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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, March 2017


Entered at Fri Mar 31 23:34:55 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Wingin - Thoughts on the Rodney Crowell show.

What an exquisite show. A big factor in digesting the lyrics to many songs was that Rodney talked alot at the beginning of the show, between songs, & between sections of songs . The talk was genuine. He's a talker, not a snake oil salesman, genuine but not earnest, comfortable but naturally polished by life lived. Professional but might as well been talking to friends in his living room. A showman but not a showman.

A lot of the talk & a lot of what plenty of these songs dealt with is close friends impending deaths, & life, how they and even he dealt with it or lived it , and then, their deaths too. He didn't talk about it in a grandiose way, a gloomy way, or a martyr's way. His naturalness gave honor, meaning, or weight without trying to.
Susannah Clark,Rodney's friend since their twenties), Guy Clark, also Rodney;s friend since then, & another friend, a friend with an 8 year old child, are at least some of the friends. To give you an idea, specifically some of what Rodney talked about was parts of the conversations he had walking around the lake ( almost daily i think he said) with his friend who knew he was dying, said he was ready to, but that he had an 8 year old kid who he had to put it all together for and show him that he was fighting to live. And the man fought the good fight, came back some, relapsed & died later.

Musically, well, first he had two pieces with him. His current touring band. Significantly in today's political climate, both are immigrants. Eamon McLouhlin, born in Ireland, raised in London, longtime in this country, a member of the Green Cards band, & now the house fiddler at The Grand Old Opry, on fiddle & mandolin. The acoustic guitarist who might have been named Jim Robinson is from Australia and also is a badass player.. That trio is amazing.

Several songs in Rodney talked about how we're in NYC and you never know who's around & what can happen. Then later on returned to that & stated it's my microphone and i can give it to anyone i want to. He introduced John Paul White, gave him his guitar and he and the band departed. White did one song, & that really showed off his singing ability. He was all over the map, soaring, dipping, the guy can sing. Then Rodney & the band came back If I recall correctly White left the stage. Rodney & band did a few. Then he introduced an old friend, said they had spent many years together on the road, & causing all kinds of trouble, that they were brothers, & that this guy has spent the last fifteen years with the Eagles & i knew it was Steuart Smith. Introduced him, & he came out to large applause. Then Crowell declares: But I had him first! And then declared, either - And I'll have him after. or And I'll have him again. As great as the acoustic three piece was, Steuart Smith on electric guitar raised the ante. He's brilliant. Later he started talking about a song he wrote about what i think he said was three way conversation in his head. And how he knew who to call for the woman;s part, and he introduced Roseann Cash.. ( course, his ex wife, &still a best friend, with love between them, which she alluded to..) John Paul White & she are on the recording of this song on Close Ties. It's titled It Ain;t Over Yet.

Two of the lines in some of the songs that I had to write down to make sure I could relay them correctly, well ,what can you say about a line like this:
"Life without Susannah, troubles me in ways i can't express.". (From Life Without Susannah.)
Or a line like this: "I'm a worried man, on a losing streak."( Might have been from East Houston Blues.)

The first encore was Leaving Louisiana in The Broad Daylight.. Then he said "There's songs that belong to the whole world. Like Like A Rolling Stone." then he mentioned ths one was written by Townes Van Zandt and said that we the audience would have to sing the chorus. He said even if you think you don't know it you do. When we get there, you'll know it. And that he wasn;t gonna sing it, so we'd have to. Pancho & Lefty.The audience sang. Rodney didn't sing that chorus till the last time.

I kept looking till i found the merch table. There wasn't much, or even many discs out. But of course i bought the record, which is packaged beautifully & contains a booklet with the lyrics & credits.. still haven't listened but will manana. The young fella working the merch table actually asked me what i thought of the show. He got an earful. I figured he had to work for Rodney, & asked, turned out he works for the venue.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 21:29:44 CEST 2017 from (174.232.9.56)

Posted by:

Calvin

Anyone see Rumble: Native Americans who rock? Nice long segment on Robbie with some cool footage.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 21:26:31 CEST 2017 from (114.75.204.242)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I appreciate that Eric is a public figure but does him being in a wheel chair really justify such an extensive spread in a paper. If he is unwell, should't the media just leave him alone. On another topic, I liked the Wood Brothers cover of Ophelia, so much better than twenty 70 somethings singing it with fake enthusiasm.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 20:53:54 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Clapton bronchitis on top of neuropathy, canceled gigs.

It's hard for these guys to actually hang the performing up. But, given the physical condition, & the fact that the man has teenage kids, this might be a case where mostly staying home with the kids is the best thing one can do, many ways, for many reasons .... well, it's his to know and decide. I just wish him & his kids happiness.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 20:02:30 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bert Berns

I've managed to get a look at the Bert Berns documentary coming out soon. Van talks glowing of his first solo album Blowin' Your Mind. And it is his first solo album. He was quite happy with how the album was put together and the experience of recording it. More later.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 19:59:32 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Bob Dylan Triplicate

I just received my copy of Triplicate. This is just a fast mention of spot listening a few tracks. The 3 CD's is produced by Bob; otherwise known as Jack Frost. The (Sound) of the records is reminicent of the best quality jazz albums one could by. Production is lavish. Intimate. Bob knew exactly how he wanted it to come across. Orchestration is top notch. About the songs later; but congratulations Jack for the incredible production.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 19:55:51 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Trilogy, with saucy bits

Listening to the Trilogy "sample" on NPR First Listen. Had to rewind during I Could Have Told You when Mr. Zimmerman dropped the F-word. What? Not sure he ever used that word in his OWN songs, let alone in the middle of a smooth standard.

All in all, I don't find this oeuvre unpleasant, and his voice is more flexible and pleasant than the critics give credit. Sure, he's no Sinatra, Goulet, or Torme, but hearing these songs in a "regular" voice is not a bad thing.

Lots of stuff to explore on the NPR site. If you want to hear Mr. Z, better hurry as they take down the streams after the record is released, which is today.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 17:38:32 CEST 2017 from (5.148.89.130)

Posted by:

Peter V

I saw Fay Hield with the Full English at Milton Keynes, The Stable. I just wish it were an easier drive. And yes, it has seats with numbers … I share the preference.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 17:16:31 CEST 2017 from (174.228.8.87)

Posted by:

bradley

Location: safety harbor

Subject: unfaithful servant breakdown

Where you go wrong in your estimation is that you assume the word "servant" literally. This gives the notion that the story takes place on some kind of mansion or Plantation and there is a dalliance between hired help and the lady of the house. If you imagine that the narrator is standing in front of a mirror talking to his reflection after he and his woman who live together in a house, it all makes sense. At first he is addressing his image, assigning blame to the man in the mirror, which gives the third person narrative. Then he begins to talk about "we" and "our", acknowledging his own complicity. At the end he is ready to accept responsibility for his unfaithful actions against the woman he loves, the one he might be married to, the one who swore to love honor and obey, therefore being in her service, and she in his. He broke that bond, she found out, she threw him out, and now he is lamenting his loss and the fact he has to go soon. The line about doing it for spite or glory probably relates to the single life that he gave up for her. Just because a train is mentioned doesn't mean it's set in the 19 twenties or thirties or the 18 hundreds. Passenger trains still run today.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 15:15:10 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: A good trend

Anna Larsen did it today. Peter V has done it a number of times. I try to do it. This site has many attributes, not the least of which is discussion of all things Band. One of the wonderful things I get from this site is the suggestions by our constituency members about performers and music that flies under the radar. Excellent artists (some who have been around for many years; indie artists; new artists) are now accessible in so many ways but unless someone brings them to our attention, they get missed. Since I've been here, I've learned about so many of these. I encourage people to put these sometimes obscure/sometimes prominent but somehow we miss them, out there for all of us to experience.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 15:07:48 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bob Dylan, Serge Gainsbourg and BB

Almost every leading dylanologist has missed Brigitte Bardot as Bob Dylan's (Robert Zimmerman) boyroom dreamgirl. Already in 1969 I had the chance to see a Finnish manuscript with the name "Dylanologia". There was a cartoon pic on BB on the sleeve. I didn't understand a thing! The author published historic novels and plays but never this manuscript. He sat in his chair with a harmonica in his hand and listened to "Self Portrait" - once, only once. That's about Dylan. A shame. - The ironic fate took his life after the same illness as Woody Guthrie's.

SERGE GAINSBOURG was obsessed on her. After being turned down by BB he had only two options: jump in to the Seine or sing the erotic song with another babe who was able - and WILLING - to sings one octave HIGHER than BB.

But I am leading 2 - 0. For the first I am alive and for the second BB has touched my shoulder but - as far as I know - not Bob's.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 15:03:25 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Fay Hield and the Hurricane Party

The Stables in Milton Keynes: Fay Hield and the Hurricane Party: Sunday April 2, 2017.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 15:01:07 CEST 2017 from (223.229.246.71)

Posted by:

Anna Larsen

Location: Norway

Subject: Best Band of Norway

Jaga Jazzist is the best band of Norway as per my opinion. They produce best jazz and rock music. I just love them.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 13:34:10 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Covering The Band

The Wood Brothers doing Ophelia


Entered at Fri Mar 31 09:48:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Jeff. I looked it up. Rodney Crowell plays The Stables in Milton Keynes on 26th July. Among jazz and folk musicians, this is regarded as easily the best venue in the country. It is intimate, with the audience up and around a flat floor … and it was designed by the late Johnny Dankworth and by Cleo Laine as a jazz venue designed by jazz musicians for jazz musicians. The sound is as good as you can get. It has a fantastic jazz record store in the lobby, and a small but excellent restaurant. They say it has the best dressing room areas too.

The downside is that it's in Milton Keynes, a rather odd town … Britain's first "new town" built from nothing after the war, and the only one using American numbered streets, except they add V (vertical) for north-south, and H (horizontal) for east-west, so you have V3 intersecting (say) H7. It should make directions easy, but it doesn't. We used to do recordings there and film there. From where we live, you'd have to stay overnight. It's a Wednesday … we're in London on the Friday and Saturday. Don't know if my powers of persuasion can add to the trip …


Entered at Fri Mar 31 09:39:25 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.92)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Band covers

I'm doing a few Band covers in a A Band at the moment - TTDODD, The Weight, I Shall Be Released, Ophelia and You Don't Know Me. I think of the last one as a cover as I try to do it as close as I can to the 83 Band. I'm not over keen on doing The Weight. I love the MFBP and TLW versions but I can take or leave the rest. Given a chance I'd like to do some more obscure numbers - maybe Strawberry Wine, Twilight and The Unfaithful Servant.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 06:49:17 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: If there are chairs...

Jeff A: I will only go to a show now if there are chairs and ideally chairs with numbers on them. I will consider a show if the venue is small and there are tables and chairs and I can get to a good place near the stage. Like a spoiled child. I figure that with age and aged knees, I too won't tolerate discomfort even to see my favourite performers. Arenas... no way for me unless I'm near the front and that is virtually impossible today. Sounds like City Winery can be OK from what you have said.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 06:41:33 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, i usually really dislike City Winery in NYC, As a result i;ve only gone a few times. i really dislike being very uncomforatble at a music show.. the place usually gets mobbed and the seating situation is usually awful... Tonight was the perfect configuration. My table of eight that really is big enough for 4 had tw empty seats, both on my side of the table. The table to my baCK HAD 4 EMPTY SEATS. i HAD AN AISLE SEAT, & THERE WAS PLENTY OF ROOM across the aisle TO THE NEXT SECTION OF Tables BEHIND us. oUR TABLE WAS FAR ENOUGH FROM THE STAGE THAT THE SOUND WAS DAMN GOOD. The few tech issues got worked out quick. I don't think the room was designed for as perfect sound as it should have been,considering it was established as a music venue. But, if you get in the right spot the sound is pretty good. But in general, I have not been a fan of the venue. This was supposed to be a sold out show. I was comped by a DJ that Garth & Maud introduced me to in nashville. .If it really was sold out, quite a few people did not show up. What a pity. Rodney Crowell is a name, one of the best country artists of our times, no joke. And 250 capacity wasn't overflowing. I will address the following more- John Paul White, Steuart Smith, & RoseAnne Cash participated in Rodney's show. The whole show was A ASTUNNER. i WANT TO GIVE a little though to how i write a bout it.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 06:27:28 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rodney Crowell and Nick Lowe

I was lucky enough to interview R Crowell at the time his book came out. He was really gracious and gave me all the time I wanted. We mostly spoke about his book and he agreed with me that his LP:The Houston Kid was, broadly, the soundtrack to his book.

City Winery NYC - Nick Lowe will be there for 3 shows, June 9,10 & 11. Jeff, if you haven't seen his solo gig I think you, or anybody, would really enjoy it.

The connection between RC and NL is that they were in-laws to the Cash family at around the same time.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 06:07:29 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Rodney Crowell

Jeff A and others: Thanks. Looking forward to your comments on this show.. Rodney Crowell is new to me though I have heard his name before. I've listened to a few cuts from the new record and have gone back and will listen to previous work. I like his work and recommend it as you do. I'll watch for him. I'm looking forward to someday seeing someone(s) at City Winery in NYC (once ITMFA occurs). Until then, I'll wait and stick to Canadian venues.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 06:03:33 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Crowell, UK shows

With Jim Lauderdale. Late July, one show in Milton Keynes, one in London, one in Dublin.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 05:44:03 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Rodney Crowell Tonight

I'm just back from a heartbreaker & a stunner of two solid hours of live music from Rodney Crowell in a good sized club but still a smallish venue. supposedly 250 capacity. City Winery, NYC.

I will write in some detail about this later as it really warrants proper presentation. For now, this was a magnificent, personal show of well introduced & mostly very personal material by one of the best songwriters & performers in his genre. I was able to buy the new record which comes out tomorrow. Close Ties. If you can catch the show do, but if not, buy the record.


Entered at Fri Mar 31 02:46:12 CEST 2017 from (96.227.58.249)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: More Bang For Your Buck

Recently here there was discussion about Van Morrison's Bang Recordings. He has apparently authorized a release of all his work on Bang. (See the link for Rolling Stone article).


Entered at Fri Mar 31 01:36:04 CEST 2017 from (114.75.203.213)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think it is great if bar bands or young folk want to play Robbie's songs but what I am not keen on are the over-indulgent 'all-star' ensembles.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 23:46:05 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Kevin. Drake's official bio & his tour schedule will give you an idea where his gelt comes from.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 23:03:57 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Streams. Piss on Em.

Kevin. streams pay the sound recording owner between a tenth of a penny and nine tenths of a penny (If that is a label, it's the label's responsibility to pay the artist his possibly various shares of that)

. I suspect that a stream of healthy piss is worth more per oz if you want to sell your urine to impure athletes, drug addicts, & paroled ex convicts who have to pass urine tests for drugs.. three million streams at the top end 9/10 of a penny i think is 270K. There is some more money from streams, but it;s also not very significant compared to past forms of income for music. that's not where Drake is making his money. Drake gets real radio airplay, and gawd knows how many other sources of income his music & his general career has.

Going to see Rodney Crowell tonight courtesy of a very nice disc jockey.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 22:57:14 CEST 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

I see it as a good thing that they are playing this music.Yes,what they label it is ridiculous but given how few young people care about this music I'm overjoyed to see young folk getting into it at all.Heck,these days I'm happy they still play instruments!


Entered at Thu Mar 30 21:58:25 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed. Yes. Keeping the music of the past alive is a great and important thing. But there's ways to do it, and there's ways (not) to do it.

But, at least to me there's something essential about preferring quality and also preferring honest marketing and also not solely relying upon another act's music to keep a band afloat and make a living.

That "Brooklyn Is the Band" title for a show really strikes me as nothing but schmucky, and the epitome of chutzpah. Some one in the marketing or booking department at the venue probably came up with it.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 21:52:41 CEST 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Fight The Power

Not completely sure what this means – maybe Jeff could enlighten us as to the monetary consequences – but I just saw a headline that hip hop artist Drake has a new album out that has received over 300 million streams ! As a by the way, I pass a house he is building in Toronto’s Bridal Path neighbourhood almost every day and his place ( ½ built now with most of the framing up ) seems set to be the biggest and most extravagant of the lot. His neighbours include Conrad Black just up the street and almost directly across the street is Gordon Lightfoot’s place. Starting price for a house on that street is about $15M……….So, there is obviously some money in them “streams” !

Does anyone cover famous Rap songs !


Entered at Thu Mar 30 20:19:05 CEST 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Tributes

For too many years too many people never heard of or forgot about The Band.Today us hard core fans bemoan all the lousy tributes & tribute bands & tours dedicated to The Band.Better to be forgotten?Better to be imperfectly remembered?


Entered at Thu Mar 30 17:52:54 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Right now there is a show about to happen titled "Brooklyn Is The Band." You can imagine how ridiculous & offensive I find the title of the show. I linked it.

It's at Brooklyn Bowl.

They're doing another Brooklyn Is The Band show in August with The Midnight Ramble Bad. I still think the title used to promote the show is ridiculous & offensive.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 16:47:58 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: covering The Band

Hi, no worries Kevin... different strokes etc. I think this debate about substandard performances of Band songs has gone on as long as this guestbook has existed... Rick Danko himself certainly got some rough reviews here circa the mid-to-late 90s. The Mavis clip takes time to get going but for me the spirit is very much there in the end.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 15:58:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

However rough the bar band, I am thrilled when they do The Weight or any Band song. No, they won't do it as well as The Band did, but who cares? It's live, it's in the room. On which Simone Felice doing I Shall Be Released has been superb every time I've seen it.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 15:27:18 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Covers and tributes

I too appreciate creative efforts by artists/ performers to cover music on record and perform on stage. Of course, its not aways up to standard for some. I agree with Bob F that music is kept alive in this way. A good example is the continued delivery by orchestras of classical works by the likes of Beethoven and Mozart etc. That music would have disappeared long ago if not for the recreation of that music by contemporary performances on record and in the music halls. The example of the blues is excellent proof of what the result is when current performers bring to the forefront music that is almost forgotten or has never been appreciated by many.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 14:55:05 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Personally I love when I go to a show and hear a Band song. Happens all the time around here. The Weight is usually performed as a celebration. What is going to keep The Band songs alive for future generations is other artists performing the songs. I would imagine this is how young fans of groups like Morning Jacket hear Band music for the first time. They go home after the show hit you tube and eventually end up at the source. Similar to what English bands did for the blues back in the day.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 13:01:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just had a mental picture of Jimmy Page hanging around in guitar shops demanding performance fees from everyone who plays Stairway to Heaven.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 09:33:22 CEST 2017 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Kevin: A case like what you describe is rarely brought and even more rarely won, and parody like what Weird Al Yankovic does is expressly legally protected. Weird Al himself has a policy of asking the subjects of his parodies for permission, but that is purely voluntary on his part and is not required by law. Jimmy Page couldn't stop anyone from recording Stairway to Heaven any more than you or I could.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 05:18:07 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: retreads

Kevin & Wallsend: whether RR could refuse more live performances of The Weight or not, your larger point's well-taken. I'd agree, at least re: that particular version from '14 somebody linked, Mavis' voice is not at all what it was. But then, who of us are. In fact the only voice from that was (I think it was ) Michael MacDonald. I've commented here before how much Gregg struggles in the present days; it made good sense to me that Derek & Warren Haynes called a halt to the Allbros. Of course, w/ no Butch now, it'll never be again. I suspect these collapsing voices are common at some age. Listening to Jackson Browne from that Wild Honey shindig in LA or even a couple of years back in NYC singing Running on Empty... voice is not well-aged, just worn.

Puts me in mind, despite well-deserved accolades upon his demise, that having seen James Cotton about 7 or 8 years ago, he barely made it through an hour in a pretty small venue. Perhaps he really was just under the weather that night; as I recall he hardly played the harp atall. It was a bummer evening, I know that. But it also puts in mind of Levon's comments about what else would he want to do. Like they mineswell just put him jail if he couldn't play music. Or Dr. John saying you mineswell be "selling shoes" or something else if you take these folks away from instruments, microphones and the like. Probably applies to Mavis.

Not be sacreligious, but honestly the bloom's been off The Weight for me for a while, at least compared to TNTDODD, King Harvest, Life is, Makes no Diff, Cripple Creek, probably another 5 or 6. I compare it to Allbros "Rambling Man" or say "Every Breathe you Take", just way overplayed. I would say TLW-40 at least had 1st rate musicians w/ Haynes, MacDonald, Don Was, etc. So far that Wild Honey show seems like the heft of the people never played these songs before. Certainly scrimped on rehearsals, at least to these novice ears.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 03:49:13 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Not really true Dave - an artist can prevent/block a recording or performance if one makes the case that such a performance will be damaging to the original work of art. Prince and J. Page have been successful for years in blocking that curly haired Weird Al from performing their songs......


Entered at Thu Mar 30 03:35:44 CEST 2017 from (64.229.14.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dave H: True - however much we might wish it was otherwise.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 03:26:01 CEST 2017 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

It's not legally possible to prevent other people from performing or recording a song once it has been released.


Entered at Thu Mar 30 00:19:03 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: It Ain't Over Yet

Bob F: Belated thanks for the mentions of Rodney Crowell and NPR. I've been having some fun adding RC songs to my collection.

Jon: No offence taken about your link I hope......I'll open or read anything you post such is my respect for your tastes.....but hearing guitarists screw up the intro o The Weight gets me every time !


Entered at Wed Mar 29 21:09:36 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Naked honesty

Bob F: With that kind of naked honesty what more can be said about the human condition.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 20:35:41 CEST 2017 from (114.75.199.62)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I agree about The Weight and the ban should also be extended to all reenactments of the The Last Waltz. I understand why Robbie doesn't want to have anything to do with them.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 20:03:01 CEST 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Stop The Weight

A part of me wishes Robbie or publisher holder Bob Dylan would pull a Jimmy Page (Page refuses to allow other artists to record and even strongly discourages performances by others of “Stairway To Heaven”) and ban all future performances of “The Weight”…….the once out of this world great Mavis Staples doesn’t have much of a voice left and her screaming at this point is hard to take ( oh, what glorious soul she once demonstrated on everything she sang ) but NO EXCUSE for her guitarist to not even have bothered to learn the song properly………like chalk on the blackboard that performance was.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 19:35:24 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: JT's recommendation - Mount Eerie A Crow Looked At Me

Mount Eerie's very sad beautiful new record is on NPR First Listen along with some songs from Triplicate plus Aimee Mann's and Rodney Crowell's new records.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 19:31:17 CEST 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Alias

As noted, Jack Frost, Elston Gunn, Blind Boy Grunt and Robert Zimmerman will all meet in an intimate setting in Stockholm. The speech....see my previous entries today.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 19:30:29 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NWC

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: "Who's gonna throw that Minstrel Boy a coin?"

... but not a word from Mr. Dylan of taking Nobel Prize money 8.000.000 Swedish crowns (but maybe later?).


Entered at Wed Mar 29 18:50:43 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Nortwest

Subject: The lead singer of The Golden Chords

From the blog of the Secretary of the Swedish Academy:

"The good news is that the Swedish Academy and Bob Dylan have decided to meet this weekend. The Academy will then hand over Dylan’s Nobel diploma and the Nobel medal, and congratulate him on the Nobel Prize in Literature. The setting will be small and intimate, and no media will be present; only Bob Dylan and members of the Academy will attend, all according to Dylan’s wishes.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 17:56:08 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Mavis and friends -- The Weight, 2014

Mavis Staples and a lot of other familiar faces performing The Weight. (Stay to the end...)


Entered at Wed Mar 29 16:40:21 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: $$$

It might cost you multi bucks.


Entered at Wed Mar 29 16:38:57 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Oscar Wilde says....

Mind you: “There's only one thing worse than mailing it in, and that is not mailing it in”

as per Oscar Wilde


Entered at Wed Mar 29 16:35:52 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 'Mail It In'

Weather it is sporting events, music events, or speeches... sometimes the athlete(s)/performer(s) 'mail it in'.


Entered at Tue Mar 28 15:48:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1966 albums

As well as Blonde on Blonde and Revolver, 1966 saw The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds, which also does well in those critics polls of polls. Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme? Not their best, but still a contender. Add Aftermath by The Rolling Stones. Otis Blue was a 1966 hit, but a 1965 release.

Add "The Small Faces" (first LP - in the Top 5 for weeks), Autimn 66 by Spencer Davis Group, Blues Breakers by John Mayall with Eric Clapton.

Sinatra did well in he UK charts in 1966 … better than the previous few years.

However, there are three consistently in "Best Albums Of All Times" lists … Pet Sounds, Blonde on Blonde and Revolver.


Entered at Tue Mar 28 15:36:32 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Mount Eerie, Phil Elverum, The Microphones (in another life)

Check out Mount Eerie (Phil Elverum) formerly The Microphones with a body of work which is highly regarded. Under the radar for many years but I predict, not for long, with his latest release. A new 'find' for me. I love when this happens.


Entered at Tue Mar 28 10:53:23 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Studs Terkel - Bob Dylan

I came across this interview of Bob Dylan by Studs Terkel from 1963.


Entered at Tue Mar 28 08:57:59 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

My maternal grandmother, who did suffer from arthritis---in her right knee--called it "Art-ristis". She wasn't too hung up on formalities. Also, being Italian, she didn't pronounce her "th" properly. : )


Entered at Tue Mar 28 05:30:50 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.63)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Arthuritis is how Fred Sanford used to say it. As he held his hands in wide open grasping fashion.


Entered at Tue Mar 28 03:08:57 CEST 2017 from (64.229.14.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: My Canadian-born father-in-law always called it 'arturitis'. He also said 'chimuney' - but not 'filum', as some do.


Entered at Mon Mar 27 19:24:59 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Re: Garth at Wild Honey Orchestra show

George's link of Garth solo led me to this clip -- a very funky King Harvest from the same show with some terrific vocals by Terry Reid. Give it a try!


Entered at Mon Mar 27 18:21:33 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: My Brilliant friend

We spent yesterday at Elena Ferrante's My Brilliant Friend in its new stage version (linked), Nearly five hours of drama with superb "found music" on the sound track. In the interval between the two acts of the first play, they played most of the "Please Please Me" LP to set the time frame. BUT in the next part they had All The Way by Frank Sinatra in close juxtaposition with Blowing In The Wind by Bob Dylan. Both sounded absolutely superb in the theatre. But I quietly thought, well, Sinatra couldn't have sung Blowing In The wind like Bob. And … well … guess!


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:52:05 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: correction:' Parsley, Sage...'

Sorry: 'Parsley, Sage...' did not even get a nomination though it came out that year.


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:49:25 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 'Blonde on Blonde' vs A 'Man and His Music'

I just reviewed Grammy Awards 1967. (for recordings of 1966). Frank Sinatra's ' A Man and His Music' won Record of the Year.

The absolute irrelevance of this award (and probably many others in the creative arts IMO) was demonstrated that year. 'Blonde on Blonde' is nowhere to be seen in any category. 'Revolver' (Beatles) and 'Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme' (S&G) appeared on nominee lists but did not win. History has not been kind to the Grammy Awards selections often. This is a flagrant example of the forces and politics that overcome art when the voting occurs. Nothing against the winner, but 'Blonde on Blonde' is arguably one of the greatest records not only of that year but of the half century.

The sad truth is that not much has changed.


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:23:51 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Artistic human spirit

What more is needed to demonstrate the human spirit than witnessing (even on You Tube) the continued commitment of Garth and Maud Hudson, 2 people who are living the health impacts of aging, but thumb their noses at this adversity and push ahead with their art with fervour. Amazing!


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:23:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Roll Over Beethoven

I always heard "got the arthur-itus sitting down by the …" in the Beatles version. I transcribed it to learn at the time, though I later bought the Chuck Berry sheet music which may interfere with memory. I think the issue is that the Beatles, like my mum and my grandma, called it "arthur - itus" not "arthritis." It's not going to be regional, because we have Liverpool, Wales and Dorset all in there … I guess it's kind of "medically ignorant." I've often heard an "ur" sound in the middle in Britain.


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:03:03 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Sister Maud rips it up

Well, she broke my heart...


Entered at Mon Mar 27 16:00:37 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Paul Shaffer was a guest on the WTF podcast. He mentioned Robbie Robertson (towards the end of the show).

Also I noticed (a couple of posts below this) that I was included as one of the performers at The Concert Against Landmines amongst the likes of Jewel, Sarah McLachlan and Lisa Loeb. One of my finer moments on stage. Rock'n Roll....it's a crazy life. ; )


Entered at Mon Mar 27 11:01:11 CEST 2017 from (86.128.183.128)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Thanks, Bob

When Bob comes to Scotland, it's difficult to get tickets. I'm no longer willing to go through the pointless effort of going on line and phoning to try to get tickets, when Ticketmaster has sold them in bulk to sister companies, then raised the prices. Now Westminster is investigating their practices.

We have a beautiful concert hall with beautiful acoustics and I have enjoyed seeing people like John Martyyn, Gordon Lightfoot, Burt Baccharach, Ray Davies, Van Morrison etc in this hall. Nearly always able to get tickets.

I like the Dylan folk albums also, but I prefer 'Good As I Been To You'. I like the guitar playing on these albums - lovely tone, if that is the word. I also really liked 'Another Self Portrait'.

But this is the home of folk, with the bonus of Irish bands being a short flight away. Remember Bob stayed with the late Scottish singer and academic, Jean Redpath, in Greenwich village back in the day. Dylan knows his Burns and he has a home in the Highlands.

There are great Scottish folk albums and for me the yardstick of brilliance is Jock Tamson's Bairns, who no longer play. (nothing of note on You Tube.) Just now, I'm playing 'The Ornamental Tree' by Bert Jansch. Absolutely brilliant.

I've linked the song 'No Gods and Precious Few Heroes' by Brian McNeill, song by Dick Gaughan. This is a brilliant protest song, whose words may be lost on you. Popular, long before the independence debate. I go and see him, whenever I can.

I play Dylan's American songbook albums. I think the songs are treated well. But I'm not going to get the next releases. Two albums are enough. I think the songs have good lyrics, but I have the Nilsson album and Frank's greatest hits. There was a boom in Frank about ten years ago. I went to see Dionne Warwick about twenty years ago. She battered through her hits in ten minutes, then we got The american Songbook. No encore. Just a thing artists seem to have to do.

Hope Roseann is doing well.


Entered at Mon Mar 27 00:41:58 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Dunc, the show you saw in 1999 had a really great song selection. I recollect I've seen him three times in clubs. Toads Place in New Haven, The Supper Club in NYC and The Chance in Poughkeepsie. The first two were great. I think I lost some of my hearing at The Chance show. Way to loud.

I love how Dylan mentioned Amy Winehouse when asked in the interview what he's been listening to.

I've been listening to Triplicate song selections on NPR the past couple days. It sounds much stronger then Shadows In The Night or Fallen Angels. Once Upon A Time is really really beautiful. Similar to how World Gone Wrong was stronger then Good As I Been To You. For me anyway, though I liked both folk records a lot.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 23:10:41 CEST 2017 from (23.241.116.216)

Posted by:

George

Location: Los Angeles
Web: My link

Subject: Garth at Wild Hney B nefit

I attended the Wild Honey benefit in Glendale last night and was a thrill to see and hear Garth play though was disappointed overall by the concert. There are a number of videos posted on YouTube. I added link to Garth piano solo.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 21:40:31 CEST 2017 from (108.2.161.170)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives

Subject: Chuck Berry's Elegant Diagnostics

RIP, Chuck Berry!

Late coming here, as usual. But, speaking of Berry's lyrics, there's a line in "Roll Over Beethoven" that cover versions get wrong-- at least The Beatles' version.

It's in the verse that begins "I got the rockin' pneumonia / I need a shot of rhythm and blues..."

The Beatles follow this with "I caught the rollin' off a writer / Sittin' down by the rhythm review".

[FWIW, I sometimes hear "writer" as "rider". Not to put too fine a point on it, but "writer" seems incongruous here. It conjures up an image of a teenage dance show from that era, with perhaps J.D. Salinger sitting in an audience of frenzied adolescents and quietly taking notes.]

In any case, Berry wrote/sang "I caught the rollin' arthritis, etc."

As usual, Berry's lyric is elegantly simple; the "rollin' arthritis" thematically complements the "rockin' pneumonia". Because, you know, if one sits down after feverishly dancing with rockin' pneumonia, one is susceptible to stiffening up and catching the rollin' arthritis.

But I don't blame The Beatles for getting this wrong. Berry pronounces "arthritis" in a characteristic Southern way, which sounds like a cross between "arthur-itis" and "author-itis".

Maybe that "author" inflection was subconsciously translated to "writer", eh? ;)


Entered at Sun Mar 26 20:07:27 CEST 2017 from (86.128.183.128)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Enjoyed recent posts.Thanks everybody.

I was lucky only once to see Bob play a smaller venue - a few hundred in the venue. Several of the numbers were acoustic - double bass etc. I remember the concert as being brilliant and quiet. Even the electric numbers. And, the place was rocking, when it was meant to be.

Here was set list that evening.

You're Gonna Quit Me (Acoustic)

Mr. Tambourine Man (Acoustic)

Mama, You Been on My Mind (Acoustic)

Masters of War (Acoustic)

4th Time Around (Acoustic)

Tangled Up in Blue (Acoustic)

Watching the River Flow

Just Like a Woman

Tough Mama (Slow version)

Simple Twist of Fate

Stuck Inside of Mobile With the Memphis Blues Again

Make You Feel My Love

Highway 61 Revisited

Encore:

Love Sick

Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat

Don't Think Twice, It's All Right (Acoustic)

Like a Rolling Stone

The other 6 Dylan concerts I have seen were in vast non descript places around the Glasgow area. I still felt glad I had attended the concerts.

I'm still on that journey that I wrote about several months ago, playing Dylan albums a few times in a row. (My Dylan journey started with buying the single, Lay Lady Lay). I marvel at where the words come from, but we all agree he is a genius. And there are, as others have pointed out, some truly great songs in the last twenty years.

What I would like to see, is a concert with Bob singing, playing acoustic guitar and harmonica; a double bass; a quiet, restrained lead guitar - nobody that needs to make a statement; a drummer like the drummer in Pentangle, quiet, thoughtful - no battering cymbals; and Garth on keyboards, moving from piano to accordion to organ to meet the needs of the song.

That's what I would like to see, and I know it works because I saw similar once. Oh, and I'd be happy with that set that I saw about 1999.

Keep on posting please, this is my default music site. Thanks everybody.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 19:31:51 CEST 2017 from (213.205.194.216)

Posted by:

Peter v

Last time 45 minutes late, time before 25 minutes


Entered at Sun Mar 26 19:16:25 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: On time

Kevin: Correct. Dylan starts on time. Lots of structure at Dylan concerts. I


Entered at Sun Mar 26 19:03:05 CEST 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dream Set-lists

Ha, twice for "Baby Stop Crying", eh......blame it on the backslash n's. Halfway through the list, I could barely see straight..........I do remember thinking about two of my all time favourite album closers "Where are you Tonight" which I did list and also ""Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight" from Infidels which I didn't......."What about that millionaire with the drumsticks in his pants?/He looked so baffled and bewildered/When he played and we didn't dance"

Starting times: correct me if I am wrong JT, but my memory is that the last 5 or 6 times I have seen Bob Dykan live, he has started on the dot right at 8:00pm


Entered at Sun Mar 26 18:45:49 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: What does it take?(utopian)

What does it take?

1. To sell concert tickets properly with first come/first serve and no favouritism

2. To use venues with seats assigned to the purchaser

3. To start on time (within 10 minutes of announced start time)

4. To respect those in the audience and the performer as she/he performs

Utopian thoughts and why I only go to small venues now. All of these positive attributes happened in the Jones/Peyroux concert.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 17:47:03 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: DYLAN LIVE

There have been a few official "DYLAN LIVE" compilations over the years. These are the ones that come to mind

About 10 years ago, PBS did one entitled "BOB DYLAN CLASSICS LIVE" (Columbia/Legacy) with tracks covering 1964 to 2003. It was given away "free" when you bought other PBS products.

BBC Radio 2, in October 2007, broadcast a one-hour programme they called "DREAM DYLAN LIVE" with tracks from 1963 to 2000.

And there was the 2001 Japan-only release with the convoluted title, "Bob Dylan Live 1961 - 2000 : Thirty-nine years of great concert performances". Just four of the sixteen tracks were from regular Dylan albums; the rest were either from compilations, promos and the like or were previously unreleased at the time. Something like that anyway.I play the latter quite often and, if you don't have the album, it is well worth seeking out.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 10:10:00 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kevin, I was delighted to see Baby Stop Crying in your set, though twice is excessive. My personal set would have Changing of The Guard and Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) too … which means a totally different band to the current one.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 10:07:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dream Dylan concert

And START ON TIME. I don't want to stand in a sweaty crowd for 20 minutes after the start time then have the lights go down and stand in pitch darkness all the way through Fanfare for The Common Man on the PA … then when it ends, no crisp start, but people wandering on and fiddling about, so the first note is 45 minutes or more late. Unprofessional. But then he is.

As I say, the Royal Shakespeare Company with a cast of thirty-two plus six musicians can start on time to the minute every night.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 10:01:42 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dreams

Good opener, JT … I once saw Bob open with Absolutely Sweet Marie and it worked a dream. I think one should plan in an acoustic solo set in the middle, though ideally he wouldn't be allowed to touch an electric guitar at all. Stick to acoustic rhythm guitar throughout for Bob.

Also, at least a ten piece band with backing singers, two keyboards, percussion as well as drums, and get Roscoe Beck, Leonard Cohen's bass player as bass player (JD's dream band didn't have a bass player) and more importantly as MD, and also Leonard Cohen's entire sound crew. Let Roscoe Beck deal with all the arrangements and rehearsals too. Go for perfect sound at every venue sending out a team to analyse each hall in advance… as James Taylor, Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen, Jackson Browne do, to name but four. Dylan might realise he'd never heard himself sounding that good.

If there are three encores, I'd follow the Paul Simon route. Second encore has to be Like A Rolling Sone. Massive dancing in the aisles, brings the house down, then go out for the third encore solo with acoustic guitar and do something old and very well-known and gentle … like Don't Think Twice (my first choice) or She Belongs To Me or If You See Her, Say Hello. Works for Paul Simon (Sounds of Silence usually, but Homeward Bound sometimes).

Also don't screw about with the encores, waiting off stage for five minutes etc. Just get on with them, as Van Morrison does.

Visions of Johanna would be the centrepiece of the solo acoustic set … unless you can get Robbie along for an electric version. No one else would do.

We all know he could easily do virtually nothing from the last thirty years and please audiences much more.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 05:37:01 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Small gigs

Merle Haggard in a Bakersfield bowling alley on a hot Saturday afternoon, 1970. A repeat: Telly master Bill Kirchen in a Denver bowling alley, 1999.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 04:44:47 CEST 2017 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Hey Zimmy, how about this one?

from the 70s: it's the old, obscure B-side "Rita May"


Entered at Sun Mar 26 03:16:07 CEST 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Good One Kevin and a major omission

I can't believe I forgot 'Visions". Well done, Kevin. I purposefully avoided the newer albums, predicting in my mind that this would happen.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 03:12:30 CEST 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

My Bob Dylan dream set, off the top of my head, would rely much less on the tired old ones andfocus more on the underperformed and more contemporary:

1. Summer Days

2. Mississippi

3. Someday Baby

4. Let me Die in My Footsteps

5. Baby Stop Crying

6. I'll Remeber You

7. Jokerman

8.The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar

9. Brownsville Girl

10. Baby Stop Crying

11. I and I

12. Working Man Blues

13. Angelina

14. I Threw It All Away

15. You're a Big Girl

16. Where Are You Tonight

Encores

17. Visions of Johanna

18. Tangled Up in Blue

19. Like a Rolling Stone


Entered at Sun Mar 26 03:00:04 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Small gigs. Steve Holley is playing drums with a band in a pizza restaurant in Brooklyn on Sunday. Yes, Steve Holley from Wings. Pizza restaurants have become very popular the last few years. They're different from pizza places, or as we used to call them growing up, pizza parlors. Pizza places sold by the slice, or pie, & also served food. These pizza restaurants are real restaurants, not slice joints, & the tables & decor are fancier, even if in a rustic way..


Entered at Sun Mar 26 01:53:18 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Ladies and Gentlemen, Dylan does the (Great) American Song Book|

Ladies and Gentlemen: Live At The Air Canada Centre: Bob Dylan does the Great American Song Book. Dooby dooby doo. Wiggle Wiggle, Tweedle Dum an Tweedle Dee indeed.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 01:45:20 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Covering Dylan

And if I were doing a 'cover Dylan' set, I would include Jason and the Scorchers, Lone Justice, The Byrds, McGuiness Flint etc, The Band, Joan Baez, Adele, And de Franco, Guns 'n. Roses, Barb Jungr. There are many more but these are some of the good ones with good cuts.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 01:35:23 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: False advertising....and Bob Dylan

A big ad campaign started today on Toronto radio stations......"Bob Dylan and his band at Air Canada Centre" the voice in the ad blares out and as the promo is going on we are treated to 5 or 6 classic Dylan songs....all rockers......No mention at all that the great man will largely not be playing his own songs on tour.......and this strikes me as unfair bordering on cruel to the Billy's and Betty's in places like Saskatoon and Kingston, Ontario who have decided this is there one chance to see the great Bob Dylan.......booking into smaller venues suitable to this subdued lounge presentation and advertising it as such would have been the honourable thing to do.....Sadly not the route taken.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 01:36:10 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Dream set options

Of course, folks, we could do multiple dream sets with all different songs and no one would complain.


Entered at Sun Mar 26 01:29:34 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Dream Set Dylan

Here is my Dylan dream set.

1. Absolutely Sweet Marie

2. Desolation Row

3. Hurricane

4. Positively Fourth Street

5. Trying To Get To Heaven

6. Every Grain Of Sand

7. All Along The Watchtower

8. It Takes A Lot To Laugh,...Cry

9. Stuck Inside of Mobile..Again

10.Gates Of Eden

11.Chimes Of Freedom

12.Fourth Time Around

13.Gotta Serve Somebody

14.Isis

15.Tangled Up In Blue

16.Like A Rolling Stone

Encore

17. Series of Dreams

18.Times They Are A' Changin'


Entered at Sun Mar 26 00:10:00 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: It's all good

Bob F: I agree: I prefer but will not boycott. It's all good. Some is just preferable.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 21:13:28 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

John makes good points for sure. It's hard to love everything an artist does. Though I kind of loved everything Dylan did for the last 50 years, The Sinatra stuff not so much. Many folks jumped off the Slow Train when Dylan went Gospel. I thought that was one of his greatest periods and the 2nd best band he ever played with. I'll always buy the records and get out and see some shows but I'll be hoping for more Blind Willie Mctell and less Fly Me To The Moon.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 19:10:07 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great band there, John D. But who gets the drum seat? Steve Gadd or Jim Keltner?


Entered at Sat Mar 25 15:45:23 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Clarity

The wisdom of John D. Read this post many times. Then listen to the radio (CIUT.FM) and all will come clear.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 14:51:09 CET 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject JT & Dylan

Comments:

I have to agree; with JT; regarding Mr. D. Bob has always recorded what he felt like doing at the time. Today we talk about Sinatra's songs. Back in the day he took us from a Blonde On Blonde to a Self Portrait; or a Nashville Skyline; as examples.

I knew friends who were really put off at Bob; crossing genres; which wasn't really done at that time. I've always enjoyed him jumping around in musical formats. It's not to say that I enjoyed every change he made; but it's my belief he doesn't expect you to.

At my age today, I listen to and love types of music I never would have embraced as a young man. So Bob. Record what you want. You've earned it. After Triplicate; has been done; who knows where he'll go next?

My personal dream concert ; before it's too late. Bringing back the songs of Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde On Blonde; on tour. Sing them roughly as we remember them. I say that because we know he can if he feels like it.

Oh and bring Garth Hudson, Robbie Robertson, Larry Campbell and Al Kooper for the tour. I might even go back to an arena for that! Well how about returning to Massey Hall.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 10:44:37 CET 2017 from (114.75.192.111)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Linking politics to music, there is a lot of hostility to globalisation now and I can imagine this feeding into a revived interest in local community based activity like entertainment. There is something soulless about downloading a song from iTunes or seeing a musician as part of a vast crowd. May just be wishful thinking on my part but the world has gone to an extreme and things might start swinging back the other way.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 09:12:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Small shows demonstrate how much younger talent there is a a level where you can make records but not get into big halls, and also that there are a lot of "heritage artists" who can still give a great evening's entrainment, but can no longer fill the bigger venues. There are two converted cinemas within ten miles of me (in opposite directions) that have films three days a week, then a mix of comedy, amateur drama, tribute bands and "heritage artists." They also keep busy 5 or 6 days a week, unlike a lot of more prestigious venues. They're staffed by volunteers and are community theatres. At Wimborne, Steve Cropper with great Southern charm announced that he had been treated better there by "these great volunteers" than anywhere else.

Seeing (e.g.) Judy Collins from the front row in that 500 seater was incredible … I didn't book early, but the venue said people avoided the front row because so many comedians picked on the front row. She's played there three times. The Searchers and The Manfreds do one of them every year, usually alternating the venues. Both give a first rate show too.


Entered at Sat Mar 25 00:53:04 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, I've easily seen a couple of thousand impeccable & magnificent shows with under a hundred people in the room. And anothe couple of thousand with under two hundred, & then for three hundred as well. There's great music in the clubs in NYC, & often, they're really small rooms.Big names too or rooms that hold 110, 120, & 50 people show. Same things big names. The Bitter End has small capacity, and that had the biggest names. the Bottom Line might have held three hundred, that was the same, big names, the best acts all the time. St Louis had an amazing club scene, I saw Little Milton with maybe a hundred and fifty packed into a small club, how many times Johnnie Johnson played to packed clubs that didn't hold 200 people. Bettye Lavette, same deal..... I used to no tmind goign t to the arenas for some shows, and i had a solid connection in the ebtertianment industry that often used to get me great tickets anywhere in the country. And other times i used to pay a scalper in NYC, but we're goign back to 85, 86, 87 and then 125 would get you third row center in Madison Sq Garden. I haven;t been to anything in big arenas or even medium sized halls in quite a while and i don't really feel like I'm missing anything. Shame is, that;s also a big statement about the level of entertainment.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 23:27:07 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

True, the experience of seeing Simone Felice with fewer than 100 people in a tiny club or Fay Hield & The Hurricane Party with a couple of hundred, vastly outweighs seeing ANYONE with many thousands of people in the audience, which is why "New folk" with sub-500 audiences is so rewarding.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 22:50:01 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: I don't like what's happening with tickets

When one looks at the venues (in most cases), the prices (very high by the 'entrepreneurs') and the possible seats, I can easily say that I am now in the small theatre or small venue club and if I the performer can't spit on me or if I can't see her/him sweating (as I could Rickie Lee Jones last week), then as Dylan said "I'm not there".


Entered at Fri Mar 24 22:48:09 CET 2017 from (114.75.192.111)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Eric talking about Chuck.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 22:12:21 CET 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: All the good seat are taken already.....

Scalpers are the only way in so many cases, sadly. Though the PC term for scalpers is now “ticket entrepreneur”

Thinking about the word entrepreneur…………reminds me of that classic story about Tony Blair and George W. Bush discussing economics and particularly about the problem of the declining French economy and George W just shrugged and concluded the discussion with the statement “ The problem with the French is that they don’t have a word for entrepreneur.”


Entered at Fri Mar 24 21:30:33 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JT, I fear you'll find ticket agencies have better seats at premium prices. It keeps happening … this pre-sale to agencies at high prices.

I just got Third Man Records "Vault" series … my first. A double live LP by Margo Price, plus a 45 and a DVD. The LP set includes Rodney Crowell's "I Ain't Living Long Like This."


Entered at Fri Mar 24 19:27:18 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: I'm remiss again.

Lee, I should have typed:I think God forgives you. Or: Hopefully God forgives you :-) ...:-)


Entered at Fri Mar 24 19:25:48 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, God forgives you. Me, you don't have to worry about :-).


Entered at Fri Mar 24 19:17:35 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: NO!

NO!: By the time I got through on the phone, tickets on the floor of Victoria hockey arena for row 22 at best or on the side of the arena higher up. No! The record will have to do. Kelowna midweek is impossible. NO! I'm committed but on this occasion, I'll wait until the next occasion. No has been a common conclusion today.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 19:12:39 CET 2017 from (65.92.193.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend / Peter V: If you want to know what the British will be looking back on fondly a hundred years from now, I suggest a quick scan of topics covered in the OT. I suspect you'll find more on how we won the war than on how nice it was to have sharing neighbours.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 18:54:34 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE,USA
Web: My link

Subject: Mr. Crowell

Jeff, I remiss I missed the remiss. My apologies.

Link is to a nice article on Mr. Crowell and his upcoming release, which I just ordered FROM HIM (or at least his website) on both CD and vinyl, in a package the includes a copy of the hand-written lyrics, a splurge, to be sure, as I do not have the media budget of some (cough, Viney) but having met Mr. Crowell at a show a few years back, feel a strong connection to the man and his work.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 17:58:45 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

There's many name artists who would could be making great recordings. And there are people who have great material for them. The issue is the futility of putting real money into recording & promoting music anymore. I guess it was the summer of 2004. I had pretty much just gotten back to St Louis, & this was before I recorded with Johnnie Johnson. At the last minute i heard Chris Hillman, Herb Perderen , & i think Larry Sparks played the casino in St Charles.there was no ttime to call anyone to try to get a personal connection made.. Hillman was greeting people signing autographs a little while after the show. Personally i think waiting in line to get a autograph or talk to an artist is really awkward and uncomfortable and unless you're really pushy or have a great personal connection or reference to mention to work for a later contact, it's just a odd thing to try to talk with a line up people up your tucches.. But i waited, spoke to Chris for a second, and basically just said I;m a fan forever, and i have a song i think you'd be the perfect artist for. Would you listen to it? He looked at me and said Sure, i'll give it a listen. But i don't have a record deal. Why would you be interested in me?


Entered at Fri Mar 24 17:49:12 CET 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Eternal immorality by Norbert

"ETERNITY? said Frankie Lee with a voice as cold as ice / Yes, ETERNITY, said Judas Priest, though you might call it Paradise."


Entered at Fri Mar 24 17:21:43 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Furthermore Lee, especially since Crowell might be one of the few name artists left whose recordings might be worth buying.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 17:20:06 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, why do you think I wrote "I am remiss"?
The last time i saw him was Sept 2007, i was standing next to Garth & Maud in Nashville. Chris Hillman also was one of the performers that night. Mavis Staples was there too. I'm remiss. Crowell is great.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 16:25:39 CET 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

today I met an old refugee,
and for only 2 dollar and fifty,
he handed me eternal immortality.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 16:10:51 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Rodney Crowell

Jeff! What rock are you living under? Life is Messy came out in 1992! Rodney released Tarpaper Skies in 2014! Title is a reference to the dilapidated house of his childhood. Get the book.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 14:41:39 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

John D thanks for article and link to interview. Great stuff.

Dylan has always done great versions of other writers songs going back to House of The Rising Sun.

Link is to NPR First Listen where you can hear Triplicate.

Dylan is playing Kingston NY in June. First 20 rows are $120 a ticket but are general admission .


Entered at Fri Mar 24 11:15:32 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.192)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Don't worry Peter, I was only joking. You shouldn't take anything I write seriously. Having said that, given Germany's history I don't think Merkel could or should have turned the refugees back. Life will go on after Brexit. No doubt after all the EU citizens leave, Brits will be lining up to fill their places in all the dead end jobs. Then people will be going on about the good old days when Britain was part of the EU.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 09:51:55 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Assigned?

Do you think Dylan has been assigned hockey arenas, or chosen to play them? It surprises me slightly, because I have complained about his insistence on all standing in Bournemouth so as to double the capacity (at full price), which is apparently his choice, but this time, in May, it's seated. I was assuming that was a nod to the type of material we should expect. We would hardly expect to jump up and down head banging and playing air guitar to Some Enchanted Evening.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 09:21:42 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent pieces there from John D, and Jeff's link to the Chuck Berry review.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 09:17:06 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All this and WW2 …

As most will know, I am extremely pro-European Union. As we saw in the terror attack in London, the victims were French, German, Spanish and American as well as British. We can only be in this together.

I’m therefore concerned that my comment about Colonel Bogey at football matches was in poor taste. I was railing against PC-ing football, but the British, French and Germans all rightly outlawed the racist chanting at black players which still follows players in Eastern Europe and even in Italy. I suppose you could take our playing of Colonel Bogey as similarly bad… but I think our 70 years of peaceful co-operation means that we should all be used to it by now. The British have never stopped watching films and series about WW2, and probably won’t, from Dad’s Army to Foyle’s War to SS/GB.

On who is leader of the free world though, that is dodgy ground. Angela Merkl’s decision to open the doors of Germany to mass immigration was done unilaterally, without consulting any other EU states, but affects us all, as once in Germany, freedom of movement means they can go anywhere. The other 26 countries weren’t asked. The right reasons? Yes, at root they were, but then estimates are that only 50% were Syrian and many from Balkan states not at war, simply joined in. Some Brexit analyses say that Merkl’s action on its own gave the anti-EU group the extra few per cent and screwed everything up.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 05:47:47 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Pete, you'll enjoy this artyicle on the new Chuck record.

I've only scanned it, but it discusses the motivations for the songs.
I tried to teach Bob Lohr how to sell home improvements back in 1982. He told me "I'm really a musician." :-)


Entered at Fri Mar 24 05:27:53 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.192)

Posted by:

Wallsend

In Australia if you are poor you hardly pay anything for health care. The American situation is really crazy.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 04:36:29 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: US health care

For the non-Americans here - Do you have to go this agro continually? It seems to me that even conservatives elsewhere are all in for a socialized system, is that valid? We could learn so much from other countries but that topic is never mentioned, maybe by Bernie -

John D - Great post!


Entered at Fri Mar 24 03:53:24 CET 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Article from Journalist & Blogger Bob Lefsetz tonight on Bob.

Won't get anybody to listen to the music. Actually, all you need to know is revealed in the answer wherein he says he listens to music on CDs. The plastic discs were supposed to be an improvement on vinyl, permanent and clear, but now the world has bifurcated, into vinyl purists and on demand streamers and if you're listening to digital discs it just proves that you're out of the loop. When did Bob Dylan become such an old fart? Then again, he's 75.

Don't get your knickers in a twist. If we can't criticize the giants we cannot push them to test the limits and exceed their previous work. We've been giving Dylan a pass for far too long. I'll piss him off, and his Grammy speech taught us he's listening, intently, and say the last great thing he did was "Things Have Changed" from the "Wonder Boys" soundtrack. It was a one-off. Which percolated in the marketplace long after the movie stiffed, even though it was quite good, better than the book, then again, Michael Chabon's one who's gotten an unjust pass himself, too much focus on the writing and too little on the plot and I'll posit his best work was his very first, "The Mysteries Of Pittsburgh," but now I'm getting so obscure and referential you might be lost. I'm doing what Dylan is doing in this interview, and it's utterly fascinating.

Getting back to the marketing element, in today's world it's so hard to gain attention that your product must be available simultaneous with the hype. Just ask Drake, who just proved it, or Beyonce. It's only old farts inured to the movie business who believe in the buildup. To tell you the truth if "Triplicate" had been on Spotify today I would have checked out some of the cuts Dylan talks about, but I won't when it's released, whenever that might be, because I will have already moved on to new stuff and Bob's disappointed me with his frog-throat voice and rearranged songs for far too long unless I hear from a trustworthy source I'm missing out. Then again, Dylan's from a previous generation, he's like God coming down from the mountaintop with the tablets, we pay attention to him, we don't need no stinking penumbra. But I'll bet your life and mine that this interview is better than the three disc set. Because that's what Bob does best, opine, give us insight into the culture. He's now lived long and is still obfuscating whilst revealing truth and instead of covering old chestnuts he should be blogging, now's when we need him most, when our country is in turmoil, we're looking for insight, we're looking for art, we're ready for his tricks. Instead he's bunting, using up his capital hyping a project that no one cares about that will be instantly forgotten, like his previous cover LPs, and if you think he doesn't care then why did he do this interview in the first place? A fake one to boot. Bill Flanagan is interviewing him but it debuts on Bob's own site? Did Flanagan even get paid? Hell, Flanagan's questions are the worst part, it's Dylan's cryptic answers that intrigue. Riddled with truth and falsehood. Bob's the original Keyser Soze. We don't know what to believe, but we can't stop paying attention.

So just when we need him most, when he could put out one cut that could change the world, Dylan overloads us with irrelevant product in a world where we've got no time. How come all the old acts can't come up to speed. Not only should the release be day and date with the hype, but one track is enough, we've got time to listen to one track. And then follow it up with another not that far down the line. We're interested in what Dylan has to say, but the fawning press has been kissing his ass for so damn long that we've gone on react and are tuning his work out. Because how many times can you go to the well and find out it's dry?

Dylan makes Minnesota come alive. Cites Twin Cities bands from far after he left. Creates myths about his family and friends not knowing or caring about his appearance on "Ed Sullivan" when he was always close to his mother and even brought her to a Yetnikoff event. Bob's creating a character, who knows who he really is, and when he says he's got nothing to say and is not worthy of the hang time you either protest too much or roll your eyes and say "there he goes again," evading the punch, dancing like a butterfly while he stings us like a bee.

Yes, Dylan's still here, unlike Muhammad Ali. And his insight and chops are as sharp as ever. But he's squandering them. He refuses to reach for the stars. Refuses to write a song that will change the world. Refuses to come down off the mountaintop and interact with us in the new world. Sure, he did that XM series, but imagine Dylan on Twitter or YouTube. Imagine him writing with Drake. Imagine him risking.

Because he still cares. And he's still stuck in the old ethos, where music is everything and you're a student of the game. Bob Dylan still gives a damn, in a world where most aged acts are only about the bread, collecting cash from Live Nation when they pass Go!, and plying the boards endlessly giving people what they want. Dylan never played that game, he gave us what we needed. And what we need now more than ever is leaders who make us think for ourselves, who sharpen our vision, who get us to investigate and come up with our own conclusions, to question authority and brave the road untaken. This interview is a marvelous start, but the "Triplicate" project is a nonstarter, dead on arrival in a world where what happens in the morning is already forgotten in the afternoon and if you take chances and create greatness you can impact society, but there's no greatness in covering aged tunes, however much insight they might contain, not when your voice is ragged and nearly unlistenable. For that, you've got to write a song that's solely your own. We're waiting Bob...


Entered at Fri Mar 24 03:43:30 CET 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Academy of Music

Listening to Sebastian Robertson's mix of Live At The Academy of Music tonight. Just incredible. I really hope Pop puts him in the drivers seat again soon for his mixes of classic Band material. Think it would be refreshing.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 03:19:21 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: 00Kevin

Wait a minute now. Is Billy's Betty Biff's Used To Be?



Entered at Fri Mar 24 02:30:09 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Billy and Betty

'Imagine poor old Billy and Betty driving 300 miles to see their fave Bob Dylan...'

I know Billy and Betty and they know who they are going to see and what to expect. Jack and Diane may be unhappy /they've seen Dylan in the 60s and haven't left the 60s in their respective heads...but not Billy and Betty. They read the internet and know what is coming. Be sure of it.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 02:12:13 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.144)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, regarding your premise of Dylan's imminent danger..... if there are - Biffs & Bettys (drinking cappucino &) pretending anything -in NYC, they're tourists. Not natives.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 00:32:33 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.192)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, you may be skating on thin ice. Now Germany is the leader of the free world and your country is siding with Trump and Putin.


Entered at Fri Mar 24 00:27:29 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob Dylan Shows and 2017 tour

The last time I saw Bob Dylan was on the tour 4 years ago with Mark Knopfler opening. I saw him in Toronto on a Wednesday and then Montrral on the Friday. He was great on both nights and what made Montreal particularly exciting was that he shuffled the set list by playing 7 or 8 different songs. And especially satisfying to me was a focus on newer ( Bob Dylan ) songs. Of note, both were in the big hockey arenas but I always make sure to have perfectly situated seats in arenas or I don't go. Some venues and with some artists, just being there is ok but rarely the case. You have to have a good scalper and be willing to pay the price.

I think I will just keep the memories those last two shows left with me ( and not purchase tickets for these Cabadaian shows ) and also remember very fondly the mid 80's shows and the great return to form shows of late 90's - early 2000's. The last shows with Larry Campbell were just great. Only complaint from the Knopfler tour was after Mark left the stage after about song 5 of the Dylan set, I didn't really hear guitar for the rest of the night !


Entered at Thu Mar 23 23:49:36 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Hockey arenas and other such

I'm not a big fan of hockey arenas for concerts. In both cases, both here in Victoria and in Toronto, Mr. Dylan has been assigned to these venues. I agree that this is not the best place to hear him and this type of material. Somehow, Leonard Cohen managed to make Victoria's Save-On Centre (this hockey arena) more intimate. The sound system was superb and helped greatly. My last experience with Bob Dylan at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto was less than adequate.

For Toronto, a successful Dylan concert was during the Unplugged period (90s) when he appeared at what was then The Masonic Temple on Yonge St. at Davenport Rd. We sat on the floor there and it was great. The CNE grandstand was a disaster (with Carlos Santana) but the concert at Canada's Wonderland (when Paul James briefly appeared) was great. The best clearly has been Massey Hall and that is true both times I saw him there.

I have to decide what to do before tomorrow when tickets go on sale.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 22:25:57 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Fawlty Towers

The famous extract … (linked)


Entered at Thu Mar 23 22:22:09 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Colonel Bogey

You have to laugh. Apparently the Germans have protested about English behaviour at last night’s friendly soccer match. The English fans sang “inappropriate songs” as they have done every single game for the last seventy years. The main culprit s Colonel Bogey where it is played as an instrumental, but everyone knows that the lyrics are. It was whistled in the film Bridge Over The River Kwai.

Hitler has only got one ball

Göring has two but very small

Himmler is very sim'lar

But poor old Goebbels has no balls at all

As Hitler’s testicular inadequacy appears to be fact rather than fiction, I think the world has to learn to live with the English fans’ inalienable right to sing this ditty when playing Germany.

Reference: Fawlty Towers: The Germans.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 22:16:51 CET 2017 from (84.209.146.1)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Garth last night :-)


Entered at Thu Mar 23 21:14:31 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

One of the more ridiculous trends for the rock star was being conviced they should make jazz albums - remember that one ? A bunch of self taught limited players thinking they could play jazz. Hilarious, but it happened..........here's a key point. Bob Dylan would never have emerged from the folk scene and become a global superstar had he not written his own songs. The songwriting was the key for him and in an overwhelming way as he didn't have a voice or performance charisma to distinguish himself above others in the same way a Rod Stewart or Tom Jones did.

Even if Rod the Mod had never written an original song, does anyone doubt he would have emerged as some sort of major star? Rod even managed the impossible task of taking a brilliant Paul McCartney song and performance (Maybe I'm Amazed) and substantially improving it. Sadly, by the time Rod got to the Ameriican Songbook project, his glorious voice had long been shot and everything sounded thin and uninspired.

Bottom line: The only reason I ever bought a Leonard Cohen album was to hear songs written by Leonard Cohen. Same with Bob Dylan. Same with Robbie Robertson. Another brilliant writer with limited vocal chops........Had Rick Danko done a Hank Williams or Frank Sinatra album - I would have bought it......but Robbie ? Why?



Entered at Thu Mar 23 20:24:49 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

...another rub is Bob Dylan booking himself into the Air Canada Centre in Toronto to present an intimate lounge act. Fine if that is what is making him happy these days but staging this kind of show in a massive 18,000 seating hockey arena might make financial sense but no other sense.

Chuck Berry: A funny part of the Deluxe Hail Hail Rock n Roll was the producers revealing that Chuck insisted on being paid for every interview segment and every performance he did for his own documentary !


Entered at Thu Mar 23 20:22:37 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Covers

Where is the line between covers, standards and tributes? The concept of "covers" only came about after the writer became the singer, no? Up to then, with rare exceptions, writers wrote and singers sang. (OK, for the sake of argument, let's ignore Pat Boone.) Elvis did not write, nor did the popular singers of his (early) days. Exceptions, of course...Buddy Holly comes to mind. But the Beatles and Dylan kicked down the door to writers performing their own material.

The Jazz mainstream is based on "covering" standards. An exceptional performer puts their own spin on it. (See Coltrane, John, "My Favorite Things") Or in a less radical vein, Ella Fitzgerald, any (or all!) of her 'Songbook' series.

Even playing songs in more or less the same feel and structure of the original has its place. People like hearing what they know. Live music beats a beat-box IMO.

Note-for-note tribute bands have been discussed here. Something like Warren's TLW shows are real, loving tributes, celebrating the music and performers that made that one-time event special, down to gathering together simpatico artists on one stage. But nobody's putting on fake Garth beards (oh, wait, that IS Garth) or pink scarves and trying to make you think you are reliving the actual event.

Given how many people have "covered" and sometimes butchered Bob's music (sometimes Bob himself), why not let him try his hand at interpreting others? Granted, three plus records in a row is a bit trying, but there is certainly enough of the "old" Dylan in circulation if you want it.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 20:18:19 CET 2017 from (24.114.56.99)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: steals across the meadows of my heart

Peter V: Nice, but I prefer the Bonzos' "In the wardrobe of my soul, in the section labelled 'shirts'".


Entered at Thu Mar 23 19:13:35 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.192)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I recall when Chuck visited New Zealand in the 1970s he got paid for a couple of shows and skipped the country without doing them. When asked about this he said in the past he had been ripped off by lots of 'whitey' promoters so he thought it was OK to rip them off. He probably had plenty of reasons to be bitter but not a good way to increase your fan base. Whatever grievances he had, it had nothing to do with people in New Zealand.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 19:03:00 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.213)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

"putting the full commitment of their ability into what they do" need not mean some one has not been able to shut off emotional involvement. And of course, he can say something that might vary in reality. But the 86 or 87 Robert Hilburn interview prior to release of Hail Hail Rock & Roll seemed pretty forthright.And not inconsistent with his autobiography.

Of course, bullshit gets presented Pete . I don't want to get deep into this But Now, out of nowhere, some one close tried to present that Chuck was a excellent blues piano player. That piano was his first instrument & he was adept. The next jump was well, that explains his songs being in piano keys & chords a pianist would choose. No shit....Well, all these years, don't you think people, especially in St Louis would know if Chuck was a mean piano player?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 18:46:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Life's A Trippy Thing

Quote: "My "pot" is full of flowers, my "grass" is bright and green …"

How did kids in 1966 feel about being lectured on substance abuse by someone who consumed whisky by the pint?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 18:43:24 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Life's A Trippy Thing

Link to "Life's A Trippy thing" from the LP "Nancy in London" (I have a copy). I think the feeling behind lyrics of the duet just about sum up Frank Sinatra. (Nice production though). Is this one Bob will be covering, I wonder?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 18:13:12 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.192)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Robbie on Chuck.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 18:05:40 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“His kind of music is deplorable, a rancid smelling aphrodisiac. It fosters almost totally negative and destructive reactions in young people.” — Frank Sinatra, 1956.....on Elvis

"Rock 'n Roll: The most brutal, ugly, desperate, vicious form of expression it has been my misfortune to hear " - Frank Sinatra on R n R in general

Yet as Sinatra got older and had less and less people around him ( if any at all ) to say NO he took a swing at Rock music himself.......now we have Bob Dylan with it seems absolutely no one around him to say NO and what we have is a vanity project which while not quite being embarrassing is disappointing. Especially as this has gone on for 3 albums now and especially as he insists on making his live shows all about the "great American songbook".........Jumping Jesus, he is doing 20 something shows in Canada this summer in all sorts of remote places......Imagine poor old Billy and Betty driving 300 miles to see their fave Bob Dylan playing a shithole broken down hockey arena in Saskatoon and being treated to 15 Sinatra songs......Run for your life Bobby, this ain't Manhatten or Toronto where the Biff's and Betty's drink cappuccino's and will at least pretend they like what your playing...


Entered at Thu Mar 23 16:25:13 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Chuck Berry: I don’t think we can judge what any musician’s emotional involvement was by what they tell journalists. We know that after the mid-60s, mostly back-up groups were just “who’s the cheapest?” Often it worked because I know of musicians who backed him for way less than their going rate just to play with him. We know he demanded money up front, declined to rehearse or even tune his guitar. Then the Robbie interview showed his deep love for words, and he found a medium.

He covered Route 66 of course, but also some deep blues. Many people will say that their ideal life would have been different, but that doesn’t stop them putting the full commitment of their ability into what they do.

And why the fuck does the autocorrect on this change THEIR to THEY'RE every time I type it?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:57:34 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Dylan speaks

Dylan to Bill Flanagan (recent interview at Dylan site)

: “These songs,” he said, “are some of the most heartbreaking stuff ever put on record and I wanted to do them justice. Now that I have lived them and lived through them I understand them better. They take you out of that mainstream grind where you’re trapped between differences which might seem different but are essentially the same. Modern music and songs are so institutionalized that you don’t realize it. These songs are cold and clear-sighted, there is a direct realism in them, faith in ordinary life just like in early rock and roll.”


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:34:08 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Emotional investment

Jeff A: Emotional investment is an interesting notion. I think when you are a kid playing and singing music, it becomes a part of you. For some, I believe it stays with you throughout your life. That Chuck Berry confirmed that this was not the case for him is not revelatory for a man who continually 'bucked the system' in his commentary. From my vantage point, this is in essence true for anyone who earns. One invests oneself both in the enterprise and in the reward and both matter.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:29:00 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.213)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Chuck Berry's personal favorite music was from the big band era & the crooners. Nat King Cole, Bing Crosby. He always claimed that in his case Rock & Roll was only a way to buy a home, then many properties. It was only a way to amass wealth, he had no emotional investment in the music at all.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:26:17 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 'Steals across the meadows of my heart'

Interesting: 'Steals across the meadows of my heart' hits me hard and stands up as a lyric with authority.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:22:29 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lyrics

One dimension is lyrics here. Blues, and original folk had lyrical concerns, and narrative impact. Dylan, Simon, Cohen all picked up on that. The Beatles did too, but only two or three years in.

Let’s take Stardust, a pretty lyric. I’ve linked the Nat King Cole version (a it’s as good as you can get)

And now the purple dusk of twilight time

Steals across the meadows of my heart

High up in the sky the little stars climb

Always reminding me that we're apart

But you’re not going to find it informative, or life changing, or deep. It may well have massive emotional impact … for example I can hear my mum singing it … but it’s by association, not because of content.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:09:20 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Perspective again

Peter V: With respect, Glen Miller makes my point.

Yes, it was our 'mum and dad's music' and it will never hit us like Dylan or Beatles or Elvis (not me so much) did. But that isn't the point. Its respect for the process and how it affected those who we adopted in our time. It gives perspective and perspective is always good.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 15:06:45 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We crossed in the ether … absolutely right, JT. We should mark these horrors of totally innocent lives destroyed. I’ve walked over the same bridge many times. We usually stay on the South Bank and when we do theatres on the North Bank around Trafalgar Square, that’s one way back. Ideology is too good a word … perhaps disease or sickness describes it better.

After Berlin and Nice, are we going to have to end up with safety barriers along every pavement?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 14:57:18 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We could do the Rocket 88 / Ike Turner, or no, Louis Jordan argument about the origins of rock, and I have a good friend who can take it back to 1926. The point about Elvis is that it broke through to the world, not that he was original. Not even the first to blend blues and country.

I think Rod Stewart’s Great American Songbook albums were mentioned, and I think Rod did it better than Bob did … he hit the notes for starters. I must say since I found the Band GB, I “discovered” that I liked Hank Williams … I hadn’t before. I’ve never been persuaded on The Doors though. I do have some Sinatra original albums and CDs, and I can sit and explore the songs of that era. But even when I appreciate them, there’s still a sense of history … they’re my mum and dad’s music, not “my” music. I went to my old boss’s funeral (he was 87) and they only had Glen Miller and it sounded superb (and I always liked Glen Miller more than Sinatra).

But Bob Dylan & The Beatles (and The Band and Paul Simon) spoke to me in a way that even Elvis didn’t. Chuck Berry stood out because his UK commercial breakthrough was in the wake of The Beatles, so more in my era. And Eddie Cochran, The Everly Brothers and Buddy Holly were way more played by me than Elvis, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins or Johnny Cash. Maybe there’s a “Class of 55/56” versus “Class of 58 / 59” division even in those early rockers.

Dylan was the poet of my generation, unreservedly the “Shakespeare of the late 20th century.” The first of the best. It grates hearing him doing the stuff I yawned at the BBC Light Programme too. However much I’ve learned to appreciate what Sinatra did, he was an ageing swinger with Mafia connections who never wrote his own stuff.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 14:34:34 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: The Earth

Subject: Tragedy

Other than music: Not the forum for this, but the tragedy of London should NOT go unnoticed here. It can happen anywhere, and it has. Innocents wiped out by miscreant' ideology' (and I use that term with trepidation). Rage against the machine (that heartless machine that kills indiscriminately).


Entered at Thu Mar 23 14:09:25 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Great grates

"Is there anyone out there who can honestly say they still listen to Fallen Angels or Shadows In The Night? "

I'll be the first. But not as often as I listen to 'Blonde on Blonde'.

I take your point.

Yes, those were indeed masterpieces, standing up well to the earlier material.

Bob Dylan's dips are still mountains. With his band backing him, I remain committed to his versions of The American Song Book. (The word 'great' has been used in a political context recently and it grates).


Entered at Thu Mar 23 13:40:28 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Time Out Of Mind and Love and Theft are masterpieces that can stand with any music Dylan ever made. After Love and Theft it started to feel like he was singing somebody else's words but all the original albums had something to offer including Tempest. I don't think you can lump those records up with the Sinatra cover records. After the first couple of weeks I've never gone back and listened to any of the Sinatra stuff. In the past even lesser Dylan records like Down In The Groove or Under The Red Sky received months of initial playing and never really stop getting played. I can listen to Shenandoah or Born In Times forever. Is there anyone out there who can honestly say they still listen to Fallen Angels or Shadows In The Night?


Entered at Thu Mar 23 13:08:35 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: npr Tom Moon Triplicate

or you can read Tom Moon's essay at npr where it originated, I believe.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 12:54:32 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: An essay on Triplicate

For those of you who are internet miners, go to whro.org, then put 'Triplicate' into the search square, and listen to a sampler of Triplicate (33 minutes) if you wish, but importantly, read Tom Moon's essay and why Dylan and his band and the work Dylan is now doing matters! Mr. Moon said it better that I ever could, but that's what I meant.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 12:41:18 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: ...before they close the door.

As for Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen's last decade was indeed superb and interesting. But leaving the cover albums aside, one could argue that albums like Love and Theft and Tempest stand up well. For some, the cover albums have put a damper on their interest and this has been compounded by the concerts with greatest hits being somewhat muted. Oh well. As they say in the USA. The people have spoken. But there is still a large minority... or is that a majority? In both politics and in art, interesting things happen. Even 'Heaven's Gate', a movie I admired from the get-go, is having a relook with positive results. I think we haven't heard the last of Mr. Dylan yet.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 12:29:39 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Revival and resurrection

"Before Elvis there was nothing'. Though I revere Lennon, he was wrong in this case. Robert Johnson and many other blues artists preceded Elvis. They were something. We just didn't know it until technology caught up and allowed dissemination. In my view now, Elvis and those early rockers, including Chuck Berry, stood on the shoulders of some of the great blues artists that we now revere.

This is a whole different discussion from the one we are having about 'standards' by songwriters like Gershwin and the like. The love and love lost ballads of the rock era by some of our favourite artists stand on the shoulders of the Gershwins of the era of our parents and grandparents and of all those 'seniors'. They should not be ignored and fortunately, they are being revived

One may not want or like the Dylan versions (that's OK), but the songs themselves deserve critical listening. The world of the 'cover', whether it is of old blues, old folk, or old 'standards' is an interesting world since it allows some of our favourite artists to interpret with voice and instruments. To me, it is like a director taking an old play and reviving it for the stage or an old movie and presenting it again on film.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 09:52:36 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance

Thank goodness for minority opinion, JT. I’m always interested in defences of Dylan’s later work, though I personally find most of it a bitter pill to swallow. I’ll buy Triplicate, and I’ll buy The Gospel Years … I haven’t missed an album in many decades now … fifty years in fact. The Gospel Years might have some interesting Slow Train / Shot of Love stuff live or outtakes, because they’re both listenable albums, though my loathing for Saved is extreme. The last two albums, I found myself hugely impressed that a small band could reproduce such big arrangements, but always found myself wincing when the voice came in. I’ll never stop allowing him just one more chance. I swore after the last two live shows that I’d never go to see him again, but I have a ticket to see him in May. I also just bought an interesting modern bootleg LP of Bob doing cover versions live in the 80s and 90s.

So I don’t give up, but I do complain. I’m glad that someone is justifying what he does now, But Leonard Cohen’s last decade was vastly more interesting and accomplished.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 07:47:25 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "Wow, a Rolling Stone, and we're about the same height."

Leslie Weinstein & Bobby Wachtel grew up in the same apartment building in Queens..

This is a great interview, Leslie West interviewing Waddy Wachtel.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 00:30:50 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Poor humor

Poor humor. Chuck Berris died this week.

Chuck Berry & then right away, Chuck Barris)


Entered at Thu Mar 23 00:08:36 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Agree to Disagree

JT, respectfully disagree, always. You're one of my favorite posters. For me, this music belongs to the senior citizens who came out in droves to support Trump and Make America Great Again. They can have it. John Lennon once said something like "before Elvis there was nothing" Of course that's not true and of course he knew that, but I think in this case it makes sense.


Entered at Thu Mar 23 00:00:21 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Feline

It looks like the 'Cat 'is out of the bag. Papa's got a brand new bag.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 23:57:20 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Minority opinion

Sounds like I am in the significant minority... not the first or the last time. It started when I liked Dylan and what he was doing with Levon and the Hawks in 65-66 and everyone I knew said he (and I by extension) was a traitor. Oh well. At least I'm not one of the 'deplorables'.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 23:09:05 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Worried Life Blues

Actually, looking for Chuck live clips, the irritating thing is that OK, he's miming, but he makes zero effort to pretend to be playing the guitar solo when doing so. So let's go for a clip with just a still photo. This is NOT Johnny B. Goode … for instance.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 23:01:33 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don't You lie To Me

Wallsend, you could level that at Bo Diddley, Fats Domino, Little Richard … and in all cases they had a limited range of song types, but certainly not “one song”. While Johnny B. Goode, Bye Bye Johnny and Rockin’ On The Railroad share a basis … it’s not the basis of Come On, or Brown Eyed Handsome Man, or Talkin’ Bout you or You Never Can Tell (for example).

I think Big Boys is above my expectations for a 90 year old, and I enjoyed it. Sure, I wondered if the guitar intro had been “cut and pasted” in and maybe it was, but if Chuck has recycled his major riffs and song types, I only wish Bob would start doing the same instead of doing Sinatra injustice.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 22:08:39 CET 2017 from (85.164.127.169)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Full circle, sort of...

Guess who'll be playing at a 3-day festival this summer, at the same site where our boys played the Woodstock Festival in '69?! (link above). Time for a little Woodstock/upstate NY adventure again!


Entered at Wed Mar 22 21:45:43 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.85)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Chuck Berry found a good formula for writing songs which he repeated over and over. Instead of saying he wrote lots of songs, it is probably better to say he wrote the same song lots of times.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 21:34:23 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Perspective

I should say that I never appreciated what are called 'the old standards' when I was younger. I thought they were old fogie music and just pap. However, with the Dylan radio show and other exposures and with appreciation for Tony Bennett and Sinatra (some of it anyway) and with even Rod Stewart's covers a few years ago, and with my first hearing of 'Soon' and 'Let It Be Me' and a few other songs by Dylan, and with age and more understanding, my view of these songs has changed. I now understand (stupid me: why did this take so long to appreciate) how these songs form the underpinning of lyrical pop music (especially the songs of lost love etc) and the foundation for much of what came after. Taken with that perspective and with a careful ear, songs like 'Cry Me A River' and many of the songs of Dylan's recent output take on a whole new meaning.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 21:22:18 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Heart

Bob F: I guess that we are going to have to agree to disagree. The ear of the beholder.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 21:03:22 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

World Gone Wrong and Good As I Been To You were and are great records. Dylan doing Pretty Boy Floyd or This Land is Your Land are great records. Dylan doing People Get Ready or Angel Flying To Close To The Ground or Copper Kettle or so many other great songs he's covered in the past are flat out wonderful. Nothing on the first two records of so called standards had any of that heart, soul or inspiration.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 21:01:01 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete. "I first met you" ... sounds like he wrote it to his wife. Pete, yes, a looking back, but not a very insightful or meaningful one..Regardless, to me, this is a really trite lyric. The possibilities were endless.... The music, well, for the sake of the people who buy it, hopefully the whole record isn't mostly reworking old licks & sections of songs.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 20:39:16 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Chuck lyric

The point is that very elderly people begin to find the era of their youth more "real" than today. Hence Chuck going back to that time and reliving it.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 20:28:32 CET 2017 from (65.92.193.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck n' Johann

Chuck Berry clearly influenced our guys' first record post-Ronnie, "Leave Me Alone" (linked).

Johann Bach clearly influenced the first bit of "Chest Fever". All thanks to Robbie, according to "Testimony", which has him saying something like, "'Toccata and Fugue in D Minor' would do splendidly in the intro to 'Chest Fever', eh Garth?"


Entered at Wed Mar 22 19:53:21 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Chuck obviously doesn't need anyone's approval, but, what the hell could be the inspiration or point of writing the lyrics to that song? In your eighties you got nothing better to write about? The only thing that could make it almost palatable is him relating to a great great grandson. Even so, a man in his eighties, with that life behind him, ain't you got nothing better to write about?


Entered at Wed Mar 22 19:08:59 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Is it rolling, Bob?

Unfortunately the Bootleg Series Volume 13 will be "The Gospel Years." Already announced in "Rolling Stone."

Triplicate annoys me as a title. Does he mean trilogy? If it were triplicate, you would get the same disc three times, not three different discs. A triplicate consists of an item and "two exact copies." Mind you, that might be what it will sound like.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 18:53:39 CET 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: Another obit

JT, you in particular might find this interesting, as well as the linked In Memoriam.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 16:11:20 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Why I think standards performed by artists matter

I would prefer Bob Dylan to release new songs which he has penned himself. I think it will happen in the future.

However, I appreciate the efforts of performers, including Bob Dylan, to interpret standards (Sinatra and others only sang them/ excellent songwriters wrote them) on recordings and in concert.

Last evening, we saw Rickie Lee Jones and Madeleine Peyroux in concert. Jones began with a moving version of 'Cry Me a River'. Throughout the concert, standards were performed with heart and creativity. Interspersed were the original songs by both songwriters. It made for a wonderful and creative evening.

While I understand the frustration of those who go to concerts to hear 'favourite hits or album cuts', these are artists. They create and part of their creativity is the ability to interpret with voice and instrument(s). This Dylan does effectively and extremely well on record and recently in concert.

An opinion: I think that the 'covering' of standards by Dylan affords him the fertile soil to dig deep again and find the words and melodies that will (in my view) result in new original creations to come. Just like listening to recordings at home as a youngster has resulted in a young woman taking those listening experiences have resulted in new creations and superb performances, so I think that its not a stretch to think that this kind of recording and performing in some way injects into the artist new impetus to create. In my continued optimism, I see this as part of the creative process for many artists.

And finally, I return to 1993 or thereabouts to 'World Gone Wrong' and 'Good As I Been To You' where covered folk and blues standards resulted in a stimulation of Dylan's creativity and ultimately 'Time Out Of Mind' and everything that came after. So, bring on 'Triplicate' and wait for what comes after. It will be good.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 14:26:03 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Peter V, that last Rodney Crowell song I posted It Ain't Over Yet actually features John Paul White also, from The Civil wars.

Dylan is playing a new outdoor venue in Kingston NY this June. Kingston is a few miles down the road from Woodstock. I can't help thinking being back in his old stomping grounds is going to give him a moment of inspiration and reflection. I imaging him stepping to the mike with that acoustic guitar on and ......putting the guitar down going back to the keyboard and playing 10 Frank Sinatra songs! Seriously has anyone ever been less excited about a new Dylan release? The only good thing is we're about 6 or so months aways from the next Bootleg Series. Speaking of that, how come Dylan's people can release these great sets every year while The Band team can only muster Last Waltz rereleases?


Entered at Wed Mar 22 13:27:02 CET 2017 from (86.128.183.128)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Bob. They really do come across as not great. Sadly, many of my musical heroes are not that nice. I don't understand the rush to self destruction that many seem to have.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 13:09:51 CET 2017 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Bach was really great in bass lines and in rhythm. He did not write his lyrics himself, but the post office director of Leipzig, Picander, did it for him. These lyrics are not as good as Johnny B Goode. He mostly used texts from the Lutheran Bible, which Chuck certainly didn't...


Entered at Wed Mar 22 10:10:02 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Boys

Thanks for the link, Jeff. It's classic Chuck. "The girls want to stay and the boys want to play so it's rock 'n' roll till he break of the day" indeed. It's way, way better than I'd expected.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 10:04:07 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bach & Berry

They're incomparable in most ways. I guess Bach established the importance of the bass line, which Chuck made use of. Otherwise, I can't judge Bach's lyrics, what with not speaking German, but I'll bet he never wrote any as good as Nadine, Memphis or Johnny B. Goode. Again, maybe Bach could do a duck walk, but he was a keyboard player, so it seems unlikely he found the space to try it.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 09:07:16 CET 2017 from (114.75.204.63)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Are we really comparing Chuck to Bach?


Entered at Wed Mar 22 08:57:08 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I still have a Chuck Berry book of sheet music from 1964. Friends laughed scornfully at the time and said "You don't need sheet music for Chuck" BUT they used to make howlers trying to transcribe the lyrics. We got them right.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 08:53:37 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Repetitive? One might say the same about Bach.

Back in 1964 you could fill a youth club dance set with the works of Chuck and Bo. The secret was in alternating them. I guess The Rolling Stones did more Chuck covers than anyone and would get the prize for best Chuck covers band. Sometimes, as with Come On, I'd say they improved on the original.

Chuck came out of prison raring to go in 1963. The run of hits in England were Memphis Tennessee / Let It Rock (UK #6), Nadine (#27), No Particular Place To Go (UK #3), You Never Can Tell (UK #23), The Promised Land (UK #26). I'd say five of his ten best songs, all in a row. He was doing comparatively better here … those are all main pop chart hits. Let It Rock was the official A side, but Memphis was the one everyone played. He also had minor hits with Go Go Go and Run Rudolph Run in the same period.

The other thing about that 1963 / 1964 run was that no covers band equalled the originals, because Chuck had such a sly way of phrasing the lyrics that he was unmatchable. But he was on an intense creative roll.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 06:47:39 CET 2017 from (114.75.204.63)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Great as Chuck was, his music was very repetitive.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 05:40:42 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.57)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: New Chuck Berry single

Linked...It is what it is.


Entered at Wed Mar 22 02:34:37 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.57)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm remiss, I think the last Rodney Crowell album i have is Life Is Messy. Which is brilliant. He was ending hsi marriage to Roseanne Cash, & if i remember correctly, John Leventhal was his producer, cowriter on some songs, and was all over the record as is his way. Leventhal and Cash have been married for many years now. How it goes, i bet they're all friends.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 23:09:45 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rodney & The Stones

Solomon, I agree. It's really good. Like is to another song It Ain't Over Yet. This one features the great Roseanne Cash. Thinking about The Houston Kid. The last song on that record, I Know Love Is All I Need is one of my all time favorite songs.

Dunc, I didn't see the Stones until the next tour. I just read a great book about Altamont and the Stones 69 tour by Joel Selvin. Really enjoyable read. Anytime you read about The Stones they come off as great musicians and lousy human beings.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 19:57:43 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Chuck

Chuck Berry, Kennedy Center Honors, 2000. Skip to the halfway point, when the music starts. Sadly just a medley but some good playing and singing. Little Richard! And you get to see Goldie Hawn kick up her heels.

Solomon, thanks for the heads up on a new Rodney Crowell. I am reading a bio of Guy Clark (Without Getting Killed or Caught) and Rodney figures prominently in parts. His first record, IMHO, is one of those perfect ones we wereIf you have not read his (Rodney') Chinaberry Sidewalks, highly recommended. The Houston Kid, indeed.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 16:50:28 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Angie DIckinson

She's 5'5'' which isn't short for a woman, but she looked a lot shorter.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 16:47:47 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

If you think sumo wrestlers look big on TV, they're even bigger, much, much bigger in real life. Even the ones who look small on TV.

On the other hand, actors tend to look smaller in real life. My stepmother (when she was working for Alitalia in her 20s, ground staff) met Kirk Douglas. She was so disappointed on how short he was.

When I almost bumped into (literally) Angie Dickinson in Banff in the '80s she looked so tiny.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 16:09:43 CET 2017 from (24.114.74.27)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: right now, a coffeeshop in the Annex

Kevin J: Looked up from my latte (sorry) to see Ken Dryden at the cash. Jeez he's tall (and i'm not short).


Entered at Tue Mar 21 10:26:53 CET 2017 from (86.128.183.128)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Chuck Berry

Really enjoyed the Chuck Berry posts and links. I love the dance scene from Pulp Fiction, which I've linked.

Never saw Chuck Berry live. Had tickets for him while on holiday in Toulouse once, but the show was cancelled.

Coincidentally, I played 'Get Yer Ya Ya's Out' yesterday and there are two Chuck Berry numbers in this late sixties set of the Stones - 'Carol' and 'Little Queenie'. Did anybody, I'm thinking Joan or Bob, see this concert?


Entered at Tue Mar 21 09:26:02 CET 2017 from (79.75.164.210)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Rodney Crowell

Bob F - I had a listen and my own opinion is that this new Rodney Crowell album is right up there with Fate's Right Hand and The Houston kid.


Entered at Tue Mar 21 09:03:01 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The bronze Strat

Fender have done one. Hard to tell, but it sounds as if the bronzing is different and thinner … Robbie complained of its great weight. I hadn't realised Robbie had reconfigured the picks up either.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 23:10:06 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: I'M IN THE MOOD!!!!!!

Bonnie Raitt and John Lee Hooker.......son of a bitch, this is so good it's im-moral. look at some of the camera shots they did of Bonnie.......moooaaannnn!

Look at some of the comments! ....some guy wrote, when Bonnie started playin' slide guitar, I looked down and my pants had fell off.........baaaaddd!


Entered at Mon Mar 20 20:40:13 CET 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck Berry "C'est La Vie"

LINKED: A real treat from the early 1970's - Chuck on a UK tv show and he prepares the back-up band for a run through of "c'est la vie"........this has it all...stay with it and you'll be rewarded for just a great take on the song.

"You could see that Pierre did truly love the mademoiselle / And now the young monsieur and madame have rung the chapel bell"


Entered at Mon Mar 20 20:29:30 CET 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Valdy at Hugh"s Room - "Play Me a Rock n Roll Song"

LINKED: Valdy - I love this song.....The track star line gets me every time


Entered at Mon Mar 20 19:37:07 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Thanks Norm

Norm, thanks for the tip. I'm going to check out that Travelers show. I'm not really pick on that modern country sound but no question she has a lot of talent. To have success in both television and music is quite impressive. Good for her.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 13:48:36 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Mackenzie Porter

She's a sweet girl and has lots of videos here. The new series she is on is called "Travelers". Bob, if you don't know Valdy, he is on youtube, search "Play me a rock & roll song" That was his first big hit from the seventies. Our friend "Bonk" (Carl) will know him. They both live on Salt Spring Island.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 13:33:49 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Congratulations Nux

Our friend Nux Schwartz has won a very fine award. At the South African Film and Television Awards Nux won the "Sound Design" Awards. Congratulations Nux!

Bob F, I have been meaning to tell you. (Not sure if you are aware) the lady who plays "Maggie Palmer" the wealthy hotel owner on Hell On Wheels. Her name is Shelagh Horsdal. If you ever heard of our folk singer up here called "Valdy", Shelagh is his daughter.

As well the girl who played Cullen Bohannon's Mormon wife, her name is Mackenzie Porter, she is from Medicine Hat, Alberta. She is also a fine country singer, you can find her on Youtube. She is in a new TV series....the name escapes me at the moment.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 12:53:32 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Conor Oberst & The Felice Brothers

The Felice Brothers and Jim Keltner are the backing band on the new Conor Oberst. Many of these songs were on his last record as acoustic songs now get full band treatment. I really like the new version of the linked song, A Little Uncanny.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 12:46:32 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rodney Crowell Nashville 72

Really good song from the new Rodney Crowell record coming out at the end of the month.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 09:17:51 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dave Bartholomew wrote My Ding A Ling in 1952. Chuck's only guilt was reviving it.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 08:27:23 CET 2017 from (219.89.8.134)

Posted by:

Rod

Chuck Berry was a great songwriter - Johnny B Goode , Memphis, going back to memphis.... Very rythmic structures and a very similar delivery to Levon.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 01:59:10 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Alvins

JQ. Just popped in my head. Downey California boys who are artists, but you would not call them blues artists, who grew up on blues, and play blues , and tour blues and release blues occassionally, Dave Alvin & Phil Alvin, both have those deep, long exposures to and working relationships with many of the old GONE blues artists.


Entered at Mon Mar 20 01:32:43 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ. You were correct to use the term artist ( "it seems the number of artists that knew and worked with the great Chicago bluesmen is really diminishing), but let me point out. Cotton was one of them. Though he was a sideman first 7 often, he was an artist too.

Also, There are songs he performed as a vocalist that he did not get credit for on the record. Well known ones. i'll find em another time.

Now there are many PLAYERS of varying levels of musicianship who worked with many of the great old time & chicago bluesmen around. Artists is another story. /n The first legitimate great artists that come to mind are Bobby Rush, who is actually from the era, Steve Freund, Vasti Jackson, Dave Specter, Bonnie Raitt, Maria Muldaur, . there are some more, including women frm the blues genre, the ones I know of mostly located in Chicago & Texas. . I;d have t think on it, & check, but i think Trudy Lynn....Diunna Greenleaf, there's a good #...... There's a guy named John Long out in Colorado, & there's John Primer in Chicago. Lurrie Bell, is the very real thing, one of Carey's sons, i guess in his late 50s or maybe in his 60s. Lurrie is baaad, gonna be here next week., there's Floyd Miles ( all kinds of credits, including with Duane & Gregg Allman, Clarence Carter), Kenny Blues Boss Wayne is still running around............the #s are dwindling but they're spread around. And any of them that are healthy are working, & always looking for paydays..... Harder to find.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 23:31:27 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Chuck Berry and others gone now

Seems that Chuck Berry wrote songs that, lyrically, were more poetic and clever that what was typically going on in early rock n roll and rockabilly. My Ding A Ling might have been an exception.

Along James Cotton now, it seems the number of artists that knew and worked with the great Chicago bluesmen is really diminishing; just like the folks of the Greatest Generation; those that grew up in the depression and fought in WW2.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 20:35:06 CET 2017 from (96.232.183.195)

Posted by:

Joan..

Subject: Chuck

I saw Chuck Berry at Fillmore East along with the Who and Albert King. A typical great Fillmore lineup. All chucks children are very sad today RIP Chuck Berry


Entered at Sun Mar 19 18:18:12 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck Shows

I saw Chuck for the first time in 1970 or 71 at SUNY New Paltz on a triple bill with Seals & Crofts and CTA. Chuck played in the middle and was amazing. CTA was unbelievable during that time so they were more then able to hold their own. I saw him at Felt Forum in NYC in 1986 during his 60th birthday celebration with Dave Edmunds and John Entwistle. He barley played 50 minutes. It was a high price ticket. I remember everyone feeling let down. Link is from that show.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 18:17:17 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Steve Miller on The King of Electric Guitar.

On many levels and touching several subjects, this is a great, informative, & important read right till the end.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 18:07:52 CET 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dave Stallworth

An important member of those championship Knicks teams.RIP.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 18:05:46 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Chuck - Round & Round

First time I saw Chuck live was at BC Place in Vancouver. It was 74 or 5 I don't remember That's a pretty big place, 25 or 30 thousand. It wasn't a lot of fun people were doing the light the matches thing. There was a lot of drinking and people had puked on seats here and there so that the place stunk.

It's so long ago now I don't exactly remember but Chuck introduces one of his hit songs (I forget which one) then starts playing a completely different song. I don't know whether he was drunk or what. I don't remember who was playing with him but maybe he was at the end of a long trip or what ever but he didn't give us a great show that night.

I think there is a lot of us that made some pretty good coin on a lot of gigs playing those songs of his.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 17:40:51 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I think the first time i saw Chuck live was in the early 90s at a New years Eve show at Limelight in NYC. Angel Rissoff was on bass , Rob Stoner on guitar, and Howie Wyeth on drums. Gene Cornish was on the gig too, but Chuck told him to tune his guitar, so Gene refused to play. It's odd, because in earlier cases Chuck would untune his guitar after people had tuned it when he wasn't looking..Could be Chuck was looking to piss him off, provoke him off the gig. But his last band was in the habit of tuning his guitar whenever they could. Times his batteries weren't charged either. That was the case in 05 at the tribute to Johnnie at The Pageant.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 17:22:57 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dave Stallworth & Jimmy Breslin have died.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 17:20:41 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Paul. To give some perspective to Chuck's quote about getting screwed on publishing and copyright by Leonard Chess & Friends, Chuck and they screwed Johnnie Johnson completely. Johnnie got thirty bucks per song, and that might have been for his performance. Most to all of the music part of the songwriting of the early Berry songs was Johnnie's. Berry admitted Johnnie wrote the music to his lyrics in front of seven people during the lawsuit. It looks like it will be in the next edition of Johnnie's bio by Travis Fitzpatrick.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 17:11:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

I treasure the 9 CD set "The Chess Years" with detailed annotation. It was issued by Charley, and like other Charley CDs rights were later disputed, not that disputes would be new to Chuck.

Back to Memphis (LINK TO CHUCK BERRY VERSION) comes from the Mercury period's first LP "Chuck Berry in Memphis" … and that included some interesting stuff. "from St Louie to Frisco" was the second Mercury album, with a decent horn section, plus Johnnie Johnson and Doug Sahm. The Mercury material has not been well-served on CD, but fortunately the LPs are not anywhere near as expensive as the British originals of the Chess albums, which are Pye International here. I find it hard to pass a Chuck Berry LP in a secondhand shop if the price is fair.

Chuck live was indeed usually a case of no rehearsal with bands picked on price not quality. However "Live at the Filmore" has the Steve Miller Band backing him. Even the nadir of his career, My Ding A Ling, actually has a great British backing band on the first version with Onnie McIntyre and Robbie McIntosh of the AWB.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 16:49:29 CET 2017 from (172.12.248.174)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

I bought the huge Chuck Berry Bear Family Box (Any Old Way You Choose It), and I'm glad I did, though I had to sign over my first born to get it. The 16 CDs are a lot to plow through, and I owned a lot of it. But there were 20-25 performances -- B sides, album tracks, unreleased stuff that had not been easily available -- that stand with anything he ever did. I was hoping that the various live tracks, none of which I owned, would be good also, but with one or two exceptions they are not worth returning to. Chuck tossed off his live performances. But in terms of great songs and fantastic studio work, the sheer volume of his best stuff would stand with anyone's. I'd be interested in anything anyone wanted to say about "favorite obscure Chuck Berry track." My favorite Chuck quote not from his songs: in reference to giving Chess and his business associates some publishing on Maybellene, he said, "They took a third in lieu of my rookieness." Band content: I always thought it was great they chose the obscure but fantastic Back to Memphis, which I knew from their version years before I ever knew Chuck's. It's the only cover version I've ever heard to this day. RIP.



Entered at Sun Mar 19 14:28:43 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: "I'm gonna learn to dance if it takes me all night and day"

'Carol' by CB was my first record purchase ever. A 78.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 13:24:10 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 335

The Gibson 335 as favoured by Chuck Berry was also B.B. King's choice. It sounds warmer / richer than solid body Fenders. It has always been a popular guitar and considered to have a particular "sound."


Entered at Sun Mar 19 13:22:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Thanks for the link to Pass Away … I was about to go and seek it on the Hail, Hail, Rock & Roll box set.

The link is to Toppermost on Chuck Berry - it was an early one before we expanded on commentary, but it adds the ten best covers … a list that could go on forever.

There's one to seek out Eleanor McEvoy singing Memphis Tennessee very slowly. I heard it in a secondhand shop last week, and bought the album "Stuff" which is a compilation of outtakes and oddities. I've been playing it all week. I'd never heard of her, but apparently she's huge in Ireland. There are three bits of her Memphis on YouTube … all barred in the UK. You might be able to open them.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 12:45:15 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie & Chuck Berry - Pass Away (1986)


Entered at Sun Mar 19 12:04:52 CET 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Chuck Berry

My perspective on Chuck Berry is not that of a musician, so I won't go into his musical impact on me.

I never saw him live, nor Bo Diddley for that matter, even though I saw many of the r'n'b greats in my youth. I guess I viewed them as being at the poppier end of r-n'b - which is more about my own limitations that his - and I had only had so much money to spend on such things. Also, I'd come into his kind of music from the jazz and classic blues part of the spectrum. And I was a radio listener, not a record buyer, though his LPs (on Pye?) were played in the school sixth-form common room.

In the early 1960s, there were two Chuck berry songs that I remember being played: "Memphis, Tennessee" and "No Particular Place To Go". The former had such a cleverly constructed lyric, each verse adding a new element to the tale, each slowly revealing the 'true' story behind the call until the picture at the end was so different from one's initial assumption. And the latter showed a very different person, humorously frustrated by the "technology".

Another thing, given my musical journey at that time, was his appearance in "Jazz On A Summer's Day". He performed, as I recall, "Sweet Little Sixteen" and one of the musicians in the band was Jack Teagarden (who had a particular resonance for me but I won't bore you with that). In that film, all the musicians were clearly enjoying themselves so much, while members of the audience (older than me and my friends) were bop-bop-bopping away - all of which impressed me greatly.

At that time, I used buy JAZZBEAT magazine (which usually included quite a chunk on the blues and r'n'b, with a column by Guy Stevens) and I subscribed to BLUES UNLIMITED, which produced a Chuck Berry biography/discography to which Berry himself had contributed. My copy has my handwritten notes on it, I seem to think. I still have all those items around somewhere in the house.

My final comment. What struck me was that Berry was always photographed/seen with a semi-acoustic guitar, which I tended to associate with the jazz guitarists before him, whereas British guitarists mostly played his songs on solid-bodied guitars. Is there a reason for this?


Entered at Sun Mar 19 11:21:22 CET 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Chuck Berry

A great poet,songwriter,musician,guitarist,innovator,rabble rouser.He was R&R.I still recall leaving my office in a suit to go see Hail Hail R&R-the theater was filled with other Chucik Berry fans-in suits.RIP Chuck.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 08:35:35 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Chuck Berry

The finest of his generation of rock 'n' rollers. Wherever musicians gather to jam, a Chuck Berry song will be the common language, the esperanto that gets it rolling. The guy crystallised the guitar intro as we know it. As a lyricist, he was the best.

As I got on a city bus and found a vacant seat

I thought I saw my future bride, walking down the street,

I shouted to the driver, hey conductor you must

Slow down, I think I ses her, please let me off this bus …

There's that interview with Robbie on the box set too, where he talks about learning narrative poems by heart in prison.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 08:00:32 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bruce Springsteen on Chuck Berry.........

....."Chuck Berry was rock's greatest practitioner, guitarist, and the greatest pure rock 'n' roll writer who ever lived."......Amen


Entered at Sun Mar 19 07:20:39 CET 2017 from (114.75.193.137)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is not much that needs to be said about Chuck Berry. He was rock 'n' roll. At least he lived to a good age.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 07:02:49 CET 2017 from (24.114.82.147)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Great Great Chuck Berry

Taking the train today from Montreal to Toronto, the "shuffle" feature was in its glory by playing ""You Never Can Tell" and "Promised Land".....and hours later I get the news from The Band GB - as is norm these days for breaking news - that the legendary Chuck Berry has died. Simply put, everyone who has played r n r guitar and enjoyed r n r music over the last 50 years owes this man a great big thank you for making life more interesting and enjoyable........a massive influence and icon to so many......King of Rock N Roll is gone.

Wallsend: Just feel pity for the smallness and stupidity. Grace and greatness always transcends.....thinks Obama v Trump....same sort of nonsense.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 06:17:27 CET 2017 from (114.75.193.137)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Robbie's strat from TLW with standard hate posts in the comments section.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 03:48:07 CET 2017 from (50.64.154.83)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck. The Master Songwriter

Remembering Chuck for everything he gave us.


Entered at Sun Mar 19 01:35:39 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Who - Mama's got a Squeeze Box

While browsing thru' some youtube finding old Chuck Berry jems, I came across this animated video of the Who doing this old song......pretty funky.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 23:46:13 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.207)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck's new record on the way.

See the link


Entered at Sat Mar 18 23:32:03 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.207)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Chuck Berry has died.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 17:17:54 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.207)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC, I'm heading out the door, but if your memory returns, i 'll see your e mail to me tonight.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 16:59:21 CET 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Googling Jeff A

Thanks Jeff for your response on Stocholm, Sweden. To find your email I tried to Google you and this is what I got:

"a fabulous name, anyone who has it should be proud, spontaneous (good in bed) ;) usually very sexy tall & thin (except for the few UNLUCKY Jeff's out there) DAMN BITCH! Jeff is so fine #sexy #smart #funny #clever #evil"

Doesn't bother me at all. It happens even in the better families, too. Like Clintons.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 16:22:25 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.207)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Madman (NWC) :-) Izzy is from The Bronx originally but if i recall properly, baked bagels in Bklyn and attended Bklyn College.

Brian Kramer, a fine blues guitar player from Bklyn who has lived in Stockholm over 20 years, hangs with Izzy regularly. Izzy can be found in his Folk Center, has plenty going on, even though he is ancient, and once in a while hits the bars for music. I don't have your email address, but if you recall my website, or van do some googling to find it, you have my email address. Or Peter or Jan can give it to you.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 16:09:03 CET 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: ABBA / Anni-Frid Lyngstad (especially to the Australians)

My two former teacher colleagues in our team in the small industrial town of Torshälla have succeeded to invent _A_ in ABBA to discuss on her life in this town where she spent her early years (and where we worked in the eighties). Normally she lives in Zermatt in Switzerland without any connections to the media. One of these guys was the band leader in the orchestra where she was the lead singer (before ABBA). I'll be there!


Entered at Sat Mar 18 15:23:35 CET 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Greater Copenhagen

Subject: Israel Goodman Young / Jeff A.

In the near future we are going to Stockholm. In the early years (I mean _EARLY_ years when we used to eat lunch in the Chinese Restaurant near Izzy's bookstore.) I didn't really know who he was. It was before this godforsaken non-moderated internet forum. It was before the Internet, invented by the devil. So, we are going to eat "chicken shop suey" there again just like we used to do and walk past Izzy's bookestore where we listened to Happy Traum. Well, the MORAL of this story is simply that that you shouldn't do that because the restaurant will probably sell only kebabs.

Anyway, Izzy is an old man and propably not sitting in his bookstore in "The South" of Stockholm anymore. In case he is, I ask my gb friend JEFF A to post a recommendation letter to my email account, becaue I have some questions to ask.

No Dylan without Izzy, no Band without Dylan. I believe we all love him, good ol' Izzy.


Entered at Sat Mar 18 02:22:40 CET 2017 from (67.84.77.159)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jon. thanks, but there used to be a few on you tube, quite a while ago since I looked. I saw Rick do the song at least 4 or 5 times, likely more. A few of those times a young guy who looked like he'd been through the ringer a few times, sang it .One time magnificently. Honestly, the ones he was in on you tube didn't do the one great time i saw justice. Not at Wetlands. Lone Star. I only caught Rick at Wetlands once or twice. i wasn't crazy about the place.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 18:42:21 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A Fish Story

Nothing to do with music.....except.....maybe a real sweet song.

The link for this page is very long and a little difficult. I was talking with a friend, (fish stories). I told him about the biggest "Blue Fin Tuna" ever caught. Like many people he thought I was crazy. In 1979 the picture was in the Vancouver Province paper. I cut it out and kept it in a log book all these years because no one ever believes it.

Now a day of course, you just google, 1496 POUND BLUE FIN TUNA. It comes right up and there are as well many big fish. This fellow Ken Fraser caught this on a rod in Nova Scotia. They have those big rods and you are strapped in a chair and your rod is held in a cup by the bottom end so you can fight the fish. You may have seen this in "Jaws".

To get a fish now a day there is a draw you have to submit your name and sport fish license number and if you are drawn you get a chance at a fish. Take a look these are really something to see.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 18:42:57 CET 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Jeff, not sure if this is what you're thinking of, but here's audio of Rick's 1993 Wetlands set where a friend of his does a guest vocal on Danny Boy towards the end. And even if not, I bet you'll enjoy it!


Entered at Fri Mar 17 17:23:48 CET 2017 from (67.84.77.159)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: New Knight.

Sir Kink!


Entered at Fri Mar 17 16:42:21 CET 2017 from (67.84.77.159)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You Tube has become quite Trump Like (discriminatory & selective) the last several years. I'm looking for a Rick Danko version of Danny Boy for St Patrick's Day & there's none to be found.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 15:28:20 CET 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: James Cotton RIP

So sad to hear. I first saw James Cotton play on a double bill with the 90s Band -- July 4, 1996, a free outdoor show in downtown Manhattan.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 14:31:01 CET 2017 from (67.70.149.219)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

James Cotton on harmonica and stunning lead guitar work by Bobby Starr on this Ronnie Hawkins record from '64/'65.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 05:17:57 CET 2017 from (67.84.78.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Garth

Garth has participated in a few of those Last Waltz 40 shows with Warren Haynes & Co.( Dr John, Cyril Neville, Bob Msrgolin, Danny Louis etc) recently and is joining the tour for 7 dates in California and Texas.


Entered at Fri Mar 17 00:54:11 CET 2017 from (67.84.78.125)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

James Cotton has died. Last time i saw him perform was in 2004. My friend Larry Johnson, had his annual Outdoor at Lincoln Center show and that year he had all Arkansans joining him. Cotton, Billy Lee Riley, and " the Human Jukebox", Sleepy La Beef. they were all phenomenal, but Billy Lee Riley knocked me out. I think Larry did that show one more year... He died this past summer. ..


Entered at Thu Mar 16 13:56:41 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fortunately, none of us were lying. But the thought does go through your head about how much you really trust the other guys.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 13:35:49 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

She never asked any questions. She'd just say "You're lying."


Entered at Thu Mar 16 13:33:38 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Lyin' Eyes

One of my maternal grandmother's superpowers was being able to tell when someone was lying. She was very good at catching someone when they were lying, including yours truly...... once, only once, when I was in Grade 4. : )

Years later when I was in high school I asked her how she knew...she said it was all in the eyes.



Entered at Thu Mar 16 13:21:20 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Roadie's Tale

Norm, there used to be a roadie’s tale (and outside Dover docks, a sign does point to Canterbury). When you arrived back in the UK from Germany, the customs tended to go over the van and equipment. We once had to unload the lot, including a Hammond B3 and line it up on the tarmac. He then made us stand in a line, and said “I always know when people are lying. I will look you in the eye and ask you ONE question.” Arrogant twit … he thought he was an army drill sergeant, I think. Then the dog sniffed the speaker cabinets etc. Now, the roadie’s myth was that if they found nothing, you could insist the customs officers reloaded the van for you. Personally, I thought it would be foolish to ask, and anyway, it took us a whole afternoon working out how to get everything in originally, and if one mic stand was in the wrong place even, the doors wouldn’t shut. So we did it.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 13:11:50 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I once told my Orlando "nice immigration" story and an American told me that "Disney owned Orlando, including the airport" and did not like tourists being hassled, so it was always the nicest airport in the USA. OK, maybe best to let Disney run the lot …!


Entered at Thu Mar 16 11:59:59 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: On the Other Hand

In 1979 I had a 1957 Ford Skyliner Retractable Hardtop Convertible. Back then I spent $12,000 restoring that car. Any one who hasn't seen one the top has electric screws and motors activated by solnoids. You pull a switch and the top unscrews about ten inches at the front folds under, the trunck opens backwards and the top goes into the trunk.

If I still had that car today, it's worth about $100,000. Anyway my wife at that time, Anne and I had'nt been together that long, (Anne has 9 sisters and 5 brothers). All those girls were gorgeous back then Anne is the oldest and then the rest were in their teens and early twenties.

Anne begged me one day if her and her sisters could take the car down to Washington shopping. It was a nice sunny day so I threatened her with her life and let her take it. There was six of them in the car so their shopping stuff they put in the trunk and had the top down on top of it.

On their return at Canadian Customs at the Peace Arch crossing this agent got real testy with them (trying to impress all these girls I guess). He made Anne put the top up and some of their purchases were in boxes that were stapled. He took out a box and stuck it up on the roof of my car. This car had 10 coats of black laquer on it. It was like looking down a well. Anne came unglued on this guy. She said you scratched this. Do you know what my husband is going to do when I get home? I want your badge number right now and you are going to write a report of what you just did. Which he had to do. Next day I went over to New Westminster where I had the car painted. I got a report from the painter to polish these scratches out. I took the work order for the paint job and went down to Customs, found the Manager and showed him. Now did the shit hit the fan. That cost Canadian Customs $270...stupid little shit.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 10:45:50 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: And a fourth …

When I was flying a lot in the 80s and 90s, I had a year or two where I lost two suitcases completely, and had a couple of 24 hour late-arriving suitcases. As a result, I was as nervous as a kitten whenever I was waiting for my bags at the carousel. I found that every time I returned to the UK, I was directed to the table to have my bags opened and searched. It takes a long time. They’re thorough. I got increasingly pissed off. I guess I was a lone male, not wearing a suit … who does on planes now, but business people did then.

Eventually, I lost my temper, and said “OK, this is the sixth time in six flights that I’ve been searched. Why? What am I doing? ‘

The customs guy said, ‘OK, just go through.’

I sad, ‘No. You stopped me AGAIN, I’ll open my case and you can search it!’

He said, ‘No. Go through …’ then he paused. He said, ‘We are watching the carousel on TV. We stop people with certain body language.’

I explained about my lost cases, and he said, ‘That’ll do it. You had all the body language of a very worried man on the TV.’

I’ve never been stopped since, but I also think after two or three searches, I was expecting to be stopped, and showed it somehow.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 10:39:23 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: oooops...colour me blushing red

That should have been "any". : )


Entered at Thu Mar 16 10:37:19 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

When I got to Japan, back in the heady days of 1988, going through customs, the officer asked me if I had an pornography. I was very tempted to say "Yeah, whaddya want?" But thought better of it.

I did get frisked as he thought I lied to him about not having a nasal inhaler. Apparently (at the time) it was illegal to bring in the country. Why? To this day I have no idea, other than to say "That's Japan for you".


Entered at Thu Mar 16 09:58:22 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Three immigration stories …

Haso, your name is a solid Lancashire name, shared with the lead singer of Renaissance.

First half of the 1980s. My co-author Bernie was on a ludicrously strenuous Latin American trip which involved from memory Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Brazil, Guatemala and Mexico. Our publisher, OUP, was trying to economize far too much on air fare and making what should have been two or three trips into one. It ended badly. They had advised Bernie that he should obtain a US visa, because on the return trip he would be changing planes in Miami. They said the two worst airports for hassle were Miami and Houston … in those days, you stopped in one or the other to get from London to Mexico City. Bernie disagreed, saying it was a two hour transit change and it wasn’t worth the effort. Of course the Mexico City-Miami flight was delayed three hours, and he missed his connection to London. He had no US visa. He was handcuffed, and driven for an hour in the back a windowless truck to a suburban building where a private company incarcerated him overnight without his shoes and belt and without food. He was put on the flight home … his passport was only returned when the plane was in the air. The last thing US immigration said to him, “You will now find it difficult to ever re-enter the USA.” Bernie replied, ‘So why do you think I’d ever want to?’ He never did. As Bernie had visited every Middle-Eastern country, and most of Latin America, he said the Miami people were the most officious and aggressive in all his travels.

On the other hand … early 1990s. We were staying in Niagara-On-The-Lake (advice of my Canadian editor). We decided to visit the US side of the river, drove across, got a US entry stamp – we had visas. Spent the day, went back via Niagara Falls (USA). There was a lot of traffic on the bridge. I tried to find a checkpoint, thinking about exiting the USA officially, but they were just waving us through into Canada. We left from Toronto. Five months later, December, we arrived in Orlando. The officer looked at our passports. “You entered the USA in July. And you have no exit stamp. So according to your passports, you have overstayed a three month visa. I told him the story. He laughed and said, ‘Officially, the Canadians should have stamped your US exit in Toronto. You are so lucky this is Orlando, where we listen to people. If this was Miami or New York, you’d be straight on the plane back to England.’

This stuck in my mind two years later. We did the Alaska cruise, where you enter the USA on the pier in Vancouver. When you arrive back, you just walk off into Canada. I had the sense to go and find the US officials and get exit stamps on our passports … not a service that was being generally offered!


Entered at Thu Mar 16 07:55:51 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.39)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But i really loved that song- Maria, also from West Side Story.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 07:44:32 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.39)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Songs from Childhood - First one I thought of.

When you're a Jet you're a Jet all the way.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 06:52:07 CET 2017 from (24.114.101.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Song memory from childhood ....

....if there is one song above all that stands out for me as a memory from childhood - it would be "Galveston" by Glen Campbell.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 04:33:12 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: RR

Taking my time w/ Testimony, the 2nd time through. Kinda bulled right in after I got it when Robbie was on his book tour. Since then a friend borrowed it after Born to Run (he's as big a Bruce guy as we are Bandilitos). He thought it's a bit surprising any of 'em, pop music in general, made it into their senior years... drugs, sex, & r'n'r.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 04:22:24 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: travelin'

Ok, late to the party here, Jerry, Norm, Peter and the rest. I didn't see any travel stories like this:

About '07, '08 not just stuff in my bags, but I got detained. Fortunately not dumped in the trashcan like your meatballs or the 5 or 6 bottles of homemade jam my wife wanted to take out for Christmas gifts in '04 or so. So... in the Houston airport the customs form got marked up in red, we were led behind the rope/screen and all that stuff to a secure room. After 2 hours or so (I was reading the NY Times while waiting, but back then, that was ok), finally let go. My wife had only been detained about 30 minutes; long enough to see the bathrooms w/ no doors and the other waiting area w/ benches/handcuffs/leg irons, when she went to the loo. I think she raised a bit of a ruckus "outside" an hour or so later, when it started to look like we would be missing our connecting flight. Some official took us both, at a dead run, to make the flight w/ 2 minutes to spare (never even looked at the customs forms). Long & short, I was sure they realized they'd have to put us up for the night in Houston and would rather have a "miss" on their tally sheet than spend the $.

Now my time in detention: I won't go into the few other folks there, or how they were treated. I never got any interview more that maybe a minute when some office guy gave me the impression that my surname, (Haslam) tickled them or something. I always guessed afterwards that you change around a letter, add an extra "l" or "s" and it might sound Arabic. In fact it's English, lots of them I'm told around Blackpool and Liverpool. (My brother always figured we were from poor sheepherders, only had 1 lamb).

Anyway, probably twice as many, quite young, customs officials clattering around, w/ their prominent sidearms than there were detainees. One guy infrequently tried to see if I'd screw up.

"So, just back from Iraq?" No actually visiting Nicaragua where our daughter works for your and my government (Uh oh, Peace Corps).

"I've been (in your state), once, relatives there". Yeah that city's about an hour from my house.

"Do you have a driver's license?" You folks already took that and my passport. "How 'bout your social security card?" I didn't really answer that as any dipshit knows you're never supposed to carry that in your wallet.

I don't recall now, but I think he tried a couple of other semi-involved approaches, but unfortunately I was just another of the 37 million folks here traceable to the Mayflower and they couldn't make my name fit their list. It's made for interesting tales ever since. Unique view of how our border guardian stuff works, or doesn't; at least at that point 10 years ago. I do remember being kinda pissed at the "minder"; as we boogied to make the last connection to Boston, he mostly talked on to my spouse. I sorta wanted to say, "Hey, SoB, I'm the one you kept for 2+ hours, not her; maybe your apologies are misdirected". But she can raise a good ruckus when need be.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 03:23:38 CET 2017 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: "When You Awake" would be my suggestion. The pop song that did it for me when I was a child, pre-Band, was "My Favourite Things".


Entered at Thu Mar 16 01:49:56 CET 2017 from (24.114.101.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"Life is a Carnival" hands down.


Entered at Thu Mar 16 01:24:05 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: The people that you meet...in your neighbourhood

Stevie Wonder on Sesame Street in the '70s.

The full episode must be on the 'net somewhere.

I wonder had The Band been a guest on the show, what song would they have performe?


Entered at Wed Mar 15 20:39:33 CET 2017 from (114.75.197.146)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Did somebody say Sesame Street?


Entered at Wed Mar 15 18:43:38 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Sharon Lois & Bram

My kids loved the Canadian group Sharon Lois and Bram. First concert I took my daughter to was their performance at the Mid Hudson Civic Center. Raffi was also very popular with the Wheels on The Bus. Though I have to admit my daughter did switch to Madonna rather early on. She would watch the tape of Madonna's greatest video hits over and over. It just happens.


Entered at Wed Mar 15 16:51:04 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Kids music

I lament that I did not get custody of the Sesame Street LPs I collected when my son was of the age. Many were parodies of pop songs. (I think the Beatles publishers sued at one point, but were shamed into withdrawing their suit.) Link is to one of my favorites, although the video does not contain my favorite line, when Grover asks, "Is everybody fuzzy?" Maybe you had to be there...


Entered at Wed Mar 15 15:56:35 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's more the thing. Now parents seem to think that BOOM-BOOM-BOOM-BOOM with a female pop star wailing over the top is kid's listening. I always went for a story or a repetition in the song.


Entered at Wed Mar 15 14:55:33 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Dr. Seuss

Hell! when we were kids we sang songs like "Two Old Maids in a Feather Bed." :-)

The song in this link is a song I used to get my kids to sing together on a long drive. It always stopped the fighting.


Entered at Wed Mar 15 14:54:33 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rick Danko did Blue Tail Fly for a children's compilation. It's "barred" on YouTube, so no link.


Entered at Wed Mar 15 14:47:55 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: kid songs

Hmm...Marvelous Toy (Tom Paxton), Froggy Went A'Courtin', There's a Hole In the Bottom of the Sea. Of course, these are from my childhood.

Don't have my Sing Out! book handy or there would be laundry list.

WXPN in Philadelphia has a long-running kids show (Kathy O'Connell's Kids Corner) that plays more contemporary songs...Birdhouse In My Soul, Star Trekkin', If It Looks Like a Duck, and many more I recall at the moment. Since my son is now over 30 and getting married in April, I don't listen to the show too much and I'm sure there are a slew of new songs. Kids albums are a revenue stream for a lot of artists, it seems, many motivated by entertaining their own offspring.

Finished 'Testimony' during our East Coast snow day yesterday. Very well written, but ended too soon. Volume II?


Entered at Wed Mar 15 12:26:21 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: The Children's Marching Song = This Old Man

The Children's Marching Song = This Old Man

'He played knick-knack' or is it 'nick-nack'?

Mitch Miller

US single. 1959


Entered at Wed Mar 15 12:14:28 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Flights of famcy/'This Old Man'

Peter: Yes... internal (same country) flight crossing only provincial borders - Toronto to Victoria BC flight. 'This Old Man" (many versions, including Bob Dylan).


Entered at Wed Mar 15 11:16:48 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Kids Songs

Kids songs.

Two generations of experience here. The BBC did a total of four double CD collections of “Children’s Favourites” based on requests. Three were general, one 2 CD set was Christmas. They’ve recompiled them in many ways since. We got the lot … they run from the 1930s to 1970s. The glaring missing item is On Top of Spaghetti, which I’d guess they couldn’t license. We have a LONG Playlist on the iPod in the car. Many were novelty adult hits Three at least of the all-time “Top Ten” with our kids are no longer played, because they’re by Rolf Harris and he’s in prison.

So here’s a useful well-tested Top Ten:

On Top of Spaghetti- Tom Glazer X

Lollipop – The Chordettes

Puff The Magic Dragon – Peter, Paul & Mary

Pick A Bale of Cotton – Lonnie Donegan

I Know An Old Lady – Burl Ives

The Wheels On The Bus – Jonathan Richman

Ice Cream Man – Jonathan Richman

Who’s Afraid of The Big Bad Wolf – Henry Hall & The BBC Dance Orchestra

Little White Bull – Tommy Steele

Robin Hood - Dick James

Any additions?


Entered at Wed Mar 15 11:02:22 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I lost my poor meatball …

JT left me humming On Top of Spaghetti all night … it is, for those with kids and grandkids, our 40 year all-time favourite kids in-car song.

Was it an internal flight? I would have thought meatballs would have been the issue … the USA is particularly sensitive that all meat products must be declared at customs. The UK / EU is even tighter: "You can’t bring meat, meat products, milk, dairy products or potatoes into the UK from outside the EU. " So not even if you declare it.

It reminds me of a Portuguese friend from many years ago. If she had been back to Madeira, she would invite us to a dinner of Portuguese specialities. We were in mid-tuna steak which she said was direct from Madeira, when she said, "You're not allowed to bring it in. So we bring it in our suitcase - we put it in the dirty laundry bag so no one can smell it." OK, I know it would have been heavily wrapped … but even so … I mean even the lack of refrigeration didn't sound good!


Entered at Wed Mar 15 00:01:01 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Saucey!

Gawd damn Jerry! I think you been traumatized by having to pour that beautiful sauce out. I got some really great sauce I can let you have....at a price that would make Wimpy happy!......y'know :-)

I make the best meatball subs in North America. I got to loving "Subway" meat ball subs so I started making my own quite a while ago. My sauce is exsguiset!!!


Entered at Tue Mar 14 23:36:20 CET 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

Jt

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Meatballs 2

Mouthwash, toothpaste and perfume are one thing. I see that all the time when I am flying. That stuff gets confiscated. Meatballs with sauce is something totally different.


Entered at Tue Mar 14 20:26:19 CET 2017 from (24.114.101.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Travel & Moreton Island

Norm: Thank you for the link to Moreton Island. I spent a few days in Surfers Paradise a while back so I guess I was close to the island but was not aware - a little slice of Bali it looks like ! Stunning - clean - beaches all around that area. Bali has all sorts of beauty but their beaches are not as pristine...................while this may sound a bit fairy, the best soap I've ever came across was purchased at a honey soap shop in Tasmania - don't remember where exactly but it was honey soap - square blocks about 3 inches by 3 inches......also purchased the best coasters ever in Tas.....tigers and Wallsend's Devils !

Travel and immigration: I have all sorts of stories but the funniest one involved a TV.........the last night of a trip overseas returning to Canada on a flight the next morning......normal routine of packing the bags...about 11:00pm and as the night is going on and the packing continues......I'm puttering around the room with the TV on.....wanting to change the channel, I realize I can't find the Remote......anyhow, no big deal....I turn off the tv by pushing the button at the front of the set......next morning - up and to the airport..........15 hours later I arrive to Canada and get asked to go to the immigration section of the arrival pass-through.....the lady asks all the regular questions and the the bags are opened. She reached in and turning over some shirts put her hand on something and pulls up the TV Remote control ! All I could say was "damn, that's where it was!" The immigration lady laughed pretty hard. This was pre-9/11

Just months after 9/11, I hand-carried a cuckoo clock back from Europe.......don't get me started on this story...


Entered at Tue Mar 14 17:18:34 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Liquids

I had a similar thing happen Jerry, last time we went to Mexico. I had a very small plastic bottle of mouthwash in my carry on bag. I can't quite remember Listerene I think it was 200 milileters. You are only allowed I believe 125. This was in Comox the security people were very nice. They said "You can take it backout and leave it in your truck if you like." Well it was raining like hell so I just said put it where ever what you do with them. I don't know what a person might have in a little sealed bottle of Listerene, but who knows what lengths the crazies will go to now a day to cause trouble.

Doug! thanks for that! When I get to Hobart I'll tell my friend Peter who I'm going to visit. Maybe we can do that. You gotta love oysters.


Entered at Tue Mar 14 15:16:50 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Meatballs... not the movie

Liquids: Arriving at the security line at the airport, a container of meatballs in a meat sauce is removed by the guard who says it must be confiscated. When pressed, his comment is (and this is supported by the head of security who is called over) that he cannot from the container determine the actual volume of the liquid in the meat sauce. If the volume is not marked and cannot be determined, the rule is that the container cannot cross the security area and must be confiscated. So what does one do? With the approval of security who attended the event, the passenger with the meat sauce, accompanied by a security guard, goes to a garbage receptacle directly outside of security, and watches as the passenger pours off the liquid meat sauce and retains the meatballs. This really happened. I was the passenger and those meatballs were personally cooked for me.


Entered at Tue Mar 14 08:57:26 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Travel experience

A dozen years ago, so after 9/11, but before the sophisticated scanners and sniffers, I was in a line to leave at the US airport. I was beckoned and told to go into the curtained personal search booth. The rubber glove comes to mind. The officer closed the curtains and said, “Relax, sir. We are not allowed to use ethnic profiling, so you are the token white middle-aged male … I’m not going to search you, but just stand there for two minutes before you go out. So how’s the weather in England?’


Entered at Tue Mar 14 08:52:18 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Travel Advice

A friend had flown from Bogota to another South American city. As the luggage came round on the carousel, several large dogs were running across the top of the bags. They all leapt on a set of beautiful leather bags and proceeded to bite and rip at them. The local immigration officers drew guns. A lady came forward. They demanded she open the now ripped and saliva sodden bags. She had many bars of Swiss chocolate. The dogs were trained with chocolate as a reward. (It’s also dumb to carry chocolate in case your bags are left out in full sun!)


Entered at Tue Mar 14 04:24:34 CET 2017 from (203.10.111.130)

Posted by:

Doug

Rockin' Chair, go to Bruny Island just south of Hobart and eat some oysters. You won't be sorry.


Entered at Tue Mar 14 01:07:48 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Let Me At'em!!!

I just reread recent posts and realized I was taken in. Ass holes using posts from before to try and bring themselves in to have their links opened! KILL THEM JAN!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Tue Mar 14 00:43:13 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Spelt it wrong

I think I got it right!


Entered at Tue Mar 14 00:39:17 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Paradise

Kevin, I forgot to mention. Don't know if you have ever been in the area. Just off the coast from Brisbane, is Morton Island. An absolute little paradise. Matheww and our Jenny were married on the beach there.

I have attached the website for it. Hope it works, we will be spending four days there shortly. I'm hoping it will help the arthritis. I have to say even in the last 3 months that I haven't been at the wheel in bad weather, and out moving machinery I am feeling great relieve. Without being in the bunk worrying about deck hands on watch, and snuggled up to my Susie........my life is wonderful! The 55 years of work was worth it all.

I guess I haven't finished off the web page some how. It is

https://www.morton-island.com.au/ I don't know the rest.


Entered at Tue Mar 14 00:24:11 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hair today.......Goon tomorrow!!

It appears there is a blood transfusion of new blood here! Wonderful!! Welcome Y'all! Some great comments, "Old Hippy" prehistoric Dylan fan.....I love it!

Lynrd Skynrd..........I don't think I spelt that right....what the fuck. Y'all got to know. The band was named after their high school gymn teacher.......who hated those long haired little pricks!.....I love that too.

Thanks for the heads up Kevin. I recall you mentioning aways back the confrontation at the Hobart Airport. We have the cushion of having our daughter there whose husband is a local.

Susan and I only carry about five kilos each of hash and coke.....so......we're ok :-).

I don't know if you have chanced to see yet. One of the new "Reality TV" shows is the Australian Customs. THEY ARE BRUTAL!........I'll be on my best behaviour alright...and THANKS!


Entered at Mon Mar 13 22:41:23 CET 2017 from (173.3.50.173)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Masterpiece Debut Albums

Child Is Father To the Man. Blood Sweat & Tears.



Entered at Mon Mar 13 22:39:53 CET 2017 from (173.3.50.173)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Masterpiece Debut Albums

"pronounced 'Lĕh-'nérd 'Skin-'nérd", by Lynyrd Skynyrd.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 22:28:34 CET 2017 from (114.75.204.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, the problem is that the cut and paste posts often make more sense than real posts. Kevin, mate, it was for your own protection. It the Tassie devils had got a smell of the apple on you you would have been done for.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 21:58:11 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy Christmas to you, too, Kevin.

brown album had a minor hit with rag mama see my website.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 21:54:46 CET 2017 from (24.114.101.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Kinda pissed that I never get cut and pasted ! Happy New Year, everyone.

Norm:. Have fun and safe travels in Australia..... A heads-up to be taken seriously....Austrailia has very strict immigration controls and even travelling Provence to Provence, their policies are to be taken literally. I once nearly got shot for having an apple in my bag on arrival from Melbourne to Tasmania, I think it was. Actually I did alert them and out came the dogs and all was done with smiles and laughs but I have seen all kinds of drama at Australian airports.

Bob F: Thank you, you were bang on about how the Frampton Comes Alive album was both the best and worst thing to happen to Peter F as he never really did anything songwriting wise after that that even remotely approached those songs........What he did do was continue to play great guitar and to even get better on the instrument. I have great respect for that.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 21:21:33 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought the cut & paste with "happy New Year" in March particularly interesting.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 20:51:52 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cut & paste crap …

We have cut & paste crap … it's all very well blocking them, but couldn't we organise a posse to go over and lynch the bastards?


Entered at Mon Mar 13 20:02:37 CET 2017 from (139.190.218.196)

Posted by:

Philips

Subject: Gail Garnet

The idea was to keep recording and going on as a Band after TLW, and given NLSC and the studio side of TLW it might have worked. Into the eighties, baby boomer fans started craving the veteran groups like nobodies business. I thought John Simon's comment that the reassembled group because a favorite of trashy rednecks was interesting, perhaps using Levon as a way to refight the civil war? Anyway, as with most sad stories, what resonates is the waste, waste, waste. Well, Happy New Year, let's hope it surprises us.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 20:00:11 CET 2017 from (139.190.218.196)

Posted by:

John Carter

Location: Pacific Northwest

In fact, it was three one-act plays. One was called "Motel" and had car headlights blazing into the audience at one point and the cast wore big dolls' heads. Another involved a session with a psychologist, more interested in money than his client-patient. The third, I can't recall visually but, somewhere in the house, I have the "script", which was published in a Penguin paperback. I must dig that out some time.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 14:55:54 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Switch

Since memories surface and some are positive, I'll say it briefly: The Band's first album was the purist evocation of heartfelt 'folk' (the people's)music that I had ever heard from an ensemble. Where that came from after their former life as Levon and the Hawks is a question for the ages. This was such a switch from the music of the bars that it was as if they were replaced by 5 other musicians. How did it affect me? I was in another place when I first heard it through. Though the Brown album was a giant step forward from MFBP and though The Band continued to grow in the early 70s, it is that first eruption of new creativity that lives on in my emotional memory.


Entered at Mon Mar 13 10:21:57 CET 2017 from (86.171.129.218)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

That was a great period, Ian. I'm too young for that era. Really like Bert Jansch, but had to wait until Pentangle to see him. Peter had me googling last week and I found a home recording of Sandy Denny and Alex Campbell singing together at his house in Glasgow. Not great, but interesting. Never saw Alex Campbell, yet saw many others from that era - Davey Graham, Hamish Imlach and Billy Connnolly, the banjo player, etc.

Good to see you back, JT.


Entered at Sun Mar 12 16:13:26 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Bryan Ferry

Speaking of song and dance men, thanks Jeff for the Bryan Ferry info. He's a true troubadour with great translation and always a great band as this time as you note. Maybe new dates will be added to 'fill in the blanks'.


Entered at Sun Mar 12 15:09:40 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Standards

"Do you think of yourself primarily as a singer or a poet? Oh, I think of myself more as a song and dance man, y'know"

As 'Triplicate' looms on the horizon (end of March 2017), consider these words from Dylan in 1965 in his San Francisco interview of 1965. With his standard covers of the last 2 albums and even the folk and blues covers of the 90s, the mining and interpretations of these wonderful songs has given us a different Dylan than the ones we have come to know.

Clearly, for some, this is anathema. Some don't want this Dylan and my perception is that that's OK with Dylan. To some, who have the perception of Dylan as the rebel (like James Dean), the poet/spokesperson of a generation (which like it or not, willing or not, he was by his words, the creator of surreal lyrical songs with renegade characters, losers and punks), or even the pop minister of the slow train, Dylan's most recent 'transformation' leaves some people longing for their own image of Dylan. He lives in their memories as he does in mine from all those years ago when I saw him and heard him and felt those words and melodies in my heart and brain.

Just my opinion now. I've listened again and again to the last 2 albums and to the new songs now available from 'Triplicate'. They are not the Dylan's I have incorporated into my music life from the past. These songs are a new Dylan and, having listened, I like what I hear and admire the work. It is not the mind-bending Dylan lyrics that brought me to him when I was 15 and kept me there for all those years. It is a Dylan of my 60s who takes songs from the past and puts them out there for reexamination and with his interpretations, sings of love and loneliness and sorrow with a renewed voice and a secure and effective band behind him.

I still want new music with 'rebel lyrics' and hard guitars. They are not so hard to find if you search and keep your ears and eyes open. There is no 'new Dylan' and there doesn't have to be. But there are many alternatives to listen to and that keeps me going. As for Bob Dylan, as always, he can do what he wants and I'll still be there. He's earned the right not only to do what he wants to do but to ask me to at least consider what he is doing in the light of day in 2017. For me, what he is doing is 2017 is OK.

Do I still think he has more 'personal lyrical Dylan songs' to create and to offer to us? Yes I do. Like the high priest, Leonard Cohen or the creator Paul Simon, that talent never goes away. He'll do it if and when he wants to do it and again, he'll knock my socks off, like he did with TOOM and this 2000s albums that came after. I wait for it. IMO.


Entered at Sun Mar 12 10:59:58 CET 2017 from (92.54.175.179)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good to see Jerry back. Many thanks for the info on Madeleine Peyroux's UK tour.


Entered at Sun Mar 12 05:33:16 CET 2017 from (67.84.76.60)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Bryan Ferry tour

Everyone should be on the lookout for the Bryan Ferry tour.

They're hitting the U.S., Canada, Austria, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Norway, some of the countries they go through twice.

Amazing band.. He's got Neil Jason on bass, Chris Spedding on guitar. Spedding you all know about. Some of you will be familiar with Neil Jason. He's one of the best bassists you'll find anywhere. Grew up in Canarsie, Bklyn, was one of the in demand NYC bassists by twentyish. Toured with Miles Davis, worked with The Stones, Nevilles, Was & still is the bassist in The Brecker Brothers ( even down one brother, they still tour), Spyro Gyra, worked with Levon, the list is endless.


Entered at Sun Mar 12 04:34:48 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Centurwion

Thwo him to the floor!....yes vewwy woughwy please!

Now! Jewish wapscalion!


Entered at Sun Mar 12 04:28:46 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Under the radar again

Under the radar again

1. Sarah Jarosz

2.Nadia Reid

3.Julie Byrne

4. Madeleine Peyroux

5.Tift Merritt


Entered at Sun Mar 12 04:02:53 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria mostly

Subject: Under The Radar

Under the radar:

1. Joseph Arthur

2. James McMurtry

3. John Craigie

4. Lee Harvey Osmond (Tom Wilson)

5. Stephen Fearing

Thanks, guys.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 20:41:06 CET 2017 from (67.70.148.118)

Posted by:

Bill M

In that case,thanks to Ian W for bringing JT back into the fold. I missed him - thought he must be on some world cruise or something.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 20:37:19 CET 2017 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Stormy Weather

Old fashioned blizzard with winds gusting over 100 kms. It's OK. We're lyin low. Makin hay.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 19:04:37 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Heavy Weather

Joe Jennings are you OK boy? I'm just watching you get a real shit kicking out there.

Hello Jerry! been hiding out I see.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 18:01:37 CET 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Memory slip

Whoops! Yes, I did see "U.S." at the Aldwych Theatre that month but I got mixed up with "American Hurrah" which I also saw but at a different time and place. The latter was the Jean-Claude van Itallie play in which Jacques Levy was involved.

In fact, it was three one-act plays. One was called "Motel" and had car headlights blazing into the audience at one point and the cast wore big dolls' heads. Another involved a session with a psychologist, more interested in money than his client-patient. The third, I can't recall visually but, somewhere in the house, I have the "script", which was published in a Penguin paperback. I must dig that out some time.

"U.S." was a British play and I can recall Adrian Mitchell reading one of his poems in it. It was the one that had a chorus about "fill my eyes with silver and tell me lies about Viet-Nam" (or was it "ears" not eyes"?). He was a very forceful reader then and, decades later when I saw him in a small local venue in the north of England, he was just as powerful.

I think Ronnie Gilbert was in the cast of "America Hurrah". I'll have to see if I still have the programme (booklet).


Entered at Sat Mar 11 17:19:52 CET 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs

Rolling Stone Magazine selected the top 25 musical performances of all time on Saturday Night Live. The Band received the 9th spot - - not surprising. Look what got the #1 slot. Oh my... Check it out..


Entered at Sat Mar 11 15:35:39 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: And finally...for the moment

On the west coast only a boat ride away from Victoria is an opportunity for those in La La Land and all points north to experience...

Magnus August Høiberg - Cashmere Cat

at the Showbox, Seattle, May 5, 2017

Unfortunately, I'll be on the other side of 'vastus Canadasus' on that day (more than a boat ride away) but I wanted to bring this to the attention of those who might be interested.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 15:27:01 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Other things considered

Since I'm already talking....

1. Catch Madeleine Peyreux if you can. She's on tour. We are to see her next week

2. BaRK. On tour. Then Stephen Fearing later in the spring with his new album

3. I was confident that Bill M would remember Emmit Rhodes. If I were a betting man, I would have... He's still out there



Entered at Sat Mar 11 14:39:31 CET 2017 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Memories

Ian W: You brought me out of retirement from this site.

"Time it was, and what a time it was, it was

A time of innocence, A time of confidences

Long ago, it must be, I have a photograph

Preserve your memories; They're all that's left you"

Paul Simon


Entered at Sat Mar 11 10:44:52 CET 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Alex Campbell and Sandy Denny

When I think of Alex Campbell and Sandy Denny, I think of pint beer mugs.

I booked Alex Campbell for the college folk club back in the mid-1960s (1964?). It was held in a venue well away from public transport, so we often arranged to pick featured singers up at the nearest station and to take them back there afterwards and they were always given their beer free. As we took him back to the station,he said that many club organisers expected him to make his own way to and fro and said how pleased he was to be treated so well - but was it the beer talking?

My earliest memory of Sandy Denny is at the Teddington Folk Club, quite near the Thames and not far from the TV studios where The Beatles did the "Thank Your Lucky Stars" programmes. I'd been to a cousin's wedding in Southampton earlier in the day and gone to Teddington that night. I saw Sandy wending her way through the crowd on the upstairs landing of a pub and she had a pint glass in one hand and her guitar in the other.

This was one of those memorable periods for me: Roland Kirk at the T.A. Centre the previous Saturday; Pink Floyd at the Roundhouse the following Saturday; and Bert Jansch and John Renbourne at the Hole in the Ground the Saturday after that!

And, eight days after that, a "FOLK & BLUES CONCERT" at St. Pancras Town Hall. Bert Jansch and Julie Felix were the headliners but Sandy Denny, John Renbourne, Alexis Korner, Tom Paley and Trevor Lucas also performed that night.

All these in a one-month period from 19 November to 18 December and I've missed out a few midweek "activities", too - Mike Westbrook's Sextet at Birbeck College and Jean-Claude Van Itallie's "U.S." at the Aldwych Theatre to name but two. The latter was partly put together by Jacques Levy, who worked with The Byrds and Dylan, of course.

Sorry to bang on about all this but the mention of the Alex Campbell/Sandy Denny album (which I also have) sparked off some memories and you get to a certain stage in your life when looking back comes to loom large.


Entered at Sat Mar 11 07:06:02 CET 2017 from (114.75.199.245)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I had occasion to listen to the Easy Rider soundtrack today for the first time in many years. The cover of The Weight by Smith is really good. I can see that they were trying to stick as close to the original as possible but I think it is the best cover I have heard.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 22:58:26 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Theme Shows and Peter F

Kev, i have to agree with you for the most part. We have friends who went to 30 or more Springsteen shows on The River Tour these past couple of years. Even though he did a great deal of other songs in addition to The River record each night, I still think it had to get old really fast. That being said a dream show back in the 70's and 80's would have been Dylan coming out and playing the folk albums in their entirety on an acoustic guitar. Whenever he reached back and did one of those songs acoustically it was always the highlight of the show for me. I would have also loved to see him do the entire Blood On The Tracks with the same type of band he used on the album.

By the way you mentioned Peter Frampton recently, he actually has a new song coming out today about saving a bird. Really nice guitar on it. Check out link.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 14:01:40 CET 2017 from (92.54.175.179)

Posted by:

Peter V

Alex Cambell- brown-yellow sleeve, bought it in Woolworths. Laden with classics. 10/6d instead of normal 32/6d. I still have that LP - I found the Sandy Denny one only a couple of years ago.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 11:51:16 CET 2017 from (86.171.129.218)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I never knew about those earlier Sandy Denny related albums, Peter, though I did own an Alex Campbell Scottish folk songs album back in the day. Another Forever More moment. But that surely backs up the point I was making.

Haso, I like jazz influenced music too. I did go to John Martyn's Solid Air concert and thought it was brilliant, but he also had to deal with punters shouting for requests not on the album.

I would have liked to have seen the jazz influenced Steely Dan. Love their music. A great retirement project listening to their music.

Bassmanlee - I've never had the opportunity to see an album being recorded. I would have liked to experience this. Watching the programmes related to this on the TV, I wouldn't have the patience. I remember seeing Burt Baccharach make Cilla Black sing Anyone Who Had A Heart about twenty times. Hellish experience for her.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 09:56:34 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Knowing what's next (live)

Because I know I'm going to review, I check setlist.com to look at recent shows before I go. Few artists are rigid, though some are. So I generally know what's coming next, though love a surprise. But you know which artists do surprises and which artists never do. Doesn't bother me.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 09:52:39 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Live at Filmore East was the first Allman Bros album I heard. I vastly prefer Eat A Peach though … but that's about my sum of Allman Bros familiarity!


Entered at Fri Mar 10 09:49:31 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Whole album shows

Didn't tribute bands start this off?

I guess Smile by Brian Wilson was my first, then Paris 1919 by John Cale (two of my all time best shows too). I've seen Steeleye Span do it with Now We Are Six, and Emmylou Harris do it with Wrecking Ball. Asia did it with the first album. Some new folk artists will tour and play the whole of the latest album. Yes, it works if you love the album, and as Steeleye Span says, it is interesting to visit things you may never have done live and semi-forgotten. Emmylou had to deal with two arseholes in the audience on hers. Review from 2014 is linked … it includes Daniel Lanois. QUOTE FROM 2014 REVIEW:

The whole album concept caused a bit of a fuss in this one. A Judas! / Manchester Free Trade Hall moment, if you like. After Where Will I Be (for which Emmylou didn’t play guitar) she announced the concept. I thought everyone knew the concept, but I was wrong. After the fourth song, Neil Young’s Wrecking Ball, a man stood up and started shouting in the third or fourth row. I couldn’t hear what he was saying, but Emmylou could, and politely (calling him ‘sir’) said that this was billed as the Wrecking Ball Tour so yes, she would be going through the album in sequence, so the content should not come as a surprise to him, and if he would care to be patient, there would be some other songs later. She’s a total professional, and handled it with aplomb, but anyone is rattled by that kind of audience attack. She announced Going Back to Harlan next with a tribute to the McGarrigle sisters who wrote it, and declared that so many of her ten favourite writers, including Lanois, are Canadian. Beautiful song, beautifully taken. But when she started Deeper Well (her co-write with David Olney and Daniel Lanois) we were reminded that an arsehole is indeed an arsehole, because the protester and his companion, got up and pushed their way to the aisle and marched out. Yes, they didn’t choose the gap between songs, they waited till the middle to cause maximum hissy fit disturbance to audience and performers.

To a degree, the Brighton Festival Programme and the ticket is slightly to blame. I read the music press, I knew she was doing the Wrecking Ball tour, and Daniel Lanois was billed with her, which makes it pretty clear. However the programme does not title it The Wrecking Ball Tour (as it is titled everywhere else) and says “she mines 26 albums and four decades of singing and songwriting for this standout concert” So there is a possibility that someone who expected early 70s Nashville with a folky bent could be surprised to find that a performer had grown, developed and changed over a forty year period, though that is no excuse for standing up shouting in the middle of a concert, nor for making such a deliberately dramatic departure. I thought back to the days of Peter Grant. At a Led Zeppelin concert, such a display while they did a surprising (then) acoustic section would have been foolhardy. The audience response was to clap louder and demonstrate more enthusiasm to her to compensate. I got sore palms contributing.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 07:39:50 CET 2017 from (24.114.48.133)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I DETEST the thought and experience of seeing a band play an album in its entirety as the concert experience. A major part of the fun of seeing a live show is wondering just what is coming next.........the thrill of realizing that Jeff Beck or Rod Stewart or David Bowie or Bob Dylan ( pre-this horrific Sinatra same-song-every night rut he is trapped in ) is about to play something you had only dreamed he might IS such a rush......Knowing what's coming next is fine at home or on a plane - not live - not ever.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 05:14:05 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: wild honey

By Jesus, Jan; were that Glendale wasn't 3000 miles from New England. Thanks for the playbill. Look forward to reviews.

Any idea, Peter, on who 1st got this play-entire-album/nostalgia thing going? Seems like quite a trend. Doing that sort of stuff, over your way? Dunc? Wallsend (other than those TLW shows Garth & John Simon were up to)? As mentioned before here, maybe the last time I go to big-time r'n'r (getting kind of $$) was The Allman Bros doing all of Eat a Peach 3-4 years ago in Boston. They'd done all of Live at Fillmore East the night before. I know Phish used to sometimes play live all of someone else's record or concert as a one-time deal back in the 90's; especially around holidays. Pretty sure they honored the Band that way at least once; maybe RofA, not sure.

For you non-United Statians, Fillmore East is well worth your time to understand those genres a bit more. I know, that you've said such as the Allmans (perhaps the Dead too), never made much splash in Jolly old England. They would be more jazz oriented than our 5, in terms of improvisational; a good bit more geared to "live" performance.


Entered at Fri Mar 10 04:54:51 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

I'm glad everyone was pleased by that Colin Linden interview. I came across it by accident. I went to that site looking for an interview Rockburn had done with Bill "Spaceman" Lee, couldn't find it, then started watching one with Don Francks and noticed the Colin Linden one.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 18:48:11 CET 2017 from (84.209.132.97)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Music from Wild Honey

March 25, 2017, Glendale, CA: Garth and Sister Maud with a stellar cast doing all of MFBP and TB live!


Entered at Thu Mar 9 14:28:13 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: debuts

Dunc, I agree there exceptions to every rule. Not personally familiar with Ms. Denny's career arc, but my point was more that artists that were integral in previous projects, (like Mr. Mason) then "go solo", they bring along a lot of experience re recording techniques, studio use, production, arrangements, etc.

I've only been in one, maybe two studio sessions. It is much different than live performance. I did learn what a producer does. He or she urges you to put down the smokes, shut up and play and not waste precious studio time. And tells you when your approach is not working. Unfortunately in my limited experience we did not HAVE a producer, so the results were less than they should have been.

Yes, Bill, Emitt Rhodes was who I was thinking of. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 13:17:43 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: In praise of John McVie

I bought the remastered Bella Donna 3 CD set by Stevie Nicks yesterday … reviews praised the remastering, bonus tracks and a whole live show. She had a star band for the 1981 live show, with Russ Kunkel on drums and Bob Glaub on bass, Roy Bittan on piano, Benmont Tench on keyboards.

Try “Dreams” because the Live 1981 version shows how great John McVie and Mick Fleetwood were on the original. I played them back to back, and while the bass notes are the same, the 1981 really lacks that particular John McVie sound and his spring and bounce. It showed me how great John McvVie was at relatively simple bass lines. Also, while I admire Russ Kunkel hugely, Mick Fleetwood’s drum part has a SNAP! to it that Kunkel’s doesn’t.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 13:09:01 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Early Sandy!

I’m thinking hard here. I reckon the first Sandy Denny album would then be “Alex Campbell & Friends” (1967) on the somewhat dodgy Saga low budget label, and a record I own. If you’re looking for name credit, it’s “Sandy & Johnny” with Johnny Silvo, also Saga and 1967.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 11:54:52 CET 2017 from (86.128.176.184)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Can't agree with you Bassmanlee and Bill M. That means if you are picking a debut album for Sandy Denny, it has to be the Strawbs album, and not count her first appearance on the second Fairport album, where she raises the performance of this band strikingly, and then there is her solo work. Admittedly her work with Fotheringay is not at the same level. Loads of artists like that, guys.

I'm gunning for you Bill M today (in a friendly sort of way). Robbie Roberson is a great album with some great songs on it. Somewhere Down The Crazy river is arguably the biggest hit of any Band related song across here. And, help me here, Bill M, (I've googled, but can't find anything), I think the song won a Canadian award.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 07:18:31 CET 2017 from (219.89.16.203)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: RAM trucks

I'm not sure that was what Bob had in mind. We had an awefull add on TV here about some guy driving his 4WD through rivers and reserves while saying "these are my values". I think it was an American add. Thankfully it got pulled quite quickly.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 04:51:39 CET 2017 from (24.114.48.125)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Anderson East - Forever Young

Just heard a TV Advertisement for RAM trucks featuring Bob Dylan's "Forever Young".....ran to the iPad to look up who was singing......at first listen seems a staggeringly great version of the song by a guy named Anderson East. Do check it out.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 04:17:25 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Butter

Coulda been, Dunc. There's a great tune, sung by his bass player called "The Boxer" (not Simon & Garf's). Shoulda been a boxer baby, 'cause everything you do just knock's me out. Etc. It starts w/ a quick little spot, maybe 4 or 5 notes that were the from the theme music of an old-time sponsor of a TV boxing show. Maybe a shaving cream or something like that.


Entered at Thu Mar 9 02:21:43 CET 2017 from (67.70.148.118)

Posted by:

Bill M

bassmanlee: You mean Emitt Rhodes?


Entered at Wed Mar 8 22:21:32 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Though it's arguable, Paul Simon's true debut is "The Paul Simon Songbook" before "Wednesday Morning 3 am" and without Artie. It was released in Europe though not in the USA till later.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 22:07:05 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: True debuts …

Catching up on an old Uncut, they suggest "One Step Beyond" by Madness as a true debut … zero previous. Fantastic


Entered at Wed Mar 8 20:21:20 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: senior moment

Bob, not Rhett Miller of Old 57s. I don't have this guy's name right, and it escapes me at the moment. It was an album released in maybe the early 70's. Green cover, his face and an old weathered window. I think he played everything on it himself. As I recall, he sounded a bit like McCartney. Got a lot of exposure but only ever made one other album, maybe two. I would have to search the record room...


Entered at Wed Mar 8 19:56:54 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.106)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Stills Collins

Apparently Stephen Stills & Judy Collins are touring together. They have a few dates set in the general NY area.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 18:15:20 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rhett Miller

Lee, the first couple of Rhett Miller solo records were killer, weren't they? I especially love the song Fireflies he did with Rachel Yamagata on the 2nd one. Link to video. Even he's debut came after years of touring and recording with Old 97's. He's from Texas but actually lives in the Hudson Valley. Very easy going sociable guy.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 17:34:47 CET 2017 from (24.114.56.251)

Posted by:

Bill M

bassmanlee: I agree, including when it comes to Robbie's first (not that it's my favourite of his anyway).


Entered at Wed Mar 8 17:26:16 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Linden interview, Rockburn

Fred, thanks for that Colin Linden interview link. this Rockburn guy seems to get around a bit. Not that I recognize all the interviewees, being a non-Canadian, but I see Bruce Cockburn and others on there. Another rabbit hole to fall down! Just what I need!

A late comment on the debut album thread. Can your really say that the first solo album by someone who had extensive previous studio experience is a debut? Isn't Paul Simon's debut Wendsday Morning 3 AM with Artie? Eric Clapton had gobs of experience with Mayall, Cream and other before his first "solo" record. Similarly, Dave Mason's Alone Together is an excellent album, but he already had the Traffic sessions behind him. Santana, CTA, I think qualify as true killer coming-out-of-nowhere debuts, and I'm sure there are many others, some going on to greater heights and/or fame and some to obscurity. Rhett Miller?


Entered at Wed Mar 8 15:58:36 CET 2017 from (172.164.12.69)

Posted by:

Albert

Thanks , Albert Wallis albertwall29922@gmail.com


Entered at Wed Mar 8 12:19:54 CET 2017 from (24.114.65.58)

Posted by:

Bill M

haso: I can't speak for Peter V, of course, but in my case no - artistic licence.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 10:44:30 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Fred. really enjoyed the interview especially as Bill M says - the last ten minutes.

JQ. Really enjoy Local Hero too. Couldn't understand at the time why they chose two settings at other sides of the country, John D. I see the film as being part of a trilogy of films related to Scottish life at the time with Gregory's Girl and the not so popular as the other two, Comfort and Joy. Though I really liked it and am sure John D would identify with the DJ as the leading character.

Thanks, Haso. I wonder if it was the live double album I had.

Yesterday I went into the local record shop, which is slowly turning into a record shop before my eyes. Another album on sale for £200 - the first Wire album, new, in pristine condition, never played and seemingly rare.

I could have bought Robbie Robertson second hand on vinyl for £14, but I'm all CDs now. So at Two for a Tenner, I bought Okie by JJ Cale, which I previously owned on vinyl. I have a JJ Cale collection, but miss those early albums. And Our Bright Future by Tracy Chapman, who I like but don't know well.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 05:03:53 CET 2017 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: coat rack

yes, Haso, I remember those racks - I believe they're still there.

I haven't contributed much here lately. belatedly i'd say we should have mentioned the debut album for los lobos, and their sophomore effort, as fine records. and i've been on a bowie binge: rediscovering young americans and station to station, as well as some later efforts like heathen and reality. no band connection that i'm aware of, but some great stuff scattered throughout his output.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 04:56:55 CET 2017 from (114.75.202.172)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There used to be a two album best of compilation called 'Golden Butter' which was pretty good.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 04:36:48 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Dunc listening

Dunc: can't tell you for sure what that double Butterfield album was, but as I think I mentioned, you'd not go wrong w/ The Butterfield Blues Band Live, which was a dbl LP. I believe this was towards the end of his time at Elektra. Many moons ago, I had a greatest type LP called Golden Butter, but somebody stole it from the backside of a coatrack during college days (glenn t., remember those in Howard Student Center Concourse?). I bought a recent cd of the same type (The PBB, anthology, elektra years) just to hear "One More Heartache" again. I recall my older brother buying an LP, probably 1967 or 8, called In My Own Dream; don't recall the name of the song but one on there was an amazing ode to hard drinks and if Butter wasn't drunk singing it, he was masterful at imitation. Of course, as time proved out, the bottle did get him pretty early.

As for Jackson Browne, you'd not go wrong w/ Running on Empty. Although my music appreciation prof never cared for J. Browne (not enough going on w/ the rhythym section, not enough key or tempo changes), he can grow on you. David Lindley plays a wonderful electric dobro. I always wondered if Richard played more dobro than we likely ever heard; seems like they could have featured it a little more, as they did Levon's mandolin, on occasion.

You guys didn't really get any $ back in the prehistoric (pre-Norm) days, now didya. Kind of amazin' it's still trudging along, 40 years on from TLW, to be honest.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 03:05:55 CET 2017 from (24.114.65.58)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: Wonderful interview with Colin Linden - thanks! Dunc, be sure to listen to the last 10 minutes, when Colin talks about how BaRK came to be and about getting ready for their Last Waltz tribute. I especially appreciated Colin likening Chuvalo to Danko.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 02:32:47 CET 2017 from (24.114.65.58)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Muzak in real life

Ragtime: In 1985 I was seated in a fancy Chinese restaurant in Jeddah and what should come out of the speakers but a syruppy rendition of "Aqualung".


Entered at Wed Mar 8 02:10:02 CET 2017 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: The Band Guestbook, my entry, 1999

Subject: A most devastating experience

Today I walked through the "Passage", which is a shopping arcade in The Hague, dating from the early 1900s.

They were playing muzak. I hate muzak. Well, you all do, of course. I am even a militant member of a Dutch anti-muzak society fighting for a muzak-free environment.

Anyway: I had to be there, this morning. Couldn't avoid it. Normally I try not to hear what the loudspeakers are doing to me. This time I was struck by a whiny tune that sounded vaguely familiar.

What was it? I tried and tried to pin down what it was...

And then... suddenly I recognized the tune...

Oh no! It happened to be a slow & slimy arrangement of "Chest Fever"!

I had to play the real thing all day to expell this painful experience out of my head. Now I'm wondering how on earth one of the most intense and dramatic Band songs could be turned into something absolutely horrible.


Entered at Wed Mar 8 01:18:55 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.4)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I had the TV on in the background while on the phone & tending to matters looking at the computer, either this morning or yesterday morning when The Weight came on the TV set. I think it started in the "Gonna catch a cannonball" verse. I hadda look, the show was reruns of a series named SuperNatural.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 23:44:54 CET 2017 from (76.69.47.46)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, Fred. I really enjoyed that interview with Colin Linden.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 21:15:09 CET 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Local Hero

Interviewed Peter Riegert; from Local Hero shortly after it came out. We talked about the magic of editing. The little town he stayed in and the beach scenes were shot hundreds of miles away; from each other. They couldn't find a town and beach like that together. I told him at the time, I wish he hadn't told me that. Ah but the magic of flawless editing. I love that movie to this day. And the soundtrack.....


Entered at Tue Mar 7 15:37:51 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Local Hero

Dunc - Your comments about Scotland and dancing made me think of this movie - so we watched it last night and it remains top notch! Some of dated aspects have almost come full circle: greedy oil men and Ruskies! And a great soundtrack and subtle humor that works completely. I'd like to get up into that area someday; I've never been north of Edinburgh.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 12:34:52 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Did some mention BaRK?

A Colin Linden interview I came across.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 11:58:35 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dance To The Music

Scottish country dancing was popular in the South … now I recall, my mum used to do it too. The English folk revival seems to have replaced it. When various folk groups play theatres, it's become common to invite several Morris Dancing groups along to perform in the lobby … the Demon Barbers always do it. So there must be six or seven local Morris Dancing groups just in East Dorset … again, I never saw it in my youth, but you did see Scottish and Irish dance troupes. It's a bit like "new" English folk, beginning to make a separate mark. The Unthanks, from the North-East, always feature clog dancing on stage too … a Northern English speciality.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 11:29:41 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks everybody. There are some really great Scottish dance bands and Scottish country dancing is very important to a lot of people. I thought the Pinball Wizard parody was brilliant. Every so often there is a boom in Ceilidh dancing. I was surprised when I read in your book, Peter, that you took part in country dancing in your neck of the woods back in the day.

Ian. You're correct in that people heard good songs and tunes through the Scottish shows. The New Year holiday went on for about 4 days and was very family and friends oriented. Everywhere was closed. Christmas is now the main holiday.

Still enjoying BARK, Bill M.

That explains it Bob F. I prefer the Kris version to Janis.

I think Solid Air is brilliant, Roger.

Robin Hall and Jimmy McGregor were a really good folk act. Jimmy McGregor, in his eighties, is still on the radio from time to time.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 10:22:10 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: American Gothic

American Gothic is leaning against the bookshelves, in a little stack of recent secondhand LP finds that I haven't had time to play. I picked up a very clean copy a couple of weeks ago. Heard it years back, but I don't remember it very well.

Road to Cairo was Julie Driscoll with Brian Auger & The Trinity's follow up to This Wheel's On Fire, and as with This Wheel's On Fire, I reckon Julie did the ultimate version.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 09:26:17 CET 2017 from (37.203.158.216)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham

Subject: The Missing American Gothic

Bill - Montana is a beautiful song - but Down River is a unique piece of acting within a song. The phrasing , the dialogue are exceptional. I've been listening to the first album non-stop for two weeks and I'll switch to American Gothic - which I think is better overall - but Road To Cairo and Down River are standouts.

Bob - The Missing - second series had more scope than the first and we watched it eagerly - but prefer the first. Have you wa'tched Happy Valley? Both series - world class. Same for 'No Offence'.


Entered at Tue Mar 7 04:07:23 CET 2017 from (24.114.56.122)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Been meaning to get back to you re BaRK. Yes, their first was influential in the sense that it got Willie P Bennett recording on his own again (instead of just playing in Fred Eaglesmith's band - not that there's anything wrong with that). And Willie P won a Juno for his wonderful comeback CD. And the three guys who thought they were doing a one-off tribute project saw the light and decided to become a formal trio. They're currently on a cross-Canada tour - Massey Hall 10 days ago, Saskatoon coming up (a friend there tells me). I hope they do the decent thing and play Scotland someday.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 22:27:53 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: I'm Not From Here

I'm not from here

But people tell me it's not like it used to be

They say I should've been here back about ten years

Before it got ruined by folks like me

James McMurty


Entered at Mon Mar 6 22:19:07 CET 2017 from (24.114.56.122)

Posted by:

Bill M

Seeing Al's heroic post reminded me of those wonderful early days at the GB when Jan would pay us by the word. Peter V and I would post 15 or even twenty times in a day -enough for pin money, but not a living wage. But Al had to go for more more more, and Jan had to move to a different model. Ah, nostalgia.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 20:33:08 CET 2017 from (76.69.44.70)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Note to self……..whenever Al Edge has been away too long….do toss in one of the following asides in a post…..”Mrs. Klopp wears army boots”…….”Luis Suárez’s 4 goal game vs Norwich City never happened – it was fake news"


Entered at Mon Mar 6 19:12:58 CET 2017 from (173.3.51.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, certainly as you gallantly presented, context is required. The first wheel actually was more staggering than the first wheel used on a car or airplane.

Speaking of Amanda, I spent part of yesterday afternoon at a show with Kay & several other long time friends. Some going back over thirty years. (Remember Kay, who is a close friend of all Band members going all the way back to the Big Pink days?). Amanda planned to join us, but a family thing popped up.



Entered at Mon Mar 6 18:29:30 CET 2017 from (86.7.70.30)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Defending the realm - that's the Big Pink realm

Kev - sorry mate - but you're talking absolute bollocks.

:-0)

And I'll proceed to tell you why with a little piece I prepared earlier - about a dozen or so years earlier that is!!!

:-0.

Incidentally within the said piece please for Amanda read Kevin

THE BAND'S BEST

Really nice of Amanda to take on board the point I was attempting to make regarding the significance of Music From Big Pink to many of us older Band fans. I have to say I found it really quite gratifying that she had gone to the trouble of actually trying to listen to the album through the ears of one of us 'arl arses', as it were. It’s a rarer thing than ever these days, such old age empathy. So many thanks Amanda.

If we go back to the time of the original discussions on this topic, my more magnanimous side had put forward a view little of which could, I feel, be construed as contentious. It was along the lines that since The Band so clearly represented different things to different sections of the group's following – in many cases this being consistent with the point of exposure of the respective individual to whichever album, album collection or particular incarnation of the group they had first experienced – the way in which Big Pink itself was rated would often correspond to such patterns. In such light it was therefore scarcely surprising – although nonetheless still very much personally disheartening – to witness the relatively lowly rating of Big Pink amongst so many on this GB – particularly, it would appear, amongst those of more recent persuasion.

My more bullish and contentious side now ventures to expand upon the slant that Amanda touched on – that is, how and why Big Pink came to represent something of a watershed to many of us – including old Slowhand Clapped Out himself - who were exposed to it for the first time back in 1968; why and how it has come to carry such significance to us.

In fact, let us go even further and for the sake of argument take it to a rather more extreme conclusion. What if we now put it to fellow GB'ers that anyone who finds they are unable to rank Big Pink alongside The Brown album at the very pinnacle of The Band's recorded musical achievements are very possibly failing to see the entire picture as lucidly as they perhaps should? That certainly – in so far as history must surely end up judging our heroes – such a contention actually goes to the very core of what The Band represents.

Okay, so I realise feathers can easily get ruffled with such candid assertions as this. Let's see then if we can try and follow this one through right from the start, beginning with a slightly broader perspective on how we formulate judgements on these sort of things.

Let's take somebody who has just latched onto a particular artist. Any artist of significance. They naturally rate this artist highly and are genuinely earnest about acquiring a completely balanced perspective on this artist. In such an instance which would constitute the most reliable way for them to become acquainted with the catalogue of that artist? Would it not be to do so as chronologically as possible? Clearly, not always the easiest way - nor the most affordable. However, in order to formulate a truly objective appreciation of a particular artist's development, both in its own right and in relation to its peers, surely the best way? In other words, you can certainly have your favourite snatches of any artist but unless you have viewed everything through the appropriate objective lens then such favouritism remains merely that.

I'll venture a personal experience where I perceive relying on mere favouritism can tend to obscure such judgement.

I have spent many an hour on various websites defending the magnificence of the Beatles first album, 'Please Please Me'. What I have tended to find is that many of the Beatles more recent fan base are invariably only too eager to dismiss the – shall we call them in hindsight – rather naive and simplistic qualities of that first album. They compare it with the sophisticated intricacies and resonances of subsequent Beatles offerings, such as Revolver, The White Album, Abbey Road or any late sixties/early seventies Rolling Stones classic album and declare poor old PPM a non-starter by comparison.

In doing so they are – in my opinion – overlooking what simply has to be a crucial part of any such judgement. That is the comparison with what else was on offer at the relevant time.

In the Beatles case this is straightforward enough to demonstrate, of course – or at least it is for those of us who happened to be around at the time. We take it as read the pivotal importance PPM occupies in rock history. Before it, for example, no other popular artist had self-penned so many songs purely for an album. Further no other popular artist had so successfully merged pure pop with R&B and R&R. The fact is that at the relevant time – namely 1963 – PPM was simply staggering in its consistent quality. It was, comfortably, the best pop/rock album up to that point in time. The best, in fact, until The Beatles next album – 'With The Beatles'. Indeed, as a little 'test the water' gauge on this, one needs only look at arguably the joint weakest track on that second album. The track "I Wanna Be Your Man" was given to The Rolling Stones by John and Paul and became the Stones’ – up to then – most successful song. It also convinced Mick and Keef that they could try their hand at songwriting. A prompting of some significance I'm sure most would agree.

Thus, in the case of The Beatles, it would be extremely flawed reasoning to form a judgement on PPM – or its follow up – without placing such judgement in its historical context. Also without taking cognizance of all the ensuing limitations of what at that time the Beatles' peers were creating or, indeed, what it was humanly possible for any contemporaneous popular music artist to create.

Moving onto the case of The Band, we find things are significantly different.

The Band's creative arc never mirrored that of The Beatles. True, their musical development did not begin an awful lot later than The Beatles – possibly only a matter of a few years or so at most. The crucial difference was that by the time The Band formally released their first recorded offering in 1968, namely Music From Big Pink, they were already comfortably the finished article, possibly as tight and accomplished as it was possible for any combo to be. What's more, they were able to dip selectively into the full repertoire of rock music's, by then, already formidable legacy and marinate it with their own vast range of contemporary and traditional musical influences. By so doing they created a sound that, whilst in itself no more unique than that of The Beatles, carried a maturity that was entirely unique.

A major part of that maturity evolved from an instinctive democracy that seemed to permeate every pore of that first album. Each tiny part of Big Pink appeared to exist simply to serve the whole. It was as if each vocal, each harmony, each instrument – in fact each and every contribution – was teetering on some invisible tightrope between dominance and subservience; competing frantically for every available space yet never less than complementary or utterly accommodating to the other.

Meanwhile, the products of these precarious balancing acts [the ensuing finished album tracks] – no matter how memorable and distinctive they happened to have been – were, in effect, always going to be there as merely a part of an integral whole. It meant Big Pink was not simply a collection of outstanding yet ultimately disparate songs. Rather, like the group who'd created it, the album was a genuine entity where everything fused together seamlessly to create a whole that was simply magical.

The instinctive ‘metaphorical’ jettisoning from this entity of This Wheel's on Fire and I Shall Be Released by some fans – myself included – was to come later. As it stood at the time of its inauguration, it was to be little wonder that The Band's contempories had never before heard such a sound, let alone that they were never able to approach the mark it set.

Nor was such unmatched accomplishment the only quality that distinguished Big Pink from anything else around.

Possibly even more distinctive and defining was its inherent authenticity. The sound conveyed everything about where it was from. The singers and performers on Big Pink sang of their everyday life; the everyday trials and tribulations of the community they were so clearly an integral part of. Crucially their words and sentiments were not mere posturing. In contrast to the vast majority of their white contempories with their – by comparison – sometimes limp offerings, these fellows were the real deal. True representatives of their own bretheren.

This wasn't Joe Cocker asking you to lend your ears for him to sing you a song or Eric Clapton waiting for some mystical love to shine in. It wasn't even John Lennon dissecting the pitfalls and/or merits of a revolution. Rather these were ordinary Joes, country cousins and kinfolk singing from all corners of their front parlour – often at the same time – in some deliciously raw and previously unheard yet unmistakable harmony of the rural American community they had emanated from. The music they were making was simply an extension of that community. Earthy yet heavenly; bleak yet uplifting; stark yet comforting.

Significantly, too, they were also inviting you, their audience, to become a part of what that music – their music – was offering. Its joys and heartaches; its mundanity and its mystery; its suffering and its healing. Even if it were only for the magical interludes when you were listening to them extolling it, then it was still more than enough for it to sink its teeth into your psyche and draw you right in to its very heart.

"Come let me show you how...to milk a cow" was no idle aside. Rather this was a fully blown invitation for you to get those city hands of yours carressing those cow's teats for all they were worth.

Forget anyone else, this was the nearest to complete Soul - and, for that matter Blues and Gospel – that any white artists had ever got; have ever got. The community they extolled was opening up before your very ears – and eyes. Imprisoned in some inner city bedroom you simply couldn't ask for more from a piece of long playing plastic than for it to transport you heart and soul into the backwoods and homesteads of rural America.

Big Pink – and its successor The Band – were a reflection of an artistic entity at the very zenith of its individual and collective power and sensibility. They were performing and singing about – and within – an environment in which they had become steeped; about which they were genuinely passionate.

And it showed.

In every note, in every chord, in every pause came evidence of that conviction. It may not have been the easiest listening music in which you'd ever attempted to immerse yourself. It may not have contained a solitary moment of what we might term pure pop or rock. However, once you had allowed its rhythms and pulses, its front parlour harmonies and sentiments, its craftsmanship and sheer mastery of the idiom to invade your own sensibilities then you could not help but become convinced that you were in the presence of some unique musical entity wherein the sum of the constituent parts amounted to far more than seemed at all humanly possible.

Hardly surprising then the attachment grew stronger with each play. And there were hundreds and hundreds of those playings. One after the other as the album's ambience entered your every orifice. And lingered for all time.

You'd find yourself reading the words of the back cover over and over again searching for some hidden clues as to what these fellows were about, which bit of the respective songs each of them was singing, where they had come from, where they were going. Frustratingly, you'd find little to quench your thirst. All you had to go on was the music and vocals spitting out from what seemed like different parts of that little mono record player before you. There was a complete absence of fuss or hype. It left you craving for the merest snippet. Your intrigue at the stark simplicity of their collective name would soon cede to a glaring realisation. What else, after all, could these guys possibly have been called?

Then there was the utter appropriateness of their own names – Danko, Manuel, Garth, Jaime and Levon. 'Levon' for Chrissakes!! You just couldn't make this sort of stuff up, so authentic did it all sound. And then the few brief sentiments uttered by the guy on guitar, Jaime 'Robbie' Robertson, about them enjoying it all 'just enough to smile at one another when we're playing'. It was like some snatched insight into the mental rigeurs of a bunch of musical geniuses. What else would they do, you'd reflect knowingly, smiling to yourself at the logic of it all. Not only was all this utterly convincing. For those to whom such things mattered – and as you might expect with these sort of things that was regrettably a minority – it was intoxicating, enchanting. In short it became vital.

Meantime, the downside was there as well, of course. Invisible, undetectable yet nevertheless looming all the time in the background.

Not surprisingly, The Band as a collective power could never surpass such an epiphany; such bona fide genius. With Big Pink and its bedfellow The Band they had succeeded in establishing a ceiling that nobody before nor since has got near.

Their achievements had soared beyond merely the sound their music had created. Somehow, the sincerity and sheer downhomeness of their songs and performances on those albums had married together to create an aura of ordinary folk community, rustic life and American history that had resulted in something unique. An art form within an art form as it were. What's more, they had taken it as far as it could go. In the process they had set a mark that was to become unattainable not only for others but also for themselves. Thereafter, inevitably, they, their music and that art form waned. As unerringly as an arrow falling from the apex of its arc, they – and we – were all destined to head towards planet earth.

As they and, hence, their music grew away from the very togetherness and lifestyle that had helped forge it; that had created and sustained it. Inevitably, inexorably it was to lose its substance. The integrity and purity of Big Pink and The Band – those albums' very essence – had been but a tangible manifestation of what was a living breathing entity.

Now the inherent pressures and trappings of fame meant The Band were struggling to hold that together.

Sure, their subsequent offerings were still of the very highest order. Fact was even at their lamest these fellows were peerless musicians and vocalists. Many individual tracks were remarkable. There still came moments of exquisite beauty. Stagefright, their third album contained a string of magical songs and performances that were a testimony to artists of such stature. Rock of Ages was ludicrously accomplished and unleashed My Brother Jake for fucks sake. Moondog Matinee was a nostalgic delight. Northern Lights, meanwhile, presented luscious textures that just soothed the soul.

The difference was in the tales these subsequent albums told; in the windows they opened.

No longer did those tales carry that indefinable authenticity of Big Pink and The Band. No longer did those windows open up to reveal a consistent cinematic landscape. What had once somehow sucked you into its tapestry until you had felt an integral part of it, now merely enthralled you with its isolated layers of brilliance.

That validity which had singled those masterpieces out; that had set them apart was – understandably – gone. Those very ingredients that had made Big Pink and The Band such complete entities, once so available, were now proving more than elusive even for these multi-talented folk.

The sobering fact was no longer did the new material speak for an entire breed of people. Rather it spoke just for the singers and performers and – while that made perfect sense for someone in their position and could still sound at times like heaven – it was simply no longer enough to sustain the aura. The Band's first two creations had made them immortal. Now, manifestly, they were showing they were not. Remorselessly, life was calling in its dues.

A sense of duty is an instinctive thing. Mostly we display it in respect of family and those closest to us. The need to protect them and defend them. To be responsible for them. It is part of the bond.

To feel something akin to that for what is merely a rock album is most probably a preposterous notion. Nonetheless, that I feel such a bond for 'Music From Big Pink' is quite evident from what I find I've written here. This is not least in response to what I have perceived since first discovering this site as a tendency of some to relegate the importance of Big Pink. The intensity of my sentiments may or may not be shared by others. And in the overall scheme of things that, frankly, matters not. What does matter, as far as I'm concerned, is that what I see as the unique majesty of Music From Big Pink has now been represented in a manner which I hope has done it some form of the justice I believe it merits.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 18:34:18 CET 2017 from (67.70.148.118)

Posted by:

Bill M

Roger: I've tried the first David Ackles a couple times over the years, but for me it always paled in comparison to his "American Gothic", especially "Montana Song" (which Zappa would parody in "Moving To Montana" - or at least that's my theory).

Peter V etc.: My only New Years eve in the UK was spent in the village of Cartmel in Cumbria - England, but only just. After hours of drinking, everybody from every one of the surprisingly numerous pubs around the town square emptied into the square to shout and mingle. I don't recall there being organised music - just ragged attempts at "Auld Lang Syne".


Entered at Mon Mar 6 18:08:14 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Jesse Winchester

The Jesse Winchester was a great debut. Not sure if that was already mentioned.

Roger, I think we had a conversation a couple years back about The Missing. Did you see 2nd season? So good.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 17:29:32 CET 2017 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Truly awful Dunc...

Thanks a bunch Dunc. So easy to parody that sort of new Years Eve music! Wow so Solid Air was the 6th album.

Kris Kristofferson - I first heard him as the eponymous player in Cisco Pike. What a film - Gene Hackman, Kris K., Karen Black and Harry Dean Stanton. I bought my first Kristofferson album after seeing this and swiftly followed with two more. Great debut album, whatever the title. I keep thinking of others - Tim Hardin anyone? Great debut album with too little to follow - like David Ackles.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 16:17:43 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Scottish Country Dancing

When I was teaching English, we had our theatre shows every Wednesday, but we had Scottish Country Dancing every fourth Friday. You got paid for "supervising" the evening so I sometimes did it. A local Caledonian Society group came in with bagpipes and accordions. The Swiss and Germans in particular loved it. Dunno why it was "country" dancing rather than urban. I mainly slunk at the sides hoping not to be pulled into a demonstration. As I fictionalised in a novel of the era, one of the the society's leaders was Welsh (but very fond of dancing) and one member was a Jamaican guy with a Scottish wife. He wore the full kilt regalia too. It was always fun.

One of those points about the novel "One Day" that was so true is that at every wedding in England, there's at least one guy in a kilt, and he always turns out to be English. it's odd, but really does happen so often.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 15:20:17 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If you were in a band in England, you would expect to be playing New Year at a dance, but I don't recall any street assemblies in Bournemouth or Poole town centres at all (now huge, with bands and fireworks). I don't recall it being a family celebration either … more a "youth club dance" event but there were also as Ian says, more formal dinner and dances. But January 1st wasn't a holiday in England either until 1973 … though heavy absenteeism was given as a reason for making it one.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 15:16:32 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Peter, the debut record was a great topic to bring up. I think we've all been thinking about and listening to records we haven't heard in a long time.

Another really influential debut was Bette Middler's The Devine Miss M. That record busted some doors wide open. Still sounds great.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 15:12:05 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Chasing it down … yes, it was originally issued as Kristofferson in the UK, but changed very quickly here to Me & Bobby McGee. I reckon UK versions with the original title and sleeve will be rare.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 15:08:35 CET 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Scottish Wedding Dance Bands etc

The last wedding I attended in Scotland (a few miles outside Aberdeen) had several attenders from Europe (Germany and Finland come to mind)and the Gay Gordons was a dance just about everyone could do - you just need a sense of rhythm really./n Many, many years ago, circumstance brought me to the Seamill Hydro, on the Ayrshire coast, one Saturday night. There was a dance on and, after a meal, I well remember dancing the Gay Gordons to "Lily The Pink"! Not a pretty sight, I'm sure, but lots of fun.

And, down in deepest London, the New Year was celebrated in my youth. My father's "works", as we used to call it, had a dinner-dance most New Years, as I recall. And I've spent the evening of the 31st ("Hogmanay" in Scotland) in Trafalgar Square amongst the masses, taking the tube (a very crowded and fun-filled journey with lots of singing and joking) back to a party that had only really got going at midnight, so we'd missed very little. And it went on well into the early hours (or after dawn, in at least one case). The big difference I found when I moved to Scotland is that it was more of a family event and, whereas it was that night and the following day in England, you could find yourself getting friends dropping in for a drink some days later.

Also, the practice of "first footing" (a lump of coal or something dark brought across the threshold of the house) I first came across in England, when visiting friends whose families originated in the North-East of England.

And those TV programmes mentioned may have been a bit too "Walter Scottish" perhaps but they introduced me to some fine old Scots tunes and ballads, for which I am truly grateful.

And so many of those Scottish Dance Bands were so very versatile. Remember "Local Hero".

A final tale. We were overnighting in a hotel in Annan once and who should be on that night but the Alexander Brothers; I really can't describe them briefly but I'd guess that they would go down well with ex-pats or those abroad of Scottish descent. The hotel staff said just go in, so we did but had two separate seats. At one point, they started to sing "I Belong To Glasgow", at which point I looked across at my wife, who is from Glasgow, and nodded at her. They saw me do it but misunderstood and brought the microphone to me. A southern accent was NOT what they had in mind.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 15:06:07 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

It was originally called Kristofferson and then reissued as Me & Bobby McGee to take advantage of the Janis hit version of that song.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 14:46:37 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't remember seeing the earlier one titled "Kristofferson" either (though the CD now is). Maybe it was originally called "Me & Bobby McGee" in the UK.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 14:00:07 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

It was the Me and Bobby McGee version I bought and I'm pretty sure that would be 1971. I thought that was it being issued for the first time and that's what Bob F meant.

The Scottish dances are still an important part of the culture here at weddings etc. And there are brilliant dance bands. But in the past, I used to suffer from the Jimmy hat, shortbread tin, Hielan' hame, Moira Anderson blues. Like Saint Andrew obviously.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 13:20:44 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Wonderful. What's next? Jimmy Shand doing Bohemian Rhapsody? As the British know, in our youth New Year was celebrated in Scotland but barely celebrated in England. I suspect we started celebrating New Year down south mainly because we knew if we stayed home the only thing on TV would be Andy Stewart, Kenneth McKellar and Jimmy Shand. The rest of the year we had the White Heather Club, though looking back Robin Hall and Jimmy McGregor were standing well above the crowd in choice of material and quality. I've been picking up early Collector and Topic discs by the likes of Dominic Behan, and Robin Hall plays guitar on all of them.

For those who don't know, the link takes you to Jimmy Shand playing The Gay Gordons for a group of seniors. Even this far south, the Gay Gordons was danced at every black tie dinner and dance in the 1950s and early 1960s. And if you played in any wedding band, you'd have to know a tune it could be danced too. It was like Hava Nagila - you might have to play it. Long gone.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 11:36:44 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: And Now For Something Completely Different

This will give Roger, Peter and Al a good laugh. Here's a version of Pinball Wizard - Dark Side of the Haggis - by Saint Andrew, a very clever guy, taking the piss out of the Scottish music that used to appear on the New Year Show, when they were much younger. I hope those in other areas of the world enjoy it too.

Or appeared in the Tartan tours of USA, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, back in the day.

Absolutely brilliant and a great laugh.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 11:35:35 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Kris Kristofferson album fascinated me too, as it's one I'd never have thought of … originally (and on CD) "Kristofferson" but reissued as "Me & Bobby McGee." It's huge, but also it compares to Carole King's "Writer" in that while it's a debut album as a singer, some key tracks had done well for other people before. But it really does sum up a major style as a debut.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 11:24:06 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Interesting posts on the debut albums. There's quite a bit of music I missed, but I wasn't going out and buying punk, although I have a few of the artists mentioned in collections.

I had a double Butterfield Blues Band back in the day, but can't remember its name. I play collections of Joe Jackson and Tom Petty. I know some of Jackson Browne's music, and feel I should own some.

I'm with Bob F on Kris Kristofferson - absolutely brilliant songs and still sounding fresh. And I liked Laura Nyro, a friend back in the day had one of her albums, but have never heard any of her material for a long time.

R Dean Taylor is really interesting. 'There's A Ghost In My House', which I've linked, is at number 20 in the Northern Soul top 500, and still played regularly at their get togethers. And these guys and gals are fanatical music and dance fans.

Bill M. I bought the Gary Clark solo album after Danny Wilson, and really like it. It didn't sell and he now makes a living writing songs for other artists.

Roger, Solid Air was John Martyn's sixth album. There were two early folk albums, two with his wife and Bless The Weather before Solid Air. But Solid Air was the first album I bought too. John Martyn has a fanatical following too and is revered by his followers.

You make an interesting point, which I think is forgotten about. (Sound like a teacher here!). We never owned every thing we listened to. We swapped albums with our mates or listened to their music in their houses.

Maybe another list would be artists' important breakthrough albums.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 11:20:19 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Effing auto typing. CONTEST was CONTRAST and WHY was WHAT.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 10:31:45 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sturgill Simpson

I'm going to disagree on "A Sailor's Guide to Earth" - to me the best album I've heard in months. I'm coming at this as someone who had never heard Sturgill Simpson before so had no expectations. It's got this HUGE sound. Take Welcome to Earth which starts off pomp operatic with piano and strings … full voice like Raoul Malo, then the band kicks in with the DAP KINGS horn section … a fantastic switch. Then total contest to languid strings and acoustic guitar for Breaker's Roar. Keep It Between The Lines is so funky. Then Sea Stories would have worked for country … or indeed for The Band. In Bloom is just a gorgeous song. Yes, it's a big, big production and the moods and styles change. Take Brace for Impact with loud bass, heavy guitar sound trudging away. All Around You … those horns! That choppy guitar. The suddenly intimate voice. Oh, Sarah is probably my favourite track. Call to Arms is where I came in because it was on a magazine cover disc last year, and it's why made me buy the album, though a straight swampy rocker is atypical. It's an exceptional album.

I realise reading opinions that it may break from the previous albums, both of which I ordered last night. If you knew and loved the earlier one, it may be a shock … but if (like many) this is where you start, it is astonishingly good.

Suffice it to say I played it in the car for a friend really loud, and we had to divert to the nearest HMV so he could buy one.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 07:47:29 CET 2017 from (24.114.51.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ben: Not one of Robert Palmer's finest works - to put it mildly. He slagged NLSC - even belittling the lyrics to the great "It Makes No Difference". The only thing he liked was "Acadian Driftwood".

Bob F........you're welcome. I just love Metamodern Sounds of Country Music - from beginning to end and remain upset by the big label taking some good songs on the Sailor LP and screwing them up with unnecessary production........and thank you for bringing back great memories of Tom Petty's debut.....a Christmas gift it was from my brother and still remember vividly playing it and loving it. "American Girl" was and still is a perfect rock n roll song.


Entered at Mon Mar 6 06:50:30 CET 2017 from (97.92.250.170)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: poster/review

That promo poster circa 75 I looked at with lust in my eyes can now be bought on Ebay for around 250.00 bucks. Photos from the beach sessions. Capital had them out on most of their acts.

Does anyone remember the original Rolling Stone Review for NLSC?


Entered at Mon Mar 6 03:14:18 CET 2017 from (24.114.58.203)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Trawna

Joe J: R Dean Taylor - not just any Torontonian, but a Yonge Street fixture in the early '60s. He did three local 45s before moving to Motown, the first, "At The Highschool Dance" from '61 has long been cherished by European rockabilly collectors. I love it too, especially for the Levonesque speed-drumming by Jack Posluns. Did your historical searches turn up the factoids that as Motown's house Canuck A&R guy he was assigned to work with the Mynah Birds (Rick James, Neil Young, et al) and Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers (with Tommy Chong)? Some of the songs the Mynah Birds recorded were ones he co-wrote. I didn't know about "Turned To Stone" though - so thanks for that Band link. Our guys would surely have known him back in TO.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 23:15:31 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I only have the latest Sturgill Simpson. Looked for the earlier ones in HMV on Saturday and he's filed under "Country" and they didn't have them. Chuck Berry was under "Easy Listening" so all it says is HMV knows nothing.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 22:31:05 CET 2017 from (24.222.133.112)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: R Dean Taylor

Heard 'Gotta See Jane' on a oldies station and I had to google R Dean when I got home. All kinds of interesting things I didn't know: He was Canadian; he was a singer/songwriter for Motown/Rare Earth; Band connection - he co-wrote 'Turn To Stone' which Rick covered on 'Cryin Heart Blues'.

R Dean was all over the jukebox and AM radio when I was in school, 'Indiana Wants Me', 'Taos, New Mexico', 'Candy Apple Red'.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 21:55:52 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Blowin Your Mind was not acknowledged as a Van album by Van. It existed but apparently annoyed him.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 21:48:43 CET 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van Morrison / Roger

I've noticed Roger you list Astral Weeks as Van's first solo album. In the articles I have been reading they list it as his second solo album. "Blowin' Your Mind" is listed as the first one. You know I don't think it really matters when it comes to firsts; because the first Bob Dylan Album I ever purchased or heard; was his 4th album, Another Side Of Bob Dylan. That sent me back to his first three.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 21:25:32 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Sturgill Simpson

Kev, thanks for the Sturgill Simpson tip. I think the last time he was mentioned on the GB, I listened to couple of things on youtube and didn't really feel it. The nice thing about Amazon Prime membership is you get free shipping, great television streaming plus lately I've been taking advantage of their free music streaming. All three Simpson records are there. The earlier ones are obviously influenced by Waylon and Merle. The last one A Sailors Guide To Earth is the big label release. I think it has more of a Springsteen 80's influence. I hear songs that remind me of Spare Parts, This Hard Land, Seeds and Part Man Part Monkey. He has some great lyrics like "But I swear that God is there every time I glare in the eyes of my best friend". I purchased the last two so I can have on my itunes. Thanks again for the tip.

Check out the song Stephen Colbert and Sturgill Simpson wrote for the Waffle House.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 16:52:16 CET 2017 from (71.46.56.121)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Good one, Norm!


Entered at Sun Mar 5 16:36:24 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Famous Ridles

They are both "Fuckin' near water!"


Entered at Sun Mar 5 13:54:24 CET 2017 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Debut Albums

I've been listening obsessively to David Ackles for two weeks. Spurred me to think of debut albums though I'm hazy as to the rules of the list. All these were either bought buy me at the time or by friends (we operated a record sharing collective). I'm surprised how old they all are - I guess I've stopped being an early adopter and am either stuck in a rut or need time to acquire new tastes.:

1. David Ackles

2. Please Please Me - The Beatles

3. Peter, Paul and Mary

4.The Songs of Leonard Cohen

5. Bob Dylan

6. Five Leaves Left - Nick Drake

7. After The Goldrush - Neil Young

8. Music From Big Pink - The Band

8. Do You Believe in Magic - The Lovin' Spoonful

9. Astral Weeks - Van Morrison

10. Paul Simon

Of course there are loads of debut albums I've bought retrospectively. I bought first Stones album years after it had been issued. Rolling Stones No 2 was my first Stones album (and still the best). Oh Dunc - I forgot Solid Air - but was that a debut? Don't think so but it's the only John Martyn I've got. The there's the Incredibles...


Entered at Sun Mar 5 12:54:27 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Sorry, posted the link in the wrong box! Right above.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 12:53:42 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBGCtNonvbI

Jan's link to making love in a canoe brought up another video I hadn't seen … Levon + Sheryl Crowe, James Taylor, Emmylou Harris, Jakob Dylan and Steve Winwood performing The Weight (linked).


Entered at Sun Mar 5 12:48:31 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Silver bands

Looked it up. "Silver" (silver-plated) instruments used to be more expensive than brass, though not much so any longer. A "silver band" used to be seen as more successful. Wiki says that while there are some silver bands in the north, and some brass bands in the south, there is a tendency for silver bands to be southern and brass bands to be northern. This figures with my memories of silver bands marching up and down football pitches in Bournemouth and Southampton.


Entered at Sun Mar 5 12:45:58 CET 2017 from (84.209.132.97)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Why is drinking American beer like making love in a canoe?


Entered at Sat Mar 4 23:44:24 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Silver bands

As far as I know it was just the colour of the metal - our local band was silver, not brass.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 20:44:52 CET 2017 from (84.209.132.97)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

31 years ago since Richard left us -- photo collage linked. Also, check the site updates for some "new" stuff, including an upcoming concert with Garth Hudson and top notch players performing the Band's debut and second albums. Going to a church tonight myself, to see Cashy Cat perform music from HIS debut album here in Oslo, Norway.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 20:31:25 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Brass band versus Silver band

PV - Are there any differences over there aside from from the type of instruments used, like in attitude, repitoire, type or size of their town, etc? I don't even know why both types are manufactured - cost?


Entered at Sat Mar 4 19:23:45 CET 2017 from (24.114.53.162)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Peter V: The big club (as opposed to teen) bands in Toronto in the early '60s had horns - the Motley Crew and the Zaniacs had both sax and trumpet, Hawkins and the Hawks had Garth and Jerry plus, for a while, a third sax and a trumpet. It was an R&B town, so plenty of teen bands had saxophones too, and some, like the Disciples and the Power and the Mission had trumpets too. David Clayton Thomas, just before he left town for BST, was involved in producing the Power. While there were lots of jazz brass players around, I thing that a lot of the trombonist in the post-BST/CTA bands were straight out of highschool bands.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 14:16:47 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good bands tend to get better on second albums … brown album, Déjà vu, Chicago II, BST II etc. The question is that debut. Very few are the “first of a kind” without some John The Baptist album by someone else. But both Please Please Me and MFBP qualify as “new.”

CTA, BST et al make me wonder where all those horn players came from. In the UK, soul bands had been horn heavy since 1965 or 1966, but I can’t think of so many white soul bands in the USA. I guess more jazz … and the marching Bands tradition taught the basics. Here we had brass bands and silver bands too, in those days they were the half time entertainment at football grounds.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 08:47:33 CET 2017 from (114.75.201.55)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I liked Deja Vu better than the first CSN album and I also think Abraxis is better than the first Santana album. I didn't like Santana III when it came out but I love it now, especially the 2cd version which came out a few years back.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 07:11:44 CET 2017 from (24.114.69.15)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Thanks for the reminder about "Mary's Prayer". A great forgotten gem. I'm pretty sure I still have the 45.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 06:50:56 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast

Subject: debuts

Man, Peter you consistently win for "depth & breadth". The resident Beatles aficonado (spouse, she'll still proudly show anyone her ticket stub for Shea Stadium, '66) would have to weigh in here, but I agree, I think Meet the....was 1st here in the states. I do have to echo some other votes:

Creedence

Santana (definitely, still the best to listen to on the way to sliding down mtns)

CTA (thanks for the reminder, the 1st real notice for the average Norte Americano that you could get brass in there w/ geetars)

CSN, yes, generational.

Butter, not a bad choice although I prefer his live double album when he was really leading a full band. Perhaps "live" pressings can be a future category.

A few new: for the funk crowd; Tower of Power... what is hip, soul vaccination (really anything Dr. Steve Kupka puts his baritone sax to).

The Police: Outlandos d'Amour, was this their 1st? Admittedly not completely w/out some gaps/weaknesses but the start of an influence for sure.

Likewise, if Countdown to Ecstasy was 1st, then Steely Dan.

As I said, Dunc, we were in the nosebleed seats in '74. I think the St. Louis Arena or Kiel Auditorium, whichever it was, sat like 25k. Unlike Elvis Costello at Wembley, we were no where near the floor or the stage. But at least, yeah, there. I actually had tickets to see Levon at a small local venue, late March 2012. Got there, but obviously no go; you just knew it wasn't just a "bad back keeps him off the drumset". Bummed. And a year or 2 late or early, not sure which, to catch him as a headliner at the Newport Folk Festival, 2000 something.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 05:52:07 CET 2017 from (173.3.48.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The Brown album is one of the greatest albums in existence. In a very small league.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 05:37:25 CET 2017 from (24.114.51.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Pink vs Brown

"The Brown album might rate as superior to the first, to some. " Not to some, JQ.....but to all......Not even in the same ballpark.....If it wasn't for Eric Clapton's mythologizing, the comparison would be laughable.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 05:15:57 CET 2017 from (173.3.48.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: First Two Band Album's In Performance with Garth. March 25th

See the Link. Happening in Glendale, Californighai.

Timely to the discussion.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 03:59:40 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Debuts and the rarity of a better sophomore effort

Bob F - I went to the BBB's East-West first and then went back; I still prefer EW, although it's been a good while since I've heard either.

I wanted to include Fresh Cream, John Prine and Elvis C's My Aim Is True to the list, although that last one was definitely an acquired taste for me, took awhile and that was my problem, not the New Wave genre - I can't knock The Pretenders and Talking Heads' debuts either.

On the rarity of superior 2nd efforts - I've always thought of a debut as the work of a lifetime, the 2nd the work of 12 months or so. The Brown album and Beck Ola (and Godfather 2!) might rate as superior to the first, to some.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 01:50:54 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Paul Butterfield's Blues Band

This record brought a generation of kids to the blues. Many jumped over them to find the originals but these guys were the real deal also. Great record.


Entered at Sat Mar 4 01:34:27 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Kristofferson

You can't overlook Kris Kristofferson's first record with Bobby McGee, Help Me Make It Through the Night, For The Good Times, Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down. Really changed country music.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 22:56:05 CET 2017 from (184.146.91.95)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on Leonard Cohen

LINKED: An interview with Robbie which is different than most - just a short one with the CBC but distinguished by him being asked about the late great Leonard Cohen. I liked his answer. Do check it out.

Debut Albums that left an impression:

1. "Look Sharp" - Joe Jackson

2. "All Things Must Pass" - George Harrison

3. "Led Zeppelin" - Led Zeppelin

4. "Never Mind the Bollocks" - Sex Pistols

5. "Strange Streets" - Garfield

Jeff A: Funny and yes the timing does fit......a smoke and a laugh with a lovely Mongolian lady.....and damn if I didn't start thinking of you.......maybe Sergey Kislyak had spiked my drink !


Entered at Fri Mar 3 22:33:29 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Debuts

Peter, great choices. The Beatles has to be tops. In America we got Meet The Beatles though I think Introducing The Beatles may have been released first.

Dunc, CSN is a great choice and really is an iconic record.

A few of my favorite debuts:

Laura Nyro - More Then A New Discovery

Blood Sweat & Tears - Child Is A Father - All the hits were on the 2nd release with David Clayton Thomas but this was the blueprint.

Chicago Transit Authority- They turned into such an mor band but the first two releases felt like they were revolutionaries.

Jackson Browne - Saturate Before Using

New York Dolls

Bruce Springsteen - Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ - Where it all started.

Patti Smith Group - Horses

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Amy Winehouse- Frank - Back to Black is where we in America jumped in but Frank is such a great record.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 19:20:23 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, but still reading the very fine book on Bert Berns, Brown Eyed Girl was the debut solo single as far as name on the label goes, but Van has always rejected the "Blowing In The Mind" album, which has a dozen other album titles in various forms, as he had no control AND didn't get paid. It's arguable whether Astral Weeks is a true debut album or not … we could argue Them too, as Van's notes to the de luxe edition claim he is really solo..


Entered at Fri Mar 3 17:35:48 CET 2017 from (96.227.58.249)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Debut albums

Peter, have you seen the recent documentary on Bert Berns which includes Van? Hugh McCracken didn't play on demos. Brown Eyed Girl is Van's solo debut.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 16:32:04 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Mary's Prayer by Danny Wilson

Thanks, Peter. You know the second last one. Remember. Look it out. Brilliant

I've linked Mary's Prayer by Danny Wilson for everybody. Give it a listen.

Since my last post I've been upto Central Glasgow. Visited two second hand CD shops and Fopp, for non Brits a good music shop. One of the second hand shops seems to be moving to DVDs. The change in Fopp was amazing - vinyl is taking over. Younger people buying.

'Talking Book' by Stevie Wonder on sale at £28. If you're selling vinyl, now is the time. I gave mine away and bought the CD years ago, but I never had a great vinyl collection, apart from the singles.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 13:36:58 CET 2017 from (173.3.48.158)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: One of the great consoles for sale

The Console used to record & mix Dark Side of The Moon is getting auctioned off.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 12:58:25 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paul Simon

Great list … though I don't know the last two. Will find out. I nearly included the "Paul Simon Songbook" which wasn't originally released in the USA. It has I Am A Rock, Sound of Silence - though every track is good.

I do see why Paul Simon is separate … very early use of reggae in Mother & Child Reunion, plus Puerto Rico in Me & Julio Down By The Schoolyard. Duncan is a fabulous lyric, but I might go for the South American version on Live Rhymin'. It's a fabulous album.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 12:12:56 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Influential debut albums

I play all these albums regularly and think they are great and hope they are influential.

Creedence Clearwater Revival - needs no explanation.

Paul Simon Paul Simon. The measure for singer songwriters. And it has a song called Duncan on it. I know there was an album back in '65, but that doesn't count.

Crosby, Stills and Nash - this was important to my age group, cutting edge stuff.

Robbie Robertson - I felt the production of great songs were continuing after a wait. 'Somewhere Down The Crazy River' is a film, and got many plays up here.

Blackie and the Rodeo Kings - High or Hurtin - The Songs of Willie P Bennett. Great music. Is it influential in Canadian music? I hope so.

Stealers Wheel - Over 50 million Youtube hits for 'Stuck In The Middle'.

Carole King - Writer. Writer becoming performer

Jock Tamsons'Bairns - The bench mark for any folk album to be measured against. Just ask Richard Thompson.

Meet Danny Wilson - Danny Wilson. Has the brilliant 'Mary's Prayer' on it. Showing other Scottish bands that they can get to the top.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 11:27:14 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Mike. I was pleased that the film had received a wider audience and was glad you liked the Michael Marra song. Your holiday seems idyllic.

Thanks, Haso. I knew it was a quote, but I don't know from where. I wish I had seen one of the concerts on the 74 tour. I envy you. I enjoy the Band's performances on the Before the Flood album.

Debut albums are a good theme, Peter, and I couldn't disagree with your list. But maybe because of my age or my cautious nature, what's important to me is the album which grabs my and the masses' attention. But I'll have a go.


Entered at Fri Mar 3 11:07:40 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Influential debut albums

Debut albums of great influence … there are many questions. What if the artists recorded an album under a different name? What if the earlier albums were (say) Jamaican releases only … The Wailers?

Van Morrison - while I think we can discount those Bert Berns demos thrown together on LP as a debut album … in the sleeve notes to “Them” Van says he was the only person who appears on the first album … the rest were all session guys … so is “Them” Van’s debut album? Or can we count Astral Weeks? I want to.

I’m tempted to Mr Tambourine Man album by The Byrds as the genesis of folk-rock, but really it’s only the singles that counted, not the LP. That’s not true of Please Please Me though … Twist & Shout, anyone? I Saw Her Standing There? Not singles until much later.

Then Sweetheart of The Rodeo is ALMOST a new band, but doesn’t qualify, so Gilded Palace of Sin takes the place.

My greatest search was for a qualifying soul album. I don’t think there is one, as all of them went for singles first, and early LPs wee “two singles plus ten more”. Sly nearly got there with “A Whole New Thing” but it’s much weaker than the next two or three albums.

SO …

Music From Big Pink – The Band

Please Please Me – The Beatles

The Rolling Stones – The Rolling Stones (most English kids intro to blues and R&B classics

Are You Experienced? – Jimi Hendrix

Songs of Leonard Cohen

The Velvet Underground and Nico (Yes, the Q writers were correct here)

Astral Weeks – Van Morrison

The Gilded Palace of Sin – The Flying Burrito Brothers

In The Court of The Crimson King - King Crimson (defines early prog)

Black Sabbath- Black Sabbath (I loathed it, but it starts off heavy metal)


Entered at Fri Mar 3 10:27:47 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Can it be that in reality Kevin is no other than that world in-famous spy, aka world's greatest no-goodink, Boris Badenov?



Entered at Fri Mar 3 06:43:27 CET 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: debuts, woodstock, 1st of the Band

Thanks for the link to the Woodstock recording, listening as I write.

My 2 debuts, have to think on more, would be MFBP & John Prine. In fact where the Brown album fits an earlier discussion... albums w/ no weak spots, I'd posit that John Prine fits in both. Even "Your flag decal won't get you into heaven anymore" isn't so dated as one might have thought before.

Jeff A & glenn t.: it could be age, but sometimes you get ahead of others; although I'm 62, not 68 or 70, the Brown album was the 2nd or 3rd album I ever bought. The cover picture got me right there, kind of like Peter talking about MFBP @ W.H.Smith. As I recall, it was my freshman year in h.s. By soph year, my friends were all about Dylan, Sonny Boy Williamson and James Taylor/Joni/CSNY. By college years we were thoroughly into the Allmans, the Dead, Skynyrd but also Yes, the Moody Blues, Steely Dan even Waylon & Willie's outlaw album. (Jeff A & glenn t: we can return to more Alton, IL comments another time; it's likely that glenn & I have many common connections from that little school on the bluffs over Elsah, for what it's worth). Yet our boys never went away; I distinctly recall a music appreciation course and playing the prof the Band along w/ Jackson Browne, after class. He was very impressed w/ these guys musicianship. But I've said here before, I think they taught Dylan a lot more about music, just as he did them about writing songs.

Dunc: I think that comment about subjugating them to Dylan especially comes from Don Was on the classic albums dvd; he thinks it was a mistake to lump them in so much w/ Dylan. Maybe it also bears in mind, that they seemed more intent on playing music than fame; I guess I thought they may have all stayed in Woodstock longer, if it hadn't got so weird for Robbie and Dominique. But then weren't Zuma Beach and Laurel Canyon kinda f***ed too? The '74 tour was definitely not about the music; the venues were huge and from our nosebleed seats, it's lucky I knew pretty much all of the Band's lyrics.

Yes, mucho kudos to Jan H for this site.

Come back, Angelina.

The question I really want answered is for RR to speak to being 73. How's it compare w/ what he thought he & Ragtime Willie would be encountering?


Entered at Fri Mar 3 05:14:32 CET 2017 from (173.3.48.158)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Don't Feed The Russian or Canadian Bears

Speaking of- Kevin didn't you disappear right around the time of....- stop fucking in our elections! Norm fell for your liberal cover but once you mentioned "smoking Mongolian" you blew the little possible faith I had in your cover.

Norman, See what you can do with that material. Maybe you can get 12 or 13 years of disturbance out of that.



Entered at Fri Mar 3 04:38:03 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Jed & listening to Woodstock

My Russian network of all things spying alerted me to the fact. ; )


Entered at Thu Mar 2 23:22:18 CET 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR Singing a line on Ain't No More Cane

I believe it's him?


Entered at Thu Mar 2 20:24:40 CET 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Woodstock

Fred, nice link. Had not heard that before. Listening on headphones, Robbie's guitar is quite isolated on the left side and you can really hear what he is doing. It seems to me that he was more improvisational or spontaneous, and while obviously playing within the song, varied more from performance to performance than the rest, with the possible exception of Ricky. The rest seemed to play pretty much straight parts, very close to the studio versions. Not that there is anything wrong with that. They are pretty damn good songs.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 20:04:47 CET 2017 from (114.75.201.218)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think the Woodstock performance is enjoyable, I don't know why people make negative comments about it. As for debut albums, I would rate Santana and Are You Experienced highly.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 19:40:56 CET 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Band at Woodstock

Just listen to those harmonies on Ain't No More Cane. Beautiful!


Entered at Thu Mar 2 17:53:09 CET 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Fred-Band at Woodstock

How'd you know I was listening to that this morning?Pretty darn good for what some described as a ragged performance!


Entered at Thu Mar 2 15:42:03 CET 2017 from (83.249.174.92)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: The Last GB / before we all die

1.) The best posts, the best arguments, the best nonsense posts are published in a book. _Paper_, that is. Crowd funding, maybe.

2.) The most horrible minutes in the history of the GB are documented... like Swedish Internet Police believing that you are a pedo network which have hijacked my Windows computer. (you haven't, right....? )

3.) Playing 'The Weight' together and publishing it with the GB book. With today's technology and Jan's knowledge it should be possible.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 13:47:23 CET 2017 from (71.46.56.177)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Happed in Mist

Dunc, thanks. I played the Michael Marra link this morning while on vacation, staring out onto the Gulf of Mexico, morning sun yet to rise. Very stirring, words that mirror my own thinking about war, man's inhumanity to man, duty to king and country, etc etc etc. I played it again. Lovely song, albeit muchly thought-provoking. Something I'll keep.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 13:25:51 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Woodstock


Entered at Thu Mar 2 13:23:36 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: 1976 NOT 1979

ooooops! ;)


Entered at Thu Mar 2 13:22:42 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Casino Arena July 1979

This may have been posted before, if so my apologies. : )


Entered at Thu Mar 2 11:47:40 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Correction

Velvet underground and Nico debut album choices by a mile. I can see where I got 8 from. Sorry.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 11:43:45 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Wallsend, Kevin, Rockin Chair, Fred, Jeff A and Peter.

Maybe fame was the wrong word I chose. Maybe I should have said they never got the recognition they deserved.

I think the Band obviously benefit from their association with Dylan, but are also harmed by their association with him. During the sixties world tour, everybody appreciates the quality of the music now, but they are seen by many people as Dylan's backing band. Many people at the concerts were folkies and would never go onto appreciate The Band's music. People, who would sing, holding their ears. There are even riders on their performances. Heylin states it improved when Levon was replaced by Mickey Jones. 'Suddenly, the Hawks had a drummer who was as unwilling to take a back seat as their erstwhile leader, Levon Helm'. I think Levon's drumming is great.

I came across this site many years ago because I was wondering if The Band songs were going to last. I love the songs. People who had the first two albums at the time would be knowledgeable music fans. Peter playing 'The Weight' every day would not be the norm. Many people here have never heard the songs. You can't even sing the first line, Kevin. I use the TV series 'Absolutely Fabulous' and 'TNTDODD' to explain who they are. I would say that the Brown album is as good as any album Dylan produced. And I like Dylan.

I don't know anybody who reads Time magazine, but it was great that they were on the front cover.

The 1974 tour. Not an expert on this, but Levon says 'the tour was damn good for our pocket-books, but it just wasn't a very passionate trip for any of us.' I get the feeling that they were seen as more than a backing band, but didn't get the credit they deserved. I think 'more than a backing band' is a quote from somewhere. Grudging praise.

Even 'The Last Waltz' which is now revered - I've read a few times that the Last Waltz was in trouble in terms of ticket sales and that tickets only began to sell when Graham leaked the guest list to The San Francisco Chronicle. And then it was important that Dylan HAD to appear.

Look at Peter's recent post relating to Mojo and debut albums - Nico and the Velvet underground 8 votes, while MFBP 1 vote.

I could go on - but I feel that the music has not had the plaudits it deserves. The songs and the way they are played deserves more.

When I came onto Jan's website, I really appreciated the effort people had put into writing articles. But the downside was when i learned of the financial standing of Band members. I got a shock.

More fame would have meant them playing more prestigious venues than they did for better rewards after the Last Waltz, whatever route they took.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 10:53:24 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Debut albums

It has to be the first album by an artist or a group. It's not as obvious as it seems … for example, the Graeful Dead or Jefferson Airplane's debut albums probably don't figure to most people. Even "Bob Dylan" was afficiandos only … I'd say "Freewheelin'" was the breakthrough, but it's not a debut.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 10:31:47 CET 2017 from (81.147.182.2)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Sunset Song

Hi Mike, Enjoyed your post. I did enjoy the film and was glad it had travelled to your part of the world. 'Sunset Song' is the first and best book, in a trilogy of three novels entitled 'The Scots Quair' by the writer, Lewis Grassic Gibbbon, who died aged thirty four. Many Scots see it as the greatest Scottish novel of all time.

I've linked a song by the late Michael Marra, 'Happed In Mist', about Chris Guthrie's husband's experience in the first world war. Anytime I heard this song performed live, there was a real silence in the audience. Michael Marra is one of Scotland's greatest sonngwriters, but many Scots won't have heard of him.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 10:00:09 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Garland Jeffreys

Bugger! Garland Jeffreys is playing Poole on Friday 31st March, a mile from my house … and I'm in London for theatre. Same last time he played here. The trouble is UK theatre has such a long booking time. We just bought tickets to see Ian McKellan in King Lear in November. We had "members" priority booking, went online immediately and while we got two seats we couldn't get them together. Total sell out run on the first morning. So you have to book way in advance for many things.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 09:52:47 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

W.H. Smith, Bournemouth. Top floor. An album with a weird painting and no title. Looked at the back. A list of names. Never heard of them. I knew the Bob Dylan connection, had read about it. Interested. Then The Weight came on the radio and the university common room jukebox. I played (as I have often said) my three tracks for a shilling every morning while I glanced a the free newspaper headlines. The Weight – White Rabbit- I Shall Be Released. That’s because if you selected the A and B sides together, the juke box skipped the second. You had to separate them. Then the fabulous Spooky Tooth covered The Weight. We were heavily into Traffic. The mood fitted.

This month MOJO magazine did all their writers choosing the best ten debut albums. It's a lazy way of filling space. The most chosen was The Velvet Underground and Nico by a mile. One chose MFBP. One chose Please Please Me. The two most obvious ones for me. So ten best DEBUT albums anyone?


Entered at Thu Mar 2 04:46:01 CET 2017 from (114.75.195.88)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I first heard the Band in Easy Rider but back then you could not get MFBP or the Brown album in New Zealand. The first album I got was Stage Fright. I was little disappointed because I really wanted MFBP. With regard to the Dead, I really liked the Skull and Roses album plus Europe 72.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 04:45:03 CET 2017 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Jeff, I'm also 58 (for a few more months). I remember being aware of hearing The Weight on the radio. Later my brother tried to get me to listen to the Stage Fright album. That got my attention. But what really hooked me on The Band was when he played Rock of Ages (all 4 lp sides) straight through. That was it! I didn't need to hear their tracks on the radio; I became a thorough Band fan, and slowly but surely acquired their records. And finally saw them live at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles in '76 before they wrapped things up with The Last Waltz. One rarely heard anything but The Weight or Cripple Creek on the radio, but then I'd rather listen to my or others records than commercial radio stations. God bless The Band! What glorious music they made! And thank you Jan H. for providing this website for Band fans around the planet.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 04:00:21 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

i liked the Band way before the Dead. though my friends were into the dead sooner, my real exposure to em was the Europe 72 album, then backwards Wake OF the Flood & blues For Allah& shows. First time i saw em was 75.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 03:58:21 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: one of my cousns is the same age as you are. But he wasn't too keen on The Band.(Still isn't as far as I know) He liked Blood Sweat & Tears a lot (still does), Climax Blues Band, The Powder Blues Band, music like that.



Entered at Thu Mar 2 03:51:17 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Yeah, what gets played on the radio is a big influence, too. By the time I really started getting into music (1976/77) I didn't hear a lot of stuff by The Band on the radio other than the usual suspects. I do remember listening to the concert on the King Biscuit Hour on the radio. I was living in Italy at the time, so I listened to the US ARmed Forces FM station rather than Italian radio for my music.

I don't think any of my Italian friends knew the music of The Band that much. It was either hard rock/heavy metal or prog rock, especially among the older brothers.

I remember a classmate (grade 10) who liked Neil Young, Dylan, Leonard Cohen and the Grateful Dead, but he never mentioned liking The Band.

Come to think of it I may have been the only one who knew of The Band. Hmm.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 03:18:25 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm 58 but remember The Weight hitting the NYC radio airwaves. And bought Brown when it came out cause I loved the cover and The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. Back then if there was a song you knew & loved on a record iodds were there were a lot of songs you would love on that record.

One or two of my friends & I used to hang out in record stores & department store record departments when i was a kid.Those experiences been long gone for people.


Entered at Thu Mar 2 01:55:31 CET 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Granted I'm generalizing here, but..

I think it a lot has to do about time.

If you were a teenager in the 60s, liked the Hawks, then it was more likely you were attracted by The Band when their debut LP came out. Certainly the connection with Dylan didn't hurt, either.

If you hit the teen years between 1975-1977 then chances are listening to The Band was not a priority. Loud that's what counted the most ...it pissed your parents off (especially if they were born before WWII)

And no The Band wasn't a loud rock and roll outfit (regardless of what you're told to do at the beginning of TLW)

Furthermore for a lot of teens (between 1977 and 1981/82...my peers) that music was, as a friend of mine (a headbanger) back then put it, "Hippy Shit". I'm sure the punkers were of the same opinion. Or worse. Although they probably thought heavy metal was hippy shit, too. ; )


Entered at Wed Mar 1 22:57:44 CET 2017 from (184.146.91.95)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Robbie explaining the choices of songs on the Testimony CD/Album....Unbound is such a beautiful song....and a nice video to look at as well.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 22:21:56 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Making a record is a ton of work. It's not a lot of work for a day or two. It's a lot of work for a while. The more music, the more work. There's a lot of listening. There's a lot of steps. The commitment & what you must deliver to achieve great results is huuge. Discipline is required.... This can all be a lot of fun, But you also have to respect the process, take a lot of brakes, have some laughs. Being a great player doesn't necessarily translate into having interest in doing this , or having that interest forever. But, bands that don't retain the level of great records, well, they got to come up with great songs, great performances, then find great production, great marketing... the industry isnt there to try to hand it to them any more.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 21:46:48 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Personalities.

Don't even get me started on Club Owners & Studio Owners.
A nice & fair studio owner with a great studio who also actually has everything working is rare these days and should be given 24 hour personal protection. (Charge what you need, just be nice and deliver.)


Entered at Wed Mar 1 21:43:07 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Artists personalities.
Are often their undoing.
Often prevent many great, well developed talents from rising above local level.

I've worked with some one I consider in the top one per cent tile, who outside of the industry and a small circle of music lovers, no one knows who the hell he is. And he is one of the greatest singers & live performer I've ever heard. Accomplished in his genres, always worked, but, with some other directions some time, might have been in that real top realm of greats. The brilliance & stage persona is there. But even today, with a sometimes great personality and professional demeanor, the rest of the time, there's enough in the way to prevent great things from happening.

And then i work with guys who just can't not be overimpressed with themselves. Great talent. Unique. Really deliver exceptional , unique music. No one except local crowds really ever heard of them. And they are too impressed with themselves to realize how lucky they are to still get to perform sometimes, & they almost don't realize they have to bend & respect other people.....

Not being able to really listen is often the downfall of many great musical artists. It's not only about them. & that's funny, because DEEP LISTENING is such a huge part of music. "What do you hear?" Is one of the questions we ask each other frequently. "I hear", "I'm hearing", I'm feeling" are things we say. But not listening in musical work relationships is a big cause of underachievement. And it's part of PERSONALITY..........Abuse, addiction, be it alcohol or narcotics. of course a huge proble. also part of personality. (Today, add all that to no real opportunity present.)

OF course, i work with some players who just couldn't be easier to get along with. Sometimes it's like that from the start, other times, it takes a little time for them to realize some one is for real. but eventually the true great and kind players see when some one is legitimate and calm down into friendship real fast.



Entered at Wed Mar 1 21:20:18 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Discourse. Or Dat Course.

The Band guys were who they were. Ultimately that is what the most legitimate artists are. How artists work translates into public acceptance & adoptence, how it is embraced,, critical acceptance, and how it is therefore pushed to the masses, is one area that is sometimes a toss of the dice, sometimes it's not left to a toss of the dice.

How labels related to artists varied for different reasons too. And of course, then there is the artists or artists in a band.
The guys in The Band were who they were, no more, or no less. What The Band & the individuals didn't accomplish pales next to the music they made. Which is as great as any music ever created. Everyone here is grateful for it.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 21:03:51 CET 2017 from (184.146.91.95)

Posted by:

Kevin

Subject: Dunc and Fame

Thank you, Mike N ! As to the question of Fame and the Band. I am not sure that they could have done any more……hooking up with the most famous and revered pop/rock star on the planet in Bob Dylan for a world tour in 1965 and 1966, then getting themselves in 1970 on the cover of what at the time would have been one of the top 5 best distributed and prestigious magazines in the world – Time Magazine – then another tour with the oh so famous Bob Dylan in 1974 and then in 1976/78 starring in the most famous and 40 years on still the consensus best concert film of all-time – The Last Waltz………what they didn’t have were socks down their trousers or the type of “Whole Lotta Love” - “Bohemian Rhapsody” type anthems that stamp fame across generations….Heck, almost no rock fan on earth even knows the name of their biggest song…how many times have you had to say “ you know, the Take a load off Fannie song”.

That Marc Maron podcast with Robbie is extraordinary........and just watched "The Night Of" on dvd.....fabulous and to think James Gandolfini was set to play the John Turturro part.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 20:10:06 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In a nut shell

Well said....Wallsend...(that sounds formidable). Totally agree.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 19:35:31 CET 2017 from (114.75.195.88)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Dunc, I don't think more fame would have helped our guys as three of the five couldn't handle the fame they achieved. Same as with sport, to be really successful you not only need a technical ability but you need an appropriate personality to go with it. You need a work ethic and an ability to stay focused which our guys seemed to lack. The reformed Band could have been more successful if they had been willing to put in the work to come up with some new music but it seems they either couldn't or didn't want to do it.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 17:47:32 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Question Mark

Hi Bob, thanks for your reply. I too have always enjoyed our conversations over the entertainment we share. I realize your friend has always championed your daughter and helped and supported her in every way that is a good thing.

I guess I'm missing something here, or it is something I don't know about. I re-read a lot of resent posts and haven't figured out what it is about.

My only point was I don't see where a third party roasting some one makes sense. I have no part in it and I don't think any one else should. Every one is entitled to an opinion until it gets to publicly taking a side and giving a couple of guys shit.

Like you I would sooner see it done instead of throwing gas on a fire...seems that is amusing to some tho'.

Leaving for Australia on the twenty-first. Got to go and find the guy who punched an old man kangaroo in the mush and have a beer with him.

If you have seen it, (it was on the news) just search on youtube, (guy punches kangaroo in the face). It is hilarious. The kangaroo has the guy's dog in a head lock. The guy runs over, the kangaroo stands up and they square off like boxers.......then POW! right in the kisser!


Entered at Wed Mar 1 17:38:35 CET 2017 from (71.46.56.161)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Dunc, I'd be interested to hear your take on the 2015 movie Sunset Song, if in fact you've seen it, filmed apparently partly in Scotland, New Zealand and elsewhere, about the story of a young girl growing up in rural Scotland shortly before the start of the First World War. I saw it for the first time a few days ago and was struck by the beautifully shot scenes, as well as the story line, although I was often confused by the Scottishness of the spoken words . . . this despite my growing up while living next door to a gasoline/petrol station operator named Angus Chalmers, who was from Perth. Fine gent. He let me gas up some of the cars that stopped by. Told me stories of his Scottish youth. I also loved the actress who played the lead in the film. Her name is Agyness Deyn, which I reckon is Celtically spelled.

Welcome back to planet earth, Kev.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 16:27:10 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

BTW Bob, in that same last post, you made fun of people with learning disabilities. Get a hold of yourself before some hall monitor gets insulted.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 16:22:51 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Geez Bob. You're really pushing it now. Though you did not ask for an apology from Munson, in the old days at least three *prominent* posters I can think of would have accused you of asking for an apology in that last post of yours. Stop being a sissy Bob! :-)


Entered at Wed Mar 1 14:44:19 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Norm, I judge people the way I find them. Jeff has always been supportive of my daughter. Taking trains all over NYC to see her perform when she was first getting started. He championed her music here and on social media. Most people won't lift a finger to help an independent artist. He's actually out there supporting live music instead of reading about it in history books. He's been a good friend. You and I have communicated about music, movies and television shows and I've always respected you. When you're not around I always ask for you. If Bill M was really a stand up guy as you say he'd apologize for making a stupid comment and that would be the end of it. Instead he comes up with some weasel excuse that he wasn't talking about anyone in the GB. Right. I'm done with it now. It's always better to let thing pass instead of getting into it with people like Bill M but that is a lesson I never seem to learn.

JQ, thank you. We appreciate the support.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 13:41:14 CET 2017 from (173.3.49.116)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Well that sure cleared things up for everyone.

This one is a healthier performance, better, but, that's inappropriate to the inspiring post. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ff9W7586Y08


Entered at Wed Mar 1 10:32:21 CET 2017 from (86.131.115.16)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Band misses

Having read Testimony at Christmas and related posts, I feel that the Band in terms of achieving greater fame in the UK suffered from a near miss and poor management.

Now the Band's cds are on sale still in the few cd shops there are and the rock community obviously knows about them, but often I speak to people who have never heard of the Band, whereas bands such as the Eagles, Kinks, Stones are well known.

Is fame important? Well that's a debate. But I feel the Band's music deserves a wider audience. Also, greater fame would have meant that they would have had bigger audiences when they reformed. I recently read how John Entwistle and Ronnie Wood (in different books) after becoming broke were put on a firm financial footing again by a tour.

The first bit of bad luck was that 'The Weight' wasn't a top twenty hit in the UK, at a time when the single charts dominated the market.

The other thing is surely it is bad management that the Band didn't appear in the Woodstock film or on the record. Bassmanlee, JQ and myself had a discussion last week about the fame of the Who in the States. Maybe the conflicting reports can be explained due to the fact that although the early singles were known in the states, Woodstock took them onto a much higher level of fame according to Townshend.

Thanks for the nod, mates.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 08:18:32 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We're still waiting to hear whether Kevin discovered his inner Outer Mongolian.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 06:42:41 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The last word!

There are times when posts here are taken the wrong way, and misunderstood. People have different slants on humour. I have known Bill M for a long time. I've sat and had coffee and chatted with him. Bill has his humour and I have mine, as does every one else. Bill is a standup guy as I'm sure Bob is. I think, (and hope) this is just a misunderstanding of a bit of humour.

This "Put 'Em UP" mouth piece from down that way has no business "gunning off" JQ and Bill and should practise what he is saying.

Bill and Bob are both big boys and can sort this out I'm sure.

To clear up otherspouting off of "Put "Em Up". When I first started posting here, (long after I found this site) the page was pink! Tracey was at the helm. I started a while before Steve Heggison. Steve and I exchanged many e mails. We had both been told from people down New York way that the "Put 'Em Up" thought that Steve and I were one and the same person. He could not believe that I was on the west coast and actually a seaman, Captain of a tug boat. We had a lot of good laughs over that and the feisty attitude of this character.

Nothing much has changed except a lot of good people have left the world, gone on to other things or just can't be bothered.

There are so few left that it really is a shame to see any problems amoung us "band of brothers" FOR WHO SO EVER SHEDS HIS BLOOD WITH ME THIS DAY SHALL BE MY BROTHER....BE HE 'NER SO VILE!

Dunc your posts are always welcome. I admire your ability to always be a gentleman. I of course ......am not. But..... at least I don't have to be out there any more getting beat about by bad weather.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 02:33:57 CET 2017 from (24.114.78.67)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: Thanks - I appreciate you popping in like that. I actually haven't said a word about RoseAnn F before right now - not positive, not negative.

Dunc: You deserve a good netizen award for your effort to keep the ball rolling the other day. I never find your posts banal, though my standards in such things are pretty low, so I've been told.

Kevin J: I certainly didn't have anyone here in mind re the hall monitor.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 02:31:21 CET 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bob W

Sorry Bob, I was responding to what, superficially, looked so damn strong. To indicate that somebody leave the GB is about the heaviest thing a poster can do here. I do stand by my hope that Bill M sticks around and this episode wraps up easily and to Jeff's point, none of this is my biz at all anyway.

I don't know if Al Edge mentioned to you that I play RoseAnn on my radio show. I had a brief bit of dialog with her early on. Boxed Wine can get the phone to ring without much prodding from me.


Entered at Wed Mar 1 00:37:35 CET 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

JQ, Bill M has never been supportive of RoseAnn's music. He's never had a kind word to say. He's one of the reasons I never post anything about RoseAnn on the GB anymore.


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