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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, February 2014


Entered at Fri Feb 28 22:26:26 CET 2014 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

Let's not forget that Peter Stone Brown said he was at the "Casino Arena" show, and that it was actually held at Convention Hall.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 20:56:52 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Nice words and thoughts Dennis……..Like most here I would imagine, I only know Mike H from his posts/links and his very obvious love of The Band………we all need time-outs now and then but sure hope he finds a way back to his family and friends.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 20:34:06 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: honourary women?

Dennis: Maybe the guys were among those who do not sweat - they glow.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 20:11:54 CET 2014 from (24.161.13.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties

Subject: Dirty Laundry

To my good fortune, I got to spend a real lot of time out on the road with the boys in the 90's: they all had their game jerseys but I'm at a loss to say how they were cleaned, perhaps plenty of Right Guard and after shave, etc.

Mike Hayward, you're loved, we all enjoyed your videos from the vaults, please, if you're viewing this, please tell someone!


Entered at Fri Feb 28 19:53:55 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.112)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: Last Waltz v. Spinal Tap: Which Is Which?

Q: Celebration of a beginning or an end?

A: The beginning of the beginning of the end of the beginning.

*****

Q: Is this is the end of [the band]?

A: Well, I don't really think that the end can be assessed as of itself as being the end because what does the end feel like? It's like saying when you try to extrapolate the end of the universe, you say, if the universe is indeed infinite, then how - what does that mean? How far is all the way, and then if it stops, what's stopping it, and what's behind what's stopping it? So, what's the end, you know, is my question to you.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 18:26:48 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Perhaps David but the twist would be that while Marty S comes off goofy/nerdy/uneducated compared to Robbie, Levon and Rick in the scenes he is in with them, the tables are turned in Spinal Tap with the musicians being pasted………closer to the bone ( for me at least ) and slightly troubling because he happens to be one of a handful of my most beloved musicians is how the Jeff Beck is sent up the pole of exposure in the movie. All in fun but….


Entered at Fri Feb 28 18:05:15 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Wink 'n a Nod

It's been acknowledged that The Last Waltz helped influence This Is Spinal Tap. Just look at how the director, Rob Reiner as Marty DiBergi, inserts himself in the interviews with the band members.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 17:14:31 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: a 2 1/2 minute "best of" Spinal Tap. The sandwich scene gets me every time. Funny movie.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 14:21:01 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Yes, back in the Spinal Tap days the standard was that there be room for a cucumber.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 13:44:53 CET 2014 from (124.24.244.167)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: wardrobes of the stars

Although I don't have a photobucket account to show examples, the shirt immortalised in TLW is indeed the same one worn in the Casino Arena video from 1976. I have a picture from an early 80's Danko/Helm gig where the shirt re-surfaces, and it was worn (under a leather vest) in Denmark, 1971. The shirt had almost as much of a career as its owner.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 13:09:38 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Did Levon wear the same shirt twice? I think he was the sort of guy to wear a shirt in different shows. I mention it because I recall shopping in Kings Road, Chelsea (just so the British readers know how cool I was) around 1970 and looking at some shirts I liked. They said DRY CLEAN ONLY. I asked if it was serious, and they said it was. I pointed out that underarm perspiration would hardly be removed by dry cleaning. The snooty guy told me that most of their clientele were working musicians who would wear them once on stage and throw them away.

This seemed conspicuous consumption to me, but friends tell me that on tour socks and underwear are routinely thrown away nowadays. I picked up a UK hotel laundry list recently. A T-shirt costs £3.50 to launder. Primark sell new 100% cotton T-shirts at £3. Socks? £2.50 to launder, the cost of a pack of five in Primark. Boxer shorts? £3 to launder, though that’s about the price new, though at that price they would not be capacious where it mattered, not that I’m boasting. I thought of that on my last three week trip to the USA, and bought socks in bulk, and threw them away.

But in 1976, hotel laundry was cheaper.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 07:29:06 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.134)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Kerrin.........eloquent as always and largely persuasive..........but have we figured out how Levon's shirt got from here, there ( wolfgang's recording ) and the TLW ? The mind boggles! ....if only the Pink Scarf would have made an appearance..


Entered at Fri Feb 28 04:20:52 CET 2014 from (124.24.244.167)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: 1976 footage

As Adam says, definitely a different show although could conceivably be Casino Arena again. However, question marks...

As Adam's Wiki link stated, "The [Capitol Theatre] was known for its in house video system which resulted in a number of good quality, black and white video bootlegs." Likewise, the Casino Arena's tapes are B&W. So if it was simply a matter of filming two consecutive shows there, why is one in colour? The above information, if correct, suggests the colour clip is from neither Casino Arena or the Capitol.

Not only are the clothes different but Garth's keyboards are set up differently. He started the tour with his extra synths set up at right angles to the Lowrey, and in mid July changed to the distinctive angled arrangement that he would use until TLW. The Wolfgangs Vault concert has angled keyboards, the colour clip does not. If playing two back to back shows wouldn't the gear just be left as it was?

The camera operators (thank you Peter) in the colour clip seem much closer than in the B&W, "restricted" was Peter's word, suggesting a similar filming strategy but on a smaller stage.

So, not ruling out two Casino Arena shows but definitely raising my eyebrows just a little...

Finally, I imagine that, house video system or not, permission would need to be obtained from the artist's management before recording anything, and it would be courteous to mention to the performers beforehand that there will be cameras lurking about onstage. So, although it's not the kind of detail one would remember decades later, I would guess that The Band and their crew were aware of it at the time.


Entered at Fri Feb 28 03:36:28 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: What, you missed such a god-given opportunity to fit a classic Band line into everyday conversation: "Hey, Carmen! C'mon let's go downtown".


Entered at Thu Feb 27 22:16:13 CET 2014 from (99.141.54.63)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: 1976 footage

If the color "Chest Fever" clip is from Asbury Park 1976, it's from a different night at the same venue maybe. The performance and clothes don't match the Wolfgang's Vault footage.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 21:43:50 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paco de Lucia

I saw him in the flamenco "Carmen" in Madrid. I was there on a Friday-Sunday conference, and my publisher said, "We have a treat for you on Saturday night. We have tickets for Carmen." Never having read about the Antonio de Gardes flamenco "Carmen" I merely thought "Oh, shit! Opera." Which of course it wasn't, but one of the outstanding shows I've ever seen. The dancing? The guitar playing? It was all magic. RIP, Paco.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 21:23:19 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…..so for those following along at home……..after all this, is this the same show that appeared miraculously a few months back at Wolfgang’s….if so, why hadn’t anyone made the connection before? Glad to know that steps are being taken to release some of this 1976 concert footage……….but just once it would be nice to hear Robbie’s take on “Between Trains” and if and when a version will be made available to the purchasing public ( Re: Mark’s question of yesterday ).


Entered at Thu Feb 27 20:28:24 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Texas Gigs

Earlier with Ronnie Hawkins, The Hawks played at a club in Fort Worth that was so rough, they had to spend the night their with guns to prevent theft of their equipment, as Robbie recounted in a recent interview with George Stromboulopoulos. Previously, in The Last Waltz, Robbie described the infamous club:

"We got to this place, a joint, in Fort Worth, Texas. It was burned out, bombed out. The roof wasn't even on the place any more. And that's when they decided to call it the Skyline Lounge. And we got there and set up and...a big place, huge. Bar, way at the back and a big dance floor. So we set up the first night. We go down to the place to play. We go in and, in this huge place, there's about three people in the audience: a one-armed go-go dancer and a couple of drunk waiters. A couple here, couple there. Somebody fires a tear gas...And a fight starts. There isn't enough people in the place to get angry. And we found out a few years later that it was Jack Ruby's club."


Entered at Thu Feb 27 20:26:33 CET 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Chest Fever

The Band never played The Capitol, this is from The Casino Arena Asbury Park in 76. We are in the process of trying to get the footage.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 19:20:29 CET 2014 from (58.104.14.150)

Posted by:

Wallsend

No mention here so far of the death of Paco de Lucia. Another great musician too soon gone.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 19:05:48 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

The above LINK is to my favorite Gordon Lightfoot song.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 18:13:03 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Day of the Week

LINK: Remember when most Canadian's used this as a calendar...?


Entered at Thu Feb 27 18:02:29 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Day of the week

This is what I use.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 17:58:31 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Curling, 30 Year Tribute, The Hawks in Dallas - and more

Curling: sorry, Peter, my irony plug-in must have disconnected that day. As for scoring systems in some Winter Olympic sports, the rules do seem opaque and the basis for disqualification in the speed skating seemed just plain random.

Blonde on Blonde: BEG posted a link about this album and the link had a couple of Dylan quotes. The second was from a ROLLING STONE interview conducted by Jonathon Cott in September 1978 and the first was from an interview conducted by Margaret Steen conducted in Toronto in November 1965 during the tour with The Hawks and published in the Toronto Star Weekly on 29 January 1966.

Bill Avis: I assume that nobody has attempted a comprehensive interview with Bill Avis about his days with The Band etc., in which case someone really should try to do so.

30th Anniversary Tribute: I attended this concert, the only time I saw The Band. They followed The O'Jays on-stage. The O'Jays were only there because EMOTIONALLY YOURS had been a recent record of theirs. Apart from that, they had absolutely no connection with Bob Dylan at all - and The Band, with all that past history together, had to follow them. This is what I wrote at the time:

"Eric Clapton came forward to introduce The Band, with reference to the effect that MUSIC FROM BIG PINK had had on him way back when. However, this was a different band. Apart form the absence of Robbie Robertson and, of course, Richard Manuel, the remianing three members were joined by three others, who were not identified. They sat on the stage on two rows of three chairs and came across like mountain men sudden;y dropped into the Big Apple. The song, WHEN I PAINT MY MASTERPIECE, was a good choice. They were supported by GE, Duck Dunn, Jim Keltner and by Booker T; even so, it felt like a reaching back into a much older style of music. I enjoyed it more than I had expected but there was a restlessness in the hall. They came and went just like any other act, which saddened me greatly".

Sonny Boy Williamson No.2 and Gordon Lightfoot: nice to a see mention of them. I saw both live in my youth and, as someone commented here before, it is quite gratifying to be reminded of such things.

The Hawks in Dallas in December 1964: this advert was very interesting and I noted that The Hawks played twice in Dallas at that time. Dylan once commented about the good reception he got in Dallas on the late-1965 tour and this advert caused me to wonder if, as it were, The Hawks had paved the way for him there.



Entered at Thu Feb 27 16:49:26 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Thanks for confirming '64. Ah, the internet - wish I'd thought of that rather than bemoaning the fact that there's no longer a perpetual calendar in the phonebook. The band being booked simply as the Hawks rather than the usual Levon and the Hawks suggests that Levon didn't make the trek that time - illness, dispute over contract / fees, creative differences that were later overcome or papered over, paternity issues / fear of shotgun-wielding fathers, personal obligations elsewhere, uncertainty re draftability ... Or maybe he WAS onboard but the promoter figured that a bunch of foreigners would attract more customers that a local kid (which is the mirror image of what Toronto promoters thought at the time).


Entered at Thu Feb 27 16:04:45 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks

The other interesting thing about the ad relates to the comments within it that note that Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks performed in Arkansas a year earlier (1963). Anyone know anything about that tour (dates, locations)? Were you present either in 1963 or at these shows in 1964? As to why no mention of Levon as a local boy...it is strange. It would have certainly increased the interest to potential showers!


Entered at Thu Feb 27 15:59:41 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 1964 (not 1965)

Bill M: The days and dates at the bottom of the ad give it away. I just checked the calendars for 1964 and 1965 (easily found on the internet) and it was indeed 1964 as you first suggested.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 15:30:20 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.134)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: From ER today, a very clear recording of Bob Dylan covering Gordon Lightfoot's "Shadows" last year..... Lovely song.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 15:15:05 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

You would have remembered if I was there. Ronnie brought Paul Godfrey and I up to sing background vocals. Can't remember if our mics were turned on. HaHa.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 15:09:08 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Back to the flyer about the Hawks' Christmastime gigs. Any ideas why no mention of Levon, the hometown boy? I'd assumed it was from '64, but maybe it was '65 and the guys were moonlighting during the Christmas break in Dylan's touring schedule? Sandy K's never mentioned it to me, so if it was '65 they'd likely've used another drummer - maybe Richard?


Entered at Thu Feb 27 14:53:02 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Yes, the Beverly Hills. Just can't recall if I saw you there on opening night (the Tuesday?) or on the Saturday when Levon and Jerry and the RCO guys jammed with Ronnie. I guessing it was the Tuesday because the Saturday was when Fleetwood Mac way playing downtown (the Gardens?) and you likely would havde had some phenomenal Q107 or label seats. Word went out afterwards that the FM drove up to the BevHills after their own show to join the fun but didn't get there in time.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 12:49:01 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Teddy Jack Eddy/ Gary Busey

When I lived in Tulsa in the early '70's, Gary Busey was a regular guest on "Mazeppa Pompazoidi's Uncola Underground". Gaillard Sartain hosted bad, cult or monster movies late Saturday night in the character of a wizard kind of guy who looked like a reject from Magical Mystery Tour. He had a number of supporting characters who did bad comedy skits during breaks in the movie. One time he carved the Washington Monument and a race car out of SPAM. Gary would play a musician who was either Polish (Teddy Jaketti) or a good old boy (Teddy Jack Eddy). Leon Russell would sometimes perform with him, and even named his son Teddy Jack Russell.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 11:45:18 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My remarks on curling were facetious, Ian, sorry! They were aimed at scoring systems in other stuff, taking off from the misapprehension that curling was hair curling.

Well, NWC, as they said of Shakespeare, the committee "know little Latin and less Greek." Rather like the auto-correct function.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 09:58:03 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Current thread

Half of my life I have been in war against missuse of the word OLYMPIAD. The event itself is OLYMPIC GAMES and OLYMPIAD is the four years period between Olympic games. The Swedish National Board Of Uncorrect Use Of Correct Terminology (or equal) has said: OK, we give up. From now on it is officially accepted to use the word Olympiad instead of Olympic games. - My life has been in vain. (I can hear Peter laugh, understandingly).


Entered at Thu Feb 27 05:01:59 CET 2014 from (99.233.208.199)

Posted by:

Mark from Toronto

Subject: RR Carny songs

I like Robbie's Carny songs. Asking again ... are we ever going to get a digital version of "Between Trains"?


Entered at Thu Feb 27 02:51:48 CET 2014 from (99.141.54.63)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

From Wikipedia entry:

"Throughout the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, the 3,200 seat Capitol Theatre was a popular stop on nearly every major rock artist's tour. The venue was known for its in house video system which resulted in a number of good quality, black and white video bootlegs."


Entered at Thu Feb 27 02:37:10 CET 2014 from (99.141.54.63)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Sebastian / "Chest Fever" live 1976

I checked this clip out again, and I agree that it's a nice version. A real shame though that Richard only appears for a brief few seconds.

I have to maintain that this, and the Asbury Park 1976 "Wolfgang's Vault" video, are the result of the venues having house video systems and recording the shows. By 1976, this was probably becoming more common and we're lucky the Band's final original lineup tour was caught by a few of these crews.

On Wolfgang's Vault, there are many other groups' video recordings from the Capitol Theatre NJ including Orleans, Linda Ronstadt, David Bromberg, Grateful Dead, Jackson Browne, Hot Tuna, etc., all pretty much dating from 1975 and 1976 at the earliest. So I maintain that all of this footage is probably venue house footage. Which is easy to explain why Robbie or Garth are surprised to see things like this come up. They played the gig, and there was no big deal about a filming situation and it just got saved.


Entered at Thu Feb 27 01:49:41 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Curling

Time is pressing this week but I couldn't let Peter's comment about curling go unchallenged. Working out the scores in curling is very easy - it is like carpet bowls on ice, a mixture of physical skill and mental calculation - with the addition of sweeping to affect the trajectory of the stones. Some call curling "chess on ice" but maybe that's overstating things.

Congrats to the Canadians for winning the Men's gold and I only wish the GB team had played to their normal standard and made more of a match of it.

I don't play myself but once stayed at a hotel that had its own curling rinks and I had a go. Great fun - even more so when you don't have the right shoes.

And, even earlier than that, I lived on the Ayrshire coast, from which one can see Ailsa Craig, one of only two world sources of the granite used for curling stones.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 23:28:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Garry Busey

From "Unsubstantiated Sessions" in the library.

Robertson’s co-star in Carny, they cut at least five tracks together, with Robertson producing, and Busey had also toured with Danko in 1978. The five cuts are in cassette circulation. I can’t find out whether there were more. Titles are guesswork.

Dixie Time Again

Rolling Down The Road

There Goes The Band

Mason Dixon Line

Run Little Belle


Entered at Wed Feb 26 22:03:21 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Gary Busey

Gary Busey's breakthrough came in his starring role in 1978's "The Buddy Holly Story," in which he also sang and played guitar. He also had an earlier career as a musician playing drums under the name Teddy Jack Eddy, working with Leon Russell and others. He also played drums on Kinky Friedman's "Lasso From El Paso," featuring Rick & his brother Terry, Levon, Richard, Ronnie Hawkins, Dr. John and a host of other notables.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 21:46:43 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK to the late - much missed Roger Ebert's review of Carny....He get's it just about right.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 21:28:12 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK is Donald Joseph's review of Carny done specifically for this site.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 21:23:00 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joan

Don't worry about it Joan. When Toronto won the World Series back to back in the early 90's it was all Bryant Gumble could do to mention it on the Today show.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 21:19:53 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Fat Man

David. You have to sign in on that site. Couldn't find the song.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 20:05:20 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Whoops, here's the link to "King Grand". Check out Mr. Toussaint's majestic keywork.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 20:01:29 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Olympics

Forgive me for not mentioning the Canadian Hockey teams I have a south of the border outlook on these things.USA, USA...oh well

As to curling, I don't even like sweeping my house


Entered at Wed Feb 26 20:01:01 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks to our old friend Mike for supplying the track details.

Here's a link to Randall Bramblett's "King Grand," featuring Allen Toussaint on piano. It's a cut from Randall's hard-to-find 1976 Polydor album "Light of the Night." It also features Davis Causey & Bob Mann on guitars and a rhythm section of Will Lee on bass (from David Letterman's Late Night Show Band and the Fab Faux) and Chris Parker on drums. Mr. Parker had previously played in Paul Butterfield's Better Days Band and later joined Stuff, where he played drums along with Steve Gadd, Eric Gale & Cornell Dupree on guitars, Richard Tee on keyboards and Gordon Edwards on bass.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 19:55:15 CET 2014 from (65.25.124.34)

Posted by:

Calvin

I just picked up a Vinyl copy of Carny the other day, factory sealed but a cut out. I of course opened it to listen to it, odd album.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 19:38:05 CET 2014 from (74.176.226.132)

Posted by:

Mike C

Thanks for that Fat Man link, DP. A great version & not easy to find. I wish Robbie would record more songs in this kind of raw, stripped down, old school style. Along for the ride are Dr. John on organ, Jimi Calhoun on bass, & Gary Busey on drums & background howls.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 19:37:33 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: cosmic justice demands digital re-issue

David P: you all are spoiled rotten with music down there.

It would be nice to know who is on the track - Jan's notes mention Mr. Rebennack, whom you can hear . . . it sure sounds like they're having fun, especially the vocalist!

Since my vinyl went down in the flood, believe it or not this is one of the albums I miss the most.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 19:10:02 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

sadavid: Seen briefly at the beginning of that clip from "Carny" are a group of Georgia musicians, including Davis Causey on guitar and Randall Bramblett on sax, providing the backup. Randall and Davis also contributed the instumental "Sawdust and G-Strings" on the soundtrack LP. When I spoke to Randall several years ago, when he sat in on sax with Levon and the Barnburners down here in Georgia, he mentioned that he also played with Levon on tour back in the early 80s. That would have been right after working with Robbie on "Carny". which was filmed in Savannah, Ga.

Robert Kaylor, who directed "Carny," had previouly explored carnival life researching & filming the Georgia State Fair Carnival in 1972 documentary film.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 18:33:54 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: fat, too

David P: thanks for that . . . along with the k/a version of "Chest Fever," really made my day . . . .

Here's the filmic version.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 18:21:23 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Fat Man & The Man in Black

The great Fats Domino celebrates his 86th birthday today. Johnny Cash was also born on this day 82 years ago.

Link above to Robbie's cover of the classic "The Fat Man."


Entered at Wed Feb 26 16:47:12 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: LATH late 1964 in the USA

Bill M: None of those shows from Xmas 64 so far appear in the listing of concerts. Thanks to JH for posting that ad and thanks to you for alerting me. Can anyone verify (were you there? or do you know anyone who was?) that these occurred.) I'll list them next time around anyway but it would be great to hear from anyone who might have attended or knows anything about these shows.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 15:17:29 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've had to struggle with the PC word for cameraman myself: it's "camera operator." Anyway, the documentary idea makes sense. It's so close up that I can't think anyone intended this for broadcast, but if you wanted to use clips, fine. They edited the two cameras together … but I would guess pretty fast. Whatever, I'm sure somebody realized they'd just captured a different and especially powerful rendition of Chest Fever. I wonder if there's a sound only recording? I guess someone with time and lots of circulated tapes could go through and compare.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 13:32:12 CET 2014 from (124.24.244.167)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Just following my earlier train of thought, seeing as two shows seem to have been filmed in NJ, probably only a week apart, both using two cameramen (persons) discreetly positioned onstage, one on each side...I'd go out on a limb and say these are connected. Could this have been an authorised attempt at documenting the tour, which was then shelved when the far grander plans for TLW took shape some months later?


Entered at Wed Feb 26 12:44:42 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Chest Fever is different … much punchier than normal. A tremendous version. It’s two cameras as Kerrin pointed out, but it doesn’t look like they had much access. One stays on Levon throughout, and I’d guess is just off to his left, filming from the side, possibly off stage even. I’d guess the other is directly opposite somewhere behind Richard, and switching between Garth, Richard (just a glimpse), and Rick & Robbie. They had to use the Levon camera recording on an interesting Garth bit because of the flare, possibly from a mic stand reflecting lights. They could have covered Rick and Robbie from that angle on zoom, so whoever was filming was being restricted, so I kind of doubt a TV company, though as Kerrin says, could be local. You can never judge definition on YouTube because there's no way of knowing how many degradations the video has gone through.


Entered at Wed Feb 26 10:29:28 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Last Post

Ha ha. nice one K.

Kev's last post..."just in case y'all wonderin' that last post wasn't really me as I actually died and went to heaven that time on the train with Roxi D’Lite....mmmmm sigh....not just now Roxi...it's only two minutes since our last....mmm...well okay if you insist....mmmm....naw Fifi you'll have to wait your turn...oh okay then come on then...

:-0)


Entered at Wed Feb 26 04:57:25 CET 2014 from (182.249.245.146)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Chest Fever '76

Hi Sebastian, I posted the question on YT a while back but no response from the uploader. The only light I can shed is that the Capitol Theatre is, I presume, the one in Passaic, NJ. I don't have a date for that show, didn't know it ever happened, but the footage dates from the first half of July, 1976 - so shortly before the other "new" show posted at Wolfgangs Vault. Pro shot with two cameras, I guess it's possible the venue filmed all their shows? Local TV? Considering that both these shows were in NJ around the same time and have both just turned up, is it possible that The Band or Capitol commissioned some filming, and the same source is holding both these tapes? It's certainly a great performance, taken at a more solid tempo than was typical on that tour. If Robbie recalls anything about it, please let us know!


Entered at Wed Feb 26 04:17:21 CET 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Web: My link

Subject: Chest Fever

Check out the Chest Fever snippet in my link. Never seen this before. Anyone got any insight? I emailed my dad to ask him. Sure would love to unearth this show and release it!


Entered at Wed Feb 26 01:29:34 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Bill are you talking about the gig at the Beverly Hills Motor Hotel. Just off the 401?


Entered at Wed Feb 26 00:10:21 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's all way beyond me. When I heard there was a curling final I assumed it was an indoor event with curling tongs and heated rollers, with a panel of hairdressers awarding incomprehensible systems of points for artistic merit. Sharon - 9.523, Tracy - 9.487 etc. And the commentator would be getting excited and patriotic … "No! The British girl's curl over the left ear is just too tight! The judges won't like that! Here come the cards … No! Only 9.378 for artistic merit. That's a disaster! That's the worst thing for Britain so far in these Olympics. And here come's the Latvian … and that's a perfectly sprung curl on the forehead … that's got to be a 9.401 at least! No! The Lithuanian judge has given 9.458! That's ridiculously high!

And we all sit gaping at the TV as if we understood how on Earth points are awarded. It's nearly as hard to work out as the diving in the main Olympics.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 23:32:59 CET 2014 from (58.104.30.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Bill M

I would see Jan in Robbie's role. After all, he had the vision to set up this site, does all the hard work and has to accept responsibility for everything while the rest of us party.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 22:27:53 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: One Last Post you say...

…..Hmmm….one last post……..Put em Up to Pat B: “Sincerely sorry, you were right all along and I always knew that”……Bill M: “I confess, there really was no such thing as a Canadian rock scene pre 1980 and every musician, magazine, song and bar I have ever listed in detail was all made up !”……………….Al Edge: “Sorry, I have never set foot in Liverpool, want Luis Suarez dealt to the MLS immediately and believe in all my heart that Storyville is much better than MFBP”……………..Peter V: “Ha, there never was a site called Toppermost and truth be told the sound at every Leonard Cohen show I have ever been to has been muddled”…………David P: “Sorry, I haven’t had a turntable since 1985 and really only own 1 Band album”………Norm: “Gawd Damn it…….and you sissies really believed I was a tug boat captain........think white collar, Torona and long evenings spent at the opera – more like it”………….BEG: “Bye bye….just so you all know……..I will be spending the rest of my days campaigning for the removal of Louuuu and Robbie from the RRHOF”…..JT: ‘Joni was right about Bob”………………….NWC: “This all makes perfect sense to me”


Entered at Tue Feb 25 22:03:11 CET 2014 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

It just dawned on me that I forgot to ask Dunc about our standard Olympic curling bet (since 2006). If you're looking in, I know you'll have the class to forward something to your local Oxfam, which I recall as your charity of choice.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 21:43:44 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend: And you'll be the guy who gets to hold the pool cue and blow smoke rings.

Speaking of the Olympics and our guys, I got to watch the women's curling final as my car was serviced (congrats, Canuckettes). I hadn't noticed facial makeup like that on video since I last viewed Robbie in TWL.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 21:33:21 CET 2014 from (58.104.19.156)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Maybe if Jan ever decides to close this website down, on the final day, all the posters, past and present, should come to together to post one last time. "Sixteen years of posting about the 'feud', it is a goddam impossible way of life'.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 21:07:51 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

To varying degrees we all have stories of seeing famous musicians at beginning stages of their ascension – including some I would guess at high school – but having The Hawks/The Band play at prom night would have really been something…..I imagine there are some great photos buried in any number of the Marvell students shoeboxes out their completely oblivious to who some of those musicians in the background were and what they became...........what is really weird in terms of a timeline that is hard to get one’s head around is……………Just 11 short years after playing Marvell High prom night…………….the boys ended it all at The Last Waltz !

I took a peak at the GB archives at February 2010 to see if anybody had congratulated the Canadian Women’s hockey team on their gold medal at the last Olympics (prompted by BEG’s concern of yesterday )……..and….while no was the answer……..I was reminded how wild the conversation here once was with the late Steve leading the conversation comparing Olympic torch runs to Hitler’s Germany and warning of the dangers looming in Russia having been awarded the 2014 games………………the craziest this bunch now gets up to is “rugby songs” and late 60’s strippers named Black Magic !


Entered at Tue Feb 25 19:12:14 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Levon and The Hawks

In the spring of 1965 Levon and The Hawks returned to Arkansas where they'd been hired to play at the Marvell High School junior-senior prom. I believe it was at that time that they also hooked up with Sonny Boy Williamson (Rice Miller), jammed & made future plans shortly before his death.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 17:55:45 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jan H: Thanks for posting that wordy flyer about the Hawks' itinerary in Arkansas - and Dallas, Texas - at Christmastime '64. Maybe there are some dates there that aren't on JT's list.

By the way, I came across a photo, in the 12"x12" booklet that came in one of Ronnie Hawkins' late '70s albums, of Ronnie, Levon, Jerry Penfound, Dr John, King Biscuit Boy, Paul Butterfield, Ken Kalmusky and Carl Mather onstage together shortly before the RCO All-Stars LP came out. I was there, as was John D, I believe, but the memory has faded to the point where I couldn't have said for sure which of the other All-Stars got onstage with Levon. (Not shown, but also onstage, were Pat Travers, Jack DeKeyzer, Mike Short and Gary Oatridge. Maybe Duck Dunn too - John D??) Would a scan help, Jan?


Entered at Tue Feb 25 17:27:10 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Oh happy day! The news just arrived that the wonderful Influence LP from '68 has just been reissued on CD. Short bursts of all songs are available at the link above.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 15:38:21 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Early '70s top-forty radio - "Sweet And Innocent" by Donny O and Michael Jackson singing a love song to a rat - enough to drive an adolescent to FM.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 15:28:06 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mormons in Muscle Shoals

In November 1970 MGM's Mike Curb sent The Osmonds down to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to record with Rick Hall at FAME studios. The sessions resulted in their self-titled album which produced their #1 hit "One Bad Apple." Forty-three years ago this month the single, with its b-side "He Ain't Heavy...He's My Brother," topped the charts. With the Muscle Shoals musicians backing them, a little bit of funk was added to their bubble-gum sound, drawing comparisons to the Jackson 5. FAME staff writer George Jackson (no relation) had originally written "One Bad Apple" with the Jackson 5 in mind.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 14:31:20 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: NWC and Peter V have boxed you in, I'm afraid. Now we're all on tenterhooks, waiting for your sage advice on cross-stitch.

Nicely set up NWC, by the way; another bronze for the Finns.

Kevin J: In case life provides you with a Groundhog-Day-type rerun, you might want to google what award it was your seatmate won.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 13:12:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'll tell you what, the auto-correct on this site is bleeding ignorant of both drama and Latin. I see it changed my theatrical instruction "omnes" to "omens"


Entered at Tue Feb 25 13:09:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rugby Songs

There were many LPs, but the two most popular were by The Jock Strap Ensemble (see link). I was never a rugby fan, but to me they were "back row of the coach on a school trip songs". I think teachers decided to have temporary deafness for "Dinah Dinah Show Us Your Leg (A yard above the knee)" but would reacquire hearing and dish out punishments if it veered further into The Good Ship Venus. The Loudon Wainwright III version (on the first Sea Shanties Hal Wilner set) has way more verses and filthier ones thanI remembered.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 13:04:49 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Osmonds

There was Joe, Joe, shoveling the snow, At the store...

There was a general store called Osmond Bros. in my hometown. The grandson of the last proprietor started a leather working business last year and named it Osmond Bros. after the defunct family business. Z admits he didn't do his homework and that his website is not getting many hits. "I hadn't heard of them", he said. Hardly believing him, I queried a couple of his contemporaries, my sons. They hadn't heard of the singing group either. We should be so lucky.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 12:41:30 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Naughty songs that make you giggle

Ha ha.

Great memories Pete. We used to call them 'rugby' songs. Presumably they were composed jointly by Bill Mclaren and Cliff Morgan whilst filling in their time during a boring game!

My personal fave is to the tune of Funiculi, Funicula which never fails to make me chuckle whenever I recall us all sat there with huge grins singing it in unison while swinging our arms in time.

Last night I learned the art of ma*tu*ba*ion
And pulling the pud
Was ever so good

Sad I know but cracks me up every time.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Feb 25 10:43:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hootenany By The Campfire

What was the most popular campfire song in Britain in the early 60s? I would say The Quartermaster's Stores. The only recorded version I know was by The Shadows and instrumental. The joy of Quartermasters Stores was that you had to make up verses in turn, based on the n ames of the company, then everyone came in on the repeat line. Thus, say one of the company was named "Malcolm" the verse might be:

There was Malcolm, Malcolm covering himself with talcum

in the store (Solo)

There was Malcolm, Malcolm covering himself with talcum

in the quartermaster's store (omens)

Then it would shift to say "Pete, trying to beat his meat" or "Fred snoring on the bed" or "Alan trying to turn his pal on". It was often rude.

The recitation "The Good Ship Venus", recorded by Loudon Wainwright III a few years ago was also popular.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 10:28:05 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Brown Eyed Girl posting on _ice-hockey_. What comes next? Peter V posting on hootenanny by the campfire? Rockin Chair posting on cross stich?


Entered at Tue Feb 25 09:28:56 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Let me add my congratulations to Al's on the hockey. It must have been very difficult playing hockey in those conditions. There was so much frost down you couldn't see the grass at all.


Entered at Tue Feb 25 01:27:19 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jolly hockeysticks

Congrats to the Canadian women's hockey team.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Feb 25 01:26:04 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Little Jimmy Oz

Ha ha.

You don't fool me that easily Rog.

You're original copies just wore out didn't they?

:-0)


Entered at Mon Feb 24 23:46:57 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: whenever I visit the guitar shop at Bloor and Ossington, I now think of the Concord and think how wonderful it is that you got to see the Hawks, meet the guys and all these years later be part of a community that cares enough to still listen and respect the music the way we all do………..as to Black Magic……oh well…………funny I shared a seat on the train between Montreal and Toronto last year with a lovely lady named Roxi D’Lite and after a few drinks and some laughs and a few hours she explained that she was miss Exotic World or miss Burlesque World ( one or the other ) and I kid you not – prior to her opening up about that, she had explained to me that she came from the circus world and true to my The Band fan roots, I asked whether she had seen the movie Carny………she hadn’t ! We spent the remaining few hours talking music and nutrition.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 22:53:36 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

:-)


Entered at Mon Feb 24 22:33:44 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Concord 60s and 70s

Kevin - I missed the described goings- on of the late 60s and early 70s. My dad and his partners were out of there by then and there was new ownership. They went on to a new establishment on Kingston Road in the early 70s for a time. Bill M knows 'The Running Pump'. It is gone now as well as far as I know.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 22:28:02 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ownership

Mr Fisher owned the Concord to about late 50s or very early 60s. Then a group with my father included purchased it and it was owned by I believe 4-5 of them as partners. My dad was an active functioning participant and went in every day to manage the establishment. I believe there were 1 (or 2) 'silent; partners.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 21:00:12 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Nashville Cats

While Dylan was recording "Blonde On Blonde" with Robbie, Al Kooper and the Nashville cats, former Hawk Fred Carter, Jr. was playing sessions produced by Chet Atkins at the nearby RCA Studio. One of those sessions in February 1966 included Waylon Jennings' cover version of Gordon Lightfoot's "(That's What You Get) For Lovin' Me."


Entered at Mon Feb 24 20:32:57 CET 2014 from (58.104.20.113)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: David P

You are of course right. I should have said mid to late 60s albums to include John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline and the basement tape songs. Very interesting to compare the IOW with the 66 performances. More laid back to say the least. I also enjoyed hearing the songs from various albums sung in one style at IOW.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 19:57:41 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dylan 30th Anniversary DVD: Noted a while back the enthusiasm here for this release. I watched this show live at the time but have not seen it since……..What I do remember was that Bob was still in his Fog period and was in very shaky form. Sad to watch really as unlike the recent Beatles tribute where – quite beautifully – Paul and Ringo – stepped up and outshone every performer that had preceded them on stage, Bob did not come anywhere near doing that………..My favorite moment was our guys doing “When I Paint my Masterpiece” and the applause they received coming on stage……….worst moment was Sinéad O’Connor displaying the kind of immaturity that would eventually ruin her career. Because of Bob’s form at the time, this was not a show I have been that eager to see again.

Black Magic ! ……..and all this time my number one dream in the “if only I could be transported back to another era” game was to be on Yonge Street 1961 to see The Hawks perform and live some of that atmosphere……….can I change this to an evening at Concord with Black Magic?


Entered at Mon Feb 24 19:14:14 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ghost City: 925 Bloor St. W.
This Bloor and Ossington location played an essential role
in the development of Toronto’s music scene.
BY: JAMIE BRADBURN

I love reading about the Concord Tavern because I would have been too young to enjoy The Hawks. And to think that one day I was in line to see Robbie Robertson for the second time and who is standing behind me making a lot of noise.....lol.......but the son of the owner/owners of The Concord Tavern. I'm still looking for the photo I took of you and Robbie JT.

Did you hang at the Concord Tavern too John D or were you still in Oshawa? You were at TLW...not too shabby at all. Unbelievable!!!!!!!...as well as.......The late sweet as peach pie Rollie and the late and sweet as cherry pie Paul Godfrey and the sweet as blueberry pie Bashful Bill. Anyone else? Did I tell you that I was at Eric Clapton's two day festival to finally see Robbie Robertson play live?! ;-D


Entered at Mon Feb 24 19:05:17 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Olympians

BEG: As far as I know, no Olympian from any country comes here aside from Al "Eddie the Eagle" Bell - and he's hung up his skis.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 18:24:04 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I enjoyed that article on Bill Avis. Thirty plus years I have been watching TLW and all that time I had thought that “Big Time Bill, Big Time” shout-out from Ronnie Hawkins was to Bill Graham….I believe it was John D who noted some months ago that the Bill in question was Bill Avis……………sometimes trivia is just that and sometimes it means something. I liked learning this.

Calvin: I am fine with KISS making it into the Hall of Fame since a part of that recognition should have something to do with fame and not just excellence……..but the only part of their careers that generated any HOF credibility at all was with the four original members……..some years ago when they reformed to do that massive world tour it was with the original four….and 50 million tin lunchboxes had only four faces on them…..besides, there really should be an exclusion clause for salaried employees making it into the HOF……………….I still remember a mid-70's basement party with “Alive” playing…..my older brother had insisted that KISS were jokes and at the time I tended to follow his lead on all things music but that album really did have a sound that was hard not to like.

The Beatles: Thank you Jed ! I had taped that CBS special you had mentioned and just watched it yesterday………Is Joe Walsh not the best example ever of the benefits of getting one’s life straightened out. He was great as was Stevie Wonder…..and as you said, Paul McCartney was in fantastic form. Very enjoyable.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 18:28:09 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bill M: I knew you'd have a lot to say even though the song isn't good. We're grateful that you're here to share all of your Canadiana knowledge.

JT: Did your father own the Concord Tavern with someone else?

Not one male poster congratulated the Canadian Women's Hockey team. Hmmmmmmmmmmm

Off to Pat B's Chi Town soon to wait for flight to David Powell's Bama....and then friends are picking me up in Mobile and then off to Gulf Shores to pay respects to Pat's B fort.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 16:57:11 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks to the link to the Bobby Kris and the Imperials 45, the second of their meagre two - neither especially good, unfortunately. Kris became a schoolteacher just north of Toronto and kept a low musical profile from the late '60s to the dawn of the new millennium. Now he pops up here and there, including the tribute to Robbie's teen-time chum Peter Traynor a couple of years ago.

Of the Imperials, the most significant music-wise is guitarist Eugene Martynec, when went on the Kensington Market, producing and playing on Bruce Cockburn's first eight or ten albums and most of Murray McLauchlan's, and - for you BEG - playing synthesizer on Lou's "Berlin".

Two other Imperials, Duncan MacBain and Martin Fisher, were in Rick James's post-Neil edition of the Mynah Birds, which morphed into a couple of groups with the same Bruce Cockburn. Then they moved to London (the British one) to form Mapleoak with Peter Quaife just after he'd left the Kinks.

Before the Imperials, Marty'd been in the early version of Robbie Lane and the Disciples who'd backed Ronnie Hawkins at the same time as Levon and the Hawks were backing Hawkins (an upstairs/downstairs thing at the Le Coq D'or, I believe) - but was considered too bluesy by Hawkins and was dumped in favour of Stan Szelest.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 16:42:35 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Jimi Hendrix Experience

I should have said "The Jimi Hendrix Experience" because Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding had their respective times to show what they could do in that set as well, though clearly it was Jimi with all his visual flare and his playing to back it up who was front and centre.

And, to be sure, that was the loudest music I had ever heard. It was in MSG and I really appreciated what was being done only because i had the albums.(by then the first and Axis) Fortunately, venues and sound systems improved thereafter.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 16:38:47 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: I'm off..

... to join the Osmonds fan club. I want Jimmy's triple LP of Long Haired Lover from Liverpool, The Leaving of Liverpool, Ferry 'Cross The Mersey, Liverpool Lou and In My Liverpool Home. He does Tom Thumb's Blues on it but begins 'When you're back in Suarez...'


Entered at Mon Feb 24 16:23:47 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'If Your Memory Serves You Well'

Reading PSB "Reviving A Memory...".

http://blog.peterstonebrown.com/reviving-a-memory

...caused me to reflect on how little we knew in the day about what was going on with regard to the music that was playing a part in shaping our future. PSB writes on how some of our boys played on John Hammond's album. The 'trade papers' were generally not read by anyone but those who worked in the industry and we teens knew little or nothing about backup musicians or who played on what records or even who members of any band were other than the frontman (usually a singer). In fact, playing an instrument was almost incidental and as we put the coins in the jukebox, we had no knowledge of how that song came to be. (Meanwhile, jazz audiences were consuming musician talents). It was an innocent time with no Rock magazines to inform us. When I saw L&TH or other bands in my dad's tavern with instruments, I only then learned to appreciate that the song was more than the singer and that it all began to make sense. When you saw Buddy Rich on TV playing drums on a show like Steve Allen it was an anomaly. It was uncommon in those days to feature a player without a singer. Prominent guitar was not featured in solo in songs except for brief interludes. It almost seemed like the musicians were giving the singer a rest and that we were patiently waiting for the words of the song to resume. This is in stark contrast to what happened only a few years later when featuring the playing became a major part of the performance on stage and on record. I watch the early Stones or Beatles (or many other videos) now and note that they were support only and were never featured. That happened later. The evolution of the player musician within a group became a major force for the audience by the time Monterey hit and before long the rock audience learned what the jazz and blues audience had learned years earlier from Miles Davis and John Coltrane and Dave Brubeck and many others. For me, it was driven home with force when I saw Jimi Hendrix in New York City in 1967 and then Blind Faith in 1969 (and understood why they were comparing Clapton to a deity).


Entered at Mon Feb 24 15:51:49 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Ozzies

Calvin, take no notice of all that denial shit from Rog and Pete. I'm sure it's just their fading memories playing tricks again.

Your mate is bang on about the Osmond's UK rating. The Ozzies, as we Donniephiles knew them better [Merrill was my personal fave btw - I guess it was those front molars], were rated alongside The Kinks, The Who and other such emissaries of rock in the very first tier of the genre.

The link nails it. One of rock's finest few minutes. [There's a brief glimpse of me in the front row six seconds into the clip btw]

At the end of the day, I guess the reluctance of their homeland's rock audience to value what the Ozzies brought to the table says it all about America's musical taste.

Not that we haven't seen that same sort of reluctance before, of course. Tony Orlando anybody?

:-0)


Entered at Mon Feb 24 15:51:39 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Nov. 14, 1965

Thank you BEG. I remember that night fondly. Had 3 front row seats. Not bad for a kid from Oshawa.


Entered at Mon Feb 24 15:41:30 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 1966 Tour with Dylan

Wallsend: The Isle of Wight was not the only concert where Dylan performed a selection of songs from his "recent" mid-60s albums. On the 1966 tour with the Hawks he performed songs from BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME, HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED and BLONDE ON BLONDE


Entered at Mon Feb 24 14:52:50 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

PETERBIO: Bill Avis

As road manager for Ronnie Hawkins, and later, The Band, this Peterborough resident has uniques memories but it’s his friendship with the late Levon Helm he treasures most

“People still have strong memories of where they were at the time these songs came out. But there’s also a whole generation of young people who have an appreciation for the music. As long as people want them, these songs won’t go away. Robbie (Robertson) wrote great songs but Levon fed him about how it was in the Delta. One needed the other. It was a very unique partnership.”


Entered at Mon Feb 24 14:38:39 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Fewer than twelve hours later, everybody was back in the studio to start in on what Dylan called “Like a Woman.” The lyrics, once again, needed work; on several early takes, Dylan sang disconnected lines and semi-gibberish. He was unsure about what the person described in the song does that is just like a woman, rejecting “shakes,” “wakes,” and “makes mistakes.” The improvisational spirit inspired a weird, double-time fourth take, somewhere between Bo Diddley and Jamaican ska, that on the tape finally disintegrates into a voice in the background admitting, “We lost, man.” That escapade prompted a time out. Robbie Robertson and pianist “Pig” Robbins then joined the band and, laying aside “Just Like a Woman,” they helped change Dylan’s boogie-woogie piano number “What You Can Do with My Wigwam” into “Pledging My Time,” driven by Robertson’s screaming guitar. Only then, after several false starts and near misses, the final proud, pained version of “Just Like a Woman” surfaced.

Johnston gets Dylan to start one last retake of “Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat” with a clangy lead guitar, but Robertson’s searing Telecaster abducts the song. “Robbie, the whole world’ll marry you on that one,” Charlie McCoy raves.

During the recording, dating back to October and through all of the changes in personnel, there had been some constants. Al Kooper played on every track of the final album, his contributions essential not just as a musician and impromptu arranger but as a conduit between Dylan and the changing lineup of session men. Kooper’s Nashville roommate, Robbie Robertson, had been involved from the start and refined his playing from unsubtle rock lead to restrained, even delicate performances, along with blues keenings that won praise from some of the most discerning ears on the planet. Kooper and Robertson, familiar with Dylan’s spur-of-the-moment ways, also helped as translators for the Nashville musicians. “They couldn’t have any charts or anything, so they were following where he was putting his hand,” Johnston told Black. “It was so spontaneous. Al Kooper used to call it the road map to hell!”


Entered at Mon Feb 24 14:24:34 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For Bill M: Kris, Bobby and the Imperials / She Belongs to Me b/w A Year From Today

Museum of Canadian Music


Entered at Mon Feb 24 10:20:22 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The Osmonds

Calvin - just to second Peter's post. The Osmonds certainly were not respected as musical unit although they beguiled the pre-teen, early teen market and middle of the road market for some time in the first half of the seventies. That was a poor time for pop music.

The Osmond family sold records in great numbers but only on the singles market. Their albums would hit the charts in the week of release and fall straight out. They had a brilliant strategy to milk their market by releasing group singles (The Osmonds), duets (Donny and Marie) and as individuals. I just checked the reference books. In November 1973 Donny was in the charts with 'When I Fall In Love'. Marie entered with 'Paper Roses' and the entire group were chart topping with 'Let Me In'.

They were all awful!


Entered at Mon Feb 24 02:02:26 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and JT, I posted these photos from Le Coq D'Or.

Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks "If you were at Le Coq d'Or on Yonge Street on 14 November 1963, you would have been lucky enough to see one of Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks' many gigs there. Robertson, who joined the band in 1960 as its bass player, had graduated to become the Hawks' lead guitarist by the time of this show. As a member of the Hawks, Robertson and his "Band mates" (minus Garth Hudson) recorded with Hawkins and lent their sound to his singles "Who Do You Love" and "Bo Diddley." By 1965, The Hawks were on their way to becoming The Band with Robertson developing into the collective's principal songwriter. By September of that year, and after a few rehearsals in Toronto, the band, still going by the moniker the Hawks, were on the road with Bob Dylan, a tour that included two nights in November at Massey Hall."


Entered at Mon Feb 24 01:59:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

JT: I previously posted photos of Dylan with The Hawks. I forget sometimes what I posted in the past, but I do keep the some links.

"These photos taken at Massey Hall on 14 November 1965 are from the Toronto Telegram fonds. Click on each image for a larger view."

Congrats to Kalervoooooooo! It was so great to see Teemu play once again with such commitment and dedication and with a whole 'lotta skill and he's 43.....lol......and great to see 53 year old Jari Kurri iin the stands.

Congrats also to Native Canadian Ted Nolan who coached the Latvian team which had our country on edge for awhile there!

As far as USA....I didn't think they had the caliber of former players like Jeremy Roenick, Keith Tkachuk, Chris Chelios. Still, it was a very close game and we'd never hear the end of it if Canada weren't the Olympic Champions 'cause it's our game.

What about the women? Congrats to the Canadian Women Olympic Team!!!!!!!


Entered at Mon Feb 24 00:15:15 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I do recall a point a few years ago when Donny was a personable chat show guest, laughing about their hit era.

On Hall & Oates, I just bought tickets for August. I still like "Abandoned Luncheonette."


Entered at Mon Feb 24 00:12:39 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Osmonds weren't respected as a musical group in the UK. Donny had a following. Long Haired Lover From Liverpool was a major hit, #1 in 1972, as was Donny's Puppy Love, also #1, but this was seen as the purchasing power of pre-teens in the early 70s from their weekly pocket money. Generally, these were all thought to be excrement by anyone over thirteen. Donny could hold a note. Little Jimmy demonstrably couldn't. Osmonds 45s are a staple of the cardboard box in charity shops that has lingered for years with no one buying them.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 22:42:01 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

And just as an aside-I was at a party last night, and of course talking music. And somehow the conversation got to a point where someone made the claim The Osmonds are much more respected as a musical group over in the UK than here in the US, and that in fact England takes them seriously.

Now the last time I spent more then 3-4 in the UK was 1984, so Im relying on some of you folk from that side of the pond-is that true? And if so, well, why?


Entered at Sun Feb 23 22:39:23 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Obviously the albums in KISS' heyday sold better, 4 Platinums in a row. But they only had two albums break the top 10 (Love Gun at No 4 and Dynasty at 9). Their last 3 albums peaked at 3-2-3 on the sales charts, albeit the last two havent hit gold status yet. So yes, the changing world plays a huge part of it as I was factually corrected to say their last 3 are their best charting albums-the fact is they didnt sell near as well.

Regardless of the issues between the partyers and the non partyers-youd think they could find room on stage for 6 guys.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 22:24:48 CET 2014 from (121.211.87.72)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Kiss

The tensions between the teetotal Simmons and light drinker Stanley and the recovering addicts Frehley and Criss are well documented. The astounding thing is the last three albums are their highest charting? What criteria? I'm certainly not doubting or questioning you, Calvin... I am questioning how this is possible, when you look at Kiss 1979-1982 or so. Wow.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 22:13:16 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Just got back from a vinyl fair, that always puts me in a good mood. Nothing fantastic buy wise, but some good stuff.

Seems yet another group is having their feud break wide open at the RocknRoll HOF Induction Ceremony. KISS has decided not to perform as the the Former founding members Criss/Freely and the current members Simmons/Stanley cant come to an agreement. Seems Simmons and Stanley were planning on taking the stage with the current band-which given the two "new" guys have logged 17 and 12 years with the band and they last 3 albums were their highest charting discs-they had a point.

I'm Guessing no Linda Ronstadt either. Nirvana is of course missing their frontman, and I'm not sure what the status is of Cat Stevens playing wise. Not sure how compelling a Hall & Oates with Peter Gabriel show is going to be.

Anywhere her an album by a group calling themselves the Riders last year? Straight ahead blues with nothing groundbreaking, just fun jamming big guitar runs RnR/Blues. The band is actually Barry Goldberg (Electric Flag/KGB), Stephen Stills and Kenny Wayne Shephard.

Going to see Alejandro Escovedo and Peter Buck (R.E.M.) This week. Should be a good show.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 21:59:19 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.134)

Posted by:

Kevin J

What a day! How good was this team? Almost perfect ......and let's remember that we were without the world's most gifted goal scorer in Steve Stamkos for the whole tournament - and John Tavaras for the key games. Name another country that could bench the reigning Norris trophy winner and the reigning Art Ross trophy (NHL leading scorer ) for effectively the entire games.

The combination of speed, size and skill was amazing to watch........and Carey Price was sensational......his overtime save against Finland was key to getting the bye out of the first round and he made a number of excellent stops against the USA..........he didn't have a lot of work against Sweden but his control of every game he plays through his puck handling ( including rebound control and decisions on when to stop play ) was lovely to see.

.......But before naming this team as best of all time ( modern day Olympics they are the first team to EVER go undefeated ) let's remember the 1976 national team at the Canada Cup that had a defence of Bobby Orr, Larry Robinson, Guy Lapointe, Serge Savard, Brad Park and Dennis Potvin...............Oh and the forwards included Bobby Hull, Phil Esposito, Guy Lafleur, Marcel Dionne, Sittler, Gainey, Gilbert Perrault, etc.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 20:13:54 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Photos form Massey Hall 1965: Dylan and LI&TH

Until today from BEG (see her earlier post).


Entered at Sun Feb 23 20:10:12 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Levon and the Hawks provide Electric soil for Dylan

PSB: This was a month before I saw Dylan and the Hawks at Massey Hall in Toronto. I have never seen a photo from those 2 shows ( I was at the Nov. 15/65) show. Thanks for your recollections. That was my first big concert ever though I had seen Levon and the Hawks and others many times before at the Concord).


Entered at Sun Feb 23 20:04:09 CET 2014 from (72.78.48.226)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Thom Cronin Newark pics

The pics of Bob Dylan and Levon & The Hawks at Symphony Hall in Newark, surfaced on Friday at a Levon page, Electric Dirt Farmer on Facebook and pretty much went viral. I was astounded because I was at the show. It was my 4th Bob concert, and also the site of my first Bob Dylan show two years before when the theater was known as The Mosque.

I bought a ticket early that afternoon and the ticket said stage site and as those pics show, people were seated on the stage. However, when I got to the theater that night, the usher led me not to the stage but to the first row! They'd added folding chairs over the orchestra pit in front of the regular seats and my seat was the 2nd one in from the center aisle. In all the time since, I've only seen one other pic from that show.

I'd seen Levon and Robbie with Bob at Forest Hills a little over a month before, but this was my first time seeing Levon & The Hawks! In one of the wide shots, you see the entire group and a line of amps, and I remembered that line of amps ever since. Unlike Forest Hills, there was no booing, and an encore, "Positively 4th Street" which was still high up on the charts at the time. I didn't know who the other guys were until a couple of weeks later when I saw a program from the Carnegie Hall show the night before that listed the musicians. The song that totally blew my mind was "Baby, Let Me Follow You Down."

As things turned out, I would see The Band (at their NYC Filmore debut and several other times)before I saw Bob Dylan again in Philly in January '74. But this was the show that kicked off my love of The Band, and a little less than 3 years later, I got "Music From Big Pink" without thinking about it. (The link above is to an article I wrote for the original Bobdylan.com several years ago that's now on my blog that talks about the show.)


Entered at Sun Feb 23 20:02:56 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Perfection

Maybe he took 2 pills instead of 1 and that put him over? Or maybe something weird in the measurement or maybe a metabolic aberration? Who knows?

The way Canada played today (from Price to the defenders to the back checkers) I don't think that Zetterberg + H. Sedin + Backstrom would have mattered too much. This game was played by Canada to perfection.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:59:15 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Muddy Waters

I had read those articles before I posted Jerry. They come up on my Yahoo page as soon as I click on line. The fact that they say he is an innocent victim just doesn't ring true. To leave that sort of thing to the last minute to get a ruling doesn't seem sensible.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:52:52 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Banned substances: how much is too much?

More from USA Today:

"Team doctor Bjorn Waldeback said Zyrtec-D is a permitted drug, which contains pseudoephedrine, at a certain level, and Backstrom has taken the medication for "several years." It's allowed at 150 micograms per milliliter and Backstrom tested at 190. "Nicklas Backstrom and I were at doping control and we told him he takes this one pill every day," Waldeback said. Said Mark Aubry, the chief medical officer for the International Ice Hockey Federation: "He is an innocent victim of circumstances."

There is something wrong with this story. The substance in question is OK at some level but not at some other level? We need to know more.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:46:53 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Not Claritin-D but something very similar with the same banned substance in combination

USA Today reports 8 minutes ago:

"Washington Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom was pulled from the Swedish lineup just before the gold medal game against Canada because he failed a doping test for taking the medicine Zyrtec-D to treat his sinusitis"

Cetirizine is not banned but pseudoepedrine is banned (a potential stimulant).

Another article suggested that the Washington Capitals know he has used this (not banned in NHL) and that the Swedish team knew as well (is that true? If so, that is astounding and unforgivable,given that pseudoephedrine is on the list).


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:38:23 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Banned substances

We'll see what finally comes out. There is Claritin and there is Claritin-D. I just reviewed the list of banned and restricted substances in the Olympics. Claritin is loratidine while Claritin-D is loratidine + pseudoephedrine. It is this latter agent which is banned (a potential stimulant).

The player should have known. The coaches and medical staff should be all over the players obsessively to avoid this. Could he have made a difference? Likely no but that is not the point. Every player matters on a team. They were missing a key player (a centre who had to win face-offs and who had great skill). Win or lose, he was essential. Not sure what the agent was that he took, but Claritin has been bandied about in the media earlier. They should do their research and be clear when they write (You already know how I feel about media laziness and inaccuracy. Get the facts and report them only after you have done your research and know!). To be out of a game because of injury is one thing but to be out because of something like this is tragic.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:30:12 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Doping??

Nicklas Bachstrom.........pulled for doping! It's hard to understand who is most at fault in this instance.

The player for not checking with any medical staff, the coach for not making it clear to his players what is not allowed.

It seems that the Olympic management gives a list of banned substances, however you would think the decision would have been made much sooner as to the condition of the player. This seems to be now a situation that the Swedish coach wants to use as an excuse to cry "foul", we may have won if we had our best player. Doesn't seem likely, however I feel bad for the guy that it wasn't handled better......by himself or coach and medical staff.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:25:48 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Defense: The new order

Norm: Right on the money.! I too was amazed at the defensive ability of Canada to totally neutralize any attempt by Sweden (and the USA before them) to come down the middle and be effective. They kept the offence largely on the outside and played a great deal of the game in the offensive zone. The defence provided superb defence and were large participants in scoring goals. Cary Price was always supported and the forwards back checked the entire 2 games.

This is a stark difference from previous years when Canada was all forward firepower and there was much less emphasis on defence. Maybe it makes for a less entertaining brand of hockey for some, but we loved it. It is how the game is meant to be played. Commentators noted that it was played like a chess match. I agree completely. In 2010, it was drama and offence. In 2014, it was defence and waiting for opportunities. This is the new order.

One more comment. No matter how mediocre a team was in hockey games, to a team, they all had very good to great goaltending. People in the know in European hockey have told me how seriously training for goaltenders is now taken from the time they are children. It certainly has paid off. In every game, goaltenders shone.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:07:00 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Congratulations and concerns

We are going to have to put our minds to skiing in all its forms to challenge the excellence of Norway. When that happens, and it will, there may be a change in the gold medal count. We need to return to downhill form and put our attention to cross country in all its forms. In that arena, there is no question that the Norwegian fitness reigns supreme to date. Congratulations to a country of just over 5 million (Canada has over 30 million). The ability of the The Netherlands to win consistently on skates is astounding.

If one steps back and takes a look at what has happened over the past few decades during which I have watched these games, one word stands out - parity. In all areas, more and more, athletes in team disciplines and individual athletes are coming closer together in ability

I suggest that if judged skating is going to continue in the Olympics, then the number of judges should be increased for any event dramatically, so that any hint of bias or fix can be diluted out (and of course, cut out the highest and the lowest ratings). As long as the public lacks confidence in that judging, skating in all its forms will continue to be a problem.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 19:07:05 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Norskmen

Not surprising to see your country folks do so well at winter games Jan. They take all of that pretty serious in your country........congratulations. They are well deserved.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 18:56:39 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pure Gold

I got up and stayed by my comfortable fire Jerry. Note how many of those young stars are from very small towns in BC.

I was surprised to see the childish comments of Peter Forsberg about the officials. I thought him better than that. Comments from the players on the Swedish team were to the contrary as those who commented were happy with the choice of officials. 49 of the 50 players who played in this game are NHL players and know the position of all those officials very well, no matter where they come from.

The management and coaching team Steve Yzerman put together just did an almost perfect job of getting those young men to execute a system exactly.

To shutout teams the caliber of the USA and Sweden was no fluke. There was much said about how comfortable team Canada looked after the semi final with USA. Perhaps they were over confident. I believe, they just believed in their system.........and proved it. To see such world class players as Sweden has totally shut down was mind boggling. At the 14 minute mark of the third period they had only had one shot on goal. I don't recall ever seeing such total domination in a gold medal game.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 18:49:02 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

only 10 gold medals, eh? tsk, tsk. and you are how many Canucks?


Entered at Sun Feb 23 16:46:42 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: O Canada indeed

John D (and anyone else who cares)

We got up in Victoria at 3 AM and headed to one of 4 sports bars that opened (no alcohol allowed in BC) and had coffee and watched. All the venues were packed and we were actually turned away with about another 100 people from the first one downtown. And it was great to be with other Canadians to watch a great team do it right. International hockey is wonderful.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 16:32:52 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

GOLD AGAIN!!!!!!!


Entered at Sun Feb 23 15:29:36 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yeaaaaaaaaaaah!

Van The Man....Robbie......Levon!!!

Photos by David Butterfield.


Entered at Sun Feb 23 14:46:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie totally getting into his guitar playing!

Photo by Chester......Simpson.

Photo of Rick and Robbie and others are by David Butterfield.

Intermission over.....Back to the game!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Entered at Sun Feb 23 14:40:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and also from 1965, but at Toronto's Massey Hall. Hey....Louuu's there too!


Entered at Sun Feb 23 14:37:19 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey JT. It's great that you found those photos!!

As you know, I'm always looking for photos. There are a lot of photos documenting The Hawks/The Band journey on this site but so many are not credited with the photographers. Anyway, while it's intermission time.....

Here's an enlarged one of Dylan and The Hawks in 1965 from the same show in Newark, NJ. Finally, we can see Robbie smiling on stage. ;-D


Entered at Sun Feb 23 14:00:19 CET 2014 from (124.25.157.226)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

JT, great find - those are exceptional pics. The same photographer has another of interest...


Entered at Sun Feb 23 09:47:26 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: young dudes play with Dylan

These photos showed up on line today. Amazing! Look at the guys. That's how I remember them at the Concord the year before.

http://www.thomcronin.com/Music/Bob-Dylan/Bob-Dylan-Convert-10265/37202548_7CtZKh#!i=3088604504&k=xTdrjRS

JH, you may want to consider them for the file.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 18:35:18 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

When listening to the acetate, Dylan would have noticed how large "the Weight" loomed over "Abbey Road", fancy production or not.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 15:54:40 CET 2014 from (24.66.208.205)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: IOW and thanks

Great photos and articles, BEG. Thank you for continuing to do research and find material that responds to the moment. IOW is well presented and deserved to be properly documented and presented.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 15:23:59 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Bob Dylan during the “Time Magazine Interview” in Dont Look Back. The woman behind him is Jones Alk, who recorded the sound for the film."


Entered at Sat Feb 22 15:08:42 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Best of Another Self Portrait: The Isle Of Wight concert

''Lay Lady Lay’ sounds a bit off at the start (as the song sometimes does live) but Dylan and The Band catches up nicely during the song. Highway 61 really rumbles along, you can hear Levon Helm shouting out the background vocals.The Band is so laid back and rambling, they sound so relaxed (in a good way). What many have described as unrehearsed, just feels right for the songs. Bob Dylan and the Band invited us to a country square dance, in a time when experimentation in the studio was starting to get big (Dylan got to hear an acetate of Abbey Road the next day). They brought it down to earth.

Listen to the difference from a bootleg and the newly released version:


Entered at Sat Feb 22 14:57:23 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Dylan said he had no thoughts about future engagements after the festval. "We will consider any offers we get," he told the reporter. "But basically we're just having a holiday."

That "holiday," according to guitarist Robbie Robertson of the Band, consisted in almost non-stop jamming. In fact, Dylan's appetite for music-making far exceeded the Band's. "He just likes to play all the time," Robertson said. "We had to say, 'Give us a rest.' We could hardly finish our first album because he wanted to play all the time."

For his part, Dylan said: "It's nice to be working with the Band again. We're just getting in a bit of practice."


Entered at Sat Feb 22 10:23:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Thanks for that Rosco Gordon / Ska link too. One of the worst things about the demise of Borders UK is that you can no longer buy "The Oxford American" here, though I get my son to buy me the music issue every year and send it over. I had read the article before, but the "Tennessee" issue has a first rate double CD and other fascinating articles … the one on black radio in Memphis and Roseanne Cash are both worthwhile. Great issue of a great magazine.

Today's Toppermost is Ronnie Spector (Linked). I hadn't realized till I saw the Twitter feed that she's playing London on March 9th, just the one UK show, and I already have tickets for Rodriguez in Bournemouth that night. It would have been a Sophie's Choice moment, and Ronnie would have won. But Rodriguez it will be.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 10:12:48 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: My 5 cents worth

Firstly I've enjoyed reading every ones comments over the past few days. This is what keeps the guest book alive.

Now my five cents worth. With a few exceptions I think there is very little that the guys released after TLW that matches their earlier efforts. Half of Rick's first release is good, a few tracks of Levon's 4 albums hold up, Robbie's first two albums are good, a few tracks of Jericho are really good and I love the title track from The Sea To The North. Dirt Farmer and Robbie Robertson are my favourite post Band albums.

What makes me sad is that The Last Waltz Suite had some great stuff on it and it's a shame they never built on that. Between Trains was great and offered a bit of promise for The Band but nothing eventuated. Like it or not The Band couldn't exist without RR. I thought at the time RM might fill the gap as a song writer but that sadly didn't happen. For me the 80's Band is nothing more than a tribute act. RR went on to write some good songs and The Band recorded some good performances in the 90's but separately they never got the combination of songs and performances right. (OK, there are exceptions - Some Where Down The Crazy River, Fallen Angel, Atlantic City, Blind Willie Mc Tell and maybe one or two others). I think RMs death was probably the end of The Band.

Having said that, their work up to and including Islands and TLW has assured them their place as one of the best bands of all time.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 04:53:53 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Thanks for the link to that wonderful article on the origins of ska. The importance of Dodd's stints as a migrant farm labour in the southern US is also highlighted in the excellent Marley biography that I'm still plodding through (my fault, not its). Bratty, Ranglin and Clue J all appear, as do future JamCans Jackie Mittoo, Lynn Tait and JoJo Bennett. The latter co-led the very successful, radio-friendly Satalites band along with Fergus Hambleton, who, as half of Goody Two Shoes, has a place in this site's discography for having done one of the earliest covers of UoCC.

If moving upstream (chronologically) from Memphis appeals, check the nearest Putamayo display (at Shoppers?) for "From Mali to Memphis" - simply brilliant.

FWiW, my top 5 Band/"solo" CDs are Big Brown, Big Pink, Redboy, City of Angels, Native Americans.

Oh yes - Laurel Aiken's backing band on that record was neither Jamaican nor American - they were Australian (and not Cdn as mentioned in at least one reggae encyclopedia).


Entered at Sat Feb 22 04:19:53 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.163)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: IOW

Little Brother, that's interesting, My experience was completely different. I always knew the IOW performance was gold. Or should I say, it was everything I wanted in a Dylan performance. I loved the set list and the style of performance. The only problem was the quality of the recording was so bad it made it pretty much unlistenable. I don't care about messed up lines, what I like is the artistic vision. I really like Hendrix's performance at the 1970 IOW for the same reason. A lot of people say his performance was sloppy and maybe from a technical point of view it was but I thought he was making a statement which went beyond the actual music.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 03:48:07 CET 2014 from (68.238.190.117)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives

Wallsend and Peter... I concur.

Peter, I also was struck by how superior the Bootleg Series tracks are to the mediocre versions on the original Columbia "Self-Portrait" LP/CD. The odd and unexpected thing for me was that listening to the new release completely changed my sketchy but enduring mental "image" of the concert scene.

I remember being baited by my high-school cronies about how lame "Self-Portrait" was-- they knew I would rise to defend both Dylan and The Band. In particular, I remember one of them reading from a review that, in part, trashed the IOW tracks as a sloppy performance that turned Dylan classics into a "boozy sing-along". Trashing performances as "boozy sing-along"s is a standard, clichéd putdown, but I took the criticism seriously and argued against it.

The thing is, though, that I secretly DID think that, apart from the impeccable "The Mighty Quinn", the performances WERE kind of raggy. I still cringe when he mangles those verses in "Like a Rolling Stone".

In a nutshell, after first listening to the S-P tracks, then later that abominable bootleg CD, I was sure that Dylan and The Band were cheerfully or wearily wasted; even The Band's fitful backup vocals and "Minstrel Boy" seemed impromptu and raucous.

This was righteously blown away when I listened to the new release. Certainly listening to a proper concert instead of excerpts is part of it; it's that mysterious "whole greater than sum of its parts" phenomenon at work. But apart from that, I was amazed at how much better the performances sounded: despite the muffed lines on a few numbers, Dylan is in command of both his voice and his lyrics; The Band's background vocals sound more like their typical call-and-response, not impulsive shout-outs. Likewise, their playing has The Band's usual energy and focus-- it's not "Rock of Ages" quality, but it's strong.

At long last, in conclusion-- my belief that IOW was an OK but somewhat throwaway performance turned out to be a decades-old misconception: an artifact of mediocre recording and the subliminal influence of those idiot critics. ("Minstrel Boy" has a place in my heart, but it still seems impromptu and raucous.)

It's one of those occasions where one is happy to be proved wrong. ;)


Entered at Sat Feb 22 03:10:40 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.163)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ben, I respect your opinions and I don't think they are inflammatory at all. This is what Robbie said in a book published in 1986:

"I've been lucky, I've been able to fulfill some of my dreams. I don't know what my dream is now, I only know I want to do great work. I want to take those chances, evolve, grow. I don't want to play in Milwaukee, at the Country Club, or in New York at the Lone Star. Are you joking? It upsets me just to think about it. I made my big statement [The Last Waltz]. I did the movie, I made a three-record album about it - and if this is only my statement, not theirs, I'll accept that. They're saying, 'Well, that was really his trip, not our trip.' Well, fine. I'll take the best music film that's ever been made, and make it my statement. I don't have any problems with that. None at all. Why should I? What the fuck would I learn by playing those clubs again?"


Entered at Sat Feb 22 02:57:15 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I really enjoyed this John D....You will too....and Colin Linden and Tom Wilson are there too.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 02:30:59 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Robbie's retirement and replacement

Robbie is the only one who spoke about retiring from the road in The Last Waltz. I don't recall anyone else addressing the issue at all. So, the fact that the others reformed 1983 shouldn't have been much of a surprise. The list of groups and performers that have retired or broken up and then come back years later is quite long. Why should The Band have been any different. Maybe if Robbie hadn't made such grand pronouncements about retiring and getting off the road, he would have changed his mind at some point and re-united with the others in some form. Maybe for an album. He put himself in a position, where it would be difficult to do so. So, in effect he set the stage for his eventual replacement. I don't see anything remotely inflammatory about this. The fact is that The Band reformed in 1983 without Robbie. As a fan of the entire career of The Band, I've always found the reformed Band undervalued and unfairly maligned. I saw them 3 times in the 90's and thought that they were fantastic.


Entered at Sat Feb 22 00:55:39 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Isle Of Wight...I downloaded the 17 songs beginning with SBTM. Fine with me until one day I can afford a decent music system.

Keith Richards had this to say:

"I saw (The Band) at the Dylan gig on the Isle of Wight and I was disappointed. Dylan was beautiful, especially when he did songs by himself. He has a unique rhythm which only seems to come off when he's performing solo. The Band were too strict. It was like they were just playing the records on stage and at a fairly low volume, with very clear sound. I like some distortion, especially if something starts happening on stage." (NME, December 6, 1969)


Entered at Sat Feb 22 00:31:37 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Isle of Wight

I had two bootlegs, both awful, and a cassette. The four tracks on Self Portrait (original) aren't great sound even. But the new CD is wonderful to have, Better mastering, more care … and the bootlegs always sounded like an audience tape.

I will note that we've had days recently with one or two posts only and today is the busiest for ages …


Entered at Fri Feb 21 23:33:32 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.163)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Little Brother, completely agree with your comments about IOW. This was the only concert Dylan did where he was performing a selection of songs from his 'recent' albums of the mid-60s - some of the best albums ever made. I especially liked the songs from John Wesley Harding. Hearing the comment he made before Quinn the Eskimo, I finally understood why he included that song and also Wild Mountain Thyme (fantastic) in the set list - an acknowledgement of his English audience. I thought through Another Self Portrait I could finally see where Dylan was coming from at that stage in his life and it seemed to be a pretty fantastic place. Then of course, there was the piano version of When I Paint My Masterpiece. Is there no limit to that man's genius.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 23:14:39 CET 2014 from (68.238.190.117)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives

Subject: Kudos and The Isle of Wight CD

FWIW, several years ago I used to hang out here and comment daily.

I got out of the habit because there were a couple of psycho regulars-- not just drive-by trolls-- who gummed up the discussions to a fare-thee-well.

Anyway, for the moment, I just wanted to add to the chorus of appreciation for this civilized, intelligent, nuanced discussion of the "same old/same old" issues surrounding The Band's disintegration.

BTW, I'm about as far from "anti-drug" as it gets, but I find Dave H's observation that "the road" is obviously a metaphor, or code, for "hard drug abuse" trenchant and compelling.

Great discussion!

PS: Just to toss in a tangent that was probably discussed here already: I splurged on the deluxe box set of Dylan's "The Bootleg Series Vol. 10: Another Self Portrait (1969–1971)", which includes the oft-bootlegged 1969 Dylan/Band Isle of Wight concert. Ironically, being somewhat chickenbleep, over the decades I never had the nerve or contacts to buy bootleg recordings, EXCEPT for a bootleg CD for that concert. The quality of the recording was really poor, and I wrongly concluded that it was the "real" recording and as good as it got.

I was impressed and delighted by this new "official" version! I doubt that Robbie or Bob dubbed in new tracks to sweeten the rougher bits as they (at least Robbie et al) did with "The Basement Tapes" or TLW post-production. I know this concert and its bootlegs has a long history, but I was under the impression that the original recording was just too substandard to be officially marketed and released.

It's a shame this version wasn't put out as a stand-alone CD ages ago!


Entered at Fri Feb 21 22:53:24 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the Memphis roots . . . of Ska

Nothing at all (directly) to do with The Band . . . a beautifully written and deeply fascinating musicological investigation that traces the Ska riddim back thru New Orleans to Tennessee . . . .


Entered at Fri Feb 21 22:51:20 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.112)

Posted by:

Dave H

Jon L: Thanks. I have no doubt you're right.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 22:25:16 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.163)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Dave H, my bad. In this forum people just post short paragraphs and sometimes it is not easy to grasp exactly what it is they are saying. Not because they haven't expressed themselves clearly but because posters come from all kinds of different backgrounds and bring all kinds of different perspectives.

Ben, if you get irritated because people have a different opinion to you, you are going to spend a lot of your life irritated.

Pat B, to what are you referring when you say the spring of 1983? I have always wanted to know when the bitterness started.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 21:50:37 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

What is a fact is that Levon never said a bad word about RR until the Spring of 1983.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 21:49:24 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Personally, saying the RR was replaceable is about as inflammatory as anything posted here.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 21:18:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The period we’re talking about was the period when RINGO STARR couldn’t get a record deal. Robbie has said specifically that you can’t say that’s the end, and then say “Not quite …”. It becomes like the Shakespearean death scene where the deceased keeps popping up with yet another line.

I would imagine that Warner Bros, wouldn’t merely think of the retainer as an advance, but as an advance plus an annual rate of interest on the advance when no material turned up. David’s point is spot on: if WB hadn’t got anything out of them, other labels weren’t going to jump in. Plus if we’re talking 1983 … were they still “retained” by WB? I have zero sympathy for conglomerates (if you throw enough shit against the wall some sticks was a universal policy) but you can see that they might be put out at no response to their investment.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 21:15:46 CET 2014 from (99.52.71.217)

Posted by:

Calvin

Ben, when I talked about an occasional poster stirring up trouble on purpose I wasn't talking about you. Considering your post we are of the same mind on my statement.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 20:27:22 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson On The Band: ‘I Hoped We Would Have A Timeless Quality’

"“There’s all kinds of different emotions.” Robertson tells Radio.com. ”I go from a place of being very proud, and really enjoying the extraordinary talent of my bandmates to some real sadness as well. It’s only Garth and I left. I can’t help but to veer between these two places.”

What went wrong? “Something happened, and I did the best I could with the people I was working with, but I knew deep down, that I didn’t give it the presentation of other stuff that I had done with the Band or other stuff I had done in my life. I was the recording engineer on some of our records, it’s always been a part that I played in this thing. A lot of the band’s records, I mixed, usually with an engineer. This was something I always felt… I was in the wrong studio situation, the wrong people, I did the best I could. “But now, I’m cool. I can sleep at night.”

Although it’s long past the point where there can be any sort of Band reunion, was Garth Hudson involved in the box set? “I talked to him a while ago, he was in the midst of doing some new music. It’s surprising how much of a forward thinker he is, and I love the idea that he’s doing some new music. He’s one of the most special musicians that God ever put here.”

While Robertson wasn’t in touch with his former bandmate at the time, he was happy for his success: “I was glad to see anything good happen to Levon. I felt that, over the years, a bitterness had consumed him, and he thought that he deserved something that he wasn’t getting in life. And this bitterness was kind of eating him up from the inside, and it was tremendously sad for me to see his journey turn so dark. When he was doing his midnight rambles, and good things were happening for him, I thought that was wonderful. I always loved Levon, I thought he was one of the most remarkable musicians. I only wanted good stuff for him. I thought if he had some success he would just feel better in life, and [I was glad] that he did get some of that.”

Robertson spoke about Helm from the stage at the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2012. “The next day, I went to New York and went straight to the hospital and sat with him. He wasn’t really conscious. (But) I was able to sit there and hold his hand, and think about all the good stuff we experienced together.”


Entered at Fri Feb 21 20:16:35 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.163)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think one thing working against the reformed Band selling records was all the publicity associated with TLW. If you do a huge concert with big stars and make it in to a movie where you say this it, the end of 16 years on the road, and then come back again it makes you look kind of ridiculous. I thought this and I was a hardcore fan. Then if you start playing watered down versions of your big hits it just isn't a good look. I was going to go and see the reformed Band in 1983 but I got talking to some guy and he told me not to bother. He said he had seen Rick a few times and he always turned up drunk. That is no way to build a fan base and run a business.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 19:59:58 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Waltzing with WB

Kerrin: As part of the deal Warner Bros. also financed the filming of The Last Waltz


Entered at Fri Feb 21 19:41:49 CET 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Dave H, I thought your Last Waltz comments were quite perceptive. Along those lines, I note that Robbie's comments on touring in the Last Waltz interviews presumably came on the heels of the Band's summer 1976 tour, where many a band member was 'wrecked' in more ways than one, and it must have been quite a challenge to keep the tour together and moving.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 19:40:21 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band

I'm not trying to intentionally stir things up here. I've been an occasional poster on this guestbook for close to 20 years. I've traded live tapes here with people back in the 90's. I've been a fan of The Band for approximately 30 years. I was excited when Robbie released his first solo album. I enjoyed it at the time, but listening to it recently found it to be incredibly dated with a bad 80's production. I think Storyville is a bit better. Go back to your woods is strong. I was excited to see Robbie on SNL perform 'The weight' with Bruce Hornsby around that time. I've listened to his other solo albums and haven't been very impressed. I find very little of the magic, the feeling, the beauty of the Band in Robbie's solo work. I found much more of it in Rick's, Levon's and the reformed Band's work. I think 'Dirt Farmer' can sit very comfortably beside 'Music from Big Pink' or 'The Band'. There's no way I could say that about any of Robbie's solo work. That's just my opinion.

I do get irritated when some people make posts here putting one member of the Band up as a genius babysitting 3 drug addicts. That's basically what wallsend wrote yesterday and I didn't see much of a response to that inflammatory comment. This is a gustbook on The Band website. This isn't the Robbie Robertson Devotional society. If some people have such thin skin regarding any criticism or negative comments directed towards Robbie Robertson then maybe they should find a guestbook on his website to read and post on.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 19:23:03 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.112)

Posted by:

Dave H

Wallsend: I don't see where we disagree. Part of the point I was trying to make was that perceptions of age and time *were* very different in the '60s and '70s--that's why a bunch of guys in their mid-30s could present themselves as, and I'm sure to some extent genuinely perceive themselves to be, grizzled veterans of the touring life without being laughed off the screen.

From today's perspective, however, with the Stones, McCartney, CSNY, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Van Morrison, and other '60s-era rockers (some of whom were Last Waltz participants themselves) still out there playing gigs 50+ years after they started, it's just no longer credible to make the argument that 16 years of on-and-off touring puts one's life or health in danger by definition. If that's all RR was saying, then he looks a little foolish now. I was trying to argue that he was saying something a little different, and something with a lot more validity, but it required a certain amount of diplomacy and myth-making to dress up the truth in a palatable way. And the Last Waltz was a great way to do it--have a party, invite your talented friends, film it all for the ages, and go out on top!


Entered at Fri Feb 21 18:57:40 CET 2014 from (219.104.39.150)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: David P

Sure, Richard was certainly contributing material early on, but my point was that the concept, direction, and eventual identity of The Band most likely came from Robbie. It took some trial and error for this to take shape, which is why the second album is generally regarded as The Masterpiece. That's right, too, WB's only got TLW soundtrack in return for the substantial retainers they paid out in the late 70's - something like one million dollars over two years. Quite possibly why Levon never saw a cent from the release, WB would have called that retainer an advance. However, it's interesting that in the Last Waltz Suite we have some new songs that are not connected to TLW in any way, namely The Well and Out of the Blue. I say interesting because TWOF gives the impression that as soon as TLW was done Levon was outta there, flying back to Woodstock, barely able to utter a civil word in Robbie's direction from that moment on. It's strangely heart warming to know that The Band not only fulfilled their obligations to the movie but were hanging out at Shangri Las working on new songs of Robbie's, for a while at least. I guess with Rick and Levon busy with solo careers it was eventually decided to slip the two completed tracks into the triple album release instead of trying to finish a whole album.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 18:11:32 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Don't forget that Richard was just as much of a creative force as Robbie in the beginning on Music From Big Pink.

The original quintet had a recording deal in place with Warner Brothers after The Last Waltz and, as we know, no further collaborative efforts ever materialized. And, when the others reunited without Robbie years later, that couldn't have helped their standing in the eyes of other major labels at the time.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:58:57 CET 2014 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: Orlando

Subject: The Band

Bringing it back to how special The Band is, I am reading Abraham Lincoln, a Biography by Lord Charnwood, and admiring how an Englishman could communicate so discerning a portrait of the United States that Lincoln grew up in - brings to mind how the Band with the Brown Album captured America as well and like the biography, published in 1916, will resonate and live genrations beyond.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:55:20 CET 2014 from (219.104.39.150)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: ...and furthermore...

Another point I didn't quite make is that although many Band fans, including myself, find Robbie's solo stuff hard to love, it is still clearly the product of the clarity of purpose, vision, and attention to detail that set the standard of the first albums so high and was conspicuously absent later on. So, although not all my cup of tea, I don't think it deserves to be dismissed with four letter words. Ben, The Band did no new records in the 80's because, according to an interview with Levon in 1987: "It's more fun to play for the people and let the good times roll." Robbie couldn't have stopped major labels from taking an interest in The Band if they had seen dollar signs, which I guess they didn't, at least when they checked out the live shows. If he had even tried it it's pretty certain it would have got a mention in Levon's book. Like Peter said, a wild conspiracy theory, please don't post it on YT or it will soon become "common knowledge"! However, they probably were keen to have new product to sell, which is perhaps why The Band Is Back was filmed for video release only a couple of weeks into their reunion tour.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:56:17 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Kerrin, JT, Kevin J-Greats posts. Especially the warning for it not to get out of hand-frankly I kind of feel like one occasional poster kept posting ridiculous comments until some of us (Me included) Finally bit and this conversation broke out. It was clearly in my mind meant to create this, and sadly succeeded. But it doesnt need to go that much further as very little taking sides in an inflammatory way has occurred so far. Much like many of you Ive been posting here for going on 15 years and have learned my lesson.

Without a doubt the reformed Band was nowhere near as good as the OQ-but then who is?. How could they be without Robbie and Richard. If Garth and Levon had been missing and the 3R were there it would have been the same-decent band, but not magic.

As for the Label they were on, I dont think Rhino was a "Minor" Label. A long time compilation/reprint label that had just had %50 of the company bought by Time-Warner, The Band was the first artist signed to their new release wing. Added to the fact many Older Acts couldnt even get a deal back then (and the Sony deal that fell through) the idea they were shoved in a corner label wise is ridiculous. Rhino was/is a solid label.

And while I tend to like a few solo albums more than the reformed guys (3 Robbies, 2 Ricks and 2 Levons would come before a reformed band album) the first two are clearly worth listening to on occasion.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:42:37 CET 2014 from (74.176.226.132)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: Heart, Soul & Replacements

Count me as someone who thinks of The Band as five indispensable musicians, each member having equal shares in the heart and soul department. Removing any one of them from the mix dilutes the alchemy which produced the magic that was The Band. Robbie was irreplaceable. The same would be true for any of the other four. The shared experiences which took them from teenagers to thirty-something men cannot be replaced by another musician, regardless of his skill level. Those experiences are in the very marrow of The Band, and you can hear it and feel it in the music.

I'm glad that they reformed and I'm grateful for the opportunities I had to see and hear them again. They were good, damned good. I wish that they had been more successful. But as someone in The Last Waltz said, "It's not like it used to be."


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:25:29 CET 2014 from (38.113.85.40)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Early 80's WNET Showing TLW

Back in the early 80's the PBS station in NYC, channel 13, showed The Last Waltz during a pledge drive. I had seen it in 1980 at a theatre in NYC that had just upgraded it's sound system and chose TLW to show it off. I'm not sure if the film was available on VHS at the time. If it was I did not own it yet. So being able to see it on TV was a big deal. During one of the "pledge breaks" to my surprise they brought out Manuel and Danko. I'm not sure if they had reformed yet. If I had to guess I would say it was before then. My initial excitement at their appearance quickly went away when I realized, as the host did too, that they could barely speak and were almost incapable of having a conversation. Manuel looked like ghost. These are guys who had been on Ed Sullivan etc...It's not like someone snuck up on them and stuck a mic in their faces when they wern't prepared. They were fried. What was that recent post on "the road"...


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:20:59 CET 2014 from (219.104.39.150)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Kevin J, correct, it is part of being in this community, but to me the seasoned fans - most of those who post here - have seen enough to read between the lines. It's the ones with only a passing interest in The Band, who browsed a library copy of TWOF skipping the boring bits about the music, they are the ones who have become experts on what a cold hearted, talentless scumbag Robbie is (that and arguing over whether Richard or Rick sang lead on certain songs). I don't see how anyone who loves The Band's best work can hear in it the massive contribution of a cold-hearted writer and a talentless guitarist. It's just plain love-of-gossip over love-of-music, which is very sad. The feud was a one man howl of self pity as has been said, but in Levon's defense I don't doubt there is some basis of fact. It's entirely likely that Robbie, with no shortage of brains and sound business advice, sought to put himself in a position that served him long term. I just think the others took their incomes for granted, and through lifestyle choices, bad management and bad luck, found themselves in the unenviable position of having to work in spite of personal tragedy, lack of inspiration, and serious health issues. It's no surprise that there were regrets and jealousies, but lest we forget that these guys made probably millions in the 70's and got to enjoy whatever that bought them, plus the kind of respect in the music scene normally accorded jazz legends and ex-Beatles. Most of us would happily be swindled, ripped-off or conned in such a barbaric way.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 17:03:55 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Scrolling down

Just managed to squeeze in a read of some of the posts from the past week or so.

Very impressive folks. Some terrific musings and reflections from fellow oldies.

Norm - definitely going to try the 'proper' fresh fish from now on even if I have to dive in and catch the fuckers meself. Our place smells like a ....insert appropriate analogy ....whenever we cook what we believe to be fresh stuff!!

:-0)

Just one thing I do have to take issue with - Pete, tremendous as it is, as you know from past discussions I can never let you have Stagefright occupying the same peerless mountain top as Big Pink and the Brown Album without begging to differ. Same for Storyville even with the other four to enhance it.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Feb 21 16:26:53 CET 2014 from (64.141.44.234)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: A united force of nature: The Band

OK: My turn. RR was the heart and soul and could write and play and kept it professional. RD was an amazing singer who could emote like few others. RM was the beating heart. GH was a musical genius that pulled the others with a centrifugal force that was unearthly. LH provided the rhythm and could sing with a life-force. As a quintet, these boys were as good as it gets. They cannot be dissected.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 16:11:54 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.237)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Kerrin......other than that islands comment........perfectly put........In his most recent interviews, when asked about the unusual but striking kick-off to Big Pink, John Simon noted something along the lines of "that was all Robbie....he had this vision about how those songs should be presented "...........,,so you are right about it being far more than just the writing and guitar................But none of this makes a bit of difference to this particular group of people that are filled with such bitterness toward a man they do not know......It is just baffling and very unfortunately has become part of being in this community.

For Everyone.........As to Robbie's comments and warnings in TLW...........please try and control these retroactive yuk yuks as we are only a few weeks away from the anniversary of Richard hanging himself after having stayed up too late one night on the road.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 16:10:16 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I personally dig and listen more to Robbie's solo recordings than the reformed Band's material. Yes, Jim Weider replaced Robbie as a guitarist but he's the first to tell anyone that he can't play like Robbie. It's like when you like someone's cooking and you ask them for the recipe.....food will never taste the same.

Or my late Ma taught me to use Balsalmic vinegar in my cooking when there's no red wine available which is most times as I don't drink much of anything. Yes, the red wine vinegar will work in your recipe if you're careful and don't use tooooo much, but real good red wine is something else to greatly enhance the taste of your food. Btw, my gourmet trained brother told me that you never use cheap wine to cook with, but use the same wine you'd drink. Then again, if you can only afford a cheaper wine like myself, then that's what will be used until my relatives bring over the good stuff.

I wanted so much to like the reformed Band. I was in a Deli when I first heard "Atlantic City" and was just moved by Levon's cover of the song. I bought "Jubilation" with all the hope in the world and in the end only a few songs stood out for me. When I bought all the rest of their recordings you could just feeeeel that one ingredient of the special recipe will always be missing.

As far as Robbie not having the same singing chops as the other three members........What???????? Should I say then well gee......No one in The Band could play guitar like Robbie......No one could write like Robbie on a CONSISTENT basis.....No one was as good a business person as Robbie was/is......and......He also has to be one of the best singers in The Band too??? I like his singing......and when he wrote a rebel anthem......Besides Marley's work this is the song that I play when I feel someone is trying to silence my voice.

As far as Robbie being "simplistic" with his songwriting for "TIWIGO"......He's writing from his heart and emotions.......Any relationship that ends....Using your intellect won't help you deal with the loss. The absolutely wrenching guitar playing in this song with Eric........REAL EMOTION....and that's why Robbie is my favourite guitar player.......He's an emotional guitar player and I can't get enough of it when he goes deeeeep.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 16:04:13 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Peter, let's look at the facts. Rick released an album on a major label in 1977, Levon released 4 albums on major labels from 1977-82. The Band reformed in 1983 and began touring with The Cates. There were a couple of video's, but there was no live album or studio album. They could have quickly recorded a "Moondog matine Part II" without any new songs to coincide with their tour. It seems strange that nothing appeared. That's all I'm saying. When virtually every other group has reformed and toured, they have released live albums or singles. something. I remember that The Guess Who reformed with Bachman and Cummings around this time and released a live album that was sold through tv ads. Maybe, the timing was bad. If they had waited until the late 80's, it may have been different. Maybe they just had lousy management. I'm just saying that I don't think that RR was as gracious about the Band reforming as many seem to think. I think he's been much more astute in interviews about the feud, than Levon, but if you go back to the interviews during the 80's he took a very condescending attitude towards the Band reforming.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 15:40:23 CET 2014 from (219.104.39.150)

Posted by:

Kerrin

All this stuff about who was the heart and soul of The Band is bull***t. Yes, Robbie was replaced but that doesn't mean he was replaceable. Unfortunately for The Band it wasn't only his guitar playing or even writing that was missing from later work. To me, Robbie had the vision and focus to take a group of very talented, charismatic colleagues and work at something with a clear purpose, with a result far beyond a tight band with interesting singers. That is art, and although The Band were masters of making it seem second nature, in fact it took so much work. Work under the whip of Ronnie Hawkins, work soaring with Dylan's creative arc, and work under the sympathetic expertise on John Simon. Robbie, Robbie learnt from all of these people and more, because that process interested him. The others, players and singers par excellence, were only really interested in playing and singing. That's not a put down, people are just wired differently. It always annoyed me how Robbie used to present himself as not just the writer/guitarist but as the musical director and visionary behind those early records. However, there has to be a large grain of truth in his self serving confidences. Even Richard commented of the reformed Band, "some of us don't like to rehearse too much". One can only assume that he referred to Rick and Levon, and that he himself felt they should have prepared more seriously for the tours. But it wasn't to be, and it became clear that if recapturing their creative peak was something they were capable of without Robbie, they were not equipped with the purpose, discipline or even the inclination to do so. Guitarists can be replaced, great songs can be sourced from elsewhere, but when you look at the setlists from the 80's and 90's Levon's idea of good time music requiring minimum preparation prevails. Cripple Creek, Ophelia, Chest Fever, The Weight, The Shape I'm In, all pretty straight-ahead stuff, and presented in diluted, jam session arrangements. Consider, though, the pearls they chose to ignore from their own back catalogue, instead filling out the sets with what another poster referred to as "new" material - Caledonia, Willie and the Hand Jive, Stuff You Gotta Watch, Blues Stay Away From Me et al. Jericho seemed so promising, a serious effort, and supported by some very polished shows, but my feeling is that this is a wonderful but temporary spike in the quality of their Robbie-less existence. I think the reformed era was first a meal ticket and second a social urge for the members involved. It was great to hear them sing and play again, but it is, I think, absurd to assert that later albums were of equal artistic status to any of the early ones. And yes, that includes Islands!


Entered at Fri Feb 21 14:24:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben, that's a (wild) conspiracy theory about major labels that I've never heard of or read before, and it would also need ALL the major labels acting together, whereas in fact Sony offered the reformed Band a contract. I've only read Robbie wishing them well in their endeavors, and I recall that they needed his agreement to tour as The Band, which he gave. The more I look back, the "feud" was one-sided. And didn't stop Rick and Garth attending the R&R Hall of Fame, nor Richard recording Between Trains. As far as I've seen over years of discussing this, the bitterness starts when the money runs out. As I've said, give five people a million dollars each, wait twenty years, and their fortunes will inevitably differ hugely.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 13:39:22 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Rick Danko not Rock Danko

Sorry for the typos in the previous post. It's obviously 'Rick Danko' rather than 'Rock Danko'.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 13:31:04 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Robiee was indeed replaced

The fact is RR was replaced when The Band reformed. What part of this fact is anyone going to dispute? Maybe, when that occurred, he was annoyed and used his industry connections to prevent them from signing to a major label. I don't know. I do remember some interviews from that time where he made some very sarcastic and snarky comments about the reformed Band being terrible, but he graciously gave them his permission to reform and he hopes that they don't stay up too late. How generous of him. Once again, the facts are that Rick and Levon began recording and touring after TLW. They didn't take a couple of years off to snort coke with Marty Scorsese. Unfortunatley, their solo albums didn't sell well. But,I will gladly take 'Rock Danko' or 'Levon Helm and the RCO all stars' over any of RR's solo albums, seven days a week. In terms of the reformed Band, I'm not a huge fane of the 1983-84 period with the Cate Brothers. It's too band that Jim Weider didn't join in '83. I think that the final 6 member lineup of the 90's was an and outstanding live act. It is a shame that nothing from this period has ever been released on cd. And in terms of recording, I stand by my view that the 3 90's albums are very strong. I think 'Jubilation' is probably the best. Book faded brown, Don't wait, Last train to Memphis. This is great music. Period


Entered at Fri Feb 21 12:27:42 CET 2014 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Dave H - sounds a little Like Kurt Cobain


Entered at Fri Feb 21 10:57:52 CET 2014 from (58.104.19.106)

Posted by:

Wallsend

When I saw the footage a few years ago of Tom Jones and Janis Joplin performing together I thought it was so weird. I guess they must have been a similar age at the time but they were from two different worlds. I never saw it back in the day, I wonder what people made of it back then?


Entered at Fri Feb 21 10:32:29 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Astute comments on the road as a metaphor for hard drugs. I don't think The Band were ever "the hardest working band in show business." There were several complete years with no concerts.

There is also something in the comment on shifts in age perception. When I was a stagehand on the Tom Jones show, I was 21. He was 28. He seemed like a middle-aged man to me … the tuxedo and song selection didn't help. I mean a dynamic middle-aged man, but definitely from a different generation, more my parent's generation, rather than my sister's age.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 09:56:57 CET 2014 from (58.104.19.106)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: David H

Interesting ideas but I think one thing you have failed to take in to account is that young people had a different perception of time back in the 1970s. People who lived through the sixties lived through a revolution and it seemed a lot longer than ten years in chronological time. The world was completely different before and after the Beatles. Then there was all the change in 67, 68, 69 and 70. When I was a hippie we used to think that Elvis was an old man but actually he was only 42 when he died. From the perspective of today the things Robbie said sound ridiculous but back then 35 was old. Don't disagree with you about the destruction drugs and alcohol brought not just in rock but in jazz as well.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 08:01:55 CET 2014 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

I wonder what the general reaction would be in 2014 if the 33-year-old guitar player for a rock group that had been together since 1998, and nationally known since 2006, presented himself on film as a world-weary veteran of the itinerant music circuit who had decided, with the well-earned wisdom of advanced age, that such hard-knock experiences as a multi-million-dollar national tour in which the group traveled between gigs on its own private plane added up to a "goddamn impossible way of life." Personally, my suspicion is that the answer would be "absolutely incessant mockery." But you could get away with this stuff in '76, and I give RR credit for pulling it off--Lord knows the Band was far from the only '60s-era rock act to engage in blatant self-mythologizing, and if he had just quit the group abruptly without a big Scorsese-directed sendoff, the music we all know and love wouldn't have gotten nearly the same attention from later generations as the Last Waltz has given it.

But what I understand now that I didn't when I first saw the movie as a teenager is that when RR talks about "the road," what he really means is "hard drugs." Substitute "the drugs" for "the road" every time he speaks and the movie becomes less an exercise in mostly harmless but sometimes silly self-seriousness and more of an unintentionally devastating document of the tremendous destruction that drugs and alcohol had visited not only on the life of the Band, as sad as that was, but on an entire generation of exceptionally gifted musical talents. This isn't to say that RR hadn't had enough of touring anyway--the last 38 years have proven that he certainly had--but it's sort of ridiculous to suggest that touring per se is a "goddamn impossible way of life." It wasn't "the road" that took "the great ones" like Hank Williams, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Elvis Presley--and would take more, including some of the very participants in the Last Waltz--it was the tragic disease of substance abuse. And *that* behavior, not playing music on stage to appreciative audiences or riding around the country on a bus or spending a few months away from home every couple of years, was what *really* was impossible to sustain, but of course it couldn't be said exactly that way, especially at that time; even the rock of coke in Neil Young's nose had to be airbrushed out of the official document of the proceedings for public relations purposes. Perhaps it had become difficult, in the circumstance the Band found itself in by 1976, to perceive that "the road" and "the drugs" really *were* different things. Or maybe, at that time, there was simply no way to separate the two.



Entered at Fri Feb 21 06:25:53 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.237)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

"Between Trains". LINKED..............funny when I hear this now I am waiting for DJ Windys additions......great song with or without the Band tunes added in.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 02:57:23 CET 2014 from (58.104.19.106)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Touring

Ian, I am sure you are right. Still, for a guy like Muddy Waters Robbie talking about being tired on the road must have seemed strange. BTW, I came across a website that gave Robbie's wealth as ten million dollars. I don't know how accurate it is but maybe working on the movies was more lucrative than touring, I am sure it was more pleasant.


Entered at Fri Feb 21 00:30:19 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Touring

Robbie Robertson had been performing/touring since the late-1950s, maybe not incessantly but fairly intensively in periods. And those early times were not in 4-star hotels and limos, I'm sure. Maybe, in his mind, he was referring to his whole time as a performing musician, not just the period when they were called The Band.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 23:33:37 CET 2014 from (174.116.231.218)

Posted by:

BBBY

Subject: RR

Respectfully, no one in The Band was replaceable as evidenced by the unmemorable albums the post RR bunch produced.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 20:58:10 CET 2014 from (58.104.19.106)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: David P

I agree about Robbie's singing. I also think with the combination and style of playing of the other guys Robbie had the perfect vehicle for his songs in the Band. It has been said a million times but it was the combination that was the trick. Once that was gone the magic was gone. That is another reason I thought the reformed Band was just sad. "What's lost is lost, you can't regain what went down in the flood."


Entered at Thu Feb 20 20:43:13 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Songwriting aside, with Robbie it's the singing. Although he found a niche in an atmospheric sprechstimme style, it's never approached the level of Richard, Levon or Rick's vocals.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 20:33:06 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

RR was replaceable?


Entered at Thu Feb 20 20:32:18 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: As time went on

Thanks for that Peter. You told it much better than I could. It is obvious I think, that Robbie's energies became evident with where he wanted to go in what he wanted to do.

It has been proven that very talented writers loose that edge and train of thought from this touring. Waking up tired and bruised with a fuzzy mouth from nights of hard work on the road, is not conducive to to a sharp mind with the pen.

A good example is Kid Rock's "Picture". It becomes a mind set to write that sort of song when that's the mood you are in.

Robbie's writing on his own, post BAND I believe to be far more constructive.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 20:14:27 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The songwriting was the 90s Band problem, not the playing. Hence AtlanticCity and Blind Willie McTell were as good as anything they ever did. Unfortunately, they couldn't find much else approaching that level.

Then Robbie solo … Between Trains, Somewhere Down The Crazy River, Broken Arrow, Fallen Angel, Sonny Got Caught In The Moonlight, Breaking The Rules, Soap Box Preacher, What About Now, Golden Feather, Ghost Dance, In The Blood, Shine A Light, This Is Where I Get Off, He Don't Live Here No More, When The Night Was Young. The thing is, all of those are at that level.

Basically you've got the performers, you've got the songwriter. Ideally they meet, but Ry Cooder and Randy Newman went years without playing live. Paul Simon only comes out every few years. Some people work in the studio. There's no "Rick and Levon were wrong" nor "Robbie was wrong". They just took different paths. If Storyville had seen them all combine it would be rated up there with the first three Band albums.

Later Levon reached the top levels because Larry Campbell & Amy Helm persuaded him to record songs in a definite style.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 19:37:31 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa

Ben I respectfully disagree that the post RR Band CDs were better than the RR Solo CDs. I would agree that Ricks first sold cd is worthy of that claim.

I saw Kings of Leon and Gary Clark Jr last night in Phila. Both great performamces. Gary Clark Jr is the real deal and will be big soon.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 18:44:58 CET 2014 from (171.159.192.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

The way I look at it, if you're a professional musician, it's your occupation to perfom and record musici. The ratio of live peforming to recording will vary, but peforming and recoring are what professional musicians do. At The Time of The Last Waltz, the members of the Band were all in their 30's. Looking back at it now, it's surprising how young thay were. The fact that 4 of them decided to reform a few years later seems perfectly reasonable. The fact is RR was replaceable. I would not say that about Levon or Rick. To me, they were the key figures who held it together from 1983-98. And I'm not only refering to their live work, I think that 3 Band albums released in the 90's remain underated and are far superior to RR's solo work. It's unfortunate that they were released on small labels, but they remain very worthy recordings. I would welcome an expanded re-release of these albums with outtakes and live recordings.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 18:36:07 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Eateries!

Hi Kevin, good to hear from you again.

Getting on to the subject of restaurants......we are not people who go out to eat much, although in our little town of 20,000, there are some spots with good food.

There are programs on TV now, like, "Restaurant Makeover", or "Bar Rescue" that confirm my feelings toward "eating out". Very often if you look , really look at the people working in kitchens, sometimes.....you walk out. Some times the smell right off makes me turn around and leave.

I expect some of you may know this. Sea food, any kind of fish.......if you can smell it cooking, it has been frozen too long and you won't want to eat it. Having been a fisherman most my life, I have had the good fortune to eat fish, crab, prawn, and all shell fish fresh from the water. It does not smell being cooked fresh. You won't get me eating sea food in a restaurant, except along the waterfront, like Steveston, North Van, Prince Rupert. I know it's fresh.

We never eat canned food. In our recycling bins, (which I got take away this morning) you may find 3 or 4 cans over a two month period. Canned tomatoes, sauce, or soup for cooking....that's it. Everything has to be fresh.

Couple of days ago on my way home, I stop at the big super store in Courtenay to buy our staples. They had big pork picnics on sale, but not smoked, just fresh. I get a big one, for 7 bucks. I put it in the slow cooker yesterday, with all the sauce and spices and made pulled pork from a Texas recipe........gawd damn is that good. Yer not getting it like that on the road.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 16:09:02 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: When the Road no longer goes on forever...

Gregg Allman recently announced in Relix magazine that The Allman Brothers Band will stop touring at the end of the year. While he left the door open for limited reunion concerts, he said: "This is it -- this is the end of it. 45 years is enough and I want to do something else, anyway. Everyone has their own real good respective bands." This comes on the heels of last month's announcement that both Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes were leaving the group at the end of the year to focus on their solo endeavors. It should be noted that Amy Helm's husband, Jay Collins, is a member of Gregg's band.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 14:51:32 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: how to tour

One of the better TV 'reality shows' is _Backstage Secrets_ -- a multi-part documentary that follows the road crew for several dates on Rush's 2007 "Snakes and Arrows" tour.

Rush has toured a lot, and they are, as me Ma would say, no spring chickens. But they have gone to considerable pains to make the whole thing humane. They bring a chef, who brings a kitchen and shops for fresh produce. As he says, you can get good catering, but is a stranger going to prepare your meals with love?

Most important, they do a few dates at a stretch and then everyone flies home to spend two, three or four days with their respective families.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 14:22:26 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff: I agree with you - completely actually........I was really just making a point about the silliness of a band member losing their place in the heart and soul club because they played fewer shows and shook less hands than the others - a standard that wouldn't be applied to any other band.

2 Man Luge: about the only thing worse than being stuck out on the road in a dysfunctional band 16 years after starting the grind as a 15 year."Save your neck or save your brother/Looks like it's one or the other"


Entered at Thu Feb 20 12:39:14 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: On the Road or Off the Bus

Wise words from Norm. I’ve spent time on the road with bands, and later I used to do one two week lecture tour a year, three or four weekend conferences and another one week tour a year. Even in my limited field of English Language Teaching it was exciting to speak to 2000 people in Bologna or Mexico City. The applause is as addictive as crack. Then you realize you were in Switzerland and missed seeing a five year old’s role in the school nativity play, and on your dying bed, the latter memory will mean far more than a bunch of strangers clapping. Then we did a video shoot out on location every year which was two weeks. Great feeling of cameradie, chatting over meals, working hard, often in unpleasant conditions, but exciting. But at the end, I went home. The actors and technical crew had the weekend off and back to another location shoot on Monday. No wonder that conversation after dinner might turn to broken relationships, estranged partners, unseen kids.

Some people can’t lose the fix of the adrenalin. My old writing partner couldn’t come down after a big talk. He’d drink vast amounts then walk ten miles. He couldn’t sustain it because he put too much in. Then nowadays, when the exciting days of the 80s are long over, and those conferences which used to have 2000 attending might have 200, I’m off the bus. I don’t do that any more. I meet my contemporaries who still do it. Khazakstan last week, Paraguay next. They can’t get off the bus, and though the audiences dwindle, they can still feel what it was like to talk to 2000 in 1980, or 200 in 1999, and they try to squeeze the same feeling of being acclaimed from 30 people in a classroom somewhere in 2014. They still need the buzz of checking in at the airport, wondering what’s at the other end. For me, I know that in 2014, what’s at the other end doesn’t differ much. And four star hotels and elaborate restaurant meals pall after about three days. You long to be able to wander into your own kitchen and have a cheese sandwich.

The parallel with The Band is, as the Pythons said, bleedin’ obvious and that includes audience sizes. And if you can get off the bus, as Robbie did, it’s a good move.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 09:10:53 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.42)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Kevin

My good man, i certainly believe that on another day, you might view a point in your last comment differently. Possibly even in a manner similar to mine. If someone pressed me to choose a heart and soul from the 5 members of The Band i would very likely instruct them that if they think it possible to isolate two and eliminate three of the members from it, their heart and soul is in dire need of heart and soul.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 07:08:22 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Rick: Can we have that one more time !

Norm: Belated thanks for the Happy New Year wishes......May the Year of the Horse be good to you and family.

Ben: Paul and Ringo have toured extensively playing Beatles songs for decades now.........probably playing 10x-20x the number of concerts the Beatles played as a group..........John played lass than 5 shows in the decade he lived after the band split up..........wouldn't it be just silliness to tout the Beatles drummer and bass player as their "heart and soul" ? I'm with Robbie on The Band being 5 equal spokes......but if pressed to pick a heart and soul I would opt for the two guys who wrote the songs.....Richard and Robbie.

David P: Glad you survived the ice storm........amazing to think of Toronto and Atlanta sharing similar winter weather nightmares............and do brace yourself for the autobiography and associated interviews...........Yes...."Going Electic" and "the Band break-up" will be 1-2 with just about every interviewer..........perhaps we can clone Carol Caffin and PSB and send hundreds of them out to the world to mitigate against such boredom !

"Better out than in"...............1980, GiGi reaches back and finds the reclining button on the front seat of my parents car...........best 18 minutes in my life since Liverpool-Arsenal February 8.......but Peter's father might have been on to something...........


Entered at Thu Feb 20 03:55:56 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Who sets the standard?

The heavy load..........as far as on stage playing goes. I think some people assume that it was a heavy grind. That is not necessarily so. There is not a count of how many dates or how heavy the load is more than one person or another want to do.\ Very often you hear how many touring dates this person or that does. I recall after the "Born in the USA" tour, what Bruce Springsteen had to say about touring.

Robbie Robertson is not the only one who had enough of that life, no matter the count of tour dates. Some people need that stroke for their ego, others don't. Some like the hype others don't need that either.

If you recall in the Buddy Holly movie, he did not want to tour, and sadly as the game played out, that winter tour was his end. Ironic, as he didn't even want to go in the first place.

I very much understand the feeling. I didn't care about going into some bar that stunk, there were too many drunks and it did nothing to make me feel good about it. Doesn't matter how many people told you how much they loved your music. There were places I'd rather be, and things I'd rather be doing.

Some people just need that hype, and seeing what is in the next bar. How many times they can get laid, or what ever other lame reason........bull shit1 It's a gawd damn unhealthy way of life, no matter how much you want to try to justify it!


Entered at Thu Feb 20 03:23:50 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Rick in 1971: We played a lot public in night clubs and with Bob, and if you go out and play a whole lot it just sounds like you're playing a whole lot, y'know. And I don't believe that you can do that and make records too. We play very little and make one record a year, and that's... difficult! And this way, if we play as little as we can, we might play for a longer period of time. I'm sure that it's not going to get as hectic, and we can also enjoy it when we go out and play. If you overplay it's like anything else, you feel like you're going to work if you aren't careful. RICK: We played a lot public in night clubs and with Bob, and if you go out and play a whole lot it just sounds like you're playing a whole lot, y'know. And I don't believe that you can do that and make records too. We play very little and make one record a year, and that's... difficult! And this way, if we play as little as we can, we might play for a longer period of time. I'm sure that it's not going to get as hectic, and we can also enjoy it when we go out and play. If you overplay it's like anything else, you feel like you're going to work if you aren't careful.


Entered at Thu Feb 20 00:01:46 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.59)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Ben

I am sure you are right about Robbie talking it up in TLW. He was trying to sell a movie and a movie needs a narrative. When he was talking about constant touring I thought he was talking more about the Ronnie Hawkins years. I think what he found exhausting about touring with the Band was being in a group with three drug addicts but obviously he couldn't say that. I am sure the reformed Band did more performances than the original Band. Levon said he like touring and I got the impression Rick did too. I don't see us all having a different take on these things as being a problem. If we all thought the same way there would be no point in discussing it.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 23:28:49 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band touring

I think this whole idea of the Band touring for 16 years culminating in thanksgiving, 1976, as RR describes it in The Last Waltz is really overstating the facts. As The Band, they toured in 1969, 70 and 71. Took off 72, did a few shows in 73, in 74 they toured with Dylan and did some shows opening for CSNY. Took off 75 and toured in 76, ending at TLW. Where's the round the clock touring the RR seems so beaten down by? I haven't counted the number of shows, but my guess is that that by 1985 or 86, the reformed Band had played as many shows as the original Band.

When I think of the Band, I most often think of Rick and Levon. To me they were the heart and soul of The Band and they carried the music on for many, many years with the reformed Band and in their solo work.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 22:27:10 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.59)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think in interviews Robbie sometimes comes across as a bit pompous and arrogant (sorry Sebastion!) but if you get past that and listen to what he says he actually makes a lot of sense. I don't really understand why people criticise him for not wanting to tour. I guess not many musicians get to choose that option. If they stop touring it is usually because they cannot attract an audience. I haven't followed the work he has done on film closely but I can understand why a creative person would want to do that. Another interesting case is Rick Laid, the bass player in the Mahavishnu Orchestra, who walked away from performing and became a photographer.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 21:52:48 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I was so much older then.......

I'm younger than that now!........ I think some of the comments here of this age old debate, ring with the lyrics of Dylan all those years ago.

Reflecting on our youth, don't we often get to laugh at ourselves over how we may have taken too many things too seriously.

I'm sure every one from time to time on, "sweating the small stuff" looked back and thought, "what was I thinking."

The old proverb, "today is the tomorrow we worried about yesterday" very often applies.

The fact is Robbie Robertson seems very well to be able to maintain that often said phrase, "If you can't say anything nice about some one........". I'm sure we've all watched our share of interviews with the man reflecting on his years of the "BAND". I don't remember him talking in any way with but fond memories, and kindness. I'm sure in a one on one conversation with him that he could be sure would be kept private, he wouldn't say anything much different.

Every man has to be honest with himself some where along the way. Continuing on with the road with a complete unhappiness for that way of life and what you are pressured to keep doing, and not being able to follow your heart with things you want to accomplish is very hard.

The accomplishments that Robbie has completed in music and movies are testament to what he wanted. It is not hard to understand is it?

There may always be a feeling he harbours for the way it was seen that he abandoned them. Every man has to live his own life.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 21:07:10 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.59)

Posted by:

Wallsend

In all the interviews I have read with Robbie he has always talked up the musical abilities and contribution of his band mates. He has always honoured them. I think where they diverged was over lifestyle - Robbie didn't want to keep doing the same thing by touring because as he said, he no longer had anything to learn from doing that.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 20:56:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't know why anyone should take a vow of silence. "Better out than in," my dad used to say, though in quite a different context. Seriously, why should they opt for "omarta"? Robbie isn't Morris Levy.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 20:50:22 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Standing in the Shadow

Kevin J: Yes it's hard to escape the dominant shadow cast by his work with his former Bandmates. Yet, with the inclusion of This Is Where I Get Off on How To Become Clairvoyant, he prompts the familiar questions yet again. While the RS reporter wrote "Robertson has been reluctant to talk about it all these years," various interviews over the decades since The Last Waltz prove otherwise. Now that Richard, Rick and Levon are no longer with us, I would hope that Robbie would deflect addressing the issue in the future out of respect for their memories and the music they made together, which ultimately speaks for itself.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 20:29:14 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.59)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: David P

I guess people keep asking Robbie about it because it is so closely related to the Last Waltz, the greatest rock movie ever made. People keep asking so Robbie keeps telling the same story. He probably gets sick of talking about it to but if you are trying to promote new material to a certain extent you have to go along with what the media want. As for the song, I think as people get older they starting reflecting more on their life. When you are young, most of your life is in front of you, but when you get old most of it is behind you. You start thinking about all the things you have done and the choices you have made. I think cinematic is the best word to describe Robbie's songs although not necessarily that particular one. The Weight, TNTDODD, Arcadian Driftwood and Evangeline could all have been fleshed out to be movies in my opinion.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 20:21:18 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

”After all these years, why do we, and especially Robbie, have to continue to rehash the reasons why he chose to walk away from his group of fellow musicians.”………David P: It might have to do with his association with the most renowned movie in rock n roll history being about the end of one of rock n roll’s greatest bands………That question is one of a very short list of questions every single interviewer has now, then, and whenever he is interviewed. It is not like he just walks around talking about this on a daily basis………Sir Paul is asked about the end of The Beatles in just about every interview he does….it is what it is….Not sure why it bothers anybody………and Silly Love Songs is a long way from Eleanor Rigby but so what there is plenty on HTBC that is superb and if not quite at the unmatchable standards of Pink and Brown then way way better than almost anything else rockers of his class have produced at similar stages of their careers.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 20:04:52 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

I hope RR has another CD in him. I would love to see RR write a CD with guest singers.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 19:03:45 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, I'm just guessing but he probably feels badly about it.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 18:59:47 CET 2014 from (219.104.39.150)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Wallsend has already qualified his remarks as his own opinions, but for what it's worth I think most of them are on the money. Just because Robbie didn't tour since TLW doesn't make him unproductive, it just makes him a guy who enjoys the creative process more than performing. Touring is not generally regarded as part of the creative process, hence TLW. I especially agree with the assessment that, although Robbie was no saint and wouldn't claim to be, he felt more obligation to take the job seriously than the others, to get up and go to work. I think his role of Band spokesperson/lone songwriter/babysitter developed more by default than by any kind of manipulative master plan and it was something he eventually tired of. In the end, they were all pretty great at the things they were great at, given the circumstances. But, like Wallsend, this is only my opinion.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 18:44:53 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi David. Don't you feeeeel the pain in that song via of the guitar playing between Robbie and Eric at around 3:07?

Hei Hildairene. We discussed this photo before and someone thought the woman was Sara Dylan. Somehow I could tell it wasn't Sara Dylan as someone thought but he kept saying it was her. So......I emailed Carol Caffin and she confirmed it was Venetia Cunningham. Check out link and scroll down.

"Jerry's then assistant Tim White thinks the picture was taken at a New York night club called Ondine (see Tim's comments below). Jerry Schatzberg confirms this, but doesn't know the whisperer. The picture on the right was taken by Jerry at Ondine on 5 Oct 1965 and shows from left Rick Danko, Bob Dylan, Bob Neuwirth, David Blue and Venetia Cunningham."


Entered at Wed Feb 19 18:12:49 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: "This ain't where I belong"

After all these years, why do we, and especially Robbie, have to continue to rehash the reasons why he chose to walk away from his group of fellow musicians. While a Rolling Stone reporter may view "This Is Where I Get Off" as "poetically" expressing his departure from The Band, the lyrics are simplistic and condescending in some respects. As artistic expression, they come nowhere near the songcraft of Robbie's prior work. Where is the intellect and cinematic vision?


Entered at Wed Feb 19 17:48:15 CET 2014 from (145.100.60.222)

Posted by:

Hildairene

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: http://theband.hiof.no/guestbook/april_10.html

I have a question for Carol... Doubt has risen with me about it being Venetia Cunningham in the picture... To me she looks more like Jones Alk, as seen in Don't Look Back


Entered at Wed Feb 19 17:44:40 CET 2014 from (145.100.60.222)

Posted by:

Hildairene

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: Picture of Rick Danko with Bob Dylan and others

http://theband.hiof.no/guestbook/april_10.html I have a question for Carol about this...doubt has risen with me about this being Venetia Cunningham...she looks very much like Jones Alk as seen in Don't Look Back ...


Entered at Wed Feb 19 15:48:09 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Nice photo and nice Italian quote. You could buy those three pointed handkerchiefs for the top pocket. The more expensive ones were a handkerchief folded and stitched, but most were just three cotton points on a piece of card.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 15:42:48 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie, Levon and The Hawk


Entered at Wed Feb 19 14:33:39 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

ROBBIE ROBERTSON - "THIS IS WHERE I GET OFF" Rolling Stone Italia, April 2011:

“Makes you smoke a lot, doesn’t it?” Robbie reminisced. “Cigarettes tasted so good.”

Shaking his head sadly, he said, “You know, there are a few things in my lifetime that I regret. One is all the cigarettes that smoked. Because it really beat me up. I did great damage to my respiratory system.”

But if he had not smoked all those cigarettes he wouldn’t have his very cool and unique raspy singing voice either, I was thinking of saying, but instead asked Robbie if he had a cigarette. If he did, we might have stepped outside for a smoke, because I was dying for a cigarette. But no, Robbie and I agreed, we don’t smoke anymore. So we just sat and drank wine and ate from a parade of appetizers Stacy brought out—oysters, sausage, lamb—and plunged into the past.

THIS IS WHERE I GET OFF

The breakup of The Band, one of rock’s greatest ensembles, has always been the subject of much conjecture. The genius of each member—Rick Danko, Garth Hudson, Richard Manuel, Levon Helm, and Robertson—contributed to an enduring sound from a band that recorded seven classic albums (before he split from the group), played a memorable set at the Woodstock Festival, and toured for 16 years. What went wrong?

Robertson sighed, looking thoughtful as he sipped his El Capitan. “Some groups have been together forever and are still productive and inspiring one another. Others—it does go stale,” said Robbie. “In our situation we hit a wall. We were called The Band. All the individuals played an extraordinary part. When one of those wheels goes flat, the others can’t drive as fast. When two wheels go flat you’re limping over to the side of the road. Three wheels go flat and you need to shuffle the deck, re-group.”

Robertson has been reluctant to talk about it all these years, but he relates the story of his departure from The Band poetically on the track titled This Is Where I Get Off

Walking out on the boys
Was never the plan
We just drifted off course
Couldn’t strike up the band

Robertson blames the breakup on the nature of the era. “It was the late 70s when there was such an indulgent drug-ridden culture. You would say hey, this worked very good Tuesday but Wednesday and Thursday were fucked. Like somebody you had great sex with last week but now when you see them it doesn’t work anymore. It was that kind of situation—addictions were ruling the creativity. I didn’t know how to communicate through the fog. You try and keep trying and keep trying until you get to a point where you say, you know what? I’m falling apart trying to figure this out. For my own sanity and my own survival I need to step aside, even if I’m just as bad as everybody else.”

The breakup led to a bitter dispute with Levon Helm over song copyrights that has since been settled. “It is so long ago, so in the past and life is so short,” Robbie said.” I have such great love and respect for Levon, so many amazing experiences that I’ve had with him, and that’s where I keep that.”

Backup vocals on “This is Where I Get Off” are performed by Rocco DeLuca, a rising young artist who specializes in open-string Dobro and often opens shows for Daniel Lanois. DeLuca will be joining Robertson’s backup band on upcoming TV show appearances promoting the album.

Describing DeLuca’s high falsetto, Robbie says the singer’s voice is “like Richard Manuel,” his old Band-mate who died in 1986. Rick Danko is also gone, dying in 1999.

“Do you miss those guys?” I asked him.

Robbie took a deep breath and looked down at the table. “Of course I do. Yeah. They’re like brothers. It’s not like you forget or get used to the idea that they’re not here anymore. I often catch myself thinking—What would Richard think about that? I’ll be working on a song and this is when I would ask Richard—What do you think about this? He would always have something progressive for me in his observation of what I was doing. And we co-wrote things together. So it was it was that habit just being extended. He would write something on his own and he would say to me, Hey do you think we should go to a bridge here? We grew up doing that. And yes,” said Robbie. “ I miss him dearly.”

So just pull over
To the side of the road
This is where I get off
This is where I move on
I know where I went wrong
‘Long the way


Entered at Wed Feb 19 14:10:16 CET 2014 from (171.159.64.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Robbie and the Band

Wallsend, I think your view of Robie and the Band is pretty out of whack. After The Last Waltz concert, Rick and Levon released albums within a year and began touring. Levon released three more albums up until 1982. What did Robbie do in this period? He did soundtrack work on Raging Bull, acted and did soundtrack work on Carny and then soundtrack work on The King Of Comedy.

When The Band reformed with the Cates and started touring in 1983, they did integrate some new material into their stlist, Java Blues, One more shot, Caledonia, etc. What new material did Robbie integrate into the setlist when he begain touring? Oh that's right, Robbie has never toured since The Last Waltz, he has never played a concert, as far as I know he has never performed a set of more than 2 or 3 songs in the past 37 years.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 12:26:23 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Excellent Toppermost today on Charles Mingus, which given the disproportionate number of ex-bass players here, should be of interest. Yesterday was John Prine. Keep looking!


Entered at Wed Feb 19 12:12:45 CET 2014 from (58.104.21.102)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Calvin

I think the period Robbie is referring to when he thought he was working and the others were partying was from Stage Fright to Northern Lights when he had to write almost all the songs. The period you are referring to when Robbie was living with Scorsese was after he had left the Band. In that period, beyond finishing the Last Waltz, he no longer had any obligation to either write for or perform with the other guys. He said himself in hindsight it was a very dark period. What I mean by a bar band is a band that doesn't create any really original music. Before the Hawks met Dylan they played rock and roll that was good but not particularly original. After they reformed in 1983, they didn't come up with any original music, but just rehashed the songs from their creative period from 66 to 76. That is what I mean by them reverting to being a bar band.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 11:19:57 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

You have your timeline all messed up Wallsend, all messed up.

You could make the argument, if you really wanted to waste time with such nonsense, that the period of time that a Band Member partied the hardest was Robbie in the year or two after the Last Waltz Concert. The house he and Scorsese shared after that project was legendary in hollywood party terms.

Added to the fact Levon and Rick got their first solo albums out before Robbie got around to finishing The Last Waltz make your "opinion" About him wanting to get down to work and the others didnt really just silly.

As for calling them a bar band, well it begs the question-have you actually listened to the first couple of albums? As they are as far away from an act youd see in a bar as one could possible imagine.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 03:22:36 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Doukhobors in Baltimore

See attached re discussion of 'Ferdinand'

This winter's getting pretty old. Threw out the back shoveling.

Better days ahead. In the field of opportunity it's plowing time again. Gonna hang out my shingle and take on all comers. Nose to the wheel.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 02:52:26 CET 2014 from (58.104.21.102)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Kevin J

You may well be right I don't claim to have any more knowledge or understanding than any other fan but recently I have been going over all the old interviews, especially the Robbie ones. There aren't many (if any) for Richard and Garth is difficult to understand. I don't doubt that Rick and Levon contributed a lot to the performance of the songs but when you read or listen to what they have to say it doesn't seem to go much beyond performance. I am not saying they were stupid, not at all as I am a big fan of all the guys, but there is a big gap between performing the song or even contributing to the arrangement and actually coming up with the original ideas. I thought the interview Robbie did for the book Where are they now Bo Diddley was especially revealing. He said he liked to party with best of them but there came a time when he wanted to stop and the others didn't. For me that is the crucial difference. Robbie grew out of being in a (really good) bar band and the others didn't. I'm not saying I am right, just my opinion.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 02:23:09 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Interesting......and those quotes date to 1987. Every time I listen to HTBC I hear something that reminds me of The Band.

Wallsend: I have to disagree with you on that one........remember that Robbie liked to party with the best of them as well...but more to the point, the other guys in the band were not Liam Gallagher stupid.....while they may not have shared all of Robbie's interests in film or literature they were certainly curious and accepting of all of these areas and more than accepting of Robbie's push for songs like Acadian Driftwood, Rock n Chair, TNTDODD........Many things contributed to the Band's demise ( time, a leader fed up with the road and afraid for the health of a lead singer and friend, etc. ) but not Richard, Levon, RIck or Garth's aversion to any themes or directions in RR's approach to songwriting.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 01:43:14 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for the Robbie quote re "stampeding cattle":

"I'm writing and I'm thinking, 'Is this maybe getting a little too legitimate?' So I got to the bridge and I thought, 'Here's where I'll shuffle the deck a little bit.' I do remember at that point thinking, 'Here's where I get to make this song not just traditional, here's where I get to stir up some dust.'"

Reading that, I hear the same voice, the same cadence and some of the same words as on the Clairvoyant album. And, if you're into bridges, there's an echo of the Native Americans album in the reference to making the ground rumble.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 01:41:06 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Picked up a factory sealed copy of Carney the other day, that is one pretty odd OST.


Entered at Wed Feb 19 00:03:39 CET 2014 from (58.104.21.102)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Subject: What goes around

I think you can see in Robbie's approach to song writing what split the Band apart. Even though he is not well educated Robbie is very intellectual in his approach to song writing and I think this would have just been over the heads of the other guys who just wanted to party (except for Garth of course).


Entered at Tue Feb 18 23:43:51 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I saw Hank Wedel's (former Band poster) Band perform at Joe's Pub in NYC with Crabby, and at a bar more uptown. I think Columbia U students were frequent patrons. Here he is once again via LocalTVIreland

A concert celebrating the life and music of Levon Helm.

May 24th, 2012 at The Pavilion, Cork.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 22:32:47 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Laurel & Hardy Dance To Santana

Enjoy!


Entered at Tue Feb 18 22:07:17 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: King Solomon

David. You made my day. Thank you sir.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 20:45:09 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan Goes To A Go Go

Dylan and his entourage, including Robbie, Mickey Jones and D.A. Pennebaker, saw Otis Redding performing with his road band at the Whisky A Go Go in Hollywood in April 1966. The opening act was the Rising Sons, which included Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder. A live recording of Mr. Redding's performances during that engagement was later released.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 19:45:45 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: King Solomon Rattles the Walls

Solomon Burke, one of the finest R&B/soul singers ever, had no trouble with the bridge in "It Makes No Difference."


Entered at Tue Feb 18 16:29:24 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: What goes around.......

"It Makes No Difference" and the lyrics that have kept many from covering it:

RR on the bridge: "When I was writing that song," he says and interrupts himself: "It's nonsense that you think of these things but nevertheless you go through them - I'm writing and I'm thinking, 'Is this maybe getting a little too legitimate?' So I got to the bridge and I thought, 'Here's where I'll shuffle the deck a little bit.' I do remember at that point thinking, 'Here's where I get to make this song not just traditional, here's where I get to stir up some dust."'

And how better to stir dust than with a stampede?

"I remember people saying for years, 'Y'know, I was thinking of recording that song but when it got to that line I didn't know what to do. I didn't know if I could deliver that.' But although I was looking to break out of that mood for a second and then come back to it, I wasn't at all saying, 'What can I say outrageous?' I wanted to shatter the silence. And the loneliest thing and this feeling that you're going crazy in this room - what could be stronger than stampeding cattle inside the wall? So in a kind of Luis Bunuel philosophy of images it made all the sense in the world to me. I just wanted to feel more of a rumble in the earth. Things were too still for me. I didn't want it to just become sad. I've always appreciated the violence in desolation as much as the helplessness."


Entered at Tue Feb 18 15:27:24 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

‘He would just tear it up’: Robbie Robertson wanted Otis Redding to cover a key Bob Dylan song

"Plans were moving forward, as far as Robertson knew. But the R&B legend’s subsequent album arrived without “Just Like a Woman.” Robertson says he ran into Walden and asked him what happened.

Turns out, Redding “went in and recorded it, and he couldn’t sing the bridge. He said: ‘I don’t know how to sing the bridge,’” Robertson remembers Walden saying. “‘In the bridge, the words are about amphetamines and pearls, and he couldn’t get those words to come out of his mouth in a truthful way. So, we had to put it aside.’”


Entered at Tue Feb 18 11:06:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Syria Mosque

Great job, Adam. The people capitalizing on your work are "Hook 'n' Jab Productions" and they stick a copyright symbol on and warn against unauthorized duplication, as bootlegs do! It's just titled "Syria Mosque 1970" now, and has good photos. Inside the back insert, covered by the transparent insert are picture of 9 other Band records, with overlaid writing in Japanese (I think). Some have familiar covers (MM, NLSC), others not. It suggests there's a series of them out there. BTW, it cost £15.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 05:49:45 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Wallsend - I sort of agree. Never liked the sound of the strats with the humbucker though the original red strat sounded good. Loved the sound of the ROA Tele.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 04:24:17 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Zimmerman and Klegerman photo

Thank you.


Entered at Tue Feb 18 01:22:07 CET 2014 from (99.141.61.127)

Posted by:

Adam

Peter V - I think you may have "Syria Mosque Legend". This particular bootleg (and all circulating ones of Syria Mosque, for that matter) is directly sourced from my audio edit/restoration of that gig. I've said it many many times here, and I'm sorry to blow my own trumpet, but I'm very proud of the work I did on the "Syria Mosque 1970" bootleg audio. The source itself is definitely quiet. You can get a very nice sound balance with the volume cranked. The recording is a mono LINE feed from the camera crew, supposedly. No actions were taken by me to edit/mess with the sound of the audio source.

So Peter, you have the restructured/correct setlist running order Syria Mosque 1970 show as edited and presented by yours truly. The closing "Slippin' & Slidin'" is from the now obsolete Great Divide box set. The notes on that one were always sketchy, and it sounds remarkably similar to the Syria Mosque recording and fits in there perfectly.


Entered at Mon Feb 17 22:59:54 CET 2014 from (58.104.20.42)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I always thought Robbie looked and sounded better with the Tele.


Entered at Mon Feb 17 19:36:48 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

'The Band's lead guitarist Robertson said there were "many, many times" in that group's career when the Stratocaster contributed significantly to songs he was writing. The Canadian musician first became enamored of the Stratocaster when he saw Buddy Holly play one in Toronto on Sept. 14, 1957."


Entered at Mon Feb 17 14:30:50 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Valentine's Day Is Over


Entered at Mon Feb 17 14:24:48 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For JT.

Nomadic Mike and Joan.... :-D


Entered at Sun Feb 16 19:24:06 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh well..........Ice Dancing it is then !


Entered at Sun Feb 16 18:54:53 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Record Fair

At Brighton Record Fair today … a new bootleg version of "Syria Mosque 1970" was around (scans sent to Jan). The bass sound is excellent, though overall it's a tad quieter than a normal CD … i.e. I had to turn the volume up, but it's fine. As we've said so many times, why did they stop doing We Can Talk live after 1970? It's outstanding here. The others on that show that got dropped are Look Out Cleveland and Strawberry Wine. They all work well. The Slippin' and Slidin' is great. One to put out officially? There are clearly decent tapes.

If Sebastian reads this, I apologize for buying a boot, but if you get an official one out, I'll buy it immediately.


Entered at Sun Feb 16 06:01:43 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: All This and World War II - Rod Stewart "Get Back"


Entered at Sat Feb 15 19:43:38 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK to an underrated song off RR's last album.....The Beautiful "The Right Mistake".....imagine Rick and Richard helping with this one.


Entered at Sat Feb 15 17:00:31 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan covers Neil Young

Above LINK Bob doing "Old Man" in 2002......a particularily good period for the band and Bob and a lovely cover.......from ERain today.


Entered at Sat Feb 15 00:36:55 CET 2014 from (58.104.13.153)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Daryl Braithwaite's cover of Breakin the Rules. Daryl does a great cover of the song The Horses - one of my all time favourites.


Entered at Fri Feb 14 19:02:01 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Valentines music

BEG, thank you for playing DJ for Valentines Day. I liked the Nils/Bruce number


Entered at Fri Feb 14 18:29:34 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

A bouquet of spring daffodils for my friend Angie.


Entered at Fri Feb 14 13:47:55 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I tried to reach you
On Valentine's Day
But how can I reach you
When you're so far away

Robbie Robertson
Breakin The Rules


Entered at Fri Feb 14 13:29:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Valentine"
Nils Lofgren
Bruce Springsteen and Ringo Starr
1992


Entered at Thu Feb 13 19:56:34 CET 2014 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Web: My link

Subject: Deep Dark Woods

Deep Dark Woods Comparison to the Bank - read article. This band draws from Band, Crazy Horse, Byrds, Dead and Floyd to name a few.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 19:27:47 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.200)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Thanks for the clarification. I wasn't saying it was new just that I hadn't seen it before. But there again, I only just came across the video of Robbie, Garth and Rick playing the Weight together at the 1994 Grammys the other day so I am obviously not up to speed with everything.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 19:13:07 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Libby

Thanks Kevin J.It was nice to read Libby's take on this,Like most things there are 2 sides to every story It was good to hear her take. She was there.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 18:52:37 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Libby, Robbie & the Helms

.......and the statement from Libby that had real relevance to the silly feud situation came shortly after Levon's death.......not that it had any impact on the hate brigade but one can only hope that one day it might:

The Libby Titus statement as told to and by Barney Hoskyns ....."The story of Robbie and Levon is much more complex than the bloggers and the press understand," Libby Titus-Fagen wrote me on April 25. "I can tell you that for the years I was with Levon, from 1968 to 1974, they each shared a part of the other’s soul. One would start a sentence, pause, and the other would finish it. They had their own alphabet, their own clock, their own DNA, a Levon-Robbie double helix. When I called Robbie to say Levon was dying, he was stunned, shattered—he thought Levon had beaten the cancer. Robbie flew to New York to say goodbye. Amy, Donald and I were in the waiting room, and I don’t know what Robbie said to Levon for the long time he spent by his bedside. All I know is that there’s a side to this life-and-death song no one has heard. Levon wouldn’t want this bitterness to ramble on any longer."


Entered at Thu Feb 13 17:51:35 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Above/below

I mixed the words. Sorry. Never post doing yoga.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 17:43:11 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Linked article below

Organisation 'Reporters Without Frontiers' has published its report of freedom of the press in 2013. The home country of the paper mentioned here above was #46 between Romania and Haiti. My home country Finland was #1. Is there a modest way to say that?


Entered at Thu Feb 13 17:40:58 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Re the CSM article, it's a couple years old and is nothing that hasn't been heard and squabbled about here. To get to page 1, go to Wallsend's link, and replace the 2 at the end of the URL with 1 - and hit enter. Or click on one of the related stories on page 2 and follow the related-story link back to page 1. To get the comments, including three from Libby Titus (again all two years old), go to the bottom of page 2 and click where you're invited to view readers' comments. The third from Libby, and the one that's least critical of the CSM article, goes as follows:

"I lived with Levon Helm from 1970 through 1974 (actually, our relationship ended in '78.) I am the mother of his daughter Amy Helm and his stepson Ezra Titus (1966-2009). Until '74, our family and the Robertsons, Robbie and Dominique and their children, were inseparable. The story of Levon's conflict with Robbie is much more complex, and much sadder, than the story that's appeared in Levon's book and in the press."


Entered at Thu Feb 13 14:19:06 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The link went to page 2, but I found page 1. I didn't see any Libby Titus quote. Is there more somewhere?


Entered at Thu Feb 13 12:04:17 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.200)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The link above is to an article about the Levon/Robbie dispute in the Christian Science Monitor. Amongst the comments are some from Libby Titus. I would be interested to know whether people here think these comments are real or someone just using her name. I have never read of her expressing an opinion on this matter but this just may be my own ignorance.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 05:26:46 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.246)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Beatles Grammy show, saw it Sunday

Jed, i thought Ringo and George were wonderful. And honestly made chumps out of many of the other artists. for me,Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart were wonderful, while My guitar Gently Weeps had it's moments, as did Something. Katy Perry was a disaster, as were Imagine dragons, That Ed Sheeran guy, or whatever the hell his name was, deserves to be flogged publicly for his butchering of In My Life.... etc etc. But George and Ringo were amazing. Class acts, all around natural performers, and so much energy. Paul is a little put on, but, at the same time- fucking wonderful. Ringo, , how can anyone mot love Ringo?

Steve Lukather , Jeff Lynne, contributed beautifully at times. Frampton. Joe Walsh, Gary Clark Jr- sure had a moment. Even John Mayer and Steve Urban, had a moment... emotional night, some of the old clip happily brought tears to my eyes. There was so much of everything to be seen in those clips...


Entered at Thu Feb 13 04:54:52 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Deep Dark Woods

Why do I keep coming back? Recommendations from those who know.

Deep Dark Woods: Excellent. Touring Europe now. Another Canadian contribution to the best in music.


Entered at Thu Feb 13 00:23:44 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Beatles

For those interested,who get CBS television,tonight at 8:30,they are rebroadcasting the Grammy Beatles show featuring Paul(who sings incredibly well-no evident cracks in the vocal chords!) and Ringo.Some interesting and also odd performances but overall a very good show.The purpose was to celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 21:50:45 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Earl Vince & The Valiants, Bill. Written by Jeremy Spencer.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 20:04:41 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Somebody's Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In Tonight

Thanks again sadavid. I agree. And am reminded of this greasy early FleetMac b-side. I'm pretty sure I used to have the 45, but credited to Vince Somebody and the Somethings.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 19:55:41 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: balls, to you

Bill M: hideous? Perhaps, but note the inclusion of Vince Taylor's "Brand New Cadillac" -- next time we are discussing cover-versions-that-beat-the-original, let's remember The Clash's incendiary improvement of this one . . . .


Entered at Wed Feb 12 19:12:30 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: Thanks. Four Rs in Rrrracket - that's the key to successful googling. It's an album worth owning, if just to get a vinyl copy of "Goin' To The River", with Bobby Starr's outstanding solo - so Robertson-like that it was later mis-credited to the Robster on an otherwise hideous British blasts-from-the-past comp (see link).


Entered at Wed Feb 12 18:44:03 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: at the go-go

Bill M: click on the thumbnail for larger image . . . the danseuse is doing that 60's thing with the wrists . . . .


Entered at Wed Feb 12 17:07:19 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

The cover of the Charly label's Ronnie Hawkins LP "Rrracket Time" shows go-go dancers onstage with Ronnie's mid-'60s Hawks lineup, but I've seen nothing that shows such dancers with when our guys were with Hawkins. I looked around the internet to find a photo of cover, but no luck - and not even a mention here in the GB discography, despite the inclusion of both sides of Hawkins' very first 45 from '58. Otherwise the album was a compilation of mid-'60s recordings by Ronnie backed by later incarnations of 'the Hawks'.

I did find the linked Hawkins discography. If lists of records is not your thing, you might scroll way down to some bigger photos and links to videos. Probably nothing new to most of you though.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 03:34:23 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yonge Street: Interactive locations of clubs and gallery.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 03:21:47 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I never get tired of Robbie.....and the Go Go Dancers for you.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 03:13:35 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

JT, thank you.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:42:22 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Hawks and the Go Go Dancers.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:24:33 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Following through

http://www.tonymart.com/memory-lane-1965.htm

One should always do what one says one is going to do.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:22:05 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Wanda & the Raconteurs

Doin Dylan's 'Thunder on the Mountain'. Effortlessly.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:19:16 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:09:49 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: thumbs carlyle

In which he backs up our lady, Wanda Jackson.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 02:06:06 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks Pat B. Was just curious about the photo, that's all. I now understand what JT was posting about. (Thanks, BTW, JT. No need to find that URL now.)


Entered at Wed Feb 12 01:41:44 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P & The Weather

David, thinking of you this evening. As you may remember we had quite an ice storm around Christmas. Power out for days. I see on the news tonight that you are getting one of the worst ice storms in Georgia history. Lots of bottled water. Lots of candles David. Here's hoping everything works out well. Stay warm.


Entered at Wed Feb 12 00:08:21 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Later

Mike: I'm at work and will find he site and put it up here later tonight if I ever get out of here. Sorry for the delay.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 22:33:11 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I posted this earlier but it didn't take.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 22:06:24 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks, David P. I was actually interested in seeing the 1965 NYT article photo, and assumed it was viewable on a Tony Mart Present website mentioned by JT, who didn't provide an actual link thereto. Employing an online search, I failed to come up with the one he was referring to. But perhaps he'll accommodate me.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 21:55:18 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.243)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Attached link to Deep Dark Woods.......nice to see a reord company that still pays for travel.......25 x 8......wonder if the boys were still able to get a comp bar....

Mike H : Very troubling news.....fingers crossed that this works out somehow.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 21:17:37 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Deep Dark Woods

Two friends told me they were a must-see … they're playing Winchester, just 40 miles away as I type. We were otherwise engaged (baby sitting) this evening, otherwise I would have been there.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 20:58:42 CET 2014 from (86.209.143.204)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Deep Dark Woods

I saw the Deep Dark Woods on Saturday. The Guardian tagged it a gig-of-the week. We were in a room with about 25 others. They're from Saskatoon - and well worth the price of admission. In fact they're worth double or triple the price (£8) I paid for a ticket. The Guardian trailer suggested the audience should anticipate Garth Hudsonesque swirling organ - and there was plenty of good keyboard work. They're a great band - known well over there? I can't work out the economics. They're doing just a few gigs and the take from the one I went to in Birmingham would hardly have paid a round trip ticket for one of the five of them. They did a neat version of Absolutely Sweet Marie - which sent me back to the fantastic original.


Entered at Tue Feb 11 20:12:45 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the info … I thought they might have had GoGo dancers … they never stripped here in the 60s, just danced. Did they add backing vocals? I'm thinking of the stuff with a female chorus (as we know Dionne Warwick, Dee Dee Warwick & Cissy Houston in the studio).


Entered at Tue Feb 11 19:31:24 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Twangs, Thumps & Wails at Tony Mart's

Mike: Since there's a fee for non-subscribers to access the full text of articles in the New York Times archives, here's an excerpt that includes the Tony Mart's info:

"In contrast, there's Wildwood, a haven for the motorcycle set, and Somers Point, which is known as the wildest spot on the New Jersey shore and perhaps the entire Eastern Seaboard."

"Thousands of college students jam its bars and night spots to drink and dance the nights and summer away."

"The biggest place is Tony Mart's. It has seven big bars, 20 cash registers, 40 bartenders and bouncers, and describes itself as the 'entertainment college headquarters of the world.' The owner is Anthoy Marotta, 51, a short, gravel-voiced immigrant, who has had his abbreviated name emblazoned atop the roof in seven-and-one-half foot high red neon letters, 'the same as General Motors.'"

"'This place is a gold mine, a $2 million gold mine,' Mr. Marotta rasped the other night amid the earsplitting twangs, thumps and wails of one of his five bands. 'But this is a no-baloney business, strictly 100 per cent legit.'"

"Outside, John Ferrara, 22, of Scotch Plains, N.J., an ex-bouncer at Tony Mart's and just out of the University of Southern Mississippi, said disdainfully, 'These kids are nothing more than madras and fraternities.'"


Entered at Tue Feb 11 17:59:15 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Tony Mart's

JT, wonder if you could you supply a link to that NYT story mentioned below?


Entered at Tue Feb 11 16:35:33 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Go-Go L&TH

From the site "Tony Mart Presents" (see photo at that site):

"Clipping and photo from the New York Times dated Tuesday, August 24, 1965 with the title “Changes-Some Subtle, Some Abrupt and Flamboyant are Evident Nearly Everywhere Along the Jersey Shore.” “Go Go” girls do the Frug in Tony Mart’s, the biggest nightspot in Somers Point. The club has seven large bars, 20 cash registers and 40 bartenders and bouncers. This photo focuses on two go-go girls dancing on a stand near the bar; however, of greater historical significance are the backs of “Levon and the Hawks” playing on the center stage. To the right is the back of the B-3 organ and saxophone player, Garth Hudson; and to the left, are the shoulders and heads of Robbie Robertson and Rick Danko in the front of the stage."


Entered at Tue Feb 11 16:28:06 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Go-Go Ronnie

From 'The Historisist: (Kevin Plummer) (concerning The Hawk's Nest In Toronto)n\ "As the set picked up momentum—with a faster, more raucous blues number like “Hey! Bo Diddley”—Hawkins is joined by the bar’s other entertainers: go-go dancers. In bikinis or miniskirts with white boots, the dancers gyrated at the corner of the stage or in golden cages suspended from the ceiling. As one 1960s dancer, Susan Swan, later recalled to Toronto Life (November 1996), go-go dancing did not always mean topless dancing. And, for her at least, it represented a form of women’s rebellion. Although many Toronto bars featured go-go dancers, Swan credited Hawkins with having come up with the idea of hiring dancers to complement his rock act."


Entered at Tue Feb 11 14:45:21 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins question …

Just listening to Sexy Ways and Come Love today, where Ronnie has Dionne Warwick, Dee Dee Warwick and Cissy Houston on the session (with Robbie, Rick & Levon & Jerry Penfound, at least according to "|The Roulette Years" notes). Then reading Last of The Good Old Boys, where Bev D'Angelo was in the much later Hawks.

I was thinking about how Joey Dee had The Ronettes as dancers and backing singers … did Ronnie Hawkins & The Hawks ever have female backing singers / or Go-Go dancers? I just wondered. Not uncommon at the time.

For the vinyl fans, I just picked up Back In My Arms Again by Nicolette Larson without looking at the B-side: a sublime cover of Little Feat's "Trouble."


Entered at Mon Feb 10 19:05:18 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mark

Good work Mark. I like the snng particularly the hsrmonies


Entered at Mon Feb 10 11:56:03 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Song For Rick (Wheels Keep Turning)

Thanks Mark, I enjoyed the song. The second voice echoing behindd is lovely too. For everyone else, I put in a direct link to Mark's song above to save cutting and pasting. Take a listen!

Also very sorry to hear about Mike. Hope so much everything turns out OK.


Entered at Mon Feb 10 09:04:57 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Mike H.

Hope he's ok. Thoughts are with him and his family.

Good song about Rick, btw. It may get lost in the news of Mike, but nice job.


Entered at Mon Feb 10 06:08:29 CET 2014 from (86.160.229.138)

Posted by:

Mark Copeland

Subject: Rick Danko Tribute

Hi, I'm from Scotland and recently wrote a song as tribute to my hero Rick Danko. It would mean a lot if you could check it out for a few mins. Rough recording but hopefully the song comes across. RIP Rick, voice of an Arcadian angel. Best, Mark http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q4n6zBc4bk&feature=youtu.be


Entered at Mon Feb 10 05:52:01 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

I think many of you will like this, especially from the 18:22 mark. : )


Entered at Mon Feb 10 01:30:10 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hoping....and only wishing the best for Mike Hayward and his family.


Entered at Sun Feb 9 20:15:08 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mike Hayward

I hope he is OK. He is an ardent The Band fan. He has a little boy


Entered at Sun Feb 9 15:05:39 CET 2014 from (24.105.224.16)

Posted by:

Lil

Web: My link

Subject: Mike Hayward

For anyone who hasn't heard, Mike Hayward, sometime poster here, has gone missing from his home in NH. I just figured the more people who know and share this, the better the chances of finding him. Thanks.


Entered at Sun Feb 9 14:01:06 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Big Daddy

Today's Toppermost is Big Daddy … it's been a strong run, John Hiatt yesterday, Sam Cooke the day before, Eric Clapton the day before that. I mentioned The Kinks earlier.


Entered at Sun Feb 9 02:17:29 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: RIAA certification and peakis on the BILLBOARD charts

I was away from home when last I posted. Now back, I looked at a copy of Joel Whitburn's tome on top-selling albums. He includes PLANET WAVES under "BAND, The" but, for understandable reasons, notes it as "BOB DYLAN with The Band" rather than "BOB DYLAN AND THE BAND". Anyway, this also went gold and, since it was No.1 in the BILLBOARD charts, was their highest ranking album. Indeed, it was at No.1 for 4 weeks.

Listing The Band and Dylan/Band albums in order of peak positions, Whitburn gives the following:

# 1: Planet Waves [GOLD]

# 3: Before The Flood [PLATINUM]

# 5: Stage Fright [GOLD]

# 6: Rock of Ages [GOLD]

# 7: The Basement Tapes [GOLD]

# 9: The Band [PLATINUM]

# 16: The Last Waltz

# 21: Cahoots

# 26: Northern Lights/Southern Cross

# 28: Moondog Matinee

# 30: Music From Big Pink [GOLD]

# 51: The Best Of The Band [GOLD]

# 64: Islands

#166: Jericho

This is from the 2006 edition of Whitburn.


Entered at Sun Feb 9 00:42:04 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Weight

that was great. They didn't do Ricks verse though - I kept wondering who would do it. I think they were being careful not to send up anyone in The Band.


Entered at Sun Feb 9 00:18:59 CET 2014 from (58.104.7.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I think on the Fallon video it would have been better if they had got Rowlf the Dog to play piano (and sing the first verse) as this would have freed up Dr Teeth to play keyboards.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 21:54:37 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

You're welcome John D. Say helloooo to Ala for me. Maybe we'll run into each other once again.

"You couldn't imagine a more touching, awesome finale to "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon."

The Saugerties native decided to don the cap of ol' Levon Helm, Woodstock's own late bandleader and drummer, and do an honest-for-goodness cover of the Band's "The Weight," very much in the vein of "The Last Waltz."

But the kicker: He had the Muppets to help him out.

Enjoy this video, the last moments of "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon," as Fallon stays behind the drum kit as Levon, and the Muppets get much of the spotlight."


Entered at Sat Feb 8 21:20:59 CET 2014 from (58.104.7.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

That video is hilarious but I am not sure if it is funnier that Rita Moreno being upstaged by Animal.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 17:49:35 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Of note is the length to which Fallon and his people went to recreate TLW's version of The Weight, right down to Garth's keyboard stack.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 17:48:44 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jimmy Fallon

Knowing that Jimmy Fallon is from Saugerties. Seeing the brown set of Ludwig's. I had to believe that this was his tribute to Levon and The Band. My wife and I both got a little misty. It was so understated. Class act. Thank you Sir. Thanks BEG for posting this.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 15:17:35 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Jimmy & the Muppets perform "The Weight" by the Band for the last waltz of "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon."


Entered at Sat Feb 8 08:44:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, that's why they say Prince Philip, as an ex-sailor, has a tendency to use "nautical language." Most of us in Britain call it "effing and blinding" but from a prince it's called "nautical language."


Entered at Sat Feb 8 02:42:39 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link is to best damn swing band ever. The Strangers @ Austin City Limits c1978. That's a sax player (Don Markham) & Paul Anastasio on third fiddle sitting in. The Hag was quite the bandleader. Probably still is though I haven't heard him in a while.

Funny how one thing leads to another on youtube. I had a need to hear Bowie's 'Station to Station'. I got to Haggard via the Staples.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 02:37:57 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Best versus BEST!

That's too complicated Bill.

This last bit of conversation, always teaches me, moderation, patience and good manners, (that's hard for an old sailor.)

Pat Brennan, John Donabe, David Powell and Peter Viney, are more often than not good examples of gentlemen. I'm not! Susan says to me, (she is such a gentle little lady.) Do you always have to swear so much and be coarse, (I'm a curmudgeon......apparently). I SAY YES.....I"M A SAILOR IT'S REQUIRED!!!

She says, well is there a hand book on it or something??? -:)-:)-:)


Entered at Sat Feb 8 01:43:44 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Being the most important is not the same as being the best. Think Word vs WordPerfect, VHS vs Beta ...

Also, Deep Purple wuz robbed, not being among the 11.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 00:43:22 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Carmen, I think it would be pretty easy to argue that the Beatles were the most important band and Dylan was the most important solo artist in the rock era.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 00:19:40 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Beatles and Dylan

According to Roger McGuinn, adding a 'Beatle beat' as he calls it to Mr Tambourine Man was the secret combination that started it all off.


Entered at Sat Feb 8 00:16:48 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"This classic photo of George Harrison and Bob Marley was taken on July 13, 1975, backstage at the Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles, California."

"Having heard that George was a fan of Marley’s music, the president of Island Records, Charley Nuccio, invited George to the show to meet Marley. When told that George Harrison was coming backstage, Marley visibly lit up and said, “Ras Beatle!!” Here’s the only other photos from this historic meeting taken by Kim Gottlieb Walker…."


Entered at Sat Feb 8 00:02:47 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Beatles won the musical revolution

The Beatles changed the world. Not just musically; but sociologically. From haircuts to fashion they made everyone fall in love with them. Coming to America; just a few months; after President Kennedy was killed; brought us out of our funk. We; in Canada were aware of them a little earlier, thanks to Paul White of Capitol Canada; who started releasing singles in the fall of '63. Love Me Do, From Me To You and She Loves You all got released here. I believe the first big release in the States was I Want To Hold Your Hand. Pat B and David P will remember Swan records. They were early believers of The Beatles in the U.S.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 22:57:05 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Beatles/Bob

This is a serious question. Who was more important to the musical revolution in the US - Beatles or Dylan?


Entered at Fri Feb 7 22:28:54 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Beatles

As a measure of their importance, what other group or artist has the anniversary of their first appearance on U. S. television widely celebrated? And this mometous event occurred some six months before they began their first concert tour on our shores.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 22:20:04 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Beatles Band Fox MSNBC Left Right

Pat- its all good. I am not ashamed to say I am a conservative. I just like to bring good Band Info to the conversation. I would bet that out of all the groups listed, the Beatles would not have been afraid to follow any of the groups on stage except maybe our guys.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 22:15:14 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Although Steve's political POV always made me laugh, his take on my Blackhawks and Antti Niemi's continuing career would cheer me much more.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 22:12:20 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

First off, I don't want Carmen to take any of this personally. I apologize if I came off that way. But, to that point, I was reading in my Chicago Tribune that Fox just hired James Carville. His appearance with his impaired wife on Bill Maher's show was cringe-worthy to the extreme, and he certainly won't raise the bar at Fox.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 21:47:39 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: MSNBC & FOX

Hi Pat - I get what you're saying about these 2 networks, but I don't think they are the equal & opposite of each other. Fox represents the far right and the radical right; MSNBC is more middle-left on that continuum. I think the truth is that there isn't any meaningful far-left anymore, versus the right. All this with great respect for your POV. It would be fun to have Ol' Steve back in here to weigh-in, eh?


Entered at Fri Feb 7 20:36:31 CET 2014 from (86.129.205.139)

Posted by:

Frank

Solomon I expect you are correct to a large extent..their motives for thus where I am sure sincere. Pat B on a trip to the States in 2002 ? and my first exposure to Fox I thought it was a comedy/parody channel [something like our Alan Partridge]..honestly,was shocked when I realised they elected Presidents etc..Steve Doosey the consumate pro..that oaf Sean Hannity has County Down roots [ my home County] have never heard anybody over here rushing forward to claim him though.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 19:49:38 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sorry, Fox is horrible all by its lonesome.

Since you inferred it, I don't visit the MSNBC site and I don't watch the channel. Disliking the cesspool that is Fox doesn't mean I spend any time cheering opposition outlets or even caring.

And let's face it, you can't compare any rock band to the Beatles. They are the most important rock band in history.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 19:23:15 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: List

Pat B - would it make you feel better if the writer was from MSNBC and left off the BAND?


Entered at Fri Feb 7 18:58:08 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

A writer for Fox News?


Entered at Fri Feb 7 18:44:40 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hmm. 2, 3, 8 and 10 are the only possible contenders. The other selections are all ludicrous, even the number 1. But even given the undoubted virtues of 3, 8 and 10 particularly, no one, not even 8, is there with The Beatles.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 18:37:36 CET 2014 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: 11 Bands Greater Than The Beatles

I agree with one of the Bands listed in this list of 11 Bands greater than the Beatles. Maybe 2.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 13:49:21 CET 2014 from (92.18.170.7)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Ain't In It For My Health

I think even the people around Levon knew he had taken the fued with Robbie to a whole new place.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 13:19:14 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Cars

At least one car has Levon connection. Russian 'Lada' means 'barn' in Scandinavia. Violent demonstrants in Kiev could be called for barn burners. Actually 'lada' means 'young girl' which qualifies this post even to Bill Wyman forum... says the man who constantly has a car ad on location line.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 10:01:13 CET 2014 from (86.182.26.92)

Posted by:

Frank

Location: Ireland

Agreed agreed and agreed Roger..Levon was badly cut up about a lot of things,things Larry Campbell was aware of but did not experience [ the right or wrong of it I don't know]..no doubt about it Levon for the last ten years or so of his life was surrounded and to a large part protected by some really first rate people,Larry,Barbara,Tony and a whole lot more,these people really enhanced his life enormously..I believe that Levon was particularly stoic in how he dealt with his illness,there is a lesson in there for us all.They broke the mould after they made Levon Helm,when he passed away he may not have been the same kid that left Turkey Scratch but he was still the same person .. that strong sense of decency stayed with him and was his constant companion his whole life.


Entered at Fri Feb 7 00:22:04 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Happy Irie Birthday to Bob Marley!


Entered at Thu Feb 6 20:29:29 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Band RIAA Awards

According to the RIAA data base MUSIC FROM BIG PINK, STAGE FRIGHT, ROCK OF AGES and BEST OF THE BAND received gold status. THE BAND s/t received platinum.

Also, with Dylan THE BASEMENT TAPES went gold and BEFORE THE FLOOD platinum.

As I recall, Robbie's debut solo album also received gold.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 19:46:06 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: An't In It For My Health

Thanks Frank - yes I watched it and noted The Wild Bunch screening. Some part of the meaning of stoicism overlaps with stubborn - and that was evident too. I thought the silences were poignant. Larry Campbell seemed an excellent partner to Levon and I felt, as he claimed, a sorrow that Levon had no time for the legacy of the early years of The Band. Interesting to see Barney Hoskins taking part. There's a surprise. It made me sorry I never got to a Midnight Ramble. Amy Helm is a terrific support for her father throughout.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 19:02:19 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: RIAA gold award for MFBP

I have no idea if this is as rare as stated: http://eil.com/shop/moreinfo.asp?catalogid=495793&From=EIL_T-B-COL-17012014-1745.STT.-T-B-Thu--TEAIS&utm_source=TEAIS&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=TEAIS&utm_content=Target


Entered at Thu Feb 6 18:46:47 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Home From The Forest

Oh the neon lights were flashing and the icy wind did blow

The water seeped into his shoes and the drizzle turned to snow......

I'm sure a lot of you Ontarians remember Lightfoot's classic. Band connection....he played it in concert for his friend Ronnie Hawkins in 2010.

Norm Jones connection? I just got home from being gone for a month. Doing a major renovation on my tug in Port Hardy, installing new bulwarks. Almost finished when I had to run up to Rivers Inlet, load 200 boom sticks take over to Smith Inlet, off load. Oh and while you are here, you might as well load a load of logs and take to Howe Sound.

Monday I have to load a load of logs in Sechelt Inlet and deliver to Howe Sound. Retirement??? what the fuck is that!

Thanks for that Bill. I'm going to e mail you a few pictures right now. If you can believe, while the welders were working on my tug, I was sanding and painting, (in January???). Jerry, e mail me, tugmanat shawdotca I'll show you some pictures.

Two pictures are really wild. The air crane, (this is a helicopter that has a lift capacity of 21,000 pounds). While I was loading my barge my deckhand took some pictures with my camera. You can see this helicopter thru trees. It looks like it is right down in the trees. Of course the area where it is lifting is all felled timber. But it's a frieky looking picture looking at it thru the trees.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 16:57:28 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Craig Harris

Bill M: I a cautiously optimistic about the upcoming book "The Band - Pioneers of Americana Music", having read the credentials of the author, Craig Harris. He has a solid music background and may have some insightful ideas to contribute. I doubt if there will be major revelations here for the committed, but there may be some variations on the themes that will be of interest. At any rate, given his credentials, I don't anticipate that this will be relegated to the usual pulp of many music books.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 16:26:38 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: music from the big pink blob-on-a-map, the C to the north

I'm sure the GB talked about it weeks ago, but a glance at What's New focused my attention on the upcoming book, "The Band - Pioneers of Americana Music". I sure hope it goes beyond the unimaginative reference in publisher's blurb to the four Canadians (never Ontarians, let along southern or even southwestern Ontarians) and the one Arkansan (never just American). I'll be happy to be proven wrong, but I can't help but suspect that Garth's key testimony about his and his colleagues' musical and cultural background in Bob Mersereau's album book will not have been used as a source.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 16:20:47 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the real Watkins Glen

Perhaps old news to most . . . I've just chanced upon this, what purports to be an audience field recording of The Band sets plus a jam set with assorted Allmans / Deads. Looks to be the same recording as that listed under "Watkins Glen" is Jan's "Bootlegs" discography . . . .

"Too Wet to Work" not represented due to rain, unfortunately . . . .


Entered at Thu Feb 6 15:18:31 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: Thanks. It moved a long way from its original home on the Toronto Blues Society's website. I appreciate that the webmaster didn't just scoff the thing and give himself the credit.

The link is to a photo of Scott's early '70s group Tundra, specifically the pic sleeve of their hit, "Band Bandit", which was written by John Rutter, who'd been Scott Cushnie's and Robbie Robertson's 'boss' in Johnny Rhythm and the Suedes. Scott is the guy in black, second from the left - looking very Robbie-ish. On the far left is Al Manning, a veteran of Yonge Street bands going back to the late '50s with Tommy Danton and the Echoes. Later, he was in Joe King and the Zaniacs with Rutter (who would join Ronnie Hawkins in the lineup that would peel away as Crowbar).

Rockin Chair: Al Manning and Glen Lecompte, the big-haired guy on the other side of Cushnie, had some success in the '80s with Coyote, the third member of which was your old fiddling chum, Gary Comeau.


Entered at Thu Feb 6 10:32:44 CET 2014 from (86.182.26.92)

Posted by:

Frank

Location: Ireland

Subject: AINT IN IT FOR MY HEALTH

Roger did you catch Aint In It For My Health ?... the word that kept springing to mind in relation to Levon was stoicism,the man had it in abundance .. no doubt about it the Levon was stubborn/ornery but honest as the day is long,generous to a fault and he could spot bullshitters/spoofers a mile off.I miss the man greatly, never see his like again..no sir ..the segment showing Ricks wife Elizabeth was heart breaking. I hope you spotted Levon's nod to the great Strother Martin..


Entered at Thu Feb 6 05:09:45 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Bill M: Here it is.

http://www.rockthisway.de/bando_scott_cushnie_info.htm

Bill M: Above is the link that you want.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 22:49:58 CET 2014 from (72.78.38.119)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Interview with Bob Sarles

Not sure what happened to the link of my review of new Mike Bloomfield box I posted here yesterday. "The Weight" is covered on the set. Bob Sarles is a documentary filmmaker, who's made innumerable films for the R&R Hall of Fame and the Stax/Volt museum. I interviewed him about making the DVD included in the set, "Sweet Blues: A Film About Michael Bloomfield.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 22:04:01 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I enjoyed Jonah Hill in WOWS. It wasn't my favourite film....three hours on blow. Although it was very difficult to watch some parts of 12 Years A Slave....much more satisfying film.

Bill M...I think Timothy White's Catch A Fire The Life Of Bob Marley is the one to have. I also have the coffee table book Bob Marley Songs Of Freedom Executive Editor Rita Marley. The CBC Radio interview with Robbie I just posted has a little anecdote about Robbie meeting Bob twice at the Roxy in the mid-seventies...Some say probably one of his best performances ever....He didn't include in Legends, Icons and Rebels how large the joint Bob was smoking. The first time I was in Jamaica, my friend's son grew ganja and yeah......Serious smokers. Levon would approve. ;-D


Entered at Wed Feb 5 21:48:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Has anyone seen "Wolf of Wall Street"? I was amazed to see it was an RR soundtrack. The best review I read here was"terminally dull" and every review said it was way, way too long. I've avoided it. Is it any good?


Entered at Wed Feb 5 21:26:52 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Speaking of Levon's words, I'm currently reading Stephen Davis's biography of Bob Marley from the '80s. Terrific book - so much better than I was expecting - not that I know enough to tell truth from bullshit. What did you think of it?


Entered at Wed Feb 5 21:18:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

CBC Radio Shelagh's conversation with Robbie Robertson.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 21:12:05 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm's thoughts on the Stage Fright album:

"It was a dark album, and an accurate reflection of our group's collective psychic weather.

Daniel & The Sacred Harp was about selling your soul for music;
Stage Fright was about the terror of performing;
The Shape I'm In was about desperation;
The Rumor was about paranoia"


Entered at Wed Feb 5 21:05:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

HOW ROBBIE ROBERTSON PUT THE BLUES HOWL IN "THE WOLF OF WALL STREET" SOUNDTRACK
BY HUGH HA


Entered at Wed Feb 5 20:14:07 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

After leaving RCA The Kinks signed with Arista and released their "Sleepwalker" LP shortly before Rick Danko's solo debut on Arista. I remember buying both records when the were first released.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 18:47:12 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Stratotones

GregD: "Betty Jo" is from '64, when Troiano was still in Robbie Lane the Disciples - meaning he was also the lead guitarist in Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks immediately post-Levon.

JT: Glad you liked the Cushnie article; I'm glad it's still online somewhere, as I couldn't find it when I last looked a year or so ago. As for the Stratotones, they were from SW Ontario - likely London or Stratford. They were around for a long time, so it's likely they would have played the Concord - especially seeing they were part of Hawkins' stable of artists. The original plan was for Levon to halp manage that stable, but he changed his mind and decided to leave with the rest of our guys. The full stable, as far as I know, was Hawkins, Robbie Lane and the Disciples (aka the Hawks), Buddy Carlton and the Stratotones, Doug Lycett, the Stage Seven and the Vendettas. All but the last two released records on the Hawk label - and the Vendettas morphed into Kensington Market.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 17:54:31 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Kinks

Today's Toppermost is Calvin on The Kinks. Do come and look and join in the discussion.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 17:47:15 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: RR The kid.

Bill M: Just read your 1990s entry re Scott Cushnie on line. Excellent. The photo with Al Boliska of the The Suedes shows a very young Robbie Robertson. Wonderful.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 16:39:26 CET 2014 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Bill M-thanks for the link to the Stratotones. The guitar is certainly "Robbie-ish" in places. Interesting that the song was written by Fred Carter. Any idea what year this was released?


Entered at Wed Feb 5 16:18:41 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We used to have a Datsun Cherry. I'm sure with cherry blossom being so positive in Japan, no one thought about English slang. But as the other model at the same time was the Sunny, I wonder if they thought it was Cheery.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 15:45:35 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Cracked Up On Highway 61

The peril of the highway as seen From A Buick 6.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 13:22:48 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan, the advert for replacement exhaust systems by the Kwik-Fit company in Britain (as I'm sure you've noticed) is "There's Nothing Quicker Than a Kwik-Fit fitter." It will never be the same again.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 13:19:29 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I googled and the Honda slogan was "Small on the outside big on the inside" which made it worse. I wonder if Hyundai looked at the Honda Jazz, and thought "Ah, Jazz, What can we do that sounds like jazz? And looking through the jazzy end of their MoR record collection, they found Stan Getz. Excellent! We'll call it the Hyundai Getz and everyone will think it's just like the Honda Jazz!"


Entered at Wed Feb 5 13:08:02 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

And the "Honda Fitta" ran into problems in Scandinavia. Google at your own risk...


Entered at Wed Feb 5 12:23:55 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Carz

There's a Japanese car can't remember the maker at the moment but the model name is "Puta". Needless to say my Spanish speaking friends have a good laugh at that one.

I have a feeling that sometimes the people making the decisions don't properly think things through. ; )


Entered at Wed Feb 5 09:44:44 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mustang Sally

My dad had three Hillmans, one after the other. My sister had a Hillman Imp. There's a book somewhere on car names which so often caused problems in different languages, the classic being the General Motors Vauxhall / Opel Nova. They had trouble understanding its failure to sell in Spain. Nova = no va. Then there's the Mitsubishi Starrion, which is alleged to be the Japanese pronunciation of Stallion, as the car was stablemate to the Colt, both names, they hoped basking in reflected glory from the Ford Mustang. Now there's effort to produce names which mean nothing in anything, or more often the penchant for numbers (325) or letters (XP). One of the best-sellers in Britain now is the Nissan Quashgai. What does that mean? I thought it sounded so much like "Squashed guy" I automatically thought it would be uncomfortable, but a friend has one, and it's very pleasant. Another is the Hyundai Getz. Is it named for Stan Getz? Why? Or is it "gets". It's a stupid name for a car anyway.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 09:21:40 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Car ads

Every 60+ Finn remembers the car ad: "Parempi HILMAN kuin ILMAN". In English "Better HWITHOUT than WITHOUT", Hwithout being here the name of the British car. You may laugh now. - Web master can remove this as a racist post. You may laugh now too.


Entered at Wed Feb 5 02:39:33 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, you are welcome. And of course, i left the s out of their last name. Sorry, Jaco.



Entered at Wed Feb 5 01:25:48 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Stratotones

Bill M: I have not heard the name 'Stratotones' since I was a teen. However, I am certain they played the Concord Tavern. I remember that but never saw them. Do you know anything more about them?


Entered at Tue Feb 4 20:38:34 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8wJt9YrT-A

GregD: I see that some kind soul has already YouTubed the Stratotones record I mentioned yesterday. Presumably that's Scott Cushnie on organ as well as lead vocal. Note the nice guitar solo - by Troiano, but easily mistakable for Robertson, I'd say. Note also that the song was written by Fred Carter, who was brought back to Toronto by Hawkins to help with the Hawk label. While Scott Cushnie produced the first Ronnie Hawkins record on the label, and also the first Robbie Lane and the Disciples record (with Troiano on guitar for both), Carter produced the follow-ups. He also wrote and produced Kelly Jay's 1966 solo record, surely at Hawkins' instigation, but by then he'd moved back to Nashville.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 20:21:31 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mad Man or Ad Man

The following is an excerpt from a press release issued Sunday by Chrysler:

"The two-minute commercial reveals the new "American Import" tagline for the all-new 2015 Chrysler 200. It features legenday American musician/singer/songwriter Bob Dylan -- who in a collaborative first for the artist -- not only appears in the commercial and provided one of his tracks, "Things Have Changed," but also narrates the apologue that celebrates "America's Import."

(The definition of apologue is an allegorical narrative or fable, especially one having animals or inanimate objects as characters, usually intended to convey a moral with pointed or exaggerated details.)

The key point in the press release is that it was a collaborative effort, implying artistic imput on Dylan's part.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 20:03:50 CET 2014 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Bill M- Yes, Scott Cushnie must have had something else in mind when he suggested to Hawkins that he hire Robbie as a bass player rather than the already-bass playing Pete Traynor. Interesting that Troiano also did some A & R work for Hawkins' new label at the time.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 19:03:36 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.65)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Soundtrack of Summer Tour

"It's getting to the point where" all bets are off. Felder, Styx, Foreigner recording a version of Hotel California. You can watch it on Fox TV tonight. 35 date tour coming,see link above.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 17:21:47 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'said the joker to the thief'

I've been reading the many articles regarding the now infamous car/Dylan ad at the Superbowl. The funniest is the notion that the ad was 'hijacked' by an awful game in which the ad came on by the time most casual viewers had lost interest in the game (the score was so lopsided that many were not concentrating or left) and so the ad (costing millions) lost its impact on its audience.

Of course, many others comment that it (and Beckham) were the best or most interesting part of the many-hour ordeal.

Of course, the 'sellout' repeaters came out and all the media did their usual aping of an ancient idea that 'the voice of our generation' had gone south. How boring!

The one I liked best was the article that said it was nice to hear his voice in a spoken word (obviously hadn't see the 60 Minutes interview or any of the other available stuff) but still interesting.

Then there were those that praised other older performers (Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen etc.) who allegedly do not 'go commercial'. That is to laugh big time.

Overall, the blog comments and articles were much more interesting and had more insight IMO than the usual press. But that is not anything surprising given what I read from the usual press most of the time.

And who got the most out of this ad, the car company or Mr. Dylan? "...life is but a joke".


Entered at Tue Feb 4 15:13:00 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jeff A.

Thanks for the link.I had no clue Jaco had a son.Began watching some you tubes-this kid is a very gifted player.Thanks again.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 04:52:33 CET 2014 from (173.3.48.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Suprised i did not know about this young man. Not a thing. Not at all.
Having seen his father perform, and having seen his father buzz in and out o f The Lone Star, and having seen his father in action, so to speak, seeing the likeness, and reading abut his musicality. this is an emotional discovery for me. And i know when i do get the balls up to listen to him play, that it will not be easy either. Ladies and gentlemen,- please meet Felix Xavier Patorius.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 04:25:22 CET 2014 from (173.3.48.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Levon on Letterman prior to Right Stuff

Rag Mama Rag. Steve Jordan, Paul shaffer, Will Lee, i think Hiram Bullock on guitar


Entered at Tue Feb 4 04:14:32 CET 2014 from (58.104.20.184)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Dylan Ad

I thought the Dylan ad was kind of racist. Switzerland and Germany are countries, Asia is a continent!


Entered at Tue Feb 4 02:16:31 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: permanently glued

Not sure where the Iphone is but my watch is on my wrist.

Not even sure of my cel #; I've never called it once.

I set up a Facebook account last week at the request of an associate. The wife hasn't answered my friend request.

Ah, it's hopeless. I'm not in time. Old.

I like sunsets and scallops and single malt whisky. Labrador gold.

Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, Los Lobos, The Pogues.

Got a rhyme going there but I'll leave it alone.


Entered at Tue Feb 4 00:56:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It was "Switzerland - watch" . My typo. But who buys watches nowadays? I wear one, but my kids say "who needs one when you've got a Smart Phone permanently glued to your hand?'


Entered at Tue Feb 4 00:53:31 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have to admit that I have seen Jeep Wranglers sail happily past Range Rovers, Porsche Cayennes and Hummers stuck in soft ground in Arizona, and my daughter has a Grand Voyager which they are thrilled with. Flat opening side doors are fantastic with lots of kids as is equipment. Fiat on the other hand, having owned two, are about the least reliable and hard-wearing European cars, though always fun to drive. But Bob knows, I'm sure, that German cars just drive better.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 23:11:39 CET 2014 from (173.3.48.232)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I missed the Dylan commercial during the Super Bowl, the thread here just prompted me to watch it. By the time Dylan said "So let Germany brew your beer," i was laughing pretty good. By the time h leaned over and said "We will build your car." I was roaring. Hysterical.

Gotta say, Chrysler gives you a lot for the money. Up front, and then, well, it's a coin toss.

i just rented a Dodoge Challenger with a Hemi engine for a month. Most fun i had in a car since my 77 TR7 - this was actually a lot more fun. Couldn't ask for better handling, or a better ride. Best riding car since my 95 2 wheel drive Suburban. And the sucker took off like a rocket, yet held the ground the way cars are supposed to. I'd buy one except for the fact that where i live the insurance on it would proabbly be 700 - 800 a month.

But chrsyler is a good product. I bought a 92 plymouth Acclaim new, put a hard mostly NYC 66k on it in 3 years. I bought a 96 Dodge Interpid new that i put 140k on in 3 years, had very minor issues with it in that time, a buddy bought it from me, ran it a good 100k till he sold it. But he did some work on it- he's a good mechanic. Bought a 203 Grand Caravan new, put 243k on it over ten years when it was stolen in st louis by punks who used it for a mobile barber shop till they got caught. No joke. now that sucker- the engine was still great. everything else i rebuilt- had the tranny worked on, did the front end three times. they'r e notorious for that. But if the car wasn't destroyed by the little rustlers i'd probably still be driving it.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 22:02:05 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: coca-cola, pepsi-cola, orangina

Ignatius: We all know what Bob meant by the "land of coca- cola line" but we also have to recognise that virtually all lands are the lands of Coca-Cola these days. And coke wouldn't have it any other way. Typing out my subject line, a line heard at popular tourist beaches around the world, it occurred to me that Robbie could do something with that - perhaps in updating the rag-and-bone man's call from "Northern Lights"?


Entered at Mon Feb 3 21:53:20 CET 2014 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Bob, by jingo!

"Oh to be in the land of Coca Cola," he once sang. And that big American flag that draped the stage during some of his appearances with The Hawks during the Viet Nam war days. Same Bob. Different century.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 21:49:56 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Union Sundown

Dave H: After all these years the Dylan song seems to ring true. Fiat had previously owned 58.5% of Chrysler, with a United Auto Workers retiree health-care trust owning the remaining stake. Last month Fiat worked out a deal to acquire the remaining shares in the company for $4.35 billion.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 21:22:32 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.112)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Seems to me the lyrics to "Union Sundown" (1983) are a window into Bob Dylan's views about international trade, such as they are (see link).


Entered at Mon Feb 3 21:06:05 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

A brief interview with Steve Van Zandt regarding Paul Simon's "Graceland".


Entered at Mon Feb 3 21:05:28 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

GregD: Thanks for posting the article about Scott Cushnie. The fact that he suggested that Hawkins hire Suedes guitarist, JRR, rather than Suedes bassist, Peter Traynor, to play bass with the Hawks may mean that Scott had a sense that Fred Carter's job would soon come up - and that Robbie would benefit from being in the group already. Besides Scott, Kelly Jay's best musical buddy in their Bronte / Oakville days was bassist Chuck Daniels - and the two of them, Kelly and Chuck, joined Larry Lee and the Corvettes (soon to be the Leesures) together, and roomed at the same Toronto hotel as the Hawks in the early '60s. And then, in '64, Cushnie rejoined Hawkins, not as a musician but as the A&R guy (with Domenic Troiano) for Hawkins' nascent Hawk label. One 45, "Betty Jo", ostensibly by Buddy Carlton and the Stratotones, clearly features Cushnie singing and Troiano playing in his best Robbie Robertson. style. Neither Cushnie nor Jack Douglas are on any of the three Liverpool Set 45s, but they're both on the two Nightshift 45s, on a 45 by High Park that was done when Cushnie returned to Toronto with Douglas in tow, and on an album called "Beatle Hits" on which Cushnie sings and plays piano, Douglas plays guitar, Liverpool Set's Lach McFaggin drums and then-Hawk Wayne Cardinal plays bass. (The LP was recorded while Hawkins was taking a break from performing while waiting for his Muscle Shoals album to come out, meaning that his musicians, including Cushnie and Cardinal, needed another project.)


Entered at Mon Feb 3 20:24:39 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The irony is that late last month Chrysler finalized an agreement to become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Fiat. In turn, the Netherlands-based Fiat Chrysler holding company will shift its tax base from Italy to the U.K.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 19:59:35 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan Super Bowl

Apparently all the planning was for naught.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 19:37:09 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Another take on Bob's video

I was speaking to a music journalist friend of mine this morning; regarding the Dylan video. He had an interesting take on it. Not that it happened; but still of interest to me.

What if someone got hold of Bob's people and got into a conservation; about the plight of Detroit. As we all know that city is indeed financial trouble. Perhaps Bob was asked if he could do anything to help? Plausible? In the end I thought it was a good take on the subject anyway.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 18:56:13 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Love Slick

In conjunction with the 2004 tv ad Dylan, through Sony Marketing, released an "exclusive" Victoria's Secret "Love Sick" CD. It featured a longer, remixed version of "Love Sick," along with 8 other previously released Dylan songs.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 17:54:56 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Voice of a Generation

Some would argue that Mr. Dylan is finally truly now 'the voice of a generation'.

You go to work (wherever work happens to be), you open the store, you do business, and you pay your employees and then you enjoy (hopefully) the fruits of your labour.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 17:14:47 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Things have changed........or not.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 17:02:43 CET 2014 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Web: My link

The link above is from this past Saturday's Hamilton Spec and features former Hawk Scott Cushnie a.k.a. Professor Piano, someone frequently mentioned here by Bill M. He discusses his brief tenure in the Hawks and how he convinced Ronnie Hawkins to hire his best friend, the young JRR.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 16:39:34 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Music Lives On

It was 55 years ago today that Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper died in an airplane crash. While known as The Day The Music Died, as immortalized in the Don McLean song, in reality, the music lives on in the hearts of many.

On Feb. 4, 1966 Dylan began his world tour with The Hawks in Louisville, Ky. And it was 50 years ago next Sunday that the Beatles electrified America with their appearance on the Ed Sullivan show.

Sadly, last month was bookmarked by the deaths of two legendary musicians, Phil Everly and Pete Seeger.

I'm reminded of all the great music that lives on, not as part of some Super Bowl halftime show, but as part of the soundtracks of our lives.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 16:37:57 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob

An old friend whom I hadn't seen in years once said to me one day......" God John have you ever changed." He wasn't just speaking about the way I looked. I said, "I sure hope so!" I'm sure Bob and most of us are the same.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 15:52:58 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bob's a corporate mogul!

Or he's kindly leaving a loving financial legacy for his children,grandchildren and great grandchildren.Can't fault a man for that! And very entertaining for the rest of us.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 15:46:02 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Working on Madison Avenue's Farm

Dylan appeared in tv ad for Cadillac Escalade in 2007. A couple of months ago he also licensed his rare recording of "Motherless Children" (recorded live at the Gaslight in 1962) for a Chrysler Jeep Cherokee ad. We also got a double commercial dose for the Super Bowl, as he also licensed his recording of "I Want You" for a Chobani yogart ad. And don't forget, he also owns the publishing rights for "The Weight," licensed for a Cingular Wireless ad campaign several years ago, which was subject to a lawsuit filed by Levon.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 15:33:15 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Making the best, making the finest, takes conviction

Let Germany brew your beer

Let Switzerland make your car

Let Asia assemble your phone

We will build your car

Hmm. Has Bob ever compared BMW, Mercedes, Audi, VW, Volvo, Lexus, Honda with Chrysler? I would imagine so. I still think of the Chevrolet Traverse we rented in San Francisco in 2012. It rolled backwards in "Drive" when you stopped on the hills. I was always told automatics can't do that. It's impossible, like a lift can't fall. We have steep hills near us, very near to San Francisco steep, though not quite and even Mrs V's little Suzuki doesn't roll back in Drive. I asked the valet parking guy at the hotel if this was normal. He said, yes, in San Francisco a lot of cars rolled backward in "Drive." But not German ones, Honda or Lexus, he added.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 14:39:10 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pMYFc9N0gs

Jed: Even funnier than the K-Tel commercial for 24 Top Protest Songs?


Entered at Mon Feb 3 14:35:34 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yes Jed. Bob Dylan previously was part of a lingerie commercial for Victoria Secret in 2004. Some thought it would be his last commerical....


Entered at Mon Feb 3 14:29:50 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Jed...Thanks for the heads up.

Here's the Official Chrysler 200 Super Bowl Commercial featuring Bob Dylan.

Thanks to Solomon for The Band video as well.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 13:11:00 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Look Alike

Could be.But the phrasing,the voice,the very pale face-it was Bob.Without the dastardly Dan mustache or goatee one can never be certain.But the certainty Dylan asserted about where cars are made was very clear.Bob seemed to be representing Chrysler and America.Or America is Chrysler.I'm confused.But it was Dylan.Yup it was Dylan.Cars.What next? Women's lingerie? To wear in chryslers while driving cross country in America.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 12:53:55 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob D / Jed

So Jed. Your confirming this is a look-a-like and not Bob? Living in Canada we don't get to see the ads.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 09:52:21 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Current stuff

I got David Crosby's "Croz" on Saturday. I've only listened twice, but I woke up looking to put it straight on this morning. The two that I'd suggest to try are What's Broken? and Dangerous Night.

The other is Jennifer Nettles' "That Girl.' (Produced by Rick Rubin). Try the title track, but the one I keep playing is "Moneyball." I wondered why she was using her own name rather than Sugarland, but I can see the reasoning. Sugarland gets put in the country section, even though each album was less country. I don't think you'd call much on this "country" except her accent. Moneyball was on in the car the first time we heard the CD and we pressed 'repeat' three times, marveling at her breath control and range.


Entered at Mon Feb 3 03:11:53 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan does Chrysler ad for Super Bowl

One of he funniest,craziest,Bob shtick I've seen to date.Truly hilarious.


Entered at Sun Feb 2 20:26:21 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Solomon, good one. Richard sounding much better than the other recent discovery. Not as many cameras. Levon with some interesting improvs.

Terrible news about Philip Seymour Hoffman. Fantastic actor.


Entered at Sun Feb 2 19:59:26 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, you agreed that Simone deserves his place in the best ten. Only fatherly pride or a large monetary investment could make that make sense! Either way, it'd be understandable.


Entered at Sun Feb 2 10:59:22 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lee Dorsey

Jeff, lists are lists as we all know, but I think the compiler was pointing out that he is in the very first division of songwriters, and also he is a different generation. I was delighted it was there.

Today's Toppermost is me again, and has several Band mentions … Lee Dorsey (linked).

On auto correction, it is getting stroppier and more predictive. It changed "we all" to "well" above three times. As I typed this it tried to change 'three' to 'there.'


Entered at Sun Feb 2 08:53:19 CET 2014 from (219.104.43.123)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Chest Fever

Well spotted, Solomon. Don't know where this was filmed but looks to be in the first half of July 76. Hopefully more will surface...


Entered at Sun Feb 2 07:54:26 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Solomon, that's great - thanks. never seen that before. The guys often had specific stage shirts but I've never seen Garth wearing that shirt before. Couldn't tell if Robbie was playing the red or sunburst strat. A great version of Chest Fever as well.


Entered at Sun Feb 2 07:18:56 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: James Govan / I Shall Be Released

Though i've never read about this here, it may have been covered. I've not heard of this guy, apparently,he was quite a wonderful talent, may still be. James Govan.

http://www.npr.org/2014/01/15/262735171/the-soul-singer-who-never-quite-made-it
that links to an NPR story about him.

the link in the headings goes to a recording that includes a supposedly killer version of I Shall Be Released. Apparently Duane Allman was on some of the tracks, but not credited.


Entered at Sun Feb 2 06:51:30 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.181)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peter, I've realized you feel very grandfatherly or fatherly towards the lad, but now am convinced you must have good reason suspect that Simone Felice is your lineage. Ahead of Woody Guthrie, Neil Young, Carole king, Leon Russell, Willie Dixon, Elmore James,Gram Parsons, John Lennon, Paul McCartney and hundreds of others?


Entered at Sun Feb 2 05:13:50 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: Among those quoted in that Star article I posted is founding Traveller Sid Dolgay, who spent much of the '60s co-managing the Willows, Eric Mercury, Dianne Brooks and the Soul Searchers (who must've played the Concord) and a couple of Bruce Cockburn's old groups.

I encourage anyone interested in Cockburn's music, especially his early music, to check out a compilation of tapes recorded by the Children in the mid '60s (and some tunes from a reunion in the '90s - see link). The notes are terrific, and very detailed, with cameo appearances by Brian Ahern, Amos Garrett et al.

Dunc: Note that David Wiffen was in the Children along with Cockburn.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 23:05:38 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Everly Brothers Reunion Show

Since the passing of Phil, I was drawn back to the Royal Albert Hall Reunion show DVD. After all this time, it dawned on me that 10 songs are missing. Also from the CD version; with the exception of a release called "THE COMPLETE REUNION SHOW." Can't believe it took me this long to realize it. I hope one day the whole show gets released on DVD.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 21:48:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don't Wake The Scarecrow

Today's "Daily Telegraph" had a "500 Must Have Music Tracks." Under Singer-Songwriter, among the ten best selected: Dylan, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Leonard Cohen, Elton John, Lou Reed, Nick Cave, we deservedly have The Felice Brothers on "Don't Wake The Scarecrow."

In "the Best of The Rest" (11-20) we have Randy Newman, Neil Young, Carole King, Ian Dury, Van Morrison, Nick Drake, Patti Smith, Loudon Wainwright III, Tom Waits, Janis Ian.

Reading their lists, this is not hasty selections. Simone Felice deserves his place in the Best Ten.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 19:05:08 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT:here's an article from the Star last week about Seeger, Camp Nievelt and the Travellers.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 18:19:18 CET 2014 from (74.101.59.125)

Posted by:

John W.

Subject: NYC

There will also be a re-creation of the Last Waltz by various musicians in New York, April 27 at the Highline Ballroom.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 13:20:31 CET 2014 from (92.18.215.179)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Chest Fever Live

I wonder if anyone has any info on this filmed live version of Chest Fever from 1976 ? It's a new one on me.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 01:52:26 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Southside
Web: My link

I do remember the Travellers and I do love BARK but this post is about Grand Funk Railroad. Every decade or so I feel the need to listen to a Grand Funk song. Link is to "Comfort Me", the only song I remember from the "Survival" album. A Band connection might be through Todd Rundgren who would produce a few hits for the group.

Late listenings include "Sun Sessions", "Jerry Lee at the Star", "How Will the Wolf Survive", "Hunter, Hunter" and "Boz Scaggs".

Is it true that Johnny Rivers isn't in the R&R HOF? You gotta wonder.


Entered at Sat Feb 1 00:19:25 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Travellers

RE: The Weavers and Pete Seeger and Joan's fond recollections: There was a Canadian folk group called The Travellers who had Jerry Gray as lead singer and used banjo and emulated The Weavers to a great degree. I mention this particularly because they were at times if I recall correctly associated with a summer camp that I worked at. It was how I first got to be aware of The Weavers. The Travellers often appeared on Canadian TV (CBC) and had a Canadian version of "This Land Is Your Land". They produced many albums from 1953 until the 60s and their popularity peaked during the 1960s folk revival. Their songs were often distinctly Canadian. They were said to produce 16 albums.


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