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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, November 2013


Entered at Sat Nov 30 22:52:37 CET 2013 from (67.84.78.173)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

No, Hempstead is not NYC, it is Long island. No New Yorker would ever refer to it as NYC...but, in light of the viewpoint Adam was taking as to what RR may have meant, sure, that makes sense. Same deal- I spent about 6 months working outside chicago, in the burbs, back in 05. I was staying out north west i guess, in the Hoffman Estates / Schaumburg area, and working down in Woodridge, Downer's Grove. I might have said i was in chicago to some, just cause it was easier sometimes. But it sure as hell wasn't Chicago anymore than hempstead is NYC. chicagoans seem to deal with it by calling the burbs Chicagoland. ...of course, i haven't looked at where ultrasonic studios was at that time, but if it was in hempstead then, it makes sense. another of the world's great mysteries may be solved.


Entered at Sat Nov 30 22:16:19 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

Todd - thanks for the comment. I'm sure someone other than me would know more about Hempstead NY vs. NYC, and if it could be considered that. BUT, Robbie says Dec. 26 was the first rehearsal, and Dec. 27 was the second rehearsal (but the first held at the actual Academy).

So Dec. 26 was the first rehearsal at an unknown location. Has to be Ultrasonic.


Entered at Sat Nov 30 16:46:26 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific North West
Web: My link

Subject: Joe Sun - Long Black Veil

The Joe Sun.........long black veil.


Entered at Sat Nov 30 16:26:26 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Old Lamp Lighter - Long Black Veil (revisited) 'n' stuff!

You guys is all gettin' old and senile. We been thru' this lots! before.

First of all, "The town hall light" there used to be lamp lighters, who went thru the towns with their jug of oil and lamp lighter on a long pole keepin' the street lights lit. The song was written and published in 1946.

Gawd damn David Powell just wants to keep layin down the law! There is "poetic licence" This big debate happened years ago, (I believe started by our departed friend Steve.) over the accuracy of dates and events Robbie used in writing Acadian Driftwood. The song is written some what in story book fashion.

I remember writing down here, almost word for word, Danny Dill's account of his process of writing the lyric for "Long Black Veil".

1. He took the story of the lady, who for years came to the grave site of Rudolph Valentino in a black limousine, she always wore a long black veil, and put flowers on his grave. No one ever knew who she was.

2. The "walkin these hills" came from a song Red Foley did called "God Walks These Hills With Me".

3. As I have said, Dill came to the "Town Hall Light" part when he had read this story about a preacher who, in Trenton, New Jersey, had been gunned down. There was (in Dill's words) no less than 30 witnesses to the event. No one ever said a word as to what he may have done, or who shot him. It was never found out.

The last and most important part what this guy did, came to him one night as he was going to sleep. "He was in the arms of his best friend's wife." BETRAYAAL!

In conclusion, on my tape Dill's comment is just as some of you have speculated. He says, "But I always wondered if......somehow........some where this may have happened!

Joe Sun then starts to sing the song. His version is very different. He recites quite a lot of the song, like telling a story.

Driving down the island, listening to my favourite FM station, "The Lounge", I heard a version of a song, I've never heard before. Boyz 2 Men singing Money!

The best things in life are free....probably the best I've heard. I was impressed.

Now driving down that road thru' the lonesome valley, I wrote my own personalized lyric to a song.......

When I get off of this tug boat, you know where I want to go,

Straight down that island highway to that little girl I love so.

To the old Spanish house on Grief Point, little Susie girl I always knew,

She told me just to come on home, and she'll show me what she can do,

Up on my shoulders, she rubs me, when she's done she hugs me,

She aays how much she loves me, a sailors dream if I ever did see one............


Entered at Sat Nov 30 15:53:57 CET 2013 from (184.66.152.240)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: My first Dylan concert

Sometimes you get the urge to write. PSB did it for me this time. Please read his recollection of his first Dylan concert on his blog. I came out of Massey Hall a changed person. I had never been to a music concert before Dylan Nov. 15, 1965. I had been listening to music since 'Shrimpboats Are Coming" in the 50s on the radio. I had seen American Bandstand and The Dick Clark Show and Ed Sullivan. We got our first TV (a Philco) in 1956. I had seen Levon and the Hawks live in rehearsal at the Concord on multiple occasions (I have written about this supernatural experience before) and had witnessed other acts in the same venue. I was in no way prepared for what Bob Dylan would do to me. There are no words to describe how, having listened to someone on record, hearing them and seeing their embodiment live, affects you. When those holy words come out of that mouth with guitar and mouth harp together it is an elevating experience. Suddenly, what is on an LP becomes alive. It lives and breathes! It has a human form that exists in the conscious mind forever. And then you build on that form at every subsequent concert you see. Like the best things in life, this undefinable form is what makes life worth living. It is the creative force that is the performer on the stage. And Bob Dylan is the master at this, over and over, again. All you have to do is read the reviews and you'll know that it hasn't stopped, missteps and all. And when it is at its peak, the Dylan experience in the concert hall is the epitome.


Entered at Sat Nov 30 07:38:17 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.143)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The man who wrote the lyrics to " brother can you spare a dime"

article about yip harburg


Entered at Sat Nov 30 06:30:50 CET 2013 from (108.200.222.215)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Ultrasonic Studios Rehearsal

Adam, I was wondering about the very same thing as I read the notes in The Academy of Music set. Finally got it recently for my birthday and have been enjoying it very much.

I was trying to figure out where the Ultrasonic Studios rehearsals fit into the picture, as I would think of Hempstead, NY as Long Island rather than NYC.


Entered at Sat Nov 30 02:31:46 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Ultrasonic Studios date

Happily diving back into the Academy 1971 box this Thanksgiving weekend. I really enjoy Robbie's essay, but was wondering where the "Ultrasonic Studios" rehearsal material fit into the story.

It looks like Robbie does mention that session. He says they drove into NYC the day after Christmas, and rehearsed for two days. So Dec. 25 is Xmas, then rehearsals in NYC Dec. 26 and 27. Then Robbie says they rehearsed at the actual Academy Of Music on the 27th, and that the day before was the first time the Band and the horn section played together.

So I conclude that the Ultrasonic Studios rehearsal/tape occurred on Dec. 26, 1971... in Hempstead, New York, which would probably be considered close enough to NYC to be called NYC. Easier to explain than saying "a close suburb of NYC".


Entered at Sat Nov 30 01:25:34 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bill Wyman + Maria Muldaur

Review on my blog of Bill Wyman's Rhythm Kings tonight with special guest the great MARIA MULDAUR … see link.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 22:15:53 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: Nice to know that at least us two GBers aren't shopping in the US. Amazing that all those Euro guys would find it worthwhile to paddle across for bargains, but hey ...


Entered at Fri Nov 29 21:46:24 CET 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Acadie

Been a while since I've read Carrier Bill. I'll have to check it out. I was thinking Robertson and 'Driftwood'.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 15:13:14 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno

Joe J: Thanks for posting "Acadie". Lovely song, but I can see why he dumped it in favour of overlapping other songs on the "Acadie" album. What struck me was how many of the lines could have walked right out of any of Roch Carrier's brilliant short novels (as translated by Sheila Fischman), "La Guerre, Yes Sir", "Is it the Sun, Philibert?", "Floralie, Where are You?". I think that the guitarist in the sunglasses at around 3:09 is Bill Dillon, a Hamilton buddy of Lanois' who has appeared on most, if not all, of Robbie Robertson's albums.

I glanced up at the on-but-mute TV this morning and thought they were showing the running of the bulls at Pamplona, but no, it was stampeding shoppers, rattling the malls.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 13:36:51 CET 2013 from (72.81.140.25)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD [still]

Subject: Thanksgiving and Shangri-la

Happy Thanksgiving!

Pat B's link to the sale of Shangri-La induced me to search this site for my own account of a visit there. Turns out it was just about 15 years ago. A lot of water under the bridge since then, and for me little time to post here, but a look now and then renews fond memories of a simpler time.

Best to all of you for the holidays!

Jan - Thanks for keeping this site up and running.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 11:06:01 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: misspelling (my first in this gb ;-)

It should have been Robertsonians and nothing else. - Sorry all you three Robertsonians.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 10:52:58 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: The Sound, Europe

Subject: Pizza

Happy Thankgiving. Try my Coastal Pizza instead: 120 degrees of Camembert (Normandie), 120 degrees of sea food (Bretagne) and 120 degrees of salmon (Oestfold). Levonistas may put cheese over other ingredients, Robertsoninans may put cheese under other ingredients.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 06:50:26 CET 2013 from (100.2.77.226)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Night at Night

Thanks for the kind words about the album, nice to hear positive feedback. No fretless Rod, just learned a lot from Rick, that's all.

I'm not sure, but I'm pretty certain that I have stage fright, so I don't plan on playing any gigs in the near future. In any case I'm sending some songs out to radio stations and wanted to know, from the people who have gotten the chance to listen to it, which two or three songs I should send. I have a feeling you all know best. If you're not a fan that's a-okay, but if you hear something that you do like, let me know.

I attached the album in the link. For some reason the people over at AHC initially slapped a charge for $7 just to download the album! That was crazy so I told them to make it free, which they did. Hopefully none of you bought the album, but if you did, I apologize and maybe it will be of some consolation that I removed one of the tracks, a cover of "Four Strong Winds". Look forward to hearing from y'all.


Entered at Fri Nov 29 01:10:35 CET 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Acadie

Lanois song never made it onto album of same name.


Entered at Thu Nov 28 23:55:24 CET 2013 from (174.92.80.32)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: St Kits

Subject: Happy Thanksgiving

A Happy "Last Waltz" Day to you people who celebrate such things.

"Baby don't you do it... don't do it."


Entered at Thu Nov 28 23:04:48 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Happy Thanksgiving

A very Happy and Healthy Thanksgiving to all my American friends south of the 49th and there are many. Enjoy the 4 day weekend.


Entered at Thu Nov 28 15:56:10 CET 2013 from (24.114.76.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you sadavid - great LINK.


Entered at Thu Nov 28 15:21:43 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the skiffle was high

Listen to Clarence Ashley's version of "House of the Rising Sun" [My link] -- the 3rd verse goes like this:

Now boys, don't believe what a young girl tells you
Let her eyes be blue or brown
Unless she's on some scaffold high
Sayin' 'Boys, I can't come down'

The way Tom sings "scaffold," it sounds just like "skiffle."
No doubt this is the true etymology, at least for UK usage: "Let's play that 'skiffle' song."


Entered at Thu Nov 28 10:20:13 CET 2013 from (141.0.9.145)

Posted by:

kastzoom

Location: jakarta
Web: My link

Subject: first visit

hello ... Waw its nice website and have nice information ...


Entered at Thu Nov 28 08:31:26 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

The prize goes to saDavid for it was House of The Rising Sun by The Animals. I picked up a large pile of very clean Pop Weekly mags dating 1964 to 1966, so will seek out some similar reviews.


Entered at Thu Nov 28 07:45:39 CET 2013 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

"Happy Thanksgiving!" -- Rick Danko


Entered at Thu Nov 28 07:26:08 CET 2013 from (24.114.76.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Wallsend: shhh. ....let's not wake up the loonies!

Dlew: I have read many things about "Whiter Shade Of Pale" over the years but "indistinct vocals" and it being a favorite amoung "the skiffle crowd" are two things unlikeley to have ever been written. I love ya.....but I think the stuffed teddy bear is going elsewhere tomorrow. I thought of you today as I was invited to a party New Years Eve in Tasmania.

Happy Thanksgiving to our friends in the US today. Life goes quickly - hug your family and/or all or anyone you love !


Entered at Thu Nov 28 05:18:53 CET 2013 from (220.233.229.98)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Peter v?

Whiter shade if pale, procul harum?


Entered at Thu Nov 28 01:09:27 CET 2013 from (58.104.2.142)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Kevin J

You do realise the whole Last Waltz was faked by the same people that did the fake moon landing.


Entered at Thu Nov 28 00:48:52 CET 2013 from (24.114.76.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Guitar heaven 37 years ago

For those who have not seen this in a while...LINK to EC and RR having some fun.......EC is an elegant player and all.....in fact, a truly great player and a hugely important man of the guitar but on this night, on this stage - it was no contest.....silly as it is to judge it in that way...there is a tradition in doing so going way back..........RR definitley cut EC on this evening.....Wish I could have been around to see RR 1961-1965 on Yonge street when players fom all over the country flocked to see his unique mix of violence and beauty.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 20:16:09 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: guess that song

I wasn't even close on the last PV quiz, but --

I'll guess The Animals' "The House of the Rising Sun."


Entered at Wed Nov 27 19:59:58 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Guess the song

Sounds like it could be "Louie,Louie


Entered at Wed Nov 27 19:56:26 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Happy merged holiday

I have been enjoying the names for this odd occurence Thanksgiving and the first night of Hanukah fall on the same day. This happens every 70.000 years.

So wishing everyone a Happy Givinghukah or a happy Thankukah

Now I aam going ot prepare my cranberry sauce and wrap presents for the kids.

So whatever you want to call it, have happy one


Entered at Wed Nov 27 19:40:00 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just found this review in an old "Pop Weekly" magazine,. Name the song and the group:

(It) was played by so many groups in the old Skiffle era, and is now given the R ‘n’ B-type style of (THIS GROUP). The boys’ own performance is milder and much more gentle than their last and I think the song doesn’t come off so well from this particular treatment. The dominant feature is the organ, and the vocal is for the most part indistinct. The slow tempo rather accentuates the repetitious phrases from the organ … one that doesn’t quite come off for me.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 19:23:29 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: TLBV

As soon as I hit Submit earlier this morning I realised that the whole episode may well have taken place in Greece. Bereaved women still wear black for the rest of their days. Maybe Byron himself was involved?


Entered at Wed Nov 27 18:26:09 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Long Black Veil

Addressing the point that Peter raised yesterday: Did the protagonist plead not guilty? There is no mention in the song of a jury returning a guilty verdict in a trial. The only proceeding described is that of the judge asking the defendant if he has an alibi as to his whereabouts elsewhere at the time of the crime. The judge explains that if he presents such a defense to overcome the only evidence (mentioned in the song), the testimony of the eyewinesses, he will avoid the consequences of a murder conviction -- death by hanging.

That seems to fit the legal proceeding I described -- where a judge, before accepting a guilty plea, makes sure the defendant is aware of the consequences his waiver of the right to present a defense at trial. And, as the 5th Circuit court cited in the decision I mentioned: nowadays the rules also require that the judge is satisfied that a factual basis exists for a guilty plea. As the Court noted in a footnote, "This change was doubtless effected to avoid such circumstances as are recounted in 'The Long Black Veil'" -- where a man is executed for a crime he didn't commit because he refused to offer essential proof of his innocence. As the 5th Circuit court described this required procedure:

"The court may refuse to accept a plea of guilty, and shall not accept such a plea...without first addressing the defendant personally and determinging that the plea is made voluntarily with understanding of the nature of the charge and the consequences of the plea...The court shall not enter a judgment upon of plea of guilty unless it is satisfied that there is a factual basis for the plea."

Yes, "Long Black Veil" is a fictional account of events, but there's still the element of verisimilitude. Is there a ring of truth to the song? Could one believe it describes something that could have really happened?

In the song, the judge indeed addresses the defendant personally and explains the consequences of not providing an alibi, as this is the key to refuting the eyewitness testimony placing him at the scene of the crime.

It is the "best friend's wife" in the end that is haunted by guilt, as she betrayed both her husband and her lover. She betrayed her husband through her adulterous action, and she betrayed her lover through her inaction in refusing to step forward with an alibi in his defense. The protagonist of the song, in refusing to neither betray his best friend, nor his lover, goes to the grave as a consequence.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 18:16:48 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

I was looking for a particular Rick and Sredni appearance at some outdoor show but could not find it........stumbled upon this just beautifully put together video of Rick doing "I Can See Clearly Now"..............if it has been posted before then an encore is well merited.

Carol C's Sip The Wine site has a lovely write-up on Sredni from a few years back.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 17:14:51 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Chuck Berry doing Nat King Cole....and noteworthy for this being one of those rare moments on set where he was satisfied with Keef........Hail Hail Rock n Roll is a great movie but also stands out as being one of the very few DVD releases where the "expanded-deluxe" version truly was worth the extra cost. The extras - all of them - are time capsule stuff especially the one hour full conversation with Little Richard, Chuck and Bo Diddley......and the RR-Chuck on a couch bits.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 17:05:55 CET 2013 from (24.161.13.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties

Subject: ...the town hall light

Peter, strolling past that town hall light, I'm thinkin' whale oil.....we still have no gas mains here in West Saugerties, whale oil was used for lighting prior to the refining of kerosene for lamps.

But I'm also thinkin' of The Bounty, but rather than the ship that perhaps protected all those whalers of yore, here's hoping that this wonderful community of eclectics enjoyed a bountiful harvest this year and can share with us Americans in celebration of that bounty.

A happy and bountiful Thanksgiving to all!


Entered at Wed Nov 27 16:37:22 CET 2013 from (184.66.152.240)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'they all did agree'

"...looked a lot like me...". Those were the days before DNA and hair and cells and (help us, Horatio) CSI. 'The Lineup'was a terrible way to 'execute' justice. Everyone looks like someone. How many times have you seen someone who you swear looks like someone you know or has a strong resemblance to some star or personality. I would hope that visual identification and hearsay have gone the way of the dodo and that today the judge would have thrown this case out with a terse dismissal and an admonition to the prosecutor to 'bring me some real evidence'.

But, what a great song and how beautiful is the image of his lover in her long black veil standing at his grave in the wind thinking about past times and a life that was. And captured extraordinarily but many of the covers of this song but still the best by our boys IMO.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 15:35:15 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

RC: I agree - we've cycled back to the good old days. Be prepared ...

PV: Other possibilities: he was a wandering English poet of the Byronic type who took the view that life wouldn't be worth living without her - and she wasn't going to leave the husband; or maybe he knew that hanging was more pleasant than what the husband would do to him when he found out.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 15:14:17 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin' Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whose Song??

How many times I got to tell you Peter! Danny Dill wrote Long Black Veil! Maryjohn Wilkins put the music to it.......gawd damn it......I'm goin' away to work this morning.

Some body better slap Peter around before I get back -:)

In a few days ........if the weather allows me, I have to tow a barge camp around Cape Scott to the outside of the island. Down into Quatsino Sound. To a logging camp where I first worked in 1961......that makes me feel OLD this morning........t'hell with all-u-yuz!


Entered at Wed Nov 27 12:29:48 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Ari

Great job, my man.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 09:07:45 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RIP, Sredni and condolences to his friends here. I remember his role in particular in Rick Danko's bass tuition video.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 09:06:28 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: My Long Black Veil

Link to Marijohn Wilkins answer disc to her own song.

I was thinking, I reckon everyone sets it in the Wild West and "town hall light" is only there to rhyme with "night" but would a Wild West town have had a light burning outside the Town Hall? No mains gas or electricity. Then the last public (legal) hanging in the USA was in 1936. Does anyone see it in a later era?


Entered at Wed Nov 27 06:57:04 CET 2013 from (69.206.142.52)

Posted by:

Willam R Lang

Location: Hurley New York USA

Subject: Shredni Vollmer

November 24, 2013 6:00 AM

Steven “Shredni” Vollmer

Our generation remembers fifty years ago the end of the life of a fallen leader. John F. Kennedy was a man with poetic vision. The Woodstock Generation took this vision and created a dream of its own.

The end has come for a legendary harp player Shredni Vollmer. Shredni added his soulful harmonica harmony to the truest music of our time. It is sad our friend is no longer here to play the blues. He will jam on with friends who have passed.

May we all find peace, love and music.

Good Bye and Thanks
Your Friend and Fan
William R. Lang
aka Fern


Entered at Wed Nov 27 05:16:06 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.57)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Chico Hamilton has died.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 04:55:13 CET 2013 from (184.145.65.247)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Rollie at the Show

Still a great read. Thanks for that. I, too, sought out the Henhouse.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 00:54:07 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Rebirth

It's a GB Renaissance! What superb reading.


Entered at Wed Nov 27 00:04:16 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Innocent

These sort of stories remind me of movies like, "The Ox Bow Incident", Sommersby, and more recently, "The Jack Bull", I was impressed with John Cusak's acting in this film.

I still often play the old cassette I have of Joe Sun, before his singing of the song, the conversation between Danny Dill & Maryjohn Wilkins regarding Dill writing of those lyrics.

The way he explains, I had all the ingriedence. I had him gettin' hung, her walkin' the hills, and all. I still hadn't figured out what he did to get himself in such a fix. Then one night just as I was fallin' asleep, I sat straight up in bed. I said to my wife it just came to me! He was in the arms of his best friends wife..now it all made sense.

Well the scaffold is high and eternity's near

She stood in the crowd and shed not a tear.......

What Dill explains, where he got this idea from, was that preacher in Trenton, New Jersey who was gunned down. He says, there were no less than 30 witnesses to the shooting, and nobody ever knew what he did. No one spoke a word, and to this day, no one ever said who did it.

Now that gets yer curiousity.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 23:58:12 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The man, or slayer, 'looked a lot like me' does not constitute beyond reasonable doubt, so he reckoned he didn't need the alibi. Poor honorable fool!

They all did agree, indeed, but it has been shown many times that mass witnesses will agree. Oh, dear. Where was Perry Mason or Rumpole of the Bailey?


Entered at Tue Nov 26 23:52:07 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fascinating legal point. Especially as it refers to a work of fiction, rather than an event. I assumed he pleaded not guilty, but did not mention the alibi, hoping as he knew he was innocent, that he would escape the gallows anyway.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 23:14:32 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Long Black Veil From A Legal Perspective

The protagonist in "Long Black Veil", from the grave, recounts how he chose to accept death for a crime he didn't commit, rather than to betray the honor of his best friend's wife. In remaining silent as to his alibi at the time of the crime, he faced the hangman's noose as a consequence of waiving an affirmative defense. In essence, that silence is analogous to pleading guilty.

It's not uncommon for courts, in rendering opinions, to contrast stodgy legal formality, with references to popular songs. In 1979 the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion that included a definitive statement on how trial courts should conduct guilty plea hearings and how those proceedings should be reviewed on appeal. The decision pointed out:

"That receiving such pleas is a process beset with pitfalls is also common knowledge, however. Of these, the two most dangerous have long been recognized; coerced pleas and ignorant ones. The first of these plainly is condemned by the Fifth Amendment's mandate that no one 'be compelled in a criminal case to be a witness against himself.' The second arises from the guilty plea as perhaps the supreme instance of waiver known to our system of justice, one by which all of its trial rights and safeguards are voluntarily foregone, and the defendant deliberately submits to conviction. If this is to be permitted, at the minimum a decent system of justice will concern itself that the admission is voluntary and the defendant knows what it is he is admitting, so he does not mistakenly consent to be punished for a crime he did not commit. These are core considerations, requirements that manifestly must lie at the heart of any respectable system for settling (as opposed to trying) criminal charges."

The court went on to discuss substantive requirements that were implemented in 1966. One of these procedural changes was "that the defendant be made aware of what might happen as a result of his plea and that the court be satisfied that a factual basis existed for it." In a footnote, the court added:

"This change was doubtless effected to avoid such circumstances ass are recounted in 'The Long Black Veil.'"


Entered at Tue Nov 26 19:22:52 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The BEST of Lefty Frizzel

I need a lot of the time now to hear "real" country music. This is a pure as it gets.

The youtube thing is great when a song comes to mind, and there it is........there are some great pictures here.

Some very good sounds of Lefty on youtube. Long Black Veil, A Thousand ways. But give this a listen.....ity's great.

Jerry, I was gonna put up a song for you, "I'm gonna hire a wino to decorate our home", but I couldn't find a good sound.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 19:12:02 CET 2013 from (72.78.38.119)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Garland on TV

Especially for BEG, Garland Jeffreys singing "Any Rain" on the Artie Lange show last night.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 19:02:49 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Shangri La

Mark Knopfler's 2004 album "Shangri-La" was also recorded there before Rick Rubin purchased the studio. I picked up the DVD-A version when it was first released and, as a bonus, it featured an interview & video performances filmed at the studio.

More recently, Kanye West enlisted Rick Rubin to tweak and re-record tracks for his "Yeezus" album at Shangri-La. Last year Crosby, Stills & Nash started recording an album of cover songs at Shangri-La with Mr. Rubin, but soon had a falling out over the producer's dictatorial approach. Among other complaints, he reportedly told David Crosby that there would be only one Beatles cover on the album. As Graham Nash later recounted, "Who the f***k is he to tell Crosby, Stills and Nash what to do?"


Entered at Tue Nov 26 18:53:11 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Choices

2 posts about guns and bars in the past 24 hours here. Makes you want to go to a grocery store and take it home. Turn on the music, sit at the island in the kitchen on the stool nearby (or in the basement at the bar) and you simulate the experience, minus the violence (but unfortunately also minus the positive cameraderie). Ah, choices. Can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 18:24:44 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

It's been mentioned here before, but Rick Rubin bought Shangri La a while ago.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 17:22:41 CET 2013 from (184.66.152.240)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: In the tradition...

Jake Bugg: Yes. And well worth a listen. In the tradition...


Entered at Tue Nov 26 17:12:35 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: From Nottingham to Malibu

The young Englishman Jake Bugg has recently released his secong album entitled "Shangri La," which was recorded at The Band's former studio with producer Rick Rubin.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 15:44:31 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: fashion icons and rebels

BEG: thanks for finding the whole thing. I noticed the 'touch of grey,' but not the shoes.

Now that you point 'em out, I see that they are black, and shiny.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 15:19:57 CET 2013 from (174.89.38.169)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi sadavid. I caught the complete interview with Robbie and George last night. Did ya notice Robbie's snazzy shoes? I especially loved his story about Rick and the clip with Levon talking about Robbie. Link is to entire interview.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 14:50:13 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: tales from the Skylight Lounge

Rick Danko faces down Fort Worth's finest . . . .


Entered at Tue Nov 26 11:08:42 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Henhouse Tapes

Thanks, Bob. I read that just trying to decide on this morning's CD, and so "The Henhouse Tapes" by Rollie is playing right now.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 08:23:46 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Nice songs Ari - and some cool fretless bass.


Entered at Tue Nov 26 05:51:03 CET 2013 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Jeff Newsom ( Rollie )

In honor of The Last Waltz and our friend Jeff Newsom.....

Entered at Fri Sep 3 16:58:42 CEST 2010 from (216.128.235.138)

Posted by:

Rollie

Subject: The Last Waltz

Lars and JQ asked about my LW experience.Here's a post of mine from way back.........

Location: Winterland

Subject: The Last Waltz Remembered(for Catskill)

Many have heard the tale. This is for those who have not."...traveling from Salt Lake to S.F. in Garths's Mercedes , piloted by the one and only David Boyle. I'm 18. Dave is in his 40's? late 30's? I'm sure he doesn't know what to make of me. I sure as hell don't know what to make of him. Somewhere out in the Nevada desert he asks me if I've ever smoked pot. Not wanting to lie , but not wanting to confess to someone close to my fathers age(sort of)I suggest I may have tried it once or twice."Good" , he says, "reach into my coat pocket". I'm catatonic until we reach Mill Valley. I do recall at one point he pulled out some canned brown bread and sardines. They disappeared quickly! Mill Valley appears thru the fog(yes both kinds!)We reach the home of a young damsel who is obviously very interested in David, but barely notices the young squire standing next to him.Off they go,somewhere into the domicile, me to the couch. Make it into SF the next day, where I check into the Miyako Hotel(or is it Kyoto? Godfrey or Donabie wanna help me here?) I'm settling in chillin out, when an older guy comes in. What kind of people is my sister hangin out with I wonder? Jack Wingate is the fellows name, long time raconteur and pal to the Band.He's beginning to get the sense he may be in charge of baby sitting me, when a rather neandrathal-ish figure strolls in with a cowboy hat, and steals Jack away.I don't know who the guy is until I see him on stage the next day. Ronnie Hawkins. Down to lunchwith Garth,sis, and some other folks. Levon and Rick come strolling thru and steam is emanating from Levons head.We duck back into our lunches.Lunch over,we help Garth prepare for the big gig,ie; a trip to the hardware store!!!! Now I'm sure musicians are total screwballs!!!!!!! Back to the Lobby of the hotel,sis and I take a breather and have a seat. In thru the front doors comes Gods messenger. Muddy Waters!with Pinetop Perkins close behind. They sit down no more than five feet from us, waiting for their bags to be brought in.At that point in my life(and to this day)there existed no greater a human being. I've since heard that when Muddy walked into a room , you could feel his presence, stateliness.To be ssure , I sat stunned, mesmerized. I forever want to go back to that moment, and hold the conversation I didn't have the nerve to discuss then. A few hrs later, I'm waiting for Bill Grahams son to bring the motor home around to the hotel to take guests down to the Winterland to check out rehearsals. I'm blown away when he shows up!! He can't be more than 12? 13? Should I get in? He can't even see over the wheel!!!!! Fuck it! I'm definitely on this bus!!! The floor of the Winterland is sparse compared to the onslaught the following evening. Scorcese and Bill Graham are getting into it......Joni Mitchell-riveting, Clapton, cookin. This is the rehearsal??? The day of the show, some photographer hands me the set list , and as a prank, tells me to call out the name of the songs beforre they happen.(yep, you can me hear hollerin before "Ophelia" and Robbie replying"You got it"on the recording. Fascinating ,eh??" Could the photographer have been Elliot Landy? Get down to the Winterland early.5:30ish ---Everybody gets fed the full on Thanksgiving dinner. Tables cover the entire floor. Dinner over, Ballroom dancing. A boogie -woogie piano player either preceeded or followed this. Bill Graham introduces the show"Good Evening". You know the rest. Ahh, the good old days. Garth picks up the newspaper the following morning, which announces that Robertson has led the Band thru the Last Waltz, or something to that effect."Fuckin guitar players get all the credit" he mumbles in mock disgust. Down the hall we go to breakfast, when we're cut off by a haggard looking Neil Young."How bout a little O' Canada,Garth" he says brandishing a harmonica.We wander off, with the canadian national anthem trailing in the distance,my last remebrance of a mind blowing event."

Happy Thanksgiving


Entered at Tue Nov 26 02:40:32 CET 2013 from (174.91.164.194)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I really enjoyed country music meeting rap last night at the American Music Awards. Here's Florida Georgia Line and Nelly.....FGL's "Cruise" with Nelly and then song moves into Nelly's "Ride Wit You" with FGL. Love the groove, energy, joy, fun.....Maybe not timeless music, but right now, I'm digging it. Even Wayne Newton is digging it! ;-D


Entered at Tue Nov 26 02:30:39 CET 2013 from (174.91.164.194)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"I was very much on the outside, even though I was in the middle of it." (1986)

Kevin J: Rollie would have been 55 last month. If my memory serves me well, his birthday was on October 6. We were good buddies. We shared so many laughs and stories. I miss him here and everywhere. Truly hope his "Sweet Jane" is ok.....


Entered at Mon Nov 25 22:56:05 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Norm…. A lot of truth in what you wrote and those last two paragraph’s capture the spirit that is The Band and the love we all have for them………….37 years ago at probably about this time the late great Rollie was driving Garth to the show. Did he ever tell us he was there? Gotta find his cd and give it a listen again….


Entered at Mon Nov 25 21:00:05 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.11)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Country singer killed by bar owner. Supposedly, they were friends.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 19:06:54 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Band Legacy

I have ALWAYS had this feeling that......The BAND, was and is an institution.......like Haley's Comet, something we'll never see again. Fans of these meld of these 5 guys are probably more hard core...die hard than I ever recall seeing, since my life of rock & roll began in the early 50's.

I really believe much of the bitterness directed towards Robbie Robertson has nothing at all to do with writing credits, money, or any of the monetary values.

It is my feeling Robbie is undeservably blamed for the demise of the BAND. There was a lot of things going on that can just make it gawd damn hard and no fun any more.

I experienced this slightly...and the biggest single reason I never persued a career in music, is because I HATED being on the road.

I'm sure many of you know what it entales. There comes a time for every one, (and at different times), that a person just says, "enough". Many people don't want to accept that.

I believe Robbie probably felt bad about it in some ways, and "The Last Waltz" was his attempt to end it with dignity and on a high note. Whether I'm right or wrong, nobody is ever going to change my mind.

Some times at night driving down Vancouver Island, through the Nimpkish Valley at night, where there is not even a light for miles, I put in the disc for "The Brown Album".

I'm alone, this time of year there is very little traffic, the road and every thing around it is black. I'm 23 years old again and that warm feeling listening to the BAND has never gone away.........


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:51:23 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight

LINK to RLJ doing The Weight. I liked it very much. If I never hear another drunken run through of this beautiful song again - I will be very happy. Ricki captures the spirit beautifully and restores some much needed dignity.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:50:46 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Magnificent Pictures

We agree totally Kevin. Those pictures of Regina as the sun went down and all the lights went on and the Snow Birds made us very proud. I was fortunate enough to make it home and enjoy the game with my daughter Amanda.

It would have been exciting to see the Tiger-Cats make it closer. However some difficulty for Henry Burriss. I felt bad for him, he deserved better.

I agree with you and Bill as well about that band? Headley.....disgusting, even worse than Nickelback. When I think of some of the real good rock bands from Canada like, Loverboy, Trooper, Powder Blues, Jeff Healey....it's too band.

However the way Sask capitalized on their opportunities wasn't surprizing.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:36:21 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was told two stories, Bill. One that it was hot and spicy and with anchovies giving a special taste. The other that it was the dish for ladies of the night after or between work. I think it’s the same with pasta.

I got the Rickie Lee Jones, Calvin. Played it through once or twice. Hated The Weight! Disliked the album mainly. Should give it another try.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:25:30 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P…..Great minds and all that…..besides I was too busy thinking of Bambi to have noticed (she used to dance to “Long Cool Women In a Black Dress” but I digress )………your additional point about the voices is actually a much more important point than RR has ever let on in my opinion as well……Waters couldn’t touch Gilmour vocally but the divide wasn’t strikingly obvious and while it was for Townsend vs. Daltry, fans knew what Townsend sounded like already………………….not the case for Robbie. I recall vividly hearing the first single ( in North America anyway ) off his debut album in 1987 “Showdown at Big Sky” and while loving it – just being knocked back in my chair thinking out loud “Oh how those band voices are missed!”…. Not easy when one had access to three of the greatest singers the rock n roll game ever knew – period end of story.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:22:14 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Pizza? How about a free Lowrey that doesn't work?


Entered at Mon Nov 25 18:09:03 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Pizza, Convicts & Strippers

Norm….I thought Saskatchewan would win but I was hoping for a close game. The images at the beginning of the telecast of the sun setting, Serena Ryder doing a lovely “Oh Canada” and the jets flying over was the best images I have seen on TV in years….and the Sheepdogs were perfect. Shame about Hedley but what can ya do…

Thoughts on Pizza………… Dennis’s description of driving one way 80 miles to Kinchley's Tavern for pizza is something else and if I am ever in that area I will check it out……..better than any advertisement could ever be…………I remember a place called Pizza Pete’s on Princess Street in Kingston…..late nights and picking up a pizza on the night home from drinking in university days – no clams in sight……but what stands out more was that there was a tattoo parlour in the area and in those days ( early 80’s ) if you were walking by and saw someone in there – if it was a guy then almost certainly would be a convict out on “weekend leave” as Kingston was home to 4 or 5 federal penitentiaries and various provincial joints and nuthouses in addition to Canada’s consensus best university Queen’s……if it was a female….well, well….. you would slow your pace as this certainly would have been a stripper named Candy or Bambi rather than the daughter of an orthodontist from Oakville named Cindy…….Fast forward 20 years and Oh how things have changed……….Cindy is not only tatted up – she might even be dancing!

One more thought on food ……………..some combinations are rightfully thought of as crimes against civilization……..never butter a bagel, never mix tomato sauce and smoked salmon, never butter a peanut butter sandwich, never ever put sugar in green tea….and and and……never go to a Fusion restaurant

Last time I was in Saratoga, I did go the a fusion place ( across the street from where Don Mclean apparantly used to play regularly ) and one of the appetizers was banana sushi ! No joke and as much as I hate to admit it…….it was great!


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:42:55 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.11)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Rock and Roll Will Never Die, fuckin A - Somebody To Love...This is fantastic, watch Jack

See the link, a must watch. It's why they still call it Hot Fucking Tuna


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:41:02 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: I was writing and didn't see your's until after I finished posting. As I added, there's seems to be an important, underlying issue of facing the challenge of becoming the interpretative voice, in addition to that of the songwriter. Before The Last Waltz, Richard, Levon and Rick set the bar high, immersing themselves as characters in the songs by adding their distintive voices from three different angles.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:29:21 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Laying Low in L.A.

JT: Robbie, in a 1987 MUSICIAN magazine interview (link above) with Bill Flanagan, expressed the following:

"I never said, 'I'm not going to write songs for a while.' I just didn't have the lure to get in there, sit down and suffer. And I enjoyed the sense that I didn't have to do it. After I did 'The Last Waltz' I thought, 'This kind of redeems me a little bit. For a little while'...I wasn't sure I had something to say. And I heard a lot of people making records who had nothing to say, either. I thought, 'I don't know if I want to do that. I don't know if I want to make records. Maybe I'll do a movie, maybe I'll score a film.' I enjoyed very much experimenting with the score for 'Raging Bull.' It made me feel good. I thought, 'God, I've always been showing up. I'm just going hang around the house for a while, talk to my kids.' I wasn't sleeping, but I just didn't want to make mediocre moves. I looked around me and it seemed like everybody was. It was an epidemic of medium out there. I'm grateful I wasn't motivated to just get it over with."

It was A&R executive Gery Gersh, a fan of The Band, who finally "convinced" Robbie to get back to writing & recording after first signing him to EMI and later Geffen Records.

Of course, the elephant in the room issue is that, after years of having three great voices sing the songs, Robbie faced the challenge of filling those shoes himself and coming up with material from a perspective he was comfortable with.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:23:43 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ari

Good job. It amazes me that one person can create an album. The wonders of the computer age


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:22:22 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Re TLW, I attended a tribute show last night, hosted by our John D. The entire set of musicians and singers were excellent, and the Weber Bros were phenomenal. The place was packed, as were the five shows in small southern Ontario cities earlier in the week - heart-warming proof that the legacy endures.

Garth Hudson guests on a solo CD a couple years ago by one of the musicians, guitarist Terry Blersh (see link). And the musical director, Lance Anderson, has done a fair bit of playing and production work with Garth, including "Live at the Wolf".

Ari: Congratulations on the album, and thanks for the link.

Peter V: I've never encountered puttanesca pizza on any menu, but will certainly give it a whirl if I do, seeing as how penne puttanesca is my favourite italian food dish. Apparently 'puttanesca' means whore, but I don't know if that's because the ingredients were seen as the kind of things that only prostitutes would eat or if eating it was supposed to put you in the mood to charge for sex.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:15:37 CET 2013 from (72.196.147.237)

Posted by:

Calvin

Not sure If this was covered last year, but did anyone purchase/listen to Rickie Lee Jones 2012 Album where she did a very interesting cover of "The Weight"?

Just sort of wondering what folks thoughts were.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:09:38 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Weight

The boys from Hamilton felt the "Weight". Surely Kevin...you didn't think those boys had any chance of not getting steam rolled.

Look at that line up of Saskatchewan this year! Kory Sheets broke a record for rushing yards that has stood since 1956. Look at how many of those boys who are actually from Saskatchewan. Playing on their own field.

Some of those boys from Calgary got so brazen they bragged about how they were going to finish the Rough Riders off and embarrass them by being in their locker room in the Grey Cup. What an arrogant imagination. Perfect for motivation.

Without a doubt one of the best football teams ever.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 17:03:41 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: 37 Years......and the truth that writing well is a form of suffering.

JT: There was an interview posted here some years ago from the very early days of The Band ( understanding that the early days of The Band was NOT early days for the group of 5 as an entity ) in which Robbie is talking then of being tired of the game and the less than ideal way the life of a rock n roller fits with real life……so very early on he was seeing the less than perfect path it was going to be……of course life is difficult for everyone regardless of paths chosen but it was telling that he was not enamoured with the game even then. When he did re-emerge, he told this to Bill Flanagan in 1987:

"I never said, 'I'm not going to write songs for a while,'" Robbie Robertson says. "I just didn't have the lure to get in there, sit down and suffer. And I enjoyed the sense that I didn't have to do it…..I wasn't so sure I had something to say," shrugs Robertson, forty-three. "And I heard a lot of people making records who had nothing to say, either. I thought, 'I don't know if I want to do that. I don't know if I want to just make records. Maybe I'll do a movie, maybe I'll score a film.' I enjoyed very much experimenting with the score for Raging Bull. It made me feel good. I thought, 'God, I've always been thinking of things to say, I've always been showing up. I'm just going to hang around the house for a while, talk to my kids.' I wasn't sleeping, but I just didn't want to make mediocre moves. I looked around me and it seemed like everybody was. It was like an epidemic of medium out there. I'm grateful I wasn't motivated to just get it over with."


Entered at Mon Nov 25 16:12:05 CET 2013 from (184.66.152.240)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lifestyle and The Well

Lifestyle was seemingly apparently destroying cohesiveness, Kevin. These boys had been together for approximately 15 years. And from the 'Islands' effort, perhaps the Well was running dry. Maybe if they had taken a sabbatical, they might have recharged their batteries. Who knows. Robbie clearly found a different direction as the others continued to perform independently or in duos/trios at times. Interesting how Garth was largely not in the picture in the later 70s and early 80s very much. I never really understood why it took Robbie 13 years or so to put out his first solo effort. I surmise it is because a) he was busy making movie music b) getting on with life c) the Well was somewhat dry lyrically. Just ideas and opinions and nothing more. Ideas welcome.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 15:40:23 CET 2013 from (24.114.76.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: TLW.........

......37 years ago today. I doubt anyone here would even know of anyone else here had that concert not taken place.......or perhaps all would have turned out differently and The Band would still be together........hardly likely...but....


Entered at Mon Nov 25 03:43:35 CET 2013 from (24.114.76.157)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Grey Cup.......Ari

Ari......I needed a break from a lop-sided Grey Cup.......The Sheepdogs got the telecast off to a glorious start playing their brand of great rock n roll but the musical offerings at a sporting event are always to be questioned and the half-time show was handled by the only band on this planet more embarrassing than Nickleback - namely the horror show that is Hedley...........anyhow came over here and was pleasantly surprised to see the release of your album........"Spaceman in California" and "Night at Night" stand out at first listen. The former screaming out for 2-3 more minutes and some RR style guitar. Well done!


Entered at Mon Nov 25 00:35:59 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The REAL Deal

The real football game starts right now......Saskatchewan is gonna eat a lot of pussy!

Jef ......I swore when the Dodgers left Brooklyn, my heart was broken....I'd never go there. But.....except for the anchovies, it sounds ok.....thanks Peter.


Entered at Mon Nov 25 00:06:36 CET 2013 from (66.65.186.191)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: my new album

Hey everyone. My very first album has been released on an indie label and I wanted to share it with you all.

The album is called Night at Night and I've been recording the songs sporadically within a one year period. All the songs were written by myself, except for the two covers Four Strong Winds and Make Me Down, and were recorded right here in my room in NYC so you'll have to forgive me for the less than crystal clear sound quality as I don't own a microphone so I use my laptops built-in microphone. Unfortunately, I don't have a band as this is hardly what I call my profession so all the instruments were played by myself.

Maybe you'll hear some Band influence in some of the songs; I based the order of the tracks loosely on the order of the tracks on Music From Big Pink. I hope you all like it!


Entered at Sun Nov 24 23:49:29 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: T is for Trouble, like a Grafton novel

The T in JT: 'T' is for 'Trouble', Jeff. Its been a great day for pizza at this GB site. Cheddar is a great cheese but I agree... I stick to 'mozza' and keep it pure. One can experiment and play games with the ingredients, but the real thing is 'mozza;. I keep it simple ... tomatoes and cheese and sometimes another topping but I stay away exotica. Its my traditionalism, true in all areas of my existence. I'm willing to experiment, but I seem to always return to my roots.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 20:31:20 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But throw a couple anchovies on a pie near the end of baking, now you're talking.....mario, of Mario's Pizza on Dyre ave in the Bronx, going back 30, 35 years ago, used to make me an Aleej sangueeche - anchovie sandwiche.... anchvoies, olive oil, garlic, on a little italian bread, mingia!

Westie, get your beat up old tucchas outa the woods and over here to Brooklyn ( the cradle of civilization) before you keel over, we'll feed ya.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 20:03:03 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Westie- i'm happy as a fucking clam.

But Jerry , now, he's a trouble maker, bringing up pizza when he knows better.

Mozz, Westie, real mozz, there's nothing like it. Cheddar on pizza, oy fucking vey, a regular fucking shonda..a hangin offense..... Might as well add the clams to that pie....


Entered at Sun Nov 24 19:39:48 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Pizza

This entire discussion has made me hungry. I think I will go out for Pizza tonight. Yum!


Entered at Sun Nov 24 19:22:42 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Foreverly

Due out tomorrow: "Foreverly" by Billie Joe (from Green Day) and Norah Jones, a recreation of "Songs Our Daddy Taught Us."

The second Everlys tribute in a year, following Dawn McCarthy & Boniie "Prince" Billy's "What The Brothers Sang."


Entered at Sun Nov 24 19:15:10 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, most mozzarella is in processed lumps. Much is made in Denmark. Nothing like the real thing from buffalo in Italy.

Cheddar on pizza is common in England and they sell the German brand here too. Jamie Oliver opened a new restaurant in Winchester called "Union Jacks" which has all English food, and has about four pizzas on the menu with novel combinations … artisan organic English cheeses and English asparagus (in season). Weird. Not pizza as an Italian would know it, but brilliant.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 19:10:48 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pizza

You've heard of "Rock Snobs." I'm a pizza snob. Naples, right by the harbor. 1978. My first speaking tour of Italy. Oldest pizza place in Naples. Full to the doors. Pizza Puttanesca … very thin crust, fresh buffalo mozzarella, very ripe plum tomatoes, olives, anchovies. Purple local wine. Never had one like it before nor since.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 19:06:56 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dr. Oetker Pizza

Jeff's upset!.....Jeff! gawd damn boy...it's awright. But you are right. Worst thing to do to clams. When you make clam chouder.....now I am an expert. Last thing you put in is clams. You don't let them boil, turns 'em to rubber.

Now on this pizza. I've never, (until about a month ago, bought a frozen pizza. Couldn't bring myself to do it. However, we drink a lot of "green tea ginger ale" don't know if any of yuz have tried it. I'm hooked on it. So don't worry J Tull fan, your point is well taken, but the amount I drink, I'll probably live to 112.

Anyway, on these ginger ale boxes quite often is a coupon. For 2 bucks off a box. A while back tho', here is a coupn for this pzza, well now I gotta try it. These Dr Oetker pizza are made in Germany I'm sure some of you know.

Thin crust, cheddar, (I HATE gobs of that gawd damn mozzarella on a pizza. Out here in Coquitlam, is a real cool place, called, "Me & Ed's Pizza". Wonderful place to tahe the kids. They get pitchers of root beer, like a pub. There is like big picnic tables around a big gas fire place. A big juke box playing old rock & roll. The pizza are thin crust with lots of cheddar. With out a doubt the best I've had.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 18:12:57 CET 2013 from (71.191.92.74)

Posted by:

SteveH

Location: Maryland
Web: My link

Subject: Visiting Woodstock

From the Wash. Post travel section on Nov. 24. Stay in the "Robertson House" with Band photos, etc. "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin’ about half past dead/I just need some place where I can lay my head. "So go the opening lines to “The Weight,” the Band’s folky, country-tinged slow burner from its 1968 debut, “Music From Big Pink.” It’s a song I’ve heard a thousand times, since I first bought the album my sophomore year in college. But never had I identified with that sentiment more than when I pulled into Woodstock, N.Y., this past Labor Day weekend."


Entered at Sun Nov 24 17:07:00 CET 2013 from (24.161.13.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties

Subject: Just had to.....PIZZA

Skipped out on The Band family feud, but.....

Kinchley's Tavern, Franklin Turnpike, Ramsey, NJ. We drive 80 miles each way for pizza to go, always ordering one extra for the ride back home!

Don't know if he'd remember, but after picking up Lee Gabites from the airport, I took him there on the way back to Woodstock in 1999 when he came over for Rick's Day In The Garden show, Lee loved it.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 16:58:05 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My son was married near Los Olivos last year, and we drove to Las Vegas afterwards and caught "Love" - stunning. "O" and "Ka" too and not a cent gambled.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 16:53:54 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Daily Meal

Worse yet, It was The Daily Meal. Not the daily survey. Daily Meal- who eats only once a day? They got it all fucking wrong to start, don't even know how to count.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 16:49:47 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.41)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Daily Fucking Survey

Pete! Some magazine or e Zine just declared Pepe's white clam pizza the best pizza in the country. Up in bridgeport or new haven, connecticut. White clam fucking pizza, the best pizza? i mean, even the fucking clams are insulted. People get paid to write this fucking drivel, Whole world is fucked up!


Entered at Sun Nov 24 15:43:37 CET 2013 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Been busy the past few weeks with quite a bit of travel thrown in and the first item I see when I check in is a shout out from Kevin J. Thanks Kevin, I do remember the song well.

Pizza does indeed evoke deep feeling for those involved. Attending my 40th high-school reunion several weeks ago, it's funny to see how lines of loyalty were (and still are) over which pizzeria was the best in the neighbourhood. A bunch of us went to one of the places in question. It was a shit-hole in 1973 and time has not done it any favours. The pizza however, was quite top notch. Thick crust with a cheesy base. The toppings were Pepperoni, mushrooms, and green peppers. Known locally as "All dressed". Order an all-dressed anywhere else and god knows what concoction you may be served.

Other than that, spent 5 days in California, in a region known as the Inland Empire. Fabulous weather. Had my Ipod set to the Beach Boys for the duration. Lucked in to a great show, seeing Los Lobos along with Robert Cray, playing around the corner from where I was staying. Did make it to Vegas on the way home, where my wife flew in to join me. "Love" was unbelievable. I recommend it to all. I knew I'd love the music but the Cirque De Soleil was great as well.

And for the Teronna contingent, I made it up there for a quick visit (11 hours). Maybe next time some of us can hook up.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 13:11:37 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beware the pizza

Last time we compared pizza it caused more distress and outrage than the feud.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 04:36:49 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Giovanni

I still remember the first pizza I ever had. It was in Toronto and made by a fantastic Italian man named Giovanni. I had it in the' Hwy 61 Revisited' 60s (I judge all my times by when Dylan records came out). I used to take my sisters there. They loved it too. I thought it was the best thing to eat that anyone could ever imagine. I can still taste those Giovanni pizzas. Mouth-watering delicious!!! Jeff, it sounds like that's what you are still getting. If I'm down Brooklyn way, I'll take you up on your offer and we can go. I get to NYC once in a while. Go see Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings when they come to the Beacon. I bought my tickets for Victoria today.


Entered at Sun Nov 24 04:08:27 CET 2013 from (69.121.107.22)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JT if you get your ass to Brooklyn while i still get to hang here, i'll take you for the abzfuckingloot best pizza to be had in the United Sates. I don't give a rat's ass bout those joints up in Connecticut been getting awards. OR Di Fara's, t he old slob who charges 5 bucks a slice on Ave J in his filthy old hole on the corner. he gets write ups too. There's still a few great pizza places here, one that is well kept, modern and sharp now due to Hurricane Sandy, right ont he bay. it doesn't get the hype that pothers do, but it's out of this fucking world, to die for, quality of pizza that was plentiful here, 25, 30, 40 years ago.


Entered at Sat Nov 23 23:27:40 CET 2013 from (92.18.219.185)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Love for Levon: A Benefit to Save the Barn

I watched it tonight and couldn't help but think of Richard and Rick as much as Levon. It's a really fine tribute to The Band.


Entered at Sat Nov 23 19:04:43 CET 2013 from (184.66.152.240)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Politics and Pizza and R&B resurrection

Politics: Increasingly boring.

Pizza: thin crust with good cheeses and toppings...now that is worth writing about.

Exciting news is that Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings coming to Victoria 4th of April. She has apparently recovered (with chemo) from bile duct cancer. New album forthcoming.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 23:35:27 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Say it Ain't So Joe

SEE LINK....Kinda, sorta my thoughts on The Eagles......but more just wanting to hear a great song by Murray Head..........Landmark will remember this one as Montrealers loved the guy.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 19:48:57 CET 2013 from (92.18.207.110)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Taj Mahal

I was looking for some Taj Mahal and noticed John Simon playing piano on a couple of things from 1970/71. Taj Mahal - Tomorrow Will Not Be Your Day and Taj Mahal - Live POP2 (1970)


Entered at Fri Nov 22 17:49:49 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

And this was Glenn Frey's band with JD Souther.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 17:46:24 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

This is the band Henley was in before Linda's. This song was a local hit in parts of CA.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 17:09:41 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: The same

Subject: The same

Forgot to say: "They're Tearing Labour Camps Down" is a hell of a song just like TOM T. HALL's song about stucking in a motell in a snow storm. Real country! Social, psychological, melancholic, manly.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 16:57:57 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Merle Haggard's melancholic song on labour camps

Good to see RAGTIME posting here again. Yes... those were the days... many Europians posting here, even my compatriots (we are only 5 million Finns), people from India and Algeria and Germany - and even from Norway! Subjects from politics to pizzas.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 14:40:23 CET 2013 from (174.91.164.187)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I dreamed I was the President of these United States
I dreamed I replaced ignorance, stupidity and hate
I dreamed the perfect union and a perfect law, undenied
And most of all I dreamed I forgot the day John Kennedy died

I dreamed that I could do the job that others hadn't done
I dreamed that I was uncorrupt and fair to everyone
I dreamed I wasn't gross or base, a criminal on the take
And most of all I dreamed I forgot the day John Kennedy died

Oh, the day John Kennedy died
Oh, the day John Kennedy died

I remember where I was that day, I was upstate in a bar
The team from the University was playing football on TV
Then the screen want dead and the announcer said,
"There's been a tragedy
There's unconfirmed reports the President's been shot
And he may be dead or dying."

Talking stopped, someone shouted, "What!? "
I ran out to the street
People were gathered everywhere saying,
Did you hear what they said on TV
And then a guy in a porsche with his radio hit his horn
And told us the news
He said, "The President's dead, he was shot twice in the head
In Dallas, and they don't know by whom."

I dreamed I was the resident of these United States
I dreamed I was young and smart and it was not a waste
I dreamed that there was a point to life and to the human race
I dreamed that I could somehow comprehend that someone
Shot him in the face

Oh, the day John Kennedy died
Oh, the day John Kennedy died
Oh, the day john kennedy died
Oh, the day john kennedy died

The Day John Kennedy Died

Louuu
Blue Mask


Entered at Fri Nov 22 14:23:27 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Apologies: duplicate post

Thanks peter v for your excellent summation. Apparently, Linda hads Parkinson's, so has retired completely from singing...

Also, very sad about sredni. My condolences to anyone who may see this.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 14:20:03 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Linda, Bernie, Ronnie and ... Erm...

Just to further cement the answer to the question, didn't an early version of what becam the Eagles actually play as Linda Ronstadt's band?


Entered at Fri Nov 22 14:10:23 CET 2013 from (24.252.157.160)

Posted by:

Calvin

Adam,

Ive done a bit of work documenting Band Live Gigs, as I know you have. Jan's list has the Kezar Fundraiser with Neil Young for 1975, as every list Ive ever seen does. But then he has the WInterland show from April 19th with 1976?. And Ive seen is frequently, and have it myself, listed as 1975.

Now you seem pretty sure the guys didnt play live in 1975, would you be interested in sharing your research?


Entered at Fri Nov 22 10:05:31 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Linda Ronstadt

Linda is interviewed at length in the latest Record Collector (Wings cover photo). She explains that she saw Don Henley performing a cover of her version of Silver Threads and recruited him for her band. She already knew Glen Frey as a friend of J.D. Souther who she was living with and introduced them. She suggested Bernie Leadon to them when they started working together, and her friend John Boylan suggested Randy Meisner. She said:

"If you want to form a band, work for me while you're putting it together and we'll have gigs, When you're ready to sign a contract, you can be your own band."

Linda is a woman of excellent taste. On The Doors she says:

"I used to watch The Doors play every night. I thought they were fabulous. I didn't care much for Morrison's singing even before we (The Stone Poneys) toured with them … I was very impressed with the group and said, 'They're gonna be a big hit band.' But to be frank, I thought if they'd gotten a better singer they'd be a much better group!'


Entered at Fri Nov 22 09:15:53 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: John D

that sounds like an amazing night.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 03:58:52 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Linda, Bernie, Ronnie and ... Erm...

Just to further cement the answer to the question, didn't an early version of what becam the Eagles actually play as Linda Ronstadt's band?


Entered at Fri Nov 22 02:44:06 CET 2013 from (24.105.224.16)

Posted by:

Lil

Rest in Peace Sredni. Another Band family member too soon gone.


Entered at Fri Nov 22 00:27:16 CET 2013 from (108.192.64.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Bill M, Cool to know that some of our ancestors hail from the same part of the world. The other half of my family came mostly from Finland and Norway.

While our Puritan roots may indeed have some attraction to the 'Old Time Religion' of The Band's music, I'd have to say that our forbearers would probably be blushing if they had a chance to read Rompin' Ronnie's interview and his desire to get some "strange". The brother's got a way with words!


Entered at Fri Nov 22 00:13:38 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

From the Huffington Post: "Ronnie Hawkins On Partying Cancer Away, Bill Clinton's Ladies And Retiring After 50 Legendary Years"


Entered at Fri Nov 22 00:03:25 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, Goldy was very active on the inet a few years ago. He said it was a Lowrey and he worshiped at the House of Garth. It was a spinet organ--a home version but no one can recall the model number--that was plugged into just the speaker of a Leslie 147 (the top horn was broken, so the entire signal went into the lower speaker/rotor). The lower rotor's speed increased and decreased much more slowly than the horn rotor, which gives you that slow swirling effect on Steppenwolf's first album. I believe Goldy eventually migrated to the B3.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 23:49:45 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

No problem! Happy to help.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 23:47:56 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Adam

Thanks Adam. I tried to remember the year. Thanks again.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 23:44:38 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

I think the question was did Levon know Sandy Helm at the time "Dixie" was written and recorded. Which, being 1968/1969, the answer would have to be No. Levon states in his book that they met for the first time in the late '70s, circa 1975.

John D, amazing story. But as the Band played no gigs in 1975, I think that concert you saw had to have been August 1976 - Essex Fair, VT... according to Jan's concert list.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 23:21:51 CET 2013 from (24.124.96.66)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Great Ronnie Hawkins interview from Huff Post today

See link above. Damn good interview.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 22:24:39 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Interesting that Goldie McJohn was using a Lowrey on Steppenwolf's "Born To Be Wild". Do you know if that was his usual instrument? Presumably he was as smitten with the Hawks as all the other young Toronto musicians were, so choosing a Lowrey would have made sense, though Goldie did attribute his percussive style of playing to a need to hit the keys on his faulty organ repeatedly to keep the sound going.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 22:03:42 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: My own M ancestors came from the same area (north Essex / south Suffolk) around the same time, though via Ireland. Maybe the Puritan background has something to do with the attraction of the Band's music?


Entered at Thu Nov 21 21:55:45 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pat knows this story. We cut a friend's L100 Hammond in half below the keyboard for easy transport. It wasn't hard, though the solder burns from all those multiple connectors still hurt after 40 odd years. L100s? Easy. We thought we had a business. Then we were commissioned to slice a B3 and it collapsed. After you've cut it, nearly all the weight is in the top half.

Signed, Me, Hernia and scar.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 21:26:53 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Talk of organs makes one wonder about Jon Lord and why Deep Purple has yet to be honoured by the RRHOF........Bill M....That point about Garth is a mystery all musicians wrestle with....."damn I have the same gear as - insert favorite player- why can't I get close to the sound?"......white strats sure look nice but don't get you much closer to Jeff Beck....not sure 10,000 hours of practise will either!.................Thanks JT......Hard to believe it has been one year since we saw that great Dylan show at the ACC......Life is moving quickly.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 21:01:07 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P., yeah, probably around 140, but they weren't top heavy like a B3. Most of the weight rested on the bottom panel.

You know, it is a good question why the B3 was so much more popular than the Lowrey. Off hand I can't think of many other bands besides our boys who used a Lowrey instead of a Hammond, although Born To Be Wild was recorded on a Lowrey. Hammonds did have a well earned reputation for being indestructible, so they held up on the road really well.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 20:44:16 CET 2013 from (108.192.64.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Garth's Special Features

Not to mention the fact that Garth has two brains and five hands. Comes in handy sometimes!

Peter V. The other day you referenced the Revolutionary War vs. The War of Independence. While both terms are familiar, I think that the Revolutionary War is fairly common, and wouldn't ruffle many feathers on this side of the pond.

In another case of Guestbook / real life synchronicity, one of the reasons that I haven't been around here as much as I used to, is that I've been doing some research on the Revolutionary War. I had been doing some genealogical research, and it turns out that my earliest ancestor in America emigrated in 1634 from Northern Essex County in England, which is much earlier than I had previously realized.

As a result of this connection, I've learned that I share an ancestral line with Joseph Plumb Martin who was a Revolutionary war soldier and author of 'A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier' which is a first hand account of his experiences serving during the war. It's a very fascinating time in our history. Another aspect of the War that I've been reading about is the Culper Spy ring which operated between New York City, Long Island, and Connecticut from about 1778 to 1781.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 20:06:41 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

And why aren't all these people playing Lowrey organs anyway, considering the fine example of we-all-know-who?

This reminds me of another SW Ontario organist of the day, a huge fan of the Hawks. At first he wondered what special features Garth had, but then realised that the answer was simpler - that Garth really knew how to play.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 19:46:59 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight

Pat: If I recall correctly from my band days, doesn't the large Leslie organ speaker cabinet weigh about 150 lbs.?


Entered at Thu Nov 21 19:40:36 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, sadly, now it sits in a corner in my garage.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 19:27:15 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Good for you Pat.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 18:39:05 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: A job for Rob Ford? He's got time on his hands and likes to throw things around.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 18:36:07 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Like An Interactive Rolling Stone

For those who haven't seen it, here's a link to the new Dylan interactive "Like A Rolling Stone" video. The song is sync'd in interesting ways with various tv channels. If you flip to Music 1 Classics, you get great footage from the 1966 tour with the Hawks & Mickey Jones.

Thanks John D for popping in to share your wonderful story.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 18:21:41 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, as the proud owner of a Hammond B2 modified up to a B3, I can assure you that the organ itself weighs a bit over 300 pounds. With the bench and the detachable bass pedals, the weight rises to 425 pounds. I had furniture dollies strapped to it and could, in my youth, move it in and out of a van by myself.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 16:41:14 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rod & question about Sandy

It was just pointed out to me that I may have answered your question incorrectly. I was thinking of TLW; not TNTDODD. To my knowledge; at the time of the writing of this song he would have been with Libby Titus.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 16:32:12 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Hammond Organs

Speaking of that Peter, I will be the emcee for a LW tribute Sunday night at Hugh's Room; in Toronto. Bill Avis's son Jerome; will be on drums and Lance Anderson; who produced Garth and Maud's album in London Ontario and is an arranger for all the songs will be part of the band; along with The Webber Brothers and some great session horn players. Recently Lance had a "problem" in his lower stomach that is now being taken care of. The Dr. asked him if he ever lifted anything heavy? His reply was, "Does repeatedly lifting a 500 pound B3 count?"


Entered at Thu Nov 21 16:10:27 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You were lucky, John. Usually when I got in free with bands I knew I had to do it under the guise of helping carry the Hammond!


Entered at Thu Nov 21 16:02:21 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

In all honesty Bill we never intended to go to the show. I just really drove all that way to say hello and have a short visit. Levon's invitation took me by surprise; but we took it. Things you'll do it your late 20's.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 15:18:30 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Mom always like you best

John D: Yes - terrific story. Thanks for sharing. Did you and Matthew have a back-up plan, like actually buying tickets for yourselves if our guys didn't come through?

Staying with mothers, though in this case Den Mother Ronnie, the thought occurred to me that the origins of the bitterness might be in the unbalanced treatment accorded Robbie and Levon by Hawkins in the early days. Think about it: Ronnie promises Robbie more women than Frank Sinatra, but what he promises Levon, according to TWoF, is that he'll soon "be fartin' through silk". Imagine Levon coming downstairs Christmas morning to find Robbie stretched out Caligula-like, being fed grapes by a bevy of underclothed lovelies. And for Levon, under the tree is a single cheaply wrapped Eatons box containing two pairs of fancy drawers.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 14:27:54 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, John. Great anecdote to start the day!


Entered at Thu Nov 21 13:10:20 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Rod & question about Sandy

Yes Rod Levon and Sandy knew each other at the time. I first met Sandy; in the summer of '75. I was working; in Montreal at CJFM-FM. Robbie's Mother would call me from time to time; as she lived there for awhile. One day she informed me that Robbie and the boys would be in Vermont in a couple of days. She even told me the motel they were staying at. So, my friend Matthew and I drove down and camped out in the lobby. Suddenly; in they came. Robbie laughed and said "hey John, my Mom told you; didn't she? Levon gave me a big hello and he had a beautiful woman with him. They all then went to change; in their rooms.

When they came out they all said goodbye except Levon. He stopped and asked me; if we were coming to the show. I said I didn't have tickets. Then he introduced me to Sandy and said, "Tell you what son. We'll just jump in the back seat of your car and you can drive us into the show. If they don't let us in, I'll just tell 'em I guess The Band won't have a drummer tonight." That was part of his genuine kindness and the first time I met Sandy. That night they played out; under the stars; with a full Moon. Watching Garth do Genetic Method and Chest Fever; with the Vermont moon; over his head (a halo effect) was a beautiful thing to see.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 09:35:10 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good point about the 90s set lists, but they really needed to have met Larry Campbell ten years earlier than they did! The Band playing something closer to Dirt Farmer would have been a good move.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 09:00:19 CET 2013 from (58.104.12.73)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Todd

I agree 100%. I have been listening a lot to the TLW recently and it doesn't matter how much post-concert production was done or whatever conflict there was because the final result is absolutely stunning. However, it is good to have the original concert recording so we can compare. When NLSC came out I wasn't all that keen on it - I wasn't all that keen on the seventies sound even in the seventies - but actually there were a couple of really good songs on there that were as good as anything off the first two albums. I think when they reformed without Robbie they should have headed more in the direction of country music which was actually very popular at that time. There is a rich vein of old songs from the twenties through the fifties they could have mined instead of just playing old Band songs. The brief version of Old Time Religion they do on the TLW sounded fantastic. It would have been great if they could have developed that but probably they lacked the creative force to move in that direction at that stage.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 07:30:15 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Evangeline

I love that song . In many ways it's Long Black Veil in 3/4 time. I like the way they mix the accordion and fiddle with a more contemporary guitar. nice.

Did Sandy even know Levon when TNTDODD was written?


Entered at Thu Nov 21 05:06:01 CET 2013 from (108.192.64.80)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Balance

I can't speak to the rest of the internet regarding any specific disparagement of Band members, but my assessment, as a long time visitor here, is that there is very little at this particular guestbook, that contradicts the narrative of The Band as promulgated in The Last Waltz.

The music and process of The Band can be sliced and diced many different ways, from many perspectives, but what ultimately matters is that the five Band members created something special together. At some point I realized that the genuinely unbiased answers to the creative mystery of The Band was and is in the music, and it's there for anyone who seeks the truth. Just listen to the music and trust your ears.

Norman, I was at the first Ramble back in January 2004, and enjoyed many special nights there in the years that followed. Thanks for your part in helping Levon his vision of hosting live music in his barn. Some really memorable moments there over the years.

Thanks to Norman & Sebastian for offering their perspectives.



Entered at Thu Nov 21 03:43:45 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: tribal vision

Kevin: Brilliant yet again. You tell 'em.


Entered at Thu Nov 21 03:08:19 CET 2013 from (24.114.66.221)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Tom M''s LINK and the comments re: Jemima Surrender

.......while the "Comments" section of just about any The Band related article or YouTube posting can be guaranteed to be the spawn of the devil - full of out and out nonsense and hatred - the comments following the Jemima Surrender are - for the most part - rational.....in fact the most rational I have ever seen in this cottage industry of Band song writing discussions.......The exceptions so far are a post by someone ( another "insider" ) claiming Levon wrote 2/3's of the lyrics to TNTDODD while his wife Sandy observed this from the kitchen. The impossibility of this lost on the insider - apparantly .........The other quite disturbing entry ( made even more so because the poster is using the name of a friend of ours at this site ) from someone linking Albert Grossman, Robbie Robertson and Bob Dylan together claiming the ONLY thing they have in unity is their "ethnicity"......apparantly overlooking friendship, brilliance and in the case of Dylan and Robertson - song writing genius. This veiled racism is a common thread in much of the anti RR discussion unfortunately...........and who knew Bob and Albert were Mohawk? Live and learn I guess....


Entered at Wed Nov 20 23:53:59 CET 2013 from (136.167.102.165)

Posted by:

Dave H

"The songs would get a little juicier, the jokes would get a little funnier..."


Entered at Wed Nov 20 18:32:04 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jemima Surrender

Sexual innuendo and double-entendre were essential elements of the minstrel show tradition. As Levon was exposed to minstrel shows while growing up in the rural South, no doubt that was a major impetus from him in the composition of "Jemima Surrender." While "W.S. Walcott Medicine Show" describes a minstrel performance troupe, "Jemima Surrender" creates a song one can envision being performed long ago at such a show, late at night, when things heat up, the moon is so bright and the girls come out onstage to dance & shake provocatively.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 17:38:43 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Research usually involves going back to the period sources which this guy/girl didn't even pretend to do.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 17:34:33 CET 2013 from (75.146.18.190)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Crown Royal and Tylenol

Rocking Chair, you might want to avoid mixing those two again unless you want to be a candidate for a liver transplant, no hyperbole intended. Mixing acetaminophen with ANY amount of alcohol is extremely dangerous and toxic. You can look it up online. Better to switch to aspirin if you are consuming alcohol.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 17:31:29 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Evangeline

LINK to a better song and much more representative of The Band......come to think of it that period of 75-76 that is derided by the other guys as being essentially Robbie's solo period where he was acting "almost completely in isolation" produced some of my favorite Band songs......It Makes No Difference, Ophelia, Acadian Driftwood, Out of the Blue, Evangeline........3 of which were staples of Levon shows over the 30 years that followed.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 17:17:08 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Jemima . . .

. . . reminds me of a Pepé le Pew situation . . .
. . . love the descending figure from the guitar solo into the bridge . . .
. . . it’s a staple of detective fiction that to adopt a convincing disguise, you have to change the way you walk as much as your appearance . . .
. . . “I hand you my rod and you hand me that line . . . we ain’t doin’ much fishin’” is one of the Great Lines . . .
. . . the bits about the canoe and the tattoo seem to have been swapped between their respective verses . . .
. . . the choice of the subjunctive mood is intriguing: “If I were a barker,” “If I were a king” . . . .


Entered at Wed Nov 20 16:28:21 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The "Old Aunt Jemima" Minstrel Song

Not long ago, while reading about Georgia music history, I ran across references to several African-American blackface minstrel troupes that used "Georgia Minstrels" as part of their name. These groups began performing during the Civil War but gained popularity during the following decades. One of the most popular of these early African-American performers was the comedian, dancer & singer Billy Kersands, whose signature song was "Old Aunt Jemima." Like many songs of that genre, it incorporated verses from old field songs from the slavery era. The song soon began a standard with white blackface minstrel performers as well. Two individuals, who had just developed a self-rising pancake flour, were later inspired to use the name for their pancake mix after attending one of those minstrel shows where "Old Aunt Jemima" was performed.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 15:36:01 CET 2013 from (174.91.165.2)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Shakey Neil Young's Bio by Jimmy McDonough

" Look out, Mama, there's a white boat coming up the river" - "Young paints a picture as rich as any John Ford Western. It's the story of a kid barely past his teens who finds himself alone against a band of marauders, dead befoe he can get off his first shot, seeing his face flash in the sky and dreaming of "so much left undone." Somehow Young conveys the feeling of a soul leaving the dying body behind."*

*"I asked Young if "Powderfinger" is an anti-violence song: "I dunno. Depends on how you interpret it. Might be. I think that the crux of it is antiviolent, because it shows the futility of violence. Guy's gonna take a shot but gets shot himself. It's just one of those things. It's just a scene, y'know?"


Entered at Wed Nov 20 14:53:46 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Jemima Surrender

Pat B: to be fair, I detected research. He or she did talk to Bill Janovitz, whose balanced views were reported then trampled by a "but we weren't there." Money's nice, but intellectually it is not a song I'd fight over. Saying that the name'Jemima' is the best "we" (?) could come up with for "a woman of color" reads now like something that coulda come from, oh, ...


Entered at Wed Nov 20 09:00:25 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Whoops! By Revolutionary War I mean the conflict some readers call the War of Independence!


Entered at Wed Nov 20 08:58:42 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Powderfinger

Some (eighteen!) years ago while doing the lyrics on Band articles, I started on "Powderfinger" and gave up in confusion. I found the linked site of discussions on the lyric, and found something with 128 posts of opinions too.

People hear the Civil War, the Revolutionary War ("red means run" as redcoats), the 1812 War, the Vietnam war ("numbers on the side" suggests a modern boat) or a post-apocalypse war.

I dunno. All I know is the best version is by The Cowboy Junkies, not Neil Young.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 06:56:33 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

It's hard to believe that someone would attempt to address the fued without doing a drop of research.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 05:50:24 CET 2013 from (117.67.43.121)

Posted by:

Tom M.

Web: My link

"Jemima Surrender and the endless royalty battle for songwriting credits between Robbie Robertson and The Band"


Entered at Wed Nov 20 01:03:38 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Misleading title

I think Powderfinger is about potential violence of one group on another, having reread the lyrics just now.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 00:52:49 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Knifin' it

Well Kevin.....and Jerry, I really didn't want to get into it...with the Johnny Paycheck saga.

Around 1984, there was a "Cabaret" they call 'em here, out on the King George highway, in the Newton area. In a hotel called the "Newton Inn"

It was a pretty good sized place had a pub, (beer parlor), a lounge, and the "Boot Legger Cabaret". I played music with a lot of the (mostly over the hill) country acts there. Past their prime guys there that couldn't make the big rooms any more.

Gene Watson, Johnny Duncan, Cal Smith, David Frizell to name a few.....and Johnny Paycheck. There was an old DJ in Vancouver, who also was a pretty great fiddle player. Now this feller, (Elmer Tippy) real old school, straight man, and very nice man, very often was out at the Boot Legger, as MC, and introducing these acts.

On a particular night way back then, there was a bunch of us up in a hotel room with acoustic guitars beatin' things up. It may have been Johnny's room, I don't remember. Anyway, Elmer comes and sticks his head in the door, and says "Johnny get out here, your up!) Paycheck has this big gawd damn knife on his belt in a holster. He whips out the knife, pulls a plastic bag of coke out of his pocket, sticks the knife in it and pulls out about a table spoon of this stuff and inhales it....he says, "I don't use cocaine, I just like the smell of it....haw-haw-haw!) I thought Elmer was gonna pass out. We're all walking down the hall then. If you know Johnny, he's got a real man sized moustache for a runt like him. Well it's all WHITE! Elmer says, "Fer chris sake Johnny clean your moustache up, you can't go on like that!) We all bust a gut.....poor old Elmer.

Now another guy, who seemed...... like Mr down home nice guy, (singin in the kitchen), Bobby Bare. Well a girl friend of mine years ago. Had her own act and was a great singer, was on the warmup card for Mr Bare. He invites Tracey into their dressing room after with the rest of the guys. When she's telling me this story, her eyes were big as saucers. You CAN'T believe this Norm, that Bobby Bare had like a sugar bowl full of cocaine....they're all just a bad bunch.


Entered at Wed Nov 20 00:19:17 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Who's gonna fill their shoes

OK...indulge me a little you guys. In the last week of work, I was up & down out of my wheel loader, I don't know how many times. You pull yourself up with your arms into the seat. Down and hook up lines. Back up again.

This arthritis in my shoulders is really giving me hell the last couple of days. Today I'm having a couple of Tylenol, Crown Royal and water, and after I listen to a few of my old favourites I'm going to lay in that hot tub.

I probably have stuck this song up here before. It doesn't apply just to the music business. In our industries, it just seems younger guys just don't want to take the responsibility, or have the ambition to take on these jobs. I still don't find many guys in their 30's even that can keep up to me. My son can, but he's smarter, he builds helicopters.

Any way, I miss George Jones and in this video you get to see all the guys. The thing any of you folks near my age can appreciate in this video is the memrobellia shown. Many of these vinyl album covers you see here are in my collection!


Entered at Tue Nov 19 23:45:04 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Shakey

Kevin J: Indeed! What was his song (Powderfinger) about anyway? I never looked at the lyrics too closely.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 22:37:49 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Welcome to the Hotel California

While he was governor of California, Ronald Reagan's daughter Patti Davis dated an Eagle, Bernie Leadon.

His successor as governor for two terms, Jerry Brown, had dated Linda Ronstadt. In 2011 he ran again and was elected to succeed Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Adding to the Golden State's political/musical connections -- Former Union cavalry officer George Stoneman Jr. was elected for one term as governor. In a reversal of roles from his Civil War experience, he had previously served as that state's railroad commissioner.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 22:36:28 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Norm……From Johnny Paycheck:

“Well I grew old too fast and smart way too slow

Woke up this morning had nowhere left to go

I know every rock and every curve in life's old road

Cause I grew old too fast and smart way too slow”


Entered at Tue Nov 19 21:55:28 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A country song maybe???

Is there a country song in here maybe Kevin?? Doesn't this Toronto debacle seem sort of Texas like.

Maybe Ford is a little like "Boss Hoggs'. Who could play the sherriff........kuukuuukuu!

Reminds me of songs like.."How can I miss you when you won't go away."


Entered at Tue Nov 19 21:19:50 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Question: The Mayor of Toronto.....

......."They got it now, Robbie"


Entered at Tue Nov 19 21:09:01 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Canad eh?

I am prone to watching Jeopardy around dinner (I often eat later than 6-7). Last evening was the first of the finals of the teachers' tournament. A question regarding leaders was posed. None of the 3 contestants could recognize the current prime minister of Canada or, if they knew it was the PM, could not name him. Thankfully, none of the contestants in this threesome was a Canadian.

I think this is pretty typical of what most Americans know about the neighbour in the north. I mention this because of a short article I just saw in the media that said that a Harvard student did not know what the capital of Canada was ("Vancouver or something?")


Entered at Tue Nov 19 20:39:57 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.59)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Joan….I hope that number is not true………As to Rob Ford……Canada is actually much more tolerant of personal foibles than most countries….much more European in that regard but this is a whole other matter of a pudgy rich kid never having accomplished much in his life finding a home of sorts as a renegade councilman ( his one claim to fame having been to proudly make the point each year that he never took a dime for office supplies and the like )…..his family didn’t want him anywhere near the family business….and although there were all sorts of examples of really bad behaviour while he was just a councilman ( being tossed from an NHL game after the couple in front of him reported him vulgar, drunken and really loud! ) …….an election happened in 2010 at just the time that many in the city were completely fed-up with overspending, garbage strikes, settlements with unions that were nonsensical and the lovable cretin that is Rob Ford decided to run for Mayor…..the field was weak, his team concocted a brilliant slogan calling for the “end to the gravy train” and here we have it……………..a right wing nut who spends his free time either roaming the streets of Toronto blasted out of his mind or hunkered down in a basement with Somalian crack dealers and gun runners……..he regularly offends the “little guys and gals” he claims to care so much about by referring to anyone of colour as either a Paki ( his go to phrase for ant non-white taxi driver ) or “football player” – what he shouts out to any young black person he encounters in the street……he drinks and drives, he texts while driving ( this apparently a strategy to woo the female vote as it puts him in line with about 75% of female Toronto drivers! )……he does all sorts of chemicals and loves to smoke pot and pinch asses – not to mentions running down old ladies in the legislature……..BUT BUT BUT….he will do everything in his power to lower taxes…….and God help us……following that strategy – he might just get elected again……oh and a final - "ya just can't make this stuff up" Rob Ford's sister was once tied in with a Canadian chapter of the Klu Klux Klan!

BEG: Thank you for that Rick in Finland clip…..what a soul he was.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 20:26:47 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Beat Goes On

The late Salvatore "Sonny" Bono was elected mayor of Palm Springs, CA and later to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Ben Jones, the actor who portrayed "Cooter" on the tv series Dukes of Hazzard, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia after defeating a man named Pat Swindall.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 20:11:04 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Confirmation

Concerning trade, (just as you have eluded to Jerry.) When I go on line, my news page comes up. Most of what is headlines right now deal with this jerk.

It doesn't matter how effective, (he may have been). Now is now. The video of Olivia Chow, on returning from China on a trade mission, She was asked, (in China)......oh Toronto is that the city where the mayor is a crack addict.) You have to feel for the lady in her embarrassment.

The only people in China who will want to deal with him are the kind you really don't want to be dealing with.

His interviews on American television, Anderson Cooper 360, and the other one, his brother is sitting by his side defending him. Apparently Doug is the real political power.

OK!.Bill what kinda Mafia burg are youze guys runnin' out there. I figure it's all the fault of guys like Bill, Kevin, John...they got him in there -:):):):)


Entered at Tue Nov 19 20:01:14 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: "Big Time, Robbie, Big Time"

Jessie Ventura a governor. Arnold Schwartzenegger a governor. Ronald Regan a president. Clint Eastwood a mayor. The USA is famous for choosing unusual leaders. I'm sure there are more that I am forgetting.

Maybe its not too late for Ronnie Hawkins.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 19:54:55 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Funny thing about political elections

Over the years, some very strange results have occurred with respect to political elections. They often occur when the times are strained economically or when the right or the left have decided that this or that cause is sufficiently important enough to 'get out the troops' to vote. As Bruce Cockburn says, 'and they call it democracy'. That is the price we pay for a system that I wouldn't trade in for any other one of the planet. So, yes, Joan, some unusual results occur and sometimes the public is more disappointed than other times about their choices. Like old newspapers, even the popular electee often gets 'old' and gets thrown out for the newer model. (Kind of like hockey coaches now that I think of it). This mayor campaigned on urban fiscal responsibility and his approach appealed to many. If there were indiscretions that would have made him less palatable to a conservative public (and Toronto is in the main small c conservative) then it sure wasn't obvious before the election and was not discussed. Yes, he was always outspoken but there was nothing about outrageous behaviour that would have sent any warning signals. Sometimes, you have to dig deep to find what can be found. This clearly was not the case here. Aside from his outrageous behaviour, there are still many who point to the good job that this mayor has done fiscally and otherwise for the city to continue to support him. No one has ever written or said that he did not do a good job or did not show up for work. What has happened is that the 'brand' of Toronto in the view of many (Toronto 'the good'/ a great place to live/ a clean city/ etc) has been tainted, some say, by its current leadersip. Effective as a mayor though he might be, this is not palatable to the masses since they see his misbehaviour reflected in their city. Tourism and other enterprises are potential victims when the 'brand' suffers. We shall see.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 19:34:45 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Shelter From the Storm"

An excellent 2005 _Uncut_ article about Bob Dylan's _Blood on the Tracks_.

Some slight references to _The Basement Tapes_, _Planet Waves_, _Before the Food_.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 19:02:15 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mayor Ford

My question is how did he get elected in the first place.

I read a book that claims one out of every 4 people is a sociopath, 25% of the population It is no wonder that we encounter them frequently.This guy Ford and people like the mayor of San Diego feel like they can get away with outrageous behavior.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 18:55:16 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: ford follies

The guy's a buffoon, but for a little while there I gotta admit it was refreshing to see a disgraced public figure who did NOT immediately grab the damage-control-consultant life jacket: contrite "apology," prayer, rehab, etc. etc.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 18:17:43 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I suspect what the Mayor sees in, or rather on, the mirror is a line of white powder. Excellent comment JT, but for some stuff you need contrition, five years of dedicated charity work and then a very humble re-entry into public life.

It's also cultural. French or Italian politicians can happily own up to sexual indiscretions without losing votes, a line London mayor Boris Johnson is cheerfully following. Generally in the UK, screwing carelessly always screws the perpetrator. Hard drugs is going to finish any European politician.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 18:04:05 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Rockin Chair: Didn't you realise that JT's talking about Ronnie Hawkins? Ronnie's at Massey Hall on Thursday, talking about his career. I wouldn't expect him to let the truth get in the way of a, or any, good story.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 17:32:45 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Scrutiny

Very well said Jerry. The disgraceful fact is that some one who has attained the job of being mayor of our largest city, has to have a great deal of intelligence. There fore to not seriously deal with the problem makes this a side show.

With TV cameras rolling and running around in assembly, like a child knocking a lady over is embarrassing to the whole country. One would think his brother may try and help him get a handle on this, instead of contributing to the problem.

Hopefully he will soon see things in the mirror a little better and deal with this so we don't have to watch it any more.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 16:48:31 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Toronto's future

Behavioural indiscretions are a part of the human experience. They occur at all ages, but seem to be more prevalent in the younger segment of our species. With the media and evolving attitudes about public scrutiny, public figures and especially politicians are under the microscope. Everyone has skeletons. In the older times, the media often 'laid off' (Kennedy etc); now no one is spared. That's OK. The target has to show contrition if she/he wants to have a chance at continuing to serve the public. That person must do that with apology and show objective signs which are palpable and obvious to the public so that they can regain the confidence that has been lost because of the revelations regarding their character or behaviour. To fail to do that puts that public figure in jeopardy and destroys any chance that the person can reactivate support and trust. Even with contrition, success is not likely but at least it is possible for a well-meaning individual who wants to continue to function in a public role. To not understand this simple and essential requirement may be the mayor's biggest failing in his public stand today. It is this fundamental lack of understanding that will likely be his undoing.


Entered at Tue Nov 19 16:03:31 CET 2013 from (174.89.93.199)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko 1996 Interview in Finland


Entered at Tue Nov 19 04:45:18 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Almost sounds like a Gene Pitney song - "The B--ch Who Trapped Marion Barry".


Entered at Mon Nov 18 22:25:29 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Who Entrapped Marion Barry?

"The b***h set me up!"

Toronto is behind the times. The mayor of the District of Columbia was convicted of cocaine possession in 1990, after being caught on camera smoking crack during an intended tryst on a hotel room.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 20:51:48 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Politics & Cartoons

In Washington DC.......the country is run from the White House. In Toronto the biggest city in Canada is run from a "crack house".

This Ford guy reminds me of the part Christopher Lloyd played in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." He's going to take the city to court for taking his power away??? This is an individual who clearly has no conscience or shame.

He shows up at the eastern conference football game at half time, gets a beer throwed in his face. In the second half Toronto got out scored by 19 points and lost the game. He must be a real inspiration no??


Entered at Mon Nov 18 20:50:07 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Joey Hollingsworth

Kevin J: Most of us seem to have confused Joey Hollingworth with Diane Heatherington, likely via Joey Heatherington - or is it Joy Heatherington?. Anyway, Joey Hollingsworth was and is much more than a tap dancer. The link is to the first minute+ of his '59 single, "Yow, Are You Hungry Baby". The saxman is Pat Riccio (sr), who a year before had joined Levon Helm and the other original Hawks to back singer Dallas Harms on his first record. Hollingsworth's next record didn't come until '66; on that one he was backed by the Disciples, who'd taken over from Levon and co. on the Hawkins bandstand.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 20:08:46 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: . . . and more Hawk . . . .

. . . in conversation with Geo. Stroumboulopoulos last Friday . . . .


Entered at Mon Nov 18 20:03:44 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: The Wisdom of His Hawkness

Rompin' interviewed for latest edition of _The Globe and Mail_ "habits of highly successful people" column. Really.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 17:28:59 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.212)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: No connection really but reading the tap dancer’s name reminded me of Dianne Heatherington and some crazy rock n roll nights of many years ago……………………..speaking of which…for anyone who has ever been to, stayed at or has an interest in the Chelsea Hotel…..Expecting Rain has a link today to it with some fine pictures…..Last time I was there it was closed to guests ( though still open ) and under renovation….what caught my attention was a plaque out front with some of the lyrics to the L. Cohen song on it…..and no - not the unmade bed bits…..

Legend, Icons and Rebels: Opening sadavid’s link below one is stuck again at just how striking the illustrations are in this book………the Joni and Aretha ones in particular…..stunning……..I remember at that age, my Mom had a piano book laying around and it had a about twenty of more pictures on the front…the only one that caught my attention at the time was one of The Byrds…..I loved David Crosby’s hair in particular…….by the time I was old enough to get into rock n roll and started purchasing music and magazines (remember Circus, Creem ) and saw Crosby again – he had no hair!!!


Entered at Mon Nov 18 16:23:47 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: when Garth first met Ronnie ...

Here's an interesting tidbit from London (Ont) journalist James Reaney's blog:

"Here, thanks to London musician Gerry Fleming, is a key meeting in #LDNont [London Ontario] history ... when Ronnie Hawkins meets Garth Hudson, apparently for the first time. Over to Gerry, who e-mailed this in response to a My London column on the Hyland screening: 'I have had the good fortune to watch the Band grow from infancy at the Brass Rail, when they first came to town. Here is a story of how Garth was introduced to Ronnie Hawkins. Joey Hollingsworth, a local tap dancer, and I were having a late steak in the Pump Room when in walked Garth and sat down with us. He had just came back from playing some gigs in Detroit. He was sick of playing from gig to gig and was quite down, during our conversation the band came upstairs, Joey introduced Garth to Hawkins and the rest is history. I like to think that I was a witness to a very historical moment in musical history. For without Garth The Band would have been quite different.' Thanks indeed Gerry. This would have been 1962 or so, wouldn’t it? Joey Hollingsworth was a star presence in London during the 1950s."

Garth knew Joey Hollingsworth from earlier days in London, where they'd played together at least once. Joey's name also comes up in relation to Hawkins a few years ago in the liner notes to a Lenny Breau recording from the early '60s that emerged a few years ago from somebody's basement. Apparently Lenny turned to Joey when he needed a rhythm section for a jazz session arranged when he first came to Toronto from Winnipeg - and Joey suggested Levon Helm and Rick Danko, who do a commendable job.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 16:01:59 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Music saved my life'

"With her 110th birthday on November 26, Alice Herz-Sommer awaits news if her documentary, now shortlisted with eight films, will make it to the final nominations for an Academy Award".....""“The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life,” directed by Oscar winner Malcolm Clarke, recently received its UK premiere as part of the UK Jewish Film Festival. It tells the story of 109-year-old Alice Herz-Sommer, a Prague-born concert pianist who was in Theresienstadt. Number 6 refers to the north London apartment where she lives."

The film features photographs and rare old footage, and there are many scenes of Alice playing the piano. It captures her moral strength, modesty and humor and she is unequivocal in stating that music preserved her sanity and brought her hope.

“Music saved my life and music saves me still.”


Entered at Mon Nov 18 14:34:04 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR does publicity . . .

. . . on CBC Radio One's book-chat show _The Next Chapter_.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 05:34:27 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

sheesh, i caught the bad habit of other posters here - I misquoted somebody. What T Bone was quoted as saying in the interview is "Digital sound has dehumanized us."


Entered at Mon Nov 18 05:20:31 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: T Bone Speaks: Digital sound dehumanizes us

ummm, alot of this, well, it resembles some things i been bitching about for 11 years.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 04:33:46 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Westie, part of me wants to tell you to stay home, and enjoy and relax the rest of your life. The rest of me knows that all that matters is that you do what you think you should. What you want to do. So, give it hell, ya old tug nut.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 00:55:14 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: WHAAATTT????-:)

Hhhmmmm...............that's funny...I thought it was mid December......I been gone so long-I been gone-gone-gone I been gone so long I been gone.........


Entered at Mon Nov 18 00:43:44 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: pick your poison

Door #1: Revisit the Fued.
Door #2: Discuss Christmas songs in mid-November
Door #3: Revisit the Dentist.

Were RoA and "Rock and Roll Animal" recorded at the same Academy of Music (same week, two years apart)?


Entered at Mon Nov 18 00:40:04 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Ray Materick

You know how when your in a time like at the wheel of the boat at night where your mind wanders around giving you flash backs. A song came into my mind from an old vinyl album of Ray's. I haven't listened to him, or thought of him in a long time.

I'm sure some of you, my friends from the Toronto area remember him, and Daniel Langois, (did I spell that right)? Anyway, there's a lot of music back there Ray did that I really enjoyed. Give this a listen.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 00:17:34 CET 2013 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Old Guestbook Times

Here's my three eurocents... Looking from a distance (in time as well as space), living in the Low Countries and coming in from the long lost 20th century, I am surprised by the amazing continuity in this Guestbook. Same people (partly), same comments, same feud as always... Never A Change Is Gonna Come... And if you want to know 'where I stand': I liked Sebastian's interesting story from a side that always avoided to be loud in judging people. I always hoped someone like him would Stand Up to give us some insightful inside information.


Entered at Mon Nov 18 00:08:44 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Toons

Norm: You are a breath of fresh air! I love Foghorn Leghorn.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 22:41:45 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Argueing---ARGUEING!

I like to argue like Fog Horn Leg Horn.....(my hero)

Son....I say SON! I keep tellin' every one you got a brain, but every time you open yer mouth you make me out to be a liar......Listen to me when I'm talkin' to yuh' boy.....he's built to close to the ground...fast ones keep goin' right over his head!


Entered at Sun Nov 17 21:43:08 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: More than 6 minutes of genius

Arguing about having an argument is definitely the way to go!. No it isn't! Yes it is!


Entered at Sun Nov 17 21:33:59 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: THEE Christmas Song!!

As you watch these pretty pictures, you get to listen to one of the greatest voices of all time.

Watch 'till the end, you get to see my Christmas Card for all of you, with warm wishes for a wonderful safe Christmas Season in what ever way you choose to enjoy it. Also a Happy & healthy New Year for every one.

I've just returned home from a fairly long trip. Moving two barge loads of equipment, and setting up a log storage grounds at this logging site. I've been there many times over several years. However it has been shut down for some time. "Interfor" the company has just reopened the place.

I have taken the road builders, and their camp & equipment, now the loggers. There is also the heli-loggers there. I just hauled a load of logs away for them last month. So there is 3 camp barges there and the heli-loggers have their support barges there, for the helicopters to land on.

There is 5 barges all strapped together there. When up and running in the New Year to full capacity, there will be about 100 men there.....it's a floating town now.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 21:22:30 CET 2013 from (58.104.18.187)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

"Is this the right room for an argument?"

"I've already told you once."


Entered at Sun Nov 17 20:29:27 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: xmas songs

Since no one else has posted it Christmas must be Tonight.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 19:32:25 CET 2013 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: best christmas song

this song and video has got to make the list. I have to think Levon would be a big fan


Entered at Sun Nov 17 17:37:31 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Two cents

And that is my 'two cents'. A penny for your thoughts on Academy of Music, one of the highest rated recommendations at Metacritic this year. Now that is worthy of continued discussion.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 15:54:22 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: No sense

NorthWestCoaster: But the other 50% of history and culture that we agree should be studied makes it all worth it. What I wrote is that we should abandon this particular conversation here on this site. The conversation,with evidence,can indeed continue and evolve if the comments made can be made with evidence-based truth backing them up. Carefully presented information (such as what Norman or Sebastian put forth) may be of value if published with references to back them (as you do in the index of a publication in a magazine or a book). The references point to sources and those sources may then be scrutinized by the reader and then he/she can further source those references for more information. That is how science and history and culture are effectively studied optimally. We have had opinion and hearsay and other forms of comment here on this particular subject for a decade and other than inflammatory remarks in many cases (those above an exception) we end up with division and anger. That is not what is intended, I trust. If it is, we are in some difficulty here. What I would envision is a publication from those who were there leading to a review by those interested and then further discussion perhaps in the comments in those publications (if they are in accessible magazines). Again, to rehash opinion here without references has more negative impact than positive. That being said, art can and should be in the realm of opinion. What one likes in music or painting or sculpture is a personal expression. That we should explore and argue about and comment upon. But character denigration or assassination without reference or facts - I think that is dangerous and in the realm of totally inappropriate here. It demeans the writer and the entire process.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 13:44:52 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Nonsense, JT!

JT posted: "1. Its about the music and we should abandon this conversation since it has been rehashed so many times. Only the primary players no the truth and sadly some of them are no longer here to participate in that conversation " - I agree. I haden't visit this site for awhile and read it all one after another yesterday - and I got bad dreams last night! - So far, so good. BUT if Western civilization should do like you say above it means that we must stop half of all historic and cultural studies. Or even more!


Entered at Sun Nov 17 08:59:03 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: interesting stuff.

A couple of interesting posts from Jeff A and Jesse. They're sort of related. It seems true to me that people just aren't interested in albums anymore and you can see that in how infrequently bands are releasing them these days. It seems like every two to three years now and it's almost like they are just doing it to draw people to their live shows rather that touring to support an album. It's a shame but it's nothing new - the album as a format only dates back to the 1960s where it was probably economical to release a bunch of songs at once on one piece of vinyl. That physical restriction doesn't exist anymore so there's no reason a band can put out a new song every month or so as a new download. The down side I think is that music becomes more disposable. Back it the old days when you to make the effort to go to a shop to by a CD or record you at least felt the need to reward your effort by giving the album a few spins in an attempt to appreciate it. In this day of everything being instantly available it's too easy to move on to something else.

The Basement Tapes project sounds interesting - a bit like what Billy Bragg and Wilco did with their Woody Guthrie release. But as was stated in one of the articles it's easier and safer to do that than take a chance on something new. I just hope Robbie and Garth are asked to participate - and maybe even Bob.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 06:28:28 CET 2013 from (98.249.12.32)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Web: My link

Subject: Favorite Christmas songs

And second, my favorite.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 06:26:56 CET 2013 from (98.249.12.32)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Web: My link

Subject: Favorite Christmas songs

First. Just listen to the raunchiness of the backing band and the tension of the music.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 03:43:17 CET 2013 from (108.217.93.87)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Holiday albums

As we head towards the holidays, I'd love to hear what Band fans consider the best Christmas albums (or individual tracks)...any genre, any era. Feel free to list your top 5 or 10. Which albums get the most listens in your home? Thanks for sharing.


Entered at Sun Nov 17 00:56:55 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Garth in Philly

"Garth Hudson, founding member of The Band, will join The Last Waltz Philly tribute at The Trocadero on 11/30"


Entered at Sun Nov 17 00:20:11 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: writing credits

That article, by John Sakamoto in today's Toronto Star, can also be found at this link.


Entered at Sat Nov 16 18:49:15 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

Jesse

Subject: New? Basement Tapes. From a recent newspaper article.

As an expression of “retromania,” it’s an unusually forward-looking one. In announcing his new label, Electromagnetic Recordings, producer/performer/pop-cultural big shot T Bone Burnett also oh-by-the-way’d his next big project: “completing” Bob Dylan and The Band’s venerated Basement Tapes.

As the admirably hyperbole-free release explains: “Bob Dylan’s music publishing company recently discovered lyrics Dylan wrote in 1967 for informal sessions with members of The Band that later became known as The Basement Tapes. Dylan has entrusted Burnett with these lyrics, and early next year — nearly 47 years since the legendary original sessions — Burnett will assemble a select group of contemporary recording artists in the famed Capitol Studios to complete the songs and record them as a band.”

Given that Burnett has worked with everyone from Gregg Allman and Robert Plant to Justin Timberlake and Taylor Swift, the possibilities are, at the very least, intriguing.

The undertaking also represents what is arguably the only opportunity of its kind in post-World War II popular music: a chance to expand a collection of work that has attained almost mythical status yet is riddled with shortcomings.

As Michael Gray, author of the indispensable The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, wrote about the album that belatedly appeared eight years after the 1967 recordings took place, The Basement Tapes is “Essential stuff, badly compiled.”

I emailed Gray, a Brit who now lives in France, to solicit his opinion about the project, but he quite rightly demurred, replying it was “all too much to surmise.” “Are they finished lyrics, or unfinished? How long has Dylan’s office been knowingly sitting on these? . . . Did Dylan decide not to bother working on them and was it his suggestion that they use T Bone?” were just a few of the not insignificant unknowns he flagged.

Another peculiarity about The Basement Tapes . . . Continued: The original sessions — which took place near Woodstock in 1967 while Dylan was recuperating from his mysterious motorcycle crash — exuded an intangible quality because, as Robbie Robertson tells Greil Marcus in The Old, Weird America, “we weren’t doing anything we thought anybody else would ever hear, as long as we lived.” The “continuation,” on the other hand, will be birthed under the opposite conditions. There will be recording sessions booked in a proper studio, “as well as a documentary film and book of photography” by Sam Jones, best known for directing Wilco’s unblinking I Am Trying To Break Your Heart. In fact, Wilco’s collaboration with Billy Bragg in completing a clutch of unrecorded lyrics by Woody Guthrie may be one of the few parallel endeavours to the Burnett/Dylan project. It also has a nice circularity about it: Dylan was offered the chance to finish Guthrie’s long-forgotten words decades before Wilco and Bragg got to them.

During one of Dylan’s hospital visits with Guthrie, who passed away in the same year the Basement Tapes were being recorded, “Woody had told me about some boxes of songs and poems that he had written that had never been seen or set to melodies — that they were stored in the basement of his house in Coney Island and that I was welcome to them,” Dylan wrote in the first volume of his memoirs, Chronicles. He dutifully ventured out there, but Guthrie’s wife, Margie, wasn’t home. He left empty-handed.

In revisiting that, or any, era, there’s a risk of creating “new old music made by young musicians who draw heavily on the past, often in a clearly signposted and arty way,” as critic Simon Reynolds writes about the titular affliction in Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to Its Own Past. That could be the inevitable — and not necessarily undesirable — upshot of Burnett’s endeavours.

Then again, from his stint as guitarist/pianist on Dylan’s mid-’70s Rolling Thunder Revues all the way through to next month’s Coen Brothers movie, Inside Llewyn Davis — set in the same Greenwich Village folk scene that shaped Dylan’s early career and for which Burnett executive-produced the newly released soundtrack — Burnett seems to have been building up his credentials for just such an audacious task. Of course it helps that Dylan has spent years liberating his canon by treating it with almost systematic irreverence, rendering unrecognizable his most famous songs in concert and leasing his music to the likes of Cadillac and Victoria’s Secret.

Even the carnivalesque album cover for the original Basement Tapes album seems partly designed to repel any reverence for the contents within.

“There was also something disquieting,” Michael Gray observed, “about the specially posed cover photos,” which were shot after the fact in L.A. in the basement of the YMCA, “. . . a suggestion here that Dylan was at once packaging and repackaging his own myth.” Perhaps the time has finally come for someone else to fill that role.


Entered at Sat Nov 16 15:22:50 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Death of attention span

I agree with that columnist. I think the problem relates to the young public's slow loss of ability to commit to anything for too long a period of time. My impression is that most young people need quick hits of interest. So if one has to concentrate too long (whether its a book or a movie or an album),it won't succeed. Popular music now as the writer said is the ability to get a 3-5 minute hit of pleasure. Economically, as is clear from those sales, we see nothing like we used to see as indeed youth has become a bunch of grazers, seeking the quick hits. Its a far cry from what we grew up with. But let me say clearly that there is a ton of very high quality music rising from the young people from the past decade, from The National to Best Coast to Jake Bugg to the Shins to Beck and on and on. The creativity has not disappeared but is growing along with the ability to play instruments beautifully and well and put it all together. That sales don't approach what they could or should is a function of a changing time complete with all that this wireless time of easy access and quick hits brings with it. Don't discount the creativity. It is there big time!


Entered at Sat Nov 16 14:53:16 CET 2013 from (68.196.242.141)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Music Is Dying

This columnist nails it and also nails the greater decline of civilization.

Maybe there is more economic sense in re - presenting already recorded music like The Band back catalogue than there is in making new music. The target audience already exists, decades of advance publicity have already been done,and in the case of The Band, still living controversy helps sell it. RR has always been touted to be a great businessman. Aside from his obvious love of the music, maybe he knows exactly what the hell he is doing from a business standpoint. He has been part of the business end of the industry for ages. New music- feh- it ain't going anywhere anyway. Save the cost of recording- rework, re- present. Save a bundle, maybe make a few shekels.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 22:47:06 CET 2013 from (108.217.93.87)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: Live at the Academy 1971

I finally got my copy of the new box set. Great thanks to all involved in its production. I've only heard a little bit while commuting to work, but it sounds wonderful, and I can't wait to hear the tracks on headphones. It's great to hear the concerts in their running order, but I've got to say that what was done to give us the original Rock of Ages album was also brilliant: pulling the best versions from the different nights, re-sequencing the song order...to give us a truly delightful sense of that special run of shows at the end of 1971.

Thank you Rick, Levon, Garth, Richard & Robbie, Mr. Toussaint & the horn section, the engineers, etc. Great job!

Have a great weekend everybody!


Entered at Fri Nov 15 21:59:08 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I hope you're not suggesting anything that anything untoward will be taking place. We Torontonians are pretty sensitive about loose allegations these days, as you may have heard.

sadavid: "Harvest moon shinin' down from the sky / A weary sign for all / I'm gonna leave this one-horse town / Had to stall till the Fall, now I'm gonna crawl". Some brilliant and discussable lines to make a handful of simple points. "Capless, batless ..." from another Robbie song does that too.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 21:20:11 CET 2013 from (136.167.102.165)

Posted by:

Dave H

Should be *four* solo Manuel compositions--forgot "Orange Juice BLues."


Entered at Fri Nov 15 21:18:18 CET 2013 from (136.167.102.165)

Posted by:

Dave H

Richard Manuel was another songwriter who was short on quantity but long on quality. Only three solo credits and nine co-writes to his name, but so many of them were major contributions to the early repertoire of the Band. It's a shame he stopped contributing, as the other members have said many times.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 21:04:10 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.212)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....and at the party later tonight.....it will be sadavid and Bill M sitting in the corner.......don't interrupt but do ask for some of whatever it is they are enjoying...


Entered at Fri Nov 15 20:44:41 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: who can you trust?

Bill M: I kinda liked "demi-mode" -- perhaps because at best I could only ever aspire to being half-fashionable . . . .

Re: "Across the Great Divide," I subscribe to a minority (of one?) opinion -- it's always seemed to me that the protagonist is not Molly's (absent as usual) partner but something like her brother-in-law, who is trying to explain to her just how hard it is to be a wild young dude trying to face down an impending future of convention and responsibility (the great divide between instinct and conscience, more or less). Molly's intentions are probably more suicidal than homicidal; her counselor tells her, "I felt that way once, and I got past it."


Entered at Fri Nov 15 20:25:18 CET 2013 from (58.104.24.34)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Rod

I agree with you completely. I am just a fan who wants to try and work out their own opinion on what happened. I know my opinion is of no importance to anyone else but it is important to me. I don't really understand why people object to this area of discussion. I know it has all been gone over time and time again but there are lots of things I don't know that I think I can learn from others.. Often this guestbook goes off topic for long periods of time so at least this discussion is relevant. By the way, I think if Robbie were to come out with boxed sets of what was done after TLW it would mean he was legitimising what they did without him so I don't think you will be seeing that. Same way, I think Levon's side will want to maintain the 'feud' out of respect for his position.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 20:11:09 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Pistol in her hand...

With Brandy Clark's new country song we have the answer from the female perspective, as she catches her lover wearin' just a grin in bed with a platinum blonde and debates what to do. (link)

"I got a pistol and I got a bullet
And a pissed off finger just-a itchin' to pull it"

Fashion concerns, however, cause her to not to lose her head as:

"I hate stripes and orange ain't my color
And if I squeeze that trigger tonight
I'll be wearin' one or the other."


Entered at Fri Nov 15 19:20:17 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: "Ruth" is it? I was thinking something more exotic like "Roux", but the internet insisted on "Rue" ... And thanks for pretending not to notice the demi-monde typo. Anyway, I'm sure the humour of the song appealed to our guys. I was listening to the first few songs on Big Brown on the drive in this morning and for whatever reason was struck by how how humorous / playful / good-natured / they are, aside from TNTDODD of course. Especially "Across The Great (Gender) Divide", where verse 1 has the guy worried about the gun in her hand - and therefore willing to "talk about us", verse 2 sees him back to his default position of talking about himself, and verse 3 has him back worrying about the gun (and talking about us).


Entered at Fri Nov 15 18:11:26 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rick's credits

In comparison, Rick's songwriting credits may be not great in number, but several are certainly substantial in quality. As a musician he had a unique quirkiness that was appealing, like that of his singing style. This is perhaps best personified in the music he composed for Dylan's lyrics in "This Wheel's On Fire." Two other examples immediately come to mind -- his collaborations with Bobby Charles in "Small Town Talk" and "All Our Past Times" with Eric Clapton. Then there's the playful humor in "Java Blues" and the emotion invoked in "Sweet Romance" from the collaborations with Emmet Grogan on his 1977 solo album.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 17:43:42 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.212)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko

"I looked back once/I can't look anymore"

LINK to Rick and the wonderful group of Danko/Fjeld/Andersen..........listening to this can't help but make you feel just a little bit better....thanks David and you're welcome John.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 16:55:55 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: ruthless

Bill M: surely you mean Mme. _Ruth_ - you know, that gypsy with the gold-capped tooth . . . .


Entered at Fri Nov 15 16:38:11 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: It may not reflect well on me, but what comes to mind whenever Robbie visits the demi-mode in his songs, including that one, is the Coasters' visit to Madame Rue the gypsy down at 34th and Vine. And you know how that turned out - shattered glass and an offended police officer.


Entered at Fri Nov 15 16:19:06 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Facts

From 'Crosseyed and Painless; - Talking Heads. ....... How did David Byrne know this discussion was going to occur? (How To Be A Clairvoyant maybe?)

"I'm ready to leave-I push the fact in front of me

Facts lost-Facts are never what they seem to be

Nothing there!-No information left of any kind

Lifting my head-Looking for danger signs

There was a line/There was a formula

Sharp as a knife/Facts cut a hole in us

There was a line/There was a formula

Sharp as a knife/Facts cut a hole in us

I'm still waiting...I'm still waiting...I'm still waiting...

I'm still waiting...I'm still waiting...I'm still waiting...

I'm still waiting...I'm still waiting... The feeling returns/Whenever we close out eyes

Lifting my head/looking around inside

The island of doubt-It's like the taste of medicine

Working by hindsight-Got the message from the oxygen

Making a list-Find the cost of opportunity

Doing it right-Facts are useless in emergencies

The feeling returns/Whenever we close out eyes

Lifting my head/Looking around inside.

Facts are simple and facts are straight

Facts are lazy and facts are late

Facts all come with points of view

Facts don't do what I want them to

Facts just twist the truth around

Facts are living turned inside out

Facts are getting the best of them

Facts are nothing on the face of things

Facts don't stain the furniture

Facts go out and slam the door

Facts are written all over your face

Facts continue to change their shape "


Entered at Fri Nov 15 05:52:27 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I've enjoyed reading the comments posted over the last few days and have no issues with this discussion as long as it doesn't dissolve into personal attacks - which it hasn't. As a Band fanatic I will lap up whatever information is available and try to figure out for myself what to believe. Any thing that explains why my biggest musical influence dissolved the way it did is priceless to me.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 22:54:48 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

I agree with the comments about a complete history of The Band being essential. I have been steadily working on just that... gathering every bootleg recording (and cataloging the official ones) from every decade and lineup of the group.

I am almost finished with "The Band" 1968-1978. All the unofficial live recordings, cleaned up and edited in lossless quality, as DVDr archives. After I finish that main period, I'll continue with "The Hawks" 1960-1967, and "The Band & Friends" 1983-1999.

It was Dr. John's "Patriotic Flag Waver" from the Babylon LP that the guys sent blaring through Sammy Davis' pool speakers.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 22:44:28 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Kevin J

Thank you for the comments Kevin J. Well I'm off to listen to The Band. Play nice everybody. bob w I'm comin' home.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 22:26:26 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: Rick did have a half-dozen or so co-writing credits on the two albums he recorded with Eric Andersen and Jonas Fjeld in the '90s.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 21:26:49 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.212)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…and of course “the facts” on songwriting credits on the post Last Waltz albums by The Band speak for themselves as facts. Garth, I believe, had only one songwriting credit on the 35 songs which were contained on Jericho, Jubilation and High on the Hog. On the first two albums which I have, Levon has one co-write and Rick none and Garth none. So the facts are that the one for all and all for one didn’t happen in the post RR either.

For the record, John’s line of “I fell in love with the music of The Band. Not their business practices.” Probably best represents where we really all should be on this……….Norman was a gentleman in how he presented his case…in both clearly expressing his disturbance in seeing how some artists can get themselves into unfair contracts and stating as his opinion only that all members should share all writing credits. I disagree strongly but at least this is an example of a discussion without the participants resorting to hateful speech against any member of a band that has meant so much to me in my life – in all of our lives – I would think.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 21:24:45 CET 2013 from (71.198.227.139)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There
Web: My link

Subject: Tom, Tom

...Nothing so near ...

...Nothing so far away...

...nothing so true...

...yet so much a lie...



Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:30:26 CET 2013 from (58.104.13.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: John D

I understand what you are saying but from a philosophical point of view you are just digging yourself in to a deeper hole. Your argument rests on the assumption that there are such things as object 'facts'. If two people witness the same incident, they will both have differing interpretations of what happened because they see the incident from different perspectives. How do you decide which interpretation is correct?


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:29:49 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Hills Were Alive With the Sound

sadavid: I think you're correct. Based on John Simon's recent interview, it may have indeed been Dr. John. Appropriately, Mr. Rebennack later recorded "Hollywood Be Thy Name," produced by Bob Ezrin.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:23:49 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

David P, thank you for that little trip back in history. That is the kind of history i like being reported here

JT, very well summed up I come here to hear about the music I love and the folks who made it possible


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:20:32 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: sunset strippers

David P: love those historical connections - good stuff!

But I think (can't recall the source(s)) it was playback of someone else's LP that inadvertently assaulted the peaceful hills of Hollywood . . . might've been _The Night Tripper_ . . . .


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:20:01 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John D: The following quote, with variation, is often attributed to the late American politician Daniel Patrick Monihan:

"You are entitled to your own opinions, but you are not entitled to your own facts."


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:08:33 CET 2013 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: pa

Subject: Planet Waves

The money thing is really no body's business. Sebastain - can you get some inside info on the Planet Waves session from your father - that is much more interesting.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 20:01:27 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Wallsend

I'm going to try this one mo' time. I should probably have never used the term, Re-writing History, based on the way Wallsend interpreted me. What I should have said....to be clear........is the "re-writing of facts." I find this happens a lot when some people attempt to tell a story from years ago and forget there are still people around that actually remember what happend. In some cases they were there. Then you call them on it. I've caught people doing it. Sometimes it's not done on purpose; but they have either forgotten what really happend; or like I've seen many many times.......lack of research. Hope that makes it clear.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 19:20:07 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Somewhere Over the Sunset Strip

When The Band set up a make-shift studio in Sammy Davis Jr.'s poolhouse in the spring of 1969, they were standing on what was already historical ground in Hollywood. The house and property, nestled in the hills above Sunset Strip, had formerly been owned by Judy Garland and her husband, the director Vincente Minelli. It is where their child little Liza grew up; where she first learned to talk & walk and, no doubt, first heard her mother's beautiful singing voice. It was also where Mr. Davis built that poolhouse, or cabana, as they say in Hollywood. A place where, years later, other beautiful voices would echo.

In a Hollywood-worthy plot twist, we should note that, some seven years later, Robbie Robertson would recruit director Martin Scorsese for The Last Waltz project. At the time, Mr. Scorsese was also working on the film "New York, New York," starring a grown up Liza Minelli and Robert DeNiro. According to Hollywood gossip, that tinsel town talk, Mr. Scorsese, at the time, had a relationship with Ms. Minelli that extended on & off the film set. The film's highlight would be Ms. Minelli's rousing version of the title theme, which would later be covered by Frank Sinatra, a Rat-Pack buddy of Sammy Davis Jr. One has to wonder if the members of The Band, while recording at the Davis home, flashed-back to Ronnie Hawkins' promise of non-pecuniary benefits to be enjoyed like Sinatra. The thought that Mr. Sinatra had maybe once been in that poolhouse, where he might have sung a tune while changing, or swung otherwise after unchanging, surely boggles the mind. But I digress.

Imagine the Italian film director Michelangelo Antonioni's visit while The Band was recording at the Davis estate. Upon hearing Richard's haunting voice singing "Standing by your window in pain, A pistol in your hand," the director exclaims "Ah, pistola!" An image fit for a film. Mr. Antonioni was then between films, about to embark on "Zabriske Point," following the success of "Blow Up," two films that also incorporated then contemporary music. Who can forget that famous scene in the latter, where actor David Hemmings enters a nightclub where, on the door there's a poster that reads "Here lies Bob Dylan, Passed Away Royal Albert Hall 27 May 1966 R.I.P" and inside The Yardbirds Stroll On as Jeff Beck demolishes a Gibson 175 guitar. The electrified sound of Dylan & The Hawks still reverberated in London town. That Antonioni would cross paths with The Band several years later, somewhere above the Sunset Strip, is also something out of a Hollywood script.

And imagine that night, when The Band was listening to a playback of what they'd been recording in the poolhouse and, not knowing at the time, the music came loudly blaring out of the outdoor speakers by the pool. The scene, as the cops came calling, had to have been priceless -- worthy of a film scene. And the bells were ringing!


Entered at Thu Nov 14 19:20:35 CET 2013 from (58.104.13.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I can appreciate that some people might get tired of the Robbie/Levon issues being rehashed over and over. However, given the fact that this site is dedicated to a band that ceased functioning fourteen years ago and with three of the five original members dead, I wonder if there are that many new topics to be discussed. I don't mind talking about the old issues because I think new perspectives can continually come up, that is why historians are still talking about the Roman empire. As for re-writing history, history always needs to be rewritten because everyday the past stands in a different relationship to the constantly evolving present.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 19:06:49 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

As i believe Steve used to write: Credit where it's due. Peter, the title "Garth Day" is an invention of yours, not mine. And far fetched, not in the least. Many artists do private events, many would not survive with out them. Some issues would be whether the fee would suffice, and more importantly even, if the man would care to discuss the subject publicly, and on tape.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 18:37:04 CET 2013 from (171.159.64.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Re-writing history

I'm not interested in rehashing things again and again. Obviously we are all fans of the Band on this guestbook and I appreciate that people have different opinions. I am glad to see Sebastian posting here. He offers an interesting perspective. I would welcome Amy Helm or any others with close ties to members of The Band to share their thoughts as well. I think that if you have a thin skin you should not get involved in discussions on this type of forum.

The re-writing history comment I made in the previous was a reference to all of these box sets and archival releases that have appeeared over the years which have basically ignored the post Last Waltz period. Only one track "She Knows" has appeared on the "Across the Great Divide" box set. This is the period that has very littile official documentation. There've been a few concerts released on video and dvd, but nothing released on cd. I've traded tapes and collected bootlegs for years and there is some amazing stuff out there.

People ask for updates about the mythical "Bacon Fat to Judgement Day" box set with regularity. I'd like to know when the archives will open for the material from the 80's and 90's. I remember years ago there was talk of the Mountain Stage cpncert from the early 90's being released, but it never appeared.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 18:24:35 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: The Band: Fully Completely

Ben: I agree that a complete history of the Band that touches on all the lineups, plus solo stuff, would be a fine thing. The best, but seriously complicating, factor is that Robbie and Garth are still alive and still productive - and I think it's reasonable to ask history to wait until such is no longer the case. Personally, I wish for a very long wait.

In the meantime, we can satisfy our need to be involved by discussing what the starting point should be. Even if we go with the adoption of the name, "The Band", technically we throw out Big Pink - and the challenge gets worse ...


Entered at Thu Nov 14 18:10:34 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT's Comments

Here Here. Now I see why you have the PHD and I do not. :-)


Entered at Thu Nov 14 17:32:07 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JTT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Jesse James

Kevin J: You mean Jesse James in the news ... again? I thought that had all been settled.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 17:26:19 CET 2013 from (70.53.47.212)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…….Oh No….it's on to Rob Ford then! Believe it or not he just said something this morning that ties into RR, Frank Sinatra and TLW.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 17:02:09 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Enough please!

I have been following the comments of recent days here with a mixture of interest and discomfort . I agree with John D as you know regarding concentrating on the music. Some comments...

1. Its about the music and we should abandon this conversation since it has been rehashed so many times. Only the primary players no the truth and sadly some of them are no longer here to participate in that conversation

2. Denigrating individuals because of what they might or might not have done is of no value to any reader. Even with first hand experience, it serves no one well at this time to do that (even if true). Like science, I believe that if there is an opinion of value to be shared, it has to be evidence-based with references that can be obtained by all to see. Otherwise, whether true or not, it is confined to hearsay and opinion .

3) I appreciate the comments regarding the feelings of ownership and commitment to one's own work expressed by musicians and authors in the last few days. I get it! I'm sure any of us who love music and prose/poetry and art get it! It is for the composer and artist to comment on his/her ownership and contributions and not for any of us who do not author or compose work to decide who did what and how that particular piece should be perceived in terms of ownership

4) as for re-writing history. That is inevitable and unfortunate when it occurs. Sometimes subtle nuances and events become realities when repeated again and again by one person or different people. Indeed, sadly, that is how our history evolves. There are so many sources (media, social networks, etc) commenting on this or that. Eventually, this 'broken telephone' effect becomes a reality and the primary event becomes mired in untruths or 'less truths'. The truth becomes fabricated like a product in a factory infused with impurities.

5)I get it that some of you were there when events occurred and have a first-hand appreciation of things that occurred and wish to express those without bias so that we get closer to the truth. If so, get your evidence and publish (if you can) not in a place where music appreciation should be the primary concern but in a place where the issues regarding the business of music can be discussed (a book like Levon did (that's OK if that's what he felt), a journal or magazine (Rolling Stone, Uncut, Mojo etc) where readers can read and respond to those comments in an open forum. Trying to make these points here (yet again) serves no purpose in my opinion. Those who have been here for a while have been 'through this movie before' and it is getting old.

6}For those who feel they must support loyalties and maintain the conversation, I suggest that we all know where you stand. The son and the friend and the co-worker all have said their piece here again and there have been comments (pro, con and other) but can we move on now... please? I know these comments were often from the heart and perhaps were in many forms accurate and well-meaning, but its enough now. The stakes have been driven into the hearts far enough and resolution of this issue, no matter where we stand on it (for whatever that is worth) can only occur with comments from those who were there. If RR or GH want to share there views with us in a biography, then perhaps that will amplify the issues. But no matter what they say, the music will be great and will never be diminished. This is primarily a music appreciation site. I think most here agree. Let's return to the music and appreciate all that is The Band (the music, not the people) and all the music that has evolved from it.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 17:00:45 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Norman

First Norman, you have caught me off guard; because I had no intention of posting again; but it's important you read my last few words; of my previous post. In hindsight, I should have saved my re-writing of History thoughts to another site; with different topics. Because; as I said before, my thoughts on the re-writing of History has absolutely NOTHING to do with The Band; or any of its members. Ben just reminded me of the topic; of re-writing history and it's one I am passionate about. As soon as I hit the send button, I thought, "oh oh. I hope people don't tie that into The Band." Thank you for your kind comments.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 15:19:38 CET 2013 from (67.189.178.48)

Posted by:

Norman

Subject: In My Opinion

John, I have read your posts over the years and your impressive knowledge of The Band has always been interesting to me. I think your insightful comments clearly indicate more then just a passive interest regarding this and any other topic that has come up on this guestbook. Could you be more specific about your statement that history is being rewritten? I tried to be careful about speaking to anything I didn't have first hand knowledge of. I tried to stay away from hearsay and present what I said that was speculation as nothing other then my opinion. I am not looking to argue with anyone at all. I was just responding to Sebastian's post to present a different perspective on this issue. As far as who has what authority? I don't know who your are talking about but I tried to put out there who I was and qualify why I might have some credible insight. Its up to the reader to decide whether I am qualified to address Sebastian's post.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 15:11:13 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Just quoting Garth, Jeff. I thought you found that important.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 14:40:29 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: This Site

I'm sure many of you have heard the old ( saying; or joke ) about those who re-watch the same movie over and over again; or re-read the same book. Each time they hope for a different ending. Hence the past few days on this site.

For those of us who have been; on this site for sometime, we remember a time; when the Moderator would just say...."Enough! Let's move on." Thank you jh for finally jumping in. I come to this site to talk about the music.

I read some of the posts of the last few days that are written; with such authority. Huh??? None of you know. I don't know and I don't care. IT'S NONE OF OUR BUSINESS. I fell in love with the music of The Band. Not their business practices. Do I have my opinions? Of course I do. Now after saying my piece, I do agree with Ben generally on one thing. Whether it be film. Art. Music. The News. I don't like it; when there are those who try to re-write History. This is not tied to Ben's reason for writing it. It's just a problem I have generally with anyone.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 13:59:24 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peter, since you are someone who makes his living writing, you should be more specific or clear. What you wrote about writing and sleeve credits, is what i responded to.

Now, on the matter of artists funding their recordings by offering sleeve mentions, up to and including executive producer credits, and live peformances, those offerings have been being made for a few years already.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 13:57:03 CET 2013 from (24.168.42.194)

Posted by:

Butch

FYI Norman knows ! I was there, then,, Norman was there ! WE KNOW the Truth! Levon was deeper, smarter, more musical than any of these 2nd handers know, Taplin sells his version of the truth and that is what it is worth,, very little in Levon's pov, If Norman & I ever collaborated on a book,, well,,, heheheh,,, They better hope I never write mine,, Stephen Davis just released his final edition of This Wheel's On Fire,, check it out,, he also " got" Levon,,,


Entered at Thu Nov 14 11:51:06 CET 2013 from (72.82.166.12)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: songwriting

My comments RR were referring specifically to this guestbook, not the entire internet. I'm sure if you seek it out you can find some very unflattering and nasty things about Levon, Rick and Richard as well as RR. Not sure about Garth, the worst thing I recall reading about Garth was a landlord claiming he was behind on rent and trying to auction off his personal property.

The songwriting issue has come up over and over on this guestbook and whenever anyone makes a post about Levon not receiving songwriting credits, several people respond and explain how the songwriting credits and royalties work and pull out old quotes from Taplin, Simon, RR, etc. Clearly, Levon is not a songwriter. I don't think that's up for dispute at this point. I think the real issue was touched on by Norman in his post yesterday. And that the contacts signed by the four others was horrendous and that they received very little money from the cd's, box sets and re-issues with bonus tracks that have come out over the years. When you consider that both Levon and Garth went through bankruptcies and by Levon's account Rick worked himself to death by touring incessantly when he was in horrible shape in '99, there's something very wrong with this picture from a financial perspective.

My issue with RR "and the suits" is that they are trying to re-write history and act as if the Band ended with RR's involvement and TLW. A true "Musical history" of the Band would include material up to "Jubilation". That's the area that I criticize RR on. He's done The Last Waltz box and the Rock Of Ages and The Musical History box and the re-issues with bonus tracks. How about something that really covers the post waltz period, it could include solo work from all of them such as the unreleased on cd "Between trains". That's the box set that I'm waiting for.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 11:31:26 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

See Simone Felice's website. You can pledge $50 or $100 to a new album, but for $2000 you can have a free acoustic show in your home!


Entered at Thu Nov 14 11:29:06 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thinking about Jeff's "Garth Day" maybe it's not so far-fetched. The latest Linda Thompson album lists sponsors who pledged to allow it to be made. Other artists have tried or are trying to raise funds in this way, including Simone Felice. The idea being you contribute x amount of money, and when the album comes out you're listed and get a free signed copy or whatever. I'd go for two tickets!


Entered at Thu Nov 14 09:17:52 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Jeff, it is pretty hard to interpret what I said as a reference to all sleeve credits. It was in the context of The Band and had nothing to do with credits on any other record. Not Morris Levy, not his secretary, not Chuck Berry, not Alan Price, composer of House of The Rising a Sun, nor Bob Dylan composer of It Hurts Me Too.

So to clarify, years of listening, years on here, lead me to conclude that Robbie wrote exactly what it says he wrote on the sleeves.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 07:30:23 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Hannukah is not till the 28th.

Put the dreidl away Pat.

I do find it peculiar that you you wouldn't be interested in hearing Garth speak on subjects involving songwriting, arrangement, and songwriting that he has participated in.. Or reading an article Garth wrote about the same subjects. Garth has 818 credits on All music, and that is probably an incomplete listing. Those do include composer credits. ( composer is how allmusic credits all songwriters, including those who fall in the more formal category of composer). So, considering all Garth's experiences, i'd think that most people would be thrilled if Garth would speak or write extensively and in detail, or at all, on these subjects. With as many experiences as he's had in his career, i'd think his viewpoint and his stories would be highly entertaining, and enlightening to most discussions involving songwriting, arrangement, recording and presentaion of songs in general. Although, i guess there are people who know so much that they might find Garth's experiences and viewpoints trivial and unimportant.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 07:03:10 CET 2013 from (58.104.11.34)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: JH

Sorry if it was inappropriate of me to have quoted some of the hate comments aimed at Robbie. I just wanted to make the point that a lot of the stuff out there is really nasty. I understand why you deleted it. Anyway, good luck to all Band fans, we are lucky to have this great guestbook. I was really sad when the other parts of the site stopped being active a few years ago.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 06:02:01 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

I am not commenting on the Band songwriting, so please don't misconstrue it as such, but Garth has said he wasn't a songwriter and appreciated those in the group who were. So I guess that wraps it up.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 04:46:35 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Just removed one entry and did a little editing. Please behave, folks. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 04:03:56 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

As strictly a singular point, there's an entertainment business sentiment: All publicity is good for business. The controversy has probably helped sell records.



Entered at Thu Nov 14 03:40:44 CET 2013 from (24.114.66.221)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"I don’t want to speak ill of the dead, but in the three critical years of The Band’s ascendence, I was there every day. Robbie worked writing at the piano or guitar every day. In the first couple of years Richard and Rick did some writing as well. By the third album, only Robbie was taking the time and effort to write. The boys showed up at the recording studio and learned the tunes."- Jon Taplin

"Crawdaddy!: How would you want the Band to be remembered?

Robertson: I would want the Band to be remembered as a real band. There was just a wonderful balance in this group, the way the whole thing worked. What Garth [Hudson] did was completely unique. Nobody else in the world was able to do anything near what Garth would do in the group. Rick, his singing and his playing’god only made one of those, and he broke the mold after that. Richard Manuel could make you cry in a second with his singing, and he was also just an amazing, beautiful soul, too. And Levon is one of the most talented people I’ve ever crossed paths with in my life. Levon taught me so much and is the closest thing I’ve ever had in my life to a brother. So anyway, I just have such warm, fond memories of the Band, and I would just want that to be passed on."

Ben: With respect, if you don't think the abuse RR has taken in Band land is both wrong and disproportionate to any reasonable comparative then you have not been paying attention.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 03:12:51 CET 2013 from (58.104.11.34)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Ben

I don't have any vested interest in any of this. I don't know why I care really but I do. I guess I just loved the music for so many years that it really came to mean a lot to me. I have no ill-will towards Levon and I think what he did with the Rambles was great. However, I used to know this Austrian guy and he told me there is saying in German to the affect that you 'shouldn't crap where you eat'. I think that's what Levon did with his various allegations. I don't know how much money the re-formed Band made in the 80s and 90s but surely the popularity of The Last Waltz must have helped them. I don't think denigrating it because he no longer liked Robbie was a good idea. As for public figures being the target of hate, I have never seen the kind of comments that are directed at Robbie being directed at Levon. People call it a 'feud' but has Robbie ever said anything hateful about Levon (at least in public)?


Entered at Thu Nov 14 02:41:12 CET 2013 from (72.82.180.205)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Wallsend, are you being serous here? I'm quite confident that you can find negative and inflammatory things about any public figure online. So, why should RR be any different? I remember reading some very nasty things about Rick after he died and some very gruesome pictures from one of his last performances were posted on this site for awhile and then were taken down. I certainly don't think that Levon (or any of them) were any kind of saint. From all accounts he could be very temperamental and cantankerous. But, I do think he deserves a tremendous amount of credit for turning the threatened foreclosure of the barn into the Midnight rambles. I hope that many more Midnight rambles are released on cd and dvd. This is what I would much rather have than re-mixes and fancy box sets of previously released concerts.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 02:36:34 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Fratto, Berry, and Freed. Private Event.

Nothing to do with Band songwriting. Only to do with Peter's statement. The writing credits on Maybelline read Russell Fratto / Chuck Berry / Alan Freed. On Nadine They read Chuck Berry / Alan Freed. Fratto was Chess's landlord. Do you believe those credits Peter?

I've seen people who have not written songs try to get songwriting that they do nto deserve. That does happen, yes. I;m not saying that is something that occurred in Band hsitory but it does happen.

Credits can boil down to a legal agreement. Where that falls off the track is if one of the actual writers did not know he was writing, or was impaired at the time of the transaction. There's more to this and there is more history to this but that is all i'm writing. And i have nothing to say about Band songwriting . But Adam asked Sebastian for an article. I have no idea if Sebastian has written songs or not, but, i would love for Garth to write and "publish", a piece on songwriting. It could be two lines, one paragraph, four paragraphs, or ten pages.But if Garth wrote something about songwriting, and songwriting he has participated in, or arrangement or writing contributions he has made to particular songs, that would be of interest.

Hell, there's plenty of Band fans here on the East Coast. Why not hire Garth for a private Guest Book related Band fan event. There's high end rehearsal rooms with great pianos,keyboards, and recording systems in the room. We pool our money. Raise a very respectable sum, 75 people at 100 bucks a head, that's 7500. Offer that to Garth for several hours of him giving a private lecture that includes his thoughts on songwriting his recollections of songwriting he has participated in plus a performance. Record it, give him the full copyright and ownership of the Sound Recording. Aside from the primary recording, no one is allowed to shoot photos or record. What Garth has to say about songwriting would be fascinating.


Entered at Thu Nov 14 00:30:17 CET 2013 from (72.82.180.205)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I found Norman's comments to be very interesting. I've read and posted occasionally on this guest book for a very long time. It seems to me that this recent idea that RR is vilified and the recipient of hate speech is very exagerated. There have been many discussions about the songwriting credits and the vast majority of guestbook posts side with RR on that issue.

There's been a long list of entertainers and athletes who earned vast amounts of money and wound up broke. Joe Frazier is a recent example of this that springs to mind. I don't begrudge RR for earning a vast amount of money for work that he did with the Band culminating with the Last Waltz. I just think that it's a real shame that the others who continued performing as The Band in the 80's and 90's didn't earn nearly as much. I can't believe that it's just due the songwriting. There are references in Levon's book about the other's selling their shares of future royalties away.

I think that Levon is far more responsible than RR keeping the legacy of the Band alive in the 21st century with the Midnight Rambles and his final albums 'Dirt Farmer' and 'Electric Dirt'. I would also love to hear from some members of Levon's family or any of the other's family. I would imagine that Amy Helm would have a very different take on events than Sebastian. I'd also strongly urge everyone on this guestbook to watch 'Ain't in it for my health' to see a snapshot of Levon's later years.


Entered at Wed Nov 13 23:46:22 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A,

Disconnected to any thing to do with Band songwriting - Peter: As you have, one can easily state that writing credits are what they say on the sleeves. But do you believe that who ever it was- Leonard Chess's landlord's girflriend or wife maybe? that got writing credit on chuck Berry and or Bo diddley songs ( i don't recall the details) - actually cowrote the songs?



Entered at Wed Nov 13 23:41:03 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Wallsend, I think it's safe to state that Levon has no "financial difficulties."


Entered at Wed Nov 13 20:25:22 CET 2013 from (58.104.11.34)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Norman

Your suggestion that the various things Levon said about The Last Waltz and other Band related matters over the years was a deliberate tactic to try extract money from Robbie is an interesting one and one I hadn't given any though to. It would certainly explain his abrupt change of heart about the Last Waltz and why he suddenly raised the song writing credits issue after so many years. One thing I don't understand is why Levon (and Garth) have such financial difficulties. I am sure they make more money than I do but I get by.


Entered at Wed Nov 13 19:38:39 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Talking of personal songs, I rate Rod Stewart's new "Time" album highly. It seems that writing his autobiography last year unleashed a wave of memories and inspired songwriting. Apparently he had started the Great American Songbook series after record company executives had told him his songwriting days were over. Well, writing the book really got him going again.

That's advice!


Entered at Wed Nov 13 18:53:25 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's good that people are being frank.

I've had my say on writing credits over the years, and after 45 years of listening to The Band and all their solo works, I long ago came to the conclusion that writing credits were exactly what they say on the sleeves. Some people are writers. Some are not.

What no one understands unless they have written and published stuff, whether music, video or print, is the deep personal feeling one has about stuff you wrote. Legally it was called "the right of paternity" in the UK, though with just cause female writers have protested. Let's call it "right of parenthood." People can say, 'Why can't it be like some punk bands and everyone share," which is reasonable unless you know you wrote it, you created it. Let's take that oft-quoted "Dixie." John Simon in the interview here states that Robbie came with him to Hawaii to finish off ideas for that album with that song complete. No other Band members along. Robbie has described writing it quietly at night on piano to avoid waking kids.

I've lived off writing since 1980, and I know clearly what I do, what illustrators do for me, and what editors, video directors and actors have done for me. I appreciate it all fully. But I know the bits I created, and it's not "share and share alike," because those ideas came from me. It's way stronger for someone like Robbie where we're talking song lyrics, the 20th / 21st century highest form of poetry. That's why it's called the right of paternity.

Interestingly, John Simon, like Barney Hoskyns, has the knack of pissing off both sides!


Entered at Wed Nov 13 18:01:30 CET 2013 from (67.189.212.48)

Posted by:

Norman- In My Opinion

Years ago I posted on this guestbook and I said some things that I deeply regret. For that I apologize to Jan and others I might have offended.

Although I agree with much of what Sebastian has said there are a few points in his post that are--I don't want to say not true but are legitimately debatable.

Let me give you some background on my relationship with Levon and how it began.

In 1999 I hired both Rick and Levon to play at my sons birthday party. It was a great day and I will never forget it. The day was very very hot and Levon couldn't speak other then a very faint whisper. Rick sang and he sounded OK but a far cry from his days with The Band. As far as the relationship between Rick and Levon that day,it seemed to me it was cordial but strained. I think it was because Levon wasn't drinking and doing hardcore drugs anymore. If you have ever gotten sober and subsequently spent time with people you "partied" with you will understand the dynamic that presents itself in this situation. I'm not sure about this but that was my thought at the time. The only two people who really know whether I am right or wrong about this would be Butch Dener and Louie Hurwitz. They were closest to Levon and Rick at the time and could probably speak to the state of their relationship on that day better then I could. I digress.

Anyway, during the party Levon and I spent some time together and I remember having the feeling that Levon had a plan for the future but didn't really have a grasp on how he could accomplish what needed to be done to get where he ultimately wanted to go.

Levon invited me up to his house with my family the following weekend. My wife and kids and I went up and had a great time on the property and Levon was grateful to have the company. Occasionally I would stop by and hang out by the lake with Lee or in his living room by the fireplace. an Over the next eight or nine years I helped Levon work with the bank to keep his house. Although I must say he was pretty damn good at dealing with the bank himself. He would be on the phone with the Bank and make deal after deal after deal with them with every intention of living up to his part of the bargain but sadly when the time came to pay them what he had agreed to he simply didn't have the money.

Either way he managed to, as he would say,'keep the wolves away from the door." He was able to do this for at least two years on his own. Unfortunately, in 2001 the bank began foreclosure proceedings. I took him to a friend of mine and he filed what would be the first of either three or four bankruptcies. All for the purpose of keeping his house.

At this time I was doing what I could for Levon and he was trying to get things going on his end. He was frustrated and said to me--"I never went so long without the phone ringing in my life." At that point he was... I don't want to say scared but he was concerned.

Over the next few years I was able to get some work for Levon in Brooklyn with a couple of friends of mine and good guys named Anthony Delgado and Henry Dodril. They were producers and hired Levon for all their shows. It wasn't much money but it definitely helped. He worked with the Barn Burners and toured with them as often as he could which paid the bills. Obviously he had his royalty checks and they helped too.

As time went by I became close to Levon. Very close.

My relationship with him evolved and our friendship became more then I think either one of us expected it would become. We had fun,arguments,good days and bad days but somewhere along the line Levon realized I didn't want to get on stage, or make money off of him. I just wanted to help him. I stayed in the background for the most part which is why nobody really even knew who I was until Brian,Paul Levon and myself started the Rambles.

The story of the Rambles is an amazing story. He had a vision and he made it come to fruition. He knew the type of people he needed around him and he recruited them.

I am not going to go into the history of the Rambles other then to say the story out there on how they started and became successful is a fairy tale. Not even close. If someone some day wants to hear the story I will tell it.. some day. But as Rick once said to me--"your going to have to buy the book to get the answer to that." Not that I am going to write a book but I will tell the story... some day.

Sebastian, let me say this before I talk about your posting.

Robbie Robertson is the greatest song writer of all time. Their songs are absolutely phenomenal!

Robbie received the compensation he was entitled to under the terms of the contracts that were signed way back when and that's a fact.

However, in the case of The Band it was Levon's position that early on they all agreed they would share equally in the success of The Band. Both financially and musically. Hence the name The Band.

I spent hours with Levon and poured over documents and financials that specifically dealt with The Band, Dylan etc.

Well I poured over the documents. Levon added commentary. lol

Looking back as I read them I remember wondering how anyone in their right mind could sign these. If challenged at the time, in my opinion and in the opinion of others much more qualified then I they would have probably been declared invalid. Drugs and Alcohol were a constant at that time and the need for money probably trumped their desire to make a better deal for themselves at a time when they actually had some leverage to do so. I am sure Robbie wasn't in that good a shape either but in my opinion he was represented by a person who had his best interests at heart. The rest of the band did not have that type of protection. I am not an attorney and I don't pretend to be one, but if your high or drunk when you sign an agreement--it is not a valid contract. It was a stupid thing to do but they did it. David Crosby sold his publishing rights too. Only saving grace was Graham Nash bought them and gave them back to him when he sobered up. The point is they did not understand the implications of what they were signing when they signed the contracts. Were they short sighted? Yes. Bad deals are made every day. But when you make a bad deal with someone you could end up defended it on a guest book 40 years later. Just saying.

From a business perspective your dad had every right to make the best deal possible for himself. I respect and admire that. However, I think the money should have been split evenly between all the members of the band, including the writing credits. That is just my opinion and I know it is controversial but that is how I feel. I know you disagree with that and that is your right. The same as it is my right to make the statement I just made.

Anyway, back to your post. Robbie absolutely knew Levon wanted to make more money off The Last Waltz. I think a lot of what he has said about the movie and Robbie over the years was designed to make that happen. He may have even received money over the years to try and pacify him, I don't know. If he did then what he did and said accomplished exactly what he wanted to accomplish. He needed leverage and he created it by not cooperating and supporting the film and the records. John Fogerty did the same thing. Levon must have had five Lawyers over the years request a full accounting of anything to do with the Last Waltz etc. The thing is when you try to tell someone that The Last Waltz didn't make any money it is virtually impossible to believe.

The bottom line is the Last Waltz did not make money as defined in the agreement they signed. But to say Robbie didn't make money off it is simply not true and disingenuous. They all made money but just a small fraction of what your dad made over the years. I am including what he was paid to work with Capital on re releases. I am including that because anyone of the members of the band would have jumped at the opportunity to work with your dad and Capitol and get paid what he got paid for work done on re-releases. I have seen the annual income and expense statements for the Last Waltz and your dad certainly did make money. Not in the sense that the movie made money and he received any profits but he did make money as a writer, Producer etc. Again that brings us back to the initial debate. Should he have split it all evenly among the other members of "THE BAND". If The Last Waltz hasn't generated any "profits" then the person who made that deal for "ALL" the members of The Band was either an idiot or had an agenda that can only be described as suspect and maybe even criminal. The use of the word criminal might be inflammatory but it's true. The person who made the deal had a fiduciary duty to protect everyone involved and explain in the greatest detail as possible the good the bad and the ugly. I know who Levon blames but I don't know for sure if they are to blame so I won't mention any names.

As far as John Simon is concerned he says one thing one day and something completely different the next. The last time I saw him Levon literally threw him out of the house. I can't remember why but that's what happened.

I am glad to hear you say your dad doesn't care about the writing credits. I am not sure he would agree with you but I am assuming it's true since you said it. I am sure the estates of Rick, Richard and Levon will be very happy to hear that. I don't know if Levon ever personally asked Robbie for more money from The Band catalog but as I said,I know for a fact your dad knew he wanted more money. I understand you are emotional about this issue but I think you need to take a step back and talk to your dad before you start giving away (not that you can)his writing credits. I know that you didn't expressly say that but that was the implication.

I know your pissed and you should continue to protect your father in any way you can. Robbie Robertson is a brand that needs to be protected and nurtured. The same way Levon Helm is a brand that needs to be protected. It's business and should be done.

Norman


Entered at Wed Nov 13 16:26:42 CET 2013 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Legacy of The Band

Yes, thank you Sebastion for Live at the Academy. Really captures The Band at a peak, with the whole greater than the sum of the wondrously talented parts. The set remains in my car every day and I smile each and every time my daughter asks to replay Unfaithful Servant or Don't Do It.


Entered at Wed Nov 13 15:37:13 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Van sings "Bye Bye Blackbird"

Confirmed: It was "Bye Bye Blackbird" by Van Morrison, a beautiful version of a great song sung elegantly by one of the greats over the final credits of "Gerontion" (thank you to the poet for this title) episode of 'Homeland". A lovely ending for a continually stunning TV series.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 22:58:34 CET 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Van the Man and Homeland?

Was that Van Morrison (jazz) over the closing credits of 'Homeland' last evening? It sure sounded like him. It was sublime.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 22:02:13 CET 2013 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Ben Howard – Oats In The Water

I really like the song from this weeks Walking Dead eposide by Ben Howard – Oats In The Water. Is anyone out there familiar with this artist


Entered at Tue Nov 12 20:14:10 CET 2013 from (67.84.79.239)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

When Neil Young is playing - well, see the link. Thanks for that interview link Sadavid.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 17:12:46 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR does publicity . . .

. . . and Brad Wheeler spins a couple of non-committal remarks into an article on 'the troubled soul of the artist.'


Entered at Tue Nov 12 17:10:13 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: deep dark woods

Bill M: apparently the 'S. Davis pool house club house method' - and the L. Helm drum technique - inspired the new album.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 16:47:49 CET 2013 from (67.84.79.239)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

David, yes, it is the music that is the legacy of The Band. Possibly, maybe, there are other legacies that can be attributed to The Band. Certainly there are some other legacies that can be attributable to Band members. But, possibly some agree, the controversy, or controversies, are not part of the legacy. They are byproducts of careers, lives.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 16:34:28 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Legacy of The Band

All of us Band fans should be thankful for the work that Robbie and Sebastian did on the Live at the Academy of Music project. By presenting The Band at their peak performing live, lavished with quality & care, is truly a gift for all of us who love the unique music of this special group of musicians. Controversy & differences aside, it is the MUSIC that is real legacy of The Band and with this wonderful release of remixes we can hear that music in different angles of clarity as never before.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 10:00:36 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Albert Grossman

"Stone Free," Andrew Loog Oldham's third autobiography volume has Albert Grossman in the dedication. I bought the book as a download, read it, and went to refer just now but it has disappeared into the ether. Maybe it's a case of, 'Hey, Andrew! Get off of my cloud …'

Anyway, he met Albert Grossman with Dylan early on in his career, then later many times again. I wish I could have just cut and pasted the quote, but you'll have to rely on my memory. He said Grossman differed from all the other managers in that he socialized with his artists on a friendly, equal level, while most kept some kind of distance or barrier. He said with Dylan and The Band, Albert was around, which would certainly not be true of Brian Epstein. Oldham met them all, and he rated Grossman very highly.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 03:07:17 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Royalties and democracies

Sebastian's description of gross man puts me in mind of managers like Peter grant or John Reid, who were hard, tough, but the artist was number one. Unlike, say Tom Parker, or Sheffield brothers, or many many others.


Entered at Tue Nov 12 03:07:05 CET 2013 from (67.84.79.239)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Four Dead. See the link Comparatively speaking, Levon was lighthearted when it came to band Feuds

I didn't read this article,. but i saw the story on the news before. The TV news mentioned royalties. Of course, there has to be drugs and / or mental illness involved a well. Killing, and suicide, ain't easy.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 20:09:53 CET 2013 from (58.104.5.70)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Albert G

People said bad things about Bill Graham as well but where would the history of rock be without him. There are creative people in the world and then there are people who are "bent out of shape by society's pliers, who care not to come up any higher but rather drag you down in the hole they are in".


Entered at Mon Nov 11 19:38:43 CET 2013 from (58.104.5.70)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I just re-read the chapter on Robbie in Edward Kiersh's, Where Are You Now, Bo Diddley which was published in 1986 and which is available on this site. I think Robbie makes his position perfectly clear in the interview he did: he wanted to move on and the others didn't; he was proud of the Last Waltz and if the others didn't want to be associated with it he was happy for it to be regarded as his project. The comment he makes about not wanting to play in places like the Lone Star is sad and prophetic in light of Richard's subsequent death. By the way, it would be interesting if someone were to go through the Last Waltz and actually calculate what proportion of screen time Robbie gets. It never struck me as being disproportionate. Levon and Rick were heavily featured in the songs, Richard and Garth less so.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 19:28:27 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Here's a positive Toronto Star review of a new album by Deep Dark Woods, who are often called Bandish, as they are here. The link's to "Red Red Rose".

"The Deep Dark Woods, Jubilee (Six Shooter). Somewhere along the line, a switch flipped and Saskatoon’s Deep Dark Woods tripped over the line from very good to “holy flurkin’ snit!” good. Not sure precisely when it happened, but fifth album Jubilee is definitely the album where it all starts happening exactly the way it should be happening for this pack of zoned-out Prairie-rock misfits. Apparently, the lion’s share of the record was captured live off the floor with the aid of Father John Misty producer Jonathan Wilson near Bragg Creek, AB, in a cabin in the woods that, for once, proved not the scene of wanton demonic bloodletting but instead the site of a fruitful and nuanced two-week recording session that effortlessly showcases the Deep Dark Woods’ command of lo-fi psychedelic atmosphere, subliminal groove and the patience it takes to get both absolutely right. The loose-limbed “Red, Red Rose” is smashingly ramshackle barnyard funk in the Band mould, “18th of December” shares some dour sonic space with the Sadies and the remote, plaintive “The Beater” and the 10-minute, album-ending epic “The Same Thing” bring echoes of early, primitivist Pink Floyd to the party. Damn fine. The Deep Dark Woods plays Adelaide Hall on Thursday, Nov. 14. "


Entered at Mon Nov 11 19:15:10 CET 2013 from (67.84.79.239)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Digital Days "Miscalculation"

Sebastian has referred to miscalculation - new designs of smoke and mirrors have arisen.A Bermuda Triangle area where artists, labels, sound recording owners, and publishers, may easily be getting beat to death today is the digital download. How can anyone know if iTunes, amazon, and other "distributors" track accurately, or report and pay honestly? Beyond that, how can anyone know if CdBaby or Tunecore, the gatekeepers or middlemen, report and pay honestly? It seems to be a total black hole, and makes the advent of cds, which were "only" problematic for getting ripped off via the burn, seem favorable, as compared to now possibly being ripped off for a digital sale.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 19:13:38 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: doin' the speculatin' boogie ...

Every once in the while I post an attempt to tie together various strands of Band history and/or Band songs, e.g., very recently, that "This Wheel's On Fire" (minus the chorus) works pretty well as a sequel to "The Weight", or, quite some time ago, that TWOF seems like two songs squashed together - perhaps verses by Dylan and chorus by Danko.

I've also expressed a strong interest in the alternate version of "You Ain't Going Nowhere" that appears in the "Tree With Roots" bootleg - the version where Dylan goes off-script and sings about how the Hawks weren't just "a bunch of basement noise" and would go out and take on the world (or words to that effect). It struck me this morning that the TWOF chorus could be taken as a follow-up to that thought rather than an apocalyptic vision - that the Hawks were ready to explode onto the world stage. And that Big Pinks's gatefold photo could be taken as serving notice that the Next of Kin had been duly notified.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 18:37:15 CET 2013 from (76.173.29.247)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Albert G.

Albert single-handedly changed the game for songwriters creating a world in the music biz where artists reaped 10,20,30 times the money. Using the influence of Bob Dylan, Albert setup a system wherein artists setup their own publishing companies. The Band's was Canaan Music. With this new approach the royalty societies (BMI,ASCAP, SESAC) paid the artists directly rather than the payments going through the record labels where they were often "miscalculated" or just as often never sent to their rightful recipient. He was a mastermind who fought tooth and nail for his artists. Specifically for The Band he got them guarantees for their live performances that was at the top of the scale for any artist at the time.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 15:43:58 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Grossman also comes out looking good in "Four Strong Winds", the story of Ian and Sylvia. Not only did he manage them well, he got them a good publishing deal and a good accountant. I also suspect that Grossman had a good in with US Immigration (and possibly also the draft board), as his Canadian clients, including four of our guys of course, seemed to have magic green cards and I don't think any were drafted. Neil Young mentions in his book that his understanding was that there was an understood going-rate of $5000 (I think he says) for a green card; in Young's case the draft was not an issue because of his health.

Back to publishing royalties: John Kay of Steppenwolf tells, in his book, of buying out a number of his former bandmates - not for some nefarious reason but because his ongoing relationship with the band's brand, and also the fact that he had the money, meant it made sense. So the resurgence of consumer interest in Steppenwolf that came with introduction of the CD was an unanticipated gift from the gods - as it was to Robbie, I'm sure.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 12:46:23 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

Just want to add that I realize learning more about songwriting royalties/publishing is my own responsibility, but I think Sebastian has a very specific point of view and compelling things to say about the situation. How royalties were split up in Beatles/Stones/etc., details about Albert Grossman, The Band arrangements and things going sour for some of the guys. I think Sebastian has important things to say and the facts to change some public opinion. Hell, Sebastian's view on Albert Grossman - labeled by many as a ruthless, evil manager type - being a father figure to RR shows that there are many different viewpoints to an issue. Maybe these things will be addressed in Robbie's autobiography, I don't know. But Sebastian's comments here are in the same category of posts that should be saved and published here for the record.


Entered at Mon Nov 11 09:27:25 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Wembley Stadium

I wonder if this is actually from the same gig The Band played - CSN&Y and Joni


Entered at Sun Nov 10 20:09:57 CET 2013 from (58.104.6.162)

Posted by:

Wallasend

The hatred that is directed at Robbie in the 'comments' section of various websites is out of all proportion to anything that he is alleged to have done. People often start with Levon's allegations and then just make things up. I think Levon's public persona appealed to Tea Party types and Levon's allegations about Robbie being part of a conspiracy of 'suits' feeds in to their paranoia.


Entered at Sun Nov 10 02:02:22 CET 2013 from (69.121.106.182)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

This is in no way a comment on anything that has been written at all. I've got no comments to make regarding any one else's posts . This is an additional comment that makes no other statement beyond the words in it.

Many artists do not dicuss the controversies they may be involved in, either by choice or by fate, or their opinions about these controversies,that are simultaneously financial, professional and personal publicly. Garth may have made some short or semi cryptic references in response to some questions over the years, but that's about it. It's not very likely that Garth will ever go into detail about the subject in any manner that gets recorded. But from my perspective Garth was and is an objective participant and would be an objective historian - if he ever were to go into detail regarding facts, and his opinions about the facts and what happened. That's all I'm saying.

Adam, if you want to know how songwriting royalties work, or any kind of musical royalties or income work , there's plenty of books to read. It would be very easy for you to get literature from BMI or ASCAP.First thing you got to undertsand is that there is 200%. BMI and ASCAP lit is a good place to start.


Entered at Sun Nov 10 00:15:58 CET 2013 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR Songs

Lets just hope RR continues to make music. I actually found the Band by way of RR. I always knew the weight, Dixie etc, but I purchased RR's 1st solo cd back in college before I actually owned any Band material which I guess is why I was always partial to RR. I love all of his solo material. I love Ricks 1st cd as well. I would really be interested in knowing if RR has any outtake material or songs that never made it on his releases. especially interested in knowing more about the material he did with neil young.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 22:38:17 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

Sebastian, thank you very much for your post. For some time now, I have wanted to see an article written by you about all of these issues. How songwriting royalties work, how they worked in The Band, what happened and when, etc., much like you have already described many times here.

I don't want that just to start more fighting among fans, but just to clear the air from someone who knows what he's talking about. Then when people start with those old issues again, you can say "Read the article I wrote. It details all of those issues people made."


Entered at Sat Nov 9 22:07:33 CET 2013 from (69.74.195.10)

Posted by:

KLRon

Location: Torne Mountain

Subject: The Real RR Story

Sebastian, thanks so much for sharing that, I knew we weren't hearing the whole story, I can only hope this will put this to rest once and for all, but unfortunately it won't for some because they warp reality to a point where they eventually believe their own lies and then inevitably have to justify their actions and convince others. Your Dad is lucky to have a son like you....


Entered at Sat Nov 9 22:05:11 CET 2013 from (86.128.176.70)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Sebastian

For what it's worth Sebastian, I think your Dad's songwriting is at the very highest level of any genre of music. I still play it regularly after all these years and it's still outstanding, unique and fresh.

Recently I went to a packed celebration of 'The Last Waltz' in Glasgow. The reaction to the crowd to the songs was brilliant. You should have seen the theatre bouncing when 'Ophelia' was played. I thought how a man's art can have such an effect on people from a different part of the world so many years after the songs were written.

This week I've revisited Storyville. I love this album and have been focusing on 'Go Back To Your Woods' (Robertson/Hornby) and 'Day of Reckonin(Burnin For You)'(Robertson/Rickets). The lyrics intrigue me, I think the chorus of 'Go Back To Your Woods' is great and the music at the beginning of 'Day of Reckoning' is a piece of brilliance.

It must be difficult at times, Sebastian, but I think many successful artistes are subjected to petty jealousies.

Like many other people,I think your dad's music is brilliant.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 22:04:27 CET 2013 from (72.82.162.85)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: the feud

There have been many other rock bands that have had feuds over the years. The Everly Brothers, Beatles, Kinks, Velvet Underground and Pink Floyd come immediately to mind. So, the Band are in very good company and I don't think that "the feud" tarnishes their legacy in any way.

I also want to point out that Robbie Robertson's active involvement with the Band ended with the Last Waltz, while the other members reunited in 1983 and performed on and off until 1998/9 and recorded 3 more albums as "The Band". So, I think the post Last Waltz era of the Band and the solo work of Levon to a lesser extent the other members are vital parts of the Band's legacy and should be archived and released on cd with the same care that's gone into the re-packaging of the Last Waltz and Rock Of Ages over the years. There's an entire unreleased album from the late 80's/early 90's that's been bootlegged as "Tombstone" that should have been released years ago. I would much rather have some unreleased shows from every period of the Band's career 1968-99 released rather then re-packaging and re-mixing the Last Waltz and Rock of Ages material over and over.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 21:16:59 CET 2013 from (74.101.228.216)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Sebastian

Thank you for setting the story straight.It must be very difficult to hear your father being trashed by people who were not "In the know". I think your dad has shown a great deal of class in this matter. I agree that many people love Levon and the rest of The Band, but even those who knew Levon admit he was difficult at times.

Amid all the confusion and rhetoric one thing stands out, the music of The Band. It is timeless, and more and more new people have come to it.

I hope your Dad does write his autobiography soon.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 16:40:20 CET 2013 from (24.108.150.14)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tragedy

"The fact that so much of the legacy of The Band swirls around in this bullshit sess pool of who got what and who got more is a tragedy." The absolute truth of this statement by S.R. must be acknowledged, committed to memory, and finally the controversy must be resolved. Just listen to the music! And again, for what its worth, R.R. is a good man with a good heart and fair business sense despite what some have written in the past.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 11:39:53 CET 2013 from (92.18.187.103)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: 60s music

The above link is a Danish documentary made in 1974 about the music of the 1960s. It should be worth a look if you have a spare three hours.


Entered at Sat Nov 9 10:47:05 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Good stuff Sebastian. I do think you and Robbie need to work on that autobiography. On the song writing issue - I brought an original along to my band a while back. The guys suggested changing a CMaj7 to an Em. They were absolutely right - it makes the song sound a lot better. They're not getting a co-credit though.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 23:58:54 CET 2013 from (58.104.16.185)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Sebastion

Great comment Sebastion. I recently revised my one star rating of Levon's book over at Amazon to include a list of the ten reasons I think the things he wrote about the writing credits are nonsense. The thing that really irritates me is that people accept what he wrote so uncritically. He really poisoned the well with that book. Looking at the reviews on Amazon a lot of people are just looking to find fault. Some idiot wrote that Live at the Academy had been re-mixed to highlight the guitar playing! I don't know what kind of person your Dad is but he is a hell of a guitar player: the 1966 tour, the Basement Tapes; Woodstock; Isle of Wight; all the Band albums; the 1974 tour; The Last Waltz to say nothing of what he has done subsequently. For those of us who loved The Band it is sad about Levon, Rick and Richard but they paid the price for some really bad lifestyle choices.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 23:53:46 CET 2013 from (101.119.14.143)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Thanks Jon L; and back to the topic

Glad you liked it. .

I've always said I'm way too far removed in time and space to comment on the rights and wrongs of the songwriting debate. So thanks Sebastian for some excellent points.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 23:28:26 CET 2013 from (72.82.170.201)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Sebastian and John Simon

John Simon does sound like a bit of a jerk. Does anyone know if he had any contact with any of the Band members (outside of hitting RR up for money)during the past 20 years. He was involved in the production of "Jericho", but he seems to have had a falling out with the Band during the recording or the mixing.

Regarding the Levon versus Robbie issue, I think it's natural that many of the fans would be more sympathetic to Levon due to the seeming economic disparity between Robbie and the rest of the Band.

I agree 100% with Sebastian's comment about The Last Waltz. it's a bit ironic, that the project that killed the Band has elevated their status and introduced their music to many people over the years.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 22:32:48 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

The great author Winston Groom, who has a number of excellent Civil War books to his credit, had to sue to get paid his due for Forrest Gump. Despite the massive success, the studio claimed it the movie hadn't made money.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 22:31:18 CET 2013 from (65.216.194.62)

Posted by:

JC

Subject: Sebastian

I too have grown weary of the "Robbie is the bad guy" mentality when The Band is discussed. I have carefully read virtually all of the interviews available on this site (and Levon's book) and it is pretty clear to me that Robbie, to his credit, took the high road. He could have written a book too I'm sure. Bravo Sebastian for sounding off and bravo Robbie for an amazing, historic career and body of work that will hopefully continue to grow for many years to come. I am a HUGE fan of all the folks involved in The Band. I hope some day their music can just be enjoyed and celebrated without all the gossip.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 22:31:02 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John Simon was pretty forthright in this latest interview, although an edit in the last segment is telling.

Sebastian, thanks for the much needed perspective. I admire your father for staying out of the fray but I appreciate your rising to balance the ledger.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 21:57:14 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Blu-Ray for Hollywood

The MGM/UA film catalog, which included The Last Waltz, has changed hands several times over the years. Most recently Sony swallowed it up and subsequently released a Blu-ray version of TLW. I recall picking up a new copy at the bargain price of $9.99. Although it's the best version yet, at that price it seems as if they were almost giving it away to encourage people to invest in Sony Blu-ray players.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 21:33:28 CET 2013 from (70.55.241.73)

Posted by:

BBBY

Sebastian: Well said! It's about time someone challenged the myths with some facts. Levon is loved on this site as he should be, but it's pretty clear that he was never a song writer. Read Larry Campbell's interview right after Levon died. Watch Ain't in it for my Health where Campbell tried to coax him into helping write a song and Levon basically walked away. And Levon's refusal to participate in the Lifetime Grammy achievment recognition because it was put on by the suits and "what did Richard and Rick get out of it?" was really just sad. The irony is that for all the years that Robbie was being slagged by Levon, by posters on this site and by various supporters, John Simon of all people knew who really wrote the songs and while he did acknowledge that it was Robbie, it was somewhat of a grudging admission. Go back and read the interview in the archives on this site.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 20:59:01 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks for sharing that, Sebastian No negatives whatsoever from me, either!

Indeed, no one gets the promised percentage of “profits” in the film industry. Last month I was reading about a movie taking $600 million … but guess what? It’s STILL not in profit, as apparently “marketing” and “overhead” costs within the system are 50% of the production cost.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 20:48:08 CET 2013 from (24.114.65.29)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bravo Sebastian. I am obviously not even family and the whole nonsense surrounding The Band makes me sick. The very sad legacy of Levon's book is that it has left behind one of the most misinformed, hate filled subcultures that has taken it as its mission to hound every video posting, every magazine or newspaper article , every interview with "comments" that make any reasonable person disgusted that these people even listen to the same music that we all here love.....The Band.............Two other points, this distorted view of songwriting has not just infected the lunatic fringe that know nothing of songwriting or music........some months back here Ian Woodward thought it worthy to post an article by a lady who had written a piece in praise of "The Weight" for a major news outlet.......a couple of thousand words and not a single mention of The songwriter's name.....when called on this, she responded by saying she HAD mentioned the songwriter because The Band had written the song! In other words, such is the merging of myth with reality sometimes that these crazy little lies take on a life of their own and become a sort of accepted truth.

Finally, while John Simon might by prickly when it comes to the royalty questions on the first two albums.......I do give him a lot of credit for being one of the most definitive and straight to the point supporters of Robbie on the songwriting issue:

" Robbie was the one who wrote the lyrics and wrote the music. Wrote the lyrics on legal paper, or whatever he wrote it on, and figured out the chords to the song and dictated the melody and chords to the other players.” – John Simon


Entered at Fri Nov 8 20:05:54 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: two things (neither at all negative) for Sebastian

I heard the story about the initial approach for back-royalties secondhand, with a slight twist: Robbie and three others said yes, but one guy said no - and it wasn't Garth.

Does Robbie have anything to add to the provided here a few weeks ago on the early '60s recording session where he backed Dianne Brooks, thanks to his uncle?


Entered at Fri Nov 8 19:29:52 CET 2013 from (76.173.29.247)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Web: My link

Subject: Elmore Magazine etc etc etc...

A while back I came upon a rather nasty recollection/interview from John Simon that was published in Elmore Magazine. I'm so tired of there only being one side to this story so I'm going to paint another picture for you. After The Band recorded Big Pink and The Band albums and they were gearing up for Stage Fright my dad very much wanted to continue the working relationship with John Simon. He felt his impact on the first two records was a bold one. However, being that he was participating as a band member in the royalties the other guys in the Band did not want to carry on with him. This is not hearsay, this is not speculation, this is exactly what happened. So they moved on...

When The Last Waltz came about and John was approached they made a deal that they all felt would be beneficial. The first two albums were not really selling any more and no one had the vision that CD's, DVD's etc would come into play DECADES later and revive these catalogs. The Last Waltz on paper seems like it would be an incredibly successful endeavor and in some ways it was. It has been an incredible tool that has embedded The Band in rock history on a higher level than if it had never been made but I can tell you that the only people that made ANY money from it were the studios. The deal was setup where the advance and costs incurred interest at a rate that makes it practically impossible to ever pay back. This was revisited as recent as this year and according to the studio we still have not seen a profit... It's the oldest scam in the book. Our credit card companies handcuff tens of millions of people with this every day.

Fast forward a little bit... The reality of the financial situation hits John Simon and he comes back to my dad and asks if he can reverse his deal and get his percentage back on the first two albums. Guess what my dad says? ... He says YES. He would be happy to do that deal but in all fairness John would have to get approval from the rest of The Band. Guess what the rest of The Band says? ... the say no.

Now this brings us to the point in the story where John Simon does this lovely interview with Elmore Magazine declaring that my dad F*&%ed him. For starters if you review these facts I've placed in front of you I'm sure you might have a different point of view... Also this idea that my dad wrote him a check for $64,000 is ridiculous. He told my dad that he hadn't been receiving his royalties so my dad contacted the label, ruffled some feathers and got him his money. Does this sound like someone who's trying to F#$k you? He clearly had the most clout with Capitol and made sure the guy got paid. My dad doesn't pay royalties to people. Capitol, ASACP, BMI etc are the companies that handle this.

Now let's move forward to a few months ago when John Simon contacted my father again about royalties.... He once again requested to get his portion of the back end back from the first two records, but this time he only asked for may dad's share because he knew the other guys and families were not in a position to do that nor did they want to do that. You know what my dad said? You guessed it. But wait, this is where I step in. I'm so sick of my dad getting beat up online and bad mouthed that I proudly present him with this article that his good pal John had most recently done and this is where that conversation ends. Time to be held accountable for the things we do and say.

Now I might catch some heat for posting this but I seriously can;t fucking take it any more. Obviously it goes without saying that I'm biased but for whatever it's worth my dad is incredibly loving and generous. You think he has an issue with co-writes or sharing royalties? Have a look at the credits on his solo albums. The fact that so much of the legacy of The Band swirls around in this bullshit sess pool of who got what and who got more is a tragedy. Here's one more little fact you might like to know. Levon never questioned my dad about the royalties and never requested a change. If you've read this whole rant than I'll leave you with this... Guess what my dad would've done had he asked...


Entered at Fri Nov 8 15:54:00 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Get Back

There was a VHS of the whole show, but I hadn't sen it in years. Wonderful … note how clearly Levon's voice cuts above the others in the chorus. The Band could have done with a bit of Billy Preston's front of stage crowd pleasing stuff in fact! Pity it didn't last.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 15:45:09 CET 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Great playing there, Dlew! I've always loved that Fats Waller song as well.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 13:57:39 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: And thanks NWC

Glad you enjoyed it!


Entered at Fri Nov 8 13:48:47 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Getting off topic again

Billy Preston and the Band... Get Back... I think it's Jim weirder on a gorgeous telecaster... Rick, Levon and Garth are present. Anyway, I'd never seen this.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 13:27:59 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Linux Mint

Subject: Pathetic teachers #2

Just listened to CD recorded in St Remy de Provence and mentioned in my previous post. It surely felt good to hear words "all our BIG ideas come from PINK eighties".


Entered at Fri Nov 8 12:18:52 CET 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Linux Mint

Subject: Pathetic teachers

Dlew, thanks for the link. You should be proud! But my wife is even worse. She has a few students in Oxford, St Andrew and Edinburgh who have promised to invite their former teacher in theoretic physics to Nobel Prize Dinner. BTW pathetic teachers. I have posted wrong information here. Sweden's biggest rock band didn't record in Brad's and Jolie's vineyard in Provence, they recorded in La Fabrique in St Remy de Provence instead. I have tried to intrude both studios but they don't let me in! Only correct info was that this band drank pastis in St Tropez.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 08:13:20 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Woodstock

maybe that's why The Band were reluctant to be involved with the Woodstock movie and re-issues. It may have cost them financially but it's an integrity issue.

Those post TLW years fascinate me - mostly because there's so little written about it. I'm sure a new Band album would have sold very well on the back of the movie. Perhaps the relationships were just too strained or they though they could do better by themselves. I think an album that carred on from The Well and Out of The Blue would have been great.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 05:40:30 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe it was Robbie who said CS&N had to re-do all their Woodstock vocals for the movie. However, any overdubbing of the Band stuff would have been for one of the re-releases.


Entered at Fri Nov 8 02:36:23 CET 2013 from (220.233.229.98)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: 28 months?

If David p is correct, and the solid weight of his record is absolutely on his side, I suspect the 28 months was either a renegotiation of an existing 36 or 48 month contract, or it was designed to end on a particular financial date (tax time or end of a particular financial year).


Entered at Fri Nov 8 00:24:41 CET 2013 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: music

Of all the arts music is the only one of which one never tires. One can only watch a favorite movie , ponder a Monet so many times. But music...


Entered at Thu Nov 7 22:40:23 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

jh: That quote about overdubbing the bass for Woodstock is consistent with drummer Corky Laing's story, in an autobiography for which Levon wrote the preface, that he was called in to overdub the drums on Ten Years After's Woodstock performance of "Going Home" because Ric Lee was undermiked at the event. Laing says he got two gold records for the Woodstock album - one for the 10YA thing, the other for having co-written "For Yasgur's Farm" (though he wasn't yet in Mountain at the time and didn't attend Woodstock at all).


Entered at Thu Nov 7 20:26:07 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: It does seem that a period close to 18 months would make more sense. And the question remains as to whether, following the release of TLW in April 1978 and the end of the retainer period, if they ever signed a proper recording contract with Warner Bros., or did they just walk away from further negotiations?


Entered at Thu Nov 7 18:25:24 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Scott Petito: Bass on "The Weight", Woodstock 1969

From Scott Petito's Facebook page:

"THE BAND / THE WEIGHT (1969.Woodstock Festival)
Several years ago I worked on out takes from Woodstock for a new version of the movie... The audio was awful.. The bass was totally gone..So I actually am playing the bass parts on this version of the weight ..I guess it's ok to tell the secret now.." (YouTube link included above)

"I am also playing with country Joe , a few others I can't recall now... Only 20 some years after it was performed.. Talk about time travel...."

"And I remember Asking Rick if he was ok with it... He said you will play it better then me! ..well I don't know about that...He was always like that though.. I play on his solo record as well 'sip the wine' I said Rick don't you want to play bass on this one?He insisted I play.. He was always gracious in that way....I mss Rick the most of all"


Entered at Thu Nov 7 18:01:51 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I saw the Rascals last night in their Once Upon A Dream stage show. Breathtakingly beautiful.


Entered at Thu Nov 7 17:52:28 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: oo-wee, look at that boy cypher

David P: 28 months? Seems an odd choice.


Entered at Thu Nov 7 16:41:46 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: TLW

As Levon recounted in "This Wheel's On Fire," Robbie & management worked out a deal with Mo Ostin at Warner Bros. to finance The Last Waltz. WB was informed that The Band would fulfill their contract with Capitol by delivering the final required album by the end of 1976 and they would be ready to sign another deal with WB, assuring them that the group would continue to record new material after quitting the road. WB agreed to put up $1.5 million to pay for filming the concert on the condition that Dylan would be in the movie. According to Levon:

"The way it ended up, Warner Bors. put us on retainer instead of under contract. They paid the group $2,000 a week each for the next 28 months, and in return got the album and movie rights to what became The Last Waltz."

Math isn't my strong suit, but I believe that retainer worked out to around $224,000 gross for each member of the group.


Entered at Thu Nov 7 13:38:14 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Can't post on Facebook.

So, here's a post from my blog... The lady singing in the video is one of my students. Ignore the mandolinist, and focus on the fantastic timeless melody of fats Waller.


Entered at Thu Nov 7 08:09:04 CET 2013 from (209.6.68.205)

Posted by:

william

Location: ireland
Web: My link

Subject: the band

super great music keep it going best of luck i be back here.


Entered at Thu Nov 7 03:25:01 CET 2013 from (146.171.254.97)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: TLW overdubs

Rick defintely added harmonies to Cripple Creek and his bass fill before the 2nd verse of stage fright may also have been added (it doesn't appear on every mix). I'd say Robbie's parts were mostly original and carefully edited rather than modified. That could be a reason that Chest Fever didn't appear on the box set - he seemed to have guitar problems during the song (and he started The Weight before Richard and Garth were ready but thats just an aside). Garth should be commended for ensuring he actually re-created what he played on the night. Levon is a class act and one of the more consistent performers in the group.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 23:54:43 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

The 90s Live in New Orleans DVD has the same issue - Rick's fingers on the video are not playing what we are hearing. In concert he had a wonderful free ranging bass that may not translate into a set recorded version.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 22:40:37 CET 2013 from (75.34.59.37)

Posted by:

Adam

In relation to The Last Waltz and overdubbing, I believe Rock Of Ages was more a product of careful MIXING and composites. I've been hearing a lot of evidence that tracks may have been made from different sources (ie Levon from night 3, Richard from night 2, etc.) to get the best "takes" of each instrument. It's just a theory though.

On "W.S. Walcott" from Academy 1971, you can hear on the NYE take that Richard's piano starts up right with the bass on the intro. On the official album, he's mixed out as the guitar does the intro, then the bass joins in a duet, and then the piano comes in with the drums. So careful mixing, as with backing vocals.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 22:10:15 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: TLW

There seems to have also been a business angle relating to the delay in releasing the soundtrack version of TLW. With the release of "Islands" in 1977 The Band fulfilled their contractual obligations with Capitol. They'd worked out a deal with Warner Bros., who released the soundtrack 3-LP set in 1978. So it seems likely that this may have been an added incentive to take their time in preparing for its release.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 22:04:49 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jan, can't find the link. Can you elaborate?


Entered at Wed Nov 6 20:32:41 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Bass on Woodstock "The Weight"

right now this is the first entry on the Facbook page linked to above. see also the comments. hm. this has been officially released on various CDs and DVDs from ca 1991 and onwards. and it not Rick we're hearing?


Entered at Wed Nov 6 19:45:31 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: TLW: Recording, Mixing, and Remaking the Music

Steve Maslow mixed the music for the original film. In a 2002 MIX magazine article, written by Blair Jackson and Chris Michie (link above), Mr. Maslow commented on the challenge involved in the mixing process. As he had a background in mixing conventional music recordings before he began mixing for films, he was well versed in the process:

"The length of the mix was the longest I've ever been on. It was six months, done mostly at night. I had three days off: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's. One reason the film as a whole took so long is [The Band] took the tapes to their ranch and messed with them for a year, overdubbing bass and keyboard and vocal parts. I remember one of the problems we had to deal with was that Rick Danko had all-new bass tracks, and he overdubbed them without regard to the sync fingering onscreen. So part of what I had to do was every time he was on camera, I had to switch from the overdub bass to the production bass and make it sound seemless, which wasn't easy becuase it had a slightly different quality to it. As I recall, there were also quite a few piano overdubs, too, but since you never saw Richard Manuel's fingers, that wasn't a problem."

So overall, broken down, 4/5 of The Band "messed" with the tapes for a year at Shangri-La and then Mr. Maslow spent another six months mixing the tracks for the film at MGM's soundstage facility.

BTW, as far as Richard's piano overdubs, not only did you never see his fingers, some might point out that he had very little isolated screen time period.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 19:33:16 CET 2013 from (174.226.1.243)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Your math makes sense Peter, but it would be helpful to know what percentage of the 80% was actually replaced. We know from most reports that all or most of Garth's organ was replaced due to the electrical interference. Rob Fraboni talks about how Garth had to transcribe every note that he played that night, and then recreate it note for note. That process alone took 3 months according to Mr. Fraboni. Beyond that, I'm not sure how the remaining 60% would break out.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 18:14:43 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Doh! 80% re-recorded. Four-fifths. i.e. four of the five members replaced bits NOT that 80% of the total was replaced.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 18:09:26 CET 2013 from (108.195.5.56)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: TLW

Rod...Thanks. I agree that their general level of performance was pretty high with the exception of some of the technical issues. I just re-watched their performances from Saturday Night Live which were done a few weeks prior to The Last Waltz, and to my ears, everything sounded great. It's unlikely that anything from SNL was overdubbed, especially as it was a live show, and I think that gives us a sense of what they were capable of in 1976.

David P. Your point is well taken, but I don't think that the surprise some of us are expressing is due to the fact that TLW had some overdubbing, and yes, that has been talked about for years. I think the surprise is due to the degree of overdubbing that is alleged to have taken place. "'Everything' except Levon's drums and vocals", as has been reported. It would be nice to know if that is merely an overstatement to make a larger point, or if it is meant to be taken literally. It would be great to get some clarification or corroboration about that from any of the principals.

For what it's worth, I also listened to an interview with Rob Fraboni who was the engineer for TLW audio post production, and he relates that the amount of overdubbing is quite less, with the exception of Garth's organ which had electrical interference in the feed.

I don't begrudge them for wanting to fix any mistakes or glitches for the audio of the event which has to live on for posterity, but it would be nice to know what the actual reality or degree of correction really was.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 16:35:18 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Sorry, my post was inadvertently overdubbed, as I'm having difficulty with the newly installed IE9 on my computer this morning :-)


Entered at Wed Nov 6 16:31:04 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Overdubs

Why the surprise reaction to John Simon's comments about overdubbing TLW in the recent interview? It's been no secret for many years that everyone in The Band, except for Levon, was involved in post-production overdubbing. In Levon's 1993 book "This Wheel's On Fire," written with Stephen Davis, Mr. Simon was quoted on this subject:

"Robbie was right in there were some good reasons for overdubbing the whole thing. Richard wasn't singing well, Rick's bass was out of tune, and Robbie wanted to improve his guitar solos. Also, the horns were recorded out of balance and had to be redone in New York with arrangements Henry Glover and I put together. The great thing was that Levon didn't need to do it over. He got it right the first time, and those were the drum tracks used in the final mix."

The Last Waltz was released some 18 months after the 1976 Thanksgiving concert, leaving plenty of time for the group members, who had the luxury of having their own studio, to re-record different parts. According to the book, Levon wasn't even around at that point. As Mr. Simon pointed out, "Levon was basically gone, because he was disgusted with certain of the business practices."

The overdubbing issue was also brought up in 2002, at the time the remastered versions of the DVD and soundtrack box set were released. As I recall, it was mentioned that Garth had to painstakingly re-recorded all of his keyboard parts because of some glitch in recording the sound of the concert. An engineer, who worked on the surround track remix, mentioned that Rick's overdubbed bass parts were not in sync with the film.

While Mr. Simon's 80% figure may be somewhat exaggerated, there's evidence that at least the members of The Band, except for Levon, re-recorded quite a bit of their respective parts at Shangri-La in the year and a half following the concert.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 16:29:54 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Overdubs

Why the surprise reaction to John Simon's comments about overdubbing TLW in the recent interview? It's been no secret for many years that everyone in The Band, except for Levon, was involved in post-production overdubbing. In Levon's 1993 book "This Wheel's On Fire," written with Stephen Davis, Mr. Simon was quoted on this subject:

"Robbie was right in there were some good reasons for overdubbing the whole thing. Richard wasn't singing well, Rick's bass was out of tune, and Robbie wanted to improve his guitar solos. Also, the horns were recorded out of balance and had to be redone in New York with arrangements Henry Glover and I put together. The great thing was that Levon didn't need to do it over. He got it right the first time, and those were the drum tracks used in the final mix."

The Last Waltz was released some 18 months after the 1976 Thanksgiving concert, leaving plenty of time for the group members, who had the luxury of having their own studio, to re-record different parts. According to the book, Levon wasn't even around at that point. As Mr. Simon pointed out, "Levon was basically gone, because he was disgusted with certain of the business practices."

The overdubbing issue was also brought up in 2002, at the time the remastered versions of the DVD and soundtrack box set were released. As I recall, it was mentioned that Garth had to painstakingly re-recorded all of his keyboard parts because of some glitch in recording the sound of the concert. An engineer, who worked on the surround track remix, mentioned that Rick's overdubbed bass parts were not in sync with the film.

While Mr. Simon's 80% figure may be somewhat exaggerated, there's evidence that at least the members of The Band, except for Levon, re-recorded quite a bit of their respective parts at Shangri-La in the year and a half following the concert.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 13:09:35 CET 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: TLW - confusion?

What exactly does John Simon mean? Is it 80% of the songs on the album or 80% of The Band's songs? And, as per an earlier comment, does a minor tweak on any one song really matter that much? Wholesale changes are another matter entirely.

I am sure you guys will know better than me but am I not right in saying that Robbie has tended to "rewrite history" (as it were) when working on recordings for public release? In which case, this would not be an isolated occurrence.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 12:47:43 CET 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Overdubs...

I don't believe it. Mixes and mastering change things. And certainly some things need overdubbing. And there's a scene where ricks fingers don't match the notes played. And I do believe some tidying up was done. But 80%? 80% of the songs, with some requiring a minor tweak, and others maybe needing more. maybe. But nit 80% of the total. It makes no sense. I don't believe john or Levon are lying, btw.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 10:58:07 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On live recording. Record Collector has a long article on Procul Harum’s Grand Hotel. They booked the Hollywood Bowl with orchestra, and engaged David Pelletier (Elvis’s sound guy, later Springsteen’s) to assemble a custom mono system to fit the bowl. The rehearsal had people saying it was the best sound ever at the venue. Come the night, the orchestra walked on, looked at the mics close to violin level, and lifted them all up high as on symphony recordings, as the sound guy watched in horror … it meant the mics would pick up the rock band instead of the strings. Then the Union sound guy walked in and told them mixing at the bowl was a union job, and banished them from the board.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 10:41:19 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There are almost no live albums without cleaning up and overdubbing, I'm told. One on TLW was mentioned in the past … in the exuberance of the event the bass went out of tune. Nowadays you could correct that without overdubbing, i assume. Maybe he means that SOMETHING was done to every song? Or 80% of the songs? But, no, obviously Dylan, Van, Muddy etc didn't come back, nor Muddy's backing guys, or Neil Diamond's extra drummer. And I really can't see Richard, Rick, Garth and Robbie watching the film and painstakingly replaying parts to sync. But fluffed notes, loud hums, a bit where you a bass goes out of tune and wait to the end of the song to adjust tuning, sure.

BTW, I'm glad that we get a couple of mic feedback bits on Live At The Academy soundboard mix. That makes it real. As I've mentioned, when they remastered "Live at The Lyceum" first time, they took out the mic feedback in No Woman No Cry and I hated it. It was feedback I knew and loved. It's back in the later DeLuxe edition.

Similarly watching a National Theatre live drama broadcast, you can hear coughs in the audience. Reality.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 07:06:12 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Location: NZ

Subject: TLW over dubbs

Todd, I'm with you on this one. The video clips I've got of Wolfgangs vaults show some pretty competent performances - with the occasional rough patch. The audio is very good though and I'm not sure where it originated from. I doubt they actually recorded anything for the box set which also has some great performances. The Band turned in some pretty good performances on the 76 tour. I don't begrudge them polishing up a few things for the movie.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 05:10:46 CET 2013 from (108.195.5.56)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Simon Says

David P., Thanks for the link to the John Simon interview. A key player, as we all know, in many facets of The Band's trajectory. I've always sort of considered him the "fifth Beatle" of The Band. It's always interesting to hear his perspective.

I'm still surprised to hear his assertions that "everything" was overdubbed except Levon's drums and vocals. Props to Levon for nailing his parts. I've heard/read the claims about the degree of overdubbing in the past, but always chalked it up to him trying to emphasize the point that there was a lot of overdubbing. While it's completely believable that bass, keyboards, horns etc. could have and did have overdubbing to fix the inevitable mistakes and glitches that can happen on a live recording, I highly doubt that that Clapton, for example, was brought in the the studio to recreate his 'Further on up the Road' solo, complete with the infamous guitar strap drop being recreated. That moment, which was then followed by Robbie swooping in at precisely the right moment and saving the day, with his own terrific solo, was a key moment of their performance. A lot of comments have been made over the years about Robbie bettering Clapton in their guitar duel, but if was indeed all overdubbed as Simon asserts, then Robbie's solo dominance may not be a fair assessment of the "duel".

Did Dylan (who never plays anything the same way twice) come back into the studio to recreate all of his parts too? Unlikely.

For what it's worth, I do recall Sebastian saying in the guestbook here, that he was surprised to hear the overdubbing claims regarding TLW, and that the amount of overdubbing in reality was minimal. And he undoubtably had a good resource for that info. (if I'm remembering that correctly).

This overdubbing issue reminds me of the comments that I recall reading some years ago from the late great Phil Ramone, that the 'Rock of Ages' recording was all from the "soundcheck". For years I had the impression from those comments, that Rock of Ages was not actually a "live" album. That always saddened me, as it was always one of my favorite live albums, and one of the first that got me interested in The Band. It now appears from the treasure trove of audio that sourced 'Live at the Academy of Music 1971', that Mr. Ramone's comments may have been overstated or erroneous.

I do know that all live albums need some fixing, cleanup, and overdubbing to make a polished final piece, and that it's quite common to do some overdubbing, but I still have to wonder if some of the claims about TLW and Rock of Ages origination may have been exaggerated.


Entered at Wed Nov 6 03:39:50 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Jack Richardson certainly had his share of commercial misses, but on the plus side he had an amazing string of hits with the Guess Who, and also Bob Seger's classic "Night Moves". And then there's the work of his two under-studies / proteges, Bob Ezrin (Alice Cooper, Lou Reed, Pink Floyd) and Jack Douglas (Aerosmith, John Lennon).


Entered at Wed Nov 6 00:56:19 CET 2013 from (174.116.176.214)

Posted by:

BBBY

Howard Stern played TNTDODD on his show today calling the brown album one of his all time favorites. He also played bits of Whispering Pines and Look Out Cleveland and said he regretted not telling Robbie what a fan he was the time he met him


Entered at Tue Nov 5 22:19:19 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: I know that Jack Richardson produced Poco's 1973 album "Crazy Eyes," as I listened to a quad-mix LP version recently. This was the last record Richie Furay recorded with the group, as, frustrated with Poco's situation at the time, David Geffen talked him into teaming up J.D. Souther and Chris Hillman, a collaboration that didn't quite live up to its potential.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 22:16:49 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Of course there was massive re-recording done. I do own the CLW. I was also there. My point is that I had never heard an audio clip emphatically saying it was so. I didn't say it was a first for anyone else. Just me. Anyway bye bye for now.

-30-


Entered at Tue Nov 5 21:39:20 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, that conversation has surfaced many times. There were some A/B comparisons between The Complete Last Waltz (which is available now with video on Wolfgang's Vault) and the actual release, and it seemed somewhere north of 80% was re-recorded. The most obvious example is the beginning of Caravan which approached a train wreck.

Just recently an account of re-recording the horns in NY surfaced--not sure where I saw it.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 21:13:54 CET 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Simon

The most shocking part of the interview was the last part; when John Simon reveals that TLW record and soundtrack was indeed not live; with the exception of Levon.

Levon's drums and vocals were the only things kept from that night. Everything else was re-recorded for various reasons. In the past I had heard that Garth's organ was the only part re-recorded because of a buzz in the line. This is really something I have never heard before; until this interview.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 19:20:30 CET 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, that interview with John Simon certainly provides some interesting perspective--along with a particularly interesting edit.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 18:26:56 CET 2013 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: And Kal's partner in ISP, Paul Cotton, went on to Poco, who were also produced at one point by the same Jack Richardson.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 17:31:50 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

As I recalll, Marty Grebb and Kal David with in a band together with Peter Cetera when they were teenagers, before seperately going on to join other groups where they gained fame. The Buckinghams, Illinois Speed Press and Chicago all signed with Columbia Records and had connections with James William Guercio.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 15:53:44 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: kind of a drag

Pat B: Last night I started to type a post about the Buckinghams but then thought, Naw, who cares? Besides you of course. So, let us not forget that Richard Bell was once an auxilliary Fabulous Rhinestone (Marty's group with Kal David and Harvey Brooks), and that the Tufano and Giamarese LP was produced by Jack Richardson, who'd played bass on one of Robbie Robertson's earliest recording sessions in the early sixties.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 10:12:08 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just remembered years ago discussing limericks with an American who had to think hard about Buckingham. That's because he pronounced it Bucking HAM while we pronounce it Bucking HEM / HUM, leading to an easy rhyme with "them".


Entered at Tue Nov 5 09:44:20 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: There was a young man from Buckingham

...as so many limericks begin. It is kind of a drag that we failed to make the connection. In spite of the British flags, the Buckinghams are one if those bands that had zero impact in the UK . I compiled a CD of the mid 60s ones out of interest. The Buckinghams, The Strangeloves, The Association, Tommy James and the Shondells, apart from Mony Mony, which was number one in the UK

Tommy James has much to say about it in his Autobiography, Me, The Mob And Music. He blames the BBC for banning him after he failed to turn up for Top of the Pops on TV, because Roulette sent him out on the Humphrey campaign instead, as apparently their masters were invested in a Humphrey victory. I think he wildly overestimates the efficiency of the BBC and put it down to Morris Levy not having the local contacts to use his normal chart entry methods.

There was certainly chart rigging in the UK too, but it had its own infrastructure and networks. But there is a significant period, mid to late 60s when a lot of good, successful American chart acts could not impact the British market.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 07:09:36 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Although they are singing live with the track--which makes for some interesting drum flams--Marty proves his vocal prowess on the second verse.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 07:02:42 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

F^ck y'all. Marty Grebb was the keyboardist in The Buckinghams. For a young man growing up in Chicago dreaming of B3's (me), he was part of the firmament.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 00:26:03 CET 2013 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Old times & Low countries
Web: My link

Subject: Marty Grebb

Marty Grebb also wrote Any Way To Say Goodbye, wonderfully sung by Terry Danko and (no one less than) Richard in the first verse.


Entered at Tue Nov 5 00:02:37 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Marty Grebb co-wrote Shine A light on Jericho and Kentucky Downpour on Jubilation. I like the first, though not the second. But the Band connection is strong.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 20:43:43 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight

Also helping to carry the load is the multi-talented Marty Grebb.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 16:52:59 CET 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: The Weight

Also of note in the Weider-Ciarlante 'Weight' are Brian Mitchell and Byron Isaacs, formerly of Levon's band (as was Jim Weider himself in recent years). Both are great players & singers. Levon's band was phenomenal even when he wasn't singing, and in a sense projects like this are one more way to carry on the torch for him. I hope to catch them sometime.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 16:45:12 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: New John Simon Interview

Link to excellent multi-part interview with John Simon conducted by Michael Fremer at Analog Planet.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 16:18:04 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Explanation for Bill

Bitch Slap:-) To open handedley slap some one. Denotes disrespect for the person being bitch slapped, as they are not deserving of a man sized punch. Suggests the slap was met with little resistance and much whining!


Entered at Mon Nov 4 15:20:32 CET 2013 from (72.82.161.210)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: various thoughts

I'm glad to see that Jim Weider and Randy Ciarlante are keeping the legacy of the Band alive. I fully support this. Frankly, Jim Weider worked with Levon for a longer period than Robbie Robertson and probably played the songs far more times than RR did in concert, so I think he has every right to do this. I would welcome a live cd of this. I believe that Garth was doing some Band tribute shows with Professor Louie and the Cromatix a number of years ago. One of these shows was released (without Garth)on cd. I strongly prefer the 90's version of the Band to the '83/'84 version with the Cate Bros. Hopefully some of the 90's shows will be released at some point.

Lou Reed's death last week was a major loss and shock. Despite his recent liver transplant, he seems like one of those people who would live to a ripe old age, like William Burroughs. Definitely the biggest musical loss since Levon.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 14:28:34 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Tronno

RC: I agree that my mayor's a wall-to-wall goofball, even without his personal issues. But what is a 'bitch slap'?


Entered at Mon Nov 4 13:29:14 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Curtis Mayfield

Today's Toppermost is Curtis Mayfield (solo) in a great article by Ceri Taylor … other recent ones include Rob The Organ on Graham Parker & The Rumour, plus two by me: Lulu and Chubby Checker. You can see I'm aiming for street creed. Do comment or volunteer to add more.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 12:47:03 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I know what you mean, and I'd be with you at a Weider-Ciarlante Band gig but not enough other people would realize, I suspect. A musician once described doing a solo gig in a 400 seater, and on the way there seeing that a tribute band (to his old band) was playing the 2000 seater down the road the same night and was sold out.


Entered at Mon Nov 4 09:57:07 CET 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Weight

I'm going to be a grump and say that I feel uneasy about Randy and Jims new venture. I'm sure I'd go and see The Weight if they showed up down here but I'd also go and see those two playing in any band and probably enjoy it more. I guess I'm just not a fan of franchised tribute bands. (Even Old Crow Medicine Show seems like a tribute band without Willie Watson.)


Entered at Sun Nov 3 18:14:29 CET 2013 from (184.145.65.247)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks. I finally managed to hook up.


Entered at Sun Nov 3 17:14:33 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: JH link

Just tried it and it worked fine from UK.


Entered at Sun Nov 3 16:08:46 CET 2013 from (184.145.65.247)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

I'm getting a "bad server response" message trying to open Jan's link via Safari. Any advice?


Entered at Sun Nov 3 14:56:47 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like the name "The Weight" (see Jan's link). Best of luck to Jim and Randy in their new venture. When I look at the ad for "The Platters, The Four Tops & Temptations" in today's paper, Jim and Randy are a damn sight nearer to being "The Band" than any of those three are to being what they're called. "The Weight" is a good way of saying it. When I saw "The Animals" only the drummer John Steele was an original.


Entered at Sun Nov 3 02:56:56 CET 2013 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Nick Lowe - Quality Street

His Christmas record arrived. The attached is track 1, a motivational gospel/rockabilly number -


Entered at Sun Nov 3 02:55:08 CET 2013 from (207.237.211.231)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

More of these, please. Soon. And in NYC.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 20:56:37 CET 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Whispering Pines goosepimples

Me too DP. Those two lines wring the emotions like few others.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Nov 1 19:36:04 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Carry Me Back To Old Virginny

Another Hoagy Carmichael connection: "Carry Me Back To Old Virginny," an old minstrel era song written by African American musician & songwriter James Bland, was the b-side to Ray Charles' 1960 single "Georgia On My Mind" (see link). Louis Armstrong previously recorded a version with the Mills Brothers in 1937.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 19:27:07 CET 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Full English

The Full English is one of my albums of the year. Their live concert Wednesday night is reviewed at the link.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 18:54:46 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: We've used up all of our time

BILL!!!.....gawd damn it.......isn't it time you bitch slapped that mayor of yours??? what a disgrace.

Well I was just down on the Rockin Chair. Doing a little maintenance. Checking water in batteries etc. I have that History of music down there with 5 CD'S and 1 DVD. I stuck that CD into that big system in the ship and let it play, Rockin Chair.

There are many twists you can take on the lyric of that song. We've all had these discussions on the meaning and interpretation of the "Weight" before too.

We've used up all of our time, is clear when you end up staying at it too long. Susan is sad many times, as she says, "I want you to have time while you are still so healthy to enjoy this ship and our last years together. That's what it's all about in the end. Believe me, I'm doing my best.

I have my outfit for sale on Kijiji. I've had over 300 views on it. If any one wants to see the stuff, on kijiji just search, (tug & barge for sale with work).

Just driving home from the boat, (I have this real great FM station from Parksville, called "The Lounge") 99.9 real great music from the 40's to now. As I'm driving home the guy says, "It's better to retire too early than too late." Ain't it the truth.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 18:38:25 CET 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Just looking at the lyrics, "Rockin' Chair" could be seen as two songs mashed together, possibly on the basis that they both featured a Willie. The "Oh to be home again ..." verses could almost make up a separate song, perhaps with a Civil War vibe - as would suit an album with TNTDODD. Come to think of it, without those choruses to tie them to the earth, the remaining verses, lovely as they are, may have been judged as too ethereal for the earthy Big Brown.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 16:57:53 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

sadavid: Here's a link to the later "long-gone rendition" that Clive James mentioned with the "calculated echo of Jack Teagarden cross-talking with Louis Armstrong."

And for another example, listen to the last verse in "Whispering Pines" for the calculated echo as Levon & Richard sing the lines:

"Standing by the well, wishing for the rains
"Reaching for the clouds, for nothing else remains"

That part of the song always gives me goose bumps.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 16:20:26 CET 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: I believe ol' rockin' chair's got me

The Clive James article in the Library on this site has a number of interesting things to say about the track including the "calculated echo" of the Hoagy Carmichael song (hear Hoagy with Louis Armstrong on a 1929 Okeh recording at [My link]).

I'm wondering if Willie wouldn't be better off dying on deck . . . the old man in the Hoagy tune seems mighty weary of being chained to the chair while he waits for the sweet chariot . . . .


Entered at Fri Nov 1 15:54:10 CET 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Willie Boy

Then there's the 1969 film "Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here," based on a book that recounted real life events from 1909. It told the story of a Native American on the run from the law after killing his lover's father in self-defense. The hunted Willie was played by Robert Blake, a follow-up to his role as one of the killers from "In Cold Blood." Robert Redford played the deputy sheriff leading the manhunt and Katherine Ross as Willie's girlfriend, fresh from her roles in "The Graduate" and "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (also released in 1969). While film character Willie Boy doesn't fit that of the one in "Rockin' Chair," one can't help wonder if the name itself had a inspirational ring to it that caught Robbie's ear. After all, as a film buff with Native American heritage, he was more than likely aware of the film being made around the same time he was writing songs for a new album.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 15:41:34 CET 2013 from (106.147.217.20)

Posted by:

aki

Location: japan

Subject: The Weight

We Play The Weight http://youtu.be/UxePXYpEPKg


Entered at Fri Nov 1 14:42:30 CET 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Rockin' Chair

Rockin' Chair is one of my all-time favorite Band tracks, second perhaps only to The Weight. Some essential viewing is this clip (link) from the VH1 Classic Albums special from the 90s, with Levon listening to a playback of the song (starts at 2:18) and calling attention to Richard's vocal range between the chorus and verse. I love watching this.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 14:01:32 CET 2013 from (98.15.190.173)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the foothills of the Catskill Mts.

Subject: Rockin' Chair

NORM- I can see how you would identify with the narrator in "Rockin' Chair." You have spent your life as a tugboat operator, riding the waves as you go back and forth from inlet to island, from rough seas to the gentle rocking of fair weather waters. Now you yearn for a rest and perhaps a rocking chair on a porch symbolizes your retirement.

However, just as many literary characters have an unattainable goal (it brings to mind Gatsby's doomed effort to go back in time to find Daisy) I'm afraid that your work ethic will be your reef and I doubt that you'll ever be able to leave the sea. I spent two years of my life on the ocean, feeling the waves and trying to get down a passageway without bumping my shoulder on a bulkhead (wall). You have to adapt to the force of the unyielding ocean. In port an aircraft carrier looks like a floating city, rising up from the pier. Out at sea that same ship is like a small corked bottle as it submits to the steady movement of the waves. Sometimes, in a storm, the gray water crashes over the flight deck and sailors aren't allowed to walk on the outside "catwalks" and ladders. That's when you learn humility.

You are the Flying Dutchman, Norm. I don't think you'll ever really get back to land, although I hope I'm wrong.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 03:11:56 CET 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT, RC et Al: I agree that "Rockin' Chair" is far from forgotten - it's one of our guys' best. Aside from Richard's voice, the part I love most is when what I take to be Levon's mandolin plinka-plinks slower and slower like time winding down.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 05:08:21 CET 2013 from (184.66.154.13)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: What's new

Thank you BEG. There is so much talent. We need to remember what we are here for. To discover.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 03:54:26 CET 2013 from (174.89.107.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Peter Gabriel responds to the death of Lou Reed
By Alex Green

"The death of Lou Reed has left the music world in shock and many of its great creative minds reeling. Everyone from David Bowie to Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine have weighed in on Reed’s death and now Peter Gabriel has revealed his own sentiments regarding this massive loss.

Posting on his Facebook page today, the former Genesis singer wrote a heartfelt and poetic tribute:

"Oh Lou, where have you gone?

We have lost a great artist
And I have lost my friend.

It was your words and your work with the Velvet Underground that inspired Vaclav Havel to name the Czech revolution, the Velvet Revolution. You brought a great novelist’s unswerving attention to the human psyche and soul and attached it to an electric guitar. That clarity and fierce honesty symbolized freedom, like nothing else.

You carried this honesty, purity and passion into whatever you did. Whether it was writers, amplifiers, artists, photography, tai chi, friendships, the glasses you designed or the journeys you had taken, anyone around you knew exactly what you were into; what you loved and hated.

You could be so difficult, narcissistic and intransigent, but anyone you allowed beyond that leather-jacketed protective and sometimes-poisonous veneer got to meet a special man that was sweet, tender and exceptionally loyal.

Watching you and Laurie finding each other was like watching teenage sweethearts (albeit super-smart). Everyone knew New York Lou, who could tell you all the ups and downs of the modern-day urban explorer, exploring drugs and sexual identity, but how many noticed the great romantic poet of the Power of the Heart that you wrote for Laurie. And what wry sharp intelligence you carried with you at all times, that could cut through any packaging and reveal the living and beating core.

It was always such a pleasure to eat and laugh with you and hear that high-pitched squeal of delight, echoing around the room and bursting out of nowhere.

Oh Lou, we’re going to miss you."

PG


Entered at Fri Nov 1 02:46:03 CET 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Dylan's Fender from Newport '65 goes to auction.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 02:27:16 CET 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hear that sound Willie Boy!

Very well done Al.........you have captured it. I am in mind of Lars much with this song. Our very long friendship, and our too brief time enjoyed together. I still owe Lars a visit.

However in truth, I have a friend named Don Sharpe. Don and I went to high school together. In the mid '60's we lived together in Gibsons BC. Don had bought a little house. I rented a bedroom from him to help him pay his mortgage.

I worked at a log booming ground, and got Don a job there. As time went by, I owned a log booming ground, and Don bought a little tug boat. He was having a hard time making ends meet. When I could I would hire Don to pull some log booms out to the storage ground for me. Don perceviered and got ahead.

Don now owns 6 tug boats, and through our friendship that now is to about 54 years, we have always helped each other out. It is not hard to say Don is my best friend.

For some reason..,,I suppose it just gets to be a habit, (like Grumpy old men) Don and I continually fight....argue that is. About the time I bought my big boat I have now, (just over 2 years ago), Don and I were having lunch in Campbell River. I said, I really want to retire, (Don is a few months older than me.....just turned 70). He is out riding his Harley a lot and being a big wheel. So what are you gonna do if you retire he says.....sit around in your "Rockin Chair". I said yer fuckin right dummy. That's what I named the boat. Well we laughed our asses off.

So I guess I have my own history with that name. Since the song came about, of course it was always something I related to. At that concert in Calgary, Richard just seemed to be living that sort of scene with being on the road. I some ways not much different than living your whole life at sea.

The "BAND" has been part of my life since their Ronnie Hawkins days. "Slow down Willie Boy", is the part that has been hard for many of us to do.

In my own case, there is nothing more I want to do than sell my tug and barge and retire. It's just not that easy. You can't just hire some one to operate the outfit. My whole retirement fund is in that equipment. In this day and age to find some one qaulified and capable to run that outfit without damaging or destroying it is near impossible. I have customers you can't let down.

There are people who want it. Want me to finance them. I'm not a gawd damn bank. Go put your ass in hawk just like I did. This is where it seperates the men from the boys. Gawd damn bunch a piss ants.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 01:32:09 CET 2013 from (174.89.107.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garth Hudson (with Maud) lifetime achievement award performance - London, Ontario Music Awards.

Not surprised that I found on Garth's facebook page that Louuu's passing is acknowledged as they performed (as well as other artists) on stage songs from The Harry Smith Project Anthology of American Folk Music Revisited.

ray pence...It was always great sharing music with you. This Guest Book is lucky to have you here. Did you ever send Jan H your essay on TLW? Anyway, I don't think I could ever wrap my head around Metal Machine Music but I'm exploring Louuu's Hudson River Wind Meditations.

JT...I appreciate how you're always checking out young talent and open to all kinds of music. You seemed to be genuinely interested in knowing more about Louuu. I find just saying his name.....Lou Reed.....packed with strength and has probably lived many lifetimes.

Nomadic Mike and Bill M...Always a pleasure. I did meet Glen Silverthorn at one of Levon's shows with the Barn Burners and Jeff Healey. Richard Bell was there too.....All too soon gone.......It was so hot that night and the music was so alive and the audience appreciated every single minute. It was a memorable night for sure.


Entered at Fri Nov 1 00:37:31 CET 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Rockin Chair

Reading of Jimmy's affection for this wondrous and unique song I feel compelled to post this old review. The interpretation hinges on the fact that the song's narrator is Willie who is on board ship talking/singing to himself - as in "I've spent my whole life at sea now I'm pushin' age seventy three and there's only one place that was meant for me". Ragtime Willie is his mate back in Virginny.

BTW if you haven't already read it I've linked PV's full review from the site.

"The musicians we hear are out on a front porch somewhere in the Appalachian mountains. Kentucky perhaps? West Virginia? You tell me. The sun is about an hour from setting over to the west just beyond the wooded glen that melts between the jagged peaks soaring either side. The tone and flavour of the singer's voice confirms it all. This fellow is related somewhere along the line to Virgil Kane, the guy who lost his brother at bloody Gettysberg. It's the mid 1800's.

It's traditional American territory and you are being invited to join these folks for some singin', some home cookin' and some suppin'. Maybe followed by some checkers and a little bit of evening fishin' a while later. Perhaps even a hoe down. This is all far too homely to be true.

And so it is.

As the singer draws you into his simple little tale, you are suddenly on board a schooner. Before you've even had time to take a seat on that comfy little porch the swell of the ocean is painting an altogether different picture.

You're alongside this old sailor. He's originally from the Appalachian setting you imagined. However, this fellow hasn't been back there for years. He's spent virtually his whole life at sea and now, in his late Autumn years, he is literally pining to be back home. Back amongst the folks he left all those years ago in Old Virginny. Back on that front porch you yourself almost sat upon barely seconds earlier. You can actually touch this fellow's yearning. He wants it so dearly it hurts. So much so he'd possibly consider even turning the ship around himself. Before it's too late he is desperate to rock himself to sleep one more time on that big rockin chair he remembers with such fondness from when he was toddler. Fact is it's probably no bigger than any other rockin chair. Yet in his memory there is none bigger.

The fellow you're with is called Willie. Not Ragtime Willie, mind you. That's his best friend from way back when in those mountains of home. No, this fellow is just plain Willie. A real character is our Willie. He talks endlessly to himself as he goes about his tasks. Fact is his long hard years on the sailing ships have left him a bit senile. He keeps telling himself to hang around and slow down as he knows he shouldn't really be hoisting sails and pulling on ropes at his age. Who knows when he might just keel over? He's seen many of his sailing chums go in just that very way. The guy's seventy three for fuck's sake. On his last legs. He really should be sat back on that front porch with his feet up taking things easy. He's paid enough dues to sink a dozen ships. Fact is when the one he's on now finally does he certainly doesn't want to be on board.

You know, one of the saddest things in life is when you've a heartfelt longing for someone or somewhere that remains unfulfilled. A love that dies untold. Loved ones or a home you'll never see again. In this sad tale we watch as poor old Willie joins that ever-growing list. One of life's sad human casualties. In Willie's case The Flying Dutchman heads him off at the pass. The reef in fact. Willie never does get to sniff that air or see those folks.

One nice thing, though. As he passes away with all his crew-mates around him, there's a sort of glow about him. A serenity that hasn't paid a visit to that withered ruddy old face of his for many many years. You'd swear it's almost as if he's had his dying wish granted. Can rockin chairs do that for you? Who knows? What you do know is that maybe senility isn't such a bad thing after all and that 'Rockin Chair' is arguably The Band's most poignant and delicious few minutes"


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