The Band
Home

History
Members
Library
Discography
Videography
Filmography
Pictures
Audio files
Video clips
Tape archive
Concerts
Related artists
Merchandise
Guestbook
Chat Room
What's New?
Search

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, December 2010


Entered at Fri Dec 31 23:22:19 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Happy New Year / Procol Harum

Happy New Year all. May good fortune continue to those who've had a great 2010 and may it significantly improve for those that have not!

Bobby Harrison, sacked from PH in the "great clearout" of 1967, went on to form Freedom and later Snafu. Because of his sacking. no great surprise that he was Matthew Fisher's best buddy throughout the WSoP credits trial! Truth be told, you only had to listen to "Pilgrim's Progress" off A Salty Dog to hear all the little bits of colour, nuances of touch etc and you'd have found in his favour too!

But was justice really done? After all, I spoke of style not composition. Levon added as much to UOCC as Fisher did to WSoP and we know the outcome of that one. Even more so considering that for Matthew Fisher to claim credits for his contributions is technically futile given that they were all bits of Bach...

Anyway - Mr Harrison. I played with Bobby for a bit in the early part of the millenium and it really was a case of "never a dull moment". A real chancer! "Can you lend us a fiver for a bottle of Scotch?" after the manager had already been down the supermarket for beers and nibbles..scamming his local country club for rehearsal space. This moved onto a local pub who were promised a free gig after rehearsals were finished. When Mick the manager and I returned from yet another sausage rolls/beers run we found Bobby setting up a little table in the doorway between the main body of the pub and the back room we were in. He had even commandeered a cake tin and the "specials" food blackboard. It read "MUSICIANS WORKSHOP. Spectators welcome - £1 each"!!! The cake tin was for the door money....

Bobby has God now - I gather he's really looking to his health too, and no bad thing. But Bobby Harrison...God...Bobby Harrison...God. No, can't make sense of it.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 23:07:47 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.220)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: A Year Ending Story

When you have the brute force of a Mike Tyson you don't need to be as careful or have the technical skills and savy of an Ali. The CIA with its Tyson tools made many errors on the road to Dallas, none more amazing than the airplane ride taken by US Air Force Sgt,( NORAD) Robert G Vinson.

Vinson, who was in Washington on personal business took a bus to Andrews Air Force Base Nov22, 63 hoping to hitch a ride back to Colorado Springs. He was told by the airman at the check in that there was nothing scheduled but if he wanted to hang around he might catch a lift later.

Vinson hears his name called and the airman tells him thre's a plane leaving for Lowery Air Force Base in Denver. He grabs his bag and heads for the plane on the runway and boards.

The plane is a C-54 cargo plane with no military markings or numbers just a rust brown graphic of an egg-shaped earth, with white grid marks, on the plane's tail.

Nobody is on the plane when he boards but soon after two men in olive green, coveralls with no markings board, say nothing to Vinson, and enter the cockpit and the plane leaves.

As the plane is flying west an announcement is made over the intercom that the president was shot at 12:29 and the plane changes course and starts heading south.

At 3:30 pm Central time Vinson sees the skyline of Dalas, a city he is familiar with.

The plane lands on a rough sandy runway beside The Trinity River. One of the pilots opens the passenger door and two men climb in without saying anything and sit right behind the cockpit. One man is a large Latino and the other a smaller thin caucasian man.n The plane flies away and eventually lands at another base which Vinson assumes is Lowery. The two pilots and the two men who got on in Dallas hurry off the plane and once again Vinson is alone on the plane like he'd been at Andrews where the plane had left from.

He gets off the plane and walks across the tarmac to building with lights on inside. There is only one guy there, an Air Policeman. When Vinson asks him where he is the cop tells him, Roswell Air Force Base, New Mexico.

Later that weekend when he sees Lee Harvey Oswald on TV, he tells his wife, that guy got on the plane I came home on, in Dallas.

Like I said, when you have the brute force of a Mike Tyson you can survive mistakes like that.

Happy New Year To One And All!


Entered at Fri Dec 31 20:53:02 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Happy 2011

Nice message, Lars. The same to you and the whole GB community of fans of The Band. Peace and love to you all.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 20:32:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Happy New Year

Link is to The Unthanks doing the Northumbrian song for New Year, "Tar Barrel In Dale."


Entered at Fri Dec 31 20:27:38 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: All the best for 2011

I wish all of the GB community a good and "prosperous" (as Rick used to say) new year. Never let yourself be daunted; may you all stay forever young.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 20:20:39 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Happy New Year

My Dad used to like to use the expression "Far be it from me". All this "thus was" conversation reminded me.

I want to wish everyone a Happy New Year. May you all be safe and healthy in the new year.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 20:01:08 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

HAPPY NEW YEAR, JAN & "THE GB." WISHING YOU A WONDERFUL 2011!


Entered at Fri Dec 31 19:52:11 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Happy New Year

Like all great bands, Procol Harum was never the same after the 'Whiter Shade of Pale' songwriting credits fiasco. A group is either a collaborative effort or it's not. But they have a strong legacy. They captured a sense of place and time in the 1960's, but like many great bands of the 60's who evoked the era, their distinctive sound kind of kept them locked there, as if in a time capsule.

Happy New Year!


Entered at Fri Dec 31 19:31:16 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Happy New Year GB folks.Be well. Tom


Entered at Fri Dec 31 16:46:21 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Happy New Year everyone.

My wife and I went to see The King's Speech last night - what a great film. See it if you can.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 16:05:41 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: What's up Doc? 2011

Best wishes to one and all for a Happy Year of the Rabbit.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 15:49:08 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy New Year, Dlew. I just realized you're now a year ahead of us. Right, resolutions tomorrow.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 15:03:47 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Happy New Year!

Peter V.'s story about the single signed by Gary Brooker et al reminded me of the joke of the two guys talking. One says to the other 'I was cleaning out this shed, and one of the things I found was this cruddy old Bible in German. It was really old - by Guten - somehting... useless.'

the other guy says 'What! was it Gutenberg?'

'Yeah - that was it!'

'You idiot! That was a Gutenberg Bible - priceless! You've probably thrown away 20 000 000 dollars, minimum '

the first guy looks at him and says 'Nah - some fool by the name of Martin Luther had scribbled all over it'

And because it's New YEar, and laughter should be a part of the New Year...

a man finds an old painting and an old violin in his attic. Curious, he takes them down to the shop to have them appraised.

The shop owner rings him up and says, "well, I've had them fully appraised, and have good news and bad news.'

'Ok - give me the good news!'

'Well, there's absolutely no doubt you're in possession of an original Stradivarius, and an original Michelangelo.'

'That's fantastic! What's the bad news?'

'Well, how do I put this delicately? ... Stradivarius wasn't much of a painter... '

I'll stop there...

Happy New Year everyone!


Entered at Fri Dec 31 14:21:11 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.220)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: New Years; The Last Under Exploited Event Of The Year

Does anyone here actually count down the end of the year( out loud)?

The retailers of the world should lobby to have either New Years or Christmas moved several months away from the other.

If Christmas was in June it opens up the possibility of fashioning New Years into a gift giving occasion, as well. 6 months would be enough time for most shoppers to get their Christmas charges paid off and be ready for another go at the malls Remember, anything we can do for the economy should be done. It's why we're on the planet.

There could be some world wide sporting event, as the uniting celebratory focus. Something more festive and longer lasting than counting backwards from 10 to 1. Probably the excitement of a globally ( time delayed for each time zone) televised golf game would be fitting as an expression of the importance of the event.The match shouldn't start til after the count down if we want people to still be conscious at the stroke of midnight. READY, 10, 9, 8 , 7 , 6, 5 , 4 , 3, 2,.....


Entered at Fri Dec 31 11:52:34 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: PH

As per PV, Keith Reid IS a bit odd, if the evidence is anything to go by. Lyricists are not all like Robert Hunter sadly - many are like Keith Reid or Pete Sinfield. The latter of course was dispensed with when Bob Fripp rang him up to say "I have ceased to believe in you".

An therein hangs PHs eternal drama for me - the absolute monopoly of Keith Reid which caused the departure of Matthew Fisher at least - when Gary Brooker ought really to have made it clear that there would be material from others too. All the times the others did offer anything it tended to be backing material for a Reid lyric.

Pat, I have often mulled over the merits of PH and there are many - the five piece with two keyboards and one guitar format obviously being the Band connection, and basic sound (Tears of Rage could almost be a cut from the first PH album, couldn't it!) - but the gulf widens as The Band get closer to the bone (2nd LP and Stage Fright) while PH become a progressive rock act (for want of a better expression; I know it is not ideal) with the kind of lyricist that was great in 1967 but a bit of an anachronism as the seventies dawned and unfolded. Add to that some chronic instability from the departure of first Fisher and Knights, then Trower until the Grabham/Cartwright period and you can see why the albums after Broken Barricades fall wide of the mark for many.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 10:39:58 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pat, you were quicker than Visconti. I just checked his autobiography. He says:

I bravely asked Keith Reid (a scary, laconic character) what the title (In Held 'Twas In I) meant and he candidly told me that each word in the title was the first word in each of the five songs in the suite … stupid me!



Entered at Fri Dec 31 09:45:09 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Magdalene (My Regal Zonophone)

In fact, Pat, your praise of Procul Harum led me to explore them further … as you know their chart success in the UK stalled after Homburg, and only "Salty Dog" sold well as an LP.

I've often wondered if it had anything to do with switching labels straight after A Whiter Shade of Pale. They switched from Decca's Deram label to EMI's Regal Zonophone. This had been basically the Salvation Army label at EMI, featuring The Joy Strings, their early 60s Happy Clappy group. Then EMI got Cordell & Visconti on board and suddenly decided to use Regal Zonophone as a "progressive" label by putting The Move, Procul Harum and (later) Joe Cocker on it. PH even worked it into a song title. I think the switch was because of Regal Zonophone's inflated name dating back to the 1920s and ornate logos, which suited the summer of love. McCartney chose to put the Percy Thrillington LP on Regal Zonophone for the same reason, I think. An amusingly named label.

The other thing on PH was a record collector thing. I found a copy of Poison Ivy by The Paramounts. The guy at the record fair had it in the 50p box. It's not a hugely valuable single … about £10 in good condition … but still cheap at 50p. The guy said "It's worth a tenner, but someone's scribbled all over the sleeve." I bought it, got home and looked at the "scribble" to see the names Gary Brooker, B.J. Wilson and Robin Trower autographed on it.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 06:51:08 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

"In Held Twas In I" contains the first word from each vocal segment.

I used to get into discussions here about the relative merits of Procol Harum, but I've come to realize it's useless.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 06:49:10 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rob the ...........

OK......Rob, when I get my hands on you, I'm gonna chew your ears off right down to yer belt buckle you little Limey............


Entered at Fri Dec 31 05:42:16 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: In Held Twas In I

David, apparently this was nothing more than rearranging the original (so don't bother checking it because only 'Twas and one of the In's remains; some of them obviously got changed!) intended names for the five segments of the piece.

I must confess I love the opening triple threat of Quite Rightly So, the title track and Skip Softly M M then lose interest halfway through the aptly named Rambling On and have given up long before the oddly-monikered suite we have spoken of.


Entered at Fri Dec 31 00:40:02 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: What Legacy will you leave.....Or.....Does it matter

My all time favourite guitar player, and one of my favourite singers doing something really worth while.

Obviously a respect for each others work......and.....I feel like goin' home.

The very best in this next year to allu yuz and I hope we all have many more healthy and happy ones, and as always, a little more peace in the world. My family will be here in a couple of hours and I hope you all enjoy the end of this year as much as I will.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 22:17:26 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sources of music … with three cars in the family, we're up to eight (radio & CD in each, but oldest one has cassette too and one has an iPod connection with iPod) without even coming indoors. I have a room full of old computers, cassette players, walkmen, discmen, radios … I'd bet it passes thirty, and I haven't counted the piano, the old electronic keyboard or the eight tuned whistles we got in a set of Christmas crackers this year (with instructions for eight people to play Three Blind Mice etc).


Entered at Thu Dec 30 21:44:18 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rory stewart

I've never heard of him. I Googled and recognized his photo as someone I've vaguely seen on TV. Well below my radar. He looks like a wanker to me.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 21:10:51 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: For the diserning frivoulous farmer

Awright youze guys. How many sources of music does each of yuz have......an don't bullshit. TV,Stereo, IPods Discman, car systems, computers......huh?? This is getting a little crazy.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 20:43:08 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.177)

Posted by:

Steve

Web: My link


Entered at Thu Dec 30 20:32:55 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Who put the bop in the bop shubopshubop???

I really wanna know.......BABY!


Entered at Thu Dec 30 20:18:35 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: "For the knowing is much harder and the going's getting rough..."

Rob: Sadly, Shakespeare and many other important subjects are currently neglected in our schools.

Equally challenging is figuring out what Keith Reid meant with "In Held 'Twas In I" :-).

--"For the sin of self-indulgence when the truth was writ quite clear"


Entered at Thu Dec 30 19:48:54 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Oh dear. Any country that adopts English as a native tongue and then can't cope with the odd "ever thus" chucked into conversation (would that it were not so!) ought to sack all members of the teaching profession - from junior school upwards to the very top - and start again*.

Hey, think of it as a time saver: look how quickly "ever thus" can be written in place of "always like that". The lazy man always finds the best solution.

(*start again: similar to "start over" except that it actually makes sense and doesn't sound at worst wrong or at best ambiguous. Lennon most definitely fell from grace on that one)...



Entered at Thu Dec 30 19:45:54 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: And the Talking Heads sang "Same as it ever was"...

Ever thus, one could be even more stilted and use the Latin equivilent "sic semper". Such was favored by the famous assassins Brutus and John Wilkes Booth, who uttered the phrase "sic semper tyrannis" (thus always to tyrants). Fans of the Coen brothers films will no doubt recall the variation used in one of the notable lines from "The Big Lebowski" -- "Ever thus to deadbeats, Lebowski" delivered by a thug as he urinated on the Dude's (Jeff Bridges) rug.

Just thought I'd keep the humourous vein going for westcoaster.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 19:04:39 CET 2010 from (166.205.140.189)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rory Stewart MP

Peter V - I don't believe this guy is well known here yet - is he a real PM contender down the road? How come he's a Tory? I read a short article that placed him as a Lawrence of Arabia & Richard Branson type: the well- bred & charismatic adventurer. It seems he has good populist pull and uses those type of political tactics. Will he pass the wanker test?

Are you a fan?


Entered at Thu Dec 30 18:39:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Impotent!

Good example David. Well OK Peter....you asked for it. I recall some where back there relating this incident. While in court one day (I had to take a construction contractor to court and kick him in the nuts. He owed me way too much money for too long for moving his equipment.) So I went in early and sat thru a couple of cases to see what kind of mood the judge was in and how he was handling things. He was a nice man. During one case a woman was on the stand giving evidence. Obviously quite nervous she was using big words obviously some what difficult to her.

To make her relax, the judge stopped her and said "Don't use dollar words when nickel ones will do. I understand you fine." I thought, good advise at times speaking that way to people can give the appearance of "talking down" to them.

Now on the subject of impotence. Rastus & Mandy were for some time trying to have a child, with no success. Mandy finally went to a doctor to find she was fertile and fine. She tried to get Rastus to go, to which he defiantly declined. She finally talked him into it by withholding his manly rights.

So off goes Rastus early one morning to the doctor. He's gone all day, and finally in late afternoon arrives home. He has on a new purple velvet jacket, pink silk shirt, white tie and a big new Panama hat. Hands on hips Mandy says RASTUS! what ever is you doin' with all those new clothes. He stands tall, squares his shoulders and says that doctor says I is impotent, and when you is impotent you gots to dress impotent!


Entered at Thu Dec 30 18:02:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Cliches. "Twas ever thus" = "It was ever thus" = "It was always like that." I'm annoyed with myself. It's the sort of stupid cliche beloved of rock magazines, but not as bad as "it failed to trouble the charts" which is awful rock journalese for it wasn't a hit. You can read it several times in every issue. But Twas ever thus with cliches.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 17:51:52 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

westcoaster: Try imaging Willie Nelson singing "ever thus on my mind." It don't sound right, does it?


Entered at Thu Dec 30 17:27:22 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Not at all Rock & Roll

What-a-hell does "ever thus" mean Peter?

Loreena McKennitt, I have never heard before. Just surfed across a channel where a live show of hers is playing. She has the voice of an angel. A Canadian gal.......they call her music, "world celtic". Very relaxing and peaceful.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 16:18:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Magazines were ever thus. I think back to Chris Welch and how he continually supported the same select band of prog artists in Melody Maker. Yes. Yes. Yes. Since then, each mag has had its favourites … Uncut does Americana incessantly (probably why I read it). I've been going off Mojo and leaning more towards The Word / Uncut. In fact the one I open with the greatest pleasure is "Record Collector" (which has a lot more than just record collecting)


Entered at Thu Dec 30 15:26:53 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Peter's comments on celebrity adoption/other tacky events that won't go away

Peter, totally agree on adoption as celebrity trinket...Louis Vuitton handbag, then a Mali baby. I don't like the film much - certainly not as funny as Borat - but in "Bruno" the old punchlines of "I swapped him for an iPod" and "I gave him a traditional African name....OJ!" seem to ring ever more true.

On a different facet of "backslapping", I whittled down a pile of MOJO magazines that were scattered in twos and threes around the house to make a "master pile" for sorting through. Naturally, were it time for a cup of tea and a smoke, I would bring one or two to the table and have a flick through.

Now, is it me or does there seem to be some kind of identical (looking) MOJO awards in what appears to be every second or third issue? Same old faces too - Richard Hawley seemingly being the most disgraceful and shameless in the "opening of a pair of curtains" stakes. Paloma Faith, members of Kasabian, Jimmy Page. Every time. Oh, and one of those Tinarawarawararawarwawen type Toureg bands. And Tony Christie, I know you can blame Peter Kay for this unwelcome resurgence, but MOJO really ought not ot encourage him further.

I still buy these mags for a read of the albums but I do tire of the "ram it home" technique they take on certain acts that I have tried and not liked at all - Guillemots, Arcade Fire, Antony and the poxy Johnsons and (quite fun but at best pub-quality) Hold Steady. Far better seems to be the bands they speak well of but don't trumpet: Midlake, Avi Buffalo, Grand Drive (Now Danny Wilson solo), Fleet Foxes. Maybe I just pulled out several copies that happened to have an awards do featured. But they do seem to get trotted out very frequently.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 11:04:58 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought the story about Elton John trying to adopt an HIV-positive baby last year was good. A great use of his money, and he’s supported the child since being refused permission. Good for him. BUT I find this whole surrogate stuff more than a bit sick. Children come into the world as people, not as accessories with lists of celebrities fighting to be godparents. There are plenty of children out there who need the help without the surrogacy thing. What does that do to the mother’s mental health? And whatever they say now, it’s obvious the day-to-day care of this child will be farmed out to “staff.” To me it has the whiff of sentimental role-play. You’re talking about a new person, not some designer dog for Christmas. Yuk.


Entered at Thu Dec 30 07:00:22 CET 2010 from (74.74.233.128)

Posted by:

Dave H

Of course, "Levon" is also the name of a 1971 song by Elton John with lyrics by Bernie Taupin. He must really like the name. At least he didn't name the kid "Rocket Man"...


Entered at Thu Dec 30 06:47:23 CET 2010 from (24.76.196.211)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: close to the floor in Toronto

I watched the Classic Albums DVD on _The Band_ not long ago, and I couldn't get enough of a segment where Garth improvises for a little bit while he drawls his own colour commentary. It's always fun to watch him play, clearly transported by the music, his head swaying inches from the keyboard(s) while his fingers crawl among the keys like spiders from Mars.

I was struck by the resemblance the other day when I caught a PBS doc about (in)famous Canuckistanian classical piano genius Glenn Gould -- the hunched posture, the arachnid fingers . . . .

There was some testimony in the doc about GG's days at the Toronto Conservatory, where he studied under a prof (Guerrero?) who also favoured a low seat.

Garth talks somewhere about studies at the TC, but I never took that to mean he spent time in the building -- some of my sibs took piano with the TC syllabus as well, I always figured it was like a franchise deal, with accredited examiners if not teachers.

Some interesting guitars at [My link], might be the next big collector craze . . . .


Entered at Thu Dec 30 03:37:42 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: baby names

Elton John and his civil partner have announced the birth of their son Zachary Jackson LEVON Furnish-John. The emphasis is mine.

Elton has always let people know of his admiration for Levon/


Entered at Thu Dec 30 00:16:38 CET 2010 from (68.198.45.0)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: final word

The fabs would have been much better off with D-28s than those J-160s, too, IMHO. Still besides poor equipment choices, ONE HELL OF A BAND !!!


Entered at Thu Dec 30 00:04:11 CET 2010 from (68.198.45.0)

Posted by:

Gene

Web: My link

Subject: Helter Skelter @ 27 min 11 sec

Damn, David, did Pauly play his Casino on that version, too? George had the good taste to play Les Pauls and SGs, at least, too, maybe more Gibsons?


Entered at Wed Dec 29 21:08:37 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.130)

Posted by:

Steve

David, Ford is to the Warren Commission what Oswald was to the assassination, a distraction from what was more important.

Allen Dulles, the head of the CIA, fired by Kennedy after he tried to force Kennedy's hand in Cuba, was the guy who should have been more of a focus of media attention when it came to the commission, than Ford. BUt Ford was such a juicy distraction. Incredible that LBJ, put Dulles in a position to be able to direct the inquiry into the murder he may have had a hand in. LBJ knew that because of a briefing he received from J Edgar on his first morning in office that concerned the CIA's involvement with Oswald in Mexico in the weeks leading up to the murder.

In Lucien S Vandenbroucke's 2007 article, Confessions Of Allen Dulles, a handwritten note by Dulles reads, " That little Kennedy, he thought he was a god."


Entered at Wed Dec 29 20:29:52 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: From Nuclear Fallout Shelters to Helter Skelter

And for our resident conspiracy theorist, there's one Gerald R. Ford, America's only president who was never elected to any office higher than the U.S. Congress. As a member of the Warren Commission investigating the Kennedy assassination, he kept J. Edgar Hoover at the FBI informed of the Commission's every move. In a strange twist of irony, he would later pardon the man that Kennedy defeated earlier. Ford himself survived two different assassination attempts, both by women, one of whom was Squeaky Fromme of the Manson family.

(Paul McCartney reportedly played his Epiphone Casino on "Helter Skelter", tying things in with a current music topic.)


Entered at Wed Dec 29 20:06:32 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Best song (found) 2010 - North Korea Incinerated?

I never bothered to look when the song on this page came out,what year I mean. I just hadn't paid it no mind until Amanda came up and made me listen. I don't have the time to take when ashore to listen to much new material and review it anymore. I have plenty of music stored every where that I enjoy. But watch this clip a little, and if you listen to the words it's not hard to relate to.

Speculating about North Korea could be an entire waste of time the way things are looking. You think those Korean people are not fool hardy enough or crazy enough to start "nookin" each other?? Don't ever kid yourself.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 19:56:19 CET 2010 from (91.42.239.50)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: catching up
Web: My link

Subject: The Book of Love & North Korea

Peter, just listened to The Book of Love (link), that's the way I want to grow old too. Maybe we should buy a house in France again, anyway thanks.

Steve, a little late, but I agree with you on North Korea, that's my idea too.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 19:55:16 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: George W. Bush, Mark Twain and Keith Richards walk into a bookstore...

And they all find themselves at the top of the N.Y. Times nonfiction bestseller list (at 1, 3 & 4 respectively). One should note that one is living, one is dead, and the other can quote the dead one by saying "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated."


Entered at Wed Dec 29 19:19:32 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.130)

Posted by:

Steve

David, judging by some of the subject lines you write I know you appreciate cryptic headlines. So here's the one the scathing, anti-Kennedy, unsigned editorial in Forbes was headed by; Steel; The Ides Of April. My goodness that almost sounds like a threat, in print.

I hadn't thought much about the JFK murder since reading some of the early books about the subject that were written far too soon, before most of the facts have been released, to be of much value and probably helped the people who were trying to cover up the murder by introducing more misinformation into the story.

It truly is incredible that arguably the most important murder in the 20th century, parts of which were caught on film and TV has no official version that is accepted by anyone.

When the government's account is the subject of ridicule on Seinfeld what are you left with?

If you like stories, and who doesn't, the whole year long lead up to the murder is better than most of what Hollywood screen writers produce.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 19:15:03 CET 2010 from (32.177.106.115)

Posted by:

JQ

Peter V - I'm totally with you on his The Book Of Love, I think it's a perfect song.

I haven't heard anything else on your list except the Ry Cooder/Chieftans deal. How do you manage so much new listening? Because of my programming duties I'm mostly stuck into one genre now; I think that can happen when you make a job out of something you love, eh?

Elvis C & Ry Cooder keep trying to create something new, inexhaustibly it seems, and often now in collaboration with others. They've been prolific and had hits & misses in the last decade, but I think they normally get something original & worthwhile achieved. Perhaps they should make record together - and hire Nick Lowe as their singer.

Ry Cooder toured Europe/Australia recently with his drummer son & NL and there's clips from that on You Tube. I think I would take Ry's Chavez Ravine as my favorite of the decade from him. Although that one is a hometown thing for me and I'm likely not too objective.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 18:06:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Unthanks

Sorry, it's "Tar barrel in Dale"


Entered at Wed Dec 29 18:02:47 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Business as Usual - Lucy

AAAAaaah....HA....HA! That was perfect David.....David, I'm ashamed of you. In these ramblings of BB King's Lucille I was sure you would mention Albert King's "Lucy". I believe those Flying V's of Albert's were know as Lucy long before BB King's Lucille.

It took me a long time to get used to those guitars. They just didn't look right to me. As Billy Gibbons had that one made for Albert for his 65th birthday, there is also one carved on the corner of his head stone.

Wilf Warkentin, my friend who is the best guitar player I've seen or worked with, for years played an Ibanez Flying V. Now a lot of people will frown on them. Wilf played that thing thru a "Lab Series" amp, which Albert King at one time used. Wilf used a foot volume pedal. He could make that guitar sound exactly like a steel guitar, (long before anyone else was ever using volume control for that purpose.) All of a sudden a mood would strike him and you'd swear you were listening to Albert King.

I am a lousy guitar player! My biggest problem is "clinching" my left hand to tight. I've tried many times to consentrate on relaxing it more. Consequently, you cannot believe the amount of times I've had to have fretts dressed on guitars I've kept a long time. A good player like Wilf, that Flying V of his the fretts after 20 years still looked new. His attack on those strings was so soft and smooth.

On the subject of power struggles amoung companies David was explaining, (Gibson & Epiphone). You just buy up the competition and then down grade them. Well with Ibanez, and that company goes back as far as 1908 building guitars and importing from the Ibanez Salvador Company in Spain, until the Spanish civil war destroyed the factory there. Then Ibanez were built in Japan. They then entered a partnership with an American company. In the 70's there is what was known as the Ibanez lawsuit period. When the Japanese company then secured in the USA, settled with the parent Gibson company for copying guitars.

The whole point of this is, the copies were too good. They were very good guitars. If not, who would have bought them, and it wouldn't have mattered. This whole discussion we've been having over guitars is just a good example of the big business power struggles over market and control.

I've got to go and rest up today. Tomorrow I am flooded with cars full of kids and grandkids, (Grandpa's is the place to be on New Years eve) There is all these little folks on my bar stools bellied up to the bar in the music room. Their glasses filled with root beer and ginger ale raising all kinds of hell and telling the stories of Christmas.......life is good......I'm a lucky man.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 17:26:32 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tracks of My Years

We did best albums. As New Year approaches, let’s refine it to best tracks. This brings in a few which aren’t from my “Top Ten Albums.” It has a number of December entries. Easy to sample on iTunes. I couldn’t get below twelve. Three have Band connections.

1 This Bitter Earth – Dinah Washington / Max Richter. Mixed together for “Shutter Island” OST, produced by Robbie Robertson. Best track of the year.

2 Equestrienne – Natalie Merchant from “Leave Your Sleep.”

3 Shaky – The Duke & The King, from “Long Live The Duke & The King.” I’ve only had it ten days. The notes thank Levon Helm Studios.

4 Sweet Baby James (live) – Carole King & James Taylor from Live at the troubadour. Worth it for the introduction alone.

5 The Book of Love – Peter Gabriel. Still not as good as the Magnetic Fields original, but a great version from “Scratch My Back.” Most of the album didn’t work as well as this.

6 Tar Barrow in Dale – The Unthanks. Only discovered two weeks ago. On constant replay throughout Christmas.

7 The Sands of Mexico – Ry Cooder with The Chieftains from “San Patricio”. A decent album but this track is head and shoulders above the rest of it.

8 Tennessee – Harper Simon from “Harper Simon.” Very hard to tell it’s not dad.

9 Out of The Blue- Mary Margaret O’Hara, from “Garth Hudson Presents A Canadian Celebration of The Band.”

10 Comin’ Up Easy – Paolo Nuttini. I found this well after it was a UK #1.

11 The Like In I Love You – Brian Wilson. From Gershwin Reimagined.

12 Sweet Soul Vibe – Steve Miller Band (Steve Milliband). The only track I like on “Bingo!”.



Entered at Wed Dec 29 16:58:53 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: humour for westcoaster

Rob: I'm sure Mr. King would say "I don't need no f-ing ho's when I got Lucille."


Entered at Wed Dec 29 16:33:24 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: B B Bling

I don't know about you David but it is the lack of f-holes that ruin the BB guitars for me! They just look wrong...a stock ES-355 would, however, go down a treat!


Entered at Wed Dec 29 16:25:43 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: New B.B."Bling" model ES-355

I noticed in a recent Musician's Friend catalog that the Gibson Custom Shop has introduced a new B.B. King Lucille Gem Series version of the ES-355. In addition to the special features based on Mr. King's preferences, this limited edition comes with deluxe finishes in sparkling gemstone colors -- amethyst, ruby, diamond, sapphire & emerald. These jewels are truly rare, limited to 25 of each color. They also sell at a bling price of $3699.99 (discounted from the MFSP of $5,175.00). So grab one while they last, so you can dazzle others with both the distinctive play and the display of these rare gems.

As I recall, it was Paul, who first got an Epiphone Casino, before George & John got their's. In Beatles guitar lore, notably, it was the guitar that Sir Paul used to play the memorable riff on "Ticket To Ride".


Entered at Wed Dec 29 15:20:27 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Gene (Fabs-era Epi)

Gene, Epiphone weren't a budget brand then - they were an eminent Stateside manufacturer just like Gibson who bought them in the fifties. Throughout the sixties there was a gradual process of whittling down Epiphone into a smaller subsidiary making largely identical models (the Casino is a Gibson ES-330 in all but minor details) or at best equivalent (the Epiphone Coronet/Wilshire/Crestwood wasn't quite the same as the Gibson SG range but did the same job in the product line). Gibson used this as a careful sales strategy, too: a town with two music stores could be given an Epiphone franchise at one store where a guaranteed exclusive Gibson franchise had already been granted to the other.

Red letter day was in 1970 where Epiphone became a brand name on imported guitars, an injustice that remains to this day as you probably know. But the Fabs - they all played quality USA made Epiphones.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 09:39:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Guitar destruction

The link takes you to a record of Pete Townsend's smashed guitars. When you get there, click on (say) Fender Stratocaster and it tells you some smashing / repair strategies. The list shows that early on, as the road manager quoted says, they were scouring shops for guitars to smash.

(quote) "I was out there trying to find guitars every day from guitar shops. I’d loosen the neck and try to get it ready, and hope that Pete could just drop it so that it fell in half, and didn’t smash it completely, because we couldn’t replace the bits.| (end quote)

Then they found Fenders easily repairable. Then they must have found the Gibson SG either broke in the right place (so was easy to repair), or they got a bulk deal on them.

I saw him smash one in Hull and it was May 1968 which is not listed. Being interested in such things I was chatting to the road crew. They had a huge roll of Marshall speaker cloth with them. Some speaker cabinets were empty ready to be stabbed, but when he was in the mood he went for a working speaker. They carried spare speakers.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 06:12:43 CET 2010 from (68.198.45.0)

Posted by:

Gene

Web: My link

Subject: Epiphone Casinos - John,& George & Paul

Meanwhile, the Fab Four(John, George,Paul) were using the budget brand Epiphone Casino in yellow. Interesting - they could have splurged for any god damn instrument they fancied - at least Gretsch White Penguins. Cars - Lots of snow in Hudson Valley. You'll spot me in a Jeep Wrangler 4s4, and when the roads are clear, my Hot Rod Lincoln Cartier Town Car. Life is good.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 05:24:21 CET 2010 from (68.198.45.0)

Posted by:

Gene

Web: My link

Subject: Clapton & 335

Of course, EC used an early 335 prior to the famous '60 Les Paul. The early 335 had dot fret markers (beware, many counterfeits exist.) The beautiful Cherry Red Models had TDC after the 335.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 02:49:29 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: westcoaster/David

I found it all very entertaining and couldn't resist joining in. But no personal dig at David - I'd have had a pop at anyone this afternoon after sitting through the long and arduous rigmarole that is installing Apple's full-on Logic Pro 9.

I think your clip shows the class of the 335 - even under all that silly widdling at the start you can really hear some tone coming through. A corker, too - a 1959 "long pickguard" model in peachy condition. Lots of pennies no doubt - but worth every one.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 01:13:16 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Belly up to the Bar

Hell Rob, I just love bugging David. He's way to serious. He's an encyclopedia, so I got to get a volume of humour put into him. He knows too gawd damn much anyway. I think he's one of those paid for judges that those Mafia guys have tucked in their pocket.

Did you watch Phil X play on that 335 Demo? He's one of those freeked out session super talented guitar players that behind the scenes make things work for other people.


Entered at Wed Dec 29 00:42:11 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Fuel on the David/westcoaster fire!

...and if we want to split hairs, Jorma didn't always use a 345 either; he had at least one 355 as well, most prominently on the Altamont film - see clip.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 23:14:20 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: awright -awright

I just didn't bother going into great detail that's too much gawd damn work for me. I just said after his use of the guitar for so long a time, when they asked him to endorse it, they made the BB King model called "LUCILLE". So........all your explanation don't count!

I just think it's funny that's all. Gawd damn court house kid.....trying to give an old man a heart attack.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 22:42:03 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Clarifying the model #

westcoaster: I was clarifying the specific Gibson model that B.B. King has favored since the '60s (the ES-355, rather than the ES-335) and noting the differences. Mr. King used to stuff the soundholes to cut down on feedback. When Gibson introduced the custom "Lucille" ES-355 in 1980, they did away with the soundholes altogether.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 22:18:18 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Demo 335

And here is a pretty cool demo of a 335 Bob. Worth watching


Entered at Tue Dec 28 21:35:08 CET 2010 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Upstate NY

Subject: ES-355

Folks, thanks for all the great information on the Gibson ES-355. Bob


Entered at Tue Dec 28 21:13:12 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: David P/westcoaster

Nice one westcoaster. I noted the ES-345 already too!


Entered at Tue Dec 28 20:57:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: SO!

And likewise, I noted Gibson' BB King "Lucille" Model in the post before yours David........You CRIMINAL!


Entered at Tue Dec 28 19:54:16 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jawbone

I mentioned that alternative definition of "jawbone" last week. When used as a verb it connotes an attempt to use one's high office or position to persaude or intimidate. I'll leave the conspiracy theories to our would be wikileakster and Mel Gibson to address.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 19:32:30 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.243)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: More Jawbone

Reading James Douglass', JFK, and The Unspeakable, I came across another take on Jawbone; Jawbone Control. It is the term used by a Forbes magazine writer when describing the way Kennedy was forcing US Steel and other large steel companies to stick to the bargain they had agreed to to keep the price of steel tied to inflation.

Douglass' book sure is full of interesting facts that have been revealed over the course of the last 40 plus years as documents are released through access to information requests and Kennedy's papers are released.

Just a few facts that were new to me; Ruby and Oswald knew each other at least a year before all the shooting started.

Ruby was identified as having been in The Plaza an hour before the shooting, driving a panel truck, dropping off a guy with a rifle wrapped in a canvas covering. Oswald wasn't just any ex Marine when he " defected" to the Soviet Union. He was one of a small group of marines who operated a high tech radar at a military station in Japan who were part of the U2 flights over Russia. Gary Powers was shot down soon after Oswald's defection, and on and on and on.

After reading the book and being faced with what The Joint Chiefs Of Staff and The CIA were pushing Kennedy to do in Cuba, Berlin, Laos and Vietnam it's harder to write off the 9-11 conspiracy guys quite as easily.

I think its safe to say that if George W had been at the helm in 61-62-63 we'd all be dead.

When you see that pathetic creeps like, Curtis LeMay, were willing to admit that their "plan" to do a preemptive first strike against Cuba and The Soviet Union would most likely mean the incineration of 30,000,000 Americans and hopefully all 140,000,000 Russians ( this is their best case scenario numbers) and they were pushing hard to do it,it's hard to automatically remove The CIA and The Pentagon from any possible conspiracy.

The most disturbing aspect of the need to "win The Cold War was that it was over ideology. Almost sounds like the motivation that these same groups today attribute to today's omnipresent enemy.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 17:18:21 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Winter??

Just watching our local news. Got over to the island yesterday finally to visit my old mum. As we drove just above Courtenay, Susan looked up Mount Washington and said, "Looks like they got some fresh powder up there."

Wanna know how much fresh powder? In the last 48 hours over 2.5 meters. That's about 8 feet. They are saying the deepest base of snow in the world right now. The same thing happened last year.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 16:54:23 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Axe Questions

Another cousin of the ES-335 is the ES-345, which has a Varitone switch like the ES-355. I believe the 345 also has gold-plated hardware. Jorma Kaukonen favored this model during his flights with Jefferson Airplane. B.B. King has progressed through all three models over the years and Gibson currently makes a "Lucille" signature model ES-355 using the specs of his favorite guitar. To differentiate between the ES-335 and its cousins -- look closely to spot the "chicken head" knob used for the Varitone rotary selector switch.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 16:52:09 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: 335 (further to dlew/David - for Bob)

Bob, if you can afford it go for the 335 as a present. It is a guitar for life and IMHO the most versatile guitar Gibson ever made. The likes of Larry Coryell and John McLaughlin have shown what a great jazz guitar it is but this is tempered by the rockabilly stylings of Dave Edmunds who has shown it has the bite for rock and roll, too. As David said, there are variations: ES-335 (basic, one output), ES-345 (posh neck inlays and varitone/stereo circuitry as mentioned. NOTE that the guitar can still be played normally, though - in mono) and ES-355 (like Chuck/BB indeed - stereo again, top of the line with even more pearl inlays and trim. Nice!) plus others down the years. Any one is a good guitar and a handsome gift!

Do you play? If not -and if the gift is intended as a surprise PLEASE TAKE A GUITARIST WITH YOU - DO NOT BUY THE FIRST ONE YOU SEE and don't be afraid to walk away from what appears to be a good deal if the player voices concerns. Even Gibson (some might even say especially not even!) have "Friday afternoon, quarter to five" guitars and you don't want one of those.

Ideally, take your daughter to a large store with several and have them let you try every single one out for ten minutes.

Of course, they might do a good deal on two of them. Did I ever tell you how fond of you I am.....!

Look elsewhere too - Gibson, as part of the streamlining of the two ranges after buying up Epiphone also offered what roughly equated to a 335 and 355 (but the latter in mono; no bad thing) as an Epiphone Riviera and Epiphone Sheraton, initially in the States but later in the far east. If you don't have the budget for the 335 after all, there are perfectly respectable far-eastern made Epiphones (decent out of the box and after a basic set-up generally, but awesome with some upgrades to pickups and tuners), and half way between there are "Elite/Eliteist" models under the Epiphione brandname but made in the USA or Japan. These are truly excellent, as are the rarer "Orville" branded instruments that Gibson manufactured in Japan for the home market - but often come up on eBay.

Of course eBay contradicts all I said about making sure you try a guitar out first - but something like an Orville guitar will always sell again if it turns out not to be what you or your daughter were looking for.

To conclude we have our own JR2 playing an Epiphone Riviera. Not sure where this guitar fits in to the picture but suspect it was Levon's for Strawberry Wine and Time To Kill.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 16:22:38 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Guitars & Feedback & Luicille

I'm sure you know the story David of the reason of the beginning of the 335. Trying to find a middle ground between solid body & electrified acoustic. The feedback problems of electrified acoustic.

On that subject, I have been using Ovation guitars now since the early 80's. My reasons, because of the fibreglass body, the Ovation stays in tune far better. For a guy like me who "beats" a guitar rather than playing it, that is important. I love the sound and clarity. The pickups, postioning, and control gives no feedback. You see all these guys with acoustic guitars electrified, with a rubber pad stuck in the hole to prevent feedback taking the richness out of the sound that to me is stupid.

In a big club in Vancouver "JR Country Club" where we played a lot. They have a house sound system and a sound man operating full time. This little sound guy, I think his name is Al. He told my brother and several other guys. Norm's Ovation is the best acoustic guitar to eq I've ever worked with and it sounds great. I'm convinced he really knows sound, as he has always been able to make every band sound great in that place, and they used to do one hour live on radio every night from that stage. He made it sound great broadcast as well..

When BB King began endorsing Gibson 335 back in the early 80's, they put out a BB King model 335 called Lucille. Looking on E Bay just now, there is tons of 335's, real and copy. One 1968 one for $5400. But there does seem to be some good deals.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 16:04:48 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gibson Variations

dlew919: The Gibson model that B.B. King made famous is actually the ES-355, which is a kicked-up variation of the ES-335. It has added features including Varitone pickup circuitry (a six-position switch to select different tones) and mono & stereo outputs. In addition to the ES-335, Chuck Berry has also used a ES-355 and a ES-350 over the years. The latter model has a single cutaway & a thicker body and has been favored by a lot of jazz artists over the years. One of the most recorded session guitarists of all time, Larry Carlton, became known as Mr. 335 for his axe of choice.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 14:13:56 CET 2010 from (110.150.9.152)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bob F.: throwing my 2c into the ring... (though I claim no superiority over anyone else's opinion...)

The ES 335 is a legendary guitar - B B King and Chuck Berry play them. I'd agree you'd probably do better with a cheaper guitar, but if you want soemthing that will hold its value (and you didn't mention if your daughter plays), I'd go for the Gibson - it's expensive,yes (possibly needlessly so, yes), but it's like buying a crappy Cadillac - it's still a Cadillac ...

PS - MERRY XMAS everyone! and a very Happy New Year for each and everyone of you!


Entered at Tue Dec 28 13:13:00 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Steve, I'm guessing it is too late for you to invest in a helmet?


Entered at Tue Dec 28 12:13:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie at the airport

I thought he was amazingly patient and pleasant and the people grabbing autographs unbelievably rude to have done so when the poor guy is waiting for his baggage. In contrast, a couple of years ago at Chichester festival Theatre, we found ourselves standing in line in the restaurant with Patrick Stewart, the star of the show (Macbeth). Everyone nodded and smiled, but not one person asked for an autograph or hassled him. The guy was waiting to get his lunch. Similarly we were in a theatre lobby with Nicole Kidman, and no one hassled her. The airport carousel is one where Robbie really had no escape, and you shouldn't take advantage of that.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 11:42:16 CET 2010 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie at New York Airport

I think Robbie remains gracious and patient. It must irritate you this sort of thing. n'est ce pas?


Entered at Tue Dec 28 08:12:35 CET 2010 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Washburn

one more thing about Washburn ... Robbie promoted their guitars back in the 80's. I did send a scan through to Jan a while back. Not sure if he loaded it onto the site.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 03:16:18 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What's in a name??

Rod; Your findings on Washburn are probably quite right. However they are all just a name now-a-days. Leo Fender's outfit was bought out by CBS eons ago. Gibson has been sold a couple of times. The pioneers of crafting those beautiful instruments have been on the dirt nap for some time now. They are all just riding on the name.

There are a couple of others that deserve more than a little attention.Jean Larivee started building beautiful acoustic guitars back in 1967. Bernardo Rico started the BC Rich in '69. There of course is a few others. Richenbacher, Mosrite that deserve attention. But Yamaha, Tachaminee and others have saturated the market.

In resent years I have found guitars, like for example Zilgan symbols. You can go in a place like Long & McCuade. In a line of 20 or 30 guitars, all pretty much the same, you will find one or two that stand out for a sweet sound, just as cymbals will. So there is no one "model" that will stand out as much as a single guitar will.

For the guy looking for a guitar for your daughter, I would certainly go for Craigs List or E Bay and find some thing older, and there are very good deals some times from people who dream big, and buy some thing very good. Then the interest wians in some way and they nearly give them away.

In any case don't listen to that gawd damn farmer. He don't know cow shit from candy bars, or guitars from mandocellos...........


Entered at Tue Dec 28 02:52:46 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Golf

A chap is waiting to tee off but is kept waiting by an attractive girl at least 20 years his junior. At first he is impatient but manages to keep this to himself and after it becomes obvious that the girl needs help from a player with experience, he calmly strolls over and lends a hand.

Neither having a course partner that day, the y spend the morning together and he helps her around the course. They agree to meet the following day as well, and being better acquainted even have a drink together after.

By the third or fourth day they are like old friends and by the fifth they are both aware of chemistry between them. The chap suggests taking a weekend break together somewhere and the lady agrees. Romance is definitely in the air.

The hotel and charming little town is everything they had hoped and thus it was a surprise that the woman grew distant as Saturday afternoon became evening. Suspecting nerves or second thoughts as the inevitable hour for going to bed drew ever nearer, they went for a sumptuous meal somewhere quiet and a chance to talk.

"My darling, I have had one of the most wonderful weeks of my life since meeting you", the chap began. "But something troubles you. Don't worry - we don't have to rush into anything too quickly..."

After a period of thought and composition, the woman begins to talk "It's not nerves, I assure you. And I have had a great week too...but...we'll I haven't had the chance to tell you something....oh god...I might as well come straight out with it. I used to be a man."

"You b*stard!" says the chap. "I've been letting you play on Ladies' union handicap all week..."


Entered at Tue Dec 28 00:55:48 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: How's Your Putter?

I’ve never particularly thought about the game of golf in terms of political affiliation. I think a lot of business people, especially sales oriented, tend to play it……probably because deals can be made on the golf course.

Country Clubs may have more Republicans than Democrats, but I haven’t actually seen any stats on that. The wealthiest person that I’ve personally known is a staunch Democrat. But she’s not a golfer…..her passions are gardening and horses. And as Bob says, there are many public courses where a lot of regular folks play. I’ve played golf a handful of times, but would not call myself a golfer. I don’t own clubs and don’t really have that much free time to devote to it. Maybe someday when I’m President, I’ll be able to get some rounds in. ;-) Those guys (regardless of political party) seem to be able to fit a lot of golf in between their vacations.

I think the appeal of golf for many, is that you are really competing against yourself, and there is always room for improvement. It takes a lot of concentration to excel, and when you are focused on the game, it’s a great way to relax from the stress of everyday life. This is what I’ve been told by actual golfers. The few times that I golfed, (since I wasn’t busy making deals or concerned about improving my game), I enjoyed being outside and getting some good walking in. Another great aspect of golf is that it can be enjoyed by both men and women of many different age groups.

My younger brother is an avid golfer who plays on public courses. He works as a landscaper most of the year, and plows snow in the winter……a solid working class guy. Oh….I almost forgot to mention that he voted for Obama. But I don’t think it had anything to do with golf.


Entered at Tue Dec 28 00:41:36 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

EEEJIIT, you'd watch it if someone put a gun to our head. The Simpsons are on FOX, those crazy lefties that saved the FOX network when it was still a kit. It could have been drowned in a bath tub it was so small and weak and that F$#K*N Homer Simpson saved it.

Saved by Homer, what does that say about you? The man who lives by; The first step towards failure is trying.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 23:34:33 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: The Latest and Best In a Long Line of Excellent Viney ESL Products

Congrats Peter. I knew you'd eventually come up with a way to combine your love of The Band's music with your ESL business. NB


Entered at Mon Dec 27 23:23:43 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Here's an OLD article on the subject of Obama playing golf.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 23:00:34 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

JQ, you are barking up the wrong tree. I voted for our current president and wouldn't watch Fox News if you put a gun to my head. Good try though.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 22:54:53 CET 2010 from (32.177.64.247)

Posted by:

JQ

bob w - I yield to your point-of-view, but maybe not entirely. How do you find such certain stats like the number of W's golf outings vs Obama's? Fox maybe?

What got me started was musing on the post-presidential lifestyle of Carter vs W and the work ethic & accomplishments therein.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 19:52:11 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: ES-335

Bob F: New ES-335s are around $2250-4800 depending on the finish & other features. If you shop around you can maybe find used model, if it's not too old, for less. Older, vintage models, however, go for astronomical prices. In this present day economy, there's always a chance you can work a deal if you pay cash.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 19:40:27 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Stevipedia, you've made it quite clear that any thinking you do is hard.

JQ, for me it doesn't have anything to do with politics or country clubs. The closest I ever got to a country club was as a caddy in my teenage years. For the overwhelming majority of golfers (including myself) it is about public courses and a chance to play a very challenging game with family and friends. I shared countless hours with my father on public golf courses(time I could never put a price tag on now that he is gone) and now am able to spend four or five uninterrupted hours with my oldest son as well as three of my four brothers. We share a lot of laughter, good conversation and simply enjoy being together in a setting that allows us to turn off the outside world for a short time. It has nothing to do with wealth (I assure you), exclusion or any of the country club trappings. Every day there are countless working class folks paying and playing the daily fees courses around our country and the world.

And for the political record, our current President has already played several more rounds of golf while in office (I believe he's closing in on fifty outings) than his predecessor did in eight years. We can read into that whatever we like, I guess.

At this time Stevipedia will recommence putting words in people's mouths and spouting foolish generalities.

Wishing everyone here a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 18:52:46 CET 2010 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Upstate NY

Subject: Gibson ES335

My daughter is graduating college in the spring and for her graduation gift I wanted to surprise her with a Gibson ES335. She's been talking about this guitar for ever. I don't know if I should buy new or look for an older model. Any advice you could give me would be appreciated.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 18:38:26 CET 2010 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Upstate NY

Subject: The Band at Monticello Raceway

Howie, I was at the Monticello Raceway show. I think it was a Sunday evening show Labor Day weekend, 1971. Happy and Artie Traum opened and then Kris Kristofferson. The Band of course were late, so Kris kept playing. I remember he did a wild version of Merle's "Okie from Muskogee". It was my first Band show and I thought they were amazing. I would see them play much better shows during the next 5 years. But you never forget that first show!


Entered at Mon Dec 27 18:34:41 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Golf For Dummies

JQ, I've been thinking hard about your queries on golf that seem to have been ignored by the golfers here, cept Brien. I think the most telling thing about golf is that it is one of those things that separates us from the other animals, at least the smarter animals.

Rob, I would have addressed the guitar manufacturing aspect of low cost start ups in the east but, am as of yet, unable to anticipate posts. I'm working on it.

If North Korea( actually when) follows its neighbors into low cost knock offs of their manufactured goods and then moves up to the higher technology stuff, when it gets to guitars, my money is on the godless crowd going with the Guitar God or a hologram of his Godness( if he's no longer above ground) as their spokesman. The Dear Leader or whatever the Pentagon's gift from heaven is called, has a soft spot for old Slow Hand. He's the only western rock star, Mini Me-glomaniac , will welcome into,The Hermit Kingdom.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 15:48:07 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Down in the Flood

It was more than a little humidity that affected Gibson's manufacturing quality this year, as their Nashville plant suffered significant damage last May during the epic flood that hit Guitar Town. As a result, they didn't ship new product for a 90-day period. To make matters worse, most Nashville-based musicians kept their guitars & equipment at a nearby storage & rehearsal facility that was also flooded out and, as a result, they were scrambling to find replacement gear.


Entered at Mon Dec 27 07:34:16 CET 2010 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Washburn

Westcoaster, I dod read somewhere that the Washburn we know today has nothing to do with the Washburn factory that operated in the early 20th century. Having said that I do have a Washburn mandolin from the early 80's that is a "re-issue" of one of the early 20C mandolins. It is a very good mandolin so I have no doubt that the quality is still there.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 22:51:10 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You're right. I meant John Grant was with Midlake. The Duke & The King don't need to be. Thanks for the Helpless link. Thanks too for the Paul Simon link. This had passed totally below my radar.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 22:37:54 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: John Grant

Perfection? John Grant with Midlake "Chicken Bones"...

Cripple Creek-esque half time beat? Tick!

Tidy ensemble work from the band? Tick!

Guitar break that isn't widdlesome (but has a wah wah)? Tick!

So-unpleasant-it's-funky-as hell noise (1)? Tick - fuzz bass!

So-unpleasant-it's-funky-as hell noise (2)? Tick - funny organ/synth outro!

Chorus that has "F*ck off" and "leave me alone" in it? Tick!

Arrogant self belief? Tick - chorus also has "I don't care what I know because I can't be wrong" as well as aforementioned FO/LMA corkers.



Entered at Sun Dec 26 21:48:28 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

westcoaster, I never knew that Gibson were 3 mths away from the toilet. I could believe it now though given that they keep releasing robitic Les Pauls that nobody buys and their marketing department want sacking. Actually, stoning to death. For the last 10 years it is impossible to buy an "ordinary" Gibson without paying big bucks for a "Heritage" series, or even bigger bucks for a custom shop. Taking the SG as an example, what you want is a Junior, a Special, a Standard and a Custom plus maybe an Artist model or two (the day they do a Cipollina batwing SG I might have to swallow my pride...). Not a couple of guitars with old hierarchy model names (such as the Special) then a load of silly SGs made from muticoloured wood laminates or pricier models with what appear to be 1950s fridge door handles (see link) as a tailpiece - and sets you back $four figures minimum!

I blame Gibson for my recent (last three years) addiction to collecting old Harmony electrics. Hmmm - yes. When the wife brings it up again, that's definitely my excuse for picking up an H75, liking it so much I bought another two of them plus six other models! None of which cost much more than $600, many not even half that. American made, seasoned timber, DeArmond pickups and hardware, sometimes a Bigsby. Don't be put off by the fact that these were once second-divison Sears store instruments. Vintage USA second division is still classic, soulful and rocking in the light of what has appeared since. The they wonder why mere mortal (ie not a retired hedge fund manager) working pros don't buy them anymore and look for an old Tokai to solder a couple of Lindy Fralin pickups into and replace the tuners...



Entered at Sun Dec 26 21:33:05 CET 2010 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Thanks Peter, interesting info. Glaucoma, bifocals, and a new city happening at one time, i 've succumbed to using GPS whilst learning my way around here.Never thought I would. Kinda dig the brit broads voice, so if i head that way. Jerome might prove to be a turn on.

About to order Garth's production.... but so far I think my only purchse of material released in 2010 was Steve Freund's Lonesome Flight. Which is a kller cd. You have to love blues, but for straight blues with a feeling, personal and very real, it is a killer record.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 19:57:26 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Guitars & Guitars

Well Rob......getting to the heart of the matter. When Gibson factory was moved from Kalammazoo many years ago to Nashville, Gibson took a real down turn. Inferior craftsmanship and problems with humidity in the south almost did that company in.

I remember this well, however I din't know until the story in wiki that they were only about 3 months from extinction when bought out and the company turned around. Gibson is still the biggest guitar manufacturer in North America.

My history with Gibson guitars began in 1955 when my Dad bought a Gibson J50, (which my younger brother Lorne still has in his studio). My first was a gibson Hummingbird I bought from San Francisco Pawn Brokers in 1963 for $235. This was one of the most beautiful still hand crafted. Being young and foolish I sold it some years later. It is now worth over $3500. Those Gibsons for about 15 years tho' through the 70's - 80's were some pretty bad stuff. My brother had a 70's Les Paul. One night in the Sechelt Legion we just got on stage. He was tuning a little and the neck snapped right off at the nut...unbelievable.

Old Man Aria tho', was a classical guitarist and they started out making guitars & violins to the highest standard. There was problems in Japan same as Nashville with using wood that hadn't been dried enough, and inferior glues. But they make some of the finest guitars.

Another company that is climbing back upwards is Washburn. In the late 1800's those Mississippi blues men like Jimmy Rogers played nothing but and made them famous. Washburn now has a patent on a pickup control called VCC, (Voice contour control). With turning a knob you can make a Humbucker sound like a single coil pickup.

The thing also is that many of the guitar makers had a lot of their hardware made in the JA Pan company.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 19:19:11 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: westcoaster/Peter

westcoaster, you are right about Aria but I wanted to avoid them! The reason being that I wanted to eschew a lengthy aside in how Epiphone started out as an eminent USA archtop maker, then Gibson bought them and started "standardising" (330/Casino; 335/Riviera...blah blah) before stopping USA made guitars wearing the Epi badge in 1970 and instead having Aria "Black Diamond" semi acoustics branded as Epiphone (yes, and Univox, and Commodore...and Domino...etc) and downgrading that great and respected brandname to the cheapo arm of Gibson where it remains unfairly to this day. Which is a completely different story, not in line with Steve's "rotational" model for far eastern manufacturing dominance.

Peter - you know me too well! You recommended Duke & the King to me on the phone the other day and when i found "Shaky" the lo-fi drums and tremolo'd guitar intro were enough to win me over! Your point that this IS a superior outfit to the Felice Brothers does seem fairly made. Certainly not in the bracket of "band that dresses like a paint-by-numbers version of The Band, sounds a bit like a paint-by-numbers version of The Band and yet snap at any comparisons with The Band in interviews" which the 'Brothers most definitely were (is it were or are? Is this permanent or a side project?)

I don't think it is Midlake backing them tho' - they seem fairly self sufficient (see attached clip of Last Waltz favourite "Helpless"*) and wonder whether you meant John Grant's album where Midlike most definitely DO provide the engine room muscle; this is allegedly also a very good album so if anybody has heard it do shout!

*Yes - that was a deliberate attempt to get a Band reference in a paragraph or two about a Felice brother.....!


Entered at Sun Dec 26 18:16:48 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Praise and Blame

Peter, thanks for your year's top ten list a while back. I was just on the verge of asking you about Tom Jones' bluesy/gospelly " Praise & Blame" album when I saw it appear as number 8 on your list. Holger P., one of the big music men on CBC radio has been going on about it in a very positive way, playing cuts, etc. The youtube vids on this material are of excellent quality as are Tom's vocals. Garth's album came in my stocking, which you had at #6 so Tom's looks like a pretty safe bet . NB


Entered at Sun Dec 26 16:03:32 CET 2010 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: not Old Virginny, but Low Countries

I must admit: rather late, but anyway... happy Xmas to you all. I looked out of my window, watched the snowy streets and thought... (what else): Christmas must be tonight.

And played the fast version of that wonderful tune...

Best wishes to all my old Band friends, Jan (keep up the good work), Peter (still there), Norbert (ga zo door), Ilkka (mein Sohn, bist du am Ambt?), Lil (back here?), good old Uncle Hangover (no one less) and all the new Band fans as well, of course.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 15:52:40 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Happy Christmas. Link is to Paul Simon's "Getting Ready For Christmas Day"

I've been informed by the missus that it'll be be my honour to escort her to Mass this afternoon. As long as I'm home in time for the hockey game.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 14:30:12 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Long Live The Duke & The King

… is my Christmas listening. It's so good that I can almost forgive the non-standard size CD case which doesn't fit my shelves.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 14:25:03 CET 2010 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Like Dunc, I will be playing my Christmas music which includes Asleep At the Wheel, Little Feat, and Frank Zappa. It should keep my toes tapping as I hit the treadmill and elliptical machines with a vengeance after two superior meals and precision raiding of the fridge and assorted chocolate bowls, strategically scattered about the house.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 13:18:26 CET 2010 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Merry Xmas everybody

Merry Xmas everybody.

Enjoy it Roger. The cricket result is good. As you probably see in the news it's now a month of Arctic weather up here and I've had enough, -10 every day... and we're used to cold snaps of two three days, but I've never seen it like this.

I wish I was in your neck of the woods, Jeff.

Still I'll play the Xmas CDs today and have a couple of malts.

Bob Dylan 'The Witmark Demos'

Bob Dylan 'Hard Rain'...picking up albums I've never owned...perhaps I'll try and become 'complete'.

Rolling Stones 'Got Live if You Want It!'

The Del McCoury Band 'Del and the Boys'...Great Tight Band.. How I got into this is through the GB...'the Mountain' which I really enjoy... on Levon's album and subsequent discussion led me to buy the Steve Earle album, which took me into the Del McCoury band.

Hope Knockin' Lost John and Bumbles are doing OK.

Merry Xmas Levon. Really enjoy the last two albums.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 12:25:11 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: iPhoto

If you have iPhoto DO NOT UPGRADE to the 2011 version. This is the worst piece of software I have ever installed. Now I can't e-mail photos without going through a huge rigmarole and it's SO creaky. I had this with various WORD upgrades, each being worse than the previous version, but iLife 2011 beats them all!


Entered at Sun Dec 26 11:20:17 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff : It’s not far from Flagstaff. We drove through snow around Flagstaff and it was 95° in Sedona (45 miles?)… a few years ago we were on a major ESL project in American English, and we were going to rent somewhere in the USA for 6 months to finish writing. We decided on the Sedona area, having spent ten days there, and spent hours researching rentals, then the project got cancelled very late on. There are some interesting places round. Jerome is where we got recommended by the local Brits (lots of them)… not far from Sedona, but way cheaper. Walt Disney and Lucille Ball allegedly made Sedona popular. We were there early season … I’d guess it was overwhelmed with tourists once the season got under way. Locals said it was great outside the season.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 07:30:36 CET 2010 from (121.44.209.67)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK / Australia

Subject: Happy Christmas

Happy Christmas GB. I'm missing out on the nearest thing to a white christmas for years becuase we're over here in Dlewland...


Entered at Sun Dec 26 05:12:08 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter,soon as I can, maybe when it starts to get hot here, I'll go spend some time rounf Sedona. I'm thinking it's got to be cooler that a way. mountains etc. It seems to get grouped with Fa;gstaff, and there's snow in Flagstaff right now. There'll actually be work of my kind there in the late spring, ealry summer,when i may want to vamoose from here.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 03:35:07 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I second that emotion

Rob; You're almost right, but! google Aria. Old man Aria started making his guitars, and "Telecasters" back in the 50's.

There are those like him that had integrity in crafting a class instrument. When you read his history, you'll get a little better picture.


Entered at Sun Dec 26 01:48:18 CET 2010 from (86.154.63.159)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Steve

Your example of how manufacturing industry is nurtured is almost borne out note for note in the guitar world as a model, and does indeed involve Korea along the way.

First, we remember Leo Fender's original Strats and Telecasters, now prized commodities fetching five figures if well preserved. Then in the mid sixties, Leo sold up to CBS. Big business bean counting now came on board, and over the next ten years these cherished instruments would start to evolve into mass-produced expensive rubbish that bit by bit had started to look, play sound and feel very different to the originals. Quality control took a back seat.

Enter Japan. Until this time producers of playable if a little awkward looking guitars (think Teisco) plus the odd quality home-grown brand (Yamaha, natch), the Japs upped their game and a couple of factories began churning out, under such names as Ibanez, Antoria, Greco, Tokai almost 100% perfect copies of old classic Fenders (and Gibsons, for that matter) that looked like the fifties and sixties classic instruments not the cumbersome and unloved stuff then-currently masquerading as a bona fide USA Fender guitar.

If you can't beat them, join them was the watchword and Fender Japan was borne. Naturally, this wiped the slate clean once again as this afforded the punter to pick up one of these almost perfect vintage spec Strats AND have the Fender logo and model name on it!

Eventually these guitars developed a reputation for their excellence and for years both Jap and USA lines were sold. This still continues to this day although the bulk of the Jap models are now retained for home market only as they were eating into too big a share of the USA market! What to do? Easy! Build even cheaper ones in Korea! Thus the "Squier" brandname was borne (actually it had already been applied to some Jap instruments instead of Fender - I guess to differentiate from the "proper" USA stuff that wasn't selling and thus perk that up again if you wanted the right name on the guitar).

This has now happened several times. The Japanese made guitars are now fetching reasonable money and maintain their reputation with Korean stuff catering for the budget end. Guess what - then the cheap stuff got moved to Indonesia and now the Korean made budget stuff is starting to get sought out second hand. It evolves and repeats, evolves and repeats....just like Steve said, almost.



Entered at Sat Dec 25 19:43:13 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: My Car - 1957 Ford Fairlane Skyliner - Retractable Hardtop

I aquired mine in 1977. Restored it and had it for many years. Getting too broke one time, forced the sale of it.

It was black with the gold flash on the side and white leather interior. Cars like this you don't forget, and they don't make anything as worth while any more.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 19:25:24 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Hot Rod Lincoln

A lot of great looking hot rods pass by here.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 19:11:48 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: She's Real Fine my 409

Car songs of the sixties......like.....Dead Man's Curve


Entered at Sat Dec 25 14:40:17 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Surfin' Bird by The Trashmen (1963) is this week #3 in the UK Christmas Top Twenty. It's on the "Club Penguin" kids internet site.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 14:04:24 CET 2010 from (166.205.143.218)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Merry Christmas

to everybody here! It's chilly this morning in this part of the Pacific Northwest, but no rain or snow or sunshine is expected - although we had a very White Thanksgiving this round.

And all the best in 2011 - Cheers!


Entered at Sat Dec 25 14:01:23 CET 2010 from (86.154.63.159)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

"Good King Wenceslas looked out from his bedroom window

When a poor man came about, he tossed out a red hot cinder"

(sung "Sarf Laaahnden" style so it rhymes)


Entered at Sat Dec 25 13:05:53 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy Christmas to all. A white Christmas at a new house sounds a perfect welcome.

Jeff … in Scottsdale you’re only about 100 minutes from Sedona. That area is great. I envy you!

Rob, I can’t recall that much of Good King Wenceslas, but it involves organs … “When an old man came in sight, fiddling with his to-oo-ell”

Steve, the batteries on (e.g.) a Lexus RX400 Hybrid aren’t a single 12 volt pull out and replace job. They extend right under the floor. They’re very heavy indeed, so have to be set low for road holding. The weight adds so much to the car that when it’s using petrol on the motorway, it uses more than the non-hybrid model. It’s fantastic if you live in a major city, where it’s running electric much of the time (and in London you’re immune from the £8 a day congestion charge). The battery info is from Jeep’s adverts in the UK press earlier this year.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 06:05:33 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

The current President is a golf fanatic. Played more golf in his first two years in office than W did in 8. Personally, I don't care who plays or doesn't. I use to play a lot (lettered in it in High School) but only play a couple times a year now.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 05:27:50 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: "Slipping Into Christmas"

I can't get the link to work, but someone just shared a rare Leon Russell Christmas song available on YouTube with me. It was only released as a single back in 1972 with very little airplay but it's a great song and worth tracking down for a listen. Happy Christmas and Merry New Year to all!!


Entered at Sat Dec 25 04:08:54 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Norbert, as I see it, every other county in that area of the planet has found a way to produce things that we need and make them more cheaply than we do.

At first they make poor quality, inexpensive things, but slowly they improve the quality and then move up to more expensive better quality products, so why not The North Koreans. They'll probably start out with a one speed bike with no brakes that only comes in one color but if they're cheap enough someone will buy them.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 03:54:25 CET 2010 from (208.70.38.1)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas!

Been snowing all day...it's a white Christmas at a house we've just moved to. Listening to "A Motown Christmas" album.

Wishin' the guestbook family all the best for the holidays. Love and peace to all. God bless us, everyone!


Entered at Sat Dec 25 03:38:57 CET 2010 from (86.154.63.159)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: Mum & Dads house for Christmas (Thames Ditton, Surrey)

Subject: Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas to one and all!

I think PV should throw caution to the wind and indulge us with the rude version of Good King W....


Entered at Sat Dec 25 03:31:27 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

NB, I'm actually in Scottsdale, next to Phoenix. Golf courses galore here. I may even play golf... miniature golf that is...There are no odds on me playing real golf, there's a better chance of me becoming a rabbi..Always thought it was a ridiculous sport, and most of the people i personally know who play golf happen to be miserable pricks or distasteful human beings. note, I wrote "most",and "personally". I'm not swinging a club at anyone here who plays golf. NB, i don't recall if you play or not, but I'm guessing not. If you do play, that changes everything. NB, I'll be here probably at least through the winter. I'm enjoying being warm , and even when it's 50 here, it's warm. Don't think this is a place I'd ever call home though.Chance to be warm and make a living, and I needed to get going. But Scottsdale is not a motivating place. The mountains, or big medicine country might do it, but i haven't been feeling adventurous yet. It's different gears here, don't know if i have these ones.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 02:06:26 CET 2010 from (166.205.143.218)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Golf

NB - You mentioned golf. What is it about golf that so many Republicans here find so compelling? Is it the country club ethos with its membership requirments and elite pull? Why are Alive Cooper & Ted Nugent avid golfers and Tom Waits and Leonard Cohen find it repellant? And then there's our former presidents here. For GW Bush and G Ford, golf defines their post-presidental years, but J Carter & Clinton are active in huge, important and mostly humanitarian projects?

Is golf little more than a rich white guy's wank? I know I've got an attitude here, but what gives? I've worked with a lot of rich white guys that are now nearing retirement and they dream of a golfing life. Is it really that all-consuming & satisfying? I'm totally suspicious.


Entered at Sat Dec 25 01:30:44 CET 2010 from (67.158.178.219)

Posted by:

Lil

Merry Christmas everyone.. and a safe and happy New Year!


Entered at Fri Dec 24 23:53:29 CET 2010 from (91.42.231.246)

Posted by:

Norbert

Steve, love you too.

Merry Christmas all! (Pat thanks for the story about your father).


Entered at Fri Dec 24 23:19:01 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Susan Tedeschi

"Hope and Desire" was 2005 so it seems to have been spared that fate Jeff. (DO persist with that link because it's a great vid !) Her website has been shut down because as of April 2010, she tours with the newly formed Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi Band. I gather that before they largely, but not exclusively, toured separately.

The Austin City Limits DVD of Susan from 2003 or so is on the quiet side, possibly to the chagrin of those who've seen her high-powered live shows. I think she now has more artistry than 12 years ago and brings way more to the quiet numbers than she used to, and needn't be loudly belting it out to be enjoyed. Though she does that as well as anyone.

Jeff, if you're still in Phoenix, guard against picking up that evil vice that Arizona is famous for - you know of course, that I speak of golf. NB.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 23:17:44 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter , I'll get you up to speed on electric cars when I have time. Your battery info is years old.

Think of a network of garages( like gas stations) where you drive in as your battery is getting low( like your fuel tank) and a guy comes out with a standard hook up battery, removes yours and replaces it with a fully charged battery and you're under way in less than the time than it takes to pump your tank full of gas.

Norbert, I think North Korean bike transportation is as likely to be our transportation future as any other.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 22:53:20 CET 2010 from (91.42.231.246)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: the road

Peter & Steve, I agree with Peter electric isn't by far an alternative, but Peter hydrogen isn't either. According to early hydrogen plans we all should be driving such a car now. It's always "In twenty years ..." but the fact is: it's too dangerous and they can't handle that in the next 150 years. The light, streamlined, low easyrider carbon bicycle (made in North Korea) is what we'll end up with. But we will be slim, healthy and happy till nuclear fusion is under control in Dec. 2159.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 22:33:00 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I;am at 199k on my 2003 Grand Carvan Sport ( the stonger suspension) with a 3.3 liter engine. The engine is perfect, legitmately like new. Had the torque coverter and one other thing in the tranny done at 137k, and seemed to be possibly heading toward another tranny job. The suspension..nother story. The kinda driving I do, and the way i sometimes ( but infrequently) drive ... Had the front end done twice, the second time ( late 09,early 2010) almsot every little possible item. Sucker was true as could be. Then got clipped by a drunk woman who ran a stop sign, hit reasonably hard, bur not a lot of visible damage. Anyway, the insurance adjuster popped for a few things in the suspension anyway,and of course , an alignment. but the sonofa gun never handled right since. I;m actually not comfortable in it in bad weather or over 50 on the highwtay unless it;s a straight road. So, I left it parked when i headed to Arizona, picked up a car here. When I get back east, probably will sell the minivan as is , being very careful to disclose the vehicle's shortcomings, and sell cheap to someone who wants to rebuild a suspension, etc.

NB, ny internet connection here is precarious, not getting to see too many v ids these days, wasn't able to view that one. but will try again. Interestingly, whoever is mastering tedeschi's recent work is pumping it up, that modern blast mentality. Probably on label instructions. (A mastering house I visited a while back put her and soem others up to dissect levels on contempary releases. whatever song it it was on steroids compared to what I look for in sound)


Entered at Fri Dec 24 21:36:52 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, BC
Web: My link

Subject: Soul Of A Man/Jeff

Here's another tune off "Hope And Desire" Jeff that I suspect will be right in your wheelhouse. Also a good one for Amy Helm to take a run at with her smokin' "Ain't That Good News" voice. NB


Entered at Fri Dec 24 21:33:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Nah, Steve … the future will be hydrogen, not electric. Why? Because all the conventional vehicles that we already have can be converted. Jay Leno does the BMW hydrogen promos, where he runs the car on stage for an hour while he talks, first placing a glass below the exhaust pipe. After an hour, it’s full. He drinks it. The five BMWs they have running in California on hydrogen cost $1 million each. There’s economy of scale. When they’re producing tens of thousands, it’ll be the same as now.

Electric is a non-starter. as the Jeep advert says, you have to run a Jeep for 140,000 miles at 14 mpg on petrol to get the same carbon footprint as the Prius batteries take to manufacture. That’s before the Prius has done a mile on the road. If the world goes electric, we have to scrap our entire vehicle stock and start afresh. Much better to convert what we have. Electric just isn’t green.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 20:31:22 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Of course everyone's going to need to learn a new car language as the electrics start rolling out on everyone's show room floors.

I heard a some guys talking about the idea being floated in California of setting up stations where you drive in and they do a battery exchange in less than 2 minutes( less time than a fill up), for a small fee and you're back on the road. Won't it be nice when the oil, gas and noise are things of the past.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 20:30:34 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Christmas

I posted this earlier but I think the "cyber grinch stole it. So again:

A very merry Christmas. May all you Christmas wishes come true.

Since no one else posted it, a link to the best Christmas song.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 19:50:00 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Big Oil

Yes Brien, I agree regular oil change is essential. I do a lot of highway, so I'm on a 5,000 mile schedule. But I use the full synthetic oil which doesn't break down as quickly.
My previous car (a 2.5 liter V-6 Ford) got up to 275,000 miles which I was really happy with.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 19:31:57 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Long Green Mile

Yer right Brien, except that milage you are talking about depends on what kind of miles. For example before they got most of Vancouver Island paved there was so much gravel road driving. The damage to ty rods, ball joints etc keeps the maintanance awfully high. My big truck I got rid of this year, I had spent $4000 on the last couple of years underneath. I loved that big truck, and almost had myself talked into new paint and the cab corners redone where they rust out. It was going to be $7500. Then I thought, I got 360,00 clicks on it, which is probably a little over the 200,000 miles. I don't know if the diesel had been rebuilt. If it calfs on me, thats another 10 grand.

So I bought this newer one. It's funny this old guy at the GM dealer here in town, he says "Norm, you know why that truck is still so new?" (the school board had it for a lease). He says that manager guy that drove it just sat in it and slept all the time. He gave me a real good deal. I just realized I made a mistake, it's a 4.8 litre. I'm not used to that yet. We still talk in CID.

Like ol' Joanie the other day with her 289 Mustang, or you'd say a Ford, 6-300. That's a Ford 6 cylinder 300 cubic inch displacement. Or a 305,307,327,350,351,400,409,460........gawd damn 5.2 light years.......bull shit.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 19:17:33 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I'm in camp with Todd - 10 years or at minimum 200,000 miles, otherwise it is disappointing. Big Key - change oil every 3,000 miles. They say newer cars with the oil that is now produced can go 5,000 miles but I still keep it around 3.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 19:08:02 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Apples & Oranges

Todd; It's as Peter says. Our gallons are Imperial gallons, 4.5 light years.

No Peter, my last big one ton dual wheel truck I just traded was a 6.5 litre diesel. It got great milage. I really couldn't believe it when I started driving this little v8 gas engine the milage I get. I had to keep checking it.

The old miles per gallon thing, just seems still easier for most people my age to understand. Any one, I'd say 30 and under looks at you like your from anothetr planet if you don't speak in litre, & kilometers, centimeters etc.

Going back from a diesel to gas in the pickup is pretty funny. This new little truck, (although I had a hard time getting used to their looks, didn't much like them), I love this one. It has the back doors that open aft for the back seat, (great for the grand kids). The thing is Susan gets a laugh out of me. It's so quiet, I've had it running several times and hit the starter, 'cause you cannot hear it. Susan has a real nice 02 Chevy Blazer 4x4. Now she just wants to drive my truck.

Anyway Todd, I'm in total agreement over maintainance. I'm the same with my boats as well. I had one truck, a 1986 Ford. Had 5 kilometers on it when I bought it. I had it undercoated and rust proofed right away. I had it 11 years, and it was still beautiful when I finally sold it. I still see around Courtenay. People have always bugged me about how I'm always washing my truck. If you leave them with mud, especially underneath, it holds moisture in their. Around the salt water where we live, (you could throw a rock from my front lawn and hit the water. Well that salt in the air and humidity just does them in. If you keep 'em clean so they dry more they will last much longer.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 19:04:56 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Happy Holidays everyone.

NB, I love Just Won't Burn, have it since it's out. Tom Hambridge did a great job with Tedeschi on that. I'm not sure I'd heard anything off Hope & Desire, but, i've not heard anything of hers since then that hits me. Production plays in to this too. She has the chops, that's for sure.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 18:51:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was wondering that, Todd. From memory, Canadians, like us, buy in litres, but still think of mpg with cars. It's odd. Canadian gallons used to be the same as British Imperial gallons, that is 4.5 litres where a US gallon is about 4 litres. For a 4.7 litre engine, 30 mpg is superb with petrol. Mine is 3 litre diesel, and gets about 36 mpg on the motorway. But some of the big ones advertised now claim over 40 with diesel.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 18:44:00 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And what call you this child?

I calls 'im Bwien......A BOMB!.....what'er you doin' brinin' 'im a bomb?


Entered at Fri Dec 24 18:41:20 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Norm, I may seem rich with my fleet of vehicles, but I'm really just fanatical about maintenance. If I don't get 10 years and 200,000 miles out of a vehicle I'm disappointed. My newest vehicle at the moment is 6 years old and has 110,000 miles......so...time to start saving up for a new one.

30 miles per gallon is impressive. Are your gallons the same size as ours. Or maybe yours is a diesel?


Entered at Fri Dec 24 18:32:42 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Feliz Navidad

Whether you like 'em er not. I dare yuh to listen and not tap yer feet.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 15:44:33 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

And speaking of "The Weight".


Entered at Fri Dec 24 15:29:04 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Reality

Well anyone knows, if you put weight....hey The Weight! if you put weight in the box of a pickup it of course settles it down and gives more traction. Empty pickup boxes are very light and bounce around even on paved roads.

However the reality is 4x4 are far more efficient. Otherewise why would they go to the trouble and expense to make them. The reality also is, 4x4 burns waaaaaay more fuel. So you don't want the damn thing in 4x4 any more than you need to.

This new little truck I got in July tho', an 07 GMC Sierra half ton extended cab short box. It had only 50,000 clicks on it. Like new with one of those 4.7 litre gas engines. It is astonishing how much power it has and the milage is unbelievable. They have these fuel injected engines well perfected now where I'm getting close to 30 miles to the gallon on the highway in a 4x4 pickup truck. I'M A HAPPY MAN!


Entered at Fri Dec 24 14:57:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Once in Royal David's City

Subject: Deck the Halls

Another post inspired by wrapping presents while listening to carols, this time on 4WD. When my kids were into Scalextric slot racing cars in the late 80s (now wrapping a set for my grandson), there was an Audi Quattro model car. Being a Quattro, it was 4WD, which worked simply by having a rubber band joining the driving wheels to the other wheels. It won every race because though the band slowed it quite a lot, it never came off at corners. So even on that little plastic electric car, 4WD worked.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 14:54:43 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: By the Fire Time

Joe J........I just clicked on the marine forecast and local weathers. We still have storm warning. The locals are up in the 40 to 50 knot range still.

I'm sure glad I got to scamper down past Sentry Shoal last week and get my last job done.

Well Todd, you know all my hollerin' is just for the exercise. I know how it works for me, so it's.....EVERY MAN FOR HISELF! If you've got two AND another car you drive to work, you're too damn rich! Have a cheery Christmas.

Remember y'all to Jingle Bell Rock.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 14:24:57 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Have a Merry Christmas everyone. Have fun, be safe.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 13:57:22 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Monticello

Hey Howie. Can't find anything on Monticello except in facebook there is a discussion page about Concerts at Monticello and someone mentions two shows by The Band, one where Kris Kristoferson opened.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 13:52:52 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: In the Bleak Midwinter

Subject: God Rest Ye Merry Gentle persons

My favourite Christmas disc, usually our Christmas morning essential, is Christmas Carols" a W.H. Smith budget CD from 1986. It's The English Chorale with organ, but what makes it special is the Altenburg Brass Virtuosi adding bits all along the way. I like no other disc of carols as much. We just discovered it has disc rot! Fine last year, not this. Long unobtainable, I'd guess. Fortunately I put it on my iTunes last year so we could play it in the car, so I can "re-make" a CD of it.

I realized I know juvenile humour words to many of them …

"We three kings of Orient are,

One on a bike, and one in a car …"

One on a scooter, blowing his hooter

following yonder car

Or later

We three Beatles of Liverpool are

Paul on the bus, John in a car

George on a scooter, blowing his hooter

following Ringo Starr.

or

"While shepherds washed their socks by night …"

I'm not allowed to sing these at home. Especially "Good King Wenceslas" which gets rude.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 13:43:15 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Three Generations

Rough weather. High seas. Northerly winds gusting to 100. Ferries all tied up. Think I'll tie up too.

Your holiday link is to Hawksley Workman's "Three Generations (in the Kitchen)".

Good Christmas all.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 13:20:36 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Sadavid's mention of, Christmas must be tonight, reminds me that I heard a version of the song in a mall while shopping the other day. I think it was the Winter, Fire and Snow recording. It was Robbie singing but under mall conditions it's hard to be sure exactly what you're hearing.

Thanks for the wishes , Serenity, and same to you.

Peter, the test for Egyptian cotton is to chew on the fabric a little. If you start speaking with an Arabic accent, caused by a condition called, Egyptian Cotton Mouth, you have the real thing. Remember only a few nibbles or the the effects can be irreversible.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 12:40:15 CET 2010 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Happy holidays to all! Enjoy the tune!


Entered at Fri Dec 24 11:57:02 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: King Cotton

David: There’s some interesting history on King Cotton and Britain. The Lancashire cotton workers were badly-hit by lack of supplies by the Civil War, but remained staunchly anti-slavery. There’s an anti-slavery / Methodist church / working class politics thread running right through. For India and Egypt, more importantly, it was a modernizing boost as the British set up new mass production cotton plantations in both to replace American cotton, and did so extremely rapidly. I was reminded of that this morning, wrapping a present and noting “Egyptian cotton”. For some arcane reason the addition of “Egyptian” to cotton is always a positive. Is it any different to other cotton? Who could tell? Does it mean produced in Egypt, or is it a variety of the plant?


Entered at Fri Dec 24 07:57:25 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Me Too! Just want to wish those who celebrate it, a very Merry Christmas. Be well.


Entered at Fri Dec 24 06:43:59 CET 2010 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario CANADA

Subject: Happy Holidays to all...

Hi guys, long time, but I'm back to wish you all Happy Holidays. Miss you all. Love reading all the posts and checking out the great links.

In the meantime I send this message to you all:

May your heart and home be filled with the wonder and joy of the season, and bring you much happiness through the New Year. I love you all.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 24 06:01:02 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Hey Norm, be careful out there! By the way, I’m not against 4WD. We own two of them. My wife drives one daily and I use the other one for plowing and occasional off-road driving. For most of my daily commuting, I drive a front wheel drive car for slightly better fuel economy (I drive a lot of miles), and a little more cargo space in the back, as well as better acceleration and fewer parts to break.

Had a meeting today with my retirement account guy to do some end of the year review stuff. I asked him about investing in Gold and or Silver as a hedge against inflation. His advice instead was to expand some investments Internationally in some of the growing economies of the world. His point was that gold could be a winner or loser depending on when you get in, and that it could be an expensive buy right now and be risky. But, he said everyone uses toilet paper in good times and bad and you can’t go wrong owning some of that.

Hope everyone who celebrates has a Merry Christmas & Season’s Greetings!


Entered at Fri Dec 24 04:10:29 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Susan Tedeschi...Friars Points Blues Tribute

Susan doing one of her own. Love this song and Susan sings it like she means it...


Entered at Fri Dec 24 02:57:38 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

NB

Subject: Ray LaM. With The Levon Helm Band

You're right Norm, that was top notch (I checked it out just now). Also some quality footage out there of Ray doing "Tears of Rage", possibly even as good a job as Elvis Costello did with Levon this summer in Vancouver.

No worries JQ. NB


Entered at Fri Dec 24 01:27:42 CET 2010 from (24.76.196.211)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: Winterpeg
Web: My link

Subject: don't mention the . . .

Much as I buy the principle of "we've got to keep talking about this stuff so we don't let it happen again," some of these class-action spokesgroups get up my nose from time to time. Like this group of Ukraino-Canuckistanians who protest that _their_ historic suffering is doomed to be short-shrifted in a museum that won't even be operating for at least a couple of years. Something Dada here. And since this piece was published, a body called the German-Canadian Congress has objected to "permanent galleries devoted to the Holocaust and Canada's aboriginal people when no other human rights violation or human suffering is receiving a permanent exhibit."

So, let's have a fight about which parish suffered more. Feh. I think I'll go spin "Christmas Must Be Tonight," just to restore my faith in the species.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:54:36 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: CHECKING IN!

Hey Norm. Been crazy busy. Will check in later.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:52:06 CET 2010 from (166.205.143.218)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Moondog Matinee

NB - Sorry, I was referring to The Band's album -


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:44:20 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, BC
Web: My link

Subject: Tedeschi/Jim Byrnes/JQ/Joe J.

JQ: By underrated album, you're referring to Tedeschi's "Hope and Desire" I'm assuming, that also features the equally great "Lord Protect My Child" (see link), "Soul of A Man" and "You Got The Silver". I was seriously checking it out on Amazon just the other day. A "must-have" just based on those four songs alone, I'd say. I have only her '98 "Just Won't Burn" Cd and need to get more by her. "Hope And Desire" sounds like the one to acquire, (unless someone here suggests otherwise).

Joe J.: You're welcome re: the heads up on the Jim Byrnes CD, "My Walking Stick". Glad you and the Mrs. liked it. Now there's a brand new one out, with which I'm not that familiar yet, (more bluesy, less gospelly, so back to his roots). Hopefully as good as the last two, which were both home runs. NB


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:27:29 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ray Lamontagne

Northern Buoy! On your vid of "The Weight" you posted, did you notice on the sidebar there is another one of Ray singing "The Weight" with Levon's Band.

This is a good vid, not a phone, where the camera zooms to Ray & Larry. COOL! Thanks man.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:10:39 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Richard Manuel

Oh!.........and here's my Christmas present to y'all....


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:07:12 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight

Susan and Derek having the ultimate Band moment, performing "The Weight" with Levon himself. A song Susan and Derek perform live, and regularly I'd say, based on all the youtube versions of it.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:03:39 CET 2010 from (166.205.143.218)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Share Your Love

NB - I'm with you on that one; it's my favorite track on that underrated album.

I don't know who did the original version, but 3 versions I love are this one, a young Aretha Franklin's and Lonnie Mack's.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 23:01:55 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: They showed up!

I was havin' a little panic attack this morning wondering whatever! became of Joe J, JQ, & Bonk. So two of 'em shows up.

Joe howzit on your side. It's so gawd awful here today we went down to get the ferry over to the island to see my old maw and take her some stuff. They cancelled the 8:00 sailing and then the noon. Shit it's howlin' here.

Where in hell is Bonk?? C'mon Carl get up off the gawd damn floor. Northern Buoy give my regards to Mrs Theresa. Good to hear from you JQ.

Cheers to alla yuz.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:55:20 CET 2010 from (166.205.143.218)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Tienamin memory

Steve - I agree with you. I guess we can add active gov't supression as one more tactic in the battle against memories. That's China for sure in this case, but less so with their memory of the cultural revolution.

That tactic isn't required here - we forget my choice.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:53:55 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: Mrs. Trucks Having A Moondog Matinee Moment

"Share Your Love With Me". Very soulful. Worth sitting through the brief commercial intro.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:49:19 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: Mr. and Mrs. Tedeschi

This time creating a bit of a Midnight Ramble vibe.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:42:26 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: Don't Do It

Susan Tedeschi and hubby Derek Trucks having a little Last Waltz moment together.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:42:37 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Can't Forget What You Never Knew

JQ, where are young Chinese going to hear about Tienanmen Sq.? The people who put Tienanmen Sq. into our vocabulary are still in power and young Chinese people don't hear anything about it. Many people in China never heard about it at the time it happened.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 22:04:05 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Merry Christmas and/or Peace to all - especially our genial minder, Jan Hoiberg.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 21:24:43 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Frankie's Fiddle

Asolutely Bill. There's a jig playing now. That is a treasure to me I really appreciate.........Frankie's gone now.

I'm not reading you address so well, and the e mail I have for you doesn't work. Send me an addy, tugmanatshawdotca


Entered at Thu Dec 23 21:17:41 CET 2010 from (32.177.82.163)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: bad memories; "it's better to let that lie now son"

It seems to me sometimes that human cultures have short memories or else manage to put memories away easily or are just plain shallow. The South here didn't really abandon the ethos of the confederacy after the war; its evil was rationalized and still exists somewhat. What ever happened to all those 1950/60's white trash racists; they would only be in their 60's & 70's now. Do they still share a good laugh in good company & revel in their past behavior? Remember the recent comment by Trent Lott?

Versus the Germans who seem to have pretty quickly parted company with the Nazis. And, as discussed here now, have found a way to not let that past be forgotten or gotten over. Fair play to them for that I'd say.

I wonder about the younger generation in China with all their sunny optimism & ambitions; wasn't it their parent's generation that were Mao's victims for many years? And then Tienamin amnesia seemingly too.

Americans, broadly, decided to forget Viet Nam's lessons and then here comes the same shit with Iraq. Can pop culture erase memories over time? Although the study of history has been relegated here to impracticality as far as making bucks is concerned, wouldn't that be the best way to not ever forget?


Entered at Thu Dec 23 21:05:51 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Truh

Westcoaster: That's amazing! We have friends in Barrie, 100 km from here, who haven't gotten their card yet - sent from the same post office by the same person on the same day. Frankie's playing's enough to make you dance a jig, eh?


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:54:48 CET 2010 from (69.113.246.252)

Posted by:

howie

Location: long island, new york

Subject: wrong name

Sorry for the last posting. The person who helped me is named Tim. Thanks again.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:53:59 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The South's Gonna Do It Again

Hell.........Bill that still happens all the time. I've spoken of the fella Rick Dunn who played steel with me for quite a long time. From Spartenburg, South Carolina. Rick had all kinds of stories like that. Also a few other guys that I've known from down there.

This is one of the all time worst tho'. In Sechelt many years ago, around mid seventies. It's November 11, We are in the Royal Canadian Legion, my Dad was a veteran member. There is a fellow who I knew all my life, friend of my Dad's. Japanese named Fred Oikie. Fred was one of the nicest guys you could ever meet always in a suit, real gentleman.

Well this guy who is totally pissed drunk, I didn't know him at all. Anyway he staggers over to the table, looks down at Fred and says well we sure did it to you sons-a-bitches now didn't we. Well Fred was so loved there the dumbass damn near started a riot.

Well I'll be a monkey's uncle. My door bell just rang, and a Canada post delivery lady just handed me a very well wrapped vinyl from Bill Munson. He's been threatening this since time began. Thank you so much Bill. I'd send you a nice jar of picled sockeye, but I know how much you don't like it, so you'll have to settle for a CD.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:51:05 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Tib's Eve

Is it only around here that anyone note's Tib's Eve? My Gran used to insist it was actually called Tipsy Eve by some because this would be the day the menfolk broke out their Christmas shine.

An early gift is a copy of Keith Richards' 'Life'. Don't think I'll get to read it anytime soon but I'll add it to the pile of books I intend to read someday.

I'm a recent convert to 4WD (a RAV4). Drove RWD vans for years. Had one major smash up on black ice. In retrospect I was driving too fast for the conditions. Anyway this is just another wet day down on the coast. Not a chance of a white Christmas.

A Happy Tib's Eve to you all. Must lay in some Christmas liquor.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:49:36 CET 2010 from (69.119.121.96)

Posted by:

Kurt

she said,,,he said


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:48:06 CET 2010 from (69.113.246.252)

Posted by:

howie

Location: long island, new york

Subject: past concert dates

Thanks to Tom from Boston for helping me with past concert dates. Does anyone remember a concert circa 1970, Labor Day weekend at Monticello Raceway?


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:31:04 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: German youth

In college one of my favorite Professors was from Germany. He was in The Hitler Youth. He said it was the equivalent of being in the the Boy Scouts. He lived in the town nearest Dachau. He said that the smell from the ovens was unmistakable. He said that people who claimed that they never knew what was happening were not telling the truth.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:27:04 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: swapping war stories in Courtenay

Westcoaster: Transport your Courtenay story to another time and another place and imagine old Virgil Caine sitting on a barstool and reciting his tale in a tavern just a few miles from an old Union army base. How far into it do you think he'd've gotten?


Entered at Thu Dec 23 20:09:20 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: King Cotton

Peter: I'm sure a great deal of the British ruling class's favour for the Confederacy can be explained in two words -- king cotton. Before the outbreak of the Civil War, most of the cotton that supplied Great Britain's dominant textile industry was imported from the American South. As for the English textile factory workers, it's easy to understand their opposition to slavery, as they understood the realities of harsh working conditions all too well.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 19:50:52 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Basses

Yep, Peter - it was Entwhistle the Ox that cited Dano basses as being unreliable on the bas(s)is that he got through about half a dozen recording the first Who LP. The Ox had a legendarily hard attack so I am not surprised they weren't up to it - let's not forget that Danelectros were made of "Masonite" (a patented variant of hardboard!). Far better are the recent reissues, whatever a vintage fanatic may tell you. Much more solid and built for the road - not to mention cost effective.

Like David, I see no reason for the Ampeg to be unreliable although the originals did have some kind of bass transducer pickup under the bridge - ripping that out and slapping Fender electrics inside would sort that out though. As for amps - well, there are only two classic bass amps really: the Portaflex B15 (great in the studio) and SVT (great on stage) both by Ampeg.

I always forget Rick went to a Gibson bass. I am sure he had his reasons but "Gibson" and "bass" just don't come together well generally. That thick, sludgy Jack Bruce tone was a Gibson - a big sound, sure, but lacking in dynamic response. Far more manageable (if you want a set-neck type bass) was Guilds excellent Starfire bass - just listen to Jack Casady on the live version of "The Other Side Of This Life" on JA's Bless Its Pointed Little Head and weep!


Entered at Thu Dec 23 19:45:45 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Bob Dylan prankster.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 19:40:58 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.192)

Posted by:

Steve

Norm, don't be so hard on two wheel drive pickups. People drive lots of them around here and quite successfully. The trick is let the box fill up with snow and away you go. Our two wheel drive Dodge Pickup had an electronic locking differential and had no problem going through 8 or even 10 inches of snow. You could go til the bumper started plowing. Depending on the kind of snow, clearance is just as important as the number of wheels driving.

My old neighbor,Fred, who always makes the most interesting observations, says that the only difference he sees between two wheel drive and four wheel drive vehicles is when they get stuck the two wheel drives only dig half as many ruts you got to get out of. I always give Fred the last word, you just can't improve on his take on things.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 18:27:59 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rick's Bass Gear

I'm sure the Ampeg fretless was quite reliable enough, as Rick used it on tour, as well as in the studio. Of course he only played the fretless on certain songs. Any of the AUB-1's inherent shortcomings were corrected with modifications -- Rick replaced the bridge and added Fender Precision pickups. Ampeg evidently gave him some equipment at one point and he also used an Ampeg SVT amp. He also favored other basses over the years, such as the Gibson Ripper, which he can be seen using in the photo link that Tim posted earlier. Since the Ripper was relatively inexpensive, it could be replaced & modified easily.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 18:19:21 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rolf Deitrich - Jack Degroom - grade 6

It was pretty hard for me to understand in grade 6, why these guys hated each other. As they were immigrants I at that age had no thoughts about things they had lived through until I was faced with it every day. I was friends with both these guys. Rolf and I hiked around places, swum in the Serpentine River together. One day some how or other Rolf got to talking about how the English started the war. His father was pretty badly shot up I guess which fueled Rolf's hatred. When I metioned how my mum's foks were from Enland and Scotland, that's the last time Rolf spoke to me.

Jack and Peter Degroom, who I asked about this afterward of course had an entirely different point of view. That was the begining of my education with what this kind of thing does. It has stuck with me and made me far more observant of the consequences of different ethnics and what prevails.

I think this is the reason I so much like the satirical stuff that the like of Mel Brooks does. Pointing out the futility of racial profiling and how rediculous it really is. Poking fun at it, having fun with it. However the problem becomes there are people who see no humour in it and just won't let it go. So much for the "melting pot".

Well it goes without saying that trying to stop on ice no matter what the tv commercials tell you is hair raising no matter what. The best thing to do is practice yelling "LOOKOUT!" very loudly and clearly.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:56:46 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 4x 4

I actually have a 4WD, but it's a "soft-roader" not an "off-roader", i.e, it has permanent 4WD, and no switcheability. Mrs V has a small front wheel drive Suzuki. I feel safer in mine, but no more confident of stopping on sheet ice (rather than snow).


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:50:50 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Too much on nationality stuff (from me) …

Guilt, reparations and stuff. You can see the French point of view after WWI, in that the Western campaign was all fought on their land. The film of the swathe of destruction is a powerful reminder. Also, farmers are STILL falling into the trenches and tunnels under their land, dug 90 years ago.

When I first started teaching English (ESL / EFL) it was as a summer job while I was at university, and for three summers I taught young Germans, only three or four years younger than me. We liked each other. We hung out together. We often discussed the British penchant for war comics and films. The British host families would happily say, ‘Good film on tonight. It’s the Dambusters.’ And they’d have to sit through it. Guilt was a major factor, but at that point, 1967-69, it was their Dad’s generation. Not so distant.

I’ve mentioned before. My dad drove the BBC radio truck into Belsen while Richard Dimbleby was broadcasting on the horrific sights. For the remaining twenty years of his life, he woke up almost every night with nightmare visions of what he’d seen. So, for example, he asked my sister’s then boyfriend not to park his Volkswagen car in our driveway. I mentioned this to friends, whose parents had the same view exactly in the early 60s. I’ve driven German cars for fifteen years (well, they are the best) and felt a twinge of guilt when I first bought one. My dad would never have driven one. I have Jewish friends my age who won’t drive one. I mentioned this in a review of Leonard Cohen’s concert at Mercedes World where he sang beneath a revolving Mercedes star. I wondered whether the thought had struck him that the same star was on Hitler’s limo. I’m sure it had. But maybe he’s got a Merc. Who knows? But nearly everyone has a German-made kitchen and kitchen equipment.

Another teaching experience, circa 1975, was trying to teach the word “tattoo”. A German guy in his early 60s who was the friendliest most affable person in the class, pulled up his shirt and pointed beneath his armpit. “Tattoo” he said. And we all stared at the letters “SS” inscribed there. What do you do?

The point so many years on is that generally the British and Germans and Americans tend to like each other. They have a lot in common culturally. A recent book on the immediate post-war period said that was an issue. British and American troops got on far better with the conquered Germans than with the refugees and forced labourers from further east who were still trying to get home. There is a huge national stain from the Nazi era, but it moved through grandad’s generation (still an uncomfortable thought) so now it’s more great-grandad’s generation. I don’t think a 14 year old should beat themself up over it. But I would feel bad if it were my dad or my grandad. The book on WW2 "Bomber Boys" pointed out the huge losses in British and US bomber crews … proportionally far higher than on the ground. And also complained that they got very few accolades after the war or medals, because of Dresden and the like. But I can't say I feel any personal guilt about Dresden. My dad, having been in Belsen directly it was liberated, had none whatsoever.

I don’t know when a national sense of guilt wears out. Take slavery. The British did more to stop the trade than anyone else did, and banned it in 1832. They were also heavily involved in it prior to that. I don’t feel any national guilt coming down as far as me, and find it ludicrous when Blair apologized publicly for the slave trade. Blair, being an upper class toff, was no doubt descended from traders or those who profited from investments in it. I’m descended from Dorset rural poor and Welsh miners. I doubt that my ancestors had a lot (if anything) to do with it, though who knows? But it’s known that during the US Civil War while the British ruling classes had strong Southern sympathies, the working class areas were solidly in support of the Union. The anti-slavery movement in Britain partly evolved into the labour movement.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:49:33 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster: You still see the same "death wish" thing playing out at a more mundane level when toothless Leafs fans go drinking in, say, Windsor, and remind the locals that "We whupped your ass in '62, '63 and '64."

Re the great tire debate, both Steve and Brien are right. Steve's right to point out that they help, but Brien's right in pointing out that they don't help him. Obviously Band fans are perfect at driving and in all other respects, but we must keep in mind that there's a road-full of imperfect non-fans out there and it's those people whose tires we have to worry about.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:48:29 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Keep on Truckin'

You ain't supposed to stop anyways Todd.....just keep on going......gawd damn bunch a kids....


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:44:50 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Spin - Spin - Spin

That's not true Peter. The danger with 4x4 that you need to be aware of, (and if you drive them all the time you learn to have a feel for). If you are on ice and all 4 wheels are driving one wheel will get traction, or more or better traction that the other side of your vehicle and cause your rig to pull one way or turn one way.

If you think that it is irelivant then you and I need to get set down at the bottom of a hill of ice you in your two wheel drive and me in my 4x4 and see who makes it up the hill. There is no comparison for any driving conditions.

They have imroved 4x4 so much in resent years, the way you can engage it without stopping and pushing a lever, or like Warn Hubs, where you have to get out of the vehicle and manually engage them. The thing is too many people don't fully understand how they work. Engaging them while driving makes your vehicle a whole different thing for handling. The whole thing is you have to understand how to use it.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:42:49 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Norm, of course 4x4 is better at getting through snow, mud, and muck. But they don't stop any quicker on ice than any other skateboard. The problem is when people without any common sense push them beyond their reasonable limits. Like any tool or mechanical device, the safety & success rate is up to the user. But I'm sure you know what you're doing. After all, you've spent a lifetime piloting vehicles that don't have any brakes at all!


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:32:02 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 4x 4

4 x 4 obviously have better grip and traction, very noticeable on wet and mud. The point was that on sheet ice, whether you have two or four not spinning is irrelevant.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:29:05 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm enjoying the tyre discussion. My dad worked for John Bull tyres, till they became of Dunlop and then for Dunlop. He used to have winter tyres and white walls for summer (then the big sales drive).

I've been round tyre factories and as a teenager used to go round when he talked on tyre safety. The British legal tread limit is 1.6 mm. The German one 3 mm (better for invading Poland on muddy roads, as Basil would say). In fact, wet weather film records a massive loss of grip well before 3 mm. I always change at the more sensible German limit.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:22:39 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: At The Movies

Bill; It seems that many things that don't effect most people go much deeper, (racially) with a lot of people.

Movies from the 50's & 60's that are shown a lot these days, (there are so many TV channels) with a lot of racial slur and profiling. Example the John Wayne and the "Indians" type of thing. Also many war movies. They affect a lot of younger people in ways that are not noticed.

That is particularly noticeable in our small communities in the way it effects young "First Nations" people. In that way, many of us will forever be paying for broken treaties. Some of these movies rub salt in wounds that just won't heal.

In that same way younger German people, in realizing the truth of what has taken place feel a great deal of humiliation. It is not often any more but I told a while back of an incident that happened to me right in Courtenay.

This was in one way rather funny. Very near my Credit Union where I deal in Courtenay is a big hotel. It has a big pub where I played music for many years, "The Mex". During the afternoon there is a group of old "Vets" that gather there and spend the afternoon sipping their beer and chatting. Many are my friends. So on this particular day I came out of the bank, and as I had some time to wait to get on the ferry and get home I decided to wander over and say hello to the guys.

As I leaned on the bar sipping a beer and jawwing with the guys, there was this German fellow about my age sitting on a bar stool. I don't really know him, but he always seems pretty loud and agressive. Some how, I guess I wasn't paying attention he gets the conversation around to WW2. Maybe he wanted to antagonize these fellows. As the Comox Airbase is only a short ways away these old fellows are all airman who finished out their time there, and then just remained in the Comox Valley. Well this German guy is very loudly declaring the Holocaust was all bullshit, it never happened.

When I suddenly started listening to this guy, I'm looking around at the faces of these old vets. Well holy shit man. Do you have some kind of death wish. I figure any minute, I'm going to have to try and break up a fight between this guy and some eighty year olds.......time to go, by fellas.

I remember as a real young guy playing music in bars and seeing some young big mouth trying to start a fight, or abuse some older guy, who you knew at some time in his life, WW2, Korea, or Nam had to end some one's life some where, and you want to fight with him, are you really crazy.

That always brings me back to that Schell Silversteen song, "The Winner" I posted here one day back there some where. The German fella was just an example of how this bad stuff just rears it's head now and then.

By the way youze guys, on driving in snow. A pickup truck without 4 wheel drive is a useless piece of equipment. I have never owned a pickup that isn't 4x4 since 1975. When you know how to use them even when there isn't snow just out logging roads where there is mud even they are necessary. Logging companies don't even consider buying trucks without 4x4. So to say they are not better is just stupid!


Entered at Thu Dec 23 17:07:24 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Tire Forum

Peter M, Yes, you would want snow tires on all four wheels for the reasons that Steve mentioned. In the old days, on a rear wheel drive vehicle, adding snow tires to the rear wheels would give a traction improvement without affecting handing too much, but it’s different on front wheel drive where all four makes an improvement…. especially when trying to stop. It’s an additional expense to put all four on, but while the snow tires are on, your summer tires are not wearing down while they’re in storage, and you’ll get more years out of them.

The Bridgestone Blizzacks are great in snow and icy conditions, but can sometime feel a little spongy on dry roads, especially as the temperatures warm up. Part of the way they achieve their ability to grip on icy surfaces is their multi cell compound that stays softer than a summer tire does in very cold conditions. They are great at sub-freezing temperatures, but not as good at 50 degrees F. The down side of this is that the softness can feel spongy compared to traditional tires when things warm up and they also wear down fairly quickly on dry roads in warmer temperatures compared to all season tires. The key is to take them off at the first signs of spring, and you’ll get more life out of them.

The Blizzacks are great but a little pricey and wear quickly. Any brand of snow tire should give you an improvement. The other hassle and or expense is getting them changed every spring and winter. I bought my set on a dedicated set of wheels that I could swap myself in my garage. It’s a little extra work, but I can do it at my convenience, and not have to wait in line at the tire shop during the busy seasons twice a year. Plus there’s always the chance that they’ll damage something for you, or notice some other “extra” work that needs to be done. The folks at Tirerack.com are very helpful, have great prices, and can answer any questions that you may have. You can order online, but I usually call them. Good luck, and safe driving.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 16:47:48 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

I especially liked yesterday's outbreak of dadaism. First there was David P's note on Beefheart's passing, then Westcoaster chimes in with that image. We won't even mention the war, or the surreal weather situation in Europe.

Dunc: I took the subway to deliver some sustaining ale to a friend in leafy Riverdale (a mere half-mile due north of Robbie's childhood home) and noticed Murray McLauchlan sitting across from me. He was holding a bag from the Bay, meaning he's mortal and expected to turn up with something nice for the wife on Xmas.

RtO: In your post about the factory-turned housing project, you sound like Basil F, asking "Is that what made Britain Great?"

Westcoaster: Interesting what you say about the guilt of German youth. Both of us grew up at a time and in a society where just about everybody's father had fought in WWII and you heard about the war and the atrocities all the time at school and on TV - and so pretty much internalised the whole thing pretty early on. When I was in Germany in the '80s and was hanging around with Germans in their early 20s, I was struck by the fact that they had only just started to be told about what the Nazis had done, and were really having trouble coming to terms with it. Obviously everyone there would have been quite aware of the fact that Germany had lost the war, but if the truly bad stuff wasn't widely acknowledged until the '80s, then maybe the widespread feelings of guilt didn't start 'til then either.

RtO / Steve: Even if you don't like Arcade Fire in general, I suggest you listen to "Wake Up" from "Funeral" (see link), which gave me the chills when I first heard it - and still does.

Peter V: Another Outlaw was Ken Lundgren, a Canuckistani on the loose in England for a few years. When I spoke with him a few years ago he was living in the same Vancouver suburb as John Booker from the Vipers, so I hooked them up - so they could swap Jet Harris stories if nothing else. I know they spoke, though I don't know that they met before Booker passed away.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 16:30:41 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, got my Danelectros and Ampegs missed … neither being considered "reliable." Yes, I recall a Bill Wyman story, but even so, Hodges would pre-date him. Whatever, Hodges clearly thought of it himself, even if any did pre-exist.

For a fellow-vinyl fan, what got me re-reading bits of Chas Hodges' book was the find of four immaculate Outlaws instrumental singles in a second-hand store, along with nine Ventures singles, all at £1 each.

The Outlaws must have been taken by "Apache" by The Shadows, because their tracks include Sioux Serenade, Indian Brave, Ambush, Valley of the Sioux, Fort Knox and Last Stage West. Ritchie Blackmore was lead guitarist, later in Deep Purple. Hodges has a lot to say on that saying Blackmore had a great sound and could play well BUT to a hardened session player like Hodges, he was in the category of musician who can't play a tune immediately when it's sung to them and have to sit down and work it out. I've heard many people make that distinction, and that only the group who can do it instantly earn a living from sessions.

Another Hodges comment was on supporting The Beatles. He says their harmonies knocked him out as did their originality, but that The Outlaws were more technically accomplished. A brave statement in 2007!

Chas & Dave founded their own "Rockney" label and became professional "cockneys". With those instrumentals was Tommy Bruce's "Buttons and Bows". If Anthony Newley was the first to sing rock in a London / Estuary accent, and David Bowie, then Ian Dury the most successful, then Tommy Bruce in 1961 to 1962 was the second. A lot of his stuff sounds like Ian Dury twenty years later.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 15:32:17 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Touching Bass

Peter: Danelectro introduced the first 6-string bass, but Ampeg first produced the first fretless bass, the AUB-1 model used by Rick Danko. I believe Fender was already making a fretless bass at the time Jaco Pastorius reportedly modified his Jazz bass in the early '70s. A decade earlier, Bill Wyman also removed the frets from one of his electric basses.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 15:04:04 CET 2010 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: new Pics from 76, I think

new to me.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 13:02:38 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.176)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter M, as Todd said, you want the same tires all around. If you have great snow tires on the front and not so great ones on the back, the rear end of the car will try and pas the front end when you break on snow. While it makes the ride more exciting it's less safe.

Pat, the term, friendly fire, has to go.

Rob, Arcade Fire has never, catch a fire, with me either. Some smoke but no ignition.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 09:45:13 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: one more thing

If you've never seen a South African zulu musician on a fretless bass, you ain't seen nothing! Those guys can glide gracefully on that instrument like nothing on earth. Pure musical bliss.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 09:38:36 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen to the ground, and under, Turtle pond
Web: My link

Subject: comments about snow, tire chains & Germans...

What a plethora of stuff to comment on... my, my, my... Todd, you mentioned a '74 Nova. I was hobbled by owning a '73 Vega. F*cking nothing worked in winter. I later had good results with traditional tire chains on a '64 Impala and a '69 Chevy Caprice (a "pop pop mobile" as I called it). Now I'm in a Toyota Echo which I will consider for Blizzak tires as I get older and more scared by the elements. Do I put them only on the front tires? On the subject of 4x4 vehicles, I've seen many of them pass us on the highways, only to see the same vehicles 5-10 miles up the road in the ditch. Can we say, "misplaced overconfidence" ?. Peter, your Fawlty Towers "Germans" reference was well taken. I understand that the series in general, and specifically "The Germans" episode were real favorites of John Lennon's. And, dlew, thanks again for the Scopitone Kinks vid!


Entered at Thu Dec 23 09:04:05 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fretless bass

We’ve discussed the fretless bass a few times. The Danelectro was held to be the first, but Jaco Pastorious is credited with taking the frets off a Fender, so making an actually decent fretless bass guitar. So I was reading Chas Hodges autobiography yesterday. Chas was one of those people who stoll through the history of rock. He was in The Outlaws who became Joe Meek’s house band, and he was in the backing bands for Jerry Lee Lewis and Gene Vincent. Then he joined Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers, then formed Head, Hands & Feet with Albert Lee (a major Band-influenced group), before becoming half of Chas & Dave. He’s a major character in the movie “Telstar.” the Joe Meek biopic.

Anyway, he says he was hanging around waiting to record “Wild Wind” by John Leyton at Joe Meek’s studio, and wondered what his Hofner semi-acoustic would sound like without frets, so did the deed. He says “Wild Wind” is the first song with electric fretless bass (1961). He then used it on other Joe Meek records.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 05:38:02 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

My father was an officer in the 387th Field Artillery. He commanded a 155 mm howitzer and helped seal the northern flank of the German incursion in the battle of the Bulge. After he finished destroying the German army, he trained on the West Coast to invade Japan until they were convinced to surrender. He was also called up for the Korean War but never went overseas. He trained artillerists here.

He was at the front for over 170 days but he rarely talked about it. A few years before he died he opened up about his experiences including the liberation of a Jewish concentration camp. He had few nice words for Germans but seemed most angry at the RAF for killing some of his men in a friendly fire accident.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 01:51:08 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: westcoaster (Smokers & Drinkers)

They do have a good command of feel and a groove, don't they? Apart from the geographical references, that tune "Tupelo Road" screams Nick Lowe circa Rockpile era and more in the meter of the vocal than anything else. Good stuff and well found!


Entered at Thu Dec 23 01:40:30 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Musically Yours

I totaly agree Rob. It was hard to watch young students speaking out over things that happened before they were born. Some crying in total embarrassment. So it is nice to try and put it behind us.

I turned Bill Munson on to a band fron Alaska a while back. I really like what they do. They are pretty young, and do a great job of "Into The Mystic". Their name is pretty "catchy".

"The Council of Smokers & Drinkers"

You can google them on youtube.


Entered at Thu Dec 23 01:26:28 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: westcoaster

Some good arguments, westcoaster. While it is very important to remember the non-Jewish peoples that tend to be relegated to a footnote in Holocaust history but also perished under the Nazis, I don't know about you but I do think it is about time all this business of suing Germany (see also: picking large companies and going through the books to see if they ever used Nazi-provided slave labour) was put to an end. IMHO a line in the sand needs to be drawn, future actions deemed to be revenge rather than justice, and the German nation - that has had the "under new management" sign up twice now since the Nazi era - should not be held accountable for deeds carried out nearly 70 years ago by a regime so extreme that it took a fearsome war to get rid of them!

It is the German people that suffer again - mostly unborn at the time of the atrocities, but end up paying for them. Not just financially either - your point about assumed guilt is a very valid one. I don't walk around shame faced at the thought of the more "colourful" Colonials around the British Empire; I would hope a 37 year old native German didn't feel embarrassed about Auschwitz. But like you say; it is there. People don't deserve that just for being German.

Having ironed out our disagreements today, it is ultimately refreshing that we have enjoyed some exchanges on the subject in a totally unrelated forum; proof that generally we have NOT forgotten how far you can push the boundaries of humanity if you will and neither has the sense of decency to ensure that such appalling episodes never occur again deserted anybody.

Right, enough about the war. Music:

The Arcade Fire - a combo that can seemingly do no wrong if you read monthly mags. Anybody else out there tried and tried and tried some more - but really doesn't see what the fuss is about and remains unimpressed?


Entered at Thu Dec 23 01:06:03 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: When in doubt.......jump out?

Norbert, That video that you linked to was pretty wild. Never saw people jump out of their cars like that before! A large percentage of the accidents that we see here in the winter, often include 4WD SUV’s. In most cases they’re going too fast for the conditions. As Peter says, they might have less of a problem going, but are subject to the same physics as any 2WD car. You could argue that they’re actually more susceptible to accidents, because they often travel faster, and have more weight to them.

The thing about front wheel drive cars having an easier time in snow than rear wheel is true, but it’s important to put snow tires on all four wheels, not just the front. It’s a lot harder to control a front wheel drive car in the snow that has mismatched tires. Another good strategy is to use minus tire sizing, and going to a slightly narrower tire for the snow tire. It has an easier time cutting through the snow and provides better traction and control.

I currently drive a front wheel drive Passat, and aside from the antilock braking system, which most cars have today, it also has an electronic traction control that adjusts the rotation of a tire independently of the others when it senses slippage or loss of traction. I’ve always been a manual shift, like to be in control, type of driver and don’t normally put too much faith in auto controlled anything, but I have to say that the ECT has saved my bacon more than once….especially on icy surfaces, and now I’m a believer. Still, it’s no substitute for common sense and a conservative foot on the accelerator.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 23:34:52 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Blessed are the Greek?

Oh, it's the meek! Well, it's about time they got something!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 23:20:54 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: Maybe someday...but probably not

Christmas Day, 1914 on the Western Front


Entered at Wed Dec 22 22:55:35 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Rob: Yes, the Ardennes campaign is popularly known as the Battle of the Bulge. I've known two veterans of that action -- my late uncle, who was wounded during the battle, and another gentleman who passed away this year. The latter, as a young officer, helped command the battered remnants of a U.S. field artillery battalion, with no infantry training or prior combat experience, as they delayed the advance of more than one German division, including a SS Panzer Regiment at a strategic crossroads at Baraque de Fraiture, Belgium on Dec. 19-23, 1944. Their gallant actions in holding-off the advancing superior forces helped permit the Allied troops crucial time to regroup and stop the Germans short of their objective.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 22:12:43 CET 2010 from (199.86.26.15)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Subject: My top 04 for 2010

I mostly listen to older music, so I heard only four new albums in 2010:

Kings of Leon, "Come Around Sundown"

Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, "I Learned the Hard Way." Is it OK to shout? Miss Sharon Jones! Miss Sharon JONES!! Miss SHARON JONES!!!

Oxford American Southern Music, no. 12

Willie Murphy, "A Shot of Love in a Time of Need" (released in late 2009). Solid funky R&B from veteran Minneapolis hipster.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 22:11:31 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.211)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: WHERRRRRRE'S JOHNNY ? Just Ask Karnak The Canuck

To the geographically challenged Northern Boy( you live in Southern Canada, boy!) you're looking in South America when he's obviously in Central America in a little place called, San Juan Del Rio, taking the waters. He just feels so at home there, for some reason.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 22:04:16 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Universal Soldier

I understand your reasoning Rob. I was not looking to put credit to any one country for winning anything but freedom. You are right in your summation. I don't disagree. However the French deserve to have their flag and souvierenty. I think they have been victimized grossly simply because of logistics.

We are fortunate that we are somewhat removed from a great deal of post war flack that still continues to this day. You can find on the internet how the gypsies of Hungary to this day are fighting a court case they have against Germany for the extermination of 350,000 people.

I watched not long ago a documetary about young folks in Germany at this time who live in a state of guilt over how they perceive the rest of the world sees them. Many require a great deal of counciling to really understand they must let go that feeling of guilt.

David: I've just come from doing a little shopping, and found a CD of "Black Counttry Communion", Joe Bonammas and his loaded band. I'm giving it to my son for Christmas. Some really good material.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:53:14 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Well said David P. That last gasp was a real horror and if I recall correctly it included the Bulge campaign didn't it?

I was driving through Kingston-upon-Thames the other day and shook my head sadly at the old Hawker aircraft factory site - now a drab and faceless housing estate after British Aerospace vacated it. I hope that one day the United Kingdom might get itself an engineering industry once again. Britain WAS great when it made things!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:46:00 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

westcoaster, I am sorry that you felt the flag comment was distasteful, and I thank Steve for pointing out the role of the Union Jack in that era. However, the Russian idea of liberation WAS to uproot swastikas and simply set a hammer and sickle there instead. Not that of the given nation!

I'm just pointing out that where the Allies generally restored sovereignty in their wake, the Red Army would claim as theirs. This is the issue between East and West in the old divided Germany that Norb was telling of, and it could have been avoided if everybody had sung from the same hymnbook instead of, as Norb said "the generations it takes".

I also fancy that bankrupting France as they have tried to do to Germany on occasions, and taking the spoils as liberation reparations to pay off the UK national debt and sort out the transport would be a cracking good idea and a good afternoon's sport, that's all. It might even destroy the EU with any luck! Maybe I'll put it to Vince Cable next time I see him in Twickers.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:42:00 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Lest We Not Forget

During the Christmas season, sixty-six years ago, the last Nazi offensive in the Ardennes area of Belgium & Luxembourg was underway. Facing the German's last gasp in this bloody campaign were American, British and Canadian forces, and the winter weather, especially early on, was a significant factor.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:40:56 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Big Ears - BIG NOSE??

Who you callin' big nose? I'll smash your face I wiw. Well he does 'ave rather a big nose.

Quit picking your nose! I wasn't picking my nose I was scratching it. Well 'e's got such a big nose 'e's got to pick it. Just call me big nose one more time, I'll smash your fucking face I wiw. BIG NOSE....BIG NOSE!!!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:28:07 CET 2010 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Got winter in my blood

Loved Richard singing that song.

25th day of Arctic weather up here. You can normally find it in our mountains and in small bursts in January, February, but it's all over here. We're not geared up to dealing with it... but it does come from time to time...and has taken the head of the transport minister.

Canadians who visit think it's a joke how we deal with the deep snow and heavy frosts. But the problem is they only come in this intensity from time to time. This is worst ever.

Never thought I would ever say this, but I'm missing the pissing rain.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:19:00 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norb: Much the same was said here about 4WD (four wheel drives). 4WD helps greatly with traction on slopes getting up and getting started, but a 4WD car doesn’t stop in a straight line on ice any better than a 2WD. But people think a 4WD car will stop and that they’re invulnerable. Bang. Front wheel drive is definitely better than rear though. And a friend had a late 60s Mustang circa 1971. Fantastic in a straight line, but it didn’t do either corners nor stopping.

The recent exhumed archive film, taken just as WWI ended, of Northern France from the air is incredible. A French airship pilot took it, very early 1919. That whole swathe of France was devastated. Churned up, knocked down, undermined.The extent of those war cemeteries as you drive through is chilling.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 21:06:01 CET 2010 from (91.42.224.122)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Winter Driving

Joan & Todd, in German winters here you must use winter tires by law. But in Holland they just discovered that most accidents in winter weather are caused by people who drive winter tires, expecting miracles.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:53:05 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.211)

Posted by:

Steve

Sorry Norm, but I feel like I should make the corrections ever since I let , BUMBLES, get off with making one of the most outrageous comments I've ever read in the GB; "The US does have a free press", I've never forgiven myself for letting it stand.

By the way, if you want the answer to your riddle I'll need to know; African or Indian.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:48:06 CET 2010 from (91.42.224.122)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Rob, thanks for your reaction. I agree would have been better the east hadn’t been there, but they had the power than to do so, did it and the cold war was born. Think we’ve gone through the eye of the needle a few times, see the tanks roll up to the line literally in 1961 (to see on YouTube also).

Anyway it’s good there was an England and a USA again. The Marshall plan did help West Germany a lot to create Das Wirtshaftswunder. In the Fifties the Germans bought motorcycles and small cars (BMW Isseta, Goggomobil, Messerschmitt, etc.). Later the Opels came and after that the Mercedes .

My wife’s uncle was an English soldier who fought his way from the Normandy to Germany, he never recovered from the monstrosities he’d been through. In fact he fought WWII every day till he died long after the war, he suffered every day again. It always strikes me when we drive through the Belgium and the North of France. The countryside so gentle and lovely, and you can’t imagine that so many million men have suffered and lost their lives there. Next war let our leaders fight themselves, in Gentioux (France) there is a famous monument with says “Maudite soit la guerre” (link), something like “Go to Hell with your war” and they’re right

Christmas: I just heard it on the radio, its official now, we’re gone have a white Christmas over here. That’s fairly seldom, happened only 5 times the last 100 years (last time was 30 years ago).


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:32:27 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Slippin' & Slidin'

Joan, Yes, it only takes one close call to hammer home the reality of the situation. Sounds like you had a scary adventure. By the way my previous car had been a 1974 Chevy Nova that was almost as bad in the snow. My Mustang was a 1985 with a 302 V-8, but it sounds like it had some of the same wet & snow road handling issues as yours did. Great summer car though! The 1966 Mustang along with the Porsche 911 are on my dream list of cars, although it’s unlikely that I’ll ever own either one. Maybe someday when the bills are all paid and I’m an old geezer I can think about it, although I may look a little silly staring down the teenagers at stop lights while revving my engine. Better make sure I’m wearing a hat so that I look the part!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:16:03 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, BC
Web: My link

Subject: Dear Omni Know-It-All

Stevon Farm: As the resident expert on how to be a resident expert, it sounds like you're the only one here with the necessary credentials to clear up an important musical question that, well, quite frankly, has been puzzling the living crap out of me (and probably others) for several years now.

Specifically, HOW COME JOHNNY RIVERS HAS BEEN SPENDING SO MUCH GOD DAMN TIME IN SOUTH AMERICA LATELY ?

Myself, along with the rest of the brain trust over at YOUTUBE, have it narrowed down to the three most likely explanations.

a) As a hobby, he's taken up hunting (ie. hunting REALLY old Nazis).

b) Playing "Secret Agent Man" thousands of times over the years has finally gone to his head, so he's taken it upon himself to spy on Brazil for the US, or

c) Having given up on getting inducted into America's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, he's decided to now focus all his energies on getting into South America's RRHOF.

So Steve, it would be much appreciated if you could enlighten me as to the correct explanation (that is, without fouling up all our hard work by infusing facts into the discussion). NB.

PS. Note in my link how Rivers, who I think is now 68 (so about twenty years Norm's junior) still sounds terrific. Norm, there's about 8 vids from Johnny's concert this year in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Both the sound and visual is quite good in all of them so you may want to check them out.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:13:35 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Todd

I guess we were posting at the same time. I had a '66 Mustang 289 engine.. Great car, but hell on wet pavement. I carried 2 100 lb sandbags in the trunk. The car would fishtale on the slightest bit of wet road. I drove home to NJ from Ohio one time. There was snow on the road. I was in the right lane behind a semi. The lane was pretty clear because of the traffic. I got the bright idea of passing the truck. I pulled into the less traveled left lane. The car started skidding all over the road. I'm trying to get control, and the whole time the semi is bearing down and blowing his horn. I finally got control and pulled over. I just sat there and shook for about a half hour. But on the dry roads it was a great car


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:01:23 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

I loved Ray Davies in drag in that video.

Peter, that's one of my favorite Fawlty Towers episodes.

I used to have studded snow tires around 15 years ago, but with the advent of radial tires, they have been banned on NY roads for years (they tear up the pavement too much.) I guess the attitude is,"If the road is that bad, stay home!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 20:00:52 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Scopitone

Dlew's mention of Scopitone video jukeboxes got me researching them. They're French, and the rival Cinebox was Italian. Some of the looped films are hilarious. Try Sylvie Vartan on "Le Locomotion" from 1962 linked above.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 19:59:40 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Winter Driving

I’m no farmer, but I spent about four winters in the 1990’s plowing snow with a 1949 Ford tractor with chains on the tires. It was on a 250 foot “S” shaped dirt driveway that went uphill from the road to the house. Plowing downhill was pretty easy. Getting back up was sometimes a challenge. I live in a different house now with a 200 foot gravel driveway that’s fairly level. Now I use a Jeep Wrangler with a 7 foot plow. It’s a lot easier than it was with the old tractor on the hill. No chains needed, as the 4 wheel drive seems to handle most of the conditions that we get. The biggest problem is raking the gravel back into the driveway in the Spring. One of these days we’ll pave it.

For road driving, I’m a big fan of the Bridgestone Blizzak snow tires. Even with a front wheel drive vehicle, I find the improvement in handling much better than all season tires on snow, and even in icy conditions.

I spent many years driving all over New England with a rear wheel drive Ford Mustang with perpetually bald all-season (AKA No Season) tires. Just didn’t have the money for decent snow tires in those days. Nothing will hone your winter driving abilities quicker than that. That was a horrible vehicle for winter driving. I used to throw a couple of cinder blocks in the back to add a little more weight, but I don’t think that it helped much. Many more white knuckle-driving adventures than I’d care to remember. Fortunately I always made it where I needed to go, and only went off the road once. As Hunter Thompson used to say, “the only people who know where the edge is are the ones who have gone over it.”

It only takes one time to realize how tenuous the traction can be between the rubber and the road. Once we started having children, I got better vehicles and kept better tires on the cars.

Now that I hear that we’re potentially going to get some snow around Christmas Day, I need to make sure that I have all of my brooms in order…..just in case. :-)


Entered at Wed Dec 22 18:44:22 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thanks Peter. Perfect!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 18:30:48 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fawlty Towers "The Germans"

Basil: Listen, don't mention the war! I mentioned it once, but I think I got away with it all right. [returns to the Germans] So! It's all forgotten now, and let's hear no more about it. So, that's two egg mayonnaise, a prawn Goebbels, a Hermann Goering, and four Colditz salads.

(The younger German woman begins crying).

Basil: Is there something wrong?

Elder Herr: Will you stop talking about the war?

Basil: Me! You started it!

Elder Herr: We did not start it!

Basil: Yes you did — you invaded Poland.



Entered at Wed Dec 22 16:41:03 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ask Steve

Worked up? I would say it was the organ grinder who was getting worked up.

Now you just get back to educating Brien all about winter driving. God knows your the expert......on every thing. I awready got my edoocashin on how much fuel my boat should burn compared to your tractor and yer Volkswagen bug....so.........bug out.

Now any of yuz want to know anything.......about...........ANYTHING!.......ask Steve.

For example, if yer paddling across a river and the wheels fall off yer canoe, how many pancakes can yuh stuff in an elephant's ear???


Entered at Wed Dec 22 15:58:38 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Down in hominy's grotto there's a soul dyin' & leavin'...

"Grand Funk will be more important to the history of rock'n'roll than Captain Beefheart. And you can quote me on that."
--Jon Landau 1970*

Don Van Vliet a/k/a Captain Beefheart passed away last Friday. In the world of music he was an icon for many and an acquired taste for most, a high school bud of Frank Zappa, a Dada-esque Howlin' Wolf meets the abstract expressionist Franz Klein.

Since it's the season, his song "There Ain't No Santa Claus on the Evenin' Stage" comes to mind. Following the primordial blues of "Click Clack" and "Grow Fins" on the B-side of the 1972 Reprise LP "The Spotlight Kid", the Captain wild west take on Santa is the least likely tune to appear on any commercial Christmas compilation.

*Jon Landau, who was then the records review editor at Rolling Stone, made the comment in a discussion with the maverick music critic Lester Bangs, an enthusiastic fan of Captain Beefheart. Several years later Mr. Landau wrote his most famous comment "I saw rock and roll future and its name is Bruce Springsteen", shortly before leaving the world of music criticism to become the manager & co-producer for Mr. Springsteen.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 14:07:33 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.211)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Norm's Flag Flap

Brien, just filling in some details you can add to your winter tire repertoire. We've come a long way in the wars of winter traveling. I remember my father stopping the car on the side of the road in the 60's when the snow was getting deep or icing up and putting chains on the back tires. I'm guessing this was before studded tires were available.

It only took about 10 minutes but it was a hassle. You laid the chains on the snow behind the tires and then backed on to them. Then you had to get down on you knees in the snow and pull them as tight as possible and connect the ends. The ride got considerably noisier and occasionally a link would break, the chain would fly off and a new adventure ( finding the chain) in winter driving would start.

As of a couple of years back it's now the law here that you have to put winter tires on from Dec5th til some time in April.

Norm, why get worked up about the Union Jack comment. The Union Jack was Canada's flag, officially affirmed in 1904. It was the flag your grandfather and mine fought under in WW1. The Red Ensign was used but was never the official flag of Canada. The Union Jack was our flag til 1965.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 05:12:30 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bad Taste?

Rob; First of all your comment of the "Allies" liberating France was tolerable. However your comment, "sticking a Union Jack" in the ground, went a little too far.

This is not a good subject to get carried away on. Especially at this time of year. In WW1, my grand father was at Vimmy Ridge. I expect you know the outcome, and particulars of that conflict.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 04:01:57 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Dead End street

Was banned by the bbc for being in bad taste.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 02:35:08 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

No subject is safe from Stevipedia.

Happy Holidays.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 02:07:55 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: The Kinks wanted their MTV

The Kinks had one of the first video clips (though shot on film...) 'Dead End Street', which featured a 'plot' (which didn't have much to do with the song)... The history of music clips is fascinating. The Beatles, (of course), The Who, The Animals. What's really worth looking at is Scopitone...


Entered at Wed Dec 22 02:05:38 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Norbert (Ost vs West)

Norbert, I always thought the ultimate failure of the allies was leaving the Commies in charge of anything. Flush out one dictatorship and leave a slightly less brutal but nevertheless equally despotic regime in place. Job not done, really! I can bet the West didn't take too kindly to rebuilding the East; why Germany has had to pay out billions in reparations that could have been used internally is scandalous. Forgive me if I am wrong, but it was having to do this the first time round that brought the country to its knees (wasn't it something like 4,000 Reichsmarks for a hot dog in the twenties?) and once again, through the doings of a questionable regime and NOT the people, it happened. and like you say, the West paid for the East come reunification because the money that was leaving Germany hand over fist to still pay off WW1 wasn't there to benefit the people that had earned it.

I'm only half joking when I say that the UK ought to hit France with a serious reparations bill*. This was the country that were sending military police in to turn out civilian pockets in the Ruhr/Rheinland areas to collect small change for reparations when the national coffers were empty.

Then when the Allies liberated France, we not only gave it all back on a plate (sticking a Union Jack into the ground would have been my choice had I been there!) but invited them to have an opinion and be a "power" come Nuremberg and the carve up of Germany. They ought to pay a few quid for the privilege of that too, as well as sorting out the UK National Debt.

*Actually, I lied. I'm not even half joking and mean every word of it.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 01:54:26 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Steve - now you get a sense of how the other half reads. Still after 30 years of being around a repair shop, and in a location that sees winter as well (obviously not Canadian) I feel I had some level of credentials to work with. Let's not forget the orginal intent of the discourse was my sharing of a story with a dusting of snow - if you needed to take it to blizzard levels to make your point, then so be it.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 01:41:54 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ray Davies

Just watched an intriguing new TV documentary / interview on Ray Davies. Most interesting was clips of B&W "60s videos" which appear to be story centred / MTV style. I don't remember them from the era, but I'd say they were years ahead of their time (Dead End Street with The Kinks carrying a coffin was just one example). Tiny clips of Amie MacDonald, Paloma Faith etc from the new one.


Entered at Wed Dec 22 00:47:00 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.219)

Posted by:

Steve

Brien, I'm impressed with your confidence when it comes to explaining snow tires to a Canuckastani who lives through winters of 3 to 6 feet of snow. A winter that begins often at the end of October and still has slush on the roads til early April. Good on ya.

The important feature of snow tires is the softness of the rubber. Tread is important but if your tires are more than three winters old they will start to harden and lose traction at warmer and warmer temperatures.

Our choice in snow tires, because we live on a dirt road/hill that is covered with hard packed snow and ice for between 3 and 4 months every winter,is studded tires. Nothing quite as thrilling as going down our hill, with its two 6 foot deep ditches on either side when it's covered with a half inch layer of freezing rain.

Studded tires are required to come up the hill on some days.

The studs used to wear out after two years but now they add titanium to them and they'll last 4 winters, but we change the tires after 3 anyway.

And of course farming and driving tractors everyday means you could describe my work days as "adventures in traction". Soome day I'll fill you in on ring chains and ice chains. That's Big time traction Brien, Big time!


Entered at Wed Dec 22 00:10:43 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Best of the Year

Peter, I neglected to add the Brian Wilson interpretations of Gershwin and the live Carole King-James Taylor discs to my earlier best of the year list. Both would be near the top. And the King-Taylor concert my youngest brother took me to as a birthday gift was probably the best concert I saw this year.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 22:57:22 CET 2010 from (91.42.252.229)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Ost und West

Put children from one village and one school into two different houses and there will grow two groups that pick on each other. Put them together again and give them one mission that they have to complete together, by helping another and the two groups will grow together again

When the wall fell, some 20 years ago east and West Germans fell into each other arms and they celebrated for a month. But some time later it showed that Ossies and Wessies didn’t like another too much. They had grown apart. The Ossies thought of the Wessies that they where arrogant and the Wessies didn’t like that their money went to rebuilt the east part of the country and they like to hold on to their wealth. Today they still don’t like another. That can take generations to wear.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 22:25:22 CET 2010 from (91.42.252.229)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

The Wall


Entered at Tue Dec 21 22:13:28 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, the profits of BAA were huge. They were forced to sell Gatwick by the monopolies commission here. Gatwick invested £16 million in snow clearing under its new owners. They had serious snow delays but soon picked up. Compare BAA's pittance at Heathrow. Next time I fly internationally. I'll preference Gatwick, in spite of the extra 30 miles drive.

Heads will have to roll. Sadly it will be figuratively when 500,000 people with ruined travel plans wish it were literally. Henry VIII would have done it literally. Put it to a vote. I think public executions of the BAA Board of Directors would rival a Beatles reunion as an attraction. Only a Band reunion would beat it for me.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 21:57:17 CET 2010 from (91.42.252.229)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: snow

Lots of snow here, in 1978-1979 there was even more snow in the north of Holland and Germany (I remember it oh so well, see the link)


Entered at Tue Dec 21 21:43:39 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Nationalisation of railways

Actually, Peter, I thought justice HAD been done the other day. My office is adjacent to the train care depot in Wimbledon; in effect the choo-choos are just the other side of my car park fence.

Anyhoo - the other day I came in and a rake of green carriages with lion/wheel roundels were coming out of the washing shed, spick and span. Sadly it was the heritage set from the Lymington branch having a spruce up, not a sign of change...

And again last week when the snow first came (or the week before) I was out dutifully gritting the approaches to the office when I heard a whoosh! It was a Merchant Navy class steam engine! It's amazing what they drag out when the new CPU-controlled stuff can't cope with a bit of weather!!!!


Entered at Tue Dec 21 21:31:22 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Formally 1970, though in an effort to forestall legislation a number of the larger stations and chains had gotten together in '68 or '69 to pick and push one or two choice slices of Canuckistani vinyl each week. That helped Motherlode, Gainsborough Gallery, Guess Who and some others. '63 was actually a pretty good year for Canadian records on the Toronto charts - with Ronnie Hawkins, Pat Hervey and Jackie Shane doing very well on the April / May charts I pointed to earlier, and with Shirley Matthews, Richie Knight and the Midknights and Ian and Sylvia going to the top of the charts that year.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 21:09:03 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: With regard to the Canadian charts, when were the Canadian content rules in broadcasting implemented?


Entered at Tue Dec 21 20:25:55 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster: A recent purchase of a DVD as an Xmas present for a b-i-l (don't tell him) meant $5 in free merchandise - so I picked a JBs comp out of the used bin. Listening to the opening song, "Doing It To Death", I couldn't help but think of MacLean and MacLean's deathless take on "All Day All Night Mary Ann".


Entered at Tue Dec 21 19:35:17 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bill M Chart

Thanks Bill. I went back to when I graduated form college. I can't believe how much "bubble gum" music was around at that time. It was a trip down memory lane.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 19:14:57 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Snowball Effect

In addition to clearing runways, the problem at airports is further complicated by regulations regarding the de-icing of the airplanes. As variances in weather conditions effect the allowable length of time between de-icing and take-off, the limited number of available runways cleared of snow result in a huge backlog of planes awaiting take-off. They can only sit out in the weather so long before the regulations require that they return for additional de-icing.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 18:46:44 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Steve - snow tires aren't magical cures. Yes they have a different tread to them but in minor snow, that barely cover the ground, it can be argued that it has a negligable effect. Careful driving & experience trumps out in this case - as far as my experience goes. As for ice, tire type rarely matter.

I'm sure Heathrow execs made out like bandits but what does that have to do with what is going on? Would it be prudent to invest in millions of dollars in snow removal equipment when history shows no need? And if they had all that equipment, what good would it have done if you have a staff that isn't trained on what to do with it. And even if they were classroom trained or even started the engines up on things and gave them a spin outside, what real good would that be if you had no practical experience with it? I'm sure there was a lot that could have been done better. My information is so surface that I'm sure it can be picked clean BUT on the surface of it, it looks as though if anything, this lesson will go a long way in being better prepared for a future event. If not, then you can line up the blocks for the head to roll.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 17:42:56 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Canuckistani charts

If you click on April and May '63 at the link above, which arrived courtesy Landmark, you can trace the rise and fall of "Bo Diddley" by Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks (top 10!). I don't think the site says whose chart it was, but I think it was CHUM's rather than a national chart.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 17:34:18 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueZlW38HfX4

Wsstcoaster: You think I have time for anything more than keeping you in line, Mr Smartie-pants? M&Ms was MacLean and Maclean in clubs here in the '70s, but in the '80s it was Martha and the Muffins. I liked 'em all, but not to excess.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 16:56:10 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.219)

Posted by:

Steve

Brien, not having snow tires can make you very cautious on the roads, there's nothing quite like that first moment of realizing that you have no control over where your car is headed.

Those private operators of Heathrow made 1 and a half billion in profits last year so were well enough financed to procure snow removal machinery.

here's the stats for Canada's largest airport, Toronto International. With 10cms of snow on the ground, 9 guys driving the 9 snowplows they have can clear all five runways in 90 minutes.

Heathrow has 150 people (probably working with brooms) trying to remove 5cms. The share holders of Heathrow INC. got the cash and everyone else got the shaft for Christmas. Under today's business practices those Heathrow INC. excs. will probably get large Christmas bonuses.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 16:44:11 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Topsy Turvy

Right at this time, this guest book is the most screwed up place imaginable! Everyone here is talking double. There is more repeated words than ever.

Rob the organ, must be playing with his organ. He's got his subject where his location is supposed to be. Peter is so exasperated at the airport he's typing furiously.

Me....I just was coming out of the shower, humming this stupid tune, and realized it was toilet rock & roll from MacLean & MacLean. I wonder if our international friends know of M & M? I'm sure that Bill Munson has to be a fan, and Sadavid as well.

Like an idiot, I decided to google them on Youtube.....good lord. I'm not putting any of that up here. But Peter, if you never have, google them on youtube. Be sure to play, "I've seen pubic hair". Many years ago my brother delighted in playing that gawd damn song on stage with me all the time.

When this comes up on youtube, there is also on the sidebar the choices for, many, MANY vagina songs. So I know what Sadavid & Bill Munson are doing with all their time.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 16:41:23 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

If the personnel isn't used to these kinds of conditions, how are they suppose to know how to react and respond in the manner in which you think they should. It is all much simpler from the outside to make commentary. Maybe they are inept but from the news we are getting, that storm is something far from the norm. Has the reaction and response been slow - apparently but far better to be safe than sorry. I would far rather be inconvienanced and safe than hurried and possibly dead because the procedures and organization of something wasn't being properly executed all for the glory of saving a buck.

On a micro scale to the issue being faced in England, I remeber traveling in South Carolina once on my way to a conference in Florida. It was mid January. They received a dusting of snow and there were some patches of ice on the roads. The whole area shut down. People were driving as if a blizzard had hit. There were accidents everywhere. For me, it seemed laughable. The snow barely covered the tops of the grass but because these folks rarely ever experienced this kind of thing, they didn't know how to react or respond to it. The news was reporting the Highway departments had no answer or clue what to do. By lunch, there was nothing to see. Like with anything else - if you have no experience with a thing - it can be paralyzing.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 16:37:32 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jawbone

When used as a verb, "jawbone" takes on another meaning. Rather than implying the use of force with an actual weapon, it infers the perception of intimidation or persuation by one using his position or high office to get what they want. What if a thief or con artist uses some sort of ruse, pretending to be some one they're not, as a scam to steal or embezzle, wouldn't jawbone become an appropriate nickname for such a criminal who uses that modus operandi?


Entered at Tue Dec 21 16:23:23 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Steve: I made a few calls, any yes, the army's willing to go shovel out the land of Peter V. The catch (#22) is that they can't get there by plane 'cause the airports are snowed in. And they can't get there by sea because both of Canada's boats were assigned to Afghanistan seven years ago - and are still in hot pursuit of navigable bodies of water there. Anyway, sorry Peter - we tried!


Entered at Tue Dec 21 14:28:19 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The pictures this morning showed the second runway at Heathrow closed as it will be all day, but the service roads are clear, because it’s not that cold and the traffic has cleared them. My son managed to get out yesterday back to the USA after waiting all day. Americans being interviewed are bemused.

I just drove to the shops. The main roads are clear, the pavements are sheet ice with elderly people trying to struggle along them. One fall, a broken hip, and that’s curtains for them. No one regards it as a responsibility to clear pavements outside their houses. Nor do most shops.

The people running British Airports Authority (a Spanish owned company because the government sold it for peanuts) said “But we spent half a million on snow clearing equipment.” The airlines are losing half a BILLION per day.

I think the government should requisition the airport, sack the entire management structure of BAA and move in foreign experts who know how to run an airport. For sure no one here does. They just think it’s a case of having lots of shops selling scarves, perfume and models of London buses.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 14:01:56 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.219)

Posted by:

Steve

ATTENTION, ATTENTION, YOUR ATTENTION, PLEASE, WOULD MR. PETER VINEY AND HIS BROOM PLEASE REPORT TO RUNWAY #2 AT HEATHROW AIRPORT, IMMEDIATELY! THANK YOU.

Have they no snow removal equipment at Heathrow? You'd have thought the guys running the place would have been paying attention to the changes in weather, forecast for central and northern Europe by climate change scientists. They've been saying for the last decade that that part of the planet should expect colder air with increased precipitation. Was no one listening?

You don't have to completely reorganize the country's air service. You could just buy some snow removal equipment. A couple of hundred brooms ought to do it. Or, maybe Bill could lend you the Canadian army if they're not needed for snow removal duty in Toronto at the moment.

Our airport problem in Montreal yesterday was more of a keystone cop episode. A college kid drives friends to Trudeau |International. They're slightly late and in a big hurry. They dash out of the car, which is parked in front of the main terminal and in their excitement leave a car door open. Someone who sees a package on the front seat panics and calls the cops who bring in the tactical squad who close the entrance to the airport causing more delays on one of the busiest travel days of the year.

In the middle of all this the college student returns to explain what happened and that the package is is homework from college. Why does anyone fly anymore?


Entered at Tue Dec 21 12:05:27 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: A little more juice in the juice harp, or at least the jaw bone...

Could there be any kind of relation between the name 'Jawbone' and the name 'Ragtime Willie'?


Entered at Tue Dec 21 09:14:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Maths again

Hmm. This happened last time I tried mentioning numbers. 40 + 25 + 8 isn't £68. Maybe poor maths has blighted my life.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 09:04:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Band gig list

Steven, click "webmaster" at the bottom left of any page to contact Jan Hoiberg who runs this website. You can then offer him the photos.

Complete gig list. Tim Wood has made an excellent start on this with some ticket and poster scans. I have some stuff I assembled from tapes and bootlegs too. I can put you in touch with Tim (just in case he's not reading this), and I can let you have my stuff. Someone has needed to do this for years. It would be ideal if like the Van Morrison gig lists which accumulated in Wavelength magazine, there were set lists where possible. To find my e-mail address, go to any article by me in the Library. One is linked above. Click on my name and the e-mail address will come up.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 08:53:17 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Absolutely right, Rob. The trouble with nationalisation now is they'd employ the same idiots to run it at even higher salaries, and make (say) Glenys Kinnock or Boris Johnston's Uncle Percival chairman of the board. Yes, I'd say sack the lot and bring in German or French railway experts.

The other inanity is that rail fares are going up, and we're told not to take cars into London because of the environment. For two of us, the rail fare (cheap day return) is £98 to London. Plus we have to get to and from the stations. My car uses about £40 in diesel fuel for the return journey, plus £8 congestion charge, plus in the very centre £25 to park for the day. Say £68. So what incentive do we have to use rail? In contrast, a similar 100 mile journey in Italy was £16 each.

Yes, back to seeing the railway (nd the airport) as a public service.


Entered at Tue Dec 21 04:54:37 CET 2010 from (76.228.79.157)

Posted by:

Steven Marcus

Location: Santa Rosa, California
Web: My link

Subject: Complete listing of Hawks/Band concert dates and canceled shows

I have been trying to find a complete listing (ala the Grateful Dead) of every known concert/show performed by The Hawks/The Band. This would include shows scheduled and not performed, or shows canceled after going on sale.

I also have a whole bunch of photo's from the sound check and concert at Stanford on 26 June 1976 that I would love to post on this web site. How do I go about doing this?

Thank you for any and all help! Steven (yes Greil is my brother) Marcus


Entered at Tue Dec 21 02:15:18 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: Nationalisation of transport - and how to do it.

Bravo, Peter - if a little too toe-in-the-water!

Not just the airports. The entire rail network needs to be re-nationalised as well. When every last loco, carriage, wagon and even down to leaflets and compliment slips has a lion and a wheel on it, I say justice is done. Of course, you have to be Eurocentric and a good thing too - an entire board comprised of headhunted Deutsche Bahn and SBB-CFF-FFS seniors needs to be appointed. I doubt we could run a nationalised network at the moment so expertise is required.

How to we pay for this? Sack a few more civil servants to pay the headhunting commission and new salaries! If that is not enough we simply send France a bill for a few billion euros in reparations for Waterloo and liberation during WW2. After all, they hung Germany out to dry for WW1 after everybody else was willing to waive it. I believe Germany has just finished paying for the first war. Just as we have finished paying the USA for WW2 relief. Why not hit France with a similar bill?


Entered at Tue Dec 21 01:08:47 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Santa Clause - The Super Man??

That fat old guy has got to be some kind of super man huh?? I been working all day today. Shopping and now filling stocking and wrapping and putting every thing in it's place. Just for my kids and grand kids.

How in hell does he do it? Those hung over elves can't be that much help. This is one hell of a lot of work.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 23:52:37 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The fury over the closure of Heathrow Airport continues. Today they were refusing people with small kids admission to the terminals with temperaturs of minus six °C. I've flown into and out of Chicago, Warsaw, Budapest and Boston with at least twice as much snow on the ground, but we get four days closure from these total incompetents. I can't understand why the directors of the British Airports Authority, on 6 figure salaries, don't resign on the spot. They should.

The government should re-nationalise the airports – with no compensation whatsoever!


Entered at Mon Dec 20 23:34:38 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: pACIFIC nORTHWEST

Subject: B-B-B-BILL

Jasus Bill, you into the Chriostmas cheer awready?.....read your last post.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 20:16:38 CET 2010 from (68.171.231.20)

Posted by:

Bill M

Vigi: I agree. I've always figured there should be three mixes in the Deluxe Stage Fright - the Todd, the Glynn and the rough one (John Simon's?) that went out to the other two.

Re references to Jewish culture, there's always the the opening verse of "The Weight", which certainly tips its hat to the fabled birth of history's most famous Jewish person. Obviously he's there too in "Must Be Christmas Must Be Tonight'. As for "Rags And Bones", it wasn't analysts but Robbie himself who said the song was built around his paternal grandfather, who'd turned to the rag/bone trade after he immigrated to Toronto from Israel(?).


Entered at Mon Dec 20 20:13:16 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Wiki on the Jew's Harp / Juice Harp / Jaw Harp


Entered at Mon Dec 20 18:22:45 CET 2010 from (68.164.6.248)

Posted by:

Pat B

In Wisconsin they called it a Juice Harp.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 17:55:58 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Jew's Harp

Actually, nowadays they've stopped saying Jew's Harp again in music stores; I assume out of political correctness. Now it is Jaw's harp (note the possesive) so is slap bang in the middle of Jew's and Jaw.

Interesting that the name change might be due to WW2 holocaust - I watched the excellent Thames TV "The World at War" recently (I think it has been shown worldwide umpteen times now but just in case: a 1974 26-episode WW2 documentary made by Thames TV and narrated by Laurence Olivier and generally agreed that it was as close to BBC quality documentary that an independent ever came).

Anyway...Jew's harp. There was a part of the documentary that talked of how harmonicas came to be very highly prized at Auschwitz Birkenau (not difficult to see why; small instrument, easily smuggled in and out, relied on no electricity and eminently playable solo rather than as part of a group). I wonder if this is why Jew's harp has been abandoned (PC reasons aside, the type of harp is inaccurate now). Just a theory - but if you walk into a music shop these days there will be a card display of them on the counter and it will say "Jaw's Harp".


Entered at Mon Dec 20 17:16:23 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.160)

Posted by:

Steve

I don't think it was Bonnie and Clyde that influenced the , But they wrote it too small, line in the song.

Here's a quote from the movie. Bonnie's Mother: You know Clyde, I read about you all in the papers, and I just get scared. Clyde: Now Ms. Parker, don't you believe what you read in all them newspapers. That's the law talkin' there. They want us to look big so they gonna look big when they catch us. And they ain't gonna catch us. 'Cause I'm even better at runnin' than I am at robbin' banks! Shoot, if we'd done half that stuff they said we'd done in that paper, we'd be millionaires by now, wouldn't we? But Ms. Parker, this here's the way we know best how to make money.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 16:12:28 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I love that line about "they wrote it too small" … something's niggling at the back of my mind about Bonnie & Clyde (which had a huge impact in late 1967). Does Clyde or Bonnie get annoyed because the name's spelled wrongly on a Wanted poster?


Entered at Mon Dec 20 16:04:59 CET 2010 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Jawbone

According to the liner notes that came with the 2000 Remastered CD of ‘The Band’ album, John Simon contrasts “Crazy Chester” from ‘The Weight’ who is a real person, with “Jawbone” who he calls a “composite of several underworld characters that The Band had known during their residency with Ronnie Hawkins in the early 1960s and when they gigged as Levon and the Hawks in 1964 and 1965.” Robbie affirms this, but then goes on to say that these things “sometimes have to do with personal experiences and people that you have known”, but that they are not specific stories. Robbie refers to it as “North American mythology in the making."

A quick search shows the song ‘Old Jawbone’ was pretty common at the medicine shows of the American South in the early 1900’s.

I think the unique thing about the character in this song is that he doesn’t see himself as someone who is making mistakes. He knows who he is and has embraced it, regardless of the consequences. “I’m a thief and I dig it”. He’s not ashamed that his name is up on the post office wall. In fact he’s he’s “on edge 'cause they wrote it too small!”


Entered at Mon Dec 20 15:45:23 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live versions

As far as I can see, they didn't do "Jawbone" live. There's always a thinning out of older stuff as each new album comes out … Jemima Surrender disappears once Stage Fright songs have to be incorporated. But Jawbone appears (a) unplayed live (b) uncompiled on the various compilation albums. So was it not a favourite of the guys in The Band? Was it hard to do? Richard vocals tend to get thinned out, as his reliability fluctuated.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 15:18:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jawbone

A lot of the articles are compilations, and Dlew's music comments are worth preserving. Old Jawbone is correctly entitled "De Ole Jawbone" and there are lots of references. Interesting that Robbie used it in "Gangs of New York". It doesn't seem to be on the album, not under that title anyway, and I'm not in the mood to listen through yet. When we did this years ago, everyone commented here and I stitched it all together. Any thoughts (those that are left)?


Entered at Mon Dec 20 14:57:42 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Re: Worst Band cover by major leaguers

Shocking! Bob started it off okay but that other guitarist needs a smaller amp! Plus the idea of Hagar slinging on a Gibson and not knowing the words is ludicrous.

The frightening thing is that the incredibly annoying Scot pop band Travis made a much better show of it! (Linked)


Entered at Mon Dec 20 14:46:38 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Peter: do we have an article in the making here?

Ari: what do you reckon?


Entered at Mon Dec 20 14:02:46 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.160)

Posted by:

Steve

The Dodge commercial was great. I especially liked the, George Washington, NASCAR driver. The clincher is undoubtably, "The two things America got right; Cars and Freedom.

Pretty ballsy statement considering the car companies, Chrysler, included were going tits up til government bailouts of billions of dollars from the US and Canadian govts kept them afloat, again. And as Mr Kristofferson said, Freedom's just another word for nuthin left to lose.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 13:05:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Snowed in so surfing

Subject: More random stuff on Jawbone

OK, more Google on New Orleans. From a book called “The Dance in Place Congo” which looks mid-19th century.

“Other performers rang triangles, and others twanged from jew’s-harps an astonishing amount of sound. Another instrument was the jawbone of some ox, horse or mule, and a key rattled rhytmically along its weatherbeaten teeth.”

A “jew’s harp” is originally a “jaw harp” too.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 12:54:36 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I did a Google and found a subscription article that referred to the Uncle Tom's Cabin show in "Gangs of New York" (Music producer: Robbie Robertson) where they're singing "Old Jawbone." The Google summary brings up a bit, then the actual site is subscription. That brings up a thread of references in the first three albums to older songs (Go Down Moses, Cripple Creek …).


Entered at Mon Dec 20 12:16:13 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: It also occurred to me, re: Jawbone

I wonder if he might be found in 'Gangs of New York', or 'Gangs of New Orleans'... the books, that is...


Entered at Mon Dec 20 11:55:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jawbone

Two odd bits from notes I had when I planned to do articles on all The Band’s songs. In Western Art, Cain is shown slaying Abel with a large jawbone. There are so often Biblical references, and that one sprung out at me because of Virgil Caine on the same album . Samson then slew a thousand Philistines with the jawbone of an ass. If that has any connection at all, it can’t be more than subliminal association, or even concious wordplay.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 11:13:13 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Jeff: Oy indeed... Ari...

Jeff: it took me to the chorus to recognise it... I'll blame the mix... oy...

Ari: authors are human (mostly), and mistakes happen... the best resource to check this stuff is theband.hiof.no ... ;)

Jawbone is a typical Band story - the story of a recidivist who continually makes the same mistakes. Unquestionably, the Hawks crossed these guys all the time - they may well have come across a 'Jawbone' - it doesn't, to me, ring of a nickname you'd just make up (unlike, say 'Lefty', or 'Shotgun', or 'Squeaky' for example) - Jawbone sounds like it's got a story behind the nickname. So, to call it history? Maybe, but not like poor old Virgil Caine (Cain, Kane) or even Ferdinand Demara. At most, I'm guessing Jawbone was someone Robbie or Richard (I'm not sure off hand who wrote the song - a quick look at the relevant page says it was both Richard and Robbie). The time changes suggest that Richard did the chorus, and Robbie did the verses - but that's only speculation on my part (cf, for example 'When you Awake').

Jawbone is one of the most technically difficult band songs - its 7/4 verses (David P.? 7/4? Is that how you count it?) manage to challenge the listener, yet are also 'natural' - these guys were (and are) masterful musicians - any mediocrity can groove in 4/4 (and god knows many try) - to groove in 7 takes chops. I would doubt you'd find Jawbone in a history of anything, but it doesn't matter: it's a great story, a great song and a marvellous basis for much discussion and speculation.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 10:37:32 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jawbone

I don't know, Ari. I just thought it was about a general type of character The Hawks would have run across a lot, but personified as a "Jawbone" in the song. You're thinking that like Ferdinand, it might be inspired by an actual story / person in the press? Could well be. Interesting to research it.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 04:47:32 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: worst band cover by major leaguers

link. a very big fucking oy.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 03:42:14 CET 2010 from (216.165.58.91)

Posted by:

Ari Selinger

Peter, I had read an article that had said something to the effect of "The Band wrote songs about American history. ie "Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" "King Harvest" "Jawbone". That's why I asked. I remember when I found out that Ferdinand The Imposter was about Ferdinand Demara.


Entered at Mon Dec 20 02:14:43 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Peter, I daresay the average author would buy a hardback a month if there was something he/she fancied reading.....


Entered at Sun Dec 19 23:57:48 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The '70s

Subject: 2010

I didn't buy any new music in 2010, except for some Mozart and a bluegrass album called "Palomino" by a group with the strange name of "Trampled By Turtles." My group the Bush Brothers had a good year, although I can't say I was part of it after having my vocal cords operated on. I'm on the mend.

I spent another year in the trees watching the wildlife go by. This fall I had a lot of chances to shoot bucks, but every time I got them in my crosshairs it bothered me that I was going to take a life just to increase my total deer kill....it's bullshit....and I always felt better after I put my weapon down and just admired their beauty.

You see, I can handle not singing anymore and I accept my body getting older and my soul getting softer, but I can't handle the NY Giants blowing today's football game to the fucking Eagles. 32 years ago this happened when our quarterback Joe Pisarcik fumbled the last snap of the game and the Eagles' Herm Edwards picked up the ball and scampered into the end zone for an Eagle victory. These things hurt a lot more than arthritis.

Norm, I liked your Christmas story. And I gotta get over there to Germany sometime to get some of that good food and excellent pilsner beer.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 22:44:11 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dodge & The Redcoats

Steve, I blame Johnny Horton. A lot of those redcoats were Hessians, but if you take the top twenty cars in terms of quality, handling, reliability you won’t find a US manufacturer among them, nor indeed a British one. The Hessians won. Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Volkswagen. Oh, and nowadays, Bentley and Rolls-Royce and Mini. The comments on site are hilarious. Surely Dodge are a bit dodgy?


Entered at Sun Dec 19 22:38:07 CET 2010 from (86.168.212.211)

Posted by:

Simon

Dave H - Thanks for the info about "Picture Book". It's one I might consider getting (the price is good for 6 discs) but on the other hand it does seem like a lot to get through, as you said. I wish they'd do something about the 60's albums as they deserve better sound quality even though I'm no purist in that respect. Some of the very early stuff seems a bit tinny and bass-shy on CD, not how I remember my schoolmates' albums. Then again they were probably on a tight budget back when they were recording them. (Those "God Save The Kinks" t-shirts on Ray's site are cool too)

Great Christmas tale, Norm. I've found that the fish oils have almost eradicated the clicky knees and hip I used to get.

As for albums in 2010 I'd say it's the first time I haven't bought anything new - and that's not because of downloading either - I just haven't had the moolah. Had to sell some stuff in fact. Next year'll be better. Tell a lie though I did buy the Complete Motown Singles box for 1966, and that's fantastic. Downloaded one track from iTunes - "Let Me Back" by Zarif. She's got a really strong voice. Very catchy nu-soul that sounds contemporary and classic at the same time.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 22:26:31 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.193)

Posted by:

Steve

Web: My link

Peter, thought you might enjoy this bit of history. The sound track is different from the TV commercial, which doesn't play the anthem. As I watched this today , during an NFL game,( what else) I thought of you and Bob W. It might be directed by Bob. I'll try and check.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 21:25:45 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah! The Society of Authors (UK) points out that if every author bought one hardback book a month, sales would soar. So, musicians …


Entered at Sun Dec 19 21:09:34 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Best albums of 2010

Midlake "The Courage of Others"

Dan Auerbach (solo album)

Not difficult choices as they are, shamefully, the only two albums I bought this year. And I think Dan A's platter was actually released last year!!!


Entered at Sun Dec 19 20:42:31 CET 2010 from (91.42.250.26)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: hallelujah!

hallelujah (link; a special edition, that's how life can be, wonderful)

Saturday's dinner, dear GB'ers, if you're ever near in Germany please know you're welcome to eat along.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 19:07:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Top albums 2010

Top albums of 2010.

Wot? No new Dylan, no Van Morrison, no Robbie, no Levon, no Paul Simon!

1 Leave Your Sleep – Natalie Merchant (2 album version). Easily the best album of the year, by a mile.

2 Live At The Troubadour- Carole King & James Taylor. Easily the best live, easily the best oldies. There’s a long, long gap between the Top two and the rest.

3 Harper Simon – Harper Simon. Dad's appearance is brief, but he sounds like him and the songs are great.

4 Brian Wilson Reimagines Gershwin – Brian Wilson. Ignore those negative reviews.

5 Garth Hudson Presents A Canadian Celebration of The Band – Various Artists

6 Hunter, Hunter – Amelia Curran. Only had it a week, but no question it’s in. I bought her previous, War Brides, on an Amazon offer, and like it even more, but though new to me, it’s a couple of years old.

7 Praise and Blame – Tom Jones

8 Tin Can Trust – Los Lobos

I’ll stick at eight. The Postmarks, Midlake, Sufjan Stevens are all highly commended, but not quite there.

Reisues and Archive:

1 Come and Get It: The Best of Apple Records

2 The London American Years (1959,1962) Ace

3 Honey & Wine: Songwriter series; Goffin & King Vol 2 Ace

4 The Witmark Demos – Bob Dylan

5 Live On The Sunset Strip – Otis Redding & His Orchestra

6 Folksinger’s Choice – Bob Dylan.

MOST PLAYED ALBUM OF THE YEAR according to iTunes is an oldie: Paris 1919 – John Cale


Entered at Sun Dec 19 16:59:30 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Something Fishy

You are right Peter. Fish oils, and particularly cod liver oil are a very important part of the diet. We are lucky we love fish and have easy access to a lot of it, so it's a main staple of our diet.

Early morning here and just sitting by the fire watching a little show I enjoy. "What ever Happened to". About forgotten celebrities. This line from old Art Linkletter. "Old age is not for sisssies" You gotta love it.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 15:40:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, I tried Glucsomine for about nine months. I stopped it and the arthritic joint got no worse at all. Then I stopped taking high-dose Cod Liver oil, and the symptoms immediately got worse. I tried it out twice, and I reckon the fish liver oil alleviates far more. I asked around. It seems Glucosomine helps more than 50% of people, but not a lot more than 50%. I was told it's always worth trying in case you're one of the lucky ones.


Entered at Sun Dec 19 02:21:45 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Devine Intervention?????

Thursday afternoon I left, listening to the threats of some pretty heavy south east air. The trip I needed to make takes you outside Cape Mudge if you go the short route. This time of year that place can be brutal. There are more than a few big ships laying below the rips off Cape Mudge.

04:00 Friday morning I slipped out of Teakerne Arm, made it through Yuklata Rapids just before slack water. Out Nodales Channel to Discovery Pass, down through Seymour Narrows on a small flood into Menzies Bay. It took less than an hour to load 3 Cat log loaders & 3 shop trucks.

Coming away from Menzies Bay, I now listen to the weather channel to make my decision of which way to go. Cape Mudge still has only SE 12 Knot & Sentry Shoal below has only 8 knots of wind with a ripple on the water. So I cranked the wheel around and slid down past Campbell River out to the Cape. Coming around Cape Mudge there was only a slight motion. I looked toward the smoke of Powell River mill. So instead of heading over to the shelter of Baker Pass, I put my course below Mittlenatch Island and headed straight for that smoke. As I came below Mittlenatch, the wind dropped and it became flat! At 18:30 I put my barge alongside, slipped into the breakwater, (in front of Powell River mill are 10 old concrete ships, huge dinousaurs fromm WW 2). Inside at the ramp I discharged the load, slipped out and headed back for Teakerne Arm. I had my barge fast at midnight, slept a few hours and came home. YEAH!...........It feels good.

I think......always, but particularly in this season, Jan Hoiberg must be a man who understands the importance of the feelings of a real true group of people to keep the passion alive for a "group" of fellows that were important in our lives. They have made many friends here, and like all of them I'm sure...I appreciate it.

There are a core of really concerned compassinate people here. Simon, I thank you for your concern and encouragement. I know of the good of pineapples. I too eat quite a lot. I also, religiously for quite some time used the Gluecosamine sulphate pills, which didn't seem to help a lot. However I do appreciate any, and all suggestions. You can't ever give up and trying anything is always worth while. I do alway eat very healthy and don't over indulge on anything, but "sunshine".

Slipping through Shearwater pass last night down toward the mill just after dark, I was reminded again of my most memorable Christmas. I remember telling this story here,I'm trying to think......8 or 9 years ago. I think some of the folks weren't around here....so if you don't mind indulging me...I'll try and be brief. I'm sure Peter & Norbert remember.

The year was either 1949 or 50. I was 5 or 6, I'd have to ask mom. About 35 miles nor'west of here is Reid Island where we lived. My father along with a couple of parteners operated a small "gypo" logging outfit. The season generally wound up about mid December. The equipment was put to bed and every one readied for Christmas.

On this year for some reason that I can't remember things continued late. As we were going away to my Dad's folks our grand parents in Vancouver for Christmas, we ended up boarding the Union boat at Bold Point stop on Quadra Island on Christmas eve. (You can google Union Steamship Line.).

I think we boarded the "Cardina". My two older brothers and I.....that's all of us there was at that time. Well my brothers were running around exploring I guess. These beautiful old boats were like minny cruise ships. I remember kneeling on a leather bench seat that ran along the wall, (this was right out in front of where I now live). I had my nosed pressed to the window looking out into the black night with huge wet snow flakes coming down. Mum came along and looked at me and said, "Whatever is wrong dear?" I felt almost sick, I said, how is Santa Clause going to find us out on this ship? She said oh don't you worry dear........he knows. Come in the lounge and sit with me. So she takes my hand, and tows me into the lounge. It was, to a 6 year old kid who was growing up in an old bunk house, "beautiful!" There was a big Christmas tree all lit up with electric lights. In our bunk house we had coal oil lights. Every one was dressed up and smiling with the warmth of Christmas.

This young man in a suit came quickly into the lounge whistling and smiling at everyone. He spied the little piano. Went over and sat down at it. He ran through a few riffs, then played "Silver Bells". Now I was used to the old battery radio we had, listening to some of mums old swing music she liked to listen to, or a little old wind up gramaphone, or Dad's guitar. So you can imagine. I sat mesmerized listening to this beautiful song. So I'm sure every one can understand why to this day Silver Bells is my favourite Christmas song.

Pretty soon mum towed me off to the state room and stowed me in my bunk. She said hang your stocking right here dear. Now I didn't have a good feeling about this, but I did it anyway. Well.....in the morning, there in my stocking was an orange, a candy cane, and this cute little wind up dog, that scurried across the floor stood up and barked. So......I knew.........Santa Clause was the smartest guy I know.

I'd like to wish every one, wether you celebrate the season or not the very best of this season and many more safe, happy and healthy ones. Including all those that have deserted us. Particularly all the ladies we miss. Roz, Abby, Jojo, Jaynie, Judy, Julie, Jan, Jersey Girl, Deb, Bones, Knockin Lost John, Bayou Sam, and many more. Hope you are all safe and happy.......


Entered at Sat Dec 18 20:06:49 CET 2010 from (64.229.238.51)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Foul weekend

Sounds scrumptious, Norbert. Save some for me. I'll be down in about 10 hours.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 19:56:57 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Calvin/Norbert

Calvin Nice work on the Burton Ohio page. I'm more familiar with the history of the SE region. (Athens et al)

Norbert: Yummm! You gave me a good idea for dinner.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 19:17:57 CET 2010 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

Simon: I've got "Picture Book." It's good but the post-"Lola" era is definitely overrepresented in comparison to its relative artistic merit. I love the '60s and early '70s Kinks but am not always in the mood to slog through the last few discs. Some people have accused Ray Davies of trying too hard to make a case for the '80s and '90s material instead of loading up the set with '60s classics, but who knows if there were licensing issues or other reasons for it. On the other hand, it is truly career-spanning and is a good way to collect tracks from albums that are otherwise hard to find or not worth acquiring in their entirety.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 18:02:05 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Or Eurostar fare, even....


Entered at Sat Dec 18 18:01:03 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Norbert

Stop it! I curse everyday that I am not on holiday in Germany, particularly at breakfast time. I honestly believe it is worth the Eurostar far just for Laugenbrotchen at breakfast and creamed Savoy cabbage come dinner time...


Entered at Sat Dec 18 16:42:41 CET 2010 from (79.202.180.163)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Fry

Forgot, Simon thanks my friend.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 16:40:58 CET 2010 from (79.202.180.163)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Chicken au Gratin

Cold winter Saturdays afternoons are excellent for home cooking, make something special with a good glass of wine, you only live ones (I guess). Anyway last Saturday we made "Chicken au Gratin" . It's very easy to make ....it's delicious! (even without the lemon and cream, be carefull with the salt though)

4 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) 1 pound button mushrooms, stems discarded, cleaned 2 Tbsp. fresh thyme, chopped 2 garlic cloves, chopped 4 6- to 8-ounce chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized pieces salt and pepper 1 1/2 c. frozen pearl onions, defrosted 3 c. chicken stock 3/4 c. heavy cream 1 c. frozen peas fresh parsley, chopped zest of 1 lemon 1/4 c. plain bread crumbs 1/2 c. grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese 2 Tbsp cold butter, cut into small pieces

Heat a large skillet over med. heat with 2 Tbsp. EVOO. Add the mushrooms and brown, about 4 minutes. Add the thyme, garlic, chicken, salt and pepper. Cook for 3 minutes. Add teh onions and cook 1 minute. Add the chicken stock and cream, cook for 5 minutes. Add the peas, parsley and lemon zest. Toss to combine and cook for 1 minute while you make the topping. In a bowl, combine the bread crumbs and cheese. Transfer the chicken mixture to an oven save baking dish and evenly sprinkle the top with the bread crumb mixture. Dot with cold butter. Place under broiler and brown 1-3 minutes.

In a few hours I let you know how the "honey bacon wrapped chicken" taste (with a Medici Riccardi Bolgheri from the German Lidl), even more easier to make, where's my corkscrew


Entered at Sat Dec 18 16:18:10 CET 2010 from (86.168.212.211)

Posted by:

Simon

Enjoyed the winter of '63 story, Peter. We normally don't get it too bad here but this is probably the most snow I've seen since schooldays. Not complaining, it's just that I've already fallen over twice today. I think you can do more of an injury to yourself by trying to stay on your feet so I'm quite content to just go flying. When it turns into frozen compacted slush I do feel really sorry for the older folk.

Re. the Kinks ... what's that Picture Book boxset like? I haven't heard much Kinks stuff after the '60s - besides the hits. I've still got to get that Village Green 3CD set but I'll order that soon. I believe they will be remastering the Something Else album soon as a 2CD set. Great albums and you wonder what Ray Davies must have thought when they didn't set the charts on fire.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 15:58:36 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: See My Friends

Agree. The Lucinda Williams benefits by not being a "Kinks Top Ten song", but I've got about three various artist CDs where the Lucinda Williams is the best track. Doing the best track is what she does. I liked Lola too with Paloma Faith.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 15:25:44 CET 2010 from (68.106.151.225)

Posted by:

Calvin

I think the Lucinda Williams cut is the best on the album myself Peter. As for Bon Jovi, in an odd way his completely over the top rendering works for me. All though it changes the songs from the original melancholy lament with just Ray singing.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 10:59:15 CET 2010 from (91.42.249.54)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Michael C Ruppert, for a snow day (link).


Entered at Sat Dec 18 09:46:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: See My Friends

I posted on it somewhere back in the mists. I thought the younger acts did better and women worked better than men. But that's so often true on projects like this, because the switch of gender stops the voice comparison. I thought the Springsteen cliched (Weird Al Yankovich does Bruce) and Metallica poor, but I thought Bon Jovi the worst of the lot. I suspect that's because I love Celluloid Heroes irrationally much in the original version and I thought he trampled all over it … but so did Ray in this version. Maybe that's right in the song … don't step on dearest Marilyn, etc

To be fair, I didn't like Jackson Browne doing Waterloo Sunset that much, though he did it very well. It's always been one of my favourite songs, and again, Ray's voice is perfect. I played the album four or five times, but didn't like it as much as the choral versions last year.

Ray did throw out some confusers on Terry & Julie while he was publicizing it. In one interview who said they were his older sisters at Waterloo Station. In the next he said they were two young lovers walking across Waterloo Bridge. We know from the dates of record and film release that the classic pub quiz question (answer: a poster of Terry Stamp and Julie Christie in Far From The Madding Crowd) is wrong. I believed it true for decades. But there was a lot of advance chatter about the film, early enough to have planted the names for the two.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 04:51:25 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: "The Henhouse Tapes"

I didn't include Jeff Newsom's CD in my list of favorite discs of the year. That was an oversight. It is my number one pick--in a class by itself. And Jeff (aka Rollie) really WAS at the Last Waltz.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 01:23:53 CET 2010 from (68.106.151.225)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

A couple of random thoughts and replies.

But first I have my latest project as my web page. I know weve got a lot of history buffs in here, this site is for Burton, Ohio-a small village in the eastern part of the state. The entries cover 1809-1978. Not as cool as the Playhouse Square one my partner and I did, but still interesting. It looks like we are about to start a site for what started out a large Shaker community, but is now a pretty wealthy suburb of Cleveland. I love doing this sort of work though, especially when I come across odd little factoids my clients knew nothing about.

As for RnR HOF inductees, I prefer the Lloyd Price, Little Anthony & The Imperials, Bobby Bland, The Dave Clark Five, The Dells, and Wanda Jackson. Ive been to the Hall 6-7 times (For concerts all but once) and frankly reading about acts I am not really familiar with beats all to hell looking at Stones or Beatles artifacts. I actually walk away learning something when I look at the Lloyd Price exhibit.

I was surprised to see the "Ad" for the photo exhibit on this page. I've seen the William Steele collection. He has/had a gallery about 20 minutes from my place and the first "showing" of the exhibit was at the gallery. He's got a good eye, nothing really all that new per se-but some really great shots if you are a fan.

Anybody able to listen Ray Davies "See my Friends", I see it made it up to No 12 on the UK Album Charts. I guess Ray still means something over there. Sadly not so much in the states. I thought the minor acts all did fine, and Lucinda Williams and Frank Black were great. And oddly enough Bon Jovi was just perfect for the sort of over the topness that is Celluloid Heroes. But I found it sort of funny that the really big names on the Disc, Springsteen and Metallica Fell Flat. But then who decided a bouncy little ditty like Better things was a good song for Springsteen?


Entered at Sat Dec 18 01:22:48 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Steve, When you can either understand, accept, or believe that it is all a act, directed & produced by the ultimate master strategist businessmen, you'll stop asking the questions you ask. There is no politics, once it hits the biggest leagues,it's an act. In the minor and local levels, there is a reality to it of sorts. Still backed by business and money,but they grunt it out in hard work ( that is alos mostly a stroke job) but they pay their dues to get to the big leagues. When they get to the big leagues, they still don't necessarily know the truth.they have a better idea, and may know. But AlGore found out the turth... withotu becoming President. When Bush & the republicans stole the election, don't you think someone sent Gore a personal and detialed message... don't even think about calling us out on this one... this is how it is, this is how it is going to stay. You are fucking ay right we stole it. Push the issue, here is what is going to happen next...... Why else would Gore & The Dems not have tried to take back the electioon they won. ...And that was essentially the end of gore in politics. he disappeared.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:59:15 CET 2010 from (193.35.132.7)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Ari vs PV...

Yes, Peter, capitals is shouting but I must admit with such limited input options I sometimes draft them in as "honorary italics". That said, despite understanding the frustrations of the system earlier I would definitely agree that toys definitely left Ari's pram in an upward direction!


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:51:31 CET 2010 from (193.35.132.43)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: Down the pub

Beefheart dead then. Good job I already have a drink on the table. Ta ta Don.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:40:09 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: In the winter of 63 …

Simon, winter of 63. It snowed on Boxing Day, and it was waist high here in Dorset. The snow was on the ground past Easter, the only time in my life that it lasted more than a week here. For me it was great. We couldn’t ride bikes to school, so we had to catch the bus for three months, shared with the local girl’s school. I was fifteen.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:36:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ari, CAPITALS is shouting. How would any of us know whether "Jawbone" is fact or fiction? The Ronnie Hawkins RS interview, Levon's novel and various other interviews have them shoplifting and siphoning gas. When people don't answer it's not a slight,it's simply that who knows, except Robbie, Levon and Garth? In general, most writers blend experience and imagination, so the result is what we call "fiction" but has a vein of fact / personal experience running below it.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:32:26 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Captain Beefheart

Sad news.


Entered at Sat Dec 18 00:23:39 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Levon home from hospital

This is, of course, good news.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 22:44:23 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Ari/Guestbook limitations

I know what you mean. I also dip into a couple of other web forums where you can start a specified thread topic and people will see that it hasn't been answered and help if they can - or conversely avoid discussions that they cannot contribute to or are not interested in. It is a great advantage in many ways.... ...but you do lose the (mostly) light hearted and whimsical nature where folks just pile in one after the other and it does seem less of a community through added efficiency.

Either format is made AND marred by either the limitations of the "consecutive" guestbook or the thread-based forum. Which is better? Either of them!


Entered at Fri Dec 17 22:37:41 CET 2010 from (86.139.110.231)

Posted by:

Simon

Thinking back on it ... Garth made some comments about boosters in an old Mojo interview and Robbie talked about them when discussing 'Jawbone' in that radio show about "The Band" that was linked to a few weeks back.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 22:19:55 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.224)

Posted by:

Steve

Ari, I don't know.

David, I'm aware of the Golden Calf\Veau it's the actions of The Trojan Horse of a different color that is of interest.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 22:17:58 CET 2010 from (86.139.110.231)

Posted by:

Simon

I genuinely don't know the answer to that one, Ari. I'd imagine the Hawks would've encountered 'boosters', which I understand to be people who would steal to order for people. I've read/heard comments from Garth and Robbie to that effect. Great song in any case and one of my favourites.

No apologies needed, Norbert ... it's snowing pretty heavily here and the t.v. is a bit boring so I enjoy the YouTube stuff. Stephen Fry is a great guy and it's good he covers topics that get brushed under the carpet sometimes.

Thinking about Peter's comments a few days ago about the weather predictions for Britain ... I was talking to people who can remember the winter of 1962/63 and they stressed just how severe it was over here. The place pretty much had it bad all over for three or four months and when it did thaw there was terrible flooding. I've read a few theories claiming it was a contributing factor in the initial impact of the Beatles - the place needed cheering up and all the rest of it. We've probably all read the stories about the Stones and their place in Edith Grove during the same period. No running water, pipes frozen solid.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 21:54:39 CET 2010 from (216.165.58.91)

Posted by:

Ari

This guestbook bugs me sometimes. Obviously I appreciate the intelligent individuals that contribute and begin stimulating discussions that I love to read over, but I'll have this pressing question that I think deserves a some sort of response (if not an answer) and it will remain unaddressed and force me to reiterate. CAN SOMEBODY TELL ME IF JAWBONE IS BASED ON SOMETHING HISTORICAL OR IT IS A WORK OF FICTION. Otherwise, I think this guestbook is always a reliable source for musical discourse and sardonic quips.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 21:31:20 CET 2010 from (79.202.191.242)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Steven Fry

Another brave man (link).

p.s. I watch too much TV today (the weather keeps us inside) and just see all those interesting people walk by today (I'm sorry too).


Entered at Fri Dec 17 21:22:52 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: dry wit

Apologies up front; this isn't Band-related. But it is such a sterling example of funny writing (in a very unfunny situation) that I had to share. It's not often you read a legal judgement that begins "paging Dr. Freud."


Entered at Fri Dec 17 21:12:27 CET 2010 from (79.202.191.242)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: 2010: Silence & Julian Assange

Silence: John Cage "4'33" (link)

In a time where governments know everything about us, the people and we know nothing about them our leaders, our governments the dealers & wealers in the dark. In times where on every single journalist come 10 PR guys, spin doctors and other liars, killing words.... Anyway they try to break his back in disgusting ways. ...for this, all that and more, my man of the year 2010; Julian Assange.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 21:08:08 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: that golden calf

David P: the prodigal veal returneth in "Forbidden Fruit" --

"Deliver us, Lord, from this golden calf / People only want what they cannot have."

This couplet's been ear-worming me lately, thanks to Danny Brooks's spirited delivery.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 20:53:12 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Forefather Pointed To Kingdom Come

"Kingdom Come" from MUSIC FROM BIG PINK (featuring a rare lead vocal by Robbie) mentions a "golden calf", which can be traced back to the Torah and Exodus in the Old Testament


Entered at Fri Dec 17 20:52:25 CET 2010 from (76.234.171.224)

Posted by:

vgcici66

Subject: stage fright: deluxe edition?

is there any chance that a deluxe edition of 'stage fright' might be issued? fans of the band might be interested in being able to compare the todd rundgren mix head-to-head with the glyn johns mix, along with any additional outtakes that might be interesting or integral to the recording sessions.

just curious ... thank you for your time! keep up the good work!


Entered at Fri Dec 17 20:45:55 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.224)

Posted by:

Steve

Hey, Jeff, I thought of you when I heard that some guy has organized a dreidel league in the US( Ny City based of course). The guy was hilarious. as he was being interviewed. He may have been the same person who organized that Deidelorama at oone of the colleges in NY.

So as far as the political thing goes, assuming Obama was serious about making the changes he promised and so many people supported him in, he could just announce he's resigning in mid term.

He can give what ever excuse he wants. But I don't buy fully into the" he has no choice". If so, why will he be so keen to run again? Is he a complete hypocrite?


Entered at Fri Dec 17 20:17:13 CET 2010 from (68.164.6.248)

Posted by:

Pat B

There is an older book titled Bob Dylan Approximately that addresses Dylan as a Jew in search of God. I think it precedes his Christian period. Not having read it for a quarter century, I recall it being interesting.

The only Band song I can think of which has even a slight Jewish bent--at least other analysts made the reference--was Rags and Bones. I assume there might be some Basement Tapes songs from Jewish sources but I'm drawing a blank.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 19:55:54 CET 2010 from (90.239.85.195)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: On a serious side: Copland/Kaplan and Dylan... and maybe The Band

Maybe because I have never known a Jew personally I feel their culture intellectually brilliant when it is at its best, but introvert, closed to us others and emotionally pathetic when it is at the worst. - Well, just like Bob Dylan. In opposite to that I have worked with Muslims and enjoyed their open and peaceful attitude - yet bothered of the same kind of "Arctic hysteria" as my own people in the North.

I have said this before: I hope PETER V, SADAVID, PAT B, DAVID P, and why not Mr. DENER and his cohort could post about Jewish culture and The Band in this site.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 19:44:39 CET 2010 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, lest anyone think i'd gone deaf, just for clarification, I did not compare either of the vocalists ( I did not know whom was whom) to Rick or Richard :-)


Entered at Fri Dec 17 19:38:38 CET 2010 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Steve, I've said it before, I'll say it again, Most likely None of this domestic stuff is up to the President we elect.Very possibly what happens today all been mostly decided and set in motion many years ago by people who are not & do not appear to be politicians. At some point, the person who is just abour to become President, or is president, may get a visit from someone , or some group of peope who explains thigns to him as they are, or possibly even reminds him, remember when... you know why it happeneded that way.... remember this other thing, you know why it happened that way. You are here because .... and here's what you are gonna do, here's what is gona happen next..


Entered at Fri Dec 17 19:33:52 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: nothing was delivered

RtO: bless your DHL fella . . . and in my limited experience, their service is tops. For a contrast, see [My link] - to summarize, dude sees a package tumble from a UPS truck into the street. Dude stops his car, picks up the package, and contacts the addressee, who does a rendez-vous with dude and collects the package.

Reaction from UPS? No apology, no credit. 'You got your package, so what's your problem?'


Entered at Fri Dec 17 18:43:36 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Re PV

A dusting is exactly what South West London (I live two roads away from the start of "London" so hardly feel qualified to speak of the weather in Surrey proper) has had also, and even as we spoke earlier it was dissipating.

The good lady wife did report that it came down quite hard in the city tho' - yet actually quite a sunny spell followed by mid afternoon.

To contrast with peter's tale of the Royal Mail, I can vouch for the efforts of DHL as two days running we have been "carded" due to having the temerity to hold down a day job and not be at home to accept a parcel. How refreshing that the driver left his own mobile number on the second card, took the parcel home and dropped it round at 8.45 precisely today ON HIS WAY to work. Extra mile? Certainly, and commendable in this day and "Nah, s'not my job mate, innit?" age.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 18:41:52 CET 2010 from (90.239.85.195)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Thanks Pat B / Aaron Copland and Bob Dylan

Thanks for your valuable information about Aaron Copland/Kaplan. I don't know how I could keep myself informed otherwise because nowadays I check the internet only once or twice a week and mostly for 10 days forecast - and AL JAZEERA - of course, for the balance.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 18:31:46 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To get away from all that snow

Steve, you're joking. Surely no one goes outside at - 5 °C? Wouldn't you die?

Anyway, Tuesday I was expecting some special delivery stuff from London … next day delivery. It didn't arrive. The post office had cancelled all special deliveries due to extreme weather conditions. That morning I had driven to London and back and had not seen a spot of snow. We'd had it four days earlier, but it thawed on Saturday. They explained that the huge backlog due to two days of snow had caused total chaos. It's back today though, allegedly. We've only seen a dusting at this point.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 18:12:58 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.224)

Posted by:

Steve

Sorry, that subject line, A Horse Of A Different Color, was pertaining to a part of the post that I deleted. It was about that old Trojan war horse Prez Obama.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 18:08:30 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.224)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: A Horse of A Different Color

Peter, I see why you didn't think the weather in the UK was all that dramatic this week. I just checked the weather in southern England ( we have friends arriving there tonight) and the weather forecast warned of another "very cold" night tonight of -5c.

I can see why you think the weather warnings are over-blowin. I'm always hoping that the temperature will remain below -5 during the afternoon so the skiing will be good.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 16:59:40 CET 2010 from (68.171.231.20)

Posted by:

David P

I know, I messed up again. It seems I've jumped ahead and celebrated New Year's early. I meant to say there was no sideman among this year's (2010) inductees.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 16:09:02 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R&R HoF

I noticed that there's been a name change in the awards. Leon Russell will receive the Award for Musical Excellence, formerly known as the Sideman category. No one was inducted last year in that niche, but there were three sidemen inducted in 2009 -- Elvis Presley's rhythm section of Bill Black & D.J. Fontana and the great Spooner Oldham, who has distinguished himself as a major songwriter, as well as a consummate musician.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 16:05:48 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Leon Russell

I was thinking about the "what was your first record purchase" question. I have no idea what the answer is, but the thinking brought back some happy memories. I had a good thing going with 3 older siblings; LP records were preferred gifts at Xmas and birthdays, and we shared our stuff freely. You couldn't always justify buying a title for yourself, but as a gift for sis or bro? Commendably generous.

_A Concert for Bangla Desh_ was one that had us all excited -- for the star power, and the sheer Quality of the package. (_All Things Must Pass_ was of an ilk, Mr. Harrison went luxe all the way.) I loved the whole thing, including the tuning up for the ragas -- but Leon's spot was the track I played over and over and over.

Looking at the clip now, it's striking how many folks they've got on stage and how clean the sound is anyway. Brilliant musicianship or good mixing? And there seem to be a lot of OK folks, Shindogs, etc. -- I wonder if Leon music-directed (à la _Mad Dogs and Englishmen_?)?


Entered at Fri Dec 17 11:21:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RRHOF

Goffin & King plus Leiber & Stoller were early inductees in the non-performer category. 2010 added Greenwich & Barry and Mann & Weill and Mort Schuman, making Neil Diamond pretty obvious for this year.

I think the 2011 list is pretty good, and with Dr John, Leon Russell and Darlene Love they should be able to do a good song at the end.

Looking through, the ones that leapt out for me as not inductees were (1) Carole King in the performer category as well as her early non-performer award, and (2) Ry Cooder and (3) Taj Mahal. You’d have to put Ry down ahead of other musical archaeologists or blues guitarists (e.g. John Mayall, Mike Bloomfield). Al Kooper seems more deserving than his erstwhile partner for lifetime achievement … I mean just the organ part on Like A Rolling Stone is worth it.

Looking back there always seems to be a worthy but not hugely influential inductee. Lloyd Price? Little Anthony & The Imperials? Bobby Bland? The Dave Clark Five? The Dells? Wanda Jackson? It seems as a bit random, in that you could add twenty similar, all well-deserved, but they’re not Chuck Berry, or Muddy Waters or Bruce Springsteen. I’d have to say that this year Darlene Love falls into that category. Paradoxically, she’s the inductee for 2011 I’d most like to see perform, but I can’t see that she was a huge individual influence. Why not (say) Cher, who sang on a lot of the same Spector sessions? Or Ronnie Spector individually (The Ronettes are already in).


Entered at Fri Dec 17 05:34:30 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

The new Sean Wilentz book on Dylan is a must read. Great chapters about Blonde on Blonde and Blind Willie McTell. Also connections between Aaron Copland and Dylan which are extremely interesting.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 04:35:10 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: David P.: In any case...

the score still stands... ;)


Entered at Fri Dec 17 03:29:44 CET 2010 from (206.53.153.7)

Posted by:

David P

dlew919: No, I did say 1993, when the two Morrisons, Cream and CCR were inducted. I'm sure that Peter V had mixed emotions about that year's absentee honorees, Van the Man and backdoor man Jim.


Entered at Fri Dec 17 02:59:28 CET 2010 from (216.165.58.91)

Posted by:

Ari

I heard the other day that Jawbone is not a work of fiction, based on something historical? Yes?


Entered at Fri Dec 17 00:37:50 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

I think it's good that John Mayall himself has not been inducted into the RRHOF. "If it wasn't for Mayall...." Yeah, whatever. If it wasn't for Mayall maybe all the audiences at UK blues/rock pubs and clubs might let go of 1967, give something else a try and not be so effing hostile to change and just live a little!!!!!


Entered at Fri Dec 17 00:14:09 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: David P... 1 of 2 things re: Van...

1) You did state 1994 - Van was inducted in 1993.

2) as far as David P. glitches to dlew919 glitches - the score is David P. 1 (though see (1) above)to dlew919 47 000 657.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 22:59:45 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Rob: What's nice about this new, more affordable model Jazzmaster is that you can get the Tele-like bite with the single-coil pickup and then switch to a Gibson-like growl with the humbucking. The middle position on the toggle switch blends the two together. It gives me a wider range of sounds than my Strat or Tele. Besides that, it's a cool looking retro guitar. I chose the vintage suburst finnish and really like the locking tremelo tailpiece & tune-o-matic bridge.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 22:21:44 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the err...Guitar

Web: My link

Subject: David P/westcoaster

David - have noticed those hybrid Jazzmasters. Do tell how you get on with it from time to time as I've always fancied a J/M with a couple of Gretsch Filtertrons in it.

This'll get the old memories going: aside from a cheap Tele (old 80s Tokai; sunburst; bound body) all my guitar parts on the album - and in general a collecting obsession of mine - is old Harmony instruments. I've got about half a dozen of them and they are absolutely killer; far more so than most items considered a budget instrument back in the day.

Have attached a pic of two of them.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 22:05:49 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R&R HoF Trivia

Dave: Beatles, Stones and Crosby Stills & Nash. Stills was also inducted as a member of Buffalo Springfield, Crosby as a Byrd and Nash as a Hollie. Sometimes Y, Neil Young was not included with CS&N, but honored with Springfield and individually. The three lead guitarists of the inductee Yardbirds are also multiple inductees -- Clapton (Cream & solo), Jeff Beck (individually) and Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin). Lead guitarists for John Mayall, who's not been inducted, have made the grade -- the aforementioned triple winner Clapton, Peter Green with Fleetwood Mac, and Mick Taylor with the Stones. Any more multiple connections?


Entered at Thu Dec 16 21:23:23 CET 2010 from (86.139.110.231)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Norm - I've read many testimonies from people who say pineapples can have beneficial and anti-inflammatory effects re. arthritis. I think the relevant compounds are called bromelins. Might be worth a Google. Arthritis runs in our family and I'd like to keep playing guitar - and I hope David's hands are okay - so I eat two or three pineapples a week. It helps that I really like 'em anyway and besides, they have many other benefits. I thought I'd throw that one out as a thankyou for that post about pistachios (which I also love). Might be worth investigating black elderberry extract too. I believe that grows freely round your neck of the woods.

Been enjoying Rob's videos - good stuff and long may it continue.

Also thanks to dlew for the worst covers link. Comfortably Numb was particularly excruciating but compelling in a playing-with-a-sore tooth kind of way. The above link is pretty special if you're a Sopranos fan ... although I'd have to caution it is indeed Not Suitable For Work. There's a (slight) Band connection to the clip even though they're not mentioned

"Fuckin Van Morrison, right?" cracked me up. Max Koch is one talented fella.

Lastly but by no means leastly ... best wishes to Levon. Get well soon.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:53:43 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gitahs

I noticed than David, because this old "hybrid guitar" I bought when I moved over here to Powell River a year ago last May is similar. It has the Humbucker at the neck and the coil at the bridge.

It has a body shape almost exactly like your Jazz Master. The body is supposed to be an Epiphone, and the neck is an Aria Telecaster neck. Man I do like those two different pickups for the twang, or warm bluesy sound. If I could only play it like my brother Lorne can. He liked it so much, he had to give me a lecture over what a lousy guitar player I am. Said I should just give it to him 'cause I can't play it worth a shit anyway. I was hurt deeply!


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:52:51 CET 2010 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Also, secondary TLW participants Ringo Starr, Ronnie Wood, and Stephen Stills are all members of R&R HOF-inducted groups (two separate groups in Stills's case). Major bonus points for naming all of them! (MAJOR HINT: Rory Storm & the Hurricanes have *not* yet been inducted...)

So I guess that leaves Hawkins, Butterfield, Charles, and Harris on the sidelines, though Emmylou is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. And I suppose Lawrence Ferlinghetti might be a member of the Poetry Hall of Fame, if one existed.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:43:04 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Jorma/Worst Covers

Mike/Kim: ALWAYS good to see or hear Jorma. Early Tuna and Burgers in particular has been a big influence over the years. I posted a song of my own "Ten Tons" the other day. Woudl you believe this started out as an attempt to play "Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning" and grew from there?

Jerry: That was an awful TNTDODD indeed! Same arrangement as Joan Baez - never been fond of that either!


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:35:29 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: The neat feature of the Blacktop Jazzmaster is the two Seymour Duncan pickups -- a hot single-coil at the neck and a humbucking in the bridge position.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:30:37 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jazz Master Blacktop

Well I admire your work David. Mine are so sore right now that if I bump them, the pain is excrutiating. There is only one product I've found that gives me pain relief for a while. It's an anti inflammatory rub called Voltaren.

I looked up those Fender Jazz Master Black tops a while back. Elvis Costello plays one. The body shape reminds me of the old Jaguars. My brother Lorne has an old Jaguar in his collection. There are quite a few youtube videos of people demonstrating those guitars. They are real cool.

Well I got to go, back late on Saturday if all goes well. Then a few weeks off. Susan and I are leaving for Puerto Vallarta on January 10 for a week. An all inclusive little lay in the sun trip for a rest of the old bones. Y'all COME ON DOWN!!!!


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:19:19 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim

Web: My link

Subject: Jorma.

Great to see Jorma keeping his Rick Danko & The Band connections alive by performing The Weight @ The Martin Guitar Tour & teaming up w/ Larry Campbell & others @ The Beacon.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:17:36 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Fret Not, Fear Not

Norm: I'm occasionally bothered with arthritis in my left (fretting) hand. This condition is aggravated when playing a long set on a gig or on songs with a lot of barre chords and difficult fingerings. Despite this handicap, I've recently added a new electric guitar to my arsenal, a Fender Blacktop Jazzmaster HS.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 20:07:40 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Caruso

Here's what I want to hear when I think of Caruso - a great song by Lucio Dalla.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 18:41:48 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Senility..........!

I just came in to have a little breakfast with Susan before I go. When I read that, Bill, then I really laughed. I forgot all about giving it to you.

That's not surprizing Peter. B B King does a commercial for some arthritic product. At the moment, I can't remember what it is. Senility again!

But you know, the Alzhiemers, could be not that bad. You'd only need to own one movie, or one CD. What the hell???

On a DVD I was watching on my tug the other night, (a pretty old one) there was a preview of a movie called "Swing Kids". I wonder if any one has seen it? It's about pre war Germany, and young folks who were against the Nazi movement and into swing music. Some really great dancing & music. I gotta buy it.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 18:25:59 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R&R HoF

How could I forget Van the Man?! Well, he was a no show at the induction ceremony in 1993. The joke that circulated at the time was that Jim Morrison (of the inductee Doors) was more likely to show than the other Morrison. Eric Clapton was also inducted that evening as a member of Cream. The year before he was inducted as a Yardbird and in 2000 he became the only triple inductee when honored individually. In another strange twist at the '93 ceremony, Robbie sat in as a defacto member of CCR, along with Bruce Springsteen and the house band, during the performance segment, as John Fogerty dismissively ignored Stu Cook & Doug Clifford, much as JRR had done years before in an interview.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 18:19:53 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Scotty Moore

Norm: When I saw Scotty Moore, a good 10 years ago, the club owner told me his wife spent a full hour massaging his hands with oils before the performance to unstick them, and that when he came off stage she immediately did the same. He was awesome.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 18:09:10 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The Woods

Subject: The Great Caruso

I've heard about Caruso and those leg kicks he used to do as he finished a song and walked off in the wings....but you have to remember that he wasn't in a class of his own. Dylan could hit the same notes and he claimed he could hold his breath a lot longer than Caruso, so that puts Bob one step up over the Great One.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 18:00:25 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Westcoaster: Glad it got there. An LP is also walking westward towards you; expect it in March, providing the snow's not too deep this winter. As for Ian Tyson's voice, I actually like it - a lot. A few months ago I heard some unannounced stunning song sung by some unrecognisable old-guy voice on CBC Radio. I was transfixed, my wife teared up, neither of us having the foggiest idea that it was the 'new' Tyson singing "From Yellowhead To Yellowstone". A couple tracks from the album can be heard at the link above, though not the title track, unfortunately.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 17:26:35 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: As time goes by

After your discussion yesterday about, "hangin' 'em up",(giving up the singing & performing), it reminds me of the last couple of videos Ian Tyson has done that are on youtube. His voice is a whisper, I'm not sure why he keeps trying.

On this subject, I can relate, and to all of you. If you play, and enjoy just the pleasure of it, even playing a few tunes with your son, imagine. My arthritis has gotten into my right hand, so badly on my first and second finger, it hurts to hold a coffee cup. I can still manage a flat pick, but if this continues, I'm afraid my guitar playing days will soon be behind me.

I never had huge accomplishments in the entertainment business, however. For most my life every where I played music people always seemed to enjoy it. For quite a few years I played with a group of guys who were much better musicians than I, but they always stuck by me, and loved the music I did. At the end of the day...I'm happy with what I did and all the people I shared it with...so that's good enough for me.

That Bill Munson found my address somehow, maybe my brothers website.......he's a crafty guy. Thanks very much Bill.

Well I gotta leave today. One more little trip this year. A local guy here who I move a lot of logging equipment for, needs 3 of his log loaders back from Vancouver Island to get busy at another job at home here, so away I go. The weather is kinda poopy, so I got to get my window here to make a dash there and back...........later.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 17:22:37 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.210)

Posted by:

Steve

Bill, I always appreciate the Pat Paulsen quotes. By the way, did you know that in Haitian Creole, Paulsen means, no pulse?


Entered at Thu Dec 16 16:33:07 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: addendum

The other song that sadavid's Haitian titles remind me of is "Sharks Ate My Wahine", which Amos Garrett performs on the same slide-guitar comps that has Colin Linden covering "Whispering Pines". To quote the great Pat Paulsen, "We all know what a wahine is. It's something you eat on a bahhun with lots of mahustard."


Entered at Thu Dec 16 12:48:17 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm a Finnegan's Wake person, myself, finding Ulysses a bit too much "airport novel easy read". You don't have to be drunk for Joyce to appear totally incoherent.

On the little known 78 rpm disc "Enrico Meets The Original Chieftains Live in Cork" there's a medley of "Take Me Back To Sorrento" segueing into "I'll Tell Me Ma".


Entered at Thu Dec 16 12:24:06 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: No....I'm not drunk

That should be Ulysses, shouldn't it?


Entered at Thu Dec 16 12:22:40 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Dlew

How screamingly drunk does one have to be in order to make reading Uylsses a less daunting task?


Entered at Thu Dec 16 12:09:40 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The other link between Caruso and Irish Poets

If you read 'Ulysses' while screamingly drunk, it sounds Italian... and yes, while Ulysses is not a work of poetry, when you're drunk, you don't care about fine distinctions like that.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 11:38:50 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Neapolitan Cowboy

Peter V: 'tis true.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 11:04:07 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And wasn't Caruso known as The Neapolitan Cowboy, and Eno the Tenor? It's all clear once you think about it.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 10:24:52 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Van & Enrico

It's a rather (not) well-known fact that the Great Caruso used to do high(ish) leg kicks, while wearing a brownish jump suit, during his arias. Hence the link to and influence on Van Morrison


Entered at Thu Dec 16 09:49:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van & RRHOF

You had me worried there, Dlew. It's OK, he was inducted in 1993 by Robbie Robertson, who said:

"Van Morrison's body of work is astounding; it speaks for itself. We don't need to name off these songs - we all know how it affects us. And in the tradition of the great Irish poets and the great soul singers, he is the Caruso of rock and roll"

There may be a degree of incoherence in connecting the parts of the last sentence though. I didn't know Caruso was in the tradition of Irish poets.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 04:15:23 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RRHOF

I was going to say that all the major performers in TLW were now in the RRHOF - but - no Van Morrison? An oversight (more egregious than Rush!) (Or has DAvid P made a rare slip... highly doubtful...) and no Mike Bloomfield... and of course, no Ronnie Hawkins....


Entered at Thu Dec 16 03:50:03 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

I posted this once before and is one of my favorite worst covers. This is Band related as you will soon see...


Entered at Thu Dec 16 03:18:13 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: dLew

Priceless stuff, Mr L, priceless. I've seen the uppermost (Final Countdown) before but the others are individually worth a punt alone.

You can understand the bad Iron Man (they are VERY young, after all) so favourite is definitely the soviet U-boat crew doing Let It Be. Notice how all the lovely ladies in the crew look absolutely identical? If anybody can identify the substance the singer is on, please find me half an ounce and post it to the UK (marked "gift" for customs reasons, obviously).

Ah, the Soviet vocal style. Not that I consider the following gentleman a bad singer - far from it if truth be told - and apologies if this one (linked) has been aired during the time I was absent from this board but I don't see how we can let the great Eduard Khil go unmentioned even if we have all seen it before. Repeatedly.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 02:57:18 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Wrost cover versions

After Rob made it look so easy, I thought I'd show you just how easy it is to do a bad cover... WARNING: May induce laughter.


Entered at Thu Dec 16 02:18:13 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

It's been positively balmy down here on the coast all fall. Rain and fog and 7C again today. Warmer in Labrador than Miami Beach. We did have that hurricane in September. Seems to be a trade off, warmer weather but vicious windstorms.

Rob, I've got to scroll back. Somehow I've missed the link to 'Jake'.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 22:33:04 CET 2010 from (91.42.235.186)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Rob, thanks great song, keep them coming!

Joan, they predict a lot, of snow here tommorow as well (link= German weather warning), .. we'll see, anyway my cell phone is on the charger at the moment.... to be continued. good night from the old cold world.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 21:54:15 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lamont you dummy!

It's the big one this time!....I'm comin' Elizabeth.

My last trip, we had to do a clean up at the native village at the head of Rivers Inlet, plus a lot of abandonded old logging equipment from.......days gone by.

I had 170 tons of old wreck cars & pickups, and about 300 tons of old logging equipment. A D9 cat, a D8, a log skidder, wheel loader and blah, blah, blah. My friend who is manager of ABC Recycling and I have cleaned up many sites on this coast.

Well with this last load, it looked so gawd awful on my barge, all the guys started calling my deck hand and I "Sanford & Son". Bunch a smart ass sons-a-..........

I got pictures of me loading this D8 Cat bulldozer, walking it right up on the pike of wreck cars. The manifold was broke, and the turbo-charger was siezed. The gawd damn thing was drinking it's own exhaust. It's a hilarious picture one of the guys took. It's smoking so bad it looked like it was on fire. I breathed so much carbon monoxside, I had to get the first aid guy to come down and let me breath oxygen for 15 minutes. That stuff is too damn dangerous and you can wake up dead real quick without even knowing it.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 21:07:57 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.222)

Posted by:

Steve

SADAVID, Norm, has been known to chache sourit bobo , but only on Samedi soir. The rest of the week he's a yoyo man.

Bill, so what was all that calling out the army, once again, about if it didn't really snow? Is this someway of justifying having an army? We need them just in case it snows in or near Toronto.

My mother has been talking to her summer neighbors up where her farm is. They got 7 inches of rain in 24 hours, the ocean is getting ready to claim two train bridges right at the end of the peninsula near her place Ther's only one highway around the end of the peninsula and it's washed away in at least two places.

Some of her neighbors have water in their basements and they live just below the crest of a hill. The winds were 100kms an hour and the waves were moving the local wharf about 6 inches from side to side. Not good news. Tonight it's all supposed to freeze and turn to snow with more gale force winds.

I call it exciting!


Entered at Wed Dec 15 21:04:34 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Thanks again. Good thing you still have a browser, what with those hungry mice around.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:53:32 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: don't make this stuff up

Bill M (and Mr. Jones, if your heart can stand it): see [My link]; click on "Listen to samples" (just beneath the cover art in my browser). Butcher a rooster at midnight. Enjoy.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:44:17 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Inductees Waltz

The Band was inducted into the R&R Hall of Fame in 1994, preceeded by Last Waltz guest performers Muddy Waters in 1987 and Bob Dylan in 1988. They were followed by fellow guests Neil Young in 1995, Joni Mitchell 1997, the Staple Singers 1999 and Eric Clapton 2000. Next year they will be joined by fellow Waltzers "Dr. John" Mac Rebennack and Neil Diamond.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:40:58 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Where are you finding that stuff? Sounds terrific. Gotta say those Haitian mice are equal-opportunity grazers eh! Reminds me to ask if you think that Zappa bowdlerised one of the tunes into "Weasels Ripped My Flesh"?


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:36:28 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Twisted Sister

That Winnypeg kid is one sick individual.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:20:38 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: bless Alan Lomax

Bill M: thanks for that link. I've been listening to some clips on Amazon, and I just might have to take out a third mortgage and buy the box. Great stuff, and some intriguing titles: "Master of the Crossroads, Here is the Devil," "Gabriel, You are My Voudou." Lots of songs to Papa Legba. Plus the (apparently) purely carnal: "Mwen chache yoyo (I'm looking for some dick)." And the "Rag Mama Rag" prototype "Sourit kaba bobo a (mice have eaten my vagina)."


Entered at Wed Dec 15 20:10:01 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Thanks

Guys thanks so much for all your kind comments; never ever thought I would be compared to Rick Danko. Other than predictable "Well, that Rick Danko, he could sing...Rob on the other hand......etc"


Entered at Wed Dec 15 19:49:15 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: RTO/weather

Rob, thanks for "Get Up Jake" I love that song. Strangely, I had it as an "earworm" just last night. I'm looking forward to the whole CD.

I don't know about media hysteria, but its awfully cold very early in the season here. A lot of snow north of here. Its not "Global Warming" its "Global Wierding" . Crazy weather.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 19:38:52 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Today's Daily Star front page had news that this will be the worst winter "For fifty years … since 1963" (let's ignore the fact that's 47 years) and that "thick snow will coat the ground to the end of February." I see. I think it is paucity of news.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 19:37:47 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: too much of me, I know, but ...

... I feel obligated to point you to a really interesting article in today's "Globe and Mail" titled Alan Lomax in Haiti: ‘Humongous riches from the poorest country’". You'll have to go to the link and scroll down towards the bottom; that way you'll note the important Beiber-news, the less important Gosling-news and another interesting article on the anticipated death of liner notes - featuring many quotes from Band note-writer Rob Bowman.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 18:33:00 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Steve: Unlike you, I think the reason why weather's in the news is that the media wants to keep us frightened ALL THE TIME. Crime's down, terrorism's a long way away, Julian "Condom-Ripper" Assange is in jail, so the only arrow in the quiver is SNOW STORM / TORRENTIAL RAINS / TOO MUCH KILLER SUNLIGHT - details at 6:00. A colleague in Ottawa sent me an email to ask how we were given the walloping the media there was saying we were getting. I said, "Storm? Jesus christ there are still bare patches on the parking lot!" While true, that may have been understating things, as there's still a good centimetre on the grass verges.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 17:58:06 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.222)

Posted by:

Steve

Rob, nice job on Jake. All you have to do now to take possession of the song, a la Ricky D, is start changing some of the lyrics.

Anyone else starting to notice how weather and weather related disasters are now becoming part of your everyday news cast as opposed to a separate segment at the end of the news?

I think it was in Tim Flannery's book, The Weather Makers, that he mentioned that once this started to happen climate change had moved through another one of climate's " Magic Gates". Magic gates are one way portals, unfortunately. The most exciting part of all this climatic change is that the change we are feeling is from CO2 put into the atmosphere before 1960. So hold on to your hats it's going to be a wild ride.

One more great singer who should hang it up, according to my brother in law and his wife, is Gordon Lightfoot. They're devoted fans of Gord but after seeing him last year in Rhode Island said that his voice just can't bring the magic to his songs anymore. Too thin and weak.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 16:12:32 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: talk about deracination!

RtO: Nice job. I wonder what Jake thought when he got up and realised that he'd have to hop a green double-decker out of Worcester Park Station. Probably did what we all do the first time in England - head for the top deck and sit at the front. Wheee-haaw!


Entered at Wed Dec 15 11:32:44 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rob the Danko?

I'm glad I'm not the only one who hears shadows of rick in rob's voice...


Entered at Wed Dec 15 06:41:06 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: nice values Rob

And I'm sure Butch would be proud of your motives...


Entered at Wed Dec 15 06:39:19 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen turtle pond

Subject: secret YouTube posting?

Hey Rob, Nice work. Heard Garth & Richard flavorings throughout. Been Looking forward to some of your real music ever since I heard "The Lowery From the Twilight Zone" hum. NOT disappointed! Thanks, man.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 06:25:19 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: rock and roll hall of fame

Neil Diamond in. (fair call, too, in all honesty). Dr John in (well past time.) Alice Cooper in. (well past time.) Darlene Love (Spector singer) in. (Well deserved.) And Tom waits (whom I don't 'get' but no doubt that he's got a huge following and much influence.) Still no KISS. Still no Rush. Still no Donovan.

The original link (removed before I posted) had Neil Young, as an amusing discussion in the comments document. \


Entered at Wed Dec 15 04:50:24 CET 2010 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, I listened to most of your song but was interrupted. The sound was excellent and the way in very good , excellent playing. Lots of talent. Obviously, in places there were intended likenesses to Danko Manuel vocal treatments.and from the one half assed listen, probably the closest in some things that I've heard.

Joe J, you are welocme and i'm glad you enjoy Deliverin.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 04:39:05 CET 2010 from (174.119.141.60)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Bobby Dean and the Gems

Bill M: Never saw Bobby Dean and the Gems in the 50's or 60's. I spent most of my matinee time in the Concord. I don't recall them playing there. Nice to see a cd release at this stage of a man's career.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 03:25:07 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Cover version

After some very encouraging responses to the two original songs I have posted to YouTube and linked to here, and also conscious of the original request to hear the Lowrey organ played rather than the "Honking" self-oscillation video I also posted, I have uploaded the above.

It is only available by clicking the link and is NOT listed on YouTube having exercised the "private" option. The reason for this is that come release of the CD I intend to give JR2 his full credit and recompense. This is listed therefore as for evaluation purposes only and I'd like to keep it that way.

But yes - it is a tune featuring your truly on the Lowrey and it is a cover version relevant to this guestbook. Enjoy and comment here as you see fit......


Entered at Wed Dec 15 00:40:14 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: 1 other album

Probably my favourite - Steve Martin - the Crow - not your usual star vanity project.


Entered at Wed Dec 15 00:30:20 CET 2010 from (68.20.39.230)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago
Web: My link

Nice video of Levon, Butterfield, Dr. John, and (I think) David Sanborn. "Slow Down," maybe late 70s. Fat, rolling beat from Levon, great stuff.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 23:02:33 CET 2010 from (91.42.247.239)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Claude Nougaro

Before I go to bed; Claude Nougaro, great French singer (chanteur) and a great man. Check him out on a lazy snowy Friday evening. Good night.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 22:30:43 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

On Sunday I attended the CD launch of the very first CD (and in fact the very first record) by Bobby Dean Blackburn, who'd turned 70 the day before. Sounded great. JT must've seen Bobby Dean and the Gems, who played up and down Yonge Street back in the day - beginning in the late '50s. Guesting on sax was the great Steve Kennedy, who, as bandleader at the Bluenote after-hours club from about '60 to '65, would've played with most, if not all, of the Hawks. Later a charter member of Motherlode and the lead vocalist on Dr Music's "Try A Little Bit Harder" (which I mentioned last weeks as one of my first 10 singles) and "Sun Goes By" (which he also wrote).


Entered at Tue Dec 14 22:25:52 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: different "It Makes No Difference"s

This is cool -- an internet project that collects cover versions -- this page is "It Makes No Difference." The video of The Band in Japan '83 is worth the price of admission. I hadn't heard the Solomon Burke before, works well as a soul tune.

I also found entries for "Ophelia," "Dixie," "Don't Do It" and "Long Black Veil" but haven't got to those yet.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 22:14:29 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

This year I saw both John Cale and Judy Collins. Both retained absolutely 100% vocal power, and both gave brilliant shows. John Cale (Paris 1919 show) was as good a show as I've ever seen. A year earlier, Leonard Cohen (who I saw three times in a year) was as good as he ever was.

Sadly, I think Dylan has gone way, way past the point of listenability on a live show. I'd never line up to see him again. Levon's still great though. But was always a "sanger" with a greater range than Bob.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 21:09:08 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The 'changing/aging' voice

I couldn't resist. Top 5 changing/aging voices. What did we expect anyway. Everything changes as it ages. We do what we can and hopes it passes the test. 1) Bob Dylan (retire? No way. His new 'voice' suits his new music and I'm as interested in the new material as the older gems; and besides, interpretation is the excitement of attending the concerts. If all one wants is what was before, don't go. 2) Levon Helm - good reason, but still sounds great. 3) Keith Richards - always in question but always interesting; again it suits the material 4) Paul McCartney - sounded pretty good to me; maybe a couple of the higher registers missed this weekend, but still damned good 5) a lot of people tied for 5th (J.J. Cale, Clapton, RR, even Leonard Cohen, though there may not be that much of a change when you listen to the old stuff and compare it to the new). In the other gender category come 1) Marianne Faithful 2) Joni Mitchell (to some degree) 3) Judy Collins- still sounds pretty good to me in the newest material. The longlived women performers in general still sound pretty good. Carol King did sound great with James Taylor in those recent concerts.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 20:26:54 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.252)

Posted by:

Steve

I was kinder to James than that, only saying he doesn't stretch the vocal chords but unlike the other two he should be considered a singer. He can sing harmony quite nicely and that's a feather in a singer's cap.

I stumbled across one of the many repeats of Eddy Sullivan's rock and roll shows on Sunday.

I'm seeing many of the performers I heard as a kid for the first time. It's actually quite funny watching Peter Noone sing Mrs. Brown with the goofy face making.He must have been 17 or 18 at the tiime of the Sullivan show.

Sly was the best of the lot on that show. What energy, what a band. He was a step ahead of the pack when it came to doing a live performance.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 20:08:59 CET 2010 from (166.129.4.112)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: MLB, early returns

Philly may have have the best starting pitching now, but Boston looks genuinely awesome and, given NYY's lack of action, is an easy pick for going all the way -


Entered at Tue Dec 14 19:49:34 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Steve: James Taylor sounds the same? Too bad, as he was always been in the Ringo / Robbie bucket when it comes to singing. Used to be one heck of a songwriter though: "The first of December was covered with snow, and so was the turnpike from Stockbridge to Boston". And that sandwich song that Emmylou covered so nicely.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 19:45:37 CET 2010 from (83.82.232.6)

Posted by:

The Mad Arab

Location: The Low Lands

Wow, I just managed to get my hands on "The Complete Last Waltz". My personal highlight must be "Rag Mama Rag", I loved seeing Rick on a fiddle.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 19:40:41 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.252)

Posted by:

Steve

Yes Bill,and preferably, with a little help from his friends.

Carole King ( 4 months older than Sir P) and James Taylor both seem to have held up pretty well, vocally, but don't do songs that stretch the vocal chords as much as some of Paul's songs do.

Tony Bennett, at 84, seems to be fighting the good fight a little better than most when it comes to keeping the pipes going. I heard him last year and he sounded as good as most guys do in their 50's or 60's.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 17:52:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To be fair, the Ringo clip is 2005. The Paul clip is 2010. At this point in life, five years is a very long time. The other thing is true … Ringo sounded like that before he was thirty. But you can't do Little Richard pitch at Paul's age. Sinatra was appalling in his last few years. Happens to everyone.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 17:46:17 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Ringo

Steve: Are you saying that all he's gotta do is act naturally?


Entered at Tue Dec 14 17:28:40 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.252)

Posted by:

Steve

Me.

I'd say the same Paul/Ringo case can be made for Levon and Robbie. Both Ringo and Robbie are talking range, singers. As long as they can talk they won't lose much of their vocal singing range.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 17:26:42 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Mr Apollo ... the greatest benefactor of mankind

Live at the Apollo means just one thing to me - a guy coming out in a cape and knocking the crowd for a loop. If Paul McCartney can no longer handle "Jet", then he's probably not even going to attempt "Please Please Please". And now, thanks to you people, I have a Bonzo Dog earworm - two separate gorillas in fact.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 17:10:19 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Macca

Thanks for the link Brien. I saw Paul on Letterman the other night and I have to agree with you about his voice. He sang "Jet" & "Band on the Run", and I have to say that it was almost painful watching him try to hit some of those glorious notes that he just can't hit anymore. Who would have imagines a time when Ringo could reproduce his songs live better than Paul.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 15:43:37 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Paul at the Apollo

Paul McCartney was in town and played at the Apollo Theater in NYC. Someone I knew went and sat in the 4th row - he said it was a star filled night. He sat right near Kieth Richards - he posted a bunch of pics on Facebook. Anyway - he linked someone's Youtube video from the show of Paul singing Maybe I'm Amazed. Personally it's one of my favorites but as you can tell from viewing this that Paul's best days of singing are behind him.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 13:56:01 CET 2010 from (184.151.127.189)

Posted by:

Steve

JQ, I thought you'd severed ties with the blues.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 12:43:26 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Didn't buy a lot of cd's this year. The two best were Dave Matthews, Big Whiskey and Trombone Shorty, Backatown.


Entered at Tue Dec 14 09:19:50 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: As usual, I'm behind the curve

So here are my 10 favourite albums that I purchased this year, in no particular order...

1) Best of Newgrass Revival

2) Buck Owens

3) Acoustic Jethro Tull

4) Manfred Man live in Budapest

5) Norm's album (haven't got it yet, but I know)

6) Rollie's album (again, it will be ordered in Jan...)

7) R T O's album (when it's finished 8) Rolling Stones: Exile on Main Street

9) The Who: who's next 10) Beyonce, Single Ladies... (forgotten teh name...)


Entered at Mon Dec 13 23:32:17 CET 2010 from (32.177.101.133)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 2010 Top Ten - but only 6 for me

Not in priority order:

* Peter Gabriel - Scratch My Back

* Robert Plant - Band Of Joy

* Johnny Cash - Ain't No Grave

* Justin Townes Earle - Harlem River Blues

* Bill Kirchen - Word To The Wise

* And, as always, The Oxford American Annual (#12) Southern Music Compilation


Entered at Mon Dec 13 20:14:37 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Bill M

Cha? Thank god for that Bill - I thought the word was going to be "Wet" for a moment there!!!!


Entered at Mon Dec 13 19:07:08 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: One word for you and your wife's shopping list, repeated twice - "Cha Cha Cha". The newest from Fred Eaglesmith.


Entered at Mon Dec 13 18:24:23 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Top Ten Albums

My problem is that after an uncommonly poor year for albums there's a sudden rush of discoveries at the end that I'm still trying to absorb … Amelia Curran (two albums there), then the Duke And The King (from Bearsville) and I'm just waiting for John Grant's Queen of Denmark to arrive after hearing two tracks on magazine end-of-year Best of … compilations, which is also where I met the Duke & The King's Shaky.


Entered at Mon Dec 13 18:10:28 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: top ten

Well, there's Garth's album, Rollie's album, Le Noise, Tin Can Trust and Little Feat's first. I know the last album is forty years old but I'd never even heard OF it before so I'm counting it. I probably haven't heard ten new albums this year. I heard Jim Byrne's 'Walking Stick' for the first time (thanks NB) and Poco's 'Deliverin' (thanks Jeffo). My most played albums were 'Tell Tale Signs' (2nd year in a row), 'Hunter, Hunter' (a 2009 release) and 'Exile On Main Street' (no, not the remaster; I'm only now getting in touch with my inner Stone

Please come on with your lists. Ms J. says there's an imminent shopping trip to the city. "My pockets are loaded and I'm spending every dime".


Entered at Mon Dec 13 17:44:41 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Rob...

Good stuff...


Entered at Mon Dec 13 15:44:35 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Top tens

It is that time of the year. I was relieved by Charlie's Top Ten with lots of artists I've heard of and two albums I've actually got (Tin Can Trust & The Union).In contrast, in the magazines they're listing fifty albums of the year, my count is around three or four, and I haven't even heard of half the artists. I suppose we all start posting our Top Tens soon. Now is good as it gives hints for gifts!


Entered at Mon Dec 13 14:00:24 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.179)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, I'd say the work by the London cops is about par for the course when it comes to policing.

In Toronto at the G-20 Summit this summer, in spite of the number of cops there, about 20,000, a small group of anarchists managed to do serious damage to buildings and even managed to burn a police car that the cops left unoccupied at an intersection on a downtown street.

The cops seemed to be more interested in chasing down, beating up and arresting people who were peacefully participating in protests.

To make it difficult for anyone to hold them responsible for what clearly appears to be premeditated violence many of the cops had removed their badge numbers and name tags from their uniforms. Over one thousand people were arrested and held from a day to weeks even though in the end less than 30 people had charges brought against them.

The RCMP surrounded a house in Newfoundland this week where a guy had barricaded himself in his house. He fired several shots at the cops which greatly raised the stakes. The cops closed and blocked all the streets in the area and put up video cameras to keep an eye on him. The RCMP, to their credit didn't bomb the house but tried to get him out by turning off the electricity, firing tear gas at him and eventually flooding the house with fire hoses.

The standoff came to an end when someone called the cops to say the guy that they had surrounded was actually not in his house anymore but was in their town which is 12 miles away. The RCMP are still not commenting while they try to come up with a plausible excuse, that doesn't include incompetence on their part, for how this could have happened.


Entered at Mon Dec 13 05:39:07 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: Favorite CDs of 2010

The link is to a North Carolina radio station where you can vote for favorite albums of the year with a chance to win some of the top 100 discs as voted by their listeners. I've used their list here for years to make my own selections, so I figured I should give credit where it is due. Their playlist is what you might call Americana, so you won't find most of the top of the pops stuff on their list. Here's my list:

1. Carolina Chocolate Drops- Genuine Negro Jig

2. Los Lobos- Tin Can Trust

3. Elton John & Leon Russell- The Union

4. John Mellencamp- No Better Than This

5. John Hiatt- The Open Road

6. Elvis Costello- National Ransom

7. Shannon Whitworth- Water Bound

8. Dr. John- Tribal

9. John Prine- In Person and On Stage

10. Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen- At Edwards Barn

And yes I did notice my list was heavy with "Johns" this year but I'm not going to comment on that. Happy shopping!


Entered at Mon Dec 13 02:46:15 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Levon... Rob

Best wishes to Levon... I'm sure he'll be fine.

Rob: another hit out of the park!


Entered at Sun Dec 12 23:58:38 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Web: My link

Subject: Ray...and Levon

Speaking of fan-of-The Band, Ray Davies of The Kinks, here is a link to an outdoor concert he did in England last summer dedicated to founding Kinks' member Pete Quaife, who had just passed away.

I forgot to mention earlier I'm sorry to hear Levon is in the hospital. I hope he's feeling fine and back home soon.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 23:44:18 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Ray Davies on "The Band" LP

I imagine Peter or one of the other MOJO magazine readers already posted this but--if not--here is a quote from the great frontman of The Kinks, Ray Davies, quoted in the December issue.

Mr. Davies is asked about his all-time favorite album. At first he mentions "In Person," a live album by Ray Charles. On further thought he has to say this: "I also love "The Band" album by The Band. It was the one thing that my brother Dave and I agreed on. It's maybe my favourite album because it's something I have in common with my brother."


Entered at Sun Dec 12 23:28:42 CET 2010 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Levon Helm is in the hospital, but OK (link is to story in Poughkeepsie Journal). He had to miss last night's Ramble.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 21:34:49 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Somebody Needs The Sack

Many thanks for the kind words about Ten Tons of Topsoil.

Buoyed by this critical approval, I have uploaded "Somebody Needs The Sack" which was the first tune I ever wrote and knocked around for years without lyrics; the sorry, sorry state of global economy was the spark that lit the fire that got the lyrics finished.

Enjoy


Entered at Sun Dec 12 20:52:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Unthanks

This folk song was on BBC4 live on Friday. It's about a Northumbrian tradition (explained in the video), and sung by The Unthanks. We liked it so much we immediately downloaded a copy, listened three times and went on to book tickets to see them live in March.

This is unaccompanied folk, pure vocal, and a lovely tune. My first thought is that it would suit Ollabelle. Do take a listen (without prejudice!).


Entered at Sun Dec 12 20:35:37 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Rob

I liked your song a lot. I'm looking forward to hearing the rest of the album. Now I find my self singing "Save our souls..." "Earworm of the day"


Entered at Sun Dec 12 19:08:55 CET 2010 from (24.108.131.161)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: News:Levon Helm hospitalized in NYC

An article this morning in The Poughkeepsie Journal says that Levon Helm has been hospitalized with 'pulmonary' issues (respiratory tract issues) related to what sounds like an upper respiratory tract infection and its impact on his COPD. It does not sound 'serious' and there is an air of optimism (not unexpected in news items like this one JT) in the article. I hope he recovers quickly and returns to his roots.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 18:21:18 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ten Tons

Sounds like a Band song to me.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 17:44:16 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Band Songbooks

Dave: I looked on Ebay and there are currently two songbooks of material by The Band for sale. One is actually mostly Dylan songs from "The Basement Tapes" official release and the other is a collection of the songs released on the "Rock of Ages" live album. That one has a "buy now" option of getting it for $75.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 17:29:41 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

I'm ready for 'em, Peter. I'll send them away with so many cogs turning in their heads that they'll need syncro-mesh. For a start, I will go with your suggestion and then add that the semaphore signal on the railway was a few feet shorter than standard for the same period (Geoff is an illustrator and cropped it to fit in the picture!). If they persist that the old route 127 was always operated by a red LT bus (which it was) I'll just send the pic I took of the bus we rode on that day (linked) which just so happens to be the same model of vehicle, in green and on a 127 working! That'll f@@k 'em.

No, I'm more worried about the railway enthusiasts that quibble over the extra half inch (matron!) in my song on the album - a plea for more goods traffic to return to the railways - entitled Put A Bit Of Freight Back On The 4' 8". I can see rail-pedants having a field day on that one.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 17:20:02 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Perils of Photoshop

Rob, you know that in a few months you'll be getting letters from irate bus-spotters pointing out that the #127 route was operated by red buses, and that bus registration MCX 267 was definitely never green. (The answer is "It was green from August 15th 1956 to April 12th 1957").


Entered at Sun Dec 12 17:13:43 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Peter V

Yes, it'll be interesting how many bus enthusiasts are disappointed by that video! That said, I definitely owe that fraternity a debt of gratitude as it was a vintage vehicles "running day" that provided me with an album cover.

In 2009, Worcester Park station was the starting point for such an event, and in fact the wife and I enjoyed a free ride on a lovely old double decker into Kingston, did our shopping at Waitrose/John Lewis and then another lovely old vehicle took us back! No diesel, no parking tickets, no bus or train fares and a chance to ride in two vintage vehicles. Great shopping day! I got talking to one of the organisers (called Steve) as we had crossed paths before: the storage company I work for has many of the old London ex-trolley/tram depots among our portfolio and in fact we had allowed a similar evenbt to run out of our store in Carshalton.

Promoting the Worcester Park event was a lovely old photo of W Park station in the fifties with a double decker coming under the bridge. It was such a lovely period piece (passing cars, period signage, bystanders' attire etc all so typical of the era) that I decided I had to have it for the cover. No matter - I was able to make contact with the chap who took it via Steve. A nominal fee later it is is mine to use however I like. We had to photoshop the bus because it was a red one! Worcester Park is on the very half-way mark of inner and outer suburbs so you got both flavours here. (Pic linked)


Entered at Sun Dec 12 16:55:31 CET 2010 from (79.202.184.48)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Rob

Rob that sounds indeed great! looking forward to the 2011 album. Goes great with a glass of wine and a vintage car magazine next to the wood fire.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 15:09:55 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great to see it up there and hear it again, Rob. I avoided getting into the videos that come up near it under "London Country" (Leatherhead Bus Running Day 2009 doesn't look promising). I was just thinking, I spent two weeks every summer parked with my aunt in Hounslow, and I wondered why Hounslow had more basic red buses … but I guess that was because it was the bus route out to Heathrow. She lived right under the flight path, and the planes looked about three feet above the roof.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 13:20:47 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rob The organ: Had a listen

Sounds great!


Entered at Sun Dec 12 10:08:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Some Band lyrics seem quite hard to fit. Usually Rick & Levon added a syllable here or there. The opposite also crops up. One is in Acadian Driftwood, “gypsy tail winds” which works on the original, but seems hard work on the very few live versions. I think the word “winds” “sore thumbs” slightly on the otherwise excellent version by Peter Katz & The Curious on Garth’s new CD. It seems easier to shift it to “gypsy tales” and elongate the “tales” to me. Though it loses the sense of it, but so does feeding old Chester.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 08:28:56 CET 2010 from (207.183.172.133)

Posted by:

Jeff Newsom

Subject: Bob W

Thanks so much Bob.All the best to you! JN


Entered at Sun Dec 12 06:56:36 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: London Country

After requests to post some music following my "Honking Lowrey" clip, I have uploaded one of the almost-done songs from the forthcoming album by my Americana act "London Country".

For the benefit of all non-London/Surrey Brits (and that's most of this forum!) the name was chosen as it reflects not only the music we play but was the name of the buses that used to run from London through to the outer suburbs. Many will know of the iconic red "Routemaster" London bus - think that but green! None of us in the band are central Londoners, so the green buses were a part of our lives until recently.

No organ on this one, sadly - in fact the album organ parts are the current focus and have been interrupted by the Lowrey needing a bit of TLC. This tune has no organ anyway - I play the fingerpicked intro and rhythm guitar - so damn near done aside from ironing out a handful of vocal phrases.

The full title of the song is (excuse the profanity but it is part of the title, so here goes...) "Ten Tons of Shit (Looking 'Round For A Fan)" and I have been asked whether it is about the global economy, the lack of peace...whatever? The truth is it is just a good old fashioned doom and gloom tune about nothing in particular other than the fact that some sh*t is going to hit the fan!

Those of a certain age will remember the old progressive rock act "East of Eden" predominantly for the one-off hit "Jig-A-Jig". The guitarist in London Country is E of E founder Geoff Nicholson, also featured on lap steel on the album.

Apologies to PV who has been a valued and respected sounding board throughout much of this project and thus has heard this a zillion times. And I still haven't gotten round to sending him a Bic biro as promised for his sleeve notes.

Anyway here it is, warts and all. Yes, another bloody Brit trying to play American music. Hope you enjoy it and any feedback welcome!!!


Entered at Sun Dec 12 05:15:14 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter

Location: pond

Subject: joe j

Funny, I've been playing the El Mocambo side, too... and celebrating Rick.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 05:11:44 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen pond

Subject: Feed old Jack?

I love any and all of Rick's permutations on this line! Miss him, miss him...


Entered at Sun Dec 12 03:17:51 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Mighty Fender Rhodes

Right you are Rob. Back in those Rock & Roll days for me, one of my guys played a Fender Rhodes for quite a while. They are a beautiful instrument.

Wayne Bassett who does all the piano & key board work on my CD played one. Wayne is a great and multitalented musician. A killer fillde player, and pretty good on guitar. But his work on the keys is great. Wayne & I did a duo for quite a while. At that time, he had a portable Yamaha baby grande. We used to pack that thing around, set it up tear it down......gawd what a job. But when he was playing it....oh.........YEAH! Some time on youtube listen to Johnny Rivers "Rockin' Pneumonia". That is the same sound as Wayne's Yammy Grand. We played that song a lot.

There were nights tho'.......packing up....I'd say Wayne....you gotta start playing the harmonica. Not long after that when I got into the big rooms with a 5 piece, I ended up with $30,000 in Sound equipment. Running 2500 watts out front and 650 watts on the monitors. That's not huge, but more than adequate for the rooms we played.

We couldn't afford any road help tho' and packed it all and set it up our selves. No sound man. Our guy who helped all the bands, "Rudy". For $50 he'd come by with his "Real Time Analizer", set the graph and tweak things for me. Playing the same rooms over & over that were mostly pretty full of bodies, you got to know your graph and where it needed to be.

When I finally weaned myself of those clubs and the steady 6 or 7 nights a week, I took all that sound equipment down to Paul's Music in Richmond and got the guys to sell it off for me. Scaled down to a nice compact little system that I could gig with now and then, and I faded to black.

Now and then I run into players and they say, 'Where in hell did you go????" I run into a real doll one day a while back in Campbell River, Lory Jordan. Good band and a hell of a singer. She runs over and throws her arms around me and says, "I thought you fell off the end of the earth".

They say that all good things must end some day...autumn leaves will fall........

Anyway RTO I hope you are enjoying your new piece of gear.....


Entered at Sun Dec 12 01:12:15 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: See my previous post.......

...and read joe j where it says Lars!


Entered at Sun Dec 12 01:07:51 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: The Weight call and response

As Peter said, the "Woodstock Weight" did show call and response: LH "..and what did he say?" / RD "He said he would...", "...I'm a peaceful man" / LH "Yeah, me too!" etc

I like that; it takes the "pitch in wherever you can" ethos of the Band vocal delivery and harmonies to the nth degree as well as offering something different in concert that you heard on the record - a trait that all the jamming bands easily pulled off with endless solos but one that the definite song arrangements of The Band required a little more thought to achieve.

As for feed CHESTER "whenever you can" that was mentioned earlier by Lars as being a joke, my take is plain error: after all Chester didn't want feeding; it was the dog JACK that did!



Entered at Sun Dec 12 00:49:52 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: BIG PINK Songbook

Dave: The words and music for the songs from the "Music From Big Pink" LP were issued by Warner Brothers Music in 1970 in a "Play-Along With the Record" songbook featuring the same cover as the "brown album" and containg all those songs as well. The only song missing was "Long Black Veil," which the fine print says was "due to copyright limitations."

For a mere $3.95 cover price the book included all those songs plus "Get Up, Jake" and an 11-page collection of sepia-tinted Elliott Landy photos. The book was designed by Bob Cato.


Entered at Sun Dec 12 00:17:59 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Won't you feed Old Chester

From the article on the site, much of which reads like a mystery to me so many years on:

The lyrics shift as the years go by and further versions emerge - it’s on every Band live album except Watkins Glen. If you listen to later live versions they’re altering lines all the way through - ‘Miss Carmen and the devil’, ‘Come on let’s shake it downtown’, ‘won’t you feed him when you want’ (instead of ‘can’ which rhymes with ‘man’) and even Rick’s ‘won’t you feed old Chester whenever you can’ which makes even less sense than the original (The Complete Last Waltz 1976). We also get a number of ‘feed him’ and a number of ‘feed me’ for the same line, but both are better than ‘feed old Chester’. At Woodstock 1969 they even try call and response as Levon calls out ‘What did he say?’ answered by Rick ‘He said, that’s OK boy …’

In Festival Express, Levon introduces the chorus with extra words: And won’t you take … / And you can take … while on Woodstock 69 we get I want you to take …

Adding words makes it easier to scan the lines, and both Levon and Rick seem to have sung easier by padding out the lines. It was and is harder to do it in the 1968 version, but Robbie Robertson’s broadcast solo versions are notably lyrically closer to the original.

But the song is theirs to do as they wish with, and after hundreds of performances, I can’t believe any musician is analyzing the lyrics closely, if they ever did in the first place


Entered at Sat Dec 11 23:54:30 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: The Weight

I notice that in The Last Waltz clip Rick sings "won't you feed Chester whenever you can". A slip? joke? I've never head him sing that before to the best of my recollection.

Am playing the 'El Mocambo Side' as we speak. Aged vinyl. Warhol cover. Don't think I've played either of the other sides in decades. The album is dedicated to one Keith Harwood, one of the recording engineers.

Yes David, I noted the Garthian vocal credits too. Wasn't able to detect it on further listening, then again how would one know?



Entered at Sat Dec 11 22:39:48 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Song Book

Dave - what purpose do you want the song book for? If it is just some lyrics and chords you need, it may well be that looking no further than this very website might be all you need to do (see link). If not, a few of us here may be able to help.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 20:12:55 CET 2010 from (75.2.133.219)

Posted by:

Dave

Subject: Music from Big Pink Song Book

I'm looking for a copy of the Music from Big Pink Song Book. Where might I look? Dave


Entered at Sat Dec 11 19:53:27 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Christmas Music

(JTull Fan note), Mojo have done a particularly good covermount Christmas CD … well worth looking out. Irma Thomas, Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, Flaming Lips … a nice selection.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 18:52:59 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: westcoaster (value of organs)

westcoaster, sadly you speak the truth there.

All these old beauties have a very low value in today's market and the only exception is Hammond. The dominance of the B3 has made that organ worth a fortune, the identical (bar the cabinet shape) models C3 and A100 not far behind and then other related models (B2, BC, RT3 etc) that are all either upgradable to, or are a bigger church version of, the B3 spec come third and hold their own.

The only other big-hitters these days are ironically the transistorised "combo" organs: Vox Continentals (we all know those), Farfisa Compacts (again, quite familiar) and Professionals (think Sly Stone at Woodstock), Fender Contempo (yes, Fender made an organ and gorgeous it is too!) and some others that have a celeb connection - like Fender, Gibson too offered an organ and it is this model that Ray Manzarek used, mainly because the top was nice and flat and would therefore support his Rhodes bass! (Gibson's organ was a repackaged Lowrey T2 in a non-wooden finish).

My two Lowreys were a steal: the transistor Lincolnwood (think Rock of Ages and the rehearsal film of King Harvest) was $250 (the air freight was several times that!!) and the all-tube '59 Festival was GB £485.

£485! That's not bad going for a non-Hammond, and in any case Lowrey consoles are so rare in the UK I would expect to pay a little more than most non-B3 organs go for. But as you say: a $3000 dollar flagship back in the day, and very much Lowrey's B3 equivalent. It's been twenty years since you could get a B3 for £485...


Entered at Sat Dec 11 18:30:15 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

One of the more interesting aspects of the video Brian linked is that the Weight starts with Richard lingering around the piano and Garth behind the organ. When the song starts, they have to hustle to get to their proper positions while a roadie struggles to set up a mic for Richard at the orgaPr


Entered at Sat Dec 11 17:19:35 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rob The Organ

Thanks for that Rob. Back in the 50's - 60's these organs were very innovative and popular. They had the moog lisence as you were talking about. They were built for home, and beautiful pieces of furniture.

The one I have, I found in a second hand store. It's a Paramount Deluxe Model 585 with a Leslie 205 in it. Takes two men and a boy to lug it around. It is in very good condition, with the original bench. Everything works including the drum program.

It is a great way to show the power and sound of Leslie. You can play it, and then kick the Leslies in and play it again and it sounds like it just grew huge with that sound. Not at all practicle anymore, but as a conversation piece and furniture piece in the music room to play around with, is a lot of fun.

Originally this organ was close to $3000 to buy. People are always trying to put a value on them. That's not possible, they are worth really nothing, but are a treasure to some one who enjoys them for a situation like I have. When you switch them on they light up and give the room a great look. Reminds me of old Wurlitzers.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 14:42:40 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: News stuff

Mild bit of politics / rock. The tabloids are full of the student riots over tuition fees at UK universities here. All the ingredients for a total cock-up are here, with resentment being fuelled by it applying to English kids, but not entirely to Welsh and Scottish ones, though all the money comes out of the common pot. Anyway, when it boiled over on Thursday, the lad defacing the Cenotaph (the memorial to war dead) turns out to be David Gilmour of Pink Floyd’s son. Apparently he was also involved in the attack on Prince Charles and Camilla. So not one of the under-priviliged at all, but a multi-millionaire’s offspring following the path of the odious son of Bryan Ferry, who staged an invasion of parliament in support of fox-hunting and blood sports. Predictably one paper found "We Don't Need No Educashun" a suitable headline.

All in all, an incident which reflects very badly on the London police passed off. The only thing that makes me proud to be British in it is that in spite of a direct, violent attack on the heir to the throne, no one got shot, in spite of the presence of armed police. I think there are few countries where people could attack the putative head of state’s car violently and not get shot.

The royal couple were attacked and jabbed or poked violently with a stick through the open window (why it was open is another question). Already the jokes about “Who on Earth would want to poke Camilla?” are in heavy rotation. The tabloid headline today was “Orf with their heads!”

I don’t know if it’s still true, but when the death penalty was abolished here years go, four offences were inadvertently left on the statute books. I’m not sure what they were, but one involved a sexual assault on a royal princess, another was setting fire to a Royal Naval dockyard and one, I believe, was threatening the life of the heir to the throne (though not the monarch). I think they all finally got taken off the statute books, but their existence much exercises the tabloid commentators.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 12:45:29 CET 2010 from (90.239.95.98)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Subject: My Christmas guiz

Congrats! The bone is yours.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 12:44:06 CET 2010 from (90.239.95.98)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Christmas guiz

I think the answer is: "More people die in the home of elderly than in this gb."


Entered at Sat Dec 11 12:42:10 CET 2010 from (90.239.95.98)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Subject: My Christmas guiz

My Christmas guiz: What is the difference between this gb and home of elderly? The first prize is a juicy bone.

A hint: westcoaster says: "I'm getting too old for this shit." Peter V, says: "Looking back..."


Entered at Sat Dec 11 11:14:10 CET 2010 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Soulful Rick

There was a debate a few months ago about how soulful the Band were. I think Rick was a really soulful singer and think he is tremendous on "I'll turn To Stone" and "Cry Another Tear", where his voice conveys a vulnerability, on "Crying Heart Blues". Great singers convey a message, a tone, a mood and this is where Rick and indeed all the Band singers excelled. N'est ce pas? The band on these tracks is really great and I would have liked to hear more of them. Too soon gone.


Entered at Sat Dec 11 03:13:46 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: westcoaster (RE: Thomas)

A Thomas, eh? There's a good old name you don't hear very often. Thomas made their bread and butter by manufacturing the USA home market VOX amps (and "Continental" organs, natch) and thus all the Beatles backline you see on US tour footage was Thomas-made. They were also extremely good value compared to Hammond, Lowrey etc. Phil Ryan from the Welsh band Man used to lug around a Thomas Floridian organ as well as his Hammond because the Thomas had a built-in licensed Moog synthesiser (pretty basic, but useable) and was the cheapest way of getting such a device!!


Entered at Sat Dec 11 02:17:49 CET 2010 from (24.158.3.94)

Posted by:

Tim(SUNDOG)Corcoran

Location: Madison, Wi
Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko, remembered...

Rick is still singing to me today! Miss you Rick. God bless your family. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP0KMZ__eh4


Entered at Sat Dec 11 01:23:27 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Lost Last Waltz footage

The Band playing the Weight at the Last Waltz - not the Staple singer version but the lost footage version.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 23:08:21 CET 2010 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: wistful memories(feelin kinda shitty, actually, to be blunt)

I'm truly shocked that it's been 11 years. I recollect so much about my life at that time, and so vividly, yet every year I'm surprised anew that it was just before Xmas. You know, afew weeks ago I was led by this board to youtube and that tribute to Rick via sketches(along with liberal doses of music and humor). I'm not in the mood right now, but it would be a nice thing to do if I was.....


Entered at Fri Dec 10 22:51:13 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Woodstock Playhouse

The Woodstock Playhouse has been bought and the new owners have started renovations in order to make it more of an indoor venue.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 21:51:15 CET 2010 from (199.86.26.15)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Remembering Rick Danko . . . "Times like these"


Entered at Fri Dec 10 21:29:43 CET 2010 from (24.142.61.250)

Posted by:

Tim ALeau

Location: NS, Canada

Subject: 11 years since losing Mr. Danko

Gawd bless Danko's spirit and his ability to cut up a deer into steak and chops while drunk, in the dark, in the forest driveway of Big Pink, after running into deer with the rest of The Band & Dylan in the back of the truck. "Take a silver dollar n put it in your pocket, NEVER let it slip away", Rick. Keep up the jam where YOU are. Levon's doin it great down here, you'd be proud.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 21:27:23 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Jeff Newsom

Thinking of you, Jeff. We keep you in our thoughts and prayers.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 19:48:19 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Streetcar named Kreviazuk

sadavid: I agree re Chantal's rendering of "Tears Of Rage". Nice 'n' Nora-like at the start, but way over-sung at the end. Still, she rates a place with Rick on the list of illustious Canuckichukistanis, no?

By the way, among the joys of listening to Mary Margaret O'Hara take ownership of "Out Of The Blue" on the new CD is hearing her switch characters from Stanley Kowalski to Blanche Dubois as she sings "He knows, he knows, he knows ..." Also gotta love the cheesy cocktail pianistics that Garth added just before that - right after "some lonely bar".


Entered at Fri Dec 10 19:30:33 CET 2010 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

From Robbie Robertson's Facebook page:

"The world lost a great man 11 years ago today. Rick Danko was a kind, gentle soul with an instataible musical fire in his belly."

[sic] on the spelling of "insatiable"


Entered at Fri Dec 10 19:17:33 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: In rememberance of Rick

A voice like no other was stilled on this December day eleven years ago.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 19:15:21 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Senility!

Sorry Dee! You are absolutely right of course. My head was screwed on backwards. Maybe I really been at sea too long.

I think the first LP I may have bought tho' was a Johnny Horton album.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 18:53:36 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: not to mention the 'phone bill

Ignatius: The Hawk's website has a spirited collection of "Quotes and Tales" -- if you scroll down about halfway, you'll see that Mrs. Hawk has a couple of words to add to the story of Lennons' visit to Hawkstone . . . .


Entered at Fri Dec 10 18:03:33 CET 2010 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Ronnie re John and Yoko

Just viewed the Ronnie interview re John and Yoko at his house in 69. Wonderful how he focuses on the food and the sex, yet somehow it is as spiritual a reminiscence as any I have seen. Delightful.

Ignatius


Entered at Fri Dec 10 18:03:00 CET 2010 from (99.149.75.147)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Horton?

Westcoaster

My 45 version of Young Love is by Sonny James. Darn, I don't even have The Battle of New Orleans by Johnny Horton.

I inherited lots of 78's, bought many 45's and albums. Including El Paso by Marty Robbins. I admit I got tired of hearing it while shopping at Cielo Vista Mall in El Paso. A friend sent me the menu from Rose's Cantina. The beat goes on.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 13:42:17 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, I wouldn't call being young, a mistake, it's not like there's a choice. Wait, actually Dylan was young by choice after having seen what older was like.

Speaking of young Bob, if anyone needs evidence that some people have too much money, the fact that a scrap of yellowed, creased paper with the smudged words to, The Times They Are A Changing,is expected to be sold for more than $200,000.00 is evidence enough. My god, give the money to a charity or 200 bucks to the first thousand homeless people you see. There's got to be a better use for the cash.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 10:00:51 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: wittering on …

Well, I guess the very name Cliff Richard is closely associated with people rambling on … but his cover of It'll Be Me (a Jerry Lee B-side to Whole Lot A-Shakin') was five years after the original, so not the usual British attempt to steal the sales by covering an American hit.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 09:40:48 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It'll Be Me

I was thinking about my dislike of “It’ll Be Me”. It wasn’t that it was a British cover, we had plenty of those, and Cliff Richard’s previous hit Do You Wanna Dance? was a very good version of the Bobby Freeman record. Cliff Richard early on could rock. In the last couple of years, soundtracks of early British TV rock shows have been issued on CD. The 1957-58 stuff (like Don Lang & His Frantic Five) sounds weak, and you get the impression that all the players are trad jazz and big band guys “slumming.” Then you hit the 1959 stuff, and Cliff Richard & The Drifters (who then had to change their name to The Shadows) leap out of the speakers as way better than everything around them. I was surprised.

I think It’ll Be Me is the sort of single you buy when you’re young by mistake. I’d really wanted the one before, Do You Wanna Dance?, but by the time I bought my record player, it had gone past its chart peak, and so I automatically bought the next one. I just gave it a listen. Cliff doesn’t do it badly. I just think it’s an awful song. Forced lyric, forced melody. At the time I sought out the Jerry Lee Lewis original to see if it was Cliff’s fault. I think the Jerry Lee version comes across almost as badly, though he does it with much more attack.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 01:27:03 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Heartbeat - Buddy Hollie - The Hollies

And! by the way. This video is an example of the beginning of rock & roll. How guys so young could translate the feelings of being young and the effects of young love in to a song as great as this.

The Hollies did a lot of Buddy's songs with class, like they do this one.


Entered at Fri Dec 10 00:50:34 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: First 5??

Well the first 5 I ever bought sure in hell weren't 45's or LP's........they were 78's. I told this long ago. I was 12 and collecting my records and learning. So my older brothers and some of those other teenaged goons were having a party one night. Some fool left a stack of my records they were using for their gawd damn party on the sofa. Some other idiot sat on 'em and broke the whole stack perfectly in half.

I ain't sayin' what the first five I bought were alla youze clowns would just laugh at me....so take off eh!

I bought so many from my paper route money I don't remember which were first. There was:

Jimmy Rogers.......Honey Comb

Buddy Holly......Heart Beat

Elvis Presley......Milk Cow Boogy

Webb Pierce........Back Street Affair

Everly Brothers.......I wonder if I care as much

Johnny Horton........Young Love

Anyways, Y'all keep talkin' about the gawd damn Lowry organs. I got this big old Thomas 1967 organ in my music room here. Big wood one, nice piece of furniture it has Leslie speakers in it and it honks. The fact I don't know shit about playing it don't matter. You won't even discuss it with me so the hell with alla yuz. Anyway I got to playing the riff from the Animals......Please don't let me be misunderstood.......so there!


Entered at Fri Dec 10 00:37:29 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Singles...

I think Howzat by Sherbet was the first single I bought... being a cd lad, I didn't have many singles... There was one called 'Superman', (I know David P. will know who it's by): the lyrics 'Superman, if I can, I'm gonna make you love me'

I seem to recall the theme from Skippy as well... but these were almost certainly at home for some reason, rather than me purchasing them. I seem to remember also Moscow, the song from the 1980 Moscow Olympics (which of course was was perverted to 'Must go, Must Go, open up the toilet door, too late did it on the floor, ho ho ho ho HO!' - but hey, I was 12...



Entered at Thu Dec 9 23:53:36 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Bad John

Big Bad John might be the most-played song on my in-car iPod this last week. Seeking variety from my grandson's obsession (since September) with Rolf Harris's Greatest Hits on the school run, I introduced "Columbia Country Classics Vol. 3: Americana" and Big Bad John was an instant and outstanding hit, which is OK, as I still love it (as I do "Sun Arise.") That means "again!" and replay.

It spared us Marty Robbins' El Paso (which is on the same disc). When we were 13, our music teacher invited us to bring in current hits to school. He'd never heard El Paso, and played it three times in a row, announcing that it was on a par with West Side Story. He then bought a copy and added it to the curriculum. I joke not!


Entered at Thu Dec 9 22:39:49 CET 2010 from (91.42.252.171)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Robin Grey

Robin Grey, just checking some Kaminofen on YouTube and discovered Robin Grey for free. (the link holds two songs, never mind the fire).

Joan the for your words the other day


Entered at Thu Dec 9 22:32:35 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

When we got our first stereo system I listened to my parents' LPs. As I recall, my first 45s were Andy Griffith's "What It Was Was Football" b/w "Romeo and Juliett" and Johnny Horton's "Sink the Bismarck" b/w "Same Old Tale That The Crow Told Me". My first LP was Jimmy Dean's "Big Bad John and Other Fabulous Songs and Tales". We were living in a country town in North Georgia at the time and my listening tastes at the time reflected what was being played on local radio.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 21:52:33 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: First 45s

Looking back … the first two records I bought were second-hand 45s, The Time Has Come by Adam Faith and Nut Rocker by B.Bumble and The Stingers. I had just acquired my record player (a Dansette) and a friend sold me two unwanted discs to try it out. Adam Faith was the first of the series of “articulate journalist-friendly British rock stars”, a role taken over by such as Pete Townsend, Bob Geldorf, Jools Holland and Alex James (Blur).

The first full-price (#3) was Sealed With A Kiss by Brian Hyland.

This was followed by Roses Are Red by Bobby Vinton, indicating a romantic but tasteless 15 year old.

Then Little Miss Lonely by Helen Shapiro.

So the first decent, memorable record I bought was #6, Breaking Up Is Hard To Do by Neil Sedaka.

#7 was the appallingly racist Speedy Gonzales by God Squad supremo Pat Boone.

Then it gets better … Because They’re Young (EP) by Duane Eddy.

#9 Things by Bobby Darin, which had a credible B-side, a fine rendition of Jailer, Bring Me Water.

#10 was It’ll Be Me by Cliff Richard. The first I ever bought on the day of release. The first I played non-stop trying to justify my investment by liking it. Even after dozens of plays and concentrated effort, I didn’t. I realized that my hard-earnd pennies had been invested in crap. This is known as “The Cahoots syndome.”


Entered at Thu Dec 9 20:24:56 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stranger in a Strange Band of Pirates

A recent interview with the actor Johnny Depp dovetailed nicely with the publication of Keith Richards' book. Mr. Depp revealed that the powers-to-be at Disney initially hated the way he portrayed the character of Caribbean Pirate Captain Jack Sparrow, which Mr. Depp based on Mr. Richards.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 20:22:13 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: livin' large with John & Yoko

Ronnie Hawkins interviewed about John & Yoko's 1969 visit.

Be patient with CBC's video player; it's all we can afford.

And fast forward to about 3:50, to avoid about 3:49 of Mark Kelley, surely one of the Lamest Things on Television . . . .


Entered at Thu Dec 9 20:00:26 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Joan, I always thought Keef was pretty strange but you think someone stranger than Keef wrote the book?

Landy, I hope you got your sister's permission to "trade" her album. Or was this the landmark decision that set your course for a life of crime?


Entered at Thu Dec 9 19:46:42 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ghost Writers In the Sky

Joan: In essence, Mr. Richards' "Life" was written by a stranger, ghostwriter James Fox, who mined 5 years worth of interviews with the subject Stone and polished it into book form.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 18:28:56 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Keef's book

I just finished plowing through (reading) his biography. A lot of words there. It was not boring, but I came away with an uneasy feeling. Maybe its just me, but I got a sense of "distance". Although he wrote of many experiences, it felt like the book was written by a "stranger". There was very little emotion. I now know what he did, but I don't really know how he felt about it.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 18:19:05 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Garth Plays & Sings

Don't recall anyone mentioning this, but Garth is also credited with vocal harmonies on "Ain't Got No Home" and "King Harvest" on the new Canadian Celebration CD, in addition to his keyboard/accordion work on all the songs.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 16:56:07 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Ripple Rock

This is a real blast!


Entered at Thu Dec 9 16:43:07 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gone-gone-gone I been gone so long..........

I been gone so long I been gone...........I been on that gawd damn tug for 17 days. This is STUPID! I'm getting to old for this shit. How will I ever catch up here now??

I scanned thru here. Appreciate your thoughts on that song Jeff. Just get me a copy music & lyrics.

Buried at sea???????? The old Scandahouvian. On that subject, we buried my Dad at sea. All those years ago, I remember the time here we discussed that. Bob Wigo came up on a cruise ship that year.

You can google this. In Seymour Narrows there was a rock right in the middle that took many ships. One, the year I was born. The William J Stewart hit the rock, and came into Plumper Bay where we lived. As it was war time, and things like sugar was rationed, the crew when getting off the ship, slavaged everything they could and brought it all up to our mom so of course it was like Christmas for her. The reason I mention this, it is easy to find this place I'm talking about. In 1958 they drilled a tunnel from one side of Seymour Narrows underneath the narrows, and right up into Ripple Rock, and blew it up. I think they knocked 40 feet off it. I'd have to look it up. It's on the internet here. I watched the blast on tv with my mum. In fact that blast was sold and used in several different movies. I recall one episode of Lloyd Bridges "Sea Hunt" wnere it was used.

My Grandfather & great grandfather had a 150 acre homestead in Plumper Bay, Quadra Island, right at the top end of Seymour Narrows. My father was born in the bay on a float house. (All the housing was still on floats at that time 1919.) Right near where the houses were fastened to the shore is a big white round rock that always sticks out of the water.

As my brothers and I pass thru Seymour Narrows all the time with our tows, and my brother Buddy, piloting the cruise ships, I guess our Dad felt that his ashes should be put back where he came from and perhpas it made him feel closer to us as we transit the narrows all the time, (I came thru yesterday on my way home). We can't go thru without turning our head to that big white rock, and nodding.

So as per his request, my brothers and I took our mum, and she brought her minister, on my fishboat, as I've owned that boat for 36 years now, it's been around the family the longest. We anchored just outside that white rock, our mum had her little service with the privacy of her sons and placed his ashes from that boat of mine and she was happy.

Burials at sea seem very much to bring peace. Now on the "Bucket List" taking the ashes up Mount Everest and sticking them in the snow in a couple old tin cans is pretty cool I guess.

Thinking about that subject for me........well my son askes me, where would you want to be Dad. I thought about that and it was frustrating for a while. There are so many bays, and points of land and the beauty of this coast. I couldn't decide. I came up with the best plan. I said Craig, if you took my ashes up in a helicopter and flew out over Queen Charlotte Strait when a good Nor' West was blowing. Spread 'em in the wind and maybe there would be little particles in every bay and point that I've been. Then my kids could just say what they always said. He's out there some where...........


Entered at Thu Dec 9 16:28:38 CET 2010 from (12.130.119.83)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Early picks

My first is my most certain: 1957/58 - Bye Bye Love - The Everly Brothers - $2 - @ Westchester Music in LA

Then a few years passed by and it was all LPs after that: '61/'62 - Peter, Paul & Mary LIVE and a couple of Kingston Trio's

Then The Beatles, followed by The Rolling Stones, The Animals and even The Doors - I saw them perform at our local playground. Other LA locals that I bought in 1965/66 were The Leaves, The Seeds and The Turtles.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 15:59:31 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: addendum

How could I have forgotten: "Rag Mama Rag" was from the dime bin too. My first Band record.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 15:46:28 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: singles

While singles are a lot more important to me, I didn't get into them until way after albums. My father bought me all of my first five albums (just two of which I'd expressed an interest in), but I was on my own when it came to 45s - meaning I had to wait until I had a bit of money. And it was a BIT of money, so almost all of the first dozen or so were from the dime bin in the new department store in the nearest biggish town. The very first, though, was "Hey Jude", which I just had to have and paid the full 75 cents for - likely in mid '69. The other early arrivals, all from the dime bin in '69 and early '70, included "Nothin'" and "Just In Case You Wondered" by the Ugly Ducklings, "Simple Deed" and "Tudor Impressions" by the Paupers, "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" by the Bob Seger System, "Fancy" by Bobbie Gentry, "Walk A Mile In My Shoes" by Joe South and (from the Crippled Civilians store in the next plaza over) "Try A Little Harder" by Dr Music. (A nod here to Landmark.)


Entered at Thu Dec 9 14:36:35 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Music From Big Pink

All this talk about first purchases reminded me of my 'discovery' of Music From Big Pink. I was a first year university student in Toronto (UofT) and was in the university book store to get some texts for courses and they had a small lp record section. I was browsing and there it was - "Music From Big Pink" - in all its glory. I was enthralled by the cover. I had not realized at that time that this record was out. Of course, I bought it and then wore it out. The 'Brown album' I found at Sam's. It was presented wrapped in some sort of folder that said something like '...when the Band comes to town' but I don't remember the exact wording. I don't have that packaging any more and am not sure if the store did that or whether it was actually shipped that way. I wore that one out as well.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 13:52:46 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I believe that "Headquarters" by the Monkees may have been the first one. I recall buying "We're Only In It For The Money" by the Mothers. I got "Wheels Of Fire" as a birthday present. The fourth was probably "Mad Dogs And Englishmen". The fifth was trading one of my sister's albums away for "Layla". I know that there are gaps in my list but I was lucky to have an older sister that was buying all the Beatles, Stones and everything else from 1964 onwards.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 13:28:40 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Went to the record stack to find the oldest LP's. Yesterday and Today, Help, Rubber Soul, Meet The Beatles and to round out the Fab Five, Something New. I did break the Beatles parade with an album I haven't played since the year I bought it, Grand Funk Live.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 12:46:42 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Southside

First four were from the discount bin at Mr. O's general store @ $1.99. There were three Elvis records on the Camden label: Flaming Star, Almost In Love and I can't remember the third. Johnny Rivers' Whiskey a Go-Go Revisited was from that same bin. I didn't know Johnny Rivers but I bought it for the psychedelic cover.

Then I started buying by mail order and the first of these would have been either Rubber Soul or KK's Me & Bobby McGee.



Entered at Thu Dec 9 11:24:08 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

First Five Lps, too long ago to be 100% accurate, but it's a safe bet that The Beatles scored twice, The Byrds once, The Beach Boys may have, and The Monkees once , and a very strong possibility was Ballads Of The Green Berets, by Sergeant Barry Sadler.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 10:29:30 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The First Five--official purchases ; )

Fly Like An Eagle (cassette)

Led Zeppelin III (cassette)

Cheap Tick Live in Budokan (LP)

Led Zeppelin I (LP)

Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd (LP)


Entered at Thu Dec 9 08:35:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sharp as a pistol

Bristol Stomp was also on that first LP I bought.

I started with singles, and the first two LPs were Christmas presents six months later. Both the Cameo Parkway compilation and Joe Brown were Golden Guinea … a budget series at 21 shillings (£1.05) rather than 32 shillings and sixpence for a full price release (£1.62). Golden Guinea had started doing some “first time” releases rather than recycling older ones or easy-listening, possibly the first budget label to do that. Last month I found a 1962 Golden Guinea “Folk” LP (simply named) which was a great all-Elektra compilation.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 05:29:05 CET 2010 from (174.119.141.60)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: First 5

Thank goodness. Back to music. I bought singles first (some of the first onces I remember... 1. Oh Carol - Chuck Berry 2) Bristol Stomp - Dovells 3) Killer Joe - Rocky Fellers 4) Be My Baby - Ronettes 5) California Sun - Rivieras Then albums when I had a little money from part time work 1) Sherry - Four Seasons 2) The Rolling Stones Now - Rolling Stones 3) Times They Are A Changin' - Bob Dylan 4) Twelve By Five - Rolling Stones 5) December's Children - Rolling Stones There is a theme here, don't you think. Appreciating the Beatles came much later. And yes, there are hundreds of vinyl albums in the basement. Some have been resurrected of late and have found their way to the turntable. The 78s and 45s are gone... sad.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 04:15:53 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: (Re Joan)

Joan, if you think that being older is difficult you want to try being YOUNGER than most Band fans (I'm 36)! Truth compels to to admit that my first five purchases all had Iron Maiden written on the cover. Err - moving very swiftly along.....

After that (age 13 or so) I stopped buying music for a few years and became addicted to BBC LPs of The Goons and Hancocks Half Hour. Then at around 14/15 the electric guitar beckoned. Remembering the heroic and stony-faced widdle-fest that was my Iron Maiden era, Dad took an interest at this point (which I will forever be grateful as most parents scowl at the thought of such a noisy instrument) and force-fed me his old Johnny Winter, Cream & Stones stuff lest I went back to the rather metallic hues of my pre-teens.

(That said, i do remember getting my first cassette player around 1981 aged 7 or 8. Dad showed me how to tape the Radio One top forty show on a Saturday afternoon and, a good two or three years before I ever purchased any vinyl, I do remember liking the Stones "Start Me Up" more than anything else, with Whitesnake's "Would I Lie To You" scoring a minor point!!!!)

Thankfully from the guitar-owning era onwards it was Cream/Hendrix - thanks to being paper-round age I was able to start buying a couple of LPs a week. So I bought the LPs Dad didn't have - and on to The Beatles LPs (Mum & Dad are first generation Stonesers that wouldn't have had one in the house) and thence to San Francisco (still enjoy Tuna, Dead, QMS) and inevitably The Band - after reading endless biogs of favourite players and every one singling out Big Pink as a turning point and normally splitting up a band or two as a reaction to it!



Entered at Thu Dec 9 04:04:55 CET 2010 from (71.64.14.15)

Posted by:

Bobby Jones

Subject: 1st 5 LP's I bought

1 - The Allman Brothers Band: Wipe the Windows, Check the Oil, Dollar Gas

2 - The Moody Blues: Days of Future Passed

3 - Blood, Sweat & Tears: Greatest Hits

4 - Jeff Beck : Blow by Blow

5 - Eagles : One of These Nights

Still have them and about 500 others down my basement.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 03:34:03 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: 5 first

As I am older than most of the people here my first 5 are a little odd. I was heavily into folk music and jazz at the time. so here goes

1 Dango by The Modern Jazz Quartet

2 Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants/

3Lambert Hendricks and Ross

4.The Kingston Trio

5.Joan Baez

Rock came a bit later for me.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 03:13:29 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: First Albums

Interesting question Peter simply because all of my young group bought loads of singles first. Probably because we could buy lots of them for around 45c at a place in cabbagetown called Sams Variety. It was cheaper to buy them there than going down to Sam the Record Man. Here's a question for you Peter. When we were kids in the early 60's one of our friends from the neighborhood who was Irish, used to go back home a couple of times a year and come back with the most fantastic new releases as singles that were not even out in Canada yet. One that comes to mind was Marvin Gaye and 'I heard it through the grapevine' along with a ton of mono Beatles singles. How come you guys in Britain got them first? I would have thought it was the other way around and it's always befuddled me. Anyway, here's my first 5 albums in no particular order. The Hollies, Please, Please Me, The Angry Young Them, With the Beatles, And some compilation of the Supremes and the Temptations.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 01:23:48 CET 2010 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

calvin

Best Guess?

More of the Monkees

Something\Anything-Todd Rundgren

Cant Buy a Thrill-Steely Dan

All Together Now-Argent

All the Young Dudes-Mott the Hoople


Entered at Thu Dec 9 01:02:18 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Blues Brothers, Stones - Some Girls, Yes - Tormato. I remember these 3 vividly because one of the VP's of Atlantic records was a customer of my dads and he gave them to me. Prior to that I really didn't have a care as to what I listened to.


Entered at Thu Dec 9 00:55:14 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: First five...

hmmm... I'll have to think... so, in no particular order, and possibly missing something, and also, while I started buying vinyl, I didn't own many records or cassettes - mostly I'm a CD lad... but here we go: all vinyl or cassette (I think) ...

Fonzie's greatest hits (a compilation of pretty great 50s classics) with an 'impersonation track' at the end...

The Boomtown Rats, The Fine Art of Surfacing

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy

A thing with Star Wars on one side and Holsts' The planets on the other

Santana, Amigos

Full Boar: a compilation of current hits...

(My parents had stuff like Simon and Garfunkle, Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra, Soundtracks, country, classical...)


Entered at Thu Dec 9 00:42:20 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Sadavid, that was about as vintage a performance as The Hawk gives. The chorus of teeny weenie mutts at the end is priceless. First tiime I've seen Ronnie not get the last word in an interview.


Entered at Wed Dec 8 23:18:08 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

While I don't see moribund on the horizon, I'm happy to chime in with my first four, which were mine all mine: Gordon Lightfoot's first, Ian and Sylvia's "Four Strong Winds", the Travellers' "Something to Sing About" (which may have Amos Garrett on uncredited guitar), Wilf Carter's "Christmas Time in Canada" for sure. The fifth would be jointly owned among siblings - "More of the Monkees".


Entered at Wed Dec 8 22:54:54 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The first five albums …

As the GB is slipping into being moribund, a potential topic to revive it. The first five albums you ever owned.

I still have the little exercise book where I noted records as I bought them. I stopped around 1965 though.

My first five albums were:

1“All The Hits By All The Stars” – Various Artists, Cameo-Parkway hits, on the budget Pye Golden Guinea label, 1962, including The Dovells, The Orlons, Dee Dee sharp, Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell.

2 “A Picture of You” – Joe Brown & The Bruvvers. The guy who could have had Robbie’s job if he’d listened to Ronnie H. when he backed him.

3 “Rock & Roll No. 2” – Elvis Presley.

4 “The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album”

5 “Please, Please Me.” The Beatles

I’ve still got four of them as bought. The Eddie Cochran walked out of my life in 1965 (I have a replacement, obviously!)

OK … anyway else going to add theirs?


Entered at Wed Dec 8 22:23:52 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: down on the farm

Steve: I think this one was posted previously - pay attention at about 0:45.


Entered at Wed Dec 8 21:33:37 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: It was 30 yeras ago today

CBC TV will be talking to Canadians tonight who spent time with John Lennon. One of the people they mentioned is, The Hawk. That should be amusing.


Entered at Wed Dec 8 16:13:16 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: invisible ink etc

Not sure what happened back there. Brain cramp. I believe I meant to post another link to '22 Minutes'. Whatever.

Above link is to a Time article on Wikileaks with reference to former Dead lyricist John Barlow who's apparently a player in this ongoing drama.


Entered at Wed Dec 8 13:53:05 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Funny that the one bloodline present in everyone who fought, that of Namibian Bushmen, doesn't seem to be getting any mention.

Pure, Anglo Saxon, indeed.


Entered at Wed Dec 8 09:18:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Years back, when Danko Fjeld Anderson came out, a review carped about Jonas Fjeld singing a song set in the Wild West with a Norwegian accent. As was pointed out then, the frontier was always a place with a high concentration of recent immigrants, and Dodge City would have resounded with Scandinavian, German, English, Scottish and Irish accents. And Mexican and Chinese. Recent Irish immigrants were virtually press-ganged into the Union Army on arrival in the 1860s … at least according to Scorsese.

Then there was the 2010 book on the Battle of The Little Big Horn (which is exhaustive, I’ve only read the reviews, which are all five star). That points out that the largest groups within the 7th Cavalry were very recent German and Irish immigrants, so that the battlefield would have echoed to shouts of Achtung! and Begorrah!

I guess the “three parts of one war” theory is applied to the broader Northern European group which would have formed the background of most Americans up to and beyond 1860 … German was next after British as point of origin. Then you can detect further waves of immigration depending on what was going on in Europe, but most of these were post Civil War. Maybe it’s “four parts” and you can include The Thirty Years War!


Entered at Tue Dec 7 23:26:08 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Southern NY

Subject: I guess if it's written in the internet it must be true

DAVID- Just because an officer of the Confederacy has French and Spanish blood (which was not the case for Beauragard, who came from a wealthy inbred French family) doesn't mean that the average Southern Confederate had ties to any Saxon identity. The South and the North, as you well know, were made up of many different nationalities. You can't call the Confederates "Saxon" any more than you could call the Federals "Anglo."

I just don't care for the profiling of any people, not even us poor Confederates. But if it makes you happy--yeah the Rebs were loaded with Danes who came from Normandy, France.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 22:52:58 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "The enemy has assailed my outposts in heavy force."

David P: The unfinished note goes on to say, "I fear that he will have confiscated my quill and ink, smashed my typewriting contraption and grievously wounded my scribe unless I am soon able to complete this missive and affix my seal to the ... OUCH! ..."


Entered at Tue Dec 7 22:38:05 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The thesis was that all three wars were sub-divisions of one war. I suspect it's a "colander" theory because you don't have to go far for the holes to become apparent … but there is a link, I guess.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 22:25:46 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: "The enemy has assailed my outposts in heavy force."

At Fort Sumter, the opening engagement of the Civil War, Confederate troops were commanded by Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, a Louisiana creole of French-Spanish descent. Gen. Beauregard was also in command at the first major battle of the war, the first Battle of Bull Run (Manassas).


Entered at Tue Dec 7 22:02:10 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Originally Alabama

Subject: Johnny Rebs were from pure Saxon bloodlines?

I didn't know that. Permit me to doubt it.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 21:34:24 CET 2010 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Uncivil War Along Faux Blood Lines

Peter, I have no citation for you, but in my extensive reading about the US Civil War I have encountered the construct in which Southerners identified themselves with pure Norman racial strains, and identified their Northern foes as mongrelized Saxon/Teuts.

The minute you see the phrase "racial strains" you know it is nonsense, but when people are killing one another, there is bound to be a significant nonsense factor involved, as a rule.

Ignatius


Entered at Tue Dec 7 20:20:15 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bill M

Peter V. mentioned he heard an analysis about the US Civil War claiming it the third of the Anglo-Saxon Civil Wars. I'd heard (some years back), of a discredited theory that the English people were descended from one of the 12 tribes of Israel - the theory states that the term 'Saxon' derives from 'Isaac's Sons'. (this is so linguistically flawed as to be beyond ridiculous...) I gently (as gently as I can - so you know, bull in china shop) supposed that the two theories were linked... I might be wrong... but I have a highly developed sense of suspicion when it comes to theories about race, no matter how seemingly innocuous...


Entered at Tue Dec 7 19:42:35 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Landmark: No link to Motherlode that I can think of offhand. Not even one of the ersatz versions pulled together to wring geld from the name. Soma was all-Maritimes, in some ways a continuation of the venerable Lincolns of Truro then Halifax. Ritchie Oakley on guitar, Jack Harris on drums, Donnie Muir on organ, Don Morris on bass (from Stitch in Tyme), NB's cousin (on both sides of the family) Frank Mackay on vocals. Mackay's solo LP from the '80s has Amos Garrett on a track, and he also had the lead roll around then in a successful musical play, "Rock and Roll", in which Robbie Robertson's pre-Hawkins group-leader, Johnny Rhythm, also appeared in. But still no Motherlode, except for the fact that Motherlode's guitarist, Ken Marco, was in the latter-day Lincolns put together in Toronto by Prakash John after he left Lou Reed's employ. Prakash had sorta gotten clearance from the Nova Scotia guys to use the name, and even had one of them in his group for a time.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 18:50:50 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Yeah Soma. I recall Bill, that you once traced the pedigree of the band for me. Am I mistaken or was there a link to that other venerable Canuckistani combo Motherlode?


Entered at Tue Dec 7 17:53:40 CET 2010 from (79.202.185.37)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: RtO & the I-war

Rob thnks for your reply, but please do put up a piece of music when ll is ready! B.t.w. there is a real I-war on at the moment, they'll attack Wikileaks and Wikileads friends attack Paypal. The times sure are changing. Off to get the 2010 Christmas tree....


Entered at Tue Dec 7 17:40:42 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Still waitiing For Invisible Ink In Joe's message To Sadavid to materialize

Nordic Man of Westcoast, Benny Bare Nookie, is just following the lead of that monetary genius in Zimbabwe, Bobby_Moo_Gobby; when you find yourself a little short of cash just print more and more and more. It's called, E Con The Moronics 101.

What should be making Canuckleheads a little edgy is that as Bare Nookie keeps printing Brazillions of US dollars, it doesn't seem to be dropping the value of US currency against the Canuckastani Loonie.

So, I ask you Mr.Nordic Coaster, WHY NOT?

Is it just my imagination or does President Obama seem to pale in comparison to presidential candidate, Obama?

Remember all his talk about trying to act like his hero Lincoln? Obama now reminds me of Lincoln's comment about too many pigs for the teats.

Sung to Belafonte's, Matilda. Obama ( boom ba boom) Obama (boom ba boom) Obama you took the money and rule like all d'uddas.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 17:12:16 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Blue Giant

Last week I wrote that I had the privilege of being introduced to a new group - Blue Giant (Vanguard signed) in Victoria. Have any of you heard this band live or on cd? They are from Oregon and have that 'sound' we all admire that evokes Band,Byrds,Sadies,BARK. There is a cut available for listening at their website. I don't usually push bands but I was knocked over by their sound and musician(person)ship.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 16:48:51 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Good point, focusing on Garth's exemplary playing throughout.

dlew: I didn't really get that post about the Saxons. What's your angle?

RtO: I've seen "2001: A Space Odyssey". No wonder you were unsettled by your smart Lowrey.

NB: Good of you to mention Soma. Do you now remember them playing our highschool during the '70-'71 season? And it's Brantford, not Stratford, that AGB's generally associated with. I'm not saying he never visited ...


Entered at Tue Dec 7 16:35:27 CET 2010 from (90.239.116.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: More about female students

For a couple of years ago these two talented young journalists which I mentioned earlier described in their radio show how shocking it was to buy food in the same supermarket as their former teacher. "Oh my Gooood, he is drinking milk and eating cookies like other human beings!!!"


Entered at Tue Dec 7 16:13:03 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Location: Freezin' in the South
Web: My link

Subject: A Canadian Celebration

I received my copy of Garth's new CD just as a Canadian coldfront moved in down here in the South. The heart warming music hit the spot, providing much needed relief. Right off the bat, two cuts really stand out for me -- Neil Young & The Sadies tearing into "This Wheel's On Fire" and Bruce Cockburn & Blue Rodeo's rendition of "Sleeping". The real joy, however, is getting to hear Garth performing with all the artists.

Link above to Toronto Star article about Neil Young's participation.


Entered at Tue Dec 7 16:03:36 CET 2010 from (90.239.116.207)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Female students... I shouldn't complain, really.

A couple of my female students from 80s and 90s are journalists in Swedish Broadcasting Company (public service, like BBC in Great Britain) with their own pop/rock music programmes. It is a new _feminist_ generation coming on strong in Sweden, just like we were an old _marxist_ generation. God bless us all...


Entered at Tue Dec 7 15:08:40 CET 2010 from (90.239.71.249)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Northern Boy: Entered at Sat Dec 4 17:36:24 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

I found NB's post most amusing because - in my early years when I had teaching profession - I taught female students between 6 and 60 years old, and I am happy to have got out of it alive!

This is about boys and Mr. Bernanke, but I believe Mr. Boy can feel the spirit: - This happened during the financial crisis in Northern Countries in the early nineties. I tried to explain what INFLATION means for some thirteen years old students. Then a really fat and nasty guy asked if "they could just print more and more money, in millions, and give it to the people"? I said only: "....hhmmmh ... he-he-he-..."

The funny thing is that this is just what Federal Reserve and Mr. Bernanke are doing nowadays!!!!


Entered at Mon Dec 6 23:48:20 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: The "The Band" Band

Caught The "The Band" Band do their Last Waltz tribute show in Connecticut a week or so ago. Excellent show. Pretty spot on musically and Gary Solomon's Rick Danko is uncanny. Plus he did a mean falsetto on I Shall Be Released.


Entered at Mon Dec 6 22:39:32 CET 2010 from (24.190.80.58)

Posted by:

Petey

Location: NY

Subject: copyright infringement

I know a band at the following address who seems to have claimed one of your songs for their own. They have done it with others peoples music too. Rag Mama Rag they changed the lyrics and changed to Sad Mama Sad. It aint right. You guys are so known for your songs and we all love ya. Cover would be one thing but you are NOT getting any credit for this. ITS WRONG. Thought you should know. Ouch! Some people just suk. Rock on! http://www.reverbnation.com/taost


Entered at Mon Dec 6 17:22:23 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: EU Bailout

Sadavid, in the same vein here's all you need to know about the EU bailout.


Entered at Mon Dec 6 15:25:31 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: read a bieber,

Peter, you've discovered The Bieb!!!! We're so proud . . . .

RtO: Thanks for the vid; I think you should get Max von Sydow in to look at it . . . .


Entered at Mon Dec 6 15:25:17 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gen. Lee, I presume

Thousands of Britains fought on both sides in the American Civil War, including Sir Henry Morton Stanley, who fought at the Battle of Shiloh as a Confederate soldier and later switched sides after becoming a Union prisoner.


Entered at Mon Dec 6 15:14:22 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter - I'm no civil war buff but I've read my fair share. I enjoy reading alternative views and thoughts on subjects - see Lost Triumph in dealing with Gettysburg. I've never personally heard the thesis you've mentioned before. I certainly wouldn't mind seeing how that argument is being made.


Entered at Mon Dec 6 15:05:08 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The Saxon Wars....

Peter: I have some kind of memory that the idea of the 'Anglo Saxon war' was linked in some way to the beyond dubious idea that one of the 12 tribes of Israel became the Saxons (Isaac's sons - Saac's sons - Saxons...) but my memory being flawed and decrepit....


Entered at Mon Dec 6 14:13:00 CET 2010 from (86.181.210.35)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Actually Peter, it's a shame LG don't make rotary speakers as their beltless and uber-quiet direct drive principles would be a real boon where mic'ing up traditionally suffers from motor and wind noise!


Entered at Mon Dec 6 09:30:21 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: wandering off into history …

I woke up this morning to BBC Radio 4s Thought for The Day, the short religious homily to which the BBC still adhers. The speaker was talking about a new book which suggested the American Civil War was part three of an ongoing “Anglo-Saxon Civil War” and I wondered if our Civil War buffs here knew of this?

The theory seemed pretty vague to me … that The English Civil War, The War of Independence and the American Civil War were one ongoing struggle between egalitarian / moralistic views (Parlimentarians … Americans … The North) and more hedonistic / aristocratic views (Royalist … British … The South). I could see the reading and it fits in well with popular Romantic literature on all three (the Gone With The Wind factor), but it ignores most other factors. Is it a currently popular book? I failed to catch the title or author as I was shaving.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 20:58:48 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rob, would that be a Hoover-powered Leslie, or an Electrolux-powered Leslie? The Hotpoint ones were always crap.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 19:20:02 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Norbert

Guilty as charged, sir!

I'd love to put a video up but I'm having trouble with the Leslie connection and my old Leslie itself. Might put a quick run through of the organ through its own speakers, just a difference between Hammond and Lowrey type video but won't do any serious playing until the spin dryer is restored to full health!

(Thinks: hopefully I can shed some of the three stone I've put on since owning a home studio before I have to appear in a video!!!)


Entered at Sun Dec 5 20:02:42 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Rob, lol I loved the video.. I agree with Norbert. I'd love to see/hear you playing.

Norbert, Nice quote.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 16:35:37 CET 2010 from (91.42.245.82)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Rob's Lowrey

Rob, is that your Honking Lowrey and hand on YouTube? It's a beauty for sure congrats! although I'm no expert. Can't you put a YouTube up playing the beauty?


Entered at Sun Dec 5 15:55:41 CET 2010 from (91.42.245.82)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Richard Layard's

Subject: Quote II

Tolstoy;

"The most important person is always the person with whom you are, who is right before you, for who knows if you will have dealings with any other person in the future. The most important pursuit is making that person, the one standing at you side, happy, for that alone is the pursuit of life."


Entered at Sun Dec 5 15:48:36 CET 2010 from (91.42.245.82)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: a lazy Sunday

Subject: Quote & Dylan's songwriting

Shortly before he died, from his bed, a wise man wrote on the birth card for the new born daughter of a friend:

"Create all the happiness you are able to create: remove all the misery you are able to remove. Every day will allow you to add something to the pleasure of others, or to diminish something of their pains. And for every grain of enjoyment you sow in the bosom of another, you shall find a harvest in your own bosom; while every sorrow which you pluck out from the thoughts and feelings of a fellow creature shall be replaced by beautiful peace and joy in the sanctuary of your soul."

Some elements are te be found in Dylan's Forever Young too, I think.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 15:22:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.131.161)

Posted by:

JtT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Its good when you are accurate - Blue GIant, not Blue Light

Sorry. It is too early in the morning, but that is no excuse! It is "Blue Giant" not Blue LIght. My mistake. Anyway, great group!


Entered at Sun Dec 5 14:38:15 CET 2010 from (24.108.131.161)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Blue Light

We went to see Dandy Warhols Wed. evening this past week in Victoria at Sugars. Opening for them was the group "Blue Light". They are (for lack of a better description) an American roots group. They are signed to Vanguard records and have a great cd out (I bought it at the show). They are also from Oregon and have some great original material and did a great cover of the Byrds (Carol King/Goffin) "Notorious Byrd Brothers" song, 'Wasn't Born to Follow". Great musicians and highly recommended. The Dandys were great and played for 2 hours and then came out and mixed with the stragglers.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 14:19:09 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: very cool beatles poster

Check this out. except for the price I would buy one. Love how yoko sneeks in at the bottom.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 13:57:15 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

NB, there's no point in my trying to refudiate that. You win.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 10:32:12 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Honking Lowrey

Phew. I think you've just indicated that "The Genetic Method" could have written and played itself without human intervention.

DO NOT LEAVE IT SWITCHED ON AT NIGHT. Imagine waking at 3 .m. to hear that.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 04:29:50 CET 2010 from (216.165.58.91)

Posted by:

Ari S.

The new issue of Rolling Stone features music playlists from the likes of Mick Jagger, The Edge, Wanda Jackson, and Robbie Robertson, who lists his favorite songs from New Orleans.


Entered at Sun Dec 5 03:30:57 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Evidence of the "Honking Lowrey"

There you go....good night all! Rob


Entered at Sun Dec 5 01:58:31 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: "Honking" Lowrey

Peter, extremely funny that you mention the "honking Lowrey" because a strange thing has started occurring. I got home from work today and switched the Lowrey on (those 88 tubes have to warm up, after all) while I put the kettle on.

Now, I had a technician round yesterday giving the trusty old beast a once over and correcting a fault, and thus had left most of the voice and effects tabs "on" because it's generally the done thing to test all the features after such works.

Soon after the kettle boiled and quietened down, I heard a funny chiming noise and thought something along the lines of the "iPhone in pocket = accidentally scrolled through all the ringtones and changed it to a silly one without even knowing" scenario. So I went back to the studio - which is a converted garage literally a doorway away from the kitchen and went to answer the phone which generally gets slung on my desk there with the usual car keys, loose change etc.

Well, it wasn't the iPhone at all. It was the Lowrey! Self oscillating, whatever you want to call it, but it was making the most other worldly incantation that was quite unsettling!

If this wasn't enough, I reached to turn off the "sustain" tabs from left to right (I figured this feature was probably creating a held loop that was the problem) and after I killed the first tab ("Staccato") the single most unsettling dischord came bellowing out (that screamed "shower scene!" at you) before the organ settled into a slower pattern that sounded like the novice bellringers limbering up down at St Mary's in Thames Ditton of a Saturday morn.

All of the above is gospel truth! I will try and get a quick capture of it via a digital camera video and post it onto YouTube.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 23:56:58 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

I'll do that Steve, but only because no one's more "fact up" than you are. NB.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 23:49:54 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.187)

Posted by:

Steve

That's better, you leave that factual stuff to me.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 18:50:38 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: NB

Is "retractoring" any thing like Sarah Palin's "refudiating"?

Justin Beiber is an enormous "heart throb" for the Preteen set. He was supposed to make an appearance at a mall near here. When he didn't show they had a riot of a couple of thousand little girls. Hysterical crying and all. Apparently he was discovered on Youtube.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 18:32:07 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Retraction

Scrap that last post of mine. Possibly to the delight of others, I've become a litte rusty at this. Nor when I wrote it was I fully awake and anywhere near what for me, alas, constitutes "full concsciousness". As a consequence, my post was not at all a fair or logical extension of what preceded it in the posts of others. Hence, I'm officially "retractoring it" ie. everyone just pretend it came from Stevon Farm and fully ignore it, (as per always). Thanks, and sorry.NB


Entered at Sat Dec 4 18:11:17 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Think Of The Children

My goodness, that factless fellow is saying, no wired phone, no cell phone. The first wireless communication ( outside of smoke signals and loud shouting)was done by Sammy Morse in the early 1840's before Mr. T Phone was born .

The time spent developing the house phone was just an example of a lack of insight into what communication is about. It's to connect people to people, not buildings to other buildings.

If someone had been thinking clearly we could have gone straight to the Star Trek communicator instead of doing a 130 year detour down Telephone Lane.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 17:36:24 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Or....

Maybe Peter, but I'd spin it this way based on having taught secondary school students for the last 30 years. If you asked the Bieber worshipping gang (ie. the early teen and pre-teen girls) what they'd give up first, their Bieber adoration or their cell-phone, trust me, it clearly wouldn't be their cell-phone. And without the invention of the regular phone- there'd be no cell phone.

So they really should and would be screaming Alexander Graham Bell at the screen, were it not for them having absolutely no clue as to who invented anything on planet Earth. Huxley had it right about the soma; he just didn't foresee it coming in electronic form, ie. cell-phones, MP3s, etc. Yep, no one need ever be alone with their own thoughts ever again in our Brave New Over-Gadgetized World.

Amishly yours,

NB


Entered at Sat Dec 4 17:26:55 CET 2010 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Canada

Subject: Dexy

Dexy that youtube video was done here in Toronto; on the CBC. CBC were very early; on catching on to Dylan.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 17:17:15 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Girl from the North Country clip

Martin Carthy mentions Dylan writing it while in the UK for Madhouse on Castle Street, so it must be from there.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 11:41:40 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: the bieb on teh beeb (unless Norton is on Channel 4 - I don't know...)

Justin Bieber sprang to 'fame' as a youtube sensation, essentially 'discovered' by hip hop star Usher. (It's a little more complicated, but that's the gist.He of course is no worse in a sense than (insert prefab pop star), but ...

I can't help but feeling an extra level of manipulation. Richard Manuel of course would laugh, buy us all a drink and remind us that good music abides... still makes me go 'mmmm...'


Entered at Sat Dec 4 10:10:20 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan in "The Madhouse on Castle Street"

Tantalizing clip of Girl From the North Country, especially as it's not one of the songs listed from the TV play "Madhouse on Castle Street" on Wikipedia (see link). It was broadcast January 1963, recorded December 1962.

I know it's "lost" but i'm sure I've seen a bootleg DVD with the title … but that's probably the TV documentary on it from 2007.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 09:54:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last night's Graham Norton Show was an odd chat show. It's generally accepted that he has three guests. If one's a singer they sing for their supper, as Bette Midler did last week. Sometimes he has three non-singer guests, then brings the singer on at the end for two minutes before they launch into song. After all, few singers are such good chat show value as Bette Midler.

Justin Bieber came on for about five minutes, and didn't sing, but got a video clip compilation of his hits shown. This is the BBC, and I thought it crossed that well-trodden chat show line. We know the guests are there to promote a book / album / film, but we expect them to entertain in exchange for exposure. This was straightforward plain promo.

It reminded me of the radio interview with Ricky Martin. The DJ pulled him in gently, asking if he had written and produced his latest hit. Martin confirmed that he had. The DJ then dropped in his closer, 'So what key is it in?' Truly a 'Doh!' moment.

So having been a rock snob, I'll move to quote of the week, read in Danny Goldberg's book "Bumping into Geniuses". Gene Simmons said it. "The reason rock critics hate Van Halen and love Elvis Costello is simple. Rock critics all look like Elvis Costello."

That's why I'd have to be careful on Alexander Graham Bell. In world terms, he must be the most well-known citizen of Stratford, Ontario, but shouting it out enthusiastically might have made one appear to be the sort of person who assembles crystal radio sets in the spare room.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 02:51:02 CET 2010 from (66.45.129.2)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: A clip from Dylan's '61 BBC telefilm (I think)

Someone just posted this on YouTube. It seems to be a clip from Dylan's 1961 (?) BBC teleplay. Not sure, but it looks like it is.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 01:01:11 CET 2010 from (142.22.16.50)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Or..

...those who weren't shouting "Richard Manuel" could've been shouting "Alanis Morissette" or even "Alexander Graham Bell". NB.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 00:53:58 CET 2010 from (216.165.58.91)

Posted by:

Ari S.

I wasn't watching Graham Norton but I would have been yelling. I've always thought the Beiber being from Stratford was funny.


Entered at Sat Dec 4 00:29:18 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Watching the Graham Norton chat show. He had a callow youth called Justin Bieber (I'd never heard of him). This youth is apparently a 16 year old superstar. He announced that he came from a small town we wouldn't have heard of, with only 30,000 people, Stratford, Ontario.

Was I the only person shouting RICHARD MANUEL, you stupid little … at the screen.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 20:31:43 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: man with broom

Bill M: see? Rock 'n' roll _is_ a goddamn impossible way of life . . . .


Entered at Fri Dec 3 20:26:14 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Mysterious? No. Illustrious? I've had my moments. Then again, alcohol can play tricks. Nonetheless I too, had a great time. Send that boy a ham! Marlene, hide the cash and jewellery, I'm sending the cleaning lady's ham to Bill!


Entered at Fri Dec 3 20:08:31 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: On a hunch I followed up on your post by googling "Then What" and was pointed to a Clay Walker video, which I didn't bother to look at because there was another pointer to the above link, which I thought was perfect given what we've talked of of late - brooms, snow, the Grey Cup game, Bachman-Turner ...

As for the Road Hammers, Yazoo was the first I heard of them and I too have been slow to scout out more - but I will. I do know that the drummer is the son of one of the Checkerlads of prairie '60s punk rock fame and that the bassist is a chum of Crowbar frontman / Hawkins alumnus Kelly Jay.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 19:35:41 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Car quoi?

Bill M: Never heard of Karkwa 'til just now, I guess I should pay more attention to the Polaris Prize. Nice wordplay, fer sure.

The new Garth CD (what else ought we to call it, GHPACCOTB?) is a ton of fun -- to me, it's like the perfect radio show, where the DJ spins only tunes you love, but everything's fresh at the same time. I think the sequencing works really well; Brooks's juicy take on "Forbidden Fruit" is a great way to start. Great harp player, except I guess it's a sax.

I tried to set aside my usual antipathy for Ms. Kreviazuk, in light of some early strong reviews . . . and I love the first couple of verses of "Tears of Rage," but only because she sounds like Norah Jones. After that, it's badly oversung.

I'm probably most tickled by "Yazoo" because a) it's a particular favorite of mine and I _never_ thought it'd ever be covered and b) the Hammers really nail it. I don't know if they always work in that genre, but by gar, it works for "Yazoo." I was a leetle disappointed that they stuck to the published lyrics (except, I think, for some improv around St. Vitus) -- but then, I haven't published my improved transcription yet. . . .


Entered at Fri Dec 3 19:33:50 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Six feet of packed snow? I can't imagine it. You would find snow here really odd. I’ve been in Poland, Hungary, Switzerland, USA and north Italy in deep snow, and everything was geared to it, not that I've ever seen six feet of it. Here, nothing is and there’s chaos. I was thinking today about winter tyres. In the 1950s (with vastly inferior tyre technology admittedly) my dad had two sets of tyres and switched them about now until late March. He also had snow chains. Gradual warming means most English people have never heard of either.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 19:19:12 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.185)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, one more thought on snow removal. When we moved to a very rural part of the Quebec in the early 80's, the road leading to the little town where our farm was, had only been kept open through the winter for car traffic for about 20 years.

People had used snowmobiles and before that horse sleighs. Snow wasn't removed from the roads, it was rolled and packed.

Horses pulled a 12 foot wide, 4 feet in diameter wooden roller that packed the snow to make the road passable.

The snow roads in that area were about 6 feet deep by spring. Everything works pretty well till spring when the snow starts to melt, or as the locals there called it, rot.

Then pretty much all road traffic came to a halt for a couple of weeks. Everybody prayed for rain and lots of it.

The last roller in the little town of Erle, where we lived, was in a shed at our neighbor's farm when we moved there. He'd been the last guy hired by the town to do the job which ended in 1962 when the town bought a gravel truck and snow plow to try and keep the road open to car traffic in the winter. I say try, because even when we lived there in the 80's and 90's the road was closed occasionally for a couple of days after ice storms or snow storms with high winds. The town was on a plateau about 600 feet higher than the surrounding countryside.

Being a back to the land, city type, and the only one interested in the days gone by, that I'd missed, I asked, Joe, our neighbor, about the pros and cons of road rolling and what the job was like. One day he told me he was giving me the roller. I guess I was the only one who showed any interest in it since it had been retired.

Though I didn't really want it because it was big and had to be stored inside or it would rot, I felt obliged.

When we moved I actually moved it here ( about 40 miles) still feeling obliged to protect it from the elements.

By a freaking miracle, my friend Barry, who lives next door has three Percheron draft horses and he had almost a complete line of horse drawn implements but not a ROAD ROLLER!!!!!!!! He was happy to take it off my hands and store it with the twenty odd other implements he has from days gone by. The old guy, Joe MacKay, who gave it to me and has long since died is smiling, somewhere. All's well that ends well.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 18:51:22 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: further instructions to chez Viney

JTF: ... and then watch for what looks like a snowman in the front yard, hold up four broken broom shards.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 18:40:19 CET 2010 from (91.42.239.93)

Posted by:

Norberto

Location: Zambia
Web: My link

Subject: Wiki Leaks & The Band

Just back from a peak at Wiki leaks (between two shut-down attacks) and searched for The Band ... nothing … but one hit at TLW. Seems that Carla Bruni, Nicolas Sarkozy and Jan Peter Balkenende had “steamy” sex while Bolero played load. Half way our little Napoleon, in his hiss naked ass (and without any shame as the beholder reveals) , stepped out of the bet (Angela's above it), walked firm and a little hautain to the CD player, put up the Complete Last Waltz, picked up the phone and talked with Obama about saving the $, during the whole "I Shall be Released", tapping Dylan's with his left foot. I for myself don’t belief it.



Entered at Fri Dec 3 18:33:36 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought that was you waving out of the window, Tull fan. For future reference, flying along the English Channel you see the Isle of Wight, and then it's about 20 miles past on the right (2 minutes).


Entered at Fri Dec 3 18:31:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When the engineer's talking about stereo, he says 'a blaring trumpet on the left', an 'out of tune electric guitar on the right' and a 'honking Lowrey organ on the ceiling', so probably not praise for the Lowrey there!


Entered at Fri Dec 3 17:40:48 CET 2010 from (68.164.6.27)

Posted by:

Pat B

A correction: before I take on the new Dylan book, I have to finish Jean Beliveau's A Life In Hockey, which after Keef's trudge is a breath of fresh air.

And there's not a lot of Lowery Organ on Dylan albums. The Hammond dominated his sound.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 17:03:44 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks bob w for the Bettye LaVette link.

I ordered a copy of the new Garth CD and I'm looking forward to hearing all the different interpretations. I'm also working on a new vinyl siding post comparing the new Black Friday Record Store Day mono single version of Dylan's "Like A Rolling Stone" with the original 45 version.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 15:58:39 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: you stand on guard for me

Steve: I hope my jocular tone yesterday didn't obscure the fact thaat we really do appreciate your support. Without it we'd have to pull our bags o'dough around on sleds. I also appreciate my friend sadavid chipping in to confirm that we ARE smart.

Speaking of friends, I should mention that I got to meet the illustrious and mysterious Landmark in Montreal two weeks ago. We sat at a bar and had a grand time talking about the rest of you.

sadavid: I'd started the previous day in Ottawa, where, it being Nov 16, I went to HMV and found the new Garth CD on the new releases wall. (Well done, HMV!!) Bought a copy, which I gave that evening to another friend in Montreal, who in return gifted me a copy of Karkwa's award-winning "Les Chemins de Verre". Seems like the kind of thing you'd know about. Took a bit of getting used to, but wow. I heard shades of other Montreal / Quebec performers - Arcade Fire for the young, Kashtin for the not-so (Band link: Kashtin's on "Music for the Native Americans"), Charlebois and Harmonium for the aged - but what really hooked me into it was the realisation that the familiar breathing sounds were reminding me of Spirit's magnificent "Why Can't I Be Free". And then it all fell into place for me: this is Karkwa's Douze Reves.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 15:51:17 CET 2010 from (217.5.150.250)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

BTW, Peter, that was me waving to you from 33,000 feet 2 weeks ago as I was flying home from Germany. Our flight path took us from France across the English Channel, and I thought 'ah, I wonder where that Viney guy is down there.'.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 15:34:52 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Steve: an alternative to curling....broomball.

It's really embarrassing for Canada and Canadians at large that Torontonians are useless when it comes to dealing with snow and the removal of said stuff. Who do they think they are...Buffalo?!?

: )

Bob: nice link.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 14:47:35 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Bettye LaVette

David, here is Ms. LaVette's performance of The Who's "Love Reign O'er Me" at the Kennedy Center Honors ceremony. Wonderful.

Thank you for the reminder.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 13:44:00 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.185)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, if you can do vigorous broom work there may be a future for you in curling.

While you can remove snow with some vigorous broom work, here on the farm it requires a 90hp tractor with a seven foot wide snow blower on the back and a 6 foot wide shovel on the front. How much horse power can you generate on that broom?

Both our methods in snow removal seem charmingly, serene compared to Bill's town where they just call in the army to blast away at any accumulation, no matter how small.

We always have to reduce our troop numbers in Afghanistan, from December to April, so that a large contingent can be ready at the drop of a flake to come to Toronto's rescue.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 11:28:00 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent and funny "Stick with Mono" video. When they talk about stereo, note they say it's a LOWREY organ in the middle. An unusual choice, no doubt related to Garth.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 07:11:14 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.91)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan Mono Promo Video

I really enjoyed the video promo at the link above. It's for the Dylan Mono box set. It's got a retro feel to it. Very fun and well done. I'm sure that some of you have seen it already, but if not, take a look.
Don't be tricked by stereo.....fun stuff!


Entered at Fri Dec 3 06:02:03 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

I finished the Keef autobio. One redeeming factor in the midst of the incredibly dire narrative: he loves Flashman.

Charlie, I've moved on the Willentz book on Dylan.


Entered at Fri Dec 3 05:33:22 CET 2010 from (68.198.85.55)

Posted by:

Herb

Location: the Indoor Garden

Subject: Dust My Broom

Don't want to be a fat man, Have not the patience to ignore all that Hate to admit to myself Half of my problems came from being fat


Entered at Fri Dec 3 05:06:23 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Peter's broom

It's a shame because he's had that broom for many, many years and with a little maintenance over the years it gave sterling service. Just replaced the handle once and the head three times...


Entered at Fri Dec 3 01:22:41 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Having mistaken Levon for Richard

And with the risk of giving Rick green hair, I'll weigh in on Australia's soccer cup bid. I'm glad we didn't get it: we're still paying for the Olympics - Soccer (as it's known here) is a huge participation sport, but noone watches it at its professional level. Australia had very little chance of getting it, actually - though Qatar seems an odd choice. Corruption no doubt. Makes me wonder how much Australia paid in bribes... ah well, another hospital shut...


Entered at Thu Dec 2 23:06:33 CET 2010 from (79.202.158.96)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Gross National Happiness

Anyway a pitty television killed the King of Bhutan's goal in 1998. But he was the first and we'll follow some day, some day, some day ....


Entered at Thu Dec 2 22:43:56 CET 2010 from (79.202.158.96)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The (unfinished) Bentham song verse II

Bill, the second part sounded like this (again Clapton),

"This man is free from servile bands

Of hope to rise or fear to fall;

Lord of himself, though not of lands;

And having nothing, yet hath all. "

we're all young older posters, but ELP?


Entered at Thu Dec 2 22:34:04 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Steve, I used a large broom but due to the intense cold and the vigour of my brushing, the broom shattered into four pieces. I joke not!


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:57:47 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: this ain't my season

My mother and her brother attended a very rural one-room school in Saskatchewan (the family arrived there to homestead just about the same time as the Great Depression arrived there). They were (mostly) delighted to win a contract with the school board that obliged them to start their winter days an hour or so early, to trek to the school and light the stove so the place would be habitable when the teacher arrived. A three mile trek, I think it was, and the pay was a dollar a month. Ah, the good old days, when the frontier was just outside the front door.

"Smart wusses"? Sounds about right. Half right, anyway.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:48:59 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, if you can use a broom to sweep a path through it then that's not snow your talking about. Flurries?


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:38:52 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: You might well think that, but I couldn't possibly comment.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:31:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, the opinion that the inhabitants of Toronto are brighter than your average Canadian (and American) is playing the Robertsonian card, surely?


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:22:01 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: confusing the Band with ELP

Norbert: The song was "Jeremy Bender" and the guy behind the piano wasn't Robbie, it was Keith Emerson. And he wasn't pushing it, he was stabbing it.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:11:48 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Subject: a tip for the snowbound

Peter V: If it gets really bad, I suggest what we do here in Toronto. We call in young men and women from armed forces bases around the country, who come and shovel our snow for free. Well, mostly free because the cost is borne by all of our fellow Canuckistanis, including the ones up north who can't even get out of their own houses except throught the chimney and the ones on the west coast who haven't seen snow in seventeen years. Sure they make fun of us for being wusses, but at least we're smart wusses: they do most of the shovelling, and they do most of the paying.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 21:06:48 CET 2010 from (79.202.158.96)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The (unfinished) Jeremy Bentham song.

I wonder if The Band ever finished their song about Jeremy Bentham. According to Clapton (in Japan) there was at least a refrain, starting ” Stretching his hand up to reach the stars ...." (he claimed to have heard Levon sing it from behind the kitchen table several times, while Robbie, standing behind the piano, pushed it into F, and G or D. Well maybe someday on eBay some tapes will ….


Entered at Thu Dec 2 20:59:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'd build a bridge and walk there …

My mother, born in South Wales, said snow only counts as snow when it gets above the window sills. Here, in effete Poole, we say "door sills".


Entered at Thu Dec 2 20:57:50 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Out of The Blue

I've had the Mary Margaret + The Sadies version on replay too. Transcendant.

Lars, oh for the days when they beat people for poor syntax. How more articulate the world would be. Yes, five inches of snow is a major deal here!


Entered at Thu Dec 2 20:53:32 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: I prefer to interpret it as people spending all their spare moments listening to their new Garth CDs so they can post their appraisals ASAP.

For me the highlights are most definitely Mary Margaret O'Hara's stunning rendering of "Out Of The Blue" and the Road Hammers' sleazy sleazy "Yazoo Street Scandal", both of which leave the original versions in the shade as far as I'm concerned. Neil Young's TWOF is not far behind, nor is the Cowboy Junkies' "Clothes Line Sage" - which always shoulda been sung by a woman, being a parody of "Ode To Billy Joe". I think the toughest job was faced by Blue Rodeo with "King Harvest"; the original's way too powerful to beat, but BR certainly get within range. And Danny Brooks does a commendable job of turning "Forbidden Fruit" into a southern rockin' blues-gospel number (songs of caution and redemption being his stock in trade). The person in the passenger's seat, a big Brooks fan but not someone familiar with the Band catalogue or the aim of this particular CD, wondered why Danny would choose to sing something so much weaker than many of his other songs. But she was absolutely blown away by Mary Margaret, who she didn't know at all.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 20:37:32 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: west of Poole

Subject: 5" of snow in Poole

Peter-

Only 5"?.......LUXURY!!! We've had times where the snow was over our heads and we still had to carry on fighting the natives. I had to walk to school uphill both ways and sometimes, when our schoolmaster didn't show up, we had to find him, shovel him out, and revive him. Not that he ever thanked us for it. He'd still beat us black and blue if he didn't like our syntax.

JON- thanks for the report and the setlist for Levon's show.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 19:45:46 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: World Cup Draw

Just to make up for the paucity of posts. World Cup 2018 and 2022. The presence of Prince William and President Clinton in Zurich failed to get the desired results. I watched the announcement. I guessed as soon as President Putin cancelled his appearance early in the day, that Russia had already won. It was sewn up and he knew it. In spite of poor facilities, Russia is a logical choice though.

Then it came to Qatar winning the 2022 bid. A country 60 km across that has never even qualified for the world cup finals. Everyone in Britain fully expected Australia to get in (on the grounds that Japan, Korea and USA had comparatively recently held it). That one is so ludicrous, that the British press, who were blamed for losing out for Britain by exposing FIFA corruption recently, will now have their investigative sights firmly set on the fat cats running world football. I’ll be surprised if they don’t get them too!


Entered at Thu Dec 2 19:26:57 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We had five inches of snow last night, here on the extreme south coast, that's the heaviest in 20 years. I know it's nothing in NY state, but here you go to the supermarket, and you're sliding on compressed snow. No attempt has been made even to sweep a path through to the door. Apparently, the legal advice to Tesco is if they clear none, and someone slips and is injured, it's an Act of God. If they clear anything at all, and someone slips, it's their fault for not clearing more (or all of it). So they clear nothing. The roads are largely ungritted, so a mere 5 inches here means schools are closed and the streets are deserted (except for kids enjoying it). Because most years we get a couple of days dusting at most, no one knows how to drive on it either, which is frightening when you're out.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 19:16:17 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Snow

I guess from the paucity of posts, that a lot of folks are snowed under. Hope everyone across the pond is OK.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 19:06:01 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bettye LaVette

The Nov. 15th edition of The New Yorker magazine had a nice profile of Bettye LaVette written by Alec Wilkinson. Following decades of obscurity, Ms. LaVette finally got widespread recognition with her electrifying performance The Who's "Love Reign O'er Me" at the Kennedy Center Honors ceremony in Dec. 2008. As Mr. Wilkinson reveals, it was dictated that she perform that specific song as part of the program honoring Pete Townsend and Roger Daltry. She did not care for the song at all, as she recounted "The biggest opportunity I've ever been offered in my life, and this is the song I've been given. I felt completed defeated." Through her agent, she lobbied to perform another song, one that she'd recorded, "Choices", a hit for George Jones, who was also being honored that night at the Kennedy Center. She was politely told by the producers that that wasn't an option, as there was already a large group of country performers lined up for the George Jones segment of the program.

After the program's musical director viewed a video of Ms. LaVette's amazing performance of Dolly Parton's "Little Sparrow", he rearranged "Love Reign O'er Me" as a lament, and the rest is history. With this approach, Ms. LaVette took a song she hated and reinterpreted it in a devastingly emotional catharsis that stunned all those in attendence, including Townsend & Daltry, as well as another honoree, Barbra Streisand, who was sitting next to them.


Entered at Thu Dec 2 18:15:22 CET 2010 from (65.47.151.50)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: New York City

Subject: Levon Helm Band at the Beacon, 11/27/10

Levon and his band played two shows at NYC's Beacon Theater over the Thanksgiving holiday. Steve Earle opened the Friday 11/26 show, and Bettye Lavette opened the Saturday 11/27 show. My wife and I went to the Saturday show and had a terrific time. Bettye Lavette and her excellent band sizzled with soul/funk energy, and Levon and his band were wonderful and high-energy as well, though their set was a bit shorter than past Beacon outings. As you likely know, Levon has had throat problems on and off this year... he had surprisingly good volume and 'punch' to his vocals, but his vocal range did sound more limited than usual and he was pretty hoarse by the final song (which was 'I Shall Be Released' ... how poignant, and appropriate, to hear him sing wistfully of 'every man who put [him] here'). He took few lead vocals, but sang more of the group choruses on other songs than I remember him doing previously. 'Blind Willie McTell' was a real treat. 'Bourgeois Blues' sung by Brian Mitchell (with a killer trombone solo) was another standout, as was the 'Mardi Gras Day' encore which got the whole audience on their feet. Great performances all around... can't wait for the next one.

Setlist (as best I can recall, with singers noted in parentheses) --

Bettye Lavette:
The Word
Been This Way Too Long to Change Now
Choices
Joy
Isn't It a Pity
Your Turn to Cry
You Don't Know Me at All
It Don't Come Easy
Souvenirs
Love Reign O'er Me

Levon and friends:
Ophelia (Levon)
Long Black Veil (Teresa Williams)
"I've got a whole lot of reasons for loving you, baby..." (Amy Helm)
? blues song (Larry Campbell)
The Shape I'm In (Brian Mitchell)
Blind Willie McTell (Levon & Larry)
Attics of My Life (Teresa & Larry & Amy...gorgeous as always)
Bourgeois Blues (Brian)
Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning (Teresa...killer)
Deep Elem Blues (Larry)
When I Go Away (Larry et al)
It Makes No Difference (Teresa + Amy)
The Weight (Bettye Lavette, 1st verse)
All On a Mardi Gras Day (Brian)
I Shall Be Released (everyone)


Entered at Thu Dec 2 16:05:37 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bob and Doug MacK

David P: You think we own that Dylan song? Take off, eh!


Entered at Thu Dec 2 14:19:56 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Web: My link

Subject: American Hero

Anyone who has the chance to watch PBS's, The Most Dangerous Man In America, should take it.

It's hard not to be impressed by the guts shown by someone like Daniel Ellsberg.

I was only in my mid teenage years when this was happening so was only vaguely aware of what had happened.

While presidents from Truman to Johnson are exposed as having lied about their intentions in Vietnam, it's Nixon, of course, that comes off the worst.

If at some point someone tries to rehabilitate Nixon's reputation a viewing of this documentary will stop that process dead in it's tracks.

Nixon comes off as a psychopathic, low level street thug. And you can easily come to this conclusion listening to him on tape in his own words.


Entered at Wed Dec 1 15:08:16 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Later to win...

Joan: The auction of the handwritten lyrics will evidently benefit the MacKenzies, who currently possess the artifact of musical history.


Entered at Wed Dec 1 03:33:39 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan

Dylan must be hard up for money. First the cover painting from MFBP and now a page from his early lyrics. Anyone have a spare $300,000?


Entered at Wed Dec 1 01:46:34 CET 2010 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

That whole Darlene Love Christmas album is probably great, the song choices are very good. Joan Osborn's is not bad either, more in a Country vein. Patricia Kass weighs in with a version for the "Four Tenors" crowd. Carolyn Arends with the slightly ironic, indie twist. The Gumbo Family .... look, I don't know who these people are, but they like to sing "Chirstmas Must Be Tonight!!"

[See the guestbook archive for more]


[History] [Members] [Library] [Discography] [Videography] [Filmography] [Pictures] [Audio Files] [Video Clips] [Tape Archive] [Concerts] [Related Artists] [Merchandise] [Guestbook] [Chat Room] [Search] [What's New?] [Main Page]

Webmaster