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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, October 2015


Entered at Sat Oct 31 19:48:24 CET 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: 17 000 / Calvin

Thanks Calvin for your link. Unfortunately, it came for 50 years too late to make me a better and wiser and tighter person. (On the other hand, it was not your fault.)


Entered at Sat Oct 31 17:36:16 CET 2015 from (32.216.232.163)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Magic Shop

Sorry to hear about The Magic Shop. Ollabelle recorded their first album there with Steve Rosenthal. Around that same time the Rolling Stones ABKKO recording were being remastered at the Magic Shop, so in between sessions, there were a lot of early Stones songs being played. One byproduct of this was the in inclusion on the first Ollabelle album of their cover of 'I Am Waiting', from Between The Buttons.

It's that kind of cross pollination of organic influences and ideas that will fall by the wayside as more and more studios close.

Another important venue mentioned in the article is the club called The Living Room. I've only been to the location that was on Ludlow street in Manhattan. That's the first place where I heard Ollabelle perform back in 2004 and it had a profound influence on me. Many musicians would congregate there and sit in with each other, mostly for the joy of playing and to try out new material. On any given night, you might see the likes of Ollabelle, Norah Jones and the Little Willies, Teddy Thompson, Jason Crigler, Sean Costello, and on and on. It was a really special place, and it's truly sad that the ever increasing price of rents is driving out many of the business that make cities like NYC invigorating and interesting.


Entered at Sat Oct 31 16:44:54 CET 2015 from (173.3.49.223)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, you guys were lucky you hadn't had lunch earlier, you might have gone to the joint that got bombed.


Entered at Sat Oct 31 12:47:01 CET 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Oats In the Water

Al, I just wore up, checked the GB for news, saw your post and checked out the link. What a nice way to start the day! Thanks.


Entered at Sat Oct 31 10:27:51 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sad news, Jeff. The basement location reminded me of a spoken voice studio we used to record in just off Oxford Street. There was a 1950s building on the site of a church bombed out in the war, and the studio was in the basement, with the old stone vault walls. This would be early 1980s during the IRA bombing campaign. We stopped for lunch after a good morning and strolled upstairs to find the street cordoned off at both ends and police cars and ambulances at both ends. The restaurant at the end had been attacked with a bomb. We had not heard the bomb, the sirens, anything. The police were amazed to see us emerging right in the middle of the area that had ben cleared.

What happened for years was that studios moved out of Central London to the suburbs, then further out again. Spoken voice studios have a harder job in a way, as they rely on actors coming in for an hour or three between other work, so can't simply escape to the cheaper towns outside London.


Entered at Sat Oct 31 05:06:44 CET 2015 from (67.84.79.193)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Magic Shop, killer NYC recording studio about to close

Another great one biting the dust. At 1300 a day ( basically up to 12 hours) , they were reasonable. And analogue if you preferred! And though it was unpublicized, for indies they did better. Great studio , odd shape set up for live room, you needed someone very familiar with the room heavily involved. but, a killer studio - just look at the projects that came out of there......


Entered at Sat Oct 31 03:06:38 CET 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: Pa

Subject: Oats

Al. I am a Walking Dead fan as well. A few seasons ago when I watched that episode I ran out the next day and picked that one up too. I agree it's a great song. My good buddy from HS won an Emmy for the walking dead as a make up artist. Just texted with him the other day. He has appears in a few episodes as well as a walker. He was the walker who was curb stomped a few seasons back. Any way he always has good stories about this show and Holloywood. He works on tons of great movies. He tells me the actors on the show are all real good people.


Entered at Sat Oct 31 00:54:47 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.8)

Posted by:

Bill M

I just turned to page 2, which turned out to be a full-page B&W ad for MFBP. What struck me is how quickly Capitol's marketing arm moved to formalise the group's name. The Aronowitz article notes that they have no name but are called "the Band" by the locals. The ad says:

THE BAND
was born in this pink house.
Their music was composed there.
Their album cover was painted there.
Get the Big Pink message
from THE BAND


Entered at Sat Oct 31 00:43:35 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.1)

Posted by:

Bill M

On Monday I traded some books for two issues of "Rolling Stone", 68/08/24 with our guys on the cover and Al Aronowitz's important feature inside, and 69/05/17 with "The Debut of Big Pink" and Joni on the cover. I like this quote from Robbie in the earlier piece: "There is the music from Bob's house and there is the music from our house. 'John Wesley Harding' comes from Bob's house. The two houses sure are different."


Entered at Fri Oct 30 14:08:05 CET 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Ben Howard - Oats in the Water

Just come across this superb song/artist whilst watching The Walking Dead!!!.

Apologies if Pete or anyone else has previously given a heads up for this guy but it's just such a haunting track it'd be remiss of me not to flag it up.

It does carry a warning though - beware the melody sticks in your head!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 29 14:21:18 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Price comparison

Rock of Ages vinyl is £27 here … so about $40, but as a lot of single albums are £16.99 or £17.99 on vinyl it's more like 150% of a single album rather than 200%, so reasonably fair. You could pick up an original for a lot less.


Entered at Thu Oct 29 12:20:28 CET 2015 from (70.193.129.89)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Rock of Ages

Haven't heard the pricey new pressing, but you can't go wrong with the original mastered by Bob Ludwig. Look for his initials "RL" etched in the run off area of the records.


Entered at Wed Oct 28 22:44:33 CET 2015 from (66.99.114.250)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Vinyl

Back in the record day, Rock of Ages was always a bargain. I always thought it somehow got logged in wrong. Picking it up for so little ended up what sparked my true Band Mania. Well, nice to see it is at Barnes and Noble in the Vinyl section now. But it's about forty dollars.


Entered at Wed Oct 28 12:42:03 CET 2015 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Lomax archive

Also enjoyed the Calypso concert and looking forward to sampling some of the rest. It's a shame, though, that the selections are chopped into such short segments, with intros separate from songs, some in two parts and even songs cut in two. Kind of reminds one of the Monty Python bit about the massive collection of string all cut into 2-1/2 inch lengths...Simpson's Individual Stringettes! Stem household tidal waves! As used in Hospitals!


Entered at Wed Oct 28 06:01:33 CET 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

No Problem Jon, 17,000 songs, I mean I should be able to find something new and amazing for a year or so.


Entered at Wed Oct 28 03:07:15 CET 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Calvin: thanks for the link! A treasure trove of great stuff. I enjoyed the 1946 calypso concert there hosted by Alan Lomax.


Entered at Tue Oct 27 20:44:39 CET 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Dyi'n Crapshooter

Great one David P; I hadn't heard that take before. It's such a well written song. I think it's very urbane compared to the Blues' stereotyped lyrics, but most of his stuff is unique that way. Perhaps that's the Ragtime element in his style.

I've always liked David Bromberg's version too, with its horn arrangement - including a dominant trombone!


Entered at Tue Oct 27 17:20:35 CET 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Lomax Archive

From Lomax's Deep River of Songs: Georgia collection, "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" by Blind Willie McTell.


Entered at Tue Oct 27 17:14:30 CET 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Well Bill MMMMM......We forgot about the UN's list.

Sincerest apologies to Pat BBBBB....I forgot about the Cubs and the Mets. Ouch!


Entered at Tue Oct 27 14:42:34 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.139)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: If there really is a god, then he, she or it is spending way too much time with the record collection. Some nice choices (especially "More Than A Feeling"), but how 'bout paying attention to the state of creation, or at least the corner of it that is Earth? The evidence is that god has been on the world's longest toot, so I suggest restocking the jukebox with sobering-up songs: "Amazing Grace", "Sunday Morning Coming Down", etc.


Entered at Tue Oct 27 13:33:02 CET 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

God's Jukebox

October 10, 2015


Entered at Tue Oct 27 13:20:37 CET 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Restless Farewell (acoustic w band)
1995 (1) 16870
1998 (1) 19210

Restless Farewell (acoustic)
1963 (3) 00615 [00615] [00618]
1964 (2) 00640 [00695]

Hey Joan....Congrats on your Mets going to the World Series. It should have been the Toronto Blue Jays meeting them there.........Since it didn't work out we're all cheering for the Mets to beat those scrappy Kansas City Royals. Want proof? Well I was in Kensington Market and I've already seen signs outside restaurants saying Go Mets Go as the Blue Jays were crossed off. Yes indeed.....Go Mets Go!
Our Toronto Raptors start season tomorrow.....but I'll be seeing "Motown" finally.


Entered at Tue Oct 27 02:45:26 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.18)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: Thanks for your concern. We arrived home safe and sound on Friday. Again, nice to have met you.


Entered at Tue Oct 27 01:17:06 CET 2015 from (208.167.254.112)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

So, over 17,000 recording by Alan Lomax have been archived, uploaded and made available for listening.

I just spent the afternoon listening to the recordings he made in Mississippi Prisons in 1947-1948 http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=10704 Just an amazing resource, mind boggling how much is there.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 19:12:34 CET 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Restless Farewell

Ian, I sent Olof a partial set list that he never used for the Mosque show. If he did Restless Farewell, it wasn't as an encore which was "With God On Our Side." Songs he definitely did were Times, Hollis Brown, Hard Rain, Davey Moore, Talking John Birch, Talking World War III, Don't Think Twice, Walls Of Red Wing and Blowin', which was introduced as "Here's the song Newsweek said I didn't write."


Entered at Mon Oct 26 16:48:10 CET 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Restless Farwell

Yes, indeed, PSB, and Dylan did it at London's Royal Festival Hall in May 1964, which we now have courtesy of last year's Copyright Extension "release". I was really referring to the opportunities that Sinatra (or someone in his family) might have had to hear the song - it was really limited to the album or the QUEST television show - but I should have been more exact in my wording. Clinton Heylin lists QUEST as it its first known performance but "dis-refers" to it in a later publication).

The source of Olof's information re Washington is the Daniel Mark Epstein book, which has a long but incomplete set list. As I recall, local reviews mentioned a couple of other songs not listed by Epstein. I have two reviews (neither complete, sadly), only one of which gives any song titles. I cannot recall Olof's source for the Chicago concert but Clinton Heylin mentions "Restless Farewell" there,somewhere or other.

Dylan's "Restless Farewell" seems to have been his response to the NEWSWEEK article by Andrea Svedburg. Izzy Young's telegram of complaint to NEWSWEEK was dated 29 October and Dylan's recording session was 31 October 1963. He is thought to have headed to the West Coast for a while thereafter and the only known concerts he did in that period were in Boston, Syracuse, Princeton, St Lawrence and Newark in November (plus a show that Dylan has mentioned in NY state on the day after the Kennedy assassination) and Washington and Chicago in December.

It is quite possible (likely, even) that he did "Restless Farewell" in Newark. I have photocopies of a couple of newspaper ads but no concert reviews, I'm afraid. I would have thought that the STAR-LEDGER carried a review.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 15:48:55 CET 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Restless Farewell

According to Olof's site, Dylan performed "Restless Farewell" at concerts in Washington DC and Chicago in late '63. And since I've always had a feeling of deja vu about that song and not from the Clancy Brothers, I'm about 75% sure he did it the first time I saw him at the Mosque Theater in Newark, NJ, November 30, 1963, since most of the songs were not yet on a record.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 15:43:30 CET 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whale boat sinking

Bill Munson, I'm hoping you are home safe. There was a 65 foot whale watching boat sank off Tofino with 5 people lost. They were from England.

Peter, you must be aware of the auction where Titanic memorabilia was sold recently. A picture of the iceberg she hit went for 21,000 pounds, amoung other things.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 15:38:25 CET 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Titanic / Peter V

I'd like to add to this T-shirt: steering system by Citroen.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 15:23:38 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan Quest: weird 'props' and setting

Quest Dylan 1964 was a weird production (good performances: weird setting) and I'd be surprised he would do it in that setting. I wonder if the background was added after the performance. It is so CBC-kitsch of the 1960s. On the other hand, he was growing and TV exposure in Canada was a good thing.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 15:17:59 CET 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Matthew Sweet

Speaking of covers, Matthew Sweet's fine album "Girlfriend" was released 23 years ago this month. It featured a classic cover photo of the comely actress Tuesday Weld. The album's brilliant title song featured the late Robert Quine on lead guitar. Check out the link!


Entered at Mon Oct 26 14:26:21 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Southampton / Spooky Tooth

Ian: You’re right about The Mayflower. A magnificent hall. An ex-cinema. It used to be Southampton Gaumont, and still was when I saw Peter Brooks’ Midsummer Night’s Dream there. It mainly has BIG musicals and pantomimes. I thought it had stopped doing one night stand gigs, but they seem to be back: Michael Buble and Russell Watson are doing one night shows on the current listing. The issue is though that as they so often have musicals for a month, it would be hard to book a single show unless it fell between them by chance. Do you know the art gallery? Right behind the Guildhall with outstanding pre-Raphaelites. If you walk across the small park you’ll find the Titanic Musicians Memorial inset into a modern office block. I’d think Bob himself would be intrested in the dance band on the Titanic. If you whisper venues for next year, Poole Lighthouse has far better sound than Bournemouth BIC, and Poole is now the home of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.

We went to the very fine Titanic Museum in Belfast, though Southampton has as much resonance. They had T-shirts with "Titanic: Built by Irishmen. Sunk by Englishmen."

Spooky Tooth were one of the finest British live bands of 1968-69 – previously the VIPs, then Art, then when Gary Wright joined, Spooky Tooth. They had great originals. It’s a pity they tried for the covers market with singles. “Spooky Two” is the album to have!


Entered at Mon Oct 26 13:45:00 CET 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan RAH

Ian: I have watched some of the RAH performances at Expecting Rain site I too am appreciative of the nuances of the 'standards' he sings. (the references to Sinatra only because Sinatra sang so many of these; however, as Dylan says, he is not covering Sinatra or even these songs; he is giving them life again so they can be appreciated for the wonderful songs they are. The songs he presents that are his are given new approaches as well. Most reviews have been very positive. As I reflect on this, I am in awe of a man with this long history of performance who isn't just 'mailing it in'; he is making what he does matter every day. That the set list does not change is of little consequence. It is well known that this is the current case. For those who go again and again to RAH or for those who follow the tour, they know in the main what they are there for. As for the band, there backing is a treat. Thanks for your comments, ian.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 13:33:29 CET 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan in Southampton

I don't know why they chose Southampton Guildhall, though I do know that he likes to play new places, so that may have been a factor. And I guess a smaller venue has its attractions, too.

I have tickets on Row B of the balcony, which I understand to be at the back of the downstairs standing area, so some distance from the stage, I suspect.

It's an odd thing that downstairs is standing because, at the Royal Albert Hall, nobody was allowed to come to the front of the stage, even for the encores, and this, apparently stipulated by Dylan's people, was strictly enforced by the RAH staff. This is not an RAH rule as far as I know; certainly, when we attended the Mark Knopfler concerts there earlier this year, there was what MK fans call "the bull run" at the end.

To add to my first paragraph :- a couple of years back, I extolled the virtues of the Mayflower Theatre as a venue, and Southampton as a location, to one of Dylan's entourage. It is always possible that this idea made its way through the many layers between a mere audience member and "those-who-decide-these-things" but I doubt it - more likely just a coincidence. On the other hand, the Mayflower must surely be a name that would resonate with any American (though it tends to book shows way ahead, which does not suit Dylan's "modus operandi") and Southampton, as the port from which the Titanic sailed, may have rung a bell given the song on his then most recent album, TEMPEST. Whatever the reason, he will be there on Friday and so will I - barring accidents.

I lived for many years in Carlisle, spiritual home of Spooky Tooth in its earlier incarnations. On Thursday night, we had a meal with Dylan friends from Carlisle before the Dylan show and, almost inevitably, Spooky Tooth came up in the conversation - not their version of "The Weight", though.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 13:21:06 CET 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Ian. I did see Dylan's performance on the night of Sinatra's 80th birthday as I tend to catch most things musical on TV. Thanks for reminding us. I didn't know about Dylan's performances on CBC's Quest however. Thanks so much Ian.

Bob Dylan: CBC TV Studios, Toronto 1964 (Video)
CBC TV Studios
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
1 February 1964
Produced by Daryl Duke.

"Dylan records a half-hour program as part of the CBC-TV series “Quest.” The half a dozen songs he sings-“Talkin’ World War III Blues,” “Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall,” “Girl from the North Country,” “The Times They Are a-Chang in’,” “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll,” and “Restless Farewell”-are all performed within the most incongruous of settings, a log cabin filled with working men pretending to pay attention. ~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)"


Entered at Mon Oct 26 11:16:16 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, Spooky Tooth's failure to chart, let alone get to "No 1" as Island predicted gives the lie to the story that buying the full front page advert in the New Musical Express guaranteed you a chart place between 28 and 30 … in their chart. I've got enough New Musical Expresses with duds advertised on the front to contradict the story … it's either Simon Napier-Bell or Andrew Loog Oldham who started the story.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 11:08:43 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Ian. It’s luck finding the right magazine. It interested me that at that point Island still thought it could “steal the hit” with Spooky Tooth … who had tried the same the year before, when they were called Art, with For What It’s Worth. Both good choices and well-performed, but I reckon that was close to the last gasp for instant cover versions of American hits.

I’m still surprised Bob Dylan is doing Southampton Guildhall. Online it says the capacity is 1,749, but that must be standing. At Bellowhead last year they had terraced portable seating in the back quarter of the hall, standing in front. For Seth Lakeman it was all seated … and I’d put the capacity at half that at most. On the upside, last year it was the friendliest O2 venue I’ve been to … no burly gruff security guys, just pleasant people. Hopefully it’s the same. At both concerts they kept the bar open with doors open right along the side which was really annoying in the seated area … near us one guy went out three times for beer, making the whole row stand up in both directions. Hopefully they’ll close the doors for Bob.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 10:44:11 CET 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan's "Restless Farewell" at the Sinatra 80th birthday tribute

It's a quietly understated performance that you may not have seen before:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT2WxkPNERM&feature=related

Most performers did Sinatra songs that night, Dylan being the exception. He later said that Sinatra had requested it but, if Sinatra himself did request it, then that seems surprising as it's relatively obscure song in the Dylan canon. He had only done it live once before and that was in Canada, in a show called QUEST on CBC in early 1964.


Entered at Mon Oct 26 01:13:37 CET 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan, Prof Louie and The Weight ads

Just back from two of Dylan's shows at the Royal Albert Hall and the reviews are right in saying that his performance of the Sinatra-related songs (7 of them in the 20 song set) is really good - he sings them with care, with reverence almost, exhibiting a vocal range I haven't heard from him for quite some years. Some of his own songs have new arrangements and the band were terrific. There is very little variation in the set list from night to night. I had originally got tickets for four shows but, for various reasons, settled on two shows, both third row (though the second night was Row 3 at the very side which is actually the front row in the Albert Hall)and the sound was excellent. On the second night, in particular, I could make out every instrument individually without any problem, which has not always been the case at Dylan shows. Even with a 20 song set, the show lasted barely any more than 2 hours - including the interval. At 7.30, he came on promptly (not very common on previous tours)and was finished by around 9.35 pm.

There is much socialising with long-standing friends and acquaintances when you attend a lot of Dylan shows, as I do, and somebody I know who was in the pub after the show does a bit of low-key tour booking and promotion. I mentioned Professor Louie and the Crowmatix and he said he had tried to set something up for the UK. It was not a conducive atmosphere in which to pursue the topic (very loud background noise and everyone cross-talking with someone else about something different, part-heard conversations everywhere around) but I may see the guy at the Southampton show later this week and I'll try to find out more.

And, finally, I loved seeing those old newspaper ads for the various versions of "The Weight". More of that sort of thing would be most welcome, Peter.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 23:00:21 CET 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Home from the C

On my drive home this morning.......the boxing match you spoke of was discussed Kevin, on the CBC show discussing Justin Trudeau. He certainly is his own man with a lot of strong virtue. He certainly has earned, and deserves the opportunity to prove what he can do.

One interesting "bit" on this show was an event that happened a while back. Many of you have probably seen the very famous photo from years ago. His father had picked him up under his arm at an event, and as they passed a security officer, the officer was saluting him. This photo has been presented to Justin so many times, it has become a joke. However at a college some where back east ( I forget which one) Justin was to make a speech. This young security officer was presenting this same photo to Justin and he was good naturedly accepting it.....BUT, the young officer said to him, "Here is this picture of you and your Dad, and...the officer saluting him is my Dad......to which Justin broke into tears.

Justin Trudeau is good friends with my sister, who for many years was a supervisor at the Victoria Rescue Co-ordination Centre. Cyndie, (my sister) was the spear head to many mountain and ski rescues. Justin, because of the death of his brother in this sport, has always been very supportive of rescue people and became friends with Cyndie.

Cyndie's son Aarron, many years ago came upon an accident as he passed on his motor bike. He got some people out of a car, gave one person mouth to mouth and saved his life. I have a picture Cyndie sent me of Justin presenting Aarron with some award, I forget the particulars.......young Justin is a good man.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 22:18:59 CET 2015 from (173.3.51.13)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: We Will Rock U. Woodstock Campus.

Worthwhile Venture? Just A New Marketing Plan? Berklee In Woodstock? Time Will Tell.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 20:46:38 CET 2015 from (69.112.185.73)

Posted by:

Rick S.

Location: Suffern, NY

Subject: Prof. Louie/Turning Point

Ian W., my friends and I saw Professor Louie and The Crowmatix last night at The Turning Point, another intimate club in Piermont, NY. It's 20 miles north of New York City, well worth the trip. The owner John said he still misses Rick Danko who played there regularly. John's sound there is outstanding . The Crowmatix always put on a great show, very tight band with great musical performances. John Platania was on lead guitar, really enjoyed his playing. He performed Van Morrison's "Domino" with his original guitar lead-in......our next stop is "The Weight Band" in Tarrytown, NY in Westchester County on November 20th.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 16:30:15 CET 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Under The Covers

The Matthew Sweet / Susannah Hoffs project "Under The Covers" has been reissued as a 4 CD box set (1960s / 1970s Parts 1 & 2 / 1980s). I've not got past CD1 which has been on replay all day. It's such a lovely and eclectic choice of songs … Different Drum, Village Green Preservation Society, Sunday Morning (VU), Cinnamon Girl, I Can See For Miles … it goes on and on. Definitely a great antidote to a dank Autumn day. OK, you'd could put the originals together, but Susannah Hoffs voice (mostly her) pulls it all together into a whole.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 11:53:49 CET 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Location: Hospital bed near Yatesey's

Subject: The ramifications of saying you don't like cartoons to a Yatesey's patron

Not good advice that Pete lad!!

:-0(


Entered at Sun Oct 25 06:52:51 CET 2015 from (68.171.246.133)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Eclection

Peter V / JT: If I'm correctly remembering what I read in Wikipedia a few years ago, Eclection's George Hultgren was born in Norway but raised in Montreal, so I suspect that his meeting with Michael Rosen in a London folk club was a case of two expat Canucks bumping into each other, chatting as we do, and finding much in common. I believe Rosen's right out of music now, but in the '90s you could find him playing trumpet with the Lincolns at the Biermarket in downtown Toronto. The Lincolns were, and still are, a very funky R&B band led by super-bassist Prakash John.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 05:05:35 CET 2015 from (32.216.227.143)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Landy's Book

Adam, I've also been waiting patiently for the book since it was announced. I know there were several delays along the way, but I've been willing to wait, if the payoff is a great quality printing. I did the Kickstarter thing too, as it's a project that I really believed in and wanted to support.
Looking forward to November!


Entered at Sun Oct 25 01:38:30 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Eclection

Eclection: In my iTunes. and Michael Rosen made a significant contribution and I know he is very proud of this album.


Entered at Sun Oct 25 00:34:15 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: NME September 1968

As ever, a 1968 music newspaper is a fun read. For Bill Munson, there’s a short review of the Eclection LP (described as: two Australians, one Canadian, a Norwegian and an Englishman.) The Canadian is of course Mike Rosen, also part of The Dundee Horns and Mogul Thrash.

On Randy Newman they say:

“Randy doesn’t sing too well, a sort of country Dylan, caring not so much for tunes as words. In fact, he sounds a little drunk.”


Entered at Sat Oct 24 23:12:48 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Peter, Todd hit the nail for you! They look the same, but check the cover of Jan's site. That brown album photo has a different lineup l to r.

I can't wait for Landy's photo book. I helped fund it on Kickstarter and he says copies will be shipped and arriving by late November. Am immensely excited!


Entered at Sat Oct 24 19:49:00 CEST 2015 from (32.216.227.143)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Photos

No problem Peter, but I'm pretty sure that the photos are from different photo sessions. The MFBP ones in Bearsville 1968 and The Brown Album cover photo from John Joy Road 1969 which was shot in the rain. They still have similar looks, but Levon's hair looks longer in the Brown cover photo.

May get more details once Elliot Landy's book arrives. I think it's supposed to start shipping soon. Maybe there will be more precise dates for the photos.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 19:17:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… and Todd. Sorry. Going too fast. No, the UK MFBP had a single sleeve, white back. I have an American copy and should have checked.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 19:16:02 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks Adam. Will correct … same session though?


Entered at Sat Oct 24 18:54:20 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

That single of "The Weight" does not have the Brown Album photo a year earlier in 1968. It's the Music From Big Pink left inner gatefold photo.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 17:32:51 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.149)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Peter

Enjoyed reading article and looking at illustrations. Well researched and comprehensive. I've always been surprised the single wasn't something like a number 1 for 12 weeks. Too far ahead for its time? Thanks, Peter.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 17:24:16 CEST 2015 from (174.236.33.180)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Weight

Peter V. Interesting info, and fun to see some of the original advertising. I may be missing something, but I don't see the photo from the Brown album, which I assume is the one from John Joy Road.

The photo in the ad that you provided looks to me like the one from Music From Big Pink. The one that is shown inside the gatefold cover in the U.S. release. Did the UK Brown album use the MFBP photo? Did the UK MFBP, not use the photo? The one from Wittenberg RD with the mountains in the background?


Entered at Sat Oct 24 16:57:52 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight

Having found those adverts for the initial UK release of competing versions of The Weight on 7th September 1968, I put together a quick article to display them. Linked above.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 12:44:54 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, don't forget, at Yates, if anyone says "Are you looking at me?" do not reply "No, I don't like cartoons."


Entered at Sat Oct 24 12:42:07 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Aussie Whites

Ha ha

Just off to Yatesey's to give it another try Westie lad! I think I'll give the clubs a miss though!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Oct 24 05:10:53 CEST 2015 from (58.104.8.92)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Quite an interesting interview with Neil Diamond from 1976. He doesn't mention The Band but it shows what kind of guy he was at the time he was working with Robbie. He sounds quite Robbie-esque in parts.


Entered at Sat Oct 24 00:43:58 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Games are so late in our zone. 9:37 first pitch. Used to be able to stay up late so easily. Not any more.

Had Norm's "After All This Time" playing in the car today. Bit of Waylon there.

RIP Cory Wells. Three Dog Night was one of my favourite bands in high school. Like the Beatles, Guess Who and CCR. All over the AM dial with some singable tunes.


Entered at Fri Oct 23 20:33:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: More on the "Works"

I tracked down some more information on the aborted "works" project. We know that the avant garde composer Penderecki was a major influence on this. Robbie characterized the composer as "like the Ingmar Bergman of music" in an interview with Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times. In another interview in 1985 with Ruth Albert Spencer, he commented further on the influence of Penderecki:

"He was one of my favorite new composers and I still like him. It's very passionate music and depressing and weird. I can't remember what piece it was that I heard that influenced me, but it made me think of an idea that I started to work on at the time. It was a mood that I found. I worked out this melocy and then I found counter-melodies with it and I couldn't find any words for it, so I just kept working on it that way. The idea was I was gonna write this piece of music, but I didn't finish it because there was nothing for The Band to do on it really -- it didn't have anything to do with them and there was no demand for it. It's not something the record companies would be interested in from me. So I was doing it on my own. I was doing it with an American Indian thing in mind. It was around the time or after the Wounder Knee episode -- I was just thinking about what happened to those people. They were going to make this movie about Wounded Knee and Marlon Brando was involved and I was going to write it for that. It kind of fell apart, so it was something I didn't finish."


Entered at Fri Oct 23 19:25:20 CEST 2015 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Time will tell.

Joan: I only hope that we can experience the wonder of a Mets-Jays World Series. Time will tell.


Entered at Fri Oct 23 19:23:53 CEST 2015 from (74.14.7.222)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan excels in Europe

Dylan getting rave reviews in London, Paris, Scandinavia and all points in between. Fans noting his inclusion of old standards are well delivered with very good voice but pining for Dylan compositions. but Bob does what Bob does and that has always been what it has been. The band has been stellar. The fan reviews and the professional reviewers have all lauded the sets and most have commented that the ability to hit the notes accurately is there in full bloom. Wonders never cease. The RAH residency continues into night 3.


Entered at Fri Oct 23 19:22:49 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Hair and music. Right now we are going to the World Series and some of the top pichers have very long hair. They are young and they are cute and this is a trademark. Was all baseball players have some kind of facial hair. Go Mets!


Entered at Fri Oct 23 15:45:54 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania NorthWest

Subject: 1.) Hair - Ian W. had wrong 2.) Wine and Al Edge 3.) Miss Richardson

1.) Hair is MUSIC! Ian W. was wrong. On the other hand, as a guy with empathy, I got his point. For me 'Saturday Night Fever' or 'Grease' are hardly any music which is changing the world. Great entertainment, maybe. Great fun and great opportunity for young talents to break thru, for sure. Maybe Ian W. has same thoughts about 'Hair'? As a schoolboy band bass player I enjoyed to play 'Let The Sunshine In'. We had this thread - a happy song - in this gb earlier this year and 'Let The Sunshine In' was not one of your choices. Now it is. It is (almost) as enjoyable as to play the bass line in Jimi Hendrics' 'Hey Joe'.

2.)I don't love you anymore, Al Edge. Your words on Aussie White hurt me deeply. The wine does more than "its' job". Yesterday I cooked a dish with fish, onion, citron, sea salt, saffrane, cream and - listen carefully now - Aussie White. Today we drank the rest of it with our home made coastal Pizza a la Bretagne.

3.) Peckerhead was the word.


Entered at Fri Oct 23 02:27:08 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.199)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Smoking accordions Batman!


Entered at Fri Oct 23 01:54:58 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hillary

I've been watching the Benghazi hearing - a GOP joke! The whole caper could be good for Hillary with the folks on the fence about her.

She's been brilliant! The GOP, Fox and conservative radio have been painting her as a strident bitch for a long time - I don't know if that's true or not, but based on what I've seen today her brains & toughness will serve her well as Prez and leader of the free world!

These republicans are just a ghastly & frightening crowd! Fuck 'em!


Entered at Thu Oct 22 23:39:26 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: squeeze box

Of course this local news story brought out the usual accordion jokes, maybe a few new ones.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 22:38:28 CEST 2015 from (46.252.67.250)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hair nothing to do with music? Now is the dawning of the age of Aquarius …


Entered at Thu Oct 22 22:23:34 CEST 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: For PSB

The concert link was with Carmen's "Dylan Does London" posting.

Hair has nothing to with music, I concede, though I could put forward the arguement that some performers adopted particular hairstyles at particular times so that their music became associated with that hairstyle - or vice versa. "Mop Tops" comes to mind, for example, as relating to the first wave of The Beatles' popularity - certainly, this was taken up by the "civilian" press in the USA at the time and by some of the teen mags.

As it happens (and rightly or wrongly), I tend to associate musicians who sport an Afro with styles of music other than Western Swing. It was not intended as anything other than a casual comment.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 19:21:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Elana James (ne Fremerman), a Jewish girl from the Kansas City suburbs, is a classicly trained violinist and a founding member of the Western swing jazz band Hot Club of Cowtown. Her group has toured with Dylan and Willie Nelson as an opening act and she was briefly a member of Dylan's band.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 17:55:10 CEST 2015 from (46.252.67.250)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: 7 September 1968

The same issue has a full page advert for Hey Jude, which entered the chart at #3 that week, and a full page ad for the forthcoming London opening of "Hair." Back page is a full page ad for Those Were The Days by Mary Hopkin. Quite a week.

According to the advert, the LP is called "Music from THE Big Pink" and the tag line is "Accept No Substitute." It list the five names in tiny print then adds "Better known as The Band."


Entered at Thu Oct 22 17:45:44 CEST 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Western Swing

Ian, I can't find the review you're referring to, but I have been pointing out the connection between Dylan's music and Western Swing in various reviews for at least 15 years now, and as far as I know, I was the first writer to do so. As for hair styles, the Wheel's original pedal steel player Lucky Oceans had a similar hair style, but it was usually underneath a hat, though I'm not sure what the hell hair has to do with a style of music. You can read all about Asleep At The Wheel, at 45 years, one of America's longest running bands in band leader Ray Benson's brand new book "Comin' Right At Ya. How a Jewish Yankee Hippie Went Country."


Entered at Thu Oct 22 17:19:51 CEST 2015 from (46.252.67.250)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Weight

I'm in London and I found "New Musical Express" for 7th September 1968 in the Vintage Magazine store.

Full front page advert: The Weight, by Spooky Tooth.

Inside page … about one sixth of a page for the advert for The Weight by The Band … and it has the Brown Album cover photo as the asdvert, a year before the Brown album.

Move on a few pages, and there's a much larger (one third of a page?) advert for The Weight by Jackie de Shannon.

All in the same issue. I'll scan them when I get home, and probably put them on my blog … I'll use them for the "Cover Versions" section of my work in progress on record labels. Anyway, Island invested more than Liberty who invested more than Capitol.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 16:32:18 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.199)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ian, Garnier is from the Twin cities in Minnesota originally, but is a long time NYC guy. His family line & music line goes back to New Orleans. garnier was born with evry type of music in his blood. Another NYer in Asleep at the wheel was Woodstock Native Cindy Cashdollar.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 16:11:37 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Elderberry Wine

I saw the Crowmatix with Garth and Maud. One of the most fun shows in Toronto.......but then again it was one of those few nights where I was very....uh.....you know. Sure glad that Blind Willie McTell and JD didn't see me that night. I'm usually reserved most of the time....lol. The other time was when the Crowmatix performed at Rick Danko's first Tribute in Simcoe. I'm not a fan of this group but I do respect that Fidel Louie was able to get Rick's music out in the end. I also have Levon Helm and The Crowmatix......I couldn't tell you anything about it today. I will have to check it out.

Kevin J...The only thing that I will miss about the Conservative Party is that Trudeau will now claw back extra amount you can contribute to your TFSA. I don't own anything so I'm able to save........as for NDP.....First time I had difficulty voting for them as they moved to the centre. Wynne stole from the left as did Trudeau and so......well.....as long as Harper was finally booted out!!!!!!! He does not represent Canadian values or most hard working people.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 15:47:40 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Oddly enough the only song I can remember many years ago at Massey Hall with UB40 is "Red Red Wine"......Also the cute guy who was sitting in front of me and when this song was performed he got up from his seat and sat on top of it and just groooooved along. In this clip group injects some dance hall reggae at end of song.....love it.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 15:31:20 CEST 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan's "Western Swing" band

I meant to say that, in the review I posted, I found the reference to Dyaln's "Westerm Swing" band very interesting.

Tony Garnier, Dylan's bass player and most long-standing sideman, was a member of Asleep At The Wheel for several years. In a magazine many years ago, I came across a photo of Asleep At The Wheel in which Tony Garnier stood out as the only band member with an Afro hairstyle. An Afro frizz and Western Swing cannot be the most natural of combinations.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 15:18:50 CEST 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan

I'm off to London tomorrow to catch two of Dylan's five shows at the Royal Albert Hall. I have pretty good tickets both nights. At his last shows at the same venue, a couple of years back, he was on top form, so I am hoping for the same again. I was somewhat concerned because he has been performing so many Sinatra-related songs in his recent sets (about a third of the show) but I was told by someone who attended last night's show that they are each fairly short and that he sings them with care, not to say reverence. It was good to read the review that Carmen posted.



Entered at Thu Oct 22 14:36:19 CEST 2015 from (68.70.61.190)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan Does London


Entered at Thu Oct 22 12:51:16 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Al Kooper

Anyone familiar with the Sellersville Theater will know this is a great opportunity.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 10:32:34 CEST 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Crowmatix and Hattie's

John Platania was the lead guitarist and was terrific. At one point, he continued to play on when Professor Louie, on piano with his back to the rest of the band, brought it to an end - to much merriment all round. "I just didn't want to stop", he told everyone. It was that kind of evening.

The room at Caffe Lena is L-shaped and the small stage is triangular, in the corner facing both "arms" of the "L". With an upright piano, the stage area for everyone else was even smaller. Gary Burke was squeezed in the back corner, playing what I would call a side drum, using brushes but managing to get a wide range of effects. John Platania and bassist Frank Campbell were sat in front of him, Louie at the back on piano and turning to stand alongside Frank Campbell when on accordion and I'm not sure that Miss Marie was actually on the stage at all but, from an audience perspective, stood to the right. On the accordion numbers, Miss Marie had to squeeze around Professor Louie just to get to the piano.

Our friends, who live out in the middle of British Columbia, loved both the music and the intimacy of the place.

We all had a meal in Hattie's beforehand. We two blokes in the party really enjoyed ours but the two women, who made the same choice, were very disappointed, I'm afraid to say.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 03:07:35 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ian, who was on geetar? Platania or Josh Colow?... When Gary hits a drum, it sure stays hit, no?


Entered at Thu Oct 22 02:44:18 CEST 2015 from (70.80.237.104)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Ian, glad that you had a great time watching the Crowmatix. I saw them in Saratoga as well several years ago and they can cook onstage. I've never been in Café Lena's although I manage to eat at least one supper per racing season at Hattie's, which is next door to it. It is said that Dylan played one his earliest gigs there and Don McLean is rumoured to have written American Pie there.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 02:37:14 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I probably should add that the only reason my friends studio usually hops is that he has found many ways beyond normal music recording to keep his studio busy. He does many different kinds of projects, & also managed to get some very desirable kind of over decades long steady work that is musical, but does not involve artists going into a studio and recording a new project.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 01:49:24 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: CBS Radio wants to avoid paying royalties by not playing pre 1972 vinyl.

See the link. Amazing bullshit, but CBS is wanting to claim original copyrights don;t have to be respected after a certain time frame and once remastering or digitization has occurred.

Anyone paying attention to my posts since August 2002 knows that i have forever blamed digitization for the demise of the industry for many reasons and many aspects of the demise. But I have always pointed to, and the reasons and aspects i discussed all have always pointed to one thing - less & less money for everyone, artists, studios, engineers, all the support staffs. today it is really practically no money. I was in my friends normally busy as can be Manhattan studio yesterday. He has a huge live room, and 5 smaller rooms. The place is usually hopping. I may have hit an unusual spot , but it was empty. Only 5 staff memebrs were there, no clients. He does a lot of location work too, so there could have been jobs goign on, but usually 3 or 4 things go on there daily. Nada.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 01:09:32 CEST 2015 from (58.104.0.7)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

This clip of Rick is probably well known to people here but I hadn't seen it before. The information says it was his last TV performance.


Entered at Thu Oct 22 00:55:23 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Sounds a fabulous holiday treat that Ian.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 22 00:40:02 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Dunc - my only problem with drinking in Dundee is the fact they make you read the Beano and eat umpteen slices of their cake whilst you're doing it.

Or is that just a scurrilous rumour put out by Aberdonians?

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 21 23:48:32 CEST 2015 from (82.22.145.205)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Prof. Louie/Crowmatix

Back from a trip. Thanks to those who replied to my question about Professor Louie and the Crowmatix. My wife and two of our friends were unsure but went along with my suggestion and all agreed that we had a whale of a time. We saw them at Caffe Lena in Saratoga Springs, a long-standing coffee-house that, I believe, seats just 80 people, though it seemed even smaller. It is great to see musicians with such a pedigree in such a small place and at such close quarters - very intimate, very relaxed, warm atmosphere, no hiding place for players or audience. Everyone into the groove.

Also on our travels, I saw a small poster for The Weight, a tribute band for you-know-who but not on a date I could attend.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 20:08:28 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.149)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Malt Whisky

In Dundee on the east coast, drinking was always pints, and some very good beers. But some people could drink massive quantities!

When I moved to Glasgow many people drank hauf n haufs - half pints with whisky shorts. In some pubs, I even used to see schooners of sherry drunk in tandem with half pints.

We are a drinking culture and I worry about the amount of alcohol that is drunk in Scotland by some people.

I enjoy a beer, a bottle of red and a malt whisky, but have you noticed that some malt whiskies are taking the age of the whiskies off the bottle and selling them younger. It is a great product and I don't think this is correct.

I have drunk good quality Canadian reds bought at Honest Eds. Bathhurst and Bloor. Great stuff


Entered at Wed Oct 21 19:37:18 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Strawberry Wine

For a musical reference, there's the homemade country favorite strawberry wine, that Levon and Fred Carter's daughter Deana extolled in song.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 19:28:46 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Charging through the night

Thanks, Kevin. I forgot that Night Train Express connection to Guns n' Roses, who apparently dedicated the song Nightrain to their vino du jour at the time. For some reason, I kept the original bottle. Why? Color me nostalgic. On the label are the words "Serve very cold." To disguise the taste apparently.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 19:28:56 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Works Timeline?

Looking at the tack notes for A Musical History, it appears that there was period of inactivity in 1972. There were only three recordings from that time included in the box set. A studio version of Endless Highway was recorded at Bearsville Studio. Move Me, a song sketch written by Rick was recorded at the Barn studio on Oct. 25 and the Two Piano Song was recorded at Bearsville on Oct. 30.

I wonder if Robbie was busy composing the Works material during this time. They didn't begin recording Moondog Matinee until Spring-early Summer of 1973. There also appears to be a gap touring between Rock of Ages at the end of 1971 and the Watkins Glen & Roosevelt Stadium concerts in July 1973.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 19:10:12 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

I remember one critic describing Gretchen Corbett as "a cross between Lauren Bacall and Bambi".


Entered at Wed Oct 21 18:51:30 CEST 2015 from (68.70.61.190)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Works

Rod & David P - thanks for the answers. Would love to learn more about this and then hear more if it is out there. Kind Regards


Entered at Wed Oct 21 17:24:20 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Works

From Rob Bowman's detailed history of The Band:

"Around the time of 'Moondog Matinee', there was talk of a much more ambitious project being worked on by The Band. Robertson had been listening to Polish composer Krzyszof Pendereki's 'The St. Luke Passion' as well as material by American John Cage. Inspired, he decided he wanted to write an extended work which would have distinct sessions one could think of as songs, but would have no distinct breaks between them. In other words, it would be one continuous piece of music from beginning to end. It was to be tiled 'Works'."

A friend of mine from high school was in a band called Smoke Rise that was involved in a similar project in 1971. Band members Hank and Gary Ruffin composed a rock opera entitled "The Survival of St. Joan," based on a liretto written by playwright James Lineberger about Joan of Arc. It was first produced as a concept album released by Paramount Records and considered the first American rock opera. The scripted play, with Smoke Rise performing the music, was first staged in Buffalo and later off-broadway in NYC. It starred Gretchen Corbett from James Garner's successful Rockford Files TV series.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 17:13:07 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, JT, as you can see, I graduated from the $4.19 a bottle Kedem. I still have a soft spot for it, but my smarts told me my sugar level could afford the additional expense. Same liquor store though, & the Kedem is still 4.19 a bottle. And the malbec & bolla bardolino really does go better with pizza.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 16:31:08 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Mike Nomad.......The Guns n Roses song " Night Train " is a homage to the Night Trains Express wine. Apparently all they could afford while recording the Appetite for Destruction album. That soon changed.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 16:23:04 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

A Local Club is having a Battle of the Bands Night where a local bands will be covering just the Music of The Band and CCR. Not sure if its an interesting idea or stupid.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 16:01:03 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Yatesey's/Aussie Whites

Sounds like you were in the right place Pete!!

Not sure if they were all over. They were certainly not the kind of place you'd seek out back then wherever you might have been. I always had them down as a sort of hangover from the gin palaces! You'd half expect to find yourself at the bar next to Bill Sykes. The term grotty was surely coined for them but on a Saturday night their Aussie Whites did at least serve a function for us.

Mind you I imagine they'd be like a Little Chef compared to some of those roadside bars you see depicted in the American movies.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 21 16:00:10 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomaf

Subject: swell, not swill

Years ago, while in downtown Cleveland, I popped into an all-night pharmacy and purchased a cheap bottle of red wine called Night Train Express, mainly for the attractive label depicting a mighty railway steam engine roaring down a track. I believe the label also carried the phrase, "Fine California Perry Wine," whatever that meant. I never got to drink it until years later when I found myself getting short on social beverages during a house party. It turned out to be quite palatable.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 14:34:57 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: doesn't make a summer

"Hirondelle" is French for "swallow" -- so it's a brand name and instructions for use all in one. Like "Twitter," I suppose.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 12:09:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought they had Yates Wine Lodges everywhere. I recall arranging to meet a pal in the one in Leeds. "Don't look at anyone. Don't speak to anyone. I'll order so they don't hear your poncy Southern accent. And whatever you do, do not brush against anyone, bump into anyone and remember if you spill anyone's drink, we're both dead."

I suggested that we might go to a more salubrious hostelry instead, but apparently danger was part of the fun.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 09:26:07 CEST 2015 from (49.156.35.138)

Posted by:

asiapoker

Web: My link

Nice site. Very helpful and so valuable. Thanks a lot! Keep up the good work.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 07:41:11 CEST 2015 from (125.237.221.215)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Works

Carmen I don't think anyone knows for sure (aprt from Robbie). Evidentally Two Piano Song from the box set was part of it.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 06:52:38 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: Pa

Subject: Works

What is the story on Works? I've seen this mentioned before in the GB. Maybe Senastian can provide some information.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 01:36:16 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Richie Furay's new release, Hand in Hand, is on the on the Grammys' first round ballot in:
Record of the Year
Album of the Year
Song of the Year
Best Rock Song
Best American Roots performance
Best American Roots song
Best Americana Album
Best Music Video


Entered at Wed Oct 21 01:29:43 CEST 2015 from (67.87.216.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mateus Rose was significant in many early teens lives back in the mid seventies. Today, if it's wine, it's a malbec or bardolino, often with pizza for mood enhancement ....


Entered at Wed Oct 21 01:25:20 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Blue Nun, Mateus, Casal Mendes. Bottom of the barrel was Old Niagara port.

Used to get 'alky' smuggled over from St. Pierre. Swap blue jeans for vodka with Polish sailors.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 00:43:05 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Ha ha - you're right. You could guzzle Lambrusco till it came out your ears!! Like lemonade.

Years before folks started drinking wine the only wine I'd ever come into contact with was the Aussie Whites in the Yatesey's Wine Lodge. Did you have them in Glasgow Dunc? We had a fair few. We used to go there to get tanked up before meandering our way to the clubs. It was lethal stuff. I'm pretty sure it wasn't proper wine though. More likely it was a type of Australian sherry. We never actually got to taste it as we just used to knock them back and then stagger out after half a dozen rounds!!

Happy days.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 21 00:21:54 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I think Paul Masson had a flat wide top that you could twist off at one time, but it required strength, then later they had a thinner foil, and a pull-back section that released the vacuum so that the top twisted off easily.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 00:16:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The test of culture was whether you sounded the initial h in Hirondelle. I am with the party that found it pretentious to drop the H as if French when discussing an ultra-budget alcoholic beverage. Though others thought it ignorant to pronounce it. A thorny etiquette question.


Entered at Wed Oct 21 00:15:42 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Span(y)ada

This was a popular pop wine then too. Normally served over ice and reputed to be good for cotton-mouth. And it was cheap enough to be used as an exotic liquid for hookahs.

Tyrolia was our Blue Nun knockoff. I think those Paul M carafes were opened with a can opener??


Entered at Tue Oct 20 23:35:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hirondelle! Yes, of course. It was “blended French wine”. Paul Masson came in carafes with a wide top. The last time I had Paul Masson was at a Thai meal 20 years ago … Paul Masson rosé, the only wine available. I think it put me off Thai food.

Bulls Blood, or Egri Bikaver, is very good nowadays, but I suspect we got a lesser quality version of it in the 70s. I went to a tasting round several cellars in Eger in Hungary (in the mid 90s) where it comes from, where ancient ladies pipetted it up from barrels and dropped it into glasses. i.e. they sucked it up into a tube, put a finger on the end, then released it into a glass. It's like siphoning petrol, for a Levon & The Hawks reference.

At the end of a conference in Eger I was given a bottle with my name and the conference logo embossed in gold letters. I just can’t bring myself to open it.

The equivalent of Hirondelle was Carafino, and the red was good in my memory, though we used to call it Parafino. It varied, but the red was sometimes Hungarian, though I suspect it was whatever they could find. Those were the days we were doing weekly stage shows for ESL students, and most of the cast got rid of a litre of Parafino each per show. Parafino came in litres … I think Hirondelle did too. And they (OK, I admit it, “we”) drove home. Very different days.

Lambrusco, as you say, was a two bottle job, being very low in alcohol.

A couple of our cast members preferred "Old England Sherry" to Carafino, and that was the strength of Thunderbird. And was sold in litres, not bottles.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 22:46:30 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.149)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Lambrusco

Forgotten that Al! Nothing like a two bottle night!


Entered at Tue Oct 20 22:44:32 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.149)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: I'll drink to that

Peter, you've forgotten Hirondelle, Bulls Blood and Paul Masson in the funny bottles.

She Who Must Be Obeyed and myself are having a nice Chianti. How we have progressed.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 22:42:26 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Lambrusco ruled!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 20 21:59:33 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Works

Wallsend, I believe that the idea, involving as it did a large lake onstage (cribbed from The Seagull by Chekhov), eventually appeared as Cirque du Soleil’s “O” in Las Vegas. They had three circus contortionists booked to play ‘The snake” with Tina Turner doing the voiceover. Donny Osmond was booked for Little John Tyler and Julie was to be played by Julie Andrews.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 21:53:55 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bad wine

Just went to check Keef's autobiography. He blames Altamnt on Thunderbird and Ripple (the worst fuck*ng rotgut wines you can get, says Keef) and bad acid. I just checked and Thunderbird is fortified so 20% alcohol. Blue Nun is a mere 9.5%. So if only the Rolling Stones had managed to convert the Hells Angels to Blue Nun or Mateus (11%) it might all have gone smoothly.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 21:19:58 CEST 2015 from (58.104.14.162)

Posted by:

Wallsend

It is my understanding that the idea behind 'The Works' was to take the story from 'The Moon Struck One' and turn it in to as rock opera like Tommy.

... Peter, just think of what might have been!


Entered at Tue Oct 20 21:13:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mateus … I don’t know. How long is it since you tried it Joan? I think it'll be memory. Back in the early 70s, the wealthier in my generation drank Blue Nun (the favourite tipple of British rock stars), the middle Mateus, and the poorer (me) Lutomer Yugoslav Reisling, which was imitation Blue Nun. A friend told me he had had a 1970 revival dinner party, with Blue Nun and Mateus, prawn cocktail, and Vesta packet freeze-dried curry and rice (still available apparently).

I was fascinated, and as my daughter likes French rosé, we decided to try similar and bought two bottles of Mateus and one of Blue Nun. I consumed gallons of Mateus in the 1970s. I’d forgotten how bad it was. No one managed to empty their glasses, and the second bottle sits unopened three years later. The Blue Nun didn’t get finished either.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 19:45:43 CEST 2015 from (86.171.224.149)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter's stereo

Enjoyed the story, Peter M. Thanks. LOve NLSC. Brilliant album.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 19:14:55 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Lancer's Rose

Joan - Lancer's was a step up. And a candleholder too. I don't recall for sure, but wasn't it carbonated?


Entered at Tue Oct 20 18:43:51 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Wine

MatuesWas good but the real fancy wine that we drank'call Lancers it came in a crock looking bottle and we drank that "we wanted" fine" wine. It was a step up from Annie Green Springs.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 18:39:14 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The LCBO is using "Rag Mama Rag" in new commercials. Sounds good.They seem to be working their way through The Band's greatest hits.

Our new Prime Minister once fought a convicted wife beater and a sitting Senator in a real boxing match which was broadcast live nationwide. Justin Trudeau rose to the occasion and knocked the senator out. For real, this was no hoax. An actual match, it was. Only in Canada, ya gotta love it.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 18:16:59 CEST 2015 from (66.213.14.160)

Posted by:

Calvin

Yes Al, if its an Actual release of Gene's-and quite a few that weren't released-I have it.

Currently doing research for a small town (17,000 today) In Northeast Ohio about to celebrate their Bicentennial. Enjoying reading the Uncle Freebie Music Column from 1968. Small town newspaper (mayne 3,500 then) trying to be hip in 1968 trying to review Canned Hear and the Doors.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 17:10:25 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.185)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norman, on both ends several generations can be thankful - it's a good gawddarn thing that you've been working in your element as a sailor and not as a history professor or journalist.

Though the internet disregards accuracy & doesn't even recognize inaccuracy, the sea does.

Now on your memoir line of thought, have you begun filming yourself on deck? Setting it to your cd?


Entered at Tue Oct 20 17:06:41 CEST 2015 from (209.133.66.214)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Somebody should keep all you peckerheads in line. I'd do it but somebody'd get hurt. I have a tendency to kill stuff


Entered at Tue Oct 20 16:29:51 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Works

Evidently Robbie got started on "The Works" project and worked on it "for quite a while," but it was not completed. It sounds like a back burner kind of thing that got pushed aside. According to Rob Bowman, "Words were written and there was an overriding story to the work. Some pieces got used in other places..." The line "lay a flower in the snow" was later used in "Fallen Angel."


Entered at Tue Oct 20 15:56:55 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Memoirs of a Sailor

Peter M, I remember "Gidget Goes Hawwian" wasn't that the one with the little red head Deborah Whally? I was in love with her, but I don't remember that name. We have to accept the fact that I'm getting old and stupid.

Well now the easterners can be exstatic in anticipation of young Mr Trudeau waving a magic wand and fixing all the economic, medical and work related problems in their world.

Who is going to fix Ontario and Quebec? Ontario is now known as the California of Canada. The province is so broke they will never see anything but red ink. Red seems to be their color. You guys better get your s--- together.

I'm going to work. There are those of us who still work here y-know! Yes-a-day I had to put another block purchase on the lifting lines on the winches for my ramp on the barge. I just got started and was paying out line on one winch and blew a hydraulic line. Lucky it happened in the harbour. So I had to take to lines off, go and have new ones made. Installed them. Climbed up and down the arms to the bucket on my wheel loader. Hung blocks on the lifting towers, threads the lines through them attached them to the lugs on the end of the ramp and had them rigged and finished by 5 o'clock anyway. Working by myself. I'd like to see any of youse guys climb up and down that rigging and hang those 45 pound blocks. I'm not supposed to be doing that....I'm old remember. We got to leave today, run up to Rivers Inlet. Put a ho drill aboard the barge, drill two holes in the rock at the beach. Install steel pins in the holes, attach 1000 foot anchor lines, attach boom sticks to the anchor lines and drop two ten ton anchors on them. Then load a full load of road building excavators, trucks, drills, pickups and fuel tanks and run 100 miles to their next work site and deposit them.

When I get back I got to run a 53 foot yacht from Port McNeill to Vancouver for a guy. He just bought it and doesn't know how to run it as it's a lot bigger than his former boat and he doesn't know the coast that well. I got to eddycate him. I hope you guys is tired just reading this.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 15:50:22 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mateus Rose? Apparently Saddam Hussein's favourite tipple (according to the play "Dinner With Saddam")

We always thought a Chianti Ruffino bottle with straw around it (as an added fire hazard for excitement) was better. We then got into buying different coloured candles, having two bottles on the table and spending meals trying to drip wax artistically. They were works of art, months in the making.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 15:06:57 CEST 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: that hideous stereo

The thought of wearing out NLSC really sent me down memory lane. I SO enjoyed the pretentious "batchelor pad elegance" of that thing for the three months that I rented it. I just looked at a site on the web showing a picture of one with the description, "Just love this beautiful 1973 Spanish Style console by Curtis Mathes!". I went so far as to further deck out my rental with touches like a pair of huge palmetto palm leaves tacked to the wall behind it. On top I put an 18" statue of The Thinker and a bust of a conquistador. Remember the practice of putting a melty multicolored candle in a Mateus bottle for decor? I dangerously parodied that by putting the drip candle in a pint sized Southern Comfort bottle on top of it, with 2" of liquor remaining in the bottle. Did not immediately dawn on me that this was a pretty good recipe for a Molotov cocktail.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 15:06:06 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: dawn

Bill M: I share your pain, but the humans had to agree on ONE side, or the zombies could've gone on with their smug divide-and-conquer forever. After a decade of darkness, the humans craved a sight of sunlight, and uncle Tom played it too careful, offering too much more of the same playing-politics, with only a soupçon of tasty social democracy.

I know the Prime Minister's offering of "sunny ways" was a quote from Laurier . . . but to me it felt like a quote from The Philosophy of Rick Danko . . . .


Entered at Tue Oct 20 13:50:46 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have the feeling that if there was any significant chunk of "Works" it would have turned up on a box set.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 10:15:00 CEST 2015 from (125.237.221.215)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: David P - Downside

I wonder how much time the "Works" project took up during those 4 years - and how far they got with it.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 10:05:52 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: styluses and conservatives

Peter: for that sort of old fashioned player, a new stylus was only a few dollars in the 70s. I say this as I’ve often told the story of how my pal and I regularly bought secondhand record players at university in Hull for £3 to £7, cleaned them up thoroughly with upholstery cleaner or wood polish, added a new stylus (less than £1) then sold it on for £10 or £12 … a new one costing £20 to £30 then. The stylus was always wrecked on secondhand players. The £5 profit was very welcome when our weekly income after paying rent was £5. It originally started because none of us had a record player in those late 60s days when you travelled by train to university, not a car laden with possessions. So we went out and bought the first one for ourselves, people admired it, we sold it … and so on. As a result I’ve briefly owned most brands of cheap record player.

Capital letters and lower case. I’ve noticed the US right wing applause for “conservative” victories in Europe. What they never understand is that all the legitimate European “conservative” parties espouse universal free state medical care, graduated taxes, universal state pensions and extremely strict gun control … policies which the American left can only dream about. (I exclude fringe parties, though even UKIP on our far right would accept those four too). Yes, punctuation matters. Mr Corbyn is a “republican” with a small r, after all.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 07:53:05 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Take solace, brown eyed girl and Bill M........Charlie Angus won so there will still be some musicianship and heart represented by the NDP.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 06:16:38 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Peter, I love your story. Spoken like a true lover of the Band - nothing but the best would ever do for such an occasion. Half your rent, wow!


Entered at Tue Oct 20 05:56:24 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Vamanos Harper, aqui no mas!

Bill M - Your election up there means a lot down here too. Our right wing loves when a conservative wins internationally, proclaiming it to be a global trend that American libs just don't get. So tomorrow should be a quiet day for them on AM talk radio and Fox, like: "Election, what election? Where?"

All congrats to you and yours!!


Entered at Tue Oct 20 05:43:50 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.148)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: Even if my political team dropped undeservedly from a solid #2 to a poor #3, I'm satisfied that at least Harper has been flushed away. And if we're going to go with a genital rather than excrementory metaphor, I'll go with the crudest possible term for the male member.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 01:34:57 CEST 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond

Subject: NLSC

At the time Northern Lights Southern Cross came out, I had no stereo. Mine had been fried in an electrical surge during a storm in Tulsa. I found a copy of NLSC unexpectedly at the Quik Trip convenience store and immediately called the furniture rental store (Rent-a-Center) and rented a gigantic, hideous console stereo for $25 a month. My house only cost $50/month at the time. It was about six feet long and had grandiose speakers behind red velveteen curtains with oak grillwork. It had a worn out stylus, as one would expect from a rental turntable. The album only lasted a couple of weeks on that rig. And yes, I replaced it as soon as it wore out.


Entered at Tue Oct 20 00:45:02 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: on the Canadian election - very funny

From John Oliver's show last night -


Entered at Tue Oct 20 00:05:37 CEST 2015 from (76.69.117.81)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Relief For Aching Shoulders......

..... a lifting of "The Great Darkness" - voting Harper out.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 23:59:41 CEST 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Moondoggie

Norm, Wasn't that the name of Gidget's boyfriend? As in, "When the Gidget goes Hawaiian, she goes Hawaiian all the way".


Entered at Mon Oct 19 23:29:23 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: To our Canadian collaborators

Any of y'all here voting for Harper the twat?? If so, not too late to change your poor addled mind yet! Right?


Entered at Mon Oct 19 22:22:36 CEST 2015 from (76.69.117.81)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Going Going Gone

Funny looking back to see how time plays games……When John Lennon re-emerged in 1980 it was as if he had been gone forever……5 years is forever at the age I was at the time…….Hirth Martinez noted that when he first got together with Robbie, Robbie noted that he was tied up and busy with this ‘Planet Waves thing”…….so I guess the 74 tour and Planet Waves and producing Hirth and moving to LA which led to the NLSC writing and tour all proved to be a good period for the Band – as short lived as it was……..1975-1977 produced:

”It Makes No Difference”, “Ophelia”, “Twilight”, “Acadian Driftwood”, “Out of the Blue”, and “Evangeline”………Genius….and yet the myth is spread that they were “shot” and “finished” after the first two albums. Nonsense.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 20:32:41 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Downside

There was a four year period between the release of studio albums with original material, with Rock of Ages and Moondog Matinee in the interim. For those of us following the group at the time, this was hard to ignore, raising the question of what's going on? They had Bearsville Studio close at hand and the live and covers albums proved they were still performing at a high level. We were left to wonder about what was happening to the collaborative fabric of the group. Cahoots had raised the question of "where do we go from here?", and we were left with a four year wait. In the meantime, the reunion with Dylan brought promise, as the group changed coasts literally and figuratively.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 19:21:02 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Say, Norm, out there on the blue, have you ever met Captain Highliner? He's a hero of mine. He's been to sea.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 18:13:03 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Further more.......Moondog??

My god........now David Powell is back into it. First of all PV said he did his critic of it 17 years ago. Now he says he don't want to stand by what he wrote now he wants to change. Well it's like being on the witness stand...you don't get to change your story!

What I want to know is ....what in hell is a "Moondawg" any way? I'm going to work for a while......got to get my gear ready to leave on a trip tomorrow..... moving equipment again.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 18:10:45 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I'll vote twice today, Norm, you crazy fu*ker ! By the way, your pal Harper has spent the last week with his arms literally around the cretinous Ford brothers. What a shameful exit - but fitting.Welcome to the new Trudeau era. Canada will be back to being the great country we used to be.

I loved the Grateful Dead link of "Let the Good Times Roll"


Entered at Mon Oct 19 18:10:03 CEST 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: Lutonia

Subject: Canadian content

Cabbage rolls and coffee... Mmmm, mmmm good! Schmenge on, Wayne. Schmenge on, Garth.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 17:30:41 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Zither Thou Goest

Garth really steps forward on Moondog Matinee with his keyboard work. He takes the spotlight on The Third Man Theme, adapting the jaunty zither instumental with his own unique touch. He also adds his tenor sax on four of the album's tunes.

The album presents a travelogue of music, beginning with stops in New Orleans, moving to Memphis and Vienna, with stops in between.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 16:37:48 CEST 2015 from (86.25.174.112)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Alan Partridge

Al - Saxondale is certainly worth a look - we've got a fairly basic cable package and it's often available somewhere.

Any Barney Miller fans out there? The best cop sitcom I know (and the cheapest).

I'm off to see Simone Felice and Anna Mitchell (again - I saw them with PV last week in Winchester) tonight at the Glee Club in Birmingham. I know it will be a wonderful gig.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 16:02:18 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Foreigner

Crazy bunch a foreigners! You guys are like dogs fightin' over a bone with this "Moondog Matinee". Let it go!.....and listen to the song I put up by the "dead"! Sam Cooke's finest.........let the good times roll........gawd damn it!

Jerry! I hope you gave those Jays a good talking to! They are fucking up.

Kevin! get out and vote!.....you coward.......what a crew we got here......


Entered at Mon Oct 19 14:51:15 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Moondog Matinee

Another good post, Al. Also Peter, I think 'Share Your Love' and 'A Change Is Gonna Come' are brilliant. I can't compare them to originals as I don't have them.

The whole nation feels gutted about the decision, Al.

But I've spent the whole weekend thinking about the state of Scottish football. Van Dijk, another player leaving, from a huge club to a smaller club. Bournemouth now have more money than Rangers or Celtic.

I read Ferguson's book and he talks about the great Souness-Dalglish Liverpool team.

Ajax's players leave at age 22, it used to be 28. It's all about money nowadays.

Anyway you're going to win the league in 4 years, Al! He should have stayed quiet.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 14:33:21 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hey Dunc

How feckin cruel and unjust was that!

I've never been able to stand that Joubert but after yesterday I'm incandescent. Can't imagine how folks are up in your neck of the woods.

Thought your lads were incredible. Just incredible.

:-0(


Entered at Mon Oct 19 14:26:06 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Hey Calvin

While searching for Mystery train to do the comparison I came upon Gene's In The Pines [linked] from the wonderful Silverado live album.

I presume you've long since had it but just in case I thought I'd mention it.

I'd say that verse from 2-18 on In The Pines even matches the wow factor of Robbies on Mystery Train!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 19 14:24:27 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Moondog Matinee

Enjoyed the posts and the original article on Moondog Matinee.

Thanks Solomon, Ben, Peter and David. Interesting exercise, Solomon.

I think Moondog Matinee is great. For me, apart from three of songs, this would be the first time I would have heard these songs.

I think all the singing is great on the album.

'The Thid Man' is often quoted in various media as the greatest British film.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 14:21:08 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete's take on MoonStruckOnedog Matinee

Just re-read it for first time since arriving here. How easy do we forget the immensity of what our buddy Pete has brought to this site down the years!!!

Bloodyhell. Never mind wow.

Incredible stuff.

:-0)

Mind you Pete I do disagree on a few aspects. As wonderful as Elvis's Mystery Train is, his take contains no real mystery for me. In stark contrast, our boys take on the very same song is imbued with it. From the false start to the enigma of Robbie's extra verse to die for to the tight hunched syncho drumming to Garth's off the rails interloping, the track sizzles with its eponymous mystery. There may well be no individual vocal to match that of the King but give me that amazing Levon/Rick harmonising any day. So if it's possible to outdo the King, Scotty and Bill even on one of their acclaimed pieces then for me the boys quite comfortably pull it off. There's certainly no mystery as to why. Or maybe there is!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 19 13:53:17 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Moondog Matinee

I enjoyed the article on Moondog Matinee. It's a great album, which too often is overlooked. Peter, I agree with your comment about Elvis. I like the Band's re-working of 'Mystery Train', but it doesn't touch Elvis's version. In some ways Elvis hovers over the entire album as he recorded 'Saved' and 'Promised land'. Elvis's version of 'Promised land' is definitive in my view.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 13:20:22 CEST 2015 from (92.18.215.110)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Moondog Matinee

I made a CD with all The Band covers and originals side by side a few years ago and I have to say none of them match the originals for me. It is still a fine album.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 10:52:20 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Moondog Matinee

I went into all this years ago in my ancient article in the library here. As it’s 17 years old, I’m not standing by everything in it, but I did a chart near the end rating the songs against the originals.

My three favourite tracks are Share Your Love With Me which definitely beats Bobby Bland’s original, Change Is Gonna Come and Holy Cow … basically the three best songs too. I reckoned I’m Ready was better than the Fats Domino version too. But the three tracks I program are Share Your Love, Change Is Gonna Come, Holy Cow. They do them brilliantly, and it’s Rick’s voice on the last two, which is my favourite voice BUT if I wanted to explain why they’re great songs, I’d play Sam Cooke and Otis Redding for A Change Is Gonna Come, and Lee Dorsey for Holy Cow. In other words, they equal the original on several … a great achievement, better the original on two, but otherwise don’t match the original.

And there's only one Elvis Presley.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 10:02:06 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree on vinyl in general, though an interesting case (as ever) is the ACE label. The remaster of "Link Wray's Three Track Shack" is stunningly good on CD … as are all their soul compilations. They pride themselves on sourcing original master tapes, and if you listen to their "London-American label year by year" series they also pride themselves on having the CD sound like the single mix. For American readers, London-American was Decca's catch-all label for reissues from American labels … lots of them from Atlantic, Chess, Liberty, Imperial, Cadence, Monument, Hi, Hickory, Philles, Dot, Jamie. Basically, they had almost everything except RCA (also pressed by Decca on its own imprint), MGM and Capitol (EMI here) and Columbia / CBS which was Philips in the UK until 1962. Their reign as the main American label was eroded when first Top Rank (which was bought by EMI and the American imports changed into the Stateside label), then Pye International realised how much American quality material London were hoovering up. Pye International first grabbed American labels, then kept them by offering them their own sub-label … Cameo-Parkway, Chess, Hickory all took the bait.

Until around 1962, they claim, Decca's ffrr mastering and pressing process was better than any other label, so avid collectors say the London-American British pressing is usually better than the American pressing. They would have used a copy master, but because major hit records would have been pressed regionally in the USA in many cases, so did the original. You'd need a pile of American and British pressings to prove it, but the dedicated collectors always assert it's true.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 04:18:12 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Articulate

You have expressed that far better than I could David. However I agree with your sentiments. I have never listened to Moondog Matinee, From Big Pink, or Cahoots on anything other than that Vinyl I have owned for years. I have listened to much other music on the alternative means. I have much of the other music on CD & DVD.

The warmth and comfort of those old, (and new) vinyl recordings can't be beat for me either.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 03:22:37 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

Thanks Al, good to be seen, So busy with things these days I don't have time to play around the Net as much as I use to.

The new Book on how Akron evolved at the end of the Rubber period will be out in December and will included a big section on the Music Scene. Devo, The Black Keys, Joseph Arthur, Rachel Sweet, Chrissie Hynde and a bunch of people you've never heard of.

Band Content-Anyone ever seen the Last Polka. Its a Canadian Made for TV Movie by the SCTV Team from around 1985 parodying the Last Waltz. It starred Eugene Levy and John Candy as the Schmengee Brothers who are retiring after 40 years as Polka Legends.


Entered at Mon Oct 19 02:09:08 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.119)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Moondog Matinee

Most listeners today will hear a digital version of Moondog Matinee, a CD or MP3 download, or whatever. To truly appreciate the recording, one needs to hear the analog vinyl record. After reading the recently linked glowing review, I played my original purple label Capitol record mastered by Bob Ludwig at Sterling Mastering. Enveloped in the warm, dynamic sound, the beauty of these covers was unveiled, drawing me deeply into the recordings.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 18:49:49 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: One more from the Dead

"The Weight" done exceptionally well.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 18:31:47 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Grateful Dead.....1989

One of the best rock & roll songs of all time.......how many times did I finish a night with this song....with people screaming.......MORE!


Entered at Sun Oct 18 18:04:37 CEST 2015 from (74.75.66.43)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: Moondog Matinee

Thanks for the refreshing look at MM. Often musicians in major groups fall back on covers when they are stuck, but I always thought this was a wonderful collection of covers, even though I've heard only some of the originals. I think the author answered your question Peter.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 17:57:55 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Nice post Norm. I agree it was a marvelous article and given the subject matter such an unexpected treat after all this time.

BTW - I'll look forward to telling Joe Butler's son when I see him this week just how much a REAL country afficianado enjoyed his dad's music!! He's a real good sort and I know he'll be chuffed as beans.

Rog - that roadie thing passed me by - sounds like it could be good - is it worth digging out? I think you're right about the Partridge character ultimately becoming played out. I did so love the earlier 'chat show' stuff. His final expression in the 'Hot Stuff' szzzz episode and also the 'this is hair on the back of a normal person' episode still crack me up. Truly funny stuff.

Great to see your name here as well Calvin lad!! Long time since I've seen it.

NWWestie - is that a bottle of stout or a stout barmaid you're treating me to? Not sure I can still manage the latter mate!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 18 16:16:03 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Moondog Matinee is a reflection of what LATH were in the earlier 60s. Though they evolved into an 'Americana' band and defined the form to some degree for the later 60s (of course there was 'Americana' before that), they were a bar band and could do it with the best of them. I compare them to Paul Butterfield Blues Band but with even more range of ability. This is a very important album for those of us who love these artists and want to understand them.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 15:26:45 CEST 2015 from (86.25.174.112)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Knowing me, Knowing Alan Partridge

Hi JQ, Steve Coogan's alter ego - Alan Partridge - was very popular a dozen years ago. Less so than other Brit TV comedy shows (notably The fast Show and Little Britain), Alan Partridge wasn't littered with catch phrases though his signature welcome - 'Knowing you, knowing me -Alan Partridge' was a winning formula for him. It was extremely funny - until the character got stale with his own show. The best Steven Coogan comedy is Saxondale - a small sitcom about an ex-roadie who didn't quite make the bid time.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 14:53:07 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

You can find a fair amount of clips of the Dillards Performing on the Andy Griffith sitcom. The actress who played their sister, and vocalists, did a few shows with them over the years as well.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 14:36:53 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In memories

This article that Kevin has linked is one of the most important articles of the history of the Band ever.

I wonder how many of us back in those days really realized how important that album "Moondog Matinee" and "THE BAND" really was, (and still is),

His words about Richard Manuel still leave a lump in my throat. Particularly his thoughts on "if some body could only have gotten into that bathroom and stopped him and helped him".

I don't know how many people have experienced a loss like loosing my brother when he was only 21. To this day a thought stays with me and it's crazy. If you drop something from your hand you can stop and pick it up. You can redo some things. When you loose some one like that, IT'S FINAL! There is no going back.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 14:35:58 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.119)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Country Boys

The Country Boys, featuring Clarence & Roland White, also appeared on The Andy Griffith Show. They later changed their name to The Kentucky Colonels. Here is the correct link for Guy Van Duser's Great TV Western Medley http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifgVUSffP28


Entered at Sun Oct 18 13:38:47 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I enjoyed the Moondog Matinee article too. Excellent. However, it somewhat avoids the issue of whether The Band actually improved on the originals.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 13:29:53 CEST 2015 from (173.68.71.190)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Moondoging

Always an oddball album for The Band with great performances all around.Thanks for the article,Kevin-much appreciated.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 13:29:19 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Western music and beyond

AL EDGE, I LOVE YOU for mentioning 'Rin Tin Tin' and 'Zorro' - the mother of all black and white TV series. (Well, as a male I don't necassarily _LOVE_ you but... go to the nearest Pub and get a stout and say that NortWestCoaster is paying ;-)

Like Italo westerns in Italy the so called Western movies were filmed in Finnish Lapland after the gold rush during the years after the WW2. There was a certain movie with a certain saloon girl which was my favourite in the sixties: 'Villi Pohjola' (The Wild North). The grand-daughter of my sexy dream girl from the sixties is a literature scientist in England. She took contact whith me according my humble academic research. Like we say in Finland: "my socks turned around in my shoes" (or was it LITTLE RICHARD who said that?)

BTW as a foolish youngster I spent two summers by washing gold in the Nordic desert.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 11:51:23 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Trewat

That's er ...'treat'!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 18 11:48:30 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Few more Westerns - Rin Tin Tin [was it uncle Dusty or uncle Rick?] and Zorro. Also not sure if anyone picked up on Ty Hardin - Bronco Layne!!!

:-0)

JQ - not seen Alpha papa. To be honest whilst a huge fan of Alan Partridge personna I'm not that fussed on Steve Coogan himself, despite his huge talent especially in creating the Alan partridge character. Could be because he's a Manc!!

For me, the Alan Partridge character especially in that first radio and TV chat show guise is up there with the great comic characters such as Basil Fawlty and Larry David. And just like those character it's never been what you'd really call mainstream - in the sense of a BBC1 stalwart. Always BBC2 and Channel 4 sort of level. Bit like The Band really. Unheralded genius.

:-0)

My son tells me the actual genius behind the character is Armando Ianucci who created the fanatastic Veep with yet another hilarious character in Selina Meyer. Whatever the case Alan - back of the net - Partridge will always be a rare trewat.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 11:29:33 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

Just wow.

Thanks so much for that article Kev.

So connected with its sentiments I've read it three times to savour every nuance.

A beautifully written eulogy but pulsing through it was the heartfelt attachment the fella clearly has not only to a fantastic album that we as a bunch do seem to have all but forgotten but even more to the unique contribution of the amazing vocalist who so elevated it.

Thing is, for so many years any cassettes I made of The Band especially in trying to spread the Band gospel would always have Share Your Love, Mystery Train and Change Gonna Come standing alongside Arcadian Driftwood and Makes No Difference as the taken as read equal of anything on the first two epics and Stagefright.

Reading this piece and making the same connection with Deriso's sentiments on Moondog on the tracks he highlights so reminded me of the first time I read Greil Marcus's Mystery Train synopsis of Big Pink [35 years ago - feck me!!] where he says the final two tracks on side two - 'Wheels' and 'Released' - soon became detached/superfluous to side one and the opening four tracks of side two. It had been the very same way I'd been listening to the album pretty much since its majesty first sunk in.

Anyroad, whatever the reason for our collective lapse regarding Moondog it's such a joy to have old feelings and sentiments stirred so vigorously by a piece of writing.

Well in Nick Deriso and well in Kev!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 18 03:41:27 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Pardon the interruption of TV cowboys, but.....

LINKED: Nick DeRiso's just issued article on Moondog Matinee. Brilliant. Has there ever been anyone better than this guy when it comes to writing about The Band. The music of The Band and not all the other bullshit.


Entered at Sun Oct 18 03:39:59 CEST 2015 from (97.127.30.101)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Web: My link

Subject: Bluegrass on "The Andy Griffith Show"

Those mountain boys playing bluegrass on "The Andy Griffith Show" were the Dillards (appearing on the program as "the Darlings"): Doug Dillard (banjo), Rodney Dillard (guitar and dobro), Dean Webb (mandolin), and Mitch Jayne (bass).

Doug Dillard left the band in 1968 to team up with Gene Clark, who had recently departed from the Byrds, and together they recorded "The Fastastic Expedition of Dillard and Clark" and "Through the Morning, Through the Night."


Entered at Sat Oct 17 23:41:34 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Steve Coogan

I never watched the Alan Partridge Show much, but it was extremely popular. He was brilliant in Philomena. He was also in What Maisie Knew and The Look of Love … the latter was an odd film, I didn't like it, but his acting was excellent.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 23:36:04 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I'm loosin' my mind

You guys are RIGHT!.........I forgot, but it was in the Lemon Drop Kid too tho'.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 23:28:38 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

Gabby Hayes

Subject: The Jeep

It was Roy Rogers. The Jeep was called Nellybell.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 23:27:26 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Nellybelle

WCoaster/BC Geezer - I checked it out and Roy Rogers' pal/cook Pat Brady went around in his Jeep called Nellybelle!

I wouldn't ever watch a Bob Hope western, or anything really..


Entered at Sat Oct 17 22:35:58 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Jeep

JQ.....What yer talkin' about is the movie "The Lemon Drop Kid" with Bob Hope. At the end of the movie Trigger would always rear up on his hind legs and Roy would wave his hat. In that show Bob Hope has the jeep rear up and he waves his hat back......crazy.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 22:30:57 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Roy Rogers

Was it his cowboy show or Gene Autrey's where his pals drove around in a jeep? Circa 1870 model -


Entered at Sat Oct 17 22:28:14 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Alan Partridge

PV or any other UK member nation member - I just watched AP Alpha Papa again. I'm told that the whole Alan Partridge thing became part of the everyday comedy culture there, its lingo, expressions, funny lines, etc. Is that true? Caddyshack and Animal house did that here too for years -

Damn funny stuff, AP, but it doesn't really have anything going here at all - Coogan does a bit though with Philomena and The Trip.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 22:15:36 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yaaaaaaaaa...But!

Lisa!.....Gene Autry's show was a musical. All he ever did was sing "I'm back in the saddle again." (that song guys sing when they get outta jail and go home to their wives :-)

And he'd sing "Here comes gawd damn Santa Claus." He tucked his pants into his boots. No self respecting real cow puncher does THAT! I mean lord.......talk about your rhine stone cowboy.......I can't stand it.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 22:13:37 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks, Lisa. I should have remembered that. I do seem to recall that Autry was noted more as a singer of cowboy songs than an actor. Acting obviously paid more.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 21:44:36 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Mike, Gene Autry did have a TV show, and Champion (the Wonder Horse) was his horse.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 21:35:16 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: No occident

Unmentioned, although I can't be certain that he appeared in a TV series, is Gene Autry. Levon's former road manager Bruce Dener, in an earlier life, said that he once worked on a roofing gang repairing (or reshingling) Autry's roof. I believe Butch also said that it was a hot day and Autry offered the roofers a cold drink at one point in the job. Can't be sure if the beverage was of an alcoholic nature. Perhaps not, if roofing was involved.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 20:51:32 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Trigger

Reminds me of that funny interchange many years ago between Dave Hodge and Don Cherry on HNIC's Coaches Corner.......Cherry was going on about how great Pat Roy was playing......Dave interjected "It's Patrick Wah, Don, not Roy, it's pronounced Wah"..........Cherry paused and replied "Well, smart guy, I have a question for you......was it Roy Rogers or Wah Rogers ? "


Entered at Sat Oct 17 20:35:37 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Cowboys and horses

When I was a kid, it wasn't the cowboys I loved, it was their horses - Champion, Trigger, Buttermilk, Silver, Scout, Topper, Buckshot, etc.

Once a year, Saturday kids' programming would air a special one-hour show on how the Lone Ranger acquired Silver - looked forward to it for weeks and never missed it!


Entered at Sat Oct 17 19:09:40 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Other occidentals

Wild Bill Hickok (Guy Madison, Andy Devine) and Yancy Derringer.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 19:08:57 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Bonanza

Thanks 'Ruskeasilmäinen Tyttö' for posting the Bonanza link. The opening scene with the burning map made a big impression. We have for several times visited the places in this map: Reno, Virginia City, Lake Tahoe. We didn't need a road map! You are diving in the deep water of your childhood. - Remember gb regular 'Dave The Phone Guy'? He lived just outside of this burning map. Our schoolboy band started even our weekly rehearsals by playing the Bonanza theme.

'Rawhide' by Frankie Laine is better, though!


Entered at Sat Oct 17 17:30:40 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: English Country!

The Hillsiders!....just great, Thanks Al.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 16:21:06 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Robert Culp

It just came to me "Trackdown". Hoby Gilman. I got a hard time thinking of Robert Culp any more with out laughing. That series "Greatest American Hero" he was hilarious at times.

Yeah jerry, I forgot Hoppy & Lash Larue. Being a Steve MacQueen fan tho' I think my favourite is "Wanted Dead or Alive".


Entered at Sat Oct 17 16:00:07 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....and as a very young child I'd watch The Big Valley thanks to a strong role model Barbara Stanwyck.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:54:51 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Elder statesmen

Lash Larue and Hopalong Cassidy. For the elder statesmen. I watched them both.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:54:33 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bonanza Theme Song

I watched this western with Canadian actor Lorne Greene.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:50:28 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Olivia Maxwell feat. Levon Helm & the Barn Burners - Sara James

"One of the most memorable moments of my music career was trying as Levon Helm was sitting right next to me, mentoring me to "Strum on the back beat girl...like this." It was a whole new way of playing the song on the guitar. Levon and his band, with Frankie Gavin on Fiddle (coming in from Ireland) and Producer Rob Frabo."


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:47:44 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

NEW YORK - JANUARY 30: Robbie Robertson of the Band performs on stage at Madison Square Garden on January 30th, 1974 in New York. He plays a Fender Stratocaster guitar.
(Photo by Gijsbert Hanekroot/Redferns)


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:45:40 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One more cowboy

The Cisco Kid.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:18:38 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.119)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Have Gun, Will Travel

Those TV westerns had great theme songs and their melodies still echo in the memories of us old enough to recall. Link to Guy Van Duser's Great Western TV Medley.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:07:00 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: Country Music on TV

I dont rememember seeing country music much outside of Hee Haw when I was a kid (Im in my fifties), and their hayseed comedy bits I think prevented me from taking seriously some of the musicians on the show so I didnt really appreciate Grandpa Jones, Roy Acuff, Buck Owens and Roy Clark.

I did however remember being impressed with Flatt & Scruggs and their appearances on the Beverly Hillbillies and the guys who played the Mountain Boys who were Denver Pyle's Sons on The Andy Griffith Show, I was probably well into my Late Teens before I realized they were the Dilliards.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 15:02:32 CEST 2015 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

Subject: Westerns

Westerns were a huge force in TV from the early 1950s to probably around 1970. And their was a clear delineation between Adult Westerns Like Paladin and Wyatt Earp and Kids Westerns Like the Lone Ranger and Red Ryder. I was always a Big Valley Fan, I mean come on-Barbara Stanwyck? How can you not like that show? And a little remembered shows Called the Guns of Will Sonnet with Walter Brennan.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 14:36:28 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.3)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

BRANDED......MAVERICK...


Entered at Sat Oct 17 13:51:06 CEST 2015 from (86.25.174.112)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: How The West Was Watched

Norm and Al = are we in danger of forgetting The Dakotas? With the great Jack Elam and guest stars including Strother Martin and others. I think it spun off from Cheyenne.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 13:12:38 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Holy Smoke!

How could we forget "THE LONE RANGER", and there was Paladin.

That's interesting Al, I don't recall the Hillsiders, but they are on the net here. Kenny Johnson first formed a band that became the Hillsiders. I see they have some youtube. I ca't play it just now. It's 4 in the morning....I'll get shot!

Some times I have to get up. The arthritis in my shoulders aches and I have to get off them.

BILL!............enjoy Tofino. Bill and I had a good chat over a coffee.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 12:43:47 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Interesting one for you Norm lad.

Got chatting last night with a real nice fella who's dad was Joe Butler who was bass guitarist and vocalist of The Hillsiders who were probably recognized as Britains finest ever pure Country group.

I think they toured US and Canada and impressed enough to be invited to play at the Grand Ole Opry in 1967 - which for a non American outfit is probably quite some achievement.

Perhaps the off chance you might have come across them Norm?


Entered at Sat Oct 17 12:32:04 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

How could I forget Ty Hardin!!!????

And Range Rider and Dick West.

Gettin' excited 'ere! Must dig out me cowie hat.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Oct 17 12:18:17 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

It certainly whets my appetite Jeff lad - then again I'm no real acid test on that score as I'm such an easy touch for anything River connected.

It was the time I first made the connection with the fella. The Born to Run single had impacted some years earlier of course but really - it had all but passed me by and he was no more than a 'name' to me.

On the very first play it hit me like a juggernaut. The energy. The exuberance. The fun. And then all that passion, all that hurt and anger. Above all that erudite insight into the ordinary human condition and mindset which nobody has ever seemed to do quite so intuitively as Bruce and all woven into this endless array of fantastic music with ballads and doo wop and angst and rockers that actually took 50's style rock 'n' roll to new places you'd never before considered. Unreal. I hadn't heard anything remotely like it before. Haven't since. I return to it all the time. Even after 35 years!!

Like right this minute in fact.

:)

Link to probably the best live video take on Stolen Car - muscles and all!!


Entered at Sat Oct 17 12:08:53 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Off the top of me head Norm lad

Tenderfoot, Rawhide, The Big Valley, Boots 'n' Saddles, Davy Crockett, Maverick, Wagon Train

Sure ther's loads more

...bliss.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Oct 17 12:01:31 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Spanky & Our Gang

Kevin..........you are such a dork.

The 1950's.....As we drove home yes-a-day I had a Amazing Rhythm Aces CD in the player. I played Susan a song called "King of the Cowboys" kind of an ode to Roy Rogers.

Susan and I got to remembering how many cowboy shows there was on TV back then. Gunsmoke, Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Bonanza, Wanted Dead or Alive, The Rifleman, The Virginian I'm sure there is more. It was a cowboy time of life.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 07:09:00 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"So, Darling, now that we have a chance to do some travelling, any places special in mind ? "Ah.....well......any place on this planet other than Comox, BC !

Note to Justin's Chief of Staff: Full steam ahead on legalization of marijuana.......but a full ban on coffee please....test trial.....a well known Harper hamlet called Comox.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 06:17:05 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.18)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tofino

Thought I'd say that I met Rockin Chair over a coffee in Comox yesterday. A good man!


Entered at Sat Oct 17 04:12:28 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.220)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al - that trailer gives an indication how sometimes a record company exec's or execs' input is important in a positive way... Additional ears can be a plus.... other times not.. Time can be a plus... Different artists, different execs, everything changes...When it works is a blessing to us all.


Entered at Sat Oct 17 03:19:19 CEST 2015 from (67.87.217.220)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks for the info Pete :-)


Entered at Sat Oct 17 01:25:24 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Trailer for The River

Hmmmm...slurp

:-0)


Entered at Sat Oct 17 00:20:25 CEST 2015 from (193.200.150.125)

Posted by:

Coach HD

Shameless.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 18:59:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "Dart Travis" books

Many thanks for the comments, Dunc!

If you want to read synopses, go to the Dart Travis site (my non-ESL pseudonym) linked. You can find the "Sixties Trilogy" by going to 1967, 1968 and 1969 on the top menu bar. There are also the short stories under SHORT STORIES on the menu - these are mainly garage band stories 1964-65.

We had great fun doing the cover collages. For the short stories one, we laid a Fender PB on the floor, and drew the outline in card so we could arrange the things to go inside the outline. The 1969 was a Ford Transit van shape from a Ford 1969 catalogue, the 1968 a placard and the 1967 a chorus dance shoe.

They're also on iBooks Store and Kobo. Not that we've sold a Kobo one yet. If you're into traditional print, amazon.com and amazon.co.uk have print on demand 6 x 9" paperbacks. Or you can go direct to Create Space (Amazon's Print on Demand site) and that doubles the author royalty.

Both the 1967 one (working backstage on a summer show) and the 1969 one (based on a rock band touring the UK and Germany) may have the odd anecdote you've heard before.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 18:48:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Simine Felice live

Review of Simone Felice, Wednesday, plus some comments on his ESSENTIAL new live double album "From The Violent Banks of the Kaaterskill" which features The Felice Brothers, pianist / vocalist Anna Mitchell (who is touring with him), Simi Stone and others. All recorded live in April this year.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 18:40:28 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.73)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hirth Martinez

From RR's Facebook page:

"Yes, "Hirth From Earth" has taken flight and now soars amongst the stars and heavens. I had the great pleasure to work with Hirth Martinez on his first album. His songwriting, performance, and persona took me to a musical wonderland I had never experienced before. His poetic connection to the universe felt unique and totally honest. For the album cover, Hirth walked out of the Pacific Ocean in a suit, hat, and walking cane, like he had just arrived from Japan. Blessings to Hirth's family for having such a maestro in their midst. May his music live forever. Robbie and the Robertson family."


Entered at Fri Oct 16 13:40:12 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Lord Lucan

Apologies for absence. Just a bit mad. But then you already know that.

:-0)

Thanks for the nod on that show Dunc. Also Pete's books. I'll be onto them this weekend, madness permitting.

In meantime for Bob F, Bob W and any other interested a heads up for what I'm sure will prove to be for me the definitive Bruce anthology release - THE RIVER.

No idea how much it is at this stage but needless to say Father Christmas will need a feckin huge sack for his Liverpool jaunt.

Here's the details anyroad.

Press release:

Columbia Records will release Bruce Springsteen's 'The Ties That Bind: The River Collection' on December 4th. A comprehensive look at 'The River' era, the set contains 52 tracks on 4 CDs with a wealth of unreleased material, and 4 hours of never-before-seen video on 3 DVDs.

It is comprised of the original 'The River' double album; the first official release of 'The River: Single Album;' a CD of 1979/80 studio outtakes; a two-DVD film of never-released, newly edited multi-camera footage from Springsteen's famed 1980 show in Tempe, AZ, long rumored but never-before-seen; rare tour rehearsal footage; a brand new documentary "The Ties That Bind" about 'The River;' and a coffee table book of 200 rare or previously unseen photos and memorabilia with a new essay by Mikal Gilmore.

'The River,' Springsteen's fifth album, was released on October 17, 1980 as a double album and reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart.

In his notes, Gilmore calls 'The River' Springsteen's "pivotal album-[the] hinge between the ambitious commotions that had preceded it and the more succinct musical riots, and sometimes terrifying storytelling, that followed."

'The River: Single Album' is the 10-track album that Springsteen recorded in 1979 as a follow up to 1978's 'Darkness On The Edge Of Town' but never released.

"The songs lacked the kind of unity and conceptual intensity I liked my music to have. So we went back in the studio," he wrote in the lyrics/photo book "Songs."

The early sessions marked the beginning of a prolific 18-month long journey of writing and recording.

Seven of the 10 titles on 'The River: Single Album' eventually appeared on 'The River,' some with alternate lyrics and arrangements, with outtakes like "Cindy" and a rockabilly version of "You Can Look (But You Better Not Touch)" never released.

Now for the first time 'The River: Single Album' will be officially available.

The fourth CD on the box set is 'The River: Outtakes,' which spans the entire 'The River' sessions in 1979 and 1980 and illustrate the depth and variety of Springsteen's work during this period.

Eleven songs are rarities that have never been released before, and for the most part are completely unheard and unknown even to fans, who have long considered Springsteen's outtakes to be treasured secrets.

"The Ties That Bind" is a brand new 60-minute documentary produced and directed by Grammy and Emmy-winning filmmaker Thom Zimny that features an intimate interview with Springsteen as he reflects on the tumultuous, extended period writing and recording 'The River.'

The film transitions between Springsteen telling the stories behind the music - and illustrating them with solo acoustic guitar performances - interspersed with period concert footage and rare photos of Bruce and the band in and out of the studio.

The final video component is "Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band: The River Tour, Tempe 1980," a new film produced from footage professionally filmed in 1980 using four cameras and recorded in multitrack audio.

The film features 24 songs - 2 hours, 40 minutes - on 2 DVDs from Springsteen's November 5, 1980 concert at Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ.

Widely regarded as one of Springsteen's finest performances, this intense show features early live versions of over half of 'The River' songs.

Also included is 20 minutes of footage from the late September, 1980 River Tour rehearsals held in Lititz, PA, showing Springsteen and The E Street Band working through live arrangements of what was then unreleased material from the upcoming album.

'The Ties That Bind: The River Collection' is packaged in a 10" x 12" box with a hardcover 148-page coffee table book containing 200 studio and live photographs - most of which have never been seen before - plus pages from Springsteen's notebooks, single covers, images and outtakes from the original album package, and other memorabilia documenting the album.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 12:55:57 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: 60s and 70s

Thanks, Adam. Great picture from 1970.

Sometimes in Britain the 1970s are compared unfavourably to the 1960s in musical terms. Maybe a little unfair.

I have been watching 'From The Cradle To The Grave', a comedy series set in working class London in the 1970s with excellent music by Squeeze.

Both young males in the family are really into music and I feel nostalgic about this time. It was before home computing and game boxes etc and music was king. Many young working class people were into exploring music of different genres and this would be a period when many young Brits, I think, would get into the Band.

Here's a shout for Peter. I read Peter V's sixties trilogy over the summer. I thought it was an excellent evocation of sixties Britain. The first book is related to variety; the second to university life and an occupation; and the third to life on the road. The stories are good, there are interesting characters, attention to detail of the sixties and coverage of many themes.It took me back in time, an accurate depiction of this era. Great stuff and three books for a tenner on kindle...great value.

I'm playing the Kinks singles just now... the sixties were brilliant.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 04:15:06 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Awesome photo of The Band from "Madison Square Garden, January 1970". I think this is from their Felt Forum MSG shows Dec. 26-27, 1969.


Entered at Fri Oct 16 04:07:52 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.107)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Paul, I saw a few Barnburners shows in 2002. For me, then, it was all Levon & the bass player. In one case that was Jeff Sarli, in another couple, it was Tony Garnier. One time Larry Campbell came played some guitar. Neither Amy or Bobby Keyes were present at any of these shows. When i've seen Amy sing da bluz i enjoy it more than when she does singer songwriter stuff....

Pete, i bet choo gotsum good stories to tell outta the ESL interviews...


Entered at Thu Oct 15 20:40:31 CEST 2015 from (107.211.249.187)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

I missed ever seeing the Barnburners, who only ever showed up in Chicago once, as far as I know. I'd love to hear a recording of Levon, Bobby Keys, Chris O'Leary, Amy Helm, etc. I've always been hoping that Levon's archival series (the one that did RCO at the Palladium) would put out a Barnburners recording. I know Levon worked with other people under the Bburners name, but the O'Leary/Amy version, ideally with Bobby Keys, is the one I'd love to have. Writeups at the time refer to a forthcoming album, but I never saw one appear, and I'd take a live or studio record, assuming they ever had tapes rolling.


Entered at Thu Oct 15 19:17:53 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: Pa

Subject: North Star and Levon

Peter M. My favorite music memory. Standing at the bar right by the door and in walks Levon. I said hi like a little excited kid and Levon takes the time to talk to me and my wife as if we were old friends. He thanks us for coming to the show then tells his manager "Butch" to buy us a beer. Best Bud I ever drank.


Entered at Thu Oct 15 19:09:01 CEST 2015 from (108.16.242.238)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: The North Star

Carmen, my wife and I were at the Levon & the Barn Burners show at The North Star. The club was playing recorded music loudly before the band came out. As the musicians came up the stairs, Bobby Keyes was the first to come into the room. Over the loud music, I turned to my wife and shouted excitedly, "That's Bobby F*CKING Keyes!!", just as the music stopped, making my earnest but crude comment the loudest thing in the room. Ouch! By the way, they were great, Levon and the Barn Burners with Bobby on sax and Amy on vocals.


Entered at Thu Oct 15 16:03:05 CEST 2015 from (68.70.61.190)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: The Wanderers

The Wanderers is a great movie with a great ending. Opening Song in comparison to closing scene shows how quickly the 60's changed.


Entered at Thu Oct 15 15:59:57 CEST 2015 from (68.70.61.190)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: North Start Bar Phila

Shame to see this one go. I saw Levon here when he was making his comeback - I had a nice conversation with Levon that night. A moment I will never forget. He actually thanked me and my wife for coming.


Entered at Thu Oct 15 08:29:40 CEST 2015 from (92.54.160.246)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Wanderers

One of the baldies, Nick Giangiuliano, was in my ESL video Only In America which we filmed in NYC, NJ and Long IslAnd back in 1995. We spent much time talking about the film.

Another great sequence is the girls dancing in a line to My Boyfriend's Back.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 17:21:05 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Pete, thanks for that link to the opening credits of The Wanderers. Whole thing is powerful... Man, when that song kicks in, and the gang starts assembling, damn if i didn't expect Norm to appear on screen.... Adios folks.. ... Whoa, the guy devouring that slice was ....... that department store ain't in my family, was owned by the Farkas family. I dated a woman whose last name was Farkas, but that wasn't her family either..


Entered at Wed Oct 14 16:59:32 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Live in Chicago 2013

Here's a live one Pete, sit back, grab a brisket sandwich, pop open a can of soda, drink a pop, whatever floats your boat :-) ... running out any minute, may not be near a computer much till late Thursday...


Entered at Wed Oct 14 16:55:03 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Pete, the label has had you tube remove Frankie Vallie's and The Four Season's original versions. I did post a medley of them including that song a few days back. Here it is again. There are recent live versions of them performing it that are on you tube, but age, y'know...



Entered at Wed Oct 14 16:53:35 CEST 2015 from (24.114.58.154)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hirth From Earth

From Hirth Martnez's Facebook page.......love this story.

"For the record...the story of Hirth from Earth: Norman of Norm's Rare Guitars had a 90 minute tape of Hirth's newest songs (about 40) and the real story is that Bob Dylan came over to buy a fender stratocaster from Norm and Norman refused to sell Dylan the guitar until he listened to Hirth's tape. Dylan patiently stood there for 90 minutes and listened to every song. Then Norm sold Bob Dylan the guitar and Dylan told Hirth that if he could think of anyone who should hear the tape, he would turn Hirth on to this person. Then he suggested to Norman that he take Hirth over to Robbie Robertson's house right away, so they went to Malibu and Hirth met Robbie. Before the afternoon was over, they made plans to make Hirth's first Warner Bros album, Hirth from Earth. And that is the way it really happened."

Do check out the linked interview I posted yesterday. Well worth it.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 12:12:44 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Walk Like A Man

Odd choice of cover, Jeff. The Kestrels were a Bristol UK covers band, notable because songwriters Greenaway & Cooke were members. They played the first Beatles tour (both of them subsidiary to headliner Helen Shapiro and crooner Danny Williams) and went on to cover “There’s A Place” as a single, thus one of the earliest Lennon-McCartney covers. The first Lennon-McCartney cover ever was Kenny Lynch’s “Misery” and he was on that tour too.

The Kestrels are a little footnote in British beat group history, as they were recording before The Beatles, but only covers of American hits. They’re very much like Brian Poole & The Tremeloes who beat The Beatles to a Decca contract, which then consisted of recording “Big Big Hits of 62” an LP with 16 rapid short cover versions. The Kestrels did the same for Pye’s Piccadilly label with “Smash Hits” with 12 covers, starting with their “near hit” a cover of Walk Right In. On the same LP they went from Walk Like A Man to Will You love Me Tomorrow to Michael (Row The Boat) to Please Please Me and Speedy Gonzales. For one of the rear cover photos (the LP is on my desk) they donned Mexican hats and moustaches and subtitled the photo “Speedy Gonzales.”

What surprises me is that the quite weedy backing (directed by Johnny Keating) supplanted The Four Seasons original in your link, with its tremendous Bob Crewe produced backing. The Four Seasons original, which opens “The Wanderers” movie will probably make my Desert Island Selection if ever the BBC invited me to do one.

The Wanderers opening credits are linked. Not the first time I've linked them. Definitive.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 02:35:57 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.210)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

See the link. Never goes out of style. Especially with a brisket sandwich, or a hot dog and soda.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 02:20:57 CEST 2015 from (24.114.58.154)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: An’ a one, an’ a two …


Entered at Wed Oct 14 02:01:31 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well GAWD DAMN!

Kevin is in one of his "Monty Python Moods".

Now listen I'm gawd damn impressed. I now have 4 full seasons of Hell on Wheels on DVD. That sweet Susan got 'em all for me. Well the actors, most unknown to me I think superb. I have been looking them up on the web here and learning about them.

One lady who is a "LOOKER" and I think she is a wonderful actress, Chelah Horsdal. She plays Maggie Palmer the Cheyenne hotel owner. So.....she was born in Vancouver, grew up in Kitsilano and is the daughter of.........Valdy! Several of the actors in this series are Canadian. Of course like many of these westerns is filmed along the Bow River out of Calgary.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 02:00:09 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well GAWD DAMN!

Kevin is in one of his "Monty Python Moods".

Now listen I'm gawd damn impressed. I now have 4 full seasons of Hell on Wheels on DVD. That sweet Susan got 'em all for me. Well the actors, most unknown to me I think superb. I have been looking them up on the web here and learning about them.

One lady who is a "LOOKER" and I think she is a wonderful actress. She plays Maggie Palmer the Cheyenne hotel owner. So.....she was born in Vancouver, grew up in Kitsilano and is the daughter of.........Valdy! Several of the actors in this series are Canadian. Of course like many of these westerns is filmed along the Bow River out of Calgary.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 01:47:01 CEST 2015 from (207.164.2.174)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: ...Completely different

And speaking of death in all its religious glory, 'no one expects the Spanish inquisition'.


Entered at Wed Oct 14 01:20:35 CEST 2015 from (24.114.58.154)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: .....and then there are the ex-parrots

'E's not pinin'! 'E's passed on! This parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! 'E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!/ 'E's a stiff! Bereft of life, 'e rests in peace! If you hadn't nailed 'im to the perch 'e'd be pushing up the daisies!/ 'Is metabolic processes are now 'istory! 'E's off the twig!/ 'E's kicked the bucket, 'e's shuffled off 'is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin' choir invisibile!!"


Entered at Tue Oct 13 23:37:28 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You know, I'm sure we never said "passed away" 20, 30 or 40 years ago. It's kind of "mortician / undertaker" vocabulary that's spread into normal use. I'd never have used it, but do now, and adopt a gentle tone when saying it.


Entered at Tue Oct 13 23:32:26 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Euphemism?

Well what is "kicked the bucket" or "Takin' the dirt nap"?


Entered at Tue Oct 13 23:27:56 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"passed" is a euphemism, of course. I find it best to use it myself about other people's relatives, but "passed / passed away" is different than "passed over" which has an implied religious dimension. About my own parents, I've always used the direct "died" and never said "passed" but awareness of others' sensibilities comes into play when talking about their deceased relatives and friends, so I'd say "passed". And we use "deceased" which is in turn a euphemism for "dead."


Entered at Tue Oct 13 21:55:14 CEST 2015 from (65.95.178.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Words

Mike: "Die" is a word most people avoid. It has a harsh finality about it that is difficult for many. It reminds the speaker to strongly of his/her mortality. There is a gentleness to "passing" or "pass away". When used words hurt, they are often avoided, especially in print.


Entered at Tue Oct 13 21:04:27 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Just passing

I remember when people used to die.


Entered at Tue Oct 13 20:51:07 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks PSB for relaying the sad news and JQ for posting the link to those interviews. That second one with Gene Clark is fascinating.


Entered at Tue Oct 13 20:41:13 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Very sorry to hear about Hirth Martinez's passing. LINKED is a very good interview with nice reflections on his music and associations......Dylan ( "Ya got 90 minutes !" )Robbie Robertson, vocal tips from Rick Danko, etc. Scrawl down when you get to the link and click on it. Very much worth listening to.

Spellcheck here is correcting Danko to Dank !


Entered at Tue Oct 13 19:14:44 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Gene Clark interview, with Randy Meisner & Rick Roberts

From 1988 -


Entered at Tue Oct 13 10:43:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RIP Hirth Martinez

Sad news. The second album, Big Bright Street, was produced by John Simon for a further connection, and Garth played accordion on the title track.


Entered at Tue Oct 13 02:11:56 CEST 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: RIP Hirth Martinez

I believe it was Saturday, on Facebook Maud Hudson posted the sad news that Hirth Martinez had passed, and a check on his official page revealed the cause was cancer. For those who don't know, Hirth was a more than interesting singer-songwriter whose first album was produced by Robbie Robertson and also featured Garth Hudson. According to Maud's post, it was Hirth that introduced her to Garth. So far the news has only been posted on Facebook. A google search will reveal much more about Hirth including his own web site and there's quite a bit of him on youtube.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 22:56:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The flat (US apartment = NYC residence) that we rented in 1973-4 picked up both taxis and police all the time on the hi-fi. It was OK listening to Frank Zappa or Velvet Underground, as you didn't notice it and it blended in, but with other stuff it could get quite disconcerting.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 22:23:18 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: Joe was playing a Coral Electric Sitar made by Danelectro. You can also hear one used of the Boxtops "Cry Like A Baby" and "Hooked On A Feeling" by B.J. Thomas. Haven't seen one of those old Baldwin amps in many years. Speaking of voices coming out of amps -- Back in the late '70s I saw Little Feat play at the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium, which was near a fire station and Atlanta Police Headquarters. They were using new wireless relays for their guitars and occasionally the police band transmissions leaked through their amps.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 21:34:49 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Baldwin Amp

David, I was also about to ask you if you knew these amps and I found this youtube clip.

This is the amp I had back in the sixties with my first rock & roll band. The colored switches on the top right side give different effects. I can't remember the watts but this amp really kicked ass.

A very odd thing happened one night about 1966 I was playing a little supper club in Richmond just out of Vancouver BC. We were very near the Vancouver International airport. Suddenly voices started coming out of my amp. We stopped and listened to an airplane pilot talking to the control tower. I couldn't believe it. I talked to the guy where I bought the amp and he wasn't surprised. It happened once or twice more that I recall. It was taxi drivers.

This amp weighed a ton and I really got tired of packing it around. I had one of those Italian Eko guitars then. A model much like a 335 Gibson.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 21:07:50 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Joe South - Songs I played in the sixties

David! tell me something about this guitar he's using and the "effect".


Entered at Mon Oct 12 20:49:02 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Lately I've been listening to music most of the time through my new tube headphone amp. The neat thing about it is that it has both 3.55mm and RCA inputs so you can connect it directly to a CD player or portable player. When listening to vinyl I connect it to my phono preamp.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 15:52:26 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Hope it goes well, Peter.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 15:24:28 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.227)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Good luck Pete.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 14:56:13 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just been told about a place that does "classic hi-fi repairs including valve amps" about 15 miles away. I phoned. They know Quad. They reckon the power supply (so do I). Hopefully fixable - I also realised the pre-amp connects to power amp by ordinary phono, so though I'd lose the interconnected switching, I could run it with another pre-amp.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 14:05:04 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

oops...missed saying Marvin Gaye is important to me.

Sorry to hear about your system, Peter. The post is good...nobody fixes anything now. What a waste. I bought a leaf gatherer yesterday. I looked it up on the internet, reserved it, then drove out to this non descript area - where I go to the cinema, will buy my next car, bought my grandson's toys recently, while parts of this beautifu town centre is full of empty and pound shops. One CD shop hanging on.

David P:Still play 'Neil Toung', 'Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere' 'CSN' and a 'Buffalo Springfield' compilation, which I picked up about ten years ago. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 13:45:48 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: 1973

Innervisions, Band on the Run, Dark Side of the Moon (only PF album I had) were important to me.

Really enjoyed the Toppermost Wailers. Had the live album and Kaya, but never played the Wailers for years. Going to rectify this.

Moondog Matinee I bought about 79-80. Think it is great.

Really enjoyed Danny Bakers' 'From the Cradle to the Grave'. May buy the new Squeeze album. Don't have anything of Squeeze, but I play a solo Chris Difford album quite often.


Entered at Mon Oct 12 07:34:50 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.143)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: In the first edition of "Backstage Passes", Al Kooper tells of playing a pre-BS&T pick-up gig with Jim Fielder and former Hawk Sandy Konikoff. Another short-term Springfielder, guitarist Doug Hastings, later recorded two Rhinoceros LPs with very short-term Levon and the Hawksfrontman John Finley and future Band sideman Billy Mundi. Yet another Springfield temp, bassist Ken Koblun, was in the Stormy Clovers at about the same time they worked with Garth Hudson.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 22:03:43 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Now that's a Canadian Beard!

See the link!


Entered at Sun Oct 11 20:59:50 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1973

What happened to all those years? Thanks for 1973-74, Dunc. May I add for 73:

Catch-A-Fire – The Wailers

Let’s Get It On – Marvin Gaye

Innervisions – Stevie Wonder

The Dark Side of The Moon – Pink Floyd

Band on The Run – Paul McCartney & Wings

The Wild, The Innocent & The E-Street Shuffle – Bruce Springsteen

I think all those are “generally accepted” … there’s also Moondog Matinee, Houses of The Holy (don’t rate it myself), Aladdin Sane (not his best) and Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (too much of it).


Entered at Sun Oct 11 20:21:57 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Thanks Giving

Today we will have our Thanks Giving dinner, as I have to get ready to go to work tomorrow.

Hope everyone up here has a happy and meaningful Thanks Giving.

Peter! get Mrs V and get over for some "Bubble & Squeak" tomorrow :-)


Entered at Sun Oct 11 16:25:19 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Amp disaster

My beautiful Quad 97 pre-amp musty have taken a dislike to the new Darlene Love CD because I gradually noticed a smell of burning. A tiny whisp of smoke emerged. Worse, in the hurry to get it out of my office, I just unplugged all eight devices attached to it without time to label the leads … which go through holes in cupboards and so are hard to trace. So now I have the Quad 97 Power Amp, the CD player and the large remote (size of an iPad) and these all interconnect … but no pre-amp. I presume the system is now defunct, though I think the CD player will be usable. Nowadays anyone charges huge amounts just to open stuff and look, not that anyone has much experience of pre-computer hardware.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 16:25:10 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Real Life Controversies & Dirty Pool

See The Link..Real Life Controversies. No Keyboard Involved. Even When There Is Regulation, Even When There is Protection, When You Can Feel Em Breathe Down Your Neck, Dirty Pool Has Ramifications.

Utley Ain't Gonna Be Able to Leave His Hotel Room without a detail of armed guards.. And should bring back the Pope, advertise it, to taste his food. Otherwise the hotel cook may decide to poison him.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 15:28:37 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.132)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Pickin' Up the Pieces

The former members rose from the ashes of Buffalo Springfield in 1969. Neil Young released his self-titled debut album and later teamed with Crazy Horse on Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. Stephen Stills hooked up with a former Byrd and a former Holly to release Crosby, Stills & Nash. Former Springfield bassist Bruce Palmer auditioned to join CS&N, but according to him, C&N were against it. As the group was set to tour, they brought in Young. Richie Furry and Jim Messina, who had worked with Springfield at the end, took a path down a country road to form Poco and released Pickin' Up the Pieces. To get released from their prior record label contracts, a trade was brokered allowing Furry to record for Epic in exchange for Nash's switch to Atlantic. Jim Felder, who had filled in on bass in Springfield, had landed squarely on his feet the year before when AL Kooper brought him in when he formed Blood, Sweat and Tears. Drummer Dewey Martin was less fortunate when legal moves prevented him from carrying on under the Buffalo Springfield name with new musicians.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 13:00:20 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: scotland

Subject: A good year

Carmen:Thanks. Here's six albums I bought over a year 1973 to 1974 and still play. It was a time I was buying albums.

John Martyn Solid Air 1973

Stealers Wheel Ferguslie Park 1973

Rab Noakes Red Pump Special 1973

Average White Band White Album 1974

Planet Waves Bob Dylan 1974

Neil Young On The Beach 1974 Still play all these albums and many more from this era.

Lisa:Never saw that film and that was an era when I and much of Britain was cinema going mad. Thanks


Entered at Sun Oct 11 05:10:45 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.128)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I agree entirely. Production by Felix Pappalardi in both cases, plus he played trumpet on various tracks and bass on one song on each album. Guitarist Eugene Martynec mustve picked up some tips because he went on to produce a bunch of important albums, mostly by Bruce Cockburn. Also played synth on Lou Reed's "Berlin", so no slouch. Last I heard, he was pursuing his interest in electronic in London (the big one).


Entered at Sun Oct 11 03:51:48 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Don't get in the way of a hungry Hungarian.

Jerry. Bertha, my mom's mother's mother, was from Hungary. In my book, and it's a long one, Hungarian Jews make the absolute best chicken soup and stuffed cabbage.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 01:37:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tombstone Blues

BBC Radio 4 played a bit of "Tombstone Blues" from the new Dylan "Cutting Edge" with The Chambers Brothers on backing vocals. Never Been bootlegged, they said.


Entered at Sun Oct 11 00:59:59 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

For you Poconuts, Poco just did a few nights at Wildwood Springs Lodge in steelville, Missouri. Rusty married a gal from there, been living ther quite a while now. Anyways, the current version of Poco is Rusty, Mike Webb, Jack Sundrud, & a new drummer who played on some album tracks with them in the 80s, Rick Lonow,. Rick of course was in Burrito Deluxe with Garth. He's also been Crystal Gayle's drummer for ages.

So these Wildwood Poco shows, it was Richie Furay, Paul Cotton, & Rusty. Paul was fighting a bad cold, but the videos on Facebook indicate he's pretty damn strong for a guy in his mid 70s with a cold. Furay's still looking, singing, & playing like a guy in his 40s to 50s. and Rusty's essentially unchanged. Linked is an old tune, actually one of the first two Poco songs i ever heard, when i was a wee lad, & picked up a 99 cent Epic sampler right around the time Deliverin hit the stores.... Norm, what sounds like a B3 , that's Rusty playing his pedal steel through a Leslie, which he had begun doing by 1968... I guess just like RR though of it, a few guys thought of that back then... sorta things were probably running through all their minds, how to get sounds........ like Clarence White & Gene Parsons coming up with that bender to get pedal steel sounds on guitars... Players trying to get sounds...


Entered at Sun Oct 11 00:43:17 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Location: Brookstocklouis

Subject: Brooklpest

Sounds like you hit the jackpot Jerry. A Brooklyn Jew guiding you through the Jewish Quarter of Budapest. Poifect. I can smell the schmaltz all the way over here. You guys must have had a blast, I'm sure he enjoyed yours & L's company as much as you he. Lots of stories to trade. Did you ask Reuven how it is that one day he woke up in Budapest? I know i once made a wrong turn in Pittsburgh, ended up in St Louis, & the rest is history, But it's not that easy to end up in Budapest from Brooklyn......
Although, today they do have a rather large nightclub restaurant named Brooklyn in Budapest.



Entered at Sat Oct 10 21:18:27 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: another from Tom Jones' new Long Lost Suitcase

Elvis Presley Blues - perhaps my favorite Gillian Welch song, brilliant writing to my taste -


Entered at Sat Oct 10 20:46:43 CEST 2015 from (195.184.191.188)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Brooklyn Reuven

So Jeff, here we are in Budapest in the Jewish Quarter yesterday with a guide, Reuven - from Brooklyn- who gave us a very positive earful of 'Jeffness' when we spoke about old Brooklyn, including Dodgers, pizza, and everything inbetween. He was fantastic. His eyes lit up when he talked about his roots in Brooklyn.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 19:55:00 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.85)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Walk Right Up! Walk Like A Man

See the link,Norm. ....I never did point this out, but way back the discussion about soda started with brisket, hot dogs, & doo wop. Doo wop was right in there. so there you go... I wondered how many people got it....No time to write what I wanna,which is innocuous...But the High Holy Days came & went, all I'm saying. Timing is everything... If it's hitting you like it is us in NY, enjoy the beautiful weather.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 14:14:50 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Transparent

Always completely honest as usual Jerry. I just like to bug those guys in Ontario. Hope the Leafs have success.

Be safe and enjoy your tour.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 07:55:24 CEST 2015 from (195.184.191.188)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Symphony in Europe: Kensington Market

Bill M (and anyone else who is interested): In honour of Eugene Martynec, born in Germany, I have been playing Kensington Market albums as we move through Germany to Budapest on a lecture tour. How lovely it is. Like a symphony on the Rhine. I think they should release those 2 albums again for public consumption. They stand up well with much of today's indie output. There is nothing quite like these 2 albums. Derivative slightly of later ( to my ear anyway)Beatles, but less embellished, these albums have a pristine sound with subtle production which places them in a unique place for me.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 05:47:28 CEST 2015 from (195.184.191.188)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Plus/Minus

By the way, Kevin and anyone else who is going to remind me.. You can point out his plus.minus as very poor and I'll agree that Kessel doesn't look like he could play defensively. This was of course not his strength. However, that doesn't mean he didn't try to do the job. His strength is scoring. It may be a valid criticism but there are other players who are on the ice often because they score goals and often have a poor plus/minus. You need a player like that on your team. Kevin, as for the Habs. It's going to be a great season.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 05:43:21 CEST 2015 from (195.184.191.188)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Phil Kessel

I am a voice in the wilderness. Phil Kessel was the only Leaf capable of consistently putting the puck in the net. He was accused of being a 1-direction player with no defensive skills (not true) and he is somewhat ornery with the media (an attribute in my view but not well appreciated). It was a terrible mistake to trade him. That is obvious now as 2 games have gone by and the grand total of goals scored by this team is 1. Kessel will continue to do what Kessel does and will be a major star with Pittsburgh and Leafs will rue the day when they didn't see what he could give them and what was needed at this time of rebuilding. He has 5 good years at least left in him and I see 30 goals a game in him. (25 was a low last year on a dismal team). Norm... I criticize the team I love because one can love them as a fan and still point out deficiencies. Someone reminded me of that. All is not good in Toronto right now with a great baseball team going south from lack of timely hitting from the guys who got them hear. As for the Leafs, its going to be a sad season and changes will come yet again. This group does not have it though the detractors will say 2 games is not enough to judge. Whatever they say, there is no Kessel and I for one am despondent about that fact.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 05:36:20 CEST 2015 from (195.184.191.188)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Vinyl Stan

Thanks for the tip, Bill. I'll check out Fan Tan Alley record when I'm back in Victoria next week. Overseas right now.


Entered at Sat Oct 10 03:13:50 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.150)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Forgot to add that it's in the bin in the very NE corner (Blues - Misc.)


Entered at Sat Oct 10 01:18:55 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.156)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: As of two days ago, the Turntable in FanTan Alley had Lonnie Mack's "Strike Like Lightning" for $15. Stevie Ray Vaughan on second lead, Tim Drummond on bass and Stan Szelest on piano. The notes note that Stan was in an early iteration of the Band.

The Hawks did play a bit of blue-beat in their Yonge Street days, and would have been familiar with reggae's forerunners from other acts on the strip, notably the Debonairs, who had a huge hit with "Steel Men" in 1961.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 21:48:13 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Country Tom

Have a listen to Honey Honey from the new Tom Jones album, Long Lost Suitcase. I was hoping to link Factory Girl but it's not on YouTube.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 19:26:40 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: NLSC Singles

Prior to releasing the Acadian Driftwood/ Twilight single here in the U.S. Capitol first released a promo 2-sided Ophelia single in 1975. One side had the stereo mix, the other the mono mix. Early the following year Capitol officially released Ophelia here with Hobo Jungle on the flip side.

I don't have copies of either of those singles, but if I ever run across that rare stereo/mono white label promo I would surely buy it. Do have a copy of the 1972 single Don't Do It b/w Get Up Jake. The latter is mislabeled as the live Rock Of Ages version, when in fact it's the original studio version mixed to mono.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 17:07:43 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gangland

I've just been watching a documentary about "LTF" a gang in Atlanta, (I think David P is a member). I sent my application down for membership so I can get their help to deal with individuals in Tranna.

Funny place that Tranna. There is a plague there. They spend a ton of money on revamping the hockey team with fresh, (almost worn out blood) and still get their asses wupped by Mon-re-all.:-)


Entered at Fri Oct 9 17:05:09 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Morning smile

Thanks, Kevin. Better than coffee.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 16:36:54 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Breaking News.......Soon to be defeated Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada has doubled down on a strategy of legislating how Canadians should live......his announcement today that all Canadians must purchase an album entitled "After All This Time" is seen as a risk. Already, pollsters are seeing signs that the electorate are strongly identifying the album's title with gentleman Justin Trudeau rather than the desperate and despicable Mr. Harper..........The artist who created the album in question was unavailable for comment.........neighbours observed that he was last seen staggering home singing ""OK Blue Jays" and muttering something about Kevin always being right.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 13:13:42 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Didn't It Rain

For UK readers: Amy Helm's new album is now up on amazon.co.uk (no longer as an "import") and I just got my copy next day.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 10:52:29 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Arthur

I had meant to add "And you were absolutely fucking right, Kevin" but I was doing it from the iPad, where brevity is an advantage.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 07:03:31 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Absurd!

Kevin!............you've never been right about anything........so.........shutup!.....................lawd,lawd,lawd.........


Entered at Fri Oct 9 05:22:05 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hey Hey My My

Into the Blue out of the black.......the version by Battleme to end season 3 of "Sons of Anarchy" might be the finest meshing of song and cinema I have ever heard.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 04:20:45 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Arthur.....

.....and, for the uninitiated, that was Peter V's way of saying "you were absolutely fu*king right, Kevin"

Blue Jays lose......hallelujah ! I might be spared having to listen to all the Biff''s and Betty's and traffic reporters in town "talk Jays" all bleeping day.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 03:44:24 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Carmen

1965.....1969.....1971.....1977


Entered at Fri Oct 9 03:10:35 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: Pa

Subject: Best year xpn

Peter M. I hear ya. Xpn is a terrific station. Philly music fans are lucky to have it. They are the only station that plays great new young bands and deep cuts from all artists and all years. What other station plays Rick Danko songs? For my money 1969 and 1975 are arguably two of the best years in Rock and Roll music releases. So to extend the debate - lets talk Mt Rushmore. What 4 years belong on the Mt Rushmore of Rock and Roll. This time you can consider concerts and Live Albums as well.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 01:56:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Twilight

As yesterday's picture showed, Twilight was the UK A side, with The Weight as the B side, to promote Best of The Band.


Entered at Fri Oct 9 00:17:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Arthur

Wiki says 10 October 1969. I had 1970 from The Kinks discography.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 21:48:29 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 1969 Part 2

Giant Step/De Ole Folks At Home, Beck-Ola, The Rod Stewart Album, The Soft Parade, Shady Grove, Truly Fine Citizen, At San Quentin, Same Train a Different Time, Okie From Muskogee


Entered at Thu Oct 8 21:46:01 CEST 2015 from (72.94.35.77)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: west of Phila.

Subject: best year in music

Hey Carmen! Trick answer to your WXPN Best Year in Music post. 2015 has been the best year in music for me, but for LIVE performance. WXPN has teamed up with KRVS, Lafayette, La. and the Pew Charitable Trust to present the Zydeco Crossroads Project. In Philadelphia, we've had a couple dozen performances at World Cafe Live, and they have usually been free. Headliners like Buckwheat Zydeco, Rosie Ledet and Rockin Dopsie Jr have all performed for us, as well as some of the smaller bands that usually don't travel outside of SW Louisiana. The excellent music filmmaker, Robert Mugge documented CJ Chenier's show at WXPN's XPonential Music Fest in Camden and Rosie's intimate gig at Norristown's Holy Savior Club (a church social club, very appropriate to the genre). The project has allied with Allons Dancer, the cajun creole dance organization that has grown an audience for this thing in Phila for 27 years. I've been involved with this music 36 years now, as a fan, then a supporter, promotor, driver, sound man and friend to most of the guys who play this music. My home mailbox has a plaque on it saying "East Coast Zydecological Observatory & Turtle Ranch". Herman Fuselier, host of KRVS's "Zydeco Stomp" weekly radio show has been invaluable to this effort, as well as WXPN's David Dye, Jonny Meister and station manager Roger LaMay. One of our first showcase concerts last September was to feature Curley Taylor and Zydeco Trouble at a place called Club Polaris (it looked more suitable for a rave). That afternoon, we got word that it had been closed down by L&I. Within an hour, Roger got us bumped up to The Kimmel Center. Talk about stepping up in class! The finale weekend of this great year in zydeco is Fri Oct 23 6PM at World Cafe Live with Ruben Moreno and Keith Frank's bands. Then, Sat Oct 24 2:30PM they are showing Robert Mugge's "Zydeco Crossroads, a Tale of two Cities", then David Dye hosts a panel discussion of zydeco's past and future. Then performances from Corey Ledet, Wayne Singleton and Same Old 2 Step, and Rosie Ledet till midnight. (I also got out to see Dave & Phil Alvin, Buddy Guy, David Lindley, Amy Helm, George Porter Jr, Joe Louis Walker and Johnny Clegg this year, so it ain't ALL been zydeco).


Entered at Thu Oct 8 20:35:00 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding:1969

I bought a large stack of records in 1969, so it seems to have been a watershed year for my listening pleasure. I'll just list the titles to save space.

The Band, Abbey Road, Gilded Palace of Sin, Moby Grape '69, Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde, Ballad of Easy Rider, Yer' Album, Dusty in Memphis, Nazz Nazz, Songs From A Room, Nashville Skyline, The Chicago Transit Authority, Clouds, Everybody Kknows This Is Nowhere, Our Mother the Mountain, Townes Van Zandt, Pickin' Up the Pieces, California Bloodlines, A Salty Dog, Unhalfbricking, Liege & Leaf, Blind Faith, Harry, Then Play On, Uncle Meat, Hot Rats, Trout Mask Replica, Tommy, Boz Scaggs, The Allman Brothers Band, Live/Dead, Volunteers, Let It Bleed.

And I know I've forgotten a few.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 19:15:37 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Reason 1055 why I love The Band........The top single of 1976 was the dreadful "Silly Love Songs" by Wings......Our boys put out the majestic "Acadian Driftwood"......and of course, it flopped....the stuff that subcultures of born of.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 17:45:31 CEST 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Twilight Single A or B?

I just checked my single of Twilight which I bought as soon as it came out, and yes it was the B-side with Acadian Driftwood being the A-side.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 16:41:07 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dates of release...,,,

......I remember being invited to see this movie I had not heard anything about and only knowing that it starred Vinny Barbarino......this was December 1977. I thought the movie was actually very good. The full impact of its songs and its indelible association with Disco and the movements peak and soon decline really happened in 1978. So, sometimes official release dates are at odds with memory time or impact times.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 16:29:36 CEST 2015 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: 1983 Band show

Found the above link to a high-quality show vid described as "12/31/83 - San Francisco Civic Auditorium". This may be accurate as Levon thanks the Grateful Dead, for whom they are apparently opening, and Bill Graham. This show is not listed in the History section here.

What was the lineup in this period? Was this still with the Cate Brothers? I believe that's Jim Weider doing the Robbie-like parts. Anyone?


Entered at Thu Oct 8 15:59:32 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Fred's reference to formative years had me thinking and looking up 1977......what a year.....Punk's peak album with Sex Pistols "Never Mind the Bollocks", Disco's peak album with Bee Gees "Saturday Night Fever", New Wave's best with The Talking Heads debut and the MOR peak album with Fleetwood Macs "Rumours"

The Kinks "Arthur".......it's stamped 1969 so would seem to me to be the year of its release.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 14:03:54 CEST 2015 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Where's the love for 1979?!?

Look Sharp! --- Joe Jackson

Cheap Trick at Budokan --- Cheap Trick

Breakfast in America --- Supertramp

Labour of Lust --- Nick Lowe

Reggatta de Blanc --- The Police

London calling --- The Clash

I have to admit that this list is rather subjective as I was 15 in the first half of '79 and16 in the second half... impressionable and formative ages music-wise.

Objectively I think 1971 may be THE year. Or maybe 1968. Or.... ; )


Entered at Thu Oct 8 13:33:19 CEST 2015 from (68.198.162.41)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: 1975

1975

1) The Basement Tapes - Bob Dylan and The Band

2) Blood on the Tracks - Bob Dylan

3) Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen

4) Horses - Patti Smith Group

5) Northern Lights Southern Cross - The Band

6) Zuma - Neil Young



Entered at Thu Oct 8 09:05:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: My 1968

Ah! My 1968:

Magical Mystery Tour (LP) – The Beatles

Music From Big Pink – The Band

Astral Weeks – Van Morrison

Bookends – Simon & Garfunkel

Village Green Preservation Society- The Kinks

Beggar’s Banquet – The Rolling Stones.

Both Astral Weeks and Beggar’s Banquet are late releases … late November and early December, bit still had enough time before the Christmas watershed. But say you add those two to 1969 … it starts looking unbeatable.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 08:58:49 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1968

Bonk, 1968 … wouldn’t choose “The Graduate” OST with its filler though … just have “Bookends,” you still get Mrs Robinson.

Again looking at release dates, “Magical Mystery Tour” was November 1967 as an LP in the USA, but December 1967 as an EP in a gatefold sleeve the UK. Given its early 1968 chart dominance (and I first saw import LPs and got one in the January), I’d prefer Magical Mystery Tour (US LP version) to the White Album, which I always thought was either (a) a great single album or (b) four separate sets of solo stuff. Side 2 of the Magical Mystery Tour LP, with the singles, rivals Abbey Road side 2 as The Beatles best "album side."


Entered at Thu Oct 8 08:49:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Still on 1971

This is a thread that could run. I thought of 1971, and it’s a strong contender because my list differs quite a bit so gives us ten … you need a bit of Google checking though. “Arthur” was 1970, and Hunky Dory was released December 17th 1971, and I think without much attention (The Man Who Sold The World hadn’t sold) and the really heavy blanket airplay came after Christmas with the January / February tour, so in my mind it’s 1972. I got Marvin Gaye too, and I forgot Blue, which should be on the 1971 list. Tupelo Honey is another thought. 1971

What’s Going On – Marvin Gaye

Surf’s Up – The Beach Boys

Link Wray – Link Wray

Sticky Fingers – The Rolling Stones

Imagine – John Lennon

Every Picture Tells A Story-Rod Stewart


Entered at Thu Oct 8 03:25:52 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: 1971 - try beating this.....

Blue - Joni Mitchell

Who's Next - The Who

IV - Led Zeppelin

Every Picture Tells a Story - Rod Stewart

What's Going On - Marvin Gaye

Hunky Dory - David Bowie

As to 1969......"Arthur" by The Kinks would have been on my list of 6


Entered at Thu Oct 8 02:20:54 CEST 2015 from (71.58.236.105)

Posted by:

Kevin from NE PA

Subject: The The Band Band

Calvin - A few months back I caught one of their shows. We had a great time. They've been at it for a number of years and really get into the music. They have several vocalists and 'trade' vocals a lot. Recommended.


Entered at Thu Oct 8 01:34:43 CEST 2015 from (184.66.101.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Music

Sorry. 1968


Entered at Thu Oct 8 01:00:59 CEST 2015 from (92.18.175.241)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: 1999

Ali Farka Touré - Niafunké

Tom Waits - Mule Variations

Steve Earle & The Del McCoury Band - The Mountain

David Hidalgo and Mike Halby – Houndog

Bonnie 'Prince' Billy - I See a Darkness

David Munyon - Acrylic Teepees



Entered at Thu Oct 8 00:59:40 CEST 2015 from (184.66.101.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Music

Geez, only six? The Beatles - The Beatles, The Band - MFBP, 3 Dog Night - 3 Dog Night, Moody Blues - In Search of the Lost Chord, Steppinwolf - Steppinwolf, Simon and Garfunkel - The Graduate.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 23:33:08 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1969

1969

The Band: The Band.

Abbey Road – The Beatles

Let It Bleed: The Rolling Stones

Volunteers – Jefferson Airplane

From Elvis in Memphis – Elvis Presley

Jimmy Cliff - Jimmy Cliff (the first fully-realized great reggae album).



Entered at Wed Oct 7 23:15:52 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa

Subject: best year for music

ok-little fun here. xpn here in Philly is running a poll to determine the greatest year in music. lets do it here but lets add the 6 albums from your year that supports your vote.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 22:30:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Twilight

Go to 45s discography (linked). That's my copy of Twilight which confirms the smaller number under CL15887 as "YCL 15887 A" and indeed 1976 on the label.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 20:19:00 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

So, from the standpoint of promoting The Best of The Band 1976 LP, it made sense to issue the previously unreleased "Twilight" outtake as the A-side of the single. However, Jan's discography section shows the wrong release date of 1975.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 19:59:35 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Twilight

Bought the UK copy the day it came out on 45. It was advertised as the A-side.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 19:15:46 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Checking further, the 45cat database also lists "Twilight" as the A-side, showing a release date of Aug. 1976. Photo shows that it was from The Best of The Band. So evidently Capitol was using it to promote that release, as well as NLSC with "Acadian Driftwood."


Entered at Wed Oct 7 18:54:01 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: A or B?

Apparently, depending on the source, there's a question as to whether "Twilight" was the A or B side. Goldmine, like Jan's discography section, lists it as the A-side on the U.S. Capitol single. I don't have a copy of the single, but maybe someone else does who can chime in.

Here's an excerpt from Levon & Stephen Davis' "This Wheels on Fire":

"We also had an outtake called "Twilight," a little reggae song that we liked enough to use as the B-side to the 'Acadian Driftwood' single and to put in the set when we started playing shows the following year."

Then there's the question of why Capitol & the group would promote a song not included on the album as the A-side, rather than the more interesting & complex "Acadian Driftwood," which was one of the best tracks on NLSC.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 18:11:43 CEST 2015 from (136.167.102.146)

Posted by:

Dave H

Was "Twilight" a B-side (and, if so, what was the A-side)? I usually think of it as a B-side but the discography section of this site lists it as an A-side with "Acadian Driftwood" on the flip in the US and "The Weight" in the UK.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 16:24:28 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Twilight x 4

Actually we have an evolution of four recorded versions of "Twilight" at hand. Robbie's solo demo version included in A Musical History box set leads to an early alternate version (see link). That version, first included as a bonus track on the 2001 remaster of NLSC and later on Capitol Rarities 1968-1977, features Levon & Rick duet vocals, with Levon singing the first verse, backed by just piano, bass & drums. Then we have the "reggae" version, first relegated as a B-side single and later on The Best of The Band compilation released in 1976. Lastly, we have the version that Rick recorded with Jonas Fjeld & Eric Andersen on Ridin' on the Blinds, released in 1994.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 16:20:30 CEST 2015 from (162.216.46.71)

Posted by:

Calvin

Anyone familiar with a tribute group called The THE BAND Band? http://www.musicboxcle.com/event/the-the-band-band/?utm_source=Master+List&utm_campaign=a0e10ee642-Master_Email_October_07_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0edab77fef-a0e10ee642-205437049


Entered at Wed Oct 7 08:28:56 CEST 2015 from (58.104.5.38)

Posted by:

Wallsend

In the documentary 'The Making of The Band', it is cool how they go from showing Robbie playing piano and singing TNTDODD by himself to Levon singing it at TLW.


Entered at Wed Oct 7 06:03:32 CEST 2015 from (24.114.73.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Twilight

I am not sure I have ever heard a song demo that became the absolute definitive take of a song in the way Robbie's demo of "Twilight" did. It's perfect..........and as much as I love Rick and know how in so many ways he elevated many of RR's songs to unimaginable levels.....certainly not the case with "Twilight". A rare misfire where Robbie definitely should not have handed it off. Glad he knew not to with the wonderful and very underrated "Out of the Blue".


Entered at Tue Oct 6 23:55:09 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Dunc

She was excellent, and you're right, what a sad ending.

Another British actress (though I've only seen her in one movie) who really impressed me was Marjorie Rhodes. She played the mother in "The Family Way", another movie from the 60s, though in color, not B & W. Charming little movie, very different from the grittiness of the other movies we like. Great cast, but she and John Mills really stand out. And Paul McCartney's first movie score.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 23:32:44 CEST 2015 from (185.31.6.134)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bruce Cockburn

Bruce Cockburn: Outstanding! I've seen him on multiple occasions throughout his career including recently in Victoria at Butchart Gardens on a beautiful August evening in the garden stadium. We got to speak to him afterwards. Cordial and a gentleman.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 23:12:41 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: First listen to Reggae

For me, in Calif USA, it was in 1968/69 and it was Desmond Dekker's The Israelites - I still play it a good bit to this day. I don't know if the DJ's at the time referred to it as Reggae though -


Entered at Tue Oct 6 23:09:03 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Lisa

I really enjoyed watching those black and white old films too.

I'm going to fly the flag for Rachel Roberts' performances in 'Saturday Night Sunday Morning' and 'The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner'. She won baftas for both films.

A sad ending of depression and suicide. An icon of British cinema.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 22:43:34 CEST 2015 from (86.171.128.65)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce Cockburn Interview

Here is a link to Bruce Cockburn being interviewed by Ricky Ross - it's a good interview.

Peter - Bruce selects 'Visions of Johanna' as the Dylan track he wants played.

Bill M - still only got the one Bruce Cockburn album, just too much music.

Thanks Kevin.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 22:24:36 CEST 2015 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

The studio "Twilight" from 1975 has really grown on me over the past few years. love Garth's keyboard and synths. I don't get why it's labeled the "reggae" version, and the '76 live the "better" version. Same arrangement, sometimes w. horns live, it only hints at reggae.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 21:53:01 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jamaica Meets Muscle Shoals

Jamaican music literally came to the U.S. in 1971 when Jimmy Cliff recorded his "Another Cycle" album at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Alabama with the "swampers." The album included "Sitting in Limbo," and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section helped add another dimension to Mr. Cliff's sound.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 21:23:08 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Synthetic World - Jimmy Cliff

See the link. As I said, he's way more than reggae.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 21:20:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jimmy Cliff Toppermost

I didn't know about the "Sitting in Limbo" cover. Thanks, DP. Since doing Jimmy Cliff for Toppermost (LINKED), I can't stop playing him … much of his output is not reggae. I can't believe I excluded Trapped and Synthetic World from my ten … but everything is SO good.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 21:07:21 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John Sebastian covered Jimmy Cliff's "Sitting in Limbo," which was the opening track on his 1974 album "Tarzana Kid." Amos Garrett was featured on electric guitar.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 20:16:54 CEST 2015 from (58.104.5.38)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Linked is a Q&A with Robbie from 1994

I recall Clapton saying he called Bob Marley to ask him what I Shot the Sheriff was about but he could't understand much of what he answered.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 19:23:48 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: Think I've got it now


Entered at Tue Oct 6 19:21:38 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

I never seem to get this right - how do you post a link that people can click on?


Entered at Tue Oct 6 19:19:43 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/what-the-music-you-hate-says-about-you

Here's an interesting study on the types of music people like and dislike (a U.S. poll).


Entered at Tue Oct 6 17:43:45 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Yachts, Saddam etc

Nice yacht. Wish I were a guitar genius and had recorded I Shot The Sheriff. Is it too late to learn now?

On Saddam, link is to my review of "Dinner With Saddam" a new comedy on in London. The story idea is intrinsically interesting!


Entered at Tue Oct 6 17:37:51 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Nord-ouest

Subject: Serge and reggae

My favourite reggae artist is Serge Gainsbourg who made a reggae adaptation of La Marseillaise, the French national anthem.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 17:27:01 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Eric Clapton's Yacht

Eric Clapton's yacht. Look for the one Saddam Hussein owned. Given to him by the Arabs as a gift for starting a middle east war!?????

Mine isn't amoung these......I don't understand it?


Entered at Tue Oct 6 16:54:37 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Eric Clapton helped revive his career with his 1974 hit cover version of "I Shot the Sheriff." His new band member at the time, guitarist George Perry, had played The Wailers "Burnin'" LP for him, which led to recording the song. This cross-over hit did a great deal to help popularize reggae for the general public here in the U.S.

Of course, one would have to mention Desmond Dekker's 1969 ska hit "Israelites" as one of the first songs to bring Jamaica's music to these shores.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 16:07:05 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

(Without going into ska v reggae), The Beatles tried it in 1968 with Ob-la-di, Ob-la-da and Paul Simon did it in 1972 with Mother & Child Reunion, far more authentic in that he used members of Toots & The Maytals, who had done Jimmy Cliff's 1969 album. But there were a lot of reggae hits in the UK from 1969 to mid 70s, many pre-dating Bob Marley & The Wailers, and bar bands would try and cover them. So to me, 1975 is late.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 15:55:27 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Correction......

NLSC was the first studio album since 1971 ! So, using the Elvis count as I do for all things music, they could not have realistically given any sort of nod to reggae before 1975.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 15:45:24 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I wouldn't say The Band were "very late for jumping on a reggae bandwagon". Twilight was 1975 and was their first studio album since 1973. I am far from an expert on this but I seem to recall that it was mid-70's when many of the large mainstream bands starting experimenting with reggae....The Rolling Stones on Black n Blue comes to mind and then much of the New Wave movement was based on reggae, some years later.

Didn't The Band get there as soon as they could have, not that they really did, mind you. Imagine if Moodfog had been a reggae tribute instead.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 13:03:46 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

BMW - Lively Up Yourself, guitar Junior Marvin 1977.

I've read that Bob wasn't always so thrilled when Marvin would take his solos as then the attention was off the prophet. ;-D

Let's go Blue Jays!
Happy Irie Thanksgiving gobble gobble....Give thanks and praises to all things musical.

Have yourselves a lively week and thanks for letting me indulge as I feeeeel the music and the words deeply.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 12:42:42 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Classical Enthusiast....Sometimes artists put out a song as a nod to a different genre of music. Bob Marley did this with his song "Punky Reggae Party".....a nod to punk in 1977. Two years later I saw BMW at Maple Leaf Gardens. Apparently one of his favourite songs period was "Lively Up Yourself".

carmen...I've only been to Jamaica three times. The first time was when Ziggy Marley and The Wailers came out with "Black My Story". Bob's eldest Cedella Marley didn't hold back in an interview in Marley's authorised Documentary. The children definitely paid a price.......She tried acting. I have her children's book "One Love" which is based on Bob's song. I had the kidzzz take one lyric each and illustrate how they interpreted the words and we made a class book. They all knew some of his songs as they heard the music at home. No reggae (rebel music) for me at home or classical or jazz. My partner however had to "listen" to classical music all the time as his mom was very "cultured" and only listened to this genre of music. He learned to dislike it vehemently and developed an appreciation for jazz and blues. The jazz musician I dated disliked reggae with a passion.......however he respected why I liked reggae and that was that. I'd say Levon appreciated it the most as he shared the same rituals. I have to admit that when you do catch a fire that the music takes you to a higher level....hey, hey......Ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 11:08:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Twilight

I'd guess they just liked the rhythm … The Band were very late for jumping on a reggae bandwagon … Paul McCartney and Paul Simon had got there years earlier. Or maybe they were ahead of the game … The Police and Two-one was in the future.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 10:05:05 CEST 2015 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Twilight

Twilight: great singing by Rick, but I never got used to this reggae twist on the studio version. So very much NOT what I expected from our boys. They were bowing for the trend that reggae was supposed to become mainstream in those days.

I'm the judgin' kind... If I had my way...

Glad to have a few more powerful live versions.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 03:14:34 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa

Subject: marley

I have been to Jamaica at least a half dozen times. The whole place is the smell of flowers and music playing everywhere you go. I love the place. Ziggy and Stephen Marley have some real good music too. Ziggy kind of expanded while Stephen stayed closer to his dads sound.


Entered at Tue Oct 6 00:02:53 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In Britain the collectibility of reggae varies enormously with ludicrously high prices in London or Birmingham, but down on the South coast, it is cheap. I bought a £25 rated Jackie Edwards 45 for £1.50 just today. Reggae has added scarcity value because most discs are badly worn, so good copies are at a premium.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 22:58:12 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Only Dylan embraced reggae for one of his live recordings and a few others. Van had jazz in his soul.. I can see why Robbie was interested to check out Marley but reggae isn't about the guitar. For some monotonous rhythms. For others it's a groove that works well with the lyrics and it allows you to lock in with the hypnotic groove. I've seen Toots and really enjoy his music as well. However I don't have all his recordings like Marley's catalog because he's not as consistent with his writing. Seeing Bob Marley and The Wailers, Toots and Jimmy Cliff and Peter Tosh and Judy Mowat solo.....All amazing and inspiring shows. Marley however will always be the one that most people in the world will give thanks and praises to. He was the chosen one. He said himself that he didn't write any of hi songs. They all came from Jah.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 22:13:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Band, or at least Garth, had reggae connections. I don't think Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers To Cross" was reggae, but it was Jamaican, and the 90s Band featured it, as did Jim Weider solo. When we saw Garth in 1999 there was a Toots & The Maytals cover just entitled "Toots" on the setlist and I was told it was one of two favoured Toots & The Maytals covers.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 21:49:11 CEST 2015 from (106.208.202.112)

Posted by:

Surya Kumar

Location: India
Web: My link

Subject: Hello

In this article you will learn some security tips to make your website much more secure. You will also learn how to implement these tips in practice on your website.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 21:40:40 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Raury

I had taped a number of the new Colbert talk shows, mostly for the music guests and while watching over the weekend, one musical guest really stood out for me - a guy from David P's neck of the woods - Raury.

LINKED: Raury........there is a light on with this guy that few performers have.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 19:58:04 CEST 2015 from (67.58.202.3)

Posted by:

stan

Location: wingham ontario canada

Subject: concert date of 11/2/85

Hi All Great web site. The location of the Band Reunion Concert with the Revols on 11/02/85 was the Stratford Festival Theatre in Stratford Ontario Canada. I was at the show and it is something I will never forget. peace


Entered at Mon Oct 5 19:54:47 CEST 2015 from (99.231.104.169)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

In general Americans came late to reggae. Most of my left leaning University friends discovered reggae and are still huge fans because roots reggae is timeless. Part-time reggae fans only have Legends in their collection. If I was stranded on a desert island; Bob Marley and The Wailers all the way....spiritual and uplifting music with a hypnotic groove. "When the music hits you feel no pain." Bob was getting some criticism when he put out Exodus because he wrote love songs to Damien Marley 's Mom.....Two songs I think. Great songs because Marley was a writer and his voice for all oppressed people of the world was heard loud and clear. Younger reggae artists use dance hall mixed with roots reggae which can work quite well but none of them can write like Marley. Jimmy Cliff and Peter Tosh have their moments but still.....Marley is Marley.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 18:56:39 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Reggae

The popularity of reggae music in general has been in decline for many years. An exception here in the U.S. not so long ago was Matisyahu, who was also known for observing Hasidic Judaism, adding a bit of novelty to his style of reggae.

Back in the heyday of reggae, The Band added a bit of its rhythmic twist to the B-side single version of "Twilight."


Entered at Mon Oct 5 17:59:34 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.226)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, at Brooklyn Flea / Smorgasburg locations, we also have 6 dollar bare bones tacos and small bags of french fries with odd toppings going for 8 bucks.. but, we still alot of have great pizza places with $2.50 to 2.75 slices....i've done a lot of "research" this last 6 months, there's quite a few. Only a handful that get 5 stars, but a very respectful amount that get 4 stars. More than i thought possible at this stage... Last night we tried a joint i never been to before, but has been around for ages.. took three trains to get there , never left Brooklyn.... the pizza was near perfect, we got a whole pie... the only thing not perfect was that the crust was just not quite sturdy enough..i 'm not sure soggy is the right word, but the crust coulda benefited from more substance. but i was very happy with the pie. JT, it's easier to think of better pizza places that are new to me that i enjoy tremendously , than it is to think of new music that i enjoy tremendously.... and it's not for lack of looking


Entered at Mon Oct 5 17:32:07 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.226)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, unfortunately that quote about Brooklyn becoming a place for hipsters with money is true etc.... the unbridled frankensteinlike real estate growth has forced prices insanely high,,,, & eliminated many great popular businesses.... & odd cococtions have been successful.... There are some thriving businesses based on old Brooklyn stndbys,,, lobster rolls have become popular & numerous again..... Nathans used to hace to die for lobster rolls...... today there's are a disappointment...But i can't say i've tried new ones....i'm not in those areas all that often & also just can't get myself to pay the over the bounds of exhorbitant for small portions... these places have lobster rolls going for 17 bucks....

JT, i just woke up on nowhere near enough sleep & gotta shower & run..... so momentarily, off the top of my foggy head i can only think of one newer performer I've seen recently who has impressed me tremendously. I'm sure there are some others, maybe they'll come to me.... but i'm not sure anyone has had the full package or been properly developed yet,...... that's a big thing, and because of the expense of living & the fact that there's not really any industry supporting them, & not much way to create much income, newer artists don't get the chance to do that themselves, & also don't get developmental contributions & influences from working with other artists or friendly other artists...

I did see a young black chick, just outa high school, playing some mostly blues rock electric guitar in a subway station,but also some Buddy Guy style blues, & n indian guy in his late 30s, playing original acoustic music in the subway. The guy had a amazing voice. I've been in contact with both, just haven't really got the time to think about else that'll probably yield no income..... i got enough of my own stuff like that :-)


Entered at Mon Oct 5 16:40:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bob Marley has one comment today. Jimmy Cliff never had a single comment. I don't think feet are moving to the reggae beat over there, it's true. I didn't even suggest Bob Marley till recently as I expected him to be one of the first ten or twenty by someone who knew far more than me. I asked if anyone had ever suggested him, and on the answer being "no" I did. As I said, "Catch-A-Fire" is one of the greatest albums of all time. "Live!" (1975) is one of the greatest live albums ever.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 16:12:05 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Meanwhile, at Toppermost, the Comments Count has Serge Gainsbourg at 5 and Bob Marley at zero ! Likely not a victory for the trench coat weirdos but rather just a reflection of Bob's massive stature.......World wide, Marley is right there with the Beatles and - really - could anyone work themselves up to argue a Beatles top 10 ? I think only leaving the live NWNC off would have generated comment.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 15:17:28 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

This was the video which exposed me to Joseph Arthur. Fistful Of Mercy with Joseph Arthur, Ben Harper and Dhani Harrison.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 14:56:29 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Oops! While listening to Joesph Arthur's cover of Louuu's songs.....I Used To Know How To Walk On Water....with Garth Hudson playing piano got bumped. Here it is.......best song off his Ballad Of Boogie Christ.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 14:51:35 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I'm exposed to newer artists or artists who have always been around but I've missed........by being open to all genres of music including rap. Tupac Shakur's music I could dig because his music is also melodic and although some topics don't resonate with me he also has songs with social commentary as for example he's trying to encourage single moms to keep their heads up....I'm not a single mom but there are times people are trying to undermine me so his message resonates.....keep your head up......or he'll use Phil Colin's music ......He's a street poet and the world has missed out by his early death. Btw at one point he was dating one of Quincy Jones' daughters and was in a movie with Janet Jackson.

I also check out what young people are listening to. In the past some have given me tapes of music from their own cultures such as Papa Wemba....Congolese.....or music from Trinidad or Vietnam.

I also am a huge fan of Music Award shows as upcoming artists are usually featured or artists I've missed. One example is gospel singer Yolanda Adams and Adele before anyone knew of her. I was exposed to The Weeknd while performing with Ariana Grande. He's dating David Foster's stepdaughter.....In one interview David says he's the real deal and a good Canadian kid. Ok David!

The other way I discover artists is by finding out who the artists I love are listening to. Robbie was listening to Robert Randolph's music......I downloaded two songs I really liked of his.

I discovered Joseph Arthur who is from Ohio and moved to Brooklyn......by making one recording with Ben Harper.....and Dhani Harrison (George's son). Also it was Peter Gabriel who introduced Joe to Louuuuu. They bcame friends......Joseph Arthur put out a recording of covers of Louuu's songs as a tribute to his friend.

If you missed it the first time here it is again.....Joseph Arthur with Garth Hudson on piano.

Peter.....I'm Marley's biggest fan. I can honestly say that none of his recordings are fillers. Of course I have favourite songs from all of his recordings. His music came from somewhere higher than himself. There will probably never be anyone like him. I've never looked at Catch A Fire as my favourite of all of his recordings however......Maybe because I only discovered him in 1975 as I'm younger......I first discovered Bob Marley and The Wailers......great book btw as The Wailers had their own story to tell about their time with Bob......Yikes!.......Anyway, I was watching Much Music.....and then BMW....Bob's car at one time.......and they're performing Trenchtown Rock live.........His fire burned me to a crisp........I became a fan for life. So when Kaya and then Rastaman Vibration came out close together while I was working part-time at a record store while in University.....and then......Exodus, Kaya, Survival.....wow.....A lot of people had Catch A Fire in their collection because of the album cover.....lol.....but yeah.......that recording caught fire with many of us. Also what was evident here was Peter Tosh's contributions which as we all know was in some ways more of a rebel than Marley himself. It's just too bad for us fans that Bunny Wailer didn't like touring and Marley wouldn't or couldn't let Peter's music be as prevalent as his own so Peter split.

On the other hand when Jr. Marvin joined the group along with American guitarist Al Anderson....music was still roots reggae but I think their guitar playing made the music even more accessible for the general public.

Btw I've always admired your ability to write and share your thoughts with all of us. It takes up a lot of time and effort. Many thanks Peter. :-D


Entered at Mon Oct 5 12:26:07 CEST 2015 from (185.31.6.134)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Newer performers

Jeff: I know you have enjoyed some of the local talent in your area and have lauded a few at this site. I'm always interested in hearing about what new young acts (like Rose or Amy) people enjoy. Can you tell me which newer performers (last few years) have done it for you like The National has for me? Thanks in advance.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 11:31:48 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, one for you from "Sunday Times Travel" yesterday on NYC.

"Brooklyn is for hipsters with money, the sort of place where a Jewish / Caribbean fusion restaurant featuring jerk gefilte fish, preferably next to a scrapyard miles from the nearest subway, is guaranteed to do great business."


Entered at Mon Oct 5 10:09:24 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.29)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

JT, Misty & The National get airplay here in NYC. WFUV was playing em all along, but i understand FUV just had some kind of changeup. So they may be getting less there.There are other stations too. But neither of those acts do it for me.... The National are Brooklyn based, one of them has a studio in Ditmas Park, a few miles from me. Mumford & Sons moved here, & earlier this summer released a song titled Ditmas. Supposedly inspired by Ditmas Park. In one interview they said it was about the freedom & spirit of Brooklyn. You know what i say. Take away their visas for being morons & throw em the fuck out. Of Brooklyn anyway..


Entered at Mon Oct 5 08:10:54 CEST 2015 from (185.31.6.134)

Posted by:

JT

Web: My link

Subject: Music

Jeff: I run into a few people like that at times. Kids 25-40 (those are kids to me). I think there is still music being made now that rivals the 'classics' you and I are talking about. What's different is that this kind of music does not get heard as much. That kind of music is swamped by the 'popular sound'. Its not 'radio'friendly' and unless you know where to go and where to listen on the internet, well... Father John Misty is a good example for me as is The National to name 2. There are others. I follow "NO DEPRESSION" and "American Songwriter" and a few others on line to see what's new.


Entered at Mon Oct 5 08:01:02 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.29)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I just got home from a bar, where i got into a conversation with a gorgeous 29 year old woman. A professional, but not the business kind, the research and academia kind...... We were discussing her life, then she asked about mine, and we were in a musical establishment. When i asked her about The band, she lit up. Her father would be close to 80, and he raised her on great music. SO here's a 29 year old with a deep connection to The Band. when Levon died she listened to nothing but the Band, and cried for about a week... A 29 year old gal, educated, not a stoner or nutjob, who wishes she was born back in those days, because of her great love for the music, and because nothing on that level gets created any more. she said it.. I even said it could, and there is some that doesn't get heard, and alot more that could be made. she disagreed.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 23:27:11 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for Bob Marley suggestions. Toppermost seems a reggae-free zone … no comments (yet) on either Bob Marley or Jimmy Cliff, both of which I find astonishing. The way I do those things, I had a long playlist. Buffalo Soldier and Natural Mystic were both contenders, but Mr Brown, a surprise choice, wormed its way into my ear and grabbed the last slot late on in the process. Of course they're all worthy.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 21:40:03 CEST 2015 from (70.193.138.170)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cass County

The new Don Henley album, featuring a great supporting cast of guest stars, is a breath of fresh country air. He co-produced the album with Stan Lynch, who also collaborated in the songwriting. Mr. Lynch is the former drummer with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers and has worked with Mr. Henley for many years. He also worked with The Band in 1997 on All The King's Men, producing & playing drums on Deuce And A Quarter, which also featured Keith Richards. Mr. Lynch also produced The Mavericks on their contribution to that tribute album to Elvis' original band.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 19:21:00 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Funny, yes Mike.....seemed just blank pages but scrawling up got to a chapter on Ronnie Hawkins discussing Bob Dylan and The Band.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 19:03:34 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

I guess you had more success with Wallsend's link than I did, Kevin.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 18:54:56 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Wallsend's link

I thought the Ronnie Hawkins comments on his urging of Rick Danko to invest in real estate - especially Big Pink - back at the time when the boys were flush with cash and Big Pink was on offer at just $25,000 was most interesting. Amazing how things turned out in that the story out there is that Ronnie was left behind by The Band....which is true.....but that one decision he made to plough some money into property in Peterborough paid off as the farm he has lived on for 40 years was on the market last year for $8 million.......If only that 800acre tip he gave Rick on land in Ontario had been followed up on, as well as Big Pink.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 18:23:21 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Wallsend

Interesting stuff? Like what?


Entered at Sun Oct 4 13:07:14 CEST 2015 from (219.97.119.100)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Tour 76

Adam, I see your logic but it doesn't match any of the information we have about the tour. I don't have all the details - would love to fill in some gaps - but this would be my summary:

Tour begins June 26th at Stanford Univ, following rehearsals at Studio Instrument Rentals on Santa Monica Blvd. It loops down through the south and up to NY, and as Pat B said, about 12 shows that we know of.

Then there's a break of a month between the Asbury Park show on July 20th, and Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium on August 20th, by which time they have a horn section in tow. So Howard Johnson was presumably approached during the east coast stops in July.

From here on, as far as I can tell, there are horns on every show with the exception of Music Inn in Lenox MA on August 29th. This could mean that show is an incorrectly labeled bootleg, actually from the earlier leg of the tour, but I have another view. They had played there on July 18th but apparently their equipment was delayed arriving from the previous gig in Washington DC, so they played a very late show and agreed to a makeup date in August to appease the promoters. Seeing as this was a freebie, and the previous show hadn't included horns, The Band probably didn't see the point in using them for this show.

Richard's boating accident, which we learned about in the Hoskyns book, was later mentioned in Cathy Smith's notorious autobio. The accident seems to have just been a rough trip, at speed, on the way to the Austin show on the 5th, which aggravated a previous injury from a car crash. Cathy was traveling with Richard, and he went ahead and played the show although he must have been in some discomfort. The ten shows cancelled were immediately after this one, with the next date being the 17th at the Spectrum. I have a single-source reference to a gig on the 12th at the Univ. of Sthn Miss., which is rather inconvenient! I suspect someone got this from a poster or ad that ran for the gig before it was cancelled.

After this we have the Spectrum, two nights at the Palladium, Syria Mosque, and I have a listing for the Univ. of Virginia, Sept 24th.

Back to Shangri Las to work on Islands, perform on SNL, and rehearse for TLW. As patchy as my knowledge is, I've never seen any evidence of shows, or cancelled shows, beyond the end of September, so I don't think the tour was ever supposed to extend through to Thanksgiving.


Entered at Sun Oct 4 08:21:49 CEST 2015 from (58.104.9.221)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Some quite interesting stuff about The Band in the book: Bob Dylan, Intimate Insights from Friends and Fellow Musicians.


Entered at Sat Oct 3 21:44:29 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Not to add fuel to the fire, but I've been thinking of a "Last Waltz tour". There weren't any dates directly before the Winterland one, ie they weren't in Akron Ohio days before on a typical gig. There was the Sep. 18 Palladium horns show, the Oct. 30 SNL, and then TLW during Thanksgiving 1976. When Richard had the boat accident, could they have gone ahead and done a few immediate dates, and the "10 canceled" were between the Palladium and LW shows?


Entered at Sat Oct 3 12:09:44 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Marley / Peter V


Entered at Sat Oct 3 12:05:01 CEST 2015 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Marley / Peter V

Peter V- Natural Mystic


Entered at Sat Oct 3 02:42:50 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: d & b

If you're a Delaney & Bonnie fan this link is essential


Entered at Sat Oct 3 00:32:08 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Marley

Just like to aver that Viney's Toppermost on Marley is spot on. Like to work 'Buffalo Soldier' in there somewhere but what odds eh?


Entered at Fri Oct 2 23:33:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: to aver

It was the Guardian, of course. Being The Guardian they note that the journalist's flight to Texas to interview Mr Henley was "paid for by Virgin EMI." It's usually true, but they admit it. Or even aver it. I can't say I've seen it in print in years.


Entered at Fri Oct 2 23:21:53 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.19)

Posted by:

Bill M

Mike N: My understanding is that Henley did not just aver, he fuckin' averred.


Entered at Fri Oct 2 22:05:48 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: High-falutin woids

"I believe some things should go to our graves," he avers. "Avers." Now there's a word one doesn't hear too often, either then or now. I believe it used to be a verb favored by some Time magazine editors in the U.S. More likely to be found in British publications, I would assume.


Entered at Fri Oct 2 19:44:34 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Marley & The Wailers

Bob Marley & The Wailers is my latest Toppermost article. Do comment over there. It was one I did with trepidation … I assumed some one would have volunteered to do it ages ago, but no one ever did. Catch-A-Fire remains up there as one of my Top Ten albums ever.


Entered at Fri Oct 2 19:09:45 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Accents

I love to watch the British comedy the PBS runs. It always amuses me to hear the people doing a American accent. They use a very broad "very howdy howdy: accent"


Entered at Fri Oct 2 13:59:02 CEST 2015 from (86.25.174.112)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Knockin' On Heaven's Door

Sam would have the best chance of getting past the pearly gates if he showed St Pete 'Guns in the Afternoon' (AKA Ride The High Country)


Entered at Fri Oct 2 13:11:09 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Autobiographies

From today's Guardian, article and interview on Don Henley.

"Just don't expect his autobiography, when it's written, to exhibit all the skeletons in his closet. "I believe some things should go to our graves," he avers. "And some things are nobody's fuckin' business. "

There's a lesson there!


Entered at Fri Oct 2 09:16:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Major Dundee continued: When will they ever learn?

We were talking about the film in the light of the latest mass school shooting. It sounds horribly pious, but the film, like its star Charlton Heston, has no moral compass. I don’t believe we’ll be lining up to see St. Peter at the pearly gates while he peruses a ledger, but if that happens, I believe Mr Peckinpah (and Mr Heston for his later activities) would be directed immediately to the “down” elevator on the basis of making this stuff. That’s because this sort of film, in a genre popular for many years, has built upon the gun situation and exacerbated it.

The Apaches in the film commit a major atrocity (let’s not go into the very small numbers of pioneers that Native Americans actually killed in such all out assaults on forts, towns or wagon trains). They are tracked down. They’re lured into attacking the Americans in a hollow thinking they’re asleep. Yes, the Apaches are intent on slaughter. Then the soldiers stand up behind rocks around the rim with repeating rifles and for a straight 90 seconds stand in a circle and simply gun them down with rapid repeating rifles like shooting fish in a barrel.. The Apaches mill around in the hollow, just getting shot. Add to it large numbers of French troops slaughtered, mainly on the basis of them having fancy uniforms with red trousers and brass helmets which one might think unsuitable for the Mexican sun. There are other very disturbing elements. It was filmed in Mexico. I cannot be persuaded that several (if not many) horses must have been killed in the making … the usual reason then for filming In Mexico.

Positives: maybe the film inspired the song title “Romance in Durango.”

Daft bits: I cannot believe that horse soldiers travelling in column through empty desert would have several guys riding for hours with one hand on the reins while the other holds a flag on a pole up in the air.


Entered at Fri Oct 2 02:06:04 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Accents.....

......and I once heard Liam Gallagher do a perfect Prince Charles......though I confess to being out of my mind at the time.

Dunc.....You touched many special The Band spots on your Toronto visit.....well done! I know there are many better concert venues....better this, better that, but I truly love Massey Hall and it is almost perfect for me.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 23:59:22 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cass County

Exploring Cass County …

As well as covering Brand New Tennessee Waltz on the album, Don Henley’s “The Cost of Living” sounds more like Jesse Winchester than Jesse Winchester. Brilliant.

The single Take A Picture Of This sounds pure Don Henley though.

That Old Flame has a great “internet lyric” as well as an almost Robbie Robertson first solo album rhythm (when with U2) .

When I Stop Dreaming is a duet with Dolly Parton. Say no more.

She Sings Hymns Out of Tune even rivals the Dillards version.

Bramble Rose- totally C&W but great use of three voices in contrast (including Sir M. Jagger)


Entered at Thu Oct 1 23:52:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually, I saw Madonna do near perfect British at length on a chat show … deliberately.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 23:36:20 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Ebony and Ivory

Best white American accent done by a black American - Richard Prior, spot-on deadly!


Entered at Thu Oct 1 23:21:58 CEST 2015 from (86.171.225.26)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks Jersey Girl

I made two trips to Toronto, Jersey Girl. On the first trip, I visited several schools in Toronto,including a short talk for teachers at a breakfast meeting, and on the second trip I had a ten day holiday. Really enjoyed your city. I've been twice to Massey Hall, saw Alison Krause and Solomon Burke, and saw CSNY at the ice hockey place, and Spamelot at the theatre.

On the second trip, my good lady allowed me two Band days - one was to Stratford and another was around the Band sites - the Hard Rock Cafe, Bathurst and Bloor, Cabbage Town, Parliament Street.

In Stratford, I met somebody who knew the Manuel family was careful not to probe and visited his 'I Shall Be Released' bench and star.

Still think The Band is great and Richard's voice is one of the great voices of popular music.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 23:11:54 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Two worst real life music fake accents – rock n roll hall of fame member ( yes, it’s true ) Madonna and Joe Strummer. Two authentic beauties for all time singing and talking in their own voices……..Ray Davies and Levon Helm……favourite all time no fake accent: Sompin’ Tom Connors


Entered at Thu Oct 1 22:15:25 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Then there's Sean Connery's portrayal of a Russian submarine commander in "The Hunt for Red October" with no attempt to alter his Scottish brogue.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 22:05:09 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Brits doing American...Alfred Enoch - How To Get Away With Murder


Entered at Thu Oct 1 21:40:05 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brits doing American … Damian Lewis os particularly good. So is Mark Rylance, but then he lived in the USA in his high school years.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 21:38:31 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Americans doing British English well

There's a long list nowadays. Modern actors seem way more accomplished than in the bad old days when Dick Van Dyke had British audiences crying with laughter at the worst British accent ever in Mary Poppins, or maybe it's the presence of specialist dialogue coaches. Meryl Streep, Gwyneth Paltrow, Patricia Clarkson, Anne Hathaway, Kevin Spacey, John Lithgow, Peter Dinklage add immediately to Robert Downey Jnr. When Peter Dinklage gave his award acceptance speech, British newspaper reporters were stunned to hear his natural American accent.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 21:21:42 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Accents

It seems quite rare that an American is called on to play a Brit. But not so the other way around. PV - Why do you think that is? Consider: Christian Bale, Hugh Laurie, Tom Hardy, the gent from The Nick, etc. Aussies too. I'm thinking the only Yank acting British credibly is Robert Downey.

Worst accent performance - John Wayne as Ghengis Khan.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 21:20:41 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lisa....No one at CMW brought up the FFFF. I had only heard about it once I starting posting here. When I met people who read Levon's book; all sided with Levon.

Hey Dunc...I'm embarrassed to say that I still haven't visited Richard Manuel's resting place and yet you came all the way from Scotland. Northern Girl and I are hoping to catch some theatre and visit but still not happening yet.

My current playlist on my Nano.....yeah I should have bought an iPod but at the time......blah, blah, blah.

Murray McLauchlan...Down By The Henry Moore
Al Green...(Sha-La-La) Make Me Happy
Ariana Grande...Love Me Harder with our very own The Weeknd (correct spelling btw)
The Heart Wants What It Wants...Selena Gomez
Damien...Soldier
Staple Singers...Let's Do It Again
Foster The People...Pumped Up Kicks
Dubmatique...Dubmatique a Montréal Ragga DUB
General Public...Tenderness
Gregory Abbott...Shake You Down (one hit wonder)
Marc Anthony...Tragedy
Mazzy Star...Fade Into You
Melanie Martinez...Too Close
Scott McKennzie...San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair)
Steel Pulse...Your House
U2...Stuck In A Moment You Can't Get Out Of
The Waterboys...Girl Of The North Country
Pitbull (Cuban American) featuring Marc Anthony...Rain Over Me (heard it also in Habana while in cab...I said, "Turn it up!")
Darius Drucker...Wagon Wheel
Charlie Puth featurning Wiz Khalifa...See You Again
Bob Marley and The Wailers...Could You Be Loved
Bob Marley and The Wailers...Waiting In Vain
Bruce Springsteen...Independence Day
Crowded House...Fall At Your Feet
Buddy and Julie Miller...Keep Your Distance

Looking forward to another night of dance companies....last night and again tonight Arcade Fire's violinist Sarah Neufeld will be performing with Toronto's Peggy Baker......Robbie would have enjoyed......Inter-Hoop......Musicians Charging Horse Singers......"Hoop dance is originally a solo healing dance. Through their transformation, hoop dancers tell stories, acknowledging the natural world of animals, plants and elements. Inter-Hoop uplifts our spirits."..................Other dance companies were from Brazil, India, NYC and various Toronto Dance Companies.
Later in the week an Andy Warhol exhibit. I did see one in Vancouver so we'll see how this one companies.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 21:11:10 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Kids and old black and white movies

Lisa - I'm with you. And I believe our TV is turned to TCM more than any other. With your kids maybe try time travel as a reason to watch old, 30-40's movies. Even the duds can be interesting that way: the cars, lingo, clothes, great art-deco and NYC apartments, etc. Perhaps it's too fussy and pretentious, but I actually find many in-color films of the late 60's and 70's harder to enjoy because of color.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 20:37:53 CEST 2015 from (86.171.225.26)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Kevin

I think 'Hold Back The Dawn' is great. Interesting post. Will listen to it again at the weekend. Thanks.

Last five albums played:

'Desperado' The Eagles. Thought about Steve.

'Run That By Me One More Time' Willie Nelson and Ray Price. Bouought that years ago after a discussion on ththis website.

'Anyway' Family - great band.

'Unhalfbricking' Fairport Convention.

'Mercy' Don Covay. Peter's Toppermost got me into this. Great stuff.

Just too much music.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 20:26:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, we've had to stop going to the British Film Institute shop in London, because you can go mad buying DVDs. The one I keep looking for is "I'll Never Forget Whatsisname" directed by Michael Winner, which has not yet been on DVD. O, Lucky Man was really hard to get for years, but I see it's now on DVD.

Britannia Hospital (1982) was the third in the "Mick Travis" trilogy. At the time i thought it pretty dire, though I love If .... and O. Lucky Man. I saw it again a few years later and it still seemed poor.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 20:14:18 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Peter

Lucky you! I have to rely on TCM, where they pop up from time to time. To say nothing of all the talented actors from that time - Tom Courtenay, Albert Finney, Alan Bates, Richard Harris, Dirk Bogarde, etc. I guess I have to include Laurence Harvey too, though I personally could never stand the guy.

I'd love to see "Whistle Down The Wind" again - must be thirty years sinc I've seen it, but some of the scenes are still vivid in my memory.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 20:13:15 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Lisa: Yes, Richard Harris was quite good in "This Sporting Life." It was directed by Lindsay Anderson, who later directed Macolm McDowell in "if..." and "O Lucky Man," two strangely entertaining films. The latter also featured Sir Ralph Richardson, Dame Helen Mirren and Alan Price, the former keyboardist for the Animals who also did the soundtrack.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 19:54:24 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lisa, yes, a lot of those B&W British classics came out on free cover DVDs with the Daily Telegraph a few years ago in association with he BFI (British Film Institute). We have a whole box of them … Brighton Rock, Whistle Down The Wind are there too. The Daily Mail, The Sunday Times. The Observer … they all competed with free films on cover mount DVDs and for a couple of years that's how I chose the daily paper.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 19:41:14 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: "The Germans wore gray. You wore blue."

"Ted Turner will present a colorized version of "Casablanca" on cable television. And that will be one of the saddest days in the history of the movies. It is sad because it demonstrates that there is no movie that Turner will spare, no classic however great that is safe from the vulgarity of his computerized graffiti gangs." - Roger Ebert, 1988


Entered at Thu Oct 1 19:19:49 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Richard Harris

Does anybody remember a very early film of his, "This Sporting Life"? About an angry rugby player ... I always loved those intense black-and-white British movies from the 60s - "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner", "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning", "Room at the Top", etc. So evocative ... my kids won't watch black-and-white movies. My claims that that they are nuanced and atmospheric in a way that color movies aren't fall on deaf ears. They also find them too slow and the dialogue too stilted. I love them, though.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 18:40:26 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Accents …

Incidentally, as I said years ago on Jonas Fjeld's accent on One More Shot - on the frontier "foreign" accents were about as numerous as "American accents." So a cowboy with a Norwegian accent (or Richard Harris with a British accent) are perfectly likely. In fact, a book on the Battle of Little Big Horn, said the majority of the 7th Cavalry were either German or Irish, so the battlefield probably resounded with "Achtung!" and "Begorrah!" rather than "Oh, f*ck. Custer's mad!'


Entered at Thu Oct 1 18:33:58 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry about the typo - Robert Harris is of course the best-selling author. Also sorry, Richard Harris was probably only poor in that particular film. I had remembered him as good otherwise. Maybe he was stuck with a British accent which stood out as odd in the context … I wonder if he tried Southern and failed. One of the ironies of life is that to the world outside the USA a Southern accent is defined by Vivian Leigh. Who was putting it on.

I didn't know the Chet Atkins "mash-up" nor the Charles Ives one (I'm using retrospective vocabulary again). There's something about the hearty cavalry singing though.

Elvis and Mickey Newbury … this may be one of those many examples where the first one you heard and loved overrides others … and Elvis was the first I heard. We had a similar Left Banke v Four Tops discussion on "Walk Away Renee." All the British people I know met the song through the Four Tops so tend to diss the Left Banke original as feeble … but it was the earlier hit in the USA and Americans have told me they find Levi Stubbs too raucous. It is so often the first one you hear.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 18:25:46 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Richard Harris & fils

I agree with the negative sentiment about RH; it's likely unfair but I thought of him as a Peter O' Toole wannabe. But I think his son Jared is top notch in many varied roles: He was the ship's captain in Benjamin Button, Gen Grant in Lincoln and Moriarity in R Downey's Sherlock Holmes -


Entered at Thu Oct 1 18:02:52 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Some actors, no matter how awful the script or incompetent the director always rise above it all and turn in great performances. Gene Hackman, Donald Sutherland, Christopher Walken come to mind…..as all three loved to work and always seemed to sparkle even in the many dreadful films they were in….all three have of course also been in their share of great films…….Richard Harris was awful in some parts but I wouldn’t go as far as saying he is an awful actor….far from it….Great musicians have been known to have bum performances, doesn’t make them awful musicians.

brown eyed girl…..thank you for retelling that story as I don’t remember seeing it before. Only Norm remembers everything ever written here……time to download “Storyville” as I don’t have it in that form. I love music that was released before 1995 as 8 or 10 songs is perfect….so fed up with downloading a release that has 18 songs on it ! Takes up too much space and using Shuffle modes means having to constantly skip forward past crap songs.

Stackridge…no fans here, I take it.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 17:49:57 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: R. Harris . . .

. . . now _there's_ a one-hit wonder!

But he'll always be Cromwell to me . . . .


Entered at Thu Oct 1 17:04:05 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Yankee Doodle Dixie

I don't think the Peckinpah film inspired Mickey Newbury's "America Trilogy." More than likely Chet Atkins' masterful arrangement combining "Yankee Doodle" and "Dixie" may have played a part. It was included on the "Chet Atkins at Home" LP released in 1957. Earlier the American composer Charles Ives wove Massa's in the Cold Ground, Old Black Joe, Marching Through Georgia and The Battle Cry of Freedom together in his orchestral work "Three Places in New England."

As great as Elvis' performance of "American Trilogy" was as a show-stopper in concert, I still regard Mr. Newbury's original version as definitive in its emotional texture. It even charted higher than Elvis'.

BTW that was Richard Harris in "Major Dundee." But who can forget his performance as gunfighter English Bob in Clint Eastwood's classic "Unforgiven."


Entered at Thu Oct 1 16:40:46 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Kevin J. Retold story.....Years ago when I met one of Robbie's high school's classmates from R H King Academy which we visited while she was visiting in Toronto.....coincidentally they both dropped out of school in grade 10......She asked me which song meant the most to her as she was about to have surgery. I thought.....You gotta be kidding. How am I going to know which one of many songs? Anyway, she must have told me that it was from Storyville. I looked at all the songs and guessed because of the lyrics that especially at that particular time it would be "Hold Back The Dawn".......Yup! HBTD was the song she needed to hear to help her get through the anxiousness before surgery. Power and healing of songs!

Lisa...When I have more time I will listen again to the tape of Robbie's talk at CMW. I'm such a frugalista that I didn't buy the CD at the time as it was double the cassette. Now I wish.........Oh well. Good news is that I still have a player for cassettes and CDS.

Btw last night was my second of three nights at the Sony Centre to check out many dance companies. My favourite as usual was the Alvin Ailey Dance Company......Atlanta Ballet also impressed me...Minus 16. ".....it makes a statement about being human and dancing: that in the face of violence and suffering, not only do we choose to dance, but we must." One of the dance companies was also Ballet BC from Vancouver...Twenty Eight Thousand Waves. All shows each night only 10.00!!!!

Linked.....Mike McGuire's cover of "Twilight".

Let's Go Blue Jays!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Thu Oct 1 15:57:29 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Major Dundee

Watched the Sam Peckinpah 1964 film last night … they redid the soundtrack mix to 5.1 (and very well too) which is why I picked up the DVD. The story takes place in Texas and Mexico. Charlton Heston is a Union officer in charge of Confederate POWs at a desert fort, and recruits 20 of them to fight the Apaches with Robert Harris as the CSA lieutenant with a straight British English accent (unexplained). It was an early "dirty clothes" Western and also the base theme leads to the Dirty Dozen and a dozen other "recruited prisoners and criminals" capers.

What interested me was the scene where the cavalry are trekking through Texas and the Confederates start singing Dixie and the Unionists try to drown them out with John Brown's Body. Did this inspire Mickey Newbury's American Trilogy as perfected by Elvis?

Also on our TLW Tour naming discussion, Charlton Heston in 1864 calls it "The War of The Rebellion."

It's a good film, but I hadn't realised how much Charlton Heston struck set poses cap askew, chin jutting out trying to look "rugged" (and thinking "Aren't I handsome?) nor what an awful actor Robert Harris was … I'd remembered him as good.

Also the f***g spellchecker on this believes that Charlton Heston should be called Charlton Preston.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 10:09:54 CEST 2015 from (125.237.221.162)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: TLW

Did Robbie actually leave The Band? All that I have read indicated that he just wanted to stop touring (probably for good reasons). I think he said as much in TLW. His intention as I understood in was that they would still record together. Rick and Levon maybe enjoyed life on the road more. Rick is quoted somewhere as saying (to paraphrase) "to only sing 1 or two songs a year and not tour wasn't enough for me". So maybe there was animosity that prevented them getting together for more albums and maybe they did lose interest after not being forced together in a touring situation. But maybe a new Band album in 79 would have got a fair bit of attention.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 04:15:16 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Nick Deriso

That's beautiful, and so true.


Entered at Thu Oct 1 03:47:24 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Storyville & Rick Danko

Nick Deriso takes a look back to Storyville in a recent Something Else article......His observations on Rick Danko's contributions are perfect.....

"“Hold Back the Dawn,” a darkly intriguing song from 1991’s Storyville, makes great use of Bill Dillon’s spacious asides, and an intriguing percussion from Alex Acuna. But, up until Danko arrives, it’s mostly atmospherics — damp and mysterious, to be sure, but really just twilit shadows without a complete form.

Rick Danko gives shape to the yearning at this song’s center. When he trails in behind Robbie Robertson, echoing the title, it’s with a trembling sense of expectation. You sense, finally, the fear (of loss, of leaving, of abandonment) that girds every passion. Robertson offers the chorus with a rangy whisper, but Danko gives it every part of his heart.

He completes the picture, and something magical happens. Robertson’s next thoughts, on a river theme, gain new power. “Hold Back the Dawn” has become something else, a tucked-away gem that speaks — in the shared vocal, and the shared experiences, of these two former collaborators — directly to that larger sense of suspended animation that surrounds a lover’s longing. Everything stops, except for the tangle of emotion.

It also speaks to that feeling when old friends meet again. There’s a tangle there, too. Joy, in having them together once more. But also, something sadder. As Rick Danko and Robbie Robertson improvise through the ending of “Hold Back the Dawn,” their vocals pushing and pulling one another, they give us a glimpse both of what once was and also what might have been if the fates hadn’t sent the Band scattering in different directions."


Entered at Thu Oct 1 02:32:42 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Here's a really great aud recording of a Lenox Inn, Massachusetts 1976 gig, "Ring Your Bell". Super focused...


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