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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, September 2002

Below are the entries in the Band guestbook from September 2002.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 23:51:44 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: clarification

what i mean is explain empty now, not the actual french song. god! whats this wine iv been drinking. goodnight all. rich


Entered at Mon Sep 30 23:46:19 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: nothing in particular

empty now.thank you so much for that amazing song about my forefathers occupation.i was very touched by it. question. empty now. what the fuck does it mean. i think youv explained it before. however having drunk a bottle of wine chilling out to the new stones comp. i havnt got the energy to scroll back. time for bed. by morning i shall expect an answer. goodnight all . rich.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 23:21:03 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: A Post Civil War Re-Enactment -- Part II

George Stoneman sat at his desk in the Governor's office. Spread before him was the latest batch of pardons and prison cummutations awaiting his signature. Prison reform and rehabilatation were matters close to his heart. His detractors were furious over Stoneman's propensity for mercy towards thieves, murderers, scalawags, bushwackers and the like. The Governor, however, had certain first-hand knowledge of what it was like to fall victim to life's circumstances.

After West Point, his career in the military was doomed by a series of misfortunate events. He proved himself to be inept as a military tactician, but under William T. Sherman's tutelage in total warfare, Stoneman achieved a certain notoriety in the lesser arts of pillagery.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 23:17:42 CEST 2002 from (203.197.126.104)

Posted by:

Yazooman

Location: unowhere

Subject: Wow !!

Wow Empty Now !!! I am impressed !!

Tho the song I mentioned had nothing to do with them....you did mention some pretty interesting names.

Mrinal Sen is one the foremost directors of India, but he belongs to the slightly avant-garde style. Abstract and socialist in his view-point. Along with Satyajit Ray and Ritwik Ghatak he could be called as among the founders of parallel cinema in India.....Raj Kapoor on the other side is a symbol of commercial Indian cinema...from Bollywood. He is a legend as well....but I am not much of a commercial movie buff myself. I hate the song and dance routines. But if they are thinking Garth then mebbe its time for me to revise my opinion. ;)

Rabindranath Tagore is one of the greatest geniuses this world has ever seen. He is the Shakespeare of India, if one has to draw a parallel. But Tagore goes even beyond that. He is regarded as the father of modern Bengali language. He was a brilliant novelist, essayist, short-story writer, dramatist, poet, songwriter, music composer, painter, educationist. And a patriot to boot too. Along with Sen he also hails from the province of Bengal (where I come from). :))

However I have no idea of Gulbahar Singh, I wonder where you picked up that name. May be I am missing something ??

On the covers trip, Trey Anastasio of Phish did some nice covers of IMND when he toured with the Trey Anastasio Band. I have one concert with me, and it sounded pretty nice. Norah "Bessie Smith" Jones is the (illegit.)daughter of Ravi Shankar, another Indian and a Bengali as well. I have been listening to her lately and I simply love her voice. "Come away with me" and "No easy way down" are both haunting pieces that sound just perfect.

Bones: Thanx for the review.......need to track that show down...

yazooman attherateof rediffmail dot com


Entered at Mon Sep 30 22:30:20 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Norah Jones

Ms. Jones' live cover of "Bessie Smith" is very good, indeed, and (of course) it is available from this site. Just click the link above and a nice RealAudio stream with Nora doing "Bessie" will be delievered from the server to your home computer - free of charge :-)


Entered at Mon Sep 30 22:25:09 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Yazooman: Like you, I have the greatest respect for Peter Viney, and have learned a lot from his posts. The good news about the latest unpleasant posting - which is much milder than most, it must be admitted - is that the mud seems to have gone no farther than the slinger's own mug.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 21:38:55 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-056.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.56)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: covers

The number of recent cover versions of Band songs is heartwarming. Travis also played 'The Weight' well live on the Jools Holland Hootenay TV show.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 21:29:41 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

Web: My link

Subject: Norah Jones

I was reading this concert review from an August show in San Francisco where Norah Jones mentioned Rick Danko and Robbie Robertson before closing her set with a "countrified version of The Band's Bessie Smith". I wish she would record it for her next release.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 21:12:51 CEST 2002 from user-11218n2.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.162.226)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Well, this will teach you to read the whole magazine before posting. In a monthly feature that highlights historic recordings, Mix features the creation of The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down". I haven't read it yet but it looks pretty good.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 21:09:36 CEST 2002 from (81.22.64.43)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Hindi films 50s

Mrinal Sen, Chabindranah Tagore, Gulbahar Singh, Rash Kapor ?


Entered at Mon Sep 30 21:07:56 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Yazooman... I wondered the same thing... here's what my quick Google yielded... http://www.kings.edu/womens_history/igandhi.html... anyway, what's that Stones tune... that goes... I'm a monkeeeey... do da doo da doo da do do?...It just popped into my head... and where can I sign my kids up for the brigade... btw, her energy for one brief instant also flash-reminded me of a former GBer... anybody remember Catbalu?... mucho missed around here... I lost a good frybread recipe she sent me too... btw, congrats to the Euro-GBers... on the recent Ryder Cup victory... hmmm, can anybody see Garth playing the bagpipes... and I bet Van could rip into a little white ball with some gumption too... pop the stones right off that little number he wore in TLW... anyway, welcome back Tommy... is the new Ryan Adams CD really any good?


Entered at Mon Sep 30 20:59:22 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Donna

Location: PA

Once again, I am trying to do the old guestbook catch up here!

Jim Weider's Band at The Pattenburg House, Friday night was just wonderful! I didn't think I was going to make it to the show, and at the last minute, everything worked out! I was so happy to be there to see all the good people, some who traveled very far to be there. When they started the show with "Forever Young" I knew it was going to be a great night of music! When they played "Life is a Carnival" not one person was sitting down! Steve: You need to expand that dance floor! :) Donna, G-Man, and sweet Momma G, Michael Lenahan & Melody, Ruby, Bashful Bill, Frankie Ahart, Pat & Jack, Kelly, Pat & Rick S. and anyone I might of forgot, it is always a pleasure! Needless to say, many thanks to the Jim Weider's Band, for bonding such great friendship's through your music! The Band's music just has that power, to bond friendships through all the show's, and through this wonderful guestbook. Thanks Jan for all your hard work!

A Belated Happy Birthday to Maud!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 20:48:36 CEST 2002 from user-11218n2.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.162.226)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Yazooman, we all learn from each other, including George "Piles" Stoneman.

The latest from Mix in an interview with the recently (and unfortunately) deceased producer Gus Dudgeon. For those of you unfamiliar, Dudgeon was a storied British record producer who loved Americana type music, thus the perfect guy to do those early Elton John albums. "Levon" and "Tiny Dancer" are two shining examples of his and orchestral arranger Paul Buckmaster's work. Anyway, in perhaps his final interview, this nugget: "I loved bands like Little Feat and The Band, who were one of the finest collections of players ever put together in one group in my opinion." Agreed.

Also in Mix, a technical discussion with mixer Chris Fogel who worked on Robbie's "RedBoy" album.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 20:35:45 CEST 2002 from (203.197.126.104)

Posted by:

Yazooman

Location: We are the ICC Trophy Champions.....

Subject: for all and sundry

Hi all,

Your favorite neighborhood Supraman is here again..... :)

Firstly who or what was Indira in Maud Hudson's post ? As in what was the significance ? The reason being that Indira is very much an Indian name...for girls e.g. Indira Gandhi. Is Purnadas Baul the link....?

Secondly....I dont remember this question being asked here before...but what type of Bass did Rick play ?

Now onto some more pressing matters.

Peter Viney is one of the reasons why we continue to have such stimulating, interesting and educative discussions here, and it is the same reason why I come here everyday and read every post. Viney, David Powell, Pat Brennan, MattK, Hank, JohnD (also our esteemed GB master, but then he is a different thing altogether ;) )......and so many else have taught me and many others so much about the music we love. And I know for a fact that much of what I know has just been picked up from them. I wish that some of this mudslinging would stop now.

In fact it was only Peter Viney and BEG's many posts regarding Van Morrison that first piqued my interest in VTM (apart from TLW). Lately I have acquired some 15/20 odd boots of The Belfast Cowboy and he is without doubt my current idol. I have one concert video of his frm 1997 Belfast (named Waterfront or something) which is simply brilliant !! And of course.....everytime I hear Moondance I am reminded of Diamond Lil, I remember she called it one of her favorite songs. Play on, ye olde Irish Bard !!

As for Travis, I downloaded their version of TW frm this site a long time back and they have done a fantastic job at capturing the spirit of the song. To me The Weight is like a never-ending song, it goes on in cycles and seems like continuing forever. I dont know of any equivalent in Rock Music but Dvorak's The New World somehow does the same thing for me. There is a very old Hindi film song from the 50s that also does the same for me but I doubt anyone here would have heard it.

Finally........Belated HAPPY BIRTHDAY wishes to the one and only Maud Hudson....heck, I am old enuff to be her son or even her grandson....so HUGS to Maud as well !!! We all love ya !!

love 2 all and take care

PS.Are there any updates on Garth playing in Bollywood movies ? And if he does come down to India some time, I would not mind making the pilgrimage. If Jerry was COOL God, then Garth is BENIGN God (Dont worry Crabby, I am still with you).



Entered at Mon Sep 30 19:54:31 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: A Post Civil War Re-Enactment -- Part I

In the year of Our Lord 1885, California Governor George Stoneman stared at the smoldering ruins of his once-magnificent house. Standing on the grounds of his palacial estate, "Los Robles" (The Oaks), amidst the sprawling 400 acres dotted with orchards now blanketed in smoke, the Governor found himself lost in the haze of memories. He was transported back two decades in time, where on horseback on the dusty road to Macon, Georgia, he turned back to north through the darkness of night to watch the distant fires blazing through Atlanta.

Abruptly, the voice of his ranch foreman jolted him back to the present in San Marino, California, thousands of miles away from that moment and that war in the past. The memory still brought him a twitch of pain, as he recalled his capture just days later at the hands of the Rebels. But the voice drew him back, as he found himself choking on the smoke of the present -- "It must have been them Mexicans, General. I seen a bunch of them riding off just before the fire started."

Governor Stoneman thought to himself, "I'm always having to fight them rebels, first the Mexicans, then the Confederates, then the Injuns, and now the Mexicans again. Those sum-of-a-bitches always seem to put up one hell of a fight when defending their land."


Entered at Mon Sep 30 19:20:24 CEST 2002 from (81.22.64.43)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Peter Viney

Thank you very much, you're the most attracting reason who make us scrolling daily the GB. At this instant you led me back to my normal state, cause my last post is (through the subject) irreverrential toward the GBers whom I have a great respect. I wrote it in a moment of ungry and musical passion

In a very few words you practically answerd to a whole set of mine posts. But there is an essential question, perhaps are you informed

Is Robbie Robertson the first guitarist who used the tremor (tremolo in italian generic musical term) in the history of rock players?
Thanks in advance.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 19:13:15 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Nice to see the Incredible String Band getting some airtime here. I'll belatedly suggest that "The Big Huge" LP is the best place to start. Member Mike Heron is responsible for the lovely "Singing The Dolphins Through", which graces the Manfred Mann's Earth Band album with the ear on the cover - the one with the hit version of Bruce Springsteen's "Blinded By The Light".

As for coal mining, one of the most affecting songs I can think of is the obscure "My Old Man" by Noddy Clegg and the Civilians. (I believe they were from just east of Toronto, but sang with fake English yob accents.) Another great Canadian coal song - though not about mining the stuff - is "Loading Coal" by the Five Sounds. An excellent Bo Diddly beat record.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 18:52:00 CEST 2002 from 1cust107.tnt3.fredericksburg.va.da.uu.net (67.200.153.107)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: What Lil Said...and Tim Rose

I agree with Lil's words about this great site. Most of the World Wide Web is as much of a vast wasteland as television, but this is an oasis and I hope Jan knows how much most of us appreciate it.

Rosalind: click the link for a fairly interesting obituary of Tim Rose. The bit about the supposed offer to replace Brian Jones in the Stones sounds unlikely but you never know...


Entered at Mon Sep 30 17:59:52 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.81)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: The Weight

Wow! I just listened to Travis' version of "The Weight" (I had never heard it before)..and it's wonderful! Almost as good as The Jan's :-)
I had mentioned to our esteemed webmaster just recently that the wealth of information on this site is absolutely mind-boggling. If I had the time and the patience to actually sit here for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for a few weeks..I'm sure I still wouldn't hit on everything there is to hear and see here.
And so, in thanking Jan again for this amazing place, I also want to thank everyone out there for the contributions that have made this site so incredible.

Have a good day everyone.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 17:57:43 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-019.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.19)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Soccer and Sock-It-To-Me

Empty Now: I was pleased to hear about the Dua Noa / Khaled collaboration – just that there wasn’t anything to say except, ‘Good.’ It doesn’t totally surprise me either- I’ve taught classes with both Arabs and Israelis in the 70s (including through the 73 war) and they were able to get on well as ‘travelling companions’ within the class. You made an interesting football analogy on the status of various players in the team or the group. I agree that the midfield tactician is the key to a team, but I suspect that often attacking players (like lead guitarists) actually get the kudos. Perhaps that’s why Bob Dylan insists on those interminable but not inventive solos on stage.When you have a near unbeatable goalkeeper (drummer) and great attackers (guitar, lead vocal), you can afford a hungover, wheezing midfield. Think Charlie Watts, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger – as I’ve just bought “Forty Licks.” The Band of course had five midfield generals in one team.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 16:33:30 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Travis - The Weight

Actually, a high-quality MPEG-3 file with Travis' excellent cover of "The Weight" is available from this site - check the link above. The file contains the whole song, but don't tell anyone, ok?


Entered at Mon Sep 30 16:23:48 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.100)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Nazi: skip this post

Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head,
Pretending he just doesn't see?

I am very very very disapointed that any of my recent posts received a feedback, specially, that anouncing the Hebrew / Arabic version of Lenon's Imagine by the Duo Noa / Khaled. I am listenning at this very moment to an MP3 version, in fact it is not bad at all...Our world today really needs to be informed of this kind of events.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 16:11:32 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj
Web: My link

Subject: Pull Hitting

LDO: I classify Mo as a pull hitter because they used the Williams shift on him a lot this year in the NL. In the second half he did hit a little more to left but just about all his HR's were to right field. He's not what he used to be, that's for sure...,


Entered at Mon Sep 30 15:25:44 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

franko

Location: boston

Subject: Calvin - Travis

The Weight is on the Travis Import called Coming Around. I found it in a local store about a year ago. At that time it was available at Amazon.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 15:21:08 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: Pull Hitters

Brien, good post on pull hitters. I would add that Mo Vaughn would use the whole field when he played in Boston. He was adept at taking advantage of the Green Monster in left field at Fenway, which is why he was consistently over .300 and won an MVP there. If he's digressed into a strict pull hitter in Shea, that may explain his drop in productivity. Hit it where it's pitched, Maurice!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 13:34:17 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

In UK Soccer lexical, attack = forward player, and defence = backward player, i guess. Sorry for confusion.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 13:29:41 CEST 2002 from (209.236.161.20)

Posted by:

Michael Lenahan

Location: Clinton,nj

Subject: G-Man retirement party

WOW!!!! What a night at the good old Pattenburg House, Steve the owner, put up a huge sign that said " Congrats G-Man...You finally hit the Spot"..I wounder who's spot he hit :o ? The JWB put one hell of a show on for the G-Man. They did an acoustic set, similar to the Carnegie Hall show. It was great to see everyone that showed up.....G and D, Frankie and his great crew, Rick and Pat, and Bashful Bill.....and lets not forget Mamma G. A big THANK YOU to the JWB for giving us such great music and being wounderful friends. Peace.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 12:12:48 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.98)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Casting - Public Cyberoom Chronicle Live

Cause i am in a public cyberoom, i was scrolling the photo galery of this site when i heard one of two teenagers behind me telling his friend:

'Look, here is Robbie Robertson, the man who introduced the tremor in rock guitar playing'.

Today's teenagers in my lovely fatherland completely lost the good manners, they were watching MY screen behind my shoulder.
My first reaction was, i must verify this information. Public places are like the internet, you must verify the authenticity of all the informations you hear within. However, at the second and more meditative step, i was wondering why only one person retained the attention in a photo where four The Band members of equal merit are present.
In soccer ball, an old natural rule which is admitted as well by public as by specialists is, the more you have chances to be the star in your team is when you are playing, in decreasing order
midffield - attack - defence - goalkeeper.
A similar perception of Rock bands since the begining established the same subjective order in the relative merit of its members, and especially in their relative public image. I must recognize that i personally owned this deteriorated judgement toward that bands which are not familiar. The decreasing subjective order is:
Lead vocal - guitar - piano - keyboards - horns - bass - drums - fiddle - flute - etc....
and when you're not a moron, you afford additional benefit points to one of these members when he is the songwriter of the band.

I accept those judgements from the wide public, I hope only that the specialized media dont contribute to this part of the game, for professional ethics.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 11:22:59 CEST 2002 from host212-140-155-43.webport.bt.net (212.140.155.43)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Windbags

I don't actually think Serge is Serge, if you get what I mean. I think he's a spammer. Nobody who was once so intimately exposed to The Band could possibly be so petty minded and mean spirited as that poster.

That said, everything "Serge" said about Pete Viney is one hundred per cent cast iron true. The guy is a pompous old windbag. Absolutely no question about it. Then again, so are most of the people who post with any frequency on any of these forums. Forinstance, if still you're reading this then you're in the presence of possibly one of the most pompous windbags of them all. Even as we speak, I am positively farting and expelling carbon doxide, steam or even worse out of every conceivable orifice. There is positively no limit to the pomposity I can expel. I have honorary degrees in the friggin stuff. Bill Gates has provided me with the platform and I am damned well going to bore everyone else rigid taking advantage of it until I finally disappear over the Cambrian mountains with my very last jet propelled inspirational expulsion of keyboard shoite.

Must say though, for all that, I do happen to find Pete Viney's a rather more informed and erudite strain of shoite than most. Not to say there ain't others too like.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 11:04:02 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-017.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.17)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Heylin, Van, Dylan

Clinton Heylin- first off, I have absolutely no problem with Peter S-B disagreeing with me on Heylin - we’ve done this many times in a friendly spirit (even through the Pete Seeger one) and will hopefully continue to do so. A lot of people dislike Heylin’s books, and they irritate me in several places too, because Clinton’s a bit like a dog with a bone (I said obstinate in the original post) once he’s decided on ‘a fact’. There was a lot of back-and-forth when Michael Krosgaard published his notes on the Dylan session tape boxes in The Telegraph, because these contradicted some of what Heylin had had to say. By saying I’d rather have Heylin as a biographer than Davis, I meant he doesn’t dig the dirt to the same degree. I read all the way through that Davis Rolling Stones book – the one that had WWII starting in 1940 – so I must have enjoyed his stuff. If you didn’t dig the dirt a bit, you wouldn’t sell any. Heylin has dedicated a vast amount of time to researching his subject, and I’m glad to find that he has listened to at least ONE other artist.

BTW, this confirms my theory that Van is quietly overtaking all opposition in recent years. He’s a far better live performer than Bob nowadays, even on an off night Van can hit all the notes, and he’s both more prolific and more consistent. Van plays distinctive choppy rhythm guitar in two or three numbers, but he doesn’t spend several minutes taking repetitive ‘Look at me’ solos while more technically proficient guitarists strum in the background. I find that I listen to more Van and less Band recently simply because Van’s still there doing stuff and creating music. Heylin might have followed a similar route to me here. World Gone Wrong and Good As I Been To You were mighty mountains to get past even for those who’d weathered ‘Dylan’ (1973), the far worse ‘Saved’, and the abysmal ‘Real Live’ and ‘Dylan and The Dead.’ The compensation is always there in the end … Time Out of Mind and Love and Theft.

Serge- great to see you using your own name at last. Keep trying. One day maybe you can contribute a positive and informative comment about early Hawk.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 08:44:42 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: South Pa.

Subject: Vi-ta-je-ex whatcha doin' to me ...

Say, don't that viagra remind ya of them big yaller pills that Lonesome Rhodes sold in "A Face In The Crowd"? "Vii--taa--jee--exx Whatcha doin to me? Ya fill me full of OOOHHH and Ec-sta-seeee!

Also Do Not Put Down Spam and Velvetta! I have a great recipe for Spam! cut into one-half inch slices..add black pepper and nutmeg.... No extra salt needed! Fry in two tablespoons butter very slowly to get the very chrispy stuff you want. When it's fried to the desired crunch, pour a mixture made from maple syrup and stoneground mustard over it and put between two pieces of buttered toast and head to the tv with a bag of cheetoes and a big orange drink. I learned to appreciate Spam in my van. I used to live in it. Fried Balogna and grilled cheese sandwiches made in the toaster-oven. Richard came up with an excellent technique of frying minute steaks on an iron set on cotton. I tried it just because he did...Naturally It Worked.

I was reading into brown-eyed-girl's link and found Tim Rose in the obituary column. I guess he was most widely known for arranging "Hey Joe" Does anyone know anything else bout him? He died last tuesday.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 08:28:34 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

B.E.G.: it's better to have the US as the 11th province than a territory, that way when we tax them, we will avoid that pitfall of Taxation without representation. Remember what THAT lead to!!

We bought a DVD player last month, unfortunately I haven't seen any LAST WALTZes at the various places I shop in. I could order the thing through the internet, but I've decided to take the Japanese route of GAMAN (roughly translated: perserverance, grin and bear it) and wait for the stores to stock it. Nothing noble about my efforts..I just want to get the points on my service card (every type of store over has these type of point cards. Every time you make a purchase you get a number of points, when your card is full you get some kind ofdiscount or freebie. In the case of Tower Records you get 3000 yen of your next perchase which translates into a free CD plus change.

Now back to my master plan of incorporating th USofA into Canada. Maybe if I offer all the back bacon you can eat....hmmm


Entered at Mon Sep 30 08:23:42 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68468.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.87)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Van!

Apparently there are currently noooooo Van Morrison official videos, DVDS or laserdiscs available anywhere in the world.......EXCEPT.....I have Van Morrison The Concert recorded at The Beacon Theatre New York November 30, 1989 video......Thanks to a very crabby poster.....and there's some Van content available like......Jerry Lee Lewis and Friends DVD and The Chieftains Water From The Well - Live Over Ireland DVD.....I'm sure a certain Englishman has all the boots available.....:-D


Entered at Mon Sep 30 08:22:14 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: response to calvin

calvin. travis are a top notch uk guitar band who were given their big shot by oasis 5 or 6 years ago when the latter chose them as support band on a uk tour. the subsequent album 'the man who' was a massive smash in the uk. the follow up, the invisable band' was also huge over here. it doesnt suprise me that they have done the weight, because they constantly rave about the band in music paper interviews. the weight is not on the 2 albums iv mentioned though i cant speak for travis's debut album, ithink its called good feeling, which i havnt got around to buying yet. i reckon its a soundtrack only track.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 07:52:36 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Tommy

Location: Brooklyn, NY, baby!

Subject: OLD Poster!

Since a new poster had jumped aboard, I thought it appropriate for an OLD poster (old as in 'former frequent poster', not old as in age) to throw my two cents in and see how my old cyber-pals are doing! FUN!

HELLO FRIENDS!!!

Anyway, has anyone gotten into Ryan Adams yet, per my suggestion more than a year ago? His third solo album is out and, I must say, it is a rock'n'roll winner! he really is a great songwriter; thoughtful lyrics with a tunesmith's knack for melody. A good time, indeed! I'm actually going to see him in about two weeks at The Beacon Theatre in NYC. A solo acoustic show, nice.

New Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers album out soon as well! Woo Hoo! You guys know how I like TP.

Anyway, keep in touch, folks.

How's it goin' out there, Butch m'man?


Entered at Mon Sep 30 07:52:51 CEST 2002 from i249-011.nv.iinet.net.au (203.59.249.11)

Posted by:

Nancy

Location: Australia

If Peter's posts make anyone think he has a superiority complex, they're the one with the problem. I usually read his posts to the end..........unless its one of those nasty sound system technical ones he gets into :)

Sometimes what he has to say interests me and sometimes not, the same as everyone else here. I feel no pressure to read his or anyone else's posts unless the subject material catches my eye - and mostly it does. To read or not to read - its no big deal, and it's not a competition, but a place to talk and to share information if you feel like it.

I want that new Van biography too. I also heard there is at least one Van DVD coming onto the market - in fact my source told me there are two of them, but I'll be happy with any. Does anyone have any information about this subject??


Entered at Mon Sep 30 07:33:32 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68468.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.87)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Fred:....Nah......It's the fourth Territory......I can hear The Clash......"I'm sooooooo bored with the U.S.A".....;-D


Entered at Mon Sep 30 07:29:16 CEST 2002 from 1cust143.tnt16.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.38.56.143)

Posted by:

Crabgrass

Location: The Front Lawn

Subject: New Poster

Welcome aboard Pam!!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 07:27:23 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Canada isn't the 51st state....the US IS the 11th province!!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 06:42:27 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: The Weight and Travis

I went to see the film Igby Goes Down this evening, and was quite surprised when during Susan Sarandon's funeral in the film a version of the Weight began to play. I sat through til the end of the credits and it was credited to the Band Travis, who I have heard good things about but am unfamiliar. Does anyone know if it is just a soundtrack item or is it on one of Travis' CDs. All I know is it was a pretty good cover.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 06:39:48 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-117-16.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.117.16)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Okay, so maybe it was a little geeky, but I sent an e-mail to the "contact Mickey" at MickeyJones.com and invited him to stop by our GB with some stories about the Hawks tour. See if he takes us up on it.

Maud, why don't you stick for awhile, too? There's no reason not to. The worst that can happen is that someone will insult you (hell, I probably will, eventually). Just ignore 'em. Come on, join the crowd. Even though I don't really know what you said last time.

Okay, Sergio, why don't you take on the big boys? This place has been getting boring lately anyway, it's time for another brawl. Let's go, buddy. You and me. You're from the 51st state, Canada, right? No wonder you're nuts, nothing to do all day but eat ham and watch SCTV. What kind of loser hangs out with the Hawks and doesn't at least get a gig as a roadie? You should have been The Band's second guitar player, if you had any brains at all, but what the hell are you? A janitor of somethin'? Come and get me, you little hoser motherhumper. Pick on someone your own IQ!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 06:25:43 CEST 2002 from proxy.samart.co.th (203.149.1.103)

Posted by:

Pamela Sorenson

Web: My link

!GREAT website with lots of usefull and ineresting info. Easy to navigate - and the design is nice too. Another great website is http://www.a3-viagra.com and http://www.a3-viagra.co.uk where you can buy viagra online. Also, take a look a http://www.aabaaca-penis-enlargement.com.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 05:41:20 CEST 2002 from dap-209-114-164-176.nfas.monroe-tnt-1.sns234.pa.stargate.net (209.114.164.176)

Posted by:

Mary

Location: Western PA

Subject: Several things ....

Well first I would like to wish Maud a belated Happy Birthday! I hope you had a wonderful day. Hope to see you again soon. Also, Lil, you had a party and you didn't invite me? I'm hurt. But then again, I might fall off my shoes and break a leg or foot like my daughter....lol. And last but not least, Roz, I was just in Shanksville on September 21st. It is only about 20 miles from my home. It is a very humbling experience. At first I thought the plane had gone down in Somerset which is about 10 miles from my home but, it is actually Somerset County, not Somerset, Pa. And, someone mentioned athletes, well Joe Montana was just here about 2 or 3 weeks ago in his hometown of Monessen which is about 5 miles from my house. Well, everyone have a good day.....and hello to my friends here.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 05:38:55 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-010masprip0415.dialsprint.net (63.186.161.161)

Posted by:

G-Man

Subject: Correct

Yes Dave Z.! Jime Weider on Dobro,,Rando on a snare and 1 cymbal! Albert on bass and Dan on keys!! AWESOME-10-12 songs!! We were lookin for U!!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 05:35:09 CEST 2002 from ool-18bc7fb9.dyn.optonline.net (24.188.127.185)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

.......and BTW - I find Peter's post interesting and informative - and I never get the feeling he thinks I'm too dumb to think for myself.

Thank you, and goodnight.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 05:32:32 CEST 2002 from ool-18bc7fb9.dyn.optonline.net (24.188.127.185)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Serge - do you just lie in wait for any chance to take a cheap shot at Peter? It's none of my buisness of course why you are angry with him, and jealous of him - but it sure is a drag to read those cheap-shot posts - IMHO.

I'm trying to decide if it's worth hitting the submit button on this one............yeah, what the hell.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 05:04:25 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Mrs. Henry

Location: The Electronics Department

Subject: The Comic Book and Me--Just Us--We Caught the Bus

This is not SPAM (I only eat that with Velveeta brand cheese), but I was wondering if I could sell this group a Serge Protector?


Entered at Mon Sep 30 04:34:48 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

G-Man: Did I hear that right?... An acoustic set... Must have been awesome... I always loved the clips of Levon and Jim on the Band video... each with a guitar.... Lars: I tried to email you but got an error message... it said your box is full or something... do you have another email address? Otherwise, I'll have to send an owl... Sorry Roz, sometimes I'm reading in here... and throw out something like I'm in the middle of a conversation... w/o any background... someone made a post named Party about Lil's party... and it moved me to a good place imagining folks having fun... I'm getting together next weekend with a bunch of college buddies and their kids myself... for some camping... gonna listen to the Hawk on the drive up... see, lot's of leaps... anyway, I too also was moved by Jan's mention of the photos (I hadn't seen Serge's... great!!!)... and it made me think of the Long Black Veil video clip... sooo, I really do have to periodically revisit all the good stuff Jan has assembled here... tomorrow night in one of my night classes we are going to talk about good and bad websites... can you guess which one I am gonna mention as my fav?... and now a goodnight to all, I just got firewood delivered... gotta go... Peter, I'm envious... I wish Van would do a Band song in his set... hmmm, maybe Unfaithful Servant or how about Just Another Whistle Stop... anyway, Stephen Davis can grow on you with repeated listenings... kinda like Van's Madame George... short on facts... but lot's of love to love's...


Entered at Mon Sep 30 03:48:53 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Scheele

Jan, any chance that we will get some more photographs of Garth taken by John Scheele. That is just a classic picture at the organ I would love to see more. Perhaps Maud may have a few in the attic :-)


Entered at Mon Sep 30 03:23:28 CEST 2002 from 235.16.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.16.235)

Posted by:

Ray Pence

Subject: Bruce Springsteen

Jenny T, you're right. I missed the Nightline but I had the priceless privilege (even though it was $75 and worth every cent) of witnessing Springsteen onstage, in action, last week in Kansas City. Five rows away from the lip of the stage, incredible and awesome, those overused words true in this case. There's plenty of bullshit in show business but none in that man and his band. They love their art and their audience. No wonder he's got Band connections.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 02:21:34 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-196.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.196)

Posted by:

Me again

I meant to put "how" (in quotation marks). Would that be correct english? Tell us Viney.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 02:15:50 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-196.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.196)

Posted by:

Serge

Subject: Whiney

To Peter Stone Brown : You must not criticize Viney's opinions. He is Mr.Know_it_all for the captive audience that he's discovered here. You'll hurt his feelings. He assumes people here are too dumb to think for themselves, and he feels responsible for how we think.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 01:30:00 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-010masprip0136.dialsprint.net (63.186.160.136)

Posted by:

G-Man

Subject: JWB

Hey,,special thanks to the Pattenburg Crew; Jimmy, Rando, Albert and Dan! Also,,the Road Warriors-Frankie, Kelly, Rick and Pat, Mike and Melody, Ruby and Bash, Jack and Pat, D-2 and Bob,,and all the others who attended one GREAT SHOW and SUPER party!! At a loss for words(honest)-BIG THANKS!! Last but NOT least,,D-1 and Mamma-G!! Ya all know what I am talkin about!! Oh, I forgot Packy the Taxi driver!! Nasty Ned,,glad U were there Bro!! Nice opening set of some kick ass BLUES!!! JWB,,did a 10-12 song opening acoustic set- AWESOME,,then rocked the house during their rockin second go round!! Thanks,,G-Man!!


Entered at Mon Sep 30 00:42:28 CEST 2002 from 1cust192.tnt2.phl6.da.uu.net (63.17.36.192)

Posted by:

Peter Stone Brown

Location: Philly
Web: My link

Subject: Heylin

Peter Viney,

Clinton Heylin's work on Bob Dylan is anything but excellent. He can't decide whether he is a biographer or a music critic, and his books are rife with attitude leaving the reader to think if only Heylin was running Dylan's career, the wonders that might have occurred.

In addition to that his so-called facts are dubious at best and quite often totally wrong.

I expect his biography on Van Morrison will be a similar hatchet job.


Entered at Mon Sep 30 00:06:23 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68468.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.87)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Subject: The Hawk and The Big Rocker

"Never let the truth in the way of a good story."....The Hawk!....Greg Godovitz Special to National Post wrote a short article on Ronnie September 20....Click on Arts and Life and search for Ronnie Hawkins if link doesn't work.....


Entered at Sun Sep 29 23:59:12 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool39-221.nas2.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.39.221)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: what a mighty mighty good man

Did anybody else see Bruce interviewed by Ted Koppel last night? I love to hear him talk. He is always so thoughtful and humble and straight from his heart. There were also recent clips of the band rehearsing. He expressed his great gratitude that the whole band is alive and well after so many years.

My husband tells me the mine we went to is actually in Scranton. I have a really bad sense of direction and I never know where I am when we are there.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 23:41:05 CEST 2002 from dialup160-b.ts552.cwt.esat.net (193.203.157.160)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: The Dust of The River.......

There IS a ISB/Band connection...........

Artie Traum (?).... Woodstock resident......wrote a book about their music, I seem to recall........

enjoying reading The GB after being away from it......


Entered at Sun Sep 29 23:27:06 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

Inconsistent and all over the map, Ani di Franco is probably the only pop artist to emerge in the last ten years who can stand head and shoulders with the big dogs of the sixties and there basicly deminishing, sometimes rewarding returns of the day.

Her new double live set, might be stuck into the catagory of what Marcus called "the obigatory lousy live album"; but of course it has great moments too. A bit of a let down after her brillent Reeling/Reckoning set, which portrays an Artist in her absolute prime who should be checked out by the posters here as they head for there various old timers games.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 22:40:46 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68468.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.87)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: Maud / Garth / Jeff Healey / Garland Jeffreys

Happy Belated Birthday to youuuuuu Maud! As I'm sure you know....."Music is the muscle of the soul"......:-D

I'm really looking forward to seeing you and Garth again.....but this time at Massey Hall in Toronto!......Do ya think you can also get Robbie Robertson and Richard Bell to perform as well??.....I also can't wait to see Garth and Jeff Healey making some music at Jeff Healey's on Thursday October 10......YEAH!!!!!

Hopefully I'll be in NYC during Canada's Thanksgiving weekend to finally see Garland Jeffreys at The Bottom Line!.....YEAH AGAIN!!!!.....Maybe Louuuuu will drop by!


Entered at Sun Sep 29 22:08:23 CEST 2002 from (81.22.64.43)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: For Richie, Al,... and anyone else concerned by mining, with kind regards

This is Pierre Bachelet, 'Les Corons', I hope you speak french, else you can feel the intention

Au Nord c'était les corons, La terre c'était le charbon, Le ciel c'était l'horizon, Les hommes de mineurs de fond

Nos fenêtres donnaient sur des fenêtres semblables, Et la pluie mouillait mon cartable
Mais mon père en rentrant avait les yeux si bleus, Que je croyais voir le ciel bleu
J'apprenais mes leçons la joue contre son bras, Je crois qu'il était fier de moi
Il était généreux comme ceux du pays, Et je lui dois ce que je suis

Et c'était mon enfance et elle était heureuse, Dans la buée des lessiveuses
Et j'avais les terrils à défaut de montagne, D'en haut je voyais la campagne
Mon père était gueule noire comme l'étaient ses parents, Ma mère avait des cheveux blancs
Ils étaient de la fosse comme on est d'un pays, Grâce à eux je sais qui je suis

Y'avait à la mairie le jour de la kermesse, Une photo de Jean Jaurès
Et chaque verre de vin était un diamant rose, Posé sur fond de silicose
Ils parlaient de trente six et des coups de grisou, Des accidents du fond du trou
Ils aimaient leur métier comme on aime un pays, C'est avec eux que j'ai compris


Entered at Sun Sep 29 21:11:49 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Thanks, dear Maud. And have a wonderful birthday over there, Hope to see you all again, soon. It's been tooo long.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 20:35:00 CEST 2002

Posted by:

Maud Hudson

Dear Jan,

Thank you for the reminders of those three photographs... three windows that, to me, opened with tugs from inside my stomach pulling through the surface of the medium, meeting and passsing the eminating soul coming from the image into the room... breathing life together once again in memories... ah sweet reverie... the Beyond and All connecting... not merely then and now, now and then, hither/thither, ying and yang... more Indira's net-like... complete-like... as in the molecule's essence in it's own shadow and illumination of the reflections of the reflections... eternally.. we and thee... you and me... exhilerating. It's comforting.

Bless you for sharing these photos and for breathing life into this wonderful website and for being the keeper of the flame!

Fondest Regards,
Maud Hudson


Entered at Sun Sep 29 19:35:03 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Woops

Sorry Dave Z _ The "Party Girl" post I didn't understand and the "Happy Birthday to Mrs. Hudson" I didn't see...I didn't see the Webmaster's post either.

I might not have mentioned "The Chiefs" and "Allentown"...But I was thinkn' them.

"Well I'm living here in Allentown...

...And it's hard to keep a good man down....

But she won't be getting up today... hey hey hey...


Entered at Sun Sep 29 19:24:44 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

I was thumbing through a One Show book... and noticed a nice picture of a gentleman looking like he was dressed for Christmas dinner... sitting on a stool... guitar in hand... turns out it was for the Gap ads...

BEG, jealous jealous... but I ordered the Hawk's book too...

A real video gem... how about Long Black Veil... off the Band Reunion video... also have a great version of It Makes No Difference... but got me wondering, how come we don't get video of Unfaithful Servant?... also a beautifully sung tune?... so similar in feel to me... makes me daydream how they could be related...


Entered at Sun Sep 29 19:14:23 CEST 2002 from london-ppp202610.sympatico.ca (64.228.11.69)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: nat-cho fromage

That restaurant, BTW, wasn't the Golden Corral in Waynesburg, was it?


Entered at Sun Sep 29 18:27:19 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-137.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.137)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Signed copies …

I hasten to add that the only reason I'm getting a signed copy is that ALL advance orders via Wavelength magazine get a signed copy! The answer is to subscribe to Wavelength of course.

One for the Brits (though by tonight you should all have a mental picture of Edwina Currie from TV). Party Political Conferences often take place at the Bournemouth ‘B.I.C.’ mentioned yesterday. The record store opposite the Pavilion spill-over venue did a full ‘Simply Red’ window display last time Blair and cronies were here. During the Major years there was a large conference here. As I drove into a car park about half a mile from the BIC at 8.30 a.m. I nearly ran over Edwina Currie tottering around dressed in shocking pink. A shock at that time of day to see a government minister wandering around a deserted car park while the town was full of armed police supposedly guarding the politicians from the IRA. Anyway, having bought the daily provisions at the store opposite, I got back into my car and drove up to the exit. This was fifteen minutes later. As I paid, I said ‘Was that Edwina Currie wandering around?’ ‘Yes,’ said the attendant, ‘The silly bitch wanted to know where the BIC was.’ (Being a local, anyone who didn’t know the location would be written off as stupid. We’re like that in Dorset). As I started to drive out, he called ‘I told her to turn right and keep walking across the by-pass.’ About 30 seconds later, I realized that he had deliberately and subversively sent her off in the opposite direction to the BIC into the rush hour traffic. I wondered for a moment whether I should have done the knightly thing and set off to search for her, but I was in a hurry and at least 10 minutes had passed. Also, with armed police in flak jackets on the top of half the buildings, I didn’t fancy stopping and trying to bundle a minister into my car.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 17:51:30 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68468.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.87)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

You are such a show off Peter! But you know....as soon as latest biography of Van is available here.....I will have three books on Van....

I forgot to mention that another reason why Bryan Ferry's cover of "Jealous Guy" is brilliant is because of Andy MacKay's sax playing!!.....He was classically trained......It seems that the groups who had at least one classically trained musician seemed to bring that extra, extra something in relation to the group's musical sensibility.....that other groups lacked....

Roxy Music...Andy McKay...oboe and sax
Garth Hudson...The Band...lowrey organ, piano, keyboards, saxophones, accordion, horns
Third World...Stephen "Cat" Coore...cello
John Cale...Velvet Underground...viola

Five more days until a night of wonder and appreciation with Garth and gang to celebrate and honour The Hawk at Massey Hall! I've also ordered a couple of books on Ronnie and The Hawks and The Band/Dylan DVD by Mickey Jones......


Entered at Sun Sep 29 17:45:04 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-099.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.99)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Van

I'm seeing Van's concert on Tuesday. I wonder if he'll be singing 'New Biography'? It isn't unknown, but is one of the rarer songs in his set. Personally I'll be hoping for Caravan.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 17:12:05 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-102.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.102)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: So you've read the new biography …

In a day when biographies are in the news (John Major was having an affair with Edwina Currie it seems, well, each to his own. But politicians on the rut do seem to lack taste or discrimination), there is news in The Sunday Times that Van Morrison has been trying to stop the imminent October biography by Clinton Heylin. Seems Viking have had to remove allegations about a denied affair, but refuse to show his lawyers the book. Van is sounding off about booksellers being at risk in law if they sell it. While he might be obstinately opinionated, I'd rather have Heylin do my biography than Stephen Davis anyday. Heylin counters that while he wouldn't call Van paranoid, he would say he exhibits paranoid behaviour (which is different?) Anyway, I have a signed copy on advance order and am looking forward to it. Heylin's work on Dylan is excellent.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 15:57:26 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: all sorts

peter. thank you for bringing ct. royal to life. it was always a story from my dads past. now it seems so vivid. al, roger mcguinn told the audience a interesting story about the bells of rhymney at a recent gig of his at which i was present. he correctly said that the byrds got the pronounciation of the word wrong. in the song rhymney would be spelt rhimney the way the byrds sang it. rhymney .pronounced correctly has a uuh sound after the rh as opposed to the iii sound in the song. roz. pensylvannia sounds like a little enclave of wales in that big country of yours.nick or anyone, whats the deal with the rick solo album. iv got it on vinyl and cd but like everyone else id jump at a new remastered version. ws walcott. slapshot isnt just the best hockey film ever, but by a mile ,the best sport film ever.theres a slapshot 2 out now but im almost certain its bullshit. i think its got one of the baldwins in it. enough said!


Entered at Sun Sep 29 15:03:00 CEST 2002 from stjhts26d031.nbnet.nb.ca (198.164.241.160)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: rosalind/pennsylvania

You forgot to mention the Johnstown Chiefs, from the movie Slapshot. The greatest hockey movie ever made. And what about the song "Allentown" - one of the few Billy Joel songs I actually like.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 10:45:01 CEST 2002 from (81.22.64.43)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Imagine, again

How did I missed that, when writing an entire post dedicated to Lennon's Imagine. I'm unforgivable. It is worth pointing out that the latest recorded version of Imagine throughout the world has been performed by a duo composed by Khaled, a singer from my lovely fatherland, and an Israeli singer, Noa. It is not the best version, but it features hopeful adapted lyrics in both Hebrew and Arabic languages. Check the link for details. They do that and this is the true courage

Have a good day everyone


Entered at Sun Sep 29 09:56:13 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Nick

Tried to do the Paragrath thing. Sorry.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 09:06:32 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Nick

Can we please talk about The Band? I know it's hard but Jim Weider (best guitarist around), Levon (best drummer ever) Garth (best keyboardist ever), Professor Louie (thanks for Jericho) and Randy C., etc. are still playing around and making really cool music./nWe should support them because in a totally commercial music environment we are all they have and they're all we have. We're True fans (I would think). Lack of commercial radio play cost the boys a lot of recognition. The least we could do is help perpetuate thier continuing existence by paying attention and commenting on what they do (good or bad I guess). /n It's a shame that no one outside of this page knows how great Danko's CD's are or Levons or Garth's or Louie's or Robbie's. Also, Garth, Levon (not just Butch) Aaron Hurwitz etc. should write in to this page and communicate in some way. Their great when you meet them in person and it would be nice to see them translate their personality here. It's hard for some people to cheer for thier heroes when they don't think their listening off stage. /n I'd like to think that the Manuel and Danko families are out there and to hear from them would really be a treat. Jan's page here is a lasting tribute to thier memory and Rick, Richard and thier music will never, ever be forgotten. /n Robbie Robertson, he should write in too. What a great lyricist and guitarist. This page is a tribute for him and should be a boon to him as well. I know he's watching because he's been around the block to many times not to. /N Jan I want o thank you for the best music page ever. There is nothing even close!


Entered at Sun Sep 29 08:08:37 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

You know, I couldn't post here last night for some reason... I was flying blindly in the chatroom too... What I would have said was... Thanks Ms. Party for your post... it left lot's to the imagination... and drove me straight to a Tangle Ridge mix for my Diet Coke... I also would have wished the Road Warriors a good friday night... I'm still anxiously awaiting a review either here or at the JWB site... anyway, happy retirement G...

The Z Family would also like to wish a happy happy to... that beautiful voice that both whispers... around distant rapids... remote waterfalls... in fog in mist... and rants among thunder and lightning on mountaintops high... where ever Garth's wonderful music is found... healing... emerging... from the whirling snow on the cold roads of solitary car rides... to the warm noise of a barroom full of friends...


Entered at Sun Sep 29 01:52:00 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

... These two guys run into the back of a restaurant and steal the first thing they see...a big hunk of cheese. The Sweet Black Lady cook runs to the door and starts yellin' at them to come back as they high-tail it down the alley. so they're panting down the alley and the first guy says:

Say, what kind of cheese do ya think this is?

The other guy looks over and answers : It's Natcho Cheese

The first Guy looks back curiously and asks: How do ya know it's Natcho Cheese?

The second guy says: Cause when we was runnin' out the door of that restaurant that lady was yellin' "Hey That's Nat-cho Cheese!"


Entered at Sun Sep 29 01:42:15 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.96)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: A very happy birthday.........

..to my dear friend Maud Hudson. Love you lots :-)


Entered at Sun Sep 29 01:11:09 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Insomnia

While waiting for the Sandman tonight, I've been going through the photo archives here - these three deserve another look:

http://theband.hiof.no/band_pictures/crabster_lwpremiere/lwpGarth1.html
http://theband.hiof.no/band_pictures/sd59/hawks7.html
http://theband.hiof.no/band_pictures/danko_bl89_jb.html

IMVHO, of course.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 00:32:07 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: deep rural southwest Pa.

Subject: Searchin' for the ghost of Tom Joad

Altoona Pa _ Where the pride was so strong people felt the could live on it. Where your dining tables had to be washed constantly to keep them remotely free of that smoke from them old trains. Altoona is now full of gravyards filled with tombstones of those old railroaders and city colleges filled with young people getting OUT. All they got to remind them that the place was once invaluable to the world's railroads.. A Museum.

Johnstown Pa. _ A town who's claim to fame is the fact that it was once considered the "Worst place to live in America" Where the watermarks from the Great Johnstown Flood are still on the buildings still left standing once the rubble had cleared away. They still get happy proud faces talking about the month Tom Cruise and Paul Newman came to make that movie. How the guy who gave Rock and Roll it's name was born right over there...

Pittsburgh _ Liberty Avenue, once a part of town that hummed with the sounds of great Jazz by great musicians is a shell. The Stanley Theater...the first time I saw B. B. King...gone to the dogs.

Jon is right. Western Pa. has no idenity. We got history...that's all. People around here laugh like hell and cuss a blue streak at the very same time. We have learned that tears and worry don't mean a thing... just like everybody else has.

From our Monongaleh Valley to our Masabi Iron Range..

To our coal mines of Appalacchia...The story's always the same....

Seven-hundred tons of metal a day... So now you tell us the world's changed..

Once we made you rich enough..Rich enough to forget our names.

Thank you all for those family memories from across the water....God...Life is tough all 'round.

I need a prozac! Anybody else want one? I got lots. But ya know what...These old hills here ain't so bad.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 00:32:30 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp70149.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.191.244)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: mining / biffalo bull / dylan / bryan ferry

Biffalo Bull: Thanks for the post.....:-D.....Also, you made me think about living in an age of fiberglass.....(I'm a lateral thinker so.....) where most people are mining for a heart of gold......I'm not worried about being depleted.....'cause my spirit has always been strong.....A clairvoyant once told me...Well..I'll save that story for "another time, another place".....Anyway, when my resources are low.....I just dig deeper.....or have another hit of underground music....;-D....Dylan understood....."Temporary Like Achilles" and Dylan and The Band's "Dirge"

"Like a poor fool in his/her prime,
Yes, I know you can hear me walk,
But is your heart made out of stone, or is it lime,
Or is it just solid rock?"....

"There are those who worship loneliness, I'm not one of them,
In this age of fiberglass I'm searching for a gem.
The crystal ball up on the wall hasn't shown me nothing yet,
I've paid the price of solitude, but at least I'm out of debt."

I think Bryan Ferry's Dad worked in a coalmine.....Bryan tried to negate his working class background by appearing bourgeois....like when he wore a white tuxedo jacket on "Another Time, Another Place"......recording of covers.....Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe" is here....and living the "high life" as if it would ever bring contentment alone......After he had a near death plane experience......He began to reevaluate his life.......One thing I always respected about Ferry besides his idiosyncratic singing style, dramatic flair, style....is that he always admitted that he's not a prolific songwriter and that he tends to put out a recording with original material followed by a recording of covers......One of his best covers (I even like it better than the original).....is "Jealous Guy" by John Lennon...........poignant singing and whistling and all......As far as I know.....He's never covered a Band song.....Velvet Underground.....yup!....I'm lucky......I can appreciate roots rock and avante garde rock.......My philosophy.....take the best from all musical styles and genres....more jewels to enrich your life......:-D


Entered at Sun Sep 29 00:22:00 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-153.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.153)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: CDRWs II

Sorry, I meant CDRW AUDIO will play in hi-fi CD burners. Shouldn't have opened that second bottle … or shouldn't have approached the computer with a fuzzy brain.


Entered at Sun Sep 29 00:19:26 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-153.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.153)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: CDRWs

CD-RWs will also play in dedicated hi-fi component CD burners (such as the Philips range). There are peculiarities- my sister just bought a second hand Toyota and the fitted CD player won’t even play CDRs, let alone CD-RWs. If that happened to me, the car would have to go straight back. But when I had a Toyota Previa of the same year, that would play CDRs – it had a very slightly different CD player. Recently, playing around with DVD-Rs and DVD-RWs, it turns out some Macs will play them (Superdrive) others with a plain DVD drive won’t. The lesson is to take along CDRs and CDRWs when purchasing computer and hi-fi equipment and check the drive out. Sony are reliable as CDR’s go- I’ve had horrendous problems with BASF (like 80% faulty in one batch) and Memorex, and some cheapo ones also have that sort of failure rate. But TDK, Sony, Maxell, Nashua, Matsui all seem reliable to me.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 22:42:09 CEST 2002 from zorg128.revealed.net (208.243.237.128)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: CD-RW's

John D., I've never had that happen. It might be becasue of the "CD-RW's" themselves. I never really use them. As you may/may not know, cd-rw's only play in pc's. But they shouldn't go to "read only". Try not formatting them and see what happens. It's been so long since I used one of those, I forgot about how they work.

mike


Entered at Sat Sep 28 21:42:04 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bitter Ironies [2]

Must admit I find this interface between tinted nostalgic perspectives and cold harsh reality a fascinating and, at the same time, an extremely moving one.

On our frequent trips to Rhymney down the years, I would often end up talking with old miners - family and neighbours of my wifes family. All fine and decent men now sadly long since passed away. They would talk forever about anything under the sun. Be it sport and politics. Beer and the past. Their love of their homeland. Their work.

Often they would recount with fierce pride and a warm fondness and - more often than not - with glistening eyes how when they were young colliers the entire Rhymney valley had been alive and thriving, peppered with pit wheels, mine shafts and levels and lit by the glow of foundries. How before dawn each morning they would march proudly en bloc for miles to their pithead. How the camaraderie and spirit of their comrades was tantamount to a gift from heaven. How they would bathe in their tin baths each night in front of a blazing fire. How, possibly most revealing of all, just how deeply held was their contempt for the Thatchers and MacGreggors of this world who had so cynically decimated THEIR precious coal mining industry.

Then you would ask those very same men what conditions had been like underground. You would then recoil as they told you. As their eyes glistened once more, though this time with a raging contempt. Contempt for the sheer misery of descending in those cages, contempt for the stooping for hours on end through cramped and gloomy passages, contempt for the mud and the filth and the dust and the cold, for the pain and the suffering, for the agonies endured by their 'butties dying from the dust'. Most of all for the bosses who had put them through their ordeals of hell.

So how do you make sense of such starkly contrasting emotions? How do you reconcile the apparent contradiction?

The answer, I suppose, is that you don't. What you see are simply two completely different ends of the human experience. And there, as these peoples' testimony, both extremes will sit.

All that toil, all that drudgery, all that adversity, all they endured are ironically - almost peversely in fact - the very things which actually made those people so very special. Often individually, ALWAYS as a breed, an entity. It shaped them and their communities. Made them as one. Solid and dependable. Warm and generous. In kind and in spirit. Their womenfolk worried and shared each day, as one. Likewise they would sigh, as one, with relief at the safe return of their menfolk at the end of each working day.

Only those who experience such lifestyles can know what is entailed. Just, I dare say, as only those who experience the horrors of war can know of that.

Whatever else comes out of such experiences, what emerges above all in such situations is the triumph of the human spirit. Always it rises above the darkness to remind us that despite all our considerable frailties and weaknesses, all our self-absorptions and self-indulgences, there is always an inherent resourcefulness and dignity within us that can survive whatever is hurled at us. And the more that is hurled, the stronger in the end is the human response.

The words of that song I posted actually got the last line wrong. It said 'They've take it all away'. Nothing, of course, could be further from the truth for they can never take away the dignity of such people. And ultimately it is that, I suppose, which counts for more than anything.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 21:29:14 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-112-205.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.112.205)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

What about that other Western Pennsylvania specialty, the steel mill? Like the coal mines, also now gone the way of the dodo, but in their time created an identity and good living for the area, while also taking a physical and environmental toll. There are pictures of downtown Pittsburgh in the '30s where the streetlights are on because the pollution made a perpetual twilight. Supposedly businessmen would come home at the end of a day with their white shirts grey. I heard that a high school graduate could start out at $18 an hour, back in the '70s. No wonder no one bothered going to college, and no wonder why the economy collapsed when all of the steel mills shut down. I had a teacher who said his brother worked in one in high school, he had to clean out underneath where the steel came out. I guess he had a certain amount of time to get in and out, and if he took too long, there'd be 1,000-degree steel passing six inches over his back. Someone else said that the steel would be rolled up in a coil and bound with wire; the wire would occaisonally break and the twenty-foot long roll of red-hot steel would going flying everywhere. And people would go outside on 95 degree days to cool off. Some of these old jobs, if a new technology came about that required the same working conditions, the government would never allow it.

JTull, let me know if you make it to Carnton. If you go, see if you can get a tour with Shannon. He's the director, but occasionally gives tours, and was very knowledgeable and funny.

I just saw that "Guns and Roses" has announced a fall tour. Not that I really care about that, but I guess it holds the same fascination as looking at a car wreck. I wonder if they'll actually be able to do the tour, since they're presumptiously booked arenas, including Madison Square Garden. I just don't know if that many people will pay money to see Axl Rose and some sidemen, when they haven't had a new album in ten years. Most kids probably don't care about them today, and most of their older fans probably won't pay money to see this crew. I just love it when these groups book themselves into these huge places that they can't fill. Remember the ELO tour last year that was cancelled, because they booked all arenas, and about a thousand people bought tickets? The J. Geils Band reunion a few years ago did the same thing. They booked arenas, then ended up cancelling the entire tour, and reunion. Apparently it was pretty good, too. But what are these people thinking? On the other side, when Roger Waters went on tour again a few years ago, he booked all really small places, then had to move most of them into bigger arenas.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 21:25:01 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.103)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Imagine

All the magic of the GB incomes from that lot of people who are attending in an almost anonymity, simply enjoying one common passion to music essentially. I believe that they share more than this. It have been written before that the GB is only words on a screen, yes but they are magic words on a trite screen. Excepted at some occasions, they often made me really happy, restored in me the spirit PLM on which I grown, whatever is their origin, cause you'll never have enough imagination to see who is really posting. Here I remind a great Lebanese author, Amin Malouf, who wrote ‘I am feeling myself nearer to a Korean of my generation than to my ancestor who lived one century before’ meanning simply that links of time are stronger than links of race. Someone can disagree with the above ideas, but he can also imagine they truthness, and then reaches an audacious feeling that the Imagine of John Lennon is formally realized here in this GB, There’s no countries, no religions, no possessions, nothing to fight or die for......... we tried and we join it.

Richard: about music for miners, a french singer, Pierre Bachelet, has a beautiful song 'Les corons', from this song one verse
'Et chaque verre de vin était un diamant rose posé sur fond de silicose'
My high school litteracy teacher, a fan of Shakespeare, learned us never try to explain the content of a poem or translate it, i think he's right. The verse means something like
'Every cup of wine was a pink diamond posed on a silicosis case'


Entered at Sat Sep 28 20:40:39 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: TOTALLY NOT MUSIC RELATED

Any computer whiz kids out there? Today.....and this has happend over the past year or so with Windows XP.........suddenly when I write files to a CD-RW.....it informs me that the back up files are read only. That means they aren't worth much to me as a back up file. I have gone in and unchecked the read only portion and clicked on Archive. I've done everything. Any thoughts? If I back it up to another part of my hard drive no problem. But once it goes to the CD-RW it informs me that it is now a read only file. It's happened before and I can't figure it out. I am using Sony CD-RW discs that have been preformatted. That could be the problem; but it takes months to happen??? Sorry for the non music stuff; but we all use comuters ehre and I you never know out there who has a theory. Thanks


Entered at Sat Sep 28 19:26:27 CEST 2002 from 0000000553-0000617300.dial.net4b.pt (213.58.7.85)

Posted by:

Mariano Barceló

Location: Lisbon, Portugal

Proporcional to worth things in life like the real music.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 16:53:22 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-064.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.64)

Posted by:

Peter viney

Subject: Bootlegs, rest homes

Record fairs. After months of not getting near one, I managed today in Southampton. The bootleggers were far bolder than for many years. I daren’t even look at The Beatles sections anymore, which are about 40 CDs deep and four or five feet wide. Academy of Outtakes was around, and The Last Moving Shadows. There were three different versions of Dylan in Bournemouth May 5th 2002. Like an idiot I bought one at the first stall for £25, only to see it with better covers at £20 and £18 on subsequent stalls. Still, I was there. Crabbie would have been delighted to see a small Doors specialist table (I gave it a miss of course). There is just so much stuff out there now. Dylan is always a reasonable section, but Beatles boots dwarf everyone, which is odd as there has been so little new product. I’d say there was more Beach Boys than Dylan, a lot of Neil Young, not enough Van Morrison. I was tempted by one from the Linda Gail Lewis tour but decided to draw a line – it was the worst tour he ever did after all.

Richie- Court Royal is the Miners Union convalescent home in Bournemouth, and sits right next to the BIC concert hall (where my Dylan boot was recorded), between the BIC and the pier in the very best place in the whole of the bay. It was an interesting cause celebre locally, because the rest home was settled in perpetuity for recovering miners, but there aren’t so many patients left, and the large old Victorian building now stands isolated on the ‘piazza’ with the brand new IMAX, Pier Approach, BIC, Surf Restaurant & Aquarium surrounding it. It looks odd and kind of left over, and Bournemouth Council (another bunch of shits as one might guess) have desired it greatly for the last 20 years – they’d demolish it the day they got it. You should have met my Great Uncle Ben who was proud to display his scars from being run down by “Churchill’s calvalry” (rather than Stormont’s) in the 1926 General Strike. He would wax eloquent about the mine owners too. He claimed to have sat next to Aneurin Bevan at school and carried everywhere a press cutting about how much money Bevan had left in his will, which was to prove Ben’s theory that he was not an intrinsically honest person, to put it nicely, - but Ben was so far to the left of the Labour party he went off the scale.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 15:57:09 CEST 2002 from cpe0050180e8779.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (24.157.151.53)

Posted by:

BIFFALO BULL

Subject: BROWN EYED GIRL--MINING AND RESOURCES

THANKS FOR CLEARING UP MY REQUEST ON THE JUDGE, IT WAS A LONG SHOT, BUT YOU NEVER KNOW. ANYHOW I RECOGNISE YOU AS AN EXCELLENT RESOURCE AND MAY YOU NEVER BE OVER EXPLOITED. MERCI


Entered at Sat Sep 28 15:54:08 CEST 2002 from abby4.revealed.net (208.16.227.195)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: Bootlegs...a few missing. Need help!

After moving a few months ago. I lost a few band boots. They are as follows: 1. At The Fast & Cool Club 2. Starry Night Club 3. Roosevelt Stadium set 4. R&R Live I've looked high and low and they aren't anywhere to be found. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mike email: the_stranger76@yahoo.com Willing to trade or send cd-r's. Bummed about the missing cd's.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 15:53:07 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-211-static.surferz.net (64.80.53.211)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: Photo of Rick

What a beautiful photo of Rick to wake up to this morning. God I miss him so much. Thanks Mr. Schoenberg (and Jan).

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 15:46:12 CEST 2002 from abby4.revealed.net (208.16.227.195)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: New Rick photo

Just saw the "new" Rick phot that has been added. Reminds me of a best friend's dad (who was also a neighbor while growing up). Just really down to earth. Never saw him get mad or lose his cool ever! Always would help us kids if our bikes needed fixed or whatever. And he worked for an ice cream company. So, we'd always get free ice cream in the summer :) If you needed a minute, he'd give you an hour. That reminds me of Rick and all that I've read about him and the kind of person he was. A giving perosn. I regret that I never got to see him and The Band perform. Ahh well, I still have the music.

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 28 12:25:40 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.105)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Pedantry again

Which of the sweet songs ? in my last post there are 3:

Stay – Jackson Browne version
The night they drove old Dixie down – Joan Baez version
Money, thats what i want – Holland Dozier Holland version


Entered at Sat Sep 28 11:29:31 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richard

Location: wales

Subject: mining,music and movies

we all know bells of rhymney,but the band's own caves of jericho is a great song about mining.i also like u2's red hill mining town of joshua tree. as for films. proud valley with paul robson and john ford's how green was my valley. romanticised views of wales but worthy nonetheless.THE FILM about mining has to be matewan by john sayles. i know we discussed him to death a while back but that incredible movie is always worth a plug. richard.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 11:15:09 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richard

Location: wales

Subject: mining

dear roz. im almost certain my ancestors ended up in scranton. ill have to go there one day. peter. i agree mining was and is hard beyond belief. my grandfather also died from silicosis. by the time he died hed broken virtually every bone in his body through roof collapses. my dad also spent a year in bournmouth in a special hospital for injured miners called court royal after a particularly nasty accident. in agreement with another post, the old mine owners were a vicious binch of shits. my grandad's family were slung out onto the streets from their miners cottage. the owner was trying to intimidate his dad who was the union leader in the pit. mr wigo, you rotter! i was going to ask a molly mcguires trivia question.you stole my thunder. roz your dead right. i think we can all see now why we love the band. have a great weekend everyone. richard.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 10:40:20 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-097.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.97)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: ISB, Elvis

Incredible String Band- “5000 Spirits” was the year before Big Pink – it came out not that long after ‘Whiter Shade of Pale’ and I received it as a present when it was very first released in July 1967. I played it to death too, and it has the most typical front cover illustration of any 1967 record. I hovered looking for the CD at a reasonable price for years and finally got one a few months ago. My original vinyl record is intact but has an embarrassingly private and intimate dedication scrawled across the inner sleeve which has meant it has not been taken out of the rack as often as it should have been.

On the “Elv1s – 30#1s” – I noted what David said and the reply saying that it had been remixed but nothing added or taken away and it was very clear. Anyway, last night we ran out of salad and on my quick trip to the supermarket, I succumbed in spite of the horrors of Wooden Heart and The Wonder of You (which will be perpetually skipped). The sleeve intro is by Peter Guralnik. So far – it’s very transparent. “Suspicious Minds” sounds as if it’s been “De-Phil Spectored” and the drums benefit greatly from a clearer stereo stage. However, the result is a lack of urgency and power, Will keep listening.

"EMPIRE" has a good five star review of TLW DVD today- official British release is finally imminent.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 07:42:29 CEST 2002 from fl-sdad-u1-c4a-253.dad.adelphia.net (68.70.2.253)

Posted by:

amo

Location: miami

Subject: last waltz party

hello to all, this is my first guestbook entry, but i've enjoyed reading your playful banter for the last year or so. I'm watching the last waltz and having some cold beers and I just want to say that The Band has given me so much pleasure the last 15 years or so. I'll never forget the first time I was turned on to the Band. Thanks to the Elliott Brothers for enlightening me.. I've managed to turn my husband on to them( who is a heavy metal fan) He now knows the entire Rock of Ages album by heart. see ya later, I'll be back


Entered at Sat Sep 28 06:05:20 CEST 2002 from 1cust54.tnt17.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.25.125.54)

Posted by:

Crabgrass

Location: The Front Lawn
Web: My link

Subject: Incredible String Band

At long last, someone (besides me) has had the good sense and good taste to mention The Incredible String Band!! I have always held the String Band right up there along with the Beatles and The Band as being the three most creative musical groups of the '60s and championed Robin Williamson as one of the most creative poetic and musical geniuses ever to walk this Earth (not that he needs my help in spreading such information) though quite a few of Mike Heron's songs also attain quite lofty heights. In many ways their songs affect my psyche much more deeply than those of any other group. For persons not lucky enough to have been around back then, the Increds were hugely popular in the same era which bore both the Beatles and The Band, and the Beatles themselves were fans of theirs.

Starting off rather simply (comparative to where they were to journey musically and poetically during the next several years) their first album titled The Incredible String Band was voted Best Folk Album in Britain in 1965 and was as much influenced by American Appalachian folk tunes as by the British folk tradition (and a few other things as well). Two years later (without banjoist Clive Palmer, an original third member who had gone off to Afghanistan) Robin and Mike (who had also gone off to visit exotic realms and collect exotic instruments) created the eclectic, surreal, and philosophical "5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion" followed by their most popular album "The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter" at which point the ISB first began touring in the U.S. playing many of the larger halls frequented by The Band such as the Fillmores East and West. Their records were produced by American Joe Boyd who had linked up with them in England where he was involved with Fairport Convention and many other British folk and "folkrock" artists. (BTW the Increds hailed from Edinburgh, Scotland which I forgot to mention.)

Personally, I'd recommend getting all of the ISB albums through "A Liquid Acrobat as Regards the Air" which I think was released around '70 or '71 - but if you don't yet have any - get "5000 Spirits" first. Eventually, they went downhill (due to record company demands that they be more commercial and probably a few more personal reasons) and disbanded in 1974.

Current re-releases on CD are very scarce (they've all been bought up by folks like me whose LPs are all scratched!!) except for the excellent "Chelsea Sessions" CD (first released about 3 years back) which bears alternate versions of songs on and outtakes from "5000 Spirits" (it's interesting to note that the CD format was around for about 10 years before ANY of their recordings were re-released in that format) but good news is on the horizon as pretty much their entire catalog will soon be released on new labels with quite a few being paired as double CDs. (The "Relics" album btw was a compilation of "best songs" released in the later '70s.) Also, a DVD of a short film entitled "Be Glad for the Song has No Ending" was released several months back - a sort of documentary on the ISB done while they were in their prime - not terrific though I'm thankful for it since it includes 2 complete songs.

For more ISB info check the above link and related sites.

djy15@hotmail.com (my e-mail address)


Entered at Sat Sep 28 05:40:09 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Thank you sooo much Brien...hell I would have never figured that one out....

I hope that baby of yours is fattenin' up and gigglin' at ya.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 04:52:19 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Subject: Hey...a party!

Hey Party Babe...yes Lil can be ruthless if you piss her off, but, I have recently found that she is simply an angel from heaven. Bayou Sam was right all along. Have fun but be safe....roz

Jon _ Thanks for the defense Homeboy :)

Empty Now _ Thanks for that sweeet song... :)

I needs ta be'a goin'on back ta wark naw ( // )


Entered at Sat Sep 28 04:41:32 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj

Subject: Pull Hitter

A Pull Hitter is someone who hits the ball to the side of the field he bats from consistently. So when you see a right hand batter at the plate and he cranks the ball down the third base line or into left field constantly - that's a pull hitter. Ted Williams was a Pull Hitter. Mo Vaughn is a pull hitter, Jeromy Burnitz is a shitty pull hitter.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 04:22:50 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Pa.

Subject: Kill The Ump! Kill The Ump! Kill The Ump!

W.S. Walcott _ Thought I could get one past ya. This is my explaination: Pete Gray passed away a few months ago and on the day he died it was mentioned on our local radio station, the one that sits on the counter here. These two fellas began to talk about it while shooting a game and I just silently listened like I usually do just to soak in information. I heard them mention that he was know as a "pure pull hitter" I just assumed it had something to do with "power". Evidently I was wrong.... They said he used a regulation bat and saved quite a few games, even one that was very very important. With the Yankees or someone. I don't ask the fellas that come in here questions because they would look at me and say "I thought you would already know that" and then they might get the idea that I'm not as knowledgeable about their beloved sports as I pretend to be and they wouldn't think that I was so cool anymore. But I will ask the fellas in the GB cause they all know I ain't cool. What is a "Pure Pull Hitter"? Is it a pulling in runs by base hits kind of deal? (I thought about it today) But.. W. S. You must admit that Pete came from absolutely nothing, both his folks slaving all day and night in those mines. Him losing an arm and still having a deep need to play ball. And he was good Dammit! And he had heart! He reminds me of Django Reinhardt who lost those two fingers on his left hand and created a brand new technique, or Chet Baker, who had his two front teeth knocked out an still found a way to make beautiful sounds with his horn.

Speaking of Chet Baker, who I have been listening to all evening. Someone mentioned here last week or so why jazz and blues musician age so gracefully... Chet baker and his horn playin' friend Jack Sheldon had a conversation once about why Chets Beautiful features were cover layer upon layer with wrinkles .. Chet said "They're laugh lines" Jack replied "Nothing's that funny" I love Chet Baker....the sweetest smokiest voice in the world...ahhhh and that horn...he's achingly delicious


Entered at Sat Sep 28 03:58:15 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-183-access.surferz.net (64.80.53.183)

Posted by:

Party

Location: Lils House

Hello Band fans! The first thing I have been ordered to say (or my drink supply will be cut off) is that I am NOT Lil. She is here somewhere. I saw her. I am also supposed to say that she is not responsible for anything I say here (my future drinks ride on that too). I am a drunk on again off again houseguest, who hasn't heard much of the Band until tonight. I am hooked! Kudos to whoever is responsible for this awesome website. You should come and join us for a drink. We started with a small gathering of 5. Last count I saw approx 13. Or I might be seeing double. Jack Daniels is the guest of honor. I just saw Lil again. She is in the kitchen. I hope she is going to cook. She's a great cook and I'm hungry. I don't know how to make paragraphs in here as you nice people have noticed I'm sure, but hey - paragraphs are overrated anyway. Enjoy your night good people. I will visit this website again. Thank you for indulging this Band virgin, but I must go before your friend Lil sees thia and waters down my drinks. She is ruthless. But I love her. Goodnight.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 02:58:30 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj
Web: My link

Subject: New Group Alert

In my constant quest to find new music to listen to, I came across a new band I found to be interesting. If you are looking for more than the usual 3-4 chord drek, then this newer progressive rock band may be for you..., They are called - - - Spock's Beard. Not as intricate as Yes, more melodic than King Crimson, they have more of an early Genesis bent with smatterings of ELP, Styx and Kansas mixed in. Very interesting music for anyone who's looking for a new group to check out.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 02:16:57 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: James Martorano

I'm always amazed when someone has just a good eye. I don't know how many times I've been around the Bearsville Restaurant and complex and I have never seen Albert Grossman's Marker. Good eye James.


Entered at Sat Sep 28 00:37:39 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool173-105.nas5.philadelphia1.pa.us.da.qwest.net (65.128.173.105)

Posted by:

JON IN PA

Location: factoryville

Subject: pa miners/athletes

Greetings,hailing from Scranton, I can attest to the comments regarding mining,athletes etc. In the mining hey-day, you worked in the mines or for one of the railroads. I am from both. Welsh miners, German railroaders. Athletes from this area are numerous, Mike Munchak, hall of fame guard from the Houston Oilers whom I played basketball with and the great Christy Mathewson of the baseball hall of fame. Much like all the great athletes of western Pa. Unitas, Montana, Namath, etc. It was a way out. The area seeks a new identity, but is filled with some of the warmest people anywhere who always look you straight in the eye. good day


Entered at Sat Sep 28 00:01:29 CEST 2002 from stjhts26d042.nbnet.nb.ca (198.164.241.171)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Pete Gray

Pete Gray was not a power hitter. He only played one year in the majors. After the war all the players returned and his career was over. He batted slightly over .200 with 13 RBIs and ZERO home runs.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 21:06:08 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Name citation

Ros, 8 time in this page only...Please plese staaaay, just a little bit longer...Jackson Brown version... or the GB will be....sader....take only what you need and leave the rest

always Jackson Browne: Charlie Young :super post, that's what i want, i gonna buy this albut in priority


Entered at Fri Sep 27 21:03:49 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bitter ironies

Pete, I think you're right about the 'goddam impossible way of life' as Robbie might say.

I've got unshakeable links going back to the late sixties with the Welsh coalmining valleys through my wife's family all of whom would awaken each morning to the actual Bells of Rhymney. Scarcely one of the menfolk who "went down the pit" as they say came out of their experience fit and well.

The irony, of course, is that, despite all that hardship the mining communities developed a spirit that transcends the bleakness resulting in a sense of community that other more serene places can but dream about.

The words of that song I posted are about the rueing of the inevitable loss of community that stems from the closing of the pits. I don't think for a moment the author nor the principal protaganist for that matter is romanticising the awful hardships below ground, merely the goodness that would stem from it and would always triumph over whatever adversity came those peoples way. Including the closing of their pits.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 20:49:36 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

I must mention how vivid these posts are today. I'm being reminded of John Ford's "How Green Was My Valley" with that exquisite cinematography by Arthur C. Miller, also Ford's "The Grapes of Wrath" with that oh-so-beautiful cinematography by Gregg Toland and also Hal Ashby's "Bound For Glory" with that wonderful cinematograhy by Haskell Wexler who also did the same rich job on "Matewan" Boy..movies come from life for sure.

I'm beginning to understand just what creates a Band fan...

Empty Now _ That's me...superb, pathetic and with a strong Janis Joplin / Forest Gump quality..:)

I'm gonna stop posting so damn much. I'm beginning to hate to see my name pop up here... I can imagine how everyone else feels. The thing is....I never open my mouth in my real life...


Entered at Fri Sep 27 20:20:28 CEST 2002 from proxy.lfpress.com (204.101.153.10)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Location: The Pump Room

Subject: belated thanx

Hey, Butch! Nice meeting you in Kingston, N.Y., last week. What a great evening that was at Mariner's Harbor. It was great to talk to Levon again after so many years. What a gracious guy! My wife certainly appreciated the hug. Sid McGinnis was a pleasant surprise since we had hoped to see the Letterman show (on hiatus) in NYC later in the week. But we made up for that with Sonny Rollins at B.B.King's. The only downer was getting repeatedly lost in Kingston. After that, NYC and Charleston, S.C., were downright easy.

Thanx again, Butch.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 19:26:21 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-154.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.154)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Mining

I don’t know if it’s worth getting too heartbroken about the loss of coal mining. My grandfather died of silicosis, and I remember seeing three of my uncles come back from the pits exhausted when I was a kid visiting Wales. The communities got broken when coal went, but it wasn’t a great way of life for the people that had to actually do it. All my uncles got out before circumstances would have forced them out anyway. My Uncle Jack got a job delivering farm supplies round the Brecon Beacons, and when I was 11 or 12 I spent a couple of days going round the farms with him in a little A30 van (delivering udder wash, a product that not many people have contact with). He didn’t have much nostalgia for the mines where he’d spent 25 years, though he did have a nasty cough to maintain the memory. As he said, the pay had been much better in the mines, but he was happier on less money, leaning on the gates talking to the hill farmers. He was quite vehement about the mines which he had come to see as a scar on a beautiful landscape. Funny, the women – my mother and her sisters and female cousins – all left during the depression in the 1930s and came to Southern England to work in the hotels and send most of their wages back to their families. I’ve only just realized how odd that is, but I guess it’s true in so many communities in the world today. The men stayed and waited for the mines to re-open. When I was young, Bournemouth had a major Welsh community as a result, though they lost their accents (my mother was 15 when she left) and you wouldn’t even trace it nowadays in the names – they all married into England.

Roger- there did used to be a funny smell hanging around the Winter Gardens on concert nights- At the time, I put it down to herbal tobacco because of the prevalence of asthma due to the heavy pine pollen in the area, but looking back you may be right.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 18:41:12 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Selected movie quotes

Hello Rosalind:

Pardon in advance, i’m not trying at all to pick up one painful topic. But your recent posts were so superb and so pathetic, that they stayed in my head until they awaked from my subconcious memory two lost quotes from two great movies. I take the liberty to post them as a necessary Post-Scriptum to your recent posts. my true reason, i cant resist to the need of evoking two movies i enjoyed.

The first one is from Forrest Gump, when he heard about the assassination of senator Kennedy, a few days after JFK: ‘In this country, it is dangerous to be a brother !’

The second one from ‘Canadian Bacon’ Alan Alda as the president stimulating the population to wage war against the Great White Evil North : ‘How can you have confidence in a people who built a so high tower’

I feel that minning is a better topic


Entered at Fri Sep 27 18:17:32 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Pa.

Subject: Pa.

I cannot let this curtain close on Pennsylvania with out a mention that this state has produced some of the best athletes in this country. I think that might have something to do with the coal mines and steel mills around here. Pete Gray, who was born in Nanticoke Pa, right outside Wilkes-Barre, stands as one of the most accomplished of these athletes. Despite losing an arm as a child, he grew to become a famous baseball player. Was known as a power hitter and is now right up there in Cooperstown, New York in the Baseball Hall of Fame!

Also, if you ever have a chance to get to Punxsutawney for Groundhog Day, don't miss it! They have a Bolman charter bus that travels up there every year. These people are something Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali couldn't dream up . My family goes up there.... I went up once and what I saw was surrealism in action. People standing around burning barrels, sipping coffee, showing entire photo albums from past Groundhog Days, trading stories from the past 30 years of Groundhog Days, fighting about who has been to Gobbler's Knob the most times for Goundhog Day, literally freezing their asses off waiting for a groundhog to come out of a hole... I laughed the whole time. And for the life of them...they couldn't figure out why... That my friends...is Pennsylvania. The Keystone State.

I'm going to cross that old line into Cumberland Maryland and sit in the old B & O train yard and shoot rats with my B B gun...


Entered at Fri Sep 27 17:29:23 CEST 2002 from bread.mcc.wwwcache.ja.net (194.82.103.136)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Moseley, Birmingham UK

Subject: Incredible String Vest

Richard (from Benxi)...

It's really difficult to advise people about the Incredibles. I think 5000 Spirits is wonderful but when I put it on my kids (who love The Band, Van, Bob, The Beatles and Stones etc) run out of the house. ISB are an acquired taste. Wee Tam and The Big Huge(originally released as both a double album on vinyl and as two separate LPs, now two separate CDs) are wonderful. 'Air' is one of the greatest love songs written. Along with God Only Knows, If I Fell and two or three Band tunes - Rocking Chair, All La Glory and When I Awake, I'd include Air on any ultimate compilation. Actually there's be a few more Band songs.

Some of the Incredible stuff takes longer to get into. "Changing Horses" challenged me although when I hear bits now and again I quite like it.

There was always a special atmosphere at ISB gigs. I saw them in 1971 (at the Winter Gardens in Bournemouth) just before I saw the band at the Royal Albert Hall. There was a lot more dope openly going around in Bournemouth!


Entered at Fri Sep 27 16:49:09 CEST 2002 from webport-cl6-cache4.ilford.mdip.bt.net (213.120.56.45)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: THE CURTAIN CLOSES

[1st verse]

Pass My Union card

I hear the whistle call

Now the time has come to watch

The final curtain fall

And it's the saddest time

Yet it's no use crying

So come and walk this valley road

That leads down to the mine

And later on

When the work is through

We'll walk those hills my darling

Just me and you

Oh girl what can we do, they're driving us out of town

Oh girl what can we do, they're driving us out of town

[2nd verse]

Down those cobbled streets

Along the terraced row

And past those factory gates they closed

About a year ago

Onto the Maerdy Ridge

Above the pithead cage

If we could start that wheel again

By turning back the page

But they closed the pit

And we've paid the price

And now there's nothing left at all

And that's the sacrifice

Oh girl what's left to say? - They've taken it all away

Oh girl what can we say? - They've taken it all away


Entered at Fri Sep 27 15:58:27 CEST 2002 from host181.olysteel.com (63.91.50.181)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Web: My link

Subject: Coal Country

There's some amazing history in the coal country of Pennsylvania. I lived in Hazleton / Wilkes-Barre area for seven years during the eighties and heard some wonderful and many horrible tales about the mining industry. To this day, when purchasing real estate in that area you must sign off on any rights to mine. Friends recalled, as children, hearing pick axes chipping away beneath their cellar floors in some rural areas. There are many horrifying stories concerning subsidence, ground collapsing and swallowing homes, cars, etc.

I must say that the heritage of the fine people of upstate Pennsylvania, one of hard work and dedication to family has served the area well. Some of the finest people I have had the privilege to meet hail from that area. They are marvelous neighbors and faithful friends.

If you are interested in the subject please check out the link above. It is for the film entitled "The Molly McGuires". Shot just outside of Hazleton, Pa. at the Eckley Mines it stars Sean Connery and Richard Harris among others. While not perfect in the factual sense it is a very good period piece and provides a good sense of those very difficult times.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 15:11:15 CEST 2002 from 0-3pool47-90.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.47.90)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Pennsylvania Mines

My husband is from Waymart, PA and his Dad lives in Carbondale--descended from the Irish that also came to NE Penn at that time to work in the mines. There is a mine (in Carbondale I think) that was closed in the early 60s that is open as a tourist attraction, but bring your hankies when you go because it breaks your heart. Especially about how they would let boys as young as seven work in the mine, often sitting in the darkness for 15 hours a day with their only job to open doors when the donkeys (who never saw the light of day) came through with carts of coal. Of course it was a horrible life for a boy and plenty of them died along with the men. My son Eric was 7 when we went and it made me so sad to think of those boys. Also if the father of the household were killed in the mine, if you didn't have a son over 7 to take his place, they threw you out of your house--you had 3 days to get out. And of course nobody could get ahead because they paid you in scrip for the company store. Think how many people with high hopes for a better life were sorely disappointed.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 15:02:19 CEST 2002 from toronto-hse-ppp3684362.sympatico.ca (65.95.238.129)

Posted by:

Lisa

Location: Canada


Entered at Fri Sep 27 14:43:53 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Wales and Pennsylvania

Richard _ You don't have to ask your brother. Between 1860 and 1920 Scranton and Wilkes-Barre Pa. up in the north east, became home to thousands of well skilled Welsh coal-miners who were drawn by the Anthracite coalfield. Most of them concentrated in an area about twice the size of Rhonnda in south Wales where most of them had originally immigrated from. My mother came from an entire family of coal-miners, from deep south West Virginia and into Kentucky. My dad, who is also gone now came from a family of railroaders. Born in Illinois, he met my mother and was forced by her back into these hills. He never did fit too well. He lived a bit on the lam and outside the law. He worked in the world famous machine shops of Altoona Pa. for a while, till he got itchy and split. Thanks Rich...


Entered at Fri Sep 27 12:51:10 CEST 2002 from proxy.newmedia.no (212.71.66.13)

Posted by:

Jens Magnus

Location: Oslo

Subject: ISB

Richard from Benxi

My favourite ISB record has always been "The hangman's beautiful daughter. Hangs nicely in thin air between folk and contemporary. There's more to be revealed! Any link with the Band?


Entered at Fri Sep 27 11:18:31 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-113.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.113)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Mickey Jones

Go to www.mickeyjones.com and you can order his 91 minute DVD / video of the 1966 tour online (I just did) for shipping October 1st signed by Mickey. This is from his colour 8mm home movie camera back then. Should be an excellent document.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 11:13:20 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richard

Location: wales

Subject: pennsylvania

dear roz. there's a strong affinity between wales and pennsylvania.in the early 20th century, economic depression forced thousands of welsh miners onto the dole.many emigrated to pennsylvania due to the mining industry located there. some of my own ancestors did this. my dad an ex miner himself knows the full story but sadly is no longer with us. a cousin of mine actually went out 20 years ago to pennsylvania to meet the surviving members of our relatives. ill have to ask him where exactly in pennsylvania they lived. sadly the mining industry today in wales is non existant.there is only one deep mine left in the whole country. cheaper imports from eastern europe killed the coalmines off. take care. rich


Entered at Fri Sep 27 07:52:32 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Bedford, Pennsylvania

Subject: Mary (bear)

As you see Mary, we have more in common than you thought. Bedford is located flat up against the Mason / Dixon line in deep southwestern Pa. Boy, it feels good to come clean about that! I had to bite my lip in the GB to keep from telling everyone that that plane that was headed for DC last year went down in that "one ol'general store" town that folks call "Hooterville" around here. Shanksville is a famous spot now. It's about 15 miles from here. We just took a trip up there this month to pay hommage, say prayers for the country and meet the President. The latter didn't work out tho. Those Somerset coal-miners were also close. Mary, I'm sorry you had to lose a brother too... Your son must be a fine strong man. I have been pulled over by them Pa. State Po-licemen. They are a rare breed indeed! I see that the military hasn't changed much. Still shippin' 'im here and there. You son is in my prayers...he'll be fine.

Okay.. I came here two or three years ago and originally posted Bedford Pa. on my location thing. I wasn't going to do that this time.. altho most of you already knew who I was when I showed up... I was looking for a way to reveal the truth, Mary gave to to me.... thanks Mary...

Richie _ I spent about five years in Seattle and was indeed fortunate enough to claim that small part in "Trouble In Mind" Seattle is a gritty town and I'm just a little ol' country girl.

Diamond Lil already knew all this...I told her.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 07:31:34 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71780.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.198.97)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Mickey Jones! And One Too Many Mornings / Self-Portrait / Dylan

Mickey Jones strikes the first note of "One Too Many Mornings".....The Hawks referred to Robbie as Barnacle Man because he was always by Dylan's side and they had become very close....

Dylan's "Self-Portrait" is mentioned here from time to time and I always remember the 8 track of this recording as simply terrible even though others here seem to like it.....Here's Dylan....Interview takes place in Dylan's room at the Chateau Champlain hotel in Montreal....1974....

Q: You haven't done any from Self-Portrait so far.

A: I didn't live with those songs for too long. Those were just scraped together.

Q: To, say, make a point or pay tribute to songwriters you liked?

A:Yes.

What about the Dylan album? (another 8 track that I thought Bob was putting us on.....) I've heard the songs were mostly outtakes from the Self-Portrait sessions.

A: They were just not to be used. I thought it was well understood. They were just to warm up for a tune.

Q: The tour seemed to get looser as it got to Canada. There was even mention of you on a station in Toronto that more or less claimed you as a Canadian citizen - or at least a man from the north country of the U.S., close to Canada.

A: Canada seems to bridge a gap between the United States and Europe - and England. It's a certain flair. And this is where I come from, this kind of setting - lakes and boats and bridges......

Q: In Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, do you think that you pretty much played the role of Dylan?

A: I don't know who I played. I tried to play whoever it was in the story, but I guess it's a known fact that there was nobody in that story that was the character I played.......


Entered at Fri Sep 27 07:11:20 CEST 2002 from (61.161.215.135)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Benxi

Subject: ISB / And now for something completely out of context...

I have a question concerning the Incredible String Band for anyone here who might be familiar with their discography. I recently got a CD copy of the "5,000 Spirits" and I love it. Previously my only purchase was the "Relics" comp which I got years ago. Where do I go from here. Whats the next best complete album that they made.

Also: Is anybody here familiar with the Gibson / Hopkins remake of "Bounty"?. Is the guy that plays the ship's musician actually the dude from ISB. He sure looks and sounds like him. Any help appreciated. Thanks, Rich.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 07:04:21 CEST 2002 from dap-209-114-161-90.nfas.monroe-tnt-1.sns234.pa.stargate.net (209.114.161.90)

Posted by:

Mary (bear)

Location: Western PA

Subject: Rosalind

Rosalind, I read with interest your post about your brother. It is so touching. I also lost a brother , who also introduced me to The Band, but not that way. Scott was killed on his motorcyle in 1978. But, I have a son who is a US Marine. Jay graduated from Parris Island last February. By coincidence, he also is a rifleman, is stationed at Camp LeJuene in NC, and as we speak is at Camp Pendelton in California repelling from mountains. I surely hope he doesn't have to go to Iraq, or Afghanistan. I have friends who ask me all the time if I am extremely worried about him. Of course, the answer is yes. But, what his chosen profession will be after the Marines is just as worrisome. He is going to the State Police Academy. I think I would rather have him in the Marines than as a State Policeman. So sorry about your brother and thanks for sharing.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 06:42:46 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Shiftin' Gear..

Empty Now _ Your post was not ridiculous and out of context. To the contrary, it was a great way to move the GB in a more palatable direction.

I have always wanted to ask Bob Dylan why "Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands" had to be so lloonngg and "One More Cup of Coffee" had to be sooo short.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 05:30:37 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71780.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.198.97)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: Dylan / Cash

There is also a new recording available called "Kindred Spirits: A Tribute To The Songs Of Johnny Cash"....Some contributors....Dylan.....Train Of Love...Steve Earle...Hardin Wouldn't Run...Bruuuuuce...Give My Love To Rose...Folsom Prison Blues...Keb Mo'....Listening to Dylan/Cash Sessions as I'm marking Geometry assignments.....perfect music.....lol......"Just A Closer Walk With Thee"....At the end of the song Johnny calls out...."What's the one ya know Bob?".....(Bob mostly hums throughout song.....) He does a better job on "Blue Yodel".....(Carl Perkins on guitar?) "I'd rather drink muddy water".....


Entered at Fri Sep 27 04:55:12 CEST 2002 from dialup-166.90.66.134.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (166.90.66.134)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Speaking of Dylan--so to speak--some good yet bad news. Columbia has announced the next two volumes of the Bootleg Series, Live in 75. The Wooster and Montreal shows of the Rolling Thunder Review. Both were multitrack recordings and have been available for some time. Bad news? Well, it means that the rumors of Columbia releasing what has circulated recently as A Tree With Roots--a fairly complete Basement Tapes collection--are false. Also somewhat disappointing: a bonus DVD with two surround mixes from Renaldo and Clara. C'mon Columbia. Doncha think Dylan fans would love the whole thing, if only for laughs? And...what about Hard Rain?


Entered at Fri Sep 27 04:51:53 CEST 2002 from 1cust45.tnt4.fredericksburg.va.da.uu.net (67.201.50.45)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Back Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Mickey Jones, Johnny Rivers, Port Dover and More...

Speaking of Mickey Jones, I just got the recent live CD from his old band mate Johnny Rivers, BACK AT THE WHISKEY, and it is excellent. Rivers' original keyboard guy, Larry Knectel turns up on some of the tracks, as does Herb Pederson. I guess Mickey was too busy to play drums.

Another interesting new live release is a double disc set from some mid-1970s Steve Miller performances for the King Biscuit Flower Hour. Since this is an official release from the radio show itself, I hope this means that an official release of material by The Band might surface including tracks not in circulation yet.

I just got PORT DOVER, ROYAL ALBERT RAGS, ACADEMY OF OUTTAKES and TAKE A LOAD OFF by The Band on CD-R (finally) and look forward to hearing them after reading so much about them here.

It's funny that all the talk here about western movies had me in the right mood for a song called "Sergio Leone" on the surprisingly strong new album by Jackson Browne. Another powerful political song on the disc has some cowpoke imagery as well: "Out beyond the ethernet the spectrum spreads DC to daylight, the cowboy mogul rides. Never mind where the gold for all this glory's gonna come from; get along little dogies, it's coming out of your hides..." (c)Jackson Browne, 2002.


Entered at Fri Sep 27 03:35:54 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71780.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.198.97)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Judge Not / Confusion

Biffalo Bull: The initials of the Judge....C.R.....but goes by R.....He knew the house band who opened for Levon and Barn Burners/Blues Band.....The guitarist was pretty good....

"I got mixed up confusion
Man, it's a killin' me

Well, there's too many people
And they're all too hard to please

Well, my hat's in my hand
Babe, I'm walkin' down the line

An' I'm lookin' for a woman
Whose head's mixed up like mine

Well, my head's full of questions
My temp'rature's risin' fast

Well, I'm lookin' for some answers
But I don't know who to ask

But I'm walkin' and wonderin'
And my poor feet don't ever stop

Seein' my reflection
I'm hung over, hung down, hung up!"

Bob Dylan...."Mixed Up Confusion"....For those who don't understand......


Entered at Fri Sep 27 02:46:38 CEST 2002 from irontnt-1-192.dialup.enter.net (216.193.167.64)

Posted by:

Zeppe

Subject: Mickey Jones in Movies

I just recently realized who Mickey Jones is also. I was watching "National Lampoon's Vacation" and I always remembered the part where the mechanic with that strange beard was supposed to fix the Griswold car, and he extorted all of Clark Griswold's (Chevy Chase) money. And the car was never fixed anyway. While reading the credits to the movie I noticed the name Mickey Jones and I looked him up on the Internet Movie Database because I knew I had seen him in other movies. It was there that I found out that not only was he the corrupt mechanic in the movie, but he was also the Mickey Jones who toured with Dylan and the Hawks on that infamous electric tour. That surprised me because he didn't really look like a musician. I guess it's a small world. I think it's great that Mickey is releasing a video of that tour.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 23:19:29 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-139.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.139)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Tall tales

Damn! Forgot the pilot's punchline: 'But don't worry. If you're lucky, he'll have pulled your head off first and you won't feel a thing." In spite of the tall tales (which I hope were bullshit) I loved Alaska.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 23:05:26 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-146.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.146)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Mickey Jones; Bear country

I was re-reading the Mickey Jones interview in the “Isis” collection last night. The guy was indeed the perfect drummer for the 1966 tour. As one reviewer said, that tour needed Mickey’s style of drumming. Great guy. Great drummer. And he got paid more than Robbie. Trini Lopez “Live At PJ’s” was the 1962 / 63 mega hit album which first featured him.

J. Tull fan – I take your point about rural areas. I did the tourist float-plane rides in British Columbia & Alaska- where they take you to a remote lake or island. The pilot had a large gun which he carried ashore when we landed, which I thought was frontier theatrics. Then he pointed out the bear tracks, which I also thought was theatrics. Then he pointed out the still steaming turd, and I said ‘Take the safety off that thing!’ Could have been theatrics too – I wouldn’t know a bear turd from a German Shepherd turd, except I think German Shepherds might be rare around there. But I don’t think any of those guys carry a hand gun as protection against bears. They carry an ominously large (and unconcealable) weapon. Then again, you only have to drive into the New Forest 20 miles from here to be 20 minutes away from police protection, let alone rural Wales or Scotland. No bears though. But I know that you wouldn’t drive far from Kyoto to be in Japanese wilderness (with bears). And in all those areas they manage to survive with the protection of a couple of large dogs. In the end, the comparative statistics on gun-related deaths are evidence enough.

The pilot also had a bear spray and I remember the advice. If the bear isn’t angry you can spray it. But that might make it angry. If it is already angry, don’t touch the spray can because it’s going to come and shove it up your ass with extreme prejudice.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 22:25:39 CEST 2002 from citrix4.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.6)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: wow!!

Thanks!! for the info

I can't beleive all the times I have seen that guy in movies and until today I had no Idea that guy had such a history with The Band!!! I always reconized him with the weirdest looking beard I have ever seen and he always seemed to show up in movies and I think I can remember being surprized when I heard that that guy used to be in a band with Kenny Rodgers... and now to find out its the Mickey Jones who played drums for Levon.... I guess you do learn something new everyday!!!

Thanks again..

just got my Joe Cocker tickets in the mail for 11-9-02... ordered tickets for Guy Davis (10-12-02), Chris Smither (1-4-03), and Greg Brown (3-16-03) today for shows coming up in Middlebury VT... only about 45 minutes from my house... what a day!!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 22:12:49 CEST 2002 from (193.194.69.78)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: PLM

By checking the GB before sleeping, i found that my post talking about Dylan is out-of-context and almost ridiculous, while things turned around US civil war and other possible wars. I want to amend myself by adding a modest post to the subject. In my mother country, a slightly different civil war began 10 years ago, 300000 persons already killed, fear is frozen, life goes on, and the grateful death can strike at any moment. In my mother country too, people are convinced that the greatness of America started with civil war, i don’t know why. Grant is as respected as Lee, names like Gettysburg, Appomatox, Franklin, breathe the glory, and make you dream. Unsufficiently informed, despite all which had been said on the question, I’ll never forget two images, both from ‘The good, the bad and the ugly’, after the battle of the bridge, when Clint Eastwood said ‘i have never seen as many guys dying at the same moment’ and when he gived a cigar to the dying soldier. All the posts on the topics are moving and suggest the respect to their authors, I greet them all with a special mention to Rosalind, of course.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 21:42:51 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-115-154.twcny.rr.com (66.67.115.154)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: Mr Jones

John Cass, that is the same guy. I was led to his website a few months ago, I think it was through a guestbook thread, and was amazed at how familiar he was. We have all seen him in countless movies and commercials, a Band connection right under our noses!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 21:33:29 CEST 2002 from oshst-064.olysteel.com (63.91.50.64)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Web: My link

John Cass,

You've got the right guy. Check out his link above.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 21:31:35 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

Subject: AI- Artificial Intelligence

There is a group out of California called AI-Artifical Intelligence, helmed by the son of Doors legend Ray Manzarek. Their new cd has just come out from Dreamworks, and Robbie Robertson is the Executive Producer. Have not heard it yet, but I gather it may be somewhat avant-guarde.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 21:27:44 CEST 2002 from citrix4.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.6)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: Mickey Jones

This might be a dumb question..but I will ask it anyway did Mickey Jones after his drumming days take up acting and was in movies like Mask (with Cher) and was he ever in Kenny Roger's band First Edition (or something) or do I have him mixed up with that guy who looks just like Mickey Jones in that picture on the web site....if not there is some actor who always seems to play a tough guy biker sort (never a big leading roll or nothing) but that beard is hard to forget

anybody know who I am talking about????


Entered at Thu Sep 26 20:45:22 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Thank you David Powell for taking that farther than I did and even mentioning the sorest part that still lingers. The ones never found who might still be alive somewhere.

And thank each and everyone of you. I was only eleven years old when it happened so the only real pain I felt came thru my mother's tears. I did tear myself open a bit to write it down tho. The words from you all came as a soothing salve to close it back up. There are good souls in this place. We have unsung Heros who died in America also that shall never be forgotten. Brave and fearless men and women who have died on streets fighting crime who have given their lives to fight fires. We have people that have fought their own civil wars and have lost the battle. Our beloved Richard Manuel for instance. I saw Art Linkleter on the Larry King show not too long ago. When asked about "How he coped with the loss of his daughter?" and if it "Still hurt to this day?" He replied, "It just wears itself out. The pain never really leaves...it just wears itself out." Good thing to remember....

I have been listening to "Sailing to Philadelphia" all morning. What a great record!

"Sailing to Philadelphia....to draw the line....
The Mason / Dixon line


Entered at Thu Sep 26 20:13:42 CEST 2002 from 66-7-242-114.cust.telepacific.net (66.7.242.114)

Posted by:

Charlie Hawker

Location: San Francisco

Subject: Rick Danko's Bass Equipment

Thanks Dave the Phone Guy... Do you know if there are any pictures or specs of that early amp? I was thinking of trying to build a replica. Any information that anyone has on this would be greatly appreciated.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 20:20:43 CEST 2002 from sdsl-64-7-16-53.dsl.nyc.megapath.net (64.7.16.53)

Posted by:

Jim

Location: NY

Subject: Big Pink

Just paid my respects to big pink. I'm happy to report that it still looks the same! Beautiful country!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 19:03:07 CEST 2002 from t2o942p18.telia.com (195.252.32.138)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Sara

Empty Now and BEG: An interesting Sara connection is that "One More Cup Of Coffee" is written in Les Saintes Maries De La Mer in South of France - there is a crypt under the church, well, what else - in the crypt there is a relic of Saint _Sara_, saint of the gypsies.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 18:33:13 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: and to add one more thing

Although I am a carnivore and defend the killing of an animal if it is for the providing of food and done humanely, I cannot understand the hunting mentality. I feel intense guilt if I accidently run over a squirrel; I could not sleep at night if I ever shot a deer or bear, etc. If the pleasure is from the hunt and pursuit, then take a picture of the animal rather than shooting the poor thing.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 18:22:52 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Guns

Peter: The gun issue is a little different in countries with vast rural areas like the U.S. and mostly developed ones like Japan. As I said yesterday, I am not a gun owner and have no intention of ever being one. I think they give a false sense of security, are more likely to be used against the owner in the event of a house break-in, and tend to be stolen and used in violent crimes. However, when traveling in the far West of the U.S., in rural Arizona and the like, you see these lone houses and trailors (yuck!)in the middle of empty, vast expanses. If these people encounter a criminal or attacker, the local police are FAR off, and if I was forced to live under such conditions probably would acquire a gun for protection under such extremes. I do not however, see any excuse for assault weapons, cop-killer bullets, etc.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 17:47:51 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-008.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.8)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: kids toys …

Jenny- kids and guns. Guns = politics, so I’ll make this remark begging that we don’t go down that Charlton Heston road. I used to think I’d keep my kids free of toy guns, but it all changes the instant they meet other kids. The one that really annoyed me was when my daughter aged 4 returned from playgroup to announce that she no longer wanted her Duplo & Lego (which she handled with expertise) because ‘Lego was only for boys.’ The other girls had told her so. We started getting demands for pink hair ribbons around the same time. Anyway, my third kid loved toy guns. So did his friends. By that time we’d given up under peer group pressure, persistent nagging and too many sleepless nights. At one party they were playing the usual ‘Bang bang you’re dead …’ games and some friends’ kids joined in. They’d never been allowed to touch toy guns. Within minutes there were tears. The kids who’d never had toy guns hadn’t shouted ‘bang bang’ – they’d used the toy rifles as clubs and clubbed the others to the ground. All a bit ‘Lord of the flies’ really. Ideally I’d avoid toy guns, but you then have to hope all your neighbours’ kids do too. This is not a parable about real guns (though it looks like one). I’d still point out loudly that Europe, Japan and many other places exist and survive perfectly well, with no less freedom and democracy, with a total ban on handguns and most other firearms too.

The Washington wall is extremely moving, even for us non-Americans. I stared long at those names and thought they were all my exact contemporaries, and it was all happening as I was going through college, starting work, doing all the things they didn’t get to do. And I also thanked my lucky stars that we’d never got embroiled in that one.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 17:34:12 CEST 2002 from cpe0050180e8779.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (24.157.151.53)

Posted by:

BIFFALO BULL

Subject: BROWN EYED GIRL--JUDGE AKA JUSTICE

IF I HAVE YOU ON MY WAVELENGTH, DID THE JUDGE HAVE THE INITIALS R.W OR B.W., IF SO WE WERE EDUCATED AT THE SAME PRESTIGOUS HOUSE OF ERUDITION, LIGHT AND LORE.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 17:06:54 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Thank you Rozalind for reminding us that each name on that wall in Washington stands for someone's brother, son, husband & friend. Let us not forget those women who sacrificed their lives also, sisters, daughters, wives & friends, many who were tending to the wounds & spirits of others. For those left behind, there are many wounds that will never heal.

Instead of uttering partisan rhetoric, the politicians presently in Washington should visit that wall and view the names in respectful silence.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 16:39:58 CEST 2002 from user-1121nvb.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.223.235)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

As we all know, "feeling" and "imagining" are quite often the same thing. I'm sure those reenactors "feel" the connection too, which was my point.

BWNWIT, to elaborate, a visit to the Carter House is even more instructive. From that house south down the hill--on both sides of Rt. 31--was the scene of incredibly bitter fighting, especially around the former Battleground Academy and future site of the Franklin Library. Whatever they say about the second bloodiest day, Franklin was in fact the largest single attack of the war. Some 20,000 Confederates lined up in a huge arc south of town and attacked the Federal entrenchments. Most of the battlefield is gone now--a Pizza Hut stands where Irish-born General Pat Cleburne died, but if you take 31 south towards the Winstead Hills, there's a nice park that explains the battle.

Even more instructive, when I was in Nashville a few weeks ago, I checked out that fine city's Civil War sites. In any number of places you can experience first hand the brutal sacrifice the country made to figure out exactly what the Constitution meant.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 15:56:40 CEST 2002 from x.electronet.net (216.173.174.94)

Posted by:

Brent

Location: The Rumor
Web: My link

Subject: Mickey Jones' 1966 Home Movies Released!

Has everyone heard about this release?! I'm pretty excited about it. Click here for details: http://www.1966tourhomemovies.com/. They are accepting orders now for dvd and vhs for October 1 release!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:56:12 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Nashville/Battle of Franklin

BWNWIT: I'll try to check out that plantation next week when I'm in town.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:54:49 CEST 2002 from oshst-064.olysteel.com (63.91.50.64)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: military experience

bassman,

While I don't at all mind your objection and respect your opinion, where in my post did I state any of this becoming "my rules"? I simply stated that my preference would be to have a President with a solid understanding of our military. In the glaring light of this point in time, standing where we are now standing as a nation, I feel it has become more important than ever. Once again, one man's opinion. Nothing more.

JTull listed many past Presidents who lacked military experience yet led with great success. I would argue that most of them succeeded in times and under circumstances that could never be even remotely equated to the challenges of these times.

You are certainly on the mark with your observation concerning those leaders who bring specific experience to their jobs yet remain ineffective. There's no doubt it happens with regularity. My point is that I would always take my chances on the experienced AND qualified. Your question concerning only musicians being qualified to criticize music, etc. is in no way relevant to anything I stated. Again, I respect your opinion and your right to disagree with mine but please don't take an opinion I stated on one matter and attempt to spread it all over other topics of discussion we share here. That sort of hyperbolic distortion only minimizes the valid points you did make.

Respectfully posted.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:40:52 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69142.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.187.253)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: One Too Many Mornings

Ooops!.....Sorry Stevie and gang.....I meant.....SEVEN WONDERS.....not.....SEVEN SEAS....I'm not a morning person....obviously....and I'm running too late to make a power shake this morning.....


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:24:36 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69142.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.187.253)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Empty Now: At this very moment in time.....Every day I HAVE to listen to Fleetwood Mac's SEVEN SEAS because of Stevie's raunchy, strong and deep voice.....I find the song lifts me up........and....Robert Cray's......PARDON......It's all in the guitar licks.....He travels all over the place in this song......I think it's his "masterpiece"....When I listen to it.....I'm on stage playing every lick......It's no wonder I'm drawn to guitar players....;-D....and I can see in my mind.....Levon playing drums..........

Dylan's SARA......Real Robert Zimmerman.....at last?.....Probably.....the most confessional.....even if the verses of this song were written in East Hampton where they had stayed at one time with Jacques Levy...SARA.....seemed liked an ode to his eternal muse....However, some people always point out how some of the lyrics don't always ring true such as SELOTLL....was actually written in Nashville and not in the Chelsea Hotel...."having just taken some kind of cure"??.....Apparently it was another six months....before Dylan attempted to clean up.....In another book on Dylan....as he was recording SARA.....well.....different interpretation again.....not unusual when anyone is trying to figure out Dylan.....


Entered at Thu Sep 26 12:38:36 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Tales of ordinary madness

1st- We are in 1975. i bought evidently the album 'Desire' of Dylan. For the first listening, i enjoyed many tracks and i rejected instinctively 'Sara'. I felt it as a kind of 'Neil-Youngized' Dylan's song.
2nd- Many years elapsed, ironically, i was more and more attracted by 'Sara' at the detriment of all the other songs. The rule didn't apply only to this album, but to any other existing song. And then, It happened something almost incredible, I have listened during four years, between 1992 and 1996, exclusively to 'Sara', several times a day. I was feeling it in my flesh and in my soul. No one believes me when i tell that, or someone who believes me doubts of my psychlogical health. An objective reason is maybe, there were no interesting new creation during the years 1992-1996.
3rd- More ironically again, during this period, I read in one of the Dylan's biographies that he regreted to have written and performed this song, regarding the person to whom it was dedicated......????
4th- Nowadays, i still listenning daily to 'Sara', the difference is that i'm listenning to others songs in parallel.
5th- I am curious to know if anyone here had this kind of behavior towards one song, even for a shortest time, or, why not, a longer.

Now the beach is deserted excepted some kelp And a piece of an old ship that lies on the shore
You've always responded when i needed your help You gave me a map and a key to your door
Sara, Sara, glamorous nymph with an arrow and bow. Sara, Sara, don't ever leave me, don't ever go.

Bayou Sam: I've posted before the reasons of my name. It's a song of Kansas which i used to sing with my band (during many years once again). 'Nobody's home'. it begins by
It's empty now no friendly face and nothing lives within....
in the arabic culture the concept of title doesn't exist. A novel, a song or a poem is refered to by the first words of the text. Since my real name is widely shared here, my friends called me EN a long time ago to make the distinction .


Entered at Thu Sep 26 12:33:52 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.2)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Rosalind: That was a very touching post about your brother Gary. I never lost anyone in Viet Nam, but I have been to the memorial and found it incredibly moving.
I also have to mention that I laughed when I read about your mention of Joey Chitwood. My boss has been calling me that for years! Seems me and my Chevy kick up a biiiig cloud of dust when I pull in every morning... and he says he cringes and waits for the sound of me taking out the back end of his truck :-) I've suggested that maybe he needs some 'busy work' if he has all that time to hyperventilate at the window each morning....

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 10:17:10 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richard powell

Location: wales

Subject: vietnam

dear roz. i found your post regarding the loss of your brother in vietnam profoundly moving. iv never been to the memorial but sepreference would be to have a President with a solid understanding of our military. In the glaring light of this point in time, standing where we are now standing as a nation, I feel it has become more important than ever. Once again, one man's opinion. Nothing more.

JTull listed many past Presidents who lacked military experience yet led with great success. I would argue that most of them succeeded in times and under circumstances that could never be even remotely equated to the challenges of these times.

You are certainly on the mark with your observation concerning those leaders who bring specific experience to their jobs yet remain ineffective. There's no doubt it happens with regularity. My point is that I would always take my chances on the experienced AND qualified. Your question concerning only musicians being qualified to criticize music, etc. is in no way relevant to anything I stated. Again, I respect your opinion and your right to disagree with mine but please don't take an opinion I stated on one matter and attempt to spread it all over other topics of discussion we share here. That sort of hyperbolic distortion only minimizes the valid points you did make.

Respectfully posted.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:40:52 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69142.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.187.253)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: One Too Many Mornings

Ooops!.....Sorry Stevie and gang.....I meant.....SEVEN WONDERS.....not.....SEVEN SEAS....I'm not a morning person....obviously....and I'm running too late to make a power shake this morning.....


Entered at Thu Sep 26 14:24:36 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69142.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.187.253)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Empty Now: At this very moment in time.....Every day I HAVE to listen to Fleetwood Mac's SEVEN SEAS because of Stevie's raunchy, strong and deep voice.....I find the song lifts me up........and....Robert Cray's......PARDON......It's all in the guitar licks.....He travels all over the place in this song......I think it's his "masterpiece"....When I listen to it.....I'm on stage playing every lick......It's no wonder I'm drawn to guitar players....;-D....and I can see in my mind.....Levon playing drums..........

Dylan's SARA......Real Robert Zimmerman.....at last?.....Probably.....the most confessional.....even if the verses of this song were written in East Hampton where they had stayed at one time with Jacques Levy...SARA.....seemed liked an ode to his eternal muse....However, some people always point out how some of the lyrics don't always ring true such as SELOTLL....was actually written in Nashville and not in the Chelsea Hotel...."having just taken some kind of cure"??.....Apparently it was another six months....before Dylan attempted to clean up.....In another book on Dylan....as he was recording SARA.....well.....different interpretation again.....not unusual when anyone is trying to figure out Dylan.....


Entered at Thu Sep 26 12:38:36 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Tales of ordinary madness

1st- We are in 1975. i bought evidently the album 'Desire' of Dylan. For the first listening, i enjoyed many tracks and i rejected instinctively 'Sara'. I felt it as a kind of 'Neil-Youngized' Dylan's song.
2nd- Many years elapsed, ironically, i was more and more attracted by 'Sara' at the detriment of all the other songs. The rule didn't apply only to this album, but to any other existing song. And then, It happened something almost incredible, I have listened during four years, between 1992 and 1996, exclusively to 'Sara', several times a day. I was feeling it in my flesh and in my soul. No one believes me when i tell that, or someone who believes me doubts of my psychlogical health. An objective reason is maybe, there were no interesting new creation during the years 1992-1996.
3rd- More ironically again, during this period, I read in one of the Dylan's biographies that he regreted to have written and performed this song, regarding the person to whom it was dedicated......????
4th- Nowadays, i still listenning daily to 'Sara', the difference is that i'm listenning to others songs in parallel.
5th- I am curious to know if anyone here had this kind of behavior towards one song, even for a shortest time, or, why not, a longer.

Now the beach is deserted excepted some kelp And a piece of an old ship that lies on the shore
You've always responded when i needed your help You gave me a map and a key to your door
Sara, Sara, glamorous nymph with an arrow and bow. Sara, Sara, don't ever leave me, don't ever go.

Bayou Sam: I've posted before the reasons of my name. It's a song of Kansas which i used to sing with my band (during many years once again). 'Nobody's home'. it begins by
It's empty now no friendly face and nothing lives within....
in the arabic culture the concept of title doesn't exist. A novel, a song or a poem is refered to by the first words of the text. Since my real name is widely shared here, my friends called me EN a long time ago to make the distinction .


Entered at Thu Sep 26 12:33:52 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.2)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Rosalind: That was a very touching post about your brother Gary. I never lost anyone in Viet Nam, but I have been to the memorial and found it incredibly moving.
I also have to mention that I laughed when I read about your mention of Joey Chitwood. My boss has been calling me that for years! Seems me and my Chevy kick up a biiiig cloud of dust when I pull in every morning... and he says he cringes and waits for the sound of me taking out the back end of his truck :-) I've suggested that maybe he needs some 'busy work' if he has all that time to hyperventilate at the window each morning....

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 10:17:10 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richard powell

Location: wales

Subject: vietnam

dear roz. i found your post regarding the loss of your brother in vietnam profoundly moving. iv never been to the memorial but several of my friends have and they all tell me its an experience they will never forget. i remember that movie in country where the climax of the film is a visit by the film's principal characters to the memorial. that scene moved me to tears. it obviously pales into insignificance compared to the real life experience youv gone through.thanks for sharing. it puts art and culture into its proper perspective. take care.richard


Entered at Thu Sep 26 09:43:40 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Jerry

Location: St.Paul

O.K.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 09:39:28 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

" Well I met him accident-ly in St. Paul Min-ne-sota
And he tore me up ever' time I heard him drawl that southern drawwwl..."

Jerry...Don't go away again...okay?


Entered at Thu Sep 26 08:05:01 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Jerry

Location: St. Paul

Roz..I just read about your brother...Thanks for sharing that...


Entered at Thu Sep 26 07:15:39 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rozalind :)

Subject: yin and yang

Mr. Donabie _ You can spell my name anyway at all..

Mr. Young Thank you..

Okay I have one more family reflection to share and then I will back off...

My dad used to be one of Joey Chitwood's Daredevils. Meaning, he would travel up and down this country and every Saturday or Sunday would securely seatbelt himself into a Chevy and hit the gas and fly like hell up a long ramp and clear a bunch of semi's. He had dreams of becoming a Nascar hero like his friend Glenn Roberts. My mother, with two of her children at her side, would watch my father try to kill himself five or six times a week while a crowd of screaming fans would go completely insane with excitment. When asked in desperation by my mother to stop he would say "I can't live without it." and my mother would say "And I can't live with it." Hey it's a different sex.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 07:11:46 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-113-37.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.113.37)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

You damn people. I should be paying bills right now so I don't get evicted, but NO, I've got to go post!

Speaking of tasteless things, I was at a carnival on the edge of town the other week, and they had a big inflatable slide for the kids, that was shaped like the Titanic sinking. The bow was under water, you climbed up stairs in the cabin, went out at the hull, then slid down the deck at a 45 degree angle. Now, I realize that the Titanic sunk a long time ago, but that's still pretty damn tasteless. It made me wonder how much longer until they have a bungee jump shaped like the World Trade Center. Or, far more likely, how much longer until the made for TV movie about it.

But one thing I saw did remind me of "Carny." They had a clown you could try to dunk with a baseball. One short, bald guy was pitching, and the clown said, "You must be bald on top because you bump your head everytime you walk under the table." I thought that was pretty good.

All you Civil War buffs, the next time you're in Nashville, don't come visit me, go check out Carnton Plantation in nearby Franklin. It's a restored plantation home, that has a very good collection of original artifacts from the actual family. But the house was used as a hospital during the Battle of Franklin, which, according to our guide, was the second bloodiest battle of the war behind Gettysburg. The difference being that Gettysburg was three days and the Battle of Franklin was six hours. At least that's what our guide said, although my dad said that there are about ten battles that claim to be the second bloodiest. Anyway, we're on the tour, going around the house, doing the typical old house stuff. And I'm going to ruin it for you now, because the surprise is half of the shock value. But in one of the bedrooms on the second floor, there was a stain in the wood on the floor. So the tour guide is talking about the drapes and wallpaper, then explains that the stain is a bloodstain from when the house was used as a hospital. If you looked at it, there was kind of a circular pattern, and he said that it was a bucket that they put the used dressings in, and after awhile the bucket overflowed with blood, onto the floor. Onto the floor, through the carpet, to stain the floor enough to last through the later attempted cleanings that were mentioned in journals and on for 150 years. So that kind of changed the tone of the tour, and everyone kind of tiptoed around the stain that they had all walked over coming in. So on to the next room, and our guide talked about one of the soldiers' journals in which he described one of the rooms having severed limbs up to the window sill. Then he said that they thought it was this room, because of the large stain under the one window. Also because of another bloodstain, which I was standing next to, which just happened to be in the shape of a severed shin and foot. No shit. He also drew our attention to the fact that there were not any toes, and they theorized that the guy's toes had been lost in the battle before they amputated his leg. The next room was where they actually did the operating, and there was a big crescent shaped bloodstain on the floor. He said that the surgeon had stood there, and that the blood dripping off of his apron had left the stain on the floor. Through the carpet, again. He said that they did forensic analysis and stuff (it's amazing that they can do this) and determined that the doctor had probably stood in the same spot for ten hours straight, amputating people's limbs. There was also a spatter behind it, and he said that the doctor would have been right handed, and they thought that when someone came to talk to him, and he turned around, that the blood ran down his elbow, off his scalpel and onto the floor. Anyway, it certainly changed the tone of our tour of this nice little plantation home, and really reminded one that the Civil War really was real people dying in horrible ways, and extreme suffering, and not some quaint little thing where everyone dressed funny and had cool beards. There was a picture of the woman of the house before the war, and then another one later on. The guide passed the later picture around and asked people to guess how old she was when it was taken, and most people said around 65 or 70. He said that she was 25, then said, "War is hell." He said there was a good book about Carnton, I think it's actually a novel, called "Black Rose."

And speaking of George W. Bush being an idiot, I don't think the so-called liberal media made much mention of his comment when he was in Nashville the other week. He was talking about Iraq, and said, and I quote, "There's an old saying in Tennessee - I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee - that says, 'Fool me once... uh..." Significant pause. "'Shame on you. Fool me... You can't get fooled again.'" I mean, he just had a look of terror on his face when he got lost in the middle of it. God, he's an idiot. If Gore had said the same thing, they would have jumped all over it. And now this genius is going to start WWIII because that's the only way he can keep his approval ratings up, and because he's too stupid to ignore the war mongers and hawks in the military who always want to start wars. Maybe September 11th will have more parallels to Pearl Harbor than we initially thought.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 06:34:54 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

About Canadians abroad: decades ago when my family moved to Italy and I had to enroll in a local school, one of the pin-headed pencil-pushing Italian civl servants goes:

"So what season is it in Brazil now?"

ME (all of 13 years old): "Huh?"

PIN HEAD: "You're from brazil, right?"

ME: "Er, no, I'm from Canada. It says so on the form I just filled out and gave to you"

PIN-HEAD: "Brazil...Canada..same thing"

ME: STUNNED SILENCE with visions of Canadians in thongs swaying rhythmically to the samba beat, dancing up and down Yonge Street during the world famous Carnival of Toronto held during the month of February...Rio..who needs it!!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 06:04:12 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp70627.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.193.214)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: Bif

Biffalo Bull: Hi! Thanks so much for sharing about Glen Silverthorn's article in the Brantford Expositor.....Small world.....I actually grew up in a small city close by.....watching the river flow......lol.....I also met at Jeff Healey's a Judge from Barrie.....He gave me his card.....So ya never know who'll you meet in sweaty basements......Anyway....Everytime I see your "name" I think of Canada's Bif Naked.....Who said Canadians can't rock whether they're snowed in....or not....??? Actually what troubles me more.....I was in NYC four times this year.....Everytime I was in a store and was asked where I came from.....Store clerks did not have a clue where Toronto was located.....I asked....Have you ever heard of the country called CANADA???????????????????.....Ya know right then I could hear......"I AM CANADIAN"......:-DD

When I asked Buddy Cage why he wasn't going to be at the Hawk's Tribute he said.....'cause he wasn't asked.....He told me that he would give anything to play with Ronnie again because he owes Ronnie so much gratitude.......He's playing with The Brooklyn Cowboys these days......I was hoping to make the Philly gig next month but now that he won't be playing with Garth again....not so sure...........


Entered at Thu Sep 26 05:25:08 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: I meant Rosalind...not RoZ...sorry


Entered at Thu Sep 26 05:24:08 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rozalind

I meant to say how touched I was by your words about your brother. It obviously came from a very private place in your being and I for one was touched by it. Thank you for sharing your inner thoughts.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 05:21:54 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Civil War

"Confederates In The Attic" is one of the finest reads I have ever picked up. I heard about it through Jesse Winchester. The Civil War itself; however; for me is the saddest war of all. People within their own country going to war against each other. There are World Wars and wars of every kind; but The Civil War is unique. As a Canadian; when I travel the historic sites of the war, I pause to listen. If those fields and trees could talk! Can't imagine the terror and the bravery it must have taken during those times. When I get the cash I would like to buy the Ken Burns DVD collection which has just been remastered and as Pat says, is running on PBS once again.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 05:14:20 CEST 2002 from 1cust186.tnt1.conshohocken.pa.da.uu.net (67.242.8.186)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Valley Forge Tonight...Civil War Hallowed Ground Tomorrow

Subject: Viet Nam and Acadian Driftwood

Rosalind: my parents met because a mutual friend died next to my father at Chosin Reservoir in Korea. So I wouldn't be alive if Woody Hanks hadn't gone down in that frozen Hell during U.S. involvement the Korean War. I grew up thinking about that.

A couple of years ago I took a day off work to drive my parents into DC, where we visited spots they frequented there while dating in the early 1950s, including the site of a riverside Louis Armstrong concert. But I also took them to the Viet Nam and Korean War Memorials. I had been to both several times, but walking the length of the Viet Nam Wall with my father as he found names of friends he lost 35 years before was an indescribably moving experience.

I appreciate the tip from Pat on that Viet Nam book that connects "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" to Viet Nam, and I wonder if Robbie's later historic epic song (and The Band's great underappreciated masterpiece) "Acadian Driftwood" was also influenced by the ending of fighting in Viet Nam: "the war was over and the spirit was broken..."


Entered at Thu Sep 26 04:57:18 CEST 2002 from (206.14.153.88)

Posted by:

Joe

Location: Arcata, CA

Subject: Garth Hudson, David Nelson Band at Hempsplash

Great discussion about westerns. Here's another vote for "One Eyed Jacks" with Marlon Brando & Karl Mauldin. By the way, while reviewing the upcoming concerts list, I was surprised to see no mention of Garth Hudson & the Dharma Bums playing along with David Nelson Band et al at the 2nd Annual Harvest Celebration/NORML's 11th Annual Hempsplash Festival in Vienna, NY on 9/28/02. Who are the Dharma Bums?


Entered at Thu Sep 26 04:53:33 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Pat Brennan _ I didn't say I Imagined blood moaning from the ground. I said I Felt it. There's a real big difference.

I posted that all-too-true story about my brother to remind everyone of what War is. For younger people who were never touched in a personal way. To those who have only read stories and seen movies about Vietnam. That Feel-Like-I'm Fixin'-To-Die-Rag was true man! War is nothin' but death and loss...that's all there is and there ain't no more.

Come on mothers...thru out the land
Pack your boys off to Viet Nam
Come on fathers ...don't hesitate...send your sons off before it's too late
Be the first one on your block to have yer boy come home in a box...Alright!

Family reflections will stop now. I'm sorry. Forgot I was talking to strangers.

Mr Young _ Thank you. I enjoyed hearing about your dad.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 04:21:44 CEST 2002 from dialup-65.56.133.108.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (65.56.133.108)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Subject: Woah

Early in Reagan's administration, one of his boob-like cabinet officials named James Watt wanted to shut all the Civil War sites down save Gettysburg and Fort Sumter. He also thought the Beach Boys were too subversive to play at DC's 4th of July celebration. In other words, he was an idiot. Interesting how high idiots can rise in government. Anyway, he viewed these battlefields as extraneous and easily discarded. Luckily, he went the way of most of the Reagan administration and left the battlefields alone. Now, someone here thinks you can walk that ground and imagine the blood oozing there. All well and good. On the other hand, I'm sure those reenactors you castigate feel the same thing when they strap it on and reenact those battles. In fact, they have some pretty heavy, emotionally cathartic experiences doing what they do. Check out some reenactor sites and find out about them. They certainly don't think they are glorifying war, anymore than we as citizens glorify war by preserving and interpreting these battlefields. They've also raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to pretect these wonderful historic resources, and for that alone we should thank them.

Okay, something I rarely admit. I reenacted once. In 1996 I had a book published about a Civil War battle just outside Charleston SC. On the weekend I went there as part of a signing tour, they were reenacting the battle I wrote about. I was doing a signing at the reenactment site when some of the participants came up and asked me if I wanted to enlist. I turned them down about 20 times before I finally gave in. All I can say is that it was wild, and although I've never felt the need to do it again, I recall almost every moment of it with relish. And part of the experience was dealing with a real dose of terror when the Federals rolled over the walls of the fort we were defending.

Confederates in the Attic is a great work, and Horwitz has a new one just out or just about to come out. CitA very illuminating and entertaining. Since I'm lucky enough to know many of the people he writes about, I can say with a fair bit of certainty that he did a creditable job describing the "scene" and the participants. And I would also add that Rob Hodge, the star of the book, is an extremely intelligent, whole-souled guy who is a ton of fun to hang with. And, yeah, if you've read the book, that's really the way he is.

For a great analysis of TNTDODD and Vietnam, check out Jim Cullen's The Civil War in Popular Culture. Another good guy.

It's also kind of interesting with all this CW talk that Ken Burns' The Civil War is on PBS this week. A stong Band connection too, with the haunting Ashokan Farewell serving as the theme music.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 03:04:42 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Alan Edge: I wonder if that school jacket and tie had a direct affect on the Beatles deciding that they'd had enough of playing concerts, years later!!!


Entered at Thu Sep 26 02:41:21 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Oops - me again

Just tried the link below for Rick. Didn't seem to work so try this instead and root him out when you get there :-

http://www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=CCM03142


Entered at Thu Sep 26 02:35:51 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Tom McGuinness

Great story Pete lad. I take it you just tried to look cool with your T McG muzzy. I think I'll see if I can get that original McGuinness Flint lp on a cd. Always had a soft spot for that one with all the Galagher and Lyle stuff on it. Then I might even try to dig out Salty Dog too!!!! Or is that kicking the arse out of it Pete???


Entered at Thu Sep 26 02:27:56 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Rick Danko/ Gene Clark

Not sure if anyone else has posted this but thank goodness it seems you can get hold of the 'Rick Danko' cd with the addditional tracks at Collectors Choice Music - http://www.ccmusic.com/search.cfm?searchkey=DANKO%2C%20RICK&bounce=y&searchType=artist.

Also for any Gene Clark lovers, his 'No Other' cd is available at the same place - as is his 'White Light', 'Roadmaster' and - best of all IMHO - his 'Gypsy Angel' demos cd. Also you can get The Byrds 'Most Famous Hits' which contains no fewer than a dozen original Gene Clark songs performed when he was with 'Cry'.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 02:18:12 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Born on the Bayou

Sam. Just to make you even more envious. Saw The Beatles twice at the Liverpool empire. First time was on the Tommy Roe/Chris Montez tour. You couldn't hear a damned thing for the girls screaming so don't be too green. Second time was with the big 'O'. Again you couldn't hear a damned thing but I do remember George Harrison staring at me - I was in the second row - because - I think - I was wearing me school tie and blazer. Thank god I stopped short of wearing me school cap and carrying me satchel, otherwise he might have walked off the stage.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 01:50:50 CEST 2002 from tnt19a-93.chcg3.il.corecomm.net (208.40.47.93)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

It's funny that re-enactments has come up in discussion here -- I'm now reading a book called Confederates in the Attic, written by a guy named (I think, I don't have the book in front of me) Tony Horwitz. It's about re-enactors and others on the backroads of American culture, and I'd recommend it as a good read to anyone interested in the subject, or in how the American Civil War has affected us down through the years.

Favorite Western movie (among many): Unforgiven

Favorite Western book: Lonesome Dove. I was all set to enjoy the movie, having heard of the great cast, but I already had it in mind that Tommy Lee Jones was going to be Gus, and Robert Duval was going to be Call. When I found it was the reverse, I couldn't handle watching the movie. Very strange; now that I've gotten comfortable with the idea, maybe I should give it another chance.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 01:33:35 CEST 2002 from ool-18bc7fb9.dyn.optonline.net (24.188.127.185)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Al Edge = I enjoyed your memories of "Love Me Do". I always enjoy stories like that. Your the same age as my uncle who saw The Beatles in Boston in '66 - the lucky bastard.

Remember the strange movie "Westworld".

Dave the phone Guy = thanks - I thought it sounded like the fretless bass on BTF. The giveaway for me is the great stuff Rick plays on "Shape I'm In" during those little break parts. I know he used the fretless on the studio recordings.

Empty Now = I enjoy your posts as well. I'm curious though if you were full at one time, and are you glad to be empty now or are you hoping to be full again at some point :-)


Entered at Thu Sep 26 01:22:38 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

I'm going to say this because I might never get another time here when it fits in to the conversation.

My brother Gary joined the Marine Corps in 1969. He was sent to Parris Island, South Carolina for boot camp. He graduated Outstanding Man In His Platoon" on the 21st of December 1969 and was awarded that medal by Colonal Robert J. Parrich. My family and I traveled to Beufort to watch him graduate. He received his Dress Blues and portrait for free. He then went up to Camp Lejeune North Carolina for rifle range, My mother has his "Expert Rifleman" medal. He came home for six week and on April 1st 1970 he left us. He was shipped to Camp Pendleton in San Diego. The last time we got to speak to him he told us there would a box arriving UPS. Folks, The Band was inside that box. In the bottom, in a crate. I was introduced to The Band for the first time by my brother who I never seen again. He was a radioman. That's the first thing the enemy looks for so that no one can call in help. He was shot off a mountain while hunting a sniper in Da Nang in July of 1970. We still have his cap with a patch on it that says "Swift, Silent and Deadly"

Every one of those faceless names on that slab in DC has this kind of story behind it. I hope to God it never happens again.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 00:33:53 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Guns

Rosalind: I might add that I would never allow my kids, if I ever have any, to play with toy guns, or ever have the real thing in my house. Don't like them, think they cause even more danger in the house, and don't like them around me, except for collector's antiques.


Entered at Thu Sep 26 00:30:51 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Gene Roddenberry

Charlie, 6 feet away from me in my closet is a 16mm color/sound version of the original series episode Mudd's Women from Gene Roddenberry's personal collection, with his handwriting on it and all. I know this for a fact as I bought it in a charity auction back in '86 with him present. Also have me and him on audiotape discussing plans for the yet to be titled 'Next Generation'. Still sad to think he has been gone for 11 years now.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 23:41:50 CEST 2002 from 1cust118.tnt1.conshohocken.pa.da.uu.net (67.242.8.118)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Valley Forge One More Night

Subject: Typo Correction & Wars ("Civil" and Other)

I need to correct a typo from earlier today about STAR TREK creator Gene Roddenberry, who often modestly said that his famous creation was no more than "a wagon train to the stars," one that was specifically inspired by the TV western called WAGON TRAIN. Roddenberry actually produced a pre-STAR TREK drama called THE LIEUTENANT, about a group of Marines at Camp Pendleton, California, and I loved that program since my own father was stationed there at the time.

Rosalind: I am very sorry to hear that you lost a brother in Viet Nam. The noble thing about that war, though, was that it was for the most part fought--as the late Charles Kuralt noted in one of his books--not for oil or some other ulterior motive, but to defend the chance of a democratic government in Southeast Asia.

I always thought that "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" resonated the pain of Viet Nam (which was going on in full force when the song was written) and personally connected The Band song with that other war because of the line about "the winter of '65" because my father was a platoon leader around Da Nang then.

I'm sure that there are those who feel that "TNTDODD" romanticizes the American Civil War as some here have said about re-enactors. Some have said the same about the Ken Burns series and it is certainly true about GONE WITH THE WIND. The reality is that more people died from diaherra and other diseases in the Civil War than from gunshots. You don't see them re-enacting that--at least I hope not!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 23:37:48 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-081.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.81)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Uncivil wars

I've seen a US (and also an English civil war) re-enactment in Britain - at some sort of Steam Traction Engine Rally, I think. Quite bizarre. People running around shouting and firing cannon. The English Civil War involves more dressing up, though I never understood anyone wanting to play a roundhead (Cromwell's lot) when the cavaliers got all the fancy costumes, lace, horses and wigs. The local Dorset accents in the "US" re-enactment were quite entertainingly out-of-context.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 23:16:32 CEST 2002 from plantlogic.com (209.195.208.11)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: State of Delaware, USA

Subject: reenacters and military experience

Sometimes I have to do a reality check in here. I'm actually agreeing with JTull and booing Wigo. Strange times indeed.

Bob, why is it that the only way to understand something is to have done it? I'd wager that the annals of bad management are at least as full of those who could DO (or had done) but could not analyze, prioritize, or lead than of those who never had 'hands-on' in the particulars. It irks me that to many (but not all) vets, one can't have a valid view of anything remotely military or foriegn policy unless they've been in the service. To whit, my Senator, Joe Biden, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations committee gets slagged by his opponent, a stuffed-shirt restaraunt owner, because he (the opponent) has been in the military, and Biden has not. Wow, I really want to elect a simpleton who learned to shut up and follow orders without engaging his brain, and parrots his Party Line, over a guy who world leaders know by name and gets briefed by the NSC, and can take a stand for what's right.

Or for a less political analogy, under your rules only musicians can judge music, artists discuss art, mothers understand motherhood, designers appreciate design, etc.

While not a fan or participant of re-enacting, I think our Civil War has a potent mythology and significance that haunts us. Our only prolonged period of waging war on each other. Somewhere in there is the need to remember that, and to make damn sure it never happens again. The crucible of the Republic, and all that...


Entered at Wed Sep 25 23:00:42 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: JTull Fan

Point well taken.

But... I saw one of re-enactments once. The faces of the young people in the "audience" is what got to me. After the "show" they were running around, hiding behind trees and making blasting noices as they killed folks dead with their sweet little fingers. I knew it was an innocent game and that's they way kids are but, Gunshows and weapon fanatics are created by folks who fell in love with weapons or who were taught to "fire" back at an early age. I ought know, my dad was one of those gun fanatics. Gunshows, Turkeyshoots, White tail deer season. He would have killed someone if they had tried to take his gun. He kept it hangin' on the back of the cellar door...just in case.

Forgive me for talking about my family so much here..


Entered at Wed Sep 25 22:49:28 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Peter,

Sorry, the Civil War in my little area of the world. But I've seen tv shows of American Civil War reenactments in Britain and other European countries, which is a little bizarre to me, but perhaps no more so than some of the Renaisance Festivals over here.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 22:40:56 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-046.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.46)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Postscript

And of course none of us paid to get in!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 22:34:07 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-046.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.46)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Manfred Mann mainly

By Civil War re-enactments, do you mean Roundheads v Cavaliers, Confederates v Union, or Levon v Robbie?

Al- yes, Roger and I went to the same school, Bournemouth School, (as indeed did musician John Wetton, actor Christian Bale and ex-Liverpool footballer Jamie Redknapp, though the last two were many years later). Manfred Mann’s residency at the Disques A Go Go – where I saw The Who, and Rod Stewart and the Soul Agents - was around the same time as they had a weekly 20 minute Blues show on the old local Southern Television station at 11 pm, where Paul Jones did an academic lesson on the blues accompanied by the group. Bournemouth musicians of that era included Zoot Money, Andy Summers, Bob Fripp, Greg Lake, John Wetton and Al Stewart. While not up to Liverpool standards, it beats most towns of its comparative size.

Manfred Mann were the basis of my experience of pop stardom. In January 1967 they played the dance at Hull University. My friend, Jeff, had a brand new car – an MG 1100 saloon, smallish but groovy – in an era when 50 parking spaces were quite adequate for 3500 students. His dad was a car dealer in London. Five of us, all with long hair, set out for the gig at the Co-op Ballroom in Hull in Jeff’s car. Not a parking space to be found. Jeff, being a Londoner, had more nerve than a diffident self-effacing Southerner like me, and said, ‘We’ll park in the artistes car park. Five bands are playing. Five of us with long hair. They’ll assume we’re one of the bands.’ The man on the gate waved us through. The guy in the front passenger seat had a neat Manfred Mann beard, and I had a Tom McGuinness-style moustache (though I was much better-looking than him in those days). The gate man shouted something as we turned the corner – to see a crowd of teenyboppers and about ten policemen. The next moment girls were screaming and pounding on the car roof. Jeff got the car to the stage door through the crowd and policemen formed a barrier around the doors. ‘Give me the keys and run!’ said a policeman and we ran for the stage door. Fortunately, the guy on the door was from the Entertainments Committee and knew us. We were hustled in. Jeff waited for his car keys while the rest of us sidled into the ballroom and lost ourselves in the crowd. Good gig, too. I think Mike D’Abo had just taken over, which upset me at the time, being a Paul Jones fan, but he was good.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 21:59:01 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Rosalind

Keep in mind that Civil War reenactments usually are encampments demonstrating not only the reenactment of the actual battle, but also of the camps, camp life, musical demonstrations, food (or lack of) clothing, conditions, etc. Yes, the battle part is important, but it is not the whole thing. I agree with your reasons for not wanting to see battle footage, or 9/11, etc., but the Civil War reenactments are something different altogether. I would be much more concerned with much of what goes on at your local gunshow than people firing fake weapons nothing but black powder in them.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 21:46:04 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

I agree that those people's hearts are, for the most part in the right place. I don't agree with war re-inactments for the same reason I hate Vietnam war pictures or to watch the World Trade Center explosions and those folks jumping out of the top story windows 15 times a day. There's some kind of cheap thrill seeking in it. It's not Entertainment!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 21:33:05 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

Dave Z: Thanks for the info about Robbie's "Unbound" being on CSI. I have read that show is the hottest on Tv, but I have never seen it.

By the way, the Opening Ceremonies of the Winter Olympics which starred Robbie, Rita Coolidge, Sting, etc won six EMMY awards (more than any other show).


Entered at Wed Sep 25 20:57:32 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Military Experience and Reenactors

Bob: I think military experience is desirable in a President, but we have had a lot of great ones who had none or very little. Lincoln had extremely limited military experience from the Blackhawk War but turned out to be one of our greatest, most intelligent Commander-in-Chiefs. Grant, two administrations later, achieved the greatest military rank and success since George Washington but was a poor President with one of the most corrupt administrations in history. Eisenhower was, at best, mediocre. Jimmy Carter was...Jimmy Carter. I do not believe either Thomas Jefferson or John Adams served, but were great, if opposed to each other, Presidents. I know FDR was a Naval Secretary but forget if he ever served in the ranks. Most of our mediocre Presidents of the late 19th century were former Union Generals, ie. Hayes, etc. Zachary Taylor of course was a war hero, but did not last long enough to evaluate. Andrew Jackson was a military hero and a great President... On Reenactors: Although a few may glorify war, I believe most who are involved due so to preserve the memory of the soldiers who sacrificed themselves in the Civil War. They are active in preserving a way of life for those men (and the women who attended them as nurses, traveling wives, etc)their values, and hardships. They preserve these vivid images for people to see and appreciate today, and in doing so honor the memories of them. Many of their activities draw attention to preservation issues pertaining to our endangered battlefields and heritage, and their work has been invaluble in getting that message out. As a former Park Service worker I have had many wonderful (and yes, annoying sometimes) encounters with them, and say 'Bah!' to those who would simplify and categorize them as war glorifiers.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 20:36:05 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: bronson/marvin

pehr .bronson and lee marvin were enemies in a film set in alaska called death hunt.cant remember if they were brothers in it though.agree with a post a few scrolls back. levon would have been a natural in westerns. shame his film career kicked in when the genre was on its uppers.classic western roles for levon,now theres a thought.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 20:10:53 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: War

I recently took a trip with my mother and brother to ghost haunted Gettysburg. While walking thru that place I felt blood moaning from the ground. The place vibrates in some places. My mother and I also took a trip recently to the Viet Nam Memorial in DC where we looked my brother's name up on that big slab. I feel that war reenactments far past or not are bad for the soul of America. It cheapens life and we certainly do not need any more cheapening of life in this world.

Charlie Young _ Thank you Sir, for the link on The Rosslyn Mountain Boys. That old record I had was made in the 50's or early 60's tho. I could tell by the sound and the feel of the vinyl. I've heard of the Rossyln Mountain boys. They use to play them once in a while on radio station DC 101 and also a station out of Hagerstown, Md. back in the seventies. They were Good!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 19:34:34 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: "Civil" War Reenactments

I like westerns with Lee Marvin, Lee Van Cleef and Charles Bronson. Like the one where Marvin and Bronson were arch enemy brothers... what was that called.

"Once upon a time in the West" was a beatiful color western. High Noon my favorite B&W.

Charlie Young I dug your post and I'm with you. I'm not offended by Civil War re enactments...I just think its pathetic and retarded and boring. History is kept alive by not making the same mistakes over and over in a much better way. People here dont really know war so they equate it with power and glory and lie about their record as a matter of course.

And I totally see the relevance of ..., particularly right now.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 19:12:03 CEST 2002 from host62-7-137-67.webport.bt.net (62.7.137.67)

Posted by:

aL eDGE

Subject: eMPTY nOW

nEITHER mY fRIEnD. tHEY ARE pERFEcT AS tHEY STand


Entered at Wed Sep 25 19:10:56 CEST 2002 from plantlogic.com (209.195.208.11)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Web: My link

Subject: Band cover mp3, etc.

Caught a show last night at Wilmington's Grand Opera House by the Dark Star Orchestra. This is a seriously obsessed Dead tribute band that is damn near the real thing. They each take the "role" of a band member, and ususally they use an historic Dead set list as their set for the evening. (Last night was April 9, 1987, we we were "treated" to one of those boring Bret Mydland tunes...) Some of these guys go beyond sounding like their roles, but even look kinda like the part. Scary. But a great show, plenty of dancin' in the aisles. I've never seen the Grand so unruly. Makes me sorry I skipped the Feats there a few weeks back. The kicker was sitting right in front of the soundboard staring at set of empty RCA jacks with no rig...

Anyway, the DSO have tons of mp3s on their web site (above) including a Cripple Creek (into Deal) from March of this year. Go to the MP3 page and select "album1". It's about 10 down. Speaking of Dead downloads, I've lost the link to the authorized download site and see no link from Dead.Net. It was posted here sometime back; could someone do me the favor?

While cruising tag sales and second-hand stores recently it struck me how many truely strange LPs were released. If you think a lot of drek gets released on CDs these days, go browse some old record bins. Mood music LPs of pseudo-Polynesian or Calypso, bad orchestral covers of pop songs, every minor celeb doing the same lounge standards, soundtracks from obscure films and shows... Yikes! Nothing like finding a stash of LPs in beautiful condition, with absoluely nothing in it even remotely interesting!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 19:04:27 CEST 2002 from oshst-011.olysteel.com (63.91.50.11)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: Commander in Chief

JTull,

In my humble opinion it seems ludicrous that we can elect a Commander in Chief who has NO military experience. I believe it should be a prerequisite to nomination.

We've all worked for or with supervisors, managers, etc. that couldn't do the jobs or grasp the responsibilities of those they are managing. That situation rarely creates optimum effectiveness. The President's task as I see it is to be the ultimate "Systems Manager". If he doesn't have broad-based "Systems" experience he's going to come up short. By no means would he/she have had to have been in a General's chair. In fact, he ( and, subsequently, all of us ) might be better served having experienced the daily regimen of the grunt.

I realize there are lots of "peripherals" around this topic but I can't help but believe the country would be better served by someone with some notion as to how the military goes about its day to day business.

I have this image of some brass standing around in a conference room just after Dubya ( or any one of a host of past Presidents ) leaves the room. Eyes are rolling.

Nothing personal. Just one man's opinion.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 19:01:45 CEST 2002 from t4o942p34.telia.com (195.252.33.154)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: To Empty Now (about Algeria and Jane Birkin)

To Empty Now - I have enjoyed your posts and asking for your help. Unfortunately the current form of gb does not include the emailaddresses so I have to do it this way.
I wonder if you have any information on Jane Birkin's Algerian connections. She is singing with Algerian musicians - even in Algeria. I have missed her and her band with only one or two days in the previous two years. I am getting frustrated!

My link is my gb vCard. The emailaddress is woodlark.geo(Danish pastry)yahoo.com - Thanks.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 18:23:14 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.111)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Location: Sahara at the south of Oxford

Subject: Help! (mind games)

Al Edge: Me too, I find your posts much worthy. I rapidly realized you belong to the GB Who's Who. I'm acomplishing drastic efforts to make my posts more comprehensible. Help me: Is their present verbose aspect due to my south-Oxfordian spelling or to my pedant bibliographical references?


Entered at Wed Sep 25 18:06:41 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Civil War reenactments

Why would anyone be offended by Civil War reenactments? Although I would never participate in one, preferring a warm bed at the Hilton and restaurant meals, I fail to see why one would have to tsk tsk those who do. They provide a valuable service in keeping history alive and real, especially to schoolkids. I also don't see the relevancy of military service to eligibilty for serving as president.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 17:40:25 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: westerns

making up for the fact i didnt have time to write about westerns in my last post. fav westerns? every decade has its greats except perhaps the 80's when the genre was really struggling. here goes. 50's- fav western;the searchers.runner up,shane.60's fav western.the wild bunch.runner up;once upon a time in the west.70's fav western-pat garret and billy the kid(this happens to be my fav of all time)runner up;outlaw josey wales.80's(tough decade this)fav western. heavens gate(full version) runner up;silverado(any western with john cleese cant be all bad)90's fav western-unforgiven. runner up;geronimo. empty now, tombstone (really good) was directed by george pan cosmatos he of rambo 2 notoriety.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 16:44:42 CEST 2002 from 1cust120.tnt1.conshohocken.pa.da.uu.net (67.242.8.120)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Valley Forge, PA today

Subject: Westerns & Civil War Re-enactments

I'm late to the western movie thread, but it struck me that time is right for a remake of the archetypal flim of the genre, HIGH NOON. It would be the perfect vehicle for Levon and Robbie, though I'm not saying who I would cast as the Gary Cooper character. That climatic duel would be pretty damn intense, though.

I grew up on westerns on TV as a kid, including the one that helped inspired STAR TREK Gene Roddenberry, WAGON TRAIN. I also remember Ronald Reagan as host of DEATH VALLEY DAYS, a role he was much better suited for than that of US president.

Speaking of Reagan, last night's Bruce Hornsby concert here in the Philly area included an inspired absurdist momemt when Bruce had an old roadie friend come out and dance while wearing a Richard Nixon mask when Bruce dusted off his song, "Defenders of the Flag," an old anti-war song that Hornsby wrote and recorded back in the mid-1980s that is now suddenly relevant with Dubya's recent sword rattling against his father's old arch enemy in Iraq. Hornsby also performed his song inspired by the late Pulitzer Prize winner Lewis Puller's autobiographical book, FORTUNATE SON, about the struggle the legless Viet Nam vet went through before he ultimately commited suicide.

Did anyone catch the bizarre moment on "Letterman" last night when the program cut to a live Civil War re-enactment on 53rd street. It was weird and not the least bit funny to me (they even copped the LAST WALTZ intro to TNTDODD as they went to commercial. As a noted Civil War historian friend of mine once told me, he has never seen any real veterans who find re-enactment of battles something that is fun to do. Of course, Dubya and Cheney are not real veterans, either, just like those western stars were not real cowboys...


Entered at Wed Sep 25 16:18:56 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: It was that damn fly!

Okay...Empty Now just hit a chord! It was that damned fly. If that damned fly had landed where it was suppose to land, yeah, we would never have had all this agony and Levon and Robbie wouldn't be hating each other. If that damned fly had landed on Scorsese's face and crawled up his big honker of a nose, he would have had a terrible allergic reaction, it would have caused his asthma to sky-rocket, and they would have had to call the paramedics and resuscitate him in the ambulance. In the hospital, he would have re-thought his life because of his near-death experience and cancelled all his current and future moviemaking ventures and gone back to New York and become a priest. That damned fly! "Get that Fly!"


Entered at Wed Sep 25 15:54:07 CEST 2002 from dial-212-1-158-134.access.uk.tiscali.com (212.1.158.134)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Baddies and Goodies

Once upon a time in the west will always remain a culture shock for me because Henry Fonda was just SO evil in it. He never so much had five-o'clock shadow on his mush as the dark side of the moon painted matt black!!

Must admit Roger I still haven't got over the fact that as one of only about half a dozen Brits to post on here you and PV went to the same school!!

Re All la Glory - you weren't by any chance angling after me posting that lullaby post? Or is it simply you experiencing one of those defining fatherly moments that need assuaging with something warm and familiar such as Levon crooning a bit?? :-0)

Re the Manfreds - saw them a while back at The Phil - Two singers - Mike D'Abo AND Paul Jones. Good night too. Chris Farlowe was there as well. Somehow Paul Jones looks younger than he did in'63 - could be his acne clearing up I suppose. Mike D'Abo doesn't.

Empty Now - I love your posts even if I don't think I entirely understand about half of some of the points you may or may not be making but rest assured I'm getting there slowly but unsurely and never fail not to rest further assured the pleasure is all ours in the partaking so keep 'em coming me old fruit!!! :-0)


Entered at Wed Sep 25 15:17:14 CEST 2002 from 56k-socal-01-40.dial.qnet.com (209.221.198.103)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

Subject: bass equipment

Charlie H. ,,,,,in the 70's 80's and 90's Rick Danko played through an Ampeg SVT amplifier.He had a 2-15 speaker enclosure.There was some discussion here awhile back about custom built amp rigs he used in the early days that were built by a friend or associate of The Hawks.

Bayou Sam ,,,,Danko used his black Ampeg fretless bass on the BTF tour.It was sure fun to watch him "slip-slidin'" on that bass.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 14:59:42 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.103)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: The Beatles: Mea Culpa - Addendum

Thanks Roger Woods for your instructive comment
The Beatles: This GB is a perfect model of democracy. I really believe it. Hope it remains like tha


Entered at Wed Sep 25 14:28:04 CEST 2002 from bread.mcc.wwwcache.ja.net (194.82.103.136)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Moseley, Birmingham UK

Subject: Empty Now - The Deguello

Empty Now - Dmitri Tiomkin didn't write the Deguello. Certainly it features in Rio Bravo, and in The Alamo (much better trumpet) both of which were orchestrated by the wonderful Dmitri Tiompkin, but it's an old Mexican (originally Spanish?) military tune signifying no quarter to an enemy.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 14:15:12 CEST 2002 from bread.mcc.wwwcache.ja.net (194.82.103.136)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Moseley, Birmingham UK

Subject: Westerns and the Beatles

Interesting lists of Westerns. While some of my greats are up there (including John Wayne's masterpieces - The Searchers and Liberty Valence) I don't think we've seen mention of Culpepper Cattle Company or Ride the High Country, both little gems. The greatest for me is the Sergio Leone master piece "Once Upon A Time In The West". This didn't star Clint, Peter. The best spaghetti westerns were made after he'd gone to Hollywood. Claudia Cardinale of Blonde on Blonde fame played a lead.

"Way of the Gun" is a terrific modern western.

Al Edge - I remember January 1963 in a similar way to your November '62. I was a 200 miles south of the cavern in Bournemouth. Our cellar club was the Disque a Go Go at which Manfred Mann had an early residency in '63.

I drove back to Birmingham late night after depositing our daughter at University. I listened to Stagefright for the first time for ages. All La Glory is up there in my top 5 all time Band tracks again.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 13:56:04 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Whotles

Attention Peter Viney:

According to Peter Howell in the Toronto Star today...Pete and Roger and Paul and Ringo should get together and form the Whotles. Paul and Ringo could you use a guitarist and another lead singer and The Who could use a bass player....harmony singer and drummer :-). Well it was fun to read.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 13:48:00 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.103)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: The Beatles: Mea Culpa / Westerns forever

Thanks for all the reactions to my post about the Beatles
I was really conscious of the risk i was exposed to by submitting such a dogma to reflexion. Honestly i wished opposite views to moderate a volunteer exageration i used. Anyway, I consider the opinion of the Gbers more reliable than the non-specialized public one, cause my own perception of the band had drastically evolved from the beginning until present days. The leading idea can be summarized as: To disagree partially with my last post is natural and can be useful to correct the possible bugs. To disagree completely means you believe that the Beatles are objectively and definitively the best of all. It could be trivial to pick up a classic debate.

I searched hard my favorite western, i cant mention one. Many are splendid, none is boring. The more recents i enjoyed : Tombstone (directed by?) and Dead Man (Jim Jarmusch) I have all the film in mind : I’m William Blake and here is my poetry !!!
Question to Rosalind who mentionned ‘Once upon a time in the West’ : does the fly played in another movie?
Cause we are in a Hawks site, remember the fantastic trumpet you heard in Howard Hawks ‘Rio Bravo’: the title of the tune: ‘De Guello’, composed by : Dimitri Tiomkin


Entered at Wed Sep 25 13:33:25 CEST 2002 from stjhts19c117.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.253.122)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Westerns

Most of the best ones have already been mentioned, ie: The Wild Bunch. I'll cast a vote for The Long Riders. Great soundtrack as well, Ry Cooder. Did anybody mention Unforgiven or Pale Rider?


Entered at Wed Sep 25 13:27:59 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69095.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.187.206)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Waterboys / Modern "Western"

Richie: I also really like "A Pagan Place" by The Waterboys.....especially "The Thrill Is Gone" (Scott influenced by B.B. King?...but completely different song) and "Somebody Might Wave Back"....but I still usually choose to play "This Is The Sea"......I knew when The Waterboys recorded "Dream Harder".....something was very wrong.......Finally my older brother and I have similar musical taste.....He never liked The Band or Dylan but really likes The Waterboys like myself.....He did however like Van when he was in Them....

Fave modern "Western"...."Desperado" directed by Robert Rodriguez....."In a poetically violent style reminiscent of John Woo and Sam Peckinpah.....Soo many surprises.....as only Rodriguez can deliver.......Antonio Banderas, Salma Hayek......


Entered at Wed Sep 25 13:01:03 CEST 2002 from 85-pool1.ras15.ilchi-e.alerondial.net (206.148.92.85)

Posted by:

Jon

Location: Missouri

Subject: Mike D.-Autumn

Have to agree with your comment about the fall. The corn down here in Missouri looks real bad, all the dry weather really did a lot of it in. Not much leaf color yet; I don't expect much in leaf color, it's been too dry, probably be lots of browns, not much red and orange. But the Band's music does fit in well, especially out camping this time of the year. A campfire, beer, and King Harvest in the background. Thats what I call living the good life.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 12:40:10 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool34-219.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.34.219)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Durango

Speaking of Pekinpah's Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, I remember a John Stewart song (Durango) where he said "I never saw old Pekinpah/I guess he forgot to call/I can understand using Rita's man(?)/He'll be the best Billy Kid of them all." So I always thought JS must have wanted to play a part in that movie. He was (probably still is) a good looking guy--I wonder if he could act.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 12:26:44 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool34-219.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.34.219)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: The Jack Bull

The best Western I have seen recently is The Jack Bull which was written by John Cusack's father and stars John Cusack. He plays a horse breeder who stands his ground against a bad guy and loses everything in the process. Except his integrity. He does a good job and he looks really good in the clothes.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 12:01:25 CEST 2002 from dial-212-1-135-103.access.uk.tiscali.com (212.1.135.103)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

How's a fella meant to keep pace with all this? You go AWOL for a few days and next thing you know you've got to read War and friggin Peace.

Westerns?

Not sure which critically are the best but my own favourite by a street is 'The magnificent Seven' - it's a kids thing and I'm still a kid I guess. A few underrated ones - Geronimo, Jeremiah Johnston, Nevada Smith.

Beatles?

I presume Empty Now was pulling our collective leg.

Basically without the ground being broken by The Beatles we probably wouldn't be discussing music on this website.

Funnily enough I've just thought of an analogy between this and the whole western genre.

There are those - myself amongst them - who for whatever reason have never really taken to John Wayne. Yet I was reading something a year or so ago written by some Westerns expert who said that without John Wayne's characterisation of the archetypal Cowboy in 'Red River' back in the thirties, the generic Movie and TV cowboy character we all know and love might never have evolved.

Certainly, the same is true with popular music and The Beatles. As a small cameo illustration of the impact they had worldwide then simply take a look at photos on this website of Levon and The Hawks taken prior to them being exposed to the cultural sway of John, Paul, George and Ringo.

It's kind of hard to absorb the reality of history in retrospect but one thing none of us should ever do - and I'm as guilty as anyone - is to draw bland conclusions from a relatively tiny modicum of the actual facts.

To infer for even a milli second that The Beatles weren't pivotal to the development of popular music or stretched its boundaries and widened its impact is to deny its very essence. If you doubt me then ask the Rolling Stones why they were so desperate to cover I Wanna Be Your Man back in '64. As ever The Beatles had led the way and though in hindsight I wanna be Your Man might now seem quite tame, at the time 'The Stones' were in awe and viewed it as cutting edge. That historical reality thing again. Life from its actual perspective before the knowledge has been accumulated.

Bayou Sam. If I can but try to capture a flavour of what it was like.

It was 1962. Late October. North Liverpool. I was 12. We were clustered around the bonfire we'd been collecting for the previous few months. I overheard some of the older lads talking heatedly of which side of this new record by some local "group" they used to watch in this club down town was the better. They were split pretty evenly into two camps but all were boasting that by buying it on the day it came out they had helped get this record into the hit parade. As it was a Thursday I dashed home to look at the Hit Parade in the Daily Mirror newspaper. At number 17 was the group they'd been talking about. 'Love Me Do' had entered straight into the hit parade at that position. I was astounded. Captivated and enchanted from that moment. I can still feel that tingling of identification even now. Shaking with excitement I bounded back to the bommy to hear more words from the insiders - The Beatles Cavern 'mates' such as Ray Lewis and Wally Breslin.

My favourite ever musical moment.

Neither Liverpool nor the world were ever the same again. Whether for the better or worse, who can honestly say but everything changed seismically after that.

In modern history there can never have been a more defining moment culturally. If only for the fact that The Beatles went on to make America sit up and take cogniscence of its musical uniqueness then those four lads who shook the world look up to absolutely nobody.

Sorry if I've come on a wee bit too strong Empty Now, but we Scousers tend to pull for one another a tadge more than most. Prickly bastards we can be. :-0)


Entered at Wed Sep 25 10:17:00 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: music and westerns

roz and peter. thanks for your response.i wish i had the same gift for answering film trivia as predicting lottery numbers. now that would be something.brown eyed girl. i agree with you entirely. later waterboys hasnt quite got the same magic as the incarnation before mike split the band. then again the new version is to all intents and purposes a mike scott solo affair. its still worthwhile though. the last album rock in a weary land was mst enjoyable. i saw them live last year supporting neil young. brilliant. susan. the first 2 remastered albums, waterboys and pagan place ,i think thats all thats out yet have half a dozen bonus tracks. so i would get them. sleeve notes, nice but not extensive. sound quality. superb.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 10:13:13 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

That would be "interesting." I didn't say I was completely awake :-)


Entered at Wed Sep 25 10:12:05 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

See what happens when I get insomnia. Dreamland released in 96. Thanks BWNWITennessee for the info. Very interestling listen.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 10:02:33 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Hard Day's Night

Just a few weeks to go until The Beatles "Hard Day's Night" finally comes to DVD. I see there are lots of great special features and it remains one of my favorite music films of all times. Also of special note in December, "The Producers" with Zero Mostel & Gene Wilder at his absolute best...... FINALLY gets it's special DVD release.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 09:57:58 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: Robert Randolph & Family Band

TO HANK FROM CORK:

Hank as a guitarist I just wanted to make you aware that Robert Randolph and his Family Band are on their way to Dublin (With The Blind Boys) and Cork to the Jazz Festival. I put a link to the tour. He is one of the greatest pedal steel guitarists I have ever heard. He is currently heard on the new Blind Boys of Alabama CD as well as joining John Medeski on the incredible CD "The Word." Check him out if you have the time. He'll blow you away. He's taken the steel guitar to heights in this era as Pete Drake did in his times almost 50 years ago.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 07:04:01 CEST 2002 from 1cust98.tnt1.conshohocken.pa.da.uu.net (67.242.8.98)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: On the Road Again After Another Hornsby Gig
Web: My link

Subject: Spelling Correction--and Another Connection to The Band

I found out that the DC-based, pre-Burrito Brothers "cosmic country rock" band was spelled with a double "s" after the DC suburb in Virginia just across the river from Georgetown (Lowell George died in the Key Bridge Marriott in Rosslyn). Anyway, the Rosslyn Mountain Boys actually had a direct link to The Band because their steel player, Tommy Hannum, worked with Emmylou Harris (click the link above for more about that band). Small world, huh?


Entered at Wed Sep 25 05:40:55 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

The new CSI soundtrack has Robbie's Unbound on it... The episode it appears in is also one of the better ones... a dark tale of supermodel math...

Does Centennial count as a western?... I always liked that miniseries... and since there's movies buffs out there... do any of you remember a Disney movie... something like... Secret of Barons Castle... might have been a Hardy Boys movie... I liked it as a kid but never was able to track it down... so maybe it's just my imagination... a good train scene I think...


Entered at Wed Sep 25 04:50:27 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Bob Wigo = I haven't heard Jeff Beck's take on "A Day In The Life", but I'd sure like to. Do you know what year he did it, or what album it's on? I'm going to finally pick up Becks Guitar Shop too.

--other bands certainly took stadium shows to amazing heights - but when The Beatles played Shea Stadium, it was something that was unheard of in rock music.

I'm sure the experts out there will correct me, or add to the list, but I beleive the Beatles did a lot of rock "firsts" =

printing the lyrics to all the songs on the album cover (Sgt. Pepper).

feedback on a recording (I Fell Fine). I always thought that there MUST have been someone who did it before. But I always loved how John "claimed" that first for the Beatles.

shortening the silence between songs (Pepper again) - not a huge musical milestone, but still.

demamding, as of '67, that they're records be released with the same song selection everywhere in the world.

they broke the rules for the length of a 45 with "Hey Jude".

long hair.

they completely changed the buisness of the recording studio - from the hours of the day you worked, to what you could do on tape. That alone is one of the things that make them the greatest.

They wanted to speak out in the early days about things like Vietnam, but Epstein wouldn't let them

I'm a little young (42) to appreciate The Beatles real initial impact. I've often wondered what it was like to go through having them right in your face for the early 60's, then to have them sort of fade - then Sgt. Pepper. It must have been amazing......I remember two storys - one was told by Phil Lesh where he talked about the Dead listening to Revolver, and when the album ended with "Tomorrow Never Knows" they were just stunned. It was something that they'd never heard before..........Also, Maryanne Faithful told a story about a party in "68 with a lot of musicians. This was a time where the flower power stuff was still flowing, and people at the time wondered what the Beatles could possibly do next. McCartney came into the party excited to play an acetate that he had with him. It was "Hey Jude" and the question was answered.

The Beatles greatness is not only the music - but the whole package. But the music is the backbone. You can't find a more diverse album than the White Album, can you? The Stones are a great Guitar, bass, drums, piano, foor-on-the-floor- rock band that nobody is on par with, but they could never pull off "White", or "Abbey Road". That's not a slam on the Stones BTW.

Also BTW - when the Beatles stopped touring they had been playing live for many years. They felt like they were getting sloppy as musicians - and stale, just going out a flying through a set that nobody could hear. They wanted to grow......Paul had no problem touring with the best of them just a few years after the split.

Wow, this post is long already. Get me started on the Beatles though.........................

Let me end on a Band note....ummm......I was listening to "Before The Flood" today - which is some of my very favorite live Band stuff, and I was wondering if Rick was using his fretless bass on that tour at all. Would any of you cats know?


Entered at Wed Sep 25 04:48:17 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.215.112.91.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (63.215.112.91)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

The Stones are better than the Beatles (what happened to that apples and oranges thing?) because they "invented" the necessarily evil stadium shows and they're still at it? Having seen enough of those stadium shows in the late 60's and early 70's--including the Stones--, I can assure you they all sounded like shit and had next to nothing to do with music. Luckily, Chicago had venues like The Kinetic Playground, the Auditorium, and the Civic Opera House where music came first.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 04:42:40 CEST 2002 from spider-te021.proxy.aol.com (152.163.195.181)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

If the Band's sensibility had been a Western Movie: Altman's masterpiece "McCabe And Mrs. Miller", of course, though Lenard Cohen got to do the music. This great film, btw, is just out on low priced DVD.

"The Wild Bunch" is a towering masterpiece, pretty much dwarfing SP other decent films.

You might have mentioned that just like "Last Man Standing"; the first Eastwood Westerns were drawn from much better Kurosowa films, who of course was himself influence by Ford.

Was "Seven Samurai" a Western? Maybe, but of course the Duke saw "The Conqueror" in which he played Genghis Kahn as a western too.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 03:52:18 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-113-165.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.113.165)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Have you heard the new Tom Petty song, "The Last DJ"? I wonder if any DJs get pissed having to play it. The first time I heard it, the DJ said "Ouch" at the end. It's not that great of a song, but he's got some nerve to release it as the first single. I like the line about the boys upstairs try to see how much you'll pay for what you used to get for free.

I've been driving myself crazy trying to remember some singer who was popular about five years ago. He was a Latin, somewhat eclectic singer-songwriter who got a lot of airplay on adult alternative stations. He played in Pittsburgh all the time for a year or two, then dropped off the face of the earth. But I saw him several times, unintentionally, because he was opening up for people. WYEP always played him, and I think he opened for Los Lobos at Metropol, or Joe Ely, so some of you in the Pitts' should remember. But he played there like five times in one year. Anyway, the song I remember was something about "It's money that makes the monkey dance." This was around '96. What was his name? It was kind of a strange name, I think it started with a P.

And speaking of vanishing spells, who remembers Madeleine Peyroux? She was kind of a proto Norah Jones; she sounded a lot like Billie Holiday. She had one release around '98 called "Dreamland," I think. She was huge with the yuppie set. She even covered a Patsy Cline song, similiar to Norah's Hank cover. But I remember trying to see her at some mid-sized club, and that mother sold out in about five minutes. She was never as big as Norah Jones, but was getting close to Diana Krall size. Anyway, it turns out that she had some vocal problems, polyps and nodes (my favorite breakfast cereal), and had surgery at Vanderbuilt Medical Center in Nashville. She was playing at a little blues club down here on a regular basis a few years ago, trying to get her voice back into shape. I went to see her once, and she was playing solo, accompanying herself on guitar (very well, I might add). The place was mostly empty, I think I was the only person that came to listen to her. The rest were rednecks playing pool and probably getting pissed off that she was bothering them. I know it's the same singer, because there was an article in the paper about her. But I haven't seen anything about her for a year or so, so I don't know what she's doing now. Hopefully she's got a deal, or is trying to reestablish her career. Now would be a great time for her to come back, what with Norah and Diana's popularity. I think there's a chance for female psuedo jazz singers to be the next big thing for about 15 minutes, like Latin music was two years ago, and swing two years before that. But most people would probably think she was a Norah Jones imitator, even though she was around first.

Speaking of Norah Jones, Mandy Barnett, Nashville's best vocalist, is recording a new CD with Arik Marden, the guy who produced Jones. Apparently it's going to be a little big-bandish and torchy, so hopefully she'll have some luck with that. The rumor I've heard is that Mandy's not very consistent in her career goals; that she goes from wanting to sing country, to torch songs, to pop, every other week. But hopefully, keep your fingers crossed, the new CD might include a couple of really cool new songs that should thrill fans of classic country songwriters.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 03:30:26 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71422.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.196.247)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: mike scott and waterboys

richie: I'm smiling as I'm sharing some information and thoughts about Waterboys and World Party....Thank you!......Mike Scott and gang didn't play at TLW so.....He's rarely mentioned here......Anyway, I do have Mike Scott's "Bring'em All In" but I was really disappointed....The only song that consistently stands out for me is "She Is So Beautiful".....acoustic recording.......Although he is referred to as "Soulful like Van Morrison, rambling like Dylan"....The Scottish singer/guitarist/pianist lost his edge when the original Waterboys split up (Band was named for a lyric off Louuuu Reed's "Berlin" recording.....Could it be ...."And then the Welshman from India".....-"The Kids")....especially when Karl Wallinger left....Fave recording without a doubt...."This Is The Sea".....

It's interesting to note that he thanks Dylan on "Fisherman's Blues".....as well as many, many others.....but doesn't thank Van.....and he covers Van's "Sweet Thing".....This was the song which I remember the most when I saw them in Toronto in the eighties.......Mike Scott reminds me of Ian McCulloch of Echo and The Bunnymen.....They were great.....intelligent, eerie, mysterious, edgy......but when Ian tried to go solo briefly......Some artists need the group to create tension for their art......I did manage to see this group at the El Mocombo in Toronto and in Kitchener (Octoberfest land).......For those of us who were into punk/"new wave".....our generation........finally...We had our own writers........

"We're setting sail
To the place on the map
from which no one has ever returned
Drawn by the promise of the joker and the fool
And by the light of the crosses that burn
Drawn by the promise of the women and the lace
And the gold and the cotton and pearls
It's the place where they keep
all the darkness you need
You sail away from the light of the world
On this trip baby

You will pay tomorrow
You gonna pay tomorrow, yeh,
You will pay tomorrow

.........
Avarice and greed
are going to drive you over the endless sea".........
Ship Of Fools....Karl Wallinger (World Party)


Entered at Wed Sep 25 03:19:06 CEST 2002 from 66-7-242-114.cust.telepacific.net (66.7.242.114)

Posted by:

Charlie Hawker

Location: San Francisco

Subject: Rick Danko's Bass Setup

Hi Everyone! Can someone please tell me what kind of amplifiers Rick Danko used. If he used different amps at different times and you know them I'd be glad to know them all but I'm most interested in the early recordings. Thanks a lot.


Entered at Wed Sep 25 02:13:22 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Like lightening out of the heavens...

" The Shadow of Chikara" aka "Wishbone Cutter" aka "The Ballad of Virgil Cane" Sometimes I forget the internet is for other things besides the GB...


Entered at Wed Sep 25 02:13:29 CEST 2002 from bob33.revealed.net (208.16.227.36)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: The Band, music for the autumn season?

Fall is coming again. Being in Iowa, it's already started. Leaves changing colors, cooler temperatures and mellow sunrises and sunsets. Though I can listen to The Band all year-round, it seems to fit best in the fall. I don't know why, but Rock Of Ages and The Brown Album get plenty of rotation each fall. Does this make any sense? The Band's music just reminds me of fall, harvest time and all that good stuff. Ok, besides "King Harvest"! Enough ranting for now

Mike


Entered at Wed Sep 25 02:02:12 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tint Monster

Location: Wild-Wild-West
Web: My link

Subject: "Westerns"

OK, now to steer this mother back into a music forum, I put out there the quintessential "Western-Comedy-Musical-Romance-Documentary".......PAINT YOUR WAGON !!!

I am surprised you haven't mentioned this one yet Peter. To my knowledge the only time Clint Eastwood ever opened his mouth with the intention of singing. Even though the result was wide of the mark he was able to slip into the comedy slot.....

"I talk to the treeeesss......."

Whooeww...



Entered at Wed Sep 25 01:42:40 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-001masprip0280.dialsprint.net (63.186.65.26)

Posted by:

G-Man

Subject: Westerns

Hey Bash,,,"Wild Bunch",,has to be best western goin!! Speakin of the Wild Bunch,,why don't ya hit the trail to the Pattenburh House this fri. for the JWB show! Now that's a pretty WILD BUNCH!! NO EXCUSE,,like I have to WORK!!!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 01:29:59 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Down in that old box canyon...where only misfits can go...

Robbie lent "Dixie" to a director back in the early eighties who made a film starring Joe Don Baker, Sandra Locke and Ted Neeley. It had a real bad civil war scene at the very beginning in which "Dixie"was used as the soundtrack....I remember thinking "My God Why Did He Let Them Use That Song?" The subject matter was undoubtedly very tempting to Robbie since it happened to be about an American Indian legend. Baker played a civil hero who had heard from a dying soldier that diamonds had been dropped down the top of a mountain. But there was a catch, Everyone who had ever tried to reach the treasure had mysteriously disappeared. He came home and gathered up two guys. A young guy and an indian who knew the score but ignored it anyway. On the way up the mountain they met a helpless woman, Sandra Locke, who seduced each one of these guys, drew them away into a private situation, and then turned into a vulture and ripped them apart. Does anyone remember the name of the film? I have forgotten.

Peckinpah was fond of throwing knives into doors... Kind of like the way Scorsese is fond of ripping phones out of the wall.

Support Your Local Sheriff had the funniest Bruce Dern I ever seen!


Entered at Wed Sep 25 00:47:18 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: Stoned

Bob Wigo, I was waiting to hear your impression of the Stones theater show. I'm very jealous!

I love the Beatles, and I completely understand why they are usually tabbed the Best Rock Band ever. However, there is something to be said for longevity, and something to be said for great live performance. The Beatles "retired" in what, 1966? They never graduated from the 30-minute-can't-hear-them-over-the-screaming-teenyboppers shows. The Stones (along with Dylan and the Hawks) were pioneers in graduating the rock show to the full-blown, two-hour, full-volume arena spectacle that still exists to this day. The Stones also virtually invented the Stadium Show, which is admittedly not one of my personal favourites. It was nonetheless a necessary evil when a band becomes as large as the Stones and has hundreds of thousands of fans that want to see them "live". I just don't think the Stones get enough credit for being the undisputed Kings Of The Live Show. Bob Wigo can attest. These guys are 60 years old now, and will still kick you in the shorts every time!

The Beatles vs The Stones debate has raged for damn-near 40 years. It's trite. The Beatles almost always get the nod, too. Well, here's one large vote for The Rolling Stones. They had to persevere for 30+ years while the Beatles rested on their considerable laurels. They satiated the greedy hordes with high-energy sets, and the Beatles shut it down because they admitted they couldn't translate their "studio magic" in a live setting.

LONG LIVE THE ROLLING STONES, STILL THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND IN THE WORLD


Entered at Wed Sep 25 00:20:52 CEST 2002 from pc-gr-acad113.nmsu.edu (128.123.23.227)

Posted by:

EMILY BENALLY

Location: The (4) corners of the southwest at EMail verna_ben@yahoo.com

Subject: The Band should play again in Casinos

I love the band,
I really wish The Band should still play in these Indians casino.

I love the sound of the band music.

I have played the cd for people and friends they like the beat of the music enough to dance to it.

I am truly sorry to say I miss Rick Danko. I play his music (Times Like These) every night

I also am sorry I cannot talk to Robbie, doesn't he know that when you are skins you are family?/n


Entered at Tue Sep 24 23:59:09 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-115-154.twcny.rr.com (66.67.115.154)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: still westerns

Oops, almost forgot one of my favorite westerns, and one with many Band connections-Pekinpah's Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. If Levon had started his acting career a few years earlier he would have been a natural pick for one of the motely outlaws or lawmen in this movie.Same subject matter-Gore Vidal wrote a Billy The Kid TV movie about 10 years agostarring Val Kilmer, which actually closely followed the facts.Do Civil War movies count as westerns? Pekinpah made a movie called Major Dundee, which meets the definition of flawed masterpiece. Star Charlton Heston backed his eccentric director's vision against the studio's interference, a director's cut of this movie would be appreciated but the reels were destroyed. How aboutmodern westerns? The Misfits,legendery as the last movie of three troubled stars-Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, and Montgomery Clift, directed by the equally troubled John Huston and written by Arthur Miller(once married to Monroe), qualifies as a modern western. So does Lonely Are the Brave, Kirk Douglas' favorite of hisown movies. Those two were both made in the 50's. Examples of truly modern,or contemporary may be a better word,are Tender Mercies, directed by star Robert Duvall,who also wrote and performed much of the soundtrack, is a modern western worth seeking out. AndJohn Sayles, who has many fans in the guestbook, made Lone Star, which except for one brief scene(the one with Frances McDormand)is a perfect movie.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 22:54:19 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-115-154.twcny.rr.com (66.67.115.154)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: Cowboys & Indians

The three greatest westerns-Shane, Tne Man Who Shot Liberty Valence, and Lonesome Dove(the sequel-Streets of Laredo isn't too shabby, either)- though very different, all share the same theme-the last days of the gunfighter and the open plains.Shane was made on location in Montana,much of the action takes place in a muddy little hovel of a settlement they built in the shadow of the Grand Tetons.It would be a nearly perfect movie if they had chosen a male and female lead who had some chemistry. Valence was made mostly on a Hollywood soundstage and lacks the gritty realism of Shane, but is very nearly a perfect movie, definitely a perfect western.The old duke is rightfully maligned by many for his politics, and he made spme crappy movies, many westerns among them, but he made some truly great ones too, such as The Searchers, True Grit, and The Shootist.That last one is a very interesting piece. Wayne plays an old ex-gunfighter racked with cancer circa turn of the century with a very short time to live. It was his last movie, made while he was literally dying of cancer.It also teams him with his old Valence co-star James Stuart. High Noon, The Long Riders, several of Eastwood's oaters, The Ox-Bow Incident,Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid,The Wild Bunch, Dances With Wolves, Unforgiven are popular and worthy of it. But search out the following titles, some great, some flawed, but all lesser known westerns which any lover of the genre would appreciate:The Hired Hand(Peter Fonda, Warren Oates), The Last Sunset(Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas), Bad Company and Wild Bill(Jeff Bridges),The Grey Fox,Chino(Charles Bronson), Bite The Bullet, Hombre(Paul Newman),One Eyed Jacks(Brando's only directorial effort, after he wrested contol from Stanley Kubrick), Two Rode Together, Rio Conchos,Elvis even made a couple real good westerns early in his acting career, believe it or not, titled Love Me Tender and Flaming Star. All of these fine westerns, in my opinion,and are readily available on video.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 22:53:11 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-048.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.48)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Westerns (cont)

According to the BFI book, there was an attempt by Hollywood to produce Westerns in Australian settings, their key offering being "The Kangaroo Kid"- I think most of us could have said, 'Not really a good title or idea".

The best spaghetti Westerns did have Clint Eastwood, which made them look pretty Western. The Mexicans had the right to make them too (and did). Myself I'm fond of the jokey Western - Cat Ballou, Support Your Local Sheriff and The Life & Times of Judge Roy Bean spring to mind.

I'm going to seek a video of 'Ballad of Cable Hogue' even though Peckinpah is in my bad books. I saw a copy of "Peckinpah's only war film" 'Cross or Iron' on offer (very cheap) and have to say it's about the worst war film I've ever seen.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 21:32:19 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Way-Out-West
Web: My link

Subject: " ? Western"

Of course you're right W S Walcott,the trivia is welcome and probably not far from the main focus on some level. It's just my transparent attempt to deflect my inadequacy that made me say it...or did you know that?

Now Mr.Viney, I totally see your point and I suppose I would have to agree with you. The,"Western",is a genre not necessarily a location. I must, however, point out that here in the "West" as it were, films produced "overseas" were given culinary prefixes identifying the continent of origin. The "Spaghetti Western" being the most notable. In this vein I think Ned Kelly should perhaps be labeled a "Vegemite Western" ? A "Kangaroo Western" ? NO, NO, a "Wallaby Western" yea, that's it

Now the obvious advantage to the "Vegamite Wester" theme would be that you can tie it into the "food" vein that seems to pevade so many topics here on the GB. It goes right to the heart of Rosalinds chuckle about "Down Under" and "Peanut Butter-n-Banana" hijinks...NO ?



Entered at Tue Sep 24 21:29:06 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.209.88.85.dial1.losangeles1.level3.net (63.209.88.85)

Posted by:

JQ

Location: San Clemente

Subject: Beck

David Powell - Beck is actually the guy with no last name. Anyway he's got a brand new record out which is quite good to my taste. Ballads & some very interseting arrangments. It's called Sea Change.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 21:15:47 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

Although I agree with David Powell that some of these record companies should take an "if it's not broke don't fix it" attitude with remixing, I have to admit it that in Elvis' case I enjoy hearing the brighter sound. My old Elvis records sound terrible, for he sounds like he is singing in another room from where the mike is located. The new Elvis #1s cd gets me closer to his voice, and, by the way, it is his voice and band playing (just remixed).


Entered at Tue Sep 24 21:12:50 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Garth

DAVE THE PHONE GUY. I just went over the note I received from Maud and sorry to get you excited.......I screwed up. He was supposed to be in the Bay area with Marley's Ghost on the 4th & 5th; but cancelled due to Ronnie Hawkins concert on the 4th. Sorry about that Dave. I'm sure he will be back soon. It's just great to see Garth out there performing again........anywhere we can get him.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 20:35:33 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: State Songs

I vote for TNTDODD as state song of VA.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 20:34:56 CEST 2002 from 56k-socal-03-18.dial.qnet.com (209.221.198.177)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

Subject: Garth in the bay area?

John D. ,,,,,can you give us any details on Garth Hudson's gig in San Fransisco? (date,times,venue,group or solo)

Butch or anyone ,,,,,are there gonna be any more Barnburner dates on the east coast other than the Lakehurst,Fl. shows near the same time frame?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 19:28:14 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Garth

It's great to see Garth confirm his coming to Toronto to work with Ronnie one more time. Garth will be coming from San Francisco where we will be gigging. No word on Levon or Robbie yet.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 19:25:15 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: remixed Elvis

In remixing the Elvis #1 hits, BMG is not adding new elements a la the DJ mix, but re-shaping & often removing what is already on the master tapes. With relative ease afforded by today's computer/digital workstations, many remastering engineers can't resist the temptation to alter what doesn't need changing. One of their most common traits is to remix everything to sound louder & brighter. Another practice is going overboard with de-noise equipment.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 19:02:03 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Richie....you louse! ;)

Jason Robards was in my head! I knew it was him! It was between Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef in The Good, The Bad and the Ugly or Jason Robards! He was too cool for dirty clothes in "Once Upon a Time in the West" Henry Fonda in the greatest death scene in the world... I coulda watched him die a thousand times...What A Great Score too!


Entered at Tue Sep 24 18:45:34 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-123.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.123)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Again - but on Elvis

David- I think the genesis of the Elvis project was the success of the remixed 'A Little Less Conversation' which was a big hit here this year. They do list it as a 31st 'bonus track' presumably because of the remix. As a precedent, The Beach Boys have included their modern effort with The Fat Boys on some compilations, and then was the Natalie Cole album. Anyway, let's hope that some dance producer isn't remixing The Weight at present.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 18:37:39 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-123.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.123)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Films …

Ritchie- your instant knowledge of film is incredible! My wife’s been trying to think of this film for ages – the date and the start (as described in Films on Video) sound dead right. It’s weird, I am unable to remember film titles, dates, actors or directors and am constantly shamed by people who can recall these things. For some reason, I can do it with music but not films. This is highly embarrassing as at one time I used to teach film history, but I always had to look it all up. In the 70s, as an aid to memory I used to clip out the Radio Times / TV Times reviews and listings of films as I saw them on TV, but it still didn’t stick. Good job I changed careers, really!


Entered at Tue Sep 24 18:24:28 CEST 2002 from libstfstx03.library.uiuc.edu (130.126.34.238)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Subject: Mike Scott

Mike Scott, at least during his Waterboys period, belongs in a category I call shaman singers, to which (get ready for it) Jim Morrison also belongs. I've never seen Mike Scott perform, but I imagine something of the same theatrical quality from those early songs. I've not heard his solo work at all - maybe if I can find his later cds at non-import prices. Richie, are the Waterboys remastered cds enough better than the original issue to be worth paying import prices - these seem to run about 26 dollars us.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 17:58:58 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: mike scott and bits and pieces

roz. thanks for the answer. id read that robbie's movie career stalled because carny bombed. i always thought there was more to it that. brown eyed girl.so pleased you like mike scott. hes one of the unsung greats of music. his solo stuff is worth checking out not just the wonderful waterboys albums currently being given th remastering treatment in the uk. scott has dylan and van connections though im not sure about any direct link with the band. peter would that western be the ballad of cable hogue. i seem to recall jason robards either being buried in sand or tied to stakes in the desert.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 17:37:12 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-154.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.154)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: More on Westerns

The trusty “BFI (British Film Institute) Companion to the Western” has an entry on Australia and notes that Butch Cassidy and the father in Junior Bonner both desire to move to Australia to rediscover the genuine Old West. More, they quote ‘Robbery Under Arms’ (1957) which features cattle-rustling, a stage hold-up, a bank robbery and a gold-rush town. They note that Errol Flynn plays an Australian sheep farmer in ‘Montana’ though this seems quite irrelevant.

Anyway, while discussing Westerns, we’re racking our brains here for the Western (circa 1969-70) which claimed to be the first to use old and dirty clothes, which were garnered from a previous film. My wife recalls it as one where the hero gets buried up to his neck in sand, but there are a few of those. The BFI book says that 1947’s ‘Red River’ was the ‘return to realism in costume’ and that later John Wayne would have eight shirts, getting progressively older and tattier, for a film. The BFI book strangely omits ‘Shalako’ (1968) which I thought was a prominent Western, albeit with Brigitte Bardot and Sean Connery. Anyway, some of the best Westerns were made in Spain by Italians. The last ‘Is it a Western?’ argument I had was with someone who claimed that ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ was more a ‘Western-with-cars’ than a Gangster film


Entered at Tue Sep 24 17:20:52 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Elvis (Presley not Costello) & Jeff (not the guy with no first name) Beck

Listeners beware! The new Elvis #1 album features versions of the songs that have been remixed for a "modernized" sound. This sacrilege is the equivalent of substituting cold-pressed canola oil for butter to fry peanut butter & banana sandwiches. The album also uses some alternate takes in place of the original classic versions. The next thing you know, BMG will be overdubbing the Backstreet Boys to replace the Jordinaires! In order to stretch the number of #1 hits, I believe songs from both the U.S. & U.K. charts are included.

Jeff Beck's "Guitar Shop" is a great album. The cover is sort of a tongue-in-cheek poke at Mr. Beck. He's known for his passion for rebuilding classic cars and the joke is that he only replaces the wrench in his hand with a guitar when he gets a craving to buy some more cars. Epic released an LP version of "Guitar Shop" and that's the one to have, not only for better sound, but to truly appreciate the cover art, which is definitely suitable for framing!

The group Chicago was recently featured on A&E's "Live By Request" show. At one point all the present members were introduced and one of the newest ones is singer/bassist Jason Scheff. He mentioned that his dad was the famous bassist who played with Elvis -- both of them, the King and Costello.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 16:37:56 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-065.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.65)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Australian Westerns

Agree that Ned Kelly is a “western” rather than a “southern” because the genre is films about 19th century frontier development. The clothes are the same. You get gold miners. You get horses. You get saloons / whorehouses. You get Chinese laundries. You get native peoples. You get mountains. You get deserts. But you get more sheep than usual. The water goes down the plughole in a different direction, but you probably won’t notice this. Also, as Australia was settled initially from Botany Bay (Sydney), the outback is all to the west of Sydney (though this is stretching the point!). Anyway, when the character rides off deeper into the wild frontier at the end, he will still be riding into the sunset, which is vital. The accents are different, but as I pointed out when Jonas Fjeld sang ‘One More Shot’ it’s likely that many pioneers had an immigrant accent of one kind or another in both North America and Australia.

Empty Now – your list was spoiled by the inclusion of ‘The End’, but I can think of many Beatles songs of huge social and musical influence. Maybe this will take the rest of the week … I’ll start with ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’.

I’m sure the ’30 #1s” Elvis is British based because of the inclusion of stuff like ‘The Wonder of You’ which stands with Englebert’s ‘Release Me’ as an instant ‘switch the radio station’ song for me.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 16:31:26 CEST 2002 from host236.olysteel.com (63.91.50.236)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: Recovering from a stoning

Bayou Sam,

I think it was you that raised the Jeff Beck question. In my humble opinion he's the greatest rock guitarist I have ever heard and seen. His performances are always interesting. He plays with great imagination and experimentation. Have you heard his beautiful instrumental cover of "A Day in the Life" ? His "Truth" album with Rod Stewart is among my very favorite listens.

There has been lots of Stones talk, pro and con, over the past few weeks. I was blessed to see their Tower Theater ( capacity 3,200 ) show this past Sunday evening. While there may be some things they can't do I must say this...there are alot of things they can do and one of them is rocking the doors right off the building. The show was marvelous in every aspect; lights, sound, great set list and a performance that I will remember for the remainder of my days. Charlie Watts was rock solid and dead on. An absolute clinic in rock and roll drumming.

They remain in my number one slot as the best live act out there today. Simply amazing.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 16:09:04 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Roslyn Mountain Boys!

Speakin' of forgettin' your own name.. my grandma, from Bluefield, W Va. used to call me Roslyn...

Mr. Young _ That album was much older than the seventies. Those guys must have been around for a long time with different line-ups... The album also had a sweet version of "Letter Edged in Black" I could be wrong about "The Master's Hand" being on that record tho.... Thank ya Sir.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 15:53:16 CEST 2002 from p508d952e.dip.t-dialin.net (80.141.149.46)

Posted by:

3d ralph

Web: My link

Very nice Site...WOW!!! I really enjoyed it. c ya 3d Ralph http://www.rebusmedia.de/3ddesign.html


Entered at Tue Sep 24 15:28:43 CEST 2002 from 1cust208.tnt1.conshohocken.pa.da.uu.net (67.242.8.208)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: On the Road in Philly

Subject: Roslyn Mountain Boys & "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny"

Rosalind: the Roslyn Mountain Boys were a local Washington, DC "country rock" band in the 1970s and they were excellent. I saw a reunion show they played a couple of years ago and they were still excellent. I believe that the steel guitar player, Tommy Hannum, became a Nashville session man. Their former keyboard guy was recently profiled in THE WASHINGTON POST because he is starting to play jazz piano gigs around DC. They were very influenced by The Band and Grateful Dead and I will have to see if I have that LP of theirs with "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny."

Speaking of that song, it used to be the state song of Virginia until someone determined that it was politically incorrect a few years ago. The irony is that the song was written by a black man and the reason it was dropped as state song was some language about "darkies." Anwyway, the state announced a contest to come up with a new state song and hundreds of songwriters entered (including sausage king Jimmy Dean) but they never came up with much more than drivel from what I heard. They actually asked Bruce Hornsby to write one but he wisely turned them down. My vote goes to the classic "Shenandoah," named after a river that flows through the state...


Entered at Tue Sep 24 14:45:57 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

NED KELLY is a western....it's listed in my copy of The Overlook Film Encyclopedia: The Western. And IF it's listed there, then it is a western. There are quite a few "westerns" set in Australia (some American-made some Australian-made) listed in this hefty tome and I've seen a few of them pardners (The Man From Snowy River; Quigley Down Under starring Tom Selleck to name 2)

I guess a Western needn't be set in the American West to be a Western. However I feel that instead of Western, the term Horse Opera should be used, that way nobody gets confused, except for those poor souls who might end up thinking "What the h... a movie with singin' horses?!?!"

And from now on all samurai movies should be called (Far) Easterns!!

Is that "new" Elvis CD different in the UK & US?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 14:05:04 CEST 2002 from stjhts20d044.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.149.173)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Beatle Songs

Empty Now - Lots of Beatle songs had social/political meaning. Ever listen to Revolution or Bungalow Bill?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 14:00:44 CEST 2002 from stjhts20d044.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.149.173)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: rock stars in movies

Yeah, I know this is a music site, but I thought it would be kinda fun to throw in a few trivia questions. I did keep it to a music thread though. Don't worry, I'll eventually come up with something to stump ya with. But I think I met my match in Richie,


Entered at Tue Sep 24 13:02:41 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: The Beatles: the first Boys-Band in history

The common memory among the widest public retained an instinctive and immutable decision, the Beatles are the greatest rock-band of all times.

Independently of the life-style of their era, I am wondering about the objective reasons of a such assumption. In my view the prolific work of the Beatles (as a band together) from 'Oh when the saints' (the real first single of the group) to the 'Ballad of John and Yoko' did not generated songs which can be considered as musically incomparable, despite of the 4 top chart in 1965. The work of the Beatles still worthy only by considering enbloc all their songs together. I don't see some monumental song which had released neither a remarkable social impact nor a real musical wonder

In that sense, does is exist only one Beatles song which defrayed the social opinion like
- Hurricane - Bob Dylan
- The night they drove old Dixie down - The Band
- Another brick in the wall - The Pink Floyd
- Paint in black - The Rolling Stones
- Get up stand up - Bob Marley
- Universal Soldier - Donovan
- The end - The Doors
and many other examples you can find

In an other chapter, Rock music often gived world stage hits produced by non careered singers, or perfectly performed worthy songs which haven't been sufficiently broadcasted and didn't shown a substancial profit for their author. This, for many reasons, essentially those induced by the show-business constraints. I'll give for example:
- The Letter - Don Fardon
- Sympathy - Rare Bird
- San Fransisco - Scott McKenzie
- Ruthless Queen - Kayak, this is an incredible beautiful song of a relatively unkown Dutch group whom, i can barely find an equivalent performance from standard singers.
- Venus - The Shocking Blue, deze is een andere gemakelijk nederlandse groep. We danced the 'Jerk' on this song
- Driver's seat - Sniff'n the Tears
I am really inclined of feeling that the Beatles didn't released a better song than one from the list above.

This post is not an unfair aggression against one band who really gave me enough pleasure. A contradictory opinion from the GBers is welcome.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 12:00:17 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Ben _ See what happens when ya give the hippies a gun. Blake's a good actor huh?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 11:44:03 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

yeah, I saw that Sam Elliot/Roger Daltry thing at the drive-in; Sam's wife, that Gal from "The Graduate" was in it too.

I saw "Electra Glide In Blue" the other night, a film where Robert Blake dreams of coming to L.A. to work for the Homicide divison!.

This quirky, sevenites existentail flick was directed by the guy who was Chicago's road mgr.(it's his only movie) and Chicago fans(not me) can spot members of the group.

The amazing thing is, it's a pretty good movie!


Entered at Tue Sep 24 11:36:27 CEST 2002 from client-cache1.wa.iinet.net.au (203.59.10.1)

Posted by:

Nancy

Web: My link

Subject: "western"

While the boys decide whether Ned Kelly is a “western” or not, you may like to know a tiny bit of info about the story, further to the fact Mick Jagger played the lead role in the 1970 film “Ned Kelly”.

The Kelly story is flavour of the moment here in Australia. There is a newish book by acclaimed author Peter Carey called “The True Story of The Kelly Gang”. It was awarded the Booker Prize for fiction in 2001. Is Carey’s story fiction or is it based on fact? The story is purported to be based on documents supposedly written by Ned Kelly whilst evading capture.

In addition to the book there is a new film (title unknown by me) with Leath Hedger (ooops Heath Ledger) in the role of Kelly. In the few promotional pictures for the film I’ve seen, Ledger actually looks less of a pretty boy and quite convincing in appearance as a wanted man.

Lastly, is “Ned Kelly”, the original movie, a western??? I thought definitely not, but I may be wrong. The article about Carey’s book definitely hints several times that the story has “western” undertones, even though the tale is about an Irish immigrant living in extreme danger in Australia in the late 1800’s. The article about the Carey book also draws a comparison between Kelly's life and premature death, and of Jesse James, which was something that occurred to me too.

Hmm reading the promo makes me want to get the book now. I’ve put up a link if anyone else wants to have a look.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 11:06:54 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Elvis!

Mr Viney's post reminded me of the night I saw Cybil Shephard on the "Letterman Show". Ms. Shephard was talkin' about how she use to date Elvis back in Memphis. The subject of Elvis' favorite foods came up and she was mentioning all the weird stuff he used to consume. Those banana and Peanut butter sandwiches fried in the entire pound of creamery butter and stuff. Letterman finally looked at her and said "Is there anything that guy wouldn't eat!" And she said "Ohhh Yeah!" It took a 30 seconds or so and Letterman started to laugh. She asked him what he was laughing at and he said "I was just thinkin'.. how the King of Rock and Roll wouldn't go dow...." it was sooo funny..it stuck in my head. Sorry....


Entered at Tue Sep 24 10:29:53 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: A Soldier's Things..

Okay. I have been wondering if any of you wonderful folks can answer a question that has been bugging me for about ten years. I picked up an album at a auction sale in Bluefield, West Virginia many years ago. It had no cover. My dad taught me to buy that box of stuff for a buck that they always have at country auction sales. He was convinced that one day he would find something invaluable in one of those old boxes. Well, for me it paid off one sunday afternoon. I found in the bottom of one of those old boxes a record album wrapped in an old torn apart bread bag. I don't quite remember the name of the group. The Rossen Mountain Boys.. The Roslen Boys...I cannot remember! That thick old piece of vinyl had the finest version of "Wreck on the Highway" I ever heard. It also had beautiful versions of "The Master's Hand" and "Carry Me Back To Old Virginny"

" Carry me back olll' Virginny..
There's where the cotton and corn and tater's grow..
There's where the birds sing sweet in the springtime"...ahhh.

Can anyone tell me the name of that old-time country group? I would be grateful.

Richie_ Robbie was set up way back when, with an agent. He was given an office on the lot that used to be Caroll Lombard's old dressing room. The agent would bring these offers to him . Robbie was offered a supporting role behind Sylvester Stallone in F.I.S.T. He refused it. Finally that agent got fed up and just looked at him and said " I don't think you really want to be an actor" I think Robbie wanted to start at the top and be a filmmaker. Not at the bottom with bit parts. I read that in an old interview somewheres. It's probably back yonder among the interviews on this terrific site.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 10:27:34 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-160.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.160)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: B.O.B.

Many thanks for the link, John- I printed out this "young book" which clears up a lot- my vinyl is the 1969 stereo remix, I guess. This will take some reading, but as one of the best five albums of all time, it'll be worth it!


Entered at Tue Sep 24 10:18:48 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-160.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.160)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Elvis, Tom & Van

Change of mind. I saw the Elvis 30 #1s (which must be based on the UK chart) in the supermarket this morning- not that I buy CDs in supermarkets, but there was Elvis between the baked beans and the toilet paper, not looking terribly out of place. The 30 number ones include the four army period hits, all displaying Tom Parker’s total lack of taste, ‘Wooden Heart,’ ‘Surrender’, ‘Are You lonesome Tonight,’ ‘It’s Now or Never’, and then from later the deeply awful ‘The Wonder of You’ and ‘Crying in The Chapel’. I now remember why Elvis wasn’t “hip” in 1961. Other mediocrities include ‘Way Down’, and ‘She’s Not You’ which had a flipside with such awful lyrics that it qualifies for a so-bad-it’s-good inclusion, ‘Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello’. It will be an enjoyable couple of hours to compile a personal Best of Elvis CDR, and Sun material and B-sides like ‘Little Sister’ come into the equation. Being #1 in the UK is no sign of quality, and the list of great missing performances is long. ‘Just Can’t Help Believing’ for starters. And as we discussed here at length once, Old Shep, if you want kitsch with your King.

On a similar singer, Van only produced four tracks on Tom Jones’ ‘Carrying a Torch’: Carrying a Torch, Some Peace of Mind, I’m Not feeling It anymore and It Must Be You- he wrote all of them.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 09:52:32 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: Blonde on Blonde Primer Part 2

Second part of the well written (everything you wanted to know) piece on Blonde On Blonde


Entered at Tue Sep 24 09:43:32 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: Blonde on Blonde Primer

Found this an interesting site for Blonde On Blonde; which includes all the different versions released at time of printing.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 09:16:44 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68745.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.186.110)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: richie / blonde on blonde

richie: :-D...My fave World Party recording is "Private Revolution" since I'm left of centre......I saw Wallinger with Mike Scott and The Waterboys across the street......one of the best gigs ever......

Dylan: "I was going at a tremendous speed...at the time of my 'Blonde On Blonde' album. (New York, 1969)

The Japanese pressings of this recording feature some slightly different mixes and extended fades on some tracks. The playing time of the UK and USA releases 71:00 minutes, which was a cut of almost two-minutes from the vinyl. "Sad Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands" lost 32-seconds. Apparently USA quickly made amends and two subsequent pressings corrected the problem. Some say that the best versions of this album are one of several special gold issues. I guess it's on these recordings where you can really hear what Dylan hears in his mind....."It's that thin, that wild mercury sound. It's metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up. That's my particular sound." (New York, 1978)


Entered at Tue Sep 24 08:10:05 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: all sorts

ws walcott.i think you mean the legacy with sam elliot. answer, roger daltrey. running man answers.mick fleetwood and dweezil zappa. brown eyed. karl wallinger, ex waterboy now fronting his own world party. terrific artist. my fav. album of his .bang.brown eyed girl tom jones duet with van was from a tom album which van wrote all the tracks for and produced specially for tom. many of these tracks turned up on the later van album hymns to the silence. my fav of these is tom tracks now sung by van is carrying a torch. interesting conundrum. how come robbies 's acting career never took off. it looked a real banker after tlw. thanks to all for the neil young responces. it still pisses me off to this day that i havnt heard on the beach. hopefully this situation will be rectified soon. rich.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 06:50:06 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71689.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.198.6)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: 45's / 8 tracks / vinyl / cds

Started out on 45's....(You thought I was going to say....."Started out on burgundy", didn't ya?) "Hey Jude", "Whole Lotta Love" "I Can't Turn You Loose"....Moved onto 8 tracks....I hated when a song was split between channels like "Woodstock" soundtrack....favourite line from concert...."All the squares go home!".....Sly was progressive in that his band had both genders and mixed cultures as well as the women were playing instruments....Moved onto cassettes.....Earlier this month at our Cabbagetown Festival I bought a Fleetwood Mac tape at a yard sale 'cause I had to have "Seven Wonders"....Sure I could have downloaded but I liked who was selling the tape and good conversation....;-D

I worked in a couple of Record Shops....Favourite vinyl.....Joni Mitchell "Court and Spark" Nautilus Half-Speed Mastered Series, Mink Deville "Cabretta", Genya Ravan "Urban Desire" (Louuuu's on "Aye Co'Lorado"), Rough Trade Live! Special Limited Edition Direct-To-Disc Recordings (Toronto Band)....I gave away my favourite Billie Holiday record which I have regretted to this day......I've never seen this recording again.....only my jazz musician friend still has it...:-(.....He was a musical elitist....most jazz musicians are......;-D...Come on.....ya know it's true....Hence he could never understand what drew me to Marley's roots reggae.....But he at least respected why the groove and message resonated with me......Moved onto CDS....Recently purchased in NYC Willy Deville "Miracle" (produced by Mark Knopfler) so that I could hear Willy on a 1987 interview.........

richie: If you're from Wales ya must know Karl Wallinger......."Ship Of Fools" and Tom Jones with Van...."Sometimes We Cry".......

Late now....Candy Dulfer is playing a Bonnie Raitt song.......


Entered at Tue Sep 24 06:39:01 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-114-205.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.114.205)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

JennyT - Los Lobos are an awesome live band, one of the best around. Next time you have a chance, run, don't walk, to go check them out. You won't be disapointed. They actually formed in 1973, even though their first LP didn't come out until '77, and their first major label rock release until 1984. They're also just super great people. BTW, would you mind e-mailing me? I'd like to ask you a question about Northeast L.A. It's BWNWITenn@hotmail.com

I loved Fox's "Undeclared." It was funny, sweet, and true-to-life - it made you say "Oh, yeah" a lot. I was pissed when they replaced it with that stupid Andy Richter crap. I'm not that familiar with Loudon Wainwright - did he play what's-his-name's dad?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 06:02:08 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-West
Web: My link

Subject: Ned Kelly

"Their are plenty of cowboys in Australia, so I consider Ned Kelly as a western. Don't get all technical on me now."

OK, W S Walcott. It's just that when I think of a, "Western Movie", Mick Jagger NEVER comes to mind. And yes, I have seen the movie.

Now, those others you mention? I spent about 15 min. searching the net to sound good with the answers but, well, I haven't seen either movie and no one's giving up the answers so.....HEY!!! This is "THE BAND" Guestbook, for crackie sake!!! not a movie quiz show...

How's that?

Night all



Entered at Tue Sep 24 04:34:15 CEST 2002 from stjhts20d047.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.149.176)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: still more trivia

What rock star choked to death on a chicken bone in the 1970s horror flick "The Prophecy"?

What rock star had a part in "The Running Man'?

What rock star's son was also in Running Man?

Tiny Monster - Their are plenty of cowboys in Australia, so I consider Ned Kelly as a western. Don't get all technical on me now.

Who played the part of Eddie Cochrane in American Hot Wax?


Entered at Tue Sep 24 03:49:23 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Rick S.

Location: Suffern, NY

Hope many fans can join G-Man to root on the Jim Weider Band this Friday night at The Pattenburg House, Pattenburg, N.J. The Jim Weider Band goes on first (followed by Nasty Ned). Hope to see you there.


Entered at Tue Sep 24 02:49:02 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: misc. stuff

Walcott - I always wanted to check out Jeff Beck's "Guitar Shop" album. I love the cover.

I'm also a Blazing Saddles fanatic. It's one of the funniest films ever. I actually got a 45 record on ebay from the movie. Side one is the Blazing Saddles Theme, and side two is "The French Mistake" from the movie. Mel Brooks is brilliant, and nuts - not necessarily in that order.

Don't you love tracking down a tune that you've been trying to track down for some time? I've had this Neil Young tune in my head for some time that I couldn't find the title of. I only had a snippet of the chorus in my mind from hearing it on the radio a few years back. I really liked that part. I finally found one of his CD's entitled "Sleeps (or Sleeping) with Angels" in a used CD bin. I found the song - it's called "Change Your Mind".


Entered at Mon Sep 23 23:20:37 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Blonde On Blonde revisited

Along with the superior sound, another thing that can only be found with the early LP pressings of "Blonde On Blonde" is a certain photograph. A photo of the lovely actress Claudia Cardinale was included on the inside, right hand section of the gatefold cover of the original LP. The photo was removed & replaced by one of Dylan in later LP pressings and all the CD versions, supposedly because of the threat of legal action over unauthorized use. The inclusion of this photo is one way to verify early pressings, along with the Columbia '360' label & stamper number.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 23:03:31 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Blazing Saddles, real tough. The De Nero/ Wainwright flick is "Jacknife". Wainwright's movie career hit bottom, alas, along with Hal Ashby's in "The Slugger's Wife."

Roz got the "Untamed" question, "Untamed" fans( love that dishwasher!) should be sure to see Mamie in "Girl's Town", with the Platters and Paul Anka. I recently caught up with a weird rockabilly flick called "Carnival Rock" out of the Coreman factory with some great unknown Rockbilly guys and the Platters too.

Some of you Band movie fans ought to do the right thing and track down a copy "Elija's Horrorscope", Richard was working with Tommy Lee Jones years before Levon.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 23:02:18 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Neil Young NOT on CD

In answer to Richie's question: Rumors have surfaced recently that Neil Young will be reissuing his back catalog on vinyl (on the Vapor label co-owned by Neil & his manager). Most notably awaited by Neil fans are the "missing six", which Neil refuses to release on CD because of his personal dislike of current CD technology. Those albums include: "Journey Through The Past" (1972), "Time Fades Away" (1973), "On The Beach" (1974), "American Stars & Bars" (1976), "Hawks & Doves" (1980) and "RE-ACT-OR" (1981).

Older LP copies, even sealed ones, can still be found in the vinyl bins, but the rumored Vapor releases haven't happened yet. "Needle-drop" bootleg CD copies of the missing six are much sought after. I recently acquired excellent sounding boots of "Journey Through The Past", "Time Fades Away" and "American Stars & Bars" complete with high-quality, original LP artwork. I also recently found the bootleg "Chrome Dreams" CD which was supposedly a prototype of "A.S.&B." that Neil nixed.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 22:55:10 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-154.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.154)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: New releases

Lifeboy: Thanks for the info on Bobby Gillespie. I will look this out.

This week’s two major releases (at least in the UK) both have Band connections (vaguely). First is Peter Gabriel’s “Up” (for the Robertsonians) then Elvis’s “30 #1 Hits” for the Levon connection (Elvis 56). The Gabriel has been 10 years in the making, and as I didn’t make my regular Monday ‘new release check’ I’ll be onto it tomorrow. One journalist visiting RealWorld studios a couple of years ago found great excitement among Peter Gabriel’s staff – ‘Peter’s recorded TWO BARS today!’

As for the Elvis, yesterday’s review said program tracks 1-10 then skip straight to the later masterpieces (Burning Love, Suspicious Minds). Though most of the film music is dross, I have a soft spot for the early 60s hits that were being skipped by the reviewer, and my programming will definitely include ‘Return to Sender,’ ‘His Latest Flame’ ‘Good luck Charm’ and ‘Devil in Disguise’ (assuming they’re following UK number ones). I might give the army –period ballads a miss though. It’s Now or Never is best in Elvis’s live piss-take version years later. Wooden Heart (if it’s on it) is as bad as Elvis got. I already have it all remastered, but like The Beatles ‘One’ it’s an instant in-car CD and good to have in one place, though while The Beatles one follows an ascending curve, this is more of a roller-coaster. ‘Way down’ was only a hit because he ended up chewing the shag-pile carpet.

David- I lost my original first issue ‘Blonde on Blonde’ around 1971, and replaced it around 1975 with one with a much thinner card sleeve. It’s no better than the gold master one, but it backs up my view that vinyl varies. I might start looking around for earlier pressings.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 22:43:39 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Subject: Champagne in Albuquerque

I get no kick from Champaaynee..Mere al-co-hol doesn't thrill me at alll...but boy did I get a kick outa seeing Alex Karas punch that horse in the mouth!

One of my favorite Neil Young songs... "Albuquerque"... Is it from "On the Beach"? Speaking of eight-track tapes the other day. I used to have " On the Beach" and "Tonight's the Night" on 8-track.

Ohhh Celine Dion!


Entered at Mon Sep 23 22:32:27 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: bits + bobs

well done empty now. correct. blazing saddles the answer to your question. question to vinyl freaks. is neil young's on the beach available new on vinyl. i saw a copy of american stars and bars in the vinyl section in london's tower records a year ago. i didnt buy it . stupid me.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 22:26:00 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Blonde On Blonde

Correction to my earlier comments on "Blonde On Blonde": The Mastersound gold CD, as well as the newer SACD, versions are two distinctly different remixes taken from the four-track session tapes. I haven't heard the SACD version but it reportedly sounds closer to the original stereo LP than any of the previous CD versions. Next to my early '360' stereo LP pressing, the Mastersound CD sounds o.k. -- it is a relatively dry & flat transfer with not as much bottom end as the LP. The first CD versions of "B.O.B." feature not only inferior sound, but abbreviated versions of several songs as well. The songs were shortened (2 LPs on one disc) because the discs used in the early days of the CD era did not have as much storage space. I find that my early CD copy of "B.O.B." makes an excellent coaster for my beer while listening to LPs{:-}


Entered at Mon Sep 23 21:54:30 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

There seems to be some confusion over the Danko re-release by Arista with bonus tracks. Does anyone actually have a copy of this remastered cd with bonus tracks?? I was told by good sources that it did NOT exist.

The Oct 4th Hawk celebration sounds great! Wish I could be there.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 21:33:02 CEST 2002 from gpf-t197.gpnet.dnd.ca (131.137.245.197)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: Winnipeg

Subject: Dead thing and much thanks...

...to Messrs. Fan and Powell for responses on my Tull and Mac reminiscences.

I've had very little exposure to the Dead, but when I first heard "Ferdinand the Imposter" a couple of months ago, I thought "Grateful Dead" immediately....


Entered at Mon Sep 23 21:30:47 CEST 2002 from host217-45-67-203.in-addr.btopenworld.com (217.45.67.203)

Posted by:

lifeboy

Location: Sussex

Subject: Death in Vegas

Peter, The song "soul auctioneer"(the Dylan VU comparison: never seen it like that but know what you mean) features Bobby Gillespie of Primal Scream on vocals, you may wanna check out their Lps Vanishing Point and Exterminator, they are not a million miles away from Contino Sessions, pretty damn good in fact.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 21:17:33 CEST 2002 from (193.194.69.87)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: trivia

The film : Jacknife

Western 70s:
A funny western of Mel Brooks where music is omnipresent as well as Count Bazie ?
(Prizes: the first good answer wins 1 CD of Celine Dion, the 2nd wins 2 CDs, etc...)


Entered at Mon Sep 23 20:49:18 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-116.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.116)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Vinyl & CD, Death in Vegas

One to watch- I don’t believe that vinyl is necessarily better. A lot of vinyl LPs are later versions, and may well be off later masters. A degree of compression always happens on vinyl that gets stronger as the record gets longer- those 30 minutes a side K-Tel vinyl collections are unlistenable – dull and very, very low volume (as well as cut). That’s why early copies of LPs are prized, and almost always American vinyl was better than European vinyl. Last week I picked up a couple of 80s or 90s vinyl rissues – both See for Miles label. The ‘Keith Richards supervised” Aranbee Orchestra, and Felix Cavaliere ‘A Rascal Alone’. These point out one of the CD versus Vinyl issues. I haven’t had the chance to sit and listen to either yet. I have CD in car, in office, it’s on every computer – but I have to make a special issue about going in, sitting down and listening to vinyl. This is one reason why it often seems a more meaningful experience.

Guilty pleasures. On Saturday, waiting in boutiques in Covent Garden while my offspring compared the merits of various designer T-shirts (each costing what I’d expect to pay for a jacket about once every two years - or even a suit, not that I own one), I became entranced by Death in Vegas’s ‘Contino Sessions’ especially as I listened through four tracks very loud with nothing to distract me. The song ‘Soul Auctioneer’ is a rip-off of early Dylan played by the VU, but nonetheless attractive to someone who likes both. So, then I wander into HMV seeking interest and it’s in the sale at £4.99. Enough said.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 20:45:48 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: loudon wainright 111

loudon had a small but dramatic role in a film with robert de niro. clue,vietnam themed movie with most of the action taking place back in the states. havnt got a clue about the rockabily film. catch you all later. rich.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 20:23:16 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Rock and Roll...movies

Untamed Youth is a funnier than hell camp Masterpiece! I love that movie. If you're gonna make a Bad movie this is the kind to make! Mamie and Lori railroaded onto a prison farm. Eddie Cochran only sang one song...Mamie sang four. Best line in the picture: "Don't hit me in the mouth again! You'll break my dental plate!"

Too much clue! Robbie and Busey wanted to make "The Last Days of Jesse James" Robbie doin' the music...woulda been nice.

I hope the GB doesn't get pissed off at us havin' a little fun with trivia. I'm always worried about doin' somethin' wrong.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 20:05:07 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: The-Left-Side
Web: My link

Subject: Ned Kelly

Since when do you call a film about an Australian outlaw a "Western" ?...Come to think of it, what would you call it? A "Southern" ?...


Entered at Mon Sep 23 19:58:45 CEST 2002 from stjhts23c029.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.171.34)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: trivia

Damn, u guys are good. I saw that movie but can't remember. I will take a guess at Jerry Lee lewis or maybe Bill Haley. Now I have to go to work, life sucks.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 19:50:08 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

And who else should answer this but me? Loudon Wainwright III; who recently WAS a regular on the acclaimed but failed "Undeclared" show.

Now, what rockabilly great was in "Untamed Youth" with Mamie Van Doren?


Entered at Mon Sep 23 19:46:30 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: this & that

Nice to read some feedback from my discussion of the attributes of vinyl. Many often ask, especially with regards to earlier CD versions, why the CD sounds different from their memory of the way the original LP sounded. Apart from the inherent differences between digital & analogue in the way sound is rendered, many CDs are inferior because they were sourced from second, third or even latter generation tapes, rather than from the original master. Often LP production copies were used where equalization and/or compression were employed to keep the needle from jumping out of the grooves in the vinyl era. These later generation tapes lack the detail contained on the original master and sound "veiled" in comparison. Both the high & low end are often clipped off and the mid-range over-emphasized.

John Donabie cited "Blonde On Blonde" as an example of an inferior sounding CD. The stereo master for this album was long thought to have been lost, like that of the "Brown Album". It was recently revealed, however, that the stereo master has been located but it's worn out from over-use. This means that all the CD versions, as well as later LP pressings, have been sourced from inferior sounding tapes. The Sony Mastersound gold CD version apparently used the best available copy that could be found. The good news is that the mono master of "Blonde On Blonde" is still in good condition and the Sundazed label is about to release a heavy vinyl LP reissue of this album sourced from that mono master. Many Dylan fans though still prefer the original stereo version because Dylan himself worked on the mix-down.

The singer/songwriter who appeared in a few episodes of MASH was Loudon Wainwright III.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 19:12:31 CEST 2002 from stjhts23c029.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.171.34)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: ned kelly/more trivia

Ned Kelly is correct. Got a tougher one. What singer was in a few episodes of MASH? He played a GI and sat under a tree singing songs at the opening of several episodes. He was supposed to become a regular cast member but it never worked out.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 17:46:38 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: phil kaufmann and proposed robbie/ gary busey question

outlaw josey wales is the correct answer to my question. roz would the proposed rr/gb film have been about the james brothers ie jesse and frank. this would tie in with the 70's phil kaufmann picture the great northfield minnessotta raid about a bungled bank robbery by the james gang it starred cliff robertson. ws walcott. the mick jagger western has to be ned kelly.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 16:31:57 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Subject: Clue clarification..

W.S._ Connection thru a Philip Kaufman's 70's picture.

GB suggestion _ From now on the Levonistas and Robertsonians should be known as the "At'sin-ovels" and "Na'inos-tre'bors" If we start laughin' at this stupid fued maybe they'll start laughin' too!


Entered at Mon Sep 23 16:17:52 CEST 2002 from (136.160.157.61)

Posted by:

Jamie

Philip Kaufman wrote Outlaw Josey Wales.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 16:05:50 CEST 2002 from stjhts23c045.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.171.50)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: western movies

Here's an easy one. What western did Mick Jagger star in? By the way, I saw Monsters Ball. I was impressed with Sean Coombs performance. A small role, but a pivotal one.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 16:03:54 CEST 2002 from stjhts23c045.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.171.50)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Roz

Roz - in which previous question can this clue be found?


Entered at Mon Sep 23 15:34:20 CEST 2002 from cpe0080c6ea3120.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (65.48.85.247)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: brown eyed girl

glad to see you met glen silverthorn, he is the one who wrote the article, last week in the brantford expositor, sept 19, 2002, featuring a recent club experience in port dover. talked to him myself at this summer's london(ont.) bluesfest, just before garth took the stage. the brantford paper website is www.theexpositor.com. the article is on page c4, under SHOWCASE, and i think it would be a good idea to have it featured and shared on this website. ta ta


Entered at Mon Sep 23 15:30:46 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Like a thief in the night...

W. S. Walcott aka Quick Draww McGraww stole my answer while I was sleepin'! I got a question with two barrels. Both ends my friends. In 1988, Robbie and Gary Busey were dreaming about making what western that obviously had to be abandoned after Busey's motorcycle accident? (Clue is in previous question.)

Levon is a born character actor.

I used to own two Jeff Beck albums. The two mentioned are the ones. I owned them mostly because friends kept asking for Beck at parties and it was always me who supplied the music.

Sorry if I spoke out of turn about the conversation on "Dark Star" The title of the song made me think of the movie and I just mentioned it without thinking..


Entered at Mon Sep 23 14:40:24 CEST 2002 from citrix5.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.9)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: The Blues

What a week of music I had... Tuesday night Levon and the fellas in Kingston NY...great as everyone knows...

then Saturday night I saw Guy Davis for the first time ever at a small hall in Woodstock VT... Guy Davis acoustic blues, storytelling, great with the audience... that man is great too!!! I ended up buying 3 of his CD's (the one with Levon of course) Gary Burke of the Crowmatix plays drums on 2 of them also.. so much great music out there... each and everytime I go see a show I am amazed at how much talent there is out there and how lucky I am to get to see as much of it as I can...Support live music there is nothing better!! (well ok maybe a few things... but not much!)


Entered at Mon Sep 23 14:26:05 CEST 2002 from prodns3.household.com (63.111.163.13)

Posted by:

Dennis Leonard

Subject: Great Website!

Great website, thanks for having it, that's all.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 13:57:20 CEST 2002 from stjhts21c030.nbnet.nb.ca (198.164.98.35)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: philip kaufman

Richie - I will take a guess at Clint Eastwood "Outlaw Josie Wales"


Entered at Mon Sep 23 13:39:48 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj
Web: My link

Subject: Novel, Beck

I am surprised Novel/Levon never pursued an acting career - He'd have made a fine character/supporting actor. And isn't that the real slice right there? Those faces that are in every picture going whether it be TV or film, those are the folks that have nice good paying, steady incomes. I always thought Levon could have fit in on that tier somewhere.

As for Becks, You Had it Coming, not a bad cd, it's still a bit technoish but it has some good jams for the style he's adapted to in the last 20 years. And to me it's Blow by Blow that's 1 and Wired that's 2.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 11:59:53 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: odds and sods

my pitch for levon's finest movie hour would have to be the right stuff. not only is it a faboulous film, but what a cast. come to think of it, its probably sam shepards best film too. the chemistry between shepard and levon in the role of shepards sidekick ridley is note perfect. its director phillip kaufmann would go on to make several more gems such as unbearable lightness of being and henry and june. question. which classic 70's western was he slated do direct only to find himself sacked with the lead actor taking over the helm(oops, terrible band pun, not intended ,honest)off to work now. cheers roz and all on the gb. richie.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 04:57:40 CEST 2002 from stjhts19c124.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.253.129)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Jeff Beck

Bayou Sam = I always liked Jeff Beck. I think "Wired" is his best. Blow By Blow is excelent too. Both produced by George Martin, BTW. I was never a big Page/Zeppelin fan. Guitar Shop is another fine album. His 2 most recent albums, You Had It Coming, and Who Else? I have not heard. I always liked his style. But I find lately he is a little too techno for me. The Jeff Beck Group-Rough and Ready is good as well. But I hear that Beck is difficult to work with, ala Frank Zappa. He doesn't seem to work with the same people very much. I read an interview with him once back in the 1980s when he said the reason he hadn't made an album in awhile was because there were no good drummers. Well, he found a good for his next LP, Terry Bozio. I can't remember the name of the album, but it wasn't one of Beck's better ones.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 04:44:27 CEST 2002 from gso88-200-028.triad.rr.com (24.88.200.28)

Posted by:

Manny

Location: North Carolina

Subject: The Last Waltz on DVD

I haven't previously been on here so I'm not sure if anyone else has posted a review on this or not. However, being a serious audiophile myself, I wanted to let everyone here know to GO GET THIS DVD!!!! What a great show. The sound quality is excellent. I know. I have 7 cabinets, 25 drivers and 800 watts on my main home system. All the cabinets are custom built. So, if you don't have this in your collection already, don't wait another minute. Head for the store now.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 02:40:28 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I tried spelling the other guys names backward - nothing.

Robertson backwards though is NOSTREBOR - sounds like a character from a sci-fi flick.

Reminds me of a TV movie Ringo did in the 70's? where one of his characters was his name backwards - Ognir Rrats.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 02:06:24 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool32-153.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.32.153)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Los Lobos

BWNWIT: How good to see Los Lobos live. I have never seen them but I am really enjoying Good Morning Aztlan. I love their rhythm section, esp. the bass. One cut reminds me a little of SRV, one of Robert Cray, and one is a little Little-Feat-ish but they have a style all their own of course. They have been together so long--since 1977 according to the DVD that comes with it. I like to call them my homeboys even though I am from Northeast LA rather than East LA.


Entered at Mon Sep 23 00:28:37 CEST 2002 from dial2a-155.i2eyenet.com (64.80.2.155)

Posted by:

HI

Subject: Mississippi live

There's a very fine Mississippi(mp3) from last month's tour posted today for download at WWW.BOBDYLAN.DE


Entered at Sun Sep 22 22:59:18 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Bill Munson - Jon Finley

Sorry to post this openely Bill Munson; but I no longer have your e-mail. Talked to Jon today and as you know he will be performing with the northernblues on Oct 20. Congratulations on your liner notes and look forward to he and Michael and Peter and Larry getting back together to do both Checkmates and Rhinocerous material the weekend of the 27th.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 20:44:59 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Still-Out-There
Web: My link

Subject: Dark Star

Not to drag this out ad nauseum (but I will) try the link above, download 0209darkstar-dew and call me in the morning. After decades of research I have come to the conclusion that this is not only the definitive Dark Star but proves Jerry Garcia the greatest guitarist af all time.

No you have to listen to the whole thing with patience and a clear head. I've been clean and sober for 18 years now and can almost walk a straight line (at least on a good day) so give it a chance. Note also Bill's drumming (this was the stripped down single drummer days).

"NOVEL" idea indeed......

Jury is still out on Garths version of this classic Dead tune but from the snipit on this site...I...I'm...need, perhaps to hear the whole thing......

Really...listen to the whole thing when you have 42:21 to relax and be transported by a group of extrordinary musicians at their absolute best...I know Butch will give it a go...

I now return you to your regularly scheduled GB

...Oh, yes,"I've Been Through The Desert On A Camel With No Name", it felt good to be out of the rain...

OK,OK,...I'll go...



Entered at Sun Sep 22 20:13:29 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: sunday afternoon jitters

Mr Godfrey - Whatdaya mean.."camel named roz" ? (grin)

She's a railroad lady..just a little bit shady..
spendin' her days on the train..
She's a semi-good-looker but the fast rails they took her..."

Levon spelt back'ards says N-o-v-e-l Hey, that boy oughta write a book! He also is a real good actor ..Didn't he do that great cameo as a bible salesman? And "The Dollmaker" with Hanoi Jane... terrific.

Dark Star was also a hippie astronaut space movie with a living pain-in-the-ass beachball in the lead role. I watched that movie stoned once and they almost had to call an ambulance..

Jamie Green - Yeah Boy! Great movie ! Did you know that "Stranger than Paradise" took that big old Cannes award in 1980? The thing cost about 40 bucks to make? Makes ya think....

Jim Jarmusch is also a pretty good actor. Remember that "Frosty Creme" waiter in "Slingblade"

Carl: "sa' wha'choo lik ta ete here"

Frosty Creme guy: "Well the french fries are alright"

Carl: "Yu mean french fried pataters?"

Frosty Creme guy: "Yeah....french fries"....


Entered at Sun Sep 22 20:13:59 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Man, this Hawk Tribute sounds like quite a gig. I don't want to start a thread on this, but if ever there was a time and place for levon and Robbie to make things right in thier lifetime, this is it.

Witt - good to see you. Nice tribute to the cassette. i repaired many tapes in my day with scotch tape. You had to sort of ignore the moment when that little part passed over the play head. How about the horrible 8-track? Did you ever look inside one of those things? Yikes!

I went to the Wiz store yesterday that closed forever today. I picked up a nice little Yarbirds box set - 2 cd's and a booklet. It was thirty percent off. Nice compilation.........Any Jeff Beck fans in here? I always like him better than Page, but second to EC.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 19:31:57 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-115-62.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.115.62)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

The lyrics to "Dark Star" mean that you've done too much acid if the lyrics to "Dark Star" start to make sense.

Now on to a REAL live band, saw Los Lobos in Lou'ville, KY last night, they closed with a jam with Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas and Byron House on Sittin' On Top Of The World and Bertha.

I think that Levon is a very talented actor, as well, much better than Robbie. It could have been another venue for some financial security that for some reason was never really followed.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 19:29:13 CEST 2002 from ppp95.a1-1.56k.execulink.com (209.239.1.95)

Posted by:

paul godfrey

Location: C A N A D A
Web: My link

Subject: Monster

Monster.....

Spell Levon's name backwards!

shineonpaulg


Entered at Sun Sep 22 19:20:38 CEST 2002 from ppp95.a1-1.56k.execulink.com (209.239.1.95)

Posted by:

paul godfrey

Location: C A N A D A
Web: My link

Subject: Camel named....

Roz

Camel named CLYDE!

shineonpaulg


Entered at Sun Sep 22 18:48:50 CEST 2002 from zorg55.revealed.net (208.243.237.55)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: Coal Miner's Daughter

Watched this for the first time in ages yesterday on Superstation TBS. Did anyone else catch this yesterday? I'm suprised that Levon didn't pursue acting more. He seemed to do quite wll in the movie.

Mike


Entered at Sun Sep 22 18:41:50 CEST 2002 from cache-bra2.cableinet.co.uk (194.117.133.90)

Posted by:

grace

Location: west yorkshire
Web: My link

Subject: psykhadel

my boyfriend has just made a new band up called psykhadel and we r trying to find an agent so if u could email me it would be great there are 4 members in the band and they r aged between 15-16 if u go to www.wheresthegig.com u can access our website by putting in psykhadel and then putting in name:grace and password:grace513 plz plz have a look at the bands site.thank you


Entered at Sun Sep 22 18:18:58 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Jamie Green

Location: Baltimore

Subject: Vinals, Cowbells, Handclaps & Films

Believe it or not, I actually grew up on vinals as well. When I was 11, I got a CD player for Christmas & the damn thing skipped every CD I tried to play. Then I started listening to my parents' record collection & fell in love. When I play a record like Abbey Road, Let it Bleed, or The Band on vinal, I feel as though I'm listening to it in 1969, not 2002.

Great cowbell...."Honky Tonk Women" (especially when my drummer Mike plays it). How bout great handclaps? Beach Boy's "I Get Around," Mavis Staples in TLW on "The Weight."

And I thought I was the only person in the world to have seen Stranger Than Paradise.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 18:02:19 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Web: My link

Subject: The Hawk

I found the info.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 17:39:43 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

"Danced with angels" How'd I git that wrong?

Thanks Y'all


Entered at Sun Sep 22 16:59:22 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Now le' me tell ya 'bout A-hab the A-rab ..the Shiek of the burnin' sands...

Empty Now - huhmm ....Name That Camel Clyde Son!

I have somethin' to add to the GB too this fine sunday mornin'. Last night, it was a' raining dogs and cats...They come in off the streets, out o' the alleyways to sit down, git down and dry off. Had about 50 people in here. Hicks with Sticks. I put on "Jubilation" and lo and behold there came such a goin's on ya never did see! Toe-tappings, singin' and a swingin' and a swappin'! "

He said.. I known high times (I known high times) more than once (More than once)

Nowww I stick strictly too the honky tonks...

..And I known danger...and I known defeat..I seen whole generations fall to sleep

..I've talked with angels...I drank my fill...I talked with God out on the Hilll

And I know my face...and I live ma' name but I go by Charlie Hawker all the same...."


Entered at Sun Sep 22 16:57:10 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Hawk Tribute

Brown Eyed Girl......you sure know a lot more information than I do. Didn't even know that tickets were on sale and how do you know whose performing? Is there someone I can go to check this out this info? Thank you. I don't have your e-mail I'm sorry.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 16:56:49 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Islands in the Sahara

Empty Now: What an irony to be listening to an album titled 'Islands' in the middle of a vast desert!


Entered at Sun Sep 22 15:01:58 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: ISLANDS

Early morning, I've just been in a small tour in Sahara on a camel with no name. Que calor señor! muy mucho calor. I brought some cassettes in my basket. What a trip! Someone can object that The Band have no merit i listened them out of context in an area 'where clothes, ground, water and scorpios have the same color'. However, someone who never listened to the album 'ISLANDS' in such conditions cannot really realize how The Band are great!
It was just an unexpected opportunity, I'm not suggesting you must live this experience whatever is the price to be paid.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 13:02:57 CEST 2002 from (202.54.193.3)

Posted by:

search engine submission

Location: india
Web: My link

Nice site!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1


Entered at Sun Sep 22 07:40:00 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Nick

Okay, wait a minute. I ordered 2 Danko ('77) cd's at 24.99 and 14.99 and now the Arista one WITH BONUS TRACKS pops up for $7! Of course I ordered that one too. Can you say sucker, I can. Oh well, the more the merrier I guess.


Entered at Sun Sep 22 05:43:18 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Thanks Brown Eyed Girl!!!... and pleeease give us all the details on the Oct 4 show... as you see them... I'm sooo envious... the BBs have made me return to the blues again too...


Entered at Sun Sep 22 04:17:18 CEST 2002 from (63.164.145.33)

Posted by:

Caledonia

Back again ...

It was great to see The Stones as a recent topic of conversation on the GB. Someone asked about Charlie Watts' solo jazz CD's. They're good, but the CD you might like the best is Charlie's last solo outing (Charlie Watts / Jim Keltner Project). It's a "techno/world" (!) CD and is probably of interest to anyone who wants to study Charlie's drum style/technique.

Someone also mentioned that they wish we had a recorded history of The Hawks so that we could listen to them devolop musically (they way we're able to hear The Stones develop during their first few albums). I agree, but really wish we had been able to listen to them develop over the course of 40 years the way we're able to with The Stones. Can you imagine what a tight, rocking group The Band would be now!

It's interesting to note that The Stones, from early on, fell into a rhythm of recording and touring (generally every three years) that The Band never developed. Based on LH's book (and other accounts) it seems that The Band were constantly starting and stopping and never developed a rhythm that worked for them. The Stones' recording/touring cycle allowed them to spend time at home with their wives/girlfriends and children.

It's also interesting to note that The Stones never lived together (except for the brief time when Mick, Keith and Brian shared a flat at Edith Grove). In fact, they often lived in different countries and generally did not see each other when they were not recording or touring. The Band did live together, often sharing houses or living in very close proximity to each other. I realize this may have been due to their close friendships (or possibly for financial reasons?) but perhaps it did not serve them well in the long run. What do you think?

Linda Thompson (w/Teddy) will be performing at The Bottom Line in NYC (15 W.4th Street/Mercer) on Saturday, October 26 (212.502.3471 or bottomlinecabaret.com). I wonder if GH will be there too?

There was a recent discussion regarding the origins of Levon's name. I had a hard time finding Levon (or Lavon) in any book. The only mention of it I could find said it was American, rare and unusual and that its origins are generally unknown. Did anyone else have better luck? By the way, Robbie (Robert) translates as "bright fame" or "famous brilliance". Jaime is a derivative of James and/or Jacob. Richard/Rick is "strong/powerful ruler". Garth, appropriately, is "gardener".


Entered at Sun Sep 22 03:50:07 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69678.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.190.27)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: The Hawk! / Levon! / Barn Burners! / Healey! / Bell!

Yeah! I've got tickets for the Hawk Tribute at Massey Hall on October 4!!!!! I'm especially looking forward to seeing Garth and Tragically Hip perform once again......Canadian energy at it's finest!.....Come on Robbie!......Since you'll be in town anyway.....blow our minds and perform too!! Come on Robbie!!

I had an absolutely amazing time at Jeff Healey's Club on Thursday night!!!!!.....I was really moved by seeing Levon again (third time)......He's all about energy, energy, energy, energy, focus, skill, collaboration and enjoyment......I've always appreciated him as a musician but this night......wow!.....A couple of songs that stand out in particular were "Walk The Walk" and "Grass Is Always Greener".....It was this song in particular that Levon seemed to really enjoy playing with the boyzzzz.....'cause he'd get up and give all of them a high five with his signature smile......:-DDDD......Anyway, he was wearing the same black and white shirt that he wore on the Bluezzzz Cruise in NYC.....So......I felt right at home.....lol........Whew! The Club was so steamy, sweaty, and hot, hot, hot!......Levon rocked all night long....unbelievable! I can't wait to see him perform again!

Pat O'Shea.....Pat O'Shea!......You not only looked mighty fine in your suit and black buckled shoes....Hee hee....(I know.....I look for the shoes.......I guess I can blame that on "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" plus I was trained to be observant...but that's another story)..........but anyway......You played even better than the last time I saw ya......So good! So good! I could tell you've been on the road a lot....You seemed more at ease at this gig.........He also just smiled all night long as he played his heart out.....:-D......You had a good teacher.....didn't ya? Thank you Pat....Your guitar is really becoming a part of you!

Chris O'Leary......I'm a Sagittarian....so you should know I'm pretty honest and quite straight forward.....I didn't really appreciate your singing at The Silver Dollar....but this time........You were untouchable.....charming.....and gave every song everything you had to give! Your performance was authentic Chris! Thank You!!....I liked also how you always brought it all back to your boss.....It's so cool to see how humble Levon is while playing.....He doesn't star trip at all......He just puts on an amazing show and supports each musician he plays with and expects the same from the other musicians.......

Richard Bell....Well....I bumped into him in the audience not knowing it was him at first and he wouldn't let me get by to take some photos.....so I barged my way through anyway.....;-D.....But when Richard got on stage to perform with Levon, The Barn Burners and Jeff Healey.......Buddy Cage is right! Richard is one of the best piano players around! His hands were part of the piano....His hands just flew across the keys.....He was in tune with all the musical nuances.......He makes it look soooooo easy......and there he was with a toothpick? in his mouth looking cool and glancing over at Levon and grinning and having the time of his life and perhaps remembering...........;-D and raising his right leg half way up at times and once.....he raised his left leg straight out......He plays with all of his body......Oh yeah.....What a treat to watch him again!!!!!.....First time was at The Rick Danko Celebration and I specifically remembered him playing "Chest Fever" and the boyzzzz in the audience were letting loose their testosterone.......

Jeff Healey......You looked even younger than when I used to see you on T.V......and there you were.....blowing everyone away......total abandonment! Pat was glued to your guitar playing and Levon would get up and tap his drumsticks in honour of you!!!!!!

Thanks to all the musicians for a night I will always remember......Damn!....I think my rock/roots reggae heart is becoming a rock/roots reggae/bluezzzz heart!

Hmmmmm.....We were in a basement afterall.....and I somehow didn't notice the biggest Boomtown Rat in the audience.....If I would have seen Bob Geldolf....I would have asked if he had an extra copy of "Live Aid '85" to send to me........

Btw....This night I did meet Glen Silverthorn who played with Rick Danko in 1961 at Port Dover Summer Gardens.....A sweet and friendly man who looked like he was feeling good all night long.....He showed me some photos of Rick and himself......He was going to give them to Levon....I'll share my photos too......


Entered at Sun Sep 22 02:19:19 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Here-Now

Subject: Dark Star......Garth Hudson

Well, hang me for a toad as Jerry used to say. It was right in front of my face all the time.......Uh, so, as Emily Latila used to say "Oh, really?....Never mind."

I guess I have to go buy the CD now. Or is it out on vinyl?

Peace-o-Rama



Entered at Sun Sep 22 02:07:26 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There
Web: My link

Subject: "Dark Star"..........

Charlie, as the saying goes "If you don't know, I'm not going to tell you."

Dark Star, is, that it is......

And that's all that it is.......

Now for my quandary, why was (is) Garth reciting the lyrics to Dark Star, has he done the song on one of his releases? If so I've got to hear it. It seems to me the perfect vehicle for Garth.

I happened to fall asleep early one night a couple of weeks ago while doing some work at my folks house. I was awakened by a sound coming from the TV I had left on. This gorgeous tune coming from the set and I look up and see Garth dancing with his accordion. It brought an immediate smile to my face. Truely one of a kind.

Great weekend all



Entered at Sat Sep 21 23:04:34 CEST 2002 from (209.236.161.23)

Posted by:

mikey Lenahan

Location: Clinton NJ

Subject: JWB

That right Ruby......lets all support The hardest working bands in the area today...Jim Weider Band...Prof.Louie and the Crowmatix and Levon and The Barnburners. Each and every member of the above bands give more then 100% to there fans. They are the Best of the Best. Peace. Hope to see you Ruby at the Pattenburg on the 27th. If you see Crabgrass let him know he should also attend.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 21:33:07 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-002masprip0114.dialsprint.net (63.186.72.114)

Posted by:

G-Man

Just checked Allman Bros. site re. JIM WEIDER interview! Super!! Ruby glad to see U among us, and thanks for info about the JWB interview!! NICK,,ya speak the truth!!


Entered at Sat Sep 21 20:00:28 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Nick

I saw the Jim Weider Band in Woodstock a few months ago. I'll say this-it was great and JW is an unbelievable guitar player. It may sound over the top but I seriously don't think I've ever seen anyone better. You have to see it to believe it and I hope to see it again soon!


Entered at Sat Sep 21 19:39:46 CEST 2002 from slip-32-101-173-202.va.us.prserv.net (32.101.173.202)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Garth's "Dark Star" and Manuel Tune in Need of Words

This week I went to a book discussion and signing by Dennis McNally, author of that massive new hardback book about the Grateful Dead. Someone actually asked him which Dead song was his favorite and he said "Dark Star." So I'm listening to Garth Hudson reciting the words and wondering what the hell it means.

Anyway, I'm working this weekend but mention of movie watching and tape-making gave me an idea for some of the talented folks here: why not write some lyrics to that third track on the new live Richard Manuel CD from Japan. As Peter Viney said in his review here, the track titled "Jazz" invites someone to write some words--"it's a pity this piece never got worked up with lyrics." If RR isn't willing, maybe some of the gifted lyric writers here might give it a shot.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 18:10:02 CEST 2002 from dsc07.ati-ga-5.rasserver.net (204.30.135.158)

Posted by:

Mike Carrico

Subject: hope springs eternal

Me and my mate were cruisin' in the car we had Stage Fright on the box. Her youngest sibling, all of fifteen years, was in residence in the back seat. She became intrigued by the sounds and began to pepper us with questions about the band. Somehow we managed to avoid the whole "who's on first?" pitfall and found ourselves instead at home plate, with her asking me to record a Band tape for her. A perfect project for this rainy day, and for the humble cassette.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 17:21:29 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

ro

Subject: the road...

I meant to say; Fellini it is! hey it's saturday...idn't it?


Entered at Sat Sep 21 17:00:54 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Miles and miles of highway..

Diamond Lil - Those pops and snaps in our vinyl represent the dreams and fantasies of our youth. Where we were and how far we've come....and what a long strange trip it's been huh...God old hippies are pathetic!

\ Empty Now - Damn what a Tag! Sounds like me when hittin' the bottom of a bottle of Maker's Mark... I seen those films you mentioned. High Fidelity was great but Jarmusch did a terrible job on that Crazy Horse one. I expected a beauty, but in my humble opinion, it wasn't not up to Mystery Train / Down By Law / Stranger Than Paradise standards at all. I was disappointed.. And he know how to use good music...I didn't understand what went wrong. Can anyone explain what went wrong with that picture?

Richie - La Strada it is! Band connection ..." Come on without...Come on within...You'll not see nothin' like the Mighy Quinn"


Entered at Sat Sep 21 16:08:26 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-198-static.surferz.net (64.80.53.198)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Wittgenstein: I loved your post about the humble cassettes! Thanks for the laugh.

Roz pointed out something about that great feeling one got when buying a new vinyl album.. and I remember that feeling. For some reason, it always felt more exhilarating to come home with a brand new album than it ever does to purchase a new cassette or cd. I'm not sure why. Or maybe it's just me...but I _like_ my vinyl. Some of those scratches that may be quite annoying to someone else are like an old, familiar friend to me.. whose very presence, flaws and all..means alot.

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 15:57:55 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.214.71.45.dial1.boston1.level3.net (63.214.71.45)

Posted by:

Ruby

Subject: forgot to say

Another thougt If you have not heard them you could show your support by purchasing their cd s Think of this a second Allman Bros. fans go to see Goverment Mule and Dicky betts band and so on Greatful Dead people still go to see Ratdog and Phil lesh Band people should be at JWB shows as well as Levon and The Barnburners and The Crowmatics It keeps the Band family united and the spirit alive thanks


Entered at Sat Sep 21 15:45:25 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.214.71.45.dial1.boston1.level3.net (63.214.71.45)

Posted by:

Ruby

Subject: be supportive

Goodmorning people Just want to say if any of you here have seen or heard the Jim Weider band please put a post in for them. There is a new space on the Allman Brothers site www.hittintheweb.com called the gig room The first featured artist they have is the JWB!!! Great interview and will certainly reach alot of people So please go there and show some support for this kicker band and sweet bunch of guys! Thank you peace to all Ruby


Entered at Sat Sep 21 15:30:21 CEST 2002 from cache3.syd.ops.aspac.uu.net (203.166.96.237)

Posted by:

Adam Daniels (Winter Sun)

Location: Australia, but born in Canada


Entered at Sat Sep 21 13:58:08 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: trivia

ros. believe it or not, scarecrow was one of my hunches.great movie. havnt seen it for donkeys years. one of those classic sleeper movies. fellini directed la strada,im almost certain,again ,its years since iv seen it. kris kristofferson said in an interview once that la strada was a major influence on his early music. iv got friends coming around any second. ill set you question after theyv gone. have a good weekend ros and all on the gb richie.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 13:47:51 CEST 2002 from (193.194.69.77)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Talking movies

Roz : Super post

I would suggest two relatively recent movies to watch imperatively :

High Fidelity - Dir: Stephen Frears - A saga of good music and vinyl planet
The year of the horse - Dir: Jim Jarmush - The realm of Neil Young and the Crazy Horse


Entered at Sat Sep 21 13:26:35 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Location: RainCity

Subject: Music, Movies and stuff

Richie _ Scarecrow. Al Pacino and Gene Hackman. They were sitting in this bar and Eileen Brennan was playin' this barfly that got underneath Max's skin and Lionel made that dumb joke to get his attention away from punchin' her. I win! Herbert Ross directed "Play it Again Sam." He also directed "Good-by Mr Chips", "Steel Magnolias" and "Pennies From Heaven". I hope the GB don't get pissed off at this little six thousand mile game of trivia. ( if anyone thinks it's out of character. Speak up) Richie and I are movie buffs. From now till 2 out of 3 or 3 out of 5. mine will have Band Connections. Richie, This is easy, Who directed "La Strada"?

Tiny Monster _ You Angel You. You hunted that song down and linked it up just for me..thanks. That's the one! Mr Viney was right. That's the album. Now I'm really confused....

I will speak up in defense of cassette tapes. The Maxell metal ones. Even Gid Tanner and the Skilletlickers sound good on them.

There's this place in Lansing, Michigan where I buy all my Cd's. They sell really obscure stuff. 10 to 15 bucks a piece. "www.elderly.com" They also sell really great new or used and vintage instruments, also every accessories one will ever need. I bought a beautiful little "Tacoma" Mandolin, sight unseen. Good prices and excellent quality. They even sell African Thumb Pianos. Bought my mama a new autoharp for her birthday a few weeks ago.

Did everyone check out Brien Sz link? Those two photograhs under his link are gorgeous... Do you sell those Brien?

Ahhh...comfort noise. I got tapes of freight trains runnin' across old wooden tracks to put me to sleep. That's my comfort noise.....


Entered at Sat Sep 21 12:35:38 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: trivia

on second thoughts ros , i dont think its play it again sam, although im sure that woody allen played a character called max in a film with tony roberts. wasnt max the name tony roberts called woody in annie hall even though woody's character was actually named albie singer. im in knots here, put me out of my misery.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 11:21:40 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Grate debate

I had me tonsils and analogs out when I was a kid. :-o)


Entered at Sat Sep 21 11:10:19 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: Kudos

Wittgenstein, I loved your ode to the humble cassette. BWNWITenn's last post cracked me up, too. Y'all are too funny!

Also, I had no idea that was Duane's dobro on "Loser". Gives me a whole new appreciation for the tune Gleaning this type of info is why I love coming here. I haven't said it in awhile, but this guestbook rocks! Take a bow, everybody!


Entered at Sat Sep 21 08:43:03 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: vinyls and movies

lil. thanks for your response. one can get quite misty eyed thinking about the various charms and irritations of the dear old vinyl format. rosalind. a really tough opener but i think iv got it. was it 'play it again sam'. lionel's character was played by tony roberts and max by woody allen. question for you my dear. who directed this film. clue. it wasnt woody.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 05:38:46 CEST 2002 from (141.238.104.212)

Posted by:

David P. Downey

Location: Corry, PA
Web: My link

Subject: United Bands of America

Rock on! and check out our website!


Entered at Sat Sep 21 04:39:26 CEST 2002 from dial-r3-42.novocon.net (64.80.15.153)

Posted by:

Jack Moriarty

Location: western NY (right now)

Subject: At last, I've found this webpage!

I understand there are only three of the original members of The Band still with us. I miss the music they made together. The Band was always original. They never seemed to write or perform in order to get on AM top-40 lists. It was fun, sometimes profound music. Are any of them still performing these days, and where? (submitted September, 2002)


Entered at Sat Sep 21 03:22:32 CEST 2002 from (63.164.145.33)

Posted by:

Caledonia

Hi again ... just catching up on my GB reading.

Roz: I'm glad you liked the Tom Waits quotes I posted last week. He always has unique and interesting thoughts and ideas, so I thought I would pass some of them along.

I was surprised to find all three of LH's solo CD's in my local Tower Records yesterday. They're Japanese imports ($24.99). Maybe soon they'll start stocking RM's CD Whispering Pines?

Have you heard Little Steven's syndicated radio show (Underground Garage)? There's a short article about it in the current issue of Rolling Stone. Two weeks ago Little Steven played a promo by his friend ... RR! ("Hi, this is Robbie Robertson and you're listening to Little Steven's Underground Garage"). It's a fun show w/lots of lost gems.

I've been listening to StageFright alot these past few weeks. Especially Daniel and the Sacred Harp and The Rumor. I love RM on these two songs (in addition to every other song he ever recorded). Well, it's been said before ... what a beautiful voice!



Entered at Sat Sep 21 03:11:10 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Hey, what about MiniDiscs?

When I used to buy vinyl, I would immediately tape the LP, listen primarily to the cassette and breakout the vinyl only on special occassions.

Alas, I no longer have my LPs (gave them away before I moved to Japan almost 15 years ago). At least my mom didn't make me through them away like she did with my 1970s baseball and hockey card collection prior to moving to Europe in 1976!!! I'm still trying to recover from the shock of having lost out on a substantial (small) fortune. Some of the cards I had...I'm starting to get teary eyed.

My mom hasn't thrown away anything since then, so when I visit home I've got magazines from that period still lying about in my "old" room.

ME: "Mom, why don't you throw this junk out"

MY MOM: "Oh, it might have some value, you never know."

ME: (mutterring under my breath) "NOW you say this"


Entered at Sat Sep 21 03:01:31 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-002masprip0128.dialsprint.net (63.186.72.128)

Posted by:

G-Man

Subject: Later than usual!!

Well,,little late on this post but wound up stayin in Kingston for a few days,,,and missed the Boss in Tonto!!! Mariner's Harbor was all class,,Mr. Dener fit right in!! Butch,,,big thank's, Bro, for the good time!!! Big John Cass, Mike Cauley & the Wildest Limo Driver on record; Frankie A. and Capt Jack, RICO S. & WILD MAN GEORGE joined us for the show! The Levon Helm Blues Band was cookin!! Just about warmed up and the Sheriff hit the stage!! Well,,,them boys looked like they got a case of Buckwheats,,till he deputized em,,HONEST!!! End of speech & back to playin the BLUES!! Levon,,Chris,,Pat and Tony looked like Billy the Kid and the Regulators,,along with Jimmy Weider and El Sid McGuinnes, lookin like Jesse and Frank James!! Levon drumin and the GREAT Tony Garnier on standup bass were a site to see and hear!! Chris,,,well had that look of a gunslinger and backed it up with his SUPER vocals!!! GUITARS,,,Butch ya not a guitar fan,,heh,,,Pat,, Jim and El Sid!! Man,,,it doesn't get any better than that!!! Two hours of some great, great home cooked blues!!!! Dave Z,,,,,where were ya????


Entered at Sat Sep 21 01:55:05 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-112-181.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.112.181)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Web: My link

Subject: Oooh!

I've finished reading the rest of the internet (I always come here first, then go check out other sites, which is why I often have to come back and post more info here) and found this zinger in an interview with Dickey Betts, talking about former bandmate Gregg Allman. This just completely blows away anything that Levon might have ever had to say about Robbie, and is about as low as low can be. Here goes, the putdown to end all putdowns - "Man, Gregg reminds me of Anna Nicole Smith." Ouch!

Furthermore, the Allman Brothers site, hittintheweb, has a new section called Gig House dedicated to undiscovered artists. Their first feature is on Jim Weider. There is a short interview with him on the site, linked above. They also said they're looking for people who want to contribute info, pictures, etc.

There was another article I saw talking about new technologies that might phase out CDs, like DVD audio and super CDs, saying they sound so much better. It's funny (well, not really), when CDs came out, they were telling us how incredible they were. Now, the same people are starting to say, "CDs suck, buy this new stuff, IT sounds incredible! And it's only twice as much money!" But maybe the future lies in a non-tangible wireless format, like downloads. I do think that in twenty years, most electronic components will all be wired together in one digital-based system. Our TV, movies, stereo, telephone, lights, ovens, palm pilots, cars, etc., will all be linked, and will basically be one component. Think about how damn hard it already is to hook up your DVD player, TV, stereo and satellite dish together. Soon it will all be integrated. But maybe our kids' kids (or YOUR kids' kids) will be looking at them incredulously when they describe CDs, and actually having music contained on a physical item. They'll say, "How did you listen to your music in the car, or on an airplane," and Jr. will say, "We had to actually take the CD with us, and put it in the car stereo, or take a discman to listen to it. We didn't have our wallet-sized personal database access modules back then." Then the obnoxious Grandbabies will be like, "No way!!! You old fart!!"


Entered at Sat Sep 21 01:45:11 CEST 2002 from p024.wamo.socket.net (216.106.52.26)

Posted by:

Ann Lossman

Subject: Internet Presale Password

Can anyone tell me how I can get a password for the Internet Ticket Presale?


Entered at Sat Sep 21 01:41:51 CEST 2002 from 8.16.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.16.8)

Posted by:

Ray Pence

Subject: Response to "Tennessee"'s question

Regarding sampling of the Band: Big Audio Dynamite, whose leader was Mick Jones of the Clash, sampled "Shoot Out in Chinatown" back in the late 80s, early 90s. A friend had the CD and I was pleasantly startled to hear that unmistakable "Fu Manchu" guitar. I can't recall the title, year, anything else.


Entered at Sat Sep 21 01:20:42 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-117-65.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.117.65)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

This cowbell talk reminded me of the Saturday Night Live skit from a few years ago, I think Christopher Walken was the host, where Blue Oyster Cult was recording "Don't Fear The Reaper." Christopher Walken played the producer - who for the life of me I can't remember who it was supposed to be, someone real, kind of the '70s version of Mutt Lange - and he kept going, "the song is sounding better, but it still needs more cowbell." And there was one guy in the band who did nothing but played cowbell, and he was just getting down on the 'bell. Dumb, but kind of funny. Like most of SNL.

Dr. John talks about the ZuZu Man album in his book "Under The Hoodoo Moon;" which, by the way, is one of the best rock autobiographies ever, and a highly recommended read for anyone interested in '70s rock and some juicy dirt. But here is what he says: "Soon after that, another group of operators, whose identities I haven't yet uncovered, hired a band to lay down overdubs on yet another collection of jingle and jam session tapes I had recorded in the early and mid-sixties. This album, called ZuZu Man, hit the market on the Trip record label soon after Charlie and Brian's stuff. A singer who was supposed to be me was dubbed over this stuff; I don't know who the guy is, but he ain't a very good imitation."

Man, nothing beats an original Edison cylinder!


Entered at Sat Sep 21 00:39:01 CEST 2002 from on-tor-blr-a58-02-513.look.ca (216.154.8.5)

Posted by:

Wittgenstein

Location: Ludd

Subject: Cassettes

I would like to defend the humble cassette. Indeed the very humbleness of the cassette is what I find so appealing, so small, so delicate, so unassuming, and yet, music lives therein. I have a Muddy Waters cassette and I enjoy it immensely. I play it all the time in the car. It cost me all of four dollars. I don't have to go out and spend big money on a cd player for the car. I can use that money instead to take my wife out to fine restaurants and order European wine. And everytime I buy a cassette instead of a cd I'm saving about eight dollars. Lot's more fine dining. When I don't like a cassette that I've purchased, I don't feel bad that I've wasted lots of money. I simply take the cassette out of the player and place it under the front wheel of my car and then back over it. Immense satisfaction. If the cassette has a song that I don't like, I simply press a button and something from the other side comes on. Cassettes fit nicely into pockets or rolled up sleeves of a T-shirt. Very cool.

Cassettes are analog and thus sound very warm although they do hiss a little, a small price to pay for all those fancy dinners with which my wife and I indulge ourselves . Cassettes say "I'm no sucker for the latest tech advancement." Cassettes are very hip. I have an Allen Ginsberg cassette. I can't imagine owning an Allen Ginsberg cd. That would be ludicrous! And there's nothing like driving down the highway with your fourteen-year-old son, flipping open the glove compartment, pulling out a "Best of Mott The Hoople" cassette, popping it into the cassette player with a little flare, cranking the volume up for "All The Way From Memphis, and watching the smile that comes over his face as two vastly different eras of musical taste come together. You can listen to trash on cassette. The cd does not encourage insane purchases. You can find me down at the Walmart scouting the $2.99 cassette display. I can indulge my whims,doo-wop, Willie Nelson, Sam Cooke, Fart and the Smells, whatever. I've got Derek and Clive on cassette and, bloody hell, it doesn't get much better than that!

Sure, they breakdown occasionally, but so what. If you're so inclined you can always repair a cassette by unscrewing the damn thing and Scotch taping the tear. If it's glued together, a few handy taps with a chisel oughta separate the two halves. This can easily be accomplished over a weekend. And as for the liner notes.....you don't read 'em because you can't. They're too small. So you save time for doing other things, like repairing broken cassettes Hail the humble cassette!


Entered at Fri Sep 20 23:30:53 CEST 2002 from 24-196-233-253.charterga.net (24.196.233.253)

Posted by:

Don Pugatch

Location: Roswell, Ga

Subject: Vinyl and New Music

On the vinyl conversation, my problem is I have no turntable. My Garrard broke and too cheap to buy a new Turntable, or better still, cannot burn Vinyl, but can do wonders with CD's

New CD, maybe album, by The Chieftans, The Nashville Sessions, with so many fantastic guests, the likes of John Hiatt, Buddy and Julie Miller, Patty Griffen to name a few. There is a video on the net floating around, or you can go to Hiatt's website, there is a link on his fan forum.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 22:04:49 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-113.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.113)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: CDs

The "gold" 'Blonde on Blonde' CD from Sony, like the "gold" 'Bridge Over Troubled Waters' is a great improvement on the muddy CD originals. Some early CDs were indeed done badly. Remasters are often worth it, though I don't like some of the Van remasters which just sound like treble and bass has been boosted with little regard to balance, tone or overall effect. I see no one has defended the humble cassette (and i'm not going to). At least CDs have the right shape for artwork. Cover art has changed as a result of the CD. There'll never be another 'Catch-A-Fire' or 'Link Wray' (1971).


Entered at Fri Sep 20 21:02:35 CEST 2002 from ironmax-2-14.dialup.enter.net (216.193.164.162)

Posted by:

Zeppe

Subject: Media Formats

Forget CDs and vinyl. I got 8-tracks if anyone's interested. $50 a piece or best offer. Hey, where else are you going to find these treasures?


Entered at Fri Sep 20 20:15:35 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There
Web: My link

Subject: Did She Mention My Name

Rosalind, check the link above, see what you think. It doesn't sound like Dr.John to me. Perhaps it was a guest artist singing? You can listen to the whole song.

It never ceases to amaze me what you can find with this contraption.

By the way there was a rather feeble attempt to put record players in cars back in the 60s (for 45s of course) but, well, let's just say it is a miniscule speck in the course of history.

Cio Bambinos



Entered at Fri Sep 20 19:48:32 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: LP / CD : 23th post of the series

Can anyone clarify which is called the 'comfort noise' ? technical, physiological aspects.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 19:18:21 CEST 2002 from plantlogic.com (209.195.208.11)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Subject: vinyl

Dave Z, the real reason old hippies like vinyl is that it's really hard to clean your stash on those tiny little plastic boxes! (You can use them to scrape up the dust, though.) But seriously, I've seen several young record collectors avidly scouring flea markets and tag sales for LPs. Maybe prices will rise, and I'll be sorry about all the ones I gave away when I replaced them with CDs. But there are still many cherished LPs that will never be released in whole (or even in part) on CD.

One of the reasons some early CDs did not sound 'right' is that LP masters had to be horribly EQ'd (the RIAA curve) to allow reproduction by phono cartridges that are by nature far from linear in frequency response. Recent re-masters made from original multi-track masters can be mixed to sound better, or more 'modern', but may not have the exact balance between track as the original mix. Some records were even originally mixed differently for US and European releases. I find I often have to re-adjust by ears when switching between CDs and LPs to hear the message and not the media.



Entered at Fri Sep 20 18:50:19 CEST 2002 from oshst-147.olysteel.com (63.91.50.147)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: Ah Ha !

Thanks Dave Z.

For the life of me I couldn't remember where I left that stuff !!


Entered at Fri Sep 20 17:29:21 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Ah come on hippies... tell the truth... the real reason you like the vinyl... is because it usually played on some sunken box also called furniture... and in a pinch... you could always hide stuff in the opening around back... where access to all the tubes is... My guess is the real reason they have those warning labels on the back of fancy CD players... telling you not to open them up... is not because you might break the machines if you try to do your own maitenance... it's to keep hippies from trying to unscrew it... in a pinch... to hide their stash...

btw, while passing through Petersbourough, Paul G's fair village, this summer... I saw the best vinyl player ever... at the Canadian Canoe Museum... it was mounted in an old canoe... lot's of dark paint too... Got me kinda daydreaming... you had to have a pretty good J-stroke going down some of those rapids... while playing "Up On Cripple Creek"... and if you splashed just a little water on her vinyl copy of "The Band"... well let's just say... "she sends me" takes on a whole new meaning...anyway, when you watch your New Orleans Video... and see Richard Bell leaning while playing a seething solo... or you catch Garth live next, and see him thrashing about... think, ah!!! Canadian... probably learned that part from vinyl while running a good one...

Anyway, I also remember a friend had a piece of such music furniture... that was almost as long as his pool table... nice for setting drinks on (but please... use a coaster)...


Entered at Fri Sep 20 17:10:20 CEST 2002 from slip-32-101-173-111.va.us.prserv.net (32.101.173.111)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: The Vinyl Frontier & Mr. Viney's Latest

The quiet return of vinyl is an amazing trend to me. Just the other day I spotted Dylan's latest album on vinyl at Olsson's Books and Records (yes, they still use that word) in Arlington, Virginia.

There are good things to be said about CDs, though, such as a project like that new live Richard Manuel disc. As Peter Viney points out in his excellent article about that album here on this site, the sound of that recording is better than I ever expected and I wonder if that would have happened in the analog era. I recently bought the Beatles Star Club recordings from Hamburg, Germany for the first time on CD and I think that the sound is much better than on my old vinyl copy of that. But most analog originals (like the excellent BLONDE ON BLONDE example from John D.) can't be beat on vinyl. Put the vinyl version of "Jemima Surrender" back-to-back with the CD and there is no comparison. Of course, now I'm laughing again about that whole "tool" discussion from the other day...


Entered at Fri Sep 20 16:16:04 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: CD vs Vinyl

I remember the first time I heard Blonde On Blonde by Dylan on CD. I wondered where Al Kooper's organ had disappeared. I was told by one of my techno-with-it friends that I was still listening in "my analog ears" to a digital production.

My answer........I don't care...........where's the organ. I wasn't being smart I was being honest. I don't care about digital numbering or whatever.........I just wanted to hear the my vinyl mix on the CD. It's the way it was recorded and in this case I don't believe that "newer technology was better." I have often seen the line "re-mixed for CD" and people like my good friend David Powell could probably explain everything to me; but the bottom line is that even though David knows his stuff we all know where his "Vinyl Heart" lies -:). Yes it can all be explained......but the bottom line is......THE SOUND!


Entered at Fri Sep 20 15:45:37 CEST 2002 from (212.31.242.105)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Diversion

By a simple coincidence or under effect of those trendy movments currently encountred in cinema, at a given time of year 1978, not less than 5 musical movies where first-visioned the same week in movie-theaters

- The last waltz
- American graffiti - Condensed nostalgia, featuring the legendary Wolfman Jack playing his own role
- Tommy - the film with Roger Daltrey
- Exodus - the film dedicated to Bob Marley
- Saturday night fever - bof!

Everything has been arranged to dispatch the non advised public.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 15:42:23 CEST 2002 from libstfstx03.library.uiuc.edu (130.126.34.238)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Subject: Vinyl

I resisted CDs until well into the 90s. This was probably a good thing because I don't have a stock of those older ones with the poor sound. There are more than 8 milk crates of records in my house - this very weekend we are building wooden shelving to hold them, because the milk crates are in danger of falling over.

Cds are certainly easier to store, and I can take them on walks. Just now my walk is the time I listen to music, so CDs get the most play.

I do know what you all mean about the sound of vinyl. I bought a CD of Steely Dan tracks - a compilation - and was very disappointed in the sound of familiar tracks. I used to listen to the early albums a lot, and the same songs sounded flat on the cd.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 15:29:08 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: CD's!

rosalind, if you're paying $20 for cd's then you're shopping at the wrong stores - new releases can be had on sale for, $11.99, $13.99 easy. If I recall correctly, albums were up in the ten dollar bracket when they went out of style.., Given time, inflation and all I'd say you'd be paying just as much if not more if vinyl was still popular today.

I once had a large vinyl collection but once the cd took hold of me their was no looking back.., You can keep the snap, crackle and pop of vinyl. My memories of album songs now on cd are quite well intact. Maybe it's my years in TV and the crisp audio of music tracks I'm used to.., I just love a clean sound.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 15:17:32 CEST 2002 from citrix5.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.9)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: Vinyl

I will never forget the first time I got into collecting Vinyl..About 5 years ago A buddy of mine told me about this store in Burlington VT that I had to go to..so I went to visit him and we hit this place called Vinyl Destination neither one of us owned a record player at the time and as I walked over to the B section and I see the Brown Album, Northern Lights Southern Cross, Big Pink... I just started going through all the Bands I liked next thing I know I got about 60 albums piled up in the corner of the store my buddy has about 50 we go to the counter and the guy tells us they are running a special 50% off all albums this month.. so about $45 later (the cost of about 3 CD's) I am walking out with about 60 records! then we head to a circut city and my buddy buys a turn table then back to his place kicking back and listening to some great stuff...looking at the album's art work... I got back home to Rutland VT and my buddy calls me and tells me his brother who lives in Rutland has a turn table he never uses and will sell it to me so I head to his place and he has a Yamaha turn table he will sell me for $100 (the thing was a $300 turn table)... Now 5 years and 1300 albums later thats pretty much all I listen to.. I still listen & buy CDs... but to me its also a fun hobby to collect vinyl..And a cheep way to have a music collection of alot of different groups,styles, and hard to find stuff (I am still in my 20's so to me vinyl at one time was something I never thought I would like)... the only down part is that when I moved into a new place they are a pain in the ass to box up and carry down two flights of stairs.. but I wouldn't trade them for nothing..

Guy Davis Saturday night in Woodstock VT's Town Hall.. third row.. never seen him before.. so should be a great time..


Entered at Fri Sep 20 14:57:26 CEST 2002 from dialup005-a.ts551.cwt.esat.net (193.203.140.5)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Leaving Soon in The Morning

The other night, here in Cork, at a party after a session, this sax/dobro player from Santa Cruz put together a sax built in the '30ies that hadn't been played for YEARS (belonging to the party hosts father, now deceased) and we jammed on "IMND" and "Brown Sugar".......a right knees up, as they say!...........

"Unfaithful Servant"..........

At the risk of sounding COMPLETELY sacreligious.....

It's like one of them Dead songs that goes on and on and is trippy and you have to see it all and dig the beauty of the singer singing the words singing it..........like "China Doll" or "Unbroken Chain"......or "Candyman"............

Don't get me wrong now, folks......

I really LOVE listening to The Band or Rick performing "Unfaithful Servant".........

....but it's very G Dead to my ears.....the title is very G Dead, too........like you would NOT be surprised at Robert Hunter coming up with a title like " Unfaithful Servant"......and Garcia coming up with chords like that.......I would n't be surprised if Garcia covered it somewhere along his way........


Entered at Fri Sep 20 14:24:20 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-073.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.73)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Did she mention my name?

"In The night" album 1985.

P.S. - this is not encylopaedic knowledge, it's just i have 'The Great Rock Discography' on the shelf next to the computer.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 14:20:26 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: sorry to come back so soon.

W S _ That Midnight on the Water" album came out in '75. I remember cause I got it for Christmas. And on Christmas day of 1975 my Uncle Ray taught me how to waltz. He was sooo drunk and boy could he ever dance... He waltzed me thru the kitchen and my mother kept yellin' at him about the candied sweet taters( that's the way we talked around our house) cookin' on the stove directly beneath his elbow. He was a wonderful guy. He stood about 20 feet tall to me. That's just how much I loved him.. That album also had a beautiful version of "Mr Blue" and also a nice version of "Dark Hollow".


Entered at Fri Sep 20 13:57:38 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool36-144.nas2.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.36.144)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Cueing on vinyl

Not to mention if you just want to hear a particular song for a particular mood, and you have to cue the record just right. And on albums where you are always playing that one song a lot of pops and noises develop at the beginning. Emmylou's Boulder to Birmingham is all scratched up at the beginning for me, because when I'm in the somber, nostalgic mood to hear that song I don't want to hear anything else on the album.

In high school our modern dance troupe did an interpretive dance to that song--I'd pay money to see it again now. Was it great?--I thought so at the time but maybe it was like Dana Carvey as Garth imitating that modern dance segment in whatever that Madonna video was.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 13:52:11 CEST 2002 from stjhts25c116.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.249.121)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Lennon on Vinyl

I know a guy who is selling a nice collection of LPs. He has a box set of Lennon Lps on virgin Japanese vinyl. 7 LPs in all, excluding his last 2, double fantasy and milk and honey. They are in mint/near mint condition. They are all on Apple and have original gatefold jackets, inserts, etc. He is asking $150. Canadian. Any opinions on this one? I think it is a fair asking price.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 13:46:10 CEST 2002 from stjhts25c116.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.249.121)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: vinyl vs cd/bromberg

I too have a lot of vinyl. I used to have over 1500 albums but know have about 400. I friend of mine has a CD recorder. The needle drop recordings turn out quite well. I then put my albums away and listen to them on CD. Why? Mere convenience, pure and simple. If you have a good vinyl presing and a top quality turntable and cartridge I believe it sounds just as good as a CD. I have an import copy of Quadrophenia that I would put up against a CD anytime. The older CDs that were originally released as LPs ( you know the ones, with the goofy pattern on the back,they all lokk the same). They actually sound inferior to vinyl, unless of course they have been remastered. The only real advantage of CDs is they take up less storage space, and you can change tracks easier with the remote. There is something about that vinyl sound I just love. But I can't put my finger on it. Maybe the sound on CDs is too compressed or too clean. But there is a distinct difference.

Brombergs "Wind on the Water" is from the album "Wind on the Water" Wallflower is on Wanted Dead or Alive. You suppose thats where the Wallflowers got their name from?

I also have Robbies first album on vinyl. Sounds great. Produced by Daneil Langois, I think.

Good cowbell-We're An American Band. Not a great song though.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 13:33:04 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Vinyl Yeah!

Diamond Lil _ It's a shame that these kids today (sound like my parents there) can never know the joy of a brand new shrink-wrapped vinyl Gem in their hands. I use to rip the shrink-wrap off of them things with such utter glee. Pull them out, hold them up to the light, check the grooves and gently wipe the dust particles off the beautiful shiny black with the back of my hand and head for that turntable. Look for lyrics on the inner sleeve, check out the artwork. Man...Those were the days! CD's piss me off. Twenty bucks for what? Use to by a brand new record for $5.98!

Tiny Monster _ I went to the internet and looked up Zu Zu Man. It ain't on there. Maybe it's an unlisted track. I looked for in my tape collection after I posted. It was right there in between Butterfield's "Watch 'im Tell a Lie" and "Breadline". Mac's voice or keyboard isn't even on the song. I could be wrong about it even bein'on one of his Dr. John's albums. Fred Carter played on that Butterfield album. Not Bad Fred!

Richie _ Got a movie question for ya.. Lionel says to Max.. He says; "Hey Max...These two guys go into a bar, right... and the one guy says to the bartender "Two mugs." Bartender says: "I know that. Whadaya have?" from '73 Rich.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 13:00:47 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.11)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: Vinyl

Richie: I had to laugh (and identify) with your comment about not having to jump up out of the chair umpteen times to change tracks on cd's the way you have to with vinyl. I was having a conversation with my 18 year old son just the other day about vinyl.. and he asked how the heck you change tracks on a record. I told him and he kind of made a face (similar to the face made when one can't find the tv remote and one has to actually get up and change the channel :-) He also asked how come we have cassette and cd players in cars.. and yet we never had turntables in cars. Hmm...

Funny how things change over the years. I'm sure that my 2 youngest think I'm lying when I tell them that there were no vcr's and no video games when I was their age. They can't imagine what I possibly did for fun. And I remember the first time my oldest saw a "dial" phone for the first time. He asked me how to work it.. because you see, it had no buttons to push! Kids.. you gotta love em.

Have a good day everyone.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 12:42:54 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: cd's v . vynil

ill never get rid of my vinyls but cds have one distinct advantage. you dont have to get out of the chair umpteen times to flip the record over. how many times for rock of ages? with doubles such as exile just whack the cd in chill out and listen to it in its entirety without interruption. however, vinyl will also have massive pluses over cds. the cover artwork. light years ahead of the coputerised images which feature on cds. also cds have negated the distinctiveness of the music on the different sides of vinyl records . look at blood on the tracks. the mood and ambience on side 1 is slightly different to side 2. have a good day all. rich.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 12:26:31 CEST 2002 from zorg146.revealed.net (208.243.237.146)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Sam, don't forget about that cd! I'm still awaiting your reply about the Stage Fright DCC disc.

Good cowbells? How's about Mississippi Queen by Mountain! At 5:00 am, that's all I can think of :) Let me know about the cd Sam. I'm just waiting for your list.

Mike...time to make the donuts :O)


Entered at Fri Sep 20 09:42:07 CEST 2002 from hse-toronto-ppp178395.sympatico.ca (64.229.82.238)

Posted by:

Blind Willie

Subject: Levon - Toronto Last Night

Once again, I have seen the best drummer of all time. Levon sweated and sometimes grinned his way way through one hot, sweaty night in Healey's basement. I like it when The Barnburners play Toronto.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 07:34:41 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-118-32.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.118.32)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: Tying threads together

This might be common knowledge, I don't know, but Beck's "Loser" was based around a sample of Dr. John's "I Walk On Gilded Splinters" as recorded by singer Johnny Jenkins, featuring Duane Allman on dobro. Probably the most airplay Duane Allman's gotten since "Layla." Has The Band ever been sampled? Didn't someone use the intro to "Up On Cripple Creek"? "Don't Do It" certainly could be used. So could "King Harvest."


Entered at Fri Sep 20 07:07:14 CEST 2002 from 64-121-53-145.c3-0.snmt-ubr1.sfrn-snmt.ca.cable.rcn.com (64.121.53.145)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There
Web: My link

Subject: "Did She Mention My Name"

I'm pretty sure it's from the "ZU ZU MAN" LP.

The Dr.John tune that is.....

Am I right Roz ?

Night all



Entered at Fri Sep 20 06:57:21 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: good cow bell

"I Call Your Name" - Beatles

"Time Has Come Today" - Chambers Brothers ?

the intros to "Down on the Corner"-CCR, and "Dance The Night Away"- Van Halen


Entered at Fri Sep 20 06:32:55 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: David Bromberg

W S Walcott - I love that beautiful "Midnight on the Water" I forget what album it's off of tho. I have a bunch of Bromberg stuff on a good Maxell. His version of "Wallflower" is great too.

Carmen - I love "New Mexicoe" too. It's my favorite piece off that album...

Vinyl vs CD _ Vinyl wins hands-down! I wouldn't give up my record collection for nothin'

There's an old Dr. John album I used to have. It had a song on it called "Did She Mention My Name" I think he made it with a bunch of other New Orleans folks. I remember the song because it's the only song on the record I took the time to learn to play. Bought it at a yard sale for a quarter. Does anyone know the name of the album?


Entered at Fri Sep 20 05:42:39 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Danko

Carmen, Danko gets cowriting credit on 8 songs and sole on 2 songs.

"What a Town", "New Mexico", and "Small Town Talk" with Bobby Charles

"Brainwash", "Sweet Romance", "Java Blues", "Once apon a Time" are with Emmit Grogan

and "Tired of Waiting" with Jim Atkinson

He gets sole credit for "Shake It" and "Sip The Wine" but as has been pointed out here in the past "Sip the Wine" was originally credited to Tim Drummond several years before. Drummond plays some bass on Danko's record. Who knows why Danko gets sole credit on his solo record. An odd one for sure.

Interestingly on the first pressings of "Jubilation" Danko was credited with writing "Book Faded Brown" but it was really written by Paul Jost. This was corrected on the subsequent pressings.

Rob Fraboni produced "Danko" The key players are Doug Sahm and Gerry Beckley (from America) on guitar and there's lots of guests like Clapton and Garth (New Mexico), Ron Wood, Blondie Chaplin, Levon, Richard, Robbie (killer guitar on Java Blues).

All this should be in the discography section but what the hell, I felt like typing.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 05:21:11 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Rick's writing credits

Carmen _
What a Town - Rick and Bobby Charles
Brainwash - Rick and Emmett Grogan
New Mexicoe - Rick and Bobby Charles
Tired of Waiting - Rick and Jim Atkinson
Sit the Wine - Rick
Java Blues - Rick and Emmett Grogan
Sweet Romance - Rick and Emmett Grogan
Small Town Talk -Rick and Bobby Charles
Shake It - Rick
Once Upon a Time -Rick and Emmett Grogan

I have the cover in a gold frame. It's one beautiful shot of Rick. The black and white glossy cover had a tendency to bend so I fixed that by keeping it protected behind glass. I bought the album after seeing a full-page ad in the Rolling Stone back in about 78 or so.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 04:27:01 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

chris

Location: connecticut usa

Subject: cds lps

Greg, Robbie's first solo album (and storyville too) did come out on vinyl...in fact, thats how I bought it in 1987....I wish "Jericho" and "High on the Hog" did, but, as far as I know, only "Jubilation" came out on vinyl...(I have one)....I dont know how others feel about this in the guestbook, but I still miss vinyl...though I think the CD meduim (with 24 bit remastering, and DVD audio) has finally started to come into its own for great sound quality...they are sounding warmer...and the packaging is getting better too....has anyone else heard the Doors remastered albums (from late 1999)? They are so superior to the first few editions (even as late as 1993) that its scary...the new stones remasters are unbelievably good to my ears...now only if the Band would put out some of the great unreleased material from 1985-1998 for the fans....dare to dream


Entered at Fri Sep 20 04:18:13 CEST 2002 from pcp01420995pcs.lndsd101.pa.comcast.net (68.81.35.162)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Rick Danko

I love Rick's 1977 self titled CD. It is always in my car. I think New Mexico is good enough to have been included on any BAND work including Brown. I could never figure out why he stoped.

My version does not contain writing credits. Did Rick write or co write the songs?

Regards!


Entered at Fri Sep 20 04:00:18 CEST 2002 from kit-uas-2-209197176214.3web.net (209.197.176.214)

Posted by:

Greg D

Subject: cd's/lp's

David P.: you answered one question I had concerning simultaneous releases on vinyl & CD. I couldn't recall if Robbie's first solo album was on vinyl too but I guess it came out when they were still releasing on both media. I didin't know that Storyville was also issued on vinyl at the time of release.Peter V.: I also found the story of Keef and the Tele revolting; considering he tours with at least 18 guitars I'm sure he doesn't need another. Maybe just his idea of fun?


Entered at Fri Sep 20 03:14:08 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Jtull Fan

Location: RIchmond

Subject: reply to Sadavid

Sadavid, how nice it was to scroll down and see your nice notes on Tull! FYI: The bonus tracks on the first 4 remastered Tull albums were previously available on the 1988 box set, now out of print. Clive Bunker did subsequent work with Blodwyn Pig, featuring Mick Abrahams, Mannfred Mann (is this their first GB mention?) in the 90's, and, only this year, in a reunion of the 1968 original lineup of Jethro Tull for several tracks featured on the new DVD Living With The Past. For bluesy Tull, I recommend 1992's A Little Light Music, wich is mostly an 'unplugged' tour compilation featuring excellent harmonica work by Ian and drumms by Dave Mattacks of Fairport Convention.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 02:40:48 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

LeeG

Diamond lil: You can reach me at LRLGabites@aol.com Ray G - I agree with you about Duece & A Quarter. Friends always enjoyed this track when I included it on Compilations for them. Along with a couple of tracks from the Burlison album that Weider produced. Scotty and D.J. will hopefully be performing in Manchester early October.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 02:35:12 CEST 2002 from 0-2pool44-60.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.44.60)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Beck/polyester bluesmen/cow bells

BWNWIT: I have loved Beck since the first time I heard him sing "I'm a loser, baby, so why don't you kill me."

Maybe jazz men dress snazzy, but the greatest blues men I ever saw were Glamour "don'ts" in atrociously colored polyester suits accessorized by white belts and shoes.

I feel like I have nothing to add to the GB anymore. The only thing that struck me this week was talking about the cow bell which got me thinking about how great a cow bell can sound and what other great songs feature one. All I could think of was War's Low Rider and Sinead O'Connor's Put Your Hands on Me, but that may be a synthesized cow bell.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 01:40:18 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Danko

Thanks John, Just before you posted I ordered two of the Danko (originals) from amazon.com. One was $24.99 and the other is $14.49. Both are imports. Could the price difference be due to quality? I figure one of them should come through. Also does anyone know what Amazon.com sales rank means?

David, you must have some killer records stores down your way. I live in the D.C. area and it took a couple months before I found Danko's first record on vinyl. It has the "cutout" hole punch in the corner and cost $18. It's in good condition though and sounds great. I'm going to beat the streets again for more stores to see if I can find a factory sealed copy or one that's not a cutout. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Sep 20 01:00:57 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: 1st CD I had skip

The first CD I had skip was Buddy Holly's Greatest Hits on MCA. Got another copy........and I haven't checked lately; but I believe is fine. I don't believe we really know yet the "life" of the CD. All's I know is that my vinyl of 45 years ago is still sounding great (ok the 45's are little scratchy)BUT THE 33 1/3 ARE GREAT!


Entered at Fri Sep 20 00:56:57 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko (Originals) on EMI

Hope this link works!


Entered at Thu Sep 19 23:46:20 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.93)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Lee G: Been trying to mail you, but mail's bouncing back. Hope all is well. Please mail me. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 23:23:59 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: keef anecdote

peter. its a horrible story i agree. however. did this guy report keith to the police? also given the fact that rock stars these days regularly get sued for millions for blowing their noses in the faces of their audiences, why has this incident not been the subject of a multi million dollar lawsuit of rockefeller poportions. given this book is riddled with factual errors , some less than truthful keith yarns are probably par for the course, and it is stephen davis we are talking about here not graham greene!


Entered at Thu Sep 19 23:02:00 CEST 2002 from host217-45-53-196.in-addr.btopenworld.com (217.45.53.196)

Posted by:

lifeboy

Subject: keith the thief

What an asshole indeed! I would have taken it back and wrapped it round his head.Wa...r!All this tough guy gypsy pirate thing is a big sham anyway, it's easy to play little roles when you're that closeted and surrounded by REAL tough guys. I have also held the same suspicion Peter that they are all that way deep down but that is sick...shame.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:55:31 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Rick Danko / The Joy of Vinyl

For some of you I may be preaching to the choir, but used, as well as sealed, copies of the Rick Danko LP seem to be plentiful and inexpensive. You can't beat the sound of analogue to your ears and you don't have to strain your eyes to look at the liner notes & artwork. Even more plentiful in used record stores is the LP version of Robbie Robertson's first solo album (on the old Geffen label). "Storyville" is a little harder to find, but not long ago I found a sealed import LP version that sounded even better than my original domestic vinyl. I also found a sealed LP copy of the "Color of Money" soundtrack recently. All three of those sealed LP copies of "Rick Danko", "Robbie Robertson" and "Color of Money" cost me less than the price of one import CD!


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:36:02 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-063.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.63)

Posted by:

Peter viney

Subject: Skipping CDs

Skipping CDs- most CDs have errors, it's just that some CD players have better error correction. In my experience, car players will play almost anything as they have mega-powerful correction. I've had Philips, Marantz and Quad players (all Philips' engines) which find errors on almost any disc. The Marantz will shortly end up in the bin because it ruins most listening (though the sound quality is very good). But then Sony-based engines play them all perfectly. Try it in another player. Then give it a really good clean. That gets rid of the errors a lot of the time.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:30:16 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-063.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.63)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Not the one from Dynasty …

Alexis Korner- a friend had a great live 1962 album with Cyril Davies etc, which had the basic stuff on it. It was called “R&B At The Marquee”and had Gotta Move, Got My Mojo Working and Hoochie Coochie Man. Don’t recall what else, except that in my spotty youth I learned those three from it. Alexis’s later incarnation as CCS redoing ‘Whole Lotta Love’ as the theme to Top of The Pops was less edifying.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:28:29 CEST 2002 from wcs2-pent.nipr.mil (198.26.74.100)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Danko

I've got the Danko (originals)from EMI. Java Blues started skipping after a month or so. I don't know if I scratched it or it's cheap manufacturing but it's the only CD I own that skips. It's also one of my favorites unfortunately. I tried to order it again and was told it was on back order and then finally not available. So if anyone can find it hop on it cause it's going out of print if it isn't already.

The packaging of the EMI Danko(Originals) is nice. It comes in a colorful album cover replica box. Inside the CD case with the cover art and credits as well. It also comes with postcards of other artists in the EMI Originals series (mink deville is one). It's actually one of the nicer packaging jobs I've seen. The subsidiary of EMI who put it out is based in Holland.

I've also got the original album with the "hundreds of pictures" photo collage on the sleeve. It's a great piece of work. Shame it got ignored again. I'm going to cherish mine. In fact when I get home I think I'll put on "New Mexicoe" with EC on guitar, Garth on accordion and Ricky singing like a bird. Beautiful song.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:17:16 CEST 2002 from user-112187e.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.160.238)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

The first Danko album pops up on ebay with fair regularity.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 22:15:07 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-109.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.109)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Wot a larf …

Finally fought my way to the end of the Stephen Davis Stones tome. First reaction – must relisten to ‘Bridges of Babylon’ which I dismissed at the time, but he argues is the best since Exile. Second, a very unedifying 2002 anecdote right at the end. This guy stops Keef in NYC and asks him to autograph his vintage Telecaster. Keef just snatches it, leaps in the limo and drives away. The guy catches up at the intersection, and gets threatened by Keef’s driver. Keef keeps it. The excuse is that if it were signed by Keef it would be worth $1000. So? Decline to sign it. What’s a vintage Tele worth in good condition anyway? Can’t be that far off (or wouldn’t be in Central London). Funny? In what way? Proves my long-held belief that they are all total arseholes in spite of the great music.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 21:55:39 CEST 2002 from slip-32-101-173-201.va.us.prserv.net (32.101.173.201)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: A Gig I'm Sorry I Missed...

I was at the Bottom Line for Al Kooper's previous performance there, but he supposedly hit the legendary NYC club earlier this month with the great guitar man, Jimmy Vivino. Vivino was hanging out in the audience last time, telling me when I mentioned that Kooper is not yet in the Rock Hall of Fame: "yeah, but he's in the Hall of SHAME."

That sort of humor was also evident in the way Vivino and Kooper billed themselves for the Bottom Line gig: "The Self-Righteous Brothers."


Entered at Thu Sep 19 21:51:07 CEST 2002 from libstfstx03.library.uiuc.edu (130.126.34.238)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Subject: Appropriate use of technology

Peter, when you listen to 'Secrets of the Heart' let the disk play on for about 2 minutes. You will then hear an interview with Bobby Charles. He talks in that soft Louuuuziana brogue, describing his songwriting methods. It seems bits of a song may come to him at any time, including when he's out and about, without a tape recorder. When that happens he finds a phone, calls home, and sings the song into his answering machine.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 21:38:12 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-002.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.2)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Correction

By 'Robbie Wood' I meant 'Ronnie Wood'- it's just that my computer is programmed to complete 'Ro-' as 'Robbie'. On first hearing, 'The Blues White Album' is crap, but I will persist and hopefully it will grow.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 20:33:45 CEST 2002 from slip-32-100-27-4.va.us.prserv.net (32.100.27.4)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan

Above is a link to a portion of that article about Dylan's hometown of Hibbing, Minnesota from NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC. The weird photo of the little kids with the drum is a current interior shot from Bob's boyhood home.

Dylan is playing some US shows this fall with general admission seating. One of these is on November 22 at my old college, George Mason University, in Fairfax, Virginia. I've seen Dylan play there twice before with good seats but don't plan to go with a general admission policy. I know that helps kill the scalpers, but general admission can get ugly in a gymnasium like that one...


Entered at Thu Sep 19 20:30:34 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

John: ONE WAY did reissue "Rick Danko" in 1997. The best I can tell it's also been reissued in Europe three or four times. There's a recent listing of the album as an import from EMI under the title "Rick Danko (Originals)". I'm begining to think that perhaps the Arista re-release was shelved due to problems over the licensing rights.

sadavid: The Fleetwood Mac album you mentioned with "Black Magic Woman" was entitled "English Rose".


Entered at Thu Sep 19 20:24:09 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State

Subject: Rick Danko CD

While it is too bad the rerelease/remaster of the Rick Danko lp has been scrubbed, it’s not as though the music isn’t available. The three live bonus tracks would be nice to have in “official” sound quality, but “Rick Danko” itself has been continuously available on CD for over 10 years, having been issued by both One Way, in the U.S., and Edsel, in Britain. The Edsel release seems still to be in print; I saw one in a record shop last week, and both amazon and amazon.uk have it listed. That’s not bad for a record that was in the 3 for $5 bins within a year of its release.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 19:02:58 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Danko Re-Release

I think it would be nice if "ONE-WAY" out of Albany got on this CD. They've released some great re-issues including those of Hawkins.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 18:55:22 CEST 2002 from gpf-t199.gpnet.dnd.ca (131.137.245.199)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: Winnipeg

Subject: brit blues etc

I'm working only with (a pretty dodgy) memory since my cherished vinyl all perished in a flood a few years back, so apologies for errors....

In my young teens I was lucky to come across a Mayall 2-disc compilation on London called "Thru the Years," that was key in kindling a lifelong love of the blues. A fascinating track is an extended Peter Green solo called "The Supernatural" that was immediately recognizable as kin to the monster Santana hit "Black Magic Woman." Via, as I later discovered, Fleetwood Mac-with-Peter Green's "Black Magic Woman." I disremember the name of the Mac album, but it had a terrific surreal cover with a grimacing disembodied head outstanding in its field.

Another huge favorite that I just recently was delighted to find on CD (with bonus tracks & Ian Anderson notes), was Jethro Tull's "This Was." High-energy flute taking what would be harp lines on some tracks. I tie people down and make them listen to drummer Clive Bunker drive "My Sunday Feeling" which could have been a very pedestrian blues otherwise. He's terrific all through, if anyone knows of his subsequent work I'd like to know.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 18:48:31 CEST 2002 from t3o943p26.telia.com (62.20.243.26)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: North Country Blues
Web: My link

Subject: David Powell's list on the great music from 1968 / Kalervo's list on the great contemporary music / To Dave The Phone Guy about Alexis Korner

WARNING TO KALERVO: - Reading the first part of this post may seriously damage your health :-)
Thanks DAVID POWELL for your nostalgic list about albums from 1968. My favorite is JOHN MAYALL's "Blues From Laurel Canyon" - a gem among the _despised_ English blues. It is a concept album about flying from London to Los Angeles, telling a story. Good artwork, interesting booklet, good players (Mick Taylor, Colin Allen, Steve Thompson). After my first flight from London to Los Angeles I just had to drive thru Laurel Canyon to see if I had visualized it right.

About KALERVO'S list of modern rock music: - Thanks for including KENT which is the best band in Sweden today. I happened to interview yesterday the headmaster in the Art School where many of the boys once went. He pointed out over and over again how _traditional_ and _old-fashioned_ the school is. In this case the combination of nostalgia and avant-garde has been fruitful.
BTW The style of KENT has been described as "aggressively decadent".

Good to see Alexis Korner mentioned here, especially coming from so far away as from Eastern Sierras. (Hey Dave, is the Autumn fog lying already on the Truckee River in the mornings?)

My link is the gb vCard and the email address is woodlark.geo(Danish pastry)yahoo.com.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 17:31:22 CEST 2002 from 56k-socal-01-04.dial.qnet.com (209.221.198.67)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

Does anyone remember Alexis Korner? I used to have his (English)blues on reel-to-reel but can't find it now. I believe I learned of Mayall through listening to Alexis Korner.(circa 1969/1973 or there abouts)


Entered at Thu Sep 19 16:59:46 CEST 2002 from user-11219iv.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.166.95)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

LDO, I don't think the Flaming Lips could cop US like the Band does, but I do think they'd approximate it. They could probably play any Stones song they wanted, and even though the Stones (well, maybe just Jagger) tried to modernize their sound by hiring the Dust Brothers a couple of years ago, they couldn't come anywhere near sounding like the Lips. But isn't this like apples and oranges?


Entered at Thu Sep 19 16:28:26 CEST 2002 from cpe0050180e8779.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (24.157.151.53)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: warm band article

there is a nice, warm article to do with a band connection from way back. it appears in the brantford expositor, entertainment section. the paper is located in brantford, ontario and obviously has a web site. thought it would be a good addition to the whats new section. deals with an old drummer from rick dankos teenage band, a band that plays as back up for ronnie hawkins, and sitting in with these guys as they play covers of band tunes. hope you find it


Entered at Thu Sep 19 16:25:43 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-004.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.4)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: purchases, football analogies

Pehr: e-mail me (viney at mailbox.co.uk) to discuss Link Wray …

I walk past most ‘Closing Down Sale- 40% Off’ signs, but when it’s Tower Records, I make an exception. I picked up good stuff too- Bobby Charles ‘Secrets of The Heart’. Sam Moore ‘Plenty Good Lovin’ – The Lost solo album’ and the Telarc blues anthology ‘The Blues White album’ (which features Colin Linden, Maria Muldauer, Charlie Musselwhite) and is relevant to recent discussions – blues artists do songs from The White Album. Sorry to see Tower, Southampton go, but when you regularly charge £24.99 for a DVD that Virgin and HMV have for £18.99 within 200 yards, ‘closing down’ is inevitable.

Al- football analogies. Peter Green as Georgie Best, OK. (And I remember the Geiorgie Best who played briefly for Bournemouth as well as the Manchester United version – both fit Peter Green), But I don’t think I’d rate Eric Clapton as having the indominatable enthusiasm of Kevin Keegan, maybe Robbie Wood fits better? Then you get that slight touch of headless chicken which characterizes Kevin’s managerial style at times. I agree that Eric Clapton, like Keegan, is the product of hard work, training (aka practice), and skill rather than genius, and sadly about 95% of all recent England teams are Erics not Peter Gs. But we never had a Georgie Best anyway. There’s fun to be had here- but it’s over a lengthy drink stuff probably. Eric Burdon as Jackie Charlton? Which guitarist would be dour enough to be the Kenny Dalglish? Which star, agent or manager would be the red-nosed, infinitely patronizing Brian Clough? I remember Brian addressing Kevin Keegan as “Look here, sonny” on TV when Kevin was the Newcastle manager. Who would be the David Beckham of rock? Far too many to list, I think.

Funny - the Peter Green / Mayall package is playing here soon and I wasn't tempted to get a ticket- perhaps I might now!


Entered at Thu Sep 19 15:48:03 CEST 2002 from oshst-128.olysteel.com (63.91.50.128)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Web: My link

Subject: David Bromberg

W.S. Walcott,

David Bromberg is setting up shop in Wilmington, Delaware. There are some shows scheduled in the vicinity. The link above will take you to a recent story in a local newspaper.

He's got a pretty good website as well.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 15:05:19 CEST 2002 from 1cust20.tnt1.hackensack.nj.da.uu.net (67.235.133.20)

Posted by:

Ray G

Location: Pearl River, NY

Subject: The Band & The Stones

I'm a somewhat regular visitor to the Band page/guestbook but don't post too often. I have been seeing a lot written about the Band & the Stones lately so I'm jumpin in. I don't know if anyone has mentioned it yet but a few years back Elvis' origianl band, the Blue Moon Boys, put out a CD called "All the Kings Men". Surviving Blue Moon Boys Scotty Moore & DJ Fontana teamed up with Cheap Trick, Steve Earle, the Mavericks, the remaining members of the Bill Black Combo (minus Bill Black-the other original BMB who passed on), and a few others.

The highlight of the entire disc is the opening song called "Duece and a Quarter". Levon, Rick, Jim, Richard B, Scotty, DJ, and .... Keith (or is it Keef?) all team up on this one. They work really well together and according to Scotty's excellent book, "That's Alright Elvis", it was one hell of a good time in Woodstock for the session. It's a great old style rocker and a great collaboration between members of three of Rock & Roll's most important entities... Elvis's original band, the Stones, and the Band.

Probably as close as you'll get to a Band/Stones collaboration.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 14:54:22 CEST 2002 from wcs2-pent.nipr.mil (198.26.74.100)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Danko re-release

I emailed Ice magazine about the Danko cancellation and got this response:

"Thanks for your note. The release is definitely cancelled with no plans for future reinstatement, unfortunately. And, I'm sorry to say, I haven't any details as to why they cancelled it. You may want to contact the label directly. This was coming through their reissue arm, BMG Heritage."

So I guess that's it then. Maybe somebody from a smaller label will buy the masters and put it out since Arista doesn't want to do it. Another great album put ouy to pasture.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 14:40:08 CEST 2002 from stjhts26d003.nbnet.nb.ca (198.164.241.132)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: David Bromberg

I'm a big Bromberg fan. Have about 10 of his albums. Is he still around? Still recording? He does a good version of Danko's "What A Town".


Entered at Thu Sep 19 14:04:03 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Levon

Well I'm still at home for another week or so; because of this illness and I'm going to miss Levon right in my own backyard. Doesn't get much worse. Butch hope you all had a good night in Cobourg last night and I know Healey's will be JAMMED tonight. Jeff Healey and Levon together. Whoooooo!


Entered at Thu Sep 19 13:53:00 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

ro

JTullFan - A M E N !


Entered at Thu Sep 19 13:44:10 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Bluegrass

That sounds great. The McCoury's doin' The Weight. I hear it in my head. Bluegrass is a rich and a wonderful thing. The first great music I ever heard was The Seldom Scene. John Starling drew me in to Emmylou Harris, which in turn drew me into Gram Parsons. I heard her singin "Sin City" and said Oh My God, Who wrote that song! Afer that it was Ralph Stanley. The guy sounds like he came from the very core of the oldest tree on them old Clinch Mountains. I love Dave Evans, Dave Evans singin' "Pastures of Plenty", Larry Sparks singin "John Deere Tractor" The Richie Family singin' "Old Ship of Zion". David Parmley and his family singin' about them 32 acres of bottom land...

I'm with you Richie, There ain't hardly been a decent film come out of Hollywood in the past 20 years. There's a good book you might like to read. It's called " Easy Riders and Raging Bulls" Goes back to Bonnie and Clyde and tells the story of how the maverick film directors of the 70's saved the place. Altman, Ashby, Scorsese...they're all there. Robbie even got a line or two. One of the lines is the day Cassavetes walked up to Scorsese at Beverly Hills Hotel swimming pool and pulled him aside to tell him "These loser's are killin' you!"

I gotta go away for a couple of days...don't everybody applaud at once now...


Entered at Thu Sep 19 13:33:17 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Blues and Jazz men

I think one of the reasons blues and jazz men (and women) age so gracefully in their careers and otherwise is that I doubt any of tem went into it for the money but rather for the love of music. When BB King, John Lee Hooker, or Muddy Waters started their careers, what was it, te 30's or 40's? We were yet to see the R& R megastars, never mind blues and jazz spread by blacks (black artist acceptance that is) beyond the racial barriers of the day. So, more than likely they went into the business without dreams of fame and fortune beyond the local airing of King Biscuit, etc. Rock stars of the 60'2 and 70's on the other hand, were drawn to the fame and adulation of Elvis, and later the Beatles, then the Stones, etc. So although many were talented, much of their motivation may have been acieving 'the lifestyle' rather than playing for small change at night and keeping their day jobs.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 12:21:10 CEST 2002 from p50853dd6.dip.t-dialin.net (80.133.61.214)

Posted by:

ulbiman

Location: germany

Subject: brit blues

hello pehr! I heard the Feelgood version many years before i mentioned that is was written by Rick. It is a very straight and powerful version. It is still available on the CD "On the job from 1979. Nice that someone remembers me old heroes.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 12:13:59 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: yer blues

inerestingly john mayall and peter green are co headlining a uk autumn tour. dream gig or what. movies!lets face it most of what hollyood churns out these days is complete and utter crap. my heroes are your altmans, your ashby's,basically, all those great 70's movies and further back than that,john ford, fred zinneman etc, also european directors such as mike leigh and bertolucci. i cant stand empty headed bruckheimer/don simpson con air type films. have a good day everyone.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 11:28:36 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Question for Pat Brennan:

How would the Flaming Lips fare with "Unfaithful Servant"? Just curious.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 05:12:26 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

fred

Rosalind: You're certainly right about jazzmen/bluesman being survivors.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 05:08:22 CEST 2002 from pcp02256121pcs.wanarb01.mi.comcast.net (68.41.189.217)

Posted by:

twilight

BWNWIT - Loved the quote from Keith about the Stones being a Mom & Pop operation. Keith Richards says some great, outrageous things. Gotta love it. The Stones are about grooooove. Somewhere between Charlie and Keith lies a real magic - Mick does a great job dressing it up. Like in "Beast of Burden" - before the last chorus, Charlie plays steady throughout, the ratchets it up for a few bars - very simple, elegant, and a great groove. "The Weight" on the new Circle album was cut by the Del McCoury Band, from what I heard. I'm really missing George Harrison, who was another man of notable quotations.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 04:41:49 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Bluesman vs Rock stars

Fred _ I always felt that old bluesmen had a very strong survival streak. They came from the Delta. Their folks were sharecroppers. They played in the streets for nickels. They had the food taken out of their children's mouths by crooks who took their magic and ran. They were suspicious and cautious and stayed that way. Survivalists. Plus they were black.... But I can't get Howlin' Wolf singin' "Goin Down Slow" out of my head. And Rock guys had it too easy for the most part, I think. They come in spurts, they're inconsistant. Too many quick stops and starts. Too many temptations, and they have not much of a strong foundation. Jazz musicians, take look at "'Round Midnight" or "Bird". Just my thoughts...

I liked those snippets of dialogue in the "Circle" album too "Pick the ban 'ga solid John. You been playin' one for 35 years ain'tcha"

Thanks for the mention of Wilko Johnson and Lee Brilleaux....Gritty back alley stuff appeals to me.

Richie _ so ya called my bluff.....


Entered at Thu Sep 19 04:31:54 CEST 2002 from 65-pool2.ras15.ilchi-e.alerondial.net (206.148.93.65)

Posted by:

Jon

Location: Missouri

Subject: Crawfish

Read this in the What's New Section: "The webmaster is off to Sweden for a couple of days (work, crawfish, pickled herring and schnaps). No more updates until next week. Y'all behave now. Please." Could someone really tell me if they have crawfish in Sweden?


Entered at Thu Sep 19 04:19:27 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Rick S.

Location: Suffern, NY

Subject: Levon Helm Band/Kingston

Doc Cass- you were so close to the action it looked like you were part of the band. I concur with your review of the Levon Helm Band Plus. It was such a thrill for me to see Tony Garnier and Levon in the groove and smiling. The band played for over two hours on the patio overlooking the water. Beautiful night. Good to see George Lembesis videotaping. The G-Man Trio; Frankie A. and Capt. Jack in attendance. Nice to see Professor Louie and Gary Burke checking out the music. Thanks Butch for inviting the Guestbook audience.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 02:36:42 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: more opinionated crap from yours truly concerning caucasian bluesmen...

Al Edge I'm with ya on peter Green being a great one. Guitar Player Magazine had a nice piece on him about a year back. Sadly he went off the rails, but word has it he's come a long way towards coming back. I haven't [icked up his record, hes put out one or two new ones in the last couple years.

Brit blues. Man I gotta throw in a plug for my favorite Brit bluesmen Wilko Johnson and Lee Brilleaux from Dr. Feelgood. They were great; they made the blues work for them, and weren't academic about it (I dont know why white people still TRY to shuffle- outside of Levon & Co., of course.) That stuff had tons of soul and was tough, gritty back alley music. Band connection: They did a cover of "Java Blues" according to this site. I've been looking for it for years. Never heard it. Anybody out there hear it?

Reminds me..Mr. Viney if you are out there. Guitar Preacher is out of print again. Damn! maybe I'll check EBay.

Found BTW a great record, old Iggy and Stooges rehearsals from late 60's to early 70's. Alot of it is just Iggy and James Williamson going through vamps in a basement or something. Now here are some effin' blues. Its sat on my turntable for a week. a good sign. Band connection?: Well besides being recorded in a basement, they do a nice "Hollis Brown" which the Band did with Dylan, '74, and a wild "Mellow Down Easy" which is note for note Bloomfield till Williamson just falls to pieces trying to keep up, but still sounds great anyway. There is a song about "She looked into my pin-point eyes and cried", that just haunts me. its on Bomp! records.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 02:22:39 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

What I want to know is this: why is it jazz muscians and bluesmen seem to age gracefully on stage while most rock'n'rollers can't? I bring this up because last night on TV I caught the tail end of a program about some 80 year old piano player (from NYC), I can't remember the name, and how he still plays gigs and goes into the recording studio. What is it? Is it the clothes (jazz and blues musicians always seem to be dressed oh so fine) or is it the fact that they don't prance around on stage so much that they can retain much energy when the reach their 60s,70s 80s? Or is there something in the water that they drink? (if so how can I get hold of some??!??!)


Entered at Thu Sep 19 01:58:14 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred and Julie

Fred, I'm with you 100% on this one. Anybody who could withstand Dick Van Dyke's 'cor blimey Mary Poppins' for an entire film shoot could surely eat the Von Trapps for breakfast with or without a spoonful of sugar.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 01:47:05 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Yer Blues

Being an unfeasibly avid Red I naturally prefer to retain a respectable distance from anything Blue.

Nonetheless, further to our round up of authentic British Blues artists, I think we ought to ponder at least a weeny while on Peter Green who - intrinsically - was surely the nearest we Brits have ever had to the real thing i.e Robert Johnson et alia.

Although the analogy I'm about to make is by no means a perfect one [since George Best actually did achieve so much], I think Pete Viney will know what I mean when I say that if Eric Clapton was Kevin Keegan then Peter Green was Georgie Best. In other words one had great talent and dedicated himself to perfecting it and becoming a true great whilst the other was naturally imbued with a gift from above but kind of squandered it.

Sadly for Peter, he went off the rails very early into his career and so never achieved anywhere near the greatness for which God had him earmarked. Eric Clapton in stark contrast achieved possibly even more than he ever really had a right to through hard work, an undeniably great talent and dedication to his art.

On a personal level, as much as I admire Eric Clapton, I mean no disrespect when I say that I would rather a brief snatch of Peter Green on 'Oh Well' or 'Green Manalishi' than a listen to an entire 'Ocean Boulevard' or 'Layla' - and I do really like that stuff.

It's just that for me Green back then had that certain authentic magical quality that I personally feel Eric has somehow lacked. As regards who I'd prefer to spend a night in the ale house with?...well that's a completely different ball game - Georgie Best of course.


Entered at Thu Sep 19 01:44:03 CEST 2002 from cfa2.execulink.net (209.239.0.235)

Posted by:

paul godfrey

Location: C A N A D A
Web: My link

Subject: stones - band

I always thought it would be interesting to hear the BAND with Levon singing solo for HIGH & DRY, I think from the Stones Album AFTERMATH.

Basically its a Leadbelly 12 string guitar type tune. Still pull out my old Gibson G45-12 and let it play.

Really don't think the Stones could do much justice to BAND songs. Apples & Oranges!

shineonpaulg


Entered at Thu Sep 19 01:01:38 CEST 2002 from 56k-socal-07-42.dial.qnet.com (209.221.196.57)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

Subject: Barnburners 3 nights in a row

It's only 74 miles from Coubourg,Ontario to Toronto, and 82 miles back-tracking to Lindsay,Ontario from Toronto.This would be a great road trip for serious blues fans.September 18,19, and 20th north of that big lake.I didn't bother to check how many miles it is from California,USA to Coubourg.This tour is not gonna happen for me, but multiple shows in a row is the way to do it.

Anyone from the GB signing on for the Barnburners mini-tour?


Entered at Thu Sep 19 00:08:55 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Empty Now

Sad news Empty Now but nevertheless a fine tribute to the man that way over there you have picked up on someone who was obscure even on his own turf. Days of Pearly Spencer is an extremely evocative song from the past of many on here I am sure. Thank you. Here is a link to a snatch of it for anybody unfamiliar with the song or the artist http://www.cherryred.co.uk/crzone/audio/mcwilliams.ram


Entered at Wed Sep 18 23:19:53 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-154.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.154)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Blues so bad …

More on why those British guys played the blues so bad (a remark that doesn’t offend me in the slightest as it’s usually true). Often the bands were semi-pro, picked up the same day with no rehearsal. Other times they were pro and toured for several weeks with Blind Snake Oil Terrapin. What happened every night was that Blind Snake Oil picked up £200 to £500 in cash. The boys were then given £15, or a mere £3.75 each for a four piece. A crap hotel in those days was about £1.50 to £1.75 (at two to a room). Add in petrol, repayments on the van and gear, food and they actually ended up poorer at the end of the tour. They hoped they’d picked up enough education (or if bright enough lifted a song or two). But it wasn’t riches or glory- it was education.

Pat – if you get the Stones gig, please inform them that I’m a mean marraccas player and also extremely cheap. BUT if Bill Wyman doesn’t want to do it, and Charlie reportedly hates doing it, why should we bother? Nah. Sod it.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 23:12:13 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: peter v. and roz

peter. thanks for that. ill give them a bell asap. roz darling. me and movies. choose your weapons. pistols at dawn, lets go for it baby! ill get back to you in the morning because right now its beddy bies in brit land. goodnight roz and pete and to all you magical people out there in band land.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 22:19:09 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

I have to admit that I'm not too familiar with David McWilliams, although I vaguely remember Pearly Spencer. Thanks Empty Now for providing details about Mr. McWilliams. Considering their similiar backgrounds, I wonder if he ever played with Van Morrison? Interesting detail about the use of a megaphone on vocals -- Tom Waits often uses this technique.

Thanks also to John Cass for the update on Levon's latest live adventures. Has anyone compared Levon's touring schedule with that of the Stones to see if they might be crossing paths?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 21:37:19 CEST 2002 from (193.251.152.25)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: David McWilliams

While I was waiting for some response to my recent post concerning one song of David Mc Williams, I ran in parallel a research engine for the same purpose.
I found a webpage which answers partially to my questions, but unfortunatelly I just realized that David was dead this year aged 56 years. I’m blowed by this information

It’s perhaps late, but I just demand to all of you the GBers, who loved this great Irish singer who hasn’t been favorized by the star system, and are reminding songs like The days of Pearly Spencer, Haarlem Lady, Brown Eyed Girl, … those songs which gave you some happiness during your youth, and even later, to visit the link above, or just to have a reverencial thought in his memory.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 21:14:22 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: O Sister

For those who liked the release (post O Brother) of O Sister, filled with Bluesgrass and Gospel harmonies of women on Rounder........O Sister 2 has been released this week. Again a very fine CD filled with Bluegrass with Gospel overtones of great women in music.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 20:55:19 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

I'm excited about Circle III coming out. With the success of O Brother Where Art Thou?, this is probably a good idea. As David mentioned, it was hard to get those old school performers like Acuff to play with these "hippies", but the music brought them together. "The Weight" is on the new one although it might not be listed.

By the way, what's the word on the new Joan Osbourne cd with "The Weight"?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 20:07:50 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Will the Circle Be Unbroken

Rosalind -- it was Bill Monroe who didn't want to have anything to do with the "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" project. Mr. Acuff was apprehensive about participating at first, but once the Dirt Band played him some tapes of stuff they were working on, he realized that they were serious about playing "country music" and agreed to do it. Mr. Scrugg was a key figure in talking other performers, such as Mother Maybelle Carter and Jimmy Martin, into participating.

The decision to include studio dialogue from the sessions really added additional fervor to the music. The 30th Anniversary CD edition restored even more of this studio chatter. Getting to hear guitar greats Merle Travis & Doc Watson meeting for the first time and Mr. Acuff reminding the young players to watch their timing is almost as priceless as the music is timeless.

The awesome list of participants joining the Dirt Band for Circle Vol. III includes: Randy & Earl Scruggs, Vasser Clements, Jimmy Martin, Doc Watson, Sam Bush, Johnny & June Carter Cash, Jerry Douglas, Vince Gill, Emmylou Harris, Ricky Scaggs, Taj Mahal, Willie Nelson, Josh Graves, Del McCoury, Rodney Dillard, Tom Petty, Dwight Yoakam, Iris Dement, Tony Rice, Alison Krauss and Matricia Berg. It also should be noted that John McEuen has rejoined the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Vol. III is a family affair --Jamie Hanna, Jonathan McEuen, Richard Watson and Ron & Rob McCoury also carry on the musical tradition.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 18:13:51 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: Kingston, NY

What a night of the Blues at Mariner's Harbor last night!!

Levon and the fellas tour down the house!!

Levon proving once again that he is the best damn drummer in history.. the Barnburners had Tony Garnier playin the stand up bass... some amazing guitar wars with Sid McGinnis, Jimmy Weider, and Pat OShea.... Chris O Leary blowin that harp like a man on a mission bringing the Blues to the sheriff in town (who is a real cool guy..)

Just a great night of music and seeing some good freinds.. Butch as always thanks for the great time...and I hope those pictures I took come out there should be some great ones there!!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 17:40:34 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Mr. Viney, Sir, You are an artesian well of information! I would like to thank all you guys for bein' so damn on the ball around here!

The Weight, a hidden track huh....nice! Levon Done one beautiful job on the second "Unbroken Circle" That album got played around the house non-stop for a few days.

Grandpa was a carpenter...He built houses ,stores and banks.
Chained smoked Camel cigarettes and hammered nails in planks...."

That song always reminded me of my dad......


Entered at Wed Sep 18 17:34:48 CEST 2002 from 56k-socal-02-35.dial.qnet.com (209.221.198.146)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

hey Brits,,,,,,what about Alexis Korner?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:50:22 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: nitty gritty

Oct 1 they release vol 3 of Will The Circle...Not certain what legends play with them on this one, but a friend of mine reports to me that according to ICE they do The Weight as a hidden track. And on another subject, who said Yoko might be ineligible? Unintelligible, maybe.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:41:18 CEST 2002 from user-11219ab.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.165.75)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

BWNWIT, I had tix to see Sigur Ros at the cathedral in Galway during the July arts fest. Then they cancelled, much too my chagrin. But I do have tix for Beck and Flaming Lips next month. Both are fabulous.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:40:02 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State

Subject: Oh, Canada

BEG: How could a Canadian, snowed in or not, raise the subject of rock stars & food and not mention Lovin' Spoonful guitarist and noted Kingston restaurateur Zal Yanofsky? (Or should that be Zaaaaaal Yanooooooofsky?)


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:38:23 CEST 2002 from netcache-2001-vip.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.64)

Posted by:

rosalind

Or was that Bill Monroe that Scruggs got so pissed off at? I'm gettin old.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:26:49 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-023.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.23)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Mayall

Roz is right there- I'd forgotten Mayall, whose 'drummerless' band could play it right too. I think the earlier incarnations with more famous participants (like Clapton) actually weren't as good at the blues feel.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:22:33 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-023.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.23)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: The Blues

Nancy is correct on the Sonny Boy quote. Which he’d said in the UK repeatedly before he said it to the Hawks. As he’d played with the highly competent The Yardbirds and The Animals, he hadn’t seen the worst of it! Someone else mentioned that the Stones were British and playing the blues, but I guess British bands actually had more experience of playing with major black artists than most American bands. In the early 60s, a lot of blues giants visited the UK and were greeted with awe and respect. Because of prevailing Musicians Union rules, they had to use British pick-up bands (See the John Lee Hooker bio for this). In the USA, I guess they’d have always used their own backing groups, not young white guys. Even in the late 60s, it was rare for blues artists to bring their own bands with them – Muddy Waters circa 1968 was an exception and you could really hear the difference. A few weeks earlier watching John Lee Hooker the British backing was terrible. In their favour, I’ve spoken to people who played with Chuck Berry (Biggest bastard in showbusiness, guitar wildly out of tune, no rehearsal whatsoever) and John Lee Hooker (charismatic and friendly, but couldn’t play a 12 bar the same twice, didn’t know what a “key” was, played as if playing solo with no regard to people following him) and Clyde McPhatter (totally drunk. Didn’t know what day it was or which country he was in, let alone what song he was doing). So there was a clash of cultures, and very few British bands could play loose enough to follow the blues artists. Most often the blues guys smiled nicely, put up with the enthusiastic but rigid boogie plodding along behind them, took the money and ran. The Stones were an exception, because they could play it loose enough. Even Fleetwood Mac, who could play the blues beautifully, never got that loose raunchy feel that the Stones had.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:13:37 CEST 2002 from netcache-2001-vip.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.64)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Nancy _ Is that it! I could have sworn I read that other version somewhere.

Anyway, I must recant that "purist" bullshit from yesterday. I feel like Roy Acuff sometimes. Acuff refused to be associated with the "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" album cut by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and friends way back around 1971. It pissed the laid-back, soft-spoken Earl Scruggs off so bad that he threw a fit in the car and called Acuff an "asshole"! I like English Blues. Mayall is terrific and them damn Stones are alright too!

Somebody.. Al... said that Richie knew more about Movies than anyone else in here. Mr. Edge, Was that you? I beg your pardon sir.....I beg to differ. Richie....how bout a game?

I just received my first e mail from some barister from Nigeria asking for money for his pal who's in prison. Guess I have finally been initiated. Evidently their still casing the Guestbook.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 16:05:52 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: hi kalervo

Hi kalervo. I appreciate your taste in music, and I'm glad there is alot of new stuff you like. I just have different needs. For me that stuff is good, but it doesnt Rock enough. I'm not too into the past either though. I'm making my own music these days and having alot of fun. I'm not too interested in listening to keep up with the times. (I'm thinking of what the Band did when they moved to woodstock- just drop out for a while and get their own groove together. I dont think that there is anything wrong with that.)

I stand by my last statement. Most new music imitates other music, and its dominated by corporate tyrant mentality that makes me feel like cattle if I buy that stuff or turn on my radio.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 15:18:33 CEST 2002 from (193.251.152.25)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Carpe Diem

Kalervo:

Thanks for introducing some groups unfamilar to me.
I know you can barely feel what i'm feeling, i hope you'll understand what i'm saying:

I enjoy ante-diluvian music, the reason is surely not the nostalgia. Only time separates the being goog from the seeming good.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 14:58:18 CEST 2002 from 128.52.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.52.128)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Harrison Tribute Concert

Link above takes you to a story saying there will be a London tribute concert to George, featuring McCartney, Starr, Dylan, Clapton, Petty and Ravi. Would be nice to have The Band there too.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 14:40:09 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-125.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.125)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Whispering Pines. In Car selections

Richie- SPIN in Newcastle-upon-Tyne got my Whispering Pines CD – it took about three weeks. (Tel: 0191 261 4741). I’ve had Jim Weider’s Remedy on order from them for about 5 weeks, but it hasn’t turned up yet. They’re very helpful. They also list ‘Sea to The North’ and the Rick Danko Memorial set.

Sam: As was said when we discussed potential cover artists, the Stones could make a great job of ‘Jemima Surrender’ – which is very Stones-like in the first place. The Band could have made a very good stab at ‘Country Honk’ too. BTW, on that ‘turn up the volume’ effect (cow bells on Honky Tonk), how about the snap of the drums at the start of Beast of Burden?

My in car collection – I have a 6 CD autochanger, but have about 25 CDRs in the car. About every couple of months I just compile recent tracks I currently like, and stick (e.g.) ‘July 2002’ on the cover. That one currently has ‘Hey, Mr DJ’, ‘Alejandra Leaving’, ‘Hard Candy’- just recent(ish) stuff. There are about 6 or 7 of those. The true permanent collection consists of compilations. I have about five soul ones, two Van M (one studio, one live), one Dylan (all long wordy stuff opening with Visions of Johanna + Desolation Row, Señor…), just the one Band, then several themed compilations – British Classics, American Classics (1-3), Female Singers (1 & 2). In the autochanger, slot 1 and 2 are stuff I’m into today - not CDRs but proper albums (today it’s Rewind by The Stones & the new Chris Rea). Slot 3 will usually be my ‘recent stuff’ CDR, I always have a soul CD in there without fail, then will be old favourites in 5- The Band, or Dylan or Van. The last slot holds a CD, not a CDR and it’s been there at least 18 months- ‘Shining Like a National Guitar’ by Paul Simon, as if my wife and I can’t agree on a CD, that will always work as the compromise CD. So, The Band is permanently in the car but not in the auto changer. Oh, and I carry a couple of Garrison Keillor cassettes for BAD traffic jams. They calm you down and stop you worrying that the other lane is moving better (the other lane is always moving better).


Entered at Wed Sep 18 13:19:16 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Alan: Mary Poppins, one arm tied behind her back, would wipe the floor with the entire von Clap..er..Trapp family

Stiff-upper lip British nanny Julie Andrews vs. syrupy aryan Austrian wannabe nun Julie Andrews...who would you place your bet on?

Beatles vs Stones: are the Fab Four allowed to have Yoko Ono on their side, or is she inelligible (perhaps until later rounds) and which line-up would the represent the Stones?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 12:16:02 CEST 2002 from client-cache4.wa.iinet.net.au (203.59.10.4)

Posted by:

Nancy

Subject: blues quote

I'm not sure about this but I think the quote about British bands playing the blues that Ros mentioned was along the lines of:

"They want to play the blues so bad......and they do".



Entered at Wed Sep 18 11:29:49 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Clarification

PS. Should point out that my nose is nowhere as big, relatively speaking, as comes across on that doodle at the bottom of my last post. That said, my mouth is infinitely bigger!!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 11:26:41 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Reflections

When you read back through all the GB postings there is really only one conclusion to be drawn.

That is, there are some right opinionated bastards on here - and I'm probably as guilty a culprit as any. As I'm sure someone once said - opinions are like arseholes - every one's got one - and they're full of shit most of the time - and a bloody good percentage of them post on the GB!!!

Actually, I think there's been some really heartfelt, insightful and stimulating posts these past few days since Pat unscrewed the bottle top on the fizzy lemonade. And then kept shaking it with a little help from yours truly.

Shall we now move on to Original Band versus More recent line-ups???? Nah, best not eh!! What about Beatles versus Stones, then? Sound of Music v Mary Poppins?

:-O)


Entered at Wed Sep 18 10:46:14 CEST 2002 from (194.100.60.131)

Posted by:

Kalervo

Location: Finland

Subject: Not high on zombie stuff

Pehr: you were the only one who reacted my post, thank you! The others are so high on zombie stuff that I think I' ll take a couple month break soon and come back praising Christmas Must Be Tonight!

Today' s music boring and over-produced? How unfair and one-eyed statement...

Some examples:

-I just got a double cd of new Basque music: sublime stuff!

- To me Bruce Cockburn' s last 7-8 albums are really wonderful...Same kind of heart music than Robbie' s Native albums.or Caetano Veloso' s, Gilberto Gil' s and some other' s (who are old but still fresh) albums ..

- There are are new breed of song-writers who are really superb: Richard Buckner, Stuart Davis, Lucy Kaplansky, Buddy Miller, Ryan Adams, Buddy Mondlock, Bill Wilson, Dan Bern, Jakob Golden (these in USA only!) etc.........

- there are really fine bands around that makes you yawn on (?) that over-played old stuff: Clearlake, the Delgados, Wilco, Rinneradio, Dapp Theory, Guided By The Voices, Weeping Willows, Antipop Consortium, Seremoniamestarit, WOR, Kent, Celtas Cortos, Bo Kaspers Orkestra, Gomez etc....

- Outside the small sand box of rock there is wonderful, spiritual, fresh and uplifting music happening everywhere in the world: Hawaii, Mali, Argentina, Japan, Spain, Portugal, Finland, indigenious world, etc....

Old music is fine with me, in healthy amounts. I am not 90 years old, so I want to live today not in the dead past....


Entered at Wed Sep 18 08:46:50 CEST 2002 from netcache-2001-vip.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.64)

Posted by:

ro

Location: RainCity

..Forgot "Long Distance Operator" for cyber-sex or guys with big stuff.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 08:39:07 CEST 2002 from netcache-2001-vip.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.64)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Band music to Screw by!

Order from off the top of my head:

Jemima Surrender
Rag Mama Rag
Look Out Cleveland
Get Up, Jake
Baby, Don't Ya Do It
W. S. Walcott Medicine Show
Strawberry Wine
Just Another Whistle Stop
Forbidden Fruit
Ring Your Bell
Chest Fever
Volcano
Shootout in Chinatown
Ain't That a Lotta Love
Promise Land
I'm Ready
Don't Ya Tell Henry
Apple Suckling Tree
Hazel
Yazoo St. Scandel
Nothing Was Delivered
"Odds and Ends.. Odds and ends....Lost time is not found again"
Please Mrs. Henry
and when ya really get tired "Old Jawbone"

Did I forget anything? "Don't crowd me lady or I'll fill up your shoe....."


Entered at Wed Sep 18 07:39:54 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Brown Eyed Girl: you are a veritable clearing house of music information...wow!! How many sources do you have on the inside?!?!?!?!?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 07:34:07 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

BWNWITenn: the Jerry Garcia quote is attributed to his posthumous autobiography, while the other two quotes are from interviews with Weir & McNally were given directly to Uncut (according to the magazine). However, I don't doubt that someone else might have said the exact same things at some other time.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 07:31:12 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69689.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.190.38)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Hawk and Clinton! /Stars and Appetites!

From all us "poor Canadian souls who are probably snowed in".........

"Paul Anka (Canadian) wrote a version of "My Way", for Hawkins, with Foster (Canadian) accompanying on piano and Clinton singing back-up.

Clinton delivered the last line, amended to "I did it Hilary's way", and brought the house down." (Toronto Star Newspaper)

Rock Stars and Food: My brother catered for a few rockers when they were in Toronto years ago....Annie Lennox....Herbivore.....The Clash.....beef....It is rumoured that Mick Jones is a herbivore...if true.....not then.....Stevie Ray Vaughan.....Texas Chicken.....In the early 90's my brother was working at a restaurant in Yorkville.....yeah.....the hood that used to be hippydom where Joni and Neil and Murray and others played at The Riverboat.....now.....bourgeoisdom......All the movie stars during our Film Fest could be seen here recently......Anyway.....in walks Keef, Keyes and Woody.....Keef and Keyes ordered pepper steak and salad while Woody ordered boulabase (help! spelling police!).....They drank two bottles of wine.....Keyes pays by credit card and leaves 100.00 tip......Mick of course was no where to be found.....Uhhhh.....I'm not allowed to share anything else about these rockers on a website.....I think he's saving all the details for his latest book......


Entered at Wed Sep 18 07:20:14 CEST 2002 from on-tor-blr-a58-04-1285.look.ca (216.154.5.111)

Posted by:

Wittgenstein

Whatever makes a piece of music special is that"something" that moves the listener..... yeah, but The Stones make music to screw to. Obviously Pat Brennan isn't screwing when he listens to The Band, judging by his recent analytical post. By the way, I use a Black and Decker 3 amp electric drill and a Sears Craftsman cordless. For driving drywall screws I have a Milwaukee screw gun. Really gets the job done!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 07:12:03 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-117-2.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.117.2)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: Shut up already!

I loved that Fortune quote from Keith: "It's a mom and pop business - Mick's the mom, and I'm the pop."

Charlie, I assume you're probably joking, but song titles can't by copyrighted, so they're missing out on that. Poor guys.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 06:40:05 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-117-2.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.117.2)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: And furthermore...

Speaking of barstool Zen, I just saw that everyone's favorite Icelandic hypno-trance band, Sigur Ros, who were featured heavily on the Vanilla Sky soundtrack, is going to tour the States this fall to support their new album. The album, which is going to be untitled, will consist of eight new tracks, none of which are going to be named. The CD, which will again feature songs sung in an invented language, is going to include a twelve-page booklet, which is completely blank. Now that's cool! Unfortunately, they are not telling anyone the cities that their tour is hitting. Okay, I made that last part up. But naturally, they are going nowhere the hell near the state of Tennessee. Also, no, I don't know whether they are going to cover any Byrds songs.

Fred, I swear I read that quote before, I think maybe in the book "Goin' Down The Road," by Blair Jackson, but that it was attributed to Robert Hunter. Does anybody else know about this?

Do you people listen to Beck? Rolling Stone gave his new release five stars. I don't have any of his CDs, but I'm starting to like his stuff more, and to gain more respect for him as an artist. He seems to be one of the few popular artists who actually has some integrity - meaning he probably won't be that popular for much longer. By the way, I still think Rolling Stone sucks, but I am going to frame this week's cover.

Aaron Copland? Surely you mean Igor Stravinsky.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 06:34:19 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Bayou Sam: you are correct about the Stones' performance on the Rock And Roll Circus. "Sympathy For the Devil" is outstanding. On the other hand the track "Whole Lotta Yoko" (yoko Ono/Ivry Giltis/the Dirty Mac)...yikes!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 05:33:43 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Whatever makes a piece of music special is that"something" that moves the listener,...." Nicely said bwnwitenn.

I was thinking about the Stones "Rock and Roll Circus show from 1968 (there's that year again). It was finally released a couple of years ago after sitting on a shelf for many years. It was reported that, at the time, Mick was hesitant to release it because The Who were so powerful, he thought they upstaged the Stones. However, when I saw the movie I was pleasantly surprised at how good the Stones were for the finale. I thoughts Mick's worries were unfounded - even though the Who's "A Quick One" was amazing.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 05:20:11 CEST 2002 from 1cust194.tnt1.fredericksburg.va.da.uu.net (67.200.135.194)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: Underplayed Songs

Long Distance Operator: yep, "Can't You Hear Me Knockin'" remains one of the great recordings by the Rolling Stones and one that doesn't make the playlists of many "classic rock" radio stations. I remember the days when an obscure instrumental by the Stones (named after the street address of Chess Records) was the theme song for a local DC area DJ. "2120 S. Michigan Avenue" remains another one of my favorite underplayed track by the Stones.

After reading the article from FORTUNE that was posted here I wonder if Mick and Keith get royalties every time a new "Ruby Tuesday" restaurant opens. Mick obviously paid close attention back in those economic classes he took. Of course, Keith is no dummy either. I have a book that shows the interior of his library and it's pretty damn impressive.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 05:20:43 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Stones

"Bridges To Babylon" ('98)is a great Stones record. Great songs all around. Much better than Steel Wheels IMHO or anything since "Some Girls". Hell, I listen to it more than "Some Girls". The Stones are the shit.

My favs in no particular order 1. Band 2. Dylan 3. Beatles 4. Who 5. Feat 6. Stones.

Apples or Oranges. Don't ya know they all taste good.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 05:07:59 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: the eyes have it

I'm probably getting punchy from lack of sleep here, but I can see Rick, if he were put up to it, doing Far Away Eyes in one of his solo shows, with the professor and/or Shredni or whoever harmonizing. I tried to picture the 90's Band doing it,I can hear Levon harmonizing, but that's as far as I got. So, anyone familiar with one of the Stones better cuts, the B-side to It's Only Rock & Roll?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:57:34 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

ro

I shound have said "different eyes"


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:54:26 CEST 2002 from dialup-65.57.8.101.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (65.57.8.101)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

BWNWIT, I believe my point was that the Stones could not play something like US which demanded much more musically than the Stones have to offer.

Now, I also believe we've entered the realm of academia with this zen-like "be the music" thing. First of all, your argument places any importance music might have in the hands of the listener; it becomes strictly a subjective ability on the listeners part to place themselves "in the music". Which, if I follow your thread to its conclusion, would place Yes above the Stones or the Band simply because certain listeners say so. That's all well and good and very democratic. I personally don't buy it, although I have pulled out Close To The Edge occasionally. I do see the efficacy of having this sort of system in place, because everybody would then be happy.

Allow me to split some more hairs. Wolf, Chuck, Muddy et.al. pursued a musical vision that usually relied on a repeated riff, as evidenced by your post and the eighth note thing mentioned earlier. Learn the riff, play the song. Then it's up to the singer (again, usually) to portray the subject matter. However, when addressing The Band, the riff becomes a much more varied, complex thing. Think of Don't Do It. Rick's opening bass riff gets overlaid by Robbie's crunch, Richard's JLLewis pounding and Garth's. The whole things changes in the verse, again in the chorus, 2nd verse with some subtle changes, same with second chorus, Levon's breakdown with Richard's ascending line, another chrous, Robbie's solo over the charge of the full group, another Levon breakdown, Garth amplifying the last chorus and Robbie taking it out, plus the surprise ending. Each section changes, sometimes dramatically, sometimes subtly all to incredible effect. Do these--dare I say-complex changes make the song better than if they just stayed on that first lick and hammered it through the whole song ala Mannish Boy? I would answer Yes. Excuse me, not Yes. The answer to me is yes.

Thanks for amplifying your answer. I don't think it's useful to get into comparing jazz with rock or classical, because, let's face, Aaron Copland blows everyone away. And, I'm sorry we didn't see you in Nashville.

And Hank, we still haven't discussed money.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:51:40 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Subject: ..continued

It wasn't just the blues The Band understood. One of the most important things ever said about music in my opinion, was when Robbie said "The land makes the music" I know that Country music played just as much a part in The Band as blues did. The Stones were outsiders to American land. That's why they needed Gram. I know I look at everything with deeper eyes. That's just the way I am. It must be those depression era photographs on the wall above me....


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:33:27 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: The Band / The Stones / Tom and Otis

Was it Sonny Boy Williamson who said something along the lines of how, when he went to England, he was worshipped by those English guys who loved the blues "They love it so much but they're sooo bad at it." The Hawks sat around in a small intimate group of old blues guys and learned the feel from the inside out. The Stones sat in front of a record player and got the feel from the outside in. I don't know where that fits in.. just thought of it. For me anyway, when I think of how The The Stones might do a Band piece it doesn't make any sense to me. It's a completely opposite feel. The Stones make ya dance, laugh and have fun, the more the merrier. The Band is real roots. It's so Intimate. The last of it. Just about anything that came out of England other than Clapton has been a hybrid, and Clapton would be the same if he hadn't been born with Robert Johnson's soul inside him. It's not their fault. When its gone, it's gone. That's just my little humble opinion slipped in with all you big cats.

I have this feeling that Otis never died. Every time I listen to him he slips up under my dress. And the guy's so sneaky, ya don't know he's comin' till he gets there.

And Tom Jones was damned cool. I loved the moves he made with those hands of his. Terrific voice too!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:23:44 CEST 2002 from host-216-76-151-109.bna.bellsouth.net (216.76.151.109)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: They don't like me, Mama/They're gonna kill me, Bud

Mr. Brennan, please allow me to respectfully clarify my position so that we might hopefully be able to reach a cordial agreement on this point. I took your repeated statement that the Rolling Stones have never written a song as nuanced as Unfaithful Servant as an implication, logically, I believe, that they are therefore not as skilled writers as are The Band. The opinion that I was trying to express, at which I was apparently unsuccessful, is that the difficulty in performing a piece of music is, as someone here are already referenced, a moot point. By taking the argument that US is "better" that, say, Brown Sugar because it is more complex to its logical conclusion, 2112 would therefore be better than The Weight. I sincerely doubt that The Band would have been capable of performing Tales from Topographic Oceans properly, yet I also doubt that anyone here would suggest that Yes is therefore somehow better than The Band. Whatever makes a piece of music special is that "something" that moves the listener, something which may be present in both Giant Steps and Bo Diddley. Ideally, ultimately, I believe, the listener of a piece of music should never realize whether it is extremely difficult or incredibly simplistic. They should simply BE the music, nothing more. Zen, perhaps. That is why I personally believe the complexity of a piece of music simply does not even exist as to a factor of the quality of the piece. lee had mentioned awhile ago that one of the Stones' songs had the same note repeated for four bars. But Mannish Boy is one riff repeated for the entire tune! Many Bo Diddley and John Lee Hooker songs are nothing more than one chord, but I would not argue that that takes away anything from the music. To discount music because of its simplicity would be to discount virtually all indigenous music, all music that has been passed down by the folk oral tradition, of which Rock and Roll is a member. Not to mention 4'33"! So I fear that if the difficulty of a piece of music were the criteria by which it is judged, we would all be worshipping the ground upon which Yngwie treads, God forbid. So I hope that this clarifies my thoughts on the matter, and I apologize if the colloquialism of my previous statements was the cause of some confusion. Please feel free to contact me should you have any further questions, and have a good evening.

bassmanlee, I have sometimes thought the same thing about the Dead, but I think that they did still produce some high quality music up till the end, if in not the same quantity. Garcia especially had a hand in some excellent material shortly before his death, like Lazy River Road, So Many Roads and The Days Between. Personally, I think that LRR and SMR could have fit nicely on the Europe '72 album. But I do think that most rock musicians' creative peak only lasts for a very few years. Springsteen, I think, peaked from '75 to '80, and while he has made a lot of great music since then, including some of his new album, he was never able to be that consistent again. The Band, let's be honest, peaked from '68 through '70. This makes it all the more unfortunate that most artists nowadays wait two, three or four years between releases. CCR's entire recording career only lasted for about three and a half years, for God's sake!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 04:14:12 CEST 2002 from dialup015-a.ts552.cwt.esat.net (193.203.156.15)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Torn and Frayed

Pat B! So you WOULD play with The Stones!

I'm gigging in Brandons of Ennis next week, Pat.........

Fly into Shannon....only down the road from Ennis....... and gig with us! \We don't pay better'n the Stones BUT we DO play Band songs!

I was reading in the latest Mojo that The Stones rehearsed in Bearsville in 1978 for a US tour.........

Any account of Band/Stones interface at this time?

Actually, Bayou Sam.......I'd love to hear Charlie Watts drumming to "The Weight"......How about Keith singing "The Shape I'm In"?


Entered at Wed Sep 18 02:23:45 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

i've been reading the October issue of Uncut. This has to be the only magazine, to my knowledge (limited as it may be), that seems to have a Band reference (or two..or three...) every issue. ths month it's in connection with the Grateful Dead.

Jerry Garcia: "I'll tell you what affected me...I was so impressed by the songwriting of Robbie Robertson. I just said 'Oh yeah. This is the direction. This is the way for us, with all our folk roots, our country and bluegrass roots."

and

Wier, however, tells Uncut he doesn't recall The Band as any kind of influence, and McNally also talks down the connection, "The ethos of The Band's material was explicitly Southern and Appalachian," he points out. "However similar The Band's material might have sounded, the Dead were thematically much, much weirder."

Gosh, after quoting so much, I'm beginning to feel like Brown Eyed Girl!!!!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 02:03:03 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69689.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.190.38)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Subject: The Hawk!

Hmmmmm....I wonder what The Hawk meant when he said that he won't be having any rough sex soon?.....;-D

If link doesn't work try.....http://www.torontosun.com....Noooooo.....I don't read this pictorial paper.......quote was on the cover......


Entered at Wed Sep 18 01:57:31 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj

Subject: Stones plus

I'm in the boat that Some Girls was the last great Stones album. Some other albums have had songs but nothing of consequence. If I had to pick their most solid effort (IMO) since Some Girls, I'd have to say Steel Wheels. It has a number of good party songs and rock songs, as well as its share of filler.

Now as of the question of the relevance nowadays of the Stones- Their old - their an oldies act of ass kickin' rock-n-roll from a different era - the music they put out is of little consequence and influnence. Hell, I'd say most rock artists don't put out ass kickin' rock-n-roll after 40, 35 maybe. What the hell does someone over those ages have to rebel against, be angry about, express confusion and young love and passion in a rock-n-roll sense? Look at those coveted artists that have been mentioned in here Elton John, come on, what has he done rock-n-roll wise in the last 20 years, Bruce, in the last 15 years? CSN? The Dead? How relevant is any of the music they have put out since their suppossed peaks. I'd say maybe David Bowie is about the one artist from that era that has tried to evolve and embrace the way rock has moved. Aerosmith, still rocks but it seems almost too manufactured, too corporate. Let's face it - Rock has come a long way and what Rock is today is a long way from what it was..,

As for artists who have that magnetism that Peter V. brought up - throw in Barry Manilow. I hate his music but I brought my wife to see him as a Valentines Day present, say what you will, he captures that audience and knows how to put on an entertaining show.


Entered at Wed Sep 18 01:56:16 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Phew...I just finished reading JTull Fan's linked article (re: the Stones' Business Empire). Say what you want about the Rolling Stones (and some of you have!) but you cannot fault them (especially Mick Jagger) for their business acumen. I like how Keith Richards described it as a "Mom & Pop operation"!


Entered at Wed Sep 18 00:46:27 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Now I am bumbed:

No one commented on my Stones link a few scrolls down. Very interesting article on finances, the buisiness of touring, royalties, etc. etc.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:14:12 CEST 2002 from plantlogic.com (209.195.208.11)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: Not a grass hut, I hope

Subject: Stowing thrones at rolling bones

Doesn't this whole Stones thing kinda miss the point? It's not an issue of whether the Stones are any good - they definitely are, especially now that we're left with the highly professional/and or sufficiently savant, accompanied by savy hired hands - they can still pull it off, and are resurrecting a lot of their back catalog this time out. The issue is are they still relevent? (Especially at those prices!)

Now I'll admit they never grabbed me as much as say, The Beatles, Clapton, Hendrix, or The Band, but they made some great records in their day, and a handful of mediocre ones thereafter. After Some Girls (which has some filler on it) has there really been a great Stones record? They were a good band that could get on the radio, made great party music, and every bar band should have a few Stones tunes up their sleeves to get the tail feathers shakin'. They've basically been their own tribute band for some time now, haven't they? "Stones Lite" Aerosmith is more creative and more credible these days. And BTW although I consider myself a not-so-closet Deadhead, the same arguement can be applied to them as well. (Or The Who for that matter.)

PS - I wish, Roz, I wish. Playing is on hiatus these days. Just a few days away from the day job puttering around the estate. (Man are my thumbs sore!) But it's nice to be missed. Didn't get it together for JWB at North Star, either. Hope they'll come back around.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:11:05 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

I take my opening line back when I say I shouldn't admit this. I admit it proudly. Tom Jones has one hell of a talent. Even today his pipes are as rich as ever.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:09:46 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V & Mr. T

I shouldn't admit this Peter...I mean Otis did it best.........BUT........I used to love hearing Tom Jones singing Hard To Handle. Saw him do it on his TV show over here. Tom Jones has a great Welsh soul.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:06:43 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: all sorts

al . thanks once again. how the hell did i get the impression that you were irish. must be my glasses. liverpool or everton?. peter. great piece on whispering pines. richard manuel was touched by the divine with his voice. your article does him great service. back to the old stones live chestnut. at the risk of having lightning demolish my house dont you think you are being unduly harsh on get your yy's out. great music, great banter from mick. charlie's good tonight inne! i think the stones being below par performance at altamont was understandable given the bunch of deranged hells angels at stage left who'd murdered one poor bastard, beaten the daylights out of several members of the audience and probably were itching do dish out more of the same to the stones. even jesus christ would have struggled under those circumstances. still, rock of ages is the best live album ever, so the band definitely has one up on the stones in the live album dept, and for that matter everyone else. question.peter, is whispering pines available over here. please let me know. peace rich.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:07:04 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

Subject: 1968

David Powell: Great list from 1968! I would go on to add some Motown albums from that same year: Love Child by the Supremes, For Once In My Life by Stevie Wonder, You're All I Need by Gaye/Terrell, Supremes Join The Temptations, I Heard It Through The Grapevine by Marvin Gaye. These were great albums that all came out in 1968 I believe.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 23:03:11 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I'm just thinking how interesting it would be to hear the Stones take a shot at some of The Band's tunes. Jagger did do "Long Black Veil". I know that's not a Band original, but still..... It would even be wild to hear them do "The Weight" in thier own style (simplistic as it may be).........I can hear the chants of "kill Sam, kill Sam" now.

I couldn't agree less (respectfully of course), that The Band could do any Stones song.....Damn it! Now I've gone ahead and compared them. See what you people made me do.

Peter - interesting observations regarding charisma, and the Band's stage set-up...Also - you've made mention a few times about your permanent cd's that are in the car with you. I'd love to see that list of your permanents if you wouldn't mind listing them.

Soneone mentioned the Stones' "Far Away Eyes" recently in here. What a great tune. I ain't heard that in ages. Ron Wood on the pedal steel if I'm not mistaken.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 22:35:59 CEST 2002 from user-1121941.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.164.129)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

pehr, I agree with you completely that this is all "comparing notes" as you well put it, pun intended or not. However, I must disagree with you that the Stones' music matches the Band for complexity, stricly in musical terms. But we've both said it and that's that.

Hank, Ennis south of Galway. I answered it as best as I could. I grew to dislike being on the road for extended periods, so it would have to be pretty big money. However, if halfway through the tour I got a call from Robbie and Levon to impersonate Richard's piano (forget the voice!!) on a Band reunion, I'd be gone in a second.

Dreaming, of course.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 22:25:17 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-090.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.90)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Tom Jones

Dave- I recall times on tape when Rick Danko (solo) was inclined to say ‘How are you doing (Philly)?’

Richie – btw, I wasn’t putting down Tom Jones. I spent several weeks at two shows a night literally lying at his highly polished feet in the wings while I controlled his mic cable (i.e, let it out, and pulled it back in those days before radio mics). For several other weeks I controlled one of the follow spots so got to see the show from out front. I saw Frankie Vaughan (12 weeks at two shows a night) more often than Tom, but I probably saw Tom more than anyone else since. Though far shorter than he is on TV, I’d rate Tom as a ‘Prince among men’ in that he’d speak to a lowly stagehand, and even seek approval- he knew ‘Detroit City’ was my favourite number and would lean down and say ‘What about that one (boyo)!’ when he really kicked ass on stage – and believe me, 34 years ago, Tom could REALLY kick ass on stage, in spite of the obligatory tux. And he had a shit-hot bunch of session guys behind him. Actually, I don’t remember that he actually said ‘boyo’ but the anecdote sounds better that way. I’m sure he didn’t. But Max Boyce would have. But mainly, Tom’s recorded output is not my sort of music.

And Al is a lucky bastard. Don’t be the one who keeps shouting ‘Rosalita!!!’ though. Ruins the bootlegs.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 22:21:20 CEST 2002 from pub32.lrc.swt.edu (147.26.108.146)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: stones

Al Edge I enjoyed your post there, though I may have mis-understood. And Pat B, I dont mean to argue, I rather enjoy comparing notes with you.

Al, when I first heard the band it changed the course of my life significantly. I went in whole new directions. The Stones affected me more in a second hand way, it was in the culture, and on the radio.

Maybe we all agree on this, at least I do. Neither group has anything to prove, really...

Pat, the complexity of music can be objectified, but it still goes beyond chords and melody. The Stones have more complex rhythms, more complex orchestration, and more complex production than the band IMHO. And as I said before somewhere, complex doesnt mean better.

Excuse me if I'm pedantic. I probably am. I am genuinely interested in this thread though.

dont most of these songwriters have arrangers they work with anyway, at least to bounce ideas off of. I know a friend that is Keith Richard's arranger (big whoop), but my point is that he's worked with Garth too. There is a collaborative community in music that, well judging who does what could be dodgy.

The Stones have a different Raison d' etre than the Band.

A song like "Unfaithful Servant" isn't what they are about. They are about the street, perhaps the gutter. In the shoes of the Unfaithful servant, I dont think they'd give a shit. The Band would, and did. They can get low down BTF,'74 and when they do alot of their fans complain.

I think my point is that both use the appropriate amount of technique for their intended aesthetic objective, no more or less. That counts big in my way of thinking. The bands that follow bands like these are incapable of understanding that concept, they copy and follow and over do themselves. Just about everybody, IMHO from the 80's was guilty of this on the radio. No offense REO, ASIA, Styx Supertramp, Kansas, fans, etc. But thats just me.

Kalervo, I cant help it. I find todays music boring, overproduced and pretentious and uninteresting in the extreme. I hope that changes. Most of the people I buy and listen too are dead, but they live on because they achieved giant stature, greatness, that I dont expect Bruce Cockburn or the Vines or the Hives to. If they do, great , but I dont see it. People told me this same thing when the Cars and the Police came out. I'm glad I trusted my instincts and still do. I'm not slagging you, just honestly telling to when I hear the adult contemporary radio station here (KGSR) I want to puke. I cant help it. I'd be happier if I liked more art and music but...

Parting shots. I hate lyrics that whine about love except Buddy Holly and maybe the Everly's and Beatles. I detest all strummers and male lead singers with high voices (not counting falsetto's of Richard and Al Green, Curtis Mayfield.

Link Wray and Iggy'll dust em all off. They'll never make them ol' bluez rekkidz like that again.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 22:20:33 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

The Rolling Stones are great!!!... Dangerous 60's cultural sounds... but for the same money you can probably... now see the JWB, BBs, Crowmatix and the Hudsons... all of them... 4 separate shows... and at smaller venues... Ok, travel expenses not included in some instances...

Neil Diamond, it's probably the name, huh?... Dry your eyes and hang in here... I enjoy your GB posts... Also, thanks Pete for the Chicago story... and Bill/Lance for sharing something special...


Entered at Tue Sep 17 22:20:28 CEST 2002 from dialup-0632.dublin.iol.ie (193.203.146.120)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Round and Round and Round we go!..........

Pat Brennan: you did NOT answer the question!

Well, actually, you answered like a Kerryman.....with another question!

Got Kerry blood in ya?

So I repeat: Would you play with The Rolling Stones or not?

Let's assume the money is to your, uh, "satisfaction" (Ha! Ha!)

The GB waits with bated breath........

Watch this space, folks.....or possibly the spaces above this space.........


Entered at Tue Sep 17 21:44:26 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond
Web: My link

Subject: Major Stones article in FORTUNE magazine

This may not be the widest read publication out here, but the link is for a 5 page article on the business side of the Stones. Very, very enlightening.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 20:01:35 CEST 2002 from host62-7-149-255.webport.bt.net (62.7.149.255)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Location: LIVERPOOL

Subject: Where I'm from

Cheers Rich,

Just thought I'd clarify my origins.

Once a Scouse always a Scouse. Stick of rock and all that caper. Bit like you Taffies as I know only too well.

PS. I'll send you a postcard from The Seine :-)


Entered at Tue Sep 17 19:51:43 CEST 2002 from host62-7-149-255.webport.bt.net (62.7.149.255)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Musical Intricacies

I think this whole debate sparked by Pat's submission re The Band's superiority over The Stones has been fascinating for a variety of reasons, not least that it has really flushed out some of the intrinsic loyalties of many on here. And I don't mean that with any veiled or snide inference by the way. Merely a reflection on what has been said.

I must admit to being taken by surprise at the fact that there were those on here that would NOT automatically agree with Pat. In fact I had to re-read several of the initial responses to make sure I had understood the points being made regarding the support for The Stones prominence within rock circles. It shows, of course, that you can never and should never take anything for granted.

As someone who grew up with The Stones very best right back to their first single 'Come On' - and loving it all along with so much other great music from the same era - I suppose I had naively assumed that other GB'ers would have philosophies regarding The Band identical to the ones I rapidly absorbed once I had discovered The Band's unique Big Pink offerings in 1968. To me nothing before nor since has ever come remotely near to matching what I experienced back then or with the subsequent album.

Of course, like with every other person on this website I have built on and developed the eclectic taste for decent music that I had always harboured pretty subliminally. My own likes range so far with so many personal favourites that I could scarcely begin to list them.

The point is though that despite them all bringing so much enrichment to my life, none have ever managed to quite press the same buttons as The Band did all those years back.

Now to unearth exactly why that is I would perhaps have to read through some of that pretty involved and cathartic stuff I wrote when I first came on this site.

One thing I would say is that, my attachment is most certainly not a cerebral one. The Band's music might well be intricate and sophisticated due to the mighty Garth. But I do not believe that is the main ingredient that reaches me.

Rather I would say it is that unique sense of community and integrity in the singing and playing. The sense of fun and spontaneity, forinstance, in 'We can talk about it' which I just don't recall hearing any other artists ever remotely approaching. It was as if you were being allowed to eavesdrop on a lively pub conversation in some remote country village. It was simply wondrous. That almost tangible feeling of it being ordinary working folk's music as opposed to the music of the radio or the concert hall.

I always feel that The Band directed their music at the sensibilities of the ordinary Joe. That they wanted the ordinary Joe to join in with their community. To be a part of it. That was the pull this particular ordinary Joe felt at any rate.

Sadly not that many other ordinary Joes picked up on what was on offer. Most preferred the more accessible impact of artists like The Stones.

This, of course, brings me rather conveniently back to the debate and perhaps might explain to some of you ardent Band fans who also adore The Stones why I never suspected for a single minute that anybody else on here would not feel exactly the same as me about The Band and their place in rock and society's pantheon.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 19:43:54 CEST 2002 from s066028114036.asp.anobi.com (66.28.114.36)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Chicago
Web: My link

Subject: Stones...yet again

I'm sure it's been covered...but there are tight Band connections to The Rolling Stones. Blondie Chaplin and Bobby Keys are the main ones. The others I guess can be talked about some other time.

For all those folks out there that second guess The Stones ability to "Rip This Joint" you really have to reconsider. The link above is to a review from the Aragon show. I wouldn't have posted it but seeing as how everyone seems to be on the subject I thought you would like it.

Bobby Keys was absolutely fantastic last night. The set list was amazing. Lots of treats.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 19:38:42 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: the welsh valleys

Subject: reply to al edge .

dear al. after a stressful day working in an eductional establishement for young offenders and school phobics, your kind words were just what the doctor ordered. your wife has tought you well. youv got the welsh valleys thing down to a fine art. can i just say that my last visit to ireland was in 1985 for the boss's slane castle gig. your countrymen were as friendly and hospitable as any welsh folks iv known.a memorable weekend that. for god's sake though dont spread the word about max boyce. wev only just aquired a decent music scene,ie the manics,super furries etc. wev only just recovered having to live down max, bonnie tyler and shakin bloody stevens, i always thought tom jones was cool not forgetting the great john cale. best wishes and enjoy bruce you lucky bastard. rich.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 19:21:31 CEST 2002 from ch-asc1-p43.taconic.net (205.231.28.43)

Posted by:

Gilberta iman

Subject: Dave Hopkins - Berkeley

Dave, How great to see a "poster" from the Great Energy of Berkeley" I'll be in your neighborhood at the end of the month. Do you know my friend, Michael Franti? Are you familiar with his music ? ( I supposed you'd HAVE to be, coming from your town !) He's a good friend, positive artist and warm-hearted family man. Can you fly to the East in October ? He's playing NYC and we can all hang out . Tara will be here also, I think. Don't know about the youngster.....although he loves that tour bus !!!!


Entered at Tue Sep 17 19:05:02 CEST 2002 from oshst-062.olysteel.com (63.91.50.62)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Pat,

I guess I'm thinking differently about the point you are making. I can't see where these dismissals are coming from. Certainly not from me.

Can we agree on the "simplicity" of The Band's music?


Entered at Tue Sep 17 18:35:30 CEST 2002 from user-11218ti.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.163.178)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Bob W, I'm going to guess that not one person here has ever dismissed Garth's talent. What I've said is that his presence made The Band's music more complex and led it's members to investigate those complexities, with Unfaithful Servant a good example. Garth has been extolled for that talent yet people insist on dismissing that same atribute when applied to the group. That's all.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 18:09:20 CEST 2002 from oshst-062.olysteel.com (63.91.50.62)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: The Complex

Pat,

I don't believe anyone is dismissing the capabilities of Garth Hudson or The Band as a whole. There is no question as to their musical acumen. The issue of whether or not the Stones are, or ever were, capable of making music as complex as The Band is really moot. Do (or did) they have someone of Garth's caliber ? An obvious NO. Could they have sought someone out if their choice of musical styles led them in another direction ? Of course. While there will only ever be one Garth Hudson there are many (as you well know) highly accomplished and diverse musicians available to provide the "complexity".

Why was Garth sought out? Clearly because the members of the existing band saw the possibilities he presented to help them create a very unique musical product. And, frankly, there was no one among them with the particular skills Garth brought to the process. Why Nicky Hopkins? Why Mick Taylor? Why were any of the Stones choices made? Obviously, those musicians provided a vital aspect of the sound they were seeking at a given point in their evolution as a band.

Rather than complex versus simple it just boils down to choices of musical style and the pursuit of the sound in the songwriter's head.

Honestly, it all works for me. It's solely a matter of mood.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 18:05:14 CEST 2002 from 56k-la-01-41.dial.qnet.com (209.221.212.104)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

I liked the way The Band set-up on stage. They had line of sight between the three singers,bass and rhythm piano together,and Garth up and behind all in the middle.All the times I saw them they were tight,tight,tight.Setting up this way in almost a huddle gave them a team effort.Sure,no one hollered out "How ya doin' Philly! or "Here's one from our new album". The Band's charisma was in the songs and great performance of those songs.I thought their stage set-up was original and different than all the other groups at the time.Everyone else put the drummer in the middle and the lead singer up front in the center.The Band concerts were ensemble playing at it's best for rock shows of that era.

Some folks go to shows for "the Show",others like me always go for just the pure music or soul of it as was mentioned.Believe me, they got over live, no doubt about that.People that were expecting Elvis/Jagger type moves and words spoken to the audience may have been disappointed at first, but The Band would get you in the palm of their hands with the awesome power of the music.I still remember "Volcano" being performed at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles.That was some hard-rockin' stuff with the emphasis on hard-rockin'.Please don't doubt The Band's ability to rock during live performance.Their groove was automatic and strong.

While The Stones were warming up for Little Feat, The Band fans enjoyed a cold one up in the lobby. JUST KIDDING! I like The Stones and you can't compare apples and oranges.How 'bout a battle of the bands where the musicians don't bring instruments they put on boxing gloves instead.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 18:00:58 CEST 2002 from 216-119-10-197.smf.jps.net (216.119.10.197)

Posted by:

Randy

Web: My link

Subject: The Band

Well done site, nice to see such a nice compilation of material on The Band. A bit off the current Stones topic, but thought some of you might be interested in the link above.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:55:54 CEST 2002 from (81.22.68.108)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: 1968 favourites

Sorry David Powel, i wrote my last post before reading yours. It fit into your subject, and i take the opportunity of confessing i consider you amongst the most qualified GBers to give credible answers to my post below.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:45:33 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State

Subject: The Hawk's Link

JOHN_D: It didn't.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:44:27 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: LINK DID NOT WORK

NO THE LINK DID NOT WORK. Just type Toronto Star into Google and today's paper will come up and hit entertainment in the mast head and scroll down. Click for full story.

David Foster....his wife.........and first wife..........Paul Anka (Huh?)............Bill Clinton............Don Tyson........... were all on hand. No Band members; although Ronnie is going to get a star on the walk of fame on Oct. 4 in front of HMV records on Yonge........the site of the original Le Coq 'Dor. Robbie apparently is coming up for that. Ronnie will also get key to the city. Levon in town Thursday night I am told.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:37:04 CEST 2002 from 118.232.252.64.snet.net (64.252.232.118)

Posted by:

Toddman

Location: Connecticut

Subject: Re: Live Stones-Live Band

Peter,

I agree with you on your point about the line up of The Band onstage. It was a little unconventional, and did seem to eschew the traditional audience/performer relationship.

That being said, I seem to remember reading a comment from (I think) Levon, in which he said something to the effect of the stage formation being developed over the years with regard to each of the members maintaining certain "sight lines" with each other. In my understanding of this, their set up would result in Levon and Rick being able to look at one another as they played, keeping the bass and drums together. Robbie, being between them could easily look left or right as necessary. This did seem to put the music first, even if it was at the expense of showmanship.

Regarding the Stones: Although 'Love You Live' might not live up to it's listings of 'best live albums', I kind of like the intimate feeling of the (El Mocambo Side) where they do: Mannish Boy, Crackin' up, Little Red Rooster, and Around and Around. I think that a lot of The Stones humor comes aross in this club recording which doesn't always surface in the stadium shows.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:36:51 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: The Hawk

Hope The Above Link Works.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:34:20 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: W S Walcott/Lightfoot

Lightfoot is still in intensive care. Doubt if you'll see him for awhile.....especially the 20th.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:20:54 CEST 2002 from stjhts20d103.nbnet.nb.ca (207.179.149.232)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Carny/Lightfoot/Emo Phillips

I just got a sealed copy (LP) of "Carny" for 99 cents. I already have a copy but the price was so good I couldn't resist. Think I will leave it sealed.

Lightfoot is supposed to play here Fri. 20th. No word yet on when or if he will reschedule. I got a feeling if he does play here, tickets will sell briskly. People are always drawn to tragedy for some strange reason.

Anybody remember the comedian Emo Phillips? I think he is great. He will be here in a few months, along with some other comics. Thinking about checking that one out.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 17:10:19 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State

Subject: Bill's Dinner w/Ronnie

Saw this in Page Six of today's New York Post (read it all---Band-related content at end):

"BILL Clinton was careful to keep a three-foot distance between himself and lovely blonde Belinda Stronach as they exited the Four Seasons hotel in Toronto. But it didn't stop photographers from snapping their picture, especially when Clinton gave her a peck on the cheek before she got into her car. Stronach, chairman of the Decoma International auto parts company, and Bill were both guests at the birthday party for country singer Ronnie Hawkins, just out of the hospital following cancer surgery."

I wonder if the great reunion took place. Anything in the Canadian papers? The Hawk has taken a beating in the gossip pages of the New York papers. Last week's Daily News identified him as a former member of Bob Dylan's backing band, and the Post tags him as a country singer, which is actually closer to the mark. Considering the reason behind all the attention, I'm sure he'd rather not have been mentioned at all.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 16:24:00 CEST 2002 from user-11219fb.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.165.235)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

BWNWIT, if you are somehow capable of drawing that conclusion from what I said, fine. Of course, nowhere did I say the Stones--or anyone else for that matter--"sucked", as you put it, because they couldn't play something like Unfaithful Servant. And, nowhere did I say the Stones "sucked" for any reason. What I said was that I didn't like them all that much. I also said The Band was capable of more complex music and subject matter. Why people rave about Garth's musical complexity then dismiss such an attribute when applied to the group has yet to be answered.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 15:26:19 CEST 2002 from (81.22.68.108)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: inquiry about 'The days of Pearly Spencer'

'The days of Pearly Spencer' by David McWilliams, remains since 1968 an unforgotten song with wonderful orchestral arrangements and splendid poetic lyrics. Thanks in advance to everyone could inform me on several points concerning the lyrics more specially. Apologies for my ignorance.

1) Both lyrics and music author, like it is printed on the original single, is David McWilliams himself, while i read in the rock encyclopedia that lyrics are assigned to Mark Hammond. Who is the actual author ?
2) An apocalyptic athmospher turns around the text, each context does it refer to ?
3) Who is exactly Pearly Spencer ?
4) In the chorus 'The race is almost run', which race is exactly concerned ?


Entered at Tue Sep 17 14:31:26 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.24)

Posted by:

Lead-Foot Lil

I just wanted to add that I have also been accused of Tailgating... but it's not true. I don't drive too fast. The cars in front of me just drive to slooooow.....


Entered at Tue Sep 17 14:17:49 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.24)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: driving loud

Peter: Heheh.. I can completely relate to that 15-20mph speed increase while listening to certain music in the car. I am soooo guilty of that (those of you who have driven with me.. um..shut up, ok? :-)
More than once have I found myself going waaaay too fast on a highway because of really getting into whatever was playing. The one that sticks out in my mind the most was last New Years Eve... driving from here down to Long Island (about a 2 hour drive). My 18 year old son had never driven down there before.. and he was following me in his car. We got onto one of those highways where you get mowed down in normal circumstances if you're doing 60 in the slow lane.. and I found myself at some point cranking up some tune that came on the radio..and looked down to find I was doing almost _95_. Arrghh. The thing that got me most was the fact that my son.. was right on my bumper! Suffice it to say I slowed down.. and have tried to be more careful ever since (yeah right).

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 12:27:12 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-075.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.75)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Play it LOUD

The key comment on The Stones was that point about hearing the cow bells on the start of ‘Honky Tonk Women’ and having to turn up the volume. Just now I was in the car with a ‘British classics compilation’ CD on, and as the chords to Brown Sugar started, I automatically lifted the volume in exactly the same way. Infectious stuff. So strong is this desire to ‘crank up the volume’ that I banned my own Rolling Stones compilation from a permanent place in the car several years ago, because I found that (a) I turned up the volume and (b) I drove about 15 – 20 mph faster. Which is risky with our camera-studded motorways. That’s why when I was listening last week to the ‘Singles Collection, Vol 3’ I put it on in a heavy traffic situation, not on the open motorway.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 10:49:07 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-047.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.47)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Live Stones - Live Band

It’s funny- the Stephen Davis book has account after account of “appalling” performances by The Stones - on their own admission too. Tales of Ronnie and Keith playing different songs even (and not knowing). I know it’s on lists of ‘best live albums’ but I think ‘ Get Yer Ya Ya’s Out’ is abysmal, and ‘Love You Live’ worse- I foolishly bought both. The Altamont performance on film was dire, for that matter. I said this once before and a kind friend sent me an actual extremely good boot of the Stones live (and such offers are never rejected if someone wants to prove me wrong!). The Band on RoA, TLW and "Watkins Glen" are superb on live recordings. Whatever, the Stones can cut through sometimes inept playing and the audience find them superb. Jagger has charisma of Adolf Hitler proportions. Certain people have enormous charisma that fills a hall - Dylan on a good night. Paul McCartney too. Muddy Waters with lots to spare. I wondered if it was just success that created it, but I think not. Some ‘middle-rank’ performers have a fair bit of it- Bryan Ferry for example.

I brought this up before, but The Band crucially lacked that spark of charisma which has nothing to do with musical performance or quality. Paul Simon lacks it, though like the Band sheer quality and experience transcends that. Some artists I really don’t like have charisma – Tom Jones has a ton of it. I’m told that in the Hot August Night era, Neil Diamond had it. It’s a magic thing, transmitted through the ether, and not connected with either liking or truth or quality. The Band deliberately set out to avoid that style- accounts of them soon after leaving Hawkins describes them looking at each other, not the audience. Maybe the years behind Hawkins got them tired of charismatic performances. The fragments like Woodstock Lost performances (soon out on DVD) back that up. I think some of the ire directed towards The Last Waltz is because Robbie was trying to force a charismatic role that was alien to them. The 90s Band had everything except it. I found even their stage positioning and set up was almost willfully designed to avoid it. They lined up really badly on stage, with Levon stuck off to one side, partly invisible among the cymbals. No one else ever put the drummer at the side. I guess it made it easier to get back and forth to mandolin and bass. They could have surely done with a touch of expert outside help here. I suspect that Mick Jagger (as long as wasn’t involved himself which would have brought his narcissism into play) could have cast an eye and said (as I did to myself), ‘Shit! Put Levon on a big drum riser sharing the centre. Let’s have Garth right up on a riser too. Stick Rick between them. Let’s get the three principles at matching eye levels, central and well-lit.’ Mick knows that for the audience there is a division between the ‘originals’ and ‘new guys’. When I saw them at Cambridge, I would say that Jim Weider, Randy Ciarlante and Richard Bell were largely carrying the show musically, so it would have been intrinsically unfair to them, but that’s exactly how The Stones do it.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 10:14:57 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: It's all oirish ter me

No offence taken Richie. Just the opposite in fact. In my usual sick-minded perverse and despicable way it's often pleasurable to see the evidence of having touched a raw nerve. I can see why I did now. Four Stones albums in the top ten best ever!!!!! Fuckinell man, don't they teach you anything about taste in dem valleys???

Joke - honest Rich. I have read your posts with avid interest even during the spell I wasn't posting and your musical knowledge is second to none. As is your movie knowledge. I'm gonna make you jealous now tho. I'm off to Paris, Barcelona and Wemblee to see the great man himself on his Rising tour. Easy Jet do cheap flights - £30 - to both Paris and Barcelona. Green round the gills mate?? I'll remember you to him. Incidentally my missus is from the top of the Rhymney valley - pity she's not still there. Another joke. I married her in 1972 and haven't been the same since - valley girl see boyo [you'll get me drift Richie]. I absolutely love South Walians. They are the most friendly, warm and generous folk you could get anywhere. In fact if it wasn't for Max Boyce we'd have moved back there years ago.

Pat - one hundred percent Scouse and proud - tho as 99% of us came from land of the little people I guess you're kind of right


Entered at Tue Sep 17 10:03:55 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: comparisons

would anyone compare the band and jimi hendrix? no? i thought not. have a good day everyone.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 09:47:53 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: We're gonna do one more, and that's it

This whole "MY favorite band can beat up YOUR favorite band" thread reminded me of an old anecdote involving none other than Mick Jagger and the inimitable Bob Dylan.

Back in the day, there was quite a rivalry between Dylan and Jagger. Bob supposedly once sneered to Jagger, "I could have written 'Satisfaction', but you couldn't write 'Mr. Tambourine Man'". Years later, Jagger was reminded of that quote in a Rolling Stone interview. His answer was brilliant. "Yeah", he said, "but could he sing it?"

It's profound in it's simplicity. Jagger has been hugely successful with his knack for getting the sex thing over, but that's never really been Bob's forte. Dylan would have as hard a time selling "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" as Mick would have penning "Mr. Tambourine Man". A classic pissing match between two rock gods!

There really is no right answer. It's only rock and roll. One thing about the Stones though, is they NEVER cheat their audience. The same can't be said for many of their contemporaries. Love them or hate them, but you have to admire their sheer professionalism of The Rolling Stones. Consistent live performance shouldn't be underestimated.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 08:40:32 CEST 2002 from as3-2-57.hip.berkeley.edu (136.152.194.171)

Posted by:

Dave Hopkins

Location: Berkeley, CA

Charlie: Good to hear about National Geographic trying to get hip. Of course, if it really *was* hip, it would know that the former Robert Zimmerman was born in Duluth, not Hibbing.

The Stones debate is interesting, and I applaud Pat in particular for having the guts to challenge the conventional wisdom about the Stones...as in best R&R band ever, etc. etc. I'm not sure what I think on the subject, but I appreciate the discussion nonetheless.

Seems to me that there are two independent dimensions that can be used for evaluating musicians/bands: technical proficiency, which is relatively straightforward to define, and something that for lack of a more precise term I'll call "soul"; I'm sure you get at what I mean by that (energy, emotion, intuition, good group dynamics, and the like). And of course, part of what's so amazing about the Band is how well it rates on both scales; to be sure, all five players were masters of their instruments, and Garth Hudson in particular had and has astonishing pure technique, but they also had soul. Now I'm one of those people who, if forced to choose, prefer soul to virtuosity if it comes down to that; for example, I'd much rather listen to Crazy Horse than...well, I don't want to upset anybody by naming any names, but you get the idea. But to have a large quantity of both attributes is quite rare, and is at least partly why the Band is so special.

Now, I agree with Pat that the Stones couldn't hold a candle to the Band on a tune like "The Unfaithful Servant." That doesn't mean that the Stones should be dismissed; they're great at what they do, or at least they used to be. Catchy riffs, spirited, slightly sloppy performances, and lyrics either about gettin' it on or putting other people down--these are Stones specialties. But, chord voicings and the like aside, there's a subtlety in the Band's performance of "TUS" that I don't hear the Stones matching. Just like, though I'd love to hear the attempts, I probably wouldn't prefer the Band's versions of "Get Off Of My Cloud" or "Tumbling Dice," just because they depend on a certain over-the-top groove that the Band never really cooked up, at least after the '66 Dylan tour.

As usual, Peter Viney's article on the Richard Manuel disc is a must-read, especially for those of us who haven't yet taken the trouble to track down the album. Thanks, Peter!


Entered at Tue Sep 17 07:52:47 CEST 2002 from cs242226-245.houston.rr.com (24.242.226.245)

Posted by:

Laura

Location: Houston

Subject: The Strolling Bones

Love the posts on The Stones and The Band. My two favorite groups! I agree that they are apples and oranges but who cares! I have my tickets for the January show here in Houston. They will probably all look like ants to me on stage ...depending on how bad my seats are LOL! BUT...I have always had a great time at their shows and look forward to this one like I have all the others. "Beggars Banquet" "Let it Bleed" and Exile on Main Street" are the best recording IMHO. "Sticky Fingers" is a great one too especially if your on alot of drugs. "Can't you hear me knocking" is such a great song to listen to really loud. I have blown many a speakers listening to that one! Question for any GB'ers out there that might know this. Was Robbie the original creative consultant on Chuck Berry's "Hail Hail Rock and Roll" but then later turned it over to Keith because Berry was such an asshole regarding the whole project or was it the other way around?? I'm thinking that Keith turned it over to Robbie because he was sick of taking crap from Berry during the making of the picture. It's been a good while and my memory is fuzzy. Have a good day everyone!


Entered at Tue Sep 17 07:52:29 CEST 2002 from cmlxxxix.hdyn.saunalahti.fi (195.197.6.89)

Posted by:

Kalervo

Location: Finland

Subject: Boooring old stuff

Forgive everybody, but probably there isn' t more boring subject in the world than Stones. Everything worthwhile has been said about 20 years ago...

I understand that in these kinds of web sites the emphasize is on nostalgia, but I really hope to read even few messages on today' s music. To me it is exciting to wait a new Bruce Cockburn album soon, or will the Delgados' new album be so brilliant as their last one etc.... There is so much wonderful music around, and some waste their lives on old boring millionaires and their over, over, over, over, over, over exposed music....


Entered at Tue Sep 17 07:45:40 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: bandvstones pt 2

dear al. apologies for the fruity language, but in answer to your question, yes. there are at least 4 stones albums that might appear in any top 10 list greatest albums of all time. also,they released possibly the greatest ever studio double album, no mean feat considering the concept of the double album became a byword for 'dissapointment'. also the stones, consistently over the years have delivered electrifying live performances. iv seen them about 10 times. each gig was blinding. were the band as consistent live? im not so sure. certainly, the one time i saw the band live, (the forum 1996), they were a complete and utter disaster. as i said, both groups are equally valid.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 07:22:47 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-116-185.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.116.185)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

So I guess that means Chuck Berry does suck. Huh.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 07:06:01 CEST 2002 from dialup-67.28.33.229.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (67.28.33.229)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Man, sometimes I just gotta laugh. Levon waxes rhapsodically about how Garth's classically trained, jazz influenced approach raised the level of the Hawks beyond all the other bands on their circuit. Robbie enthuses about how Garth made all of them sound better. The Hawk relates how Garth's approach--making sounds nobody had ever heard before--pushed the Hawks beyond their limits. Time Magazine makes special mention of Garth's genius. Al Kooper lays it out in Rolling Stone. We hear reviews of recent Garth solo, duo, and group shows that describe his magic, his unbounded talent, his ability to spin different cultures into a single grab bag that is uniquely his own. His incredibly complex approach to music. Listen to the Genetic Method. Listen to the snippet from TLW. Too Wet To Work. All the boots.

And I'm supposed to go to the King Crimson site?


Entered at Tue Sep 17 06:26:39 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Bob

Yeah Bob, Thanks for livin'. He was always the voice of his generation and still is. With his last two releases he has proven it once again. I love it when those that fly so high and are so detached come down to earth in their older years and tell it like it really is. It's good for hearts to know that Bob is just a sap for love and still, after years and years of being "Hip" that he's just a good old boy like everybody else... But I still want to know why "One More Cup of Coffee" is so damned short!

"There was a time...when lonely men would wonder...

..thru this world...rollin' aimlessly along..

So many times.. I've heard of their sad stories..

...written in the words of dead men's songs..." ~ John Prine ~


Entered at Tue Sep 17 06:09:46 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-116-185.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.116.185)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

I guess if anything, the Rolling Stones prove that Rock and Roll doesn't have to be complex, or difficult, to be good. If you all love music that's challenging to play so much, why aren't you all groovin' out on the Yes or King Crimson websites? I'll take Chuck Berry, personally. Even if he can't play Unfaithful Servant. Then again, Muddy Waters or Elvis Presley probably couldn't, either.

The story about the dog barking at the car horn reminded me that I was on a trip recently to a different city, and there was this giant statue, like about ten feet tall, of some historical figure. These people came walking up with a dog, and all of a sudden the dog just freaked out when he saw the statue. He was just barking up a storm and growling and running around this statue, for about five minutes. It was hilarious.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 05:27:45 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: The Stones, The Band, Life, and Death

Wow. I was almost afraid to come here today after my last post, because I thought I would be flamed. I regretted the harsh edge to some of my words, but I felt strongly about defending the honor of a band I love. The only reason I took the criticism of the Stones so personally is that I respect the opinions of the people who post in here. When you love something as much as I love the Stones, and they are insulted by people you respect, it hurts.

The comparisons of The Band and the Stones are futile. Apples and oranges, right? You CAN love them both, as Bayou Sam declared, and I'm living proof! I would never diminish one in praise of the other.

I saw the Stones twice this month. Once again, they delivered a highly entertaining evening of robust music. We have no right to see this close a facsimile of The Rolling Stones in 2002, but there they are! It could have been 1969, 1976, 1981, or 1989. It's still Mick, still Keith, and still the Stones. No self-parody here, because they can still pull off "being the Stones", without compromise, after 40 freakin' years! Nobody works a room like Mick Jagger, even if the "room" is a football stadium. Somebody in here said that he can hold 50,000 people in the palm of his hand, and it's the truth. That's an extremely rare ability, folks. You can't teach it. You either have it, or you don't. And Keith Richards has to be listed among the greatest rhythm guitar players of all time. His catalog of hits speaks for itself.

I have often said that Bob Dylan was penalized for living. Had he died in the motorcycle crash, he'd be cannonized. Had he expired after "Blood On The Tracks", he'd be revered forever. Instead, he literally became a punchline for the better part of 20 years. It wasn't fair, but life never is. Death was a tremendous career move for Jim Morrison and Kurt Cobain because they never had to get old. It's also a coward's end, as Warren Zevon recently said. Bob Dylan persevered, and I thank him for continuing to enhance the quality of my life with his genius. Thanks for living Bob.

Peace. -LDO

PS- Where does "Can't You Hear Me Knocking" rank in the Pantheon Of Complex But Lovable Rock Songs? ;-)


Entered at Tue Sep 17 05:11:45 CEST 2002 from 1cust8.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.8)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Dylan's Hometown in NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Once again, the times they are a-changing: quiet, conservative old NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC magazine is getting hip on us. The October issue devotes five full pages to Hibbing, Minnesota (with lots of photos, of course) just because his Bobness, Mr. D, was "born and partly raised" there. The exterior photo of his childhood home looks pretty stark and explains a lot about Bob. The article mentions a Dylan theme bar/restaurant called Zimmy's that sounds like it would be the sort of place some of this cyber group might hang out at in real life.

Now back to the Stones...


Entered at Tue Sep 17 04:41:17 CEST 2002 from parachute3-156-40-62-76.net.nih.gov (156.40.62.76)

Posted by:

Quinn The Eskimo

Location: Maryland

Subject: Stones

My favorite memory of the Stones was listening to “Let It Bleed” way back in high school at a friend’s house. My friend had a dachshund named Schultz who used to lie on my friend’s bed in his room while we listened to albums. If you remember "Country Honk," you'll recall the car horn at the beginning and end of the song. When that came on, Schultz would get up, jump off the bed, and run downstairs to the front door and bark like crazy. After a while he would give up and return to the bedroom, jump up onto the bed, and resume his supine position. Of course, this was just in time for the end of the song, and another honk - which sent poor Schultz off on another mission furiously guarding the front door. We loved that album, not only for its effect on poor Schultz. IMHO its certainly one of their two best, but I think that I would give Beggars Banquet the slight edge, among the two.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 04:39:25 CEST 2002 from dialup-67.28.33.229.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (67.28.33.229)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Subject: US vs YCAGWW

Pehr, musical complexity can be objectively identified. Check out the chordings on the site here, especially the Garth influenced bass line and the equally Garth influenced B section, which is totally unlike anything the Stones have ever recorded. It is typical of the kind of complexity (and subject matter) that the Stones cannot touch. Like I said before, the Band could play any Stones song, but the Stones wouldn't know what to do with much of the Band canon. Garth is certainly one of the reasons.

I agree YCAGWW is quite good, mostly because of Al Kooper and that choir.

Considering the treatment accorded Nicky Hopkins by the Stones camp, I think his being name-checked here is ironic.

I was intrigued by Paul Roberts' Rolling Stone magazine reference. Since the mag premiered in 68 or 69, do any of the superlatives heaped upon the group in Robbie's speech apply at that particular point in time? Some historical revisionism perhaps?

BTW, if I need that roll-down-the-window, crank-the-radio moment, give me the first 20 seconds of Rock and Roll Doctor.

And, please, this is all in good fun. Neil Diamond, what do you think of the Stones?


Entered at Tue Sep 17 04:36:36 CEST 2002 from 1cust208.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.208)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: 1968

David Powell: 1968 (the release year of BIG PINK and all those other great discs you mention) was also a turning point year as sort of the last gasp for stuff like Herb Alpert and Paul Mauriat hitting high on the pop charts. By 1969, bands like Led Zeppelin, Blind Faith and CCR were high on the top album list and there was no "easy listening" in sight...[why do I feel like Casey Kasem all of a sudden?].


Entered at Tue Sep 17 03:40:11 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: The Stones

I wouldn't even listen to The Stones for a long time after I found out about the GP rips. But dang it, They're fun! Fun to watch and great fun to listen and dance to. They're like a highly dysfunctional family with tons of soul. Kind of like the GB here.

Brown eyed Girl mentioned the feminist backlash created by some of the Stones albums. Remember the one over "Some Girls"? What was that line? "Black girls just wanna get.....all night and I don't have that much jam..."

Al Edge _ Wholesome, Refreshing girlie insight. I like that. I think yer funny and quite Okay...

Remember Scorsese and Rick walkin' back thru the hallway discussing what Shangri-la was. "It's a clubhouse, where ya get together, talk, play music" Yeah..it's nice...


Entered at Tue Sep 17 02:15:07 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

almost forgot.....Neil Diamond - don't go away man. I always considered myself somewhere in the middle between the musical giants, and the folks who just plain like the Band. Neither of the two is more important than the other. There are the occasional folks who think they are holier-than-thou. Just be amused by them.

Sometimes something a person says just dosen't strike much, if any, response. Don't take it personally......... IMHO, you went up a few notches when you had the balls to use "Neil Diamond" as a handle. That was funny.

Don't leave - hang out - it's only rock n roll.

Also, Long Distance Operator - nice post.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 02:08:42 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: stones debate

Pat B I get your point. My point is that Unf. serv. has a basic structure of 4 chords, yes some inversions, and voicings, relative minors, but I'm not sure that makes it more complex. Its not really that hard to play, at least in the sense of getting through it.

YCAGWYW is complex in total sound, and designed and orchestrated beautifully, the form follows the function. well, I here intresting inversions and jazz riffs off htat guitar and so on. But if you dont see it, you dont. I'd still put it up. complex chords arent the only criterion, IMHO. to Quote one of my heroes, (not) "Its a vision thing".

Unfaithful Servant is great, but compared to the Stones ycagwyw, they sound like 5 depressed amish guys or something.;) Apples and oranges. Oh well. The Stones play wicked ass Blues and Midnight Rambler will always kill me and they rock, just like the band.

But what am I doing sticking up for these Brit Rockers anyway? very out of character for me:) ttfn


Entered at Tue Sep 17 02:04:32 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

How did this Stones talk evolve into a comparison between them and The Band? Apples and Oranges, as someone recently posted.....You can like both bands - I'm living proof.

Someone please explain to me, I'm beggin' ya',why a song (especially rock n roll) has to be musically complex to be GOOD?

I took "Let It Bleed" with me today to listen to. I have the liner notes in front of me now. The core band is on almost every cut - then you have folks like Nicky Hopkins, Al Kooper, and Leo Russel sprinkled around. Brian Jones appears on a couple of tracks, and Mick Taylor is on some...BTW, Keith plays that cool bass intro to "Live With Me". It seems that whenever a Stones bass line catches my ear it's Keef playing it........Why are so many folks looking so deep into the Stones for something deeper? They are a great rock and roll band in the true sense of rock and roll. If you want a real crank it up, roll down the windows, get me another beer, dirty, in your face rock song - you can't do much better than "Brown Sugar"........and if you hear the opening cowbell on "Honky Tonk Women", and you DON'T turn it up..............


Entered at Tue Sep 17 00:21:54 CEST 2002 from 12-249-69-3.client.attbi.com (12.249.69.3)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Chicago

Subject: Stones at The Aragon

Well I'm off to the show..doors are at 6:00 show at 8:00. Rumor has it that Dr. John is the opener. Might be a great evening. I'll fill ya in later.


Entered at Tue Sep 17 00:19:10 CEST 2002 from user-1121897.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.161.39)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

The perceptive Al Edge must have some of the Irish blood in 'im.

Popularity in and of itself means nothing to me. I think I can accurately and honestly say that the degree of popularity that The Band reached had absolutely nothing to do with my enjoyment of their music. I don't discount the Stones' show biz acumen, but if you are going to compare and contrast groups/singers based on that criterion, then you are in the Celine Dion/Brittney Spears part of the universe. There are plenty of Stones songs I like, all of them pretty old. I'd rate U2 as having delivered the goods better over a similiar period of time than the Stones. And I'd easily take Van Morrison's output over the same period of time as The Stones'. At any point, there were always many more bands that I liked.

David P., The Rascals' Once Upon A Dream.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 23:59:49 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: The STones

The Stones are probably the most consistant band ever Paul. The Kinks are the only group I can think of who came close, managing to release high quality Albums unbroken from 1964 to around 1990, strangely they are much like the Stones. 2 Guys surrounded by whoever the feel like calling part of the group those days. The STones are certainly one of the most popular bands ever. I guess the point some of us have tried to make that the Stones are more perfromers than musicians. How long would you listen to the STones just jam without Mick on stage? Not long, not as long as you would the Band. But none of our 5 guys have ever been able to hold 50,000 people in the palm of their hands night in and night out like the Stones. Mick could be the greatest showman in R&R history. They just arent a "band" in the traditional sense, nor are the fantastic musicians. ALthough Charlie Watts is better than he is given credit for. Anyone ever pick up one of his jazz albums?


Entered at Mon Sep 16 23:01:22 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Complete and utter bollocks and...er respect

So Richie, let me get this straight then. You saying you rate The Stones as highly as The Band?


Entered at Mon Sep 16 22:52:27 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: The Year in Music: 1968

While going through all my albums not too long ago, I was reminded of just how many of my favorite albums were released in 1968. That had to have been one of the most incredible years in music for me. Here are just some of the releases that I can remember:

"Music From Big Pink", "The Beatles (White Album)", "Beggar's Banquet", "Electric Ladyland", "Astral Weeks" and two (!) from the Byrds ("Notorious Byrd Brothers" & "Sweetheart of the Rodeo") are at the top of my list. Then there's Van Dyke Parks' "Song Cycle", "The Songs of Leonard Cohen", Simon & Garfunkel's "Bookends", Cream's "Wheels of Fire", Creedence's self-titled album, Buffalo Springfield's "Last Time Around", Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation", Frank Zappa's "We're Only In It For The Money", Fleetwood Mac's "English Rose" and Blood Sweat & Tears' (w/Al Kooper) "Child Is Father To The Man". By the way -- as I recall, Dylan's "John Wesley Harding" was released in late Dec. of 1967, so that album's sort of blended into the following year in my mind. I'm sure there's some more I can't remember. Anybody else have any other personal favorites from 1968?


Entered at Mon Sep 16 22:37:25 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: bandvstones

to say that the stones cant hold a candle to the band as a band, with respect, is complete and utter bollocks. big pink and the brown album were seminal albums in the grand scheme of rock and roll. however bbanquet right through to exile were equally as vital as anything the band came up with. also those particular albums by the stones were not just majestic pieces of music, but they captured a mood, tapped into the zeitgeist as much as the band did with their work. stating that the Band were a superior group to the stones is an eronious argument. both bands are equally valid i would have thought.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 22:17:56 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: fao MB - and anybody interested

Hope this is ok MB. I've e mailed it to you and also put it on here as some may have missed it first time round.

DO NOT FORSAKE ME OH MY DARLING

The odour hung around ominously.

Foreboding? Perhaps. Fear? Maybe.

Call it what you will. We shall never really know for sure. That night in that narrow alley, whatever it was stalked nostrils desperate for something fresher.

Yet, in those moments that followed no change would come. No fresh pastures would materialise out of the thin air. The protagonists at either end of that alley were already set on their destinies. It was too late to stop now. Two worlds were about to collide. Two lives mapped out years before were now ready to discover what had laid in store for all those years.

Either side of them the ramshackle shanty pulsed with offers of refuge. Lights shone from caravan windows. The shadows formed offered them an escape. Beseeching them to accept a way out. Yet, in reality, the flickering lights merely emphasised the steely resolve etched deep across each of their faces. The easy option was spurned. The get-out clauses rejected out of hand. These were men who simply never turned back. This was their Tombstone. Their Dodge City. This was their alleyway of fate.

As they drew nearer, their eyes met. Bizarrely, it revealed disparate appetites for the momentous rendezvous about to unfurl.

The one oozed relish. The other, meanwhile in stark and sobering contrast, reeked of dread.

It was suddenly clear the stench of foreboding had emanated from one source alone; that those seemingly corresponding resolves had been fed by differing fuels. At once, an upper hand had been established. The rule of the jungle would apply here as anywhere. And this alleyway was no place for the faint-hearted.

The protagonist relishing his fate was now sprightly, hungry even; seemingly eager to pounce. The other was cagey, as if almost frozen in the glare of the spotlights from those caravan windows either side. He glanced almost desperately either side at the lights that shone on him. Now he would have taken any one of them to make his exit. To transport him away in some mythical ray. Now he prayed for a door to open to invite him in. Any light. Any door. Anything. A hole in the ground, even, to swallow him.

It was too late. Perhaps, it had always been too late. The sprightly one, the younger of the two was too nimble. Moved far too fast. Even before his older adversary had time to realise what was happening, he had flashed out his arm from his side and grasped the hand of his adversary.

It was as firm a handshake as he had ever conjured up.

"Don't mind I hope Van, lad. Respect mate!"

As they loosed go after what seemed like a shake that would last forever, the younger man walked off into the night. Smiling. Content. An over-enthusiastic fan off perhaps to bother others of similar repute amidst that backstage shanty. Garth? Richard? Rick? Meanwhile, Van Morrison stared disbelievingly at his hand; moulded as if putty. He wondered to himself whether he'd ever be able to play the piano again.

[Unofficial backstage ramble Nostell priory UK circa 1983 - The Band headlining]


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:25:40 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Paul Roberts

Subject: Stones

I dislike the GB when it turns this way, but since i feel attending a Stones autodafe, i just remember there is a serious witness for the defence. Anybody watched the TV document dedicated to the 25th birthday of the Rolling Stones magazine, which was commented by Robie Robertson, reminds what RR said when asked about the choice of the magazine title: ' It was natural that the magazine held the name of the most constant, the most popular, the most... group in rock history'


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:12:31 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sticks and Stones

First and I think INFINITELY most important. Neil Diamond/Crazy Chester. Not sure what it was that hurt your feelings mate but you should most certainly carry on posting. You are most definitely as much a part of this forum as anybody. I for one accepted you from day one as you know and when I've been on even as a lurker I have always enjoyed your straight to the point, honest style. It's wholesome and refreshing. A bit like Rosalind's but without the girlie insights. Keep on truckin' la.

Good banter re the Stones but apart from Pete Viney's insight possibly a bit of a misleading kerfuffle on the whole.

Thing is I think a few on here have kind of missed the point if I'm not mistaken. In fact, it's almost as if they were Stones fans who had a chip on their shoulder about The teeny weeny Stones being victimised on the masive ultra acclaimed Band's website!!!!!!!!!!!! Amazing stuff.

I don't think even Pat Brennan was actually knocking The Stones for what they are or what they've done. I certainly wasn't as I absolutely love loads of their stuff if at the same time I'm not that sold on any of them save Charlie as human beings. The point is tho, as great as they have been - and there is surely NO question of that - they simply cannot hold a candle to The Band as a band.

The thing which myself and I think Pat and a few others were driving at was that on the whole they have tended if anything to be overrated - especially live [compare Jagger forinstance with Brucie - utterly different class and I've seen both many many times] - by most punters whereas by comparison The Band have been massively underrated.

It doesn't mean we all sit there like ice boxes when the likes of Brown sugar and Tumbling dice are belting out. I mean, come on, could anyone who appreciates The Band NOT respond with their tail feathers to such fantastic music???? It just means we wish We Can talk and Chest Fever could have gotten maybe one hundredth of the same acclaim and recognition. Same goes for the kudos the respective bands have received down the years.

In a way I daresay it's all down to a bit of sour grapes at the unfairness of The Band's lack of populist acclaim and The Stones are as good a yardstick as any with which to highlight it. Certainly in my discussions I've never slated The Stones. That would be ridiculous. I've just maintained that as great as they are they still as a band fall a good way short of The Band.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:12:05 CEST 2002 from adsl-34-142-232.asm.bellsouth.net (67.34.142.232)

Posted by:

MB

Subject: Book

I am gathering stories for "Tales From the Rock and Roll Highway," a book to be published by Billboard Books next year. I am looking for stories regarding performances, touring, recording, fan encounters, etc.; anything interesting, funny, poignant, crazy, whatever. If you have a story to share, e-mail me at inkstainedwench@bellsouth.net


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:08:19 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Dylan / Live Aid 1985

Pat mentioned that Dylan hated his appearance at Live Aid. No wonder -- Ron Wood & Keith Richards attempted to back him up and it sounded like they were all playing something completely different. It was so bad, it resembled a Saturday Night Live caricature skit of Dylan at his worst. As I recall, rumors abounded regarding a Stones reunion appearance at the concert, but Jagger ended up doing his solo thing instead.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:05:50 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

Subject: Stones/Band

I am jealous of the Stones in one major way. In 1968, when they released Beggars Banquet, the Band released Music From Big Pink as their debut record. Both groups for the next few years would create historically significant works, and both groups had been playing together for a number of years prior to 1968. My jealousy is that we get to hear the Stones become a great band from their early work to 1968. The Band did not have that luxury. Wouldn't it have been great if the Band had cut six records leading up to Big Pink? History has now taught us that Big Pink and The Band were a culmination of something rather than the start.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 21:03:03 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: The Stones

I'd have to second your point of the simplicity of Stones songs Pat. I've been playing the Bass for 22 years and there isnt another major group with Bass Lines as incredibly boring to play as the Stones. There is a point in Jumpin Jack Flash were there are 32 consecutives 8th notes from the same note, same fret. A guy could fall asleep playing that, at the least lose count. The STones are enjoyable to listen to, even their recent stuff isnt bad-but stellar music it isn't.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 20:21:20 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Paul Roberts

Subject: Logical mathematics

axiom: there is no order relation in music taste

theorem 1: If the band is the best group, you must enjoy other groups and singers.
proof: you have already enjoyed other groups before being able to realize that the band is the best. QED

theorem 2: If you like the band music, you cannot like the band music ONLY, EVEN if it is a unique kind
proof: accordingly to theorem 1, and the fact that RR, LH, GH... themselves have been fans of other singers. QED

lemma 1: the spririt of the band is to be receptive to alternate groups and singers, consequently this is the spirit of the band fans.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 20:18:07 CEST 2002 from user-11219eh.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.165.209)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Hank, what's the pay?

Dylan hated his Live Aid appearance, which is why he joined up with Petty for Farm Aid.

Lowell mighta been all coked up but he was right.

Pehr, You Can't Always Get What You Want has four chords, all simple block types. The B section of Unfaithful Servant has some absolutely beautiful suspended chords that the various guitarists in the Stones have never come near approaching. And the rhythmic thing that leads to the full stop and startup is exquisite.

Saying that not liking the Stones represents some psychological misplay or artfully chosen academic stance is silly. As someone said, it's a matter of taste. I can give some pretty substantial reasons why I don't like the Stones, but I don't think anyone here is dumb for liking them.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:41:13 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: Stones and Bangladesh

My favorite Stones albums are Bleed, Exile, and Some Girls(to my dismay, I heard Beast of Burden on the oldies channel the other day).And Faraway Eyes still cracks me up, one of the funniest songs I have ever heard. Black & Blue is also a real cool, underrated album.I wooed 2 wives and a few other women with Memory Motel off that album(also made use of IMND, Share Your Love, and Acadian Driftwood in that capacity).I would love to catch them on this current tour, but only in one of the small theatre shows, and I don't count on that happening. I'm certain someone can help me with this one-I was living in Monterey CA back in 74, right after It'sOnly R&R came out, and I knew this guy who had that song on a 45. It was B/W, as so often happens on singles, what I recall to be a far superior song that I don't think has turned up on any of their compilations.Haven;t heard it since, forgot the title, anyone? And speaking of Bangladesh, Iknow at least one GB poster-Rick S- was at that concert, and has fond momories of it.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:41:11 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-077.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.77)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stones, Chris Rea

Lotsa Stones stuff: I’m going to try to agree with as many people as possible (because I’m in a very good mood generally).

Sure, the first two Stones LPs were a lesson in R&B and they’d done their homework, when they were lone voices and however much musicians pretend otherwise, so many got to the blues like Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Bo Diddley via the Stones, and then they had impeccable taste in soul covers of Bobby Womack, Marvin Gaye, Don Covay, Bob & Earl etc.

“Paint it Black” from House of Blues shows Taj Mahal, Junior Wells, Wendell Holmes, Bobby Womack, James Cotton reciprocating on Stones songs. They also jammed with Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy in their time. Keith did the Chuck Berry film.

However, reading the Davis book they were never “a band” in the way The Band or The Beatles were, and the more I read the book, the more it seemed rare (certainly after about 67) for more than three “Stones” to be on a track. Very rare for Wyman to be on them at all. They almost always had a keyboard player, who was never a “Stone”. As Pat said last week, they used great musicians on tour and in the studio. I think Keith is a unique musician. Charlie a very good drummer indeed. Surprisingly drums were sometimes played by others. There are 80s bits about Keith’s guitar technician playing on albums instead of Keith. Ron playing bass. Keith playing bass. Because it was so rare for them all to be there and straight. They were never a “band” in the way The Band or Little Feat were. They were a corporate identity built around two stars, who could afford to surround themselves with the best.

Jagger is an amazing stylist and performer, and very fit. He’s also a complete mean and vain arsehole, unfortunately and from all reports a very nasty piece of work.

I often prefer the early Stones versions of blues to the originals. ‘Love in Vain’, ‘Honest I Do’ and several others define the songs for me. On soul, their covers are great, but the originals almost always better. Go to the originals of Can I Get A Witness, Mercy Mercy, Harlem Shuffle for superior takes. I’d have to say PLEASE go and listen to The Temptations on ‘Just My Imagination’, ‘Ain’t Too Proud to Beg’ and ‘Don’t Look Back’ (which Peter Tosh and Keith covered). The Temptations are in a different class altogether ON THESE SONGS. ‘Just My Imagination’ by The Temptations stands up there with Marvin Gaye’s ‘What’s Going On’ and Sly’s ‘There’s A Riot Going On’. The Stones cover is very well done, but it doesn’t touch the original. The Stones best work is the originals in that great 68-72 period, then after that, for me they become a singles band- there are many astonishing singles – Start Me Up, Beast of Burden, It’s Only Rock & Roll, Angie, even Undercover of The Night. But albums had a lot of dross and filler.

So, on blues by white men – seek out Chris Rea’s ‘Dancing Down The Stony Road’ (2 CD set), released today in the UK. Chris Rea wrote this after a near-death illness and surprised everyone by doing a blues album. If you like your blues in Howling Wolf style, you will be bowled over by this album. I’ve only heard half so far and am transfixed. A contender for one of the best albums of 2002 (as most critics agree so far).


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:30:15 CEST 2002 from dialup-0641.dublin.iol.ie (193.203.146.129)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Rip This Joint!

LDO!.....Rockin post!

Pat Brennan!.....Answer honestly the following:

If Chuck Levall dropped outta The Stones touring line-up and Mick J rang you up to take his place:

Would Ya?....Would Ya?......I'm sure ya could, ya.........

ya boyo!........

Lowell George was coked outta his head when he told the story (to the late Timothy White) about blowing off Mick and Keef when they wanted to jam with him.....

Again, The Stones woulda had nothing but the greatest respect for LG and Little Feat......and there's a great photo of Mick J and LG backstage at a '70ies Doobies/Little Feat gig in one of them retro-photo books......all hangin' out and havin' a laff.......

Also......Didn't Dylan write on the liner notes of "Another side.........."

"an' dean martin should apologise to the rollin' stones........?

Yes, he DID.........and he appeared at Live Aid with Keef and Ronnie.....and that was Brilliant!......spawned Farm Aid.......completely acoustic after a whole Global Day of Electronic famine relief.....better'n'CSNY on the day.......totally funky..........and Dylan hangs with Ronnie all the time.....saw Ronnie jam with Dylan in Killkenny last year......rockin!

I never, ever heard ANY of The Stones diss The Band.......the thing is, The Stones woulda been completely in awe of The Band/Hawks pedigree.....Wasn't Bill Wyman good enuff for The Hawks backing John Hammond?

I gotta stop........I feel a huge post comin' on and better take a Cold Cold Cold shower....

later, dudes.........


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:16:37 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: stones

Stones and Band are apples and oranges. I cant help but sense a feeling of defensivess and desparation in the comments that put the stones down. I imagine it would be the same seen the other way. comparing things doesnt really open you to the true essence of either subject.

Not that I dont like to speculate.

Pat Brennan, I would not hesitate to match "Unfaithful Servant" with "You Cant Always Get What You Want", just off the top of my head. That is a very complex song, from Al Kooper's French horn solo, building thru the many layers, including the legendary percussionists whom Kooper said could play those licks and roll perfect spleefs at the same time without missing a beat! It may be a C/G/F etc. kind of song but the extensions and voicings and rhythm take it far beyond the rudimentary.

Its really about taste anyway, isnt it? I dont think "Unfaithful" is really all that complex. Its not Brubeck, after all. Its a folk song.

my taste... I hate complex thoughts. I appreciate them but avoid them now. A record, a good song shouldn't have to be a struggle, but should stand on its own.

Bip Bop Bip Gabba Gabba Hey! Be Bopa Lula Tutti Fruitty,


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:15:22 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-171.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.171)

Posted by:

Levon and Garth in London

Subject: It ain't gonna happen !

Unfortunately it was an error by the London Free Press regarding the Levon/Barnburners/Garth appearance ad. for Sept.20 in London. Sorry, wish it could have happened.

Dave Z: I guess you're relieved that you won't have to drive another 1000 miles :)


Entered at Mon Sep 16 19:10:19 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: JWB in Philly last Sat nite

Just playing GB catchup here after a few days off-Ben,wish you had said hello the other night. It was a great show, but way under-attended. I see Roy Buchanan's name popping up here, and at the Jim Weider Band show the other night I overheard someone say"if you never saw Roy B. play, you're lucky, because you just saw the next best thing".All those years I saw and listened to Jim and Randy play with The Band, I didn't know how much of their talent was being held in by that unit. It was the 4th time I saw the new JWB lineup (who have taken the place of the Honky Tonk Gurus), they are tighter every time. They are stretching tunes out like I used to like to hear the Dead stretch em out, but there are no ragged edges with these guys. They have rendered Don't Do It into an unrecognizable 10 minute monster complete with a drum solo and an a capella section. They usually only play this, and 3 other Band-related tunes-Life is a Carnival, The Weight, and The Remedy(which Jim cowrote with Colin Linden, BTW).They do some R&R and R&B covers, but most of the shows consist of songs written by Jim and/or Jim & Randy and their various bandmates.And every now and then they debut a new one, such as the other night a new JW composition which was dedicated to the in abstentia Acadianruby. If they come around, do yourselves a favor and go out and see them, and if I;m around, come over and say hello. I'm bashful, but not unapproachable.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 18:20:13 CEST 2002 from libstfstx03.library.uiuc.edu (130.126.34.238)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Peter V; very nice review, and good work at putting the performance in context.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 18:05:27 CEST 2002 from oshst-035.olysteel.com (63.91.50.35)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: A Stones Throw

Pat,

While I wouldn't argue the degree of musicianship between The Band and the Stones I will say this....I've been extremely fortunate to have seen something close to two hundred and fifty shows in the past thirty years. Among those are at least ten Stones shows. I have never been disappointed and have always been amazed by the energy they generate.

The two bands you compare are so disparate in style that any comparison seems impossible. I am very definitely among those led to seek out the artists that influenced them and have to disagree with your premise that they had no impact in that direction. I would argue that Keith Richards is among the very finest rhythm guitarists in the history of the genre and I will gladly second LDO on his Jagger comments. Frankly, there has been no one out there to rival him as a front man for a long, long time.

I believe it's more about style and musical sensibility. It's only Rock and Roll !!!


Entered at Mon Sep 16 17:59:22 CEST 2002 from dialup-209.245.77.174.dial1.losangeles1.level3.net (209.245.77.174)

Posted by:

JQ

Location: San Clemente

Peter V - Thanks loads for the review. Welled penned, fine insights & (seemingly) hard work. It would take me forever to finish something of that quality. Cheers.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 17:50:13 CEST 2002 from px1ar.ed.shawcable.net (24.70.95.203)

Posted by:

BrelandC

Location: Michel First Nation in Edmonton

I would like to say i love your music and look forward to more activists songs.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 17:42:31 CEST 2002 from slip-32-100-27-251.va.us.prserv.net (32.100.27.251)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Living As a Bad Career Move...

Long Distance Operator: Great post! Just ask guys like Leon Russell and Johnny Rivers, who are continually snubbed by the Rock'n'Roll Hall of Fame, what a lousy career move that staying alive is. Not many remember that the last Elvis Presley tour had lots of unsold seats months before he died...

As Dylan said so well,"...now to her death is quite romantic..."


Entered at Mon Sep 16 16:41:25 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

First, thanks for the note, Ilkka.

Second, following up on the note from Lance Anderson that I posted last week, here's his description of what came of his invitation to Garth Hudson:

"Just wanted to let you know of a special night last week at the Rockit.

" Michael Sloski and I started up our regular Tuesday night thing. Jake Langley, a fabulous young guitar man sat in even though he had just broken his elbow!! Jake is a great jazz player, and plays octaves in the style of Wes Montgomery as well as anyone I have heard. Smooth and fluid. What's equally amazing about Jake is that he is a fine Blues and Rhythm and Blues guitar player.

"Then John Dickie walked in and sang a few as did Denis Keldie on organ. One of T.O.s finest Terry Blersh also sat in on gtr and as I went to the piano a fine time was had by all.

"As we were finishing up around midnight, Garth Hudson peeked in the door with an accordian in his hand. Well we knew we were in for a long night now.

"It was a very memorable musical late night/morning. Denis Keldie went out to his car where he just happened to have an accordian in the trunk ... and duelling stereo accordians!! (That will either quickly empty a place or a party will break out.... nothing in between). We were treated to a series of Tarantalas and obscure fifties instrumentals by two of the finest and eclectic accordianists around.

"The organist Rickie Dee arrived and played and sang a few numbers. Well we all traded chairs and played organ, accordians and piano until past 3:00am. Jim Poulis the owner of the club was gracious to let us hang out.

"So we will go at it again tommorrow night. I don't know who will show up to play but my musician friends know that they are always welcome to sit in. Hopefully we can get more people out so that this room with the relaxed atmosphere can continue. I'm having a blast.

"Tuesday Nights at the Rockit, 120 Church St. (at Richmond) T. O. 9:00pm start.

"Anderson/Sloski duo ,,,,,,, Hammond B3 and drums w special guests."


Entered at Mon Sep 16 15:24:32 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool34-173.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.34.173)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Stones tours

I went out with a guy circa 1986 who had supposedly travelled with the Stones on a tour a few years before that. (He was a bigtime liar but this story may have been true.) He would sometimes say "Last tour they'll ever do" and shake his head regretfully. How many have they done in the almost 20 years since?


Entered at Mon Sep 16 15:13:58 CEST 2002 from 1cust126.tnt2.hackensack.nj.da.uu.net (67.235.142.126)

Posted by:

Ray G.

Location: Pearl River, NY

Subject: Peter Viney: Whispering Pines Review

Peter,

Enjoyed reading your review of Richard's "Whispering Pines". Makes me want to shell out the $35 or $40 bucks to order it from Dreamsville Japan. I know it would be worth it to have "The Beak" live in my own living room.

Peace


Entered at Mon Sep 16 14:32:37 CEST 2002 from 12-249-69-3.client.attbi.com (12.249.69.3)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Chicago

Subject: Stones

Well...don't have much to add to the Stones comments accept that I happened to score tickets on a rerelease from Ticketmaster around noon on Friday.

So the wife and I are off to The Aragon Ballroom to see our first Rolling Stones shows. Hope it's a good show. In the last eight years she and I have seen some dynamite shows. Hope this is one of them.

Incidentally I think they are smart for transitioning in theatre shows like The Aragon. I always wished that The Dead would have done more of that. The Allman Brothers do it well now.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 14:11:38 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Location: RainCity

Subject: Movies and food!

Hell Jerry if it were up to me I spend all day talkin' movies and food!

Remember how it was in high school? Ya just felt like you wanted to crawl into a hole sometimes. And then, later on when ya started to get older and folks you knew in school that you thought didn't like ya..They come up to ya and say stuff like "Boy it's great to see you again..Ya know, I really liked you in school!" That's happened to me a hundred times. And my answer to them is always the same... "Why didn't you tell me back then?"

My day is filled. found an old BB gun that used to belong to my little brother. Found it in the bottom of an old box along with a red tube-box filled with BBs I'm goin' down to Hoochie's Dollar store, buy me some candy and pop and a couple cans of potted meat that they got on sale for 2 for a buck. Then this evening after work, I'm goin' out to watch the trains. I got a favorite place I like to sit. I carry my old beat-up 6 string and wonder down between the trains pretending I'm Woody Guthrie. Then I'm gonna sit on my favorite stump with my Maker's Mark and shoot rats with that BB gun I just found.

Have a sweet day everyone....

Mr. Donabie _ You Sir, are in everyone's thoughts....get better real fast.

I got an e-mail from someone yesterday. It wouldn't open. I only got to read the subject line. To whoever it was from...sorry ..I hope it was a nice letter and if not, I'm glad it didn't open..


Entered at Mon Sep 16 13:39:23 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Thanks B.E.G. I got thubject line. To whoever it was from...sorry ..I hope it was a nice letter and if not, I'm glad it didn't open..


Entered at Mon Sep 16 13:39:23 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Thanks B.E.G. I got the message!


Entered at Mon Sep 16 13:38:38 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Toronto

Subject: Memory That Went On This Morning

Bob Dylan and The Hawks were playing together for the first time at Massey Hall. I had front row seats; for which now is music history. During that evening in the middle of the concert, I noticed a small thin black man walk out from stage left; with a chair and sit down to the side watching the concert from the stage.

From time to time he would yell out things like,......."way to go Bob....sounding great Bob........Hey Bob!" Dylan would always look over and seem to be getting a little pissed at the man; but not in a heavy way.

Turned out later the little man on the stage; who was unknown to me at the time, was appearing that same evening over at "The Riverboat" where so many folk and folk-blues artists would appear. It was John Lee Hooker.........who just thought he would drop by. Bob, as I said wan't totally amused by the "yelling out"; but you could see that Bob had great respect for the guy from his early days in the village.

It's just all a great memory now.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 13:36:42 CEST 2002 from stjhts19c108.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.253.113)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Subject: Stones

OK, enough of the Stones. Their peak period was from 1969-72. Beggars Banquet, Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers, Exile. Nothing much else by them interests me.

Didn't an up and coming group by the name of ZZ Top open for the Stones on their 1972? tour? I remember reading they blew the Stones off the stage.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 12:31:48 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68352.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.184.225)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: Express Yourself!

"We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, but of the quarrel with ourselves, POETRY.......(Yeats)

Better Red than Dead.....;-D (brown eyed girl)

To those Posters who are feeling ignored or not part of THE BAND CLUB.....I'm not a Club member either.....I've never been your "typical" Band Fan.....On purpose I choose to post about musicians who are not necessarily associated with The Band 'cause I can only take so much toxicity.....I'm a MUSIC FAN FIRST....The Band is one Band that I am obsessed about......not the only one.....as I'm sure everyone can tell by what I choose to post.....:-D


Entered at Mon Sep 16 12:21:17 CEST 2002 from zorg143.revealed.net (208.243.237.143)

Posted by:

Mike

Subject: Music

That's right Rollie. I forgot to mention that about Walter Horton, Calvin and the rest. You bet it's classic footage :) And what a bluesman...John Lee Hooker.

Long Distance Operator, I hope you don't think I'm trying to diminish The Stones. I'm not :) I'm just not that big of a fan. And I don't see what the hype is about them. Solid band? Yes. Greatest Rock and Roll Band In The World? Not by a long shot. But, it all boils down to opinion. And I won't knock anyone else's views or musical tastes. For example, Peter Viney does NOT like The Doors. And some of us here (iincluding me) do! The great thing is that tastes are respected here. And yes, Lowell George was brilliant.

Neil Diamond, "Oh well I have a feeling I'm not the only one who hasn't fit into the Band fan club..I tried. I will say that it is sometimes a cold place, just remember not every Band fan know's all there is to know about the Band or music in general"...What do you mean? It's not a matter of fitting in, is it? Am I wrong? Anyone? Since I've been coming here for almost 4 years, all that matters is the music. I've never felt the need to have to fit in. Nor have I felt ignored if my post didn't start a thread. I come here because of the music (and The Band). But, we don't discuss The Band exclusively. There are many artists to be discussed. You say that this is sometimes a cold place. Why? All the regulars and semi-regulars here have always been friendly to me. Some of us are more opinionated than others but not disrespectful. It seems to me that you might be bothered if nobody responds to your post. Just because nobody responds doesn't mean he/she didn't READ it. Sometimes, a post sparks thoughts and opinions. Other times, a post might have said all there was to say about a certain topic. I think that when people try to fit in, that's when they set themselves up for a disappointment. Just be yourself. That's all man :)

Time to head out for work. I don't like Monday's

Mike


Entered at Mon Sep 16 11:23:22 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Scarlett Rivera

Subject: Spanish proverb

Comparison means devaluating the two parts


Entered at Mon Sep 16 09:48:11 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Bandfans

Hey Jerry _ I have a true story to tell. I found this site about 2 years ago. The first thing I did when I got internet hook-up was to search for this group. I thought it was a useless thing to do for nothing but a discography and a few lines of bio. I thought the Band had came and went. Boy Was I Wrong! It was like being hungry, walkin' along an old deserted railroad track, looking down and findin' a great big Gold Coin. I had a lot to say. I was extremely pissed off at Mr. Helm for ruining MY fantasy! I said a few very unpopular things and got plastered for them. Everyone attacked at once. I didn't know what I could say and couldn't say, so I said everything. I fought back. (if I'm not mistaken Mr. Jan got the internet task force after me.) Bad News. Punches Flyin', Fur Flyin' Every Which a' Way. Hank said It was like "Dylan and the Hawks rattlin' on stage at Newport" I was a bad girl and I'm sorry.

What I'm tryin to Jerry is, If you love The Band's music. If you can't live without a dose everyday. When you think of quality music The Band is the first thing that comes in to your head. If you're forever trying to turn youngsters on to this group and get their ears out of Rap and Hip Hop and that bullshit they're continually trying to force down their throats...then you belong here. We got insiders here too...I'm beginnin' to think that Butch and Dave Z are the same cat...

I ain't ashamed to say I dropped out of high school. I ain't ashamed to say I live in a three room apartment on top of a poolroom with a neon "Miller Light" sign shinin' thru the window. I ain't ashamed to say I'm still single and ain't got no kids and have a compulsion to be adored by everyman I meet. And that's alright with me. Hell! MattK told us about himself..he wasn't ashamed. Was ya Matt? A Honda?

This is the bottom line Jerry. The party ain't no fun when yer friends start to leave! Okay?


Entered at Mon Sep 16 09:14:55 CEST 2002 from h0050ba8ceef5.ne.client2.attbi.com (66.31.104.255)

Posted by:

Long Distance Operator

Subject: The Stones I Throw

Hey, I love Little Feat and The Band as much as anybody. ANYBODY. Ditto for Roy Buchanon. You know what the problem is, though? Most of these guys are fucking DEAD. Lowell George was brilliant. Unfortunately, he's also fucking dead. Richard Manuel? Gifted, a perfect voice, troubled, and dead. Rick Danko? A beautiful soul, a tremendous singer who became grossly overweight and died young. Sadly. Roy Buchanon is the most criminally underrated guitarist of all time. A true pioneer. Today, he also finds himself very dead.

Mick Jagger is not dead. He also happens to be the best frontman ever. Period. He had that title sewed up twenty years ago, and now his current exploits onstage are the equivalent of a victory lap. Mick Jagger, I remind you again, is not dead. He has the body of a 20-year-old, and at 59 still possesses the moves and energy that spawned over a billion imitators. Do Mick and the Stones have to apologize because there are some pompous pseudo-intellectuals out there on the fringes whose tedious approach to music-listening prevents them from appreciating their brilliance? Uhh, no. There are many people who simply wouldn't know a good rock-and-roll show if it were in their trousers. Some of them, I suspect, post here occasionally. It's utter nonsense to sit around and diminish the achievements of the Stones over the last 40 years, but you can be sure that someone will try.

I'll also take the time add an emphatic "HELL YES, the Rolling Stones DID turn me on to the music of Chuck Berry, Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Gram Parsons, Fred McDowell, Robert Johnson, and Smokey Robinson!"... to name but a few. I, in turn, have turned hundreds of others onto that music. I thank them for that. Keith Richards' tribute to Chuck Berry, "Hail, Hail, Rock and Roll!", is probably the second-best rock movie of all time. You all know the first.

God bless the Rolling Stones. There's nothing wrong with living, and living to tell the tale.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 09:07:39 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp69804.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.190.153)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Mick Taylor

Bob Emu: I agree with you........but I think Keith would disagree.......in regards to Mick Taylor if I understood your post....."Ron Wood seemed to project new energy into Keith. As Keith said during the tour, (1976 Black and Blue...Btw I remember the Feminist backlash at the time re album title) in an interview with Barbara Charone: "Mick Taylor took eighteen months to knock into shape. Woody is there. As far as I'm concerned he's a lot more there than Mick Taylor ever was." It was true, Woody even looked like a Rolling Stone - scrawny, raddled but dynamic.".....

I think the point was......We don't want real musicians in our band......We didn't want Brian Jones.....and Mick Taylor didn't really FIT INTO OUR CLUB.....He tried.....He even wore make-up during video shoots and eventually became a slave to drugs himself.....but the difference was......He was actually a musician's musician like Brian Jones before him......I still can hear Taylor say in a radio interview that the Stones were not real musicians......He was inhibited musically by playing with The Stones......Btw.....I saw him solo in a small club in Toronto.....All I remember was that it was a somber evening......My fave video of Taylor with The Stones was during "Goat's Head Soup" and I think his most fluid and tasteful licks were during the playing of "Time Waits For No One"........Ain't that the truth!.......;-D......Marianne Faithfull also has stated that the real reason for the hiring of Woody (besides needing a lead guitarist) was that he was the perfect go between Mick and Keef.....and he fitted into THE CLUB....


Entered at Mon Sep 16 08:41:47 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Peter V: I just finished reading your review...I think your final question re. why a Japanese company could put this CD out (with such good quality), while a North American one hadn't/hasn't/won't/can't /couldn't (choose the appropriate word) is a good one. I believe the answer can be found in the fact that Dreamsville is not a huge Japanese company and it is probably run by people who are genuinly enthusuiastic about the type of music they promote as opposed to what's going to be the hot ticket this year (like the big recording companies do).There are quite a few independent record labels/recording/publishing companies (jazz, pop, rock, etc) like this in Japan that work, somewhat successfully, outside the box of the corporate music establishment.Unfortunately, the top YEN makers are still those contracted to the big labels.

Richard (from St.Catharines): How's the culture shock?

well, back to watching the sumo (big men bumpin' bellies).


Entered at Mon Sep 16 07:54:18 CEST 2002 from acaab4b8.ipt.aol.com (172.170.180.184)

Posted by:

Bob Emu

Location: The Midwest

Subject: Responses to E-mails

Bayou Sam: the piano on "Ain't Too Proud" was by Billy Preston. Ian Stewart plays only on "Short And Curlies", apparently a song that wasn't supposed to make the album.

Pat Brennan: Elvis covered "Mystery Train" too. He never actually wrote anything. His credits were all to siphon off money, a common practice in rock and roll.

Bayou Sam: Ringo was on tambourine during Dylan's set.

Brown Eyed Girl: Marianne Faithfull gets a credit on the Virgin CD re-release of "Sticky Fingers"

Dave the Drummer (from the 13th): Yeah, I knew Garth was on MTV back in '84. He's not on now, though, and that was my point. What is on now is entirely vapid and devoid of talent. And talent would be the perfect thing to try to get on... except that Garth's not too marketable to corporate America, and, therefore, probably wouldn't get much (if any) time on the air.

Can you imagine Garth Hudson calendars, roller skates, scented candles, bubble gum, cologne, and Garth's own clothing line? I can't, but I sure can imagine any below-average singer that can't (or barely can) play one instrument selling that kind of crap.

Finally, A note on the Stones:

The Rolling Stones were great. Then they lost Mick Taylor. Ron Wood's a great guy, but every album with him has taken longer and longer to get out. There were 14 studio albums (I'm counting the American pressings for the albums before "Sticky Fingers") between 1964-1974, there have only been 9 studio albums since then.

They're good, but not great. Look at the Band's albums from the '90s. Look at Neil Young, at Bob Dylan. You can grow old gracefully, and still sound great. You shouldn't go trying to act like you're still 35, and get these crappy MTV-based bands to open for you. And you shouldn't experiment with every new style that comes around once you pass 40. I never was that impressed with any entire album released after 1978.

And why don't they let Ronnie Wood sing? They let Mick sing. They let Keith sing. And Wood's just as good as Keith. And they're both better than Mick.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 07:23:50 CEST 2002 from 1cust140.tnt1.idaho-falls.id.da.uu.net (67.250.109.140)

Posted by:

Jeffrey(rollie) Newsom

Subject: to:Mike D on "The Blues Brothers"

Not only is Pinetop Perkins playing in the Maxwell St Band, but also harp great,Big Walter Horton, bassist Calvin Jones and drummer Willie Big Eyes Smith from the Legendary Blues Band. Classic footage to be sure...........


Entered at Mon Sep 16 07:00:51 CEST 2002 from 24-148-58-186.na.21stcentury.net (24.148.58.186)

Posted by:

Doug

Location: Chicago

Subject: These Guys Are Therapeutic

Technology is a tough sector in the US right now -- my company just went through a round of lay-offs and my name was on the list. Obviously a little discouraging but while sending out resumes this weekend --I had a 'Band-athon'. All of the stories, all of the images -- many of which describe characters in far graver situations than I even approach --really lifted my spirits. After all it could be a lot worse ... I could have a horse named Jethro that just went mad! Nice post Neil Diamond.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 06:24:26 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

It's a good thing that you don't have to be accepted in here to be a Band fan...oh well I have a feeling I'm not the only one who hasn't fit into the Band fan club..I tried. I will say that it is sometimes a cold place, just remember not every Band fan know's all there is to know about the Band or music in general, they just like great music and may not know how to articulate it as well as some of you...I have aknowledged several of you here for well written Post's, Roz was the only one who at least reached out once in a while and said hi, for that thank's Roz hun..I will continue to listen to all of the Bands great music...

Jan...This is a great site you do a great job of this, Ive learned a lot...


Entered at Mon Sep 16 05:53:43 CEST 2002 from jed26.revealed.net (208.23.178.121)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: The Stones/Little Feat

Pat B., right on! Sam, the covers of "Ain't Too Proud To Beg" and "Just My Imagination" better than the originals? Umm, NO! Sam, I like ya but I gotta disagree.

The Stones just seem to make those songs sound weak and downright lame. I'll take The Temptations versions anyday! Why? Well, The Stones' covers seemed slapped together. Un-interesting!

Pat, that's true about Little Feat. Also, Mick and Keith sent a roadie over to ask Lowell if they could jam with Feat. Lowell's response was to "fuck off". That's ballsy. And you're right! The Stones should've opened for Feat. There's a highly talented band that never got due credit and could easily slaughter The Stones onstage and in the studio. It's obvious, but I don't like them much. Except for their 1960's output. After that era, they either seem to be trying to hard or not at all. Just my view.

Not trying to stir the pot here, but it's only an opinion. But if you like or love The Stones, ok by me.

Mike


Entered at Mon Sep 16 04:45:09 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam - 5th post today - it's like a Yankees World Series run.

Location: ny

Pat = I might give you "Just My Imagination", but "Ain't To proud to Beg", Charlie is just right in the pocket on that snare. The piano is tasty too (Ian Stewart I assume). cranking it up is required when the Stones version comes on. Oh and, I love you too :-)

This could be fun - how about Stones tunes that The Band might have done a nice cover of? I say "Salt of The Earth".


Entered at Mon Sep 16 04:35:51 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.208.66.2.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (63.208.66.2)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Subject: Gimme three steps

In the early 70's, George Bush the first substituted for Spiro Agnew (ahh, the company we keep) to award the Jaycees Top Ten Americans Under 35 award to noted speed freak Elvis Presley who wrote Mystery Train which was covered by The Band.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 04:28:11 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.208.66.2.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (63.208.66.2)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Bayou Sam, you know I love you but the Stones' covers of Imagination and Beg are better than the originals??? Oy.

Now Hank, we've been here before. Hank is Irish and lives on The Rock which makes him (by birthright) correct about 99% of the time. This however is the 1%. Your point that the Stones turned the world onto Chuck Berry etc is pure academia. That they copped these people almost note for note is obvious, and selling it back to innocent teenagers is genius, but very few people actually graduated from the Stones to the originators. Otherwise I would have guessed Muddy and Wolf woulda had at least one hit. Dylan turned to folk/country blues after his high school Little Richard phase. He heard the Beatles on the radio and started thinking of getting a group. Arguing that the Stones had something to do with it has no basis in fact. And as far as the statues go, Dylan could have great respect for the Stones business acumen, but I've never heard him wax rhapsodically about the group itself. And Dylan has been known to say a lot of things.

Here's something you could argue. There was the big news years ago that the Stones broke up, that Keef and Mike hated each other. So they cut solo albums and proceeded on solo careers. Except that the albums bombed and the tours were underwhelming. Which forced them back together, a decision any good business man would make.

Quite a long time ago I dared anyone to find me an instance in the Stones canon that matches the nuance and soul of the descending line/ritardando/stop/start in Unfaithful Servant. It was SOP procedure for The Band and miles beyond the ability of the Stones.

The Stones asked Little Feat to open for them. Lowell said no, that they should open for him. And he was right.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 04:19:17 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

My fourth post today - it may be a personal record.

You know what else I like about the Stones? They're reliable. Sometimes there is a band that just seems to sound the same all the time (Rush, Phil Collins, Yes,& others) and it's boring. But with the RS, it sort of seems OK. Like a comfortable T-shirt. You can always count on some rock n roll roots kind of stuff, and a few slow ones, as well as a nice cover song. If they diverted too much from what they do best, I think they'd fall on thier face. I guess the most they ever diverted might be Satanic Majesties. When I hear that the Stones are once again coming back into the spotlight every few years, it's like an old friend visiting. Hey, there hasn't been an age determined yet when a person can't rock anymore. The first rock and rollers are senior citizens, and most of them can still kick ass, so the Stones have a ways to go yet.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 04:08:01 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Chris Z

Location: Chaska, MN

No, David can not make anymore road trips for a while... well, at least not until he gets his hair cut... Even if Robbie were to somehow join Garth & Levon, my answer would still be No!... Right now he is rocking in a fetal position on the backseat floor of his Jeep Wrangler... mumbling "people should go, Go"...


Entered at Mon Sep 16 03:42:32 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Roy Buchannon and the Rolling Stones

When I found out that them Stones had the audacity to ask the Great Roy Buchannon to join them as "second" guitarist I just about laughed my ass off. I imagined in my head what it must have been like.

Mick and Keith: "Hey Roy, How bout joining us as a member of the Stones? We need a rhythm guitar player."

Roy: Sounds Great! Tell ya what. We can keep the drummer and the bassman right where they are. Mick, You go put on one of those short little dresses and some high-heeled pumps to show off them skinny little legs of yers... and put on pretty red lipstick to show off them lips.. And girl, You can be a back-up singer.

Hey Keith, Go find another job! The Stones don't need you anymore! From now on this group will be known as "Roy Buchannon and The Rolling Stones." Take it or leave it?

It probably didn't go down that way...but it should have! (Roy didn't need a vocalist)


Entered at Mon Sep 16 02:14:05 CEST 2002 from zorg154.revealed.net (208.243.237.154)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: The Stones

Ok, I know I'll catch hell for this. I just don't see what the hype is about The Stones. I think their 1960's output is great (having plopped the cash for all the remasters), but the rest of it doesn't grab me. Overall, I have to say they aren't as good as most seem to say. But, that's just my opinion. And I'm not knocking anyone else here. I think that quite a bit of thier post 60's stuff if repetitious.

For me, they were at their peak in 1968/1969. It's also very obvious that Gram Parsons (while not introducing them to country msuic) re-kindled their interest in that type of music. Listen to Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Parson's infuence is evident all the way thru the "Exile" material. I'm sure that Keith and Mick were inspired by Gram. And because of this, I do have respect for The Stones. I like them, yes. Yes, they were never as talented as The Band (then who is?!) but they've done some good stuff. Not the best band ever (by a long shot) but certainly not the worst.

Also, by chance I was at the local Borders yestrday and decided to replace my long since player-eaten VHS copy of The Blues Brothers on DVD. The sound is like a pile of towels were taken off of the speakers...It's that good. Plus, it has 12 minutes of extra footage included in the movie which hasn't been seen since the first screening in 1980. But here's the best part: the scene of John Lee Hooker performing "Boom Boom" on Maxwell Street in Chicago has been expanded to it's complete version. I completely forgot that Pinetop Perkins can been seen on electric piano in that performance. There's a Band link, he was at The Last Waltz. And we all know of Duck Dunn's and Tom Malone's links to The Band. Just thought I'd throw that at ya.

Mike


Entered at Mon Sep 16 02:14:01 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: The Stones

Bayou Sam mentioned "Some Girls" There's a song on there called "Faraway Eyes" I always really loved the country-inflected stuff.( Thanks GP) "Ain't too Proud to Beg" and "Tumblin' Dice"...great music. Even if they were reptiles. They're fun to watch too.

Hasn't Keith been makin' a big stink over Mick gettin' knighted? I heard the other day how Keith is callin' Mick's new record "Dogshit in the Doorway".


Entered at Mon Sep 16 00:26:14 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I like the Stones' "Black and Blue" album too. It's the first one with Ron Wood I believe. There's a song on it called "Memory Motel", which is (or was) a motel out on the east end of Long Island (N.Y.-where I am). It's a tune I always liked, and has Mick and Keith singing different parts of the song.....There's also a great tune on B&B called "Crazy Mama" (no, not that one). The lyrics are not that great, the music is standard blusey stuff - nothing brilliant and ground breaking - but it shows the reason why they get called the greatest R&R band.

Y'know another thing about the Stones I like is some of the cover songs they've done. They always seem to pay tribute to the people they used to-and still admire. I love thier covers of "Ain't Too Proud To Beg", and "Just My Imagination" far better than the originals.


Entered at Mon Sep 16 00:05:13 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: anything

cheers bayou. as i said , its ages since iv seen the movie. i hope eventually a dvd of concert for bangladesh comes out in the vein of the recent lw dvd. id still like to know when the long promised remastered cd is coming out. as for the stones, having seen them umpteen times on uk tours, you cant knock them. on their day, they are peerless, on record and especially live. last great album. id go for some girls. last good album. steel wheels was pretty good. greatest record. beggars b. to exile, all on an equal footing. 2 underrated stones classics, black and blue and tatoo you. goodnight all from dear old wales. richie


Entered at Sun Sep 15 23:59:46 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-186.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.186)

Posted by:

Serge

Subject: Levon and Garth in London Ontario

I know this conflicts with the September 20th. date in the "What's New" concert listings for Levon and the Barnburners playing at the Fall fair in Lindsay Ontario, but last friday's London Free Press has an ad. for Levon and the Barnburners, with guest Garth Hudson at London's Western Fair Grandstand on September 20, at 8 pm. Proceeds to the Rural Expo 2002 Legacy Fund. Tickets $ 40 (Cnd)advance and $45 at the gate. Phones: 1-800-261-9631 or (519)673-5715.

I'll check this out and repost about it. Hey Butch..what's going on? You in on this?


Entered at Sun Sep 15 23:25:57 CEST 2002 from dialup240-b.ts552.cwt.esat.net (193.203.157.240)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: I only get my rocks off when I'm on The GB defending The Rolling Stones

Hmmmnnn.....I'm really surprised when Band GBers rail against The Rolling Stones.....It's a pointless thing to do......

As I wrote a couple of weeks ago, I would be very surprised if The Stones had nothing but the very highest respect for The Band........and The Band woulda known that The Rolling Stones almost single-handedly turned whole generations AROUND THE WORLD onto Chuck Berry, Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters.....

You could reasonably argue that if it were not for The Stones, Dylan would NOT have been inspired to go and find a band to back him live and The Hawks woulda never evolved into The Band. Bob Dylan has said that the USA should erect statues of The Stones (and The Beatles) for what they did to revive North Americas interest in its own music.....

I mean, if it's good enuff for Levon to sing with Keith on "A Deuce and a Quarter" AND if it's good enuff for RR to GLADLY hob-nob with Keith at award ceremonies AND IF IT'S GOOD ENUFF FOR RONNIE WOOD TO BE AT TLW.......AND BE IN THE MOVIE..... then WHY would any GBer be soooooo uptight about The Rolling Stones? This, I don't understand.........

........another thing about The Stones which is very admirable; The Stones have a tradition of putting on GREAT support acts on when they tour......acts who could conceivably blow them off the stage.........Despite all The Hoopla and Hype around The Stones, MUSIC is at the core...which is what you want, at the end of the day.......but you can't ALWAYS git wot ya want...and yes, there IS a similarity between that song and The Weight....but THAT'S cool too..........

The best book on The Dead is Rock Scullys book, "Living with The Dead".....Hilarious..........He manages to present them as totally human but not at the expense of the mystical hippie trip they were on.........and is completely respectful about The Band........he maintains The Dead actively looked forward to gigging with The Band on the bill.......

....and "why not?" sez you.........

Here's wishing Warren Zevon all the best at this time......hopefully, he'll write a song to scare his sickness away!......


Entered at Sun Sep 15 22:51:39 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Scarlett Rivera

Subject: Song creation

An anthological case of song inpiration.

For the annual jazz festival of Montreux, Zwitzerland in 1971, Frank Zappa was in concert at the Casino, in front of the lake of Geneva. During the concert, the Casino burnt down, people went out from the building, and Zappa hurried in the Rolling Stones mobile studio which was in the vicinity of the Hotel. Completely dismayed, he watched the scene where he lost all of his hardware in a few minutes. That surnatural vision of the Hotel burning above the lake has been translated in the title of a famous rock success, the description of the circumstances, in its lyrics:

Smoke on the water - Deep purple

Many generations of rockers have believed it was a drug song


Entered at Sun Sep 15 22:30:55 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Artists and Criteria

Suppose it's all down to the criteria by which anything is judged or rated.

Makes perfect sense to me what you say Sam.

Stones fans would point to a vast legacy of great songs that are integral to rock history as well as the longevity of Jagger, Richards and Watts as being the reason why they are the best rock band. Beatles fans would simply point to the ground they broke in 7 short years.

Meanwhile, us lot on here would point to two/three/four/five albums of matchless collective musicianship and at least two of matchless evocation of rural America [other more fortunate souls on here would point to matchless live performances] as to why The Band stand without peer.

Of course my missus would simply point to Francoise Hardy's love song collection and say 'beat that'!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Sep 15 21:57:01 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: South Jersey

Subject: JWB

Saw the JWB last night at the North Star, small crowd, great band. These guy's could use some press help no doubt. Jim's a smokin guitar player, but that rhythm section put a fire up his butt all night, those guys sing and play great. Incredible version of Life is A Carnival.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 21:39:30 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Jenny T.

Jenny, check out www.jethrotull.com for an explanation. Wish I could attend one of those rubbing elbows seesions. It is just Ian, his son perhaps, and maybe backing musicians on stage doing questions and answers with the audience with local djs moderating. Kind of like what Billy Joel has done on college campuses recently.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 21:03:55 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: the stones

even though I wouldn't say that the Rolling Stones are "the greatest rock n roll band", as they are often called - I think they have every right to claim so.

that make sense to anyone - it does to me.

Has anyone mentioned "Some Girls" yet? That may be thier last great album.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 20:53:22 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: Madison Square Garden -1971

richie = at Bangladesh, Dylan's set had him on acoustic, and harmonica - George playing his Strat. electric, and Leon Russell on bass guitar. George and Leon also sang harmonies with Zimmy at the same microphone. Ringo may have been hovering in the back playing a tambourine, but I'd have to check....Also, it's high time you saw the Bangladesh concert again - you'll like it :-)


Entered at Sun Sep 15 20:41:39 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: billy preston/dylan link up

dear peter, as you know, b.preston and dylan were both at concert for bangladesh. its ages since i saw the film but dylan's set was all acoustic so billy may not have backed him. was there an all star jam at the end a la last waltz. if so billy preston would have backed him then. as i said, its ages since i saw the film. anyone know when the eagerly awaited remastered version of con. for bangl. is coming out?


Entered at Sun Sep 15 20:22:25 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-154-access.surferz.net (64.80.53.154)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Patricia: Thanks for the info about ebay. I'll check into it.
Anyone from this site is welcome to e-mail me anytime. d_lil@hotmail.com


Entered at Sun Sep 15 19:33:10 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Stones we throw [out]

Good point Pat, forcibly - and very properly - made on the website of what is surely the world's finest band [in its truest sense] ever.

I have lost track down the years of how many pub/workplace arguments I've entered into on that very same tack. Most of them it has to be said with fellow inebriants who had never even heard of The Band but vaguely seemed to recall through their veil of beery brew a song that went 'Rag mama rag' which made convincing them against The Stones populist onslaught pretty much a David versus Goliath proposition. Thank God I always remembered to carry that sling around with me.

The irony of course is that tho infinitely artistically superior The Band were never a tenth as popular as The Stones - in Britain not even a hundredth.

Yet isn't that so often the way? Why so? Who the fuck knows. I'm bloody certain I can't figure it. Possibly only once has the best within their field ever been the most popular and we all know who they were.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 19:13:41 CEST 2002 from slip-32-100-27-128.va.us.prserv.net (32.100.27.128)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: RR, Tom Principato and Other Guitar Greats...

While watching Robbie jam with Zal Yanovsky and others on the televised portion of the Rock'n'Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony broadcast a couple of years ago, I wondered how two such great guitarists could virtually retire from public performance. After attending an amazing performance by Telecaster & Strat Master Tom Principato at a local blues festival yesterday, I think I may understand why. With so many fine players out there, it must be a little like the old western movie cliche of the veteran gunfighter always in the aim of young hotshots.

Principato is no kid, but just starting to get the recognition he deserves (see the link above for more about him). I had not seen him play since his young days in a Boston-based blues band called Powerhouse and knew his work since then as a Washington, DC area favorite in the tradition of two other guitar greats, Roy Buchanan and Danny Gatton. Principato even released a live CD collaboration with Gatton called "Blazing Telecasters." Yesterday he told me that there may be a DVD release of one of his duo shows with Gatton as well. If you get a chance to see this guy play live, do it before he decides to retire from guitar-slingling like Robbie and Zal.

Ben Pike: speaking of David Crosby, isn't it interesting that Croz spent that hard time in prison in Texas for cocaine possession while Florida Governor Jeb Bush's daughter was not even charged with anything last week when she turned up in drug rehab with a "rock" of crack cocaine in her shoe.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 18:32:31 CEST 2002 from dialup-63.208.66.2.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (63.208.66.2)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Kansas? I Want You To Want Me by an Eighties band (song was released twice in the 70's)? The Rolling Stones? We should get one thing straight. The Rolling Stones couldn't cop a tenth of what the Band did, and The Band could cover the Stones like flypaper. The best players in the group were hired hands, a reality that persists to today. The Band's subject matter ranged across all human emotions, while the Stones basked in perhaps two. Charlie Watts once said he never recognized playing on Start Me Up because they overdubbed the song into another universe. So organic.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 18:13:20 CEST 2002 from stjhts24c086.nbnet.nb.ca (142.166.232.91)

Posted by:

WS Walcott

Location: Canada

Subject: Dylan Tour

Dylan played here Aug.9, great show! Charlie Sexton had 17 guitars, if I counted right. I been away awhile. How is everybody? Hang in there Warren! Best Stones album? Exile on Main Street.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 17:44:01 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool35-51.nas1.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.35.51)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Buddy Guy/Ian Anderson/Dancing in the Street

Pete Rivard: I didn't know Buddy Guy had a place still--and with food no less! When I lived in Chgo, he had the Checker Board which was kind of a dump but maybe that's the best kind of place to hear the blues. It has since closed. It was on maybe 43rd Street? I went there a couple of times, once for the Muddy Waters tribute shortly after his death, when it was reported that the Stones would show up but they never did. The place was packed and the music was amazing and I got my picture in the paper which was kind of a disaster as I said in here before. Phil Guy (Buddy's brother) is pretty good too if he still plays around town.

J Tull Fan: I see in the paper an ad for "Rubbing Elbows with Ian Anderson." What does that mean?

My feet are so sore and dirty this morning because I danced for four hours barefoot in the street last night (and finally made it rain thank God). There was a very good 80s cover band at the town festival. Best sounding songs of the evening: Rebel Yell, Should I Stay or Should I Go, I Love Rock and Roll. Most unfortunate: Come Sail Away. Most surprisingly danceable: I Want You to Want Me. I requested What I Like About You but they couldn't fit it in, but they ended with that Jenny/867-5309 song so everyone said that was my song anyway. (They were only kidding.)


Entered at Sun Sep 15 17:44:14 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

RX for the Stones wars: here's a Beatle's story you may not have heard.

In 63, for tax reasons(!) A.I.P. had sent Roger Coreman to London to shoot his new, more expensive than usual feature "The Mask Of Red Death." Everyday Coreman had lunch with Jane Asher(female lead) who one day asked if She could bring along a friend from Liverpool. So in walks the then unknown Sir Paul, and tells how he's in this band who was playing London for the first time. Oh course the papers were full of The Beatles triumph the next day and they went on to be real famous.

Too bad Coreman wasn't savvy, he could have signed The Beatles up for A.I.P., and they could have been in Beach Films with Buster Keaton and Don Rickles; shot by David Crosby's dad Floyd cinematographer for almost everything done by A.I.P. in those days.

"The Masque Of The Red Death" by the by, is a good bet for Halloween if you have never seen it. It is easily the best of the Coreman Poe films(faint praise perhaps)very colorful and imaginative, with great sets cobbed together from other films. Christopher Lee gets a cameo, and Vincet Price and the great Patrick McGee get to be real evil; they suggest Starr and Gingrich planning a day's strategy. You can pick it up for about ten bucks, with another Coreman/Poe (The Premature Burial) on the other side.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 16:44:54 CEST 2002 from cfa2.execulink.net (209.239.0.235)

Posted by:

paul godfrey

Location: C A N A D A
Web: My link

Subject: brown eyes, lil, john d

Brown Eyes...are you getting my emails? 3x I have asked you if you read RONNIE HAWKINS-PETER GODDARD - LAST OF THE GOOD OL BOYS? For all BAND fans this book is a must read. It will answer many of the questions that pop up here on the GB.BTW I passed on your email.

Lil' - we have a band here in CANADA named GODDO. You have a good day too!

Spoke with John D. recently. His voice sounds very strong and I believe we will be hearing him on the radio again real soon. shineonpaulg


Entered at Sun Sep 15 16:30:42 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

Although, I do think that Start Me Up has been played to death at sporting venues across North America (along with BTO's Takin' Care Of Business and Todd rundrgen's Bang On the Drum). There should be a moratorium on these 3 songs from being played on PA systems in the Western World.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 16:27:01 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

I've always been partial to the Stones' Tattoo You.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 16:25:31 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

All I Want For Christmas Is A Dukla Prague Away Kit (Half Man Half Biscuit)


Entered at Sun Sep 15 16:08:14 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68551.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.170)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: sister morphine

Marianne Faithfull apparently wrote the lyrics for "Sister Morphine" which came out on STICKY FINGERS....This song is however only attributed to M. Jagger and K. Richards. Marianne felt so humiliated that she wrote an indignant letter to Allen Klein and went to see him. Klein showed her a letter that was written in 1969 by Mick and Keef stating that she should get a third of the royalties. She was not given credit afterall 'cause she was still contracted to Gerry Bron, and no one wanted to see him receive any of the song's royalties. The "arrangement" was that Marianne would get royalties, BUT NO CREDIT.

Marianne had the desire to make art out of a pop song. Her association with The Stones had inspired her to create herself. She didn't want to be just another woman who hung around with The Stones. She has declared that the song was not about a junkie's last hours. In fact at this time in her life.....had only experimented with smack once.

"Sister Morphine" is the story of a man who has had a terrible car accident. He's dying and he's in tremendous pain and the lyrics of the song are addressed to the nurse....I used John Milton's "Lycidas" as a model.....Mick began writing the music in a garden in Rome where we were staying with Keith and Anita. It was just a riff, essentially. He had the melody for about six months and he would walk around the house strumming it......I was a big VELVET UNDERGROUND fan. I knew "Sister Ray" and "Waiting for the Man", (hmmmm....She didn't mention the most obvious one from the VU.....Louuuuu's masterpiece at the same time - "Heroin") and these also must have drained into my brain somewhere......The result of this effortless creation was not to inspire the writing of more songs but the use of more drugs!"

It is interesting to note on her "Blazing Away" video (Garth is here playing!!) that she is given credit for this song. She also stated that it was Keef and not Mick who seemed to push more for her receiving credit for this song......

I think her "Broken English" recording was brilliant.....I remember when "New Wave" music was featured in clubs.....We'd always hear "Broken English".....Here's also where you'll find "Why D'ya Do It".....The ultimate song about jealousy.....the ultimate.....It was at this time that her former main squeeeeeeeze Mick FINALLY came through for her.....Apparently she was so nervous the first night before her show that she didn't think she would be able to perform.......So she called Mick up and whatever he said to her.....She was able to acquire the strength and courage to express herself........on her own terms........finally......

John D: I emailed Paul G.....You keep changing your email addy....:-D


Entered at Sun Sep 15 14:55:42 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

patricia

Location: RainCity

Subject: Mills Brothers on eBay

Lil _ I went into eBay and found what you're looking for. The Mills Brothers All-Time Greatest Hits. I checked out the sellers record he has 0 negatives on his record. The Cd had only been played once or twice and is auctioning off for barely nothin 4 bucks + $2.25 shipping. I use Ebay quite a lot to look for old blues and old country stuff. If you aren't registered there...it's real easy to do.....even I could do it, that's how easy it is. Just go in and type mills brothers in the thing and it will take you directly to the page. As you can tell....I don't sleep a lot...


Entered at Sun Sep 15 14:48:24 CEST 2002 from cache-ink1-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.3)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pillow Talk

Hey Carmen, as I was only saying to Les and Nerys in bed last night, that Exile on Main Street sure is a great album.

Must admit, as the catalyst though not the instigator [Mr Viney please stand up - you are guilty as sin mate] to all this 'Are you being Served' shoite, I am experiencing a fair degree of shame and squirming as I could never stand the bloody thing. Nor any of the cast for that matter save Captain Peacock and Mr Graces floosie.

Picking up on Pete Viney's comment re his TV mate I must say I'd have thought anybody who could boast even the most teeny weeny fleeting association with Fawlty Towers would have kept stum about any connection with 'Are you being Served' which for me rests firmly at the arse end of British "comedy" alongside 'Love thy Neighbour', 'On the buses', Mike and Bernie Winters and a huge and best forgotten assembly of others.

Now can we please talk about Tony Hancock, Alf Garnett, Alan Partridge and Chris Morris before Les and Nerys kick me out of bed for whining and complaining too much !!!

As Junior Soprano might be heard to say "I've had Grace Brothers so far up my arse I can taste Mrs Slocumbes hairspray!!"


Entered at Sun Sep 15 14:32:34 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-070.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.70)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Keef Kovers

Mojo covers- all is explained in the front. There are three in general circulation – Keith, Brian, Mick. Then there’s a shared cover with ‘Charlie & Bill’, but this can only be bought from ‘Mojo Recommended Retailers’ – a list of independent record stores or direct from Mojo. There aren’t any along the South coast of England. The covers have different quotes attributed to them. In the article inside the mag Keith says (of the knighthood), ‘Mick’s fucked up so many times, what’s another fuck up?’. On the cover this becomes ‘Mick’s screwed up so many times. So what’s another one?’ This was probably wise. The multiple covers idea is bizarre. Do people actually buy multiple copies? I think they might create ‘rarities’ – I noticed today Borders had about 20 Keith, and just one Mick. The last ‘Star Wars’ OST CD had four covers for a limited period, then changed it to one different composite. I believe the first ‘multiple record sleeve’ was the LP of Spooky Two by Spooky Tooth, which came in at least green, blue and purple, but possibly in maroon and brown too- I can’t remember, but my copy’s purple. I think it was an attention grabber rather than an attempt to sell several copies and I don’t think they bothered with the CD

To keep you up to date on these Davis reported rip-offs, it seems Billy Preston really wrote ‘Melody’ and Ian McLagan was paid a total of $20 for playing on two released tracks. Is Billy Preston the only musician who has played as a temporary member of the three big ones- The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Band? (Rather than someone lurching onstage for the odd jam)? I guess he hasn’t backed Dylan (not that I know) which screws up his c.v. slightly.

Mojo order of Stones albums was: 1) Exile 2) Bleed 3) Banquet 4) Sticky 5) Satanic.
The correct PV order would be 1) Bleed 2) Sticky 3) Banquet 4) Exile


Entered at Sun Sep 15 14:16:07 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

patricia

Location: RainCity

Subject: forgiveness...

Diamond Lil, May I e-mail you? I wanted to ask permission first. I have something that I am able to share with you now. Please leave your answer in the Gb or e-mail me rosalindrichardson@webtv.net thank you sweet sister


Entered at Sun Sep 15 12:58:11 CEST 2002 from pcp01420995pcs.lndsd101.pa.comcast.net (68.81.35.162)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Favorite Stones Album

Regards to all GB'ers. Been away a while. Back surgery has a way of keeping you away from a computer. Since the topic of the Stones has been kicked around, I thought I would poll everyone on their favorite Stones album. For my money, Black and Blue.

Also, take a look at the cover of Beggars Banquet (which is also a great album) and you will see to a referance to Dylan and on the back cover it says music from Big Brown. Any thoughts on this?


Entered at Sun Sep 15 12:44:08 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.48)

Posted by:

Lil Again

Location: Typos 101

Subject: asking the obvious question

What the hell is is "godo" day???! :-)

(Note to self: Have coffee before posting :-)

Have a _good_ one.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 12:40:41 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.48)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

As I was just sitting here wrapping birthday presents that I bought months ago for someone whose birthday is coming up, I realized that my Dad''s birthday is also impending. The kids and I are making a sort of 'memory package' for him.. photos of family with captions to help him remember through his Alzheimers haze..people and things that he loved. Music has always been a love of his. Along with the photos, we're making a tape of some of his favorite tunes. Does anyone out there by some chance have 'Cab Driver' by The Mills brothers...? I need this one badly. I'm willing to pay for materials and postage if anyone can send me the tune..and it would be much appreciated. Thanks.
d_lil@hotmail.com

Forgiveness is a gift you give a friend. I can give it, I can take it.. how bout you?

Have a godo day everyone.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 12:00:32 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: mojo,nerys,captain peacock

dear peter. the mojo's are all keith ones in my home town of neath. answer to trivia. nerys hughes and william hurt film. second best. directed by chris menges, whhiliam hurt plays a loner living in the hills of wales who decides to adopt a young teenager. needless to say, the kid helps bill come out of himself. question. frank thornton who plays captain peacock in the magical are you being served had a small blink and you miss it role in gosford park. any guesses?


Entered at Sun Sep 15 08:36:06 CEST 2002 from (61.243.158.4)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Benxi, China (formerly St Catharines)

Hi Bandfans. Well, all of those top 10 lists we've made in here over the years finally came in handy. I moved to China a few weeks ago to teach English and had to decide on what to bring with me. The Brown Album, Before the Flood and Planet Waves all made the cut. Didn't have BT on CD : ( Reading this GB over here is a real treat. It's like getting a letter from home everyday. I'm going to try and get the kids singing "The Weight", should be fun. PETER V: Did you say you had written books for ESL? If so drop me a line at ttrpatterson at hotmail.com and we'll exchange info. See you later folks!


Entered at Sun Sep 15 06:05:07 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

I was thinkin' about what Dave said about Cane and Abel. The song always made me think of the Prodical Son, but both apply, don't they?

I carry a cassette tape of my favorite Band material with me everywhere I go. I have four songs that are always back to back. Daniel and the Sacred Harp, The Weight, I Shall Be Released and This Wheels on Fire. They just seem to be kin....


Entered at Sun Sep 15 04:01:01 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Location: RainCity

Subject: ..it's good transportation..but the brakes aren't so hot

Dave Z _ thanks. and thank you for using the word "passion".. I might not got much else but I got that! and you know what they say.. "Any kind of love without passion..well it ain't no kinda lovin' at all"

I miss that Bassmanlee, He's probably off doin' a show or somethin'. That "if you ain't been to Edge City..you'll never understand" reminded me of that Dylan line in "Joey" ".. Cause they seemed to understand...what it's like to be in society with a shackel on your hand"

Caledonia _ Thanks for that Tom Waits post the other day.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 03:15:38 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

John once said in an interview that he gave Paul credit on "Give Peace....." out of guilt because he (John) was breaking away from Paul.

By the time John cut "How Do You Sleep", the guilt seemed to have subsided.


Entered at Sun Sep 15 03:14:25 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

I bet the Remedy CD release party is rocking right now... Hope G-Man posts a review... and the BBs are gonna do 4 nights in a row... Damn... maybe that's why I feel like I should be driving somewhere...

I kinda liked your passion on the sacred harp post, Roz... Made me daydream a little about a Cain & Able story with a different ending...

Paul G, I just ordered that Ronnie Hawkins book today...


Entered at Sun Sep 15 02:09:28 CEST 2002 from 1cust236.tnt17.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.25.125.236)

Posted by:

Crabgrass

Location: The Front Lawn

Subject: "Satanic Majesties" Review

I'd have to say that the Stones' "Their Satanic Majesties Request" is quite a good album although musically a departure from their basic style and rather heavily influenced (with acknowlegement) by the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper" album. Certainly, "2000 Light Years from Home" is a standout Jagger/Richards composition. This album proves that the Rolling Stones were creative beyond the rhythm & blues rock bag. I really like it - *****!!


Entered at Sun Sep 15 00:25:17 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

errrr changing my answer, after reading Lil, thinking it was Mr. Humphries...


Entered at Sun Sep 15 00:18:43 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

Subject: Are You Being Served??

Peter.. Love that show, they have it on PBS over here and do not miss it if I'm around, correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Captain Peacock the one who ask's Mrs. Slocombe about her pussy...great show...


Entered at Sat Sep 14 23:50:09 CEST 2002 from 128.52.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.52.128)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Half Past Dead

Noticed in an Entertainment Weekly item that erstwhile Levon co-star Steven Seagal's new movie is titles "Half Past Dead." Link above is to official site. EW said something about "the coolest movie title ever." Coincidence?


Entered at Sat Sep 14 23:37:24 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: testing...

... please ignore (unstable server again)


Entered at Sat Sep 14 23:22:32 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Kansas

Scarlett. I'll have to check that out. Never been a big Kansas fan, but you have me intrigued. BEN: I don't know why you want so badly to be proven right. If I had postulated theories such as yours, I would be happy to be proven wrong and eat my dirty shoes!


Entered at Sat Sep 14 23:04:18 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-166.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.166)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Various

The latest Mojo has a set of varied Stones covers (for obsessives). All the ones in the Dorset area seem to be "Keith" covers, though at Heathrow yesterday they were split between the Keiths and the Brians. On the whole, you'd want the Keith one (if only for Band connections- though Bill Wyman rings in with a strong Hawks / Hammond connection). Most perplexing was the 'Best Stones album' feature which put the dreadful 'Satanic Majesties' at number 5 (if you can't guess 1 - 4 you're not a fan. They scream at you, not that I agree with their Keith-driven sequence.)

Mrs Slocombe's Pussy - I once spent two weeks working with Bob Spiers who directed many 'Are You Being Served' plus a couple of Dad's Army & Fawlty Towers as well as 'Absolutely Fabulous' (and the Spice Girl's movie). He was a great Band fan, and we spent every trip to locations listening to 'The Travelin' Wilburys' & The Band - this was circa 1989 - I'd never thought of it before, but now I wonder if he was responsible for choosing 'This Wheel's On Fire' as the theme tune for Ab Fab. Probably, is my guess.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 21:50:10 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.36)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Peter/Al: Ok... so I'm slow..but I just realized who Mrs. Slocombe (and her pussy) is. From that great British comedy show "Are you being served?", yes? I can't for the life of me remember right now what the name of the um.. effeminate male character is on there... but he always makes me laugh. It's a tremendously funny show. Thanks for the smile.

Have a good evening everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 21:24:52 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Scarlett Rivera

Subject: Kansas

JTull fan, Brien Sz:

In order to avoid inducing anyone in error, I would add the following informations:

I dont know anything about the Kansas discography, but their main album 'Point of know return' which is also (i discovered this recently) 'the more listened to album in USA the 10 latest years' (Kansas official website). Their other albums may be quite different.

after reading the last Jtull fan post, i relistened the CD completely this afternoon. They are somewhat more electrical and loud than Tull in general, they dont use the flute. But now, I am convinced more than any time of what i said before. There is a strong Jethro Tull influence, which is the more perceptible in the following tracks (I update the list):

Point of know return - The Spider (instrumental) - The knew - Sparks of the tempest - Hopelessly human


Entered at Sat Sep 14 19:59:49 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-119-209.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.119.209)

Posted by:

Back with no wife in Tennessee

Subject: Grateful Dead/XM Radio/Ranting/Raving

So I've gotten the impression that a lot of people here have read, or are reading, Dennis McNally's Long Strange Trip, about the Grateful Dead. It's gotten mostly glowing reviews, from what I've seen. It may be the best book to date covering inside information about the band, although I haven't read many others. But there were a few things that I thought detracted from it. First, having over half of the book cover the first six years of their career was a bit too much. Granted, those might be the most interesting years to most people, and they were the years when the whole Grateful Dead ideology was established, but it kind of resulted in giving the impression that the band's career came to a peak in 1978, and the following 17 years were just sort of an epilogue. I mean, Brent Mydland's death gets what, a page? And Vince Welnick, who played with them for five years, is mentioned maybe three times. Bearing in mind that the majority of the book's readers are probably only familiar with the about last fifteen years of the band's career in a personal, first-person manner, most of them would probably enjoy more information about what was going on in the latter days of their career. McNally casually mentions that Bob Weir stopped writing with John Barlow sometime in the late '80s, which I never knew, but doesn't say anything about why. Then the little interlude chapters, they're interesting, and kind of give a feel for what a GD concert was like, but they also break the flow of the book. He'll mention a song in one of the interludes, then later on in the book, go into detail about the song, when it was recorded, and you sort of think, didn't I already read this? Finally, his ongoing reference to himself in the third person was a bit strange, I thought.

Okay, that's my New York Times book review. I'll turn in another one next year, when I actually read another book.

I have to say, after reading about The Band, the Grateful Dead, the Allman Brothers, all groups who at one time, to me at least, had the image of getting along together; I almost don't want to know anything more about the personal lives of these people. I'd rather be naive and idealistic. I'd kind of rather not know that Bob Weir and Brent Mydland got into fistfights in the dressing rooms, that Weir wouldn't play an encore because he was pissed at the drummers, that Brent Mydland walked into New York city traffic with his eyes closed, or that no one in the band said anything to Kreutzman when his father died. Although I think the thing about reading tell-all books like that is, it sort of makes you focus on the negative things that you weren't aware of. In reality, that sort of thing is probably quickly forgotten by the participants. Just like in a family, the bad stuff flares up but then is dropped, but to an outsider, you think, "Wow, I didn't know it was that bad and dysfunctional."

So the insurance company finally sent me a new radio after the bastard Levonistas stole my old one, and it said it was XM Radio capable. I thought that was kind of cool, although I still didn't plan on spending $10 a month to listen to the radio. BUT, then I found out that in addition to the monthly fee, you have to buy a special antenna, and a satellite converter, that costs about $250 (or so I was told). See, I think the idea of satellite radio is pretty cool, especially for long drives, but fuck paying probably $350 to get the equipment, then an additional monthly fee, for something that may or may not be around two years from now. And that's just for one radio - I guess you have to pay another $10 a month to have it in another car, or at home. That's why I don't think the sattelite radio thing is going to fly, so to speak, I just don't think most people are going to be willing to pay for it. They'll pay $70 a month for 500 channels of shite on TV, and for their cell phones, but I think the average consumer feels differently about radio. We'll see. But I think it's going to end up as another good idea that just doesn't end up working. Like audio DVDs, minidiscs, DVix and rent-a-BWNWITenn.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 19:37:34 CEST 2002 from slip-32-100-27-53.va.us.prserv.net (32.100.27.53)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Warren Zevon

I'm sure that there are other connections to The Band, but I'll be boring and point out that Bruce Hornsby played accordian on Zevon's 1995 MUTINEER album (I guess Garth was not available). Hornsby, of course, played with Robbie as well as the latter-day version of The Band on various occasions, but I doubt if he ever got anywhere near the accordian if Garth was around.

The saddest part about Zevon is that he quit smoking eight years ago--though he kept the sunglasses-wearing skull with cigarette in mouth as his "logo." I'm really kicking myself for missing his recent tour now. May his struggle be as painless as possible...


Entered at Sat Sep 14 19:27:43 CEST 2002 from 216-119-11-191.smf.jps.net (216.119.11.191)

Posted by:

LEE HO FUK

Location: the kitchen

Subject: werewolves, chinese food, and perfect hair

richie, come on down and have a big dish of beef chow mein some time when you're in London.

Warren Zevon rocks! Rock on!


Entered at Sat Sep 14 19:07:17 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Thanks Pat, of course I am right about the court's rip off 2000 by the Scallia five, in one of the great criminal acts of American History; as I am about "One Clear Moment." Someday, PV, you should look into what I have been saying about, ahem... other matters, you'll see all the facts back me up there too.

But this whole thing has gotten me thinking about the movie "Perfect" again. How about the great scene in the begining where Carly Simon throws her drink at Travolta? This has got to be one of the most bogus moments in cinema history, right down there with when John Wayne played Genghis Kahn(You look more like his brother Don, pilgrim). Can you imagine Carly Simon, the queen of manipulative glossy rock mag hype, getting MAD at ROLLING STONE for the press they gave her? Dispite making some good records, Simon's career was always sustained by endless self indulgent puff pieces.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 19:06:07 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: warren zevon

get well soon warren. interestingly the london chinese resteraunt mentioned in werewolves of london is still going strong and carries a picture of warren in the window. its bang in the middle of chinatown. i cant bloody remember the name of it. there was an excellent feature on warren in a recent edition of uncut magazine. he came across as a guy who'd taken a few knocks but was still out there giving it back big time. lets hope that spirit sees him through this terrible crisis. good luck warren. richie.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 18:35:18 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-168.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.168)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: How do you like it?

I admit I peaked in the search engine, so will leave the answer to Richie's question to a more honest poster. Nerys's website does not show her in uniform as The District Nurse. I'm sure they didn't want to upset Al's mate Les unduly. Still, no doubt it lingers in our collective memory - I think she reverts to her own Welsh accent for this, but it's been so long since it was shown, even in the most arcane areas of satellite TV.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 18:10:31 CEST 2002 from du227-5.ppp.algonet.se (195.100.5.227)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: North Country Blues
Web: My link

Subject: To Bill, about spelling the surname of our highly respected webmaster - Brown Eyed Girl's pics.

For the first: thanks for spelling my name correctly. I appreciate it. Honestly.
You said that my post on the correct spelling of the name of our highly respected webmaster Mr. Høiberg was sarcastic. I read it myself once again. I must admit that you are right (well, maybe not _right_ but let's say: you are not wrong :-). Actually, the difference between an 'o' and an 'ø' is as dramatic as difference between saying 'Bill', 'bull' or 'ball'. (You said something like "who cares" :-)

I learned to be sarcastic when I was 15 seconds old: when I yelled for the first time the midwife said: "SHUT UP KID, FRANF KAFKA HAD IT NOT SO FUN, EITHER!"

Thanks BEG for the pics you posted for some time ago!

My link is my gb vCard, and my emailaddress is woodlark.geo (Danish pastry) yahoo.com


Entered at Sat Sep 14 18:10:22 CEST 2002 from abby2.revealed.net (208.16.227.193)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Very sad news about Warren Zevon. A vastly underrated songwriter. Sentimental Hygiene is one of my favorite albums without a doubt.

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 14 18:08:44 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: nerys hughes

as someone from nerys hughes's neck of the woods ill throw in my twopenneth in the form of some nerys hughes trivia. name the film in which she starred with william hurt. no quick peaks on the net for the answer please!


Entered at Sat Sep 14 16:27:45 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: NLSC, Kansas

Well first Kansas; they are one of those groups that I lump in with Jethro Tull, I don't dislike them, but rarely if ever listen to them. I had friend who was a Kansas fanatic and learned all their songs on guitar. They use to have some rockin' songs but it seems time has been unkind to them in a radio play sense.., maybe satellite radio will be kinder.

NLSC: I use to knock this effort. Then after the reissues came out, I came to realize the error of my ways. Still not in the rotation as much as other Band cd's but it gets its share.., More so than Cahoots, which I listen to every couple of months to see when I'll see what I'm supposedly missing..,


Entered at Sat Sep 14 16:18:47 CEST 2002 from zorg123.revealed.net (208.243.237.123)

Posted by:

Mike D.

JTull, very interesting. Northen Lights is still a joy for me to hear anytime. It could be a RR solo album in one aspect (songwriting credits). But it has the feel of a band album too. Hobo Jungle is among Richard's finest vocal performances of his career. And Garth? The Honey Boy Orchestra is all over that album :)

I am a bit late in airing my opinion of Stage Fright. I missed out, due to family matters. I say that's it just as good as the first two. Dare I say it, but the first two albums get a little too much praise. Ok, flame me :) Much to the detriment of Stage Fright, Rock Of Ages and the rest. Stage Fright was the 2nd Band album I have ever heard. I think it's more honest and revealing than the others. What do I mean by that? Well, the album seems to be hinting at how their lives were and how success had affected everything. And yes, the DCC disc and the 1990 cd (the same alternate mixes) is my preference. I love Robbie's acosutic being phased on "Daniel And The Sacred Harp", which wasn't on the original. Enough rambling. I like the thought of Pretzel Logic (the song) being on NLSC. I sometimes have wondered what wizardry Garth could've done to some of the Dan material.

I can even imagine Richard singing Billy Joel's "Baby Grand". Ok, to me he does sound like Ray Charles. I guess it's just the emotion of his vocals...I still haven't heard anyone else sing and put so much emotion into a vocal.

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 14 15:59:45 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

no more personal stuff in the GB after this...

Mr. Donabie _ that story about Little brother was true...all true. i just wanted to thank him out loud and I got caught.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 14:34:21 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Lots, Rick Danko Answer, NLSC, 1876, Kansas

To our new friend in Kentucky, welcome. The song in question is Sip The Wine, from Rick Danko's first, self-titled LP. He re-recorded it for 1999's Live On Breeze Hill (studio version, not live). KANSAS/Tull: I have to be honest and say that I am not too familiar with Kansas beyond their radio successes, and that's too bad because I am really intrigued that they may have a Tull influence. How DOES one reflect a Tull influence? Ian himself has stated that it would be difficult to pull off without being derivative, at least if a flute is used, but perhaps acoustically,and in terms of meter and time signatures, it is possible. I really regret I've blown my opportunity for comment! NORTHERN LIGHTS: I love he textured depths of this album and believe Richard's vocals (and Rick's on It Makes No Diff) are sublime and beautiful. The album definately does not get its' due. Perhaps so because, as seen in the writing credits, it is as close to a RR solo album as the Band ever made, perhaps Storyville, if it had the rest of the guys, would have been similar. Rags and Bones sounds almost Steely Danesque to me, and could have fit on Pretzel Logic, whose title track would have fit well on NLSC. PAT BRENNAN: I am not familiar, or more likely have forgotten, the issue of the Louisiana results. I'll take your word on it though. I would think given the state in question they would have favored the Democrats, but still, the political parties calling themselves Democrat and Republican today are not the same ones that did so 100 or more years ago, and will evolve again 100 years from now.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 14:21:44 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Diamond Lil _ The other day when I sang that song from "Ballad of the Sad Cafe" at ya, I just had the song in my head, (words and sounds swim around in my head.) It wasn't until I posted that I realized what the movie was about. patricia's sorry...I'm completely misunderstood out there, I can amagine how it looks in here...

I hope Mr. Donabie doing alright..


Entered at Sat Sep 14 13:49:46 CEST 2002 from (65.245.68.111)

Posted by:

Bob Murphy

Location: Springfield ky

Subject: Comment and question

I just started listening to the bands music and I just can't beleive how good there lyrics and all out sound is.It makes me wish that some of todays bands would just sit down and listen to the bands music and realize that music doesn't have to be commercial but that it has to say somthing or move something inside you.Having said all of that I have a question to ask, I was watching The Last Waltz recently and in scene 24 Martin Scorsese is talking to Rick Danko and asking him what he was doing now,what was the name of the song that Rick Danko played for him and is it on any of the bands albums or Rick Danko's albums.If someone could answer this for me I can finally get some sleep at night.My e'mail is bmurphy19@hotmail.com .Also please excuse my spelling I'm from ky you know.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 13:07:42 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: correction...

I should have said "Most of us won't know" instead of "Some of us won't know."...

Diamond Lil _ See , I'm bein' myself....


Entered at Sat Sep 14 13:00:12 CEST 2002 from cache-wit2-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.192.2)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Moseley, Birmingham, UK

Subject: Nerys Hughes

The GB has evolved beyond recognition in a week. Peace breaks out, Al Edge returns and Nerys Hughes (did she get up and sing with the Band at the Forum in '96 or was that someone else?) is rampant all over it.

By some strange chance I saw Garth on Letterman too. (He's so unfunny and didn't mention Garth.) Next thing has to be Levon and Robbie having dinner with The Hawk.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 12:58:02 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Daniel and the Sacred Harp

Everybody seems so fond of analysis and musicology when it comes to this amazing group. that's great stuff, but I must mention what this song means to me.

There's this kid, see, and he feels like he was called from his mother's womb for a special service. Except his family wasn't musical in any remarkable way, so he had to make it happen on his own. He prayed and prayed for a way to make this miracle happen. Finally it began to manifest itself. He thought he had finally gotten his prayer through and God had mercy and had given him his miracle. But as the boy grew he began to realize that maybe he had been wrong about the the direction in which the seed had come. He became blind and suffering. No one understood. Finally he broke down. He told his brothers but they did not understand. He went to his Heavenly Father in desperation. His Father said "Son You've given in... You know ya won that harp...but you're lost in sin" The boy went away with his head low... He went back to that mountain and he "Blew across this meadow like a wipperwill" ....But the more he played, the more it hurt.... He saw the faces light up when he played his harp. He knew that he was spreading the gospel. But what kind of gospel. Was it a good gospel or a bad gospel? Some of us won't know till we reach the other side....


Entered at Sat Sep 14 12:52:20 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-044.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.44)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stones

I've just got to the bit where Ronnie Wood and Mick Taylor got ripped off for their writing credits. Will there be no end?

Loo posters- the essential two are the tennis player scratching her bum, and Frank Zappa sitting on the throne, but after 30 odd years on the wall, they begin to look a bit unpleasant. But the Van Morrison smiling one has HUGE rarity value.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 11:45:53 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Richie_ I personally Love "Northern Light" "Hobo Jungle" is my favorite Band song along with "Whispering Pines" and "Rockin' Chair" and "Let The Night Fall" off "Islands".

David Powell _ thanks...


Entered at Sat Sep 14 11:28:02 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: underrated gem

my own vote for a band classic not fully given the credit it deserved at the time would be northern lights southern cross. it contains 2 of my fav. r. manuel vocal performances, hobo jungle and rags and bones; the awsome it makes no diff(dear old rick in magnificent form) and the majestic acadian driftwood as its centrepiece. the cover is great, everything about it is class. nlsc should have been a launchpad for even greater heights instead of a sort of studio epitaph for the original quintet (does islands count?)any comments?


Entered at Sat Sep 14 10:47:14 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Scarlett Rivera

JTull Fan:

Here are some tracks in Kansas album "Point of know return" (1976, CD remastered 2002) where it's hard not finding at least a Jethro Tull influence:

- The instrumental track - Closet chronical - Hoplessly Human - ...

Coincidence ?...It could be very interesting to have a Jethro Tull expert advice


Entered at Sat Sep 14 10:28:05 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: BACKWITHAKNIFEINWoundedknee

Don't go there Tennessee la. Stay out of it. She's gonna be mine. The postman has just reached number 124 as we speak - only 6 more deliveries to go and she'll be on my loo wall. I redecorated it last night in anticipation. The Band pic's still there of course.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 08:27:46 CEST 2002 from as3-2-17.hip.berkeley.edu (136.152.194.131)

Posted by:

Dave Hopkins

Location: Berkeley, CA

JTullFan: The way I heard it, McCartney got composer's credit on "Give Peace a Chance" as thanks from Lennon for helping him record "The Ballad of John and Yoko," which, as you may know, features just John and Paul since Harrison and Starr were unavailable at the time.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 06:46:18 CEST 2002 from (63.143.93.2)

Posted by:

Pete Rivard

Location: Hastings, MN

Subject: The Stones at Buddy Guy's

Here's a cautionary tale on the vagaries or fate and cosmic injustice: Three years ago I started a new job teaching at a technical institute in Minnneapolis. Another instructor in my department happened to start on the same day, and we hit it off famously. We get to Chicago three or four times a year on business, and the first time we went together in '99 he wanted to go to the Hard Rock Cafe or The House of Blues and I flatly refused. I informed him that when we visit Chicago, we go to either Buddy Guy's Legends or Kingston Mines to get our music fix, and there'll be no debate on the subject.

He soon saw the error of his ways, and we've been taking our business to both of the aforementioned venues since. This past week, my colleague went to Chicago with his second-year students to a trade show, and I had to stay behind to host another group's annual meeting in Minneapolis.

So Wednesday evening, he takes the "of age" students to Buddy Guy's. They stuff themselves with crawfish etoufee, washed down with Goose Island, and about 12:30 Buddy himself takes the stage from that night's act. He says, "I gotta couple of friends here tonight. They come here to relax. But if everybody promises to just kick back and leave these guys alone, I might get 'em onstage with me for a tune or two. Don't be houndin' 'em for no autographs or nothin'."

Well, his friends were Mick Jagger and Ron Wood.

Now, ain't that a kick in the pants? If not for me, he would have been at the Hard Rock Cafe Wednesday standing in line for T-shirts. Instead, he's sitting at a table 15 feet from the stage knockin' back Goose Islands while Mick and Buddy are jammin' on Red Rooster.

SON OF A BITCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Sat Sep 14 05:49:14 CEST 2002 from px1nr.wp.shawcable.net (24.66.94.140)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: Winnipeg

Subject: coincidence?

Most probably coincidence, but a couple of weeks ago I noticed a rare enough phenomenon – Band references in general-interest magazines. First there was May's "Atlantic Monthly" where "The Puzzler" featured 'The Band" as the solution to D1 (regrets to those still working this!).

Then "Vanity Fair" (I'm guessing July, I've tossed the rest of the mag) had a mini-article by Lisa Robinson in the "Fanfair" section that begins, "When V.F. photographer Sam Jones wanted to make a movie about 'a great American rock band at the height of its creative powers,' he asked the critically acclaimed Wilco if he could follow them around while they made their sixth album, 'Yankee Hotel Foxtrot.' Says Jones, 'They struck me as having the same philosophy as a group like the Velvet Underground or the Band – that old-time "music comes first" integrity – and I miss that.'"

Then the August issue of "Famous" (the give-away at our Famous Players cinema chain) had a short piece by Michael White ("the music editor of Calgary's 'Straight'") on the Saskatoon band Wide Mouth Mason's new album "Rained Out Parade.":

"The album was recorded at the Tragically Hip's rustic Bathhouse recording studio near Kingston, Ontario. 'Before we even recorded a note, I had been really interested in the idea of doing a "Music from Big Pink" kind of vibe,' [Shaun Verrault] excitedly recalls, referencing The Band's legendarily organic-sounding 1967 album. 'The sort of album where we go live in a house and where, if you hear the toilet flushing, it just adds to the song. We would mic the walls so you could hear the way the room shook or reverberated when music was being played in it.'"

...today "National Geographic" shows up with 55746 as the month's featured zip code. That happens to be Hibbing, Minnesota, and there's much mention of Mr. Z. in the article....


Entered at Sat Sep 14 04:31:04 CEST 2002 from toronto-hse-ppp3681222.sympatico.ca (65.95.226.37)

Posted by:

Ricky K

Location: Long Branch

Subject: intro rips

I've always thought The Eagles ripped the intro to Tequila Sunrise from Ian & Sylvia's "Someday Soon" (maybe the Judy Collins Version)

John D: this time, the sign off's for you:

Dileas gu brath

Ricky K AKA Aquagoat


Entered at Sat Sep 14 03:54:38 CEST 2002 from dialup-209.244.64.166.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (209.244.64.166)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

jtullfan, the Louisiana returns of 1876 were nothing but fradulent. Heck, Louisiana had two governors in 1874. An interesting place.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 02:55:15 CEST 2002 from ac84193f.ipt.aol.com (172.132.25.63)

Posted by:

Will

Web: My link

I enjoy your site very much.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 02:28:26 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: credit thread

If you check the credits to Aqualung, you will see it credited to Ian and Jennie Anderson, whom he was married to for only a very short while. She had taken photos of homeless people, which inspired him to write the song, and feeling generous, gave her 1/2 the credit to the biggest commercial success he would ever write. Doh! Interesting how Paul McCartney gets 1/2 the credit on Give Peace A Chance. I doubt he was between John and Yoko when John wrote the song during that bed-in. At least it shows John lived by their cowriters agreement until the end.


Entered at Sat Sep 14 02:09:36 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

I just had to hurry up an see if I was lucky enough to land directly on top of Tennessee.

I knew Michelle Phillips had a job in that band...now we know what it was!


Entered at Sat Sep 14 01:10:53 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-114-159.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.114.159)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Web: My link

Why Rolling Stone sucks, in my opinion: I've read the magazine, off and on, since the mid-'80s, and I'm sure it was better in the late '60s and '70s. But I guess my problem is that I considered it to be a music magazine, which it's really not. I don't mind the political and news articles so much, but half of the cover stories in a typical year are of actors, and if I wanted that I would read Entertainment Weekly. Add to that articles about software designers, authors, the what's hot lists, college features, etc., - well, like I said, I guess my problem was in thinking that it's a music magazine. But ever since I've read it, there has been less and less music features, shorter and fewer album reviews, seemingly more advertisements. Add to that its coverage of virtually exclusively mainstream artists, and it's oh-so-hip attitude at what is basically a mainstream, corporate publication - it just turns me off. Plus, in the last few years, I've gotten tired of every issue having a half naked person on the cover. Not that that bothers me, but if it's what I was looking for, I could go elsewhere. And every story with a girl over the age of fifteen has to focus on sex. When Natalie Portman was on the cover, it said - "Sex, Brains and Star Wars: The Very Private Side of Natalie Portman." Then the headline of the actual article said, "the Star Wars queen sees the sexual side of art and life, 'but I don't go wagging my boobs around in people's faces'." Then in the actual article, the actual quote, not to mention the only mention of sex, was when they asked her about pictures someone had taken of her at a topless beach appearing on the internet. She said, "I was just so angry - it just makes you feel dirty inside. Everyone's seen boobs, but I just don't like being objectified. I don't go wagging my boobs around in peoples faces. I was on a deserted beach." Pretty titalating stuff. I wonder if she felt dirty after seeing the magazine. Their just corporate hacks trying to make money, and posing as cool people. See the link for more info.

I promised I was going to talk about "A Long Strange Trip," but right now I have to go in search of a real sex mag.

Who the hell is Nerys Hughes?


Entered at Sat Sep 14 00:11:35 CEST 2002 from cache-ink1-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.3)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Golly gosh [or gee] - you mean it really is on its way to me

But surely I am being teased here? Surely it cannot be that legendary shot of Nerys on the captain's table of the Royal Iris wearing nothing but a GERRY MARSDEN toupee. Why there are men who have scoured the entire globe in vain for that image. Sacrificed everything. For just one solitary glimpse. And to think all this time it has been hanging innocently on Pete Viney's loo wall. Next to the one of Van the Man smiling. Or was that merely wind? No matter, still two rare treasures in one small room, whichever way you view it.

By the left, this GB truly is a wondrous place.

Though perhaps not quite so wondrous as Pete's magic loo.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 23:23:03 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: songwriting credits

The stories about Keith Richards coming up with the idea for "Satisfaction" and Paul McCartney writing "Yesterday" remind me of the circumstances behind "California Dreaming". It's another instance of an artist eager to record the idea before it disappears in a fleeting moment. John Phillips was inspired to write that song following a walk on a snowy winter day in New York with Mama Michelle. Michelle was tired and went to sleep while John worked on the song. As the words & music began to flow, he urged Michelle to wake up and write it down for him as he played it. Rather reluctantly, she got up, wrote it down and then went back to sleep. John rewarded her efforts by giving her co-credit, resulting in half of a considerable amount of royalties over the years.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 23:17:37 CEST 2002 from (64.242.2.37)

Posted by:

Uncle Charlie

Subject: Stones/Band subconscious

To follow the Stones/Band thread, as well as the unintentional tune swipe phenomenon, does "You Can't Always Get What You Want" sound oddly like "The Weight" to anyone but me? Forget the Bach Choir nonsense; I mean the episodic storyline, the wierd characters,the piano/organ washes, and the overall feel. Or am I deluded?


Entered at Fri Sep 13 23:01:10 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: 1876

Pat, I had not forgotten 1876. I left it out because the results were the product of an agreement between the two parties rather than fraud at the polls. Now if you want to make the case the agreement was a corrupt bargain, I will go along with that. I also left out Jefferson's electin in 1800 for similar reasons. The bottom line is that Bush won the election of 2000 based upon rules in place at the time, and still in place today. Yes, Gore won a plurality of the voters but that does not mean he won the election, based upon the electoral college. No one, Al Gore included, is making any attempt to change the constitution for the next election, so we will be playing by, and accepting the results of, the same rules in 2004. Funny how those people in Florida STILL can't figure out how to vote with new equipment!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 23:01:15 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-081.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.81)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: just socializing …

Al: I've sent the Nerys pics in a plain brown paper wrapper as usual. Unfortunately I wrote "Nerys Spread" on the envelope so you'd know (meaning the centrespread of her in twin set and pearls with sensible cardigan). Hope your postman doesn't get the wrong idea!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 23:01:15 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: And ah

And wasn't there a fair amount of shananagans when John Q. Adams lost but beat Andrew Jackson...,


Entered at Fri Sep 13 22:37:03 CEST 2002 from user-11218rt.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.163.125)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Subject: Whoooops

Uhh, the 1876 election giving Rutherford Hayes the presidency makes 1960 look like Disneyland. Republican machinations which resulted in the abandonment of Reconstruction lay at the heart of it. Sorry for the political bent, but, jtullfan, you kind of fell into this one.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 22:29:44 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: songrwriting credits

Interesting, the last post's mention of Hotel California and Tull. I never realized that about Kansas, but ironically several years back while introducing We Used To Know from Stand Up, Ian Anderson accused the Eagles of lifting its chords for Hotel Calfornia.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:54:44 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Scarlett Rivera

Subject: original creation, plagiarism, tribute and unconscious imitation

Thanks Bayou Sam for evocating the birth of yesterday

All the cases listed in subject are well-known situations in the psychology of art creation
There are numerous alternative cases which have intrigued me for long years and are still without response, if someone can clarify them

1- The guitar intro of Eagles 'Hotel California' is that of the Rolling Stones 'Angie' 4 mouths delayed between their respective apparition.
2- All my friends (and me) who discovered the group Kansas, principally through the album 'Point of know return' 1976, make naturally the similarity with Jethro Tull.
3- A great new-wave hit of Alphaville (1984) is entitled 'Forever Young'

There are many other cases i forget now. I think that the music must evoluate, sometimes declines, in any manner. I am only rememberring a spanish proverb: 'comparing is to devaluate the two parts'


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:50:27 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: A little knowledge is...

in some peoples cases, just that. A little knowledge that is too uninformed to truly be dangerous. Ben, there is only one presidential election in U.S. history where credible evidence exists that through fraudulent activities, the wrong man was given the presidency. this was in 1960, when Pappa Joe Kennedy, through the Daly machine in Chicago, threw several precincts to Kennedy. Nixon suspected fraud, but given the international situation, accepted defeat. Regarding the right wing destroying all things sixties, the reality is that it was the radical left of that era, to which you obviously belong, that destroyed traditional liberalism in this country. By traditional liberalism I mean FDR, JFK, Hubert Humphrey, LBJ, etc. etc. The Democratic party has NEVER recovered from that era, and the realignment of the political map and loss of 'the solid South' means that every Democratic presidential nominee, if he wants to get elected, must either be from a Southern state or promote themselves as a war hero/hawk, ie. Kerry and Lieberman. If JFK were around today, he would not be considered liberal, nor would any of the others, with perhpas the exception of Humphrey. If the democratic party of these great individuals still existed, and it might were it not for the extreme left, I might still be a democrat today, along with many others. So stay radicalized and bitter,it turns people off and results in your further political marginalization.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:36:30 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-144.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.144)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Linda T

I would have bet 100 lira that 'One Clear Moment' by Linda Thompson was on CD but Ben is right. My copy is vinyl. Haven't played it for too long either.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:31:27 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.37)

Posted by:

Bones

Rolling Stone magazine, for better or worse, has been a great source of support for the Band and its members. Jann Wenner has always loved the Band's music and he was still covering their Band projects and solo projects when nobody else would. As recently as this year, there was a feature story calling The Last Waltz the greatest of all time.

Even Levon, who is skeptical of anyone in the busines (especially good friends of Robbie's), received two feature articles in the last ten years. One right after he wrote his book, and one after throat cancer when he was railing on Robbie the whole time. Name two other major publications who gave Levon that kind of print?

Obviously, Rolling Stone has done a lot to promote the Robbie legend as well as the Band's. For those reasons I will always has a soft spot for Jann and his magazine.

By the way, Garth was GREAT last night!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:18:49 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I believe the story is that Keith came up with the "Satisfaction" riff as he was falling asleep, and grabbed a tape recorder to record the basic riff - then he crashed. The next morning (or probably afternoon in Keef's case) when he awoke, he played the tape which had about a minute of the riff, and almost an hour of him snoring.

Reminds me of this story = McCartney woke up one morning and had a tune in his head which he played for everyone for days asking if they knew the song. He liked it and was convinced that it must be something he'd heard. Nobdy could identify it, so he figured that he must have written it and gave it the working title of "Scrambled Eggs". By the time it became an actual recording, it was "Yesterday".

Most of you probably know that story - but I figured, what the hell"


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:15:18 CEST 2002 from (144.71.77.200)

Posted by:

G-Man

John Cass: Ramada, 09/17!! Take Broadway right to the river!! Ah,,,work next thurs.,week after-tues., thurs., & fri. and outta Dodge!!! Need more time to catch JWB and LHBB! How bout 10/11 & 12 at Foxwoods???? Hey,,hope RW's enjoy North Star tomorrow!!! JWB gonna lite it up!!!!!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 21:09:00 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

Garth and Bubba, a very good week for Letterman Indeed. Linda Thompson's first album, never on CD, wasn't bad either. Some tracks are on her anthology, also excellent.

I'm listening to the CD of Dylan covers by that guy from YES! It's not that bad.....

If Right Wing America, in it's never ending dumb bunny assault on all that was the sixties, would simply break out video cassettes of the Rolling Stone Movie "Perfect", one of the great cinema atrocities this side of "Robot Monster"; they wouldn't have to waste so much time stealing elections.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 20:52:47 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State
Web: My link

Subject: Rolling Stones/Rolling Stone

Just finished reading the recent GB posts speculating on a Jagger-Richard(s) feud when I saw the above link. Still not a Band-level feud (and with a Stones-size cash flow to piece out it probably never could be, cash flow, or the abrupt cessation thereof, seeming to be the precipitating factor in the feud closest to all our hearts), but not bad. And a good pick-a-side confrontation between old-school R&R attitude and the rocker-as-celebrity ethos.

One aspect of the “old” Rolling Stone no one’s mentioned is the record reviews, which played an enormous part in shaping the post-“Sgt. Peppers” canon. Well into the 70s, each issue was loaded with reviews from the likes of Jon Landau, Lester Bangs, Ed Ward, Robert Palmer, John Morthland, and Dave Marsh. Even Greil Marcus, hard to imagine as anything but a grand theorizer, was a record reviewer then, often with five or six (“Dusty in Memphis,” say, or the most recent Ike & Tina Turner) in one issue. Depressing that thanks to “Almost Famous” Cameron Crowe, who appeared in the magazine much later and specialized almost exclusively in sucking-up-to-Southern-California-superstar interviews is the person people think of as a Rolling Stone writer.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 20:52:11 CEST 2002 from webcacheh12a.cache.pol.co.uk (195.92.67.76)

Posted by:

howard sharples

Location: england

I think The Band are the greatest all round group that ever was. All great musicians, with singing voices to match. I think Robbie Robertson is the most underestimated guitarist, ever. He can knock the spots off any of them- Their music has give me something I can't explain. When I listen to the Band I'm happy.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 20:40:30 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Donna

Location: PA

Bashful Bill: Can you finish the book "Shakey" by tomorrow?

Jim Weider's Band will be playing at the North Star Cafe in Phila., tomorrow night. Looking forward to seeing some GB poster's there!

Just wanted to also add, how nice it was seeing Garth on David Letterman last night. I was very happy when they finished the show by mentioning Garth's name!

John D, Wishing you have a speedy recovery! Our thoughts are with you.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:49:39 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Bashful Bill: I enjoyed the McNally Dead bio despite his unkind remarks about The Band at Watkins Glen (which I mentioned in the guestbook several weeks ago). I do think Mr. McNally has a tendency to perpetuate the Dead myth at times instead of dissecting it. He does mention that Phil Lesh sang Robbie Robertson's "Broken Arrow" during the Dead's 1993 tour.

Rosalind mentioned the "Bentonia style" open tuning used by Skip James. This is a somewhat unusual tuning in that the strings are tuned to a minor chord, Em to be exact, and cross-picked using three fingers. Most slide guitarists, like Ry Cooder and Duane Allman, favored tunings in open major chords such as D and E. Skip James also used open A and G on certain songs.

Al and Peter, as you may well be aware, Keith Richards still seems to express some displeasure regarding Mick Jagger's solo projects. In a recent interview in Guitar World magazine, Keith refers to Mick's latest solo work, "Goddess In The Doorway", as "dog shit in the doorway". While I wouldn't categorize this as a feud, Keith does seem to resent the fact that Mick may be channeling his recent musical ideas into non-Stones projects.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:45:45 CEST 2002 from (207.236.90.5)

Posted by:

Ian Campbell

Location: Mississauga, ON
Web: My link

Subject: Jeff Healey's

Website for Jeff Healey's bar in TO, where Levon Helm and the Barnburners are scheduled to play on the 19th.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:31:26 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool36-76.nas2.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.36.76)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Subject: Satisfaction

I am pretty sure Keith Richards said Satisfaction came to him in his sleep, and he woke up and wrote it down. The next morning he didn't remember writing it down but there it was on his night table. But maybe it came to him in his sleep because he heard it somewhere else.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:30:26 CEST 2002 from webport-cl6-cache4.ilford.mdip.bt.net (213.120.56.45)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Corruptible seed[iness] on the GB

Mrs Slocumbe's pussy indeed!!!!!!

Next thing you know there'll be cussin' and swearin' - and dear old Serge will be blowing a friggin gasket!!!

Er...actually Pete, the Nerys pic was for ... er... me.

:-0


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:26:15 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Rolling Stone

The last nail in the coffin for Rolling Stone, I think, is when they gave Milli Vanilli a positive review and featured them on the front cover.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:22:15 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-012.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.12)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: More crossing in the ether

Every time I press submit I find something else to comment on. Al, do you think Les would be over-excited or calmed by a picture of Mrs Slocombe's Pussy? I believe the Nerys Hughes issue of "Belles of 1979" is now sold out at the publishers, otherwise I'd happily send Les my treasured copy.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:18:41 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-012.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.12)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Rolling Stone (cont)

Jenny's post and mine crossed in the ether. I think she's right- extend the good bit into the 80s (about halfway). They started getting weaker on music, but they did do pioneering stuff on (e.g.) AIDS before anyone had heard of it. Some of their investigative stuff pushed out the rock too much for me, but it was first-rate stuff. As Jenny says, lots was two years ahead.

'Almost Famous' is THE film about Rolling Stone in its classic era.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:13:38 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-012.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.12)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Rolling Stone

BWNWIT: I reckon 'Rolling Stone' only started sucking as we entered the 80s - the late 60s and 70s were the era of Hunter S. Thompson, Cameron Crowe, Ben Fong-Torres, Tom Wolfe- all great writers, and many things in there were wonderful- I think of the original 1969 Ronnie Hawkins interview, Robert Palmer's Portrait of the Artists as Young Hawks, two or three Robbie interviews. 'Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail' was the last political stuff I really enjoyed reading. The British edition was mentioned in the Stephen Davis book- it was financed by Mick Jagger and lasted only a few months. Jagger withdrew funding when he found he couldn't manipulate content in his favour. The result of having the British edition was that the US edition was unavailable and bits were anthologized by the British one, meaning that we missed crucial reviews of 'The Band' for instance (we had locally written ones). Somewhere in the attic I have musty boxes of those old Rolling Stones. I spent some time once trying to extract ones with Band content, but gave up due to dust mites from the crumbling paper.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:09:17 CEST 2002 from 1cust15.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.15)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: SHAKEY and A LONG STRANGE TRIP...

Bashful Bill: I just finished SHAKEY and bought A LONG STRANGE TRIP this week (both actually hit the NEW YORK TIMES bestseller list). The Neil Young book was certainly interesting reading, but often more than I really wanted to know about Neil's personal life--and a lot more than I wanted to know about the self-centered and highly opinionated author.

I can tell that LONG STRANGE TRIP is much better written and researched than SHAKEY, though. Dennis McNally has served as the official Grateful Dead publicist and "historian" (he has a friggin' PHD in American History!) since 1984. I look forward to working my way through it as soon as I finish the one about the Carter Family from down in Old Virginny...


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:06:10 CEST 2002 from host212-140-153-250.webport.bt.net (212.140.153.250)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Standing order for Blender mag

Back with No Life in Either Knee - don't suppose you've any idea whether this month's Blender mag features any Nerys Hughes pics - any angle will do?? Only...er my old mate Les just sent me a postcard from his monastery in the Outer Hebrides asking if I had anything that might break his vow of silence.

Mr Powell sir you are - as ever - absolutely pinpointingly accurate concerning Ry. It is indeed churlish of anyone to begrudge Ry the odd whine as he more than anybody else goes out of his way always to ensure fulsome acknowledgement of any author of a song he re-works.

Btw - if there was someting wrong with the long bit of Ry's guitar could it be said to have a wry neck???

:-0)

Regarding Keith Richard's boots. Surely the leather is shed annually from his mush??

Finally, thanks for kind comment Dave. I assure you the sentiments are mutual.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 19:04:25 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool36-76.nas2.cincinnati1.oh.us.da.qwest.net (63.232.36.76)

Posted by:

Jenny T

Location: Ohio

Subject: Rolling Stone

I don't think Rolling Stone has always sucked! I haven't read it much lately, but I subscribed for most of the 80s. Sometimes it seemed like they were really into morbid feature articles about tragic deaths, but the reporting and writing were usually top notch. Also they seemed to break current events stories about two years before the rest of the media--I can't tell you how many things I read about in there that never seemed to make it into the public eye for a long time but turned out to be big deals.

And they have had a lot of great writers in their stable, including some with a very sophisticated understanding of politics, economics and government, and some with very good senses of humor. If it becomes another dumbed down magazine with lots of pictures of pretty people I wouldn't be surprised, but every issue used to contain some pretty deep reading. I can't say I always agreed with the stance on certain issues you could probably guess, but then I wouldn't want to.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 18:39:40 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Hey Ralph, I've emailed you a coupletimes, but they are bouncing back, all well over your way?


Entered at Fri Sep 13 18:36:01 CEST 2002 from syr-66-67-111-66.twcny.rr.com (66.67.111.66)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Subject: a good read

John D, hope you are recovering. I'm in the middle of Shakey-the authorised bio of your countryman Neil Young, you should check it out if you haven't already. Has anyone read the new Grateful Dead book,also authorised, I think it's title is A Long Strange Trip?


Entered at Fri Sep 13 18:27:09 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Location: Toronto

Hip circles in Toronto ca '67 were a-buzz with talk about the City Muffin Boys, a local group that seems never to have appeared in public until well after the buzz had died (something like Klaatu, much later). As late as '78 a former group member told me that the Stones had run off with one of their tapes and turned it into "Between the Buttons". A very nasty thing to do!

Biffalo Bull: Speaking of Klaatu, the MC at the Danny Brooks gig in Port Credit, Virgil Scott, once had a group called the Innocence of Virgil Scott, whose drummer, Terry Draper, was one third of Klaatu. Don't know if he was in the group that Virgil had with Danny earlier than that (Soul Possessed).


Entered at Fri Sep 13 18:04:15 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: OTIS! / this & that

Brown-eyed girl: I don't know if you are aware of this but your post about Otis Redding is quite timely. This coming Sunday, Sept. 15th, is Otis Redding Appreciation Day down in Macon, Georgia. As part of the festivities, a life-size bronze statue of Otis will be unveiled. The statue depicts Otis sitting on the pilings of a dock, guitar in hand and a pad of song lyrics by his side. Appropriately, it is placed overlooking the Ocmulgee River in a park next to the Otis Redding Memorial Bridge. Phil Walden will be the keynote speaker at the ceremonies and afterwards there will be a live concert down the street at the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.

Your point is well-taken Mr. Edge, but it should be pointed out that whenever Ry Cooder recorded classic songs he properly credited the songwriters. It's my understanding that Mr. Cooder, in recent years, downplays the "riff tiff". Perhaps his "reptilian" remark was really a description of the boots Keith Richards favored in that era. Over the years, Ry Cooder has worked with many great artists, including a few with Band associations, such as Pops Staples, John Hiatt, Jim Keltner and Tim Drummond.

Remember the film "Crossroads" in which Ralph Macchio portrayed a young guitarist on a quest to learn how to play the blues? In addition to overseeing the film's soundtrack, it was Ry Cooder that played Mr. Macchio's guitar parts at the end during the duel with "Scratch's" (Satan disciple) guitarist, played by Steve Vai. For some reason, that duel wasn't included on the soundtrack album. It was recently pointed out to me that Steve Vai has included it on his "Elusive Light & Sound 1" CD compilation (under the title, "Head-Cuttin' Duel"). It's nicely set up with excerpts of dialogue from the film. I've really been enjoying this wild intrumental music this week.

Twilight: your trivia answers are correct -- #4 was the Woody Guthrie Tribute. Before their appearance with Bob Dylan, according to some accounts, The Band was announced as "the Crackers".


Entered at Fri Sep 13 17:55:43 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-112-7.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.112.7)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Speaking of MTV sucking, there have been a bunch of articles recently about Rolling Stone Magazine changing editors, trying to appeal to the younger, dumber set. The editor of Blender Magazine is now taking over Rolling Stone, trying to increase sales by adding more sex, shorter articles, less news, and more colorful graphics. I don't see what the big brouhaha is, though, Rolling Stone has ALWAYS sucked! Now it's just sucking harder, and in a different style. Sort of like... oh, never mind.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 17:52:10 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-010.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.10)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Who wrote what

Let’s get this right in my head …

Marianne Faithful wrote Sister Morphine
Ry Cooder AND Gram Parsons wrote Honky Tonk Women quite independently of each other
Otis Redding wrote Satisfaction
Lonnie Donegan didn’t write it, but owns the rights to Nights in White Satin
Richard Berry didn’t really write Louie, Louie.
Levon Helm really wrote The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down

Well, I can live with all of these, but the bombshell is that Al’s mate Les and Nerys Hughes co-wrote the opening lines to ‘The Liver Birds’ and that Carla Lane has been luxuriating in the stolen credit all these years! This is not treated in the definitive “Mrs Slocombe’s Pussy” by Stuart Jeffries which I had thought the ultimate guide to British sitcom. (To those who doubt, this is a real book- I’ll even give you the ISBN if you don’t belive me). Anyway, Jeffries mentions that a popular recording group called ‘Half Man Half Biscuit’ wrote a song called ‘I Hate Nerys Hughes’. I’m deeply shocked and am glad that I’ve never bought any of their records, as slagging off the nubile Nerys is going too far!

Spent an hour stuck in traffic between Heathrow and Notting Hill this morning, which I spent listening to The Stones “Singles Collection Volume 3” which includes ‘Memo From Turner’, ‘Honky Tonk Women’, ‘Can’t Always Get What You Want’, ‘Sympathy for the Devil’ (out of sequence, so as to be track 13 I noticed). I was surrounded by dark shiny limos returning from the airport with every limo driver wearing dark glasses. I thought it was suitably sinister for the music. Then I realized I was also wearing dark glasses, which is pretty reasonable when driving east on a sunny early morning. Anyway, after a full hour of The Stones, I switched to The Band – and it sounded completely wrong for the ambience of Notting Hill backstreets (an area where I often listened to them in 1970). I had to switch back to The Stones! Never found The Band inappropriate before, but I think I’d been getting into The Stones too intensely.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 17:14:28 CEST 2002 from citrix5.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.9)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: CONCERTS

Just picked up two tickets for Joe Cocker 11-8-02 Casino Ballroom Hampton Beach NH!!...

G-Man if your out there e-mail me if your going on the 17th to see Levon...I will be there with Jimmy (from Jilly's)... can't find your email.. I am sure your living it up now... you retired yet???? and offically touring with the JWB as their security!! ever need some beef backing ya up give me a call!!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 15:23:24 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave ~ (the drummer)

Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Web: My link

Subject: Garth/The Call/ MTV

Bob Emu: Yes; Garth has been on MTV. The year was 1984. Garth had recorded and toured with a band named "The Call." They had a minor hit with the song "The Walls Came Down" from the album "Scene Beyond Dreams." Garth is featured on Synth, Keys & Sax. Robbie and Peter Gabriel worked with "The Call" as well. "The Call" mines the same musical territory as "The Band." I highly reccomend them.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 14:18:44 CEST 2002 from citrix5.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.9)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: 9-19

Brown Eyed Girl,

I see you posted Levon & Barnburner's are playin on 9-19 at Jeff Healy's bar.. I didn't see it posted on concert page... Where is Jeff Healy's bar??? can you give more info on this show..please??

Get well wishes go out to Warren Zevon... he used to play every year at Killington VT (big ski town)was the first bar show I ever went to... it was two days after I had turned 21.. he hasent been back since about 5 or 6 years ago to the venue (Picklel Barrell) because some drunk fool dropped a pint of beer from the upper-level right into the middle of Warren's paino.... Warren always put on a great show... my prayers are with him..


Entered at Fri Sep 13 13:58:18 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Web: My link

Subject: Brown Eyed Girl/Otis

I loved your Otis post and I was wondering what book you were reading. As I am laid up....it sounds like a great read. Brown Eyed Girl you should put some time aside next April 28-May 3 as the Stax Museum (Link) will open officially in Memphis. I had such a wonderful tour this past summer (it's not finished yet) and seeing the Marquee up again brought a tear to this old eye. Anyway most "living" (I should hope so) performers of the Stax label will be performing a big concert as part of the opening. It would be great to see, Booker, Steve and Duck back Eddie Floyd again. You still boggle me with your musical knowledge. Thanks for the great reads.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 10:31:36 CEST 2002 from as3-1-114.hip.berkeley.edu (136.152.194.36)

Posted by:

Dave Hopkins

Location: Berkeley, CA

It seems redundant writing to echo the other positive comments about seeing Garth Hudson on the Letterman show tonight, but I can't help myself. Linda Thompson played "Dear Mary," the leadoff track from her new album Fashionably Late, backed by her children Teddy and Kamila on guitars and harmony vocals, plus our man Garth on the accordion (who got a namecheck from Letterman and Paul Shaffer after the break). It's terrific to see Linda performing again after nearly 20 years of being unable to sing, and what can I say -- the woman has excellent taste in accordion players. (BTW, the album version of "Dear Mary" features ex-husband Richard on lead guitar.)

Al Edge: great to see your posts again. I always enjoy reading them.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 10:08:11 CEST 2002 from 213-48-244-191.liv.cvx.blueyonder.co.uk (213.48.244.191)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: [W]ry humour - pots, kettles, at least dark grey possibly black

This plagiarism business. Have to smile. Is Ry not being rather er...wry in all this? Awry even? Dare I say even er...ri...sible. Maybe he was even on the... rye during the interview. I mean I really do rate Ry's riffs, licks and all but bleedin' 'ell if ever there was a second hand Charlie it surely has to be dear old Ry baby. I mean bloody nora he could even show Rita Coolidge a thing or two when it comes to cover versions. Don't get me wrong I love his music and I know his scores and his inventiveness and his interpretations of other people's or long forgotten songs are invariably superb, usually a celebration and often an enhancement of the original - but come on it simply has to be a piss-take for Ry of all people to complain about someone half inching another's stuff. Least of all for all their undoubted Reptilian warts/skin two songwriters as great as Keef and Mick. Okay so if Ry had ever come up with a Brown sugar or a Tumbling Dice or a Sympathy for the Devil then perhaps I could have taken it seriously but a pleasant reworking of 'How can a poor man stand such times and live' or a beautifully textured film score scarcely lends weight to his beefs when set against Jagger and Richard's prodigious pantheon. Anyroad, besides, Ry was at least 10 years behind The Stones in pilfering Bobby Womack's 'It's all over now' for his 'Paradise and Lunch' album - superb version that it is. Certainly a wry bugger our Ry if you ask me. I do like him tho. Possibly more than Keef and Mick if truth be known.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 07:50:30 CEST 2002 from ac97f5bc.ipt.aol.com (172.151.245.188)

Posted by:

Bob Emu

Location: The Midwest

Subject: Garth, yet again

All I can say is wow... what an experience. Missed the little bit back from commercial, though. It's good to see some talented musical guests on television for a change.

Let's face it, MTV sucks, and that's where most kids my age think it's at. And it's the MTV acts that get booked on these late night shows.

By the way, does anybody know anything about Garth's future projects?

Maybe Garth could get on MTV somehow. No... he's talented, it could never happen.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 07:20:48 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I can only echo the posters who ran to the computer faster than me. Garth was great - and the song was very nice.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 06:52:29 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71195.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.196.20)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Garth / KoKo / Yeats

Allllllright!......Garth plays with Linda Thompson and gang on Letterman this morning!......Great close ups of the wizard himself.....Garth come on now!!!! If you can play with Marianne Faithfull and groove to "Why d'ya do it?".......Surely you can play with Robbie again.....;-D

Hey! I always thought that KoKo Taylor's "I'm A Woman"......was in response to Diddley's "I'm A Man".....(1955)

W.B. Yeats: "Who mocks at music....mocks at life".....


Entered at Fri Sep 13 06:51:09 CEST 2002 from 1cust177.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.177)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Garth on Letterman & Twilight's Quiz Answers

Garth was great as usual on Letterman's show tonight. I think he was aiming his applause at the end at fellow native Canadian Paul Shaffer and his band for their take on "The Weight." That Linda Thompson song sounded great. Is that whole album that good?

Twilight: I was stumped by those David Powell trivia questions. I think you deserve to win a copy of THE BAND DOES DYLAN RIGHT.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 06:44:12 CEST 2002 from parachute3-156-40-62-52.net.nih.gov (156.40.62.52)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Subject: Paul Shaffer

Did anyone notice the song played as Letterman went to commercial? A brief snippit of the intro as they left and the end when the came back of The Weight. I hate commericals!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 06:43:31 CEST 2002 from i-222.susqu.edu (216.87.200.222)

Posted by:

Britton

Subject: garth on letterman

loved seeing garth on the letterman show...he got as much screentime as the singer...beautiful song too...even had "the weight" outro to commercial...and then letterman mentions garth at the end...and he claps for himself!


Entered at Fri Sep 13 04:46:59 CEST 2002 from pcp02256121pcs.wanarb01.mi.comcast.net (68.41.189.217)

Posted by:

twilight

Answers to quiz: 1)Byron Berline (sp) 2) Glyn Johns 3) John Hiatt 4) John Hammond Jr. or Woody Guthrie Tribute (I think The Band was The Band at that point).


Entered at Fri Sep 13 04:18:38 CEST 2002 from 1cust160.tnt16.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.38.56.160)

Posted by:

Crabgrass

Location: The Front Lawn

Subject: Ill Winds In NYC

DEATH AND DESTRUCTION BLOW THROUGH TOWN ON 9/11

Fierce winds wreaked havoc across the area yesterday, killing a New York boater and a New Jersey senior citizen. A small boat carrying four men capsized off City Island in rough seas and high winds at about 11:15 a.m. drowning Victor Anesquita, 66, of Astoria, Queens. In West Amwell, N.J. Roberta Taylor, 75, was killed by a falling tree branch in the parking lot of an antique flea market.

Blustery winds snapped a large rotted limb from an oak tree in Westfield, N.J. injuring 13 students, one of them a 14 year old girl who had to be airlifted to a hospital with head injuries.

Columbus Circle was evacuated yesterday after howling winds sent wood flying from the top of a giant building site critically injuring a construction worker. Several construction workers and others were hit by windswept debris at 41st St. and Madison Avenue.

A five foot piece of wood blown off a building under construction smashed the back window of a taxi. "It's lucky it didn't hit the front window," said the driver, Pierre Chery. "I could have died." [Thank God it didn't!!]

(excerpts from the NY Daily News.)


Entered at Fri Sep 13 03:56:04 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

I happened to live in the same neighborhood as Warren Zevon for a few years; and through sheer good luck I happened to discover he is a real nice guy, very approachable, and a good tipper. Best wishes in these hard times.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 03:14:35 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Warren Zevon/Answer to Gilberto

Gilberto: He has innoperablle lung cancer. Scroll down a dozen or so posts and you'll find a link I posted.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 03:11:52 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp71195.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.196.20)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Levon and The Dictionary Of Soul

Levon and The Barn Burners.....Thursday September 19 at Jeff Healey's.....Well not his home.....but his bar......Amy should be there!!

"Satisfaction".....Rumours surround The Rolling Stones and Otis Redding.....My latest book is on Otis....(even Bryan Ferry named one of his sons after Redding).....Apparently it was Steve Cropper who heard the song originally written by Mick and Keith and he could imagine Otis singing his own version......When Otis finally heard the song.....Otis changed some of the lyrics....The Stones' publishing company weren't even aware that the lyrics were changed and that the song was already out......and was a hit!.....

Interesting to note that The Stones had recorded an Otis song at the same time....."That's How Strong My Love Is".....In relation to Otis improvising lines at a rapid pace and pronouncing "satisfaction" as....."satis-fashion".....Cropper states....."Why change him? That was Otis. We called it 'the dictionary of soul'. I loved it. That's what made him so unique; he'd just barrel right through that stuff unaware of anything.".....No matter whose version ya like....It's always a blast singing along with the audience the chorus.....at a Stones Concert......great party band...(same feeling as singing J.J. Cale's "Cocaine").....Now if ya want a "speedy" version.....There's....Otis live at "Monterey"........probably one of the first African American performers to sing to a mostly white audience......There was no doubt.......when Otis was on........He was on!

The first time I heard ("Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay"....on the radio while Grandpa and I were cruisin'....A radio announcer said that Otis wrote "Satisfaction" but he was so down and out (before this song was a hit) that he sold the rights to The Stones.....Marianne Faithfull also has stated that when she met Otis backstage he adamantly told her that he was the one who wrote "Satisfaction".......So....there ya go......Three interpretations....any more?????


Entered at Fri Sep 13 03:01:50 CEST 2002 from ch-asc3-p25.taconic.net (205.231.28.121)

Posted by:

Gilberto Iman

Subject: Warren Zevon

What's the story on Warren Zevon? More facts, please. thanks......


Entered at Fri Sep 13 02:20:36 CEST 2002 from hse-toronto-ppp178395.sympatico.ca (64.229.82.238)

Posted by:

Blind Willie

Location: Ontario

Subject: The Band Does Dylan Right

Can't believe that in 32 years I've never thought of making a Band tape/cd of Dylan songs. I don't have Minstrel Boy on cd and $99 US for the Great Drives videos is a bit much. Ended my cd today with Richard doing Released and Tears of Rage from Whispering Pines .... Danko is on both songs.

Høiberg .... looks like it worked ....


Entered at Fri Sep 13 00:59:00 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-115-3.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.115.3)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

It's interesting that the Stones gave credit to k.d. lang on "Anybody Seen My Baby" after they claim to have realized the melody was similar after it was already recorded and mastered. Keith said he heard his daughter singing the lang song, and said to himself, "Oh, shit." But who knows what the real story is, and why they were so generous. Maybe they share the same manager.

After the Led Zeppelin, Levon Helm, and now Rolling Stones books, I'd say that Stephen Davis is an author of pretty dubious reliability. Not to mention originality.

I saw Clinton on Letterman last night. No matter what your opinion of his politics or morals, he is obviously an extremely intellegent man (even if he did put his foot in his mouth with that "going up to the music room and blowing" comment). Something I don't think that anyone being honest with themselves could say about our current leader. I think it would terrify me to see how George W. Bush would answer the same questions Letterman posed to Clinton. And I have to say that I agree with his thoughts on the current Iraq situation, with what the ramifications will be if the U.S. decides to just start waging war on any government that we don't approve of.

Send some wishes for a legendary country songwriter right now, too.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 00:37:39 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Warren Zevon

Awful news. Pity the poor soul and his loved ones.


Entered at Fri Sep 13 00:17:51 CEST 2002 from cache-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.2)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Liver Birds will come and get you singing Ee-aye-addio

Believe it or not my mate Les at the corpee used to fancy Nerys like mad and even joined The Spinners club at Gregson's Well because he heard a rumour she used to go there. Anyroad he started going there religiously. Twice a week for months on end. But after all that time there was still no sign of the gorgeous Nerys.

Then one night just as he'd begun to give up all hope, sure enough, out of the blue there she was. A vision of sex and beauty. In this slinky low cut stunner. And - as I'm sure you remember Pete lad - she had one hell of a voluptous figure to display did our Nerys.

Well Les could scarcely believe his luck. The poor fella began shaking like Bill Clinton on a promise. He can scarcely control his ardour.

Anyroad, a few scotches later he's calmed down a bit and begins to fancy his chances. In fact, he's sure that she's giving him the eye. So he waits for the dancing bit to start - don't ask me how you dance to The Spinners by the way - and makes his way over to Nerys who's already on the dance floor in the full bloom of her voluptuousness giving it the full come hither treatment.

The rest, as they say, is history:

LES [longingly to Nerys]: You dancin'?

NERYS [promisingly to Les]: You askin'?

LES [expectantly to Nerys]: I'm askin'

NERYS [tersely to Les]: I'm dancin'

Les retreated in an instant, his manhood withered in the split second of her rejection. Never did recover. Became a Trappist monk so I believe. Absolutely loathes The Spinners. Then again, don't we all?


Entered at Fri Sep 13 00:16:15 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Desperado Under the Eaves..

Yes Sir. To quote one one his own lines: He's "Too old to die young and too young to die now"


Entered at Thu Sep 12 23:45:15 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Warren Zevon

If I knew how, I'd pray for Warren Zevon - for a miracle. I _never_ get tired of that music. His 1976 self-titled album is one of the great masterpieces in rock music, up there with you-know-who.

Saw him live once, in '94 in Austin, TX. Great moment at that gig for us Norgies when he asked "Any Norwegians out there tonight?" before doing "Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner," from _Excitable Boy_, about the "warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun."


Entered at Thu Sep 12 23:16:43 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-135.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.135)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: WW2

Just in case anyone is complimenting themselves on knowing it was 1941 rather than 1940, Mr Davis was talking about England so it's 1939!!!

Al: Having lost Freddie, dare we put forward Nerys Hughes as a ringer? No? Thought not.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 23:14:14 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-135.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.135)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stephen Davis

Wish I hadn't just read the "Uncut" review of the Stephen Davis 'Stones book. Unfortunately the credibility loss he's just suffered will spoil the second half of the book for me (as well as reflecting badly on the Helm / Davis volume). It seems (and I checked and it's true) that Mr Davis has the Second World War commencing in 1940 and has Alexander Pope ("Who would break a butterfly on a wheel?") commenting on the Oscar Wilde trial some 150 years after his own death (in his defence it might just be poor sentence construction - perhaps Pope was quoted at the Wilde trial) Oh, dear. And that's before we get to the howling errors about the Stones.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 22:47:35 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: trivia connection challenge

From recent guestbook topics -- name the (most) common denominator in each of these music pairings:

(1) "Country Honk" / "Acadian Driftwood"

(2) "Beggar's Banquet" / "Stage Fright"

(3) "Across The Borderline" / "Jubilation"

(4) Ry Cooder / The Crackers (hint: in back-up roles)

score 5 points for each correct answer


Entered at Thu Sep 12 22:14:25 CEST 2002 from (12.33.126.141)

Posted by:

John W.

Location: NYC

Bumbles - I stand corrected on the Clinton endorsement statements. I guess I should have said it seems many of those ASSOCIATED with him are taking a political fall.

Ben - I doubt anyone will ever be able to convince you that there was a legitimate reason to impeach Clinton or that Gore lost the election fair and square. I'm done going around in circles about it. But it is a bit sad that you are still so obsessed with these 3 year old and 2 year old issues. Get over it!


Entered at Thu Sep 12 22:08:49 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-147.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.147)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Spelin furrin words right

For those who have a Macintosh, the 'o' in Høiberg is simply "Alt-O', but then Macs do everything better.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 22:06:19 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-147.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.147)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Freddie & The Dreamers

I posted this years ago, but Al may be interested. My kids went to the same playgroup as Freddie Garrity's in Bournemouth. At the Xmas party the lady who ran the playgroup introduced their mother to me. 'Peter, this is Mrs … Mrs … er … Mrs … Freddie and the Dreamers.'



Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:57:02 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Isn't the current US president called George the Second because that's where he finished?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:55:22 CEST 2002 from pool-141-153-198-111.mad.east.verizon.net (141.153.198.111)

Posted by:

Bumbles

Location: The Garden State

Subject: Movin' On

Hard to imagine the teenage Mick & Keith as Hank Snow fans. And I’d be surprised if rocker Matt Lucas’ “I’m Movin’ On” was ever heard in England. Ray Charles did release it as a single in 1959, though---his last on Atlantic and the first of his C&W covers---and that would have been hard to miss.

JOHN_W: Don’t know whether to attribute it to poor reading skills or an attempt to dissemble, but you’re fast & loose with the facts lately. Yesterday you posted “quotes” from the Guardian, none of which appeared as headlines or in any way represented the opinions of the columnists whose work inspired them. Today, you, like so many of your ilk, seem to have been tipped over the edge by---surprise!---President Clinton. For the record, the former president endorsed neither Representative McKinney nor former Secretary Cuomo. As for Al Gore, his role as the heir to and partner in the Clinton presidency no doubt contributed to his victory margin (1,000,000+ and votes still coming in from Florida).


Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:48:24 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Borderline / open tuning

Boy this place is like going to music school around here, thanks

Does Cooder open string tune along the lines of Bentonia tuning? I am a Skip James fanatic. Please tell me the difference in their "open tuning" styles.

Someone mentioned _Borderline_ this is out of context of course but "Borderline" was always my favorite Ry Cooder soundtrack.

That magazine article I mentioned this morning was not Creem but "Crawdaddy".

Ben - Politics, conservative or liberal has always been "May the Crookedest Best Liar Win" so ..No, I am not moist. I just remember very recently hearing Al Gore's people saying "Thank God Almight Al Gore ain't in the White House now!"


Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:26:57 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: I'm Movin' On

Bill: I believe the Stones recorded a version of "I'm Movin' On" live on tour in the U.K. in March of '65. It was released later that year on EP in England and in the U.S. on the "December's Children" album (which also included Bobby Troup's "Route 66" from that same EP).


Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:17:32 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Of course, Dim John, as the media kept flashing us the "red and blue" chart, those of us watching the numbers saw Al Gore's lead increase overall considerably in the final tally. Since Brother Jeb just settled the voter cases in Florida( a major admission of wrong doing, ignored in the press, Surprise!) we know more than ever that Bush lost; but of course, those were only black people screwed out of voting, second class citizens by ditto head standards. Finally, I admit, Gore did lose the final Five to Four tally, to SC judges who go out and give firebreathing speeches at Republican rallys! The grotesque corruption of the American right wing, of course, is the major threat to the health and safty of our Nation. What a loser like you, John W, fails to mention is the House Impeachment managers are droping like flys, even the supposedly untouchable Barr. But Hey Tull fan, you can bet a million our two was spent by the sleazeballs on your side, trying to brand Clinton as gay. With the millions your side spent smearing, could it have been possible you let that possiblity go? I doubt it. By the way, any of you "Plague on both you houses" gang ready to grow up? "The Hunting Of The President" by Joe Conason is a good place to start.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 21:14:51 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond
Web: My link

Subject: Warren Zevon terminally ill


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:56:36 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: speaking of John Simon

I read somewhere his statement that he was 'fired' by Levon and Rick befre the completion of Jericho, yet he seems to have remained on personnally good terms with both. Anybody know the facts and behind this and what portions of the album he did/didn't work on? Seems like Uncle Louie filled his shoes afterwords.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:53:33 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Location: Toronto

Thanks to David Powell for noting the Stones' version of "I'm Moving On". Does anyone have any idea when they started performing it, or if the 1963 version by R&B singer Matt Lucas was a hit in the UK (as it was here and in parts of the US)? As I've mentioned before, Matt, who also drummed, was an auxiliary member of the Hawks at the time of his hit.

Speaking of singing drummers, hearing an Eagles hit on oldies radio this morning made me think of the type (Don H, Levon H and Karen C being the three that popped to mind). For some reason the thought occurred to me that the Levon Helm Sextet may have been named in honour of the Dave Clark Five (Dave being the drummer, not the singer). Thoughts?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:48:52 CEST 2002 from oshst-058.olysteel.com (63.91.50.58)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: All Down the Line....

David,

Interesting that I've seen "Mannish Boy" listed in recent Stones setlists. I'm hoping they break it out at the Tower Theater on 9/22 as I've been fortunate enough to come by a ticket.

The subject of "influence vs. plagiarism" is teeming with possibilities for discussion, no doubt.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:38:35 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: old, new, borrowed & blue

Good point Bob -- "borrowing" influences is common in all types of music. Case in point, from The Last Waltz: "Mannish Boy" is Muddy Waters' answer to Bo Diddley's "I'm A Man".

Don't get me wrong -- I love the music of the Rolling Stones. Jagger & Richards have been able to assimilate ideas and make them their own by adding their distinctive mark to the music. For instance -- to say that Gram Parsons turned them on to country music is ridiculous since they were playing songs like "I'm Movin' On" by that great country singer from Canada, Hank Snow, when Mr. Parsons was still in prep school.

By the way, thank you Susan for posting John Simon's quotes about "Stage Fright". From his comments, he seems to have had more than just an advisory role in the recording of that album. It was particularly interesting what he said about "Daniel and The Sacred Harp" -- "It's one that Garth and I have been working on for a long time". I wonder what Mr. Simon meant by that?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:34:46 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Weaknesses

Good thing Clinton didn't have a thing for some of his male supplicants, what say you John W.?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:30:21 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Al: I used to be familiar with Phil Harris's hit, "Smoke That Cigarette". Possibly because my parents had the 78, or maybe just because it was in one of my piano-lesson books. The parents had a ton of 78s, most of them Bing / Andrews Sisters / Glenn Miller '40s/'50s pop - oh and lots by the Weavers. The only ones I know I've kept are "Third Man Theme" by Anton Karris and his Zither (guess why?) and Red Foley's "Sugar Foot Rag" (which I kept because my beloved Rhinoceros covered it).


Entered at Thu Sep 12 20:11:45 CEST 2002 from oshst-058.olysteel.com (63.91.50.58)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: Throwing Stones

With the Stones in the headlines of late they seem an easy target when the topic of songwriting credit arises. From all I have read over the years on this subject it would be difficult to argue their innocence. We shouldn't forget that, with rare exception, nearly every major rock and roll act over the past forty years has been pulled into this controversy.

Whether the theft was an inside job ( a familiar premise here )or a blatant twelve noon heist there are very few in the industry who haven't taken part. By no means does the huge number of offenders absolve any of them but this "club" has a vast membership that goes well beyond Mick and Keith. After the recent passing of the great archivist and musicologist Alan Lomax, there were many laudatory pieces written here and, to my recollection, one passing comment concerning some very questionable copyrights, publishing rights and even songwriting credits. With some investigation it appears that these improprieties on Mr. Lomax's part could be termed extensive.

While I agree with the point being made I don't agree with the narrow approach some seem to be taking to prove it. The music industry has been victimized by thieves from the very beginning.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 19:54:52 CEST 2002 from host62-6-114-92.webport.bt.net (62.6.114.92)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Freddie and dem Dreamers

Hilarious post that Pete lad. And the bit about the other four Scousers was quite amusing too!! :-]

Actually Freddie Garritty [legit spell?] was about as Scouse as a pint of Boddies.

Inexplicably he was a big favourite of my dear late father. I can never forget us all watching Thank Your Lucky Stars on the telly back in '64 as Freddie and the Dreamers followed The Fab Four onto the screen.

'Now THAT'S what you really call talent' declared my dad in all seriousness [bless him]as Freddie pranced around like an egg on stilts. A minute or so earlier he'd dismissed 'I want to hold your hand' and the entire Beatles phenomonen as a 'flash in the pan'.

Ahh, long live that precious generation gap.

Not that me old fella was completely devoid of taste - one of his other faves was Phil Harris and two of his most cherished 78's were 'Darktown Poker Club' and 'Woodman Spare that Tree' - classics both.

Talking of which, both would surely have made it onto the Stagefright album had our boys only ever managed to master that authentic Balu voice!!

Mind you I'm not convinced either would ever have been good enuff for Big Pink and The Brown album!!

:-]


Entered at Thu Sep 12 19:52:04 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Ilkka's instructions will be pointless - and maybe even annoying - to most of you. I suppose it boils down to regional differences in where the computer companies choose to stick 'special' characters. I figured out how to make ø on my keyboard (depress and release Ctrl and / simultaneously , then type o) - but even then it has to be imported from the word processing package; it can't be typed straight into this sign-in form. As it was Jan who determined what could and could not be typed in here, I suppose he's not too bugged by a missing slash in the second letter of his surname. And if he's not, why would anyone else be? One of my very few principles is not to be annoyed on behalf of someone else who isn't.

For his unwarranted sarcasm, Ilkka should be forced to do time with his pooch in little pink.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 19:37:21 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-002.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.2)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stone steals

Figures- we always assumed ‘Country Honk’ was a laid back version of ‘Honky Tonk Women’, but if you reverse the order of writing, then you get a Gram Parsons’ song (Country Honk) which is then embellished with Ry Cooder riffs (Honky Tonk Women). But whichever way it went down, the song was defined and made by Jagger’s interpretation which is, reptile or not, brilliant here. The other thing about the Stephen Davis book is that Bill Wyman hardly ever seems to be present- there’s a lot of ‘Mick, Keith & Charlie’ putting down songs, confirming that credits were always murky (Ian Stewart? Nicky Hopkins?) and often surprisingly ‘late fifties fake’ regarding Brian and Bill. Keith Richard may have ‘nicked’ credit for guitar parts, but also gave Bill credit by default for bass parts he himself may have played. As to Ry, he says that Keith didn’t jam with him so much as run out of the room every time Ry started doodling around (presumably to start the tape). But those four albums (from Banquet to Exile via Let it Bleed & Sticky Fingers) are the most interesting things they ever did.

Al- apologies! Freddie G was from Manchester, now I think. And i finallt remembered Jimmy Tarbuck’s name.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 19:23:01 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: this, that & the other

Some of us are old enough to remember when albums were released on those two-sided, 12" vinyl, long-playing discs called records. When deciding on the running order of songs, the recording artists had to decide, not only how the entire album flowed, but how to open, close and sequence the songs separately on each side of the record. From the listener's standpoint, the music was presented in these segments, with a brief intermission or breather as one got up to flip the record over to the other side. I think it would be interesting to go back & look at how The Band's records, particularly the first three, were sequenced by playing side. In this digital age of CD reissues with up to 80 minutes of uninterrupted playing time & bonus, it's easy for some of us to forget how the music was originally sequenced. Many younger listeners may be completely unaware of this segmented listening experience.

As others have mentioned in the guestbook, the experience of listening to music in larger doses may dilute the over-all feeling of enjoyment, especially when the potency is not strong enough to maintain the prescribed time length. Come to think of it, from this perspective, sex, drugs & rock 'n roll really do have a lot in common [:-}

I recently picked up several of the new Stones reissues, including "Beggar's Banquet" and "Let It Bleed". You can really hear Ry Cooder's influence on Keith Richards' playing style, beginning with that latter album. Mr. Cooder's collaborations with the Stones happened to have coincided with the decline & passing of Brian Jones. In addition to finding a replacement for Mr. Jones, Mr. Richards, as a guitarist thrust even more into the spotlight, was apparently searching for a new style of playing.

Along came Ry Cooder, with his palette of open tunings that allowed him to play rich, powerful chords & notes using the slide and/or fingerings. With the guitar tuned to ringing, open chords, one can play rhythm & lead simultaneously with ease since the strings are tuned to the root notes. These open tunings lend themselves to interesting patterns & intervals of notes. Through his first-hand experience of playing with Mr. Cooder, strengthened by capturing it on tape, Keith Richards was afforded access to this Rosetta stone guide to guitar riffs.

Listen to "Memo From Turner", the song from the "Performance" soundtrack that Peter Viney mentioned, along with Stones' "Jamming With Edward" album that featured Ry Cooder. When you then next listen to "Let It Bleed", "Sticky Fingers" and "Exile On Main Street", you can really hear the echo of Ry Cooder.

The Stones later credited Ry Cooder on guitar on "Sister Morphine" from "Sticky Fingers". It is interesting to note that this song was co-written with Marianne Faithful, but she received no credit when the song was initially released. Years later, this oversight has been corrected on reissues. Sadly though, Jagger/Richards still receive sole credit for the "The Last Time", which is nothing more than a secular reworking of a Roebuck "Pops" Staples song. You can't always get what you want, but if you try so hard, you can steal what you need. Let it bleed indeed.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 19:17:03 CEST 2002 from t3o942p27.telia.com (195.252.33.27)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: Across the border
Web: My link

Subject: Mr. Høiberg, Country music

The LEAST you can do is to write the name of the webmaster correctly!!!!!!!!:
First press the 'H' button (That was not too difficult, wasn't it?). But now it is getting serious: press the '&' button, yes that's the one over '6' - then write 'oslash' followed by ';' - that is the critical point which separates the men from the boys or the women from the girls. Then write 'iberg'. Now you are ready!!!
Now type after me, please: Høiberg, Høiberg, Høiberg. VERY GOOD!!!

And now to something Americana related. A serious post, for the change... from the bottom of my musical heart...

Thanks DAVID POWELL and CHARLIE YOUNG for responding to my post on COUNTRY MUSIC. I am ashamed to accuse our gb newoyrkers to be hypocratic, for not to beeing into country music. This is how it is: in every culture there is music you love to hate. In my Nordic culture it is tango and humpa. It is the reactionary non-musical way of playing, feeling and thinking. But when I played in a Wedding Band I saw how the ordinary people enjoyed it. It was the healthy and real way of making of music. The tragic in this is that as a musician you'll find yourself in the borderline... loving to hate it and hating to love it. (If you gb regulars know what I man.) I am aware that the country music represents the values you newyorkers wouldn't dream to accept. That's how I feel about Nordic tango, waltzes and humpa and the Swedish and - even WORSE - Norwegian dance band music. The paradox is that when we listen to these kind of music from other cultures, we like it, we believe that we can relate to it, we simply love it. But having it around us, living inside it, we would hate it.

"The moral of this story, the moral of this song is simply" - like my first (and last ;-) idol BOB DYLAN sings:

"Listen to the fiddler play
When he's playin' 'til the break of day
Oh me, on my
Love that country pie.
Rasberry, strawberry, lemon and lime
What do I care?
Blueberry, apple, cherry, pumpkim and plum,
Call me for dinner, honey, I'll be there!"


Entered at Thu Sep 12 18:51:41 CEST 2002 from (12.33.126.141)

Posted by:

John W.

Location: NYC

Ben Pike - I must compliment you for sticking by your principles, misguided as they may be. Looks like Janet Reno has joined the list of Clinton-endorsed candidates who are losing elections (see Al Gore, Andrew Cuomo, Cynthia McKinney). I guess those mafia-like oil boys must be spending a lot of money to "buy" up all these elections, huh? Or -- maybe an endorsement from Clinton is sending voters directly tothe other candidate?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 18:28:52 CEST 2002 from cpe0050180e8779.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (24.157.151.53)

Posted by:

BIFFALO BULL

Subject: UNITAS, THE BAND

THE BANDS UNIQUE HARMONISING HAS AN APPEAL TO ME THAT CONJURES UP IMAGES OF 3 OR 4 DRUNK LITHUANIANS SINGING ON A SATURDAY NIGHT AFTER A HARD WEEKS WORK. THAT IS SOUL THAT FOUND ITS WAY INTO AN ELEMENT OF THE BANDS MUSIC. HONK IF YOU HAPPEN TO AGREE.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 18:19:17 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

And what a graceful, classy, and reassuring apperance on Letterman it was by our last elected President. None of the arrogence of a born again air head who had the office bought for him by a mafia like cartel of criminals from big oil(Roz, if you go moist over this crew, you ain't even Janis Ian) just a smart guy trying to make some sense of the world. What he could have done if, horrors, he didn't have a weakness for the ladies, which we allowed the worst scum lying at the bottem of our country to punish him with the perverse glee of a Joe McCarthy on angel dust. Had the "plauge on both your housers" stopped it, of course, there might well never have been a 9-11. "God is not mocked" smirked a Jerry Fawell on the 700 club after the towers fell, and we could got a clear gaze at the mantality that bedeviled the Clintons.

Perhaps I will reward Letterman by watching Linda Thompson too.....


Entered at Thu Sep 12 18:17:13 CEST 2002 from (137.187.144.172)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD [but originally Baltimore]

Subject: Thanks!

Charlie Young – Baltimore, Elliott Landy, Johnny U., the Band and me[!] in one post. What marvelous company in which I find myself! I am forever grateful.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 16:57:45 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Peter: Levon and Jesse Ed played with Roger Tillisonin California before Levon was called back to join the Band. I'd be surprised if Ry Cooder wasn't part of their crowd - which also included Jimmy Karstein, Junior Markham, Leon Russell, Bobby Keyes, Carl Radle and Sandy Konikoff.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 16:50:18 CEST 2002 from (12.33.126.141)

Posted by:

John W.

Location: NYC

Why is it, in the year since 9/11, we have heard numerous renditions of "God Bless America" and see this phrase all over the place, yet if there has been one "Allah Bless America", I have not seen it. It should not matter what your perception of the almighty is. If you believe in the U.S. and what it stands for, you would want your deity to protect and bless it. So why only we see Christians/Jews invoking "God Bless America". Is "God" supposed to love all humans regardless of their national affiliation, but "Allah" is anti-American?


Entered at Thu Sep 12 15:05:23 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: The Stones

..Reminds me of a "Creem" magazine article from about the same period, 1974. I think it was Chris Hillman, who said that he was there the night that Gram Parsons "Sat down and wrote "Country Honk" Exactly the way it ended up on the record." Not even so much as a "Thanks G.P." on the back of the damned cover. G. P. was an extremely gifted musician who was sucked dry by those vipers.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 14:50:25 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: Stage Fright in the Car

I was going to a current favorite Reservoir in western New Jersey, where Hummingbird Moths and various butterflys abound (the Monarchs are beginning their trek south), to do a little photography; I was listening to Stage Fright, really cranking it, since all this talk has started. I was doing my Rick impression and playing a really sloppy air bass when I came to the gate of the place and lo and behold a man was standing there. He put his hands up for me to stop as I slowed down. The gates were closed. "What's up? I ask. "We're closed." "Closed?" I say. "9-11, all reservoirs in the state are closed today and tomorrow." I nodded and understood..., Safe but a shame this has come about in our country.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 14:46:45 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Location: Algeria

Mullah Omar:

Stop using the name of Allah as a pretext for all the bullshits you post here-in, you attack my sensibility of muslim more than the others one. Despite of this, I believe that someone who chooses The Band site cannot be entirely bad, perhaps just a little bit silly.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 13:47:12 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68670.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.186.35)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Subject: Peter and Peace

Peter Viney: ......I am so glad that you realized the importance of Van's music in my life.......'cause you feel it too....:-DD.......and Robbie knew too.....He knew something was happening at TLW.....When he simply called out......"Van the Man"!......Oh yes indeed......After two gruelling weeks....(Now I understand Louuuuu when he states....."My week beats your year".....lol.....You sent much needed music.....Van's voice and his higher power music.....is always so sexy.....so soothing......so sweet......so scintillating......so spiritual...........yum!.....THANK YOU AGAIN PETER.....YOU ROCK MY WORLD!.....

Maybe if we all had the same dream.....It would come true......A world that yearns peace.....

"When the time comes, people will seek the truth in all things. They get it when they are ready to hear it.".....(Bob Marley August, 1978)


Entered at Thu Sep 12 13:40:04 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-097.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.97)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: 4 scousers + The Rolling Stones

Al: Gerry Marsden, Freddie Garraghty, Ken Dodd and the fat golfer with the gap in his teeth who’s got the COM 1C number plate. His name escapes me.

Rolling Stones: I’m still reading the Stephen Davis book in dribs and drabs, but the bit around ‘Let it Bleed’ is particularly good on feuds and conspiracies (as well as particularly prurient on listing Marianne Faithfull’s various partners). There’s a long quote from Ry Cooder, against which the ‘feud-starting claims’ in Helm & Stephen Davis’s book on The Band pale in comparison. Cooder had been invited over to London. They got him to play solo in the studio for many hours, taped it all and then stole a number of licks. Cooder walked into the studio unannounced and found Keith working on a new song that he had developed from tapes Cooder had played on. Cooder complains that The Stones, and Keith in particular, did a “sponge job” on him. “A lot of what I did showed up on Let it Bleed, but they only gave me credit for playing mandolin on one cut. ‘Honky Tonk Women” is taken from one of my licks. They even admitted this to John Phillips. What bothers me most is the theft of songs. The Rolling Stones are a reptilian bunch of people.’

This was all reported in Rolling Stone magazine in the 70s, and I remember someone saying that the Stones lived on bits of Cooder right through ‘Exile’ and were still lifting things up to around 1974. (Since when they haven’t done anything as good). ‘Memo from Turner’ from the ‘Performance’ OST shows what they might have sounded like if they’d decided to pay Ry rather than rip him off. As so often when bands need new personel, the existing songwriters are very loathe to admit a new and good one – this was one of the 90s Band problems, I feel.

Davis never mentions the Otis Redding ‘Satisfaction’ urban myth though, which indicates as I always thought that it was bullshit, and he also rubbishes the Mars bar urban myth. Cooder, as well as being one of my favourite guitarists, is surprising in not having links with The Band as far as I can judge. (Eliminate the via Jesse Ed Davis toTaj Mahal to Rising Sons one as too remote).


Entered at Thu Sep 12 11:44:22 CEST 2002 from cache-ink2-kno-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.0.4)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Returns and Strawberry wine etc

Thanks for welcome Bob. By the way who are those four other Scousers ? :-]

Thing is although I do only dip in now and again I've never really been away. I just drift around the place like tumbleweed reading bits and bobs - which reminds me I really do need a haircut.

The reason I scarcely ever post is twofold.

Main one is time. Personal and business circumstances leave me few windows to sit and write my usual diatribes. Incidentally I notice that the GB's largest byte month since Rick's passing coincided with my arrival on here - I mean why use one pithy comment when you can squeeze in a few hundred more!! :-]

The other is the seemingly inherent gravity of the GB. My tongue in cheek stuff began to seem to me incongruous with a debate on say who had the nicest frets on their guitar or how Rick's bass sounds incomparably better if you stand on your head on top of next door's shagging wardrobe with your latest woofer wedged between yer tweeters.

Thing was I'd throw a few in, they would get ignored. In the end I guess I simply kind of tired of nobody seeming to latch onto my little funnies - and as you all know as much as it can make your eyes water and holler for mercy when someone actually does latch onto your funnies, it is not half so bad as when someone doesn't - joke btw - fifth so far for the uninitiated!

So there you go. Hello/Goodbye and gleetings fellow Bandonians.

Now as regards Stagefright. I must say it's an intriguing one. I have always loved it. Way back when it first came out it was the first time you could play a Band album to your Beatles/Stones/Tamla loving mates without them making a bolt for the nearest door. Thing was by the time Stagefright had replaced Big Pink and The Brown album as the sole occupant on my Dansette scarcely a square inch of our backyard door was visible. Five hundred flush bolts covers an awwwwful lot of bare wood. :-]

Anyroad, as much as I love it for all its gloriousness and majesty and splendour and Susan's reminder of what Simon Says - Put the Band on the air!!! - I really have to come down in the camp of those who place it firmly outside the top two of our boys recorded achievements. Personally I would place it just below the reissued Rock of Ages with those marvellous bonus tracks.

My reasons? Haven't got time to analyse at the moment since there are more crap jokes pressing me to be cracked. I think essentially it's my own instincts about The Band's place in music. For me nothing I've ever heard from any artist/artists comes remotely near to the sound/spirit/ethos/integrity of those first two pieces of work. I realise that view is not shared by many in here, though when you reflect on it it's no bad reflection on our boys if all we're debating is whether something is or isn't the joint first greatest rock vinyl recording of all time!!!


Entered at Thu Sep 12 11:06:39 CEST 2002 from as3-2-131.hip.berkeley.edu (136.152.194.245)

Posted by:

Dave Hopkins

Location: Berkeley, CA

Subject: D&TSH

Thanks so much to Susan for contributing the info from the John Simon interview regarding Stage Fright. I was most interested in Simon's comments about "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" (or "Heart," as the case may be). He makes the connection explicit between the song and Sacred Harp or shape-note singing, already noted, of course, in Peter Viney's terrific article about the song, which I just had the pleasure of re-reading. It appears that "Daniel" started out being about that and kind of wandered from there, if Simon's comments are accurate. I was also interested in his comment that he and Garth had been working on the song for awhile. Given that Mr. Hudson is undoubtedly the most knowledgeable historical musicologist to ever make his living playing in a rock-and-roll band, I wonder if the shape-note idea originally came from him, with Robbie taking it from there with a fable about an actual "sacred harp" that became, as Peter has written, the Appalachian version of the devil-at-the-crossroads myth, as well as an eerie metaphor about the Band itself.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 10:02:13 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Livin' In The U S A !

Hey Y'all _ We made it thru the day. Now if we can just make it thru tomorrow. And tomorrow we'll be sayin' "Gee I hope we can make it thru Saturday" Well...As Janis always said " It's all the same fucking day man"

"New York.. Los An-gel-is.. Oh how I yearn for yooo!..

Dee-troit.. Chi-ca-go.. Chat-tan-ooga.. Ba-ton Rouge....."

You know, Chet Atkins was the only guy there ever was who could rhyme a word like "Far" with "Tomarr" and make it sound natural.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 07:55:20 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Susan = nice job on that John Simon/Stagefright post. It was cool to read that from back then. I didn't realize that Richard was drumming on Strawberry Wine - but that now that I think of the drums, it has to be him. The drumming on that tune has the same feel as the middle part on Rag Mama Rag.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 07:47:29 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-112-92.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.112.92)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Sorry, but I just broke the Wind. Time to stop my war upon the Burrito.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 05:36:10 CEST 2002 from 1cust251.tnt16.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.38.56.251)

Posted by:

Mullah Omar

Subject: The Wind

Indeed, the presence of God was manifest in the high winds in NYC today sending out a warning to the U.S. to stop it's War Against Islam!


Entered at Thu Sep 12 04:31:35 CEST 2002 from slip-32-102-22-147.md.us.prserv.net (32.102.22.147)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Outside of Baltimore Tonight

Subject: Elliott Landy in the Bargain Bins & the Late, Great Johnny U.

Thanks for the kind comments about my STAGEFRIGHT ramblings. I could write a book about how much that album has meant to me over the years. I realize it was actually the start of my senior year in high school that SATGEFRIGHT came out, and the end of that school year that I finally got to see The Band in concert (at Meriwether Post Pavilion, near where Jonathan Katz resides). That show is still etched in my mind, from the opening notes of "W.S. Walcott."

Fans of Elliott Landy's famous photos of The Band may want to look among the bargain books in their local stores. Today I found a pile of cheap copies of Landy's 1996 book, WOODSTOCK VISION: THE SPIRIT OF A GENERATION. There are lots of shots of Dylan and others besides The Band as well.

Finally, before I discovered Rock'n'Roll, my first hero was a quarterback for the Baltimore Colts in the mid-1960s named Johnny Unitas. He never lost his mythic hero status to me. Today he died suddenly at age 69. The game was never the same after he left it. May he rest in peace.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 02:58:44 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-013ilchicp0199.dialsprint.net (65.176.128.199)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Subject: John Simon on Stage Fright

Here's a segment from an article in the July 9, 1970 Rolling Stone. The first part of the article is an interview with Robbie, where he talks about the films the Band turned down. I'll send the whole article to Jan so he can put it on site if he wants to. But this bit about Stage Fright fits in with the current conversation. The interviewer spoke with Simon by phone, because Robbie did not talk about the new album during the interview.

Simon then ran down a list of the songs on the new album:

"Stage Fright" - Rick Danko sings the lead. "I think it's the best vocal performance Rick has done."

"Time To Kill" - Everyone sings on this one. "It's kind of a universal song. The kind that's going to pop up on the Andy Williams Show or the Tom Jones Show, specials and all that, dancers dancing around and whirling. But it'll be wonderful. The perfect song. Garth Hudson plays great piano on that one."

"Sleeping" - Richard Manuel and Robbie Robertson wrote it, and Richard sings. "It's the first waltz we've ever done."

"Strawberry Wine" - Levon (pronounced with the accent on the fist syllable, incidentally) Helm sings it and plays guitar, with Richard on drums. "That was just take one. We went in and did it and they sang it live. It was terrific on take one and we didn't go any further."

"All The Glory" - "It's a song to a young person. I can't be sure, Robbie may have written it for his little girl, or it may be more universal that that. Levon sings on that one too, and the contrast between 'Strawberry Wine,' which is one of those evil songs, and 'All The Glory,' which is a goody-goody song, is amazing. Levon carries them both off."

"The Rumor" - "It might be my favorite, I don't know. It's one of my favorites. Probably the longest song on the record. Richard, Rick and Levon sing it. It's dramatic, you know, but a real rocker."

"W. S. Walcott Medicine Show - "It's about this medicine show that used to travel around down south. Levon and Robbie were reminiscing about it. That's the one with Garth's tenor solo in it. I play horn on that 'cause it was lying around."

"Daniel and the Sacred Heart" - "It's one that Garth and I have been working on for a long time. It's about shape note singing, which is Appalachian in origin. What shape note means is that in the original hymnals made out in this country there weren't enough people who read music. So they would have a shape to designate a note on a scale. I really don't know what the correspondences were, but it may have been a circle for do, a triangle for re, a square for mi, a diamond for fa, you know. It' s a very direct and deliberate kind of singing. That was the beginning of 'Daniel and the Sacred heart.' It's gone a long ways since then."

The final two cuts are "The shape I'm In," a rocker sung by Richard Manuel, and one that was only half written. "We haven't gotten it down yet," he said. "The title's floating out there with the lyrics."

Finally, Simon compared the new album to Music From Big Pink and The Band.

"The first album was a first album. Everybody just went into the studio and did their best. We put it out, and it was a hit. That made the second one a little harder to do. We were a little worried about the second album, not because we were worried whether we could do the first album again, it's just that we wanted it to be really special for all those people out there who liked the first album. I think it showed a little more workmanship, a little more toil. The third album is a lot more relaxed. We just whipped through it, and everybody was real relaxed."


Entered at Thu Sep 12 01:55:30 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: fair enough...

.I just didn't want any old stuff to be re-hashed again. I never left my real e mail address here Before....that's all


Entered at Thu Sep 12 00:53:16 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Been watching CNN... Drove my boys to and from pre-school today... while listening to Largo... Uncommon Love stands out today... I send wishes of healing to the victims families... via the GB wind...


Entered at Thu Sep 12 00:28:49 CEST 2002 from ool-18b9c11f.dyn.optonline.net (24.185.193.31)

Posted by:

Justa Nuther New yorker

Location: L.I. N.Y.

Subject: Sept.11th

If Listening to music brings harmony to the mind.then one understand's why 'The Band's greatest hits sits in my discman. The world was changed one year ago today.And I often question God's exsistance. Today she showed her rememberence through the wind. Every breeze, each dust particle that blew upwards today during the service was a sign from God. Microphones were screaching out cries . The wind created a spiritual emotion..I NOW BELIEVE.....


Entered at Thu Sep 12 00:02:19 CEST 2002 from plantlogic.com (209.195.208.11)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Web: My link

Subject: Guardian

John W., I don't know what Guardian site you're looking at but the one I read today didn't have any of those quotes in it that I saw. In fact there were some fairly reasoned columns from both Khalil Shikaki and Simon Schama. Maybe I need a pair of whatever you're wearing...click link above.


Entered at Thu Sep 12 00:02:06 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-33-access.surferz.net (64.80.53.33)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Bayou Sam: Please mail me (I miss the e-mail addresses in here!) Thanks.
d_lil@hotmail.com


Entered at Wed Sep 11 23:09:20 CEST 2002 from 12-243-212-169.client.attbi.com (12.243.212.169)

Posted by:

King Whistle

Location: Kensington, CT

Subject: Bobby Dylan / Rockline 1985

Not too Band related, but I'm getting a kick out of it: According to expectingrain.com, tonight (9/11/02) the syndicated radio show Rockline is going to rebroadcast a call in show featuring Bob Dylan which originally aired in June of 1985. See here's the thing: I dialled for about 1 1/2 hours and got through to talk to Bob. Two things that I remember: 1. The question I wanted to ask was rejected by the screener, so I begged him to give me a question so I could talk to Bob. 2. During the show, Bob requested to hear "Obviously 5 Believers." When the song ended, the announcer/host complemented Bob on the harp work. Bob had to tell the poor slob that it was Charlie McCoy. I remember that night sitting in my room at my parent's house (I was 18) like it was yesterday. I haven't heard it since. I've got to tape it somehow tonight....Peace to all.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:58:16 CEST 2002 from ool-182d8920.dyn.optonline.net (24.45.137.32)

Posted by:

Patrou

Web: My link

Great site, I want to come back later when I have more time, thanks


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:49:29 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Bones: Much as I used to like "Miracles", it isn't remotely rock and roll. Reminds me of Rolling Stone magazine granting Mac Davis the Perjorer of the Year award for his "Rock And Roll I Gave You The Best Years Of My Life".

On another note altogether, the subject line of Peter's lates post reminded me once again what a confounding thing the English language can be. How unclear it must be to others that Running Orders are so very different from Standing Orders. Or that "Running Bear" by Johnny Preston is so very different from "Running Bare" by Ray Stevens.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:44:38 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: alternate Stagefright song order

Side 1. 1. The Rumour 2. Stagefright 3. Just Another Whistlestop 4. Daniel & The Sacred Harp 5. Time To Kill Side 2. 1. Sleeping (ever notice how the opening guitar is reminiscent of Rocking Chair?) 2. W.S. Walcott 3. Shape I'm In 4. All La Glory 5. Strawberry Wine. JOHN IN NYC: try emailing me at us2inva@excite.com, we can enjoy some political talk.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:24:42 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

There is a compilation called I Love Rock and Roll (the 70s) Volume 3. Oddly enough, the Band's "Up On Cripple Creek" (1969) is on it. Actually, there are some great tunes on it including Jefferson Starship's "Miracles", Steve Miller's "Take The Money and Run", and Doobie Brothers' "Black Water". Has anyone seen this? I just received a copy from CDNow.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:19:20 CEST 2002 from (131.137.245.197)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: Winnipeg

Subject: Strawberry Wine

I've always loved this tune. You get that wheezy sound at the very beginning, like a hand-cranked Victrola coming up to speed, or a wheezy old man rousing himself to make a point. As has been mentioned, the bass is wonderful - not a "groove player," perhaps, but the band latches on to a heck of a groove here.

It's up-tempo, but I've never thought it was light, or lightweight. The lyrics (Helm or Robertson? - and how many songs have THEY collaborated on?) show that great ear for idiom-with-a-twist, and they're pretty dark lyrics really. Here's this guy, past his prime, who's done it all and seen the rest, and NOBODY is gonna tell him when to put the jug down. Offer him love or liquor, he'll take liquor. The way it's put across, it's not a question of whether he's a hero or a fool. What you hear is the authentic voice saying "this is who I am, you can take it or you can leave it" - much as in "Cripple Creek" or "Dixie". The Band paints a picture, but The Band don't preach; they respect you enough to let you think for yourself.

If I remember from the Helm/Davies book, this might have been cut at the same time Levon was in his dependency. There's irony for you (unless you really think it's an anthem). "I just wanna feel good all the time" is pretty close to the centre of the truth about addiction, and the whole song is a way better treatment of the subject than e.g. "Forbidden Fruit."

There's a comment somewhere about Levon sounding drugged-up or something - he may not sound completely elated, but I think he's in fine form. Try singing along at a good volume when you're washing the dishes, and see who runs out of air first.

I always heard the line as "I would even run the BODY across the other county" which would be darker yet, and a likely cause of the sort of post-traumatic stress that would drive you to drink.

Thanks for the space.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 22:09:58 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalindrichardson@webtv.net

If anyone would like to communicate with me for any reason...the gb is not the place to do it. I am not afraid of viruses. These little boxes can be replaced for a mere 50 bucks.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 21:55:58 CEST 2002 from (12.33.126.141)

Posted by:

John W.

Location: NYC

Interesting how even on the anniverary of 9/11, some people can't even allow one day for reflection and mourning. A quick perusal of The Guardian's UK web site shows columns and forums filled with anti-American vitriol. "What the U.S. did in Chile in the '70's, now that's real terrorism". "Bush is the real terrorist". "The U.S. is waging war not on Al Queda but on the entire Islamic world". You would think they could let it rest for one day.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 21:53:55 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Rosalind = I'm not gonna drag this out - but - I thought that Lil sort of called you out in a clever way. Alot of people would have been much nastier. Sure it had a little sarcasm, but let's face it, you left quite a mark in the past. Then you fessed up and asked for the hatchet to be buried and Lil, showing some class I thought, agreed, and that was it. You seemed to have arrived at a real happy place at that point. But if you're gonna bury the hatchet, don't dig it up again the next day. That's all I'm done.

Charlie Young = I loved your post regarding Stagefright.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 21:50:15 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-074.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.74)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Running orders

Running order of albums – we always praise the running order of the first two – which were carefully considered. The brown album was perfection – not so sure that Big Pink’s running order quite hits perfection – it’s the last three really, and the way This Wheel’s On Fire splits Lonesome Suzie and I Shall Be Released. I think Marcus or someone had a say about this years back. It might be why in critics polls (as I pointed out a few months back) the brown album consistently comes ahead of Big Pink. But for me, Stage Fright is up with them.

Cahoots – not the fourth in a quartet of greatness, I’m afraid!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 21:29:48 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: please..

D.Lil - MattK - and P.Brennan _ I want you three folks to know that I deliberately planted the "thank you" to Little Brother the other day.

I disagree with Bayou Sam when he said Lil's post was handled well...with compassion. On the contrary. I felt it was deliberatly planted with insulting remarks, sarcasm and alluded to lies (about the gb being shut down and threatening to Mr. hioberg) __Enough of that for me__hatchet's buried__

To the other two of you. Are you two people adults? Why then hold grudges for so long and always insist on getting in one more shot? I hope I am not going to get any He/She jokes now. The GB' version of "Ulgiest man on campus" .

To the "Big Nurse" whoever they might be _ You don't know how close you came to home. Here's wishing you never suffer a nervous breakdown that takes your life away for 7 years and puts you in a mental facility.

Now please let the jabs stop. I am finished


Entered at Wed Sep 11 20:40:22 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Strawberry Wine, and albums of my youth revisited.

First of all, thanks to all of you guys overseas and your thoughts for us Americans today. They are appreciated. The link I had posted earlier was www.teamtwintowers.org, which is a New York based organization dedicated to rebuilding the World Trade Centers as they were or better. There is also a great article online at the New York Times Magazine, with an awesome rebuilding plan with two behemoth towers, seemingly larger than the originals with a an interesting 'twist', set just off the 16 acres of ground zero, which would become a memorial designed by Maya Lin, who designed the Vietnam Veteran's memorial in DC. Very inspiring as a combination. Now, albums that have lived up from my teen years or become even more impressive: The Band, Big Pink, Abby Road, Revolver, Pet Sounds, Plastic Ono Band, Blonde On Blonde, or most things Dylan. Things that have declined: Anything by Pink Floyd, The Moody Blues, and the Doors. Not that all Floyd and the Moodies have become drecchh! to me, but as a once rabid fan I find half of their stuff interesting and half mediocre and maudlin. STRAWBERRY WINE:I hereby defend the honor and integrity of this song! The original concept of Stagefright was to lighten things up and move away from the seriousness of the first two albums, This is perhaps, with the exception of W.S. Walcott, the only song to uphold the original idea. I love it's fun, loose, and quirky attitude. It's perhaps one of the best ways to enjoy 'time to kill', is happy in an unencumbered way. Perhaps it is not the best way to begin the album. It may have been a better ending, with The Rumour opening the album instead, which would have harkened back to the same unconventionality of Pink in terms of a slow, rather than fast song opening the album. The Rumor wuld have immediately spoken to rumours of the Band floating around at the time, and Strawberry Wine, as the closing track, could have suddenly lightened things up(as well as confirmed some rumours after dispelling them!) after the darkness of Stagefright and Shape I'm In. Again, this gets back to my previous points that Stagefright is less a cohesive album than the first two, and perhaps this is due to song order than the quality of the individual tracks, ie Sleeping would be a much stronger song if sandwiched somewhere in the Brown album, around Whispering Pines' spot, than between Time to Kill and Strawberry Wine. Try it. Sorry for my verbosity.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 19:56:08 CEST 2002 from host194.olysteel.com (63.91.50.194)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: That "timeless" thing

Charlie Young, as always, you hit that nail dead on.

All of this "timeless" talk raises a question....When recalling the music that was "yours" as a teenager, which albums have and which albums have not stood the test of time for you? There are many obvious titles to cite on either side of the issue. I would be interested to hear the opinions of the GB on this matter. To add to the discussion, I am curious to hear which albums you have revisited in the recent past that, to your surprise ( and possible disappointment ), didn't hold up when you would have bet the house they would still hold the magic?

Let's agree up front. The Band's work held up.

Get well John D. Welcome back to my fifth favorite Liverpudlian, Alan Edge.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 19:35:13 CEST 2002 from m198214176085.austin.cc.tx.us (198.214.176.85)

Posted by:

Pehr

Subject: stage Fright

Charlie Young... I enjoyed that post about Stagefright. Sleeping is one of my favorite band compositions, When Richard gets going on some of those warm, resonant ballads I just fall out.

Though I agree "Strawberry Wine" borders on throwaway or at least filler material, as with you I like it just the same. For me it is garth and the Accordion, I believe. (I'm not sure what that is, that ebbulient flowing, happy sound back there.

Peter V said something yesterday that got me thinking about the production of records. Its the ensemble, the Part to whole of a work. some of the best records IMHO, if you listen to the musicians tracks separate you hear this weird stuff. Put it together though and its brilliant. I always liked this about the Ramones. Its not all about technique or skill of musicianship. I'm thinking of Garth for example. Though I recognize fully that he is one of the greatest musicians ever, its really his ability to do something with the sound of an accordian, the sound of a Jews Harp on cripple creek or the harmonica sound on TNTDODDD that speaks so much more than the mastery of the instrument. I Feel that way about Rick's bass as well. By not being a groove bassist he makes the song live in a different way. for me Ricks bass is like the diaphragm of the song, you can here it breathe, sigh, sniffle, chuckle , etc. in the spaces he fills and punctuates.

I think the album will probably be spoken of highly for the next time capsule. They were on a whole different path than the rest of the recordings of that time, always significant in defining the essence of Rock n' Roll whatever they did throughout their catalogue.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 18:51:10 CEST 2002 from t4o942p14.telia.com (195.252.33.134)

Posted by:

Ilkka

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: 9/11

May I take the opportunity through the medium of this fine website with its intrinsic North American and Global heart to pay respects to all innocent victims - in the US (as well as in Afghanistan) - of September the eleventh. As the son of the WW2 refugees my thoughts and my feelings are with you.



Entered at Wed Sep 11 18:04:15 CEST 2002 from 1cust73.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.73)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: STAGE FRIGHT Revisited

September 11, 1970 was the date I bought the album STAGE FRIGHT on a Friday afternoon following a day early in my junior year in high school. Thrty-two years later the album stands--as Peter Viney eloquently said--as an equal part of The Band's "triumvirate of masterpieces" (what does that make CAHOOTS, Peter?). A reviewer at the time used the word "autumnal" in describing the record, probably meaning songs with mature themes and musicianship that was unsurpassed then and now.

I dug my original copy of the album out of the basement last night and found a review tucked inside from the September 13, 1970 WASHINGTON POST, written by Tom Zito. It was the lead review of a batch of new releases from the time that included SUNFLOWER by the Beach Boys and albums from Eric Clapton, Leon Russell, Joe Cocker and others. I actually own most of those other recordings, though none has the timeless appeal of STAGE FRIGHT to me. There was always something about the crispness of the sound of the third album by The Band that drew me back time after time.

To me, the weakest song on STAGE FRIGHT is the first, "Strawberry Wine," sort of a diluted version of "Jemima Surrender," but fun nonetheless. Beneath the frivolity, though, is the dark undercurrent that runs through the entire song cycle. Spending all of one's money to "feel fine" sounds great, but around 1970 music stars started dropping like flies from living that philosophy. The "firewater on my breath" that turns up in the title track sounds ominous compared to "Strawberry Wine," a sort of reality check, day after hangover.

Though Zito liked the album and called it "a lot more upbeat than either of The Band's first two albums," he goes on to say that "it might easily be mistaken for a new Creedence Clearwater Revival" album." That seems simply silly all these years later. Maybe Mr. Zito was hitting the strawberry wine at the time. Anyway, he does qualify that by noting the "intricate interplay of sounds and feelings [and] the attitude of questioning that permeates the album."

The "upbeat" description is intesting, because if you look at the lyrics, there is lots of language dealing with death and dying plus several specific Biblical references laced with an overall spiritual, almost mystical aura--and a recurring theme of withdrawl from the worldly life into one surrounded by nature. In "All La Glory," the autumnal image is literal, with leaves turning color, and the promise of "finding a harmony." At the same time, the hopeful feel of that song (that ended side one on the LP) is coupled with the troubling image: "feel so tall, like a prison wall."

My two favorite songs from STAGE FRIGHT may be the ones co-written by Richard Mauuel--"Sleeping" and "Just Another Whistle Stop." The former is simply magnificent, with the repeated line, "we can leave all this hate before it's too late; why would we want to come back at all" bringing to mind Rip Van Winkle in those same Catskill Mountains that would turn up again in the next song, "Time to Kill." "Just Another Whistle Stop" uses a line that borrows from a classic cinema title ("Odd Man Out") just as the title track shares the name of a 1950 Hitchcock film about a murder.

Side two of the original LP ends on a hopeful note with the line in "The Rumor" with the promise, "it's a-coming--a brand new day," right out of the ending of GONE WITH THE WIND, while the repeated "close your eyes" section (sung so hauntingly by Richard) echoes "Sleeping" once again, while both foreshadow the eerie, eyes-closed photo that turned up on the cover of the CAHOOTS album.

I can't guarantee that people will still be fascinted with STAGE FRIGHT one hundred years from now, but I'm still captivated after 32.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 17:28:05 CEST 2002 from webport-cl6-cache2.ilford.mdip.bt.net (213.120.56.37)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Location: Liverpool

Subject: Respect and Condolences

May I take the opportunity through the medium of this fine website with its intrinsic North American heart to pay respects to all victims - living and dead - of September the eleventh. My thoughts and my feelings are with you all.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 16:24:20 CEST 2002 from 222.good.net (209.54.25.222)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: Good thoughts

On this tragic anniversary, I'm making it a point to send out nothing but thoughts of love and compassion, for victims and their families for all they've lost, as well as the twisted bastards who did the deed - to cleanse them of the anger and hate that drives men to unspeakable acts. May God have mercy on all of us and help our hearts and minds find peace in these difficult times.

Also, John Donabie, I'm sorry I neglected to say this earlier, but bless you, and may you find strength and healing in the love of others.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 16:24:02 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

September 11th

Strength, Healing, Liberty, Justice, Peace


Entered at Wed Sep 11 16:17:31 CEST 2002 from 222.good.net (209.54.25.222)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: oh please

Yeah, but you do a search on my email address that I used here for 3 + years, and the first thing you get is a link to one of my ancestor's websites, where I'm incorrectly identified as a grandson - by name.

It's hard not to chuckle at the "who me," protestations. Guess it must have been another "serge" who sent me emails awhile back from that same email address as those threatening missives last week.

Lil's right, the world is FULL of coincidences that astound.

Oh wait, I was right about that one too.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 15:55:21 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Seattle

Yes - The Commander and Chief is standing. Proudly declaring to America and America's enemy...

WE ARE NOT AFRAID ! WE ARE INTACT AND NOT AFRAID ! NOR SHALL WE SUBMIT !


Entered at Wed Sep 11 15:40:24 CEST 2002 from dialup-0896.dublin.iol.ie (193.203.147.128)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Like, was Shaggy a Dead-Head or what?

Whilst feeding two 5 year old boys (my son and his buddy) after school these days, I have to watch ÒScooby DooÓ on the Cartoon Network while they munch the lunch..........

Lo! and Behold and donÕt I hear the Theme Song (which I used to listen to myself as a kid in Queens).............

ÒScooby Dooby do..... WE GOT WORK TO DO!"

Reckon the session musicians in the Ô70ies doing that gig dug The Band and ÒGet Up Jake"?

.......maybe?

Ton Scherpenzeel!......try the link up there now....it should work this time. HereÕs hoping you enjoy what you see and hear!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 15:37:51 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Seattle

Silent prayers for your loved ones and my own....so far away. Let's us hold together at this sacred time in America's life. May God bless, protect and strengthen each and every one of us thru the years that remain.

Let us form one body, one heart, and defend to the last Warrior our country, our homes, our liberty and the graves of our fathers. ~ ~Tecumseh~ ~ Shawnee


Entered at Wed Sep 11 15:35:34 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: 911

Thoughts and prayers this morning.., watched about 5 minutes of the ceremony.., that's enough.., the day still is vivid.., I consider myself lucky as my wife was on the next train going in that morning.., I can only take small doses of watching the tragedy - I was glued for a week when it happened, so it's now glued in my brain.

Cheney goes away and Bush stays because it looks better for the President to stand in the face of terror, than hide in some bunker. You put the VP in hiding because in case something does happen, the chain of command stays intact. The President in the big glass window is symbolic of.., Here I am, Can you see me? I'm not afraid. It looks worse if Cheney is around and Bush goes in hiding.., the terrorists win in that case.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 14:30:17 CEST 2002 from host194.olysteel.com (63.91.50.194)

Posted by:

bob wigo

Subject: 9/11

Remembering Larry Senko, husband, father and friend to many. Too soon gone.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 14:22:48 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Garth on Letterman

Garth Hudson will be on Letterman Thursday night backing, I believe, Linda Thompson.....of "Richard and Linda Thompson" fame......as she releases her first album in 7 years on Rounder records.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 14:20:01 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond
Web: My link

Subject: see link


Entered at Wed Sep 11 12:40:17 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.26)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

The sound of bagpipes playing "Amazing Grace" on the clock radio as I awakened this morning....eerie.
Reflecting today on all the innocent lives taken on this day last year. No tv today. The picture in my head is still there..and will always be there.
Reflecting too, on those who mean the most to me in my life. Some are close, some are distant..but all are near to my heart.

Have a peaceful day everyone.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 12:31:38 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

Thanks Kalervo...

Remembering those lost......


Entered at Wed Sep 11 10:19:29 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-056.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.56)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: More on Dylan covers

I had forgotten ‘Don’t Ya Tell Henry’ was on Watkins Glen (good job that wasn’t the JEAPORDY question then), but then again for political considerations you’d want to balance ‘old Band’ and ‘new Band’ recordings as much as you could.

Ed- ‘Minstrel Boy’ was only a bonus track to make the Japanese edition unique – so should be missing from the US release to promote buying of two copies by fans. That’s the way it works nowadays.

The sort of label is one that’s good at getting diverse permissions – Platinum’s House of Blues label seems good at this!

Knocking on Heaven’s Door – it’s all the guests on Woodstock 994. The SNACK version has Dylan on (which takes away the point a bit) and The Byrds Tribute Band version is a bootleg- still a possible though.

Ben – I don’t disagree with you that The Band’s own stuff is n more interesting (except Tears of Rage) but as I have said before, my point of view is that I collect Dylan because of his Band association, rather than vice-versa :- )


Entered at Wed Sep 11 10:10:15 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Thank you Bassmanlee...there's nothin' in the world like a good bassman...


Entered at Wed Sep 11 09:45:16 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

Ed Blayzor

Location: New York

Subject: Joan Osborne

I heard Joan Osborne covering "The Weight" on the radio today, the DJ said it`s from her new cd of all covers called How Sweet It Is due out next week......Peter V. i made a cd-r last year of the exact list you posted minus Minstrel Boy.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 09:35:01 CEST 2002 from (194.100.60.132)

Posted by:

Kalervo

Location: Finland

Subject: Appreciating

Neil D.: I really appreciate that you are so considerate. Thank you!

To be able to re-think is one of the best characters in a human being (not saying that I was right and you were wrong in this matter, Neil). This brings to my mind Nat Hentoff, who is still kicking strong in Village Voice. He used to put down John Coltrane' s music when something happened and he became one of the best known J.C. fans. He even wrote the liner notes to some John' s albums. This is telling me that Nat is for real, not just another critic who can never admit that he/she is sometimes wrong...

I really hope that Autumn in New York can be played some day without any side-thoughts. It is my favorite Frank Sinatra song. My prayers are for you.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 09:20:06 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

Ed Blayzor

Location: New York

Subject: Joan Osborne

I heard Joan Osborne doing a cover of "The Weight" on the radio today, the DJ said it`s from her new cd of all covers called How Sweet It Is due out next week.....Peter V. last year i made a cd-r of the exact list you posted minus Minstrel Boy.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 08:12:03 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

Subject: Ahhh a music site after all

Kalervo...on July 3rd I posted about understanding 9/11, I have never ripped anyone in here until then, it sometimes takes me a while to see the error of my ways, I apoligize for taking an earlier post of your's out of context, I sometimes need to read between the lines, I know that it has been a while, but I assure you I'm sincere..

Dave Z.. very nice post about Garth, you have a way of painting a descriptive picture of the event...

Nice to see the talent of many of you in here be put into what this site is for...


Entered at Wed Sep 11 07:47:49 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Clarification

The " Why don't you crawl back under that bridge" line was in reference to the Troll I learned about in kid's books. Not in any way meant as a derogatory comment aimed at our homeless population. Some of my best friends are living on the street.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 07:17:57 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-116-125.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.116.125)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: More BandTV?

Did anyone see Jimmy Fallon on Conan O'Brien tonight? Did he say something about "singing like Levon" when he was talking about lip-synching at the 9/11 concert, or did I mishear it?

Pete, I was cracking up back when Dubya announced his so-called War on Terrorism last year: Cheney was in an undisclosed secret location, and Bush was sitting in front of a big picture window! Guess it shows who they think is more important.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 07:09:42 CEST 2002 from hvc-24-164-169-94.hvc.rr.com (24.164.169.94)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Oh-my Ohmar

Ohmar, shmo-mar....you hide behind who-knows-what in the name of the everlasting....

Band connection? I suggest you follow the link above, download Tramp in the Street, and check these wonderful folks feelings 'bout the down 'n out.

Connection? Jack Elliot showed up on what he described to this rambler as one of the worst days of his life and did a song at The Band's show at Santa Rosa, Ca, spring of '96.

We here have true love 'n kindness in our hearts.....


Entered at Wed Sep 11 07:02:01 CEST 2002 from parachute2-156-40-65-195.net.nih.gov (156.40.65.195)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Subject: Henry

Pat Brennan - My guess is that Henry from Watkins Glen is a studio cut with crowd sounds added - sounds familiar, huh? My recollection is that the arrangement is unlike the versions from the shows mentioned, but does place it around the time of the Brown album.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 07:00:57 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Seattle

Hey Moo-la _ Why don't we just hook up an electric cattle prod to your testicles and laugh our asses off while you cry out to your great god allah to save ya. Crawl back under that bridge...

Keep safe tomorrow everyone.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 06:30:56 CEST 2002 from 1cust193.tnt17.nyc9.da.uu.net (63.25.125.193)

Posted by:

Mullah Omar

Location: Somewhere Else

Subject: The Creator

God is GREAT!!!!!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 06:16:19 CEST 2002 from (12.162.211.130)

Posted by:

Pete Rivard

Location: Hastings, MN

Subject: music and technology

I hosted an event by a group called Xplor at Dunwoody today. They're basically the users group for digital document creators and data wranglers...anyway, scoping out the mini-trade show portion of the event I fell to talking with a rep from a company called "rimage" (pronounced re mahj'). They sell this neat concept that links databases of any digital variety with CD or DVD burners which also include a 1200 d.p.i. inkjet printer mechanism that prints photographic quality full color images right on the CD with archival ink. http://www.rimage.com

Well, the conversation turned to music, as conversations are want to do, and he related the story of some band who has a recorded body of forty or fifty songs. Instead of selling CD's from the stage, they pass out songlists and, for $15.00, you get your choice of any ten tunes on their list, in the set order of your choice, with a personalized message on the label of the CD. For $25.00 you get your picture of you posing with the band, or your favorite band member, taken digitally at the gig, on the label.

Now that's a way to build a following. Hop their music's as good as their business savvy.

On a separate note, I just heard they're hustling Dick Cheney off to an undisclosed secure location. Now what the hell are we supposed to think about that, we that have to go about our business in plain sight and in public tomorrow and every other day? a. He's more important than the president, and this country needs him more?(!) b. he's nothing but a big puss. I say we hustle Bush off to an undisclosed, secure location and strap Cheney's sorry ass in the chair immediately behind the desk in the Oval Office and train a webcam on him all day tomorrow. See how bad he really wants that job. If he can't show up for the job he was elected for (and don't get me started on the election) then he shouldn't have run in the first place.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 05:16:49 CEST 2002 from dialup-67.28.47.103.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (67.28.47.103)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

JKatz, hence the question mark. Never have been able to place it. Doesn't sound like the two shows we know were well recorded (Woodstock, Isle of Wight). Any guesses, anyone?


Entered at Wed Sep 11 04:47:21 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-110.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.110)

Posted by:

Serge

Subject: TO DAVE Z

Yes that was me. I knew you were coming, but I couldn't spot you. You should have made yourself know if you saw me. It's a shame because a few of us local musicians and oldtimers who knew Garth when Moby Dick was still a minnow, spent a couple of hours with Garth and Maud backstage. But don't despair, Maud and Garth will be back. John D: sorry you couldn't come. Hope you're feeling better. Yesterday Maud and Garth visited the University. Today they were in Toronto at the International Film Festival. Maud knew that you were coming Dave, and had asked me if I knew you and had seen you. All the cameras that you saw there were for a reason. Ask Jan H. for my Email. I don't know yours, and asking a search engine to find a "Dave Z" won't get me anything. Just like I'm sure it wouldn't help find a "MattK". Don't try any email ads. for me that you see tossed around here. They're not mine.

I am sorry we didn't connect. Next time perhaps.

P.S. Apparently the reason Garth didn't play the keyboard that was on the piano was because it was a loaner and Garth didn't have time to program, or try out. He thaught maybe he would play it...but decided otherwise. Besides, what he did do with piano and accordion was fantabulous, and Maud sang like an angel... Lance Anderson's review is much more eloquent than anything that I might have written. By the way, Garth is supposed to be on the Letterman show backing some singer this Thursday the 12th.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 04:44:50 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-002masprip0476.dialsprint.net (63.186.73.222)

Posted by:

G-Man

Jtullfan,,,,,,,ah,,,Schmeenge Bros.!!! Maybe that video'd be good to watch tomorrow! Take away some of the hostility that still lingers over 9/11 and how soft this nation became! Mr. Viney nice explanation re. groove and fill bassists!!!! Speakin of BASS PLAYERS,,,ya gotta CHECK OUT JIM WEIDER BAND"S, ALBERT ROGERS!!! NOW,,that kid is one funky player!!!! He and Rando really to some funky rhythm!! Dave Z....U R a lucky RW, by the sound of your report!!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 04:21:29 CEST 2002 from parachute3-156-40-62-191.net.nih.gov (156.40.62.191)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Subject: Dylan Covers

Wait a minute! What about "Don't Ya Tell Henry" from the ROA reissue?

And for bonus tracks I suggest "See You Later Allan Ginsberg" or "I'm Your Teenage Prayer" both from the GBTs - they were more collaborative, so to speak.

Pat Brennan: "Don't Ya Tell Henry" from Watkins Glen the CD, but was it from Watkins Glen the place?

JAKE1118: Its well worth $37 Canadian! So...Get up Jake its late in the morning, the rain is pourin' and we got work to do.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 04:06:50 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity (by way of Edge City)

Subject: lots of stuff..

This album being put together here today sounds great! I personally have 14 hundred bucks I would gladly throw in the pot to help get it paid for. There's this guy across the street who was selling a powder blue 1959 Ford with the most gorgeous chrome I have ever seen. He sold it right out from under me.(I asked him to wait) I think we should all make a little financial contribution to this dream and when the thing is released, It can say "Paid for by Love"

Amanda _ I had a call from my aunt Dorothy who lives in North Carolina. She said there was a terrible storm down there. Hope you're alright....

Mr. Donabie _ Thanks for the buffer.....

Ben - just for you: From roz to Lil...

"Sweet Pee-ches...where ya been all daa-ey?...

Looove yo' peaches Mama...Where ya' been all daa-ey?....

...Wanna taste yo' pee-ches.... Why yooo stay a-waa-ey?......." Hug Lil

Mr. Hoiberg - Thank You Sir.

I just heard the weirdest thing on the news... Buzz Aldrin punched some guy on the street. The guy walked up to him with a Bible in his hand and asked Mr. Aldrin to sware on the Bible that he had walked on the moon. Buzz Aldrin decked the guy!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 03:46:59 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Oh yeah - thanks Don for the reply. I don't know who the hell is using peoples names from the GB to send possibly tainted e-mails - but it sucks, and must certainlly be illegal. Has anyone else gotten any - or has some schmuck got it in for me?

I worked in the city today. It felt a little weird to driving in, even though it's Sept 10th. There was a session of the United Nations, so 2nd Ave. had alot of cops all down it. By the time I left the city they had declared an "orange" stage of alert. There was also a Police presence at the Midtown tunnel, just like last Sept. When I got to the Queens side I looked down at lower Manhattan. It's still hard to believe......... The Empire State Building looked especially beautiful today for some reason.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 03:38:16 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

It's interesting how some find Stage Fright not as "flowing" as the first two. I find SF flows great, and when it reached the end I'm disappointed and have often started it right from the top again.....Rick's bass is fantastic on the whole album. Peter mentioned the fact that it's a fretless bass he's playing, which is obvious. I love the fills he does on the intro, and breaks parts on "Shape I'm In" - and the exhale that Richard? does on those same breaks. It's just a great album.

Patricia = I had a strong feeling that Rosalind was you a while back - I really did. I figured it wasn't worth trying to find out - or "out" you. You seemed to be having a good time and staying cool. As Patricia I always thought you we're OK until you went over-the-top. Take Lil's advice. Hang out, stay cool, join in.

Speaking of Lil - I gotta say - that was beautiful the way you handled that whole Rosalind/Patricia thing a few posts back. I think it shows why you are "good people"........Just wanted to say that.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 02:49:47 CEST 2002 from ac819a69.ipt.aol.com (172.129.154.105)

Posted by:

O'Toole

Subject: Jeopardy

A while ago I was watching Jeopardy when, to my surprise, a $200 question in the "Rock Music" category popped up a question something to the effect of "This Band had a hit with the song "Up on Cripple Creek." My heart sank as the milliseconds ticked away. "Sons of Bitches!" I hurled all manner of curses and remote control batteries at the screen as the final buzzer tolled. No one even attempted an answer! It is a sad day for rock and roll. Thank God I know the answer.


Entered at Wed Sep 11 02:26:33 CEST 2002 from 1cust148.tnt1.fredericksburg2.va.da.uu.net (63.36.6.148)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: The Band on JEOPARDY!

None of the three contestants knew the name of the band who recorded "Up on Cripple Creek" tonight on JEOPARDY. Canadian native Alex Trebeck looked pretty disappointed...

Nice to see STAGE FRIGHT coming up again as this month marks the thirty-second anniversary of the US release. I hope to have some pithy comments tomorrow but need to listen to the gold disc version in the car while I run out to buy some new parts for a toilet (that beats watching TV).


Entered at Wed Sep 11 01:11:24 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

PV, I say the hell with the music, none of Band's Dylan covers(save "Tears of Rage") are among their best, most interesting music anyway.

What I want is more exciting, erroticly tinged interplay between Dimond Lil and Ros, you have know idea what this is doing for my fantasy life, keep it up girls!


Entered at Wed Sep 11 00:41:27 CEST 2002 from modem025.phl-tc03b.fcc.net (63.121.117.112)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

For the record, the Fall issue of Sing Out! (p. 151) contains a short review of the recently re-issued Danko, Fjeld, Anderson release "One More Shot". And I quote:

This Appleseed release reissues the wonderful album Jonas Fjeld, Eric Andersen and the late Rick Danko recorded in 1991, previously a 1993 Rykodisk stateside release. Highlights then and now are numerous: Danko singing Andersen's gorgeous "Blue River" and the Danko/Andersen collaboration "Drift Away", to name but two.

The big story here, though, is the second CD, a 72 minute audie (audience DAT tape) of a July 20, 1991 appearance at the Molde International Jazz fesitval in Norway. Four of the studio album's songs recur here, a definite plus as they take on new shadings in the live show. Danko takes lead on several songs he first sung with The Band including the rare favorite "Twilight". Andersen pulls out chestnuts like "Sheila," "Baby I'm Lonesome" and "Hey Babe, Have You Been Cheatin'." Fjeld's songs are the equal of his compadres. Danko called him "a Norwegian treasure" and Andersen has echoed these sentiments. The sound is a bit raw, but the performances are wonderful.

If you already own the studio album, I recommend you get the new reissue for the bonus disk and treat a friend to your old copy as a gift. Two birds with one stone. (end quote)

P.S. Roz, I hear you. I admit, I don't go back that far...but, please, stick around. As one of my old friends used to say, "Edge City? If you ain't been there, you ain't never gonna understand..."


Entered at Tue Sep 10 23:58:05 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-118-47.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.118.47)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

The Band did "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" on the Woodstock '94 broadcast with Roger McGuinn, and Jorma Kaukonen, Jack Cassidy and Bruce Hornsby might have been on it (they all played with The Band, I can't remember if they were all on that song). But I don't think the CD should be in chronological order, it should be sequenced by what tracks work best together. Then we can e-mail Quentin Ryan at Breeze Hill to get to work.

Maybe the perpetually bankrupting K-Tel, or some other such sleazy label, can do a "The Band Plays Dylan" CD, and just put all of the Planet Waves tracks on it!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 23:40:57 CEST 2002 from user-11218f8.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.161.232)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

"Dontcha Tell Henry" from Watkins Glen?


Entered at Tue Sep 10 23:09:39 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-170.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.170)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: The Band does Dylan Right

John D: Dave posted it while I was typing it, such is the speed of the web, and Dave also chose the right title for it, but to add more detail, I’ll repeat it (as it’s already typed!): OK, so here it is. No bootlegs. :
1 You Ain’t Going Nowhere – The Basement Tapes, by Bob Dylan & The Band
2 Nothing Was Delivered – The Basement Tapes by Bob Dylan & The Band
3 Tears of Rage – Big Pink by The Band
4 This Wheel’s On Fire – Big Pink by The Band
5 I Shall Be Released – Big Pink by The Band
6 When I Paint My Masterpiece – Cahoots by The Band
7 Blind Willie McTell – Jericho by The Band
8 I Must Love You Too Much – High on the Hog by The Band
9 Forever Young – High on the Hog by The Band
10 One Too Many Mornings – Tangled Up in Blues by The Band
11 Don’t Ya Tell Henry – Broadcasts Vol 4, KGSR, Radio Austin, 4 May 1996, by The Band
12 Long Distance Operator by The Band (various possibles here)
13 This Wheel’s on Fire (#2) – Times Like These, by Rick Danko
14 When I Paint My Masterpiece (#2)- Dylan 30th Anniversary Tribute by The Band
15 Highway 61 Revisited – Great Drives, by Levon Helm
BONUS TRACK
16 Minstrel Boy – Self Portrait, by Bob Dylan & The Band
And Dave’s right. ONLY Bob gets to do the cover picture. The hassle will be getting the new Band and old Band to appear on the same album. Never been done before.

Has anyone noticed, now that we’re discussing music, how people like Jonathan Katz and Joe and others have reappeared? There may be a lesson here …


Entered at Tue Sep 10 23:06:53 CEST 2002 from cpe014120014212.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (24.101.159.214)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JAKE BUY IT

JAKE BUY IT! But go throught HMV Canada. www.hmv.com It will be in Canadian dollars which is a lot less than your dollar and it should end up costing you around $26.00 American with shipping....I think.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:56:04 CEST 2002 from 56k-la-01-28.dial.qnet.com (209.221.212.91)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

The Bob Dylan Tribute Album we want to hear, or The Band Does Dylan Right

Tears Of Rage

I Shall Be Released

This Wheel's On Fire

When I Paint My Masterpiece

Blind Willie McTell

Love You Too Much

Don't Ya Tell Henry

Forever Young

One Too Many Mornings

Long Distance Operator

Highway 61 Revisited

Maybe Bob could paint the album cover.(CD artwork as it were) kinda like BP.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:51:48 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-202-static.surferz.net (64.80.53.202)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

I have Rick, Richard and Gene Clark doing an amazing version of 'Knockin on Heaven's Door'......

(Maybe we need to make this a triple cd?)


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:44:00 CEST 2002 from (137.187.144.172)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Subject: Dylan covers

There is a Rick Danko boot called something like "Unplugged at the Wetlands" that has a version of "Forever Young" that segues into "Wish You Were Here Tonight" which should be on the Dylan covers album.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:37:29 CEST 2002 from (12.33.53.2)

Posted by:

JAKE1118

Location: Long Island

Subject: Manuel's Live Album

Has anyone heard this 'Whispering Pines' album by the late, great Richard Manuel. He was my favorite BAND member and I would like to know if the album is worth the hefty price ($37 ...I realize it is a Japanese import). Jake1118


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:27:12 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Covers/Viney

Peter, I just caught the post that says this wraps it up. For those of us to kept up on this......anyone care to post the final tunes includes Jan's great clincher

Dave Z. You'll never know how envious I am. I hope that Maude and Garth will put out the recorded version of the show (with maybe a few bonus surprises) that Lance recorded on Sunday night. BTW for those who do not know him......Lance Anderson is the right person for this job.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 22:03:21 CEST 2002 from pub24.lrc.swt.edu (147.26.108.138)

Posted by:

Pehr

Location: wrayville

Subject: various

Still on my Link binge but got curious, then very happy to see the cordiality back here!

John D., best to you.

Dave Z. I'm so jealous. thanks for the report.

David Powell, thanks! I'll get with ya soon.

Stage Fright: Great album IMHO, though different from the 1st two masterpieces, It's still so resonant, timeless. I enjoy the appreciation of Rick's work on this album being spoke of this time around. I was addicted to this album almost a year when I first heard it. Discovering the music of the Band was like being caught in an avalanche, and the depth of the fallout is something I hope I never get out from under it.

Richards voice on "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" sounds like I'd imagine the voice of the Great Spirit would sound when he comes in with "The Sacred Harp was handed down..."


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:55:52 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: High On The Hog

I loved the first 1/2 of Hog when it first came out, then pretty much forgot about it. Recently I've really come to appreciate the album and think it was underated severely. You have Garth's wonderful hornwork: does any Band album feature more of it? Back to Memphis is beautiful, and High Price of Love, overlooked by me at first, is a really funky good little song. The outtake Youngblood, which should have been included, has a basement tapes fun feel to it, like they recorded a song to have fun over a pint of beer rather than the intention of releasing it. Plus, it has the rarest of the rare: a Garth vocal part!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:54:18 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-001.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.1)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Dylan covers …

Jan fixed it - with 'Highway 61' I reckon we finallyhave enough for an album. It doesn't need to be 79 minutes. Quality over quantity. All we need now is a label and someone with contacts to run down the permissions … seriously, this IS a good idea!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:35:38 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Ton Scherpenzeel

Hank :

sometimes the GB resembles to the Jerry Springer Show : It makes me sad
sometimes the GB resembles to Speakers Corner : It makes me angry
sometimes the GB talk about The Band and related topics : It makes me happy

Please, I'de never been able to open the Site (My link) in your post below (http://hankwedel.com/), I'm behind a proxy, i just obtain the message:
'You are using a Browser which does not forward all the information the Server needs.' didn't find a solution . am I missing something worthy ?


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:17:16 CEST 2002 from wireless-cl02-163.halden.net (195.70.189.163)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan covers

What about Levon's wonderful version of "Highway 61 Revisited" from the _Great Drives_ TV documentary? Recorded in the Sam Phillips recording studio in Memphis in '95 with some brilliant musicians.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:13:03 CEST 2002 from wcs1-pent.nipr.mil (198.26.74.99)

Posted by:

Nick

Location: Virginia

Subject: Forever Young

The Band's version of Forever Young (dedicated to Garcia) on High on the Hog may seem a little redundant since they played it on Planet Waves and the Last Waltz. They didn't sing the song however and that's why I'm glad they did it nearly 25 years after Planet Waves. Levon, Rick (doing a nice little Dylan impersonation) and Randy trading vocals is a nice touch with Garth's playing elevating the song as well. The Last Waltz version is my personal fav but the High on the Hog take is definitely sweet for me as well. I saw the Band do it in Trenton, NJ and it was great. They were joined on stage by none other than Steven Segal (that was strange, I thought I was tripping) who was making Fire Down Below with Levon. The Band played after driving all day from Vermont (they were an hour late setting up). They proceded to tear that place up good. I mean they were tight boy! After the show they signed autographs at the bus for another hour or so. I'll never forget it. How many groups do that? Those guys were cool as shit. I looked for the set list here but didn't see it. I do remember they closed with a hot Willie and the Hand Jive. I really miss Levon's voice. He could really sing it. What a shame. High On the Hog is a little maligned maybe 'cause "Free Your Mind" is on it, but there are some really good songs on there. I think "Back To Memphis" is awesome and Rick's singing on "Where I should Always Be" is unbelieveable, really special. In fact the only song I don't like is "Free Your Mind", everything else is pretty darn good INMHO. I kind of rambled here, but what the heck, that's why this page is here I guess.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:10:10 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: nj
Web: My link

Subject: What About..,

Does Rick and Bob's, This Wheels On Fire count? Could be Rick's contribution from his Times Like These cd. Or was it mentioned already and i missed it.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:09:21 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Dylan Covers

PV: One good thing about memory loss: Look at all the great music to rediscover! Now, lessee. Barnburners: The recent Summer Days from Love & Theft. Good beat, and the great applicable line 'I know a place something's still going on!' would be a great self reference for them. For Robbie: Tangled Up in Blue. I'm not a great fan of his vocals but I think his voice would work well with this piece, as well as his guitar. Garth: A favorite of both of ours: Senior, if only to hear him interpret the sax parts. The whole thing could be a Garthified instrumental!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:06:31 CEST 2002 from dialup-0593.dublin.iol.ie (193.203.146.81)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: There will be Peace in The GB..........

Hmmmn....What's all this?

Just scrolled up and down The GB and found everyone to be cool and discussing music and gigs!

.......and that idea of an album of The Band covering Dylan songs is very serious indeed..........


Entered at Tue Sep 10 21:04:54 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

Classic Masters by Robbie Robertson has been playing on my cd player for some time. I edit out "Sacrifice" and "The Sound Is Fading", and I end up getting a great Robbie cd that blends well unlike a lot of compilations. My only regret is that the extra mile was not taken to obtain the rights to soundtrack cuts and unreleased tracks.

By the way, if you remember the Makin' A Noise film about Robbie, there was a segment where Robbie plays with a local musician in a garage. Well the kid's name was Derek Miller I believe, and he has just been signed by SOAR records to record his debut record.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 20:52:26 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-165.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.165)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Dylan covers by The Band

Shit! How did I miss not only Forever Young, but One too Many Mornings -I even did an article on The Band's version of the latter! This is a bad sign of ageing! Plus Long Distance Operator. We're so near an album, but as Pat says, not quite there. There is a solution - Let Robbie, Garth & Levon + The Barnburners choose one song each and cover it! OK, that opens it up to suggestions … who does what?


Entered at Tue Sep 10 20:51:10 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.75)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Roz: Consider the hatchet buried. You seem to be a person, who by your own words, really wants to just 'fit in'. Know how to do that? Just be _yourself_! You'll find that most of the folks in here are very nice, genuine people.. alot of whom have become leery of someone who hasn't been very 'genuine' in return. You seem to have a good sense of humor and a good heart..use them to be part of this community.. not to alienate yourself from it. Your last post (about The music of The Band) was very nice. Thanks.

Dave Z: Thanks for sharing your weekend in Ontario with us! Sounds like it was a wonderful time. Wish I could've been there. Garth and Maud never disappoint!

Have a good night everyone.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 20:21:47 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Location: Toronto

Stage Fright: The first two songs I heard were "The Shape I'm In" and "Time To Kill" - not sure which order, but probably "Time To Kill" given the info in Peter's message. John Donabie played one then the other fairly religiously on Toronto's second top-40 station, CKFH. (I was not yet cool enough to listen to the 'underground stuff on FM.)

This may not be the case elsewhere, but around here "Shape I'm In" has among the best 'legs' of all the Band's songs. The reformed Crowbar, when they play, play that song. A few weeks ago, near Belleville, I saw a pair of aging rockers with acoustic guitars play it in the park where the village fair was being held. Sounded great, as always - I think because it's one of those songs that nobody can destroy.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 19:55:38 CEST 2002 from 56k-la-01-42.dial.qnet.com (209.221.212.105)

Posted by:

Dave the Phone Guy

Location: Mono LakeDave

Dave Z.,,,,,,thanks for relating such an inspiring experience.I believe a Garth Hudson show would be all that you experienced.Everybody attends concerts hoping to participate in the majic(unexplainable qualities)of the music. Every performance does not always reach that "peak", but I'd guess Mr.Hudson's do.

Are we agreeing that Stagefright is a damn fine record.I always liked it.Peter V. brings up a good point about the great bass playing on that album.That unexplainable quality exists in Rick Danko's bass playing.He's not a groove bassist,that's for sure.Peter's comparison of Rick's and McCartney's bass playing styles as compared to Duck Dunn's is valid.As far as Danko being the best singing rock bassist, I bet you won't be able to stir controversy with that statement in this guestbook.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 19:10:41 CEST 2002 from user-11219do.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.165.184)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Peter, "Long Distance Operator" from the BP reissue would qualify. Still not enough for a CD.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 18:15:33 CEST 2002 from (216.88.34.18)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Band Dylan Covers

PV: you left off High on the Hog's cover of Forever Young (was that the most unnecessary, if unnoffensive, cover ever?)and, perhaps the last Band recording ever, 1999's fine version of One Too Many Mornings ?


Entered at Tue Sep 10 17:49:20 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-048.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.48)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Best wishes …

Very best wishes indeed to John D. Get well soon.

Pat got me thinking - Is there a full disc worth of Dylan-written songs by The Band without Dylan himself appearing on them along the lines of 'The Byrds play Dylan' or 'The Hollies play Dylan'?( I mean excluding Self Portrait, Basement tapes, Planet Waves and Before The Flood tour) I make it:
Tears of Rage, I Shall Be Released, 'This Wheel's On Fire', When I Paint My Masterpiece, Blind Willie McTell and Love You Too Much - five definitive versions, better in every case than the Dylan ones plus one that really wasn't worth covering at all. There's a few 90s live versions of 'Don't Ya Tell Henry'- one was on a radio station CD once, I think. You could legitimately include BT versions of 'You Ain't Going Nowhere' and 'Nothing was Delivered'. Then wouldn't you be scraping around odd solo things? (Not that I can think of any). I've deliberately avoided walking to the CD shelf to check so will be happily surprised if I've forgotten some.

Stage Fright bonus tracks- the bonus 'Daniel' is just learming the song. The bonus Time to Kill is a stunner though.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 17:40:09 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Subject: Maud & Garth Show in London

First off, I'm not qualified... no way no how... to rationally discuss the "phenomena" I experienced Sunday night... I just feel so damn lucky I was able to put all my remaining concert going eggs into this one basket... and then negotiate a good deal on the homefront...

And I'm not gonna give any good details either... especially if there is a possibility that this show might come out on video or tape... So I'll try to "allude" to some things not pointed out in the other reviews...

The wait before the show was a non-issue to me... The Hudsons were extremely respectful to the audience in their performance... A beautiful song was played for 9/11 victims and Maud was choked up introducing it... Garth also dedicated "It Makes No Difference" to Rick... I liked his specific phrasing, again very respectful to the times... but I'll spare the details... There was a humorous side to the wait though... most of the nice folks were a little older than me... and the ushers offered chairs at one point... I myself passed on the chair even though I followed up my 15 hour drive with a night on the town and a little too much to drink... To me it was some great unintentional tension building for what was an awesome show... And years from now the folklore will grow and we will find out things like kids were born while in line and now they have their stories to share... and for sure someone will assert those big candles were actually burning brightly... yeah, I didn't see anybody complaining on the way out...

The obligatory expected Band covers were anything but that... I don't know what Garth does to get that orchestra sound on piano but... whew!!!... My favorite cover was... Blind Willie McTell where Maud sang as if she was telling us a secret... boy, I don't want to say anymore... The Weight, It Makes No Diiference, The Breakers... I left wondering if they could have done each cover four or five substantially different ways one better than the next...

There was also instances where a song you might have expected to hear played on one intrument was played brilliantly on an unexpected one... Old Lang Syne was played partly on stage and partly back offstage... as a great close... after exiting...

And my guess is that anybody who's labeled Garth as just a wild and crazy improv guy... well, these traditional or conventional minded folks must have been blown away... the depth of emotion in his playing and Maud's singing was incredible... not to mention the technical degree of difficulty... nothing sloppy here... Garth was taking his music test in front of God... and we got to witness... God also laughed at the coal mine joke... A+ but keep preaching to the masses... now say a Hail Mary for too much fun with Danko... and be on your way...

This was a multiple audience kind of show... homage was paid to London for sure... and those who know alot about music even if not there... but there was also slapstick flying everywhere too... and even if you don't know what he is doing technically... you sure felt it... I wonder what a classical pianist would have thought?... probably "great but not as good as so-and-so"... and that's not bad because there is just not one audience that covers it all... you have to consider how it plays to each maybe...

The bad bad accordian jokes were all the more funnier... because he usually stopped on the dime... after something amazing... Romania Tourism better get in touch before some other country trys to brand themselves as being Garth-like... and Apple better get in touch with Maud... I got a silver one... hey, I want a black one now too...

Finally, I know it's billed as Garth Hudson... and I don't even want to disrespect that... but this is a team performance... if it comes out on video or CD, Maud will definitely get her due... and you will be able to enjoy a bit of their wonderful relationship together... God Bless them...

btw Serge, I Iooked for you... and think I spotted you before the show... were you dressed in all tan?... I was way up front in line... I was so blown away by the show I even forgot to take pictures... and my shyness must have got the best of me afterwards... or maybe I just didn't know where to wait... anyway, it's not the last social opportunity I'll probably fumble on... definitely my loss... I lingered outside in the hallway for a little while hoping to see somebody... and then I hit the streets to work off the good energy...

Maybe later I'll post about my Saturday night adventure... or revisit down the road if no CD or video comes out.... As an painter, my mind logs and remembers all the visual dance going on... and it was great stuff... Awesome show!!!... Don't miss them if you get a chance... I pleaded with wattresses, bartenders and even a local piano player to buy a ticket... but I guess Garth so far has been able to allude the categorization required to ensure good marketing... if a video or CD comes out, that will change for sure...


Entered at Tue Sep 10 17:33:55 CEST 2002 from 24-196-232-39.charterga.net (24.196.232.39)

Posted by:

Don Pugatch

Location: Roswell, Ga

Subject: Live Music

Bayou, did not email you, be careful, so many virus's going on, like I said, be careful, guess that is why we don't put our address on the site anymore.

On the live scene, Buddy and Julie Miller coming back on Sept 28, last time, excellent and sold out and packed, have already got the tixs to the show, opener is Steve Forbet, well, somethings just can't be perfect. Doubt that Larry Campbell will be there, since he must be touring with Bob again.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 16:58:33 CEST 2002 from user-11219hq.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.166.58)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Lil, a fair bit of detecting, no doubt.

There's a very interesting article in the Chicago Tribune today, available in a restricted form on their website (you have to register to read it). "Time Passes Slowly" does a roundup of musicians who have covered Bob Dylan, and the boys are mentioned prominently. Despite the usual factual problems, the article is extremely complimentary and urges someone/anyone to issue a disc of The Band covering Dylan.

And I join all here in wishing the best for John D. Hang in.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 16:26:57 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

franko

Location: boston

Subject: Jonathan Katz

Jonathan. I e-mailed you yesterday and I must have an old address. Please e-mail me at fjdpele@aol.com if you can.

Thanks, Frank


Entered at Tue Sep 10 15:53:27 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: G-Man, still out here?

I had this notion to check out the GB archives of 9/10-9/11 of last year. Kind of depressing; no need to go do it yourself. But anyway, on 9/10, before events disrupted this particular thread, G-Man and I were discussing John Candy's and Eugene LEvy's The Last Polka, featuring the Schmenge Brothers. Well, G-Man, I am sorry it got lost in the shuffle. I believe I left my video copy in my mom's possession, as it meant a lot to her. I will be in her area on business shortly, and was considering rummaging her closets for it. Are you still interested in a copy if I can locate it?


Entered at Tue Sep 10 15:51:44 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-108.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.108)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: STAGE FRIGHT

OK, more on why Stage Fright is one of a triumvirate of masterpieces. Read through the recent remaster sleeve notes by Rob Bowman, which have some excellent quotes. Bowman makes a point about the bass playing quoting Rick, ‘You kind of slide around, playing a little softer with more half-shades.’ Then put on the album. ‘Strawberry Wine’ might be a minor song in the Band’s canon, but the bass playing on this is one of Rick’s finest moments – until you continue and discover that the bass on every song is extraordinary. Rick Danko’s just claim to be considered one of the ultimate rock bassists is proven on this album. I recall a while back Butch said that ‘Rick wasn’t a groove bass player’ which caused a storm at the time, but the guy who listened to him play more live than any of us have, was right. Rick didn’t play like (e,g.) Duck Dunn. Listen to Duck Dunn on “Respect” then Rick on this album. They’re poles apart but both brilliant bass players presenting us with great bass lines. Rick is like McCartney in the way he senses and fills the spaces in the song – the way the bass massages the direction of the song. Groove bass players set something down and the song follows.

Years ago I had a long discussion with someone who knew a great deal about music theory and he pointed out that one of the Band’s joys was ‘imprecision’. I didn’t understand at the time, but since, reading more on theory by Howard Goodall you realize that the notes and intervals are not a law of the universe, but something that people came to agree on. My theorist friend pointed out that the fretless bass is always imprecise, or as Rick Danko said ‘finds the half-shades’. Richard’s vocal is magic because he hovers around the note. Levon’s drumming is never metronomic and (as he says on his drumming video) just drags the beat. Garth – well, everything finds new areas. Listening to Stage Fright today, I think I see what he meant. There are so many moments of magic – just listen to the drums on ‘The Rumor.’

Posterity – I don’t know. Joe’s brought up a good one. We discussed this before. There were periods in theatre history where Cymbeline and The Merry Wives of Windsor were seen as the twin peaks of Shakespeare’s achievment. In fact from 1616 until the early 1950s ‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’ was one of his most popular and most performed plays.

So what will the future see as the best of The Band? While they existed until 1996 three Stage Fright songs were a near certainty from any live show, meaning it was the most highly represented of their classic early albums. I’d hope that the musicologists of the 22nd century will be enjoying Stage Fright as much as the first two. Of course, by then ‘The Moon Struck One’ might be considered their finest moment, and my obscure internet ramblings on its lyrics (written a mere 30 years after the event) be presented to the world for the ridicule they deserve.

btw, the recent stuff here on ‘Stage Fright’ is a bit more what it used to be like!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 15:45:39 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Pick Purnell

Web: My link

Susan: You can read in the webpage refered to by (My link):
'Sit This One Out' - Writer: Pick Purnell. Can’t blame anyone for not knowing what a Pick Purnell song is supposed to sound like, since none of us had ever heard one.

Try Also
http://www.popmatters.com/music/reviews/b/burkesolomon-dont.shtml


Entered at Tue Sep 10 15:33:26 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind (patricia)

Diamond Lil _ You have finally made me cry. Now, sweet sister, may we bury the hatchet?

I want everyone to know Patricia never threatened Mr. Hoiberg. She's trying to remember back thru the fog but she is almost positive that did not happen. Ms Lil, If you kept those couple of messages that were passed back and forth, as innocent as they were, you have more problems than Patricia ever had.

I am not here to damage anything. I am here because The Band gave me something to embrace. I was, and am still am, touched in a way that no other music has ever touched me. There was a rawness in me from childhood that I did not understand. It was a mystery. Hearing The Band for the first time shone a light into that mystery, and made it no longer a mystery. I started to become "me" after that night. I had a bad time of it up till then. Feeling like there was nowhere I belonged in the world. Things begun to change. My insides grew into this music and into the core of where this stuff came from. I became an individual. I internally set myself apart. How? The Band gave me a voice.

I worshipped that group of 5 guys. I would lay in bed, in the dark and feel and listen to the love and brotherhood that flowed back and forth across those stages. I just knew that these guys were strong enough to survive anything together. I would hear them bouncing off each other, giving each other room, supporting each other, The history, the respect, and love for music that they had staggered me. And then, many many years later levon's book came out. I was so excited. Finally I was going to get the story from the horse's mouth. Yeah! It made soooooo angry! How could he do that to us! Why couldn't he have just loved and respected the Band's people enough to swallow that contempt! Why couldn't he have found another avenue to get back at Robbie. Why did he have to hurt Us?

I got used to it and now I see both sides. that was a long time ago. It don't even hurt too much no more. I have learned to listen and appreciate it with new eyes.

Mr. Hoiberg - If you don't want me here after what I Just pulled out of my heart in front of the world. I will leave and never never come back to this Guestbook. Please tell me in one post "Out" If you don't say nothin' I will asume I am welcome as long as I don't raise no hell.( maybe a little kidding and general everyday mischief don't apply...please don't hold me to no standard any different than the rest of the folks...please Sir.)


Entered at Tue Sep 10 14:38:22 CEST 2002 from (66.200.102.19)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Stagefright

Glad to have the chance to work this subject again, as my last post was misunderstood some months back on it. The first two Band efforts, in my opinion, are great ALBUMS, whereas Stagefright has great SONGS (not that the first two don't). With the exception of the Weight, Cripple Creek and Dixie, I prefer to listen to Pink and Brown in their entirety, start to finish. They have a cohesive flow, where even their few lesser moments act as a binding to the rest of the work. How do you not listen to King Harvest immediately after Unfaithful Servant? On Stagefright, the parts are greater than the sum of the whole. Stagefright, Shape I'm In, Daniel & The Sacred Harp and W.S. Walcott rank among my favorite Band songs, but I can enjoy them as much, if not more out of context, than I can, say Chest Fever. Viney is right, the 3 center songs on side one of Stagefright are weaker efforts, but would be jewels if on Cahoots. Strawberry Wine, a song I like, starts the album in a fun, quirkey mood, but then it zigs and zags until the beautiful All La Glory, and then the first 4 great but unconnected songs of side 2, to end with the Rumour, a good song but isolated in a sense from the others. Not that every album need or should be a stylistic or thematic whole, but when pulled off as gloriously as the first two, Stagefright pales by comparison as an album, but not due to it's individual songs. Hope you all could follow this.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 14:10:54 CEST 2002 from dial-212-1-141-254.access.uk.tiscali.com (212.1.141.254)

Posted by:

Joe

Subject: Wishful Thinking

Lovely to witness all the support for Stagefright. Well deserved, too, as it is an outstanding album and at least the equal of the work of virtually any other corresponding group.

At that point, however, I do have to draw a line and bring what I consider to be a touch of sobriety to the proceedings - and I certainly am not wishing to patronise here but I really do feel that on what is The Band's very own personally dedicated website a degree of perspective is called for.

As magnificent as Stagefright is - whether the lighter original or the rootsier Gold version - to rank it alongside the first two albums is I feel merely wishful thinking or a even mild delusion on the part of those making the submission. I say that incidentally with the greatest possible respect to the sincerity of those making the point.

In two or three hundred years time as fine as it is Stagefright will I'm afraid be all but forgotten except perhaps by the odd academic or completist archivist. In stark contrast the first two masterpieces will surely have confirmed their status as arguably the two finest examples of how it was actually possible given all the right ingredients being present for rock music to transcend into musical art to match anything of any musical genre before or since.

I think we sometimes are in danger of losing sight of just why The Band's first two recordings were so special. Just how unique they were. Genius if you like. The point I feel is that it is only once in any era when everything comes together to culminate in a piece of work so good that it simply cannot be recreated or matched by anything else of its type. Uniquely The Band managed to pull off such a feat twice. By the time of Stagefright some of the ingredients - don't ask me to elucidate as I don't think it's possible to define what they were - had gone missing. It matters not of course because the legacy of those first two albums - minus the two closing Dylan interpretations on Big Pink of course - had been preserved for posterity.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 13:35:12 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rosalind

Ros....I too am very happy that Patricia was helped by Little Brother. We often have demons and things that go bump in the night in our lives. Seperating them.....at times.....is difficult. My wife always says, "we're all God's children." It's such a simple line; but that's the say she looks at everyone, no matter what. Guess that's how she's stayed married to me so long :-) Embrace the day!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 13:29:53 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rosalind

No Ros.......not aimed at you at all.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 12:39:02 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.35)

Posted by:

Lil Again

Subject: Stage Fright

I just got so wrapped up in amazing coincidences that I forgot to mention that "Stage Fright" has always been my favorite Band album. I've probably said it once or twice before though. And my favorite tune? "All la Glory"..

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 12:34:12 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.35)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: deja-vu

Wow Roz.. ever hear of deja-vu? Funny that you mentioned "Little Brother" in your post yesterday. I was thinking about him only recently after re-reading some old e-mails from him. He of course, stopped posting in here loooong before you ever started... so I'm impressed that you remember him! Thanks for sharing his comment to you about being like 'Janis'. He must really know alot about Janis.. since he said the same thing about someone who used to post in here, named "Patricia"...a real nut job, not honest and forthright like you. She, in fact, got this gb shut down a few times and even threatened Jan! Can you believe it?! "Little Brother" and I exchanged alot of mails about that person..and I'm not sure why I kept them..but I did. I also have 1 from Patricia herself...mentioning Janis which I'd be happy to post here if you'd like a laugh! Too funny!! So glad to be able to share such an amazing coincidence with you! De-ja vu all over again.....


Entered at Tue Sep 10 11:01:10 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-099.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.99)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stage Fright

When was Stage Fright actually released? It entered the US chart on 5 September 1970 and climbed to number 5. According to the ‘Great Rock Discography’ UK release was October 1970. I can still picture hearing songs from it for the first time. It was a hot sunny Saturday afternoon (my mind tells me it was late August, just before the 1970 Isle of Wight festival) and I’d returned briefly to my mother’s house so as to write a thesis. I was sitting in the garden and they announced on the radio they were going to play two songs from the new Band album. As I’d been obsessed by the first two albums – totally so since the brown album came out – I sat up and paid 100% attention. They played ‘Time to Kill’ the new single, and ‘Just Another Whistle Stop’ (possibly because it happened to be the next track). I spent the next few days trying to remember as much as I could about them. I was totally broke at the time, but scraped up enough money to buy it, and because my record player was completely buggered at the time, used to take it to a friends’ house to play it on their decent hi-fi (till I saved up enough to buy a new record player). I read and re-read the “Time” extracts on the insert. The critical thumb’s down at the time? Probably “third album” syndrome, not helped by a dumb choice of singles. In the USA they put ‘Shape I’m In’ on the B-side of ‘Time to Kill’ and in the UK ‘Sleeping’ on the B side. The correct single (as time, and concerts have shown) would have been ‘Shape I’m In.’ While ‘Time to Kill’ and ‘Whistle Stop’ would have been the best tracks on ‘Cahoots’, there were three songs, all on side one, which were weaker than the others (add ‘Strawberry Wine’ which I was praising only a couple of weeks back). I think it’s melody rather than lyrics in both cases. That’s why you get these comments that ‘Side 2 of Stage Fright is as good as the first two albums.’ Which it is. So is ‘All La Glory’ and ‘Sleeping’. Why they chose those two (Time, Whistle )to promote it is a mystery. And it was a dumb choice, as The Band must have known because they quickly dropped them out of the live act. They continued to do ‘Shape’, ‘Stage Fright’ and ‘W.S. Walcott’ live right up to the 90s which shows they were enduring songs. But my two personal favourites (today at least) are ‘Daniel & The Sacred Harp’ (never done live) and ‘The Rumor’ (on which Richard tended to falter live).

BTW, I do like and value all three 'weaker' tracks - on Cahoots or Islands they would have shone likejewels.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 07:15:23 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Pammi's site

Hey Girl _ You got a pretty nice site there goin'. Get rid of some of that bubblegum and heavy metal stuff and add a little Skip James and Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee and you got yerself a winner!(Your Big Mama Thornton blues link don't work tho.)

I never knew that Muddy and me had fried ba-lone-i in common. I see he could afford Ritz crackers..I ate mine on a regular saltine with that same dash of Tabasco. "Oh Yeah... Ohhh Yeah... Everythin's gonna be alright this mornin..' Ohhh yeah..WHOO...."


Entered at Tue Sep 10 05:53:23 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-022castocp0067.dialsprint.net (65.178.96.67)

Posted by:

Jeff N(rollie)

Subject: Sam and Stage Fright

Oh no you didn't Sammy!!! Check out some of my posts from a couple of years ago!!!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 05:42:42 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I'm loving all this Stage Fright talk - and I take full credit for starting it (he said humbly).

DPugatch = I got an e-mail with your name on it, and with an attachment. I didn't open it because of these uncertain times. Did you send it? I've confirmed phoney ones in the past (not from you)- that's why I'm just asking.

I'd love to score one of them DCC Stage Fright's if someone would be so kind. philbin3@aol.com


Entered at Tue Sep 10 04:28:05 CEST 2002 from (204.101.153.2)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Gord Lightfoot

A bit of wire bumph on the latest re the singer's condition, etc ...

Bleeding blood vessel in abdomen was source of Lightfoot’s problem: surgeon

HAMILTON, Ont. (CP) — The surgeon who operated on Gordon Lightfoot says the singer has a rare and serious condition — a weakness in a blood vessel in his abdomen.

Dr. Michael Marcaccio, a gastrointestinal specialist, explained Lightfoot’s condition at a briefing Monday at McMaster University Medical Centre, where the 63-year-old singer remains in the intensive care unit.

Lightfoot was taken to the hospital by air ambulance early Sunday after experiencing severe stomach pains and cancelling an appearance Saturday night in his home town of Orillia, Ont.

“If Mr. Lightfoot weren’t such a healthy man, he might not have survived,” Marcaccio said. “We’re dealing with the issues and things are as good as they could be at this point.”

He didn’t divulge a lot of detail about the ailment, noting that the family “is coping with lots, obviously, and we want to respect their need for privacy.”

“In general terms, the problem relates to weakness in a blood vessel,” he said. “It’s probably been there a long time and it started to bleed. And its particular location and the nature of the structures around it is what’s made its care a little bit difficult.

“So he’s had a bit of a rough ride for the last day and a half and . . . we’re taking this as it comes. It’s a situation where we can only deal with what’s presented to us.”

Lightfoot’s wife, Elizabeth, was keeping vigil at the hospital, and several members of his band were at the news briefing and said they’re grateful for the care he’s receiving. They also acknowledged the concern of fans.

Friends were surprised by Lightfoot’s sudden illness, noting that he quit drinking 20 years ago and exercises regularly.



Entered at Tue Sep 10 03:55:31 CEST 2002 from parachute4-156-40-68-183.net.nih.gov (156.40.68.183)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Subject: Stage Fright

Politicians: Warning musical content! Scroll past this post.

Peter Viney: Thanks for all of those quotes about Stage Fright. I never understood the rating of this album as below the first two. It is certainly different. Somewhere Robbie Robertson is quoted as saying something like: "After the response to the second album, we wanted to lighten things up a bit as everything was being taken way too seriously." At the time it was released, I think Time magazine said that the Band had finally released a rock 'n' roll album. Lighter maybe in the "feel of the music" but certainly some rather dark lyrics making for some inconsistencies. For example, in "The Shape I'm In" the following words are sung with a beat like "Tuti Fruti":

Out of nine lives, I spent seven

Now, how in the world do you get to Heaven

Or in "Time To Kill":

A police siren flashing light,

I wonder who went down tonight.

People, people, where do you go

before you believe in what you know?

So for a "lighter less serious" album, some rather dark ominous presence came through in the writing. Those complexities [and the fact that my 4-year old loves "Daniel and the Sacred Harp"] makes this different but every bit the equal of the first two, IMHO. [But then again, don't take this too seriously because I still like Dylan's "Saved."]


Entered at Tue Sep 10 03:38:40 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-001masprip0048.dialsprint.net (63.186.64.48)

Posted by:

G-Man

Subject: JOHN D

John,,glad all turned out well. Lost U E address; tryin to track it down! Keep Rockin!!


Entered at Tue Sep 10 03:16:39 CEST 2002 from abby11.revealed.net (208.16.227.202)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Subject: Stage Fright

I can hook ya up with the DCC version too. When the remaster came out 2 years ago, I almost got rid of it until I came here and read the mixes were the alternates! I sure am glad I hung onto it.

Mike


Entered at Tue Sep 10 02:49:59 CEST 2002 from cdm-66-87-233-bent.cox-internet.com (66.76.87.233)

Posted by:

Pammi

Location: Flowerchild, Hippyland
Web: My link

Wow, nice site and of course great band and music! Thank you so much for sharing the memories and this site. I've got you linked on my mega 60's webpage. Peace & Luv......Pammi :)


Entered at Tue Sep 10 02:05:23 CEST 2002 from 128.52.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.52.128)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: New Wilbury's Board

Stumbled across a new Message Board about The Wilburys. See link above.


Entered at Tue Sep 10 00:38:20 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj
Web: My link

Subject: Comrade

Pat B: You may now address me as Comrade or Comarofski Sz..,I always considered myself a John Birch Communist ;)


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:36:37 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: Stage Fright

Nick: DCC's licensing rights to "Stage Fright" have apparently run out and more unfortunately DCC is presently out of business. Copies are therefore in short supply, hard to find & demand high prices. At one time MUSIC DIRECT (www.amusicdirect) had a few remaining copies. You might try (dpowell@pgfm.com) and I'll see if I can hook you up with a copy.

Pehr: If you're out there -- I haven't forgotten your RR CD-R. It will be on the way shortly.

Jeff: sorry about mispelling your last name.

Isn't talking about music fun? Well, not anywhere near as fun as listening to it!!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:16:59 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

John D. -- Glad to see you back "on-line" & hope you're doing fine.

Jeff Newsome: In my opinion, if "Stage Fright" had been released by anyone else, it would have met with great praise by the critics. Unfortunately, The Band released it as their follow-up to their magnificent one-two punch of "Music From Big Pink" and the "brown album". To judge "Stage Fright" objectively, I think you have to look at it separately as a change in direction from the previous path. By the time it was recorded the group's sights had changed considerably -- they'd gone from the relatively peaceful seclusion of Woodstock to life in the spotlight on the road. The subject matter of the songs began to change like those of the reflections in a stream. To paraphrase Dylan -- time may pass slowly up in the mountains, but out of the road it starts to go by fast.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:11:45 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Mr. D.

Mr. Donabie _ I had a heart attack in 1995. Brought on by stress, too many cigarettes and alcohol and the fact that problems like that ran in my dad's family. I never had a chest pain, it all happened in my stomach. My blood pressure got so high that my eyes hemorraged and I almost went blind. Those things are survivable. Wishing you all the best in your complete recovery. I hope that reference you made about "planting zingers wasn't aimed at me. That Big Pink house means a lot.

Mr Powell _ Sorry for getting your post mixed up with Dave Z's. Honest mistake.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:11:12 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-117.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.117)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Stage fright comments:

All Music Guide
The songs sound more ‘raw’ (on the DCC version), more live in the studio and far more interesting than the relatively flat smooth versions of the original album. The singing has a raw, immediate quality, and both the singing and the playing have a lot of wrong (but honest) notes that were buried in the official mix - all of the material is different … This version of Stage Fright puts it much closer in content and spirit to Music From Big Pink and The Band which preceded it.

Chris Morris (Billboard)
Considering the excellence of Stage Fright, it’s incredible to recall that the album was looked upon as a disappointment in some critical quarters upon its release by Capitol. That opinion, which has certainly blown away in the winds of time, was likely more a response to what had gone before in the career of The Band than to any (apparent) deficiencies in the album itself … Twenty years later, Stage Fright is a durable, exciting and often profoundly affecting record that can be counted among the most distinguished in The Band’s very noteworthy catalog … Forget about what those long-ago detractors may have said - this is The Band near the peak of its considerable abilities

John Bauldie ( Q ):
Stage Fright, the third Band LP from 1970, may well be the greatest of their records. There is more of Robbie Robertson’s wonderful guitar playing on Stage Fright than any other LP; there is The Band’s greatest rock ‘n’ roll song, The Shape I’m In; The Band’s greatest Americana song, The W.S. Walcott Medicine show; the best of The Band’s trademark “interactive” vocals, on Daniel and The Sacred Harp and The Rumour; and the best of Robbie Robertson’s gentle ballads, Sleeping and All La Glory.

Patrick Humphries (Vox)
…tracks 6-10 (the old vinyl Side 2) are quintessential Robertson … the songs marked The Band down as the finest purveyors of Americana yet heard.



Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:06:14 CEST 2002 from libstfstx03.library.uiuc.edu (130.126.34.238)

Posted by:

Susan

Location: Illinois

Subject: music selection

I've been doing something opposite to franko; rather than buying current music with Band influences or Band personnel (although I do some of that) I'm buying music that influenced the guys that I was not really aware of back in the day. Ray Charles Atlantic sides were featured last night during the cooking and eating of dinner, and I've got a Sam Cooke collection, 'Keep Movin' On' in my bag today.

I'm also buying music that's current, but in that classic soul style - i.e. Solomon Burke's latest, which is keeping me company in the office just now. This brings me to a question; who is Pick Purnell? He's credited with a great song that's used as the closer on the album - Sit This One Out - and I've never heard of him. What else has he done?

"Love sometimes takes the form of frustration
I'ts a sad combination of emptiness and doubt."

It's a wonderful song, and a beautiful performance; one of my favorites on an album with many wonderful things.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:05:34 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-117.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.117)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Nostill Priory

Peter- good to hear from someone who was there (I wasn't). Not the finest hour for any of the participants, but Van performed 'Caravan' as on TLW (but not as well) and a song listed as 'I'm Forgetting' which probably isn't the right title. Feel free to e-mail me if you want to discuss more, substituting '@' for 'at' (because of junk mail crawlers, I won't write it as it is) : viney at mailbox.co.uk


Entered at Mon Sep 9 23:01:58 CEST 2002 from wcs1-pent.nipr.mil (198.26.74.99)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Stage Fright- DCC Version

Dave- Where can the gold version of Stage Fright be ordered? Thanks.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 22:30:55 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

franko

Location: boston

Pat. I agree. I only meant that she proably wasn't aware of all the songwriting credit discusions that have gone on in here.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 22:14:12 CEST 2002 from wc12.ym.rnc.net.cable.rogers.com (66.185.85.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Thank You

I would like to thank those who have wished me the best the last few days. I thought my heart attack of a couple of years back was rough. Best wishes to Ronnie Hawkins, Gordon Lightfoot and Levon. Bill thanks for the Lance post....I had tickets last night; but of course could not attend. It must have been magic! I don't want to preach here; but the next time you want to plant a zinger on someone........think of that Pink House and it will remind you what David Powell reminds us........it's about the music.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:59:35 CEST 2002 from user-11218oo.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.163.24)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

franko, all you have to do is examine the songwriting credits to see how many great Band songs were written by Richard.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:46:39 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: a new leaf

Mr. Hoiberg _ If you're still looking in, I need you to know. If you will allow me to be here, I will follow the rules of the webmaster and keep the frivolity to a mininum. I really do love The Band and want to part of the family here. Dave Z's point is well taken. I am a GUEST. The rules of the house apply. Things got better for me. I'm doin okay now.

There used to be a fella who posted here that went by the name of "Little Brother" (From the philadelphia Area) He once told me that I had a strong "Janis" quality. He also told me "Not to take it as far as she did" I don't know if he's still here, or if he even looks in. I would like to thank him for those words. No one had ever said me that before. I looked at Janis, and then at myself. It helped me even things out. Maybe even helped me stay alive. Thank You Little Brother.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:42:54 CEST 2002 from (169.200.133.38)

Posted by:

Bones

Thanks to Lars and David Powell for actually getting us back on musical terms.

Chris: I didn't know Charlie Sexton made an album prior to the one which Rick sang on. Thanks for the correction.

The Last Waltz version of "WS Walcot's Medicine Show" is wonderful! Great horns, great backup vocal by Rick,...etc. I'm sure it was hard for Robbie or whomever to leave that off the original release.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:41:03 CEST 2002 from s01i34-0130.no.powertech.net (195.159.140.130)

Posted by:

Simen Ulsaker

Location: Oslo, Norway

Subject: In a station

Does anyone know what the keybord-like, centre-based, instrument on "In a station" is ? I know that they fed roxochords through wah-wah pedals and other things, does anyone know if this is the case here too? answers, comments etc simen76@hotmail..com


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:40:05 CEST 2002 from s01i34-0130.no.powertech.net (195.159.140.130)

Posted by:

Simen Ulsaker

Location: Oslo, Norway

Subject: In a station

Does anyone know what the keybord-like, centre-based, instrument on "In a station" is ? I know that they fed roxochords through wah-wah pedals and other things, does anyone know if this is the case here too?


Entered at Mon Sep 9 21:27:51 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Jeff

Location: Brooklyn

Subject: Thanks Jan!

Jan, thanks for the kind words. I very much appreciate your support. Although we've not yet met, you have been a good friend throughout. Best wishes always, Jeff.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 20:59:01 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

franko

Location: boston

Subject: Lucinda/John Hiatt/Al Stewart

I can't seem stop buying cd's with any link to or contribution from the Band (Indigo Girls, Mercury Rev, Shannon Curfman, etc.) So I wasn't surprised when I bought Lucinda's "artist's choice" compilation. About IMND she writes "This is just a great song. The melody, the harmonizing, the lyrics. It's real organic. What can you say about The Band? They had a great thing. They wrote great songs, and you always know it's The Band." THEY wrote great songs? Apparently, she doesn't read the GB.

Thanks to whoever recommended I see John Hiatt solo earlier this summer (Don or David, I think). What a great show.

I also saw Al Stewart solo acoustic - also great IMHO. After the show I gave Al my name and address and about a month later received - FREE - 2 CD's of an acoustic show he did in Croydon in 1999. Wonderful sound quality. Along with the CD's came a list of nearly 40 CD's, many live acoustic, one going back to 1970, but also some unreleased studio stuff and some mixing board CD's from concerts he did in his band touring days (Year of the Cat tour, etc.) Made me wish Garth or the Andy that posts here had the ability to do the same. It is sad to me that Al has 400-500 previously never heard, demo's, alternate studio tracks, and live versions, yet from The Band we had to wait for relatively few "new" things on the re-issues.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 20:55:49 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Location: Toronto

Here's an long, but very interesting, post to another list I subscribe to. It was written by Toronto-area musician Lance Anderson, who should be known to many of you as the guy who put together the estimable CD, "2B3: The Toronto Sessions".

"Last night I had the great pleasure of recording one of the most special evenings of music I have heard. I recorded 'An Itimate Evening of Music with Garth Hudson' at The Wolf Theatre in London ON. It was my honour.

"Although not strictly a Blues concert, as he played a lot of Jazz in the program, it was one of the finest diplays of piano playing I have ever witnessed by a musician who is totally dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in music. Not only is Garth naturally gifted, but he has seriously investigated most genres of North American piano music of the past century (including blues, boogie woogie, jump blues rock n roll etc ...).

"Remember, this is on the piano, not the organ which he is already well known for. (He also played virtuoso accordian, including some Romanian music and a number of saxes, but that's a whole other tale.)

"As we talked after the concert, it became obvious that he has an encyclopaedic knowledge of Blues, Jazz and Rhythm and Blues music and recordings. This man has lived for this music for the better part of his 60+ years. The audience, was not prepared for this onslaught of brillance and it floored them. Though the concert started anywhere from 1/2 an hour to an hour late due to confusion of the start time printed on the tickets and some technical difficulties with a film crew, they hung in there for what can only be described as a most memorable evening with Garth and his wife Maud.

"If you have an opportunity to hear this phenomena, run don't walk to get a ticket. As you can tell, as a piano player, I am finding it hard to express how incredibly inspiring this gentle soul is. Unlike someone like Oscar Peterson who is 'touched by God', and has an inherited gift like Mozart had (and therefore, in a way, is beyond us mere mortals,) Garth's dedication to hard work, practice, youthful exuberance and sheer determination has inspired me to renew my investigation and to work on areas that have always given me trouble. It's his example that inspires.

"Another unique aspect of Garth's approach to music is his 'theories of learning.' How to learn something in the fastest and most efficient way. He has given a lot of thought, not only as to what to learn but more importantly, as to the best way to learn it. I have never met, in all my musical education, anyone with more unique and insightful things to say on this subject, than Garth.

"As you can probably tell I was thrilled to be around such a special artist and just had to tell someone. Sometimes life is very rewarding. Hopefully we can finish this recording and get it out soon, so that you can experience what I did last night. This is stuff of legends.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"On another note:

"Michael Sloski and I (B3 and drums and vocals) start up again at the Rockit (120 Church St. T.O. at Richmond) tommorrow night (Tuesday, Sept. 10 th) for an indefinte run. We will be having some special guests on a regular basis. I have invited Garth down to enjoy the pizza or sit in. There is certainly a chance that he may not have the opprotunity to drop in, but he had a twinkle in his eye about playing sax with an organ duo. Michael and I are preparing to finish off the recording we started in the spring which has the working title of FOOTWORK."


Entered at Mon Sep 9 20:53:28 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-022castocp0488.dialsprint.net (65.178.97.234)

Posted by:

jeff newsom

Subject: STAGE FRIGHT

Glad to hear Stage Fright getting favorable press from the house commentators. I never understood its less than wonderful reviews from the critics of years ago.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 20:30:30 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: A&R Studios / four-track

Pat: I think you're correct -- the basic instrumental parts went live onto two tracks with vocals, horns & other various over-dubs onto the remaining two. The "Classic Album" video illustrates this technique.

It's funny but if you listen to Elliot Mazer's recording of Neil Young's great "Harvest" album, you kind of get the feeling that Mr. Mazer had sound of "Music From Big Pink" in mind.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 20:16:35 CEST 2002 from user-1121965.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.164.197)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

David P, I believe what they did with the four-track was record the group live onto two tracks in a true stereo field then use the remaining two tracks to overdub whatever came to their collective minds. Thus you have the alternate version of "Tears of Rage" on the reissue without the horns. It also allowed them to reconfigure themselves instrumentally in the middle of a song ("Chest Fever"). It's also probable that they isolated certain instruments when they knew they weren't going to need extra tracks for overdubbing which would explain the phantom organ in The Weight.

The DCC version of Stage Fright is indeed a must-own for the serious.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 19:28:58 CEST 2002 from (208.218.212.2)

Posted by:

David Powell

Location: Georgia

Subject: this & that

First of all -- best wishes to John Donabie.

I refuse to get caught up in the latest round of guestbook squabbling. Music has always been a source of solace to me and I'm not going to let anything or anyone distract from that inherent power in music, especially in light of the significance surrounding this week. As a GUEST here I always try and mind my manners so as not to offend the hospitality of our cordial host or any of my fellow guests.

On the subject of The Band's music -- "Stage Fright" has always been at the top of my list, just behind the "brown album" and "Music From Big Pink". Following the release of Capitol's 2000 reissues, I've spent some time comparing the different LP & CD versions of all The Band's albums. My conclusion regarding "Stage Fright" is that you haven't heard that album until you listened to the gold CD version remastered by Steve Hoffman for the DCC label. The confusion regarding the different mixes by Todd Rundgren and Glyn Johns continues, even in light of the 2000 reissue which further confounded the issue in its liner notes. Steve Hoffman, who had access to the tapes of the various mixes, insists that he used Todd Rundgren's because "They were the first generation master mixes". The other mixes were evidently remixed, later generation copies dubbed from the original masters. This makes perfect sense since Rundgren was working in New York and Johns was working at Island Studios in the U.K. almost simultaneously, making it doubtful that they were both using the original multi-track masters or 2-track mixes.

Last week, Pat Brennan mentioned the MIX magazine article on The Last Waltz. One of the sources quoted in that article was Elliot Mazer, who was the chief recording engineer for the live concert. Mr. Mazer mentioned that his work with The Band went back to "Music From Big Pink". According to him, Robbie Robertson asked that he listen to the original Big Pink mixes because "Robbie was concerned about how dull and dark it was...Turns out that it sounded dark and it sounded great. They had not planned it that way, but the engineers that worked on it were very conservative about EQ. A lot of it was done live in the studio, and the 8-track tapes were worn. All of which can make a project sound dull".

I seem to recall that "Tears of Rage", "Chest Fever", "We Can Talk", "This Wheel's On Fire" and "The Weight" were recorded basically live in A&R Studios in New York onto 4-track. The rest of the album was recorded in L.A. using 8-track recorders. I find it interesting that Mr. Mazer would attribute the distinctive sound of Big Pink to a combination of flat EQ and worn tape.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 18:56:04 CEST 2002 from citrix4.doc.state.vt.us (159.105.102.6)

Posted by:

John Cass

Location: VT

Subject: Lathum Show

Lars & Diamond Lil

I was also at that show at the Star Lite Theatre in Lathum.. I can remember the rotating stage I really miss those days seeing the Band... If my memory is correct I think Taj Mahal was the opening act... I also remember looking at the upcoming shows they were having and seeing Leon Russell and the Marshal Tucker Band were schedualed to perform there the following week.

what ever happened to the Star Lite Theatre in Lathum NY??? I have never seen that place ever listed in any Pollstar or Music Source concert listings sites.

my favorite place back in the day to see the Band was at the Night Shift Cafe in MA.. I think they only played there twice that I saw.. but what a place always fun..although a little run down


Entered at Mon Sep 9 18:38:14 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.35)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Jhwygirl: (Hi! :-) According to the news here, Gordon Lightfoot is in intensive care following abdominal surgery yesterday. His tune, "Carefree Highway" has always been one of my favories.. may he take that same route to good health again.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 18:17:06 CEST 2002 from jaxn3t01-du08.onewest.net (199.104.80.8)

Posted by:

jhwygirl

Location: the land of snow

were there new developments concerning Gordon Lightfoot's health? They are playing him quite a bit on the local NPR today....

BTW, Hello there everyone!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 17:49:07 CEST 2002 from user-11218cj.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.161.147)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Brian Sz, you are obviously a communist. Or at least a liberal.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 16:27:21 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Location: Nj
Web: My link

Subject: Stage Fright

This may be sacrilege, but I'd take Stage Fright over Big Pink, anyday. For whatever reason, BP falls to 5th on my list, ROA being number 1, the New LW 2, Brown 3, Stage Fright 4, then BP. I know BP is full of classic's but.., I just don't know why, pacing? production? - Love the songs on compilation cd's I put together but not as a unit.., Strange huh?

Rosalind: Thanks for the compliment, I appreciate it.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 16:18:07 CEST 2002 from m124-133.on.tac.net (209.202.124.133)

Posted by:

Bill

Location: Toronto

I'm really happy that Biffalo Bull enjoyed Danny Brooks (not Gary Brooks) and the Rockin' Revelators in Port Credit yesterday. As he said, Richard Bell's work was magnificent, especially the achingly beautiful accordion on "Lift Me Up".

The recently deceased British actor Leo McKern is best known to me, and probably others within range of a PBS station, as Rumpole - he who must obey.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 16:13:34 CEST 2002 from rollingrock.taconic.net (205.231.149.33)

Posted by:

Gilberta Iman

Subject: David Beebe

Thanks Matt for the info. I'm still not sure if it's my friend from years ago but you've given me a head start on knowing for sure. I appreciate it very much. Amanda, hope we're friends after our recent misunderstanding. Roz, you can only sound as melodramatic as you are melodramatic. Tee hee


Entered at Mon Sep 9 16:05:21 CEST 2002 from x.electronet.net (216.173.174.94)

Posted by:

Brent

Web: My link

Subject: Happy Birthday to The Rumor

Today The Rumor is two years old. My pal Adam has pretty much taken over running the site and he's planning to start updating some of the content besides the trade list, which is continually updated.

Here's the address to access an mp3 of Dylan playing "Quinn the Eskimo" at a recent show: http://www.btinternet.com/~andrew.homer/news.htm. He's never played this song live except for with our boys at the Isle of Wight until recently. Pretty cool!

I agree with Bayou Sam that Stage Fright should probably be considered in the same breath with the first two records.

Listened to "Rock of Ages" reissue in its entirety yesterday. "Unfaithful Servant" has to be one of my favorite songs of all time.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 15:53:45 CEST 2002 from hoiberg.hiof.no (158.36.51.55)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: School for Fools

Got my copy of the new Jeff Alexander/Larry Thurston blues album _School for Fools_ today (thanks, Jeff). Highly recommended! Levon on drums on 10 of the 12 tracks.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 15:39:05 CEST 2002 from cpe0080c6ea3120.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (65.48.85.247)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: reverse damascosis

upon reccomendation from a gb'r, saw gary brooks and the rocking revalators, featuring richard bell, at the port credit, ont., jazz and blues festival, sunday afternoon. the sun was hot, the beer was cold, and a mildy aromatic scent wafting in the air made for a religious experience. the line up of groups was excellent playing a lot of rhumba, jump blues and big band. it was the revalators that pierced the soul with a blistering performance. it was a treat to see a smiling richard bell, working his magic on the accordian and keyboards, helping us all as we got a litlle closer to heaven.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 15:32:42 CEST 2002 from cache1.nottingham.ac.uk (128.243.220.21)

Posted by:

Peter

Location: Nottingham

Subject: Nostill Priory

The Band played Nostill Priory with the Cate Bros but without Levon Helm in August, 1984. As I remember they played to a small but enthusiastic crowd which swelled considerably the following day for the appearance of Van Morrison. Morrison actually made an appearance during the Band's set for one song which I don't remember but certainly wasn't part of the Band's recorded ouvre. The festival itself was a strange affair and included bands as diverse as The Damned and Lindisfarne. Lots of hard drugs on open sale and I think the festival culminated with the police moving in and smashing up a few "travelers" caravans. I also had my Bob Dylan t-shirt knicked. The rumour was that the Band wouldn't turn up. I was amazed when they did, even without Levon. I recall Rick Danko taking lead vocals on 'The Weight'. It was still the only time I ever got to see the Band in any of their various incarnations.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 15:18:25 CEST 2002 from cpe0080c6ea3120.cpe.net.cable.rogers.com (65.48.85.247)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Location: canada

Subject: reverse damascosis

under reccomendation from a gb'r, saw gary brooks and the rocking revalators, featuring richard bell, in port credit, ontario, sunday afternoon. the sun was hot the beer was cold, and a midly scented aroma wafting in and out of the beer tent, probably contributed to the religilous experience we all had. the line up of groups playing music was extremely good, playing lots of rhumba and jump, some big band, but the revalators provided us with a piercing, soulfull perforomance. it was a treat to see richard bell, smiling and playing his keyboards and accordian, adding his magic, and putting us all a litlle closer to heaven.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 14:14:59 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-177.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.177)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: 1984, Tony & Elvis, BWNWIT

1984 ‘no show’ – wasn’t there a dispute with the agency / promoter? ‘Don’t book those jobs so far apart … ‘ kind of thing? That was given as the reason Levon didn’t play on the Nostell Priory show (which was 25 August 1984).

Two things to occupy my mind today. First, trying to find a Tony Blackburn – Band link. I could lie and say ‘I first heard The Weight on his show and it changed my life …’, but there’s no point in fibbing because then I’ll turn up an 1968 old postcard or something and it’ll turn out to be true. I mean it is remotely possible, though at the time of the release I think my daily radio choice was Radio 270 from the North Sea. So far, the closest I can get is that Tony used to perform ‘Devil in Disguise’ and ‘Good Luck Charm’ and Levon narrated Elvis 56, but that’s tenuous even by my low standards.

Then it’s sorting out all these multiple BWNWIT identities. I’d never guessed that the spelling-challenged poster “Bush Will No Wot It Takes” on political.diatribe.com was part of the consortium, nor that “Buck Wheat Nuts Wheatgerm in Tofu” on the vegetarians.now site was involved. How can I have been so stupid?

Lars- you have been sorely missed!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 13:56:47 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-189.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.189)

Posted by:

Try this...for Garth

Web: My link

This works.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 13:51:41 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-189.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.189)

Posted by:

Again...

Subject: Free Press

Sorry that link doesn't work. Seems the Free Press doesn't allow them anymore.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 13:48:48 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-189.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.189)

Posted by:

Serge

Web: My link

Subject: Maud and Garth

Nice intimate concert with Maud and Garth last night. Go to link for story. Scroll to TODAY, Worth the wait

Dave Z: Didn't see you there, during or after.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 12:48:51 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: the band 1984

thanks for the response jan. by the way keep up the fantastic job your doing with the site. despite the spats, this site is still the best of its kind. love and peace. richie.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 11:30:48 CEST 2002 from hoiberg.hiof.no (158.36.51.55)

Posted by:

jh

Location: Norway

Subject: The Band circa 1984

richie,

The Band (w/The Cate Bros.) were scheduled to play the Isle of Calf festival in Oslo in the summer of 1984. They cancelled that one, too. I still have my ticket somewhere, was so disappointed that I didn't attend the festival at all. I had never seen them before, and as it turned out this would be the only time I'd had the chance to see Richard Manuel on stage. We had to wait until 1994 to get them over here, when they toured Norway for the first and only time as The Band.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 10:50:10 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: the band circa 1984

like everyone on this gb i was jumping with joy when the band reformed in the early 80's. iremember seeing a program for the glastonbury festival summer 1984. the band were down to play. obviously it didnt happen. they played that north of england festival instead with van, and phil lynott's band at the time, grand slam. anyone know why the glastonbury thing didnt happen? someone's bound to know.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 09:41:32 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: uk

Subject: tony blackburn

dear peter. i used to listen to tony blackburn's radio 1 show all the time in the 70's. i also enjoyed his sat. teatime disney shows. question. didnt he have a dog on the radio show which used to bark like crazy. im pleased hes back in the limelight, though i must confess i must be one of the few people in britain who hasnt seen the celeb. show


Entered at Mon Sep 9 06:11:43 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Roz, thanks for the joke; there were some other funny one's in this month's "Mudflap Slut's Trucker Comics" as well. Anyway, I discovered in looking up something else that Brit charactor actor Leo McKern passed away in late july.

He had classy roles in "A Man For All Seasons" and "Ryan's Daughter"; but may always be remembered best as Clang; the guy chasing the Beatles around in "Help". Fans of British cool stuff may also remember him from the last episode of "The Prisoner." Sorry if PV already covered this....


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:50:00 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

roz

Location: RainCity

Subject: Time Shot!

Matt and Pat _ Carom!

Jerry _ Hey Baby, You're on that list..

For anyone interested in attaining the Saturday Night Live performances of "The Boys" They're auctioning it off on eBay along with every other SNL in history, including the one with Ricky, Butter and Busey. Robbie's are there too. It'll probably go for 50 bucks or so.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:42:10 CEST 2002 from saintpaul.pioneerpress.com (208.149.52.102)

Posted by:

Neil Diamond

Lars.. Thank's for your Band story, love hearing folk's that saw these guy's live...

Roz.. I'm devastated, I thought I would of made your Poster's I like list, crying in my beer...

Marsen...Thanks for the heads up on the "Hawk" being in "Red's movie, I'm going to see it Mon. night and will keep an out for Mr. Hawkins...


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:36:46 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

Thanks for the nice words JTull Fan... Whew, I'm beat... great GREAT show by Maud & Garth tonight!!!... I'll post more tomorrow night after I get home... but now I got to hit the hay... tomorrow it's up at 5am to put 13 hours more on my green Jeep...

P.S. - I'm very impressed with London... great shops to go with... the great chops... a college town too...


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:28:58 CEST 2002 from dialup-65.57.15.99.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (65.57.15.99)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

...and its always nice to see Lars posting in here. Reminds me of the good old days.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:20:11 CEST 2002 from dialup-65.57.15.99.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (65.57.15.99)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Man, great minds think alike.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:19:39 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: David Beebe

I know David Beebe plays drums on a Roches album I have ("A Dove"), which was released in the early 1990s ('91? '92?). I don't know anything about him, though - before or since.

Incidenetally, "A Dove" is a fine album. Probably the last "great" Roches album, IMO. I think it's a better record, than their eponymous debut album, though that first album is an all-time favorite ("Keep On Doing" is pretty interesting as Robert Fripp's influence really makes it something other than a "Roches" (Fripp's producing really makes it a Fripp + Roches record - fundamentally different than what either artist would have done left to their own devices).


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:02:59 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: old biscuits

BWNWIT, I wasn't attempting to hash old crap. I was simply pointing out that I've been friendly with people I disagree with and unfriendly with those I generally agree with. Nothing is implied by that statement, but you can infer what you may.

Gee, Roz, and here I thought all we shared meant something. I'm crushed! Still, they say you can tell a lot about a person by the company they keep - so I gratefully accept the boobie prize:

Any club that includes Pat and Diamond Lil' is one I'm honored to have membership in. Thanks!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 05:01:45 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

I don't really dis-like anyone here. Not even the folks that call me a Jarp ~Transient...whatever that is?


Entered at Mon Sep 9 04:57:19 CEST 2002 from dialup-65.57.15.99.dial1.chicago1.level3.net (65.57.15.99)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

mattK and Lil? That's awfully good company. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 04:41:52 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny -still

Subject: "I want to tell you, my head is filled with things to say.."

Tenn = yeah, we had a little bru-ha-ha once upon a time. But I think we fixed it when we both found we had a similar interest in Bluegrass.

Rosalind = since you like me - and thanks for the kind words - let me suggest something if I may. If there is someone you dis-like, just avoid them in here. Posting names of people you don't like dosen't do anyone any good. I don't think it reflects too good on you. I'm not trying to preach - it's just a thought.....I hope you still like me :-)

The idea that the "feud" could be so consuming peoples thoughts to the point that it gets personal just makes me shake my head. I think it's a damn shame that Levon has the feelings he does - but that's his buisness. He may even have a legitimate beef. I don't know what the hell Robbie did by buying out the other guys. That's none of my buisness either. I also won't lose any sleep over the prospect of Levon kicking the shit out of Robbie. Of course, we're going to talk about something like that when it comes to light. But geez, is that stupid fued really getting people that nuts?

I happen to be in a very select group that likes both Levon, and Robbie (or Robbie, and Levon if you wish). The contribution that both guys made to this music is equally wonderful in my mind. Levon's take on events since TLW has been much more documented for sure. Robbie did TLW and moved onward and upward. We don't have a pipeline to him - and he hasn't written a book yet (God, I wish he would). So I do get a bit hot when I see him getting slammed by folks who probably should shut up and listen to a good album (like Stagefright maybe)instead.

How about that Stagefright CD. Great stuff. I still like it as much as the much beloved first two.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 03:26:07 CEST 2002 from parachute4-156-40-68-58.net.nih.gov (156.40.68.58)

Posted by:

Quinn the Eskimo

Location: Maryland

Subject: Scroll past this post

Boy its gets nasty in here. I agree with Peter Viney and Matt K. No wonder Jonathan Katz never posts in here any more.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 02:40:09 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: okay...

..Since the Split Double Elimination round is over, I would like to come clean and share a few little feelings in the process.

I come here out of love for The Band's music and thru a need to be accepted and liked by The Band's people. I will take being insulted, I will take being left out, I will take just about anything because I no longer rattle. I know how the place works now. Don't take offense, don't hold no grudges and be kind to anyone who mentions your name in a half decent manner. I brighten up when I get the feeling that someone half-way likes me and or acts like I might have something to offer the place and I ain't ashamed to say that. I have had the hell beat out of me but I keep comin' back because I dig this place. My favorites here include Bayou Sam and Mr. Donabie, who I think are genuinely nice cats. They're' at the top of my "I Like" list. There's more but... At the bottom of my " I Like" list are MattK, Pat Brennan and Diamond Lil. I say that because I'm positive that they don't give a shit.

Gilberto _ I hope I don't sound too melodramatic for your taste...

I would like to have a drink and shoot a couple games of One-Pocket with each and every one of you. I shoot a mean game of One-Pocket! I'm damned sure I could wipe the floor up with any of ya in a game of One-Pocket!

I'm also quite fresh! I grew up in The Band's music, from the bottom up, internally, and have a deep love for The Blues... So most of you fella's here might get some if you cared to try.

I would also like to get something off my chest that has been bothering me for about a month. I don't remember the guy's name but he's writing a book on Boys. We had a discussion about Testosterone and Ego. I went crooked. You probably don't care and don't even remember but I'm sure that that book you're writing is gonna be great. Those sons of yours are lucky to have a dad so interested in their up-bringing and internal welfare.

That Brien Sz is a damned good photographer too. Bayou Sam should link us up to some of his photography....

Now how about that Brown Album! What a fuckin' great record that is!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 02:27:06 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-20-access.surferz.net (64.80.53.20)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Lars (Hi! :-) .. Thanks for bringing back the memory of that show. I was there.. it was August 9, 1996, at the Starlite Music Theater in Latham. I remember it so well because my husband had died only 7 months earlier, and my in-laws..knowing how much I loved The Band.. surprised me with tickets to the show. I think it's the first time I smiled in all that time. Thanks again for reminding me of that wonderful night.

Have a good night everyone.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 02:16:35 CEST 2002 from 128.52.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.52.128)

Posted by:

Dexy

Jeez, guys, cool it. Once again, let's hear it for Mr. Hoiberg.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 02:10:00 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Something that really matters, to Dave Z.

As a lifelong Yankess fan I just want to tip my cap to the Twins and the class they have shown this season. Way to go! If my guys have to play you in October, I will be cheering for my Bronx Bombers, but if you win I will cheer for you all the way. Way to go against contraction and Selig! And as a businessman who travels to the Twin Cities 4 times a year, I must say they play to a beautiful, if COLD, way too COLD, part of the country. Good luck!


Entered at Mon Sep 9 01:35:05 CEST 2002 from (206.57.105.142)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Pine Bush, NY

Subject: The Band

I apologize in advance that this entry does not take sides in any of the many feuds we have going on in this guestbook. It's a memory of a night in August (or was it Sept?),1996. My wife and I were guests of the Band (thanks to Butch) and our tickets were supposed to be at the "Call Waiting" booth at a venue (I forget the name) in Latham, NY. It had a big circular stage that rotated slowly as the performance went on.

Butch had some posters for me and said he would see me there, just sit in the back over by the dressing room door. Afterwards, the Band would "hold court" and we could go in and say hello. But fate stepped in as one of the kids who was dancing (there must have been an opening act....it's kind of fuzzy now) in the aisle decided to drop his cookies right next to our seats. So we moved over to sit in the center seats. I was looking out for Butch when he suddenly appeared on the stage, all alone, his hands in the air as if he couldn't understand something. The two hicks from Pine Bush looked down and agreed this was probably part of The Act. When I called Butch a couple of days later he said it should have been obvious that he was wondering what happened to those two hicks from Pine Bush.

The Band finally came out in single file and I was shocked at how tired they looked. They had been on the bus for a week and were going to Buffalo (?) that night after the show. Randy looked like he had dropped a lot of weight. I remembered him as being a good natured stone mason I had worked with a few years ago. Now he looked.....tired.

The music started and everyone seemed revived. That's one of the best things about Band music: it heals you. They played all Band songs that night, if I remember correctly. Rick was there playing his bass and singing as his feet kept the beat as he shifted his weight from one to the other. Levon and Randy laughed together in the middle of a song, some private joke between two drummers who seemed to really like each other. Jim Weider had to bend down to get some of that magic out of his guitar, a little grimace on his face. ....then he saw Rick come up to him, Rick's chest puffed out like he was trying to intimidate the "Weege"....and then Jim smiled. This was a band of brothers, with Garth up there behind his organ (like some mad professor concocting an invention) and Richard Bell playing his piano, sometimes lifting a knee up and leaning back as he played along.

We enjoyed the show, the boys finished up and walked slowly up the ramp to their dressing room. Garth was limping for some reason, Butch was by his side. I looked over at the line of people who wanted to get by the security guard to get to meet the Band. "It's late," I said to my wife. "Let's just go home."


Entered at Mon Sep 9 01:20:10 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-115-79.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.115.79)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

I hate to keep prolonging this, but since I guess I started it as much as anyone, I'll take the responsibility.

Amanda, I get the impression that you've been badmouthing one of my GB allies. I don't know for sure, though, since I usually just scroll past your posts.

MattK, we sent a total of about two e-mails back and forth about two and a half years ago. Jesus Christ, that's some serious grudge holding. Cool! But for the record, Matt sent me an e-mail after I called him a "dweeb" (not a word I would normally associate with, but it was in reference to a post where he called someone else the same thing) in a post on the GB where he had typically listed more minutae than any mere mortal could possess without making a trip to the reference room of the local library. Actually, I've never really gotten into the whole personal e-mail insults thing too much, although I'd certainly be willing to give it a try. Even Butch and I haven't traded too many e-mails, excluding the random few where he's filled me in as to what exactly I am. And I think that I might have gotten into a fight with Bayou Sam once a long time ago, but I can't remember what about, and I kind of like him.

As for any animosity towards Levon Helm, it's basically the thing of us Robertsonians being in the silent majority, and those pea-brained, filth-ridden obnoxious Levonistas being louder and more vocal, so if we want to compete, we have to be more extreme. But as for what I said about him last time, the only thing that wasn't admitted by him in his novel was that he weighs 130 pounds! I guessed at that. If I had called him a cancer-ridden mute, THAT would have been wrong. See, I do hold back a little bit.

Finally, since BWNWITenn seems to be getting an unusual amount of postive publicity recently, it's probably time to clear some things up. The "BWNWIT" persona is actually created by a syndicate of about 25 employees, designed to increase tourism in the state of Tennessee. Located in the L&C Tower in downtown Nashville, the group posts messages in about 129 various websites, all under the acronym BWNWITenn. You'll find messages from this "person" everywhere from CNN.com to travelocity.com. The actually meaning of the "BWNW" portion of the name varies according to the topic of the website. For example, it stands for "Bubba With Nuclear Weapons In Tennessee" on the u.s.militia.com website. Anyway, the person responsible for the alleged "biography" recently posted on the Band website has been dealt with accordingly, and is no longer a part of the BWNWITenn team.

I was going to say something about the Dennis McNally Grateful Dead book, but I think I'm getting tendonitis, so you're just going to have to hold your breath till next time.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 00:42:57 CEST 2002 from cache-wit2-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.192.2)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Birmingham, UK

Subject: Tony Blackburn

I (seriously, honestly) haven't been watching 'Get me out of here, I'm almost a teeny bit of a celebrity'. I've unavoidably kept up with it however because even the serious press covers it! Tony Blackburn eh. Yes, I remember him in Bournemouth - and I used to catch the #3 myself from the Square to Moordown. Never saw him though. I remember when he had a daily morning show on Radio 1. He'd do it from the BBC in London and then drive down to Bournemouth in his E Type Jag, a journey I used to make myself at the end of terms. He overtook me once and I kept up with him for about twenty miles. I doubt he remembers. Hard to find a Band connection but I bet he played The Weight and Rag Mama Rag a few times on his morning show. Still, Peter, if you can connect Evelyn Glennie to Levon Helm via Live 1966 I'm sure you can come up with something.

Keep on keeping on MattK.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 00:40:01 CEST 2002 from dial2a-239.i2eyenet.com (64.80.2.239)

Posted by:

HI

Subject: BEEBE THE DRUMMER

Some years ago he was drummer in Jules and the Polar Bears, Jules Shears old group.


Entered at Mon Sep 9 00:15:50 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: private? aye!

As my mom always used to say...

If the foo shits, wear it.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 23:50:28 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-048.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.48)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: UK Celebrity Survivors

I guess only Roger & Richie are going to follow the point of this- but I mentioned watching tonight's winner, DJ Tony Blackburn as a gold lamé clad guitarist-singer in 1963 or 1964. My sister tells me that in 1962, when she used to go to his shows, he'd get on the same #3 bus at five past eleven, which was the last bus (which Roger will know) carrying his gold lamé jacket in a holdall and travel home with the audience. I liked that image.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 23:27:37 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-183.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.183)

Posted by:

To Viney

Subject: for you to read when you fall out of your sack, whenever that is.

You may have way with your mouth, but you make a lousy private eye. Why don't you scroll further back and see who "American Son" really is as an example, instead of laying blame on my butt for someone badmouthing your buddy K. I have a hard time giving a shit about your opinions about anything anyway. Just don't point at me always. You know nothing.

Who rang your bell about any of this anyhow.?

Signed: well...you know who, right?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 23:00:00 CEST 2002 from dialup134-a.ts552.cwt.esat.net (193.203.156.134)

Posted by:

Hank

Location: Cork
Web: My link

Subject: Did You EVER know you're my He-Ro?

We played a wedding up in Sligo recently and, while we're setting up, this fella comes up to me and intros hisself.....Sean....I'd met him before at a gig we did in Dublin but only spoke briefly to him.....

This Sean fella is a GB lurker....he reads this shit we post....but only rarely posts.....He started introducing me to the arriving wedding guests as:

"Hank....big Band Fan!.......got his own personality on The Bands Web-site!!!!!"

....dude fell over backwards getting to the dancefloor when we played "Evangeline" as a waltz for the grannies at this wedding........

I alluded to this in a recent post....lurkers!......reading!......

I can only imagine that this GB is enormously entertaining in a soap operatic way to folks.....

I mean, it is to ME....and I post!......

It's a bit sad when you read what some people have to put up with as a result of posting in here...but, overall, this place is a very enjoyable pyscho-cyber field trip!.........

(uh, I dunno if you dig that description of it, but........ Thanks, Jan!)

........and if you're reading this, Sean....hello!.....that was a rockin' wedding!

(Yes, we play weddings - so long as you pay us very well and want a Bob Dylan/Band/Chuck Berry/Rolling Stones/Dead/Wailers-Beatle Hanks Wedel and Williams type of band to boogie for three hours........ AND accept FULLY we're not going to play "The Wind Beneath My Wings" or the latest Oasis/Britney song-atrocity......)


Entered at Sun Sep 8 22:45:52 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Location: Chaska, MN

I'd love to say Hi to any GBers who will be at the show tonight... I'll be wearing my black Garth T-shirt and a navy blue MN Twins baseball cap... Should be a great show!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 22:38:10 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp68489.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.185.108)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

JEFFrey! Your last post.....so simple.....so right on mon!....I loved and appreciated the reminders!...Btw....The new nippers are waiting for some new sound bytes from you!....

Btw2.....It's nice to see many people these days who elongate their words as I do.....It's soooooo comforting to know that I'm not the only expressive speller in this GB....;-D

To those of you who will be in London, Ontario to see Garth and Maud this evening......Have yourselves an amazing time like I did in NYC and Toronto!!.....They will just have to come back to Toronto and hopefully my camera won't be turned away in my home town again!....(I had no problem taking photos at The Bottom Line however).....

Bill Munson....say hellooooo today to Michael Fonfara at the Music Fest in Port Credit....Please continue to keep me informed....Unfortunately it wasn't in the cards this weekend..........Anyway, anyone who can work with Louuuuu in spite of his idiosyncrasies.....is someone I'd like to meet.....:-D


Entered at Sun Sep 8 22:17:24 CEST 2002 from wdse-eng2.wdse.org (131.212.19.54)

Posted by:

Marsen

Location: N Minnesota

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot

Just heard the latest on Gordon Lightfoot. He is now in stable condition in a Toronto hospital. He had some abdominal bleeding and pain, but doctors expect a full recovery!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 21:32:24 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

Subject: Gilberta Iman

I spend so much time teaching my kids right from wrong that I forget where I'm at. I definitely don't want to be the GB's "Miss Manners". I am sorry and I hope there is no hard feelings.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 21:20:11 CEST 2002 from rollingrock.taconic.net (205.231.149.33)

Posted by:

Gilberta Iman

Subject: David Beebe

A few posts ago, I enquired about David Beebe, a drummer who has recently passed away. Can anyone inform me if this is David Beebe from Coventry, a band from a million years ago. The bass player's name was Pete and lead was played by a guy named Billy, who wore an American flag leather jacket with fringe. (...sounds bad, but, it was really stunning) This band was rockin' and I always wondered what happened to David, a beautiful Adonis-like creature. Any info would be of great comfort.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 21:12:41 CEST 2002 from rollingrock.taconic.net (205.231.149.33)

Posted by:

Gilberta iman

Subject: Manners

Amanda, apparently we do not understand eachother's language. I meant no rudeness towards you in my "scroll" comment, let alone that is was a "GB putdown". Where did that come from? If I have offended you in any way, I apologize certainly. That was never my intent. Please forward an " Amanda's Book of Manners" in order that I do not repeat my errors or commit an agression in the future. Please feel most free to correct any spelling errors I make as it has never been my strong point.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 20:55:45 CEST 2002 from (80.84.130.132)

Posted by:

Kerry Livgren / Steve Walsh

Location: Kansas

Subject: GB

It's empty now, no friendly face and nothing goes within
I look around and I find no trace to tell me what has been
I came to learn perhaps to teach but I can tell somehow
The site that I was sent to reach has got no interest now
For those who made this place they dont remind and feel no pain
A stranger fate was never known


Entered at Sun Sep 8 20:03:19 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

Subject: Gilberta Iman

Your sensory skills are off. I wasn't trying to be sarcastic regarding your career. I was borrowing from what you wrote to tease BWNWIT. I am so happy you used one of The Band GB's ultimate cutdowns...regarding READING POSTS or SCROLL BY POSTS. Whether you read them or not is one thing, but making an announcement about it is another. I find that just as rude as correcting another poster's spelling. You don't have to read my posts, probably too melodramatic for you anyway.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 20:02:07 CEST 2002 from 12-249-69-3.client.attbi.com (12.249.69.3)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Chicago

Subject: my goodness

What in the world is going on here?

Overdubs on The Last Waltz: I thought we had discussed before that Ricky's bass playing was only overdubbed through some of Joni Mitchell's set, and that there was the odd spot that Rick simply prefered to clean up.

Garth also overdubbed some pieces because of a nasty hum from a blown speaker I thought. But I don't remember how much of Garth's stuff was overdubbed.

Robbie was actually in Los Angeles on the night of The Last Waltz and it is actually his stunt double doing most of the very dangerous guitar neck bobbing and tendinitis inducing raised hand vibrato thing. Robbie has later said that in interview portions his part was played by David Cassidy.

On a serious note: Gordon Lightfoot was hospitalized this weekend for undisclosed reasons.



Entered at Sun Sep 8 19:20:50 CEST 2002 from rollingrock.taconic.net (205.231.149.33)

Posted by:

Gilberta Iman

Location: usa

Subject: Not quite sure

Perhaps you misunderstood my post, Amanda. It was directed to BWNW...and the intent was to inform him that in spite of the things I have seen, it is refreshing to read his humor and opinions, just as we must scroll or read your posts. I sensed some sarcasm regarding my career but who really cares ? This week is especially reflective for me and my post was to BWN.. who lightens things up a bit. On a more serios note, I have heard of the passing of drummer David Beebe. Can someone tell me if he is the same David Beebe who played with Coventry many years ago ? I am so anxious to know if it was him as it has been many years since I have seen him and had no idea he was in the area.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 19:01:30 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

I would rather have more fun around here too. I am very much the fun loving type. Aggressive behavior brings on other aggressive behavior. If I posted everyday that so and so was an asshole and that I hated this and that, then might I expect some aggression? God knows that I would never want physical harm to occur to anyone because of the GB. This is the Internet, you've got to be careful. I have never been afraid to discuss the feud and I find it does relate to many aspects of discussions here. I just don't get how being on one side of the line, Levonista or Robertsonian, carries over into all other personal beliefs and values. I am the odd duck if that is the case. Don't you think that if Robbie had a manager that posted here on a daily basis, that we would all be having love-hate relationships with him too? We are all a bunch of fanatics...face it!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 19:01:01 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Amanda, as earnestly and forcefully as I will ALWAYS argue my point with anyone, the fact that someone disagrees with me never angers me in a personal way. There is a big difference between making threats and comments about someone's personal character based soley on their stated opinions, and arguing your point with vigor.

As much some, more sensitive folks perhaps, may disagree, I've never attacked anyone simply for having a differing opinion than mine. I've gotten angry when people mischaracterize what I've said, called me names, or gone been abusive themselves. There are, however, any number of people here who I disagree with strongly on certain issues who I would count amongst my best GB "friends." There are also people I now avoid, who agree with me on any number of issues.

I like arguing facts and interpretation of events. Two people can come to the same conclusion, facing the same exact facts and be completely reasonable about it. For example, my pacifist views were somewhat contrary to Peter's more hawkish views post-9/11, yet I still hold him in as high an esteem as anyone else here in the GB, and consider him a friend.

BWNWIT and I have passed a few less-than-complimentary emails back-and-forth, yet many (perhaps yourself) consider our views on Levon v Robbie to be rather similair (in someways, maybe, though I don't harbor the personal emnity towards Levon that he obviously does). When I first came to the GB, my first "incident" (all regular posters have them at one time or another) was with Donald Joseph - who in substance I almost always agree with, but in style seems to have a unique ability to offend me.

Ironically, my first contact with Serge was him emailing to congratulate me on bickering with DJoe (after Donald posted that I should be wary of making friends with Serge as he goes off the deep end with some regularity - a paraphrase).

I'm sorry if you feel I've ever "attacked" you in a personal way. I certainly have no personal animosity towards you. I've objected when you've put words in my mouth, and clearly we have a different perspective on some issues - but that's healthy.

Whereas, the crap Serge is pulling is not only disturbing, but unethical, immoral, and probably illegal (blackmail is usually a crime). It's got nothing to do with anything I've actually said. For whatever reason, probably because I've "allied" myself with the wrong people (do people really live this faction crap this seriously?), Serge doesn't like me personally, and will attack me regardless of what I've said or who I say it to.

Case in point. This latest adventure in la-la land was apparently precipitated by an eruption that actually started between Butch and some others. The irony is, Serge is no fan of Butch, and has launched very personal attacks his way on these pages.

I guess there's a weird honor that I've made Serge's top-shelf of "guys I hate."

Me? I don't have a list. I don't "hate" anybody.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 18:41:39 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-163.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.163)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Amanda- I think that ‘It is not appropriate to get aggressive with strangers because you disagree with their views’ is fair advice on and off the GB. The feud is one reason why aggression flows. Another is politics. Politics is something everyone has a view on, people get riled but I don’t think a Clinton supporter ever got persuaded by the views of a Bush supporter here, or vice versa. It’s been good to see less politics here recently. But in relation to The Band, it would appear to me that past support for Jimmy Carter and Clinton, support for Greenpeace (as well as Rick’s ‘Live on Breeze Hill’, ‘Somewhere Down the Crazy River’ is on ‘Rainbow Warriors’, a Greenpeace compilation), Rick’s support for Women’s refuges, Robbie’s support for Native American rights, Levon’s support for African-American artists who were ripped off, Levon’s attacks on rapacious record companies, would indicate a generally left-of-centre consensus, which may well be now out-of-date and no longer in action. I (a) don’t expect anyone to agree with me (b) do not “hate” anyone who argues the opposite.

By saying I valued the three people who were attacked doesn’t mean I don’t value others’ views too. They just didn’t happen to get attacked this weekend. And I’d love to see Serge spending his energy by telling us what a Hawks concert was like; what they played, what the scene was like.

Should I say this or not? Probably not, but I think it’s reasonable to say that the ‘Levonistas’ tend to respond more aggressively than the ‘Robertsonians.’ Though not always. That might be a reflection of the views expressed by the two principles in public. I’ve never heard any case of Robbie threatening any other member of The Band whether intended humorously or not, nor a case of him denigrating any member of The Band. In my opinion, a couple of the attacks made on Levon here recently were over the top and unfair, but the argument was started by intemperate comments attributed to Levon, which I accept that, as Butch tells us, were humorous ‘tall-talk’. So that’s discussing the feud. The feud will be part of the interchanges here. That’s inevitable. Mick v Keith. Mick & Keith v Brian. John v Paul. Lou v John Cale. CCR. Robbie v Levon. That’s rock & roll. Let’s get back to some fun!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 18:41:42 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-022castocp0227.dialsprint.net (65.178.96.227)

Posted by:

jeffrey

Subject: guestbook rules

Rule number 1--Get a life. Rule number 2-Do as I say , not as I do! Number 3--Get a life. There ,hope that helps


Entered at Sun Sep 8 18:35:14 CEST 2002 from sdn-ap-022castocp0227.dialsprint.net (65.178.96.227)

Posted by:

jeffrey

Subject: anson funderburgh and the rockets

Sorry Butch, looks like the Rockets are gonna beat you guys here to become the first real blues band to perform at the Knotty Pine here in Victor Idaho. Christ, it's about time!! I've done my best to hold down the fort out here in the sticks, but looks like ole Sammy Myers is gonna blow down the house!!! It's going to be a classic evening because it's a real , what's the term Levon uses in the Band autobiography video? " A shithole and a half!"? Well, maybe not quite that bad , but definitely a small road house that's seen a lot of good music lately.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 18:16:22 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Wow!, when Peter Viney gets pissed of, it's getting serious.

Try this - when the name of a GB poster pops into your head, don't you pretty much get an instant thought about what kind of person he/she is? - just from the gist of thier posts over the years, or even weeks. There are people who are always interesting, or always funny - or both. Some just seem like really nice folks.

There are obviously some who know The Band, or parts of the Band. Some of THOSE people carry it well. Some think they're hot-shit because of it - but they're not. Even worse are the people that think they are above everyone else. Even the occasional wacko's that pass through here are more fun.....

Whoever sent that e-mail to Matt is fucked-up - and I think Matt's post showed alot of character, and class that the "threat poster" dosen't posses on thier best day. As a matter of fact, the person who sends e-mails like that is a bully and a coward. They also have a hell of a nerve threatening to use this Guestbook against Matt. That dosen't show much respect for Jan and his efforts.

Peter = nice post.

Tenn = your post was funny as it gets. I just hope Matt didn't think it was making light of his post.

Mike D = there was a whole lot of discussion in here a while back about overdubbing of live tracks. I don't remember (as I said) just how much was done on TLW. I do remember Levon saying in his book that all the guys were bought in for overdubs, but he pretty much told them to "stuff it" as I recall. And as far as "feeling" goes, Rick definately oozzed feeling in his playing....Oh, and congrats on being expectant parents. I've got four myself. They are alot of work, and it changes your life - but they're worth it.

Lastly - big thanks to Jan for showing great restraint during this last debacle. I think Matt handled it great.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 18:05:55 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: Reply to Marsen

Yes, I read your post! When I caught my name mentioned my first thought was 'uh-oh' given recent days out here, but how nice to read what you wrote! Three albums I highly recommend for you, Tull's 1995 album Roots to Branches, 1999's Dot.Com, and Ian Anderson's 2000 album Secret Language of Birds.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 17:57:19 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

Subject: Reason

I can imagine what it would feel like to be harrassed by someone from the Internet. I would be devasted if I knew that someone had my home address and phone number. I would definitely take all proper precautions to keep my family and myself safe. If anyone gets treatment like this, please do not laugh it off. I feel strongly that we all agree on these points.

I am not, however, grasping the full meaning of Mr. Viney's post that reads,

"It is not appropriate to get aggressive with strangers because you disagree with their views."

Does this statement refer to postings on this GB AND beyond? BWNWIT, Ben Pike and MattK have all been aggressive towards strangers who didn't share their opinions, via The Band GB. I have no idea what these three gentlemen do through private emails. Mind you, I am not siding with Serge or any other alleged harrasser. I am just trying to get a grasp on this code of ethics that we are supposed to be following. Mr. Viney also wrote that,

Ben Pike, MattK and BWNWIT "are valued contributors to this site who have opinions. Often strong ones, which is a good thing. I don’t feel threatened by views on The Band that are different to mine."

There are many people here who have strong opinions worth sharing and who do so in a way without alienating others and that is a true gift. EVERYONE, not just MattK, Ben Pike, BWNWIT, Peter Viney or Serge, should be able to feel unthreatened by their differing views of The Band or any other topic. We all have to admit that the source of most of the turmoil boils down to "THE FEUD". There was a line drawn in the sand and one side is the Levonistas and the other side the Robertsonians. Some people blame Levon and some blame Robbie. Does "THE FEUD" have to be the fuel for so much hate? And when you think about it...isn't it the posters of the GB who add even more fuel to the flame? I had to step out of my one-dimensional world and way of thinking to realize that I couldn't hate one person I didn't know because of another I didn't know either. I think it is pretty safe to say that must of us don't have a personal relationship with Robbie or Levon. I love the Band that was and is no longer. I love them so much that I even care enough to visit this site and post, as all of you. Let Robbie and Levon battle it out and don't hate them for THEIR lives and how they chose/choose to live them. Discuss the hell out of it all you want, but let it be about them and not you. I realize that it is a very hard thing to do because it really feels personal. Now I will take my rose colored glasses off for a minute while I say something to BWNWIT. I never before had reason to doubt that you were an okay guy. I don't know if something went down with you and Levon in the past. The way you have attacked him recently was very hurtful. You went beyond the usual "Levon is tarnishing the Band's image" and "Robbie is a money hungry jerk in Armani suits" cutdowns. You were really trying to demolish Levon and I hope it wasn't out of your anger at Butch. This would have been really crappy behavior if it had been aimed at Robbie too. Can't we all be a little more careful with each other? Look at where all this aggressive behavior led to this week...someone being stalked by another poster. As much as MattK and I have openly disagreed with each other, I would never wish him or anyone else here any ill will. Sorry this post took up so much space. This website and Jan's hard work are of value to me and I don't want to see it destroyed.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 16:56:54 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: true 'dat

Serge is also the only person who's posted in the GB and left the gtconnect.net fingerprint. And while I'm sure there are many people in the world that may think me a jerk (not that I really care), Serge is the only guy who's made an issue out of demanding to know "who I am." The fact that he has a track record of doing the same with others adds weight to finger him as the culprit.

Of course, all of that is circumstantial, and like OJ, maybe Serge is the target of some freakish plot or coincidence. Yep that, could very well be it.

Except Serge has sent me emails using his "tangobeat@yahoo.com" account before - and signed his name.

Seriously, Serge, you gotta seek some counciling. I've joked about this before, but you're not right in the head.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 16:44:37 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

Subject: BWNWIT & Gilberta Iman

BWNWIT: You fooled me. I thought BWNWIT meant that you had returned to Tennessee after being away and that your wife didn't come with you. You can tell I have been married for awhile. My mind can't remember the single girl mode at all. Gilberta Iman went from good and evil in the world,life in it's true state,war torn villages, crying children and starving mothers to BWNWIT adding delight to these pages. You should be quite proud of yourself. Gilberta has seen many horrors and you of all people have touched this person's heart. Maybe you ain't so bad after all.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 16:21:25 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-122.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.122)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: A serious comment

I am fed up with deliberate troublemakers who post under many names and try again and again to stir dissent. This is not funny, but genuinely unpleasant.This is a MUSIC site run from a Norwegian University. Jan has tolerated our excursions into many other subjects, and it is the free-flowing nature of the GB forum which is one of its appeals. It is not appropriate to get aggressive with strangers because you disagree with their views. It is not appropriate to issue veiled threats in the manner of “a disgruntled postal worker”. It is not appropriate to probe beyond people’s chosen web IDs. I have had a look back through the last 48 hours.

You will see that Serge today writes from “ gtconnect.net (66.59.176.167)” and 66-59-176-112.while one of the four creepy posts yesterday came from gtconnect.net (66.59.176.155). First we had “American Son” on cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71) attacking Ben Pike and BWNWIT. Then two posts later we had American Son, but now writing from soami.rrcnet.com (168.143.113.119) attacking Matt K. Then clearly the same person again, pretending to defend Matt while creepily revealing knowledge of his name and town from gtconnect.net (66.59.176.155). Then Mighty Mouse who erased most of the info line, leaving (207.236.25.220) again making silly ‘I know where you are’ jibes. These were obviously from one person, with four e-mail addresses trying to be threatening and creepy. No sane poster needs four addresses in one day.

I was disgusted to read the e-mail which was sent to Matt and posted here earlier, When Serge used to send his threatening “I know where you live” e-mails a few years back, at least he used to sign them. At least three of us got them back then, which is why we recognize his style today. As for Serge, who has used about fifty pseudonyms and addresses over the last five years saying that “I never bothered to hide my identity,” then he is a liar.

This weekend’s victims include Matt, BWNWIT and Ben Pike. All are valued contributors to this site who have opinions. Often strong ones, which is a good thing. I don’t feel threatened by views on The Band that are different to mine. The fact that someone was an early friend of The Hawks, and has contributed photos to the site is outweighed by the constant attempts to undermine and ultimately destroy the hard work that Jan has put in here.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 15:56:42 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-112.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.112)

Posted by:

Huh !?

Subject: K

Unless "what" stops ? Call Toronto, or Seattle or Bangor Maine. What's anything got to do with London ? Get lost. I've had enough of your nonsense.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 15:13:03 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: threats

Contacting the police in London OT is not a "threat," it's a promise, unless it stops NOW.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 15:06:41 CEST 2002 from wdse-eng2.wdse.org (131.212.19.54)

Posted by:

Marsen

Location: N Minnesota

Subject: Ronnie on the Big Screen

Greetings to all! With the many Canadians that frequent the GB, Im sure many have heard of The Red Green Show. It's a Canadian show on PBS on stations throughout the northern US and Canada. Anyway, Red was in town for a private screening of his new feature length big-screen movie "Duct tape forever". Well during the movie they stop at a little gas station in Canada, and theres this older dude in grey overalls pumping the gas. Some guy behind me says to someone "Is that Kenny Rogers?" I turn to my wife and exclaim "It's The Hawk!" Sure enough it was Him, and he even had a sewn-on name badge on his chest that read "Ronnie". That kinda made my day. He appeared again at the end and was at the top of the list of guest stars in the credits. Unfortunately, I met Red before the movie or else I would have asked him about Ronnie, I'm sure he knows him...........JTullFan if you see this, I got the new Tull DVD and it's great! Some of your discussions have inspired me to explore them more, and it's always fun re-discovering something great from long ago. Later All!!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 14:50:40 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Get some psychiatric help, Serge. Seriously.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 14:18:33 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-167.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.167)

Posted by:

Me again

Subject: K's beef.

I don't see my name anywhere on the Email you transcribed. Be careful K. Don't jump to conclusions.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 14:18:21 CEST 2002 from zorg70.revealed.net (208.243.237.70)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Location: Midwest

BWNF...I love it! Humor, satire and sarcasm rolled into one.

Mike


Entered at Sun Sep 8 14:13:06 CEST 2002 from h66-59-176-167.gtconnect.net (66.59.176.167)

Posted by:

Serge

Subject: Mr Kennedy

You poor schmuck. I have no idea of what your beef's all about. You seem always to lay the blame on me. Do you really believe that I am the only one here who is annoyed by you ? I have better things to do than to waste my time. And don't threaten me because some dude is pissed at you. (Scroll back a few postings)

Go blow your saxophone.

BWNWIT : Now that's a great and honest CV.

Mine is too boring to publish. I am a big fan of what used to be THE BAND, that's it. I never bothered to hide my identity as some do. At least now we all know who we are. Thanks, whoever...


Entered at Sun Sep 8 12:50:32 CEST 2002 from rollingrock.taconic.net (205.231.149.33)

Posted by:

Gilberta Iman

Location: usa

Subject: Thanks BWNW......

I'm a journalist. That enables me to go to far reaching places and see what's going on, good or evil,and tell the stories of people. What I see is not fiction. What I see is life in it's true state. Been in the jungle, been in war-torn God aweful villages with starving mothers and crying children. Tenn., You add delightful life to this page, which for reasons of assignment I am not always privy to, because you have wit, humor and a good heart. All the sentimental moanings of "words on a page" backlash you have received have missed your point. I got it and always do.. So, I thank you for filling the chasm between "Band Scholars" and melodramatics. The Band is great....no surprise to anyone there. We have all enjoyed their music and honor their God-given talent. Maybe those with anger management problems can put them aside and those wearing rose colored glasses can remove them for just a bit of time and let's enjoy each other's company listening to some good music. Please continue your posting, BWN...Someone is bound to offer you a great career in humor and satire. Thanks


Entered at Sun Sep 8 09:11:46 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: Livin' in the Land of Nod (cause it sounds neat)

Subject: ? and the Mysterians

Tennessee You damn liar!

Fred _ People don't like lima beans because they have that funny skin on the outside and that grainy texture against your tongue...kinda like eggs rolled in sand. You have to kind of get used to them. I used to feel that way about apricots, till I seen that movie "Goin' South".

MattK _ Thanks for telling us all that personal stuff about yourself. How ya ain't got no wisdom teeth and things like that. I just have one tiny question. How big is it?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 08:21:50 CEST 2002 from tu4.nirai.ne.jp (218.40.170.165)

Posted by:

Fred

BWNWITennessee: I thought I WAS dictator of Uzkranistekipanimanistan...go figure!

Why do people dislike lima beans???!?!??!?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 06:39:48 CEST 2002 from qn-212-58-184-135.quicknet.nl (212.58.184.135)

Posted by:

John Walter

Location: Den Helder Holland

Subject: The Band Forever

The first time I hear the band, I was cleaning up the kitchen, and by surprise I was ready in an hour, what usely took two hours, the video who was running stopt(The Last Waltz), and I stopt too, so every time I go to do the diss, I put on The Last Waltz, and now I am falling right in love with it....... Great page guys Greetings from holland


Entered at Sun Sep 8 05:51:00 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-124-17.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.124.17)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Okay, I'll go next. I was born in the back of a Greyhound station in Hungry Horse, Montana, in the first year of the Great Depression, on the night of a full moon. My father was a circus clown who died when I was 12 in a violent altercation with the bearded lady, who he was in a love triangle with, along with the one-armed midget. I never knew who my mother was. I spent my adolesence working as a pasty warmer in a Thunder Bay tittie bar (thanks, Chong!). After a scary work-related accident in which I nearly lost an eye, I drifted down to Uzkranistekipanimanistan, where I eventually became dictator. I abandoned my reign about a decade later, after I converted to Amishiasm. To make a long story short, as I'm sure you can tell by my name, I currently reside in Alaska, with a Husky, Malamute and a Siamese Fighting Fish named Billy. As you can probably also tell by my name, I have never been married, although a girl did grab my ass one time. I am currently employed as head fry chef at the Juno House of Burgers. I enjoy spending my free time weeping, creating butter sculptures of Robbie Robertson, and downloading pornography. On the weekends, I sometimes sit in on ocarina with the local Inuit blues band. Oh, I also invented the internet. Okay, who's next? Rosalind?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 04:22:26 CEST 2002 from ac89a785.ipt.aol.com (172.137.167.133)

Posted by:

O'Toole

Subject: Lucinda Williams Album - Band Pick

Not sure if this has already been answered - but a while back someone mentioned Lucinda Williams had put out an album of songs she'd picked herself - and that one of them was a Band tune. I saw it today in the store- the song was "It Makes No Difference." One of my favorite songs.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 04:18:23 CEST 2002 from sam3.revealed.net (208.16.227.98)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Location: Midwest

Subject: empty_glass76@yahoo.com

Sam, I don't see any differences in sound vs. playing on the DVD. I just don't belive what the site says. Then again, some things WERE corrected. In Levon's book, John Simon alluded to Rick's bass being out of tune. Maybe he hit a few bum notes that were later re-done. I checked that website for other movies, and they aren't all correct. Ah ha!!! But ya know, the concert as well as the filming was problematic at times. In spite of whatever was overdubbed or re-done, it's still The Band in all it's glory! And if Rick hits a bum note, I don't mind as long as the feeling's there...And no matter what incarnation of The Band, it was always there (at least to my ears).

I've really been watching The Last Waltz a lot since I returned home from a week's vacation in L.A. and Seattle. I finally relaized that I had the option of widescreen on the DVD. Now if they could locate outtakes and release a dvd of those....ahhh! :)

And since my wife and I recently discovered we'll be parents, "All La Glory" seems to be taking on a new meaning for me. It's a really exciting time, all around. And I'm proud to say I turned her onto The Band. She's coming around...Since she like country music, she seems to prefer Levon's vocals the most.

What's wrong with John D.? I always enjoy his posts and his demeanor. Whatever the case, I hope he's alright. Take care all. Goodnight.

Mike


Entered at Sun Sep 8 03:11:28 CEST 2002 from sc-hiltonhead1a-a-197.hhe.adelphia.net (68.70.18.197)

Posted by:

Amanda

Subject: John & ?

Get well quickly, Mr. John Donabie!

The mystery is one of the best things about this place.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 03:06:13 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: What the fuck's going on in here?

I wish I had waited a few hours before posting that message that ended up between MattK's. Wow!


Entered at Sun Sep 8 02:59:12 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: Stylepoints

And whatever "Maybe that will stop you from butting in where it does not concern you" means, rest assured, I will not hesitate to comment, ask questions or even criticize in anyway different than I have.

How about it Serge. Let's see your name and location and a biography on you. That is, unless you've got something that YOU'RE ashamed of?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 02:54:41 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Thank You Diamond Lil

Mr D. Our best wishes and feelings are right there with ya. I don't know ya, but you're one sweet guy....I can tell.

Someone mentioned the other day how the folks here are only words on a screen. Maybe so, but I have found that when words come out of someone in written form, there comes a personalness that cannot be faked even if we try. The strengths and weakness's show. The need for expression, the need for acceptance, a desire to be liked... I watch everything that goes on in here, and I remember things. There are real souls behind every word spoken. I for one, no longer will underestimate the importance of a place like this, obviously formed out of a love for The Band and their fans. I remember Levon once saying that his dream was to see The Band last forever, being a family and traveling around like the Grateful Dead did. He didn't get his wish of course, but maybe this Guestbook is a way of fulfilling his wish to a certain extent....

I feel a little emotional and reflective today. Maybe it's the crop duster terrorist thing...I think they're calling it the "drones of death". Maybe it's hearing about Ronnie, maybe it's the 9/11 anniversary. Maybe it's everything combined. Hold on to your loved ones and take care good friends.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 02:50:16 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: Threats, Blackmail and Biography

Friends. Please forgive me for having to air this out for public consumption. However, I do not deal well with threats of blackmail.

Serge. Do whatever you feel you must. I have nothing to hide. Keep in mind, I will not hesitate to contact US and Canadian Federal law enforcement, as well contact the London, Ontario authorities and lodge charges of assault, harassment, and blackmail. You possess no information about me that any amateur using a search engine couldn't find. Your actions, however, have exposed you to serious legal risk. I encourage you to just let it drop now.

If I get one strange phone call, if I suddenly start getting unsolicited sales calls, if someone so much as slows down driving by my house, I will not hesitate to agressively pursue any and all civil remedies available to me under both US and Canadian law.

For everyone's edification, here's an email I just got from Serge:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Date: Sat, 7 Sep 2002 15:48:14 -0700 (PDT)
From: "niceone" tangobeat@yahoo.com | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
Subject: Whereabouts
To grubbery@yahoo.com

What do you think ? Should your real name and address be made public on the GB ? You've remained secretive too long. Always knew who was what and where. NOT FAIR. I think it's time to open things up. Maybe that will stop you from butting in where it does not concern you. Let me know James Matthew Kennedy. Grandson of the Doaks. From Pownal Maine. Or should I phone you at 207-XXX=XXXX. ? (*) Send an Email, and promise to mind your own fucking business. Or start signing in with your complete name and coordinates.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(*) I'm sure, after our fun with the Nigerians lately, people will respect me not wanting to post my phone number in a GB that's regurlarly scanned by less than honest folk.

Lessee, what else can I tell you?

I'm 36. Have a brother and two sisters. I was born in Denver, CO and have lived in Portland, OR, Mass, VT, NH, Wash DC and Maine. I majored in sax performance at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colorado where I studied classical sax with Roger Greenberg. Professionally, for the past 10 years I've focused on blues and r/b, and have had the pleasure of playing with Luther Guitar Jr. Johnson, Terry Adams (of NRBQ), and Susan Tedeschi (before she was famous). I was recently featured on The William Caslon Experience's contribution to Upstairs Records latest compilation, "Blue Light One" (that's me on TWCE's song, "Valis").

I also work as an information designer/architect for a startup in Boston (I telecommute), called TopicalNet. Before that, I helped build many of financial services applications still used by many commercial and professional stock trading web sites. I was also responsible for news production at the Washington Post's web site (I'm the guy that pushed the button that published the Newsweek story for the first time that broke the Lewinsky story - it's true!). Before that, I built the original PC Connection and MacConnection computer catalog sites. I've been involved in public online information systems since 1990 when I helped launch the world's first gui-based online newspaper for The Rocky Mountain News in Denver, CO.

I have a wife who is a writer and former political consultant and reporter. We no kids, two dogs (a dalmatian and a shiba inu), and a big fat groundhog on our land that we've nicknamed "Elvis."

Actually my GREAT grandfather was named Doak. My grandfather's name was Marvel. My dad's name is Kennedy. My ancestors on my mom's side (the Doaks) were farmers and sailors and/or farmers from Portugal, Canada and America who married Hawaiian women. My great great grandfather actually owned Waikiki Beach and a large chunk of Oahu, which was mostly swamp at the time, and was sold to finance a failed poi farm on the windward side of Oahu.

My dad's from SW Virginia (Lee County, VA and Harlan, KY), where he was the first male in his family to NEVER work in a coal mine (and he had 4 brothers - one who was at Pearl Harbor and another who died in 1944, crashing short of their runway in England on return from a bombing run over Germany). My mother's father was a petty officer on submarines in both WWII and Korea - he once sailed under the north pole. My GREAT grandfather on my father's side, Joseph Leonard Dodge Kennedy served with the Confederacy in the Civil War, earning a Confederate Medal of honor for something no one can remember. Reputedly he's named after HIS great grandfather, Joseph Leonard Dodge, who family legend says fought in the Revolutionary War, though I've never found any record of him.

Wow, lots of geneaology there. Serge was so interested in my genealology, though, I figured it was important to him that everyone know.

My favorite color is purple. My car is a Honda. I never registered for a political party until 2000 when I registered Green Party. My tenor sax is a Selmer SA 80, series one and my Soprano is a piece of crap Yahamaha I bought on the cheap.

I don't have my wisdom teeth, but I still have both my tonsils and my appendix. I sleep on the right side of the bed. I hate lima beans.

Anything else anyone want to know?


Entered at Sun Sep 8 01:45:38 CEST 2002 from (63.164.145.33)

Posted by:

Caledonia

I found the Lucinda Williams' CD ("Artist's Choice") I mentioned a few days ago. The Band song she chose for the CD is "It Makes No Difference".

A few Tom Waits' quotes from an interview he did w/Uncut magazine in June 2002:

Discussing his relationship with his wife and musical collaborator (Kathleen):

"We used to play a game called Let's Go Get Lost. We'd drive into a town, and I would say, 'But, baby - I know this place like the back of my hand. I can't get lost.' And she'd say, 'Oh hell you can't, turn here, now turn here. Now go back, now turn left, now go right again.' And we'd do that all night until we got lost, and she'd say, 'See, I thought you knew this town?' Now you're getting somewhere, now you're lost. That's kind of a good metaphor for how we collaborate."

"Songs are sometimes at their most satisfying when they confuse you - you don't listen to them for information. It's not like you read a recipe on a box of macaroni. If you listen to a song, you're asking to be confused or mystified. You're asking to go get lost."

"If you're a creative person you're always doing something creative. There's an old expression: 'The way you do anything is the way you do everything'. So if you're creative about how you make dinner, then you'll be creative about whatever else you do."


Entered at Sun Sep 8 01:25:40 CEST 2002 from 64-80-53-74-access.surferz.net (64.80.53.74)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

Subject: Good thoughts for a friend

I'd like to ask all of you to keep our friend John Donabie in your thoughts. I'm a great believer in strength in numbers.. and there's no such thing as too many good wishes. Please get well soon my friend. Hug.


Entered at Sun Sep 8 00:49:40 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

MattK = your quite right about Joe Morello being a great drummer. I didn't know he was legally blind - but if go into any drum shop, evryone will give kudos to Morello.

If Rick's bass playing in TLW was indeed re-done - why? I can't imagine that he played bad. Maybe the recording didn't cut the mustard?.......Sorry if this is an old subject matter - but if it is, I don't remember - and it's better than calling people names, and all that cursing shit (opps) :-)


Entered at Sat Sep 7 23:52:05 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Carny / Ben Black

I just wanted to remind any one listening in Band country that Carny is being shown this month on the Encore movie stations. They're playing it as a part of a Jodie Foster marathon deal. Check your local listing for times. For anyone who hasn't seen it, it's a pretty good picture.

I love the jazz stuff here today. There is a wonderful scat singer from here in Seattle named Ben Black. If ya like scat, he's the ticket.

..oh..no need to comment on that dumb old joke..I'm gonna stop that and start appreciating and respecting this wonderful site more...before we lose it.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 23:36:43 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-075.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.75)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: There's always a Band link …

Taking a further look at Evelyn Glennie's fascinating website- in 2000, she was working with Michael Brauer. who it says produced Dylan's "Live 1966" - the CD sleeve actually says "electric concert mixed by Michael H. Brauer."


Entered at Sat Sep 7 23:20:28 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie

Location: wales

Subject: walesvfinland

kalervo. thank you for your kind words. i did not expect us to win. my friends and i as we watched the game in the pub were hoping for a draw. as it was, a great day for welsh football. your manager didnt help when he was quoted in the papers this morning as saying we were the worst team in the group. he must have really wound our boys up . still, theres a long way to go yet. and finland had us on the rack more than once today. a great game. see you in cardiff.best wishes. richie.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 22:47:08 CEST 2002 from cache-mtc-ac02.proxy.aol.com (64.12.96.71)

Posted by:

Spinell Tappe

Location: Better Days

Subject: Dumb Drummers (& Smart Pigs)

I'm not really going to anger anyone by talking about dumb drummers (or deaf or blind ones), but I will comment on that Clinton/pig joke from the last century. I just wanted to update the hilarity by suggesting that Dubya trade his drunken daughters for a couple of porkers. At least pigs are intelligent...


Entered at Sat Sep 7 21:22:38 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-041.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.41)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: drummers

Thanks Roger for the link- that's her. A very appealing personality I recall, and she can play!

Thanks also Matt K for the Brubeck note- As I tend to do, I've been playing 'It's A Raggy waltz' a lot recently. Don't know why, but I heard it in astore and it's stuck! I went and got the album.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 21:11:06 CEST 2002 from zorg203.revealed.net (208.243.237.203)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Location: Midwest
Web: My link

Subject: empty_glass76@yahoo.com

I found this website by chance. Check out the link. Even if it's true, I still love the movie!!!

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 7 21:06:18 CEST 2002 from zorg203.revealed.net (208.243.237.203)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Location: Midwest

Subject: Thank you Calvin

Thank you so much Calvin. I appreciate it. I shop at amazon a LOT! I never even thought to look there. I must be losing it.

As for blind drummers, don't forget Stevie Wonder. He even jammed with Jimi Hendrix during a BBC session. Incidentally, this can be heard on 2 tracks on the 1998 Hendrix set "BBC Sessions" ("I Was Made To Love Her" and "Jammin'"). I guess you don't need to see to be able to play. Ya gotta love Stevie...

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 7 20:51:48 CEST 2002 from ptd-24-194-189-156.maine.rr.com (24.194.189.156)

Posted by:

MattK

Subject: Blind Drummers

The first (only?) guy who comes to my mind when discussing blind drummers is Joe Morello, who was Dave Brubeck's drummer during his most popular era in the late-50s and early 60s. Morello wore coke-bottle glasses, and reputedly could make out dim shapes, but was considerered legally blind. He's also, perhaps, one of the more underrated drummers out there. As Brubeck's drummer during his "Time Out" era, Morellow is the guy who had to come up with to play in odd meters (5/4 with "Take Five" and 7/8 with "Blue Rondo A La Turk" among others). Blue Rondo eventually became the song Dave used to feature drummers in future recordings/concerts. Anyone familiar with the first Carnegie Hall album that Brubeck recorded can tell you no one ever swung 7/4 harder and with more sensitivity than Joe - considering he was the FIRST guy to make such odd meters swing makes him a pioneer of the first order, IMHO).

Most drummers I've met who know Joe's playing will gush forever about him. Sadly, since he was identified with somewhat "commercial" jazz of the era, at a time when Elvin Jones and Tony Williams were forever changing the roll (heh , pun intended) of drummers in jazz and all forms of music, Morello, sadly, has ended up a kind of footnote for many folks, even many jazz fans.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 20:37:03 CEST 2002 from dxiii.hdyn.saunalahti.fi (195.74.4.213)

Posted by:

Kalervo

Location: The miserable soccer country
Web: My link

Subject: Tom T. and other favorites

Thanks Ilkka and your dog: Kiitos Ilkka! Oh yes this furious Ostrobothnian don' t like to be the second-rate human being, as human-beings we are equal, to be a president or star is just an overcoat...dying parts of this play...And yes Tom T. Hall is America' s Veikko Lavi, the real fine storyteller...By the way my wife has Karelian roots...

American diet brings to my mind how little is there (and here) a talk about addiction (alcoholism included) in music business. I guess the Band was affected by addiction much more than it has been documented. Richard and maybe others, at least Rick, too...Maybe it is because the western world is so addicted there is so much blindness in these matters...

Richie: Finland is so bad soccer country that it hurts... Congratulations!

Ulbiman: Oh..you know Hurriganes?! Finnish bands are quite popular in Germany: Him, Nightwish and some others... Oh well, Finland loves Rammstein...

If someone is interested in Jorma Kaukonen' s brother Peter,the original member of Jefferson Starship, whose album Black Kangaroo is a minor classic, here his web pages. He is a professional therapist nowadays, but is still playing.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 20:27:27 CEST 2002 from cache-wit2-hsi.cableinet.co.uk (62.30.192.2)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Moseley, Birmingham, UK
Web: My link

Subject: Pinball Wizards

Peter, you must mean Evelyn Glennie. She's an enormously gifted concert percussionist who spills over into a range of genres. See her home page above.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 20:02:23 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Jeff

Location: Brooklyn

Calvin, your characterization of Prof "Louie" Hurwitz was right on the money. Lou is a genuine, kind, friendly person. He also is an excellent musician, songwriter and producer, and one of the guys that knows his way around the music business that actually will give someone a helping hand and advice.

The Cromatix is composed of similarly made up people. Everyone in that band is rock steady musically, and you will not find any attitudes there. They all are nice everyday people.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 18:54:47 CEST 2002 from modem139.phl-tc03b.fcc.net (63.121.117.226)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE
Web: My link

Subject: Joni

Carmen - No, The Last Time I Saw Richard is about her first ex-husband, Richard Mitchell. BTW if you want a preview of what the new album might sound like, Larry Klein produced, and Vince Mendoza arranged her last album as well. It also was heavily orchstrated but only included two Joni songs, Case of You, and Both Sides Now (which is its title). The rest were 30's-40's torch songs. And it's exquisite. (see link).


Entered at Sat Sep 7 18:22:24 CEST 2002 from 12-249-69-3.client.attbi.com (12.249.69.3)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Chicago

Subject: Charlie Sexton

Bones: I think you are refering to Charlie's second album that has Rick Danko on it. His first album was called Pictures for Pleasure. It was released in 1985 and background vocals are credited to Merchant Bankers. There is a Thanks To Dylan's Rolling Thunder Review lead guitarist Mick Ronson on the album though.

Viney: Your question about Chicago set me thinking. My brother was a Chicago fan and by the time I got to sorting through his albums Chicago was in there late seventies "Hot Streets" phase. I remember barely getting past the album cover to put the record on the player. It didn't last long from there. It took me a long time to learn that Chicago made music that was not just saccharine ballads.

John D: Thanks for the update on The Hawk's spirits and enormous heart.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 17:58:44 CEST 2002 from cache-dg05.proxy.aol.com (205.188.208.137)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: Mike's question and the Crowmatix

You can get Richard's CD on Amazon.com Mike, maybe a $1 or $2 more, but worth it for the speed of delivery and ease of use. I caught The Crowmatix and Fat Fish & Blues in CLeveland last night, they were fantastic. Their originals were fantastic and they did a whole heck of a lot of Band covers as well, a night well spent. On a more personal note, after the 2cd set I wandered over to their merchandise table, bought a CD, and began to chat with the guy working it. I noted Louie was setting alone behind the bandstand and I asked the guy, whose name I believe was Eugene, if he Louie would mind if I just stepped over and said hello. After getting the OK, I just went up and introduced myself, said I enjoyed the music and thank him for the evening, but then as I started to depart when he asked me to set down and proceeded to spend the next 15 minutes or so shooting the breeze about the Band, the Band associated groups, and music in general. What a really decent, genuine guy. I went away with even more appreciation for their music.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 17:55:40 CEST 2002 from filter.lpl.london.on.ca (198.96.80.15)

Posted by:

Stuffedcatlitter

Subject: Weird names

Poor Kramedogsdish. Is someone making fun of your name ? Is it real ? If not, why don't you let us know the real one. I think that guy has it almost right. Kramedogspuke is better.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 17:01:54 CEST 2002 from bob44.revealed.net (208.16.227.47)

Posted by:

Mike D.

Location: Midwest

Subject: empty_glass76@yahoo.com

Ahh, it's great to be back in here after a long vacation. I come back and there's good news and sad news. Very saddened to hear about The Hawk but I hope and pray that he's doing well.

Also, looking forward to the Rick Danko release too. And I FINALLY got Garth's cd. Came 2 days ago...My head is still spinning from it. I can say that it's not safe to play this while driving :) Too distracting, too "feel good"...But that's Garth. For me, he always sets the mood with whatever he plays. Lastly, I am having a hell of a time trying order Richard's cd. I HAD a number to call, but lost it. And I don't quite relish the Yen/Dollars exchange. Can anyone help me? I would appreciate it. And what else have I missed? Happy to be be back.

Mike


Entered at Sat Sep 7 16:23:10 CEST 2002 from 0-1pool155-62.nas64.philadelphia1.pa.us.da.qwest.net (65.129.155.62)

Posted by:

G-Man

What a life,,,on my way to Sterling/Hannibal NY to see THE JIMEWEIDER BAND and Cromatix!!! Hope to see some of ya there!!!


Entered at Sat Sep 7 15:37:11 CEST 2002 from (207.236.25.220)

Posted by:

Mighty Mouse

Subject: to the KOOK

Hickory Dickory Doak

My mouse has found the bloke

MattK might get a poke

Cuz he has lost his cloak.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 14:32:29 CEST 2002 from (64.80.240.18)

Posted by:

Diamond Lil

George: The tune you're referring to is called "Rockin Chair", and you'll find it on the 'Brown Album', or the one just titled "The Band".

Ben Pike: How nice of you to share your sentimental um....journey through breakfast with us! :-)

JohnD: What a wonderful post about your friend Ronnie. Thanks for sharing. He sounds as if he's made of the same strong stuff as Levon is. I hope so.

Have a good day everyone. Hug Jan.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 14:21:49 CEST 2002 from schltns-3.demon.nl (212.238.196.9)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Beste George Frankena, de song heet Rockin' Chair, is te vinden op het album The Band, en op deze voortreffelijke website kun je alles erover vinden. Kijk maar goed en klik op alles wat je tegenkomt. Veel plezier!


Entered at Sat Sep 7 14:01:07 CEST 2002 from node-c-b2ba.a2000.nl (62.194.178.186)

Posted by:

George Frankena

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: Name of a song

Can anyone tell me if there is a song from the Band with the words OOOOH, to be home again. If so, what is the name of the song and on wich album can I find it.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 12:30:16 CEST 2002 from du-tele3-143.mailbox.co.uk (195.82.121.143)

Posted by:

Peter Viney

Subject: Pinball wizards?

Drummers - wasn’t there a deaf drummer? Or rather classical percussionist? I saw something on TV on her and thought at first it was a piss take, but it wasn’t. She could feel the air movement of other instruments or something! She played a bit on the show, and was actually good. Her story then appeared in at least two educational textbooks, supposedly as inspiring. Anyway, it did seem truly weird beyond the call of equal opportunities legislation. I can see how it would work if the drummer started the number (like a beat box) but not how it’d be easy for her to accompany.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 12:17:16 CEST 2002 from pcp01420995pcs.lndsd101.pa.comcast.net (68.81.35.162)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Joni Mitchell

For all the Joni Mitchell fans see the following article:

http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/2002-09-05-joni-mitchell_x.htm

I noticed one song listed is The Last Time I Saw Richard. Does this have anything to do with RM?

Best Regards!


Entered at Sat Sep 7 09:02:56 CEST 2002 from inktomi1-swa.server.ntlworld.com (213.105.224.4)

Posted by:

richie the brit

Location: uk

Subject: brown eyed girl/isle of white

dear brown eyed girl. i think you may have 2 isle of white festivals mixed up. the footage you refer to of free singing allright now and joni pleading with the crowd to show some respect are from the 1970 festival headlined by hendrix, the doors and the who. other acts included miles davis, tiny tim, rory galagher and elp. it was filmed as message to love. dylan and the band were at the 1969 festival. they played desolation row at the end of the 1970festival film, because of the hill outside the festival fence called dr where people could watch the festival for free. message to love is a great movie. check out the doors footage. jim in all his bearded , bloated ragged glory.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 05:20:09 CEST 2002 from ool-18bd4b83.dyn.optonline.net (24.189.75.131)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Ed Blayzor = thanks for the info on the upcoming Harrison CD. I'm looking forward to it.

John D = nice post on the Hawk - it was good to read

Lil = great quote you posted, and much needed

Tenn = the only blind drumming that comes to mind is none other than Stevie Wonder. He worked with McCartney on the excellent "Tug of War" album, and he drums on at least one track on the album. The song is called, "What's That You're Doing?". I'm not sure if he drums on any others. I just remember being amazed (maybe) when I first read that. Being a drummer myself, I can tell you that you can get so used to your drum-set to the point where you can close your eyes and you just know where everything is.

"Watch out now,take care

beware the thoughts that linger

winding up inside your head-

The hopelessness around you

in the dead of night

Beware of sadness"

"It can hit you; it can hurt you-

Make you soreand what is more

that is not what we are here for."

- George Harrison


Entered at Sat Sep 7 05:14:40 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Subject: Don't Stop...thinkin' about Go-mor-rah

Since Ben here is still living in the past, I have a presidential joke.

One day as President clinton was getting off the helicopter in front of the White House, he had a baby pig under each arm.

The Marine Guard snaps to attention, salutes, and says "Nice Pigs, Sir"

President clinton replies "These Are Not Pigs! These Are Authentic Arkansas Razorback Hogs! I Got One Fer Me And I Got One Fer Hillary!

The Marine snaps to attention, Salutes and replied "Nice Trade, Sir!"


Entered at Sat Sep 7 04:05:02 CEST 2002 from cache-rf05.proxy.aol.com (152.163.188.165)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx.

Yesterday, at the height of the troubles, I took a ride into town to see about one of my bidnesses. Seeing as I was there and all, I grabed a couple of pieces of the right wing media and strode into my favorite breakfast nook, to sort through the lies about THE GREAT BILL CLINTON and other matters.

The waitress brought my little brunch, as I unfolded the news. I noiced the radio was on and a song started playing....

"When the lights go down in the city...."

I dug into my eggs, resolved that the battle I fought was a worthy one....


Entered at Sat Sep 7 03:47:50 CEST 2002 from cf4.telstraclear.net (203.98.49.151)

Posted by:

ajr

Location: a land of wonder

Subject: Garths Bollywood project, Tennessee, broken links under whats new

I really don't know why people act so shocked and suprised when they come across agressive behaviour and inane bickering on an internet forum. Thats what probably 9/10 of all internet interaction is like. The best you can hope for is that the participants will do it with some wit and style. Over the years in which I have intermittently perused the GB I've always thought Tennessee (at least the text on the screen I associate with him) is quite witty and more tongue in cheek than many are able to appreciate. Not that he needs me to defend him obviously.

ONTO "the music"...Garth Hudson is to do a Bollywood soundtrack??!!! How exciting!!! And I guess obvious too given the cinematic quality of his music, his connection with the Bauls and the use of Indian instruments on the sea to the north. I, for one will see the film and buy the soundtrack whenever it comes out.

Jan, I don't know if you bother reading any of this but the links posted on 5 September under "what's new "are broken. I assume this was where the information on Garth's new Bollywood project was.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 03:26:57 CEST 2002 from (63.164.145.33)

Posted by:

Caledonia

Hi again ...

One more quote from Dave Davies' autobiography (Kink):

"Because Ray wrote a great deal of his songs on keyboard, I always preferred him playing keys in the studio. It was easier to get a hook, feel, or vibe of the song. Technique means nothing in the end. It's the personality, the soul, the essence of an individual's 'feeling' underlying the music that is more important to me. Nobody can play piano like Little Richard, who has such a distinctive style that you know who it is straight away. There are so many guitarists who are great players, but sometimes it is hard to tell one from the other. Pete Townshend has a great style. So do James Burton, Albert Lee, Robbie Robertson, Jeff Beck, B.B. King, Neil Young, Les Paul, Hendrix, Tal Farlow in particular, so brilliant, so 'him'.


Entered at Sat Sep 7 03:09:10 CEST 2002 from p03-15.hartford.dialin.ntplx.com (204.213.188.115)

Posted by:

kramedogsdish

Mr. gt.connect aren't you something? You know how to make fun of other people's names. Gee, you sound so much like Mr. Yank-it-off. Why don't you ever talk about The Band since you are so all knowing? You really don't need a "required name" now do ya. No sirrrreeeeeeee!

kramedogsdish


Entered at Sat Sep 7 02:50:09 CEST 2002 from ti231210a080-0430.bb.online.no (80.212.233.174)

Posted by:

Groan Alone

Web: My link

Subject: Focus

Checking in on the guestbook made me want to quote Allen Toussaint, rendered from Dr. John's "Desitively Bonnaroo" (I was saying things like if we really really loved we could make it through the bitter and the sweet But Your way is dealing with the ladder My way is getting down , down, down Your day is filled with money matters, my day is filled with sound, sound and no sound,) What's all the fuss about? Just listen to the music...


Entered at Sat Sep 7 02:27:46 CEST 2002 from host-209-214-112-80.bna.bellsouth.net (209.214.112.80)

Posted by:

BWNWITennessee

Subject: You talkin' to me? Are you...

Still waiting for that e-mail.

Bayou Sam, remember that guy who posted about winning the Last Waltz contest where he got to meet Robbie? I thought he said that Robbie was very friendly, going above and beyond what he expected. Although since he did win a contest, RR would be somewhat obligated to be. But I thought he said something about Robbie listening intently to him, and even putting his and on his knee. Now that's friendly! It seems like almost everyone here who's met the other guys have done so after a gig, which obviously isn't going to happen with RR. Plus, it seems that nobody who posts here is from the West Coast. I've always been surprised by that, since that state is full of dirty hippies, and you would think some of them would be GBers.

I've had two thoughts enter my head in the last day. Number one is the popularity of these new (yet again) punk bands, like the White Stripes, Strokes, Vines and Hives. Once again they are being regarded as the saviors of rock and roll. I think it's a New York music critic thing, why bands that play that kind of music are just always adored. They're playing stuff that sounds like it is 25 years old, and for that the critics love them? It's funny, when the original punk music was coming out, the music they were calling dinosaurs, like The Band, Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin, was only about ten years old. Now the same type of people are making music that sounds like it's 25 years old. Plus, the critics scoff at Lenny Kravitz and the Black Crowes for sounding dated, but the same critics love bands like the White Stripes, which there are new versions of every couple of years. I've always thought this punk/college rock worship was a bunch of Kurt Loder-type BS.

The second conversation topic you may choose from is, are there any blind drummers around? There are tons of blind guitar and piano players, but I couldn't think of any blind drummers. I don't play drums, but I'd think if you were on the same kit, you'd get used to where the various pieces were by feel.

On the same lines, I just saw that Stevie Wonder has no sense of taste or smell due to an accident in the early seventies. I never knew that. Poor guy, that must suck, the only thing he has are hearing and feel. He doesn't seem to be bitter about it. I would be. Especially if I couldn't taste chess pie. Mmmmm.

I KNOW YOU ARE, BUT WHAT AM I?


Entered at Sat Sep 7 01:16:05 CEST 2002 from hse-mtl-ppp70348.qc.sympatico.ca (64.229.192.189)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Location: cabbagetown

Subject: Delphine / Taplin and Isle Of Wight

The movie MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING was filmed in Toronto and.......the music co-ordinator......Robbie's daughter.....DELPHINE ROBERTSON.....

I bought another Dylan book....I think that's 23 books now.....I'm a little bit obsessive compulsive when it comes to Bob....Anyway, like all good Band fans.....I looked up any info on The Band and there was Dylan and The Band at the Isle Of Wight in 1970.....I am always disappointed when I'm watching this outdoor event (England's Woodstock?....or was it the death of Woodstock?) because there aren't any Band songs featured and you hear Dylan at the end of the concert singing "Desolation Row".......but.....you don't see him!!! Well....I finally saw him perform this very song last November live!!......:-D.....(I did however really enjoy watching Free perform "All Right Now" and Joni showing guts and conviction while pleading with the audience to settle down and let the musicians perform without violence occurring.....Joni, "I think you're acting like tourists man. Give us some R E S P E C T.".....two highlights for me)......

So what happened at this gig was that Robbie refused to go on stage until the sound problems were fixed but Dylan kept telling the roadies for The Band to go on stage anyway......Robbie and Taplin still refused.....

"I don't care if the sound system works or not!" Bob stormed. "Fuck their fuckin' sound system! Tell 'em t'go on without a sound system! You go out there an 'tell th'Band to start playin' an get it over with! Go out there and tell th'Band to go on right now! Go ahead! Go out there an' tell 'em!"

Al Aronowitz went up to Robbie Robertson. "Bob wants you to play right now whether the sound system works or not." Robbie looked at me like I was crazy. "Bob's having a shitfit," I explained. "He says it's gettin' too late for him. He says you've got to start playin' now, no matter if the sound system works or not!"

Robbie laughed at me. Nothing was more important to Robbie as The Band's sound.

It would be years later, after hearing the capacity for betrayal in the accusations hurled at each other by Robbie and Levon, that the idea would enter my head that someone for some reason might have been trying to deliberately sabotage Bob's performance!.......It was well past ten before Jon got the sound system fixed and The Band went on stage. To me, that made Jonathan Taplin one of the unsung heroes of his time. He held his position, accomplished his mission, refusing to retreat while under fire. One thing I never did learn, though, is exactly what was wrong with the sound system!"


Entered at Sat Sep 7 00:48:41 CEST 2002 from netcache-2004.public.lawson.webtv.net (209.240.198.63)

Posted by:

rosalind

Location: RainCity

Subject: Thanks Mr D.

I always wanted to know Ronnie Hawkins. Since the first time I ever seen him, up on that screen. First he went to Robbie "Come on Robbie, let's take a little walk.. Tell me Who Do Ya Love" and I think he noticed that Ricky was feelin' a bit left out. I think the Hawk notices everything... He is a guy stuck in a I-gotta-top-myself trap. No matter how outrageous his last antic was....he knows, if he's gonna live up to that reputation of his, the next thing's gonna have to more outrageous. What-a Guy! A Big, Sweet, Pussycat. Ronnie, We always knew. We just let you go on thinking we thought you was a killer! You are Loved...more than you can know. We ain't forgot... and we never will...

These little squabbles in the guestbook ain't nothin'. I work in a place where I see guys kick the crap out of each other at the drop of a hat, Fight like hell over a hat dropped on the floor. They punch each others lights out, pick each other up off the dusty planking, rub each other on the head and laugh their asses off. Women is different. Women hurt each other in a much more subtle way. They needle and claw and make sure the damage goes to the soft spot. I prefer men. As friends and as people in general. I don't know why I felt like sharing that...but thanks......


Entered at Sat Sep 7 00:10:58 CEST 2002 from 128.52.cm.sunflower.com (24.124.52.128)

Posted by:

Dexy

Subject: Thanks John D

John D -- Thanks for the Hawkins first-person update.


Entered at Fri Sep 6 23:35:28 CEST 2002 from user-11218sb.dsl.mindspring.com (66.32.163.139)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Subject: Lampooning boobs in a PC world...

Charlie Young, you're forgetting big-breasted, drug-addled blondes.


Entered at Fri Sep 6 23:20:16 CEST 2002 from p3ee28ca4.dip0.t-ipconnect.de (62.226.140.164)

Posted by:

Luka

Subject: MOLLY

hey molly, it's been a while. i'm sorry. was very busy the last couple of weeks because i had to move house. i spent the last couple of days watching tlw. it took me ages to finally get to watch the video so it was no surprise that i've been busy with it for a couple of days. it's