for Carmen isn't complete. But I think that record is tremendous.

Robbie Robertson 1987: Fallen Angel/Sonny got caught

Storyville: Resurrection/Sign of the rainbow

Redboy: Rattlebone/Stomp Dance (Unity)

HTBC: Won't be back/She's not mine

Very difficult to narrow these down, I have to say.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 04:08:37 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: For f*ck sakes..

I cannot believe the stick JRR gets for his vocals, yet Dylan & Neil Young will get a free pass (from the same people who decry Robbie's singing) And I don't want to hear/read the reasoning re: His Bobness & Mr. Young "It's not about the voice, it's the message ...blah blah, blah". My advice: apply the same to JRR.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 03:43:26 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Been listening to the Subdudes a lot lately. I believe these guys are among the best bands out there. Great stuff.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 02:42:31 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: One for Simon

Have you come across these Simon? The Sand Band. Seem pretty impressive in the sort of understated way that certainly hits me right between the eyes. I presume the video is Seffy Park bandstand.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 02:34:19 CEST 2011 from (76.71.9.173)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"One wo/man's trash is another wo/man's treasure."

"Robbie Robertson and his backing band Dawes stopped by Late Show with David Letterman to play "He Don't Live Here No More," a song from How to Become Clairvoyant, Robertson's first album in over a decade. Robertson is in fine form here – his voice is raspy but sharp, and his guitar solo is evocative and seemingly effortless."

As far as the guitar break in this song...It's exactly as Robbie wanted it to be......totally unexpected. I agree with Kevin J....If it wasn't for this guitar break I probably wouldn't be drawn to this song as much, but the driving drum beat......I get a Native feeeel here.

I'm digging Steve Winwood's organ (I would have loved more from Winswood!) and Robbie's guitar on "The Right Mistake" which was dedicated to Thelonius Monk. Thanks to Bob F who posted the Woodstock Radio interview with Robbie....I discovered why.......

"You could be the perfect stranger
You could be from Illinois Pat B"......

Sheryl Crow's song "My Favourite Mistake" was about Eric Clapton.

This Is Where I Get Off....Robbie sounds like he's shaking as he sings about a bittersweet time in his life with The Band. I absolutely dig the musical conversations with Robbie and Eric trading licks....seamlessly. I imagine since Eric is also a writer that he would understand Robbie. I think his support of Robbie's project was paramount....not whether Levon received two Grammy awards for his solo work. It would be much harder in the rock category to be recognized.....Although as Neil Young said at our Juno Awards...."What year is this?' He won for Adult Alternative album of the year as well as receiving a Humanitarian award.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 02:30:45 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: ROBBIE

BTW---CARMEN: I got this far, but don't have the time to finish your request for now. Here goes with my faves from ROBBIE's 5 albums:

1987-"ROBBIE ROBERTSON:1. "Broken Arrow"...2. "Showdown At Big Sky"

1991- "Storyville" 1."Breakin' The Rules"... 2. Night Parade.

1994-Music for Native Americans: 1.Golden Feather... 2. Ghost Dance,

1998- RR: Contact From The Underworld Of Redboy: 1. Unbound--2. The Code of Handsome Luke.

2011: How To Be Clairvoyant: 1. He Don't Live Here No More...2. When The Night Was Young...{not sure on this one as I recently purchased it, and haven't had the time to play it often].

CYA Soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Apr 8 02:11:37 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan..

Hello again. Just a link for anyone interested in Bob Dylan's recent tour of China.

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Apr 8 01:27:25 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jed

It's okay Jed, I know what you are saying. We are on thin ice at the moment, we folk that paste regularly in a Band-based community, but genuinely have listened to RRs record and maybe don't think much of it. I like it more than any of his others, mind.


Entered at Fri Apr 8 00:04:03 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Definition of fun [Part 2]

Keef - man of the people.

Ha ha - Nice one Pat

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:57:20 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

In the first place, Jed, don't be fearful. With one or two exceptions, this is a fairly peaceful bunch. I just thought that since you've made five posts slamming either RR's voice or his comments in the article, (granted you did say positive things as well) that you wouldn't object to at least one from someone a different point of view. I wasn't going to say anything since almost everyone here has heard my thoughts on this issue many times before, but I didn't want you to feel as if no one was paying attention. I'm certainly not angry about anything.

Pat, I may have that memo somewhere, but I've been busy looking for my birth certificate.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:56:19 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

David P., looks like fabulous weather down there for the Masters......a rite of Spring for me.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:54:39 CEST 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR's best solo work

Just a little Fun - now that there are 5 solo CD's and other songs. Lets put together a best of bakers dozen - rules as follows - 2 from each release and 2 not associated with one of the 5 CD (Soundtrack Songs)and 1 wild card (any Song/any CD). Fallen Angel, Broken Arrow, Somewher Down Crazy River,Hold Back the Dawn, Day of Reckoning, Ghost Dance, It Is a Good Day to Die, Unbound, The Code of Handsome Lake, She's Not Mine, When The Night Was Young, Shine Your Light, Between Trains.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:52:18 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: DEB on air

And I've still got one of me original teeth Debs. Smack in the top middle

central eatin'

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:51:57 CEST 2011 from (76.71.9.173)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Daniel Lanois Performing 'The Moon Struck One' by Robbie Robertson at Songwriters Hall of Fame Gala.....Well a tease lasting 14 seconds.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:47:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Taking sides

Wasn't referring to you specifically or perhaps even at all Jed. Merely stating that ever since I first came on here the feud has been paramount as a topic of discussion. It was far worse before the hiatus when i thing there were more of Levon's hardcore supporters on here.

It just saddens me. Simple as that. I've never taken sides. I simply cannot as it's my love for The Band as an entity and all its original five members that brought/brings me here.

Of course I see the faults on both sides. I just wish...

:-0(


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:47:21 CEST 2011 from (76.71.9.173)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wintersleep Performing 'Broken Arrow' by Robbie Robertson at Arts Centre in honour of Robbie's Songwriters Hall Of Fame award.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:42:48 CEST 2011 from (76.71.9.173)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's a better clip than the one I posted on Sunday.
Part of Robbie Robertson's Speech at the 2011 Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame (Clip 1)

I finally was able to find a copy at one of our Indigo Bookstores of the Rolling Stone article on Robbie today. I didn't infer what you did "Jed" re Robbie taking the time to read books while the other Band members might not have been inclined meant that Robbie was superior intellectually. I read that he liked to read and catch up on everything he missed as he dropped out in grade 10. It's interesting to note that I think only Levon graduated from High School and Garth?

I do agree with Tracy that Robbie's gone Hollywood and he won't be back! Actually....The very first time I thought he'd gone Hollywood was during the 1974 tour with Dylan. I was reading _Knockin' on Dylan's Door_ On The Road in '74 and I could see how Robbie was becoming mesmermized with the Hollywood stars who were at the shows. Could it be because of his huuuuge love of films?

Does he flaunt his wealth in restaurants because he's noveau riche and not from old money? In the article the writer tells us that Robbie orders a 250.00 bottle of wine. Did Robbie tell him to write that or did the writer want to make a point?

He also shared how he was really angry when the boyzzz didn't show up after TLW. I think he said he felt burnt. I don't know....

Only the first time I met Robbie did I feeeel some warmth or friendliness.....He's not Garland Jeffreys! Having said that....I think if you're looking for another Band record.....You better move on. This record is more atmospheric and PERSONAL. He lets us in.....I'm thankful for that.

In one of the interviews I posted or maybe it was one of sadavid's posts.....We've been finding some of the same ones lately.....He said he will address what happened with The Band more in his autobiography.

Ohhhhh.....I almost forgot......He did say in RS that he did contact Levon a few years ago......nothing resolved.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:41:12 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Al, you don't sound a day over 105.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:37:34 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Al Edge

I clearly stated that Levon should not have opened this up for the public in the first place.It was uncalled for.But,I don't feel that RR's passive aggressive approach should get a pass either.That's not taking a side.If RR had said nothing in The View/Geddie Interview & in RS there'd be no mention.I'd prefer to talk music,but I'm fearful there is an angry reaction to my critique of RR's voice as well,while my admiration for the songs & guitar work(not all of it) is left ignored..


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:36:16 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jed, that's not what I said. Keef still revels in being a streetwise man of the people while Mick hangs with royalty and authors. Plenty of people aren't friends but still make music together, and there is some question as to how friendly Keef and Mick are.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:30:12 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: It's an age thing

Sorry that of course should have read 110 years

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:28:57 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Keef's Book

Yup,I read the book.Perhaps,although I love The Stones,as compared to The Band there isn't the same emotional feeling in my perspective.This certainly affects my point of view as it might most people.Also,Keef & Mick are still friends,still make music together & plan to tour again,so it's hard to compare to a long time gone Band & in light of the extreme anger,however expressed,that pops out every so often.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:27:54 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Definition of fun

Got to admit Jed, ever since I first came on here around 111 years or so ago I have never found the side taking anything other than sad and dispiriting and a constant thorn in the side of the band I've always admired above all others.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:23:15 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Straight Down The line

Right from the start, the lyrics took my attention. Robbie is a storyteller. Always has been. As in the portrait of Sonny Boy Williamson II.

… when I met an old bluesman

with a walking cane

he wore a striped suit

and used someone else’s name

he said ‘Son, I’ve seen it all

and it’s not what you think

He said ‘there are some tough choices to be made’

and he took a little drink …


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:21:28 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More RR

Deb--you post a very fair point of view & I don't "vehemently" disagree(though I may still disagree) with anything you say since I'm not feeling "vehement" about any of this! In fact,I find these discussions quite fun & interesting & I usually come away learning something or tempering the intensity of my own opinion. Regarding RR & reading,I never meant to suggest there is anything arrogant in RR's interest in reading & educating himself--he's obviously a very smart person--but rather that his demeanor might come across as arrogant--in this circumstance to his fellow Band mates.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 23:14:33 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Deb, in America circa 2011, being smart, well-educated, or intellectually inclined is considered elitist. You evidently have not received the memo.

Jed, I look forward to reading RS. Have you read Keith Richards' book? It would seem in some ways Keith is Levon and Mick is RR when it comes to the elitist thing. In regards to this, writer Bill Wyman's fake Mick review of Keef's book is brilliant.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 22:47:39 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Subject: One more thing

I forgot -- since when is reading an act of overt arrogance?


Entered at Thu Apr 7 22:45:05 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Jed, I read the same article you did and I'm not sure I see a cause for the load of umbrage you're toting away from it. Like the differing tastes in voices you referenced, that may come from our approaching the subject with different prejudices (in the literal "pre-judging" sense of the word).

Regarding Levon, it's rare to find an article where Robbie says anything negative about him at all. What he said in this one, something along the lines of "Levon was always mad at someone -- the lawyer, the manager. Now it's me." (I don't have my copy of the magazine at hand, so that's not a direct quote.) is borne out in Levon's book.

I like Dirt Farmer just fine, although not nearly as much as you do. I do think that what I've heard of this album promises to be as good and understand that you would vehemently disagree. As you said yourself, we've all got our opinions.

Gosh, I miss Steve.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 22:12:02 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: This Is Where He Gets Off?

Jed: After just a cursory listen I have my doubts that the songwriting "On How To Become Clairvoyant" comes close to the skill level one should expect from Robbie.

"Walking out on the boys
Was never the plan
We just drifted off course
Couldn't strike up the band

We'd been working the graveyard shift
I wonder do you catch my drift
This was trouble in the making
But it's a risk well worth taking"


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:57:55 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Levon /RR Singing

Peter--again a matter of how our ears hear it,but Levon's singing on Dirt Farmer is a thing of beauty while RR's singing hasn't changed over the years--lousy.However, RR does a version of Twilight while playing piano & it's quite beautiful.This exception is on A Musical History. Pat--as for the RS interview RR endeavors to prove himself the intellectual amongst a bunch of backwoods fools who insulted his prolific reading habits.Perhaps they were merely mocking his overt arrogance.And,the way he drags Richard's memory through the mud with out of line drug talk is wrong.After all,Richard isn't here & can't respond by addressing RR's vices of the times & certainly the way RR lived in Hollywood when with Marty..How hypocritical! But,given RR's skill with words & storytelling,unlike Levon's straight up anger & direct talk,RR is more nuanced & attempts to seem the choirboy trying to tame unruly Band members.Give me a break! But,I still do appreciate the great work RR has done & the new album as well--gotta compartmentalize these things like music & life!!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:35:41 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Pat: No, it was someone else who pointed out Bo Diddley's health problems at the time, after I questioned why Robbie had chosen to play a cover of that old standard, rather than one of his originals, in one of his few live appearances.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:34:25 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: T Bone

The link is to a tribute to T Bone Wolk by Daryl Hall and a bunch of other musicians (including GE Smith)

David P I agree with you about the guitar solo in the middle. It kind of jarred me too. It didn't seem to belong there. Kind of like an afterthought.

I've really been enjoying the discussions lately. I do miss Steve. I'd love to hear his take.

One final thought. This is said in awe, not in malice, Robbie has a fabulous PR person.. They are doing a bang up job of getting his name everywhere.

I'm waiting for my copy to get a real "Listen".


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:20:45 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: ROBBIE & all posters here.

POSTERS HERE: All you guys have really made my day. It has been a wonderful time reading all the great posts and links in the last few days on ROBBIE, his interviews,etc. Thanx to you all for your inputs.Will be reading them over again.

BEG: You are a gem. What would we do without you? You make this place a pleasure to be here.

BOB F: That interview from WDST radio was a goodie.

AL: So nice to read a funny. I used to post jokes a lot, but don't think they were appreciated too much. I liked doing it though.

TITLE for ROBBIE's book? Here's a few suggestions!! How about his song titles? re: "Unbound", "Endless Highway" and my own, "This Is It".

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:21:08 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jed, note that Carmen is talking about songwriting and not pure product. I think Levon actually has more solo albums than RR.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:15:41 CEST 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, Richard even said the Band was five guys and anything less than four was only a taste. And Richard spoke a lot more about his frustrations than what appears in print; the Ruth interview was perfectly indicative of his feelings.

I agree that the 90's experience was more together. Richard Bell was a monster and covered all kinds of different parts. The infusion of new material was certainly welcome although they still relied on blues shuffles and such to fill time. To be honest, I kind of recall them playing Free Your Mind somewhere, but that may be the only song from the last two albums that I saw them do live. I did see Richard do She Knows which is on the AtGD and is wonderful with Garth's overdubs.

David P, was it you who mentioned that RR and Clapton did the Bo Diddly beat at the Crossroads fest as a tribute to Bo who was dying at the time? I recall some mention of that.

Jed. I'm looking forward to seeing these castigations you say are in Rolling Stone, mostly because I've never seen RR talk badly about the members except for drug use and tardiness.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:12:16 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The thing that struck me is that sylistically, Levon would probably like "He Don't Live Here No More." The other thing is that has Levon's voice has deteriorated due to health problems, Robbie's has improved (as someone said due to confidence). They're not in a very different place at this point in time.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:01:33 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Carmen--RR

Read the RS interview & watch the green room clip from the view & you'll see RR does,ever so craftily,fuel the fire in a mean way.As for the "he's put out more albums than Levon" argument you offer,perhaps quality is more important than quantity.And,again,I'm not denying that I like parts of this album by RR which is far superior to his prior efforts.And,Dirt Famer is better than all of them!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 21:00:46 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: Regardless of the guitar he used, the solo itself still doesn't work for me, as he sounds like he's stumbling through it without having ironed it out ahead of time. If that's what he was aiming for, as a jarring juxtaposition punched-in, so be it.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 20:34:38 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Clapton played the guitar on HDLHNM and Robbie did the solo on the old 1927 acoustic………..It is a stunning change of pace that is unlike anything I have heard on any rock song before……….It is the only part of the song I like in fact………As I have said he could not be expected to change guitars so just goes for it with the strat………………I would think that for all that had not heard the song must have felt he had blown the solo…….when, in fact, he had not…….and The View was at least closer to the original…………


Entered at Thu Apr 7 20:07:24 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

O.K., I listened to the recorded version of "He Don't Live Here No More" at Robbie's website and I'm somewhat amazed that the guitar solo sounds as rough on the album as that on his recent two live versions. To my ears it doesn't flow smoothly at all and I'm surprised he chose to use that take. That's just my two cents worth.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 20:02:06 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: BEG/MIKE and KIM/PAT/JEFF

Yeah. I'd like to add my own thanks for the links you've provided.

Finally got a chance to view them. I can see what Jed means but I can live with Jaime Husky Robertson's growls. The two songs I've heard sound great. Clearly the recorded versions are superior given Robbie's vocal limitations but the live song on the View sounded fine though I can see what David P meant about the solo - time seemed to stand still for a moment.

Like with all Robbie's stuff there's real smart and clever arrangements to maximise the songs' potential with the subtle guitar pickings and accompanying vocalists.

Thanks also to Pat for that moving UnfaithfulServant link. For me, beautiful as it is, Rick does take the whole thing a mite too slow for my own taste but as a poster on there says that Paul Butterfield solo at the end is too much.

Pat and Jeff. The Statdler and Waldorf of the GB. Tremendous stuff fellas.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Apr 7 20:00:35 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

I think that RR has in fact always taken the high road in the "fued" and he has proven it again in his new songs. He doesn't disparage his old Band mates but rather looks back with fondness. What do you expect him to do when in just about every interview he does someone brings up Levon and the song writing question. RR has written 5 Solo albums and other songs for movies since the break up and Levon has written how many? Reminds me of the recent video where the little kid is picking on the fat kid. When the fat kid finally fights back he get faulted.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 19:40:11 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks for all these links to BEG and to Mike & Kim. You're doing a great service to us all. Whoopi Goldberg didn't mention another Robbie composition … the Whoopi Goldberg Theme.

I hope he changes his mind on live stuff. His problem would be that if he goes out, he probably has to do The Weight which is not his strong point vocally. He'd be great sticking to solo stuff, but you know what happens come encore time and everyone starts calling for it. In the UK he could get away with Crazy River as the encore as it was a hit though!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 19:10:20 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson updates.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 18:31:58 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: He Don't Live Here No More

Just watched Robbie's performance on The View and noticed that he still seems to be having trouble nailing that solo. As I don't have a copy of the album, I haven't heard the recorded version for comparison.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 17:54:57 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

BEG, thanks so much for the links. I haven't had the chance to check them all out, but I will.

My copy of HTBC is on its way, but I did stream it from NPR, so I have heard it once and liked it a great deal. I did see the Letterman show and agree with David P.'s assessment, but Robbie with a touch of rust is better than many players on a good day with the sun shining. It's great to hear him playing again and these songs are quite good.

I've really enjoyed the way that this discussion has, for the most part, stuck to the music rather than personalities. I hope that continues.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 17:51:22 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.242)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie is the last one to be honoured on CBC. He talks throughout songs with I'm assuming videos?
He confirms that he did live in the Bloor/Bathurst area. He didn't mention his home in Riverdale on First Avenue (Levon wrote in his book that it was in Cabbagetown......Bonk and I are honoured none the less.) ;-D

Tom Wilson and Colin Linden performed "The Weight"......(Where was Stephen Fearing of BARK?) imagezulu and I love these guys live. I didn't think it was exceptional....I don't really like anyone performing TW except for The Band!.....However, having Colin Linden help honour Robbie was very special as Robbie influenced him a lot in his own playing as he did many other younger musicians in Toronto. Ohhhhh....How I would have given anything to have seen Robbie with Colin Linden and Garth and Rick at The Horseshoe!!!!!!!!! Where was I that night? :-((

Daniel Lanois performs "Moon Struck One" on pedal steel (first instrument he learned to play). Btw, he sometimes goes for coffee at Cool Hand Of A Girl Cafe...a great breakfast place in the Junction that Mr. Maximus, his partner and I used to frequent a lot. Ok....back to Lanois.......I wish I was there for this cover....One of a kind for sure! You won't even recognize the song which is more than fine with me.

Wintersleep.....Nova Scotia's indie rockers perform "Broken Arrow"....I'm not really feeeeeling it here.

Sylvia Tyson states she pulled rank to honour Robbie. Robbie accepts award. I posted a link on the weekend that shows Robbie at Songwriter's Gala for Songwriters.

Titles for his autobiography anyone?


Entered at Thu Apr 7 17:35:17 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Kevin J: Thanks for the prompt action digging up the link to "Beyond Comprehension". I've posted this before, but the drummer on the Cougars' version of "I Wish It Would Rain" (see link) acknowledges that he borrowed the UOCC beat - though it was '70 and he had to play it himself rather than sample it. The lead male voice is Jay Douglas, who you can still see around, and the lead female voice is Jackie Richardson.

David P: Glad you mentioned Arkansas, because that reminded me to post the thought that Levon's early, more frantic style (listen to "Forty Days", for example) may owe much to whoever Ray Charles' drummer was on the original Atlantic version of "What I Say", notable following the works "right back to Arkansas". Maybe the mention of his own neglected state roused Levon to play that way?


Entered at Thu Apr 7 17:32:39 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Location: RR on The View

As I keep listening to the album the songs are growing on me.But,the singing is grating & very difficult to listen to.Then,on the clip posted here from The View RR said,in response to a question, that he didn't sing with The Band because he was song writing & playing guitar & couldn't do everything! He's gotta be kidding.To state that he should even consider singing when working with the great voices of Rick,Richard,& Levon is absurd & consistent with RR's not so subtle digs about his former Band mates in the recent Rolling Stone interview.I'm beginning to prefer songs RR has written about others rather than his newly discovered first person writing & dread reading what digs he'll put in his upcoming book.BTW,I am not suggesting Levon has been correct in dragging the feud out publicly in the first place but RR would show some class by just leaving it alone.And,despite the lyrical intent & content,they are well written song lyrics.So,the album is good,but I wish RR would stick to his music....& hire a singer!!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 17:10:48 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: buckin' 65

Bill M: I forgot to mention that (as part of "Robbie Robertson Day") Terfry promised to reprise some of Jian's interview on the "Drive" show this afternoon. All Robbie, all the time . . . .
Forty-seven miles of Bobwa strikes me as forty-seven miles of very bad road indeed . . . .


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:58:44 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: brown eyed girl

Many thanks!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:55:08 CEST 2011 from (24.124.96.239)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/fmr home of wm. s. burroughs/lawrence kansas

Subject: robbie on the view

Thank you brown eyed girl for the links and your positive presence.

Considering the very brief time frame into which The View squeezed Robbie and his story, I have to say I'm more than pleased. We got a killer clip of The Band on SNL 1976, nice images of Robbie and Marty, a warm and knowledgeable welcome from Whoopi Goldberg whom I like a lot, a mini-interview in which Robbie gave props to The Hawk and the south, and topped off by a solid performance which I found better than the Letterman turn myself, since Dawes and RR had a little more space and the song had a little more funk.

All in all, we're getting spoiled these days and I don't mind it one bit. Brien, I couldn't agree more with your favorable assessment of Robbie 2011.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:47:35 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.242)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

"Hey, Hey.....I feeel alright!"
Four times!
Guitar break!

When listening to CBC today you'll have to be very patient while others are honoured before you get to Crowbar's song.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:46:41 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For Bill M: I wonder if the royalties were paid on this....See above link as The Band meets Rap

Bob F: Not sure why but that interview segment is the most enjoyable one I have heard so far.......Thank you.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:44:39 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.242)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Hey Bill. I have Crowbar on my Nano. As far as bob's list....only one song...Al Green's "Let's Stay Together". I should have "Let's Talk Union"....

For those of you who prefer Levon's last two solo recordings rather than Robbie's latest.....Different strokes for different folks as I only really enjoy two songs from "Dirt Farmer" which I bought at Rochester's House Of Guitars where MFBP is signed by Rick Danko! :
"The Mountain"
"Wide River To Cross"
"Electric Dirt" I downloaded only these two songs:
"When I Go Away"
"I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free"

Bill MMMMM! "Power to the people".....Right now! "Power to the people"......."Power to the people"......"Oh what a feeeeeling"......What a rushhhhhh.....Oh what a feeling....What a rush.....Btw.....I cannot get into the other Rush at all!


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:43:15 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:43:15 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Musique Terroir

Kevin: Johnny Cash's affinity for Ronnie Hawkins seems natural, as Mr. Cash, like The Hawk, Levon, Conway Twitty, Charlie Rich, Glen Campbell & many other musicians, hail from Arkansas.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:25:42 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

BEG: Good news. I'm especially looking forward to hearing what Wintersleep does. I absolutely love their big song, "Weighty Ghost" (see/hear link). I'm also wondering if Crowbar means a reconstituted Kelly Jay and Crowbar? Wouldn't that be nice - Oh what a feeling, what a rush!

Speaking of the CBC, earlier this week on my commute home Rich Terfry played a song by rappers Gang Starr. Can't say I like it aside from the rhythm track, which was undeniably "Up On Cripple Creek" throughout. Don't remember the title, but it wasn't UOCC.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:19:28 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

bob w: I always enjoy these lists…… I especially like to see what other artists are listening to….last night on Rockline, RR mentioned bands The National and Autolux as ones he likes……………………sign of the times I guess…….I didn’t know about either one……………………..The answer to your question for me is 3 or 4 if you count Tina Turner’s version of Al Green.

Last night on Rockline, RR was asked a question about Johnny Cash playing with the Hawks at Le Coq d’or ……..now that would have been a night I wish that I had seen……He noted that J. Cash loved Ronnie Hawkins………………….an interesting program last night in that they played music from all parts of the career and people called in from all over North America…….


Entered at Thu Apr 7 16:09:36 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: WDST Radio Interview with Robbie

Recent Interview with Robbie from WDST Radio in Woodstock, NY


Entered at Thu Apr 7 15:56:16 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: What Goes Bump On Saturday Night Live

RTO: I think you're reading too much into that SNL clip. It appears that it wasn't from one of Robbie's actual performances on the show, but rather just a short music bumper leading into a commercial break. In other words, Robbie just stepped back into the house band area of the stage to join in & share the mic with G.E. & T-Bone during one of their brief bumper segments leading into & out of commercials. This is a common part of almost late night shows, including Letterman & Conan, where Levon has recently done the same. Usually the theatre audience gets treated to a full performance, while those watching on television only get to see brief snippets before & after the commercial breaks.


Entered at Thu Apr 7 15:52:13 CEST 2011 from (69.177.230.78)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Yes, it sounds like Peter caught them at a particularly bad time. But that shouldn't negate all of the good shows that they did in the 80's and 90's. Just as some bad shows in 1976 shouldn't reflect poorly on the entire decade of the 1970's. I'm sure some nights were probably better than others.

Perhaps the rigors of travel carried over into the stage show, but I think there was more to it than that. After all, the Vancouver and Japan shows which are documented on video as well as others feature fairly strong performances. And there was certainly some travel involved there.

Or maybe I was just extremely lucky, and the dozen or so shows that I saw over the years were the good ones.

Here's a twist:
Using conventional Guestbook reasoning, when Robbie performed at Eric Clapton's Crossroads concert, he introduced the song that they did as a tribute to Bo Diddly, which I suppose was appropriate at the time. But with all of the classic songs in Robbie's canon and considering that his live appearances are few and far between, wasn't it a disappointment that the "auteur" chose to do a tepid & dull rendition of 'Who Do You Love'? Or maybe there wasn't time to rehearse anything more creative or inspired. Was it laziness?


Entered at Thu Apr 7 15:51:09 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the circle of life continues ...

"We'd been working the graveyard shift
I wonder do you catch my drift
This was trouble in the making
But it's a risk well worth taking
So just pull over
To the side of the road
[...]
I pulled into Nazareth
Feeling 'bout half past dead"

Kevin J: Interesting that you chose yesterday to mention Ms Wawa and "The View", as that was exactly the same day that I was thinking how much mileage she's gotten out of Ellas McDaniel's reference to her in one of his classi