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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, March 2016


Entered at Thu Mar 31 19:04:52 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hi-Fidelity is not just a shop

There were a lot of hifi / stereo spectacular LPs in the 60s. One shop I know has a stack in a box labelled “for sampling” because the hi-fi exaggerated stereo effects go well on top of hip hop or beats or dance or whatever they call it. I picked up odd ones on the way. Amazingly Enoch Light’s “Discotheque” is, I am told, especially popular for mixing and sampling. Anyway, Jazz Percussion by Peter Appleyard (the vibes player) is the Audio Fidelity 1960 disc I mentioned.

I gave it a high volume whirl today, and then tried some other LPs of the era sold on hi-fi credentials, but which I usually picked up for the archetypal and unwittingly amusing sleeve designs. To my amazement, the Audio Fidelity one DOES sound definitely way better than stereo demonstration discs from Mercury, EMI or Decca. Well, once you get used to the production values … they feel if you’ve heard a snare drum and cymbal on the far left for a bit, with perhaps timpani on the far right, you might enjoy them changing places. But that is the genre. Audio Fidelity produced the first stereo disc in November 1957, and were therefore the first to suppose that people would enjoy sitting listening to express trains crossing their living rooms. For that is what they put on side two.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 16:31:28 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

SORRY, NORM? WHAT DID YOU SAY? CAN YOU REPEAT THAT?


Entered at Thu Mar 31 14:36:18 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hearing!?

Are you trying to make out I'm deaf!.....:-)


Entered at Thu Mar 31 13:45:15 CEST 2016 from (70.193.141.158)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Nipper's Master Voice

While a record may be capable of reproducing a certain frequency range, what listeners can actually experience will depend upon the ratings of their phono cartridges, amps, speakers and related equipment. Then of course each inividual's hearing sensitivity differs, depending upon age and other factors.

It could be that Robbie wants to tell his life story in two parts -- as a musician struggling to succeed and later as an individual seeking new challenges and ventures. If the first part is well received, it will generate further interest in what happened next. One imagines that there is enough subject matter to be covered in such a manner.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 11:13:13 CEST 2016 from (58.104.10.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

To my mind it wouldn't make much sense for Robbie to split his autobiography into two parts. Most people will be interested in the story up to the TLW and only hardcore fans in what comes later. If he split it into two parts I am not sure how many buyers there would be for part two. Also, Robbie isn't all that young any more. Would he want to keep working on a part two? I wonder if that crap about Robbie's microphone being turned off at TLW is going to last forever. Garth said he didn't know anything about it so why would Levon?


Entered at Thu Mar 31 11:02:41 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Audiophile stuff

I looked out my 1960 copy of "Percussive Jazz" on Audio Fidelity. The liner notes go into tiny detail, but one that caught my eye was that it is cut to a frequency range of 16 to 25,000. I thought 20,000 was the highest possibility for vinyl, but it says:

"Not within the range of the human ear but inspection of the grooves with a microscope will show the etchings of the upper dynamic frequencies. It is the opinion of the manufacturer that if these frequencies were omitted … a certain warmth of tone that is felt and sensed rather than heard will be lost."

The strobe pattern around the centre label is also static only if your turntable is playing at exactly 33 and 1/3 rpm.

I picked up the disc a few years ago. But 1960 … and it's got a wider range than CD.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 10:34:58 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Testimony

Knowing the ways of publishing, a book scheduled for this autumn will have been done and dusted for some time already. Writers, editors, designers and illustrators work to tight schedules, get a book finished … then a full year passes “in production.” This will involve printing in the Far East and sending copies by sea freight. The worst thing an author can do is mention that magazines with far more words and more elaborate colour artwork manage to get “produced” monthly, or that amazon’s Create Space can have copies with you in 48 hours. So “Testimony” will be long finished.

There is a neatness in narrative in stopping at TLW, so the story has a beginning and an end. It’s also true that other rock autobiographies are great in the early and prime career period, but fizzle out somewhat towards the present day. It’s also true, I imagine, that a “Part 1” to TLW would outsell a potential “Part 2.” But that’s a shame. I would bet that Carny is worth a chapter or two of interesting material, let alone all the film scores, the first solo album, all the New Orleans stuff on Storyville (there was a major interview or two on that), Guitar Legends, Seville, then the Agrigento Native Americans show, and the two later albums.

Let’s hope it goes for the “Screw it, at my age I’ll just tell it like it was” approach that made Keef’s and Rod Stewart’s autobiographies so readable.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 05:52:11 CEST 2016 from (76.66.111.160)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Subject: Scott Cushnie appearing at celebration of Levon Helm - April 23

The following arrived in my in-box today:

---------

Our 4th Annual Celebration of Levon Helm on the Anniversary of his passing.

Fans of The Hawks, THE BAND, The Cate Brothers, The Barnburners and other band’s that Levon recorded with can gather on Sat. Apr. 23rd to help us show Levon how much Toronto appreciated his contributions to our musical life and history.

With the 9 piece band from ‘The Last Waltz - A Musical celebration of THE BAND - Live ‘ and special guests Chuck Jackson, Johnny Max and ex-Hawk member and producer of the Hawks Scott Cushnie, we will play music from all eras of Levon’s career, featuring Jerome Levon Avis (Levon’s godson) on drums and vocals, Terry Blersh (guitar) Dennis Pinhorn (bass), Rob Gusevs (organ) and Lance Anderson (piano and musical director)

http://hughsroom.com/2016/02/4th-annual-anniversary-a-celebration-of-levon-helm/

or call 416 531-6604 for reservations

------

It's nice to see that Scott Cushnie's still performing. Someone else sent me a schedule showing Scott guesting with the house rhythm section at the Blue Goose in Mimico on April 17, 4-8:00 pm. With him there will be his most excellent guitarist-sidekick from the wonderful Canadian Aces of the 1980s.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:39:36 CEST 2016 from (86.182.125.155)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Jeff

Thanks, Jeff. Different e mail address.

I'll ask Peter to send you my new e mail address.

This relatively new lap top is being attacked by pop ups. what a nuisance.

I'm playing 'Paris 1919', which is a great album.

'Wonder when we'll be in Dundee'.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:07:56 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA

Subject: Testimony

I see on the 'What's New' page that Robbie's Testimony memoir will be available as an audio book. Will he read it himself or just stand in front of a switched-off microphone while somebody else reads it?

(I'm sorry, that was wrong...but I couldn't help myself!)

I also see that there is a new Eric Clapton album out. Anybody know anything about it? I hope it will be more coherent than Old Sock, which was kind of a mess.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:39:51 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Speaking of vinyl, the HBO series by the same name is kind of silly but interesting in a weird way. However, the latest episode had some Band content. The hero is in Vegas trying to interest Elvis in recording with his semi-punk band. To sweeten the pot, the hero tells Elvis of a producer who would be perfect for the project. "John Simon." Elvis goes blank. The hero in an effort to jog Elvis' memory says, "You know, Janis." Still no response. So the hero pulls out the big guns, saying, "The Band." Ahhhh. Elvis smiles and starts singing the chorus to The Weight.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:43:12 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Frank Sinatra covers Robbie Robertson

LINKED: A reference to this was in the documentary, though they got the timing a bit wrong.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 18:15:34 CEST 2016 from (107.77.106.84)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Mr Frank

Kevin, I loved that documentary! It was so well done. I know what you mean. My favorite Elvis was the songs he recorded in the last 10 years of his life. Many folks pass over that stuff.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:02:08 CEST 2016 from (24.114.72.221)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: All or Nothing at All

Funny....I did know it was Indian but confess to not being able to differentiate the many dialects.....Hindi is ussualy a safe guess but I looked at the CIUT website to discover it was Punjabi.....in the few minutes I was there, it was just talking.....I might have driven off the road had the DJ broken into a rockin Punjabi "Rag Mama Rag"

Reason 788 why I like this place.......BIll M wasn't kidding about wanting a chapter on the Orbiteer years and neither was I about "Between Trains"

Bob F: I just finished watching a truly superb bio documentary on Frank Sinatra called "All or Nothing at All". Highly reccomended. Like most stories on people's lives, I tend to always enjoy the parts that were more out of the spotlight......the down years in some cases.....or the quiet years. If you really like someone and or just respect the music or literature someone has produced, sometimes these are the most interesting times to read about.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 14:20:35 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Post TLW

Kevin, don't worry, they should be able to cover everything post TLW in a future Mojo article.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 14:04:30 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kevin, I am most impressed that you knew it was Punjabi rather than one of the other many languages of India. But the pressing question is, was the music any good?


Entered at Wed Mar 30 02:31:11 CEST 2016 from (68.171.246.25)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Great idea - a full chapter on "Between Trains". Another chapter I'd like to see: the Orbiteer recordings..


Entered at Wed Mar 30 01:27:37 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Al is worried that there won't be enough room left for the illuminati. Has your membership card arrived yet, Al? Mine must be in the post.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 00:58:41 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dave P - wasting valuable space on the GB

Just don't do it again DP

OK?

GB space is too precious for fuck ups like that.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:32:13 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....Ah, yes and $700Million.......moving on, reading more about "Testimony - a Rock n Roll Life", it would seem that it will only cover RR's life up to TLW.......that would be disappointing to me as I was hoping for a more complete life story. A chapter on the story behind "Between Trains" in itself would be welcomed but I guess not to be.

Anyhow, a lot of this is still guessing at this stage, perhaps it will be a full autobiography.

CIUT: True story.........the ice storm last Thursday and holiday on Friday, really mixed me up.......as I got in the car on Friday afternoon at about 2:15 in the afternoon, I thought. 'ah, I'll tune into John's show", so I flipped to CIUT and I hear some guy in a bit of a tizzy going on in Punjabi.....and my first thought was John really is taking eclectic to a new level ! A few minutes later I realized it was Friday not Saturday and I was in fact listening to a show called "Radio Punjabi" not "Mixed Bag"


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:12:50 CEST 2016 from (70.193.141.158)

Posted by:

David P

Sorry for the double postings. For some reason I got an error message for my first attempt, which didn't go through right away.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:06:58 CEST 2016 from (70.193.141.158)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Reissues

One specific example of a vinyl reissue that is superior to the original LP is Mobile Fidelity's recent version of MUSIC FROM BIG PINK. Mastering engineer Robert Ludwig has confirmed that Capitol rejected his original reference mastering for having "too much bass." They feared that this would present tracking problems for the average consumer turntables at the time and had their engineers cut the bass level on the pressings they released. MOFI restored the full bass level, along with a smooth, correct top end and rich mids for their reissue. My copy is dead quiet and flat, thanks to the quality heavy vinyl they use. While my copies of the original Capitol rainbow label pressings sound great, they pale in comparison to MOFI's excellent reissue.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 15:45:23 CEST 2016 from (70.193.141.158)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Reissues

One specific example of a vinyl reissue that is superior to the original LP is Mobile Fidelity's recent MUSIC FROM BIG PINK. Mastering engineer Robert Ludwig has confirmed that Capitol rejected his original reference mastering of MFBP for having too much bass. They feared that this would cause tracking problems for the average consumer turntables at the time. So Capitol had their engineers cut the bass level on the originally released pressings. MOFI restored the full bass level on their reissue, along with a smooth, correct top end and rich mids. My copy is flat, thanks to the quality heavier vinyl, and dead quiet. While my copies of the original Capitol rainbow label pressings sound great, they pale in comparison with the MOFI reissue.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 11:04:40 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The vibes of vinyl

That Muddy Waters Folk Singer LP was issued in Britain on Pye International. This was the point where Pye didn’t know where to place the Chess catalogue, so “Bo Diddley Is A Gunslinger” and “Muddy Waters At Newport” were on the Pye Jazz imprint … at that time blues and R&B were still considered sub-divisions of jazz. “Muddy Waters Folk Singer” was Pye International. A near mint copy goes for around £60. It makes you wonder … which is more desirable, an original at £60 or a new pressing at £18? To the collector, the original always carries a premium. And in spite of those “180 gram virgin vinyl” stickers I’m increasingly wary of some reissues.

Vinyl does have quality issues, even with new stuff. I wanted to get the one hour version of Max Richter’s 8 hour “Sleep” and there are several comments on amazon on quality issues with the vinyl – crackles and pops, especially on the clear vinyl, so I ordered the CD. Similarly, as I mentioned, the recent “limited edition” vinyl 45 of Elvis with the London Philharmonic overdubbed is Rice Krispies on the B-side (all snap, crackle and pop).

On the good news, check out Ace’s 40th Anniversary Singles Box Set. I copied them onto CDR yesterday and not a crackle or hiss on any of them. It’s a beautiful production. Seven 45s in card sleeves reproducing the original label designs, but each side has a different design. So Disc 4 has Otis Redding one one side in a repro Volt sleeve and Volt demo centre, flip it over and you get James Carr in a repro Goldwax sleeve and centre. The attention to detail is such that Discs 1-6 which are American recordings have “large hole” centres while disc 7 which is The Zombies / The 101ers has a British “small hole “ (LP) centre.

The version of Try A Little Tenderness is outstanding – this set goes for different takes, and they said Otis’s takes on songs differ more than anyone’s.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 08:20:27 CEST 2016 from (68.192.72.45)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Dunc

Dunc, If your e mail address hasn't changed, I sent you an article you'd get a kick out of.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 07:49:24 CEST 2016 from (24.114.50.94)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The long awaited return of brown eyed girl......Testimony

November 15, 2016


Entered at Tue Mar 29 05:11:56 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: My Favourite of all Time Songs

I've spent a little time tonight listening to this to cheer me up.

It's hard to pick number one, Hotel California, Whiter Shade of Pale, Brothers In Arms.....this take of Knockin on Heavens Door with Mark is the best you'll ever hear. Look at the look on Bob's face. I think he thinks so.

Probably my favourite is still, "Maria Elena", by Los Indios Tabajeras.

But "The Weight" is in that mix. The vid of Knockin on Heavens door,is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgAoe1o2134. I think it is hard to beat, as well as Mark's guitar, the gut singing Bob puts into it.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 02:54:02 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: United............It's so easy.......

This weekend I had the great fun of playing with my two grandchildren in the yard, They hunted for their Easter Eggs. Then they joined the community Easter egg hunt at the school. It was a wonderful time.

After sitting down and watching the news, I see in Pakistan 70 people, mostly women and children in a park being murdered by a suicide bomber. Putting a damper on my feelings to say the least. Watching that news with these beautiful little children with me is gut wrenching. It's hard to understand the mind set.

My only consolation is to watch these videos of "Playing For Change".......UNITED!...........If you have a couple of minutes from your busy life just take a look. To see these happy people make such beautiful music is my only saving grace.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 17:42:35 CEST 2016 from (70.193.141.158)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Muddy Unplugged

In 1963 Ralph Bass at Chess Records recorded Muddy Waters stripped down to the acoustic roots of the Delta. The resulting album, "Muddy Waters Folk Singer," was released the following year. As the title suggests, Chess was aiming for a wider market by appealing to the popularity of folk music at the time. Make no mistake, however, this is a heavy dose of deep blues that cuts like knife.

This is one of those "records to die for," combining the emotional impact of song selection with excellent recording sonics. The latter can be attributed to minimal miking with the natural sound of music recorded live in the studio, reverberating in the room, not in an isolation booth. The sound breathes and bleeds deep.

On four songs, Muddy's bottleneck acoustic is accompanied by Buddy Guy on acoustic guitar, swapping leads:

MY CAPTAIN
YOU GONNA NEED MY HELP
COLD WEATHER BLUES
BIG LEGGED WOMAN

On four songs Muddy and Buddy are joined by Willie Dixon on stand up bass and Clifton James on drums:

MY HOME IS IN THE DELTA
LONG DISTANCE (CALL)
GOOD MORNING SCHOOL GIRL
COUNTRY BOY

On FEEL LIKE GOING HOME Muddy delivers a chilling solo version.

While standard CD & LP vèrsions present great dynamic sound, several "audiophile" reissues released over the years add greater detail and resolution. My go-to versions are the MOFI heavy vinyl LP and the CLASSIC RECORDS HDAD, a DVD which offers both 24/192 and 24/96 high resolution. Both are out of print, but I believe there are other audiophile reissues currently available, in addition to standard, less expensive versions. Many reissues also include bonus cuts featuring Muddy's electric band. However, you can't go wrong with any version you choose.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 12:25:12 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Peter Gabriel version

I'd better put the fully-scored Peter Gabriel version too. It's a fascinating contrast.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 12:23:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Book of Love

Just heard on radio (Michael Ball) that The Book of Love is BBC Radio's Record of The Week. Michael Ball announced it by "Irish singer-songwriter Gavin James" which suggests Mr James wrote it. It is by Magnetic Fields (aka Stephen Merritt) from "69 Love Songs" and there is an elaborate Peter Gabriel version on the "Shall We Dance?" soundtrack. It was sung acapella by a singer friend of my son's at his wedding. Though all three versions are magic, the completely stripped down original is my favourite. Linked for Easter Monday (a national holiday here in the UK).


Entered at Sun Mar 27 23:22:24 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: JD

Missed Donabie last Saturday. Was on the road in a rented vehicle in a snowstorm. Can we do it again John? Is there a podcast?


Entered at Sun Mar 27 19:41:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Vinyl fans … the Universal 5 EP box set "Motortown Revue: The French Eps 1965." Beautifully packaged. Great sound.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 17:52:16 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Fog Game

Love that story, thanks.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 11:28:59 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Al, thanks, please take my hand.

….and tell them the streets in front of the little house in Amsterdam, where he was born, turned into a sea of flowers and that on the window of his birthplace they carved Cruijff’s words “playing outdoor should be taught in schools” and that every 14th minute of a soccer game he gets a standing ovation and that he is loved by all and ….


Entered at Sat Mar 26 02:24:23 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Johan Cruyff

That was a wonderful tribute Norb.

Says everything of the great man. For me Europe's finest ever footballer and alongside Di Stefano, Pele, Maradona and Messi on the global pantheon.

Would you mind if I used it on another site? Your name, of course Norb.

I'd never heard of him. Then one foggy Amsterdam night back in 1966 him and Ajax announced their arrival on the world stage and football was never the same again.

I've reproduced a Dutch article for yourself and any other footy nut to savour.

THE FOG GAME

When we talk Classic Games, many many candidates come to mind. But this particular one is the Mother of All Classic Games!

Johan Cruyff calls it his favorite match ever. And looking back, this 1966 game between Liverpool, the Champs of England (and probably one of the best teams in the world, back then) and Ajax can be called the birth of Dutch Total Football, culminating in Oranje’s demonstration in 1974.

This game is since then known as “De Mist Wedstijd (The Fog Game)” and without the spectators nor the tv cameras being able to see a thing – let alone a ball – Ajax beat the English 5-1!

Right winger Sjaak Swart: “It was a fairytale, no one believed it actually happened.”

Rinus Michels was hired as Ajax’ coach in 1965. The season before, Ajax almost got relegated. Never before performed Ajax that bad.

In Michels second year, Ajax wins it’s first European game against Besiktas and Liverpool comes out of the draw for the second round.

Ajax normally would be considered too weak for those teams (Benfica and Real Madrid are two other contenders for best European team) but under the inexperienced but tough Michels, the team starts to settle and find it’s rhythm.

But England won the World Cup that year and Liverpool is the fave for the title in the European Cup.

Still, the gutsy Amsterdam rebels feel that something is possible. That particular day – December 7, 1966 – a think mist hovers over Holland and most Ajax representatives assume the game will be cancelled.

In those days, the players would drive to the stadium themselves. Henk Groot was picked up by Sjaak Swart in his Citroen DS but due to the moist air, the car won’t start. Swart and Groot have to push the car to jumpstart it (I can’t see Kaka and C Ronaldo do that…) and the players arrived at the stadium only 45 minutes before the start of the game.

Michels is pretty relaxed. He instructed his team already and he knows he doesn’t need to motivate them against Liverpool. The only downside is, Piet Keizer is injured. The magical left winger is crucial to the team, but Michels needs to find a replacement and does so in Cees de Wolff. De Wolff was an amateur the year before. “I hadn’t played for Ajax yet and this was my big break. A huge opportunity to make my name.”

15 Year old Ajax youth player Louis van Gaal desperately wanted to see the game but couldn’t get a ticket. “So, I checked where the oldest steward was and I slipped in at that gate. I knew the old guy couldn’t chase me so I was in.”

Like Ajax, Liverpool has a remarkable coach in Bill Shankly. Like Michels, he has a sharp brain and analytical skill and he likes to play mindgames. When he saw Ajax play against Telstar and quizzed by the media afterwards, he couldn’t stop complimenting Telstar. But when he got home and talked to his players, he couldn’t stop mentioning this young talent he’d seen, a certain Johan Cruyff.

TV legend Herman Kuiphof would do the tv commentary. In those days, games were broadcast live only when the stadium was sold out. And it was certainly sold out on this night.

Kuiphof: “The mist in the day was severe, but the weather forecasters said it would disappear in the evening. Yet it only got worse. When I sat in my commentary-booth, chairman Van Praag came to ask if I could also give commentary for the fans in the stadium. He was worried that they couldn’t see a thing.”

Both Liverpool and Ajax wanted to play the game. Liverpool has an important match against Man United the coming weekend and the team management wants the players to play and stay in shape.

Ajax realizes it has a full stadium of fans and they want to offer the fans something special. The Italian ref checks the vision some 30 minutes before kick off and by then he can still see the goals from the center spot.

Game on!

Ajax plays in white, which helps the players find each other. The game starts perfectly for Ajax. Henk Groot crosses the ball in and debutant Cees de Wolff heads the ball from the edge of the box (!) behind Liverpool goalie Lawrence: 1-0.

De Wolff: “After I scored we walked back to our half and we could hear the fans cheer in waves. No one had seen the goal, so they cheered because they heard others cheer.”

Ajax goalie Gert Bals cheered a full 5 seconds after De Wolff had scored.

The game hardened. Wim Suutbier got a severe knock and could hardly walk. Henk Groot had a big wound on his eyebrow.

Ajax medic Salo Muller: “I think I went on the pitch seven times to treat a player and the ref never saw me do it once…”.

Sjaak Swart plays the game of his life. Not only does he need to support the injured Suurbier on the back spot, he also dribbles past three Liverpudlians to cross the ball to Nuninga who tests Lawrence. The goalie drops the ball and Johan Cruyff scores the second goal. Again, no one saw it.

Kuiphof watches from the monitor and is able to see it a tad better than the rest. Young Louis van Gaal was cheeky enough to climb to Kuiphof’s tv-box and he watched the game on the monitor. “That Kuiphof even blocked the wind for me. It’s was quite nice…”

Klaas Nuninga would score the 3-0 not much later. And then something remarkable happened. Sjaak Swart hears the whistle and assumes it’s half time. He walks off the pitch, to the dressing room only to be stopped by an Ajax boardmember.

“He said, Sjaak! What are you doing. The game is still on. So I went back. Came on the pitch, received the ball and crossed it in the box: 4-0!”

Michels implores his men to keep at it in the second half. Liverpool does come back in the second half with a vengeance, but they simply can’t score. Ajax scores the fifth until Lawler scores the consolation goal.

After the match, Bill Shankly isn’t fussed. “I wasn’t too impressed with Ajax. They got lucky. Next week in Liverpool we’ll beat them 7-0.”

Ajax prepares well for the return. Bill Shankly, meanwhile, starts playing his mindgames. He tells the press: “Ajax got lucky. That goalie, Gert Bals, wouldn’t even play in our amateur teams. They’re in for a hot night and their physio better bring heaps of stretchers.”

Ton Pronk: “His words did have effect. Shankly made it seem as if our win was an anomaly. So, we were motivated to the teeth.”

Rinus Michels knows about the magic of Anfield and the power of the fans’ singing their amazing songs. To help his players get accustomed, he sends them onto the pitch really early. So they could get used to the atmosphere.

Sjaak Swart: “I will never forget that. There we were. Alone on the pitch, facing The Kop. And they all started singing You’ll Never Walk Alone. The emotion. I’d never heard that song, but I got goosebumps. I’ve always been a Liverpool follower ever since.”

Liverpool starts fiercely but luck is on Ajax’ hands. The English hit the post twice and after 20 minutes, the storm rests. Ajax settles into the game and Johan Cruyff would score the first goal in the second half. He’d score a second before Liverpool scores twice. By then, the Liverpool fans are quiet.

After the game, Bill Shankly comes into the Ajax dressing room and congratulates the players individually.

Pronk: “That was impressive. A larger than life guy. He said to me: the war is over. You won…”

When Ajax comes home, thousands of fans await the team, as if they just won the European Cup.

And with that game a new era had begun. Johan Cruyff: “Michels was an important factor. We could all play good football, sure, but he added the team discipline. He gave us confidence and the Dutch fans realized we could face the best of the best and come up as winners.”


Entered at Fri Mar 25 23:28:02 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Opiates & Lingo

Norbert, I've been tip top, thank you. Maybe i shouldn't have worried about you. But after a decade of not understanding your posts at all, the last couple of years i 've enjoyed the hell out of your posts & had either a full or pretty good appreciation of what you were aiming for. Of course, I absolutely realize that some of you gents that speak two or four or five languages are light years ahead of me. Jan's English is impeccable. Far better than mine. I haven't spoken another language that well since i excelled in Spanish back in school days. Lack of use has made ordering at Taco Bell difficult for me. Cheerio! Aw fuck, now I'm talking Londonderry or something i shouldn't be.. You're a bad fucking influence Norbert!


Entered at Fri Mar 25 19:57:40 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Kaleo - From Iceland

Don't know if any of you have experienced this group of kids from Iceland......very impressive.

Their official video of "All the Pretty Girls" would put you in mind of a group of hippie kids of the sixties....very reminiscent.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 19:33:16 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

David, I have the DCC also, I haven't listened to it recently, but it does sound quite good.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 19:25:22 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Ben: I bought the DCC gold reissue when it was first released and still relatively affordable. It was sourced from Glyn Johns' first mixes. Evidently Capitol got the tapes mixed up when they licensed the reissue and sent the tape to DCC. The original Capitol CD version released in 1989 was also sourced from the Johns first mix.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 19:00:35 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

David, I have a few of those MFSL Band discs. They do sound quite nice. There was also a DCC Gold disc of SF mastered by the highly acclaimed engineer Steve Hoffman. That disc is long out of print and goes for pretty big bucks on the secondary market.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 18:13:19 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stage Fright

I gained a new appreciation of "Stage Fright" from listening to Mobile Fidelity's LP and SACD reissues that were released several years ago. Adding to Todd Rundgren's challenge was that they used a remote recording truck and he was at a mixing board in a tent outside the theater.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 18:10:31 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: 14

Jeff thanks, you must feel better now.

Anyway, talking about hero's ... Today exactly 69 years a boy was born in a working class hood in Amsterdam. He became a skinny little boy with a big wiseacre mouth but a good heart. He was always talking, knew everything better. Only when he played soccer on the streets he silenced. He was the best player of his streets, of his Amsterdam and soon of Holland. A ballet dancer with the ball, his play was so beautiful people called it art. He made Ajax Amsterdam the best team in the world and became a hero. Thereafter he made Barcelona champion, became the best player in the world and people called him J.C The Savior, a legend was born.

Yesterday he died.

Johan Cruyff, the inventor of electricity. Tells the Gods how things really work now.

RIP number 14, thanks.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 16:24:19 CET 2016 from (108.2.144.116)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: Overlooking the Delaware and NJ

Subject: Links

Wow, guys, a lot of great links of late

Jeff A., too bad those eyebrow extensions never caught on...

Simon, Peter, Bob F, all good stuff.

Bill M., thanks for the Hungry Chuck. I had no idea they made another record, although my Man Mr. Ecklund is greatly missed. I love their original LP, which my friend Mark bought based on it's somewhat DaDa-esque cover. What a pleasant surprise! Keep up the good work, guys!


Entered at Fri Mar 25 16:05:23 CET 2016 from (109.170.173.98)

Posted by:

Peter V

According to Small Town Talk, Todd Rundgren was trying to sound like Richard on "Once Burned" which is why he asked Levon and Rick to play on the track with him, which they did.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 15:47:51 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Stage Fright

If Rundgren's comments about the recording of 'Stage Fright' are accurate, then I'm just pleased that the album turned out as well as it did.

In 'Ain't In It For My Health', Billy Bob Thornton asked Levon about SF and Levon says something to the effect that the Band was pretty much through by the time that they recorded SF. I found those comments to be pretty jarring. I would have expected to hear those type of comments about 'Cahoots' rather than SF.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 09:58:14 CET 2016 from (210.86.76.153)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: TLW vs RAH

I'd go for TLW as there may be extra video involved. Though I'd jump at any more video from 71 - either ROA or RAH - or both. Get Up Jake would be amazing. Actually - did they ever perform that again?


Entered at Fri Mar 25 06:53:51 CET 2016 from (24.114.49.127)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: JQ

Just got in and what sad news about Gary Shandling. There aren't that many truly original talents in any field and he most certainly was one in comedy. Can we go straight to 2017 already.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 03:19:16 CET 2016 from (76.66.111.160)

Posted by:

Bill M

Re Todd and our guys, I've always detected a slight, wistful echo of Richard's "Lonesome Suzie" in Runt's big hit:

I guess just watching you has made me lonesome too
Why don't we get together
What else can we do?

We gotta get you a woman
And when we're through with you
Maybe we'll get me one too


Entered at Fri Mar 25 03:17:39 CET 2016 from (207.98.147.238)

Posted by:

N. Walker

Location: Alabama

Subject: Love your site

Great site. we're doing a Last Waltz tribute concert and it's really cool to see all this info in one place. Just wish I would've known before the transcription work.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 02:58:08 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Todd Rundgren, 1973 TV Appearance

Linked , Todd Rundgren, in a 1973 TV Appearance. Norm must have dressed him.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 02:12:50 CET 2016 from (76.66.111.160)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Wild Willie

Simon: Thanks to the RAH link. I liked the interview with Robbie, particularly the bit about the rocker fans of Ronnie Hawkins. As it happens, I got to meet one of them, Wild Willie Jeffery, in '79 or '80 when he was in Toronto and we arranged to meet at a Hawkins show at a club on Merton Street. (Same street, and maybe the same hall, where the 1959 CHUM chart shows Hawkins guesting with Robbie Robertson, Scott Cushnie and the rest of the Suedes.) I don't recall how Willie and I identified each other, but I do recall that he introduced me to Hawkins, who proceeded to tell us about his earliest band of Hawks, called the Black Hawks because all but Ronnie were African-American. I don't think that info was in circulation at the time, but it has turned up in one of the Hawkins / Hawks books. Around the same time, Robbie Lane called me to tell me that he'd just seen Robbie Robertson, Domenic Troiano (who'd replaced Robertson with Hawkins) and Terry Bush (who'd replaced Troiano, but whose playing had previously inspired Neil Young - see the book "Young Neil") swapping yarns and comparing notes at the same club. Wish I'd seen that!


Entered at Thu Mar 24 22:00:45 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Gary Shandling RIP

A very funny and intelligent fellow. A big loss -


Entered at Thu Mar 24 18:30:51 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Royal Albert Hall

"Strawberry Wine," "Rockin' Chair," and "Look Out Cleveland" from the June 1971 RAH concert were included in A MUSICAL HISTORY box set. A tantalizing tease of what is in the vault of unreleased recordings.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:02:00 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.144)

Posted by:

Bill M

For a more positive take on Grossman, see "Four Strong Winds", John Einarson's book about Ian and Sylvia. Both Tysons see him as a good manager who got them good deals with good royalties, a good lawyer who took good care of their interests and a good accountant who took good care of their money.

Kevin J: I've always preferred Jesse Winchester's second albun "3rd Down, 110 Yards To Go".


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:18:36 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, i was at two in a row of the New Years Eve shows Rick and Fagen did at Bearsville Theatre. I'm pretty sure there only two, but maybe there were three, cause but my remembrance of the shows lineups are a little different than the article. I thought i recalled Vivino being in both. And Weider only being at one. i could be wrong. Mindy Jostyn was definitely in both shows i went to, and Catherine Russell was in at least one, but i think both. The shows were amazing of course........... As was every of the many shows i saw at Bearsville in the 80s and 90s that Rick was a part of.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 15:59:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Common Ground …

… the track from "Five Miles From Hope" where we have Garth Hudson backing Mindy Jostyn. Thanks for the reminder, Bob! I hadn't played the album for years, but it's playing now. Other guests include Carly Simon, Larry Packer and Donald Fagen.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 15:47:32 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Rod & Mowtown

Kevin, Simon, enjoyed the links the other day. It's good to see Rod is growing old gracefully with his sense of humor intact and that Motown never grows old.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 15:44:49 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Small Town Talk

I use the library for most of my reading pleasure. I can usually get any book in a few days. I enjoyed Small Town Talk. Living 25 miles from Woodstock, I saw a lot of the performers discussed in the book and maybe that has something to do with it. No one talks about the Woodstock Mountain Revue anymore and that's a shame because they were amazing. If this book helps to keep that music alive, well that's a good thing. I think he should have spent more time on the great shows Levon and Rick did in the Hudson Valley over the years. Check out the link to a New Year's Eve show Rick did. They also did a ton of benefits in the area throughout the years. Big time shows at places like UPAC in Kingston. He could have spent some ink on that. Most annoyingly he never mentions the great great musician Mindy Jostyn who was always the classiest player in the room.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 15:34:46 CET 2016 from (99.249.59.50)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Royal Albert (Hall not Grossman)

Ben, I had thought that the Royal Albert Shows were from the European tour of '71 and Rundgren must be in error. I agree it's easy enough to get the years mixed up after all this time. They are shows that certainly would be worth officially releasing especially given the quality of the sound. It sounds as if those are the only shows from the European tour that Rundgren mixed.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 13:58:36 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: The Greek's Grossman

Some comments about Albert G. from Nick Gravenites (found at [My link]):

"There was more than music being played at Newport in 1964 -- there were the head games and the power trips of the music business, the vested interests with their own agendas protecting their turf against the new, young, and hungry. Alan Lomax Jr. gave Paul Butterfield's band a desultory and condescending introduction, almost apologizing to the audience for their presence at the festival, he introduced the question "Can a White Man Play The Blues?", and this so infuriated Albert Grossman that he confronted Lomax and they wound up punching it out, rolling around on the ground in the dust of the backstage area. Hey, it was good to see dirt under their fingernails.

Yes, Albert Grossman, the big-time manager, was taking care of his business, but, unfortunately, Paul was just a small cog in the Albert Grossman machine called Bob Dylan. There was so much of Bob Dylan's money passing through Albert Grossman's hands that it was a full-time job for him just renting places and hiring people to collect it and to count it all. Everybody was recording Dylan's music, The Byrds; Peter, Paul and Mary; Ritchie Havens, god knows how many groups around the world and in how many languages, and Albert had his fingerprint on every dollar that went cruising by. Albert's trip was money. He was no tapdancer, no musician, he was a businessman and the business he took care of best was his own. Ostensibly, he was managing the affairs of his clients, but the advice he gave them wasn't necessarily the best for them. You can be sure it was the best for him. If he was really managing other people's affairs, the best advice he could give them was to fire him. Of course, Albert got all the songs of all his artists published through his own companies. Now, it seems to me that if he was really managing his artists' affairs and giving them good advice, he would have advised them to form their own publishing companies so they could keep the hog share of the money while paying the manager a share of the proceeds. What a joke!

Albert Grossman managed this huge deception with his clients, purporting to be in their corner for their interests. Meanwhile, he used his own lawyers, his own accountants, his own agents, his own record production companies, to keep most of the cash for himself, and by the time anybody wised up to what he was doing, the contracts were all signed, the money went to Albert, and there was nothing you could do about it.

When Albert died, it was as if Pharaoh died, and when Pharaoh dies, everybody dies. Most of the records, the files, the contracts from these early Grossman days, why, they're "lost," they've "disappeared," "lost in a fire," they went into the tomb with Pharaoh, the only thing left was a punched ticket on a one way-trip to the morgue."


Entered at Thu Mar 24 13:38:31 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: rockin' roller

There are premium cars, luxury cars -- and then there are classic cars. Elvis Costello featured a photo of this one in his memoir published last year.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 10:55:28 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

When I read those kind of comments from critics I think ... well lets compare what Robbie has achieved compared to what Hoskyns has achieved. I wonder if Levon ever read Hoskyns book. If he didn't read his own book I doubt he would have read somebody else's.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 10:53:16 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: 1971

Geoffrey Cannon's review of The Olympia, Paris in 1971 is already in the Library here … linked. But take a look … he says two men with Arriflexes were constantly walking around the stage filming.

So it looks like Olympia, Paris WAS filmed (and therefore recorded professionally). One for Sebastian to seek out?


Entered at Thu Mar 24 10:44:18 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RAH

It's definitely the one to go for - I hadn't known they'd got Todd Rundgren over to mix it either. Although it's only months before the Rock of Ages show, it's the Band - not "The Band + horns" so the arrangements for the main tour, plus as Simon notes, different songs are on there. I'll look out Geoffrey Canon's Guardian review of the concert later.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 10:39:49 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hoskyns and Robbie

On balance, over the 23 years since Across The Great Divide, Barney Hoskyns has done The Band far more good than harm. He curated an excellent compilation, and wrote about them glowingly in magazines too.

The issue with Robbie goes back to the book in 1993. Hoskyns is harsh on the first RR solo album. Some words lifted from just a couple of pages:

hamfisted, overblown, excruciating, pomposity, pretentious, bloated, grandiose ,the myth of Robbie’s “genius.” He goes on to describe RR as a “Hollywood ad man, riding around in a black BMW.”

I’ve taken issue with this absurd dig in the past. A BMW is a premium car, like a Lexus, Infiniti, Audi, Cadillac, Mercedes or a Volvo. It is NOT a luxury car, like a Porsche, Lamborghini, an Aston Martin or a Ferrari, and Hoskyns must have interviewed many rock stars with several of those in the garage. It’s a car any successful professional of Robbie’s age would drive.

Hoskyns described how nervous he was going to interview Levon in later years, fearing his reaction to “Across The Great Divide” and noted that Levon never mentioned it and was friendly and courteous. Good for Levon (though the prospect of an interview for Rolling Stone probably helped), but it shows Hoskyns anticipated possible backlash from Band members.

Then we get to the rejected liner notes for the reissues, whereupon he called Robbie “a vain control freak.” What did he expect? I’m not vain, but if someone had said about me what Hoskyns said about Robbie, then was put forward for a paid role on a project I was controlling (freak or not), I would have definitely rejected their input. I think most people would.

In fact, a few years ago I was asked to contribute to a festschrift (or whatever it’s called – we don’t say it in England) to a prominent someone who had criticized one of my books in a review, and I declined.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 10:14:25 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

A while back when Sebastion posted he said they would work on the RAH and Festival Express material but that it would take some time.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 09:30:30 CET 2016 from (86.167.24.162)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Subject: Royal Albert Hall

Ben, I was thinking the same thing. If we did get a revamped LW box then that would probably put back any chance of an Albert Hall release by four or five years. I can almost imagine some record company person pouring cold water on that idea anyway -- it's too close to the Academy performances time-wise, it'd be confusing for the public, the Last Waltz is more of a surefire thing, etc. But the RAH performances that we've heard seem to hint at a quite different (at least in my mind) sound from the Academy dates. There's the fact they had a bespoke PA system set up for them (see link to Richard Williams piece of a few years ago) by Charlie Watkins. Plus there are songs like We Can Talk, Look Out Cleveland, Slippin and Slidin that won't be as familiar to the public live. Seems to me that they had a real kick-the-doors-off-their-hinges aspect to their sound here (as well as the subtleties that made them so special, obviously). In a nutshell, different enough sounding to the Academy shows as could possibly be within the space of six months or so.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 09:25:42 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I think Hoskyns has not been happy with Robbie since some of his liner notes for the reissues were rejected.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 06:36:50 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Greg, The Royal Albert Hall shows are definitely '71. I guess that Rundgren got his timeline a bit confused. That's understandable when you're talking about events from more than 40 years ago.

It would be wonderful if the Royal Albert Hall show was finally released. I'm much more interested in unreleased live shows than in another rehash of the Last Waltz.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 05:26:32 CET 2016 from (99.249.59.50)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Royal Albert Rags

Did the Band play the Royal Albert Hall in 1970? The famous bootlegged shows are from '71 but in the Todd Rundgren interview posted by Dave H, Rundgren said "...and after that I was in England and I helped to mix the Albert Hall show that they did there." Assuming he meant mixing the Stage Fright tapes at the time, but might he have meant he also mixed the Royal Albert shows from the next year for a possible live release, and not the sound for the concert?


Entered at Thu Mar 24 02:30:01 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.27)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Hungry Chuck

Peter V: Good to know that Hoskyn's newest is strong on the Bobby Charles album. I found the best source of who-played-what info to be an odd boutique site given over to some Woodstock band like Hungry Chuck. So I just googled Hungry Chuck and learned that they'd reunited to record a second album decades later - Amos Garrett, Jim Colegrove, ND Smart, Jeff Gutcheon.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 00:41:53 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dr. Amigo, that's a new one. According to the ISP, he ( a female would have been Dr. Amiga) could be in Charlotte, North Carolina, or Chicago. That's a pretty big distance to be covered by one ISP. Then again, I'm ignorant of how that stuff works.



Entered at Wed Mar 23 22:11:11 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I am interested in the details of our guys' lives to the extent that it influenced the music and their careers as professional musicians, I think any stuff unrelated to that is personal and nobody else's business.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 22:02:50 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ben, I read the whole thing. I wasn't offended by anything. All the gossipy bits are pretty much common knowledge. I bought it because I wanted to find out more about Albert Grossman and there isn't really anything new. Grossman, like Bill Graham, seems like a really interesting person. Perhaps not pleasant, but interesting. If you are a hard core fan, you can easily pick up the bias in the various sources the author used.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:48:04 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Wallsend, Thanks for the offer, but don't worry about. If you have a Barnes and Noble type of bookstore near you, you may be able to return it for store credit. Have you read the entire book or were you so disappointed that you put it down before finishing?

Kevin, I discovered the Jesse Winchester album probably 20 or years ago when it came on a Rhino CD. 'Biloxi' in particular is a really beautiful song. Tim Hardin did a really nice cover of 'Yankee Lady' in the early 70's.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:12:06 CET 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, Rick talked about Garth's narcolepsy. 1999--"I hope this doesn't offend him, but Garth may suffer from a little form of narcolepsy."


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:09:38 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Small Town Talk

I don’t anticipate reviewing it – more mentioning good bits as I go along. There is a lot on people I’ve barely heard of, or have little interest in, and I’m skimming those bits, and my rule on readability and number of proper nouns for names and places per page gets far exceeded at times.

When it gets to things I am interested in (Janis, Hendrix, Dylan Our guys, Todd Rundgren, the Muldaurs, Better Days, Jesse Winchester etc) I’m slowing down and finding it has good material from what appear to be original interviews. I must say I haven’t found anything particularly offensive so far, but you detect a lack of warmth towards Robbie, which I find surprising in someone who’s spent so many years listening to his songs. He builds up a kind of story about the place.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:02:47 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Agreed, Ben! And his last few releases were really good as well. So sad that he got sick just as he was enjoying such a fine 2nd wind.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:38:53 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.15)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ben, I wouldn't both with Small Town Talk. I regret buying it. I would be happy to give you my copy if there was so way I could get it to you for free.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:25:50 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Kevin, The Jesse Winchester album is a classic. Both, 'Biloxi' and 'Yankee Lady' are outstanding songs.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:17:10 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

As Rundgren grew up in the Philadelphia area, one wonders if he ever saw Levon & the Hawks perform at Tony Mart's down at the Jersey shore. After high school he did spend some time in nearby Wildwood where he joined Woody's Truck Stop before leaving to form Nazz. While he may not have crossed paths with the Hawks at the shore, he did no doubt share the experience of playing in clubs there.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:00:25 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ben.......Robbie and Levon had both worked with him before Stage Fright - on Jesse Winchester's great debut.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:00:15 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Small Town Talk

Peter, I'm still sitting on the fence about ordering 'Small Town Talk'. Do you plan on writing a detailed review when you finish the book?


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:55:39 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I thought that Rundgren's comments were somewhat entertaining. But, without hearing the entire interview there's no way of knowing whether he talks about other projects he's worked on in a similar way. I can't imagine that anyone in the Band was a Nazz fan, so they probably had no idea who he was.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:19:29 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: 40th, not 50th.

I'll give the link again,this time with the correct amount of years. Warren Haynes leading a 40th Anniversary Last Waltz concert. Of course, he's 6 months early. Maybe he wanted to be the first.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:11:23 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Proof that your personality is as captivating as we might have always thought, Jeff.....or that Rundgren's even more off-base than I stated.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:00:44 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin...If it makes you feel better........There's many people whom have spent a lot more time with Garth than I. But i've spent up to 7 hours in a stretch with him several times and never once did i see him fall asleep....


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:58:35 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Despite the difficulties in recording and mixing, "Stage Fright" reached the Billboard Top 5 upon its release in Sept. 1970, making it the group's highest charting album.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:54:04 CET 2016 from (67.87.217.49)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: 50th Anniversary Last Waltz Concert

Kinda Odd. Scheduled for April, and taking place in New Orleans. then again, it includes a tribute to Allan Toussaint, and despite the fact that he often lived in NYC, New Orleans was his home. It;s just a little bit expected that a big Last Waltz show would take place on Thanksgiving.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:40:00 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rundgren makes it clear that he was 21, had no interest in drugs, and found progress maddeningly slow. Fortunately for him, he never worked on a Rolling Stones album. He also had green hair, which Levon found obnoxious. If we recall the tale of Levon chasing him around the Bearsville Theatre threatening to bite his ear (or was it nose?) off, then you can see he might harbour bad feelings.

Having often sat around for several hours while musicians got round to getting round to begin thinking about an introductory jam before actually starting to consider thinking about rehearsing, I kind of sympathize. The quote from “Pulling Into Nazareth” follows:

QUOTE:

Steve plonked the seven mugs of instant coffee on top of a speaker cabinet, ‘You’ll have to come and get it.’

They’d been there for an hour already, and the rehearsal still hadn’t progressed beyond doodling around. There seemed no end to the musicians’ capacities for self-absorption, for piddling around aimlessly once they’d got instruments in their hands. Antoine was messing around with ‘Time is Tight,’ playing the same couple of bars over and over again, while he adjusted the tabs on the Hammond. Bud was doing slow, thoughtful bass scales, Mickey was pissing around with his wah-wah pedal, and Julian was tinkering with a little tune that sounded original. Chas had spent an hour tightening drumheads, adjusting cymbals and doing sudden explosive rolls round the kit. Steve was bored shitless. Eventually, someone would start a plodding 12-bar, and once a second musician finally noticed and picked it up, they might all decide to play together.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:26:33 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Peter V: My point was more the insensitivity of the Garth references and the focus on the drugs with the others over and over again at the absence of EVER even mentioning that the album turned out to be a pretty good one. Surely, you would think he might have some comment on the music that was made.

Anyhow, the sensitive wonder kid that Hoskyns foolishly believes could have been bigger and better than David Bowie was last seen playing a rather uninspiring rhythm guitar in Ringo's oldies act. Fitting.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:17:56 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dion

On a different note, has anyone else got into "New York Is My Home" by Dion? There's some splendid work by Jimmy Vivino on everything except the title track, which has Paul Simon and Duke Gadd instead (LINKED). Some of it is a little too "generic R&B" but when Dion shines, as he does on the title track and "Can't Go Back To Memphis" it's firing on all cylinders. I linked "New York Is My Home." A YouTube video of Can't Go Back to Memphis is listed, but won't open in the UK. It might open in North America if you search for it.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:11:53 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hoskyns has some interesting stuff on Rundgren in Small Town Talk. It seems Grossman was bent on hiring him out as a producer, for example to George Harrison to finish the Badfinger album … at four times the going rate. Badfinger found him “rude and obnoxious” and Michael Friedman is quoted “ Todd was so difficult to work with that he almost never got to do a second album with anybody.” The bit Dave H posted has more than Hoskyns did.

Kevin – you can’t blame Rundgren (or Hoskyns) for “linking opiates to Levon” when Levon mentions the problem in his own book. There was no secrecy on this sort of stuff from Levon, which makes me surprised that people try to sweep all this under the carpet. And Levon and Rick post Stage Fright played on Rundgren’s album.

Small Town Talk is very good on the Bobby Charles album – with more information on who did what than was around before. Also an odd note that Rick “auditioned” for bass on the Better Days album. (And didn’t get it).


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:44:26 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stage Fright

Mr. Rundgren failed to mention Glyn Johns' involvement in the mixing of the album. Just to recapsulate -- Both Rundgren and Johns did initial mixes, which were rejected. They then had another go at it and all of Rundgren's second mixes were chosen for the original LP, except for "All La Glory," "The Shape I'm In," and "The Rumor," which came from Johns' second mixes.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:51:22 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Am I the only one that has had it with Todd Rundgren ? That latest interview of his is at least the 4th or 5th time over the last several years when he has been asked about The Band and Stage Fright and not once have I heard him say anything even remotely complimentary. Worse than that though, he goes out of his way to reveal a rather private medical condition that Garth has. Unprompted, he describes Garth’s condition in every interview…….not to mention linking opiates to Levon…. Petty and bad form in my opinion………Rundgren spent two months with The Band and it’s as if he is suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome......If nothing else it does put in context the stress Robbie must have felt having to live with this dysfunction in the studio and on the road for years on end.

Thanks for the transcription, Dave. I know that takes an effort.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 11:12:34 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

That Rod Stewart link is brilliant! I've seen James Corden on stage (One Man Two Guv'nors - linked) and he is an extraordinary talent working an audience, and always doing the unexpected.Rod came across very well!


Entered at Wed Mar 23 01:34:58 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.0)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nice to see Barak Obama say nice things today about the amazing Cuban boxer Theophilo Stevenson, a hero of my youth. On a musical note, playing the lovely "Chan Chan" by the Buena Vista Social Club in the car made me think that Ry Cooder should have been part of the US delegation.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 23:55:57 CET 2016 from (136.167.102.146)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Subject: Todd Rundgren interview

Todd Rundgren was interviewed on Marc Maron's podcast and had a few comments about working on Stage Fright. I've transcribed an excerpt (starts around 44 minutes in):

Maron: Did you like those guys, the Band?

Rundgren: Those guys were very, very experienced...and I was not. They had already been the Hawks, with Ronnie Hawkins, and played probably forever doing that.

MM: Were they impressive? When you looked at them, were you like, 'Holy S**t'?

TR: No, I was not! I mean, I think we got along. They found me amusing in certain ways, but also I got things done. I exuded a certain confidence about what I was doing that always sells.

MM: When you listen to that record, can you identify your sound as a producer?

TR: No, and I was not a producer. There was no producer on Stage Fright. They were kind of scrupulous about that.

MM: You were just mixing?

TR: I did all of the recording, and mixing, and after that I was in England and I helped to mix the Albert Hall show that they did there. And then on my first solo album, Levon and Rick Danko did a song for me. So I got along with all those guys. They had an internal dynamic that was so tense anyway. You know, there was a lot of tension about the fact that Robbie wrote everything and therefore owned the publishing to everything, and so they kind of felt sometimes like sidemen to Robbie's thing. I never, thankfully, had to get into the details of that, but I knew that that was kind of a constant source of tension.

During the sessions, it was herding felines. Trying to get everyone all at their instruments and ready and in the mood to do a take seemed to take most of the time. Most of the time was not spent doing takes, it was getting everyone onto their instrument to do a take. Well, you know, a lot things would impinge. One is that Garth was, and likely still is, a narcoleptic, so he would just fall asleep at some point, even in the middle of a song.

Levon, unfortunately, was involved with opiates and stuff like that. We'd be trying to do a take, we're at the Woodstock Theater, and we can't find Levon, we're ready to do a take, and we finally find him under a pile of curtains somewhere, fast asleep. We do a session one day and Richard doesn't show up. Where's Richard? Nobody knows where Richard is. Richard apparently has spent the night in his car with his nose face down in a culvert, all night long. They had issues.

MM: But you got into that with Grossman...

TR: It characterizes them. You kind of channel those issues into the music, ultimately.

MM: And that's the job of a producer?

TR: Ultimately, but as I say, I was not the producer. I did not have the authority to say *claps* 'Hey, let's get to it, wake up, Levon!'

MM: But you had the authority to say, 'Come on guys, can we just...'

TR: I don't remember literally what I did, but I could be very sarcastic and needling, and stuff like that. I remember they all got angry at me because at one point I referred to Garth as an old man. Because relative to me, he was.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 23:13:38 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Small Town Talk

Women on the road: was the cut clunky or knowing? After all, Joni sings Coyote which is a role reversal. Now I think back, I had noticed the juxtaposition as potentially thoughtless but also thought-provoking.

I had 2 to 3 hours waiting around today so progressed with Small Town Talk. He does get into this "privacy" / "secrecy" / "covering up misdeeds" Woodstock vibe - choose which one of the three it is. It has often appeared here over the years. Is it a desire for privacy or a desire for covering up and pretending things didn't happen? Take Geoff Muldaur, mentioned the other day as one maligned. He is maligned by reports from his then wife, Maria in the book. So we assume it's true. So is it invading privacy or just saying "you do the crime you take the time"? I reckon Barney Hoskyns very carefully sets up the issues, as on the Sheriff's dept's blindness to any Band members doings or misdoings. It's fascinating. I also think most of the alleged "gossip" is public knowledge anyway, though I was greatly surprised to read that Jesse Winchester could be a difficult drunk. Todd Rundgren';s Stage Fright tale, portraying Levon as a supposed hillbilly ordering Lobster Thermidor (for instance) is a very old one.

Hoskyn's short summing ups of he albums is very good. Not that I agree, but it's very good in the space.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 21:53:12 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Actually, Simon's correct in pointing out the one bit of clunky direction in an otherwise masterpiece film.....and it was indeed Scorsese choosing to follow that awkward comment about "women on the road" with the Joni Mitchell performance always seemed wrong to me.

BTW, stick with the Rod Stewart LINK all the way through - it's worth it - all 9 mins


Entered at Tue Mar 22 21:49:28 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Motown

Due any day is a vinyl box set of the Motown French Eps, long treasured for the selection, plus the complete live show in Paris.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 21:41:25 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Rod Stewart - Great LINK

All of us need a reprieve from the madness of the world sometimes and often this GB and good music does that for me...........so, please do check out this LINK of Rod Stewart in a car driving around LA talking about shagging and singing and shagging and singing......a most enjoyable and funny clip that I promise will put a smile on some faces.

Bob F: Thank you for that most wonderful "Jealous Guy" Link.....Made my day.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 21:37:54 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apologies, Simon … I made a connection on Women On The Road that hadn't been there.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:46:38 CET 2016 from (58.104.11.187)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Did Rick, Richard or Garth ever complain about how they were portrayed in TLW?


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:34:04 CET 2016 from (86.161.3.12)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"Nowhere to Run". An obvious choice but one I couldn't resist.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:18:55 CET 2016 from (86.161.3.12)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Subject: Motown treasure trove

Peter, I didn't say anything about so-called sexist comments in the movie. Something like that wouldn't bother me in any case.

Bob F - have you checked out that channel on YouTube that has the Motown extended mixes? I don't normally go in for that sort of thing but these are really tastefully done and an obvious labour of love. They seem to showcase the talents of all the people involved. I've linked to My Cherie Amour and it really highlights the beauty of the tune. I'd be interested in anyone else's favourites.

Al, I think you'd really love these.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:05:56 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Now you see it!

Who knows, who was directing the cameras David. Possibly there were more things best left unseen. The one thing is, as I dealt with on stage. Some things at the time are so embarrassing it makes you want to cringe or walk off the stage. It could be in the editing the situation may have been.....well this is the best we can do.

All this hind sight may be fun but I doubt that putting it together at the time was that much fun. When you get to thinking about what your reviews are going to be.

It still is a different mind set 40 years ago. With more experience now at the age these fellows are, they may do things entirely different. The scrutiny here now is mostly by older men. Are most of us now, not doing things some what differently that we did 40 years ago?


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:43:50 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Well at least the inclusion of the interview segments gave Richard more time on screen.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:32:54 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sign of the Times

A lot of this rhetoric has confirmed a very strong case as to why Robbie Robertson had enough of "The Road".

I can remember very well those reasons why I wanted no part of it. Friends that were constantly destroying themselves with booze and drugs. A guitar player friend of mine who had amazing talent I watched snort $1500 up his nose in a one week gig. Would come on stage thinking he was doing great and was so bad I just wanted to choke him.

My friend Peter Hamlin a super drummer who hung himself. He had played drums for the "Cement City Cowboys" in Vancouver. There is a movie they made in Vancouver back in the 70's called "Country Music Nightly". I think I found it on youtube one time.

In editing the material for "The Last Waltz", who would have wanted the job to select what would and wouldn't be shown? If much of that interview footage had been left out, how would those guys have felt about it? We can't show you because you were too wasted. We'll pick a time when you are straight and do some post show interviews. What makes anyone think they'd go for that.

In speculating what went on, it's very likely those guys were in a depressed mood knowing this was the last hurrah and they were ending it with their own way of partying.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:16:24 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: It's The Same Old Song

Link to the amazing Four Tops doing the classic "It's The Same Old Song".


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:11:37 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Robbie was well aware of the shape the guys were in at the time and he certainly can't be blamed for their condition. However, the decision to include those interview segments in the film can be attributed to him and Scorsese. So forty years later viewers of the film, in the words of Levon, are left with the impression of Richard looking like "Che Guevara after the Bolivians got through with him." That's all I got to say about it.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 15:59:10 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.137)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: I thought your link was going to be to "Itchycoo Park" which has my favourite Faces intro.

Petr V: I don't think I've heard of Fay Hield ouside the GB, and I'm afraid her name souds like a put-on, like June Bugg. Today it's reminded me of "Hayfield", a very good song on Tony Kosinec's second LP, "Bad Girl Songs" (with Zal Yanovsky).


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:34:58 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Peter, You've made the argument that behavior from the past shouldn't be judged by today's standards but should be judged by the standards of that time. Does this line of thinking only apply to drug use? At what point would you scrap this line of though and begin judging past events by a different standard?

I certainly don't think that there's any equivalence between drug use and genocide. I just think you're standing on a very slippery slope when you apply this type of logic to events from the past.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:08:03 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben, I don't think you can equate accepting the fact that a couple of guys in your band are somewhat relaxed, as they no doubt usually were, with slavery and the Holocaust!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 13:29:56 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Peter, I don't think you can excuse misdeeds from the past by saying that they were the norm at that tine. Wouldn't this line of thinking if taken to the next step excuse centuries of human atrocities such as slavery and anti-Semitism because they were the norms at the time?

Sorry, this argument doesn't work for me. And if excessive drug use was looked on so positively in the 70's than why was Neil Young's coke booger removed from his nostril in post-production and why didn't Robbie appear under the influence in the interview segments? By all accounts that I've read, both Robbie and Scorsese were doing lots of coke at this time.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 13:23:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It's good enough for me …

That Old Time Religion. Thanks for the link. It made me think that if the Band had kept going, they would surely have started to incorporate more fiddle into their act. I barely see anyone without a violin-family instrument on stage now - 5 for Natalie Merchant if you count double bass, four for Fay Hield.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 12:53:34 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Can't ever let a Faces moment pass without linking the universe's greatest ever song intro


Entered at Tue Mar 22 12:49:10 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Faces

Great Faces link Bob. Superb version of Jealous Guy which really brings out the beauty, power and depth of the song and the incredible vocal prowess of Rod the plod and delicious musicianship of those fellas.

Ha ha - and love the comment from the American who thinks the Faces have British accents!!! Try telling that to scousers, Scots and Geordies!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 12:36:08 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Blimey. All this talk of TLW and not one reference or link to the very bestest bit.

Fuck me people! What are you lot on!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 12:12:08 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Never A Dull Moment

Kevin, Never A Dull Moment had the perfect title. Those songs have stood the test of time beautifully. Also, when discussing Beatle solo song covers, The Faces have the bookends. First with Maybe I'm Amazed and later on with Jealous Guy. They were so good.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 12:04:01 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rita Coolidge

Peter, like wise with your mention of Rita Coolidge. I've always loved her first two solo albums. I saw her perform twice early on. First with Mad Dogs and Englishmen at SUNY New Paltz and a year or so later at the Vassar College Chapel when she was touring in support of her first record. Just wonderful. She lost me with the MOR hits but I would love to see her perform one more time.

Check out this recent interview she did in support of her new memoir.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 11:20:57 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Movies aren't put together haphazardly. If Robbie and Socrsese were unhappy with the interview footage that they got at Shangri-La it wouldn't have been used. Period.

How many other concert movies have been structured like the last waltz with interview segments sandwiched between each song? None that I can think of. Clearly, the interviews were not necessary. So, it stands to reason that the interviews were included because it pleased Scorsese/Robbie.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 11:00:37 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What shocks me is that people are shocked by a musician making sexist comments about life on the road in 1976. I thought they all came across as strong, distinct personalities, and OK, some were “relaxed” for the interviews. What would really have shocked me is a total absence of sexist remarks from an all-male band in what looked similar to a dressing room situation. That’s how it was. It’s a “locker room.” In these PC, corporate, ever-so-careful about what you say days, it might jar to see a bunch of 1976 guys being normal for the time. When I started teaching English, 95% or more of the staff were male. I have to say the staffroom discussions in 1971 and 1972 (most of our students were female, aged 18-25) were incredibly sexist. But often very funny.

Rick came across as optimistic and strong to me too.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 10:04:29 CET 2016 from (219.89.19.123)

Posted by:

Rod

I always thought Rick came across as pretty cool in TLW. I agree with Kevin J that he hasn't always come across well in other docos. Festival Express is the obvious one but he also seems under the weather in that solo Capitol Theatre concert. But as Peter said these are different times and to their credit a lot of modern bands have a more professional approach to their jobs. I suspect Robbie and Scoresese did the best they could with the footage available. 35mm film can't have come cheaply - or all the film crew.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 05:00:32 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.40)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think if you are easily offended by drug use and debauchery, it would be best not to listen to rock music.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 04:35:37 CET 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Interesting. The producers of your major motion picture want to include everyone in the group in some interviews to "tell the story". You get scheduled to be interviewed. You show up "under the weather" and it's RR's fault. Ridiculous.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 03:13:38 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.103)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

David P.

Don't you know that in this GB it is required to portray the humanities, frailities and bad habits of any member of the Band when Norm says it is. And that when Norm says it's not okay to, it's not okay. When Norm decides, as he often does, that it is improper to discuss their weaknesses, bad sides, then you must not. In the first case, if you disagree, you are a pussy. As you and some others are today. In the second case, if you fall out of line, you are a disrespectful s.o.b and much worse. If you don't know all this by now, you are a failure sir. Give your head a shake.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 02:52:39 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Spilt Milk

What's done is done. What purpose does it serve to continue whining about it for years. Richard was Richard. What you see is what you get. Do you think Richard would put on his Sunday best, shave and comb his hair to do an interview to please you? Give your head a shake.

There is a multitude of musicians who have put anything but their best foot forward over and over. If that hurts your sensibilities......well tough shit.

Look at the pictures portrayed on these stupid gossip magazines all the time. Too many actors to name who have been absolutely stars in the roles they play and are falling down drunks in real life. A good example is that kid who grew up in a hippie commune and was probably injesting drugs before he could walk. Robert Downy Jr. When he plays a good part in any movie he is a star.....then he becomes a total waste.

I told the story here years ago. We were playing a show in the "Bootlegger Cabaret" at the Newton Inn. Just out of Vancouver, closer to Surrey. We were up in a hotel room a gang of us with Red Robinson, and an old DJ friend from CKWX, Elmer Tippe. Well Johnny Paycheck is getting into fine style, Red Robinson comes in and says, "Johnny! your up!" Johnny pulls a big knife out of a sheath on his belt. He pulls out a big plastic bag of coke, sticks the knife in it pulls out a pile on the knife, (about enough to kill a horse) and he sucks it all up. Johnny has a big black mustache.......now he has a white! mustache. He's trucking down the hall headed for the stage. Elmer Tippe, (a straight old guy) looks horrified. John! fer Christ sake clean your mustache off Elmer says. We are all just shaking our heads laughing.

I think some of you guys have watched the "Ed Sullivan Show" too much......


Entered at Tue Mar 22 01:50:23 CET 2016 from (107.18.149.46)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: albany, NY

Subject: TLW 40

Sorry, but I always thought that the interview of Richard was disrespectful and should have been redone. He deserved more. joe


Entered at Tue Mar 22 01:45:18 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.2)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wow, common sense breaks out at the GB (re TLW's portrait of artists as young men). I took a 4th-year Ryerson classmate with me to see the premiere of TLW at the Elgin, just around the corner from our school (Ryerson). And yes, Rick and Richard looked like at least half of our class at least half of the time (not including evenings and weekends). I thought the movie made it perfectly clear that Richard was extraordinarily deep - both intellectually and emotionally. And jesus he could deliver a line!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 01:05:13 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.154)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for posting the review of "Stage Fright". Too bad there wasn't quite enough 'enigmatic solitude' for our little buddy. I like the thought of "The Band" and "Let It Bleed" coming out at the same time. I haven't yet had a chance to do a song-by-song comparison, but it's clear that "The Weight" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want" are philosophical brethren.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:42:54 CET 2016 from (24.114.49.127)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: TLW - Can you spare a minute or two between bottles 7 and 8 of Grand Marnier on Thursday for a film interview with a short bearded weirdo!

Imagine if you can that Paul McCartney had decided to do a movie at the end of the Beatles in 1970.........and that in addition to all the great Beatles songs to be featured in the film, it was decided by Paul and the Director that George would get to preview All Things Must Pass with a a good bit of "My Sweet Lord" featured very prominently in the film.........yeah, I didn't think you could imagine that........and yet Rick's very prominent and wonderful scenes highlighted by the "Sip the Wine" segment can now be seen to be examples of Robbie and Scorsese conspiring to show Robbie to be the one with the "power and control" in the band, as David has hinted at. By the way, I have no problem with anyone having issues with the scenes but to suggest motive seems entirely silly to me.

Even the biggest budget films have schedules and timelines.......it was decided a year after the concert that interviews would help.....a few days were set aside to get footage........and the filmmaker would have used the best of what was shot. Simple as that. This was rock n roll, folks and its not like there are many - if hardly any - examples of Richard and Rick carrying somethelves any different in interviews in the years before or after TLW. In fact, in other The Band docs made post Robbie ( VH1 Making of The Band ) and that other full length documentary on The Band - Rick comes off quite poorly. Whose fault was that ?

As I write this I am reminded of the great humour Ruchard had and that Ruth Spencer interview where the interviewer stated that they wished they had been at The Last Walltz and Richard replied "Yeah, I wish I could have been there as well".


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:08:13 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.40)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Whenever there is any kind of comments section on an article or clip and Neil Young's name comes up in connection with TLW, youngsters always mention about the coke being removed from his nose with great shock. It makes me laugh. If a bit of coke makes them so shocked, I wonder what they would make of all the other things people were doing back then.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 23:54:49 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Then & Now

This is all pretty laughable. Back then things were the way they were. Shit.......if you were going to try to do interviews when any of those guys got straight, you might have waited a long time :-)

What in hell is with you guys, fer Christ sake David. It's the way they were. If you had thought your 2016 values would work back then.....do you know how many times you would have been told..."fuck you"!

The Band was "THE BAND"! Look at all the things they did over the years. Yuh think that was going to change? what a bunch a pussies you guys sound like.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:45:40 CET 2016 from (86.161.3.12)

Posted by:

Simon

Weird thing is, for me, I only thought the 'women on the road' scene was a bad one. Richard was clearly sozzled there. The other scenes with him struck me as fine. He even seemed bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, so to speak. Almost sage-like. Likewise with Rick. I was probably in a worse state as a viewer the first time I saw TLW.

I always thought that it was a case of Scorsese having to coax what he could from them. I found the following quote from that old Mojo feature on the Band from '93-ish. The interviewer is Chris Heath:

CH: Apart from Robbie, they weren't too keen to be interviewed for the film ...
MS: Nobody. They didn't want the camera near them.

CH: How did you persuade them?
MS: I didn't -- he did, a year later. But they were always very reticent. I had shot them at Woodstock and we had a very bad time. They threw us off the stage. I didn't know Robbie at the time and I loved their music -- Chest Fever, the way Garth played the organ, Levon's voice, Robbie's guitar playing -- and they didn't want us near them. They didn't enjoy being at Woodstock that night, and we shot what we could but it wasn't very good. So I never really had a good impression of them personally, and when I finally got to meet Robbie I was somewhat sceptical, but we talked to one another for a while and everything seemed to be fine.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:10:38 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.40)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, I was watching some old episodes of 'The Bill' (A British police drama) from the 1980s the other day. It was amazing. There are practically no computers and everybody smokes. They also say the most incredibly racist and sexist things. In one of the episodes one of the cops says, 'I don't like Asians, I don't mind blacks, but I just don't like Asians' and he is mildly rebuked by his boss for his intolerance!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:01:41 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't think you can transfer a 2016 mindset to 1976. Nowadays, smokers are pariahs. In 1976, most teachers I knew made a desperate attempt to smoke two in the staff room during a 10 minute break. Drinking and driving wasn't just frequent, it was standard and widely tolerated. Seeing a rock star stoned would elicit somewhere between a snigger and applause. Yes., I think 2016 is right on most of this, and 1976 was wrong, but you can't transpose the values back forty years,


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:58:27 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.40)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I assume all five guys would have seen and approved of the movie before it was released so I don't see that there is an issue with the way they were presented. If any of them really didn't want to do the interviews or be in the movie they would have just said 'no'.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:52:37 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

BTW, I'm not knocking the overall film, just questioning the decisions regarding the interview segments.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:45:11 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

What would be the excuse for not interviewing Richard and Rick when they were more clear-headed? The interviews were conducted after the concert and, after all, it took a year & a half or so to edit and release the film. A great deal of time was spent dubbing and correcting mistakes in the performances. Coke residue were masked from beneath Neil Young's nose at considerable expense, reportedly at the insistence of his manager. There is little doubt that Scorsese and Robbie made the filming & editing decisions, so they had control over the final print.

While Rick's "Sip the Wine" segment presented his new recording with great impact, from the first time I saw the film I realized that he was not in the best of shape, so to speak, during that interview.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:10:38 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

True, everyone I know loved TLW too. I can't believe we're knocking it, but there you go.

See Joan's link - it wouldn't open, but I took off the "v" at the start of the address and I did. I didn't get too far at all. Apart from seeing Levon tearful through disaster after disaster, the script is making major, major assumptions about Richard's attitude and feeling in 1969. I ended up shaking my head in dismay.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:05:13 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

This really is getting funny. Are we talking about the consensus best movie ever made about music and rock n roll ?

For crying out load, the "Sip the Wine" scene is absolutely brilliant and was loved by everyone who saw the film in 1978 and for 40 years since. Where is it said that Rick Danko came off badly ? Say what ? Perhaps, you are confusing Festival Express, David.

Everyone I know who saw TLW loved Rick Danko in it. Never before or since has any singer in a band benefited more from the lighting, camera angles and songs that the director and songwriter and movie producer had a hand in creating.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:59:08 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Bio pic script

Someone posted this script on Facebook. He says he has a lawyer and has copyrighted it I will not put my personal comments here I'll let you judge for yourself. I have reservations


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:22:34 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: View from the fly's eye

Inexcusable? I reckon there are a few assumptions being made forty years after the event.

First, have you tried telling someone who is drunk or stoned that they’re too stoned or drunk to do something?

Then were Messrs Scorsese and Robertson in a much better state on the day, or were they simply better at holding (whatever)?

Then would Rick and Richard on that day have been embarrassed by being somewhat out of it? I suspect not. How would they have felt if someone had said, “I say, chaps. I’m afraid you two lads have been hitting the bottle somewhat. Rather funny odour to the cigarettes too. Best keep out of it until you sober / straighten up. Perhaps we should exclude you from the interviews.”

I suppose the question is whether they were plied with whatever on the day so as to make them look bad. I really don’t think so. I reckon that’s just how it was.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:33:55 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: TLW interviews

That the interviews with Richard and Rick were conducted when they were not is the best of shape is inexcusable. Was this self-serving on the part of Robbie and Scorsese, in order to show Robbie as the one in position of power and control? It is also telling that Levon was not alone when interviewed, as Robbie was always present


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:49:16 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Stage Fright review 1970

I started reading "Strange Days" today, one of the three old mags I bought on Saturday. I thought it was 1969, but it's October 1970, and as luck would have it, this had the original Stage Fright review in it. I almost wonder if the same owner had kept hem for the Band reviews. I hadn't noticed this one, because it wasn't illustrated. I just added it to the same page on my blog. Linked above. (Jan, do lift these if you want).


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:22:09 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually, the only RR negative one I recall was quite subtle, when he was asked about Jericho, and said how he wished them all well but he hadn’t heard the album. “Not having heard it” was a strong putdown (meaning I wouldn’t invest $15 to buy it), but I seem to think Levon said that about one of Robbie’s solo albums too.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 11:50:23 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Kevin, I don't have a handy link to provide. The comments that Robbie made were in books. I have provided the quotes on this GB in the past. I can try to dig them out again, but I can assure that on at least two occasions shortly after the Band reformed, Robbie made some negative comments about them. I don't know why this should be surprising. He's human, just like the rest of us. I do agree with you that over the past 25 or so years he has been for the most part very diplomatic when discussing the reformed Band and his fellow Band members.

Regarding the Last Waltz itself, well, I have very mixed feelings about it. I have multiple versions of the recordings, both official releases bootlegs which I enjoy a great deal. It's the movie and in particular the interview segments that I've always had some issues with.

In a nutshell, I feel that Robbie's dominance of the interviews turns the narrative from being a true story of the Band to being for the most part Robbie's story. And I think Richard really fares poorly, what do we learn from Richard in the last waltz except for the fact that the Hawks used to stuff cold cuts into their coats in grocery stores and that there were bands with funny names like Chocolate Marshmellow Raincoat and The Beards back in the 60's. Of course, these stories were told while Richard was clearly under the influence.

So, I do have an issue with Robbie/Scorsese for portraying Richard in this condition to celluloid posterity. Frankly, I think they should have scrapped the interviews and structured the movie in some way that was more fair to all 5 members of the Band.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 10:10:46 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Milking the market or cash cows

Repackaging. I quoted Natalie Merchant last week, “If the music industry hadn’t totally collapsed, this could have been a hit.” And that’s the issue, with all these box sets and vinyl reissues. There are financial gaps to fill. I was in a store on Saturday talking about Record Store Day. They were excited about the Dylan EP of unreleased tracks, but in fact it turns out that these four unreleased tracks, are rather “imminently to be released tracks” from his new album of standards. Then there are more Bowie picture discs.

The trouble with a lot of this stuff is that it’s designed to be collected rather than listened to. You all know what happens to stuff designed to be collected. My mum loved a particular series of collectable plates which she displayed. Franklin mint, I think. We bought her one at Christmas and another at birthdays. These were about £25 each and that was 25-30 years ago. They came in a box with a certificate, saying how valuable they would become. I saw a pile of boxes of the same plates in a charity shop on Saturday - £3 each. It's the same with all those gold-trimmed Folio Society "collectable books." They're worth very little secondhand. I fear these Record Store Day picture discs will travel in the same direction. They’ll shoot up in price for about a week, then inexorably fall ever afterwards.

The other thing, I’ve raced to get the Dylan “limited edition” releases every Record Store Day. But I know three shops which have copies of the last three years, still at issue price. As one store owner told me, they sell out on the day fast. A week later, the record company phone and say “We just found a box of 200 that we missed. Do you want another ten copies?” But that happens with lots and lots of titles. The proof will be when we find two copies of #1675 of a “numbered edition of 2000” but one record store guy said, “I’d bet there are at least five of each number in he UK alone.”


Entered at Mon Mar 21 08:00:12 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Rod, if the repackaging of Rock of Ages is anything to go by, it will be expensive. It seems artists of a certain status have realised they can extract large chunks of cash out of nostalgic baby boomers. I think even if Robbie had stayed not much would have been different. Now people rave over this so called Americana but by the mid-seventies our guys were out of fashion. It seems like Robbie had run out of songs as well by the end.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 07:23:09 CET 2016 from (219.89.19.123)

Posted by:

Rod

Wallsend, I find the Robbie / Levon thing fascinating as well. It's something you can't ignore - especially when you wonder what The Band might have been able to do at some later stage. But as someone said the actual reason for the fuede is sadder than we'll ever know.

On a brighter note I am looking forward to what comes out on this new TLW release. Just hope it's not too expensive.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 04:20:22 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Men and Their Daughters

Wallsend, I certainly wasn't singling you out in any way. Any discussion is healthy and interesting when it is done with out venem. But the Last Waltz has been beat to death. There still is interesting snippets and conversation that comes along to keep the page interesting and happy. There is a feeling of fellowship here, like the fellowship of the ring that is hard for many to let go of. There has been many bonds formed here that are life long. It is a very stead fast thing for the web master to continue the hospitality and integrity to carry on considering what goes on here some times.

The link I have attached is to the "Farewell" of Glenn Campbell who suffers from Alzhiemers disease. Much of this video puts me in mind of Amy Helm. Glenn's youngest daughter Ashley, (a fine musician and very talented as is Amy Helm). Ashley is interviewed a lot in this video. She explains how here and her brothers cope with looking after their Dad in his final performances as the disease took him.

That young lady is quite amazing how she was able to cope and look after her Dad with out breaking down. Keeping him active and how she was able to look after him. She is an amazing woman.

My youngest daughter Amanda is like that. Watching Amanda's daughter Elena and the relationship her and I have and her talent, I'm quite sure I'm going to start Elena on guitar and leave her with the fun to have of sharing music.

To see how our older years are handled by true love, watch Ashley Campbell.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 03:21:25 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

My bad. The Robbie/Levon thing is something I have an endless fascination with. I shouldn't bring it up here because it is all well trodden ground and it irritates people.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 02:26:03 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Talking to the WALL

Kevin, I think it has become very apparent over time that "Ben" is one of the people that is confirmed in his belief of taking a side on this "fued" which he appears to enjoy to keep alive.

As Wallsend has and many of us in any discussion with this guy, trying to convince him of anything but what he already has his mind made up over is futile.

Some of this stuff I try to watch as an observer when I bother to take a gander in here. It becomes really pitiful to watch The Last Waltz get pulled through the wringer over and over again for the same lame contradictions.

What Levon said or felt was his and his alone. To try and attest to what he was feeling or thinking, or who put words in his mouth is......silly.

It is sad that Levon was not able to go to meet his maker without things weighing so heavy in his heart. Who knows, maybe in his final days and hours he may have felt differently and went with some more happiness and a lighter heart. He had so many wonderful friends and a beautiful and talented daughter to carry on his legacy as she has. What ever was in his mind or went on in his final days and hours is private and his own. To try to make comments about what he felt or meant or said is disrespectful and cheap. The man left a wonderful amount of music that we all still enjoy. Leave his thoughts and feelings to him and knock off the fucked up analysis!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 01:30:58 CET 2016 from (24.114.69.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ben.....When exactly did Robbie make any disparaging comments about the reformed Band ? Please provide a link to these statements. Right from the time he emerged from 10 years of silence in 1987, every comment I ever recall reading or seeing was always gracious towards the guys and what they were doing.

Only once years later when hit again with a question that called into question the authenticity of his concerns for his bandmates health and his pulling the plug on touring did he exhibit some frustration when the interviewer made the comment that "well everything was fine by 1983" did Robbie make a comment that "I never bought everything was fine for a minute and Richard paid for that with his life". That is the only time I can ever recall RR showing any real emotion on the issue...........As to him having gone around making all sorts of disparaging comments on the reformed band during the mid-1980's.....I don't believe that or you for one minute. I'll apologize if proven wrong but I just don't believe it.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 00:35:32 CET 2016 from (97.127.102.253)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Subject: Martha Velez

. . . was not the only American to record with Bob Marley and the Wailers. The guitarist Donald Kinsey, born in Gary, Indiana, contributed to the album "Rastaman Vibration."


Entered at Mon Mar 21 00:22:59 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Levon interview

Wallsned, I just listened to a big chunk of this interview. My reaction is that Levon sounded very relaxed and soft spoken, as if he had just taken a yoga class or done some meditation before talking to Terry Gross.

This interview was done at the time of the book's release, and I think it's a possibility that Levon was advised to tone down his anger towards Robbie. His comments regarding Robbie are at odds with what he expressed in the book and of what he has said in probably dozens of interviews for the rest of his life.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 23:40:17 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Ben, here is a 1993 interview from NPR from the time Levon's book came out where he says he doesn't have any issues with Robbie and it 'all worked out for the best'.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 23:05:59 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: last waltz

Wallsend, I hardly find any smoking gun type of revelation in that snippet of interview. While Levon does say that the last waltz was a good idea at the time, he also says that it wasn't his idea and that he was looking forward to getting on the road with a new project after the last waltz, and that's exactly what he did with the RCO All-Stars.

Levon devoted quite a bit of space to the last waltz period in his book, and I'm inclined to believe that his true feelings were expressed there, not in this single interview from 1983.

Jeff, To your point, I've read several interviews with Robbie from the mid 80's in which he made disparaging comments about the Band reforming. A few years later he changed his tune and has remained basically neutral about the reformed Band ever since.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 22:14:35 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

My bad, it was the Conon O'Brien Show (at about the 7:30 mark). O'Brien mentions that Levon's book has just come out.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 21:51:19 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

The interview is from 1983 Modern Drummer magazine. I am pretty sure Levon said a similar thing in an interview with PBS in about 1992 but I couldn't find it. I will have another look for it.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 21:02:12 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Generally speaking: Many musicians become diplomats of sorts. And many remain that way. Not all.
Many times many musicians:
1) say many things they don't want to say because they know they have to to keep working or to promote something to fulfill the promotion clause in a contract. There are times that even some one as stubborn and proud as Levon would have said things he did not really mean.
2) Many musicians will even outright lie about things in interviews or promotional situations. Because they know have to.

OF course, there are those who are exalted enough that they can get away with giving vague answers. Or non answers, or changing the subject.

When was that interview?Late 70s, early 80s?


Entered at Sun Mar 20 20:28:19 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

RF: The Band performed its last show on Thanksgiving 1976. Were you ready for it to end when it did?

LH: Well, yeah. I'm ready for whatever the day is, but it wasn't my idea. If I had to make that decision on my own, I don't know if I would have made it or not. But I was just as happy as anybody else to turn a new page and start out on some new projects. I never subscribe to the stay-at-home policy. I'm not sick of the road or sick of eating in good restaurants around the country. I like to travel and go to Japan, go to the sushi bars and sleep late every day. I was just concerned with having a good time. I was thankful as hell that a few people took the time to listen to it. The longer it went, the more the new wore off. By the time The Band did The Last Waltz, the chemistry had changed, and it wasn't a big thrill anymore to live that studio kind of life. It was a whole lot of fun at first, but after a while it got to be enough. It used to take us a reasonable amount of time to get it to where we felt we could live with it. The chemistry has got to be right, and I think, as we got down towards the end of our contract with Capitol Records, it had grown from a privilege and pleasure into an obligation. I don't know how all that stuff happens, but you do need to keep a good perspective on it. Everybody had other ideas, other projects and different adventures they wanted to have, so The Last Waltz was a good idea at that time.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 19:32:09 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To explain, I've just been reading that 1969 copy of International Times. Their view was that dope shouldn't just be legal, it should be compulsory! It's a time warp. It was even more so in 1976. The bookstore in Stroud that had the old underground mags (at a third of London prices) said he often had such magazines because the town was full of old hippies. Judging by the vast array of handmade organic cheeses and organic vegetables in the market, I guess he's right.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 19:20:05 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oh, they did. The booger would have been removed because it was illegal, not because those involved were sensitive on the issue!


Entered at Sun Mar 20 19:16:14 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Wallsend, Clearly everyone in the 70's didn't think that being stoned was a positive thing to have documented in a movie or Neil Young's coke wouldn't have been removed.

When exactly did Levon say that the last waltz was a good idea? Please provide a link to this statement.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 19:01:28 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ben, back in 1976 nobody thought being completely wasted was a particularly bad thing. Clapton tells a story about doing an entire concert flat on his back because he was too drink to stand up. When I first saw TLW I didn't think anything of it, that's just what people did back then. That is why so many of them are dead. As for Levon's take on the TLW, before his book was published he used to say 'it seemed like a good idea at the time'. He should have stuck with that.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:44:52 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Bill, I don't think my post was schoolyardish at all. The last waltz was Robbie's project. Levon's feelings about it have been well documented, just take a look at his book or any number of interviews he gave over the years.

We've all heard the story of Neil Young and his coke booger that was removed in post-production from the last waltz, yet Rick and Richard (in particular) were included in interview segments in which they were clearly zonked out. Was it really necessary to show Rick and Richard in this condition? It would have been nice if they would have gotten the same consideration that Neil Young did.

I've heard the claim that Levon benefitted from the last waltz many times over the years and I've always felt it was overstated. I'm sure that many people first discovered the Band by watching the film, but I think that most of them would have discovered the Band anyway. I think we're all aware that the Band's first two albums are widely considered two of the finest and most influential albums in rock history. I think if anything that the last waltz became a real albatross for the reunited Band.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:26:17 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The brown album - original review

Yesterday I found some great 1969 newspapers. One of them was New Musical Express for 29 November 1969, reviewing "The Band" (brown album) on its belated British release. I've scanned it and put it on my blog (LINKED). It's worth reading.

I also found a 1969 International Times (underground) and a 1969 Strange Days (a British office breakaway from Rolling Stone), but The Band review is the most fascinating. (Jan feel free to grab a copy for here).


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:19:21 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Also, as someone pointed out here last year, you can clearly hear Robbie singing on Evangeline when Richard stumbles. Robbie did all the post concert work on the movie and soundtrack. If he had wanted to pose as a singer he could have just done some new vocals and mixed them in. Robbie sang at other concerts why would he not sing at TLW?


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:06:52 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben, would that be the turned off mic that Robbie is clearly seen sharing with others (like Rick, and guests) who are singing into the same source?


Entered at Sun Mar 20 17:52:37 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.151)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, Whoever cooked your heroin today, don't ever let them do it again. Then again, maybe that's not it. Maybe it's a different supply. You better get it worked out, before they fucking kill you. Or, though i love your posts of the last 4 to 6 months, give the shit up again. Just go back to being boring and totally incomprehensible. I'll miss ya, but i rather you live.....


Entered at Sun Mar 20 17:34:54 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

Umm, Ben, Rod didn't make his point in a schoolyardish way, so why the schoolyardish 'counter'?

Had it, stamp it, touch green, no talk-backs.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 17:08:39 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: last waltz

Rod, I disagree with your comments regarding the last waltz. In my view, Robbie and Scorsese put the movie together to please themselves.

Is there any other concert footage of the Band in which Robbie sings into a turned off mic? Is there any other interview footage of Rick and Richard in which there are totally fucked up? Does anyone think that Rick and Richard's career or reputation benefitted in any way from their stoned portrayal in the movie?

If you want to make the argument that Levon benefitted from the last waltz. I would counter that with the point that Robbie benefitted from The Band reuniting and performing a number of his songs over many years.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 16:19:32 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Fay Hield & The Hurricane Party

Linked music review. You need to look both for the music (I've already recommended her "Old Adam" CD) but for the astonishing setting of the gig.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 15:45:51 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Posting

It’s all about the right mix:

A solid combination, regulars will agree (bottom up):

Bill
Bill
Peter
Peter
Bill
Peter

Whereas this combo often leaves a great question mark (top down):

Peter
Peter
Bill
Peter
Bill

-----------------------------------------------------

And it’s said before: A post is no joke, a post is always strict, always true, always serious, and a post is always right, the mistakes and errors are always ours.

-----------------------------------------------------

Last but not least, to prevent any further decline of the great English language here, I like to recite with great emphasis, particularly to our American Band fans; Please note that this Mercedes under the GBs isn’t a kindergarten for amateur writers. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 09:56:09 CET 2016 from (219.89.19.123)

Posted by:

Rod

I don't think Robbie necessarily hogged the lime light in TLW. In the concert footage he features no more than in the live footage I've seen of other Band concerts. And perhaps with the interviews he had to step in to keep things going as the others were either reluctant or too wasted. I'm sure Levon benefited as much as anybody from that film - even it if wasn't always financial.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 01:40:24 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: For What It's Worth......Misconceptions??????

A good example of how some of this stuff gets twisted. Stephen Stills wrote this song in 1966 due to the problems on the strip when Buffalo Springfield was hired as the house band at the Whiskey-A-Go-GO.

Many of the shop owners were complaining of the young people in the streets and causing a disruption to their business. A rally was formed to protest their claims. Some of the people in the rally included Jack Nicolson and Peter Fonda who was handcuffed and taken away.

This song became a war song as is shown in "Forrestt Gump". Didn't have a gawd damn thing to do with war. People think it was about the Vietnam War.........It's hilarious how misconstrued some of this becomes in our history.

The song is shown on youtube as "Stop Children What's that Sound"......it's called "For What it's Worth"........flor what it's worth.........:-)


Entered at Sun Mar 20 01:37:13 CET 2016 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: tlw

Kevin J, Wallsend, Ben and others: I tend to agree that Scorsese was more setting Levon up. That was always my favorite line in the whole film, w/ the Hawk's promise vis-a-vis Sinatra a little behind as 2nd. To me it always showed Levon as every bit the historian that Robbie made himself into. It's as if Levon captured Chuck Berry, the Wolf, Sam Phillips etc. etc. all in one paragraph. (Kinda like RR captured the whole of Southern angst in one 4 minute song.) Yeah, I'd say that line itself calls them out as the grandpappies or progenitors of whatever they want to call it. Would "roots music" be preferable to "Americana"? I admit the term itself seems more in keeping w/ a stroll through the front door of a Cracker Barrel than such a key section of r'n'r that Eric would say adios to Cream, etc. If it's Cracker Barrel, then good God, we ought be talking about the most derivative crap out of Nashville in the last decades than anything to do w/ Levon and Robbie.

I thought a recent column in the Boston Globe following George Martin's passing had more than a little resonance here. He refers to when the 4 1st came to him and "'keeping them as they were'"... where "no one was the star yet all of them were". The writer later references the camera at their 1st Ed Sullivan show trying to figure out who the star was. Even Hoskyn's, at least originally, acknowledged how totally key all 5 of the Band were. When you think about that characterization of the '64 Sullivan, it makes it pretty simple to see that Scorcese would hunt for a star, probably made easier by his clear affinity, personally for Robbie. I 'll let others argue about RR's histrionics or not.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 23:39:17 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Wallsend, I seriously doubt that Levon's issues with the last waltz had anything to do with how he was represented in the interview segments of the movie.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 22:40:46 CET 2016 from (24.114.69.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Location: Toolin' Around Woodstock

Subject: CIUT

I also enjoyed the show.....tuned in 1/2 way through "Rock n Roll Shoes" - always so great to hear The Band on the airways. The revelation for me was Arlen Roth and that stunning version of "Ballad of Thin Man". I purchased the whole album from iTunes a few minutes after hearing that cut. The guitar on Thin Man is just beautiful.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 21:04:33 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Show #1 CIUT Toronto John Donabie

And that, friends, is how radio should be. A great first show by John D. Eclectic, informative, a true 'mixed bag' delivered with the gentle honesty and perceptive intelligence of the man. Stay tuned, folks.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 18:17:48 CET 2016 from (58.104.7.67)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Kevin J: I agree with you about the term Americana. It seems to be something created by marketing people. It would be interesting to know if there is any surviving interview footage from TLW. I know Garth said he hated doing the interview part and Rick and Richard were so wasted they could barely speak but more clips of Robbie and Levon would be interesting. I always found it strange that Levon complained about TLW because he got the best lines and featured so prominently in it.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 17:09:46 CET 2016 from (24.114.69.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Broken Arrow

Wallsend: You might be right as it could well have been a tee-up job but my feeling is it was just one of Levon's good descriptions/stories that a non musician like Marty would have accepted whatever answer was given.......either way, it is illustrative of the silliness of a category like "Americana".....

Jed: Thank you......I had no idea that the Gratefull Dead or Phil Lesh had covered the Robbie Robertson song "Broken Arrow"..........what's available on YouTube dating back 20 years are versions that are a bit rough ( to be kind ) but still lovely to see a great song being played.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 16:58:51 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: A reminder: John D on CIUT in 2 hours and 12 minutes

Don't forget to tune in to CIUT Toronto for John Donabie and his return to radio, playing his choices. You are in for a true positive and enjoyable radio experience.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 16:56:32 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The only way to hear music live

Norm: Thanks. Watch for this band and go if they come anywhere near where you are. We sat 2 feet or less from the bandstand dead centre at a table for 2. (got there early and staked our claim).


Entered at Sat Mar 19 16:30:30 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Good Times

Fine revue Jerry. Envey you.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 16:16:50 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Across The Great Divide- Tribute to The Band Victoria BC was superb.

The Band tribute show at Herman's Jazz Club in Victoria last evening was superb. Dylan Stone and the other musicians were absolutely faithful to the songs in their 2 sets. This is a tight band of excellent musicians who know their stuff and love what they are doing. When they played 'Rocking Chair' exquisitely, Norm sprang to mind. The vocals by the bass player and the drummer were great. In some cases the vocals could have been brought forward a bit but otherwise I thought it was a brilliant evening. They encored with 'Chest Fever', 'I Shall Be Released' and then Mr. Stone said ' This is our only cover of the evening' and they did a home run version of 'Atlantic City'. (clearly he doesn't count any Dylan-written songs as covers since they did do 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' earlier). (And of course they also played 'Tears of Rage' 'Wheel's on Fire' and ask I said 'I Shall Be Released'). They are playing again tonight at a different venue in Victoria and we are seriously considering going to hear this band again. Mr. Stone said they would likely mix up the order of the sets. I should add that they 'borrowed' a mandolin player, the highly regarded Jesse Cobb, who 'guested 's a 6th player and he came on throughout the evening when the song called for a mandolin and he was great. Musicians are; Aidan Miller (piano), Dylan Stone (guitar), Chris Van Sickle (organ), Sean Thompson (drums), Gordon Light (bass)


Entered at Sat Mar 19 16:06:50 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Across The Great Divide- Tribute to The Band Victoria BC was superb.

The Band tribute show at Herman's Jazz Club in Victoria last evening was superb. Dylan Stone and the other musicians were absolutely faithful to the songs in their 2 sets. This is a tight band of excellent musicians who know their stuff and love what they are doing. (When they played 'Rocking Chair' exquisitely, Norm sprang to mind.) The vocals by the bass player and the drummer were great. In some cases the vocals could have been brought forward a bit but otherwise I thought it was a brilliant evening. They encored with 'Chest Fever', 'I Shall Be Released' and then Mr. Stone said ' This is our only cover of the evening' and they did a home run version of 'Atlantic City'. (clearly he doesn't count any Dylan-written songs as covers since they did do 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' earlier). (And of course they also played 'Tears of Rage' 'Wheel's on Fire' and as I said 'I Shall Be Released').

They are playing again tonight at a different venue in Victoria (Northern Quarter on Douglas St.- 2 sets: 8 PM and 10 PM) and we are seriously considering going to hear this band again. Mr. Stone said they would likely mix up the order of the sets. I should add that they 'borrowed' a mandolin player, the highly regarded Jesse Cobb, who 'guested 's a 6th player and he came on throughout the evening when the song called for a mandolin and he was great.

Musicians are; Aidan Miller (piano), Dylan Stone (guitar), Chris Van Sickle (organ), Sean Thompson (drums), Gordon Light (bass)


Entered at Sat Mar 19 03:45:12 CET 2016 from (58.104.7.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Kevin J, I always thought Scorsese talked like that deliberately so that Levon could come out with the punch line. Scorsese is very knowledgable about music and he must have heard all about the Band's musical experiences from Robbie before they made the movie.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 03:16:22 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Phil and Friends

Watching webcast from Capital Theater-Part of the 3 show Phil Lesh 76th BD show.Tonight's easily the best of the three and they did a poignant version of Broken Arrow during an excellent first set.I'm eager for set 2 of the last show of my couch tour.Warren Haynes,Jimmy Herring,John Molo,Rob Barraco and Phil are the band-better known to hard core Philheads as The Q.To many their best ensemble and tonight is spot on.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 01:51:58 CET 2016 from (24.114.69.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Americana, as defined by the Americana Music Association (AMA), is:

"contemporary music that incorporates elements of various American roots music styles, including country, roots-rock, folk, bluegrass, R&B and blues, resulting in a distinctive roots-oriented sound that lives in a world apart from the pure forms of the genres upon which it may draw. While acoustic instruments are often present and vital, Americana also often uses a full electric band."

Notice the absence of "African roots"........anyway, what utter nonsense the term and category of "Americana music" is...........reminds me of that scene in TLW when a bewildered Martin Scorsese asks Levon after Levon had explained the melting pot of music so beautifully........"so, what is it called? and Levon responds with a pinch of disdain "Rock n Roll"..........He left out "you bleeping moron! " I always feel the same way when someone tries on the term "Americana Music" with me.

Always good to see you here Bob F...... I thought my reference to "Italian Girls" last week might have prompted an earlier return.

Fred........The F1 Circus resumes this weekend in Australia......practise times suggest 2016 might be as boring as 2015.....let's hope not.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 00:05:37 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, that's FIENDS and Angels. Just looked on amazon - it's unusual for CDs to be valuable, but in Martha Velez's case they are. Will have to keep an eye open for them.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 00:00:12 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Friends and Angels

Thanks, Bob. it's years since I heard that … or thought about Martha Velez. I have the Wailers one … Escape from Babylon. I'll dig it out and dust it off!


Entered at Fri Mar 18 23:49:36 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Americana Music

I think he makes a solid case that the foundation of what is now known as Americana Music was formed in Woodstock. I find that very significant.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 23:29:32 CET 2016 from (58.104.7.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I thought the main problem with Small Town Talk was not the gossip aspect, which is to be expected in that kind of book, but the lack of any meaningful insights into the significance of Woodstock as a town and its place in the broader cultural landscape. Perhaps I was expecting too much.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:37:47 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The way I see it, Rick co-wrote Small Town Talk. Robbie wrote The Rumor. It figures that they were mentioning the same vibe in the same place. And if a book features Janis and Jimi prominently, we can't be surprised if drug-related deaths get mentioned.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:30:03 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: http://www.popmatters.com/review/small-town-talk-by-barney-hoskyns/

This review seems to support the book as gossip argument.My plan is to read the book before reaching a final conclusion.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:06:42 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: By the time they got to Woodstock...

Ellen McIIwaine and Pat Alger, two performers from Atlanta I first saw playing separately at the 12th Gate Coffee House here, later achieved greater success in Woodstock. Pat, who worked with Happy & Artie Traum, later became even more successful as a songwriter after moving to Nashville. Ellen, a powerful singer & guitarist, has recorded a great deal and performs a lot in Canada.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 18:12:51 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Martha Velez

It's great to see Martha Velez's name so prominently in the first half of the book. Martha was this incredible blues soul singer that lived in the Woodstock area for a few years. She actually is the only American artist to record with Bob Marley or something like that. Martha and Jerry Moore use to come down to The Chance in Poughkeepsie on Sunday nights and just burn the house down. Everyone loved her.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 17:48:53 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mike Nomad's Link

I really liked what playwright Glenn Grainger had to say when asked why there was merit in doing a play on Richard Manuel.

"Richard Manuel was an immense talent as a musician, songwriter and especially as a soulful vocalist. To this point, there has been a bewildering lack of canonization of his talent through storytelling. This play aims to kick open the door."

Band content and a tribute with an original approach.....imagine that. Hard work that might actually feed the soul of people in so many ways.....yet a guy who relishes in describing people as junkies and unworldly is getting all the attention. Sad.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 17:28:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I haven't got to the Geoff Muldaur bit, David, though he makes it clear at the start that Sally Grossman was against him. He is quite stern on John Martyn, but I had heard those stories before.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 16:53:46 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Small Town Talk

Peter: I'm sure Sally Grossman, Geoff Muldaur, and several others who are still living would disagree with your not laden with salacious gossip assessment. Then there are those no longer with us whose reputations have been sullied with the author's focus on their human shortcomings. In that respect, Hoskyns' book certainly lives up to its title.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 14:16:47 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually, if you live in a place you're likely to have problems with books about it. I picked up a book on rock in Bournemouth (a title with far less potential than one on Woodstock) and found myself disagreeing all the time, though I do know the author slightly. There were reams on Al Stewart, and visits by The Beatles, but nowhere near enough (or on some nothing) on Zoot Money, Andy Summers, John Wetton, Robert Fripp, Greg Lake and others that I'd have started out with. It's inevitable. We have different viewpoints, and when it gets local, they're more obvious.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 14:03:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Small Town Talk

I'm still struggling through the book. I'm not finding it much of a page turner yet, nor that it's laden with salacious gossip. Possibly it could do with a bit! He does point out that he lived there himself for four years, and points out that there was a tradition of tight-lipped suspicion of strangers, especially ones asking questions. And he starts on a positive note.

Mind you, I remember a Simone Felice concert. He talked about a song referring to the "shitty town he grew up in" (Palenville). Someone in the audience in the sedate and wealthy city of Winchester shouted out "Like Winchester!" Simone laughed out loud, and said "You don't know the half!"

My grandad, from rural Dorset, always said his local catchphrase was "There be a stranger! Heave half a brick at he!' Maybe the Catskills have an affinity with Dorset on that one.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 13:23:46 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Small Town Talk

I hate to ro this since,while I ordered the Hoskyn's book,I'm beginning to regret it.I must have read a dozen reviews and based on these I'm realizing that this is a gossip book that seems to flame or shame everybody and everyone who lived in Woodstock. I have lived there part time for close to 40 years and while there are problems like in any part of the world whether city or town,they are made all the more "large" since famous people are involved.But my experience of Woodstock is significantly different that what I've read from the reviews.And my interactions with many of the characters,famous or not revealed very different personality facets than what I've read.Yes,I've still got yo read the book given the reviewers could be wrong.And,no the town is not dead-it remains the most beautiful town,physically and spiritually,in the NYS area and it still has great significance and holds great beauty.There is also some darn great Rock,blues and jazz music going down if you know where to look.I guess I just don't like gossip,gossip books or in general,trashing people and places.Since its woodstock this book may hit a nerve.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 13:08:59 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Suicide of "The" and "A" Band

On a serious side... The Last Waltz was a suicide. Sweden's biggest rock band is committing a suicide as well. They are doing it with this video (and a tour and an album). Many say that this is done with a style. I wonder... Even if one of the members wrote (almost) the whole material there were never antagonism like Robbie-Levon in the end. Sure, half of the members were Finns. We said "keep the Finnish flag waving high" when we aparted and the flag is surely waving high on the horse of the knight in this video. Makes me satisfied! Half of the crew were Swedes, actually from the college were Mrs. NorthWestCoaster was instrutor in theoretical physics. Maybe the ethnicity is an antagonism...or the political correctness from the leading member. Sounds familiar?

If you are intersted in how rock videos are made I can tell you that everything is real... not really, the tiger refused to go into the tunnel so the tiger is filmed in a zoo and the tunnel is in Stockholm.

Warning: The Death might be frightening for sensitive people. I was frightened!


Entered at Fri Mar 18 01:11:43 CET 2016 from (58.104.9.81)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Really liked that jazzy version of The Weight. Usually when people cover The Weight it just sounds like an inferior version of the original but that version really added a new dimension to the song.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 18:53:52 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Bill Frisell

Link to Bill Frisell's jazzy cover of "The Weight."


Entered at Thu Mar 17 18:06:41 CET 2016 from (65.93.116.61)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: New play

Manuel, a new play by Glenn William Grainger, previews April 26 in London, Ontario at the University of Western Ontario's Paul Davenport Theatre and is centered on the Band's Richard Manuel, in particular the "clash between the harsh external road of the musician's life and one man's profound inner longing for peace and acceptance." According to promotional material, the production, which runs April 26-May 1, "is a lively and musical tale told from the point of view of Richard's last remaining brother Al, who reflects back on 30 key years in his brother's turbulent and incredible life." It adds, "In doing so, Al confronts his own feelings while facing formidable forces of nature and dark complexities of the human condition."

Terry Danko is listed as a special musical consultant.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 17:27:00 CET 2016 from (184.145.118.56)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Colin Linden - Guitar Story LINKED - Do Read it

LINKED: The RR story referred to below jogged a memory of a guitar story from Colin Linden. Every guitar player here will relate in some way........The Band connection: players should look into the soundhole from time to time....

Welcoming of 25,000 refugees - check, Lowering of the retirement age - check, legalizing pot and selling it retail - about to be checked, changing our presence in the Middle East - check, Giving women 50% of the Federal Cabinet positions - check, Making Canada feel like Canada again - check, Making Kevin J happy and Norm uneasy - CHECK ! All in 100 days - remarkable.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 16:02:26 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Half Cocked!

I'm remembering you said that Kevin......for when he fucks up royally. He already has started to in many cases. But YOU! choose to ignore them........I'll get you one of these days Kevin.....so help me..:-)


Entered at Thu Mar 17 15:39:04 CET 2016 from (24.114.50.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Guitar Roots

For the guitar players here that take interest in the life of some guitars, there is an interesting thread over at the Robbie Robertson Facebook page where in tesponse to a photo posted of Robbie playing a tele in late 50's/early 60's, some guy wrote in to say he purchased the instrument from someone in New York in the 80's who claimed he had originally got it from RR back in the day.....the RR team are actively responding to the guy.

Justin Trudeau to announce today that the retirement age in Canada for benefits will be returned to 65 - just as he had promised to do in the election. How refreshing to have a politician that actually keeps his promises. I'm already ready to vote for the guy again.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 15:34:32 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Natalie Merchant

My review of Natalie Merchant last night is now live (see link).

For that essential Band connection, it was at the Royal Albert Hall.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 13:31:54 CET 2016 from (67.248.135.112)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: albany, NY

Subject: TLW 40

What TLW 40 could really use is a high quality, dedicated stereo track for those of us who have not elected to do surround sound. joe


Entered at Thu Mar 17 10:06:59 CET 2016 from (219.89.19.123)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: TLW turns 40

I'm hoping there's lots of stuff they couldn't use in the film that got picked up of the cutting floor. Alternative angles, some extra footage from Shangri La. Just hope it's not too expensive


Entered at Thu Mar 17 03:18:16 CET 2016 from (58.104.19.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Didn't Robbie give all TLW footage to the National Film Archive last year on condition that they go through it and see what was there? Maybe they found some stuff.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 01:51:57 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Outrageous!!!!!!!!!

I think my old buddy Lars Pedersen gets worse every day. He has a picture on his face book page, with the caption, "Charles Manson endorses Donald Trump!"

I just about bust a gut.......maybe it's getting that bad???


Entered at Wed Mar 16 19:25:51 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Quote of the day

“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”


Entered at Wed Mar 16 15:35:25 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: TLW at 40

The Band Facebook is reporting that there will be some new footage included with a 40th anniversary special release of TLW.......Really ?

A 1 hour featurette of Bob Dylan trying on different hats........hidden camera footage of the White Rooms greatest hits........the lost backstage lecture from Joni Mitchell to Neil Young on where not to put his hands and to our guys on why playing their popular songs might not be the best idea..........a Richard Manuel conversation with some local country club types on why loud in sports coats is the way to go.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 14:03:27 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Riding a bicycle, John D

John D: I'm sure it felt like you had never left 5 minutes into the radio show with Bill King. Its always good to get the 'feel' again though. It is reassuring but I'm sure for you it was like riding a bicycle. You never forget how

By the way, 'you must tell me how your head feels like under something like that'.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 13:29:15 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: for what ails you

To The AntiCat: It's not just the doctor, The Meters can cure you all on their own . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 16 10:18:49 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: City Lights Bookstore (for Bill M)

There are several photos from Adler Alley in early December 1965. Two photographers have been credited over the years: Dale Smith and Larry Keenan (most commonly the latter) Some of them include Robbie in the shots and some do not. I don't think it is a question of cutting Robbie out (and I'm sorry if I gave that impression) so much as who happened to be talking to who when the photographer(s) opened the shutter and who the photographer(s) happened to get in the frame as they shot away.

I can recall one photo inside City Lights Bookstore and that does include Robbie, furthest from the camera but very central.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 07:59:38 CET 2016 from (80.111.13.10)

Posted by:

Seán

Location: Ireland

Apropos of nothing below...

"That's what parents do"

Pretty sure I still have that on a videocassette here somewhere - don't ask me to dig it up though!


Entered at Wed Mar 16 07:48:27 CET 2016 from (80.111.13.10)

Posted by:

Seán

Location: Ireland

Yeah, those herbs the doctor send (sic) me

Sure gave me the Remedy

Now I must send him dollar \So he won't choke me collar

Rinse, repeat, never swallow

Life too short, water shallow


Entered at Wed Mar 16 07:31:32 CET 2016 from (80.111.13.10)

Posted by:

Seán

Location: Ireland

Bollox, foiled again! Good spam below (possibly deleted by the time you read this).

Did Mac even play on Testimony? Did he ever have (a) hairpiece? Did it ever try to kill him?

The only sure cure is The Genetic Method - usually/normally followed by a bout of Chest Fever.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 05:25:16 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

The Bill King with whom John D shared a radio mike this afternoon is a notable local bandleader, photographer and festival organiser. As a musician he first came to the fore as the inaugural keyboardist in Janis Joplin's Kozmic Blues Band - a gig he gave up when Vietnam called and he chose Toronto, where he's lived ever since.

He's done tons of records over the last 45 years, but the linked one is my favourite. It did okay as a 45, so his group, Homestead, got to do an LP, but the record company called in the spectacular John Finley (a man who had turned down an offer to be the frontman for Levon and the Hawks five years earlier) to redo the vocal.

Note that both 45 and LP were produced by Jack Richardson, who'd played bass to Robbie Robertson's guitar on Diane Brooks' "Orbiteer Twist" record of the early '60s, and would go on to produce Bob Seger's "Night Moves".

Jan H: Your son may know Bill King's son Jesse, who operates successfully as DUBMATIX.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 04:49:59 CET 2016 from (80.111.13.10)

Posted by:

Seán

Location: Ireland

Peter, you said "...That can be a problem as it makes you too reluctant to cut it..." I did an almost double-take on that! :)

As in: Cut it v Ship it.

Here, 'mean" means tight, and not in the musical sense.

I buy most of my books secondhand; sorry about that... I never dribble on them though.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 04:25:55 CET 2016 from (80.111.13.10)

Posted by:

Seán

Location: Ireland

RC: had a longer post typed, but lost it in Preview...

Craig lives in you and yours.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 03:38:54 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: My Heroes Have Always Been Rockers

My brother Craig died in September 1973 at the age of 21 in a logging accident. I've missed him every day of my life. This was his favourite song.....Craig was a great accordion, organ and piano player. He would love to hear how Bob Seger and John Fogerty do his favourite song.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 02:52:28 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M / JT

Yes I got a call to co-host with Bill this afternoon. After being off air for four years I jumped at the chance and didn't tell anyone. Wanted to work out some kinks. Thanks everyone.

Hey JT. Start off with some Cutting Edge Saturday? I've got my Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat on.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 00:09:35 CET 2016 from (24.114.65.159)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Libraries

Pre-Internet, libraries were fun for looking up old stories from the microfilm files.......but for books, at least the majority of ones I had wanted, libraries weren't for me as I generally like to keep a book after I've read it. Takes space but worth it really.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 00:09:27 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Libraries

The library in Winton, Bournemouth where I borrowed so many books as a kid has Andrew Carnegie's name on a plaque.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 23:12:35 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: US libraries and PO's

In most cities and even small towns these are typically some of our very nicest buildings - I don't know what will eventually happen to both, but as structures they are normally superb. In days of the Commonwealths and a better attitude about common wealth our ancestors got some things right!


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:55:28 CET 2016 from (76.71.6.144)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: CIUT - Google it and play it on the computer

James Brown....Boz Scaggs and a couple of great contemporary songs so far....Samantha Martin included.....Thank you, Bill M !


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:49:44 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: bookstores

Peter, Your story was very funny. That kind of behavior doesn't surprise me at all. Borders had a much larger profit margin from the café then from books or music. I worked in the music department and I know that the profit margin on CD's was fairly small.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:22:36 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: preparedness

Bill M: I guess John D is getting a feel of the facilities. I make presentations to audiences often.. The most important work one does is the work that precedes the actual presentation (arriving early, checking out the audio/video equipment and the 'lay of the land'). I guess maybe its the same for radio. It makes sense.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:10:38 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.141)

Posted by:

Bill M

Happened upon CIUT radio to find John D guesting with Bill King. He's now playing Jerry Garcia's cover of TNTDODD.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 20:27:07 CET 2016 from (76.71.6.144)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Luis Suárez Returning to Liverpool - in 3 years & WS Walcott

I had read this while I was away and thought it might cheer Al Edge up.

Rod: Thank you......wonderful clip. The Band at its full power.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 18:05:50 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good story, Ben. I sometimes used to go to photocopy shops in the UK to get colour transparencies (for those old enough to remember OHP projectors) for talks and lectures, and they were from my own books. But I had to sign a copyright disclaimer asserting that I had rights to copy it and was sometimes asked for proof of identity. I'm happy to say!

Much as I loved Borders, I still remember sitting in the coffee shop in Chicago. The guy at the next table had a single volume of the Encyclopaedia Britannica open on his table. To hold the page open, he had a large coffee cup placed on the page. He then proceeded to eat a large elaborate sandwich, dropping onion, butter, bits of meat and tomato onto the page. To add insult to injury, he had brought the sandwich in his bag - he hadn't even bought it there. So by fouling up one page of an encyclopaedia, he had effectively rendered an entire multi-volume set worthless. As a business model for a bookshop, it was madness. And yet no one told him to fuck off out and never come back, which I would have done.

I noticed it because when I first started writing with Oxford University Press, they still had a printing works in Oxford. They printed the complete multi-volume dictionary there. A huge sign took up an entire wall: ONE PAGE CREASED OR CRUMPLED IS (14) VOLUMES DESTROYED. (I don't recall how many volumes there were).


Entered at Tue Mar 15 18:04:40 CET 2016 from (76.71.6.144)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Lovin You Ain't Easy

Bingo, David ! I've had my say on the book. There are parts of it I just don't believe and other parts that are distorted or just plain distasteful.

Bill M: Thank you for the Pagliaro link and information...and yes, it was Kendrick - not Hendrick ! Gino Vannelli was another very impressive talent from the same neighbourhood.

Rockin C: I've always enjoyed your stories about going out to sea but do hope next year does bring that retirement you want. I see a guy around town now and then who was with me several years ago on that great trip to Stuart Island and Dennis Washington's place. He always mentions it was the best trip of his life. It really was something. I had never realized how difficult and highly specialized the tug boat work was until witnessing it first hand on that trip. Time flies - that was 2010.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:46:30 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: copying books

I used to work in a Borders book store and I remember on at least one occasion that someone came up to the customer service desk and asked if there was a copy machine that they could use. The manager explained with a straight face that that copying pages from any of the books or magazines would be illegal. As soon as the dejected customer walked away, we all had a laugh about it.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:34:41 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Libraries are OK - we get PLR (public lending right) though not much. Actually as book sales decline I look forward to photocopying royalties. A lot of out of print textbooks still earn decent photocopying royalties. I just wish the USA would join the UK, Canada, Germany & Scandinavia and start paying them.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 16:43:28 CET 2016 from (70.193.161.13)

Posted by:

Ďavid P

I also checked out Alan Paul's excellent ONE WAY OUT history of the Allman Brothers band from the library. Later, when it was released in paperback, I bought a copy. It included a new updated chapter on the breakup of the group after Warren and Derek announced that they were leaving to concentrate on their solo ventures. The dysfunction in the way this was handled underlined problems with the group's dynamics. Although the group was plagued with drug and other controversies over the years, the author presents the members candid account of the events suscintly with respect. One can't say the same about Mr. Hoskyns' style that bombards the reader with minutiae and tabloid tidbits.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 16:03:42 CET 2016 from (70.193.161.13)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Card Carrying Reader

With my library card in hand, I've checked out many music related books in the past year. Some of the best subjects included Mavis & the Staple Singers, and the recent Graham Nash and Linda Ronstadt memoirs. Çonvenience and budget wise, my local library is hard to beat. I still buy a lot of books and prefer reading actual hard copies, rather than using e-readers.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 15:18:40 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, David … that's mean (in the British sense of careful with cash). Books are there to be bought. Actually, in spite of minor errors, I think it's probably "over-researched" in that some of the detail is not especially interesting. So a lot of work went into it. That can be a problem as it makes you too reluctant to cut it.

Of course being a professional author has no bearing on my view that books should be bought. Or maybe it does …


Entered at Tue Mar 15 14:22:25 CET 2016 from (70.193.161.13)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Small Town Talk

After vowing not to buy Hoskyn's book, a friend urged me to read it and lent me his copy. While there are many revelations, there's a tendency to to turn over every rock to reveal dirt about everyone in the style of TMZ.

I also noticed several apparent errors. Richard Farina was not a Harvard man, as he attended Cornell, where he became friends with Thomas Pynchon. Mike Bloomfield, at the time he played with Dylan, was using a Telecaster, not a Stràtocaster, which he often carried around without a case. Previous accounts of the deer hit by road near Woodstock credit Rick, who had once worked in a butcher shop, field dressing the deer with a pocket knife, not Garth.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 11:12:59 CET 2016 from (92.22.33.187)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: ROA

That's not fair I had to buy Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 (4 CD/DVD) to watch this! I knew it would end up on YouTube one day like everything else.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 10:13:54 CET 2016 from (219.89.19.123)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

new on Youtube - W S Walcott from ROA - amazing


Entered at Tue Mar 15 09:49:24 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: photos / Small Town Footnotes

Bill, that touches a chord. In years to come my descendants will flick through family albums and wonder who the invisible photographer was and also wonder what I looked like.

My progress through Small Town Talk is getting slower. As with the artists / painters earlier, there is such a parade of people I’ve never (or barely) heard of that each page seems a mass of Proper nouns. Then there’s this faux-academic affectation of putting interesting stuff in tiny, tiny footnotes. Either it’s worthy of inclusion in the main text or it’s not. There’s a long footnote on Jackson C. Frank, and for the life of me, I can’t see why it’s relegated from the main text. Then we have a really good bit on John & Beverley Martyn, but the funniest bit ((at a later meeting Levon told John he couldn’t remember him, but he remembered Beverley’s “torpedoes” with clarity) is stuck down in a footnote. I thought footnotes were for further reading and references, not bits of the story. I used to over-use them myself, but I finally grew out of academic affectation!

Actually, I guess footnotes are dying because online you can link instead.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 03:16:49 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.4)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: Any word on why the second photo is Robbieless? In my humdrum world it would mean that Robbie snapped the shot. If that's true here, who took the first one?


Entered at Mon Mar 14 23:29:28 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: City Lights Bookstore

That sharp corner outside the City Lights Bookstore leads off the main drag (Columbus Avenue) down what is now called Jack Kerouac Alley. In early December 1965 [when it was called Adler Alley as I recall], it is where Robbie was photographed with Dylan, Ginsberg,Ferlinghetti and Michael McClure after the fire alarm went off in the bookshop. In Dylan's last Bootleg Series release, THE CUTTING EDGE, there is a photo from the same scene (it excludes Robbie) but it is wrongly attributed to outside the KQED press conference. No so.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 22:17:03 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.139)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: I know they're gloves but ...

Rockin C: I suggest you look up 'idiot mittens' in the pictionary. With a couple of alterations you'll be good to go.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 20:54:10 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

How Britain is really viewed by the rest of the world.

ok, I'm horizontal.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 20:48:04 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Bob Donlin, Neal Cassady, Allen Ginsberg, Robert LaVinge and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 20:21:23 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Words

From a young man till old age my late grandfather wrote down every single new word he learned in a book. He called this book “Words”. On his dying bed he gave me this book. It holds about 100,000 words and 10 numbers. Sometimes I look at them, add a word or strikethrough one.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 18:40:42 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan In Montreal in 1962

I am currently preparing an article on Dylan's visit to Montreal in 1962 and I like to include appropriate credit.

A while back, someone here posted a link to a website with some useful information and artefacts from the "scene" back then. If that person could let me know, I'd be happy to include the name in the "Thanks" section.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:48:41 CET 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: Bill Frisell

Bill Frisell's low-key exploration of folk and country themes goes back a way, including 1997's Nashville IMHO a classic gem, and 1998's Gone Just Like This Train. Also to be recommended in another genre altogether is his treatment of Elvis Costello & Burt Bacharach's Sweetest Punch compositions. And practically everything else he has released. Bill often employs the very tasteful Victor Krauss (Alison's bro) on bass. Victor's albums 'I' and 'II' are worth seeking out. Mr. Frisell appears on both.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:44:42 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: What's a Memory Like You

The first part of this song is just John and his guitar and a fine jog he does with his great voice.

Lisa! that is one hell of a glove.....but ......240 bucks for a pair of stainless steel gloves....that would even stand the salt water?....first thing I'd do is drop the gawd damn things over board and they'd sink!...:-(


Entered at Mon Mar 14 08:50:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Shadows & Burns

Ah, The Shadows. Virtually any British rock guitarist of note will have owned Bert Weedon’s “Play In A Day” tutor, plus a small stack of Shadows records. They were on my mind the other day. The vintage guitar shop in Bath had a classic early 60s white “Shadows” Burns guitar in the window (£1499, I think). That was an inspired idea for sponsorship. Replace The Shadows matching Fenders with matching Burns guitars. Give them sets in different colours. People will ignore the horrendously ugly tuning heads and flock to buy their heroes’ guitars. Unfortunately, just at that point The Beatles arrived, Apache and Foot Tapper were dropped from every garage band’s repertoire almost overnight, and the Burns guitar was instantly unhip.

Were they any good? I Googled and you can buy a new one for £225 but they have a Fender style tuning head, or a “Burns Shadow” with the ugly “scroll” headstock for £425.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 04:09:35 CET 2016 from (107.77.97.128)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bill Frisell

Westcoaster - Try his Disfarmer. It's the soundtrack to a bunch of Depression era photos that caught his attention /


Entered at Mon Mar 14 03:00:40 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bill Frisell

I played your link a few times David, to be really sure of my feeling. I gotta say it.

I've listened to Bill Frisell and the wonderful talented work he does. I've had this impression before.

As soon as his guitar starts to sing it really puts me in mind of "The Shadows" of long ago.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 00:55:14 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Norm, this glove is literally made of very fine chain mail, so there's nothing to fill up. That's why I thought it might work for you. It was designed for woodcarvers, to protect their hands when working with those sharp chisels and knives. I've done a little woodcarving myself, and it's no joke when you slip up with those tools!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 00:48:55 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Long Black Veil

Well I've made a decision! This is the best copy of this song ever. I've always been a great fan of the Chieftans. Their versatility and masterful musicians. This is a tribute to how versatile Mick Jagger can be. As well who ever put this video together did a wonderfdul job.

Lisa, Hi girl! I do wear gloves for a lot of my work, but this job yer sticking your hands down in the water. Gloves fill up with water. Wet gloves are very hard to work with. Unfortunately it just doesn't work. Thanks any way. You are just like Susan. Do any thing to look after a guy and make his life easier.

Hey Carl! how goezit? Well I'll be glad to be done...paid my dews I think.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 00:44:40 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: the last CD I listened to - Remmy Ongala


Entered at Sun Mar 13 23:03:57 CET 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK(Carl)

Subject: Norm

Shit Norm. If I wasn't 64 I'd buy your rig. And I do have a pretty good idea what kind of coin you pull in. As it is I own the best Graphic Arts and Printing business in the Gulf Islands but I'm tired of lifting 80lb. boxes of paper every day. Christ, I'm only a buck forty five at the best of times so your job would probably kill me. But I do love the water!


Entered at Sun Mar 13 22:54:35 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Danny Dill & Dickie Lee

Of course we all remember that Danny Dill wrote the lyrics to "Long Black Veil".

I was listening to several covers of his & Dickie Lee's, "I've Been Around Enough To Know". It is hard to beat the job John Schneider, (Dukes of Hazard" did of that song. I wish we heard more of that boy. A great voice, and not a bad picker either.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 22:53:53 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Work gloves

Norm, Lee Valley sells a large variety of work gloves for all sorts of uses, but one they have is a carver's chain mail glove, which sounds to me like the answer to your sore paw problem. They are only sold as singles (they can fit either hand), and are very expensive ($119 each), but it would be better than salt water on barnacle cuts, ouch!


Entered at Sun Mar 13 22:36:35 CET 2016 from (70.193.161.13)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Bill Frisell

Bill Frisell's version of "Just Like A Woman", from his eclectic 1993 album "Have A Little Faith", is also sublime.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 21:58:18 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.9)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: the future's so bright ...

Rockin C: Guy and mule? Sounds more like Timbuk3 without the girl.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 20:51:38 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Much Crazyness

A deaf guitar player with a limping mule? sounds like a gypsy to me........did the mule sing?

I just got back ashore last night, and Kevin that number 71 you mentioned some where back. Well I was 71 last August. This past week, I was out on boomsticks on the water unhooking the chains that chain the logs together. Then up in my log loader loading them all on the barge. Then we took a 200 mile jaunt and unloaded them at Hawksbury Island up at the mouth of the Gardener Canal. Then tow the barge all the way back to Port Hardy.

Now the fact is not to boast. I feel very fortunate every day that my body has been so durable to accept the abuse that I have put it through with this work. The only thing that was problematic. Those boom chains being in the water for long periods of time end up with a lot of barnacles growing on them. When you grab them to unhook them you end up with a lot of cuts on your hands. Of course the salt water makes them sting pretty good. So you end up with pretty sore paws for a while. You must understand, I get paid a lot of money for what I do or I sure in hell wouldn't do it. I have a pretty positive feeling that I won't have to be doing this next year.

You go ahead and laugh at me Todd! but I will get this outfit sold and I will retire.........some day soon...


Entered at Sun Mar 13 20:30:52 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: A Nod's as Good as a Wink when your driving

"She was tall, thin and tarty/ And she drove a Maserati/ Faster than sound/ I was heaven bound/ Although I must have looked a creep/ In my army surplus jeep/ Was I being too bold/ Before the night could get old/ No, no, no, no/ She proved me so wrong"


Entered at Sun Mar 13 19:12:34 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Billy, a horizontal position is reported? Thinking about a post?

Talking about miracles, some of you know that I love miracles. Last year on my way to Lourdes I met this deaf guitar player and his limping mule. They weren’t looking for salvation but still a miracle happened. …. I’ll take the horizontal too.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 16:13:14 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Masters of War

My current ear worm is linked … Charles Lloyd and The Marvels doing "Masters of War". I found the CD last week … the sublime guitar is Bill Frisell. (Two Band connections there then).


Entered at Sun Mar 13 03:09:51 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.134)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: With the lamentable disappearance of dlew, I think we're down to Wallsend and his shadow - so 1.5 Strines at best.

Norb: Discretion please! On the basis of past reports, I suspect he's horizontal and not alone.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 23:20:23 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

KEVIN!


Entered at Sat Mar 12 20:29:59 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Woodstock / Wallsend

Thanks Wallsend for your post on Hoskyn's book and Albert Grossman. Just like you I am interested in Mr. Grossman's role in Woodstock.

BTW. Bill M, You were sorry for not having posters from Australia here for a few weeks ago. I believe we have a couple of posters still in GB!


Entered at Sat Mar 12 20:13:59 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: oops ...

John D doesn't start his new radio gig until next Saturday. Sorry.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 16:54:13 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill you’re right, let's put Kevin behind the wheel (fucking spellcheckers).


Entered at Sat Mar 12 16:12:47 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.128)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Home Alone?

John D's show is 2:00-4:00 EST.

Norb: Are we missing someone? Have you seen Kevin since Dusseldorf? KEVIN!


Entered at Sat Mar 12 15:41:38 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Keith Emerson ...thoughts

Keith Emerson was a brilliant composer and musician. He carried on the tradition of the classical composer in modern times, creating opus-like symphonic pieces in the tradition of the greats. He was the antithesis of the 3 minute pop song. His partner said he always wanted to be remembered as a composer and that is precisely how I saw him from his days in The Nice and thereafter.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 15:35:48 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Magic Bus Tour

The bus slows down …. Mike’s looking fine in his white overall behind the worn wooden wheel …. Bono fixing cell phones, not losing a word …. behind him Peter reading our latest page turner .... Bill and I studying old Play Boy stories …. all admire Mike for holding back in the back ….. Sheryl hollers from the rear shelf speakers …. the colored girls harmonizing ‘gasoline, gasoline‘….. we’re standing still now … I look up …. the Maradonian border.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 15:17:23 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Our friend, John Donabie

OK folks. John Donabie gets to play his music and do what he can do as well and often better than most radio personalities ever have done. Like the New York radio personalities of the 60s, Toronto had a vibrant radio scene as our music evolved. Peter V, you would have loved Big G Walters and his R&B approach on CKEY in the early 60s. That's where I first heard Sam and Dave. I remember it clearly and distinctly. The knowledge of D. Pritchard and R. Schwartz on CHUM FM was legendary. It was the reassuring and friendly nature coupled with the insights of John Donabie in those years (and subsequently wherever he landed on Toronto radio) that was like an anchor in those turbulent times. These people were the real deal. We were lucky to grow up with them. Listen to John next week and read the article I sited.

http://www.fyimusicnews.ca/articles/2016/03/11/conversation-john-donabie

Any comments?


Entered at Sat Mar 12 15:09:18 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: PSB writes on Hoskins Woodstock book

The book is generally good and PSB writes again with expertise and from experience. Its a worthwhile read for anyone with an interest in this time and this place. I found it very sad that seriously dangerous mind-altering body-dangerous drugs were used to the extent suggested in this book. The word 'junkie' is a painful one to read. It does not diminish the music but it taints the memory of the musicians. Truth is truth and so we, the fortunate who can continue to enjoy the music, have to endure the truth. For me it was as if people close to me were making terrible mistakes and ruining themselves though I know they knew better. As to the town itself, the writing conjures up an idyllic place where you could go into small venues and sit around and listen to the best on a regular basis. That is my vision of how music should be appreciated. Live and in a small room where you can be close enough to the musicians that you can see their eyes. I particularly appreciated learning more about Albert Grossman in this setting and about Todd Rundgren, a musician who I have admired right from his start. Thanks, Peter, for another insightful and excellent review.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 06:33:34 CET 2016 from (64.229.183.199)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: forget about your brotherly lovey-dove ?

PSB: Nice article, but I don't get much sense of whether you think the book's worthwhile or not. Was your intent to damn with faint praise, perhaps what's expected from those from the City of Brotherly Love? (I can't even type that without Zappa's "Motherly Love" running through my head.)


Entered at Sat Mar 12 06:02:18 CET 2016 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: tribute bands

Just an overdue comment about tribute stuff that was aired out in the gb earlier this week. I can't pretend to comment on the excellence or lack of any particular group I already saw mentioned, yet in a way I can see the whole idea as slightly off-putting but perhaps it's about all there is of many of the classics. I suspect the Weir/Hart/Kruetzman effort gets as close as one can to the topnotch original, but have not heard them yet.

Here, locally we've had 2 recent deals somewhat in the same vein. A band from the Berkshires of western Mass. named the Revtor band (at least that's what I recall the name) comes and puts on a re-enactment of TLW, (in mid-February, Rochester, NH) getting local musicians to play the guest spots as much as possible. They weren't bad, although the amount of soloing, while typical of most r'n'r certainly isn't of our 5. The woman who put out the Coyote rendition was particularly good; however it's kind of amiss to not have an African-American be a stand-in for Muddy. At least my spouse could finally see from the audience around us, that perhaps I wasn't the only fool soul hooked on the Band.

There's a different local guy who puts together a show w/ 5 or 6 local groups doing their own takes (2 or 3/group) on one catalog. In this case it's filtered through their own styles and tendencies. The music of Neil Young was last weekend, but I couldn't make it. A year ago, he started the whole idea w/ the music of the Band. I found it quite interesting, w/ a couple of acts pulling out some deep cuts from MFBP and A Musical History compilation. In a way, more like when Phish would play somebody else's entire album as a concert, it's more satisfying than a strict tribute re-hash, even though the musicianship at a local level may be a little spotty. For what it's worth.

I guess based on PSB's review the new Hoskyn's won't be a total waste of cash.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 05:15:55 CET 2016 from (64.229.183.199)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Jack August / Jacob Geisinger

Kevin J: As you'll likely recall, my favourite Jack August / Moonquake song is "Don't You Try To Be My Baby". But there's also this cover of "Not Fade Away" from, I believe, an unattributed but excellent RCA Canada LP from ca '71 called "Rockers". Much of it's in French (like "Grande Blonde" for "Young Blood"), but not this one. Rousing covers of R&R standards by Pagliaro (uncredited), Walter Rossi, August, Serge Blouin, John Hagopian, Derek Kendrick et al.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 03:52:44 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JQ......posts crossed. I believe you and figured as much......just funny.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 03:48:32 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bravo to Chicago......finally, enough people in a U.S. city/community stand up and vigorously protest the madman Donald Trump........about time as the media had just begun an almost across the board re-branding of the imbecile as "Presidential".

Another Stanley Cup is on the way as well.....the ex Habs will assure that.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 03:41:01 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Jeez, Kevin J

That's some coincidence. No offense but I swear I didn't see that clip until now -


Entered at Sat Mar 12 02:15:16 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: JQ and Moonquake's "Remember"

Sad news about Keith Emerson. 71 seems awfully young and yet many these days are not getting by that number. I wonder if others are in this boat, but I seem to get all my breaking news from this website,

JQ: see my link of March 1 to a song that remembers some of those activities exactly - and fondly. A very good song as well.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 01:11:18 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.130)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Was Galloway talking about £1940 or £19.40? Or was it in $?


Entered at Sat Mar 12 00:34:30 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Emerson, Lake and Palmer

First time I heard that record I was in a brand new UC Irvine dorm room with a lid of Panama Red and staring at a few black light posters - heavy indeed!


Entered at Fri Mar 11 23:22:11 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Much saddened by the death of Keith Emerson. I saw him several times way back with The Nice too. Ironically I found an original copy of "Ars Longa Vita Brevis" by The Nice (on Immediate) a few days ago, and bought it. What a year for music this has been. Another great gone.

Band connection: The Best Revenge soundtrack, Keith Emerson, Levon Helm and Garth Hudson.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 23:10:04 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Keith Emerson

It is reported that Keith Emerson has died at age 71. That hit me hard. I admire all of his work and thought he was a special musician with skill and imagination and his work with The Nice, ELP and as a solo artist was superb.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 22:50:44 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: John D - well deserved

Our friend, John Donabie, has had a very positive impact on all of us and I thought you might be interested in this article. And don't forget to listen. . http://www.fyimusicnews.ca/articles/2016/03/11/conversation-john-donabie


Entered at Fri Mar 11 21:34:10 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks Jeff. Got it. Will look out.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 21:05:33 CET 2016 from (58.104.19.113)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I was a bit disappointed with Small Town Talk. I was hoping for a more complete picture of what kind of person Albert Grossman was. There were a few interesting anecdotes but the book didn't really tell us anything we didn't already know about the indulgent life styles of overpaid rock stars.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:52:31 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i sent you an email re Natalie's show. Hopefully i have the correct address.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:49:06 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: PSB review

Very good review. I enjoyed it. I'm part of the way through the book seems pretty good so far


Entered at Fri Mar 11 18:40:18 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent and very fair review, PSB. I'm halfway through. As I said, I loved him starting out with Simone Felice and Simi Stone (who I am hoping will be with Natalie Merchant next Wednesday).


Entered at Fri Mar 11 18:24:43 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, I'm glad you took my advice. You'd have been wise to do so when you were moderator as well :-) . see, it's never too late.

Enjoy the show.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 18:01:45 CET 2016 from (100.34.147.66)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: My review of Small Town Talk

The link is to my review of "Small Town Talk"


Entered at Fri Mar 11 17:08:10 CET 2016 from (24.114.57.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: George Galloway

George Galloway once described Christopher Hitchens as being a "drink-sodden ex-Trotskyist popinjay"........so his Monica reference was not from his "A" bag.

Rock n roll in movies and tv shows is often poorly portrayed - granted - but I thought the Buddy Holly story was superb. The most embarrassing cringe worthy unwatchable mess of a movie and of rock performance on screen has to be Dennis Quaid trying and failing beyond belief doing Jerry Lee Lewis


Entered at Fri Mar 11 17:03:55 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Superficial

Peter V: I agree about Cash. It was OK. Though I found Jersey Boys entertaining because of all the music, I guess what I can't abide is what I perceive as the superficiality about issues and the drama these superficialities take on. We all know its more complex than what we see and I think that's what bugs me.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:59:58 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have been known to throw stuff at the TV due to the BBC's obsessive need for historic re-enactment. The TV programme is about (say) fishing in Grimsby from 1930-2016. The voiceover say "The Vikings landed here in 962 …" cue depressed looking actor in a horned helmet and furry top holding an axe and shield trudging along the beach.

Rock music films? I'll have to think. The fictional ones can be very good indeed … such as Across the Universe and Almost Famous, and we're still in the As.

Biopics … the Johnny Cash one was much better than the Bobby Darin which in turn was much better than the Ray Charles.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:49:17 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Music drama on TV and in movies

There is something about movies and TV dramatic series that deal with music of the last 65 years that gets under my skin. Even with Martin Scorsese, whose work I love, I can't watch this current program because it feels artificial and emulates the stereotype. In short, though I try to be open-minded, this just plain bugs me. I won't watch it after watching it once. When the movie is about a classical musician or a jazz artist from yesteryear, I've often enjoyed it. Even the Buddy Holly movie and I'm Not There bothered me in some ways though there were some good things to say about them. I did like 'Bird' and 'Amadeus'.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 15:31:29 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Carole King in Hyde Park

You persuaded me, Jeff. Got them. General admission. My love for "Tapestry" is great, and Don Henley's Cass County was one of the best albums of 2015 too. Two must sees, then add the band … I didn't want to go for all those corporate areas close to the stage which advertise "exclusive toilets and bars" as they'll be full of arseholes in red suspenders (UK braces) baying with laughter about the stock market until Don starts "Hotel California" then they'll all start jumping up and down and yelling, 'Ya! Jolly good!'

Radio 2 was fun this morning. I was driving and caught the outraged phone-in about the British-American Special Relationship after Obama's unfortunate remarks. They had George Galloway, an extremist left-wing pro-Saddam guy if ever there was one. But I have to say he had me laughing so much I nearly hit a bus. He described the Special Relationship of Cameron and Obama as "the same relationship as Monica Lewinski to Bill Clinton, and we know which one is kneeling down.' then he said, 'Can I say that?' and the DJ had to say, 'You already have. This is live radio.' The rest of his conversation about 1940 is best left unrepeated!


Entered at Fri Mar 11 14:09:41 CET 2016 from (66.249.93.26)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: HBO

I wonder if anyone else has been watching the Scorsese/Jagger produced series on HBO called Vinyl? It was strange hearing British bands like Slade and Status Quo getting mentioned on an American show. I think both band's went under the radar as far as American success went. I reckon both band's had some great moments especially as live acts although the critics viewed them as irelevant for the most part.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 12:11:44 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert, a typo there "$18.49". I thought we agreed on $1849.00.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 11:25:20 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A

Subject: Tribute to NYC's Lost Music Row

Pete, whatever you have to do to get to that Carole King show. Odds are she has Danny Kortchmar, Kunkel & Sklar with her. you don;t want to miss that.

tonight i saw a covers show. a tribute to Music Row- 48th st in NYC, where all the great music stores were. 25 bucks plus food & drink, in The Cutting Room. Great sound. Fucking great sound..

Two drummers 75% of the night. Sometimes it was Brian dunne ( amazing) and ( Brooklyn Boy) Liberty DeVitto ( 30 years with billy Joel). Sometimes it Was Brian dunne and (Brooklyn Boy) Carmine Appice ( vanilla fudge, Beck Bogert Appice.....). Soemtimes Will Calhoun and... Sometimes,. Lee finkelstein ( Tower of Power, Blues Brothers....)and........
Bass, almost all night long- Kenny aaronson, from my neighborhood. Stories ( Brother Louie), Dust ( With MArc bell- Marky Ramone- and Richie Wise), Bob Dylan, Yardbirds, too many to mention),
Guitars- oy! Mike Ciros ( other worldly), Jay Jay French ( Twisted Sister), Gene Cornish, many others)
Keys, Benny Harrison, who put htis together,. mnay credits, including Henry Gross for many years
Vocals : Natural Born Schmoozer Angel Rissoff (Little Isidore & the Inquisitors, Planotones, .), Tommy McConnell ( Blues Brothers, Eileen Ivers), Rob Popparozzi ( Blues Brothers.......)Sarah Divine, Benny harrison, Jay Jay French, Gary U. S. Bonds, Tom Bowes ( Tower of Power) more
Horns: Don Harris (Tower of Power, and hundreds of others), Dave Mann ( Tower of Power....)Richie Cannata ( billy Joel, hundreds...)
I'm missing alot of players

three hours of solid music, non stop, all A Plus, Plus So you have four members of Tower of Pwoer plus a full band performing Tower of Power songs, in tribute to their horn player that died this year
angel Rissoff singign Runaway & shaky Ground

Tommy Pipes McConnell doing an otherwordly job singign Fame, Let's dance, & Heroes for Bowie, the band scorching, i mean just fucking gorgeous & powerful, Gary Us Bonds doing his hits, Sarah Divine just magnificent on Lady Marmalade, & Rock Steady, Benny singing several Steely dan songs, that Mike Ciros just burned on guitar all night,

Jay Jay FrencH singign Why I Sing the Blues for BB King , Benny & Tommy singign Take It Easy, a decidely NYC version of Take It Easy that was killer! , some oen else on Tequila Sunrise, a bad ass horn led version of Them Changes, King Curtis arrangement.............
Earth, Wind & Fire- several songs, just magnificent

just a shitload of first class music, by some of the best of the best, nothing but heavyweights, playing for their past, their city, their memories, and their lost friends....

A show you could have paid 500 bucks to see and got your money's worth, every penny. Hardly a civilian in the room, almost all musicians, industry people. ....A n almost completely full room, about 220 or so... What a mind blower of a show...


Entered at Fri Mar 11 10:50:13 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Little Brother- I'd suggest Al Kooper as the best source. He has replied to others in the past, and was there.

Just wasted an hour of my life trying to book tickets for Carole King doing Tapestry in Hyde Park with Don Henley as support. You run in circles. £65 to stand on the grass hundreds of yards away, or a King's ransom to stand a bit nearer and have a ticket in a "commemorative wallet." Dreadful website sending you in circles, then when you try and book 2 tickets "General Admission" (i.e. several hundred yards away) you get "Maximum Purchase Number Exceeded." I'm inclined to say "Fuck it. I'll buy the DVD when it comes out."


Entered at Fri Mar 11 04:16:11 CET 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Watching the Wheels/Kevin

Great cover. Incredible. But every time I listen to the beginning I'm hearing Bridge Over Troubled Water. No worries. Didn't someone say there has only been 5 songs written in the rock and roll world and all the rest are just copies.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 00:56:52 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.0)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: thanks fior all that interesting background on the Johnny Rogers record! The b-side is just the instrumental tracks, so easier to listen to. All-in-all the Montreal sporting world's equivalent of "Honky The Christmas Goose" by Johnny Bower.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 23:57:15 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Ordinary Superstar no. 20

Bill M……Thank you for taking a look…..The Aloe Blacc “Watching the Wheels” just floored me………Very funny about that Johnny Rodgers song as I knew about it and believe my older sister might have had a copy of it. Loved the Aquarius label…..Anyhow, Johnny was a Heisman Trophy winning receiver that came north to play football in Montreal in the mid 1970’s…He was an extremely exciting player and also a very flamboyant character – prone to flashy furs, great hats and running across the goal line backwards after long punt and kick-off returns………..Anyone who was anybody in those days hung out at a club called Night Magic in Old Montreal. Johnny liked to call himself an “Ordinary Superstar”……He would have met and mingled with Jack in those days which no doubt led to the recording of that song…….another linkage might have been the drummer in Moonquake – Derek Hendrick – who for a time ( pre drum machines ) was the go-to drummer for almost all of the Montreal produced “Disco” recordings…France Jolie, Patsy Gallant, etc…….As an aside, Derek went on to become quite a presence in the Yoga world.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 23:46:16 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Any Info on Danko/Manuel-U. of P.-4/12/80

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2pyU26e3ec


Entered at Thu Mar 10 23:28:44 CET 2016 from (74.12.49.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Kevin J: I did as directed and I"ll stick with any of Bryan Ferry's live version of "Jealous Guy" - consistently excellent, all the way from '82 to 2014. The Live Aid one is neat because of a) David Gilmour and b) the cameraman business (as noted in the comments). Kevin J (again): What should crawl out of the $2 bin and into my hand at Village Vinyl but a late '70s 45 on the Aquarius label written and produced by Jack August - "An Ordinary Superstar" by Johnny Rodgers (who he?). Unfortunately it's country & disco. Still, a welcome arrival in light of the sad news of his passing. (BTW, I saw the old friend, now a resident of exotic Smith Falls), who first introduced me to Jack's early oevre, last weekend at a tribute jam in honour of the passing of CJ Feeny / Lee Van Leer, an under-the-radar stalwart of the local scene since the early '60s, whose passing I believe I mentioned a couple of weeks ago. Also in the audience was Sonny Milne, the guy who took over for Levon on the Hawkins bandstand - and who is with the current version of Robbie's old band the Consuls.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 22:46:59 CET 2016 from (100.11.151.162)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives (and Philly PA suburb)
Web: My link

Subject: O/T "Rainy Day Women..." question

Pardon an O/T question about a "Blonde on Blonde" track-- "O/T" because I don't think any of the Band members involved in that masterpiece are the answer to this burning question.

I'm asking it here because there's a lot of "insider" expertise in this guestbook.

On "Rainy Day Women...", one of the performers raucously and hilariously volunteers "response" shout-outs throughout the song. I hear him on the left-hand side, assuming my stereo is correctly wired. I assume he's one of the musicians (not a non-playing visitor), but I can't correlate his inspired ululations with a specific instrument.

I won't try to transcribe his various hoots and hollers, along the lines of "Yes, they will...". He's SO into it that I think he's the guy who makes Dylan laugh a couple of times.

I did check the great Sean Wilentz article archived here (see link) called "Mystic Nights: The Making of 'Blonde on Blonde' in Nashville". I hoped he'd give this individual honorable mention, since IMO his ad libs really help to "sell" the song.

I e-mailed Wilentz, but he never responded. :(

If anyone knows who the mystery man is, please let me know. Thanks for your attention and consideration.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 20:38:14 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert (& Peter)

Subject: Books: The Band and its Fans

Thinking about my legacy ….. the things I achieved and I’m proud to leave behind are not so many. Yesterday our proof book “The Band and its Fans”, that Peter and I wrote, came. Maybe that’s some sort of achievement. Rereading the GB chapter I was struck again be the poster we interviewed back in 2014 (he doesn’t post here anymore but let’s call him x):

“…Yes I was one of the first to post in the GB, must be in the first half year or so. At some point I had a “fued” with another poster, one night I drank too much and really got nasty. I posted some remarks I’m not proud of ….. that person went away and he never came back. That is almost 20 years ago now, but it still bothers me every single day. I don’t know where that other poster came from, don’t even know if he still lives, but for twenty years every single day I say sorry ….. but I can’t reach him …..sometimes it wakes me up at night ….. a haunting thing … ”

On our way back to the hotel Peter and I didn’t say a word in the car, we were both moved by this little story, guilty memorizing all our own vain posts….. this situation lasted at least till we reached the hotel bar.

Anyway The Band and its Fans will be available from 04-01-2016 (hard copy $18.49 ; ebook $11.49 either Amazon or Peter’s …it’ about a Band and it’s about you and me, don’t miss it).


Entered at Thu Mar 10 20:20:10 CET 2016 from (70.193.136.223)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Delta Lady

Rita Coolidge co-wrote the piano coda used for Eric Clapton's "Layla" with her then boyfriend Jim Gordon, but never received official credit.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 18:29:59 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: John Lennon - Best Cover I have ever heard !

LINKED: Aloe Blacc's transcendent cover of John Lennon's "Watching the Wheels".

Please do check out the LINK above as I believe it to be quite simply the best cover of a song I have ever heard. Stunning.

Nice to see Landmark's name here a few days ago.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 17:49:04 CET 2016 from (74.12.49.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

How about "Daniel Radcliffe and the Sacred Harp"? I see the opening scene taking place by a lake where Daniel, Julie and Little John are cavorting happily 'neath a midnight moon until a serpent (the Skin-Walker in disguise) appears ...


Entered at Thu Mar 10 15:24:17 CET 2016 from (74.12.49.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

I saw in the paper that JK Rowling is moving onto Robbie's post-Band turf and incorporating the Skin-Walker into her new project. Made me wander what might have been if Ronnie Hawkins and his Yonge Street School of Rock and Roll had been Dumbledore and Hogwarts? Robbie as Harry, presumably ...


Entered at Thu Mar 10 14:24:05 CET 2016 from (74.12.49.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Thanks for the link to "Pulled into Nazareth". Very funny. The paint-licker guy sounds familiar; was Al E in the band?

Rod: Good of you to mention Seatrain. George Martin produced the second and third of their four albums. Here's a link to my favourite of their songs, "Marblehead Messenger". The drummer on both Martin albums was a Ronnie Hawkins alumnus, Larry Atamanuik, whose punchy style graces the first two King Biscuit Boy albums (both of which are also graced by the piano work of Richard Bell).


Entered at Thu Mar 10 11:20:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've just bought tickets to see Rita Coolidge - a classic example of an artiste building a career on carefully-selected cover versions.

With the "(ahem) originals" you can get down to one guy (The Animals, The Kast-Off Kinks) who was original, but not a singer, or with soul-related bands, one guy who was in the last line-up that actually included an original member. The various "The Platters" are in this category, though when I saw them in 2014, they were extremely good. But when you have a 30-something announcing "This was a big hit for us in 1955" you do have to smile.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 09:57:42 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Covers bands

There’s covers bands, tribute bands and “the (ahem) originals.” Covers bands will always be important, simply because The Beatles, Dylan, The Band, Springsteen et al have the best songs.

There’s a bit in “Pulling Into Nazareth” (linked) where two of the group have a van breakdown and have to wait while it’s being repaired. The night before they got dosed. They’re waiting in a posh car showroom, and get into conversation with a very straight female receptionist:

QUOTE:

(Steve) looked round the showroom. The highly polished automobile paintwork glimmered under the fluorescent lights. A tiny edge of flashback niggled at his brain. He walked round a Cortina GT. There was Julian kneeling on the floor.

Licking the car’s door.

‘Julian! For fuck’s sake! What are you doing?’

‘This is the most beautiful car I’ve ever seen.’

‘It’s a fucking Ford Cortina.’

‘The paint, Steve. And every colour tastes different.’

‘How many cars have you fucking licked?’

‘All of them now. This dark green one tastes best. Like earth.’

‘Is your friend alright?’

‘Oh. Hello. Yes. Just lost a contact lens. We’ve found it though.’

The woman was carrying a clipboard with some papers. She was about Steve’s age, but the heavily lacquered hair, frilly white blouse, black pencil-skirt, ultra high-heels and gold-rimmed glasses came from a different planet than the one he was currently occupying.

‘He looks right poorly.’

‘He’s had flu. Getting over it now.’

‘Doesn’t he speak for himself?’

‘He’s very quiet. He’s still got a bad sore throat.’

‘Hmm. You’re a pop group, then.’

‘That’s right. Epsilon.’

‘What does he do?’

‘Sings and plays piano.’

‘With a sore throat?’

‘He’s saving it for tonight.’

‘Have you been on the radio?’

‘On the John Peel Show.’

‘Never heard of it. Not in the Top 20 though?’

‘Not yet.’

‘Do you play any Beatles?’

‘No. We’re not a covers band.’

‘What’s a covers band?’

‘Doing other people’s hits. We don’t.’

‘What do you play then?’

‘Original songs.’

‘It must be a bit boring for the audience. Not knowing the tunes to anything.’

‘I hadn’t thought about that.’

‘Then maybe you should,’ she suddenly smiled. A glorious, dazzling smile of triumph over the unwashed barbarians. He listened to the tip-tapping heels recede as she walked out of his life.



Entered at Thu Mar 10 06:23:03 CET 2016 from (219.89.31.128)

Posted by:

Rod

George Martin. What a great talent. I always think he gave The Beatles the edge in the same way Garth made The Band something special. Plus I love that Seatrain album he did.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 01:20:38 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, Nov 8th 2003 is most likely the time Garth & Maud played in that club in Philly. that harp playing gal, Erin Hill, was on the bill. You and I met for a minute after the show when i was helping Garth pack up. Sounds about right ime to me, cause Feb of 04 Garth & Maud were in nashville, then i was, & then in April i left NY for 8 months... I don't think that you and I meeting in a Philly club took place during the short time i was in in 05.

That kid gets no slack, Lee. He clearly meant The Band (that later backed Dylan) , as opposed to the band backing Dylan. It's a hanging offense, about as bad as thinking the Allman Brothers manufacture Almond Joy candy bars or the Grateful Dead is the name of a Zombie flick.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 00:23:34 CET 2016 from (184.206.181.203)

Posted by:

BenPike

Location: Cleveland Tx

The usually empty cliche about changing people's lives seems utterly fit George Martin. What a different world we might live in had he not been here.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 00:18:02 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.26)

Posted by:

Bill M

I agree with Ben that it would have been objectionable if The Weight had bulked up somewhat and called themselves the Band. But beyond that I don't see why this conversation is taking place. It's tough to make a living as a non-famous musician, especially an aging one, so if the Weight guys can make more money doing Band songs than anything else, more power to them.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 23:00:57 CET 2016 from (108.2.144.116)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USa

Subject: To 'T' or not to 'T', or maybe 't'?

Aw, c'mon Jeff, cut the boy some slack. If it said "the" band or "his" band, but not "The Band" no harm, no foul. Both Brooks and Cooper played with Dylan, no? Mebbe some wet-behind-the-ears editor is the culprit. "Dylan's backup group was called The Band, right?" Maybe he'll run for President some day.

Was trying to peg the year that we saw Garth and the Crowmatix in Bryn Mawr, PA. Wonderful time, great music, a chance to shyly chat with Maud and briefly with Garth (say hello). Michael Falzarano was there and I think Sneaky Pete? And I have a signed Sea To the North dated Nov/8/03 so that narrow that down, don't it. Definitely had a Band focus, but not sure it was billed as such...

But I agree...tributes, yes, tribute bands, as businesses, not so much. There was/is a yearly festival in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania with NAMES of bands that are long gone. Really, who is Canned Heat these days? But I play in a covers band and when you pull out a decent rendition of a song that takes even one person back to their teenage selves and you see that smile, it is well worth it.

A few years ago a local group (Mad Sweet Pangs, with guests) put together a Thanksgiving eve Last Waltz tribute at a local theater venue. Virtually no one on stage was born before the original event. Still sounded great.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 20:58:22 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: A New Expert. Soon He'll Be Posting Here.

This "writer" should be sent to stand in the corner for eternity. Listening to the sound of trucks speeding on gravel roads while bobcats screech through headphones..

When were Harvey Brooks & Al Kooper in The Band. My fucking god, they should take every one of his paychecks back.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 20:36:55 CET 2016 from (173.3.49.139)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Tribute shows & tribute bands are two different things entirely.... I've made a strong distinction repeatedly . Responses that blur that shouldn't create improper representation of my point....If not for that, i'd have bowed out of this discussion already....And yes to whomever wrote that good music is good music.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 19:19:45 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If The Weight played the UK, I'd try very hard to see them. Good luck to them!


Entered at Wed Mar 9 16:40:45 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Prof. Louie

I might go see him on Thursday evening in NYC on 72nd street-always enjoy good music in tribute or just for what it is.What I or others label the music is fairly irrelevant-it's either good music or not.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 16:38:24 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: George Martin

RIP.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 16:35:37 CET 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band tributes

The Weight are,like Ben said,similar to in approach to Phil and Friends.The intent is not to mimic(like The Band The Band or for the Dead,there is the Dark Star imitators or for Beatles it's Fab Faux) but to interpret the music.Phil has done that very successfully and by regularly changing lineups the interpretations are noteworthy.And,I believe that Garth would be a pleasure to listen to in any circumstance including tributes to the music he helped create.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:49:10 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band tributes

I don't see anything wrong with any of these folks (Garth, Jim & Randy or Prof. Louie) doing Band tribute shows. In particular, I think Garth, Jim & Randy have very right to do this as they were members of the Band.

They are not presenting themselves as The Band, so there's no deception involved. Also, The Weight appears to be sanctioned by Levon's estate as they have performed at the barn many times and there shows and articles are all linked from Levon's facebook page.

Again, I think that what 'The Weight' is doing is not much different than what Phil Lesh and Bob Weir in various combinations have been doing with the Dead's catalog over the last 20 years.

Now if Jim and Randy had recruited Terry Danko and Terry Cagle and hit the road as 'The Band', ala Lynyrd Skynyrd, I think we would all find that objectionable. But, they appear to be doing this in a very respectful way and are actually resurrectiing a lot of deep album cuts that the Band rarely if ever performed.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:37:33 CET 2016 from (67.84.79.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Apples, Eggplants & Pretzels.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:35:25 CET 2016 from (80.29.79.104)

Posted by:

jordan

Location: kansas babe
Web: My link

Subject: enriched by love

good people right there...


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:12:53 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Garth

Jeff, I'm aware of your friendship with Prof. Louie. We had a pretty heated discussion about Louie on this guestbook several months ago. I'm really not interested in rehashing any of that.

The fact is that Prof. Louie has played Band tribute shows for many years. To the best of my recollection, Garth has performed at some of these shows a number of years ago. It's certainly possible that I'm mistaken, but that's my recollection.

There is no question that Garth has performed at other 'tribute to the Band' type of shows. I have a link to an article about a 'Songs of the Band' concert that Garth headlined with Jimmy Vivino in 2012. The lineup of this concert included Jim Weider, Randy Ciarlante and Brion Isaacs, so this looks like the germination of 'The Weight' band.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:09:17 CET 2016 from (92.22.16.5)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: George Martin

He has to be right up there with the very best music producers of all time.RIP


Entered at Wed Mar 9 09:58:03 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: George Martin

A sad loss, indeed. My own world would have been a lot less enjoyable without George Martin.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 09:39:10 CET 2016 from (217.33.210.130)

Posted by:

Peter V

The extent of George Martin's genius extends back to all the weird and wonderful pre-Beatle recordings at Parlophone. A wonderful man, and a great figure in music. RIP


Entered at Wed Mar 9 06:55:26 CET 2016 from (67.84.79.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

George Martin has died.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 05:46:01 CET 2016 from (67.84.79.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Last Real Record Man

The story of Steve Popovich & Bat Out Of hell


Entered at Wed Mar 9 04:19:50 CET 2016 from (67.84.79.114)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ben, as you know, I consider myself a friend of Aaron's, & I really dig & support The Cromatix. Separately, I saw them in a real small room in Brooklyn recently, & gotta tell ya, it was a beautiful, enjoyable show. While they're normally a loud band, the sound was strong, but kept reasonable in this small venue. The vocals were crystal clear, I really enjoyed hearing their voices up front. The room had a great acoustic piano, and hearing Aaron and Marie play that far more clearly than normal, well it was beautiful. It was a killer show, two great sets.John Platania is friggin amazing... Some of The Band songs did bring tears to my eyes....And John Platania doing Domino, well, it's a moment....

Now all that said, you wrote: " Garth did participate in a series of 'Band tribute' shows with Professor Louie a number of years ago." i could easily be msitaken, but i believe that you are incorrect. Garth hadn't played with them for quite some time. I'm certain not since 03 or 04. they may have played some Band songs when Garth played with them, but i dont; think & truly doubt he ever participated in a Cromatix show thaat was billed as a Band tribute. I doubt any shows of the period he performed with them were INTENTIONALLY promoted as a Tribute to The Band.i was at a few myself, Woodstock Playhouse in either 02, or 03 was one... Like i wrote, i could be wrong, but don;t think so...

It really don;t matter, and the whole discussion is a little goofy. Me, in general, i'm really against tribute bands. I'm pretty much against bands that don;t include some good original material in general. I can see bands starting out as strictly cover bands, but with an eye towards writing songs, and then, as they improve as writers ( hey , they could start out as good writers, it has happened), moving towards that mostly..... but, if you want to just be a cover band, stick to holiday inns, elk clubs, moose lodges, weddings, bar mitzvah's, private parties. Let the bands that create great original music get the increasingly few club gigs that pay decently.

Me, while there are people and musicians i like in tribute bands, i kinda think tribute bands are a detriment , a scourge on the earth., etc etc


Entered at Tue Mar 8 23:08:21 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Dimensions (Toronto) tribute the RS

Another great Rolling Stones tribute band in the early years was The Dimensions of Toronto, who played high schools. As Bill M knows, they became A Passing Fancy (Jay Telfer, Seon, Rick Fruchtman and others) with a few hits (I'm Losing Tonight was probably the best of them). But you can image what a great night it was hearing the Rolling Stones properly done. And yes... The Blushing Brides were probably the best at it!


Entered at Tue Mar 8 19:54:47 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: David Bowie - Ian Hunter - Mick Ronson

LINKED: Definition of being great live ! Say this for Bowie, unlike many, when he gave away songs...he gave'em good ones. The BAND linkage.......Bowie lived in Woodstock and Rono played with Dylan....

JT: The Blushing Brides at Maples Inn, West Island, Montreal 1980.....the best tribute performance I have ever seen......Dare I say, almost better than the originals at that period of time.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 17:59:41 CET 2016 from (67.84.77.111)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The Band had three of the greatest singers ever.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 16:07:03 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: They sell and we buy.

Caveat emptor? You never know what you're going to get once you lay your money down. 15 minutes. 2 hours. Crap. Wonderment. They sell and we buy. I don't expect absolute honesty in the music marketplace, having been burned in the past. So I buy carefully and if it sounds to good to be true, it usually is a problem and I avoid it.

Sometimes I am amazed. When I first came to Victoria, there was a place downtown (not there anymore) and the band playing that night was a Rolling Stones cover band. They were great. Who knew what to expect. I went in there with full knowledge that time and money was being used. This time I was not disappointed. Another time I paid a great deal of money to see a major star in Toronto in a large venue. The sound was intolerable and the effort to make it all palatable was obscene. So .... even caveat emptor may not succeed. Beware but I know that there are no guarantees whenever you lay your money down. As for tributes, I'll take my chances if the musicians are known to me (with the internet, if you make the effort, you can get a pretty good feel of what they are all about and if it might be worthwhile).


Entered at Tue Mar 8 14:13:27 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Weight

I look very favorably on what The Weight is doing. With two members of the 90's Band, they are a legitimate continuation of that version of the Band and not a run of the mill tribute band.

I'm not surprised that Garth declined an invitation to join The weight. Garth is close to 80 years old now and when he does the occasional performance, it's usually with his wife.

Garth did participate in a series of 'Band tribute' shows with Professor Louie a number of years ago. From my recollection, those shows were well received at the time. I don't see how those shows are much different than what the Weight is doing now.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 14:03:30 CET 2016 from (76.68.227.87)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

And yet these bands continue to milk big profits. I recently saw where the Temptations will be touring with the Beach Boys this summer. I have to admit that I have considered going to see these "Happy "Together" package shows, should they reach anywhere close to where I am. Then I heard that some groups such as the Association were horrid and that the Turtles are only on-stage for about 15 minutes. That eliminated any chance of me going to see any show of that ilk.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 09:35:44 CET 2016 from (217.33.210.130)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Just My Imagination

I wasn't suggesting such a reunion, but rather pointing out how ludicrous the Temptations and Four Tops tour 2016 is. And personally I would rate the original Temptations above both Led Zeppelin or Pink Floyd for merit and songs.

I saw an ad for a UK band who apparently play the classics of Lynyrd Skynrd and The Band. Not a combination for tributes that springs to my mind.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 09:29:25 CET 2016 from (219.89.31.128)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Weight

I don't really like the concept of this group. Sure those guys played with/in the reformed Band - but I think of them as mostly sidemen. They weren't there when the original music was conceived by the OQ. I'd still like to see those guys play in some other context though.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 08:03:36 CET 2016 from (72.143.229.47)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Weight Band........on 2nd thought

Jeff.....I really hope that invitation never happened.......since you reported it, I believe it but it saddens me, nevertheless. I would think all of us here believe The Band to be at least the same stature of Led Zep or Pink Floyd and in our optimistic eyes, maybe even the Fabs...........so can anyone imagine a worse fate than drawing the short straw and being asked to call John Paul Jones and "inviting" him to join a Led Zep tribute band.........or, God forbid, George Harrison to join a Beatles tribute band.......or Richard Wright to join a Floyd tribute........embarrassment is the mildest descriptive one can imagine......Garth is a beautiful soul and the answer would have been easy and no doubt gently delevered.....but Good God...


Entered at Tue Mar 8 06:52:07 CET 2016 from (173.25.176.154)

Posted by:

Band Shirt Guy

Location: Minnesota
Web: My link

New tour dates posted by no love for Minnesota this time. Disappointed by not surprised, he was just a year ago. I might just have to make the drive to Red Rocks this summer to take pictures of Dylan shirts in the parking lot.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 00:53:10 CET 2016 from (68.196.242.190)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I'm stating what should be obvious.....At the inception of the group, Garth turned down an invitation to join The Weight.
Then they asked Marty Grebb, who clearly accepted.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 23:53:46 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Making the world better for just one day.......you say...

.....getting that know-it-all Bono to tell me how to get that bloody U2 song off my iPhone would be a start !


Entered at Mon Mar 7 23:04:55 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The Big Imagine Day

I think this world could use a new all over the world concert, not to raise money but to show that we still care about each other.

We start at dawn in Australia with the Foo Fighters (they’re crazy enough to do that). They will hop aboard a fast plane and fly to Gorky Park, Moscow and perform there. Then London and finally Central Park in NYC.

There would be poets and writers perform between the best Bands from all over the world.

1. Sydney
2. Moscow
3. London
4. New York City
• 24hour concert, aired in 100 countries
• Foo Fighters
• Australian Bands
• Russian Bands
• The Stones
• Clapton
• John Mayor
• Dereck Truck and Susan Tedeschi
• Springsteen
• U2? (we have to talk about that one)
• Joe Bonamassa
• Metallica
• Sheryl Crow

If it would only make this world a better place for just one day.

I have to call Dave Grohl.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 20:37:50 CET 2016 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Weight

Mavis Staples includes a more gospel-like rousing version in her shows now. There's a new doc on HBO about her -


Entered at Mon Mar 7 19:31:20 CET 2016 from (217.33.210.130)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Weight

I agree, two great guys who were members. If they had wanted to go out as 'The Band" they'd be closer than The Four Tops or Temptations currently advertised as touring. Add Garth and they'd be way closer than the current The Animals.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 18:27:39 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Weight

Sad reality of today’s music scene is that tribute bands make a lot more money than bands trying to get gigs playing original music…..to a degree, this has always been the case…….experienced first-hand when our guys transitioned from The Hawks to Levon and the Hawks….it’s just more pronounced now as there are far fewer places to play live in most cities……..a scene that plays out every few years in Toronto is some of the town’s great guitar players dropping everything and cramming for a few weeks on Jimmy Page to be in shape for Led Zeppelin tribute band auditions……The Zep tribute bands make real money !

As to The Weight band…..I think it is a tribute in the finest sense….great musicians playing the music of what really is still an underappreciated band…..It is not like they are billing themselves as “The Band”………..so many examples of 60”s and 70’s bands that are truly rip-offs…….”The Guess Who” play all over North America with just the drummer from the original band……………….Taking a different name as The Weight band has done adds honour to the project and differentiates “tribute” from “rip-off”……and they are a collection of truly great players – The Weight band are.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:30:48 CET 2016 from (67.84.78.101)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: See the link. Randy Meisner's Wife Shot Dead

Long history of troubled times for Meisner.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 16:04:10 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I would agree that My Morning Jacket's performance at Love for Levon, especially "It Makes No Difference," is a fine tribute to The Band.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 15:43:26 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tribute

I guess you are right David, because they don't follow and play strictly the Band music. However would you agree that when they play the Band's music, particularly at " Love for Levon" they were paying tribute to the Band?

I got to leave right now. Got to go and load a load of boom sticks that's 70 foot long logs on my barge and transport them damn near to Kitimat for a heli-logging outfit. I'll be back in about a week.

Peter! see if you can control Norbert, and that Scandinavian fool who has to abuse my tug name to insult the crazed woman Rosalind.......what an outfit.....


Entered at Mon Mar 7 15:30:57 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm?: My Morning Jacket is not a tribute band. The group's lead singer & guitarist Jim James has released an EP of George Harrison covers (under the name Yim Yames) and recorded "Going to Acapulco" with Calexico for the soundtrack to "I'm Not There."


Entered at Mon Mar 7 08:45:54 CET 2016 from (219.89.31.128)

Posted by:

Rod

Do any of you guys watch The Middle? There's a Dirt Farmer poster or album up on one of the kids walls.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 04:30:09 CET 2016 from (67.84.78.55)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: " Mike Love is a giant selfish dick"

See the linked article regarding Mike Love. A subject of past discussions here.. Steve Albini, also the subject of some past discussion here, is referenced as well..

Some memorable lines:
"Morrissey, Steve Albini, Billy Corgan, Liam Gallagher, and the McRib are completely out-jerked by Mike Love."
"Mike Love started a career by singing in the Beach Boys, and has spent the rest of his life ruining everything good in the world. Last Thursday, we were given another really good reason to hate Mike Love, as he somehow legally kicked Brian Wilson out of the Beach Boys, which might be the most fucked up thing ever."


Entered at Mon Mar 7 02:20:22 CET 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Cripple Creek Ranch

That place and the price is a total rip-off. I've been going to Hornby Island for a lot of years to their blues workshop and anyone who is anyone teaches there. For 5 days and about $600.00 bucks you get to learn and play with the best. Including DAVID VEST! Check out the website. Hornby Island blues workshop. Like JT said, David Vest is awesome in his story telling and talent. His sense of humour is badass. One time, as drummers we were brought into one of his classes to help with a back beat for his piano players who he was having a hard time with. We all set up and he says to his piano students, 'OK this next one is in the key of G. And if you get mixed up go back to G!


Entered at Mon Mar 7 01:15:04 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tribute Bands?

Watching the performance of "My Morning Jacket" is a good example of a tribute band that give their all to do real justice and tribute to the music they obviously love. If a person tries to compare them to "The Band", that is just wrong.

I don't believe they try to copy the Band. They do the music their way but keep it true to what it is.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 01:02:35 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: tribute bands

I think of 'The Weight' as far more than a standard tribute band. Jim and Randy were in the Band for many years and played on their 3 90's albums. I think of what they're doing with 'The Weight' as similar to what Phil Lesh and Bob Weir have been doing with the Dead's music over the last 20 years. They're keeping the music alive for the fans and themselves. Nothing wrong with that in my book.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:46:35 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Glass???

Yeah Jerry, but are you talkin' about a pint glass or a shot glass???..........:-)


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:39:21 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The glass

Different strokes for different folks. Some like to go to getaways and discuss what interests them. Others don't. Some like tribute bands. Others don't. Some look at life and what is offered as a glass half empty while others see it as half full and are thrilled that there is still something left in the glass. As for the $$, it cost money to have a glass.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:28:26 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Camp Cripple Creek

Wallsend, I read about this earlier today on facebook. I agree that this looks a bit pricey, but if you actually went to the website of this resort you would see that they host a series of music camps with comparable prices.

So, I think that your characterization of this as squeezing every last cent out of the Band's legacy is way off base.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 20:25:19 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Thomas Merton and The Band

I’m working on this assay about the influence of Trappist monk Thomas Merton on Dylan and The Band.

“Our job is to love others without stopping to inquire whether or not they are worthy. That is not our business and, in fact, it is nobody's business.“

Ok, I'm off to Harry Brown.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 20:24:49 CET 2016 from (24.114.75.79)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......oh my....decisions...decisions......after much thought...spending the $500 extra to not share a room or bath with "Sawdust" Biff is the right way to go.

Thank you, Joe. Listened to Joe Ely and Butch Hancock today and great way to start the day. For those who care "Live at Liberty Lunch" is one of my all time favourite live albums.....one of my favourite albums, period.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 19:26:31 CET 2016 from (58.104.3.102)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Good to see that every last cent is being squeezed out of the The Band's legacy.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 16:54:11 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: David Vest review-excellent

David Vest performed exceptionally well last evening, playing a mix of boogie, New Orleans (Fats Domino) old time rock, blues and Bob Dylan (Dark Eyes, Political World, Queen Jane Approximately, One Too Many Mornings )and Roy Orbison. He had a particularly excellent group supporting him, with a spectacular Damon Graham on drums. He's playing at Hermann's again on April 2.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 13:58:20 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The John Coffey Beer Incident

Miracle Concert Moments: Now watch this man (link).

Those who think I post too much may take comforting out of the fact that for every post I post, I leave two posts out (something like leaving out the 4 on the hi-hat).


Entered at Sun Mar 6 13:04:44 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Talking about great women Joan, thanks.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 12:45:47 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Gasoline Will be Free

Yesterday I spook an angry man at the gas station, he was through with civilization and was on his way North. He wanted to live in the woods alone without phones, computers .... (but that’s another post)

Anyway he pointed me towards this song “Gasoline Will Be Free” from Sheryl Crow.

What a great song and what a fantastic woman. I want to marry her, think she will look great in a blue Porsche with the roof down (the back singers in the back). That would be a kind of art and I’d drive with her from A to B and back, day after day. Gasoline will be free!

"But when the government turned its back on farming
Man, what I hear
They dragged the pumps out of the ground
With a big vintage John Deere"


Entered at Sun Mar 6 04:03:35 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Subject: David Vest

JT is right: David Vest I's most definitely worth watching for. If you can't catch him live, I suggest cecking out his latest CD, "Roadhouse Revelation". We caught him here in late January, and then saw him win an award at the Maple Blues Award show the next night. He grew up in the US south - with some of the Muscle Shoals guys - and has terrific stories to go with his terrifice sons and playing.

JT: Colin Linden performed at the same awards show, and also won an award - and took his long-time rhythm section, John Dymond and Gary Craig, up to the podium with him. He acknowledge their fallen comrade, Richard Bell, as well as the other two BaRKers. Since Colin James was mentioned a few days ago, I'll say that the only time I've seen him play was with Linden at a loose jam that ended the Maple Blues Award program 10 or 12 years ago. Colin Linden was hamming it up onstage, but there were clearly two lead guitars at work. After some investigation I spotted the chronically self-effacing Colin James firing away from the back, leaning unobtrusively against a speaker.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 03:20:32 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Will The Circle Be Unbroken "Further On"

Joe, and any one else who may be interested. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band has done 3 volumes, (albums) of the Circle. This 3rd album, (if you haven't seen it) is superb.

The absolute super stars of country & bluegrass. The sound is wonderful and the show is THE best. I wonder what the price was to see this many super stars. This is an entire show.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 02:51:37 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: David Vest tonight at Hermann's Jazz Club in Victoria

David Vest tonight: Hermann's Jazz Club in Victoria. We are going. Pianist extraordinaire. Maple Leaf Blues Winner. Now a Victoria resident. Find his music. You'll like it.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 02:29:56 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Texas Time

That is a great old song Butch Hancock wrote Joe. Have you listened to the cover the Texas Tornados did of it? Real class. That's my kind of music.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 02:07:37 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Been listening to Texas country lately. Link is to a Butch Hancock song. You really need to hear Jimmie Dale do 'Ripple' too.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 01:20:41 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I meant to add that we played the '61 (?) Dianne Brooks record with Robbie on guitar that day.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 00:11:05 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The days of old......or when we were young

You fellows recalling those days put me in mind of my old buddy Red Robinson. Our coming of age days of rock & roll were made memorable and a lot of fun with Red on the radio.

Up the island on our coast Red was the most important part of our rock & roll lives bringing us all that music. I'm pretty sure it was him that introduced me to the "Band" one rainy night driving down this island. When I got to where I could get the radio waves and first heard "The Weight". A great memory.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 21:27:46 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Yes. 2-4 pm Saturday afternoons. Thanks for asking.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 20:17:34 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

2:00 PM EST right?


Entered at Sat Mar 5 18:48:20 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

John D congratulations they finally came to their senses/n Norbert I really like the Waldo story


Entered at Sat Mar 5 17:25:34 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Test: I am listening to CIUT:FM on iTunes stream now

I am listening to CIUT-FM on iTunes stream now. Just enter CIUT radio above and then click on the appropriate area of that site. Easy. No fuss/no bother. Clear. Looking forward to it, John.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 16:16:58 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: CHUM-FM 104.5 Toronto

John D mentioned his early days at CHUM-FM 104.5 in Toronto. I cannot even begin to explain the impact of John, Benji Karsh and David Pritchard on those of us who listened to them in those early days. They brought the first 'indie' (yes they were signed to record companies, I know) idea to the uninitiated and formed a foundation for as yet unheard musicians in Toronto. I distinctly remember the first time I heard Carlos Santana on CHUM-FM. It was the same with many musicians as the new talent was presented thoughtfully and with class. It was an amazing time in radio in Toronto.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 16:00:21 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Big Bad John

Great to hear of your new program John. I for sure am going to try to find it.

The main thing John is that "you" enjoy yourself and savour the opportunity to relive a lot of good times.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 15:57:18 CET 2016 from (86.128.250.27)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Welcome back

Welcome back, J Tull fan.

I saw J Tull in the early 70s in Dundee. The concert was great in that it was innovative and unlike anything else I had seen at that time. I remember the guitarist taking centre stage and playing great stuff.

Only play the greatest hits now. Just too much music.

Last five albums played:

The Basement Tapes

Ry Cooder Bop Till You Drop

Johnny Cash at San Quentin

The Chieftains The World Wide Over

Paul Brady Hooba Dooba


Entered at Sat Mar 5 15:53:36 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Ringling Bros Barnum and Bailey

Subject: The Great Waldo

Bill, of course.

Our dog Waldo was a circus dog ones. He was a star and performed three times a day as The Great Waldo. In his showy glitter costume, he has performed for the rich and famous, Kings, Queens and Presidents. He has seen things a dog isn’t supposed to see. Left him an attitude, we’re his servants not his equals. He’s living in his own world now, missing the applause, he mostly sleeps on his golden pillow dreaming about the past.

In his dreams he still jumps higher than any dog ever did. He was one of the famous Riders of the Wind, flying, his diamante cape fluttering behind him, from one galloping horse to the next in full speed. Had his own presidential suite at the Ringling Bros Barnum and Bailey train.

I look at him now, he’s lying next to me with his diamante collar, but he isn’t with me at the moment. No he’s in that enormous circus tent again, jumping, flying, through the dark arena … 1000V searchlights, the golden scans, pull him out, will he make it? …..the crowd holding its breath…..drums roll…….absolute silence…..this has never been done before….. but just in time he makes it … a safe landing ……pffff…. the crowd goes wild …… standing ovation, people taking pictures, flashlights. ….. The Great Wald did it again, he smiles and bows his head …. with a little attitude, but I can’t blame him. Fly Waldo!


Entered at Sat Mar 5 15:42:48 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: John Donabie on the radio again

John Donabie: I for one am going to try to listen to your show with the streaming you suggest is going to occur. What a great opportunity for all to hear one of the great talents of radio play our music. As you know, I grew up with CIUT-FM and went to school at UofT in the late 60's and early 70's when our music 'came of age'. I purchased MFBP unheard in any way from a bin at the UofT textbook store. The radio station and you are a perfect marriage.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 15:40:15 CET 2016 from (98.244.70.124)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Thanks for the warm welcome back guys. Ben, I rarely have liked any Tull upon the first or even second listen. It's an acquired taste even for a fan like me but perhaps that's why it stays with me so long. I'll dismiss something and 20 years later finally appreciate it. Since they/Ian have explored so many different styles, if I tire of progressive there is the earlier blues period, when I tire of that there is the electric folk phase etc. I hate to admit the Passion Play box set is still on my wish list. Kids, mortgage, etc have severely limited my budget for such things but I do like the outtakes I have heard such as Sailor. I also agree on remixes. Unless they somehow allow the original artist to release the material as originally intended, it is just an arbitrary reflection of some third party's preference.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 13:50:53 CET 2016 from (71.11.132.80)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Subject: Tull

Hey Tull Fan, congrats on the Anderson Photo! That must have been a big moment. I did play that Brick part two but only once. It didn't knock me out but it's probably deserving of more plays, and perhaps some day I will. I found myself responding to the early albums a bit which I formerly was never into. How do you like the big Passion box? Is the Warchild one good? the only thing that sort of bugs me about the former is that the "remix" actually changes some of the material to the overall detriment of the thing. The extras discs sheds light on what he was going for. As with the recent big Dylan dump, I think we see the original choice was best as far as what to use.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 13:50:44 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.5)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Thanks for the brief trip report. Sorry to be missing it - I slept in and didn't hear you knock. Are Kev and Mike getting along?

John D: Good to hear. Ask Ken about the TO soul show I did with him from Village Vinyl a year or so ago.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 13:46:47 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Tull Fan

I'll second Illka and Peter V, welcome back J Tull Fan.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 12:54:16 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Bill M / JT

Bill, you have been so very kind to me; over the years mentioning what my early days at CHUM-FM meant to you. Well buddy....it's going to happen again, one mo' time.

Beginning Saturday March 19th from 2-4 pm I will be back on the air recreating that "format" that you so enjoyed.

CIUT-FM 89.5 wants me to have a "free form" show playing whatever I want and interviewing anyone I want. Never thought I would ever get this opportunity again; in my lifetime. I'm really looking forward to the opportunity. If anyone outside of Toronto wants to hear it you can play the "stream" on either iTunes or Windows Media Player. Thanks Jan for letting me do the plug. THE BAND is back on the radio Bill. And of course Bobby D.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 12:53:00 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: JTull Fan

As always, good to see old familiar names in this gb. I have an anecdote for you.

After I left our school-boy band they became rather succesful. They toured in Sweden which was like Simcoe boys playing in Toronto. "Big time people, big time". When they returned to Finland they took the boat which is mentioned in DOUG SAHM's song. It goes like this:

Helsinki calls me Oslo is far away

Go to Copenhagen, we'll spend the day

Land of the Midnight sun calls for me

Meet me in Stockholm, baby, where we can be free

Meet me in Stockholm, baby, we'll mess around

Take a real slow boat to Helsinki town

When it's over, now you wanna stay

Live your life with me the Scandinavian way.

The thing was that JETHRO TULL came to Finland with the same boat - and oh boys, how fun they must have had together. By that time (60s/70s) rock bands travelled by boat, not by aircrafts. Imagine: two more or less "international" rock bands drinking together on a boat. But not me!!! Poor me who keeps on posting in this lousy forum.

Sorry, now I have to go to WC and cry but don't cry for me, Argentina.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 11:47:28 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Die Götterdämmerung

Subject: Today's Lidl List:

-Kummerspeck (350gr)
-Zwanzig Streichholzschächtelchen
-5x Turschlusspanik (kleine Scheiben)
-2x Backpfeifengesichter (groß)
-Fremdschämen 1kg
-3x Handschuhschneeballwerfer
-1x Goße Treppenwitz (600gr.)


Entered at Sat Mar 5 01:20:45 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

ahh… the Feud.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 23:36:25 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good to see Tullfan. Feuding is lower level now, I think.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 23:32:58 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill, on our little trip in our pink magic bus we’re fine, all of us.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 23:19:41 CET 2016 from (87.144.164.243)

Posted by:

Norbert

Todd, maybe we’ll meet someday.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 22:27:25 CET 2016 from (75.146.18.190)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Ben Pike

Ben, I got tired of the feuding on this site and ultimately Facebook and other sites took the bulk of my time. I check in maybe every 6 months or so here but never post but since you asked about me here I am. I actually got to meet Ian Anderson backstage about a year and a half ago at a charity concert and enjoyed a short discussion with him and walked away with a photo and autograph that I will always know is authentic. Have you checked out his solo Thick As A Brick 2?


Entered at Fri Mar 4 21:15:09 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Cocaine fueled?

Wallsend - I think that was its era for them -


Entered at Fri Mar 4 20:24:59 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.27)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A clip of Rick I hadn't seen before but this site gets a mention in the notes.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 20:02:12 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Tulsa

Joan, I know ... still, why not? The connection between Oklahoma and Guthrie is definitely there, and the foundation wants to attract young people to the area (though the mean age of Dylan fanatics might be a bit of a moot point). It seems to me that with the huge CD release and now this, the man is looking after his legacy. As he should.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 19:34:49 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Lisa

Thank you Tulsa??


Entered at Fri Mar 4 19:05:37 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Wow....Thank you, Tim. A date I usually remember. I also remember exactly where I was when hearing the awful news.

Nice to know also as we have learned in recent years that Richard's family is doing well.

Robbie's thoughts on Richard from a few years ago:

"First met Richard when I was 17. This was months before he joined The Hawks. He liked to laugh more than anyone I knew. He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve... and could sing like Bobby Blue Bland. How can ya beat that? Love him and miss him." - RR


Entered at Fri Mar 4 18:37:35 CET 2016 from (130.64.25.61)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Richard

30 years, hard to believe. Listening to Tears of Rage now.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 17:28:37 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Should have, would have, could have?

Wishful thinking or not, that full collaboration with Robbie never happened. However, Rick and Garth made brief appearances on "Storyville." It was released in 1991 and took four years to make.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 16:47:36 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko 1989

LINKED: LA Times article on Rick....ah, to be able to turn back time and wish that album of his with RR could have been developed and recorded.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:57:44 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Politics (scroll)

Mr. Trump is like Ms. Rosalind Richarson - with an atomic bomb.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 04:11:16 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.1)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Oliver - hotcakes!

Thanks Lisa,

These days, any mention of Woody Guthrie makes me think of Woody's longtime friend Eddie Albert. How much of Jeb and Hank Kimbal (not to mention Arnold) came from their share yout' in Oklahoma?


Entered at Fri Mar 4 01:16:41 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.10)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: thanks for your post. FWiW, Kasich comes across to me as the adult in the room. An impressive adult too. Like always I waver between hoping the 'opposition' chooses a total dickhead who will repel voters to 'my' side and hoping they choose the most sensible candidate, lest they win.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:57:04 CET 2016 from (58.104.5.205)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Lisa, these are happy days for Dylan fans. Thanks for the link.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:39:30 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan

Wow! This is amazing. Ian, you'll love this!


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:55:28 CET 2016 from (98.110.36.106)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Politics

I don't see any reason not to have a discussion about Politics here. Just like any topic that comes up, if someone doesn't have any interest, they can scroll by.

In my view both Trump and Cruz would have a very difficult time winning a general election. I think that Rubio or Kasich would be more competitive. That being said, the idea of Trump being the Republican nominee is pretty terrifying.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:35:46 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Kasich

First let me say I can not vote for anyone; as I live north of the border. As someone who lives north of the border, I don't think I can ever remember; in my lifetime; being this frightened about the top 3 Republicans running for office. The only person that appears to be really bright and knowlegable and quite Presidential is John Kasich. He doesn't get a lot of attention in American Media. The top 3 literally just scare the hell out of me.

And by the way Rosalind if your up to being criticized. You say Bernie Sanders is a socialist/communist. Only some....let me repeat....only some Americans marry the words together. Totally different Rosalind. We have socialist healthcare in Canada; but we are indeed a true democracy. I think Peter V would agree as well for England. Read up on your definitions my dear.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:25:23 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Margo Price

PV - She's getting a good bit of recognition here now. There's a thorough review in the Feb 2 New Yorker and she appeared on Colbert's Late Show in January -


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:23:57 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ian W

Ian tried to send you an email this morning a number of times; with something I think you would really like. Trying to reach you failed every time. I was able to get in touch with you in the past.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:10:19 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: On music …Margo Price

Is Margo Price getting the stellar reviews in the USA that she is in the UK? It's ahead of her album "Midwest Farmer's Daughter" due next week from Third Man records. It's very country country so a little atypical of Third Man, although Jack White produced Loretta Lynn. There are a few songs up on YouTube.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:23:02 CET 2016 from (173.108.231.224)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Strange bedfellows

I used to do it myself and mix it up with Roz etc, but there are a lot of places online to talk politics now, I think you are just courting bad feeling if you do it on the Band room. And for a music related references to Roz, our big W supporter: I will forever be proud that The Band's one political endorsement was for Jimmy Carter. So, any other Band fans into Tull's "A Passion Play?"


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:53:01 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hmm... Not according to the most recent polls

Jeff A - They show that Hillary beats Trump pretty easily. But she ties Cruz and Rubio beats her by 3. Bernie beats all 3.

So, although it's corrupt journalism, I wish the media would hold fire a bit on Trump now and save their big stuff for when he's up against Hillary.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:45:44 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.128)

Posted by:

Jed C

Location: The Hills of Beverly

Whoo-wee, look at that PV boy cipher!


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:43:10 CET 2016 from (67.87.216.156)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Actually JQ, while i doubt Trump can beat Hilary, & know he can't beat Bernie, there was no chance of Cruz or Rubio beating Hilary. While I'm still uncertain of Trump's actual intent, he is the only present Repub in the running that might have any shot at beating Hilary. While I'd like to think he doesn't, he appeals to so many of the truly simple minded, angry, ignorant mindset. He's the political equivalent of the lunatic with a keyboard & internet connection. It's impossible to shut him up, & he has no morals,& no qualms about lying, stating untruths, to accomplish his goal & be the loudest in the room.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:31:27 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Trump sucks, but...

PV and our pals to the North - Trump is bad, but possibly better than you think. You really need to look at Cruz and Rubio; Trump really is better than those 2; he remains the best of the worst.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 15:27:20 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Whoops! You can see why I struggled with maths. Sorry, 55.8%. I think.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 15:09:57 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

34.2% of Republicans voted for Trump. That means 65.8% didn't.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 14:21:23 CET 2016 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Delegates, primaries and caucuses

I have been studying the delegate/primary/caucus system of the USA for the past few days. I had never really understood how it worked. I now get it (I think). It is very different. Until the convention, despite what the media tell us, there are many things which can happen to result in the final candidate for each party. Ultimately, given the convoluted system that exists, it comes down to mathematics. To be the candidate of choice and be the likely nominee, the candidate has to have collected through the primaries and caucuses of the individual states a certain number of delegates. If he/she does not, then at the convention, a 'brokered convention' may occur wherein all delegates are freed of their commitments and deals can be made and anything can happen. This latter event occurs uncommonly (last time: apparently 1952). I suggest that anyone interested spend some time studying this since this puts the media hype into some perspective.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 23:47:10 CET 2016 from (65.94.48.32)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Strange days

From a neighbour. Strange days when there is a vacuum and leadership is required. It has always been a troubled world full of discord and animosity. Fear and vulgarity are front and centre now and their propagation is winning the day. Shame! Someone needs to step up and stop this madness.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 23:35:52 CET 2016 from (158.69.112.86)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Aren't you all Sanders fans? You're voting for a socialist/communist and you say America ISN'T gone? And to have Viney spout up, a Brit ! Come on, your country and all it's people fell without a shot. At least the majority of America is willing to fight to be independent. And isn't that Northwest she/he or whatever and whoever they might be, did they used to parade around here acting like some seafarer person with a wife and a boat? And now he can't speeky Englishy? Typical of the ilk of this pathetic place. The Band should be ashamed of it's fans if they're all like you.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 22:53:46 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"America is lost anyway"? Really? Tell that to the Greeks or Macedonians or Syrians or Iraqis or Afghanis or Somalis or the residents of Calais. In the words of Eddie Cochran, "Man, it looks like heaven to me!"


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:33:07 CET 2016 from (67.222.152.241)

Posted by:

Mike

Location: Homsapien
Web: My link

Subject: Shiiiit

Spam me


Entered at Wed Mar 2 18:50:14 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Roz - "America is lost anyway"

Hopefully... at least in the aspects that she/he loves.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 14:43:15 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Responses

Thank you for that Jerry. I really enjoyed his slide work on one of my favourite songs. That was a great little show Colin was putting on. He plays his own slide on that guitar made of steel, (particularly on the song, "I just came back"). That really cooks.

I'm just out the door. Rebuilding the log booming ground in Port Hardy. In this weather it is no fun.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 12:23:06 CET 2016 from (65.94.48.32)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Chris Caddell

Norm: That is Chris Caddell, a Toronto musician, who you is playing with Colin James in that video of 2011. He's been around for a while and has some solid credentials according to what I've read since you asked the question.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 10:39:43 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I assume NW Coaster was commenting mildly and politely on the vehemence of your references to your elected President, a man generally held in high esteem in Europe.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 09:51:52 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Answer to Rosalind

There was a point in your latest political opinion but there was - in my mind - hatred in your use of language.

Because I am not native speaker I encourage even other gbers to ask clarifications.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 05:48:52 CET 2016 from (91.213.8.84)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Subject: My Latest Opinion

NorthWestCoaster - Where in my latest post is "the hatred" you spoke of me spouting? Tell me where. I deserve some an answer to that simple question.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 02:32:59 CET 2016 from (64.229.180.125)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno
Web: My link

Kevin J: Thanks for passing along the sad news of Jack Geisinger's (aka Jack August) passing. Very weird timing, as the last thing I looked at online yesterday was Wikipedia's entry for 'Rock Opera', in which the attached 'mini-opera' by Jack's old group Influence was mentioned.

I believe that the only time I saw him play was when he was in Luke and the Apostles in the summer of '70 or '71. I've always loved the only record with Jack in the lineup - see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unhHMbVuLS0 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwhUMwACz3k



Entered at Wed Mar 2 01:43:13 CET 2016 from (174.155.34.120)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Passion is no ordinary word

Whatever happened to Jethro Tull Fan? Political lightweight that he was, he was indeed true to his favorite group and very knowledgeable about them.

I've always been hot and cold on them in a somewhat surprising fashion, mostly liking the tuneful acoustic stuff best. Yet I never warmed to "Songs From The Wood" and my favorite was the much dissed "Thick as a Brick Follow up "A Passion Play."

It's been out for a couple of years now but I finally got around to shelling out for the beautiful two disc two CD boxed set (there is one for "War Child" also) and it just came in the mail. Beautiful set to look at, anyway, and if this Play is your Passion, you have been well served.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 18:26:51 CET 2016 from (76.69.45.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bill M: Not sure if you knew but I was just told by an old friend in Montreal that Jack August died in November. Lovely guy and a fine musician, as you know.

LINKED: My favourite Moonquake song.


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