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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, May 2017


Entered at Tue May 30 23:48:30 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NYers are pros Pete.


Entered at Tue May 30 21:10:49 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Muddy Waters TLW

Robbie writes:

From Robbie's Facebook page:

Muddy Waters at The Last Waltz.........."There’s been a misconception over the years that I should clearly straighten out. While we were inviting musical guests to join us for the Band’s Last Waltz concert, Levon suggested Muddy Waters. We had always been big admirers of his music, and were unquestionably influenced by him. There was a period in the early 60’s when Muddy’s records rarely left the turntable. The only concern amongst the members of the Band was- could we do justice and play his songs as well as we knew them from those amazing Chess recordings.

Muddy originally came from the Mississippi Delta in an area just across the river from where Levon grew up. Levon’s ties to the blues of his homeland were a strong bond and I completely understood his desire to have Muddy join us. Levon was totally confident in our ability to play with Muddy, so we completely embraced the idea. At our rehearsal before the concert, Muddy brought along his piano man Pinetop Perkins and guitarist Bob Margolin. We also invited Paul Butterfield, the master blues harp player, to join us. Muddy had been up to Levon’s barn in Woodstock NY and recorded the old classic song, “Caledonia”, so he suggested we do that one. I asked about Muddy’s amazing “Mannish Boy” track, and Bob Margolin thought was a great choice, and gave us the lowdown on the arrangement. Playing with Muddy and these guys at the concert was definitely one of the highlights of the night for us.

Someone claimed years later that there had been a dispute over whether Muddy’s performance would be included in the Last Waltz movie. This is absolutely untrue. Then, to top it off, I heard that we’d contemplated replacing Muddy’s performance in the film with Neil Diamond’s. Ridiculously false. No one involved, not Marty, nor any of us, ever considered not including Muddy in the film. His performance in The Last Waltz is phenomenal and speaks for itself.

I seriously needed to dispel these absurd claims." - RR

True and as Robbie says it was Levon that wanted Muddy there; in the first place and everyone was in agreement.


Entered at Tue May 30 19:35:49 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What was the problem, Jeff? Didn't the New Yorkers know how to light a barbecue?


Entered at Tue May 30 19:32:10 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred.I'm unaware of studies or percentages regarding hair color & proximity of BBQs to homes . It's not, but could be a blonde joke.

BTW, my customers that did that were never in NYC, generally Midwesterners.


Entered at Tue May 30 11:29:43 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Burning burgers and the house down

Who puts their BBQ grill close to the walls?!? Oy vey.

No wonder the world is in the shape it is these days.


Entered at Tue May 30 11:09:38 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Goerge Foreman fights fires.

Fred, for lazy apartment dwellers George Foreman grills are the fireman's friend. Two, four, twelve, fifteen serving size indoor or indoor /outdoor grills.

People damage or set their houses on fire with barbecues too often. Common sense says keep flames & embers away from houses... I learned siding on steel, & though I prefer real wood siding & brick, made a living with pvc clad steel & aluminum for as long as possible, & then vinyl. Even the best vinyl siding is an atrocity, but an artist can do wonders with it. I always attempted to drill it into my customer's heads to keep the barbecues away from the walls. You'd be surprised how many customers melted siding. Fortunately none of my customers did real serious damage to their homes.

One thing I noticed, that cheap Canadian vinyl siding was a lot flimsier than the better garbage made here in the U.S.

I only sold & hung the thicker gauges american vinyl dreck.


Entered at Tue May 30 07:20:00 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The thrill of the grill

I dunno. It does show some kind of initiative and a bit of, mmm, unconventional thinking. There's no balcony and you want to grill. Whaddya gonna do? ; )


Entered at Tue May 30 06:14:54 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: New Jersey...Ring the moron alert!!! Call the fire department.

See the link.


Entered at Tue May 30 03:23:07 CEST 2017 from (114.75.206.3)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Robbie said on several occasions he never read Levon's book. Also, in the comment on Robbie's website, he talks about not including Muddy in the film whereas Levon was talking about not including him in the show at all. If Levon was as disengaged and hostile to the whole project as he claimed, why would he even care?


Entered at Mon May 29 23:55:11 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Someone, someone

That 'someone' would be Levon Helm on page 261 of This Wheel's on Fire, where he claims a flunky - possibly his 'close friend' Jon Taplin - was sent to ask him to tell Muddy he was off the show, to which Levon suggested they remove Neil Diamond. Don't these guys read each other's books?

I always read Levon as stating an inner truth as he saw it rather than hard facts. Robbie was clearly thrilled by Muddy's presence, and I believe his account.


Entered at Mon May 29 23:05:27 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.230)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Cromatix perform at WatchFire

American flags that are wounded & in need of proper retirement are burned ceremoniously. The Cromatix performed at the event.


Entered at Mon May 29 21:58:43 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

From Bob Margolin in response to what RR wrote about Muddy and TLW:

"Very interesting, thanks for sharing that with me. Robbie's description of what happened at the rehearsal and the concert is accurate, to my recollection...... What was happening behind the scenes – I have only heard from Levon talking to me and his writing. I was around Garth Hudson a lot earlier this year, but neither of us brought up the subject. We only talked about music."


Entered at Mon May 29 19:00:46 CEST 2017 from (24.114.50.83)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Muddy Waters-Robbie Riobertson-TLW

From Robbie's Facebook page:

Muddy Waters at The Last Waltz.........."There’s been a misconception over the years that I should clearly straighten out. While we were inviting musical guests to join us for the Band’s Last Waltz concert, Levon suggested Muddy Waters. We had always been big admirers of his music, and were unquestionably influenced by him. There was a period in the early 60’s when Muddy’s records rarely left the turntable. The only concern amongst the members of the Band was- could we do justice and play his songs as well as we knew them from those amazing Chess recordings?

Muddy originally came from the Mississippi Delta in an area just across the river from where Levon grew up. Levon’s ties to the blues of his homeland were a strong bond and I completely understood his desire to have Muddy join us. Levon was totally confident in our ability to play with Muddy, so we completely embraced the idea. At our rehearsal before the concert, Muddy brought along his piano man Pinetop Perkins and guitarist Bob Margolin. We also invited Paul Butterfield, the master blues harp player, to join us. Muddy had been up to Levon’s barn in Woodstock NY and recorded the old classic song, “Caledonia”, so he suggested we do that one. I asked about Muddy’s amazing “Mannish Boy” track, and Bob Margolin thought was a great choice, and gave us the lowdown on the arrangement. Playing with Muddy and these guys at the concert was definitely one of the highlights of the night for us.

Someone claimed years later that there had been a dispute over whether Muddy’s performance would be included in the Last Waltz movie. This is absolutely untrue. Then, to top it off, I heard that we’d contemplated replacing Muddy’s performance in the film with Neil Diamond’s. Ridiculously false. No one involved, not Marty, nor any of us, ever considered not including Muddy in the film. His performance in The Last Waltz is phenomenal and speaks for itself.

I seriously needed to dispel these absurd claims." - RR


Entered at Mon May 29 14:08:04 CEST 2017 from (24.114.70.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Eventually, but not just yet.


Entered at Mon May 29 11:49:50 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… and then there were none.


Entered at Sat May 27 22:14:44 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Gregg Allman

Deeply saddened-with Dylan & The Band,the soundtrack of my life. RIP Gregg.


Entered at Sat May 27 21:35:20 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Gregg Allman


Entered at Sat May 27 03:59:18 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Levon

Remembering Levon on his birthday.


Entered at Fri May 26 21:15:49 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: OMG

It's beautiful. The CDs are encased in a gatefold Sgt Pepper LP sleeve … I thought I must have bought the vinyl version at first (not much point with 5.1 blu ray). And on June 1st it was fifty years ago … see link to the appropriate Dart Travis novel.


Entered at Fri May 26 18:04:07 CEST 2017 from (64.229.182.143)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: And they both moved on to copying Bob 'n' Our Guys with their respective great white album covers.


Entered at Fri May 26 17:14:57 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 50 Years Ago Today

I just opened the box set of Sergeant Pepper. It has a plastic "moving sleeve" like Her Satanic Majesties Request. It's circular then … the Stones tried to copy The Beatles 50 years ago. Now The Beatles have copied The Stones!


Entered at Thu May 25 19:36:00 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, I sent you a musical question. Hopefully i used the correct e mail address.


Entered at Wed May 24 23:31:48 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.60)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, this guy might provide your needs..

babablondejokermanbythesideoftheroad@gmail. This man has an unequaled record of success in this field.
Vanishing Blonde Joke Spells
Blonde Love Spells
Lost Blonde Love Spells
Divorcing Blonde Spells
Marriage Blonde Spells
Binding Blonde Spell.
Breakup Blonde Spells
Banish a past Blonde Lover
Blondes want to be promoted in your office
Want to satisfy your Blonde lover
babablondejokermanbythesideoftheroad@gmail


Entered at Wed May 24 21:49:12 CEST 2017 from (142.166.48.53)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: Yes, the one in NB. I leared yesterday that it's locally known as Freddy. Or I think it is because I ate at a place whose business card says "The first vegetarian restaurant in Freddy". It's actually not just vegetarian but vegan, and Persian, and so good that I had lunch there yesterday and then went back for dinner. May I suggest the apricot stew?

Back to music: a surprisingly large proportion of the C&W / rockabilly players on Yonge Street when Hawkins and Helm got there in '58 were from New Brunswick and Cape Breton. Goin' Down The Road, eh?


Entered at Wed May 24 17:00:32 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Academia

I wonder if there is any ACADEMIC RESEARCHES on the Band. Not only "what Robbie really wants to say" (... a difficult question as it is!). For many years ago I aswered to a few questions from a Swedish student who tried to be PhD on the greatest rock band in Sweden. Haven't heard of her ever since. More promising is my contact to a Finnish PhD who actually is planning to wrote her OTHER thesis on this band. I offered my knowledge on social and political context (having lived near their reality for many years). - I have tried to find essays and thesis on The Band in this level but without a success.


Entered at Wed May 24 16:58:33 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bill M & Kevin J = Bad Boys - Bad Boys!

Thanks for that Bill. Love Emily Carr's work. Alert Bay is on Cormorant Island. It is about 3 miles long and a 15 or 20 minute ferry ride from Port McNeill. A really cute little village.

Like hearing about Lenny Breau, a super picker. Is it FredricktoN NB you are at?

KEVIN! have you been watching the Ottawa Senators? Getting the job done, (just barely).

It's a shit day today rainy and gloomy, can't get much done. Otherwise I won't be around much the next few months. As soon as I get these boats in shape I'll be on the water. Maybe doing a little eco-tourism trips showing people our coast and make a little pocket money.

Anyone coming this way email tsolum666atgeemaildotcom


Entered at Wed May 24 16:27:28 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.60)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Irving Azoff states YouTube's value to the music industry is none, yet gives credit to Spotify & Apple music. He must have points in em.


Entered at Wed May 24 15:20:59 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: The Band / Miss Richardson... on a serious side

On a serious side... I am just a jerk (=your and Google's word) on the other side of this globe... but can't help but wonder if you'll ever gonna write about your memories on The Band. Mr. Daniloff never did, you know. What a shame!

... and of course: CHEERS to your new home, Norbert! (We all must live somewhere ;-)


Entered at Wed May 24 14:41:44 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Rosalind

This is 'Miss Rosalind Richardson Blues' and it goes like this:

(C7) Miss Richardson asks when no one answers
(F7) Miss Richardson answers when no one asks
(C7) Miss Richardson doesn't answer when someone asks
(G7) Oh Lord, will I ever gonna lose?
(C) Miss Richardson Blues

Thank you very many!


Entered at Wed May 24 12:41:32 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Kenyan connections

Glenn T: my stepmother grew up in Kenya. Her youngest brother was born there in 1954. Her father owned a photo studio in Nairobi (he spent WWII in a prisoner of war camp somewhere in Kenya).


Entered at Wed May 24 11:26:55 CEST 2017 from (142.166.48.53)

Posted by:

Bill M

Haso / Glenn T: No problem at all - way better than spells and blonde jokes. A friend's been working at a Christian mission in north Kenya for 30 years; it gets in the blood.


Entered at Wed May 24 04:15:19 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: glenn t

Glenn: yeah, it's not the Band, but maybe they'll humor us. Reini's middle son, Mark is the Nairobi guide I mentioned. He wrote a book on many of his experiences, including difficulties w/ Rwandan rebels about 15 years ago or more, called "Dangerous Beauty". Africa is most definitely his muse. I know happy hill well, lived in Doc's Magumba for a couple of years.


Entered at Wed May 24 01:25:50 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.98)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

A guy walks into a coffee shop. He sees two blondes who are drop dead gorgeous, & resemble each other very strongly. He orders coffee & a donut & is waiting for it. Unable to contain himself he blurts out, Geez the two of you are so beautiful, I gotta ask: Are you sisters? One blonde says Sisters! We're not even Catholic!


Entered at Tue May 23 23:39:54 CEST 2017 from (142.166.48.53)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

This is a neat little news story and video about a policeman who comes to tell some teenage rockers to turn down but stays to sit in on drums.


Entered at Tue May 23 23:32:19 CEST 2017 from (142.166.48.53)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Fredericton at the moment

Rockin Chair: This is a very nice little city with an impressive art gallery housing a collection donated decades ago by a local boy who made good - Max Aiken, aka Lord Beaverbrook. I thought of you when I saw the title of an Emily Carr painting, "Indian Village, Alert Bay". I think you've mentioned Alert Bay - maybe from your childhood days?

Also, as we haven't heard from you and JT of late, does that mean you're both helping with the provincial recounts?

As it happens, Fredericton has a couple of decent used record stores in the 'downtown'. For a buck I couldn't pass up a 45 by Lone Pine and his Moutaineers, "Fuzzy-Wuzzy Teddy Bear" / "It's Good-Bye And So Long To You". The b-side was written by Harold Breau aka Lone Pine, and features Mrs Breau, aka Betty Cody (i.e., Cote). Harold and Betty were the parents of super-guitarist Lenny Breau, who played with his parents when he was super-young, and may even be on this one.

When the family moved west to Winnipeg, Lenny mentored a young Randy Bachman, and to a lesser degree a young Neil Young. But to Band fans he's a jazz guitarist who used Rick and Levon as accompanists in some 1961 recordings.


Entered at Tue May 23 13:02:47 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: : D

Bill M: It's always the guys who listen to Uriah Heep, isn't it?


Entered at Tue May 23 12:26:42 CEST 2017 from (24.114.74.231)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: heroes and wizards

Fred: I remember a classmate in grade 10 English telling another that the poems he was turning in were really Uriah Heap lyrics. Maybe a JK Rowling did too, come to think of it.


Entered at Tue May 23 10:41:00 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

The British and Japanese...kindered spirits it would seem. Kindered spirits at sucking the joy out life's simple pleasures, that is. ; )


Entered at Tue May 23 10:01:06 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In Britain, anywhere that plays music needs an annual Performing Rights Society Licence. That includes physiotherapists who play relaxing music, dentists who have a CD of Mozart, fashion boutiques with Radio One playing, and your secondhand vinyl store. They get chased for it too.


Entered at Tue May 23 09:57:53 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

An atrocity directed at young kids, perhaps at their first "grown-up" concert. My granddaughter has been asking to go to a concert with friends for months. Now it'll be a while before her mum lets her. There are no words, not that it stopped commentators on Radio 4 this morning. Apparenty "the answer to the challenge is engaging the communities". If I ran the BBC (and I probably should) I'd have an auto-mute on the words challenge, engage, communities and robust (robust came a few seconds later). It might train people to think rather than repeating cliched drivel.


Entered at Tue May 23 07:24:21 CEST 2017 from (24.114.66.37)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Fred.....

"Nothing from everything" everywhere else for songwriters - may as well get a pinch from the hair salons.

Dunc & Bob F: just finished watching first two seasons of "Shetland" - Loving it. A great show. Thank you.


Entered at Tue May 23 06:20:48 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I forgot to add...

it seems now, in Japan, from that article I linked, you can't even quote a song lyric in a speech without having to fork over cash.

Good thing this wasn't the case when I was in Grade 12 taking English Lit.(in Canada, not Japan) where I went through a period of quoting songs in essays (one line I remember using "All we are is just dust in the wind")


Entered at Tue May 23 06:09:43 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A bit of background

Recently a law was introduced which would allow the Japanese Society of Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers (JASRAC) to go after music schools to pay copyright on music and songs the students play.

They will also go after businesses that play music in public places (e.g. a hair salon playing background music)

I think the law will go into effect in 2018, but already there are lawsuits and counter-lawsuits.


Entered at Tue May 23 05:53:31 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: From the good grief file:

Be careful what you say in Japan.


Entered at Tue May 23 05:22:14 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: haso

haso, that's a name from way back (reini ross). i lived for a few years in reini's old house on happy hill (on campus) and would you believe i have a kenyan connection? my wife is from kenya, so we have beaucoup family in nairobi. in fact we've got a kenyan cousin on her way to visit us at this moment; flight due in tuesday morning. sorry folks, this is not band related.


Entered at Tue May 23 04:54:06 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: more dogs/flies

Peter: I always wondered if RR actually caught that fly. I never had any luck w/ that method; in fact a little aside: the only person I ever saw succeed at that was an old college friend that I even saw catch a sparrow in flight bare-handed. But then, he subsequently became the most well-known Anglo wildlife guide in Nairobi, Kenya (glenn t: Reini Ross's son).

Yeah, I mean I cried when I had to put down my favorite dog 3 years ago. They do have a place in a household, at least here in the US of A, but enough's enough. Good comments about Italian rescue dogs. And the daughter mentioned last entry, gets severely bummed when the 1/2 Malamute, 1/2 American Indian dog she got at a rescue shelter gets out through the sliding screen door and goes on "a solo" at her respite in the mountains/fortunately back after his 2nd ramble.

(PETA: don't pay any mind), having had our own, afore-mentioned Siberian Husky, I absolutely enjoyed sitting in the sled for almost 2 hours behind a team of veteran Iditarod sled dogs, breaking trail one winter in Colorado. My friend, the musher, would certainly speak to what the dogs are bred to & clearly what they wanted to do: pull. I mean PULL. They are literally jumping all 4 feet out of the snow, wanting to get going.


Entered at Tue May 23 02:16:02 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Before she fled Canada.

Live. Joni Mitchell, when she was still Joni Anderson. Also The Chapins, including Harry, & Dave Van Ronk.


Entered at Tue May 23 01:40:38 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.193)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: you are right. I will do my best to make amends should I encounter the same fly.

Peter V: It's a two-way street. For some thirty years, Robbie's fly has been dining out in fly heaven, regaling his chums with the tale of how he went out on a high note - leaving bits of six different dog turd, plus two of his own, in the sweaty palm of a rock star and putative media celebrity. Better still, some of the detritus found its way into the possession of an Oscar-winning movie director via a see-ya-later-Marty handshake.


Entered at Tue May 23 00:56:01 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

There was an explosion with resulting fatalities at an Ariana Grande concert at The Manchester Arena in Britain.


Entered at Tue May 23 00:36:08 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Still, the Fly met its comeuppance in The Last Waltz.


Entered at Tue May 23 00:03:50 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Everything in nature wants its little bit. That fly obviously thought he had more right to the item in question than you did Bill. And in the natural order of things, he might've had a point.


Entered at Mon May 22 23:30:43 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.193)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: One day last summer I realised my life had hit a new low when I stooped to pick up after a niece's dog and had to fight off a fly to gain access to a dog turd.


Entered at Mon May 22 20:47:31 CEST 2017 from (24.114.66.37)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jerry Seinfeld puts the Dog and Human discussion into perspective:

"If you see two life-forms, one of them's making a poop, the other one's carrying it for him, who would you assume is in charge?"


Entered at Mon May 22 19:25:50 CEST 2017 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Misanthropy

Just what is it about humanity that makes us believe they are the most (or only) valuable life form here?


Entered at Mon May 22 15:35:41 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Big Noise

On a lighter note...attended David Bromberg's Big Noise one-day festival this weekend in Wilmington, DE. Alt-grass band Front Country, Larry Campbell & Theresa Williams, Anders Osborne, Dr. John, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, and of course David and the Big Band. What's not to like?

Larry Campbell is one of the most inventive soloists I've ever heard, a point reinforced by some of the subsequent solos by other players. Not that they were bad, but they were not Larry. A bit disappointed with Dr. John, who gave a sort of dial-it-in greatest hits performance, but I'll be happy to be breathing at his age! Chris Robinson was pretty good, with a good sound. Odd tube amps and vintage keyboards. Clavinet? Rhodes? Mini-Moog? All the real deals. (OK the piano was a Yamaha digital, but still impressive.) All played through Fender Twins, Super Reverbs, etc. And hand-made Divided by 13 guitar amps. Cool stuff.

Lonesome Dave was in good form, with the 8-man, 3-woman backup. My fave, trumpeter Peter Ecklund, now the only original member of the Bromberg Big Band of old, was in the house and I got to shake his hand and have him sign one of HIS CDs. A splendid day, all in all.

Picked up Larry & Theresa's album, which is quite good, and an older solo guitar album by Larry, 'Rooftops'. So far, so good.


Entered at Mon May 22 14:52:58 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Shaggy dog story

To the dogs. My father always said that was where the world was going...ever more too true. Not that I have much against them, per se, except for the ones who bark constantly in my neighborhood. That's not bad dogs, just bad owners.

But, I am probably more into Peter's camp. Years ago while working "on the road" I was coerced to join a table in an otherwise empty restaurant where the owners were trying to console a woman (major drama queen) who had lost her beloved pet. It seems her husband had inadvertently left the door unlatched and the dog ran out into the street and was hit by a car. The woman was going on and on, castigating the husband for his carelessness and vowing to leave him over the incident. My response was both unsympathetic and un-empathetic. Not too long before I had lost my step-brother in a highway accident. I could not stomach so much angst over a dog. "Lady, it was dog. If it was your husband who was run over, would you be this upset?"

I never was the popular kid...


Entered at Mon May 22 06:14:07 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

All you get is one verse Pete. You being the dog with the bone, i couldn't resist. :-)


Entered at Mon May 22 04:52:46 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Peter & The Disney Dogs

Pete, you're just like a dog,
Like a dog with a bone to grind.
My finger got sewn on,
It grew straight & works just fine.
1001 Dalmations,_ Pluto & Goofy will take bites out of your behind.

Without Pluto & goofy it would sing easier, so, the spacer line indicate a pause, to make it sing with Pluto and Goofy in. The more dog bites out of Pete's tuches the better :-)


Entered at Sun May 21 16:50:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: K 9 P

It might go back to “Lady &* The Tramp” but the Disneyfication of dogs is more extreme in America (and Germany) than the UK. The other day I had to wait 20 minutes in the car in a quiet street, and I watched a woman training a guide dog for the blind, crossing roads repeatedly, stopping, starting. The dog was intent on its very useful role. Then you see the search and rescue dogs in the Italian earthquake … and the handlers, who will keep those dogs at home, have no compunction about sending them into danger to rescue people. The dogs are then called “brave” but I kinda think the dogs have not sat down and filled out a health and safety assessment, nor made a moral choice. It’s just what they’re trained to do.

That’s the good side. Then you get the ludicrous … in California we watched a dog being strapped into a BABY seat on a supermarket cart. In the UK, the dog isn’t allowed in the supermarket at all (unless it’s a guide dog) let alone put in a seat meant for babies. We were disgusted. But then the US has bereavement cards for dog owners, BowWowTiques etc.

It all reminds me of watching an English woman in Portugal expressing her horror that a dog had just “raped” another dog on the beach. There was a weird undertone going back to the invasion of Belgium in 1914, in that the male dog was a GERMAN Shepherd as she kept pointing out. You want to go and explain that outside Disney dogs don’t have elaborate courting rituals.


Entered at Sun May 21 14:44:03 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Wallsend: looks like that'll be a good documentary to watch.


Entered at Sun May 21 13:56:47 CEST 2017 from (65.19.167.130)

Posted by:

Rosalind

My Gosh, what's been goin' on in here? You people need the coppers called on you. Stop makin' sa much noise.


Entered at Sun May 21 11:47:59 CEST 2017 from (114.75.199.13)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World – Trailer


Entered at Sun May 21 07:18:09 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Another round of Canadian Club


Entered at Sun May 21 07:17:12 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Canadian Club.

Linked


Entered at Sun May 21 06:21:02 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Smiling while nasally challenged

Jeff:I was blessed by the gods with natural talent. See : )


Entered at Sun May 21 05:42:17 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: dogs

Some folks are dog people, some cat people, some both, some not about pets atall. Really doesn't matter, seems to me. We tended towards dogs, but Peter, your point is very well taken. They ARE dogs facrisesakes, not humans. I'm afraid it's gotten more and more confusing in modern times. Psychologists, playtime, even folks wheeling the damn things in baby strollers. I wish that were only an urban legend, but I've seen it way more than once.

That said, I can't recommend my daughter's stories of canines in Latin America. She literally rescued a bedraggled soul being pulled in the dust behind a donkey cart. Later, when she (so 1st world of her) wanted to get Esperanza spayed, the guy who claimed towards some sort of vet experience, cauterized the scrawny little thing w/a soldering iron. Life in a small town in a 3rd world place.


Entered at Sun May 21 03:57:37 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, the dog had a horrible protest bark.

Separately, how do you keep smiling without a nose?


Entered at Sun May 21 02:39:37 CEST 2017 from (118.103.63.141)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Gone to the dogs...

Why are we so quick to blame the poodle for this "mishap"? How do we now Jeff didn't instigate the incident? : )


Entered at Sat May 20 21:58:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, that’s one way to gain an empire and it worked for us.

But it comes down to your viewpoint: do you see dogs as surrogate humans? They’re not. Dogs are dogs. Some are friendly and loyal. Some are inbred and insane. Some are bred to be vicious. Whatever, they're not humans.

("Savages" however are humans.)


Entered at Sat May 20 20:53:20 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mazel Tov Norbert! May you & your family use the house in good health. That's some roof!


Entered at Sat May 20 19:45:10 CEST 2017 from (96.232.183.195)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Norbert

Congatulation on your new house Looks lovelyh


Entered at Sat May 20 18:57:59 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Raj

PV - Roll it back 150 years and I could hear a mustachioed and pith helmeted Brit officer saying: "A single finger of any brave British soldier is worth an infinite number of these savages!"


Entered at Sat May 20 16:58:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It’s a species thing, JQ. Dogs that attack humans, especially newborns need putting down. One human baby finger is worth an infinite number of dogs to me. Anyway, all my various best friends were humans.


Entered at Sat May 20 16:55:37 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

May you enjoy your new house! I guess it's in Holland this time? Anyway, if you're thinking disc storage, we just bought some metal CD racks from Holland - really pleased. They do them in several colours, and we assembled and drilled two x 1008 racks to the wall in an hour and a bit. Just ten days to come too. They do CDs, LPs and DVD sizes.


Entered at Sat May 20 14:48:11 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Norbert's new house

I liked more your House Of Blues in France than your fancy house of today. I still read the old French prayer book you found in this abandoned house.

Norbert posted for some years ago something like "I liked you more in old gb than I like NorthWestCoaster of today."- Now we are even and can move on. BTW paint it pink!


Entered at Fri May 19 23:59:01 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Dog killing

Seems you're a bit quick on the trigger PV. Although the rednecks where I live would be on board for your position. It's likely, and most often, an accident of over enthusiasm - I got bitten in my face as a toddler which required a hospital stay and that dog ended up as my best friend for over a decade. How old are you anyway? 19th century?


Entered at Fri May 19 23:53:14 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, my mom was 19. My parents had moved to L.A right before i was born ( moved back to Bklyn just a couple or three months later). The dog might have been newly acquired...My mom asked the nurse in the hospital if her dog would be jealous of her son. The nurse said show the dog your baby when you get home. So it's real possible i was thrust into his face and the dog responded excitedly. How hard would it be to detach a newborn's finger? Maybe he thought it was a cocktail frank... I never got more details.. But, i think he was given away.My father might have had him put down, he's definitely always been pretty wound up about disclosure, responsibilty, safety, etc so if the dog was given away full disclosure and warnings were involved, and the dog given to a home with the right situation.


Entered at Fri May 19 23:32:30 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Me and the Brown Eyed Girl


Entered at Fri May 19 23:26:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bitten finger

I do hope the poodle was put down. A dog that assaulted a new born should have been. Mind you, if I'd been the parent I would not have needed a vet to do it.


Entered at Fri May 19 22:32:08 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Ilkka, the house we just bought (link).


Entered at Fri May 19 21:39:09 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I was fresh home from the hospital after being born. Literally, a few minutes. My mom introduced me to her standard sized poodle. He bit my pinky practically completely off. I'm told was hanging by a thread. Back to the hospital i went. My first dog was an amazing beagle, a full sized one, & big for that too.lived 16 years.. Since then they all been mutts I found on the street.


Entered at Fri May 19 15:55:29 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, I'll never give up my little stuffed French poodle. He's apricot colored. His name is Captain Norman. Ironically, Captain Norman was manufactured by a company located in Quebec.


Entered at Fri May 19 11:06:28 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Nailed it!

I left it in. The metal will set off alarms, so that should be fun.

Don't own a poodle...pets aren't allowed in our building. Actually I've never seen a poodle in the neighbourhood (a lot of homeowners in our part of town have dogs)...all sorts except poodles and German Shepards. Mind you years ago in another place I lived my next door neighbours had a German Sheppard. It was still a pup at the time.


Entered at Fri May 19 10:59:59 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Nodoby uses a dryer here. It's always windy and with high temperatures even when it is winter (higher compared to colder places that is) therefore don't need one. Doing my bit for the environment unlike your President and his cabinet of idiots. : )


Entered at Fri May 19 10:43:27 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Freddie, Freddie, Freddie

I suspected drying but thought that if you were dryer less you'd have worked out the old suspension in front of a radiant space heater. Keep the Poodle away from the space heater....BTW, you made me realize I best ask: Did you pull the nail out of your left foot now that it's flattened? I forgot to mention that step :-)


Entered at Fri May 19 10:31:52 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Bill M: calm the waters indeed. ; )

The Band connection to Tears Are Not Enough...another reason the illumi-nutties made sure we never got our T-shirts. ; )


Entered at Fri May 19 10:28:55 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I am the Laundry King, I can do anything...

if it isn't raining that is.

Don't need to go to the laundromat. It's just the hanging of the laundry on the clothesline while it's raining on the balcony that makes the whole exercise of laundry such a futile enterprise.


Entered at Fri May 19 07:13:47 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, don't ya know real men don't complain about going to the laundromat in the rain. They take their French poodle & away they go.


Entered at Fri May 19 05:50:05 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: it's rainy season, and I can't get any laundry done. hence the numerous posts. Ooooh wait, the sun is out. Gotta go. ; )


Entered at Fri May 19 02:36:48 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Yo Schmendrick, there ain't no bad dogs.. But, please don't go out and get one.


Entered at Thu May 18 22:57:04 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Investigations....Are You Sure???

It just gets crazier every day Kevin. That Fino reminds me of an old blood hound with sad teary eyes and droopin down ears. His side kick there is always running in circles and yapping like a little French poodle.

Weathers getting good now. Got to install an engine in one boat and sand and paint and varnish the other one. Now that is really hard to do when yer dead drunk all the time.....Haw - haw - haw!!!

Now looking back, it wasn't North Korea who invaded Vietman that last time was it? They didn't invade Iraq and Afganistan. I mean Russia invaded Afganistan way back there. There is still Russian scrap iron laying every where. So how is the USA any different than those there other guys??

They invade us every summer too...:-)


Entered at Thu May 18 21:45:26 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Breaking News: Rod Rosenstein has just expanded the brief for special counsel Robert Mueller to include the “Norm-Bob F thing”


Entered at Thu May 18 20:30:58 CEST 2017 from (67.70.148.205)

Posted by:

Bill M

It's hard to get the intonation right, but 'fred' means 'smoothing the waters' in some Japanese dialects.


Entered at Thu May 18 19:02:21 CEST 2017 from (24.114.75.241)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: Plus, 'ours' was the only one with Band involvement - by Richard Manuel.


Entered at Thu May 18 17:29:00 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: GB Happy Endings

Since the beginning of Norm's drunken Fuhrer on Monday, Fred has posted more than he might in three or four months sometimes. And I put him on an even keel.


Entered at Thu May 18 15:21:28 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: just don't charge me an arm & a leg. ; )


Entered at Thu May 18 13:33:57 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, if you haven't moved, you'll receive my bill in the mail. Just send it to your insurance co.


Entered at Thu May 18 13:04:38 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: I never knew you were a podiatrist. : )


Entered at Thu May 18 12:40:07 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Podiatry

Only one flat foot? Just step on a nail with the other foot & you got a pair. Now you're even.


Entered at Thu May 18 10:01:49 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Sergeant Bilko

I still enjoy Sergeant Bilko, playing episodes from the boxed set every so often, but they are dated.

I see Donald Trump as a retirement gift. All that entertainment for free. Loved his speech talking to the Coastguards this morning. Poor Donald.


Entered at Thu May 18 09:10:33 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: that's why I never had a career in the military; that and the flat right foot and mild asthma. : )


Entered at Thu May 18 08:57:07 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: : )

Jeff: the world revolves around my time zone. It's how I keep my youthful good looks. ; )


Entered at Thu May 18 08:11:52 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: derflion

Jeesis fucking christ fred,let's get a few things straight.
You're a failure as a ball buster. You ain't got it in ya.
But if your gonna try, do it on the right time schedule.


Entered at Thu May 18 07:03:46 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: ; ) con'td

And when you've gotten things straightened out for the better, only then will I start to spell the word "criticize" properly. : )


Entered at Thu May 18 07:01:26 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: ; )

Norm was wrong to compare the US to N.Korea.

He should have compared it to Hitler's Germany because that seems to be the road you (as in you Americans...more specifically the ones in charge these days and the knuckleheads who voted them in) are intent on travelling down.

Get yer fucking shit together please and stop being too skin-thinned when being critized by the rest of the world.

(And I say that with a smile on my face and a twinkle in my eye).


Entered at Thu May 18 06:53:10 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Bill M.: Your story about the Live Aid T-shirts just confirms my crackpot theory that it was a conspiracy against Canada & Canadians conducted by the Live Aid people with help from the CIA & MI5 because they were jealous of the Canadian song Tears Are Not Enough being vastly superior musically & lyrically to the British & American benefit tunes. ; )


Entered at Wed May 17 21:58:57 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Yes and interesting in that while my late sister was a bit older than Amy when first discovering The Band and especially TLW, it was also Rick Danko and specifically the song "Stage Fright" that really impacted her. And it wasn't just Rick's good looks that got the girls, it was that something so rare and special in his voice that cut deep.


Entered at Wed May 17 21:05:22 CEST 2017 from (67.70.148.205)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for sharing that. A nice thought - a little girl putting some puzzling things into a context that best suits her understanding. A big friendly guy looking big and friendly playing a big and friendly sounding instrument.


Entered at Wed May 17 20:47:19 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Amy Helm - Robbie Robertson - TLW

Prior to a recent Last Waltz tribute concert in which she was participating in, Amy Helm had some nice and funny comments in an interview with Eric Volmers:

On “Testimony”, admitting that she had yet to read it:

“I have two young kids and I haven’t finished a book since they were born because I fall asleep as soon as I start reading,” she says. “A lot of friends have read it and I’ve heard it is filled with a lot of really incredible memories and stories of a really incredible time.”

On being at The Last Waltz as a young child:

”At that time, I thought that my dad played drums for Rick Danko’s band,” she says. “For me, the Last Waltz was really Rick Danko. Stage Fright was the only song I knew and the only one I wanted to see. So that’s my memory of it, watching Rick do his thing.”


Entered at Wed May 17 18:43:49 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But back to the subject, Bob. Every time he's caught making untruthful, unacceptable remarks that are offensive to intelligent people, just like Twitler, Norm denies his complicity. The evidence is right there, but he denies it. And for all these years, the Republican Congresspeople in The GB have either supported his positions, or kept quiet. ( Sometimes Norm was supporting their legislation. He didn't understand the arguments, the bills, not one bit, but he knew how to get votes )


Entered at Wed May 17 18:12:24 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Man In The Mirror

Bob,
After you held that mirror in his face, Old Norm's likely to stay drunk for a month or two, or do a month long AA marathon. But, like I've written since he entered here 13 or 14 years ago, if it keeps him from kicking a dog, I don't mind him swinging at me.


Entered at Wed May 17 17:25:20 CEST 2017 from (67.70.148.205)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Good of you to refer to Jasper Carrot, whose gentle humour I heard in the UK in '83/'84, but not before or since. The Mandela line is new to me and strikes me as top-notch. Was it Jasper who said he realised he was passe when he heard the crowd's reaction to Alexei Sayle? ("Save a child; kill a social worker.")

Fred: I donated twice - once in Mecca, once in London. and received not a single tee-shirt. Water under the bridge, I say.

Dunc: A news article a couple weeks ago said that Peter Oundjian conducts both the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Does this mean that you people got a special performance of cousin Eric Idle's Life-of-Bri 'oratorio', "Not the Messiah (He's a Very Naughty Boy)"?


Entered at Wed May 17 15:14:27 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Norm

Norm, I've been busy the last couple of days so I haven't had time to properly get back with you. Before you started to think of yourself as this great humanitarian, you've posted homophobic comments on the GB. If I remember correctly it was just the loud mouths from New York who called you out on it. Last year you posted comments that were clearly anti semite. Again only the New Yorkers and Ben from New Jersey, who I don't think has posted since that time called you out on it. So before you compare America to North Korea and post anymore teach the world to sing videos, check yourself out.

Also, I have no problem with you classifying me with Jeff A. Jeff has questionable taste in music, but he's a very good person. That said, I understand why you and Bill M are such good friends.


Entered at Wed May 17 13:02:54 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

They (as in people who know about these things)say Sgt. Bilko is one of the finest comedies in the history of comedies on TV. Me? Having watched reruns galore (courtesy Channel 29 from Buffalo) --I'm not a big fan. But were an episode shown on TV tonight and nothing else was on, I'd watch it.

As for him being a real person....I bet every branch of every military service in the world has a Sgt. Bilko of one sort or another.


Entered at Wed May 17 11:15:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My dad was a motor pool sergeant and loved Sgt Bilko more than anyone on TV.


Entered at Wed May 17 10:46:10 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Fred, is Sergeant Bilko not a real person?


Entered at Wed May 17 10:32:54 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Kindered spirits

Dunc: we should form a club. Maybe we could get s benefit concert organized to help ease the pain. No? : )


Entered at Wed May 17 10:07:45 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Still waiting for my Sergeant Bilko tee shirt. Ordered it in 1979.


Entered at Wed May 17 09:54:20 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: I doubt if I'll ever get over not having been sent that T-shirt back in 1985. ; )


Entered at Wed May 17 09:29:29 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I sympathise over the T-shirt. Years ago I bought one of those Two-Tone LPs and on the shrink wrap was a big sticker with FREE MANDELA. Well, I opened it up and there wasn't one inside.

(First heard by comedian Jasper Carrott).

But seriously … I keep getting stuff with download codes that don't work. Back to Black Vinyl hardly ever work, and they don't reply to queries. I had a Motown EPs box set … download code didn't work, and that's Universal. Again, no reply. Same yesterday with Las La Land Blu-ray from Lionsgate. They've replied requesting multiple scans et.


Entered at Wed May 17 09:20:51 CEST 2017 from (210.86.98.215)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Roll tape

could be a bit of a mood killer getting it off


Entered at Wed May 17 09:18:31 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Consolation

Fred,what are very possibly the best t shirts you ever saw will be on the market sometime this year. Maybe a month or two. And one of the best recordings you've heard in years will be out before the year is over..


Entered at Wed May 17 08:26:54 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I'm still out $20 and no T-shirt to show for it

Jeff: Taking a look on EBay I found one for sale at over $100. Feed the world, indeed!


Entered at Wed May 17 08:21:24 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin: I've always thought that Indy Cars through the years (with the odd exception) have looked aestheically challenged compared to F1. Even in 2017. Especially in 2017 : )

I've never been a fan of racing oval tracks, but I do ocasionally make an exception for the Indy 500.


Entered at Wed May 17 07:59:08 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Fred......Peter V........Legends DVD BOX & LED LIGHT

....how dare ya criticize the 2017 F1 cars - ok, the shark fin is horrible but do Google Alonso's Indy car and do it on an empty stomach, such is the grotesque state of the current Indy car...... All that aside, I do hope he wins the race. I have such special memories of that day in May growing up. Always an F1 fan because of Gilles but the Indy 500 holds special memories too.

Peter's posts sure do attract the spammers for reproduction......... The reason I was always partial to GB Hall of Famers DVD BOX and LED LIGHT back in the Norbert/Tracy/Peter V renegade GB days was that they never did pick on any of the regulars......and were regularly just short of Al Edge great.


Entered at Wed May 17 07:38:11 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That's about 50 - 60 smackers now Fred.


Entered at Wed May 17 05:33:59 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Live Aid owes me a T-shirt!

I donated $20 to Live Aid in 1985....I was in university at the time, hence the small amount of money. I felt it was the right thing to do.

Later on, much later, I found out that anyone who donated $20 or more got a Live Aid T-shirt. What?!? At the time of donating the money I didn't know that was a "benefit".

Bob Geldof where's my T-shirt?!? : )


Entered at Tue May 16 23:17:15 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Eve Of Destruction

From 1965. I think it might have been the only one to make it into the top-10, maybe even #1 for a spell.

Sung by Barry McGuire (New Christy Minstrels) and written by the recently departed PF Sloan.


Entered at Tue May 16 23:06:22 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Science March

My wife went to the science march and the cheer was:

- What do we want?!?!

- Science!!

- When do we want it?!?!

- After peer review!!!


Entered at Tue May 16 20:42:02 CEST 2017 from (67.8.138.65)

Posted by:

Tom Kaine

Location: CT now live in FL(surprize!!)

Subject: The review of the box set at the end of the pagehttp://theband.hiof.no/albums/last_waltz.html by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Does Stephen now regret this review? Hindsight 20/20 & all that, but sometimes you have to "let it come to you"(Life & well,everything). From personnel experience, if you don't, you will crash right into it when it all slows down. And if you put it on paper, oh boy! Love all things Bandish, thank you for your never ending gift.


Entered at Tue May 16 18:36:03 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Dundee
Web: My link

Subject: Jute Mill song

This is one of the most popular Scottish protest songs. Written by Mary Brookbank, it poses the question of how you can keep a family on 10 shillings and 9 pence a week?

At this time, the end of the nineteenth century, there were more millionaires in part of Broughty Ferry, a suburb of Dundee, than any other place in the world, until overtaken by Texas.

I was brought up in part of Dundee called Lochee, once a separate place, which was the biggest mill town in Western Europe. The vast majority of my family worked in the jute mills and lived in slums. My first two houses in the 1950s were slums. I remember them because families were still living in them several years after I had moved out.

Carolyn Hester covered the song in the early sixties. It was about 1971 when I heard her version and thought it was great that the song had been covered by an American. This version is by an Irish singer, Karen Casey.


Entered at Tue May 16 17:56:39 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Roll Tape!

In the digital world, "Roll Tape" has a new meaning. I may writing the script & the score for the film. See the link.


Entered at Tue May 16 17:50:36 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Do They Know it's Christmas

Bob Geldof's protest song had an immediate and massive impact...... I wouldn't think there is any other protest song that came close. Turned uninterested and the indifferent into caring about hunger and raising money that saved lives immediately.


Entered at Tue May 16 16:46:56 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria

Subject: Sly

I get it Jeff A. Thanks. 'Different strokes for different folks.'


Entered at Tue May 16 16:43:39 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT- "Ohio" was not a typically good song. It was a song of outrage & shock.. But it certainly was musical, & a song, but it was a protest cry that could be sung,screamed, chanted, & musical enough to get immense FM airplay, & universal recognition. And it's still poignant, & still musical in it's way.

Tin soldiers and Nixon coming,
We're finally on our own.
This summer I hear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio.

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Tin soldiers and Nixon coming,
We're finally on our own.
This summer I hear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio.

Musicality matters. Content matters, but presentation of the content matters. Putting random poorly expressed thoughts in unappealing forms does not a good protest song make

As a doctor, you are a scientist. If Einstein had all his thoughts, all his science, but could not present it in a way consumable to scientists, if he could not transmit it, what good would it have been?
There's transmission & reception.

Content has to be good to start, & it has to be presented well & relatable. Just words, anyone can write just words. There's gotta be more to the words.


Entered at Tue May 16 16:01:03 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria

Subject: One more time, then I'm gone

Bruce Springsteen, Fiona Apple, Billy Bragg, Arcade Fire, Franz Ferdinand and others....say no more. Though not hits, still saying what needs to be said on all the issues. Its not if the songs are good, its what they say IMO.


Entered at Tue May 16 13:31:02 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Protest song that made a difference

Um, "We Shall Overcome"?

"Deep in my heart, I do believe..."


Entered at Tue May 16 11:09:55 CEST 2017 from (85.133.27.98)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: We shall overcome

The thing about CSNY's Ohio as a protest song was instant reaction - they cut it and got it straight out.

Jimmy Cliff - Vietnam, Marvin Gaye - What's Going On, Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth all set a high standard.


Entered at Tue May 16 08:21:48 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'd have to say civil rights & the anti war movement were the first areas protest songs had a direct effect on.............but the later changes in society were also part of the tidal wave that was started or given new life in the 60s....


Entered at Tue May 16 08:18:28 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fred, if there's studies to answer your question I'm not aware of em.... think about how many squares turned into hippies. Sometimes it was slower. Look at Archie Bunker, even he changed many of his views.Society changed, the protest songs undeniably were part of it.

I think it's okay to count Abraham, Martin, & John as a protest song....It protested assassination, & mourned the loss of Lincoln, MLK, RFK, & JFK.


Entered at Tue May 16 08:12:17 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I'm still protesting

I think that for those who came of age in the 60s, the protest song was a powerful weapon in creating change.

I was born in '63, so the only protesting I would have done in that decade was about not being able to stay up past 9 pm. Or having to eat food I didn't like. (For those keeping score at home...I lost every battle).


Entered at Tue May 16 08:04:47 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: I Protest!

Good points.

I figure that if you we predisposed to one way of thinking, say anti-war---doesn't matter which war, (pick one and insert here) then any protest song that is anti-war will confrom to your way of thinking. You're already on board that train.

What interests me are/were the effects protest songs have/had on those people who hold/held an opposing view or the muddled mass in the middle who are/were ambivalent about any issue.


Entered at Tue May 16 07:46:01 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin: yes, it seems the 2017 F1 season is turning out be be an exciting one. Cars still look uglier than sin and a few improvements need to be done vis a vis the rules, but things seem to be slowly changing for the better. Fingers crossed.


Entered at Tue May 16 07:32:26 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The songs assisted in galvinization. Constant reminders, repetition, raising hope, building community.identity, purpose.............


Entered at Tue May 16 07:28:51 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Fred, the 60s were a unique case. there were many great protest songs. The cumulative effect is what yields results. What happened here in the U.S in the 60s. a great part of it centered in Greenwich Village and to a lesser degree California, led to and also was tied to social change. Where Have All The Flowers Gone, Blowin In The Wind, Eve Of Destruction, The Times They Are A Changin, I Ain't marchin Anymore, Universal Soldier, War ( What Is It Good For) ,Pawn In their Game, Say It Loud, I'm Black & I'm Proud, ...... earlier, you had Woody Guthrie The Weavers, Odetta...........later you had the 70s, CSN7 Y- Ohio........... others.... Nina Simone, even Billy Holiday, sang protest songs.... the Staples sang protest songs too.............the effects were felt. It was a huge part of social change.......Today you have- well see the link. There should be a law against this. But I'm gonna send old Norm a set.


Entered at Tue May 16 07:26:03 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Protest songs question......Fred....

.....not sure whether this fits exactly but whenever I think back to the mid 80's and the South African Apartheid - and the movement to end the madness - I always remember the power - the mighty power and beauty - of Peter Gabriel ending all those concerts in such powerful and meaningful ways. True Protest singing that made an impact and a difference to a generation.

while in LA in mid-late 80's, I couldn't help but see how the emergence songs like "Fight the Power" had a profound impact on all sorts of people - not just the young black kids. Caused a stir - not really sure it made a difference.


Entered at Tue May 16 06:50:25 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Fred: The Giorgio Moroder/Germany connection made me smile for all sorts of reasons.......but on to more important world matters......I really do hope you are enjoying this truly fabulous F1 season so far......Vettel and Ferrari and great battles with Mercedes.....so nice to see real passing and wider cars/ fatter tires and tires that allow for driving on the edge till the end of a race. Looking forward to the Canadian Grand Prix.


Entered at Tue May 16 06:45:50 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Protesters singing protest songs

This talk of protest songs got me to thinking...have there been any that have been effective? I mean effective in persuading those who are of an opposing opinion or those who don't have an opinion in changing their minds.


Entered at Tue May 16 06:37:48 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin: Don't get me started on Sting's Russians. ; )


Entered at Mon May 15 21:05:36 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“Believe me when I say to you/I hope the Russians love their children too” – Sting

Sting’s excruciatingly bad “Russians” is the perfect example of a bright guy getting carried away with his own importance – and so much so that he couldn’t even see how lightweight and silly his attempt at an important song was. Others like John Fogerty were able to make perfect, meaningful and lasting songs of protest/outrage like “Fortunate Son”. Dylan in so many ways and on so many occasions also reached perfection with “Blowin in the Wind” and “Masters of War” and on and on. Bob Marley had the touch as did John Lennon and Marvin Gaye. Many others, of course but pointing a finger at the direct target or subject matter rarely makes the point that well.

and in this case….of the current US President…the situation is so far beyond a rock n roll or rap song meaning anything….it really is about what Jed described perfectly. Scary times.


Entered at Mon May 15 20:51:32 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Fucking A right that musical taste is subjective, Pete. There's a lot of stuff people like on here that I do, & there's a lot of stuff on here that doesn't float my boat. But that's their right. That song Bob posted the other day, it's inoffensive enough, & the writer's (McDermott) emotions are certainly valid & well expressed. There's nothing wrong with the song, in fact, it's certainly the best Springsteen knock off I've heard. The chorus is powerful & anthemic, but To Me it's just another run of the mill non remarkable song. TO ME. If some one else wants to love it, hey, that's what makes horse races. I listened on a pair of real small beat to hell Harmon Kardon computer speakers but have the suspicion that within a modest budget it's a well recorded & produced track. And though he may not have done it intentionally, no one has ever sounded more like Springsteen.It don';t bother me one bit if some one loves that song, but my opinion is my opinion. Far as I'm concerned, anyone who enjoys a wide variety of music is very fortunate......... The Decemberists were here recently, i was offered a pair of freebies to see them at a new place titled Brooklyn Steel. i declined. Nothing of theirs has really gotten me going- well recorded, great players sure, but, nothing i heard really lit a fire under my ass & these days i save my energy for something i got a good shot at really digging.


Entered at Mon May 15 19:33:20 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To be fair, I didn't think the song was exactly Blowing In The Wind either. But with songs it's all subjective.


Entered at Mon May 15 18:32:53 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: NWC: Rare And Unreleased, 1969 - 1976

Our schoolboy band leader (now a studio owner and producer) has posted some photos from "those happy golden years" in the sixties and early seventies (My link). You can easily see that we liked to sound like Creedence Clearwater Revival and Blood Sweat And Tears and - why not- Chicago.


Entered at Mon May 15 18:24:23 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete. People are entitled to voice their opinions about songs. Be clear who started swinging and then lied about that.


Entered at Mon May 15 18:17:28 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, either you're playing double agent again, or you need to work on your reading comprehension again.. Norm started in on Bob before i even listened to that song. He knows everything, why not?


Entered at Mon May 15 18:15:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There are so few of us left anyway … let us not fall out with each other. We can agree to disagree on stuff.


Entered at Mon May 15 18:00:13 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The GB.....

.......writing today in the New York Times, famed music and media critic Biff Bobaloo noted that the astonishing resurgence of thought to be dead Band Guestbook took another dramatic upswing on May 15....... He concluded his piece by observing that "the once vibrant and glorious guestbook is really just a songwriting/feud discussion away from being restored to its former glory".


Entered at Mon May 15 17:54:08 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Kevin, I remember you having many heated words during the Canadian elections with Norm. Obviously he can say things that piss you off as well.



Entered at Mon May 15 17:45:11 CEST 2017 from (24.114.53.197)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob.......anti-Jeff in the case of Norm or anti-George W. Bush/anti-Trump in the case of the rest of the world should almost never be confused with anti-American. Very different things entirely but I notice too many "Americans " fail to understand that.


Entered at Mon May 15 17:31:28 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm. Obviously you want to forget posting this: "It's so far away it's easy for people who just want to be critics of music not to feel anything about it but make idiotic comments about a song that draws attention to the horrors right on this continent from more lunatics."

Have you somehow managed to be unawares of your permanent resemblance to Twitler?

And, while we're at it, all your Canadian political discourse with Steve, Kevin, and others has put you squarely in the right wing camp. Odds are if you were a U.S. voter, you'd have voted for Twitler.


Entered at Mon May 15 17:01:36 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Roger

Sorry Roger I forgot to thank you for the invitation. Susan and I are very much looking forward to a trip that way early next summer as we both have ancestry from Scotland and England.

On my mum's side. Her mum was born in London and her Dad who was born in India, (his father was a tea plantation owner) and he grew up in Dollar.


Entered at Mon May 15 17:01:39 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ, the whole thing is ridiculous to even ponder. Might as well wonder what Norm would be like if he was born an Orthodox Jew.... or wealthy in Queens.


Entered at Mon May 15 16:57:32 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Laughable

Bob, your comments just remind me of the ridiculous comments you made when Bill Munsen said some thing a ways back and you and your partner were sure it was directed at you when it had nothing to do with you. This is the same. My comments about Syria were in no way directed at you, (unless you are involved in the way the Government of the USA treats refugees). Your position that comments are directed to you personally are just stupid.

You go ahead and bring up any thing you like that I may or may not have said about the USA. I have a lot of friends in that country who don't agree with the politics. If your not one of them I won't loose any sleep over it.

Just reading some of the "comments" on news articles on the web are mind boggling how people can believe in that crazy man. I certainly agree with Jed.


Entered at Mon May 15 16:47:27 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

John D, just giving Norm back a taste of his own cough syrup. I wish I had the ability to go back on the Guestbook and bring up every anti American comment Norm has made throughout the years. I didn't appreciate his Syria comments.


Entered at Mon May 15 16:45:16 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The gallant south

Jeff - I think the general wisdom is that the South would have had to abandon slavery in short order or they wouldn't have any customers from either of their 2 northern neighbors or further abroad.


Entered at Mon May 15 16:41:30 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm fascinated by alternative histories of the Revolutionary War, but by "The South"I was assuming "south of the border with Canada - i.e. all of the USA."


Entered at Mon May 15 16:29:57 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sure JQ, would you have preferred The South to secede & then slavery could still exist today?


Entered at Mon May 15 16:25:29 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob F?????

Bob F writes "I'm not going to start supporting crap music just because it's anti Trump. I'll leave that to the Canadians." Where is that coming from Bob. Why the large paintbrush to the country to the North? I don't get it. Please explain. Don't understand your comment. Is is because JT pointed it out and he's Canadian.


Entered at Mon May 15 16:11:22 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Oh Canada

Hi Bob - Don't be too hard on Canada. There was an interesting bit in last week's NYer about the BS associated with our Revolutionary War; how there was no true need to break from England - and how, if that had happened and/or we had allowed the South to leave, we could have been as good as Canada is today!


Entered at Mon May 15 16:02:29 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, you have refused Norm your loyalty. Don't ya know..........


Entered at Mon May 15 15:26:36 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: What is amazing is

that people discuss trump and his behaviors, actions & decisions,from a perspective of rationalism and logic.He is a deeply disturbed man grappling with serious emotional disorders right before our eyes.He's batshit crazy and therefore potentially dangerous."We live in a political world,Love don't have any place.We're living in time when men committ crimes, and crime don't have a face."(Dylan,Bob) Or it does have a face-it's Orange.And crazy.


Entered at Mon May 15 15:08:38 CEST 2017 from (24.114.58.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Oh, Isabella, proud Isabella

Bob F: Thank you for that reference. Wow. Those words sure do apply........I think of Neil Young every time I am on Isabella street in Toronto. Never knew exactly where he had lived but somewhere on that short street - with Rick James, I guess it was.


Entered at Mon May 15 13:56:51 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Norm, please stop. That song and video is just awful. JT posted twice about the song so I gave it a listen, watched the video and gave my honest opinion. I'm not going to start supporting crap music just because it's anti Trump. I'll leave that to the Canadians. Don't disrespect me by trying to say I don't care about what's happening on Syria because I don't like that stupid song. The songs you've posted throughout the years are a million miles from the Joseph Arthur song, so please don't even act like that's something you would listen to. I'll leave you with Neil Young's Ambulance Blues. This verse says more about what's going on today then any of this artsy pseudo intellectual crap.

I never knew a man could tell so many lies

He had a different story for every set of eyes

How can he remember who he's talking to?

Because I know it ain't me and I hope it isn't you



Entered at Mon May 15 12:56:30 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Well said Norm

Absolutely spot on Rocking Chair. And on your way from Bournemouth to Glasgow there's a bed for you in Brum (that's Birmingham).


Entered at Mon May 15 07:50:56 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Cicero...the disco king. : )

Kevin J: Didn't he have a US Top 40 hit, produced by Giorgio Moroder, back in 1979? I think it was number one in Germany, too. ; )

Have to agree with Jeff & Bob F....that was the crappiest protest song I've ever had the, erm, pleasure of listening to/viewing.


Entered at Mon May 15 07:32:57 CEST 2017 from (24.114.58.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"No one dances sober, unless he is insane.” - Cicero


Entered at Mon May 15 05:42:16 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Horror and Shame

For the last two days CBC has shown us the horror and devastation in Syria. The most graphic pictures of children laying in the street gasping and dying from the chemical bombs that were just dropped on them by the government of Syria.

It's so far away it's easy for people who just want to be critics of music not to feel anything about it but make idiotic comments about a song that draws attention to the horrors right on this continent from more lunatics.

The linked video shows how children should be treated, no matter what their religion or colour.


Entered at Mon May 15 04:32:50 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That was an awful song in October & it's an awful song now. Lyrically, musically, pure dreck. Nothing musical, melodious, or interesting about it..Certainly not a song to inspire votes, thought, or rally a movement. Not a song anyone would listen to twice without a gun pointed at his or her head.


Entered at Mon May 15 04:15:36 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: James Clapper

I read a very long article on here today of Mr Clapper's take on things Bill.

I think that there are many who listen to him and his long history and when some of them who are afraid to speak out gets their heads out of the ass, Impeachment is not far off.


Entered at Mon May 15 03:33:21 CEST 2017 from (72.143.192.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Joseph Arthur

Stuff that needs to be said - many times in many ways, and hopefully more articulately. I'm now going to try to find out what James Clapper said earlier today; from the headline I saw, I get the sense that he'd agree with Arthur's sentiments.


Entered at Mon May 15 02:42:23 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The SONG!

Did you expect it to be a cheery song Bob?? Fer chris sake, it wasn't meant to be a nice song.

Look around you a little. Is what is going on nice??

It's hard to figure right now which country has the most fucked up, dishonest, scarey government, between the USA, Russia or North Korea.

It is absolutely mind boggling the thought process of many people in the USA right now.


Entered at Mon May 15 01:36:08 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: The planet

Subject: Protest songs

So when Bob Dylan and Phil Ochs had a problem, they found the words and the tune to say so. So did many others in other times. I am aware that some musicians have spoken, but please inform us of any other songs.


Entered at Mon May 15 01:33:45 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Planet Earth

Subject: Silence

The silence is deafening.


Entered at Mon May 15 01:31:26 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Planet Earth

Subject: Why it might matter

Its not a great song for sure. But it is one of the only songs of which I am aware where someone in the music arts has said anything.


Entered at Mon May 15 01:22:53 CEST 2017 from (87.117.204.2)

Posted by:

Jan W

Web: My link

Although we never met, I’m proud to call you my friend, RIP Robert M Pirsig. Thanks for making this world a better place. “Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you're no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn't just a means to an end but a unique event in itself....To live only for some future goal is shallow. It's the sides of the mountains which sustain life, not the top.”


Entered at Mon May 15 00:03:17 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

I like some of Joseph Arthur's music but that song is just awful. Sorry.


Entered at Sun May 14 16:56:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Joseph Arthur

Here's the YouTube link.


Entered at Sun May 14 16:32:19 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lets be Clear!

You are so a "jerk"....:-)

Norbert's sense of humour, sometimes it's a little hard to follow but it's always there. Sometimes I think he's been hanging around those poppy fields a little too much.

Next year I'm going to try to get by and see you Norb and have a couple pints of that German beer. Then I got to go up to Angleland and give Peter a kick in the pants. I'm hoping to go up to Dollar Academy in Scotland where my grandfather grew and meet up with Dunc and get to shake hands with a real Scot. It's kinda my bucket list.

Don't get frustrated Jerry! I'm going to try to look. I been busy watching Mellisa McCarthy and Alex Baldwin. This morning on the news they were showing the Saturday Night Live clips. (I tried to watch it last night but I fell asleep!) Anyway Baldwin in his Trumped costume grabs Mellisa, (Sean) and says "Kiss me Sean". Sean says "I can't I got a wife." Baldwin (Trump) says "It's ok I'm famous". They get into a gawd awful clinch. I just about choked!


Entered at Sun May 14 15:29:56 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: This planet

Subject: Joseph Arthur The Campaign Song

I see I have to be directive: Joseph Arthur: The Campaign Song: has relevance. Free download.


Entered at Sun May 14 11:51:23 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Ewan McColl

I spent some time reading about Ewan McColl a few years ago. I think he disliked everybody. This guy was serious. His famous quote about Dylan was that he was '10th rate'. Plus he spawned a whole generation of amateur folk singers who thought the only correct way to sing a folk song was if they were holding one ear.

This is an interesting article on him in the Guardian. Well wort a look.

And he did write two of my favourite songs of all time.


Entered at Sun May 14 11:05:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Carlin was wrong that it was because Paul Simon was American … Pete Seeger and Peggy Seeger both recorded for Topic at the time. What it was that he was "modern folk."


Entered at Sun May 14 10:33:30 CEST 2017 from (210.86.98.215)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: OCMS

I haven't bothered with OCMS since Willie Watson left but the new Dylan tribute might be worth a listen.


Entered at Sun May 14 10:32:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon

I'm reading "Homeward Bound" by Peter Ames Carlin. I keep a book to read with tea in the morning … always a music bio that I just read 10 pages or so a day. It's stuffed full of fascinating detail. Dylan sat and guffawed loudly through the songs the first time he saw Simon & Garfunkel in a club, and was contemptuous of their middle class background … in the days when he was claiming to be a half-Cherokee who'd worked carnivals in the South-West (before his own equally middle class background emerged).

Also Paul Simon was lined up to do an album for Topic in England, (the right on left wing folk label) but Ewan MacColl killed it on the grounds he was American.


Entered at Sun May 14 00:13:03 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: Joseph Arthur

I don't think this one has been pointed out. Check out Joseph Arthur and his recent work (single ; 'topical') You can find it on you tube.


Entered at Sat May 13 20:51:23 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Ubuntu

Subject: I am not "a jerk" according to Google anymore. I'm not sure about Miss Richardson who called me the jerk, though.

Like I posted before Google translated my full name as "a jerk". The bad thing was that they translated the name of the former female social-democratic President of the Republic as "I am a bitch". After that they gave up on translating. UNCOMPETENT COWARDS! However, I didn't give up. This is how I - "the jerk" - translates Google from Finnish to English: "the most pitiful parasite in the internet".


Entered at Sat May 13 19:43:45 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Michael McDermott

Michael McDermott put on one of the best shows I've see in years last night at a house concert in New Jersey. 30 people showed up in a room that could easily hold 100. It really is an impossible way of life but not for any of the Last Waltz type reason. Check out this great song Michael wrote about his father.


Entered at Sat May 13 19:11:40 CEST 2017 from (83.249.184.182)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Amerka? / Bill M

Bill M: I understand that you tried to write "America" in Finnish. Good for you! But not good enough: It is spelled as Amerikka or Ameriikka, like they did in the 19th century when some people drove The Dixie down. Because I am in the good mood this first Summer evening here in Scania I'll say : "YOU PASSED THE TEST!"


Entered at Sat May 13 18:46:36 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Good 'Ol Boys

Bill M - This one of R Newman's is right on time now too, especially when our new AG Jefferson (Davis not Thomas) Sessions speaks up!


Entered at Sat May 13 15:22:45 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.59)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: let's drop the big one now

Norbert: Thanks - makes more sense than anything else I've read. Best not mention that the scion of the secretive founder of this here site is pussyfooting around Amerka, seducing the young and innocent with beats and electronica.

May I suggest that Randy Newman's "Sail Away" album is an excellent guide to today's poli-sci, fake nostalgia, etc.


Entered at Sat May 13 14:12:32 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Band and the fall of the FBI

The real reason Trump fired James Comey:

One late night in April, while Trump was working on his wall, Jared Kushner put up TLW CD and played it loud as always. (Due to the phrase “Play It Loud” Carter Page had ordered 100 TLW CDs to play in Moscow hotel rooms to outsmart Russian spy mics during pre-election visits to Mr. Putin).

Trump took a short break and while leaning back in his enormous office chair and overlooking the coarse black circles he had drawn with his felt pen around America, he noticed the music.

“What’s that Jarry?”

“That’s Americana Mr. President” Kushner answered.

“How do you know that, smartass?” Trump asked.

“Here, look at this Norwegian website, it’s all there, Mr President”

“Norway? ... Isn't that in Germany?.... Our Americana in Merkel's hands? … Fucking Obama, I want them here!” Trump pondering Kansas, right in the midlle of the circle, hard now with his fist.

“Get me showboat Comey on the line!”

To make a long story short; .... three weeks later Trump was furious when he heard Comey still hadn’t managed to bring the Band back to America. He immediately began writing Comey’s resignation note:

“While I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation, I nevertheless concur with the judgment of the Department of Justice that you are not able to effectively lead the bureau. You have forsaken to bring our Americana back into the heart of America leaving me no other conclusion”

Comey sawTrumps letter flashing by on TV screens when he was speaking to agents at the FBI's field office in Los Angeles .

So after all this whole Comey incident wasn’t a Russian thing, or a Hilary- or a North Korea thing. It was us…. Where Bruce Willis failed we played the main role …. we and our beloved Band caused the fall of the FBI.

How about that to start your weekend.


Entered at Sat May 13 11:59:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good Ray Davies interview in The Guardian yesterday. I hadn't known that he'd sued The Doors for Hello, I Love You's lift from All Day And All of The Night … and won. He says he met Jim Morrison in 1968 who said "You Really Got Me!"


Entered at Sat May 13 10:27:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 50 Years of Blonde on Blonde

Just playing "Fifty Years of Blonde on Blonde" by Old Crow Medicine Show. They play the complete album in sequence, recorded last year at the Country Music Hall of Fame. Released here yesterday. Highly enjoyable.


Entered at Fri May 12 22:50:27 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

The Cyrkle had a lesser hyt with "Turn Down Day". I kinda liked both way back when. Just went to Wikipedia - produced by John Simon eh. Hmmm.


Entered at Fri May 12 22:34:41 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: red rubber ball

red rubber ball was written by paul simon and bruce woodley (the seekers). also performed by simon and garfunkel, and found on their "old friends" box set.


Entered at Fri May 12 21:59:24 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Looking at that photo and others since having read Testimony – I always think of what Robbie wrote about how Levon was very strict on cleanliness and the guys regularly showered before and after shows – a discipline driven in to them by Ronnie Hawkins and maintained by Levon when he became band leader…..Those who have read the book will recall when Robbie and Levon first visit Butterfield with Bloomfield…..that Levon notices Butterfield raunchy sweat stained state and shoots Robbie a glance like “what the fu*k is going on with this guy”……….a night or two later, Robbie and Levon break into Butterfield’s apartment and steal his weed !


Entered at Fri May 12 21:50:44 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: The Wood Brothers -- "Ophelia"

Great live version, performed at Levon's barn.


Entered at Fri May 12 21:46:42 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Love the photo - 1965 ! Imagine how many like it are sitting in drawers somewhere with no one even knowing what they have...and there's the Tele I mentioned in an earlier post or did that one not make it to The BAND days.

Jeff: The Cyrkle...I had never heard of them or the song .....went to youtube and had a listen...interesting video for two reasons - the guitars and one of the guys haircut.


Entered at Fri May 12 21:05:37 CEST 2017 from (74.75.157.7)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: JH Photo

Wonderful photo. Just wonderful!


Entered at Fri May 12 21:05:18 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: Originally, Easton, PA
Web: My link

Subject: Cyrkle

Jeff,

According to Wiki, only one of the original members was from Brooklyn or at least was born there. (The other was born in Albany, so it's not inconceivable that he ended up there.)

They did, however, go to Lafayette College in Easton, PA, the town what where I was borned. We townies hung around the campus in our misspent youth. I have two cousins and a niece who went there as well.

Mrs.lee and I drove around the "Center Square" mentioned two weeks back on our way home from my son's wedding in the Poconos. We also got an impromptu guided tour of the Easton Library, where my Mom worked for many years. Her name, apparently, still opens doors. Memory lane.


Entered at Fri May 12 20:48:45 CEST 2017 from (84.209.147.226)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: And then Dylan picked up the phone...

This previously unseen(?) photo is supposedly the real thing?


Entered at Fri May 12 20:34:14 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, something i only learned recently, the two main guys in Cyrkle, are Brooklyn boys. After Cyrkle they both made a living writing jingles & doing assorted other things. A guy i know is good friends with one of them, who just came & played at his birthday party.


Entered at Fri May 12 19:51:33 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Village People - IN THE NAVY!!!

Don't forget Kevin......gawd damn yuh!


Entered at Fri May 12 18:29:46 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Disco.....

....in case anyone was wondering:

"Disco is all right. People always want music to dance to. I quite like some of it, for example, the Village People hit ‘YMCA.’" - L.Cohen, 1979


Entered at Fri May 12 18:06:33 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

20 songs that were on Leonard Cohen's Jukebox:

1. “Unchained Melody” By The Righteous Brothers

2. “Blueberry Hill” By Fats Domino

3. Janis Joplin’s “Piece Of My Heart”

4. Van Morrison’s “Veedon Fleece”

5. Tim Hardin’s “Don’t Make Promises You Can’t Keep”

6. Billy Joel’s “Light As The Breeze” Cover

7. Bob Dylan’s “I And I”

8. Otis Redding’s “These Arms Of Mine”

9. Bobby Darin’s “If I Were A Carpenter”

10. “Folsom Prison Blues” By Johnny Cash

11. Nick Cave’s “Avalanche”

12. Elvis Presley “Don’t” & “Are You Lonesome Tonight”

13. “Y.M.C.A.” By The Village People I

14. “My Father” By Judy Collins

15. Red Rubber Ball By The Cyrkle

16. Roy Orbison’s “House Without Windows”

17. “Je ne regrette rien” By Edith Piaf

18. Chopin’s “Nocturnes”

19. Ray Charles “I Wonder”

20. Joni Mitchell’s “A Case Of You”


Entered at Fri May 12 16:55:58 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Nolb

Subject: Seeds of The Land are planted

“BASICALLY MOST MUSIC THAT IS RELEASED NOWADAYS IS A REPEAT OF SOMETHING WE'VE ALREADY HEARD’’

We, a small group of venture capital investors, have decided to grow our own The Band band called The Land (copy right reasons arrested The Band). We finally found the right sperm and planted this in 5 Chinese surrogacy mothers. On the same day Lobbie, Levon, Galth, Lick and Lichald were planted, for efficiency reasons all Land members will all have the same birthday.

Each Band \ Land member will cost about $50.000,- that makes a total equity of $250.000,- for the entire band.

The Land will be financed by issued share capital.


Entered at Fri May 12 06:37:30 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin J: The Rock for Prez. Why not? I mean if lawyers, academics, bad actors and delusional businessmen can't get the job done, why not let a wrassler take a shot? But first let me finish building my fallout shelter. ; )

Actually I'm of the opinion that Elizabeth Warren should have been the Democrat's candidate in 2016...she could have won.

Dunc: Good ol' Guy Lombardo. : ) Actually that song has a some hope in its message. Precious Time is about the finality and futility of it all.

Conversely, Van's Days Like This has to be the saddest sounding happy tune ever recorded.


Entered at Fri May 12 06:27:16 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Art hoax involving Dylan & The Band

I wonder, was one of our British posters behind this?

: )


Entered at Fri May 12 06:14:20 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, I thought it was Duane Johnson, the actor named The Rock, that's being proposed as a Repub Pres candidate. Scarily, he could win.

Eliz Warren, Sherrod Brown, some others that escape me now, are good Dem choices.But morons could elect The Rock.


Entered at Fri May 12 06:13:02 CEST 2017 from (24.114.58.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Adam

...really nice seeing Adam here.....I had been thinking about you as I was stuck for 25 minutes in a condo basement last weekend waiting for an elevator and a fellow detainee was also carrying a guitar case and we struck up a conversation.........long story short, he mentioned he had been building guitars based on some instruments of musicians he admired.....and I referenced someone I knew about ( you ) who had built a Robbie Robertson Tele from scratch......funny, as he immediately referenced TLW and I had to point out that THAT guitar wasn't what I was talking about.

Jumping Jesus: Just got in and saw Debra Winger on Travis Smilley.......I remember vividly seeing "Urban Cowboy" in late 70's/early 80's and thinking she was as sexy and beautiful as anyone could possibly want.......and she still looks fine but when I arrived at the station I was wondering who this pleasant looking older lady was.....ahhhhhh, life is going by toooooooo fast.


Entered at Fri May 12 02:11:05 CEST 2017 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Jon Taplin's book "Move Fast And Break Things" is a must have for readers here. If only for the chapter "Levon's Story", which is all about Taplin's time with The Band. Great insight where he says Robbie wrote songs and worked hard in his studio, while others slept in. He was there every day from 1969-1971, he says!


Entered at Thu May 11 22:31:55 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: One day away from your heart

Kevin J: Presumably Marianne had her reasons. Maybe it was just that Bob wouldn't promise not to sing?

Funny thing. I just googled "twenty-four hours to Tulsa" and the first choice was a map showing how to drive from where Google erroneously thinks I am to a certain city in Oklahoma.


Entered at Thu May 11 22:26:34 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

...."rather than Bob Dylan" is a more comfortable image....

A serious discussion was had today on a serious radio station in town about whether a wrestler named The Rock should run for President...The consensus of the panel was ( gasp ) that he should.....We are truly living in mad mad times....such is the damage being done by the orange clown.


Entered at Thu May 11 18:43:40 CEST 2017 from (184.146.95.89)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….on a long list of worst decisions in history……Napoleon invades Russia…….Boston Red Sox decide to sell Babe Ruth…..and Marianne Faithful chooses to boff Gene Pitney over Bob Dylan…

Bob F: Thank you for that really thoughtful suggestion. I look forward to reading the book.


Entered at Thu May 11 17:16:30 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Maybe Fred. Great song but GuyLombardo and the Royal Canadians might disagree.


Entered at Thu May 11 15:14:53 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I've no idea where that ' came from. I noticed it as i clicked in agreement.


Entered at Thu May 11 15:12:30 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, what was Faithful picking partner's for? Your wording was wide open.


Entered at Thu May 11 13:27:17 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Del Shannon & Burton Cummings

Every one wanted to play music with Del Shannon! He shows Burton Cummings how Runaway came to be.


Entered at Thu May 11 11:15:53 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Speaking of Van Morrison...

Could "Precious Time" from Back on Top be the cheeriest sad song in the history of rock?


Entered at Thu May 11 10:34:49 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Jeff. 4am now here. But alcohol used to finish at 10pm back in the day. Maybe that's why the nation still drinks to excess. Then you could go to a concert.

Thanks, Peter. I've still to watch it. But then will read the review. I've done my serious theatre. I used to go to every production of Dundee Rep and still went to the serious theatre when I moved through to the West at first. But now it tends to be Jersey Boys, Cabaret etc and some cutting edge dance acts.

Playing Wavelength by Van Morrison just now. Loudly. It's a beautiful day. Great accordion playing on track 4 by Garth. Van singing at his best. A brilliant rock album.


Entered at Thu May 11 09:54:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Note that given the choice of a partner one night, Marianne Faithful chose Gene Pitney ahead of Bob Dylan.


Entered at Thu May 11 09:53:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "King Charles III" review

As it is being shown in North America too, some may be interested in my review of the BBC TV drama King Charles III. I also saw the theatre play in 2014 and the two are compared (and the theatre version linked)


Entered at Thu May 11 09:50:30 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Well Bill, I should have read your Wiki entry first. So that's what it was. Wild sound! They didn't mention it, but he had another hit before Runaway, called Hey Little Girl. One of the first songs I remember.


Entered at Thu May 11 09:39:30 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Dell Shannon was my favorite singer when I first started hearing rock and roll in the early 60s. I loved the sound he got with that crazy organ - was he one of the first to use it?

Dell Shannon and Gene Pitney, they were the guys!


Entered at Thu May 11 05:26:54 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

All the mentions of Del Shannon sent me to Wikipedia, which has a pretty impressive entry (linked). All I knew before was a) "Runaway", b) "Hats Off To Larry", c) that his early keyboardist was Max Crook, and d) that he was from Michigan. I had no idea of the early assistance to Bob Seger, or the later assistance from Dave Edmunds, or the 1963 first American recording of a Beatles tune or anything else. An interesting career - and some terrific records.


Entered at Wed May 10 23:49:00 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Band Correlations

Fact I: “In the early elementary school years, astrological sign is correlated with IQ, but this correlation weakens mostly with age and disappears by adulthood.”

Fact II: “Mr. R. Robertson is one of the rare exceptions of the second part of fact I and so confirming the entire fact I.”

Fact III: “Every time TLW is aired there is an increased number of flying extraterrestrial object sittings reported during the entire broadcast.”

Casual Extrapolation: If they’re so keen on our Band (Robertson), wouldn’t they also keep a good eye on this very GB too? .... please, until further notice, let's all keep this in mind before hitting the submit button again, thank you.


Entered at Wed May 10 19:09:44 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Nelson Toppermost

Link to the Rick Nelson Toppermost I did in 2013. Seems like yesterday!


Entered at Wed May 10 19:06:43 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, you'd mentioned Del Shannon. A few years ago an old friend gave me all his Del Shannon, Roy Orbison and Brenda Lee 45s, with the reward that I would put all the B-sides on CD for him. An enjoyable task.


Entered at Wed May 10 17:48:03 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bobby Darin

I think Bobby Darin is very big in Scotland ? UK? I still play his hits regularly.


Entered at Wed May 10 17:06:03 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Ricky Nelson at 16 his first recording - I'm Walkin

I don't know why you guys always leave out Del Shannon, I outta box your ears!. He was huge! Do any of you know he was asked to join the "Travellin' Wilburys"? Then he had to go and commit suicide.

There are a lot of recordings and vids of Ricky Nelson singing that song, but this one is apparently the first.


Entered at Wed May 10 16:48:06 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Beautiful - The Carol King Musical

Talking about that time frame, the Carol King Musical on Broadway is terrific. Anybody coming to NYC should check it out. Broadway tickets are actually cheaper then concert tickets now. Crazy world.


Entered at Wed May 10 16:29:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

As often pointed out, Eddie Cochran (plus The Everly Brothers) were proportionally more popular in the UK than America. Eddie Cochran is premier league here. Link to a live "Something' Else."


Entered at Wed May 10 16:26:53 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Web: My link

Subject: Here Come The Girls …

Brenda Lee. Link to her version of "Tragedy"


Entered at Wed May 10 16:24:40 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: XY again

Peter: mea culpa; I avoided even duos . Bo Diddley and Little Richard for sure. The others of course deserve consideration. I would have left off Bobby Vinton but his songs keep coming up in movies (I thought about him before putting him on the list).


Entered at Wed May 10 16:23:30 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Then there's a "pop singer" list of superior quality to the Fabian / Frankie Avalon / Bobby Rydell lot. I'm thinking of Tommy Roe, Brian Hyland, and of course Bobby Vee.


Entered at Wed May 10 16:20:04 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You have to add Eddie Cochran, Bo Diddley, Little Richard, Everly Brothers to the majors list. And promote Buddy Holly to A list too.

As to the B-list, definitely Gene Vincent. For Britain, Cliff Richard is a must.

Bobby Vinton, for British listeners, is down with Bobby Rydell, Fabian Frankie Avalon … of no lasting impact.

What about Chubby Checker? And Joey Dee?


Entered at Wed May 10 16:17:29 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: XX again

Etta James and Nina Simone: Yes Bob: 2 artists who became recognized later as major players. (I didn't include groups on purpose: only individual singers).


Entered at Wed May 10 16:11:37 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Connie Francis - link to Where The Boys Are, one of the all time great vocals

Patsy Cline

Little Eva

The Shirelles

Etta James

Nina Simone



Entered at Wed May 10 16:02:22 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: XX

1. Dionne Warwick

2. Sarah Vaughn

3. Jackie DeShannon

4. Peggy Lee

now come to mind as I continue to think about this.


Entered at Wed May 10 15:51:51 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: Richard not Richards

Sorry: Cliff was good but there was only one of him. - not Richards


Entered at Wed May 10 15:42:26 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria BC

Subject: Who made a difference

There were many pop stars in the late 50s / early 60s as I was 'coming of age'. Some made a difference and stand up well today. In this time of 'Triplicate', and discussions of Dion DiMucci and Rick Nelson, it might be worthwhile to recall who had lasting impact. We'll omit Elvis from this list for obvious reasons. There were many 'heartthrobs' in those days (Frankie Avalon and Fabian and Bobby Rydell but I have not included them because the impact in my view is based upon enduring effect on music.) Notice the lack of women in this list. Brenda Lee and Mary Wells could be included and maybe even Leslie Gore

There is first a group of major players who probably were best recognized later in time. They include

A. Chuck Berry

B. Sam Cooke

C. Fats Domino

They among others paved the way for many including

1. Dion

2. Rick Nelson

3. Bobby Vinton

4. Buddy Holly

5. Bobby Darin.

6. Jerry Lee Lewis

7. Roy Orbison

These are all American singers. I have not included Freddy Cannon or Richie Valens though they did have a significant impact during their time. Cliff Richards would likely be on a list.

Of course, one can conjure up others. That is the purpose of this exercise. That's my list.


Entered at Wed May 10 12:53:17 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

My brain starting to work, the more i think about it, the joints like The bottom Line that had two headliner shows a night with pre sold tickets,, i think the show times were 8 & 11. Sundays the Bottom Line modified by dropping the opening times an hour for each set. Closing time in NYC was, still is 4 a.m.


Entered at Wed May 10 12:29:41 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Nelson also had Tom Brumley on pedal steel for a long time.

Dunc, another reason i got out as much as i did was a lot of shows started 9:30 to 10 :30. The Bottom Line had two shows a night, the second, doors opened 10 i think. The Bitter end i think was set up the same way back in the day. . Sometimes I'd go to both shows, sometimes just one, often the late show. Downtime, started about 10, would go as late as Vivino would play, often 2- 2:30. 78 Below shows, the same, it was a late start. The Lone Star, two sets a night, we could walk in any time & could generally stay as long as. Tinker Street Cafe was usually a late start if i recall correctly. I had time to work late, etc, get changed, get there, the only thing there wasn't much time for was sleeping..... Of course, being self employed, & working much too much in general, sometimes, especially in Woodstock, I'd crash a week or two, leaving the house mainly for music. .... Alot of those NYC clubs the music ran real late, Rodeo Bar, Tramps, Louisiana


Entered at Wed May 10 10:20:33 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Jeff. Interesting.

My friend, now 71, is a great Ricky Nelson fan. Went to see him in concert in Glasgow many years ago. He was disappointed because he though he was dull.

I read, quite recently, that he changed and called himself Rick Nelson, wanted to be considered a serious artist, and did produce an outstanding country album. Thanks Rockin' Chair.


Entered at Wed May 10 09:51:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ricky Nelson

Having James Burton on guitar did him no harm!


Entered at Wed May 10 01:50:04 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ricky Nelson

Hell yeah Bob. Ricky was great. His twin boys are pretty good too. I played a lot of his music.

My favourite Ricky story was when he recorded Fats Domino's, "I'm Walkin". Fats couldn't get any air play because that was still back when black fella's music wasn't played on white stations. Ricky had a huge hit with it and made Fats a lot of money.

Well later Fats used to say, "I got to get Ricky to record more of my songs. I got nine kids and I need the money". :-)


Entered at Wed May 10 01:02:22 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Re Ricky Nelson, of the members of The Stone Canyon Band was Denny Sarokin. Denny also wrote "Sanibel", made famous by Crosby, Stills, & Nash. Denny is from Sheepshead Bay, where I live now, just a neighborhood away from Marine Park. I'm pretty sure Denny did something with Rick's son not all that long ago.


Entered at Wed May 10 00:48:37 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, I don't remember. I'm getting old quickly now.

Norm, how about Ricky Nelson? Elvis and Ricky Nelson were my starting points. I use to love when they showed him performing on Ozzie and Harriet. He made great music his entire career.


Entered at Wed May 10 00:01:05 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, i meant to ask, but just now remembered to- was there any on stage cross over between Dion & The Band at that UPAC show?



Entered at Tue May 9 23:49:03 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

There were scenes all over the place Dunc. A lot of people began many great friendships in these joints. I still have friends i met in music clubs in the 80s. For real music lovers, repeat offenders, you'd see the same faces & talk,, or just start talking with a new face, & end up friends. Every now & then in the last decade I've run into people i haven't seen since the mid 90s... The downside of this was you could never hide. In 94 i was dating a Israeli gal named Sue. We broke up. Well, Thursday nights was The Black Italians at Downtime, & prior to dating Sue, that was my go to first date joint. It was a guaranteed good night out & it was home turf... So when I broke up with Sue I took Lisa to Downtime that Thursday... Downtime was set up with the stage against the street wall, tables for maybe 24 -30, some hanging out standing area& a stooled bar for 8 -10 downstairs, then at the rear, a staircase leading upstairs to a second level that could hold 50 people hanging out, but had 3 tables for up to a dozen total on the rail. So Lisa & I walk in & grab a table up front, near the door. Ann comes over & joins us... As I was parking myself i thought i saw something that just stuck out as odd, up on the rail. I didn';t pay it no mind. Well, it turned out to be Sue in disguise with a few of her girlfriends. She had put her her up differently, or mighta hd a hat on, with big sunglasses, sitting down, looking down at me from a crowd, looked different i guess, but i wasn't looking out, & wasn't expecting to be spied on.. but all these joints were home. a lot of em stopped charging the regulars. the Lone star was a name joint, with respectable ticket / door charges. Pretty fast they stopped charging a few of us that i knew of to get in. I didn't smoke, but a friend Crazy Teddy (RIP) had killer weed. Was a dealer that held down a full time job selling kiddie & women's shoes in s high end shoe store. Had a shoe clientele following. He was known in the clubs for a lot of things, including his weed.. Dark green broccoli colored shit that if a bag was out, would clear my sinuses. Anyway, he used to get the door man, the bartenders, some of the managers, and a lot of the musicians high. the club stopped charging a few of us to get in ,a nd soon after, they stopped charging us for drinks. Just hit the bartender and that was it. No joke.....Downtime, when Jimmy & The Black Italians started there, the door was just 3 bucks, at the end, it was still just 7. But there were at least 5 or 6 of my friends & i that i don't think they charged us after the first time or two. ....You never knew who was playing with them...Wayne Perkins, Elliott Randall, Al Kooper, Charles Brown, Shuggie Otis, that was the Thursday night hit, & Thanksgiving & New Years.... New Joint in there now- American Beauty- set up with the small front room i think, & two more stages, one pretty damn big room. The gys own the whole buiklding, & got the most of the first floor or two going all the way back & can do what hey want. As the name indicates. American Beauty seems to be headed towards Dead imitation & tribute bands, & jam bands. A early mid 40ish friend of mine in a name jamgrass band just played there with guys from other name jamgrass bands, but i did't go..


Entered at Tue May 9 23:28:49 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Just goes to show yuh!

That was funny Bill they were oldies when you started listening.

When I started in the late 50's we were playing The Everly Brothers, Elvis Carl Perkins Jerry Lee Gene Vincent & The Blue Caps, Eddie Cockran. Then about 61 I got into Dion & The Belmonts, The Four Seasons, Del Shannon, just to name a few. Of course 1963 came the invasion from England and things were never the same.

I also should have mentioned, in the logging camp where I worked, (late at night) we would get some Alberta station I believe it was. That is when I started playing Lightfoot's music then Hawkins and the boys 40 Days started me out. I had a beautiful cherry sunburst Gibson Humming Bird back then.


Entered at Tue May 9 22:00:26 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

A big part of the #s is that, i used to be able to jump in my car, pick up a person or two or three,and be at the Bottom Line, Lone Star, or Tramps, in 15 minutes, .& The Academy of Music or Palladium...... The Beacon Theatre, add 10 -15 minutes. There were a helluva lot of other great music joints in NYC, & places that came & went in a matter of a few years.. And there was always great music. And till about 12 - 15 years ago, driving around & parking in NYC was never a problem at night. So you jumped in the car, & poof, you was there. Today different story. ......In Woodstock, i lived minutes from Tinker Street Cafe & The Joyous Lake, & there was Sebastians a little further. Bearsville Theater, when i lived in Cooper Lake, was a 5 minute walk from my house.When i lived in Shokan it was 15 minutes. So proximity often made getting out easy. And then also, once upon a time it was nothing to drive three hours for a great show.


Entered at Tue May 9 21:52:27 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I am amazed at the number of shows you and Peter have done, Jeff.

I was good in the early seventies, but late sixties would be dances. But there was a thing in Scotland even in the seventies that shows would break out into dances in Scotland. I think Peter mentioned this way back in the GB.

But family and football(soccer) took over my life. My son became a semi pro and I followed his progress. I coached school teams, district teams and organised tournaments and schools' internationals. Probably went to about 4 games a week. But I enjoyed it.

But I feel lucky to have seen who I have seen.


Entered at Tue May 9 21:38:22 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I wasn't at that UPAC show Bob.


Entered at Tue May 9 21:30:30 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, you're way ahead of me as well. We had an obsession with going to see the same acts over and over. Looking back I wish I'd seen more of a variety. Talking about Dion, do you remember a show at UPAC with The reformed Band, Dion and Graham Parker?

Dunc, we loved Hinterland.


Entered at Tue May 9 21:27:41 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

No way Pete. 21 years at an average one show a week is 1050.25 years at an average 3 shows a week is 3900. That's 50 shy of 5k.. You've got some years on me & I reckon you got out more than me in general, even with you raising kids.Anyway, the last couple years I don't get out that much. But there were two decades that I was out the door. Of course, my educated considered guestimate could be too high, but, in the unlikely event it is, not by more than a thou. What's a thousand amongst friends?


Entered at Tue May 9 20:58:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, you are thousands ahead of me.


Entered at Tue May 9 20:39:18 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, yes, a lot of great shows. By doing some math i can safely state that over close to 46 years i know i've easily seen at least 5k shows, but likely somewhere between 5 & 8K. Yet i think it pales in comparison to the number of music shows Peter & Bob F have seen. ...There were a couple of decades I was able to put in 60 to 80 hour weeks, & catch music live 3 to 5 nights too. Having homes in Bklyn & Woodstock, there was always great live music in NYC & Ulster county, & one of my St Louis periods was jam packed with great live music, local artists that were also national/ international & national/ internationl acts passing through.


Entered at Tue May 9 19:56:59 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Yardbirds

Two good versions, Peter. I saw Davey Graham do it - no lyrics. So many versions. Here's Jimmy Page in the Yardbirds developing it.

Glad you enjoyed it Bob F. I'll see about accessing the Spanish series. We're away to watch the next series (if my wife can get me off the CD player!) of the popular Welsh series Hinterland


Entered at Tue May 9 19:42:09 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Dunc, A Hard Day's Night is truly perfect from start to finish. We watched all three Department Q features. Really great. We're now watching a Spanish crime show called Mar de plastico. Excellent as well.

Kevin, when you have time pick up Fredrick Backman's new book Beartown. It's about a small town literally in the middle of nowhere that lives for and through their local hockey teams. The book centers on the junior division team. What Friday Night Lights and Hoosier's are to their respective sports, that's what this book is to hockey. The way this guys writes. Wow. I think it might restore your love for the game.

Has anyone heard Garland Jeffreys new record 14 Steps To Harlem? Really great, great record. It would have been great in 1977 so in 2017 it sounds over the top good. He is 72, made the record with no music business backing accept pledge money from his fans. James Maddock co produced. Maddock and Jeffreys, two guys worth rooting for. Brain Mitchell from Levon's band plays on the record. Check out the title song.


Entered at Tue May 9 19:26:12 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sinead O'Connor

Another beautifully taken version by Sinead. She has that Irish drawn out note to perfection.

In "The Ferryman" Brid Brennan sang it from a rocking chair in the role of Aunt Maggie Far Away (an elderly lady who was "away with the faeries")


Entered at Tue May 9 19:20:15 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: She Moved Through The Fair

Van Morrison with The Chieftains goes without saying … linked.


Entered at Tue May 9 19:13:27 CEST 2017 from (86.167.95.172)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

It's a very good version, Peter. And a difficult song to sing i would think.

I just don't know the Cowboy Junkies, Bill. Just too much music.


Entered at Tue May 9 18:31:57 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: That's probably my favourite song on what's certainly my favourite Fairport Convention album. It has such a special ambience - something like the the Cowboy Junkies' "Trinity Sessions".


Entered at Tue May 9 17:53:12 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

There was a marvellous solo unaccompanied version of She Moved through The Fair in Jez Butterworth's play "The Ferryman" last week. Try the link to Marianne Faithful's version live. If you're trying YouTube, have a listen to her earlier version from North Country Maid as well, which has (I think) sitar.


Entered at Tue May 9 17:38:15 CEST 2017 from (86.171.223.86)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Those three artists don't mean a lot to me, Peter. hi Bill M.

Last five albums played.

Fairport Convention - What We Did On Our Holidays. I've become a bit obsessed with "She Moved Through The Fair". Too young for the Anne Briggs version.

Beatles - A Hard Day's Night.

Frankie Miller - High Life. Played a lot of Frankie in February, but Peter's post got me getting it out again yesterday. Album never got a hit so no further collaborations. I think Frankie is brilliant.

Capercaillie - Delirium. Iconic folk album. Gaelic in the top 40 for the first time. Voice of an angel. Got the kids in The Highlands carrying the traditional instruments into schools with pride.

Chris Difford - The Last Temptation of Chris. Really good songwriter. Beautifully produced album.


Entered at Tue May 9 16:56:02 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

By the time I started listening to top 40 radio in '68, Dion's hits (aside from Abraham, Martin and John) were played as oldies from the deep, dark past, so I mistakenly lumped him together with the older artists that Peter V mentioned. I even thought that Dion's "Ruby Baby" was the original from the '50s and that Ronnie Hawkins' 1959 version of "Ruby Baby" was a remake of Dion's hit. How very wrong I was!


Entered at Tue May 9 11:10:38 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just dug out Dion's over "lost" Laurie album, "Dion" from 1968. It has a folk version of Purple Haze with flute. It is dreadful. Good Sisters of Mercy though. He also does Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever as a gutless pop ballad. Also awful. One to avoid!


Entered at Tue May 9 10:54:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The advantages of youth, Dunc. I'm older. I was just starting in youth clubs for Runaround Sue, saving up to buy a guitar for The Wanderer.

Dion is a bridge between the classic early rockers (Elvis, Jerry Lee, Little Richard, Eddie Cochran) and The Beatles era. In that 1959-63 period we think of a run of straight teen pop … Brian Hyland, Cliff Richard etc.

But there were three who carried the torch for tougher, more raucous rock in that interim … Dion, Gary US Bonds and Freddy Cannon. They combine well together on a CDR too!


Entered at Tue May 9 10:13:08 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.165)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Peter. The hits are the ones I know. They take me right back to primary school days.

Some amount of concerts you have seen, Jeff.

Thanks Kevin. I'll give the series a go.


Entered at Tue May 9 05:44:51 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Twitler has the worst of the greater NYC area working in the White House. He is the absolute worst NYC has to offer, & he brought the rich dregs of the earth with him. People who admire & value nothing but money, & lack consciences. Not only have they no ethics or morals, the only belief system they subscribe is that evil behavior is good & just in order to attain wealth, that intentionally causing pain to others is worthy, as it crushes them, & therefore additionally strengthens & promotes you........Without going into detail I'll just say I've battled this mentality a long time.


Entered at Tue May 9 03:01:21 CEST 2017 from (24.114.84.217)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"It is easy to be open and tolerant if you are rich." - NorthWestCoaster

Not always the case, NWC.......... Do note that Donald Trump's core Cabinet team of 15 have a net worth of more than the combined wealth of 1/3 of the entire USA. His inner circle of 5 or 6 real decision makers are all mega multi-millionaires. Even the bat-shit crazy mumbling bumbling imbecile Sean Spicer is worth in excess of 10 Million.....


Entered at Mon May 8 18:22:04 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The last time I saw Dion perform was at a Black Italians show at the Cutting Room in NYC, maybe 2009. Over the years I 've seen he & Rick guest twice together at the second Lone Star location, the Lone Star Roadhouse. Once they came up with The Little Big Band, Jimmy Vivino & Harvey Brooks band, the other i am pretty damn sure was at a Neil Young backed by the MGs show. There's nothing on google. But google is getting weaker with a lot of stuff i've noticed. I wish i had kept records & took notes at shows in the past. the folly of youth- as Levon said about other subjects, you think it's never gonna end. In any event, each time they did doo wop, Dion's hits together. Heaven. Busey got up at The Neil Young show too.


Entered at Mon May 8 18:05:14 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Dion had two major hits in 1961-62, Runaround Sue and The Wanderer. He had minor hits with Lonely teenager (1961) / Teenager in Love (1959) and a late entry with a reissue of The Wanderer in 1976 (with the film?) and then King of The New York Streets in 1989.

Being a man of exquisite taste I also have Lovers Who Wander, Little Diane, Donna The Prima Donna, Ruby Baby and Abraham, Martin & John and some later singles. His later blues albums are excellent æ Bronx Blues, Return of The wanderer, Fire In The Night, Yo Frankie, Son of Skip James. Last year was New York Is My Home with a Paul Simon duet on the title track.

Dion is really, really good. I don't know why I never did a Toppermost.

See LINK to R & R Hall of Fame induction 2010


Entered at Mon May 8 15:44:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was talking about this the other day … in 1971 I ran into a friend at the Marquee who was an agent. There were at least five agents / A&R people there that night … I knew three of them, and knew "of" the others. That was the other reason for playing it. The agents would go to three or four of the main venues (Kooks Kleek was another) in one night, listen to 10 or 15 minutes of a band.

They did scout outside London, but because of the centralised nature of the industry, they would rely on bands getting to them in London and taking the third slot or second slot at the London clubs. Managers like Brian Epstein went and badgered the record companies too.


Entered at Mon May 8 14:48:01 CEST 2017 from (86.161.15.60)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Dion

It's an interesting article John D thanks.

In my past, I was only aware of one person, who played Dion regularly. I like what I have heard. Maybe, I was just a little too young.

But I remember many years ago listening to a discussion on the radio, the gist of which was that Dion's impact in the UK was not big. Peter?


Entered at Mon May 8 14:39:42 CEST 2017 from (86.161.15.60)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Going to London

Thanks, Peter. But this is the bit I don't understand. When the Scottish bands/artists went to London, how did they get a record contract?

Did they just try to get gigs in clubs which were frequented by the record people. Hence, the low fees clubs like the Marquee (as you explained) could get away with?

Or was it a case of the manager hounding the record companies to get them to come and look at their band, which would be easy to do if they were playing along the 'road', in the hope that they would get picked up?

Surely it would have been easier to send out 'scouts' throughout the UK to source good bands then offer them contracts? Rather than them all having to move to London?

I remember an aunt having Beltona records.


Entered at Mon May 8 14:08:32 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just reading a Paull Simon biography … another fan of Dion.


Entered at Mon May 8 13:54:52 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan Dion Follow Up from the liner notes

Here's what Dylan himself has to say about the Dion album; taken from the album notes

"Dion comes from a time when so-so singers couldn't cut it--either they never got heard or got exposed quick and got out of the way. To have it, you really had to have it, no smoke and mirrors then--not a minute to spare--rough & ready--glorious and grand--grieving with heartache and feeling too much but still with the always "better not try it" attitude.

If you want to hear a great singer, listen to Dion. His voice takes its color from all palettes--he's never lost it--his genius has never deserted him."

Bob Dylan


Entered at Mon May 8 13:42:22 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan & Dion

I'm not sure how many of you knew that Dion was recording for Columbia; when Dylan was recording Bringing It All Back Home. Dion sat in on the sessions. Dylan was a fan of Dion's since his doo-wop days. The web page I've included describes Dion getting to know producer Tom Wilson. To cut it short, Dion recorded a bunch of tracks; with Wilson that included 3 Dylan covers. Oh yes. Al Kooper is on these sessions. Dion than had a major problem with Columbia and left to go back to Laurie records I believe. Well some of these tracks have been released over the years as 45's. Now we finally have the entire album. Dion says he actually forgot about them over the years. The album is called Dion: Kickin' Child The Lost album 1965, produced by Tom Wilson.

I was fortunate enough to get an advanced copy. It's quite good. Shows where Dion might have gone. It will be released on the 12th.


Entered at Mon May 8 12:54:57 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: British regional labels

Dunc asked "Did Scottish bands have to go to London to get a record contract?

In short, yes.

The British record industry, unlike the USA, had no regional hubs. It was totally London-centred. New York, Detroit, Philadelphia, Chicago, Memphis, Nashville, New Orleans, San Francisco, Los Angeles were not just centres for a “sound” but the home of record labels. The majors had regional pressing plants for different areas. Britain had Merseybeat from Liverpool, or The Animals from Newcastle, BrumBeat from Birmingham, and later the Madchester sound from Manchester, but there was no major label outside London. They all had to go to London not only to get a contract, but a decent studio.

Labels existed in the provinces. Phil Solomon’s Emerald Records in Belfast was the most successful, but by the time they enjoyed a number one hit with Dana, the records were manufactured and distributed by Decca. Regional labels focussed on folk. Cambrian, Qualiton and Welsh Teldisc had a lifeline for a wider range in Welsh language records, including pop from Mary Hopkin. There were Scottish labels like Beltona (which did Irish and Scottish music) but that was owned by Decca too. Interestingly Decca labels say “Made in England” while Beltona, pressed at the same English factory, probably in Dorset, say “Made in Great Britain.” Other Scottish labels were Folk / Country Dancing oriented, like Grampian (which declare “Made in Wick”), then Norco and Glenside. But they wore their tartan loud and proud, and were of no use to rock and pop hopefuls. Because there are far fewer speakers of Scottish Gaelic than there are of Welsh, they did not have the chance to cross to other genres in the same way that Welsh labels did (not that you’d want to hear much of them).

Similarly, some folk and specialist labels survived in England outside London … Oak was in rural Surrey, not far from London. Humberside was a folk label in Hull … but they were very minor affairs.

On Dunc's other question, English prog bands dreaded Scottish support bands. We found then that the local Scots support band would play half a dozen songs from the Top Ten, with a few other well-loved covers. For prog bands, featuring 10 minute epics none of the audience had ever heard before, the Scottish support band was a much-discussed and feared topic.


Entered at Mon May 8 12:19:21 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Which part of "Le Pen" country? The north-eastern industrial area or the South? While the industrial areas were the heart of resistance, surely the south was under the Vichy government anyway?


Entered at Mon May 8 12:01:36 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

On a serious side. - Don't wish luck to "the French people". Wish luck to the wealthy middle-class people in big cities (not in my favourite city Marseille, maybe). There is another France in the rural country, as well as in small and middle-sized cities and suburbans... the forgotten people who has paid this party. I've "lived" in the heart of Le Pen country for three-four years. I wouldn't call them for nazi. In fact this was the main region for resistance. Nationalists - yes, untolerant and nostalgic - for sure, but not more than some fools who worship a five decades old rock band which didn't even had a name!

It is easy to be open and tolerant if you are rich. And it is easy to be rich if you've got the money.


Entered at Mon May 8 11:08:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

M. Macron is greeted with relief. Actually 33.9 %, for Le Pen, BUT Euro bureaucrats were applauding Macron’s victory on the radio as a “victory for Europe” while it is anything but. A third of voters in a core country just voted for a neo-Nazi Eurosceptic. And Macron was the only possible vote for anyone sensible from Conservative to far left Socialist, hardly a sustainable coalition, and he has no party. Macron, if Norbert will forgive a Dutch simile, is the little boy with his finger in the dyke. I'm a fervent "remainer" because while there is a lot wrong with the EU, we should be "in" and helping to fix it.


Entered at Mon May 8 09:46:56 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Norhwest

Subject: Norbert was dreaming. Again.

Norbert was wrong about me. If you use Google Translate Finnish-English and write "I am (my name)" you'll get "I am a jerk". Mrs. would be "I'm fucked".


Entered at Mon May 8 05:31:35 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: France

Kevin J - Yes and yeah for France. But still 38% went for the nazi. This thing we call the First World, the civilized world, the modern world, etc, seems intent on replaying the 1930s. And then onward from there -


Entered at Mon May 8 01:50:09 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: BILL!!!

Bill! yer starting to sound like a "Fundamentalist".....:-)


Entered at Mon May 8 01:18:39 CEST 2017 from (74.12.33.93)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the quantum tao

Norbert: I came to the conclusion years ago that a fundamental question that doesn't have two equal and opposite answers isn't really a fundamental question.


Entered at Sun May 7 21:31:39 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Oh Peter, me too. It will always have a special place in my heart. I even have a tape of Carny, but unfortunately our VCR doesn't work any more, so I haven't seen it for ages. It used to crop up on TV occasionally (an edited version, which is how I found it in the first place) but nobody's shown it for ages.

The most obvious similarity between Petrouchka and the Carny score is the way both composers use the bass instruments (bassoons, etc.) and the timpani and percussion. And there are occasional bits that almost sound like direct quotes, one composer honoring another's style. Petrouchka is a great piece, and it still sounds contemporary, even though it's well over a hundred years old.


Entered at Sun May 7 21:21:51 CEST 2017 from (86.161.15.60)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks everybody.

Thanks, I'll look into Carny too.

Interesting. Peter. I remember years ago you posting that when you went to Scotland with bands, you were impressed at the standard of the local quality.

But did you have to leave Scotland to go to London to get that record contract?

Not being Edinburgh or Glasgow the bands I saw were on the up apart from huge concerts. The big concerts I saw were Nice, The Who, Jethro Tull, Deep Purple, Yes, Graham Bond Organisation, ...some of the music I liked others not so much.

But the up and coming bands I saw were AWB, John Martyn, a very young Thin Lizzie, Family, Fleetwood Mac, Kevin Coyne, Barclay James Harvest, Bebop Delux, Stan Webb Band, a great blues package from London with Jo Ann Kelly, Davey Graham, Pentangle...and many others, many of whom didn't make it, but were very good. And lots of Scottish acts. Thanks Bill M. I'll check that out.


Entered at Sun May 7 21:22:02 CEST 2017 from (24.114.84.217)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bravo to France for going with tolerance over hatred.


Entered at Sun May 7 20:40:12 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa, I love the movie, love the soundtrack. i'd never made the Stravinsky connection. An intriguing one to explore.


Entered at Sun May 7 18:28:22 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Carny

I've always had a special feeling for this movie because it's how I found The Band in the first place (not till 1989, unfortunately).

And I've always loved Alex North's score for Carny, though I believe critics (maybe just Pauline Kael) found the score too intrusive. I sure didn't - for me it's atmospheric and intriguing, with its ominous undertones. And it reminded me of Igor Stravinsky's score for the ballet Petrouchka , which also takes place at a carnival. I've always wondered if there was a tie-in, or it's just my imagination.


Entered at Sun May 7 16:37:29 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Carny

Thanks, John. I have the original LP and a CDR I made from it, but I don't have an official CD either … I just ordered one. The Alex North side is interesting in its own right.


Entered at Sun May 7 16:06:02 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Carny

I realized earlier this week that I didn't own the soundtrack for Carny. So I used same day shipping; from Amazon. It was 1980. I realize that Robbie working; with Alex North was quite a match. Favourite tracks are still "The Fat Man' and "Garden of Earthly Delights. Great horn arrangements.


Entered at Sun May 7 15:33:02 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting theory, Norb. Does it sill work if there is no observer though?


Entered at Sun May 7 15:30:03 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc: London is a huge draw, but in my experience, while there were lots of venues, bands didn't get paid much. Some clubs like The Marquee circa 1970, bands would play for £15, even moderate name bands would only pick up £30. You had to do it so in the adverts of in New Musical Express you'd have MARQUEE: John Mayall … Yes … Chicken Shack … (then your band) … Brian Auger & the Trinity. Social Secretaries at colleges and universities would book a band because they were in the London adverts. So the prestige London clubs were a loss leader for bands. I can recall a band picking up £30 in London in 1970, then £150 to £200 a night around universities and colleges … including a Scottish trip (as detailed in "Pulllng Into Nazareth" in fact).

The contrary was that while a Scottish college might pay £200 for a moderately well-known band "from London" (which meant the members lived in London, though originating elsewhere, including Scotland), they would expect to book the local talent for a lot less. Of course a London band had 300 plus miles of petrol each way plus hotels.


Entered at Sun May 7 15:14:35 CEST 2017 from (86.161.15.60)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Back in the day - early seventies- when I went to many concerts, a source of frustration was that artists/bands, who were doing well moved to London. So I stopped seeing them or maybe never saw them until they had made it semi big.

The reason was of course the chance of a record contract.

But I think another reason was the population of London and the South East with the South coast near. Bands were able to play a different area every night of the week for months without travelling far. London is a city of different towns.

So sometimes I lost out. But there are Scottish bands which I like, but maybe didn't develop an audience in the rest of the UK.


Entered at Sun May 7 14:20:59 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Quantum Mechanics and The Band

Looking at the Solvay conference picture of 1927 I suddenly realized that Quantum Mechanics (QM), or specific the Quantum Computer cold be the key to solve the feud once and forever. Imho to answer the Feud with a haze of probability could be of a much higher quality than the assurance we are looking for till now.

Like light, the Feud can behave both as a wave (R.) and a particle (L), and thus the Feud’s own “Robbie-Levon duality”, similar to light's "wave-particle duality" can be placed into the foundation of QM.

Let’s put the Feud, Robbie (R.) and Levon (L) into the Schrödinger equation and call it The Norbert-Band Theorem.

Till now everyone can fight the Feud and is right about the Feud. But the day I’ll get the Nobel Prize we all will know the Feud is solved and I was right.


Entered at Sun May 7 11:10:29 CEST 2017 from (114.75.200.215)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Or you could just say nothing.


Entered at Sun May 7 10:32:24 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hello (Look Out) Cleveland Revisited

It is a conundrum. In the 60s, we had twenty-five city tours. Now, for artists like Dylan or Springsteen, it’ll be 5 or 6 locations. This means “Hello Cleveland!” is a bit daft. At the Sandy Denny Tribute show, the artists waxed enthusiastic about what a wonderful audience “Basingstoke” was. Basingstoke is a town on the motorway with a reputation for dullness. It has an excellent modern venue, The Anvil, and as the vastly larger town of Reading is less than 20 miles away (and has no decent venue), many of the audience will travel from Reading. The Anvil gets a rare A * rating for ladies toilets from Mrs V. Few venues have enough.

At that Anvil concert, we had travelled 55 miles from Poole. Our neighbours had travelled about the same from Portsmouth. We spoke to a guy from Coventry, more like 100 miles. So “Hello Basingstoke” might only apply to a small percentage of the audience.

I’d guess Bournemouth gets chosen by Dylan, Simon, Taylor, Cohen because it’s in the centre of the South Coast, with a large modern venue and reasonable road links and lots of hotels. The larger cities of Southampton & Portsmouth have no equivalent hall. The next decent one is The Brighton Centre, 100 miles east. You won’t find any equivalents travelling west, though Bristol 85 miles north west is good, and Cardiff, 120 miles away in South Wales right on the major M4 motorway, is superb.

That’s why “Hello Bournemouth” should be “Hello Southern England.”


Entered at Sun May 7 05:48:08 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tears are not Enough

Surfing youtube tonight listening to songs that comfort me. How long is it since any of us listened to all those artists we care about coming together for such a good cause.

Ronnie Hawkins, Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young, Bryan Adams, and on forever. The "Slick" work of David Foster.

It's interesting how many people compare this to "We are the World" and have some critisms of the American contribution to this world crisis.


Entered at Sun May 7 05:35:43 CEST 2017 from (74.12.50.54)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Matt / Peter V: Thanks for sending me back to Peter V's article on "Pepote Rouge" (and thanks Matt for Pepote Orange!) Not far east of Mecca is a very high and steep escarpment with the lovely small city of Taif atop it. Because it's moister and cooler than the coastal plain below, it understandably is used by the Saudi kings as their summer residence. So why not Pepote Rouge too?

Still, I doubt very much that Robbie was thinking of Saudi Arabia when he wrote the lyrics. To me, if you remove the von Daniken verse you end up with a garden-variety myth of the sort that can be found in major and minor religions around the world. "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town", but more sophisticated.

Dunc: The link's for you. The song was running through my head (as it has done occasionally since I first bought it on 45 in 1970), but it struck me that it might interest you on account of the singer, Adam Mitchell, having lived the first 12 years of his life in Glasgow - and you can hear the remnants of a Scottish burr in his singing. The family then moved to Toronto, where he joined the Paupers just as they joined the Albert Grossman stable in '66. The Paupers made a bit of a splash at the time, but faded quickly; Mitchell co-produced Linda Ronstadt's first solo LP, then went on to considerable success as a songwriter (Nicolette Larson, Olivia Newton-John, Merle Haggard, Kiss...) - most of which is set out in Wikipedia.


Entered at Sat May 6 23:43:45 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Thanks, Matt. We used to devote much time to lyrics here. It is good to get thoughts again.

Wish I had known you were at Bournemouth, Ian. I have spoken to two friends who were there - I didn't see them either.

Hello, Cleveland! Solomon Burke had the line 'it's good to be in your wonderful city' which saved thinking. Now I think of The Grand Ole Opry, miles from Nashville, or the National Exhibition Centre near Birmingham, and he would need to say 'it's good to be quite near your wonderful city.'


Entered at Sat May 6 22:07:09 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Kurt Nilsen

JQ - I am aware of Kurt Nilsen, but listening to the song in the Shrek movie I was keen to know who all five were.


Entered at Sat May 6 19:32:28 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Kurt Nilson

Westcoaster- He was one of that quartet of Hallelujah singers and I believe he enjoys a big rep in Norway, maybe throughout Europe. I think his primary genre is country although his vocal range and taste could likely cover anything. He does a fine version of Hank Williams' Lost Highway in duet with Willie Nelson.


Entered at Sat May 6 19:26:36 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Kurt Nilson

Westcoaster- He was one of that quartet of Hallelujah singers and I believe he enjoys a big rep in Norway, maybe throughout Europe. I think his primary genre is country although his vocal range and taste could likely cover anything. He does a fine version of Hank Williams' Lost Highway in duet with Willie Nelson.


Entered at Sat May 6 19:18:28 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Ilkka from the Nordic Countries,

I’m grateful to be your fiend, all those years. I admire your courage to stand up. There aren’t many people like you that go, when needed, against the flow of the masses, that stand out and take risks.

Once a year in May in Holland we think of them, all silence for two minutes. Cars stop in the streets, people stand next to their bikes, machines in factories are shut off, the TV channels and the radio stations all silences those sacred minutes in May. For two minutes we are united, we think about all victims but also about the few who had the courage to stand up, to fight and to save. I think you belong there too.

Know you’ll never walk alone and If some day far, far, away in the future the inevitable end comes, I will be there to hold your hand.


Entered at Sat May 6 16:10:44 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Bob at the Palladium - 'I Could Have Told You' clip

'I Could Have Told You': http://www.videomuzic.eu/bob-dylan-at-the-london-palladium/?lang=en


Entered at Sat May 6 16:02:19 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Rick - It Makes No Difference

https://www.jambase.com/article/remembering-rick-danko-it-makes-no-difference


Entered at Sat May 6 15:48:41 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Hallelujah

It is not hard to see why this video has almost 27,000,000 views. I'm sure Leonard would be proud of the voices of these young men.

They sing his song with passion and respect.


Entered at Sat May 6 15:42:48 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan shows

I, too, went to the Bournemouth show but had a fairly close seat, though off to the left-hand side, so that the light above and behind Dylan's head shone directly at us for some of the songs. I could see all the band but my wife, beside me but refusing a switch of seats, even temporarily, couldn't see the rhythm guitarist, drummer and bass player. She had attended one of the Palladium shows, though (I, all three). My views on the show largely coincide with those of Peter,so I'll avoid repeating too much.

'Desolation Row' was the highlight of all four shows. I would have gladly have foregone 'Early Roman Kings' for a fuller version of 'Tangled Up In Blue', the song that preceded it. Dylan's singing on the 'cover' songs was both respectful and meaningful; he sang them with a degree more 'care' than on his own songs. Others commented to me that he sang them better than on TRIPLICATE (I don't know, as I haven't played the album yet). The arrangement and his delivery for 'Pay In Blood' and 'Long and Wasted Years' were not as effective as the last time he was here, in my opinion, but still well up to scratch. At Bournemouth, I thought his vocal on 'Love Sick' was as good as any I can recall before.

There were three microphones in the middle of the stage, which he didn't use at all. By rumour, they were there to prevent photographers focussing their lenses on him (that is, in the hope that the mikes would be in focus but him not). Instead, when not at the piano, he stood a bit behind them using a fourth mike. I heard comments afterwards about his eccentric movements when standing there but not actually singing. As Peter said, there were no spoken words, just very occasional gestures towards particular band members and almost (I think!) towards the audience at one time. After the first Palladium show, my wife commented (perhaps a touch grudgingly) that, "As Bob shows go, that was pretty good". Unlike the last tour, there was no interval; he started at 8 pm, more or less on the dot each night, and finished some time between 9.50 pm and 10.00 pm. The Palladium weekend was a bit hectic (arrived Friday in time for the show; "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead" matinee on the Saturday afternoon; and a family gathering in Portsmouth on the Sunday, when engineering works meant five hours of train travel)but it was worthwhile, despite the limited set variation, to see him in a relatively small venue (about 2300, I think). There, I've had my Bob-fix for the year.


Entered at Sat May 6 08:51:37 CEST 2017 from (73.250.61.194)

Posted by:

Matt

Location: Baltimore

Subject: Pepote Rouge Article

For starters, Peter Viney if you're reading this, hell of a job. You bring a knowledge of history, geography, and mythology to your writing that is rarely seen in musical reviews. Muchas gracias. As for the Pepote Rouge article, I wanted to offer a different interpretation for a few lyrics. First, the line "And all their leaders are cast in clay". In the article you mention two interpretations, one being the biblical "golden calf" reference, and the other being the Nixon/Watergate "feet of clay" metaphor. My interpretation of the lyric has always been a reference to clay statues or sculptures, as in, all their "leaders" are dead and gone, leaving them with no one to follow, and inducing a romanticization of the past. This would fit in with the narrative you mentioned elsewhere in the article about the Biblical and Arthurian themes of the hopes and expectations for a return of such heroes. Clay statues and sculptures were common in ancient times throughout the Middle Eastern region around the "Mecca plain", as well as ancient Greece and Asia. While Terracotta Army is a the best known example, it was unsurprisingly used more often to portray monarchs and leaders than men of the lower orders.

My other point is in reference to another lyric earlier in the same verse, "And lead our people into the light of day". While you attribute this to a biblical reference, it always made me think about Plato's "Allegory of the Cave", in which the freed prisoner returns to the cave attempting to enlighten the others and lead them out. Chances are both of these lyrics have multiple meanings, but I just wanted to lay down my two cents. Looks like we didn't exactly get Pepote Rouge, but rather, Pepote Orange, an evil, mutated version leading us further into the darkness. But who knows, maybe the great Ty Webb was right when he said, "The shortest distance between two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction, Danny."


Entered at Fri May 5 22:48:04 CEST 2017 from (76.66.112.173)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: How would have have felt with a "Hello Cleveland"?


Entered at Fri May 5 16:02:19 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fake news?? Fake Facts?? FAKE PRESIDENT!!!!

I could just hear old Leonard singing to that fool! Inauguration?

I heard that there's a secret chord,

That David played to please the Lord,

But you don't really care for the truth do ya.......


Entered at Fri May 5 15:49:24 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Who indeed?

Paul would solve the problem and draw the crowds. He could play Back in the USSR as a tribute to the outgoing leader. But any choice would do: maybe we could have a 'diamonds' them with both players backing their individual songs.


Entered at Fri May 5 15:33:40 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ok, but who plays bass? Bakithi Kumalo from Paul Simon's band, or Roscoe Beck from Leonard's band? Roscoe is the better MD, and arranger, so perhaps he should get it, with Bakithi just doing Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes? Or we could sidestep and just have Paul McCartney on bass.


Entered at Fri May 5 15:10:06 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Hard

And for the final encore: 'Hard Times' and Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall' - a fitting finish.


Entered at Fri May 5 15:07:51 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Can you imagine?

Peter V: Your suggestion conjured up visions of absurdity, with Dylan, Cohen, and Simon ('the unholy trinity') up on stage backed by Robbie Robertson, Garth Hudson, Levon Helm, the excellent musicians of Leonard Cohen's most recent concerts, his backup singers and Charlie Sexton taking turns with Robbie on songs. This would be a sort of TLW concert and of course Scorsese would be filming.

All would do their own compositions with everyone on stage contributing. If 'Bye Bye Love' or "Melancholy Mood" came up, they would take turns doing verses. An otherworldly concert occurring in my mind. Maybe introduced and hosted by the first female president of the USA, elected when Twitler finally is 'asked to forgo' any further leadership. In fact, this could be the concert for the inauguration party. They could read the required Nobel Prize speech so we could all hear it. If I had my way, I'd ask Leonard to read it while Bob and Paul listen attentively. Of course, we would have to 'honour' Twitler, and for that I'd introduce the song "You Want It Darker" as an ode to hard times in the USA as it becomes 'great again'. I'd have the FBI director introduce that song. For the encore, I'd have them trade verses on Visions of Johanna and for the final encore.

Any readers: This is only an idea for the Bizarro world. Any comments or revisions welcomed. Or we can have 'The Silence' since this is perhaps a religious experience and, like the movie of the same name, saying nothing when absurdity is occurring seems to be the order of the day.


Entered at Fri May 5 13:48:03 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I guess Bournemouth is warmer and has a better beach than Sweden?

Hard choice, Jeff. If I could have Simon AND Cohen, I think I'd take the duo. Otherwise, yes, it has to be Bob.


Entered at Fri May 5 13:15:23 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "How The Music Industry Is Putting Itself Out Of Business"

See the link.

Gary Clark Jr is far from a household name. Yet he has endorsement deals? Honestly, he doesn't impress me. He has tons of talent & ability , I haven't really seen him put it to real use. ( I'm sure he wouldn't care about my opinion).

Creativity & talent levels of new younger artists has already suffered immeasurably. And "exactly" what does it mean to " own" a position in Apple or Spotify ( see the author info at the end of the article).


Entered at Fri May 5 13:08:15 CEST 2017 from (114.75.202.214)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, the Nobel Prize selection committee barely got an acknowledgement so why would you think Bournemouth would do any better.


Entered at Fri May 5 13:02:06 CEST 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But Pete, if you had hindsight with instructions to choose one artist to keep, in return for never hearing the others, & losing the memory of the others, I'd assume it'd be Dylan, keeping his shortcomings. It's an unfair arbitrary , & ridiculous test that I present, but, I'd have to go with Bob. Browne & Taylor aren't in his neighborhood. Cohen & Simon approach.


Entered at Fri May 5 10:51:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just added to the Dylan review (as I often do after sleeping on a review):

The lack of engagement remains a negative. How needy we are. Just the tiny crumb of “Hello” would have pleased. “Hello Bournemouth” would have shown personalization of a sort. “Good to be back in Bournemouth” and we’d have been ecstatic. Paul Simon tells anecdotes about playing here in 1964. James Taylor spent the interval sitting on the edge of the stage signing autographs. Leonard Cohen’s wry humour elevated the shows. Jackson Browne once said he’d spent his two day tour break in Bournemouth before the show and listed the local walks and restaurants he’d loved. I’ll assume Bob was in one of the three top hotels and could afford a sea-facing room. He would have seen the Isle of Wight from the window, an anecdote waiting to be told. Ah, well, it wasn’t. After 55 years, we should know that.


Entered at Fri May 5 07:28:40 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

My new favourite version of Got My Mojo Working : )


Entered at Fri May 5 06:17:46 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Dylan review Peter V

re: Dylan 2017 BOURNEMOUTH; Glad to hear this, Peter. I've been hearing some of the material on You Tube and it is very good for the most part and supports what you have written. thank you.


Entered at Fri May 5 00:49:05 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: BOB DYLAN

Review of the Bournemouth Show on the 2017 UK tour. Far better than I had expected. JT said it would be. Quite right. Link above.


Entered at Thu May 4 19:17:13 CEST 2017 from (24.114.83.191)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, JT. I do love the blues, I play the blues and I am most definitely feeling the blues these days. I have never seen the Paul Deslautiers band but just checked and they are scheduled to play the Trembalnt Blues festival this July. I will try to catch them there.

Speaking of the blues........imagine a country that prides itself on teaching the world about democracy about to pass a bill that will affect every single citizen and the majority of the elected representatives voting on it have admitted to "not really having any idea what's in it or how much it will cost".......Oh, and if you have any or those pesky little things called "pre-existing conditions" you are about to be thrown off the bus and run over.......and the beat goes on for the Orange Clown.


Entered at Thu May 4 17:20:20 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Paul Deslauriers Band

Kevin J: If you love the blues, check out The Paul Deslauriers Band out of Montreal. They are a Canadian national treasure.


Entered at Thu May 4 14:11:20 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: 1. Thanks for Unthanks 2. NHL hockey

I'm not posting much anymore: I figure if I have something to say, I'll say it but will keep it to minimum

1. Peter V: lovely review: I'm listening to this and am really enjoying it, and would hope that some day I can be there live to hear/see Unthanks

2. Kevin J: I too am disgusted by the duplicity of the NHL; the players are the essence and they must be protected at all costs: Sidney is only the latest in a series of horrors: there are so many things to say about this: I'll keep watching: I think the NHL is beginning to get the message: Progress is slow: Keep watching, Kevin. O should get banished from this round of the playoffs (he won't): He should pay for his crime both in terms of time and money. The N crosscheck was a result of O's 2 slashes, one to the head. O and others like him can't be allowed to play that way. The stick has to be for shooting and passing and cannot be used as a weapon in any way. O's use of the stick is a felony.

Players who do this are ruining careers and the game.


Entered at Thu May 4 06:14:04 CEST 2017 from (24.114.83.191)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Just tuned into a PBS station north of Montreal where Mountain Lake PBS is promoting a 40 anniversary and they ran a clip of a blues type rock outfit called Bailey Brothers.......They sounded great.....I had never heard of them before....anyone else know about these guys.

Bob F and Dunc.......Not sure if this has been mentioned before but the Danish show "The Eagle" is very very good.....Shetland next up.......a by the way for JT.....after a lifetime of playing the game and watching it.... I am off hockey....the massacre of Sidney was the final straw.... may Gary Bettman rot in hell.....Let's hope they do something before a transcendant once in a lifetime talent like Connor McDavid is destroyed. At least the NBA protect their stars.

Where the F are Pat B and Todd ?


Entered at Thu May 4 00:08:27 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Unthanks 2017

Link to review of The Unthanks at Southampton yesterday. This 2017 tour is devoted to the songs of Nick Drake's mother, Molly Drake, and the influence is clear. She recorded her songs in the 1950s on a domestic tape recorder and they were released in 2013. Now The Unthanks have added their ethereal voices and superb arrangements to the material.


Entered at Wed May 3 15:09:59 CEST 2017 from (76.66.112.173)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I didn't think much of the Guardian review either. Illogical and irrelevant are two words that come to mind. The writer beats up Taplin for making argument X (with the Band as evidence), and when done proceeds to make the same argument X (but without the Band as evidence). And then there's the over-the-top closing sentence: "Taplin’s own experience with Ohanian should show us just how dangerous it is to be dependent on the goodwill of spoiled brats." Dangerous, or just maddening or disappointing?


Entered at Wed May 3 14:30:02 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guardian article

What about:

"Of course, Serial and S-Town have their critics, but so does the music Taplin loves: I know people who would rather eat stinging nettles than sit through the whole of The Last Waltz."

That is one bit I took exception to. Yes, I know people like that too, but they are generally the ones who "don't like rock music" at all.


Entered at Wed May 3 12:57:34 CEST 2017 from (114.75.201.144)

Posted by:

Wallsend

That is what I thought too.


Entered at Wed May 3 09:18:17 CEST 2017 from (210.86.77.121)

Posted by:

Rod

I'd be keen to read that Taplin book but I think the review in The Guardian was (mostly) spot on.


Entered at Wed May 3 06:14:39 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.24)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Hummingbird


Entered at Wed May 3 01:27:29 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I think you can read a single article on the Sunday Times site if you input some information. I had a print copy, and you can only access a single online one at intervals and I sometimes need to check Theatre reviews in The Times.


Entered at Tue May 2 20:49:17 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RIP Col. Bruce Hampton

So many great artists attended the Hampton "school of music."He collapsed onstage at his 70th BD show last night & died later at the hospital.RIP Col. and thank you for all the wonderful music & musical "offspring."


Entered at Tue May 2 18:53:04 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sunday Times

You can't read the article unless you are a subscriber.


Entered at Tue May 2 16:11:13 CEST 2017 from (86.173.65.98)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

It's not all great about the Band, Fred. Thanks.


Entered at Tue May 2 13:56:30 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Guardian vs The Sunday Times.

Oh. (insert surprised look emoji here)


Entered at Tue May 2 12:28:59 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Taplin article

No, the Sunday times is more of an interview, and doesn't have any of the negatives the prat at The Guardian put in about the Band.


Entered at Tue May 2 12:08:33 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Dunc: the item about Levon in The Sunday Times is probably the same (give or take some rewording) as the one found in The Guardian (see my link)


Entered at Tue May 2 11:23:13 CEST 2017 from (76.113.238.113)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Rory

Peter and Kevin, thanks for the response. I kind of thought that wasn't the case as far as Gallagher being asked to appear. The only connection that was remotely close was Rory playing on Muddy's London sessions but then a number of people did. Lots of information floating about since his passing over 20 years ago some of it not accurate.


Entered at Tue May 2 10:30:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've never found any Rory Gallagher / Band connection whatsoever. It seems highly improbable … mind you, maybe someone said "I've got two tickets to see it. Do you want to come with me?" which is "an invitation."


Entered at Tue May 2 06:01:03 CEST 2017 from (24.114.83.191)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jerry & Rory a Beatle named George

Jerry: As to your question of Rory and TLW - not to my knowledge......In an interview with Robbie Robertson I posted several days ago here at the GB, he was asked about guests who were invited and turned down the invitation to appear at TLW and he said he couldn't recall any who did......when asked if there was anyone the Band wished they had invited but didn't, Robbie answered George Harrison.


Entered at Mon May 1 21:45:42 CEST 2017 from (76.113.238.113)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Rory Gallagher

Home nursing a torn quad tendon on my left leg with lots of time on my hands. Listening to and reading a lot about Rory Gallagher and came across something I've never heard so I'll ask it in here. Was Gallagher invited to the Last Waltz?. Read it in Gallagher forum that was attributed to a quote from Rory's brother Donal Gallagher who was also his manager..


Entered at Mon May 1 21:26:56 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.24)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, :-) I don't get carried away any more. Next time I do will likely be in a pine box.

Bob- Yes, it's better to be one of us old fools who posts on The GB.


Entered at Mon May 1 20:42:31 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Joan Shelley

Poking around that NPR First Listen again, found a young lady named Joan Shelley who has a new album produced by Jeff Tweedy of Wilco. Very low key, mostly just acoustic guitar and vocal. Echos of maybe Nick Drake, Sandy Denny, maybe early Joni. Quite soothing.


Entered at Mon May 1 19:36:16 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Spiraling

Dunc, Spiral is one of my all time favorite shows. What a cast.

It's hard not to love Amazon Prime. You can hear so much music and if you love something, owning it is a click away. I like that.

Young people who use to be the biggest customers of the music business just don't have that passion for music anymore. The hours we spent listening to music they spend playing video games or watching comedy. The world has changed. Keep in mind, I'm not one of those old fools who sit around lecturing young people on how to spend their time. They look pretty happy playing those video games.


Entered at Mon May 1 16:34:13 CEST 2017 from (86.173.65.98)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Peter and Jeff. Interesting, but i can't get the S.Times article. But got me reading.

I was amazed what I am able to stream on Amazon.

And before we all get carried away about the success of vinyl, the Financial Times reported that 2017 would be vinyl's peak in the USA.

Here's a review of Jonathan Taplin's book in the Guardian, not always sympathetic.

Thanks Bob F. Glad you enjoyed. Very popular was 'Spiral'. Brilliant. Wish I had been there for the root beer float.


Entered at Mon May 1 11:30:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Taplin is described as an old friend of Levon's (so the incident on tour described in Levon's book has been forgotten). The dramatic dive in 18-24 months happened to video sales too, but 4 or 5 years later (being harder to stream initially). I speak from bitter experience! I'm going to have to put my surviving video series out of print soon. Several hits every day on my site, but no one buys one and the only constant enquiry is "Where can I download this free?" I've fallen below my distributor's minimum sales figure.

The fracking also-chequered (those three all happened!) keeps turning Levon to Devon.


Entered at Mon May 1 09:43:43 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Great minds share great viewing habits...

Bob F: I just watched that a few days ago. Very interesting, indeed.


Entered at Mon May 1 09:39:21 CEST 2017 from (114.75.197.185)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I know Jonathan Taplin has made those comments about Levon before. I guess he must have some kind of inside information or else he wouldn't have said it. Also, the timing of the royalties drying up would seem to coincide with Levon going broke and starting the Rambles.


Entered at Mon May 1 05:53:30 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

No matter how I rewrite my take on Pancho & Lefty, The GB tells me to scram. Won't let me post it.


Entered at Mon May 1 05:08:15 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Pancho & Lefty- Willie and Bob

With an amazing band. They were still young whippersnappers compared to now. I've been trying to post my thoughts on this song since last night- the GB tells me to scram....

An instant classic song- yet almost unnoticeably unortohodox song writing.


Entered at Mon May 1 03:40:16 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.119)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Been in the car most of the time since Friday A.M. Yesterday i heard part of a song from Americana by Ray Davies & it was excellent. All the stations i listen to here have been playing Davies nonstop....... So back to Friday. that post i made about Rock & Roll Cowboys was after one or two listening. what i liked about the song most was the musical performance. I listened twice, and decided the song was powerfully played & very catchy, but still felt the same way about the lyrics.

Today , they were playing solo Davies, and Kinks, then played Rock & Roll Cowboys but the record includes Davies talking his way into the song.About deciding to move out of NOLA and said good bye to Alex Chilton, his neighbor. The conversation of Chilton about songs he wrote- relevance from when he wrte em and how they make him feel singign em now- the same-o transport etc- and then the tv brought on a black and white cowboy flick, but the sound was off- and that it was all there- you have to hear Davies describe it. But it made all the difference to the song, and then i enjoyed it a whole lot more...

So here is my bitch,. As a songwriter and a listener i've always been pissed off when a lyric is senseless or pointless and there's nothing redeeming, and the song is not redeeming. And then the songwriter gives background, and there still really is no connection that anyone but he or she should feel. Bullshit - do your job. Now this time, there is a real palpable connection- but - it is necessary to hear the story from Davies, and i think he got lazy with hsi writing this time. Listen to his other songs- you don't need a blueprint to get him.I ti s all in the lyric and spot on. This time, you do need a blueprint. All it would have taken is one line, at the most two. He got lazy.

With Davies introduction,. i dig the song.


Entered at Mon May 1 01:03:04 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Neil Young Don't Be Denied

Link is to a great Neil Young documentary on youtube.



Entered at Mon May 1 00:58:31 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Department Q

Dunc, we watched the first Department Q last night. A really great show. Kevin was right about the dynamics between the two lead detectives. Great stuff. Thanks again for the tip and keep them coming.


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