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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, August 2017


Entered at Thu Aug 31 23:45:27 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Southern Blood

NPR is featuring Gregg Allman's posthumous release today.Worth a listen.


Entered at Thu Aug 31 22:00:41 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Josh Ritter - Showboat

New Josh Ritter reminds me of something Elvis would have sang in the late 60's. He's so good.


Entered at Thu Aug 31 17:22:57 CEST 2017 from (173.32.250.162)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Skip Prokopp

Like others here I was saddened to learn of the passing of Skip Prokopp. He was certainly a major musical force in the Toronto and later on, Canadian and international music scenes. Virtually no one in Canada in the early 70's could turn on a radio without hearing a Lighthouse song. He will definitely be missed. RIP.


Entered at Thu Aug 31 02:46:25 CEST 2017 from (70.24.158.193)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Foreign Relations 101

Kevin, just a suggestion: When in South Korea next year, try to lay off on the "fire and fury" stuff, will you? I know you're a sensitive and worldly guy but . . . .


Entered at Thu Aug 31 02:45:36 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Skip Prokop, RIP

John D: Thanks for letting us know about Skip Prokop's passing. That is indeed sad. I understand his autobiography was about to come out - or maybe it did. The early days of his career (i.e., before Lighthouse), are likely of more interest to many here. He was a founding member of the Paupers, whose first early records - from 1965 - were all produced by Duff Roman, who'd produced Levon and the Hawks' first post-Hawkins session the year before. And like our guys, the Paupers joined the Albert Grossman's management stable, so besides doing their own two LPs (one with Al Kooper on keys), played on Peter, Paul and Mary's "Album 1700" (that's Skip drumming on "I Dig Rock And Roll Music"), on a Richie Havens LP, on a Pozo Seco Singers LP, and likely others. And it was Skip on drums on the Kooper / Bloomfield "Live Adventures Of" album. And Skip, along with Paupers bassist Brad Campbell, was slated to be Janis Joplin's Kozmic Blues Band, but bailed at the last minute to return to Toronto to form Lighthouse. (Brad Campbell stayed, though, and was on both "Kozmic Blues" and "Pearl".)


Entered at Thu Aug 31 02:05:41 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Skip Prokop

For those who follow Canadian musicians, Skip Prokop, founder of Lighthouse has died at the age of 74; from a stroke. RIP.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 23:53:03 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I guess one reason Levon got a lot of support in his complaints about Robbie from people posting on the internet was that a lot more of these people had seen the 1990s Band than had seen the 1960/70s one.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 23:48:51 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.134)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Bob, I probably was at that same Band show at Bearsville as you & Sue. I saw two there in the nineties that were amazing.

Kev, thank you sir.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 20:35:38 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peteer V

Thanks for the tip Peter. I hope it eventually gets to Amazon dot ca and Amazon dot com


Entered at Wed Aug 30 19:06:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Girl From The North Country

The Girl From The North Country Original London Cast recording is now on amazon.co.uk for release on 29th September. Note that it says LONDON cast which strongly suggests there will be other casts in future … keep an eye out!


Entered at Wed Aug 30 17:36:52 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, the recordings were an issue, but they also put out the DVD of Live at Loreley which was recorded on a bad day on a bad tour. Why? Maybe it was in the contract, or maybe they couldn't throw up the opportunity of having a professionally recorded video for nothing. (Loreley filmed everything for broadcast, I believe). The Greater London Radio broadcast just before that might be the nadir of the 90s Band's career.

But as I said, Levon comes out of Loreley well, holding it together through sheer will.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 16:17:07 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: The Band

It's nice to see some conversation on The GB about The Band. Maybe if Sebastian and team would get serious about putting out some live shows we'd really have something to talk about. None of us are getting younger Sebastian.

I saw that Nassau Coliseum show PSB referenced. The worst show I ever saw them play. However The Palladium show in 1976 was the best show I ever saw them do. The Band did a show with Neil Young, Willie and Waylon at Foxboro in 1984 that was truly amazing. Richard was healthy and sounded great. They played a benefit at UPAC in Kingston fall of 91 that was off the charts. My father had died a couple moths earlier and I was still really grieving. For two hours that night I felt ok again. I never loved them more. They did a show at Bearsville Theatre when Jericho first came out that people still talk about. The real problem was the recorded music after Jericho.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 13:59:53 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Kevin J

Thanks so much for the link to the Glen Campbell video.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 12:44:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Glen Campbell

From my 2011 review at Brighton:

He didn’t play much guitar. In half the set he had a hand mic only. When he did play guitar, it was usually only to take a solo. There were a few stutters, but as soon as the solo starts to fly you are very aware that this guy has spent fifty years at the pinnacle of his profession. I loved his little joke towards the end as he strapped on a 12-string for Southern Nights:

"I’m the best guitar player here, and they only let me do a couple of numbers."


Entered at Wed Aug 30 07:04:20 CEST 2017 from (24.114.104.245)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: "Play Some Guitar"

For fans of Glen Campbell and the instrument......do check out Expecting Rain of August 29 and the item on Campbell's 5 great guitar performances....I love them all but especially the legendary clip that Norm had posted years ago where Chet Atkins, Guy Clark, Willie Nelson et al look on with sheer pleasure as Glen lets it rip.

Jeff: Good to scroll back and read about your recording session. Looking forward to listening to this in 2018.

Expecting to be in Korea in March 2018.........just my luck that the Orange Clown decides to pull to pin right around that time. Consistently bad haircuts really should be a disqualifying feature for any world leader.


Entered at Wed Aug 30 00:20:27 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: While the Felice title you highlight suggests a similarity with King Crimson's "21st Century Schizoid Man", the lyrics you copied suggest a deeper similarity to "Clothesline Saga" from the BTs. Laundry and phlegmatism.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 23:33:05 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, i bet we were at a lot of the same shows. I was at that Whistler's show, that was 89, i was living round the bend on Racetrack Rd, in Cooper Lake. If you knew/know Hardy, the optics guy with the horses , llamas & other animals on his property, i was two houses down. Bobby Messano's in laws were in between. Whistler's was a great day, Dr John, etc.To me The Band were pretty damn good that day.By normal musicians standards, great. It wasn't their absolute best show of those years, but they were damn good, & certainly had their MOMENTS of BANDNESS that day.BTW, Bearsville Flats, right there, I replaced the windows in three houses in there. One couple saw my ad & called me in 89, then two of his neighbors got my # from them, around 92, 93..


Entered at Tue Aug 29 21:48:15 CEST 2017 from (24.114.104.245)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: PSB''s Review & other......

My only quibble with the review is that it's 99% summary/rehash beginning to end with only two sentences of review......"Robertson knows how to tell a story and for the most part does it in a way to keep you reading".......and near the end "Testimony is for the most part a good read".......Faint praise and that surprises me.

I know of 5 or 6 people, non-musicians and not Band fans in the way our bunch here would be described, that all read the book and all were just blown away. Much in the way the New York Times and the vast majority of all other reviewers were.

Testimony is the most enjoyable rock bio I have read. From the opening page, I felt like I was on that train to the south and could feel - strongly - all the emotions associated with winning his place in the band, earning the respect of Fred Carter by standing up to him, building a great friendship with Levon. All the stories from fights in the Hawks to his descriptions of returning home to Toronto and the just beautifully described relationship with his mother and the absolutely wild experiences with his Jewish gangster uncles ! The fact that this book was written entirely by Robbie -in long hand no less - is important. I loved that these were his sentences and experiences and not someone else's recreations taken off a tape recorder.

The 2nd half of the PSB piece is wonderful because it is exactly what PSB does better than anyone I know and that is mix personal experience, musical knowledge and opinion. Funny, but a year or so after Peter described that scene of mid-60's Woodstock and Robbie pulling up to a hardware store in Bob Dylan's station wagon carrying with him a "don't f*cking say a word to me" vibe as he walked on past the civilians within the vicinity....I still think about that.

Todd & Calvin: Really great to see you back here.

Joe Frey: I've been away for a while so don't have much to add in terms of new music......BUT while lying around the other night I caught Alejandro Escoveda on Austin City Limits and he was just great. I was previously unaware of him.

Bill M: Thank you for the heads-up on Pag. I wasn't in town. Hope that you got a chance to go. The Box...yikes, had no idea that were still around. I used to see their main guy around a lot while I was in Montreal. He lived on the other side of the mountain.

Dunc: Glad that you enjoyed The Burreau. Season 3 should be out any day now. Also, watched Spiral at Bob F's suggestion. Season 1 was brilliant. 2 through 5 not on same level but still very good. Thank you, Bob. Had started watching Grantchester season 3 before getting out of town and standards maintained. Really good.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 21:46:39 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

In Woodstock,in formal and informal settings,announced and unannounced shows or in New York City,I know I've seen as many performances in the post Waltz days as anyone.Can I measure against Jeff or PSB? Who knows? But,I do agree with Jeff-I feel deeply blessed for those last years.I saw the guys with the Cates,with Weider and all those guys,and in different combinations.I saw them in outdoor venues(will never forget the Whistlers show in bearsville by the pool-a whole day of spectacular music-Rick was incredible and Levon's voice ricocheted around the mountain),Tinker Street Cafe(and Marty's),the (Joyous)Lake,Uncle Willie's in Kingston,The Flamingo in Saugerties,private parties in Woodstock,Andy Lee Field,the Lone Star,Queens College,Caldwell College,The Capitol.Point made.I saw them a lot.And as Jeff said,they were often great,sometimes less so.But well worth seeing and greatly missed in today's environment of shitty music.Heck,most my musical heros are gone,sick,dying or retired.I pray often for the greats who remain.So,I'm not gonna criticize what these outsized talents gave us simply because it doesn't match their early outputs.But,it sure is better than anything around these days.And most of it,while not like the originals was still great music.To each his own taste and opinion-and opinions are like assholes-we all got 'em!


Entered at Tue Aug 29 19:37:30 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peter (SB). Respectfully, because i DO NOT think that you're deluded or a crank, i doubt that you could have seen a significant # of the Band shows that i saw. There's no way. BTW, i never saw them in 83 or 84..i was in St Louis, & doubt they came through....I do have that Band Is Back thing from 83, & honestly, it doesn't meet the level of even poorer Band shows without the Cates.Nothing against the Cates.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 18:57:36 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Jeff, you DON'T KNOW how many times I saw the later incarnation of The Band. I did not mention every show I saw. I saw enough to know.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 15:21:02 CEST 2017 from (86.169.218.119)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks PSB. It's a great piece of writing. I'm going to read it again.

Thanks, Jeff. I'm pleased you saw great performances.

Just played MfBP and the Brown album several times each over the last few days. Both still beautiful and fresh sounding. I play the remastered Brown CD, just because I wore out my old CD. It's also a great piece of work.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 14:48:07 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i'll checkout Ian Felice later, thanks


Entered at Tue Aug 29 14:39:31 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Any of you naysayers ever get back together, or know anyone who back together with an ex boyfriend or girlfriend , or ex husband or ex wife,& pretty much stay(ed) that way, with room in the arrangement?

I, & a whole helluva lot of people are very appreciative of & thankful for those last 16 years The Band gave us, on & off, from 83 - 99. Was it rocky? Sure. Perfect? Fuck no. Perfect at times, hell yeah. Sometimes fucked up? Why not?

It was their lives. No one has the right to tell other people what to do or what they should have. And judging, well, sometimes judges should get hung. sometimes judges go to jail....

All that said, from the beginning on, The Band was one of the most beautiful, most fascinating, most incredible, most musical, most bone chilling , most joyful, & most painful, & most sad experiences.. Still is.

Sometimes there's no (conclusive) happy ending.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 14:26:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: IAN Felice

Check out the new album ""In the Kingdom of Dreams" by Ian Felice, produced by his brother, Simone. Not many songs begin as "21st Century":

Well, The aliens landed on election day

and they stole your mother's lingerie …

Simone played drums on a few tracks. Link is to "Road to America."


Entered at Tue Aug 29 13:43:01 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.35)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peter makes good points. Yet, Peter was not at many Band shows after they reupped. My bone of contention is the same as it is with anyone who criticizes their live performances but hasn't been to several dozen of em. I saw them dozens of times at the Lone Star Cafe & Lone Star Roadhouse alone. The first times in 85 with Earl Cate they were increasingly excellent. By the time he shortly returned elsewhere they were insanely mindblowing. I saw the Band all over the place, Woodstock, Bearsville,Central Park, Westbury,Carnegie Hall (JJ Cale opened, The Band was 10000% from the first to last note), other places....There were some poor shows, with moments of brilliance & pure Band came through, there were shows that were 2/3 okay (or okay to poor) & 1/3 off the charts great .Shows that were 50/50, 80/20. 60/40 etc. And some, not an insignificant amount, total mindblowers. You tube wont show you all that.Most of my friends are as musically astute & fussy as I. I had friends, & tons of acquaintances at these shows. And I often knew staff. We generally all agreed on the performances.. I'm one of the most critical judges of any musical performance you can find, & as I have for 15 years now, I will tell all of you, including PSB, that universally deride their live performances since 1983 that you saw & are witness to limited shows, & don't know wtf you are talking about. Peter , your article was great except,- except that from your very limited exposure, you are very wrong on the quality of The Band's live musical performance after they regrouped.


Entered at Tue Aug 29 05:43:56 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A Testimony of Truth

Peter Stone Brown's article is as good as it gets. Straight and true. No frills or icing. The truth about song writing credits. The chaos of drugs and cars.

In his conclusion about Robbie's decision to end it, I doubt that Robbie made that decision lightly without a lot of agonizing.

As Peter said, "at the time, it was the right decision, and it still is." As sad as that is, it's a fact.


Entered at Mon Aug 28 16:39:08 CEST 2017 from (174.104.129.230)

Posted by:

Calvin

Well done PSB


Entered at Sun Aug 27 21:04:25 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: PSB

Thanks PSB for sharing your thoughts about Robbie's book and The Band. I appreciate all your contributions to this site. This site has been so blessed to have contributors like you. Pretty remarkable that we can continue to discuss the music of The Band, and other things, through this site - many, many thanks to Jan!


Entered at Sun Aug 27 20:21:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Extremely good article by PSB, with astute conclusions. Do not skip it!


Entered at Sun Aug 27 18:33:33 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: My review of Testimony

Hi, the link is to my review of Testimony and additional thoughts on The Band.


Entered at Sun Aug 27 17:32:23 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Richie Havens

Probably one of the best covers of Tupelo Honey you'll ever hear is Richie's cover of Tupelo Honey. Then he slides into a Dylan tune, (Just Like a Woman) I think. It just doesn't get any better. When he changes songs you all of a sudden realize he's changed it's so smooth.


Entered at Sun Aug 27 15:55:21 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Tupelo Dusty

Link to Dusty Springfield's version of Tupelo Honey. It's on the "Van approved" compilation of cover versions and the delight is the extra verse which Van later cut. Quite different but also lovely.


Entered at Sun Aug 27 14:02:52 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Houston

Watching footage of the flood waters; in Houston Texas this morning. My thoughts and prayers go out to them. People are much more organized than in the days of Katrina.


Entered at Sun Aug 27 12:41:10 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Audio of this show was just posted on Youtube: Warren Haynes & Michael McDonald - 2017 The Last Waltz 40 Tour


Entered at Sun Aug 27 02:04:24 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

More like the perfect anachronism - it's a bit like not having your house wired for that new-fangled invention, electricity. Which is not to say I don't waste as much time as anyone on the internet, because I definitely do. But I don't really need or want a phone, so ...


Entered at Sat Aug 26 21:55:52 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.113)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lisa,wow! Cell phone free by choice. Tell your husband i said that you're on track to being the perfect woman.


Entered at Sat Aug 26 20:13:58 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Very good points, Ian. Who indeed? And it's an increasingly irritating intrusion.

My husband has Alexa, against my wishes I might add. His rationale is that as he's in the business, he has to stay on top of technology for his clients. And if we're out somewhere, he can ask Alexa to turn on his coffee machine and it will be ready to go when we get home. But Alexa really creeps me out on a very fundamental level. I'm just not comfortable with this weird technological presence in the house.

However, as a person who doesn't even have a cell phone, I'm obviously in the minority.


Entered at Sat Aug 26 16:12:14 CEST 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Hatties

Thanks Landmark,

My house is about a mile or so from the track so I will be walking over later to catch 5 or 6 of the races - - including the Travers.

Hatties fried chicken is one of my guilty pleasures. Will be going there for dinner on Monday with friends. Thanks for the info on the other records. joe


Entered at Sat Aug 26 15:33:32 CEST 2017 from (96.20.207.56)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Joe, normally I would be there today for the Travers but major home renos will be keeping me in front of my computer watching today's card. I don't have a playlist as such but I do agree with you regarding Fleetwood Mac-the Bob Welch years. I have Future Games and Mystery To Me on a steady play, either at home or on my Ipod. The only two other things I am listening to regularly are Imaginary Diseases and Little Dots by Frank Zappa with the "Petit Wazoo" band from 1972. Am missing my Hatties fried chicken sandwich for lunch,


Entered at Sat Aug 26 14:59:16 CEST 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Carlene Carter

Bob F,

If the venue in Albany was JB Scotts on Central Avenue, I was at the show too. joe


Entered at Sat Aug 26 09:33:41 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "The Content of No Content" by another name - and more

We can't post links now but the NEW YORKER article to which 'b.lee' referred can be found on-line (ironically, by googling. It is worth a read. It is also available under the title, "Who Owns The Internet?".

There was an interesting programme on BBC-TV recently; it was entitled 'The Secrets of Silicon Valley'. I only caught the first of its two parts; it was relevant here, not that surprising but quite worrying. Seeking to 'disrupt' existing ways and means (existing ways of life and means of earning a living) with an almost evangelical fervour seemed to be one main strand.

OK, let me lay out my stall. I do not FB (or use any other social media platform), never text (maybe once or twice only in all my days) and have never bought an Apple product. I have made use of amazon to buy 'stuff' but, as time has gone on, much much less frequently; it's mostly for price comparison purposes these days. I have a really old-style mobile/cell phone; it doesn't internet, take photos or video and it is my servant, not my master (and it is turned off for 99% of the time - maybe more). But I do 'google'.

I'm not against new technology but I am wary of it - wary of the people who set it up and 'run' it - and wary of where it might lead us. An example: one of my offspring recently bought an Alexa - a fun thing in its own way but, if it responds to what you say, what's to stop it being set up to listen in to all your conversations at some time in the future?

The BBC has something called i-player, which allows you to access some of its (already broadcast) programmes through your computer. Fine! A useful provision. Recently, however, I tried to use it to access a radio programme to which a friend of mine had contributed, only to discover that you now have to register with the BBC to access i-player on your computer - with no 'Opt Out' facility! Apparently, the BBC wishes to enhance my listening/viewing experience by sending me .... who knows what. Well, I don't want their suggestions. And, to use the old phrase, "Sod that for a game of soldiers". Who are these people who wish to intrude on my life? What gives them the right to do so? Who and how are their activities being regulated and/or controlled? Who voted for this?


Entered at Sat Aug 26 04:28:41 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.113)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Norm, get yer act together man. What yer tryin to say is Da Bluz. Bluz with da big lip.

Separately there is a Jelly Roll Morton song titled big lip blues, the lyrics mean something else. Long intro...


Entered at Sat Aug 26 04:20:12 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: THE BLUESSSS!

If you feel like a real good shot in the arm of the blues.......in 2003, Van Morrison, with Tom Jones and Jeff Beck with some smoking blues licks doing, "Bring it on Home to me". Just search it on Youtube.


Entered at Sat Aug 26 02:13:36 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Carlene Carter

Joe, great list. Some things I haven't heard but will check out. I love Carlene Carter. One time many many years ago she was playing a club in Albany with sone of the Rumor in her band. My wife was stopped at the door because she had her camera bag. No photos they said. When Carlene got to the club my wife told her what happened. Carlene went back out to our car with my wife and carried the camera bag in. My wife gave the door man a smirk like she was Angelica from The Rugrats. I'm glad Carlene is still making music and looking healthy. A true survivor.


Entered at Sat Aug 26 00:14:16 CEST 2017 from (74.103.167.178)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE(laware), US

Subject: Taplin, Levon, Corporate Hedgmony

Browsing the 28Aug New Yorker (yes, I am a liberal) came across an interesting article titled "The Content of No Content" by Elizabeth Kolbert, which concerns the concentration of media access by "GAFA" (Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple), and refers to two recent books, one by our old friend (?) Jonathan Taplin, "Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy" and Franlin Foer's "World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech"

Wow, these guys need editors just for their book titles!

BUT an entire paragraph regarding Levon. (Jan, if there are copyright issues here, please redact.)

"Consider the case of Levon Helm. He was the drummer for the Band, though he never got rich off of his music, well into middle age he was supported by royalties. In 1999 he was diagnosed with throat cancer. That same year, Napster came along, followed by YouTube, in 2005. Helm's royalty income, which had run to about a hundred thousand dollars a year, according to Taplin, dropped to "almost nothing" ... Friends had to stage a benefit for Helm's widow so that she could hold on to their house"

The Last Waltz is also gets a reference.

Good article, worth checking out if you can.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 22:43:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joe, I'd thought I was the only one here with "Ice On Fire." Never heard of Wilmer & The Dukes. I know all the rest.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 20:37:51 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.79)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Favorite so far of 2017

I'm stuck, really stuck and can't stop listening, to Jake Fussell's What In The Natural World. He typically sets old songs and tales to a finger picked Telecaster and normally performs solo. He opened for Wilco in a few of their shows I think -


Entered at Fri Aug 25 15:54:44 CEST 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

Subject: Now that I am semi retired and thinking more about music

Hi all, I am a regular viewer of this page but post only once in a while. With more time to think about music, I am often amazed on how much music is out there that I have missed. I recall in a previous post, Peter V was talking about a Dylan album (I think it was Street Legal) that he really enjoyed. Well I revisited that record and rediscovered an old gem.

I began to think what records that I regularly pulled of the rack to listen to. It seems those records were not my desert island records, included in the music critics top 500 records of all time or even may have gotten great ratings in allmusicdotcom.

I thought that it would be interesting to share my "under the radar records" with the hope that others would do the same. With so many places to sample music before you buy it, it may be way of discovering some gems that I have let slip by. I stayed away from The Band (although Moondog Matinee and Islands would be two records that fit the bill). Also, no John Simon since I think we are all familiar with some of my favs: The John Simon Album, Journey and Harmony Farm.

So here are my top ten artists and the records that get heavy rotation at my house.

1. Allen Toussaint - Life, Love & Faith/Southern Nights.

2. McGuinness Flint - McGuinness Flint/Happy Birthday Ruth Baby.

3. Paul Butterfield's Better Days - Better Days/It All Comes Back.

4. The Mighty Diamonds - Ice on Fire (reggae meets soul - produced by Toussaint).

5. Eddie Hinton - Hard Luck Guy (or any of his records. He is often referred to as the "white" Otis Redding).

6. Felix Cavalerie - Felix Cavaliere/Destiny/Treasure.

7. The Cate Brothers - Radioland/The Cate Brothers(with Union Man).

8. Carlene Carter - Carlene Carter (1st Album) with a killer version of Graham Parker's Between You and Me.

9. Wilmer & the Dukes - Wilmer and the Dukes (Upstate New York college circuit band in the '70s. Still being sold on Amazon).

10. Fleetwood Mac - Kiln House, Future Games and Bare Trees (post Peter Green and pre- Buckingham and Nicks).

I hope others will share their lists too. joe


Entered at Fri Aug 25 15:00:47 CEST 2017 from (70.24.158.193)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Tupelo Honey

I took up your suggestion, Norm, and played about a half-hour of Van. And yes, I too reflected on old friends who have since departed. A somber, yet appreciative start to the day. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 13:48:21 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Marching Through Georgia …

JUST ADDED:

Where do you stop with statues? ? The Nelson statue story shows it can go on and on.

Let’s think about the statues of the other side. Take General Sherman … there’s a a gilded one in New York, in a Trump Tower colour choice. Sherman was in charge of the “March to the Sea” through Georgia. This is considered to be an early example of total war, destroying the infrastructure. It was “Scorched Earth.” No doubt many Georgians thought of Sherman as a war criminal. But he won.

I would not be surprised if some Georgians start suggesting the removal of Sherman’s statues. But why stop there? There’s Grant and Vicksburg … it could go on forever.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 13:35:16 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Whoops! Sorry about that. Will re-watch Flight of the Conchords to improve my recognition skills.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 10:16:27 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.183)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Keith urban

Peter, Peter, Peter.keith Urban was born in New Zealand. Not sure why I really care about that. Probably read too many articles about Crowded House being Australian...which is like claiming Bob Dylan and the Hawks were Canadian.


Entered at Fri Aug 25 05:03:34 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Reflections & Nostalgia

Just got back from 8 days in the shipyard, working dawn 'till dusk on getting the "Rockin Chair" ship shape. Many times when I come home powered out I come in the study, (I have a real beaut' of a wood rocker at my desk). I slip into the chair, put on my head phones lay back and listen to something relaxing.

I have just listened to one of my all time favourite songs and certainly my best Van Morrison song, "Tupelo Honey"! YOU CAN TAKE ALL THE TEA IN CHINA PUT IT IN A BIG BROWN BAG FOR ME! SAIL IT RIGHT ROUND ALL THE SEVEN OCEANS DROP IT STRAIGHT INTO THE DEEP BLUE SEA.

As I listened my mind wandered thru' the years of enjoyment here with the Guest Book.....and all the friends we have lost.....my first conversation with Paul Godfrey, Steve Heggison, Jeff Newsom, J Tull Fan, David Powell, many more and more recently, loosing Jerry T.

So take a few minutes and listen to Van sing the best, "Tupelo Honey".


Entered at Thu Aug 24 22:16:05 CEST 2017 from (78.72.216.185)

Posted by:

Carina

Location: Sweden

Subject: The last walz

My first contact with The Band was watching The Last Waltz on telly. Their music is really fantastic. It's really impressing how everybody could sing very well and play numerous of instruments. Just finished reading Testimony by Robbie. So interesting to read about how the songs were made. The history of The Band, the tours, their up and downs. Their music will live forever.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 21:26:01 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Watch out - it's contagious!


Entered at Thu Aug 24 15:37:03 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On seeing the news that a Guardian journalist is calling for Lord Nelson to be removed from Trafalgar Square, I just added three paragraphs to the Civil War & Statues piece linked below.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 15:08:39 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger

Subject: Bloody Autofill

Daniel Lanois!


Entered at Thu Aug 24 14:36:07 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger Woods

Location: Birmingham EU

Subject: Daniel lanes and Girl From The North Country

Daniel Lanois performed the only UK concert on his current tour schedule at a small venue - Oslo - in Hackney. Maybe there were 300 folk in the large upstairs room. My daughter and I stood three rows from the front. It's sometimes better to be towards the rear of the room because you get a better sound experience - but I wanted to be close to Daniel Lanois. It was a superb, if relatively short set. There were too many electronic music offerings for me and only The Maker from his first album but he was in great voice. His band - Jim Wilson on bass and vocals, Kyle Crane on drums - matched his brilliance on guitar and pedal steel. Kyle Crane was extraordinary. The only other drummer I've seen with such exuberance was Keith Moon in his prime but he'd be no match for Kyle Crane.

The following day we saw Girl From The North Country. This is worth making the trip to London for - even from Glasgow! It is exceptional. The play and cast are great but the music is fantastic. I asked whether there were plans to record a soundtrack album but the person at the theatre thought not. It would be a great album.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 13:10:04 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Civil Wars and Statues

I just put some of my posts (including today's) together, added a lot and illustrated them. See link to my blog.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 11:08:24 CEST 2017 from (86.158.93.112)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Catching up

Enjoyed the discussion on the bass. I like going to a concert where there is just a guitar, bass and drums with perhaps a rhythm guitar. I enjoyed seeing the Who and the last time I saw Lou Reed it was great. I still enjoy listening to the Beatles and Cream. At the recent Glasgow festival there were 50 000 young people there on the Sunday and the headline band were Biffy Clyro - guitar, bass and drums. Nowhere to hide. The young people loved it.

The only monument to the American Civil War here is in Old Calton Burial Ground, Edinburgh. It is good with an emancipated slave raising an outstretched hand towards Lincoln. It is in memory of Scottish American soldiers who left Edinburgh to travel to America and sign up with Lincoln. One of the soldier's widows was the driving force behind its erection.

The city symbol for Glasgow is the statue of the Duke of Wellington with a traffic cone on his head. It started in the eighties with people on a night out climbing up it and putting a traffic cone on his head. It's quite high when you get up there. I think it sums up Glasgow and Glaswegians. 'Edinburgh has the castle and we have the traffic cone.' Passed it the other day and it's funny to see tourists photographing it. I hope Roseann got a picture, Bob. Give it a google.

I think we all forgot the design of Levon's 'Electric Dirt'. Obviously designed for CD and thoughtful and beautiful, the way part of the cover is magnified to appear on the disc.

Good luck, Jeff.

That's me folks.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 10:44:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: George III

George III is celebrated in Weymouth with a major statue. There is also an image of George III cut into the chalk hillside above Weymouth. Legend has it that the king was furious because it showed him riding away from the town, and regarded it as a hint to leave. In fact he never saw it, as it was cut into the chalk after his last visit.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 10:25:44 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Civil Wars

On to Civil Wars. A very good question. Do the losers in wars get statues erected to them?

Benedict Arnold has a plaque on his London house describing him as “American patriot.” It is not an official blue one and looks old. The War of Independence is not a good comparison on attitudes to losers in “civil wars” (which is how it started out). It’s taught in Britain in much the same way as in the USA, from the “Americans goodies / British baddies” angle.

The Declaration of Independence talks about George III :

abolishing the free System of English Laws and transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries

Because the framers, and many people in Britain, considered George III, who was also Elector of Hanover, to be German, and the troops had large numbers of Hessian German-speaking mercenaries. This was necessary because British forced conscripts were considered highly likely to defect to the American side at the first opportunity and hightail it westwards.

Thomas Paine has tributes all over Lewes in Sussex. Thomas Paine married his landlord’s daughter. He’s also commemorated with a Lewes pub name, “The Rights of Man”. He separated from his wife in 1774, deserted her, and emigrated to America. “The Wrongs of Man “by Elizabeth Paine has never been published.

The trouble is establishing who the losers were in the English Civil War. On the face of it, what with getting decapitated in 1649, King Charles I lost. I once filmed in St. John’s College, Oxford, under the fine Le Seur statue of Charles I. Le Seur did another bronze equestarian statue in London in 1633. On the Parliamentary victory, it was ordered to be melted down. A wily metal smith bought it, hid it away, and spent the next decade selling cutlery that was allegedly made from it. When the monarchy was restored, it was revealed and now stands outside Charing Cross Station.

Cromwell won, but on the restoration of the monarchy his body was exhumed, mutilated and hung up at what is now Marble Arch. In 1899 a statue of Oliver Cromwell was erected outside Parliament. It probably had the same intent as the Robert E. Lee statues erected in the 1920s in the USA. In this case, to show the Irish who was in charge. Cromwell had been responsible for a swathe of atrocities in Ireland. In 2004, Parliament voted on whether to remove it. Cromwell was hated by the left as a butcher in Ireland, and by the right for regicide. In fact, it was voted to keep it, as Cromwell was also a champion of the supremacy of parliament. There it stands today.

Going back to our previous Civil War, now the bones of Richard III have been found, there will be statues and memorials to the eventual loser in the Wars of The Roses.

Fiction surely frames our perception of civil wars. Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind had more effect than any historians. The book and film polished an image of the Southerners as the romantic Cavaliers, and the north as the stern Roundheads. It led the British to see the American Civil War as a replica of the English Civil war. It wasn’t. Blame Margaret Mitchell.


Entered at Thu Aug 24 06:04:17 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: w/ Ian, other random notes

Ian, Peter V and John: some excellent points being made. Yeah, Jeff and glenn, there is some serious breadth of know-how going on here. But then I already knew that after all that transpired relative to bass picks and the like. A ? later specific to glenn. Ian, I especially like that there's "not enough light, too much heat".

On the character of Southerners, I would posit that's also very true of Midwesterners. And let us not forget 2 of those states gave la Naranja his position in DC. As one who's lived on both coasts and the Midwest, there is much less provincialism and stand-offishness in the middle of this country, at least in my experience. I well remember, moving to SoCal in 1963, how my New England born-'n'-bred mother couldn't get over how it was supposed to be real friendly out there, yet all 6 neighbors had fences along the fences on our rental property. Anyway, as I said to a self-described center-right independent/Republican friend on Sunday, who was certainly safe in venting to me about Naranja, "not all 63 million who gave him a vote are racists". Not all stupid, either, although one certainly wonders.

Peter, your research on Lee was interesting to me. Quite curious how his sense of things in the mid 1850's paralleled what I recently learned was Lincoln's at his museum in Springfield, IL. At that point, during the Lincoln-Douglas debates (and Jeff/glenn will recall perhaps that the last of those debates, somewhat famously took place in Alton, IL), Mr. Lincoln also held that slavery would peter out and that blacks would likely, given the chance, move to Africa or Central America. He did not really come to full emancipation until well into the War. That said, yes the whole states rights or economic arguments are a canard. It was about maintaining their "culture", their type and standard of living and ALL that was based on the subjugation of other human beings, full stop. Levon telling Robbie to remove any reference to Lincoln in TNTDODD doesn't change that fact; it was just practical, if he wanted to tell the story he was after.

When I've been reading various comments here, and not knowing exactly what's right re: every statue, I came to this. Right, Lee was not of a "foreign power". But even set aside the provenance of most of these symbols (Jim Crow, etc.), were not many, Lee, Stonewall Jackson, N. Bedford Forest, Jubal Early, etc. commissioned officers? Did not many of them matriculate at West Point? I'm no expert on military law, but I suspect taking up arms against the forces of the Union would be treason, would it not? Where exactly and when has any other country celebrated individuals who were treasonous to that country's existence and organizing principles. I'm quite sure, there is no profusion of statues here to Benedict Arnold, famous from his flipping away from the colonists in the War of the Revolution. I know in stories told of ancesters of ours, that the Arnold branch from Connecticutt, seemed to disappear from the family tales. More so, in fact, than the relative who was either a merchant or a ship's capt involved in the triangle trade, nothing to be proud of.

In fact, Peter and others from the Isles: are there even any statues to B. Arnold over there? Plus, did not the rebel forces surrender at Appommatox Courthouse? How often are losing forces celebrated, after the fact, by statues? Victims, such as those of the Holocaust or American Indian genoside, w/ good reason, yes; but losing, rebellious citizens and soldiers? Seems like a very unusual situation.

glenn t: I asked Jan how one gets an e-mail from here and I see Norm put his down for Todd from CT. So any chance you could e-mail me at haso77atcomcastdotnet, when it's convenient? I should like to continue a dialog about your times on the limestone bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River, living at Happy Hill. etc. I'm not much of one for reunions and all that crap, just interested.


Entered at Wed Aug 23 23:42:48 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

some folks just forget to remember to forget...


Entered at Wed Aug 23 17:53:47 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.111)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sometimes i'm amazed at the breadth of knowledge some people here have about diverse subjects. I'm serious. I used to know a pretty good amount of stuff, but i done forgot most of it!


Entered at Wed Aug 23 14:53:05 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Rolling Stone comments on those C&W singers who haven't commented … Keith Urban is mentioned, but he's Australian. He can hardly be blamed for not speaking. Damned if you do (he's not American), damned if you don't (why not comment).

On the states' rights argument, Texas had the right to secede written in when they joined the union in 1845 after 9 years as an independent country. That was retroactively rescinded in 1869. But Texas was also a sore point because it was expanding the area of slavery … from East Texas into westward expansion, and westward expansion of slavery was a major issue for the north.


Entered at Wed Aug 23 10:26:44 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Country Music and Charlottesville

Googling:

RS: “Country music stars are reluctant to speak up about Charlottesville”

... should reveal an interesting article in the context of previous exchanges here.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 18:02:52 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.25)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Gallant South

I lived in Atlanta for 5 years and traveled the around area a good bit, and I also have some heartwarming anecdotes- I found the friendliest people to be in New Orleans, not including the drunk frat boys from Texas. The New Orleans accent is unique and it's easy to know who's a longer term resident. But that aside, the democratically elected leaders from the south are and always have been some of the most repellant Americans ever. And, current gerrymandering and voter repression aside, reflect their polite electorate.

Ian - I don't believe that removing the monuments to Southern military leaders will diminish their historical importance at all. In fact the removals may finally enable southern schools to tell the truth about the nonsense of the state's rights rationale and their era as a foreign country.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 16:58:51 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, John - I love your waiter story. Part of the friendliness is informality. Last year in Ireland we were in Portrush on the North Coast … with my sister-in-law and her son. He's been trying to lose weight, but ordered the full Irish breakfast. My sister-in-law said, 'You should stick to toast. You're on a diet.' The waiter took a chair, sat down, and said, 'Now go on, missus. Let him have the fry up. Why, I've had two meself already this morning. Tell you what, I'll bring it to you anyway and you leave what you don't want.' In most accents that would be offensive, but in Irish or deep South USA, it's just like you're part of a family. I'll add that breakfast was included in the tariff. He wasn't trying to sell a more expensive meal.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 16:00:02 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The South

I agree with Peter & Ian. Since 1980 my wife and I and family have spent a great, great deal of time in the south. Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana. The farther south you go the friendlier the people get. Service in hotels, restaurants etc...just the friendliest people. On one trip we left the south and drove north to New York state and went into a restaurant. Waiting for awhile, I see a waiter and say, "excuse me, we're ready to order." He looked at me and said, "well I'm not ready to serve you yet!" I love the South. From New Orleans to Natchez to Oxford and beyond.

Just so there is no misunderstanding I love New York state and California as well.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 14:41:44 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Girl From The North Country

Peter V, that was a really well written review and thanks for the link to Tight Connection. Wow!


Entered at Tue Aug 22 14:15:23 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Edinburgh Festival has a joke competition. The papers reported the Top 15 this morning. My favourite came second:

No, you can't compare Trump to Hitler … Trump could never have written a book.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 14:13:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Totally agree, Ian. I found the South far friendlier, the food way better and the music? No question. I think it was Holly Springs or Oxford in Mississippi. We parked in the city square and as a stranger you're never quite sure what the rules are. We saw a police officer coming towards us. Oh, dear. I thought. Wrong place to park but he strolled over, wished us good day. Asked where we'd come from and spent ten minutes chatting to us. Oh, and he was African-American. One of many casual encounters where people stopped to pass the time of day. The only other place I've been that friendly is Ireland.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 13:58:25 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Random notes on recent posts

Just a few rather disconnected jottings.

I wish I thought that the problems within the country and the views expressed by those on the right were limited to the South but I’m afraid I do not.

Not all right-wing ideologues are southerners. Robert E Lee did not represent a ‘foreign power’. Those who agree with you may possibly be ‘good people’ but you just don’t know. Re Arlington House: I was simply asking where one might draw the line. Should certain people, places or events be expunged from history? If so, who or what do you expunge? How do you decide? And who will make the final decision? Once that decision’s made, whoever or whatever has been expunged is gone, unlikely ever to return. (Reminds me a bit of communism and those who deny the holocaust).

Judging the past, particularly the more distant past, by contemporary standards often finds predecessors falling short. Past heroes become less heroic; saints appear flawed or, at least, tarnished. How our generation will be judged in the centuries to come? How would wish to be judged? By the standards prevailing in the future or by the standards prevailing now?

MLK once said something like, ‘a riot is the cry of the unheard’ (not his exact words, just my recall). Nowadays, social media, camera phones and 24-hour news coverage combine so that, overwhelmingly, the cries are certainly ‘heard’. Too many voices are heard, from too many directions; they’re too loud and drown one another out; passion overwhelms debate and that the considered centre cannot be heard. Soundbites predominate; oratory all but forgotten. Single issue politics are elevated to major concerns. Too much heat; not enough light.

Clarity, integrity and proportion.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 03:46:08 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.25)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: R E Lee

Robert E Lee was the military leader of a foreign power that killed nearly half a million Americans. He knew about Andersonville, used child soldiers, civilian terrorism and most importantly knew his was a lost cause. Yes, tear down the memorials to him. They are monuments to a horrible cause not history lessons. In the context of those times he should have been hung in the town square. Jefferson and Washington did nothing comparable to what he did. "State's Rights" is a canard that has been used by the south since our founding - it was and is to this day about racism, slavery and segregation. The south remains a carbuncle on the ass of America - although the music, literature and even the cooking are unsurpassed by any other place on earth. And all the good people that live there and agree with me.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 02:35:31 CEST 2017 from (74.12.34.164)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: 'Inert stoneware' - you mean the president's brain?


Entered at Tue Aug 22 02:35:16 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.146)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ian, Kushner's ancestors were amongst the most revered resistance fighters. They must have started spinning in their graves decades ago, when Kushner's father & uncle turned out to be lowlife bastards, picked up velocity when Kushner too did, & from when he married Ivanka, must have still been increasing spin velocity. What's going on now is nothing new for Kushner, he's been working for a Nazi fuck all this time & he should know it. Kushner the Kapo. Fuck him.


Entered at Tue Aug 22 01:52:18 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Back with my wife in Tennessee .. there goes Robert E.Lee

From today's NEW YORK TIMES:

"By the end of the war, 120,000 Tennesseans had fought for the Confederacy, but a significant number, 31,000, took up arms for the Union. As historians have noted, that meant Tennessee alone provided the federal forces with more soldiers than all other seceded states combined."

An interesting statistic in the light of the discussion of "The Night They .....".

And don't forget that the former home of Robert E. Lee overlooks Arlington National Cemetery. Is that to be taken down, too?

Further, am I not right in saying that Jared Kushner is Jewish? And that at least one set of his grandparents survived the Holocaust? And didn't Ivanka Trump convert? Inert stoneware aside, what must they be thinking of the equivocation being displayed now?


Entered at Tue Aug 22 00:31:07 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.146)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks guys.


Entered at Mon Aug 21 20:21:39 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.25)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Eclipse

We got to about 98% in my backyard. Very interesting and the first one I can recall in my whole life. The temp dropped about 8 degrees and the light became quite eerie, like it is at 9pm.


Entered at Mon Aug 21 19:00:50 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, if the new songs are as good as the stuff you played me last year it's really going to be a wonderful record.


Entered at Mon Aug 21 18:58:11 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Like Sebastian Flyte's teddy bear! So exciting for you Jeff - you sound seriously stoked. A nice zone to be in, especially these days. I hope you have great success!


Entered at Mon Aug 21 16:52:21 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.146)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

John, this drummer is Eric Parker, one of Chris's brothers.They all drum. Eric is amazing....seriously bad... No, I'm not looking for guesses... It's just not the time....Separately, there is a vocalist on the project whose vocals i recorded in 2013 that we agreed upfront i would not use his actual name. I thought of Aloysius, he loved it, that is how he signed up for the job, performing under the name Aloysius.


Entered at Mon Aug 21 14:40:57 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter & Releases

Your so right Peter. Record companies were always concerned that; with a December release the album would get "lost"; in the throws of Christmas.


Entered at Mon Aug 21 14:38:30 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jeff A

Jeff, Chris Parker has been one of my absolute favorite drummers for years. Mystery singer eh? Are you looking for guesses; or are you waiting for the release to reveal who it is?


Entered at Sun Aug 20 17:56:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

They always used to say "out by the last week in November or wait until March" for releases. On the other hand, January / February with all the majors either spent out on decent stuff pre-Christmas, or holding back till Spring might give a better chance of review space.


Entered at Sun Aug 20 16:56:46 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.146)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Mazel Of The Irish

John, looking at it now,it's gonna be a real close call. With real mazel either the tail end of 2017 or more likely early 2018. Events that will occur in a month or so will shed some light on the timing aspects.


Entered at Sun Aug 20 15:11:00 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jeff

Looking forward to it Jeff. Any chance a release in 2017?


Entered at Sun Aug 20 10:01:53 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When we were kids, history used to be Great Men, Kings and battles… Clive of India, Wolfe of Canada, Sir Francis Drake. We also had Great Women … Joan of Arc, Elizabeth I, Florence Nightingale. Braudel was a major part of moving interest to social history, so we get books telling us about history via the pen, the potato, coffee, salt, shoes (it took centuries for the concept of right and left shoes to arrive). Now, so much is multicultural that kids spend months on the Ashanti of West Africa, but don’t know when World War II started or what Oliver Cromwell did.

But it’s all history. And you need to experience all three approaches.

I think of the murals of the siege of Vicksburg which we admired three years ago. I can’t see anyone taking those down. As they told us, July 4th was not celebrated in the state of Mississippi until 1945 because it marks the fall of Vicksburg to the Union forces.


Entered at Sun Aug 20 09:55:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sounds brilliant, Jeff! Look forward to hearing it.


Entered at Sun Aug 20 05:58:04 CEST 2017 from (67.84.79.146)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Those of you who saw Dylan's 86-87 tour with GE Smith, Chris Parker, & Kenny Aaronson are well familiar with the exceptional quality of Kenny's bass playing. Some of you know Eric Parker's drumming from his years with Joe Cocker & Orleans, among other great acts. Some of you heard of , maybe witnessed ( the playing of) Arthur Neilson, who i have been raving about here since i entered in 02. I know Arthur since the 80s, and Ive always said i'd just as soon as , maybe even rather, see Arthur play than Clapton. Arthur was on two tracks on my School For Fools project that released in 02, I have a pile more with him on em from 01 that will be released this or next year. But, I also have a masterpiece project that i've not touched in 4 years.

I spent yesterday, Friday, & part of today, in a studio in Woodstock with Arthur on guitar, Kenny on bass, Eric on drums, & a mystery vocalist every one of you here are familiar, likely very familiar with. We got four of my songs tracked, & vocals.. Finished vocal tracking during a few hours this afternoon. Very very heavy fucking duty. Really as good as it gets. That makes 10 tracks that probably each could be a single. I still gotta live through the rest of this.


Entered at Sat Aug 19 23:16:27 CEST 2017 from (74.12.34.164)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

If the Germans can manage to teach their children about a horrible war without big bronze visual aids, I'm sure the Americans can manage to do so as well. I'd say that statues get in the way of education when they focus attention away from the issues / reasons / events / lessons and onto the 'great men' in charge.

Kevin J: The newspaper lists Michel Pagliaro as playing at the Bandshell at the Ex on Monday at 7:30 pm. The Box is the opening act.


Entered at Sat Aug 19 14:10:52 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: History

I read the Oxford American online about the previous removals in New Orleans. I had realized that many of these statues date to the 1920s, and Huey Long and Father Coughlan and the KKK and American fascist movements of the era.

My issues are that as a trained historian, I just hate airbrushing history. Teach from it, but don’t eradicate it. Which is why I agree with John about moving them into museum spaces where they can be educational, but no longer a rallying point. Germans are taught the history ofWorld War II. In contrast, many Chinese haven't a clue about Mao and the Cultural revolution.

My second issue, to repeat, is that the 21st century is being unfair on Robert E. Lee. Obviously we can’t blame the founding fathers for living decades before it was an issue, but Mount Rushmore does indicate selectivity on the villains.

When it comes to memorials to the Confederate war dead, you have to respect them and leave them alone. Period. Otherwise you will be forcing people in the middle to veer to the right in those towns.

.On slavery, the economics were indeed interwoven tightly with the system. One of the things done so well in Dixie is that Virgil is back with his wife in Tennessee, a state divided into slaveholders by the river, and subsistence farmers in the hills, where there wasn’t slavery. Virgil Kane wasn’t a slaveholder, but a farmer working the land. One could say that the non-slaveholding farmers were deceived by the slave-owners, which has truth in it. But they weren’t all fighting for slavery, and slavery was not evenly spread across the states which fought, though it was legal in all of them. Nor did the Emancipation Proclamation appear until 1863 as part of the Northern war strategy. It’s pure Marx: Feudalism in the South versus Capitalism in the North. You can argue that the social systems are more important than the economic systems, or the reverse. Whatever, it’s Virgil Kane’s brother that got laid in his grave, and eradicating monuments will feed the right-wing bastards by enlarging their constituency.


Entered at Sat Aug 19 07:17:21 CEST 2017 from (174.104.129.230)

Posted by:

Calvin

I think one thing our northern and friends across the Atlantic are not clear on is these statues where not put up to honor history of any kind, but to make it clear to black people that they were still in charge.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 16:38:02 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: My Last Post

One of the things I wish about this site is that we are allowed to edit our posts after being sent. I'm on a large radio site here in Toronto and they have no problem with that. Anyway; after re-reading my last post I would like to change my comments on Slavery and Economics. Slavery was in fact the #1 reason for the war; but economics played a part as well. That's what I meant to say. Edit button please. Really? I just tried to insert a smiley face. Site won't let me.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 16:28:15 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Statues and such

I believe the statues should be moved into museums; in the south. Remember in the end this is about history. My wife and i visited Gettysburg a few years back and they had statues of both the North and the South. Lee never fought in Charlottesville by the way. Never lived there. I understand the statue was put up in 1924.

Something that is not being discussed about the Civil War is that slavery was only a part of it. The big reason was economics. The south was making a fortune on cotton. However; why could they make so much money? Slave cheap labour. Both General Lee and General Grant were both great generals. Gettysburg helped me understand the bigger picture. I say again. I don't think the statues should be torn down and thrown away. They should be put into museums in the south and allow teaching to younger people.

BTW Trump talks about taking down statues of Jefferson and Washington; because they were slave owners. Personally I think the founding Fathers of the U.S. should stay. I can't crawl into the heads of those who lived back in the 1700's. Certainly by no means; was it right. But we all now have a few hundred years of hindsight.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 15:24:59 CEST 2017 from (74.12.34.164)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronno

Peter V: "Lee personally disbelieved in both slavery and secession from the Union, but felt ... his honour came above his personal opinions." A troubling ethical calculus, but likely one made by others before and since.

Because we didn't get taught US history until high school, I knew of Lee only vaguely until the Joan Baez version of TNTDODD hit the airwaves. I do, however, have a specific memory of being impressed with him leading his men across a dangerous lava field in the dark, the highlight (as far as the mini-me was concerned circa '63) of a story on him in my family's copy of "The Golden Book of Knowledge, Volume 1". Perhaps there's a plaque at the lava field, which must still exist.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 13:30:44 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Sorry Peter, missed the reference. All I remember is the bit about Levon driving Robbie to the library. The right pushes this idea that when it come to morality there are many shades of grey so you cannot make a judgement about anything. There is no difference between the violence of Nazis and those who oppose Nazis. I don't buy it.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 12:30:18 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.183)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robert e lee

Peter, I agree with you about Robert E Lee. He comes across a bit like Rommel. An honorable professional solder who was on the wrong side. To be honest I don't know too much about either of those two so apologies for any offence.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 11:56:52 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wallsend, I'm following Levon's exhortation to Robbie: to treat Robert E. Lee with respect!


Entered at Fri Aug 18 11:32:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Incidentally, a solution which was suggested to the Cecil Rhodes one was to move it indoors to a museum space with explanatory signs as to the context. Then it can't be a rallying point anymore, but can be part of a history lesson. It also covers the point that these were made by prominent sculptors at one point, displaying enormous skill so also count as works of art.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 11:23:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was pointing out that Robert E. Lee was "the least of the bad guys." If we were to apply the logic to London (eliminating the politically incorrect) we would only be left with the memorial to the horses and mules killed in WWI in Park Lane.

The issue is far right lunatics using the statues as rallying points, and that's the conundrum. While I hate to agree with some Republican comments, they point out that if you apply the same logic to Mount Rushmore, only Lincoln would survive as Washington and Jefferson were slaveholders. In contrast, Lee freed his slaves.


Entered at Fri Aug 18 11:03:08 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I don't think the issue is as complicated as you suggest Peter. Statues of people who defended slavery and which are now rallying points for Nazis should go. Didn't Levon refuse to sing 'Dixie' after 1976 because he thought it was an insult to the South?


Entered at Fri Aug 18 10:48:14 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: There goes Robert E. Lee …

There goes Robert E. Lee. This is a complex one. I’ve been reading the arguments. No, there are no statues of Hitler in Germany. Yes, after the Berlin Wall fell statues of Stalin and Lenin were torn down all over Eastern Europe. On the fall of Saddam, his statues went first.

In 2016, there were moves to remove the statue of Cecil Rhodes at Oxford University. Rhodes founded the Rhodes scholarships and was a benefactor of the university. Eight former Rhodes scholars became heads of state, including Bill Clinton, three Australian PMs and leaders of Jamaica and Pakistan. Rhodes was a colonialist oppressor if ever there was one, but there is the question of context. One comment on the Guardian article last year was:

Cecil Rhodes was a bastard, for sure, but one of the most important skills in life is learning how to deal with bastards, and it's lot easier when they're made out of stone than when they're made out of blood and bone.

But Robert E. Lee? From the article on “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” on this site:

Lee was idolised in the south, and toured around Virginia setting up education for veterans until his death in 1870. Lee had also ensured that the peace treaty included a binding pledge that former soldiers 'would not at any time be disturbed by Federal authority, provided they lay down their arms and returned home.' Lee personally disbelieved in both slavery and secession from the Union, but felt that his people and his honour came above his personal opinions.

Clement Eaton : Robert E. Lee expressed this feeling in a letter of 1856 in which he wrote that the holding of slaves was an evil, but he added that their emancipation would result sooner from the mild and melting influence of time than from the storms and contests of fiery controversy.

During the war, Lee freed quite a few of his family's slaves. Lee felt that the war was God's instrument to end slavery. Lee has also been praised for ordering his troops to surrender once and for all, thus avoiding a protracted guerrilla war that could have gone on for months and years.

Destroying the statues of recently deposed dictators is heat of the moment stuff, and most of us would approve. But a century later? Isn’t that what the Taliban have done in destroying historic sites?

Remember “Those who do not learn from history are forced to repeat it.”

Then what about those memorials to the Confederate dead in every Southern town? We’ve never gone to the battlefields of Flanders or Normandy and removed the names of the German dead.

BUT these statues do seem to attract crowds of extreme right wing racists and are a focus for them. It is a conundrum, but Robert E. Lee as a historical figure is being demonized. I think Levon would have had robust comments on this!

So if you follow the logic, that any mention of Lee or Jackson is a support for slavery, then next comes a radio ban for “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.”


Entered at Thu Aug 17 20:12:50 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Girl From The North Country

Peter your link is exceptional. Wonderful concept. I think this is something that Bob would actually appreciate. Bring the whole cast over here!!!


Entered at Thu Aug 17 14:07:12 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Glen Campbell Beach Boys

I was thinking this morning that I hadn't read anything about Glen Campbell's funeral. Turns out he was buried one day; after his death;in his home town of Delight Arkansas. Leave it to the British newspapers to tell me things that I never knew. Turns out that Glen played lead guitar on "I Get Around, Dance Dance Dance and Help Me Rhonda" among other things for the Beach Boys. Brian Wilson was a big fan. I re-watched the documentary I'll Be Me yesterday; with my son. He knew little of Glen Campbell; other than some of his hits. I hope he won't mind me saying this; but watching Glen deal with alzheimer's disease brought tears to his eyes. Also did it for me again as well.

One more time. RIP Glen Campbell. I wish they would re-release his autobiography, Rhinestone Cowboy. I understand it's really good.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 12:52:52 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Tight Connection To My Heart

Ah, they now have a video piece from Girl From The North Country … Sheila Atim on Tight Connection To My heart. She is the pregnant adopted daughter in the play. This how radical the interpretations are in the play. Everything has to fit 1934 musical instruments too.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 12:44:57 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Girl From The North Country

Thanks, Ian. I'll be very surprised if Girl From The North Country (Linked again) doesn't go to Broadway. It will be a hard one, because the cast and band are SO good, but are British. It would be a great shame not to take them, at least the main ones, but while the American accents are very good indeed, a few are not quite perfect, which could be an issue. A lot was created in rehearsal, but I guess it's like other plays created in rehearsal, they are then fixed for subsequent productions. Anyway, it's intrinsically strong enough to survive recasting and moving to America.

I was surprised at some of the negative reactions from the Dylan fanbase. As I pointed out, the highly-experienced theatre critics who gave it five stars are the very top tier of critics, and are very sparing indeed about awarding plays five stars.

You can hear bits on the Old Vic website, but I assume as they were up on the first day that they're rehearsal in an empty theatre. They don't do justice to the effect on the night in a full theatre.

The comments also include bits of "Who's Conor McPherson?" In fact he is a highly-acclaimed and experienced Irish playwright.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 12:35:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My politics tutor was American. His special area was Fascism. He said he came to Hull, because in the 1930s, when British Fascist blackshirts paraded through the streets, there were two places where the crowds of ordinary people stopped them: East end of London and Hull. He said he liked the idea of a city that had stopped fascists early on.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 11:04:03 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.64)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Roseann is absolutely correct. Well done.

I have just finished rereading 'Just One More Dance' by Ernest Levy which tells his story of being taken from his home in Bratislava in the middle of the night and dumped in the countryside, taken from Budapest to Auschwitz, to Birkenau, forced march to Bergen-Belsen, through seven concentration camps, survival and then finally ending up as a Cantor in Glasgow. An horrific story where the teller is compassionate, inspirational and seemingly free from bitterness. He dedicated his life to telling children of his tale and warning of hatred.

I don't understand why there were not mass arrests of the so called white supremacists at the point where they were marching and shouting anti-semitic chants.

But every country has its problems.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 02:36:28 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: 1) Dylan San Jose 65; 2) bass playing; 3) "Girl From The North Country"

Still in the thick of life but I do poke my nose in here from time to time, so a couple of comments:

1) I've had those new Dylan recordings for a short while now and, as I recall, the electric half of San Jose was previously available as Berkeley '65.

2) It's a strange to me that I read something about bass playing here and the name that pops into my head is Ed Faultless, who few will know let alone recall. He played stand-up bass (fingers, of course, giving a thickish, kinda-thunky sound) in the jazz haunts of my youth, mostly pub sessions. Ed Faultless may be a largely unremembered, if memorable, name and I just wanted to put it out there in cyberspace. Friday nights and Sunday lunchtimes at the Palm Court in Richmond, with Dick Morrissey on sax and Ian Hamer on trumpet (deep, deep sighs)!

3) Forget the naysayers elsewhere. Peter's review of "Girl From The North Country", the play at The Old Vic, is the one on the money. Sure, there are elements in the 'story' that will ring a bell but you get a great night out. Don't be put off by the thought that it's a musical - it's not. While only some of the songs are complete, the extracts are used effectively, some from more than one song. I got the impression that changes suggested by the cast in rehearsal were adopted which, if I'm right, is significant because the play is so much an ensemble piece. The acting is of a high standard, the musical arrangements are terrific, the singing is great and, as you already know, the songs are, too. I know many of you live far away from London but, if you get a chance to go, grab it. Even my wife, not the world's biggest Dylan fan, was extremely complimentary - and she's never wrong.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 02:01:59 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.25)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Nazi

I can imagine the excited stand-up cheers of an entire audience viewing a movie or newsreel of 1934 Germany if a group of Jewish citizens attacked a goose stepping throng of nazis. Cheered without any equivocation about who was more wrong. The most discouraging aspect though is that the nazi crowd in Charlottesville may only be the tip of an iceberg that widens as it goes down to include up to 30% of Americans. I hope not.


Entered at Thu Aug 17 00:19:32 CEST 2017 from (171.25.193.77)

Posted by:

David J.

I am extremely blessed to have grown up on the tail end of the "Generation of love" (70's)... I can still hear The Band's "Rock of Ages", just to name one of their many discs, playing in my head. I still have the disc but my turntable bit the dust years ago, plus I have a recently adopted rescue dog who isn't quite ready for the sonic assault of my volume level. Any, perhaps someday she will be introduced to the once in a lifetime magic, that was the original 'The Band' I knew and love.. Our prayers go out to those who suffered at Charlottsburg and anywhere else at the hands or voices of those who hate, God will deal with them justly. ...It is mine to repay sayith The Lord. P.S I didn't vote for him!


Entered at Wed Aug 16 23:22:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great comment from Roseanne. Absolutely right. Nazi is not a word that should be bandied about and has often been exaggerated, In this case, it's accurate.


Entered at Wed Aug 16 17:54:25 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, yes, I read that & LOVED it yesterday. Ro is aces.


Entered at Wed Aug 16 17:24:53 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Danko and picks

Rick Danko played bass usually with his fingers, until the '74 tour where he broke his hand I believe around the NYC show.. From that point on, he played with a pick.


Entered at Wed Aug 16 16:36:51 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Tears of Rage

Jeff, and anyone else who might be interested. Something my daughter wrote yesterday I think cuts to the bone. She linked this with Vice's video from this past weekend.

"I am not a religious person, but there is nothing quite like watching a nazi scream they want you and your family dead to remind you of your jewish descent. I watched Vice’s “Charlottesville: Race and Terror” and I felt terrified. I’ve spent my life fighting for gun control because of people like the speaker for the alt-right, pulling out all of his guns and saying more of us will die. These are the people who PASS the mental health checks to purchase guns. Never in my lifetime did I think I would have a “at least I have my dad’s last name” moment and I was so angry that these people made me afraid. How can I be a good ally if I am scared? Then I thought about the rally I attended last night. So many beautiful people fighting for each other, who were moved to get on trains and buses and skip after work dinners to stand outside Trump Tower and say they won’t stand for this. It wasn’t the first and it certainly won’t be the last and these are the places you remember that there is so many of us fighting for what is good that there’s no way we will lose. I urge everyone to watch the video if you’re feeling strong enough. I totally understand if you feel you can’t stomach it these days. I especially want to urge the people in my life who don’t understand why we march and rally and fundraise. The ones who don’t believe racism is a real problem in this country. The ones who see black people and hispanic people and muslim people and transgender people as “other.” The thing that scares me about the alt-right movement is that I’ve heard some of this language from people that would never in a million years consider themselves a white supremacist. This is not a republican or democrat issue, neither group seems to have our best interest at heart, but I will say I think the conservative party has been slipping in these ideas for as long as I can remember. Wanting to control women’s bodies, wanting to control who can marry who, wanting to keep the jail systems as lucrative as ever, using undocumented citizens as scape goats, turning black lives matter into some kind of hate group..these are all forms of control that have led us to this. This country has done a great job of making all of us white people racist, it’s our job to undo it. As for me, this Jew plans to churn out even MORE media “we control this shit right?”, go to even more rallies, and to take that fear and turn it into power."


Entered at Wed Aug 16 16:03:16 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Since Twitler started running for President of the U.S. I've stated that he is a Nazi, & that anyone who supports him is a Nazi or minimally a Nazi supporter. Yesterday he removed any doubt from anyone's mind. He is a Nazi, & anyone who supports him, , even those Jews who do, is a Nazi or minimally a Nazi sympathizer ( if that doesn't make you a Nazi).

I'd like to believe that the U.S. can eat this scourge that's been growing within & now is endorsed & promoted as a valid political force by the President . Some experts state ( & have been since Jan 20) that Twitler & co have disbanded the agencies & departments that have been combating this movement & these groups & our ability to do so is almost depleted. I don't know, but if so, hope it can be quickly restored....But it's obviously more important than ever to get him out , & & Pence, Ryan, McConnell,Sessions etc etc....Hopefully we make it .. Mueller is likely a year to two away from having a full legal package tied in a bow. Only hundreds of miracles get us that far...


Entered at Wed Aug 16 12:01:51 CEST 2017 from (50.199.225.241)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Pick AND finger

Depends on the song.


Entered at Wed Aug 16 11:49:33 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I see a couple of Dylan concerts from December 1965 in San Francisco and San Jose have been posted on Youtube. I don't know enough about Dylan recordings to know if these are actually newly circulating tapes or not but they may be of interest.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 23:13:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To pick it or finger it

An old friend e-mailed me:

Look at the long-disappeared 'finger rest’ that all Fender basses shipped with into the 70s. Most players took them off immediately along with the pickup covers. The idea was that you curled your right-hand fingers under the rest in order to get more leverage for plucking with the thumb - thus producing a meaty thud which was obviously Leo Fender’s approved tone.

But one of the sensational things about Leo’s invention from the get-go was the hitherto-unheard sounds to be made by playing an electric bass with a pick.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 21:10:11 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.25)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bass Fiddle

Ever see anybody play stand up bass with a pick? I think Jr Brown uses metal finger picks on his Telecaster section, is that common?


Entered at Tue Aug 15 17:24:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I remember those felt bass picks. I thought they were designed for players who picked from choice, but wanted a softer fingered sound for some songs. I'm sure I had one once. They didn't really work that well.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 15:19:39 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Pick

I commented years ago how Rick Danko used a pick a "lot". Many pictures he is using a pick. Many years ago, (I haven't seen them in a long time) there was thick felt picks that were somehow made quite ridged for bass guitars.

I remarked way back about Rick using a pick because a fellow who played bass for me back in the 80's used a pick a lot. Jimmy Ryan his name was. His Dad was a black man and a music teacher. Very strict, he taught Jimmy bass. H e would teach him bass runs then he would take a string off the guitar and make him play the same things again until he only had one string left and make him do it over and over.

Jimmy's attack with a pick, or that thumb pull caused him to break a lot of strings but it never bothered him or made any difference. He was one of the best bass players I've known.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 14:12:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Isn't there a shift on the size of the lineup? If a bass player is in a loud three-piece there is a need for a more cutting, aggressive sound. BTW, the online discussions add Mr Danko as one who mainly used fingers, but sometimes used a pick.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 14:08:45 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: bass picks

Even then in my teens the boxes of picks had a section for "bass picks" - which were thicker. Looking on line now, you can get a "Lemmy" one if so inclined. Obviously fingers mean you can use different fingers on the right hand for different strings. If you want a hard percussive sound for a number, don't you go for bridge pickup and a pick?

There's quite a debate about it on line with people saying "real bass players don't use picks" and "it looks like a beginner." BUT bass players known to have used a pick at least some of the time include Paul McCartney, John Wetton, Roger Waters, Chris Squire, John Lodge, Noel Redding, Phil Lesh, Mike Mills. Some Carole Kaye images look like a pick. I looked at John Entwistle and it's mainly fingers, but sometimes pick. Same with John McVie … and with pick in fingers, he's right up near the bridge. With fingers, he's more central. I always thought the choice was part of the repertoire.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 14:02:00 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: To pick or not to pick

Of late I play with a pick. A rather heavy one, Jim Dunlap "lozenge" style, kind of looks like a vaguely triangular cough drop. My late lamented lead man turned me on to them. While at times I have played with fingers (never got the hang of that funk thumb thing) the pick allows a little extra punch or attack that is hard to get with the fingers and IMHO allows me to be a bit more aggressive and audible over the guitars and drums without increasing the volume. I first switched to pick (or plectrum, if you prefer) in the New Wave era when bass was prominent. Think Graham Maby with Joe Jackson. Does not Sir Paul play with a pick on occasion?


Entered at Tue Aug 15 13:24:40 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Most bass players I know would use both, alternating pic and fingers, depending on the effect wanted. I was amazed that a NY arranger in 1967 had never seen a bass guitarist use a pic. The Bert Berns book has had me listening to the two Ace CDs on Bert Berns in the songwriter series. The genius touch is clear as it hovers over such diverse artistes, but listening to Hang On Sloopy by The McCoys, Brown Eyed Girl by Van, and Erma Thomas on Piece of My Heart you can hear one intelligence running through. Van complained that he didn't like the tight arrangements with the session guys too.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 13:20:02 CEST 2017 from (174.104.129.230)

Posted by:

Calvin

I was born around the time the book you referenced came out. And I, and nobody I knew, ever played Bass with a pick or even heard of anyone doing do so.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 12:28:21 CEST 2017 from (219.89.10.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I don't play bass that much these days but always use my fingers. I always found a pick quite difficult. Only prob is that you can get some nasty blisters if you don't practice enough. I have a sunburnt Ripper and an Ampeg copy..both with flat wounds


Entered at Tue Aug 15 10:09:23 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Picking

David P recommended “Here Comes The Night” by Joel Selvin, subtitled The Dark Soul of Bert Berns & The Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues. I’ve been reading it a few pages at a time for about a year. He really knows stuff about Mob involvement and the NY songwriting and production of the 60s.

There are odd things I don’t get. He says that the studio session for Van’s Brown Eyed Girl had Eric Gale switching to bass guitar and playing it with a flat pick … that’s just an ordinary plectrum, isn’t it? It says the arranger had never seen anyone play bass guitar with a flat pick before. What? 1967? We all learned to play bass with a pick in 1962-1963. It was the default action. That’s what Shirley Douglas’s bass tutor “Easy Guide to Rhythm & Blues for The Bass Guitar” taught. We had great admiration for those who were able to manage with fingers only. The book was as influential as Bert Weedon’s “Play In A Day” for British guitarists. Part of its charm was the photo of Shirley playing a Fender PB while wearing a ballgown on the cover. She’s next to Chas McDevitt holding a Strat. It was published by “Beatnik Music.”

The book has priceless moments like a mobster smashing a Martin guitar over Van Morrison's head for effing and blinding at him.

It also makes me wonder about backstage TLW … Van Morrison and Neil Diamond had much shared history with Bert Berns.You'd imagine they would have had a lot to talk about.


Entered at Tue Aug 15 04:53:24 CEST 2017 from (173.239.240.71)

Posted by:

Calvin

Well Bob, everyone from the scene back then told me stories about Rachel being such a sweet kid, and having a dad who was made the stereotypical demanding stage parent seem like sweet person. AS one person who had some success of their own said to me, "Dick was well named".

As for Hynde, while she was in a shortlived band with Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo in the very early 1970, (And by shortlived I mean the played out once) all of her success came post Akron. In fact while she was part of the scene at the time, she was more or less considered Terry's little sister. Terry Hynde's sax has been a mainstay of the Numbers Band since around 1970. Local Legends really.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 23:13:13 CEST 2017 from (72.9.3.20)

Posted by:

Olivia

Location: Southern Maryland

Subject: Tura-Lura-Lural (That's An Irish Lullaby)

What are the notes to play this song on the penny whistle? Also I really enjoyed your notations on the tune.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 22:04:26 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Calvin, looking forward to your book on the Akron music scene. We saw The Pretenders and Rachel Sweet their first time through New York. I remember The Pretenders played a club in White Plains called oddly enough Detroit's. They were amazing. The original line up was killer. Rachel Sweet played The Bottom Line. My wife and I loved that first record. Played the grooves off of it. We went down and saw the early and late show first night. I remember being disappointed. I don't think she was ready yet for that kind of showcase. It was quite a buzz around her. I remember reading Springsteen showed up the 2nd night.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 11:16:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Delighted to see Todd, Calvin and Glen back. Great news about the book, Calvin.

Three day weeks … yes, it’s the same here, John. Doctors, chiropractors, osteopaths … they all seem to be putting health before wealth and switching to 3 day weeks as they get older. My current doctor’s doing it in his 40s.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 05:24:02 CEST 2017 from (173.239.240.71)

Posted by:

Calvin

Appreciate the notice of my popping in. Been really busy the last year and just turned in my fifth book, and first on music, on The "Akron Sound".

Its essentially about the Punk/New Wave Movement in Akron 1975-1985 that spawned Devo, Chrissie Hynde, Rachel Sweet, The Waitresses, Jane Aire and bands who got a major record release or two but never broke through like The Rubber City Rebels, The Bizarros, Tin Huey, The Numbers Band and Unit 5.

Very excited to finally publish a book on music.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 03:41:47 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

Peter, my doctors are all retiring; or going on three day weeks.


Entered at Mon Aug 14 03:01:38 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A good look

Todd! If you've a mind to, email me sometime. I'll reply with some pictures of the big boat so you can have a look at her.

tsolum666atgeemaildotcom


Entered at Sun Aug 13 16:08:23 CEST 2017 from (32.216.237.109)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Live Music - Amy Helm

One of the things that I've missed out on over the last year or so has been live music.
Have been trying to make up for it lately, and have seen Amy Helm a few times over the last couple of months. She's been introducing some new songs into her set including some originals.

One of the newer songs, 'Cotton and the Cane', seems to draw from her life experiences, growing up as Levon's daughter, and is pretty damn poignant, as well as being a fine piece of songwriting. It's not sugarcoated, but is full of honest emotion. Here are a few lines of lyrics:

"I’m the daughter of a sharecropper’s son
Tilling the soil, of my father’s memories
Sacred fields of dirt and pain
Holding tight to what remains
The cotton and the cane"

"Kind hearts and compromises
Santa Claus, cheap disguises
Cigarettes, ash tray fires
Chin to the chest, doing our best
Breakdowns, always wanting more"

There's a YouTube clip at the link above with one of her recent performances. Cindy Cashdollar has been appearing with Amy recently and adds some nice slide work.


Entered at Sun Aug 13 11:47:54 CEST 2017 from (86.159.197.148)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Good to hear from you Glenn, Todd and Calvin.

The site with the John Byrne is really good, Peter, Thanks. I had never seen the Donovan cover. Changed my mind and went to the Edinburgh Festival yesterday. Took my grandson and saw a great show - three Australian guys with wheelie bins exploring Variety techniques - hat routines, balancing, comedy, juggling, mime etc. Strong, physical actors and fast moving.

That's true, Bill M. But John Byrne as well as being a great artist, is a decent writer too. He's a national treasure up here. But I'm delighted that Bob got the big prize.

I was thinking too about people we had lost from the GB. Many seemed too soon gone. On Friday I played Joe Cocker, Peter Paul and Mary, Leonard Cohen and 'A Hard Day's Night'. Sadly missed artists. I also miss Michael Marra and John Martyn concerts.


Entered at Sun Aug 13 06:09:40 CEST 2017 from (32.216.237.109)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Norm, glad to hear that your keeping things ship-shape. Boats can be a lot of work, but also provide a lot of enjoyment.

One of the boats that I used to do the bottom painting on was an old wooden boat, lapstrake type construction. That thing leaked like a sieve, but every spring the owner would have me jamming some cotton into any especially wide gaps between the boards. Guess it worked, cause it never sank on my watch, but that bilge pump ran all the time!

Peter V. Congrats on the birth of your grandchild, and and turning 70. Sounds like quite a party with many of your old musical cohorts


Entered at Sat Aug 12 14:02:55 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for that about JT, John. I was looking forward to meeting him one day. Yes, so many gone. My doctor, three years younger than me is another one this year.


Entered at Sat Aug 12 10:26:27 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

It Makes No Difference was used in an episode of I'm Dying Up Here. Season One, Episode 9, titled Lingchi.


Entered at Sat Aug 12 02:09:07 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

I really don't know Bill. Jimmy & Dash never mentioned him to me. Of course Seals & Crofts were not in the original Champs that recorded Tequila; as you know Bill. A number of musicians went through that band.


Entered at Sat Aug 12 01:39:47 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

" He did well with chord charts, though, did some great guitar solos and was fantastic on the record dates." is a quote from that article on Campbell.... and that's the key to alot..... so many sessions, you go in with charts and the melody and inherent melody & groove of the song. The players feel their parts & the instrumental.........if it's a band, well, it's a band, but if it;s not, the songwriter/producer, or the songwriter or the producer, or both of em, are choosing players for their ability to feel every aspect of the song- through the changes and lyrics and the form ( and may have to guide em but usually not)........ the same goes for the guitarists, drummer, the bassist, the pianist etc etc......there ae musciains who understand what a song is, and there are those who never will.... there are people who are music. You might not know it from the rest of their life. but........... and in many cases not many people ever hear of them. But........


Entered at Fri Aug 11 20:26:23 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

John D: I recall you being chums with Seals and Crofts back in the '70s. Were they still in the Champs when Glen Campbell passed through?

I suspect that Campbell's first trip to Toronto was as a Beach Boy in the mid-'60s. A photo of him with bandmates graced a CHUM chart of the time.

I don't think anyone's mentioned "Dreams Of The Everyday Housewife", which is in my memory bank as the first song I heard by him on radio. I also have a vague recollection of seeing him and a short-haired John Hartford doing "Gentle On My Mind" together on TV back then.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 19:58:27 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Wrevking Crew Mates Carol Kaye & James Burton on Glen Campbell

You may gave to click on Skip Ad to get to the article.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 19:53:06 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / Dunc: Byrne, Escher, Picasso - none of those guys won a Nobel Prize like the guy who did the Band's first album cover.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 17:57:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Digit of The Man in Black

If someone is posting spam, Johnny Cash's finger is the perfect reply. If regular people want to post sensible links then Jan provides a key. It seems perfectly fair to me. As it goes, I've been listening to Johnny Cash "The Legend" all day today.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 17:11:40 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: 2012 Levon Tribute

Dunno if I posted this before, but I saw it again just now. It's Simone Felice in Dublin, a few days after Levon died, and has a wonderful tribute before he goes into his own Radio Song. I was lucky to hear him do a similar tribute on the same tour, but we got I Shall Be released.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 17:02:17 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Todd & Calvin & other sundry nonsense

I just dropped in....to see what condition my condition was in!

Holy smoke, I was thinking about you just the other day Todd as I worked on the Rockin Chair. A quite a bit of fibreglassing to do. Sanding and Painting, and I'm down to the bright work. Hope to be finished in a couple of days and get away for a cruise. Thank you for the congrats. Good to hear from you to Calvin.

As to the two Morons with bad hair cuts, (definitely a good analogy). These are two loose cannons. It seems to me that the US, and South Korea are like two boys at a pond poking an alligator with a stick. They keep flying these planes over the Korean Peninsula, right in his face. To what end? They know it drives him crazy...er! Why not do their exercises some where else?

Now, Japan says if North Korea fires these missels they will just shoot them down. Well, why even say it why not just do it to show the North Korean nut it's just a waste of time.

In our day and age it is amazing to me that men who are supposed to be "LEADERS" of countries who should be teaching their people to live in harmony with compassion for others have to act like spoiled fucking brats.

This Trump loonie tries to operate as if this whole thing is one big reality TV show. I talked to a guy from Boise, Idaho with a big yacht tied up across from me the other day. He says to me "Trump tells it like it is." I said, "Do you believe that? The man is a pathological gawd damn liar!" Needless to say we didn't have a lot to talk about.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 16:10:19 CEST 2017 from (83.249.164.129)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Webmaster's negative attitude

One of the reasons I don't post here ragularly any more is the negative attitude of the webmaster. The latest example of this is the well-known middle-finger pic on the late Mr. Cash. Some of you may think this is just funny. I don't think so. Mr Hoiberg is showing the middle finger to the memory of Mr. Cash and showing the middle finger to the contributors. Norwegians in common are not known to have this negative attitude. In fact, my dearest neighbours here in Sweden are just Norwegians.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 15:21:05 CEST 2017 from (83.249.164.129)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: My ol' ticker

On a personal plan I'd like to tell that after the driving licence for an eighteen wheeler and an examination for coastal skipper I am taking lessons for a flight certificate - if the doctor says that my ol' ticker is OK... but it is still capable to do "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" on banjo so what more is needed!?

If I crash in to the North Sea please write something nice. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 14:58:17 CEST 2017 from (83.249.164.129)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Glenn Cambell

Yes, I remember Mr. Cambell with a manly and moderate love. In fact, when I took my driving licence for an "eighteen wheeler" I strummed his song constantly with my back in sweat!

Back in the seventies country legends from Wembley Arena Country Festival - or whatever the title was - visited even Nordic Countries. I've seen them all in a cold ice hockey arena from Boxcar Willie via Loudon Wainwrigth III to Barbie Benton. I sat in the first row when she sang and looked directly to my --- eerrrr --- big eyes ;-)


Entered at Fri Aug 11 14:52:12 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Interesting Modern Drummer piece by Bronx Boy Ralph Rolle, the drummer from Chic. He grew up in the Bronx River Houses, the projects. Of interest to some will be his first meetings with Steve Gadd. A good story. Of interest to others will be one of his early learning techniques..


Entered at Fri Aug 11 14:22:09 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: People passing away

I just wanted to mention that if you want to, you have to go to Youtube and watch Alice Cooper's 11:00 minute commentary; on his very best friend Glen Campbell. His comments are truly moving. He refers to Glen as one of the top 5 guitar players in the world.

Also I really wanted to attempt to tell you about JT's last email to me; but every time I try, I get the Johnny Cash finger. I can't remember; when I reported Jerry's death; that he did survive the surgery to his heart; but had a stroke a few days later. It was a simple tread mill test that gave his doctor's the warning signs. He was thankful for that and picked his own surgeon; who did an excellent job. No one could foresee the stroke. I was honoured that he wrote me about his upcoming surgery; as he was a very private person and he hadn't told anyone outside of the family and asked me not to post anything. That he would report back; on the site; when it was over. Sadly he didn't get that opportunity. I'm feeling a little melancholy this morning. I know I am not unique in this situation; but I'm just losing too many friends over the last few years. As my Father once told me, "Son, no one gets out of this world alive." So true.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 13:04:50 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Byrne album sleeves

He was featured in the recent Billy Connolly TV programme, painting a new portrait of Billy. This was a couple of weeks ago. Should still be on BBC iPlayer,


Entered at Fri Aug 11 13:01:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: John Byrne album sleeves

Link is to "Tartan Rocker" blog with images of John Byrne sleeve designs. You can have a pleasant long browse looking at these.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 12:46:53 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, John Byrne's covers are great. There are also ones like Mott The Hoople's first LP on Island (M.C. Escher painting) and a 7" EP of The Lonely Bull by Herb Alpert which is a Picasso.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 11:57:47 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John Byrne

My favourite album covers are done by John Byrne - Stealers Wheel, Billy Connolly and he also painted Gerry Rafferty's guitar. A Paisley cafe had them on show.

But I felt disappointed when I found out he lost out to Peter Blake over the design for what became the Beatles' White Album. I find this cover boring. Although I really like Sergeant Peppers' album cover.

His design was later used for a later compilation album called the Beatles' Ballads, but this wasn't released in the States. Beautiful cover. Sorry I can't link it.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 10:19:50 CEST 2017 from (210.86.75.38)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Glen campbell

As a pre teen Glen Campbell was my first hero before I moved to bigger things like Albert Hammond and Neil diamond and ultimately The Band (A bit of a jump there). Been interesting reading the comments on Jimmy Webb. I can't help thinking that the day of the great song writer is over. Sure there Will be some good songs still to be written but nothing with the impact of TNTDODD or even Galveston.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 10:14:28 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like Naturally and Reckless Abandon cover art … and the albums. There's a good version of "What A Town" on Reckless Abandon. At the time, the manager of a local record store had a stack of T-shirts made up with the J.J. Cale "Really" logo on them. I guess he had a record company promo one and had it copied. I bought two I liked it so much. Unfortunately in those days promo-T-shirts were made for one off events like stag parties and hen parties and were thin cheap cotton, so neither of mine survived long.

I have two runs of five framed sleeves. The first run is West Coast and chosen for the art. After Bathing At Baxters, It's A Beautiful Day. Happy Trails by Quicksilver Messenger Service. Wow by Moby Grape … US sleeve, as the UK one had text all over the picture. Cheap Thrills.

The set of five by the DVDs are soundtracks. Some Like It Hot, Cleopatra (Liz Taylor), Far From The Madding Crowd (painting of Julie Christie), Wizard of Oz (1955 LP) and Custer of The West (fabulous painting).

I switch them from time to time.

The West Coast replaced a set with Sergeant Pepper, We're Only In It For The Money (Sgt Pepper side) and a Japanese synth version of Sgt Pepper where they were painted looking the other way. Plus "The Fool" and 5000 Spirits by Incredible String Band. Decided it was all too bright when we changed the room.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 06:30:39 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.113)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Framed album covers

I've got JJ Cale's first one Naturally, David Bromberg's Reckless Abandon and the Brown Album framed, also a poster sized "High Lonesome", all in full view. Not relegated to the garage where I've seen some pretty good ones at friend's through the years. The Brown Album is there because it's my all time fave. The others, although I love the music and still listen regularly, are there for the artwork, just my personal taste.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 04:00:10 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nice to see both Calvin and Todd checking in.

Peter V: It wasn't as easy as I thought it would be to find the 'right' cover on the internet. Then I did, but Johnny Proctologist won't let me provide a link to it - a tall daisy in front of a blue concrete wall. Funny that you mentioned album covers with wide white borders versus the image going right to the edge. I was going to note yesterday that my first copy of the Barber LP had a white border (I think because it was the Canadian release on Quality) whereas the one on my wall was an upgrade - no border and in better condition - and it's the US release on Laurie. Glad you found it and like it, anyway.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 03:36:21 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: DC bully

I think John Lennon put it very well in his song Crippled Inside. "You can shine your shoes and wear a suit; You can comb your hair and look quite cute. You can hide your face behind a smile. One thing you can't hide Is when you're crippled inside." Trump is a thoroughly dishonest individual with no regard or respect for anything or anyone other than himself. We can only pray that his words and actions energize folks in the US and elsewhere to stand up for what is right and honest; to fight for unity and inclusiveness; to embrace kindness and courtesy; and to act with grace and dignity. He has not shown the least bit of ability or interest in expressing those qualities.

I feel sorry for him. What a burden it must be to think the world revolves around him, and that he can so casually call people names, distort or ignore the truth, and make promises that he doesn't intend to fulfill. He can't even play a round of golf without cheating.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 03:33:00 CEST 2017 from (174.232.139.97)

Posted by:

Calvin

Ive seen both Campbell and Webb recently, Webb during the last few months. Glen a few years ago. Webb was lucky to have the relationship with Campbell he did. Not that he isn't talented, just not amazing stage charisma.

I seem to remember Garfunkel doing him justice as well.


Entered at Fri Aug 11 01:23:55 CEST 2017 from (32.216.230.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Checking In

Hey Band friends. Long absence on my end. Have a lot of catching up to do. Wanted to say how sorry I was to hear about the passing of David P, JTull Fan, and more recently JT.

Learned a lot about music from David P's posts, and appreciated his love of vinyl and the Allman Brothers. I recently found an original Brown album with the lime green label and "RL" carved into the dead wax, which is a particular pressing that David frequently championed. Great sounding record.

I never met JTull Fan in person, but I feel like we lived somewhat of a parralel existence growing up in southern Connecticut in the New Haven area. We only found out about it in retrospect, but were faurly close in age, and both frequented the West Haven Yankees AAA ballpark as kids and ate at many of the same great New Haven area apizza  restaurants. Through the guest book, he turned me on to Zuapardi's in West Haven which was one of his neighborhood favorites growing up. I've been there a bunch of times since then, and he was right.....good quality pie.

We also shared stories about seeing The Band in the 1990's at a club called "The Sting" in New Britain, CT. A tough town that was at one time known as the hardware capitol of the world. I'm sure that we were at some of the same shows back then, but just didn't know it at the time as it was pre-GB days.

Dr. Jerry was a class act, and I loved hearing about his experiences seeing the Hawks in the early days at the Concord Tavern. I also appreciated his enthusiasm for Dylan and keeping an open mind about his newer work.
JT, David & Ed will be missed. Sorry that I'm so late to comment.

And finally, for now, congratulations to Norm on his retirement. Of course that big wooden boat he bought is a full-time job, but I'm sure he's up to the task....no stranger to hard work, that fellow.

Thanks to Kevin J. for the shout-out. I haven't stayed away on purpose. Life just got busier than normal for a variety of reasons, and I had to realign some priorities.

I've probably missed a lot, so I'll have to do a little more scrolling back to get caught up.


Entered at Thu Aug 10 23:42:04 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.113)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Our hero Trump

What a state for the world now: 2 morons with bad haircuts threatening total destruction - the possibility of an over excited mishap seems one possible outcome. And of course our right-wing is yelling about Neville Chamberlin again - diplomacy is appeasement!!


Entered at Thu Aug 10 23:26:27 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Politiks

Why doesn't this swaggering braggart of a bully realize that threatening the North Koreans is like trying to have a logical conversation with Jim Jones as he distributed the Kool Aid in Guyana:?


Entered at Thu Aug 10 11:45:44 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

That's a great Chris Barber album sleeve, Bill. It wasn't on any British release and I'd never seen it before. The jazz ones I took down included Terry Lightfoot's "Tradition in Colour" also a painting. You normally see the reissue with a large white border, but I found the original HMV LP without the border (Link to picture). It's an interesting album in that Joe Meek recorded it, and the drummer was a young Ginger Baker.


Entered at Thu Aug 10 10:20:46 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Jeff and Bob F.

I regularly play Isaac Hayes' version of 'By The Time I Get To Phoenix'. At over 18 minutes long, I remember some writer's quote from back in the day that 'By the time he finished the song, he could have made it to the place.'

Normally, I can't abide long(er) tracks now. There are several exceptions - I also like the live version of 'Reeling In The Years' for example.

I feel I wasted part of my youth sitting through drum solos. Aagh!


Entered at Thu Aug 10 03:41:49 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: My one and only framed LP cover is "Petite Fleur" by Chris Barbers's Jazz Band (Laurie 1001). I just went and looked at it - gorgeous and puzzlingly moving. (I'm not the only person puzzled over the 40 years I've had it.)


Entered at Thu Aug 10 02:00:18 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Something else to sompare time wise- the luxury of the time. As i've repeatedly said, that late 50s to late 70s period was a vortex of social, technological, political, & economic abundance/whirlwind. Look at the luxury of having a hit song in The Poor Side of Town so not being able to release By The Time I Get To Phoenix as a single... And that was common.... No one got to worry about that today....


Entered at Wed Aug 9 23:59:25 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good info Bob, it sure sounds like a publishing deal. When you say signed- in what capacity? It was very likely a publishing deal. What was of value to Rivers were Webb's songs ( even if Webb was also signed as an artist)... It all come backs to two things: great songs, & the publishing value of great songs. As an artist, Rivers also just had interest in a great song getting recorded again, & heard more, but it sounds as if he also was the publisher or owned at least a piece of the publishing.

So my point was: there are SOME RARE songwriters with songs as good as By The Time I get To Phoenix today, that don't have a prayer of getting em heard by business people with the ability to make em smash hits...& the main reason is the money ain't there. Also, there aren't as many of those songs today, or as many writers as good as in ages past- & one reason is it often takes time to get that good, & even if you're that good in an instant, not having the ability to make a living at it - most- not ALL- BUT MOST PEOPLE WILL HAVE TO COME TO THEIR SENSE & JUST GO MAKE A LIVING- AS A MESSENGER, A STOCkBROKER, A CUPCAKE BAKER, OR A POSTAL WORKER MAIL CARRIER, or real estate sales person or lawyer, SOME KEEP WRITING TOO....aLL THE CAPS were a mistake typo, & I'm too lazy to fix em...


Entered at Wed Aug 9 23:41:47 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jimmy Webb was signed to Johnny Rivers Music company. Johnny Rivers did the first recording of By The Time I Get To Phoenix. His version in my opinion is also a masterpiece. Like Elvis or Willie's version of Always On My Mind. Greatness on Greatness. At that time Johnny Rivers was having a monster hit with Poor Side Of Town and wasn't planning on releasing Phoenix as a single.. He knew Glenn Campbell from some session work and it was Johnny Rivers who brought the song to his attention and suggested he record it. This is from the Jimmy Webb memoir I had mentioned this morning.


Entered at Wed Aug 9 22:43:17 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The Webb/ Campbell relationship, & one posters one sided & erroneous presentation, how it was a feather in Campbell's cap that Webb chose him to record some of his best songs (i'd bet it started with publishers) , put this in my mind.... What the average person usually doesn't get in the discussion about the various losses or negative impacts that the digital realm has had upon MUSIC, as opposed to just the MUSIC INDUSTRY is the relationship between availability of money to be earned & quality. I'm going to just be real brief, and direct to the point i want to make and not get into what i have discerned about the intricacies & details. I do want to make the point that I am aware by the time cds came along, by the time Napster came along, many labels stopped investing much in anything but sure things or formula music. the amount of quality music getting made had dropped, but there still was plenty. It wasn't yet a desert..

But here's a real big thing, & that's the job of a publisher. Songwriters don't have the time or necessarily the ability to do this, the chutzpah, or necessarily the access. There used to be armies of song pushers. It's the job of the publisher to get songs heard.. Publishers used to get up to have the royalties for that, maybe 100% of the publishing. They paid advances against it..... sometimes they just paid salaries. Today publishers might only get half the publishing, or they might get less- just a administration fee, which is very negotiable... But to think that the average person, or even a songwriter that has a good reputation and heavy credits and reviews can just walk up to artists he or she knows and easily get songs heard and considered is not necessarily correct. And you have to realize that by exposing songs before they are published a songwriter may both get his / her distinctly original songs ripped off with in legal limits.

The general scaling down of the publishing industry is the result of the inability of publishers to make money today. Digital copying, streaming, downloading, has killed em. Publishers can't make money on sales of hard copies, not even downloads anymore, or on airplay...

And if you watch film, tv, cable tv, commercials, you'll see all the various ways USERS are avoiding various fees- such as sync fees on original recordinggs. You hear tons of cover versions of classic songs


Entered at Wed Aug 9 14:07:26 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Never saw Glen Campbell nor Jimmy Webb. Great songs.

Thanks, Lisa. Must be two only...


Entered at Wed Aug 9 13:41:05 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: The Cake And The Rain

Jimmy Webb's memoir is really good. His greatest songs just have that magic about them.


Entered at Wed Aug 9 09:48:15 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Glen Campbell

Link to my 2011 review. That was billed as the Farewell Tour, though there is a new album too. He has lasted six years then, but he looked physically well in 2011, and could still joke on stage. He is a very good example of live charisma. He sounded wonderful in the hall, but a few months later, after my review, I heard a section from Brighton - same gig … on radio and it sounded pretty rough.


Entered at Wed Aug 9 07:06:21 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Actually JQ, that's a two way street. Jimmy Webb is fortunate Glenn Campbell interpreted/performed Webb's songs. How that happened, I'm unaware. If Webb knew of Campbell, & sought him out, or his publisher or label began the association.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 23:18:03 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.113)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Jimmy Webb

It's a further accolade to Glenn Campbell that the great songwriter Jimmy Webb chose him to perform some of his best works -


Entered at Tue Aug 8 23:04:37 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Glen Campbell - very sorry to hear it. He had Alzheimers but coped well on stage, surrounded by his family. From the Folkswingers to The Wrecking Crew to The Beach Boys to solo star!


Entered at Tue Aug 8 22:41:12 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham

Subject: RIP The Rhinestone Cowboy

Glen Campbell dies at the age of 81.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 19:55:04 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Well, you hear "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" lots of times when people are discussing the ins and outs of a situation.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 18:51:50 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Language

I read an interesting article in one of our national newspapers a few weeks back relating to an environmental issue.

What was interesting was that the young writer used the phrase 'paved paradise, put up a parking lot'. I've seen the Joni term used before.

I thought it great that a line from a song, that many of my age group love, has entered the language in common usage.

What other examples are there of this?


Entered at Tue Aug 8 18:44:23 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Wallsend. Enjoyed the clip.

Great value for the Sandy Denny and Fairport. I followed Sandy Denny at the time. Maybe her solo albums could be more consistent, but brilliant at times. I still think the first three albums that she appeared on with Fairport are great. It's a great buy that Peter's flagging up, if you don't have them.

Interesting decor, Peter. How about a two tone album for black and white? Wasn't The Selector a great album cover?

I was at an art exhibition on Friday on the other side of the country, by one of Scotland's leading contemporary artists, He's in his seventies and a great Dylan fan - was at the Edinburgh 1966 Electric show. Many paintings in the show, including three great ones related to Dylan, including the one on Expecting Rain website with Alan Ginsberg in the background.

Bob F. Too true, Great act live if you ever saw Joe live. I tried to stream documentary on Amazon, but it didn't have it. Would like to see the documentary. Many thanks.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 15:47:15 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Framed LPs

We have well over a dozen framed LPs and often change the contents of the frames. Yesterday Mrs V decided it was time for my set of cool 50s jazz sleeves to give way to black & white to fit the new decor in the room. Three photographic, three illustrated. Revolver was first choice, but then looking through CDs "What we Did On Our Holidays" by Fairport and the first Procul Harum were selected to go with it. I had neither on vinyl. Being Tuesday, I always go to my local vinyl store to see what he's bought in over the weekend.

I'll check to see if he has the Procul Harum, I thought, and as a good luck token, played the Cd in the car going there. I was greeted with the news that he'd bought two boxes of late 60s LPs. First box, first record was the Procul Harum. A few LPs further back was the Fairport Convention. They look great.

The photographic set will be Times They Are A-Changin', With The Beatles … and … we're torn between Bookends and Born to Run. I think Born to Run is the better sleeve, but Bookends kind of fits better. I also play it more, but fortunately have two, mono and stereo. Will try both to see which looks better.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 14:21:44 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Thanks Peter!


Entered at Tue Aug 8 12:00:49 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

There is a Fairport Cropredy Convention 2017 going on in Oxfordshire and Banbury this week. Friends of ours went over for it. Petula Clark is the guest artist.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 11:00:12 CEST 2017 from (1.43.161.13)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just came across some footage of Sandy Denny I hadn't seen before on Youtube. You can find it if you search for: Fotheringay Live at The Beat Club 1970


Entered at Tue Aug 8 10:24:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fairport Convention

This effing spellchecker is musically ignorant. It really wants "Airport Convention" above.

Anyway, further to Dunc's post yesterday. The first five Fairport (it did it again with "Airport) albums are in Universal's Classic Albums series … five for £12. You can't do better than that.

Then yesterday Sainsbury's supermarket had a 3 CD set "Who Knows Where The Time Goes" for £5. A coffee and a muffin at Starbucks. It has some odds and bits on it too. But worth having for the car … assuming you still have a CD player.


Entered at Tue Aug 8 00:43:51 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, the barge is not going to reach Poughkeepsie until after 10pm now. I guess they're on an MTA type schedule.

Dunc, there is a great Joe Cocker documentary streaming called Mad Dog With Soul. A complicated guy but one of the all time greats. Never made it into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame. What a joke.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 23:20:42 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D - look up your model on line. Region coding for DVDs can be removed by tapping numbers into the remote control for many UK models … though I have heard it's harder in North America. My copy of "The Band is Back" is Australian, and says "ALL" under regions. That's unusual as "Region 0" is the normal for uncoded discs. The issue though is that it's PAL standard. So while it's not region coded, it maybe only plays on PAL players and TV sets. North America is NTSC not PAL. So then maybe you'd need a multi-region player. A pity as the latest format, 4K UHD format doesn't have region coding. But Blu-ray does. I think by the time we get to 4K everyone has decided region coding is a non-issue. I thought with hi-def TV, PAL or NTSC was no longer relevant.

On which. the blu-ray on The Last Waltz box set is astonishingly good.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 17:05:08 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Band Is Back

Does anyone know if "The Band Is Back" is available on DVD, playable on North American DVD machines. I do know it's available in the PAL format. I sometimes think I should invest in an all region player. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 16:28:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There's always a problem when two or three clubs dominate a league … Scotland, Portugal, Netherlands all had the same issue.Mind you, it is usually hard to see any English club outside the top six winning the league, which is why Leicester was such a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately it was an exception.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 15:17:38 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, Pete,because of the situation, I haven't really had the stomach to follow organized sports since the later 70s. It just hasn't felt real at all. Occasionally a rivalry or series or a particular team might be worth watching for a short stint for me, but that's about it.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 14:30:17 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Couldn't agree more, Peter and Jeff.

I noticed that Bournemouth do that. Matt Ritchie did well there. Boruc is a great goalie, who developed his skills in Scotland. Also, I do feel that generally some very good English championship players don't get a chance to move to the premiership now.

I did have a dream that an Arab state would buy Dundee United or St Mirren, and another club could challenge Rangers and Celtic.

Then those pre rounds in Europe are difficult for Scottish clubs, even Rangers. Rangers, Aberdeen and St Johnstone are out of Europe already. Because of the nature of the game with players changing clubs often, these clubs are playing matches with players, who have just met each other.

Other countries suffer. Ajax, who were once the best club in Europe, are out of Europe, already.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 12:16:22 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, generally speaking sports have become like politics: all about the money.
BTW, my thought was it's not unlikely NWC did see that post you referred to. Keep in mind how special the man is :-) .


Entered at Mon Aug 7 12:01:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

An afterthought, Dunc … if only it was the power of English money. As we read of the Chinese trying to buy Manchester United, we could list Chinese, Middle Eastern, Russian and American money in the Premier League before we even get to English. Then there's Qatar first buying Paris St Germain, then spending £200 million on one player. What happened to fair play rules?


Entered at Mon Aug 7 11:57:24 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Footballers … it's pretty bad throughout Britain on imported players. I found a 1976 Scotland v England programme on Sunday, and I just looked. Even back then 13 of the Scottish 22 played in England, 9 in Scotland. The glory days of Leeds and Liverpool had a Scottish backbone.

We feel pleased that AFC Bournemouth must have the highest number of actual English players of any Premier League team … 16 listed as "first team" plus one each Scottish, Irish and Welsh. Then only 9 non-British. No wonder our national teams under-achieve.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 11:24:55 CEST 2017 from (86.159.14.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Everybody loves 'Born To Be Wild', don't they.

Finished series 1 of 'The Bureau' last night, Kevin. Great stuff.

Bob F. You've got me working through my all my Joe Cocker. So your senior moment, as we call them in Scotland, has led me to revisiting one of my favourites. Great singer.

Before that I played the first three Fairport Convention albums with Sandy Denny on them (one of them Heavily Band influenced and all great), then the three solo Sandy Denny albums I have. I don't have the Fairport album, when she returned to Fairport. In fact, I've never heard it.

And it's good to see how popular my little country has become as a tourist destination. I was up in the N.E. end of last week at an art exhibition and I passed one of the great panoramic views of Scotland. Beautiful. At the exhibition, a brilliant surreal painting of Bob Dylan sold for several thousand pounds.

We're still Europe's most passionate football fans, but it's difficult to develop a team nowadays. Because of the power of English money as soon as a good player comes along, he is sold to an English club, often as speculation. Southampton bought a sixteen year old from Dundee United, Chelsea bought a sixteen year old from Rangers. Both outstanding for their age, but because the English clubs are so powerful, it's worth taking a gamble.

Al Edge. I really feel pleased that Liverpool have got Andy Robertson. I've seen him several times and am glad there's that Scottish link with Liverpool again. I can go back to the first Scots invasion - Shankly, Yeats, Slater and I'm having a senior moment - the player, who went from the St Mirren 1959 cup winning team, played every game in the second division for Liverpool, then never played once in the first division. Aaah!


Entered at Mon Aug 7 10:13:40 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One could add that a scroll down a short distance would have revealed the original post about Goldy McJohn.


Entered at Mon Aug 7 03:37:01 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: Goldy McJohn was a Toronto-born organist who gain considerable success in '68 with his band Steppenwolf, whose big hits, "Born To Be Wild" and "Magic Carpet Ride" were both driven by his organ-playing. If you're not familiar with Steppenwolf, but are familiar with Janis Joplin's music, you may be interested to know that Goldy guested on her "Kozmic Blues" album (because it was produced by Steppenwolf's producer, Gabriel Mekler). The GB's Pat B noted here last year that Goldy had posted on online keyboardist news groups that he had been inspired by Garth's playing back on Yonge Street in the early and mid-'60s.


Entered at Sun Aug 6 23:33:26 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC.

Your first post today, you describe yourself as "simple." In your second post you describe yourself as posting "to a political site for intellectuals (says the man himself ;-)."

Do you have as much difficulty deciding on where the front of your underwear is?


Entered at Sun Aug 6 15:08:03 CEST 2017 from (83.249.164.129)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: GB

FYI I post nowadays to a political site for intellectuals (says the man himself ;-). It has 50 000 visitors a day and - which is the best of all - I can write in my _own_ language. I am funny in Finnish. At least I laugh myself to death!


Entered at Sun Aug 6 14:48:15 CEST 2017 from (83.249.164.129)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Sad News about Goldy / John D

Yes, sad news indeed ... but who is Goldy? (A simple guy who knows nothing about nothing is wondering.)


Entered at Sun Aug 6 14:01:49 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Sad news about Goldy.


Entered at Sun Aug 6 10:51:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa, contact Jan and he can give you a "key" for posting links.


Entered at Sun Aug 6 03:18:11 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Lisa

Thanks..........Well, hits today are very different than hits years ago- & in every aspect quality is a big difference. Especially the songwriting, the part to which the first article you referenced alludes. Yes- The pile the names on routine is in play..... it' been in play on recordings for years... Look at the upcoming release from the Blues Brothers, they have everyone left alive in the blues & r & b world on it.

I'll read that PRO database article soon, just glanced now. But ASCAP & BMI ( the one I'm on) had out of necessity already begun a joint darabase. The reason being Congress has made their lives far more diificult, & in their efforts to get their artists paid, ACAP & BMI need to be able to communicate better & faster than before.... And yes,,, Congress has been in bed with MUSIC INDUSTRY (Labels) in order to j keep what artists get paid minimized. ASCap & bmi are fighting...RIAA I have had dealings with, mostly tech & identification stuff when I'm releasing material..

Just for mentioning, The Blues Brothers is almost a NYC band for a long time now. All three vocalists are NY Metro area residents, one a Bronx native, one a Jersey native, one a Ohio native. the drummer is frrm Long Island, Bones Malone and Lou Marini are in the horn section still, Leon Pendarvis, the keyboardist , oneof the SNL musical directors has been in the SNL band for almost 40 years...... steve Cropper lives in Mississipi. but Jon Tropea, the other guitarist, is a NYC native.


Entered at Sun Aug 6 02:38:17 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I didn't notice the new addition to the sign in page, but when I tried to use the link in it, I typed out the message but my laptop wouldn't send it. So, for some reason it won't let me contact him ...

The article was from a site called Digital Music News, and it said that the average hit song nowadays has 4+ writers and 6 publishers, as compared to the 70s, where the stats were 1.95 writers and 2.04 publishers. Another article on the same site is titled "War Erupts Over Whose Global Music Rights Database Is Better", which I also thought you'd be interested in. Oh well ...


Entered at Sat Aug 5 23:17:56 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lisa. Write to Jan to get hooked up. The Mid Hudson Bridge noted in that article i linked is where Bob has his business set up on the walkway.


Entered at Sat Aug 5 22:52:13 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

I'm trying to send Jeff an article, but Johnny Cash won't let me, and I can't imagine why (nothing remotely offensive?) - so, how do you get out of it?


Entered at Sat Aug 5 17:46:44 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Tugboats In The MidHudson Valley


Entered at Sat Aug 5 04:57:48 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Goldy McJohn, RIP

I just read that Steppenwolf's original and long-time keyboardist Goldy McJohn (really John Goadsby) died in Seattle of a heart attack - at age 72.


Entered at Fri Aug 4 00:29:50 CEST 2017 from (70.115.129.98)

Posted by:

Crazy Chester

Location: Austin, TX

Subject: Garth turns 80

{ I asked you at Levon's funeral, that as the oldest member of The Band, were you surprised you would outlive Levon, Rick and Richard? You replied, "I certainly am John, I certainly am. May you continue to live on Garth & stay forever young. }

+1


Entered at Fri Aug 4 00:10:23 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.33)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Trump and Liberace

Cheese brothers in taste -


Entered at Thu Aug 3 23:46:33 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As quoted today, Trump thinks the White House "a dump" and not up to the high aesthetic standards of the Trump Tower. What's needed is more gold taps in the bathrooms.


Entered at Thu Aug 3 21:25:39 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.33)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Today's Trump transcripts

These are so damn revealing and such a verification of Trump's idiocy - maybe even persuasive to the moron class. Hannitty and his cohorts are beside themselves about the leakers. Give it a few years and these leakers - if we survive Trump - will be seen as true American heroes.


Entered at Thu Aug 3 20:27:38 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Linked: The Troggs in the studio trying to make a comeback.


Entered at Thu Aug 3 16:19:07 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.33)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Westcoaster

Aren't you guys on fire up there? We could be at any time. The forecast for today is 103. High, dead and very crisp grass everywhere; it just ain't normal. It's meant to break a bit starting tomorrow-


Entered at Thu Aug 3 16:00:00 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rod: I take it back - it's not hard to find. "Garth Hudson Our Lady" on eBay yielded many new copies under $15US, and at least one provided free international shipping.


Entered at Thu Aug 3 15:56:21 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rod: I agree entirely, though my favourite is still what's been on the music machine yesterday and today, "Our Lady, Queen of Angels". Likely hard to find anywhere, never mind the Antipodes, but definitely worth some trouble.


Entered at Thu Aug 3 11:16:46 CEST 2017 from (210.86.93.173)

Posted by:

Rod

I must listen to the sea to the north again. The title track is an amazing piece of music


Entered at Thu Aug 3 01:22:53 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Subject: But Then...........

Those of us a "cut above" with a finer vocabulary Peter, would use the term, "Richard Cranium"..........you see.

I wonder how one little piece of meat could get hisself so many names...

Johnson, Peter, Willie, Dick.....I'm sure there is more just not in my head right now. Y'all must know the song, "I'm goin' back to Nashville to get my Peter....built.

I finally got the weather I need. Hot enough to burn the nuts off a chest nut tree. Sanding and painting like crazy. Had to come home for one night..........carry on.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 23:45:16 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Willies.

Pete, then there's Norah Jones band, The Little Willies.

Yes , Willy is used to refer to the male appendage.

Yet, say Willie all on it's own, i, as well as many Americans of my age, would think of Wilie Mays.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 23:19:55 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: As I've said before (quoting comedian Dave Broadfoot), if someone's going to be making 90 percent of your decisions, you want to be on a first-name basis.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 19:45:53 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Happy Birthday Mr. Hudson. All the very best. Serenade yourself and your bride; on a concertina; tonight. I asked you at Levon's funeral, that as the oldest member of The Band, were you surprised you would outlive Levon, Rick and Richard? You replied, "I certainly am John, I certainly am. May you continue to live on Garth & stay forever young.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 17:44:43 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Dickies

Jeff, I have my Dickies on right now! Blue serge, side pocket. Just the thing to crawl around on the shop floor chasing down wires. Impervious to most slime and grime, although I did scour the knee of one pair (I've three) when I took a header on some ice and landed on my knee on the pavement. It's got a slight whitish spot, but the fabric held. Can't beat 'em.

The other dickie, well, I think he's semi-retired at this point. Wish I was.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 17:44:15 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Kev, sorry about that. Nothing in Dunc's original post should have led to that mistake. It even had Tambourine Man as the subject. What's sad is that my hearing is actually going quicker then my mind. We have a concession at a NY Park and how I mix up people's orders all day is really funny.

No doubt Elvis could have had better management and a healthier life style. He died way to young. What I think get's lost is that in the last 10 years of his life he recorded some of the greatest songs of all time. Suspicious Minds, In The Ghetto, Always on My Mind and my favorite, Any Day Now would be at the top of the list but there's plenty more. His Dylan covers were really great.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 16:03:29 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, on the band name Wet Willie, I know this can be a prank in America varying from mildly gross to extremely gross … but do you use "willie" as a child's name for the male appendage in North America? We do. So did you think the double meaning of "Slick Willie"?


Entered at Wed Aug 2 14:20:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Happy Birthday

Yes, happy birthday to Garth. "The Sea To The North" will be this afternoon's listening.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 13:29:34 CEST 2017 from (69.203.125.109)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Happy 80th birthday, Garth!!


Entered at Wed Aug 2 12:38:32 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, yes, a dick is slang for the male organ here in the U.S., but that never extended to dickie/Dickie. Here it's only dickie the clothing item, Dickie the clothing Brand, or Dickey or Dickie, the guy's nickname.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 12:15:47 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

The Italian toast "Cin-cin" is a big no-no in the Land of the Rising Sun, where it refers to a part of the anatomy that boys have and little girls don't. ; )


Entered at Wed Aug 2 10:47:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Johnny B. Goode

Yes, 'johnny' for condom derives from 'johnny bag' - a bag over the johnny. I never knew about Toby down here in the south.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 10:22:29 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.125)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland.

Subject: Names

People use gobsmacked up here. On the east coast gob becomes gub.

As well as Willy, Johnny(a condom), and Dick, in the part of the east coast where I was brought up, Toby was used to describe the male organ.

ut my favourite term to describe the male organ, perhaps now dying out, is 'We're all Jock Tamson's bairns' (children), meaning we are all the same. Used when somebody is getting above themselves, for example.

I wonder what somebody checking into the GB would think today!


Entered at Wed Aug 2 09:19:06 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The fake turtlenecks are apparently back in fashion … I Googled and found on sale "Dickies for women" which would causes hilarity in Britain. It's odd, "dick" is surely used in just the same way in USA as Britain … leading to dickhead etc. But you don't use the children's version dicky? Maybe that's why we found Tricky Dicky a funny name for Nixon. I assumed it was deliberate.

We also found Slick Willy funny in exactly the same way, as willy, like dicky is a children's name for the male appendage (I choose words carefully to avoid Johnny Cash's finger, though 'johnny' is the a third children's name for it.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 05:29:56 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

I see that a somewhat interesting article on TNTDOD and the cultural-appropriation argument appears at this site's What's New section. Yesterday there was an article in the "Globe and Mail" on a different argument taking place in Richmond, the city that had recently fallen in the song. I just skimmed, but I did learn that Richmond was not just a place name that scanned, but the capital city of the Confederacy. No wonder that it's fall was an especially big deal. (I must admit that I'd totally forgotten that it's still the capital of Virginia.)

I just looked-up Richmond VA on Wikipedia and was captivated by the quick skate over this history of the place: "During the American Civil War, Richmond served as the capital of the Confederate States of America. The city entered the 20th century with one of the world's first successful electric streetcar systems. The Jackson Ward neighborhood is a national hub of African-American commerce and culture." Don't mention the war. I did once, but I got away with it.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 03:17:26 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is a review of Rumble in the New York Times. Robbie gets a brief mention.


Entered at Wed Aug 2 02:58:30 CEST 2017 from (24.114.75.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Funny thing about names and associations......while driving on the weekend I was getting fed-up by the music and radio options and decided to switch away from the satellite pre-sets and check out the main channel list of Sirius radio.......and while flipping through the channels, I noticed a "Garth" channel and it took me a moment to conclude that this likely wouldn't be related to our wonderful wizard of the keyboards........Also a bummer to see the "Playboy" channel has vanished.....I guess The "Hip Hop Nation" channel might be the only place left on the satellite dial to find some raunchy talk !

Bob F: You owe me 20 minutes back for trying to find Elvis and Mr. tambourine on YouTube ! I did find a Glenn Campbell version......and I didn't know or remember about the Elvis "Shall be Released" take......how much more special he could have been with a sharper music focussed manager/helper.

Has there ever been a better name than Elvis in show business ? Reminds of the Brittish bookmakers that were taking bets when Di and Charles were having their first and a headline in one of the rags had Elvis at 100 to 1


Entered at Wed Aug 2 00:47:54 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dickey

Any mention of Dickey would be Dickey Betts,for me.Though I recall wearing dickies in the 60's for a short while.Then turtle necks came along.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 23:57:15 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, if i think of Dickies, i think of work socks, though Dickies brand make jeans,work shirts, work shoes etc. And of course, it brings to mind the the fake turtlenecks from when i was 5 or 6 years old... the Brit term i was unaware of, but googled and found it.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 23:14:50 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

GOB is mouth, Irish or English, so I'd guess gobshite is someone who is generally speaking shite. Gobsmacked is as surprised as you would be if someone smacked you in the mouth. I think, anyway!


Entered at Tue Aug 1 23:12:27 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Gobshite is definitely Irish English., but gobsmacked is general British English … assuming it's used in Scotland, Dunc?


Entered at Tue Aug 1 22:13:40 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.97)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Gobsmacked

PV - This word is largely mainstreamed here now but gobshite is not yet. Aren't they directly related? Rhyming slang is brown bread here, never caught on; or hasn't yet. Is it diminished in use over there now? Generationally?


Entered at Tue Aug 1 20:21:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, you may not be aware of the meaning of "dickie" in British English.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 19:36:25 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.125)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Male grooming for the eldely

Time for a cravat, Peter.

Age, Bill, is when the barber says, "Eyebrows, Sir?"

A truly great milestone for Garth, tomorrow.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 19:17:31 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.126)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Pete, to preserve your shirt collars, get a supply of dickies.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 18:42:11 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Male baldness

This is the topic for me! I put gallons of that Redken stuff on 20 years ago. Total waste of money. I decided to go Yul Brynner and shave it all off. The downside, as Mrs V points out, is that I wear out shirt collars fast because by the evening I have stubble on my neck, which is tougher than hair and abrades the cotton.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 17:52:53 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hirsute

Bill M - What's the story with all this new growth in ears particularly? Do you know if anybody's ever recovered from male pattern baldness?


Entered at Tue Aug 1 17:11:49 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.236)

Posted by:

Bill M

Speaking of age, by my calculation his Garthship achieves the big eight-oh tomorrow!

Dunc: I know what you mean. Semi-formal means trimming the nose hairs. Formal calls for taking care of the ears as well. (Garth is free to abide by his own rules, of course.)


Entered at Tue Aug 1 14:20:31 CEST 2017 from (174.95.199.216)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Interesting and timely piece on cultural appropriation, particularly when we are reading more and more about this subject. (Hey, Will Shakespeare! Some nerve writing about this Venetian merchant guy.)


Entered at Tue Aug 1 13:18:58 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.125)

Posted by:

Dun c

Location: Scotland

Don't worry, Bob. It's normal. I can't remember what I forget nowadays. Bloody Ageing. As Billy Connolly said, "From the Rock n' Roll Years to the Nasal Hair Years." I'm free and I can't get motivated today.

Just happy sitting playing, Bob 1966 disc 1. I hadn't truly appreciated the harmonica recording until your post, Peter. Perhaps too focused on words. Brilliant on many tracks. Playing 'Fourth Time Around' just now - stunning harmonica. Seven great songs.

Also, it's a great recording. Atmospheric and you can hear every word. Thanks.

Catching up with posts, Thanks, Jeff.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 11:44:31 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Losing It

Dunc, you were talking about Mr. Tambourine Man and for some reason I got I Shall Be Released in my head. It's kind of funny and frightening at the same time. Sorry about that.

We started The Bureau last night. It's good but I'm not sure how long my wife will want to stick with it. She only likes grisly who done it crime shows.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 11:09:05 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.125)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks, Bob F. I'll seek them out. I have a good collection, not complete, of Joe Cocker, and have seen him live, but did not know he had recorded Mr Tambourine Man. I really like Joe, and will buy the album it is on. I saw Joan Baez and liked when she talked of Dylan and did her impression of him. I've got a greatest hits collection, butdon't know her work in detail. A thousand times - Elvis's version must be good. I'll seek them out.

Thanks, Peter. I play that version and think it's great. I'll play it again this morning and focus on the harmonica playing. Sometimes I think how negative people were when booing the electric Dylan, but they were also losing something special. I was lucky enough to see a quiet semi acoustic Dylan only once, but loved the experience. I'll check out the other versions. I thought about you yesterday because in the list 'Visions of Johanna' is low, but I owe my INCREASED appreciation of the song to you championing it many years ago on the GB. I miss Borders.

As some of you may have gleaned, I'm interested in Scottish art. I have an etching by one of Scotland's leading artists, which focuses on the audience at the 1966 concert in Edinburgh. Many in the crowd are older, not a pop crowd. They were losing something dear to them.

I'd recommend Gene Clark's version. Great piano.

Thanks P.S.B.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 10:49:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Marmalade's Mr Tambourine Man

Linked … it's a good version.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 09:25:00 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

PSB, very interesting article on Dixie. It echoes the Irish playwright Conor McPherson setting his play with 20 Dylan songs in 1934 Duluth. But I thought it worked.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 09:20:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mr Tambourine Man

Dunc, when I saw Michael Gray speak, he said his favourite Dylan recording of all was Mr Tambourine Man at Manchester Free Trade Hall … i.e. in the acoustic set before he Hawks came on. He played the recording. He was particularly enamoured by the harmonica solo and focussed on it. We were all in Borders (it was that long ago). I've told this story before. An old tramp had joined the free talk which was to promote a new edition of "Song & Dance Man." He was half asleep. At the end, I was chatting to Michael Gray and the tramp lurched up, and said "You're the best harmonica player I ever heard!" to Michael, and wandered off into the night.

Different ones to try … the Brothers & Sisters on the "Dylan's Gospel" compilation. Duane Eddy did an instrumental in full twangy style (awful). Johnny Rivers did an unnecessary very close cover of The Byrds version.

I saw Marmalade around 1971 in a small club outside Bournemouth. They were an incredibly tight band, with great vocals.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 04:20:27 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Cultural Appropriate and Dixie Down

Thought some here would find this article which uses "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" as its main example interesting to say the least. Read the whole thing, the writer kind of goes in a round about way to get to the point and make his case.


Entered at Tue Aug 1 01:29:36 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: I Shall Be Released

Dunc, Elvis did a version in 1971 that came out on a box set of his 70's recordings. It's actually just the chorus but it is so beautiful. I've probably played it a 1000 times. He calls out Dylan's name at the end. It's on youtube. I don't know how to link anymore. Joan Baez did a wonderful version on her record of Dylan songs Any Day Now. Joe Cocker also has a splendid version.


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