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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, September 2015


Entered at Wed Sep 30 23:11:22 CEST 2015 from (58.104.11.161)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

An extract from the Gainesville Sun, May 26, 1995:

Robertson says he has not read Helm’s book. “He’s never said anything to me, ever, over all these years. I would talk to him every once in a while and he’d never say anything like “Listen, I’m angry with you,’ or ‘I don't like the way you handled things’, or ‘It was your fault the Band broke up.’ Nothing. So I was surprised that it came out that way.”


Entered at Wed Sep 30 22:50:40 CEST 2015 from (193.200.150.152)

Posted by:

Coach HD

Ask Brennan, Jeff. Surely he knows exactly what Levon said to you.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 22:00:49 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lisa, Levon marched to his own time...He could have read it, maybe even been surprised, not minded. Could have said that's show bizness. Fuck it.

I don't remember who it was. But i recall some one asking about Larry Thurston. I think this was before Levon met him, but i had played 3 tracks Larry had already cut vocals on for me for Levon & Levon loved his voice, performances. . Now i had told Levon the background previously , he knew it. I explain to this person Larry's history, work with the Blues Brothers, that he had developed a problem , and some other things that led to him knowing he was supposed to go home to st lou and become a preacher. With a big knowing smile on his face Levon burst out: *See what the music business done for him*. Now, LOOK might have been in place of SEE, and DID moght have been in place of DONE,,, it was 13 and change years ago...


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:57:53 CEST 2015 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Last Waltz

Strange hypothetical re touring post Last Waltz (after the 1977 stage recording of Evangeline and The Weight), given the obvious that Richard Manuel was in no condition to tour - I love Ring Your Bell on You Tube but the voice is jarring. The Band was no longer capable at that time of running on 5 cylinders (and one could argue that John Simon was a necessary 6th to provide spark and outside oversight) Thus, possible to continue onward in studio but Levon, Rick, Garth and Robbie went on to their own projects and the 4 circled back in the early 80s with the Cate Brothers.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:51:10 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

I think Rick's solo career was killed off when that idiot Clive Davis dropped him from Arista, when his 1977 debut didn't skyrocket to the top of the charts, and when he was in the process of recording the follow up ("Cryin' Heart Blues" Other People's Music)...


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:41:07 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

J

Angie- this is from Libby's FB page, in April 2012. I just copied, pasting it here now. I mentioned this here before, not sure if inserted it.

"I lived with Levon Helm from 1970 through 1974 (actually, our relationship ended in '78.) I am the mother of his daughter Amy Helm and his stepson Ezra Titus (1966-2009). Until '74, our family and the Robertsons, Robbie and Dominique and their children, were inseparable. The story of Levon's conflict with Robbie is much more complex, and much sadder, than the story that's appeared in Levon's book and in the press." I guess if she can write that on her public page, which anyone can access, it's okay to post it here.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:30:15 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Live from New York

Levon and the RCO All Stars did receive big exposure when they appeared on Saturday Night Live on March 19, 1977. Levon sang "Ain't That A Lot of Love" and Dr. John sang "Sing Sing Sing."


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:27:33 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

beg, I don't think there was one. Or if there was, I never knew about it. Thinking back, I don't believe anyone recorded it. I know the people who put on the Music West event had no idea that their keynote speaker would generate so much interest - they had to merge two rooms together to accommodate the number of people lined up for this event, a line that started to form hours before the stated time, and grew longer and longer, till it was evident that something drastic had to be done. Did anyone at the 2003 Q & A you attended ask about it? It would be really interesting to hear your cassette!

Peter, that was exactly what I thought, too. It does seem odd though - I mean, if it were you, wouldn't you at least want to read the book that supposedly told your life story? Maybe at the time he didn't think it would be considered so important. Who knows?


Entered at Wed Sep 30 21:08:29 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Lisa! I forgot to ask you last time if you bought a CD of the Q&A with Robbie. It wasn't until 2003 that I heard Robbie at a Q&A. I strongly wanted to ask about the FFFF as I started posting here around that time.....but thankfully....I restrained myself. I stlll have the cassette so I'll have to check it out again. At the time I painstakeingly tried to share from that night and some posters thought I was making things up so.....Robbie didn't do a meet and greet at Canadian Music Week as did Daniel Lanois. I still have the linked passes, cassette and some photos I took.

One of my friends was no longer interested in Robbie from this day forward because he didn't meet his fans....but became enamoured with Lanois. She kept talking about his energy.....I talked to him about my favourite songs as he genuinely seemed interested to know. He also played his first instrument.....steel guitar for us so.....yeah.......yeah......

Bill M...Since you also like to find a good deal. The other Colleges at UofT will also be having their sales. One year I found Levon's book at Trinity College. I had borrowed it from a friend but I was only going to buy it if it was......5.00. This year I bought two CDS and three books for 7.00. I'm buying Robbie's book with gift cards that the kidzzz gave me.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 20:58:30 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.27)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ben: it's perfectly clear that everybody knew they were making a documentary that involved the concert being filmed by professional crews with cameras and stuff. And that it was the end or was to be portrayed as such. In financial terms, anyone who changed his mind and tried to put things back together shortly after the fact should have thanked his lucky stars that Robbie kiboshed the plan (if he did). They would have received more in royalties from TLW-chared nostalgia than they would have been paid to tour Robbie-less, plus they would have had to work on schedule.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 20:35:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have suggested that Levon never read it before and am not the only one. This is extremely common with "ghost-written" autobiographies. I reckon hours of tape, then Stephen Davies went away and selected and assembled. I bet Levon was surprised.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 20:05:45 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: 1993?

I think beg is on to something here. When I was at the Q & A session in 1993 that I've written about before (and it was long, about two hours), to the best of my recollection no one asked about any rift between Levon and Robbie. And if it had been general knowledge at the time I'm sure someone would have. It was a very well-informed audience - they knew way more about The Band's music than I did at the time, as I was a relative newbie.

When I first read Levon's book (which I think came out right about that time) I was really struck by the dichotomy of the writing. The stories Levon told which sounded clear as a bell in his own voice were so different from the rest of the book. And then, in later interviews he said that he was surprised at the amount of animosity which came through when the book was published. I've never heard anyone here suggest this, but I've always had the strong impression that he never actually read the finished product before it was put out. If he had, wouldn't he have had more input as to the contents? He could have changed anything he didn't agree with presumably - after all, it was written as though he was the author. Maybe after it came out, things were more or less set in stone, no going back. What do you all think?


Entered at Wed Sep 30 18:52:33 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Final Performances?

It's my understanding that at some point after TLW concert The Band did get back together to film their soundstage performances with The Staple Singers and Emmylou Harris. They also filmed the interview segments for the movie.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 17:42:34 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Some of you feel that 1983 was the year that changed everything for The Band. I think it's more after 1993. Interview here is listed as 2007 but you'll hear 1993 interview first. I've posted this 1993 interview with Levon many times but it's so important to listen once again. He talks about audience reaction at Forest Hills Concert, where he ended up after leaving Dylan and The Hawks, the distraction....the tension.....in The Band regarding lack of collaboration.

Most importantly......14:43.....when he was asked about reconciling with Robbie.......He said that's how he felt at the time (Ffff)....but no longer. So in 1993 Levon still referred to Robbie.....as Robbie.....and.....no need to reconcile. He states that they're doing well and Robbie's solo record is doing well....probably things worked out for the best as there's a time when everyone has to move on....Robbie just chose to get off the bus earlier.......Anyway, after 1993 some are no longer doing well ????

2007 interview is here as well.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 17:19:44 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Jeff, The point is that Robbie provided a false narrative in his interview segments in 'the last waltz'. His claims about the road being an impossible way of life, etc seem pretty facile when two members of The Band were back on the road before the movie hit theaters.

Again, I don't blame Robbie for retiring from the road. Clearly, Richard was in very bad shape and it probably seemed like they were dragging him around on the last tour.

However, Robbie had the option of simply walking away. Many key players have left bands over the years such as Gene Clark, Graham Nash, Richard Thompson, Peter Gabriel, Ritchie Blackmore and countless others and the bands continued on.

According to Levon, there was no option at the time for the others to continue as The Band without Robbie.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 17:03:22 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Listening to Marc Ribot's Y Los Cubanos Postizos. I bought this CD this week at Victoria College, UofT's book sale.
I've been to Cuba four times and have been to Habana, Varadero, Santiago de Cuba.....all seductive. For those who haven't been there better go before it all changes.......

Bill M and Joan...I only posted the thread of the one hit wonders as I had no idea there was an unofficial national day. Yes we've covered that one many times too.

Same as topic about the Band name moving forward....So here I go again.

BAM 1988
Inerview Robbie Robertson Spinning A New Wheel Of Fortune

Chris Willman: "Some of them went out on the road individually and with other outfits in the interim, but apparently it wasn't just the road they missed, but the whole sense of being the Band?"

Robbie Robertson: "I think that's just what they had to go on. That's what worked the best, I guess. I'm not really positive of this, either. I'm kind of guessing, because I never sat down and said to them, "Why are you doing this?" I never did that.

We would talk about it, and I would just say, "You''ve got my blessings. I hope that it works really well for you." I never, ever wanted to try and get in the way or prevent it. They'd say "Well listen, can we use this name and everything?" I thought "Of course." It's more up to the audience to figure it out, to put a make on that, how they feel about it."

How did a lot of us feel? They're the Reformed Band.....no one can be The Band......except The Band. :-D


Entered at Wed Sep 30 16:33:58 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The members of The Band, except for Levon, also spent 1977 "polishing" up TLW tracks. It then took another six months to mix.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 16:31:07 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Imagine McCartney allowing George and Ringo to carry on as The Beatles.....or Page allowing Plant and Jones to carry on as Led Zeppelin...or Townsend allowing Daltrey and Entwistle to go on as The Who or Ray Davies allowing Dave and fiends to go out as The Kinks........now imagine Robbie Robertson allowing The Band to carry on without him........oh, hold on, he did allow it !

Jeff: I loved Levon's pride.......walking away from Dylan said a lot about him and I have no doubt he was not at all happy about putting the Band away.....but I also believe that TLW was a brilliant concept and had it made everyone in The Band the money they thought it should have, the feelings -especially Levon's - would have been different.......as to a farewell tour, The Band were not nearly popular enough at the time to have pulled one off successfully.....thus not even a discussion.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 15:41:13 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ben, again two separate subjects. If you can't make lox , eggs, & onions cause you're out of eggs, having lox & cream cheese on a bagel, you don't say i ate lox, eggs, & onions.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 15:09:50 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The RCO All Stars was a major solo project with major players on board, and really elaborate record sleeves, tour etc, Rick Danko's solo tour was apparently successful, but he stalled on a follow up album. I should think in 1977 both were feeling pretty good about the future.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 15:00:32 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Jeff, I don't have Levon's book handy at the moment, but he makes it pretty clear that there was no option of continuing as The Band (without Robbie) after the last waltz concert. So, what option did Levon and Rick have at that time except to pursue solo projects?


Entered at Wed Sep 30 14:20:12 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apparently Bellowhead are in a somewhat different position. Jon Boden the lead singer, arranger and front man is leaving. Someone who was chatting to them at a festival told me the others all wanted to continue, but decided it was impossible as he was so much the leader and focus. It's a great shame, but it must be an unwieldy band to take around, which might be why they haven't done America.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 08:40:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Goodbye (Cream album title)

As the English pikeman said to the Welsh archer:

‘Bugger it, Dafyd. This pike’s heavy. I’m fed up with this Hundred Years war.’

‘So am I Perkin, boyo. Bot look you, it’s only got fifty years left to go.‘

Howard Johnston was looking back 40 years and dividing his work with The Band into the “Rock of Ages era” and “The Last Waltz era.” Time gaps within that are irrelevant. As far as he was concerned, there was some difference in material so different arrangements to be done. So two eras. He might have said “the final tour” and we would not be debating whether they knew it was final or not.

In fact, the Farewell Concert was invented with TLW, wasn’t it? I suppose The Beatles might have known that the rooftop show was the end, but they didn’t sell tickets for it. The Farewell Tour an advertised concept might begin with Cream in 1968 or Frank Sinatra in 1971. See link to Rolling Stone “Ten Farewell Tours That Didn’t Stick.” Not sticking seems to be the default. Eltn John is quoted in 1977:

"I've made a decision tonight that this is going to be the last show. There's a lot more to me than playing on the road and this is the last one I'm going to do."

I saw the Glen Campbell Farewell Tour and recently the Albert Lee UK Farewell Tour. I saw the Spiers and Boden Farewell Tour last year, and the second gig on the Bellowhead Farewell Tour this year. The Farewell Tour is in two sections going from July 2015 to April 2016 and I also have tickets for one of the last Farewell concerts. Hopefully it won’t stick.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 06:20:50 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Two different things Kevin. But if you wish, be as sarcastic as you like. I expressed my take on it. Do i have to be correct. No. But- i see it as two different things... By the time the Last Waltz was in planning, it was a done deal. As discussed here, RR was leaving regardless. And apparently, if those who wrote about it here are correct, the others were blocked from continuing with the name.... So it made some sense to participate for Levon.... even so, he was pissed off, & if Muddy wasn't playing, odds are Levon wasn't...

Kevin, could you imagine Levon going out on a farewell tour for The Band in 76?


Entered at Wed Sep 30 05:46:00 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"If it had been called The Last Waltz Tour, had it even been conceived as the last tour, or a tour leading up to a final show as The Band, Levon & maybe even the other three guys would have bailed early."- Jeff A

Of course, had it been named The Last Waltz and conceived as a final goodbye.....with a full TWO MONTHS to consider and prepare for the whole thing .......we all would have been shocked, just shocked that anyone in The Band showed up.....imagine the horror to find out now that this trickery all happened in the first place ?


Entered at Wed Sep 30 04:36:24 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Todd's comments made sense.

Named later of course. If it had been called The Last Waltz Tour, had it even been conceived as the last tour, or a tour leading up to a final show as The Band, Levon & maybe even the other three guys would have bailed early.

Those shows in the U.K. that Levon did not participate in, well, he decided not to go, that's it .... (condensed,edited ) the guys went, & asked a Woodstock attorney friend to try to get him there. They got there, & called this guy again & asked again. there was still time.... So he drives to Levon's, gets out of his car, hears "Alan, I'm not going", looks up , sees a shotgun pointed out a window, gets back in his car, and leaves.... I got the whole story & background from the horse's mouth...


Entered at Wed Sep 30 04:35:03 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.199)

Posted by:

David P

Like all those battles that comprised Sherman' s March to the Sea through Georgia, the last tour of the original Band can be viewed as the unscripted Last Waltz.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 03:47:11 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Coach SD, you never did make your little self clear. Have you ever in your long quest to remain relevant in Band-dom used the term The Last Waltz Tour? Oh, that's right. You haven't--until just now.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 03:39:15 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

There was no tour that culminated in TLW. The summer tour of 1976 began without the horn section--about 12 shows. The horn section was added and they performed another 12 shows. They played one show after that probably without the horns in Pittsburgh. The everyone went home. Those two intervening months involved sessions for Islands and rehearsals/production for TLW. Levon was there and said there was no mention of "putting it away" until sometime in September, not coincidentally after the Austin gig.

TLW was a one-off show. There was no tour that led up to it.

In the American Civil War, the Chickamauga Campaign ended in mid-September 1863. The three day battles at nearby Chattanooga between the same armies occurred November 23-25. No one would say they are part of the same campaign.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 03:23:17 CEST 2015 from (193.200.150.125)

Posted by:

Coach HD

Wait. You mean Patty's interpretation doesn't supersede a horn section member's recollection? Even in retrospect Mr. Johnson can't simply throw that Last Waltz Tour terminology about without running it through proper channels in Chicago. Everybody knows that.

The nerve of him.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 02:34:54 CEST 2015 from (70.193.169.199)

Posted by:

David P

Howard Johnson was there and took part in what became the end of the road for Robbie. He was privy to what the public was unaware of at the time. I believe he had a better sense of what was going on at the time when Robbie was deciding to pull the plug. As Mr. Johnson worked with Levon in the aftermath, I'm not going to question his description of events leading up to the demise of What went down.


Entered at Wed Sep 30 02:05:21 CEST 2015 from (24.114.71.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bill M.....

.....of course, Dan McCafferty knows he was.......love hurts...


Entered at Wed Sep 30 01:17:46 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: Justin Bieber's so young that maybe he thinks that Jesus of Nazareth was the lead singer before Manny Charlton. Said to have been a humble guy, observant,followed the food rules. And stage presence!!


Entered at Tue Sep 29 23:40:09 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent summing up, Todd. As you infer, no one called World War One that at the time, but speaking years later they all did. Hence 'The Last Waltz Tour'. Equally in 1974, no one would have talked about the "Before The Flood Tour" until after the album came out. But that's what I'd call it in retrospect. It makes simple sense.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 22:57:26 CEST 2015 from (174.236.35.18)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Tour That Became The Last Waltz

Let’s not get hung up on semantics.

The fact remains that The Winterland gig, which was ultimately filmed for The Last Waltz movie, had been on the books as the last show of a tour that had been in progress. Several of the later gigs on the tour utilized horns, including Howard Johnson on Tuba. It may not have been known at the beginning of the tour that the Winterland gig would be the last Band show, but circumstances as the tour was rolling, eventually led to that decision and outcome. For all practical purposes, it became The Last Waltz tour, even if it wasn’t billed as such. We have to factor in that Howard Johnson was looking at it from the perspective of a participant musician, not a marketer.

Calling the dates on the tour that Howard Johnson was involved with “The Last Waltz tour” is a fair thing for him to call it based on his recollection of how he came to be involved with the number of gigs that led up to it, and is a reasonable way to differentiate it, during a comprehensive interview, from his Rock of Ages involvement, or his RCO involvement, or any other number of chapters in his association with members of The Band.

There have been many battles and campaigns during wartime that have been fought during the course of history. It’s not always apparent until the war is over, which battles led to the end of a war. It certainly can’t always be predicted at the beginning of a war, which battles will be the last, until the end actually arrives.

But looking in the rearview mirror, it’s reasonable to call it what it is or became, and recognizing its importance in the overall history. It really was The Last Waltz tour during those last few months. Or if one prefers: “The tour involving horns which led up to the final show of the tour which was filmed for a movie named ‘The Last Waltz’ tour”….. But I think that’s a little wordy compared to what Mr. Johnson called it.

He was probably trying to clarify that TLW wasn’t “one-off” moment, but that he had actually been on tour with The Band, and other horn players in the time period leading up to that final show as a way to prepare for the gig rather than just having rehearsals. It was the end of a process that he had been involved with…..”on tour” as it were.

Dylan going electric at Newport is a fair and descriptive way to refer to that event, even if it wasn’t advertised that way prior to the event.

The Judas moment at Dylan’s gig at the Manchester Free Trade Hall, is a fair and descriptive way to refer to that moment, even though no one knew that’s what it would become ahead of time.

Sometimes the lens of history is more accurate. I attended a gig on The Who’s “Farewell Tour” in the 1980’s.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 22:16:58 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

It wasn't referred to as that at the time, and I've never heard it referred to as that. I saw the Chicago show and there was no sense that they were on a final tour. I think Rolling Stone announced the decision after the Palladium show.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 21:05:40 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Although not billed as such at the time, isn't that what the last tour became known as for those who took part?


Entered at Tue Sep 29 20:37:50 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, Howard Johnson is pretty strong on the subject: "So I didn’t really come in close contact with Levon again until The Last Waltz tour. Most people don’t know there was a tour for that."


Entered at Tue Sep 29 20:33:51 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.9)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

See the link. Avatar is going on the block. i can't imagine anyone buying this great studio for the tsurres and small profit margin. It's a shame. i won't even get started......i was there two years ago, it's a wonderful operation....if you have the gelt, it's the kind of place you want to record... it was one of the two safe places left to record in NYC, but again, i won't get started...

Ben, what Peter means is that solo shows or tours don't count as The Band.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 19:18:35 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

PSB, I don't have Levon's book in front of me, but I distinctly remember him indicating that Robbie and "the suits" prevented the Band from continuing without Robbie at the time of the last waltz.

So, again the question comes back to why didn't Robbie just leave at the end of the tour and let the others continue as the Band if they wanted to.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 19:08:36 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

PSB, Your math is off. Both Rick and Levon were on the road one year after the last waltz concert (and prior to the release of the movie). The criminally underrated "Rco All-Stars Live" album (featuring Howard Johnson) was recorded New Year's eve 1977.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 18:27:42 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Staple Singers

Track listing for the upcoming Staple Singers 5-CD box set. The live film set version of "The Weight" with The Band is included.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 18:25:24 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The days of yore

The days of yore what? On a totally different, uninteresting subject we now interrupt regular programing.

On this internet this morning on my Yahoo news page which comes up, "Justin Bieber announces he now wants to live like Jesus." " No I don't want to be Jesus, Bieber says, I just want to be like him."

Now what in hell does that mean? He wants to have, long hair, beard, and sandals, and try and find a funky bunch of friends......or has he been watching too much Monty Python?

"I'm not the messiah!".....now back to regular programing.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 18:21:51 CEST 2015 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: '76

Levon and Rick Danko going on the road as solo artists (two years later) is not the same thing as The Band going on the road.

When I saw The Band at Asbury Park in July '76, there was no doubt in my mind it would soon be over. That didn't stop me from seeing them at the Spectrum in Philly a couple of months later. When The Last Waltz was announced a few weeks later, I wasn't the least but surprised. Sad, but not surprised. We'd known it was coming since the Nassau Coliseum shows in August '74.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 18:15:46 CEST 2015 from (74.13.220.34)

Posted by:

Coach2

Two lawyers to watch.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 18:05:58 CEST 2015 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

David P-interesting pictures from Santa Cruz 1976 with horn section in the background. I could well be wrong about this, but I recall reading somewhere that when the Last Waltz concert was set, a previously-planned concert for the Bay area, which was actually to be in Oakland (I don't know the date), was cancelled, and changed to the Winterland date which was pushed back to the November Thanksgiving. Someone might have more info on this.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 17:36:58 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

There also appears to be a horn section in this photo from the 1976 concert in Santa Cruz. Does anyone know the exact date?


Entered at Tue Sep 29 16:53:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I don't believe Howard Johnson was suggesting that it was billed as "The Last Waltz tour." In hindsight he was merely pointing out that by September 1976 plans were being made to quit touring by bowing out at TLW, which would include expanding to add a horn section.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 16:39:25 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Yes......"Who is Rick Danko" would have been the correct answer.

Coca-cola: Howard Johnson's attention to this was actually one of many points in the interview that really let you know that this guy has it going on..........one small bottle or can of coca-cola contains 25 grams of sugar.......anything above 40 grams of sugar a day is diabetes territory.......chain drinking coca-colas is dangerous.

Stackridge.....The Last Waltz.......a friend of mine flew over to England last week to catch a show of this band that is calling it a day at some point this year. George Martin produced one of their albums in the early 1970's. My pal is a musician, not a jet-setter but such is his appreciation of this band that he saved for a ticket and off he went.......I had never heard of them before ! I am sure RTO and Peter and Bill M would have.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 15:15:30 CEST 2015 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

The Howard Johnson interview was very interesting. I was surprised by his comment about Levon chain drinking coke being such a serious issue. I would have expected him to say that about cigarettes or joints, but coke, not so much.

I've never read anything to suggest that The Band's 1976 tour was billed as any kind of farewell tour. From all accounts that I've seen, at some point during the tour (after Richard's accident), Robbie decided to make the final concert at Winterland into an all-star farewell concert, which mushroomed into a movie, and box set.

The issue I've always had with the last waltz, to some degree the concert, but primarily the movie is it's false premise. It simply should have been billed from the beginning as Robbie's retirement from the road, not the Band's. The premise was proven false, before the movie hit theaters, by both Rick and Levon going back on the road (with solo albums).


Entered at Tue Sep 29 15:05:44 CEST 2015 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: horns and more horns

Unlike the Rock of Ages shows that employed horns, with the horn section coming on after an opening section by the Band sans horns, the horn section pretty much plays throughout the entire set on 1976 shows with horns. With attendance purportedly spotty at many of the concerts on that tour, cost could well have played a factor as to what shows would be supplemented by horns. Listening to the Palladium show as I write this.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 10:51:46 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nazareth

Funnily enough, though I'm sure they wanted "This Flight Tonight" an alternative correct answer is Java Blues, which they also covered.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 07:44:45 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Final Jeopardy Question

"The group Nazareth performed a song later in their career written by a famous musician who played at a concert named 'The Last Waltz"

Answer: Biff..."Who is Joni Mitchell ?" Host of Jeopardy: "Incorrect, you moron! " Anyone else ?


Entered at Tue Sep 29 07:19:00 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.......one more time for my pal, Bill M.........."so, honey, did I hear you right.....you dropped $599 today......please tell me it was a down payment on that LV bag.....or, no wait......5 VIP passes for Candy and me to the Scandanavian Spa ? oh, for fuck's sake, not 18 disc's of Bob with just 20 songs we all already know stopping and starting and stopping and starting and stopping and starting again and again and again ! "


Entered at Tue Sep 29 06:21:42 CEST 2015 from (185.31.6.134)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Evolution

It will be an interesting exercise listening to the studio evolution of the songs on those 3 albums. I hope some of the commentary in the book provided will amplify and augment the information we already have on the process. These are not going to be cds you listen to in a traditional way. For me, I look at this opportunity as more of a study of the music to its final form. I feel fortunate to have this opportunity to delve into this in such a detailed manner.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 05:59:36 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ahhh, but remember that the city is a funny place
Something like a circus or a sewer
And just remember different people have peculiar tastes
and the -

- Glory of love, the glory of love
the glory of love, might see you through


Entered at Tue Sep 29 04:37:14 CEST 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: The Cutting Edge

I agree, Peter... that Disc 18 looks like a must-have. I wish that were being issued as part of the 6CD set, or on its own. Hopefully we can buy the MP3s at least.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 03:12:23 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Oh, Coach SD couldn't answer anything else so he jumps on that. You want to go on record saying there was a Last Waltz Tour, SD? Did Levon say the decision to end it happened in September, SD? Did the section start sometimes after the LI shows, SD? Gee, Coach SD, I was--as you say--fucking right about all that stuff.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 03:00:34 CEST 2015 from (193.200.150.152)

Posted by:

Coach HD

So, Brennan did the Austin show really have a horn section after all? Oh, you were fucking wrong and Adam pointed it out. Did you get all that, Pattie?


Entered at Tue Sep 29 02:28:02 CEST 2015 from (71.58.236.105)

Posted by:

Kevin from NE PA

Subject: Final Jeopardy Question on 09/28/15 episode

"The group Nazareth took its name from the first line of a 1968 song from this other group."

Only 1 contestant got the correct answer.


Entered at Tue Sep 29 00:50:56 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Great eye, Adam.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 23:44:37 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Also, Tom "Bones" Malone? to the right of Garth's head in the 2nd picture...


Entered at Mon Sep 28 23:43:26 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Pat - the pics from Austin Texas, Sep 5 1976, really do show a horn section. Look at the 2nd one (showing Howard Johnson to the right of Garth's Leslie), and the 5th one (showing female violinist to the left of Robbie).


Entered at Mon Sep 28 22:26:16 CEST 2015 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Horn Section

Thanks David P. for the link to the article on Howard Johnson. Makes for an interesting read, especially the part about working with John Lennon on Walls and Bridges and asking for a co-credit for Beef Jerky, although I don't recall Lennon being arrested for drug possession in Canada.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 22:13:49 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, in early July 76 they played a number of East Coast gigs (Asbury Park, Tarrytown, DC, and Lennox Mass.) and two Long Island shows (14th & 15th). It is possible that RR talked to HJ around the time of the Long Island shows about putting a section together, as the section shows from that tour all post-date the LI shows.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 22:07:21 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, the Austin gig (whose extensive photos show no horn section) was on September 5. Although the story goes that they cancelled 10 gigs as a result of Richard's mishap, as we've discussed here before they played University of Southern Mississippi with Richard a week later, then played Philly on the 17th--the source for the recently posted Ring Your Bell.

SD, did you get all that?


Entered at Mon Sep 28 21:58:38 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Coach SD, just quoting Levon (among many) who said the decision to quit was made in September of 1976 (p. 253, TWoF, 1st Ed.). Does it bother poor little you that I remember stuff like that and can quote it accurately?


Entered at Mon Sep 28 21:53:04 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 1976 Timeline

I'm not sure about the date, but sometime in the summer of 1976 Richard injured his neck in a boating accident in Texas. As reported later in Rolling Stone the group had to cancel ten scheduled shows while he recovered. Obviously his health was a growing concern at the time. Later on, at some point the issue of quitting touring was first raised among the group. As Rick later told Rolling Stone on the eve of The Last Waltz concert, "We first started talking about it when we cancelled the ten shows. I knew we were going to put it away, but I wasn't planning on announcing it."

As Howard Johnson recounted in the interview I posted, "Earlier in 1976, when they were playing in New York, Robbie askesd me to come up and talk about putting a horn section together for The Last Waltz." That would have been on Sept. 18. I believe the official announcement that they were quitting the road was made in November. So isn't it feasible that discussions about suspending touring had been made by the time of the Palladium show.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 20:45:30 CEST 2015 from (193.200.150.152)

Posted by:

Coach HD

You would surely know better than someone who was on the tour. Because you're a special kind of smart.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 20:12:30 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.30)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: You lost me at 'ok'.

Kevin J: I can't imagine the opening sentence, never mind the rest.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 20:03:06 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I think Howard Johnson is a bit mistaken in his recollection of a Last Waltz tour. They toured in 1976 and used horns on a number of shows, bu there was no indication it was their last tour before it was over.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 19:12:38 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Robbies Bio

At this point it seems as per brown eyed girls post that the US is getting only the Kindle version. I see that the Canadian site for Amazon has a hardcover edition. I really would prefer hardcover over Kindle. I have a paperwhite but I like to have the book. Does anybody know anything about what it is going to be hard covered edition for the US?


Entered at Mon Sep 28 18:33:41 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Howard Johnson

Yes, agree. Read it before, read it just again. Thank you.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 18:05:44 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The Howard Johnson interview is fabulous…..I recall reading bits of this in the past, but just read it all and it is well worth the time on all kinds of levels……Thank you, David P.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:45:36 CEST 2015 from (184.145.117.250)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dylan's new bootleg release......

...……imagine how the conversation in the car might go before departing with the family on a long trip………”ok, darling, your choice of music for the first few hours, what were you thinking of ?…’ah, well, I was going to give the new Bob Dylan bootleg a listen….disc 8 has 20 different versions of “Desolation Row”….should be great !’....... “For Christ sake, when are you ever going to get over this Dylan thing!"


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:34:38 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Horn Section

In an interview Howard Johnson talked about working with The Band on "The Last Waltz tour." He mentioned playing in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Austin, and "a few around the west coast."


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:24:50 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cutting Edge

If I get a copy, the real excitement is going to be Disc 18.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:09:55 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Greg, not certain but there are boots of at least three. The RYB show that I posted was the day before the Palladium show.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:08:13 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Holy cow! Track listing for the 18-cd Dylan package.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 17:01:29 CEST 2015 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Ring Your Bell

Pat B- thanks to that link to the live version of Ring Your Bell,a song that certainly lent itself to live performance. I don't know how many concerts on that final tour they were accompanied by the horn section.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 16:00:16 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Testimony: A Memoir Hardcover – Deckle Edge, Sep 13 2016 by Robbie Robertson (Author)

"One of the most spellbinding, entertaining, major books of the fall: the long-awaited memoir from the Canadian music legend takes us candidly, in his own voice, into his extraordinary life and friendships with some of the greatest artists of the last half-century.

Robbie Robertson's singular contributions to popular music have made him one of the most beloved songwriters and guitarists of all time............."


Entered at Mon Sep 28 14:51:06 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.127)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Thanks for the positive tip on Henley's album Pete.


Entered at Mon Sep 28 13:00:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cass County

On my first listen through to Don Henley's new album. Go for the DeLuxe edition. I know some of you have an inbuilt anti-Eagles attitude, but I can't think any Band fan would fail to love this album. In the current plethora of available labels, Don Henley has Capitol for this with a nice classic purple Capitol centre. We all know that three of the best four bands ever were on Capitol (in America anyway).


Entered at Mon Sep 28 00:12:16 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Cereal Killer Cafe - I knew nothing about this, though we were in London on Saturday night. It did remind me of our Belast 'political tour' guide who pointed out that if someone breaks wind in Belfast water cannon and rubber bullets come into play, but full scale violent riots in London get a mild slap on the wrist. Proved yet again. Have you seen the size and felt the weight of a so-called rubber bullet?


Entered at Sun Sep 27 23:45:55 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Koln

We saw Dylan in Koln in 1994, a sidetrip tagged on to a planned city-break elsewhere. The venue was the Tanzbrunnen, across the river from the places you describe JT, I think. We went to venue on the cable car (the Seilbahn ??) high over the Rhine - one of the more unusual ways to get to a Dylan concert. It was July and one of my other memories is that was baking hot, so hot that, when we visited the small chocolate factory there, we dare not buy any of their products for fear that they would melt before we reached the air-conditioning of our hotel.

As for VW - to shoot themselves in the foot is bad enough but to take aim first ?????


Entered at Sun Sep 27 18:57:38 CEST 2015 from (185.31.6.134)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

I agree, Norbert. We are Koln right now and we laughed all afternoon. We laughed when we were herded sideways so as not to walk on the square under which is the subterranean concert hall where a concert was occurring, since the steps of the pedestrians overhead could be heard through the non-soundproofed top of the hall. We laughed when we heard about the conflict between the 2 companies that made the eau de cologne. We laughed at a lot of things. But when we were told about the 'troubles' associated with current events in Germany in the past few weeks, none of us laughed. It was no laughing matter.


Entered at Sun Sep 27 18:54:55 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Damn that Cereal Killer Cafe. (Thanks, Jeff. I badly needed a laugh.)


Entered at Sun Sep 27 18:22:45 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.69)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: East London Fuck Parade

Pete, Al ? This revolution targets cereal killers. What's really happening beneath this oddity?


Entered at Sun Sep 27 16:54:01 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Ben, humor is a serious thing, not a laughing matter. Please leave it to the Germans. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Sep 27 07:37:34 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Ring Your Bell, live, from that mediocre NLSC.


Entered at Sun Sep 27 03:43:40 CEST 2015 from (70.194.101.176)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Joke

Here's a joke of mine that got a nice reaction on FB so I thought I would put it here cause it's vaguely music related. "Whoa, The Pope is really going over BIG. He's so hot right now, Sinead O'Conner is taping together a photo of him."


Entered at Sat Sep 26 18:48:20 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: The Original Caste (from Calgary, Alberta) doesn't belong on that list of one-hit wonders, as their follow-up to "One Tin Soldier", "Mr Monday" also did very well on the charts.


Entered at Sat Sep 26 01:17:39 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Cahir

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Atlantic Charger

Gave thanks to the man up above that the folks all made it home safe this morning Joe. I watched it on the news. Brings me back to Stan Rogers and the "Mary Ellen Carter"

When it happens any where we all feel the grief.


Entered at Sat Sep 26 00:12:35 CEST 2015 from (92.54.175.179)

Posted by:

Peter V

Roger, that's right!

Cars … I suspect all diesels do it. Apparently because the UK manufacture Honda, Toyota and Nissan (which are mainly petrol) they say it will be good for business here. Eventually they might measaure mpg with four large people, two suitcases and a full tank of petrol, rather than with a jockey driving an empty car with everything off and just a gallon of fuel in the tank, which they all do.


Entered at Sat Sep 26 00:08:30 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: S & R

Had to scroll back a bit but found the 'Cherokee Cowboy' link. Thanks Norm.

Party tonight to celebrate return of nine local fishermen whose vessel went down off Baffin Island on Monday. They'd been fishing turbot off Greenland. Crew spent rough night in liferaft with three metre swells and loose ice. Coast Guard S & R copter on scene almost from get go. Photo available on CBC of five woman S & R crew and their commander, also a woman. I worked a couple summers with CCG in the 70s. Only female was the payroll clerk. We've come a long way baby.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 22:39:57 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Lou Reed

Brown Eyed Girl, I just picked up a Lou Reed cd from a radio broadcast in 1978 called "Hassled in April". The sound quality is pretty good. The interesting thing about this is that is was recorded about a month before "Take No Prisoners", but doesn't have any of Lou's stand up routines.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 22:32:11 CEST 2015 from (81.214.246.202)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Karl Wallensuz

Peter, you're remembering Karl Wallendsuz from Oxford - not the guy who played with The Waterboys...


Entered at Fri Sep 25 21:05:28 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Night Life

HEY!!! Did any of yuz listen to the link I put up to Ray Price?? Now smarten up. Willie Nelson wrote that song for Ray when he was playing bass for him.

The link I put up is to a show on Austin City Limits. NOBODY! could sing like Ray and his band is top class country 'specially the steel player. Ray's climax of the song he hits notes no one can.

Yer right Norbert good buncha folks here. Ol' Peter's great. He knows I just love bugging him. Marryin' the brown eyed outfit.....she scares the shit outta me. Now Joan, she's a quiet laid back gal quite like my Susan. :-)


Entered at Fri Sep 25 20:22:03 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Norm, you are right life’s too short and Peter is a fine man. So is Bill and are you and Pat and my friends Ilkka and Ragtime. I almost married the Brown Eyed Girl and Joan ones …….. l*ve all, I even dig Al ;-).

Yes VW fucked- up, I have this trauma of a black cloud following me and my VW every day now (see the shaking Germany post).

Was in Osnabruck today, we watched young people making music on the streets in the sun and having fun ……and I kissed Els and she whispered: “what a beautiful day”.

Anyway time for Mad Max 2015 now ;-)


Entered at Fri Sep 25 19:19:59 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It ain't what it looks like....The shame

Hi Pat! I expect you are noticing the ongoing soap opera with young Patrick Kane. It appears the mother claims this "rape kit" was left on her door step? Who in hell ever is going to believe that. Did the tooth fairy leave it?

To mess with a young man's life for money is shameful I believe. I bet it's difficult for coach Joel to keep his lid on and not say too much. He is a pretty no nonsense guy.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 19:02:05 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

98.6 by Keith. Sorry, Norm, I'm repeating myself. Love you.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 19:00:50 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: The Monroes


Entered at Fri Sep 25 18:54:02 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: One hit wonders

My favorite one hit is "What do all the people know" by the Monroes


Entered at Fri Sep 25 16:51:34 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The German Connection

What's this love stuff all about Norbert? I hate everything and every body. That way you can never be accused of bigotry.

How you come you let those guys get away with building all those fucked up cars over there Norbert? Now the guys in Peter's country are going to test emissions on every danm car..........what a mess! :-)


Entered at Fri Sep 25 16:39:58 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jerry Lee & Chuck Berry

David! Meeting Butch Owens, well now you are part of history. Jerry Lee said he thought the gun was empty. I think he's full of shit' I too think he is generally a self centered jerk who has no conscience at all about what he does.

If it had been me, after recovery, there wouldn't be much left of his trigger fingers and he'd had to get a day job instead of trying to play the piany.

Ben relax fer chris sake, I was joking with yuh so I'll tell the guys not to stick yuh in the swamp -:).

I'll have to go back into the book for time and place if you require it. Jerry Lee and Chuck got in a fight on the stage some place just before this concert begins. There was a closed curtain. When the curtain opens Chuck has got a knife at Jerry's throat. Jerry's old man, (who is every bit as crazy) has a shot gun at the back of Chuck's head, to the amasement of the crowd who sat in stunned silence.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 16:37:16 CEST 2015 from (173.68.71.190)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Amy/Acadian Driftwood

Amy,her guitar player--all 4 players,captured a real cool vibe that's conveyed in the song.A special warmth.They clearly derived great joy singing and playing it as well.Thanks for posting.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 15:07:36 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....and now the complete "Acadian Driftwood" by Zachary Richard and Celine Dion.
And no.....I don't have any guilty pleasures. When someone says a song is a guilty pleasure......it comes across as if you're ashamed of your musical taste. I know what I like and don't back down from songs that bring me joy. My opinion.....Get your groove on anyway you can!


Entered at Fri Sep 25 14:59:15 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Larry Klein (second and last husband of Joni Mitchell) produced "Acadian Driftwood (song of resistance) with...Celine Dion and Zachary Richard.
Here they are Recording The Song Acadian Driftwood 2009.
I'm not a fan of Celine's but this one song is on my Nano and played constantly as the emotion is real.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 14:46:01 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Ben. You're right about personal tastes. One of my favourite covers of "Acadian Driftwood" besides the one from BARK is by two artists who actually find real meaning in the song.......

Zachary Richard avec Celine Dion : Acadian Driftwood


Entered at Fri Sep 25 14:38:39 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

The last time I checked, musical taste was completely subjective. I think it would be pretty boring if we all had the same opinion on everything.

For example, some people love 'Cahoots', I do not. I have no problem with people having a difference of opinion as long as the discussion stays on the music and doesn't deteriorate into personal comments or passive aggressive diatribes. If I have been guilty of engaging in some of that in the past, I will strive to keep my comments focused on the music and I expect others to do the same.

There's no reason to turn a discussion here into a facebook style flamewar. We're all here because we're fans of the Band, so we have more in common than most of the population.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 13:08:59 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

NATIONAL ONE-HIT WONDER DAY September 25.

1955 – “Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)” by The Penguins
1963 – “Six Days on the Road” by Dave Dudley
1968 – “Tip Toe Thru The Tulips” by Tiny Tim
1969 – “Smile a Little Smile for Me” by The Flying Machine
1970 – “One Tin Soldier” by Original Caste
1970 – “The House of the Rising Sun” by Frijid Pink
1972 – “Hot Rod Lincoln” by Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen
1983 – “Puttin’ on the Ritz” by Taco
1988 – “Don’t Worry Be Happy” by Bobby McFerrin


Entered at Fri Sep 25 12:56:21 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Jerry Lee

Jerry Lee recorded a very good cover of Dylan's 'Rita May' in the late 70's. I think it's better than Dylan's version,

I have the 'Let It Rock' cd and dvd. It's a very good show. Ronnie Hawkins seems to treat it like his version of 'the last waltz'. It's a good place to see a professionally recorded set by the 90's Band. I recall watching the backstage footage with Levon and Jerry Lee once, I'll have to go back today and re-watch that.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 12:55:31 CEST 2015 from (66.243.208.197)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, Maine

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

Thanks for the link Pat. What a wonderful version by a talented lady and a great band. It's early, but I checked out Shawn Colvin's version on ITunes that came out today. Great day for a great song!


Entered at Fri Sep 25 12:35:25 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Jerry Lee Lewis and Robbie Robertson during 20th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - Show at Waldorf Astoria in New York City, New York, United States.
Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage


Entered at Fri Sep 25 12:15:56 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: love

Peter, you don’t love me too ;-)

I disserve it for sure, thanks for saying it out loud now.

Don't let it spoil your day.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 11:45:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lest you think me harsh, I often had a bucket of cold water thrown over me. It did me no harm. It made me the sort of guy I am today.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 11:44:07 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Love you, too

It's like being on a train. All mobile phone conversations seem to end with "Love you." or "Love you too." Why do these people need confirmation of affection? I grumble. Back in the day, "Goodbye" or "See you" was sufficient. Love you was kept for intimate moments, not for shouting into a phone in a public place. They need a bucket of cold water thrown over them, that's what I say … mumble, grumble.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 11:14:48 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

p.s. love your post, thanks.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 10:43:31 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Bill, love you too but have to correct that popular iron myth here:

The nights in Big Pink it could be chilly as we know. It’s right that mostly Richard turned on the iron in the kitchen (that’s how the ironing myth arose). To call that an "ironing fetish" doesn't do Richard right, regard it as a survival thing. Smart enough for alternatives Richard rarely used an iron to iron.

And only at the end, after The Band got rid of their pizza addiction, there was room enough in the fridge to freeze clean their jeans.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 07:00:31 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Amy and her band covering Acadian Driftwood from that so-so NLSC. The guitarist has done his homework.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 06:46:25 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jerry Lee & Levon Helm

Norm......I loved reading those tales of the crazy man Jerry Lee Lewis.....funny stuff.

In a The Band connection, I recall several years back watching with some dismay Jerry Lee being quite disrespectful to Levon Helm....It was at the Ronnie Hawkins 60th birthday thing and the backstage footage showed Levon walking up and introducing himself to Jerry Lee....The Killer was sitting down and was raving - sincerely raving - about the talents of Jeff Healey. He barely showed any recognition of Levon and Levon being a gentlemen and gracious attempted to explain who and what Jeff Healey was all about....Then, at one point Jerry Lee looks aside at Levon and in responding to another attempt at a question from Levon simply says something about Levon having his own teeth the last time they met ! Levon just gets up and walks away - no doubt thinking the Killer deserved a slugging ! Anyhow, it left an impression with me that Jerry Lee, even stone cold sober, was a bad form kinda guy....Scintillating talent though and I agree with Ben about so much of it being largely unknown to most........anyhow, there is a story that Chuck Berry once knocked Jerry Lee cold with one punch....deserved, I imagine.......Keith Richards claims his knockdown by the hands of Chuck was completely undeserved, on the other hand....hmmm,.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 05:33:45 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.156)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: The story of the Band's jeans has been bent out of shape over decades of retelling. The simple truth is that, yes, most of the guys put their jeans in the freezer overnight, but only to hide them from Richard and his ironing fetish. That was fine, and even welcome, in the early days, but by the Shangri-La period the iron would always be caked with grease from steakettes and grilled cheese sandwiches.


Entered at Fri Sep 25 00:22:30 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Twilight was a song written by Robbie Robertson and this was one of the cuts off of that album titled, 'Last Man Standing" from 2006.

"Twilight (feat. Robbie Robertson)" by Jerry Lee Lewis."

Ok Adam!! I was just checking as I didn't recall any posts by you when I posted clips from the Ingersoll show. Looking forward to your review. :-D


Entered at Thu Sep 24 23:09:34 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Killer

Jerry Lee Lewis is a fascinating character. His Sun recordings are classic, but I think some of his 60's and 70's recordings on Mercury are even better. 'Live at the Star Club' is an amazing live album. Some of his country performances are remarkable, 'She still comes around', 'Another place, another time', 'What's made Milwaukee famous' and many others. Lewis is simply a force of nature.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 22:28:13 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The Band's Jeans Fate Confirmed

At the end The Band didn’t wash their own jeans anymore, they just put them in the freezer overnight instead (all following Rick).


Entered at Thu Sep 24 22:14:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Killer (part 2)

I forgot to add that Jerry Lee's former teenage bride, cousin Myra, moved to Atlanta years ago where she became a real estate broker. She's now known as Myra Williams and co-wrote a book about her life with Jerry Lee that became the basis for the movie "Great Balls of Fire," starring Dennis Quaid and Winona Rider.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 22:05:10 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Killer

Norm: Several years ago I met Jerry Lee's old bassist Butch Owens. He lives near me in Clarkston where I frequent a neat little used record store. I was in there one day talking to the owner when Butch walks in bragging the he was "the only man to get shot with a .357 magnum by Jerry Lee Lewis and lived to tell about it." I already knew about the story and that Owens was from the area, but didn't realize he was still around. He basically said that Jerry Lee was a good guy at heart, but got out of control when he was messed up on booze & dope.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 22:01:07 CEST 2015 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

BEG - I certainly DID attend Garth & Sister Maud Hudson's performance in Ingersoll last July. It was an incredible time, as always! I'm working on writing down my memories for an extended journal.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 21:53:58 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Time Is Illmatic


Entered at Thu Sep 24 21:39:48 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Purple Haze

David! I think my mind is in a purple haze. By the way I watched that vid. you put up yesterday.

I made this comment about Scotty Moore's amp and a closet. Here it is from Nick Tosches book. (I'm just rereading a bunch). Bin a long time.

The echo effect heard in many Sun rockabilly recordings had been used, less subtly, by Wilf Carter in his Victor records of the 1930's, and by Eddy Arnold in his 1945 "Cattle Call". (The unique echo sound of the Sun studio was achieved through the use of a tape loop delay and a 71/2-ips, instead of the more advanced 15-ips, two-track recorder. The added echo effect heard in Scotty Moore's guitar relied on a custom built amplifier, made in Cairo, Illinois, by a man named Ray Butts. Moore got the second amp that Butts built; the first went to Chet Atkins. The third to Carl Perkins, and the fourth to Roy Orbison.

Moore - CLOSET! When he ceased working with Elvis in September 1957, Moore put the amp in a closet. Several closets later he withdrew it at Carl Perkins request and plugged it in for one of Carl's Mercury sessions in early 1975. He never used the gawd damn thing for 18 years?

On to Jerry Lee:

I'm just gonna start where he went to shoot Elvis, (there is just too much about him). November 23/1975, 3am. One of Elvis security guards phones him and wakes him up telling him Jerry lee is there with a gun, drunk. Wants to either shoot Elvis or play some music with him. Elvis tells him, ignore him. By the way less than 24 hours before he had been arrested drunk for rolling his $46,000 Rolls Royce over and had several charges.

I guess it was the next September he shot his bass player, Norman "Butch" Owens in the chest with a .357 Magnum gun. Owens survived. At one point he was evicted from a building in which he had an office because he came in one night and shot 25 holes through the door because he forgot his key.

The description of Jerry Lee:

Believe it: Jerry Lee Lewis is a creature of mythic essence, a Set, a Baptist Dionysos. He is the heart of red-neck rock & Roll and, maybe, the greatest country singer alive. Talk about rock & roll depravados: Jerry Lee makes them all look like Wayne Newton. Talk about honky-tonk heroes: Next to Jerry Lee, they're a bunch of frat party pukers. "I was born feet first, been rockin' ever since," he'll tell you if he's in a good mood.His vassals and kin will tell you more: Jerry Lee can out-drink,out-dope, out-fight, out-cuss, out-shoot and out-fuck any man in the south. He is the last American wild man, homo agrestis americanus ultimus, and his every day deeds are the stuff of Don Siegel movies. "Just don't get too close to him and you won't get hurt." said Waylon Jennings. In all ways he is a lord of excess. "I've seen him eat four steaks and then eat again in a couple of hours said his sister Linda Gail.

This is my favourite story:

Somewhere in the direst and scariest gut of Alabama, Jerry Lee was playing a honky-tonk. It was a gas-money date. Pick up some cash and split. Toward the beginning of the second set, a drunken, thick, red man encroached Jerry Lee. He was angry. "My wife's crazy about you," he said motioning to a female dissolved in darkness and smoke and the blurred vision both men shared. "She bought every record you ever made. But I think you're a piece of shit, and you know what I did? I went home and busted every one of them records. What you think about that boy?" Jerry Lee moved his face close to the drunk's captured his pupils with his own and said in a voice neither soft nor loud. "Good, now she's got to go out and buy 'em all over again."

Last one and I'll stop:

Writers have not had much success interviewing Jerry Lee. One night in Brooklyn in 1973, an editor of Country Music asked Jerry Lee a question. The interviewee responded by leaping across the table, breaking off the butt of his pint bottle of Heaven Hill, and sticking the interviewer in the neck with it.

Who wants to go and party with Jerry Lee? Now don't y'all jump up at once.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 21:26:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: No One Can Make My Sunshine Smile

Albert Lee, just five weeks ago. Same band. Same stage positions,


Entered at Thu Sep 24 20:35:12 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Chicken Pickin' Trinity

Albert Lee, Vince Gill and Danny Gatton performing Rodney Crowell's "One Way Rider.'


Entered at Thu Sep 24 17:38:04 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Start saving now.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 17:31:56 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The 18 CD set is only available direct from Bob Dylan's site. $599 (or £392). That still works out as £21 a CD, though you also get the nine singles on vinyl 45s and the book.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 17:29:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Albert Lee

I don't know - it's advertised as UK Farewell Tour, and he stressed that he lived in LA, had lived in the USA for 40 years, that this was his American band. Maybe he just doesn't want to tour outside North America anymore.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 17:15:41 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Albert Lee

PV - Speaking of those with a facility for Rockabilly... Thanks for the review, although I don't quite get the "farewell" aspect. Is he retiring?

There's a couple of songs where, as the sideman, I think he really stands out in originality and musicianship: Dave Edmunds - Sweet Little Lisa and Rosanne Cash - My Baby Thinks He's A Train. I'm not 100% certain on the latter but I know there's many, many more he's contributed to -


Entered at Thu Sep 24 16:54:16 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I didn't say sing like Roy on his songs but sing like him as far as being a gifted singer. Garland is technically brilliant but can also sing falsetto as he's heavily influenced by do-wop singers but he has a clarity in his tone that most singers don't have. kd Lang........exceptional singer for sure. I first saw her when she was country punk. Her duet with Roy as the boyzzz would say here....."killer", "monster", "sublime".


Entered at Thu Sep 24 16:53:54 CEST 2015 from (109.158.43.104)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

The Story Of The Cutting Edge video. I feel a bit sorry for those who will be scrambling to order the 18 CD version as it's allegedly limited to 5000 copies. That will probably sell out within a day or two. One of the discs on that set contains the hotel room recordings with Robbie. Those aren't on the 6 CD set as far as I can tell. Still, that's why God created FLACs.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 16:39:06 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sing 'em Like Roy

I have seen two people who can sing like Roy Orbison, both demonstrating it on Roy Orbison songs: k.d. lang and Raoul Malo of The Mavericks.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 16:21:20 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Duane Rutter was one of the musicians who played at the first and second Rick Danko Tribute in Simcoe, Ontario. I was at the first one. Duane posted here after I shared all my photos from the show and town. Glenn's photos are posted on the site.

Duane Rutter - "I guarantee you Crazy Things has plenty of live in the studio performances ... For instance on Take That Water when you hear me shout out "take one Garth!" that's me playing and singing with Garth Hudson playing piano about 10 feet away and when Sister Maud Hudson takes a verse its all happening at the same time 6am Clubhouse Studio in Rhinebeck NY!!!"


Entered at Thu Sep 24 16:10:16 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Favourite Roy Orbison song! I don't recall him performing this song at Ontario Place when all shows....great or small.....cost 7.00.....hmmmmm I don't know maybe this was in the eighties?
When Tom Petty told Roy that he's probably the best singer around. Roy agreed. I would say the only contemporary singer who is as gifted la singer like Roy would be........
Garland Jeffreys!!!!!!

Adam...Did you not end up going to Ingersoll to see Garth and Maud?


Entered at Thu Sep 24 12:36:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Albert Lee

Review added on my blog of Albert Lee, UK Farewell Tour featuring Cindy Cashdollar last night.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 09:23:19 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Beatles covers

Larry Williams & Carl Perkins. See WIKI list of Beatles covers linked.

Carl wins on Beatles covers. They’re evenly matched on studio recordings though: Matchbox (Long Tall Sally EP), Honey Don’t, Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Beatles for Sale). Add “Live at The BBC” and you get Sure To Fall (In Love With You) – one of four BBC recordings of this song, Glad All Over (which Carl recorded in 1957, but did not write … it’s NOT the Dave Clark song!), then Lend Me Your Comb is on “Anthology”. Ringo Starr also did Sure To Fall solo.

I would say that of the list of covers, Larry Williams’ Slow Down is the outstanding one in a Beatles version – but you get Paul McCartney rather than Ringo. For Larry, John Lennon did Bony Moronie solo.

If you roll in Live and Solo, I suspect that like everyone else it’s Chuck Berry who had most covers: Roll Over Beethoven (With The Beatles), Rock & Roll Music (Beatles For sale), so only two official studio, but Live At The BBC adds Too Much Monkey Business, Carol, Johnny B. Goode, Memphis Tennessee, Sweet Little Sixteen, I Got To Find My Baby. “On Air: BBC Vol 2” adds I’m Talking About You.

Actually, as Paul McCartney has said, it was love of the Everly Brothers, Girl Groups and Buddy Holly & The Crickets that differentiated them from the run of bands then. Not that they covered the Everly Bros much – just So How Come at the BBC. Everyone did Chuck Berry. Few could do Little Richard or Larry Williams .


Entered at Thu Sep 24 06:03:44 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks to Zavadka for sharing info re Huffington Post article on The Band and to Joan for posting article.

Hi Bill M. Great baseball, eh? I continue to dig Marcus Stroman!!!!! Love his energy...........emotional ball playing but keeps it under raps while throwing the ball.....cool haircut. Also really am drawn to Edwin Encarnacion as he's a power hitter.....cute like a teddy bear.....and love when he hits a home run he's flying with his wing....and Roberto Osuna....confidence and intensity.......only 20 years old.....left home at 12 to help support family......all I need to know...nothing can rattle him. Uhhhh....maybe you're not even a fan. More fun to talk about than politics anyway.
Hey Butch. How are your Yankees doing? A Rod continues to get under my skin. I do however respect and appreciate how at 40 he can still play at a high level.....very physically fit too. ;-D

Hey Westie. I can't believe I forgot "Shame On The Moon" as well....as I posted a great interview with Mary Martin....yes.....the Mary Martin.....and she talked about Rodney and then his song was played. I knew he was once married to Roseanne Cash but didn't really know his music. Wow.....now there's a song for the boyzzz.......

Until you've been beside a man
You don't know what he wants
You don't know if he cries at night
You don't know if he don't
When nothin comes easy
Old nightmares are real
Until you' ve been beside a man
You don't know how he feels

Once inside a woman's heart
A man must keep his head
Heaven opens up the door
Where angels fear to tread
Some men go crazy
Some men go slow
Some men go just where they want
Some men never go


Entered at Thu Sep 24 04:48:23 CEST 2015 from (76.66.110.114)

Posted by:

Bill M

A late offering re Carl Perkins. Our guys (or most of them) back Ronnie Hawkins on a lively cover of "Matchbox" in the early '60s. Hawkins recorded a later version in '69, backed by Duane Allman, Scott Cushnie, Richard 'King Biscuit Boy' Newell, David Hood and Roger Hawkins.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 04:15:03 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ben & Ben again

Ben Pike, I haven't looked over the Beatles entire catalogue. Can you imagine thru' all they have done what a chore that would be. I am only relying on what I have available to me from these sites. On the one site, the statement is made to what I have said about Carls songs.

Ben from Joisey, I have just sent a hit out through Jack Nicolson to have you stuck in one of those swamps, (that Bumbles always liked to call "meadows".)

I already answered your question about Carl's early work. NO! he wasn't just playing country. He was then writing his music, and re-writing it to suit what he saw in his crowds.

I have no idea if you are a musician or your musical history. There is an expression called "crowd awareness" that we practise on stage. That is you watch your crowd, and what is getting them off, or what they are drawn to. This is what Carl Perkins was a master at. That his how he refined some of his songs that made them work. That is why his peers called him the pioneer of Rockabilly.

I'm going to tomorrow take up on Jerry Lee. I did this here many years ago. I think it was the time Jan had taken a "sabbatical" from this place, spent a lot of time getting his head straight. Mean while Norbert was at the helm...and as always, Peter was being his annoying, no good, fucked up Englishman self........OH! high Peter.-:)

What I will lay down here are pages from Nick Tosches, "Country The Biggest Music In America". so if you think that I'm fabricating, .....get the book and read it.

Jerry Lee is far crazier than any one even suspects. I'll show you.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 03:50:05 CEST 2015 from (70.194.69.195)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Beatles favorite guy

I do think, as far as official studio releases go, the mostly forgotten Larry Williams led the way with "Dizzy Miss Lizzy" "Slow Down" and "Bad Boy." John would seem to have dug him the most. But please correct if I have that wrong....


Entered at Thu Sep 24 03:06:00 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Most recordings by Beatles

I don't know that Ben Pike, all I know is what the Beatles claim.

There is no doubt that the energy of Elvis was a dominant force every where Ben. If you listen to Carl Perkins himself about it, he was always a very laid back humble guy, and he paid Elvis his due.

That is not to say that Elvis Presley was not a humble man. As David Powell has said Elvis Presley respected Carl, and knew his place in the work of things then. That is why when Carl was so injured from that accident Elvis showed him respect.

Of course some of this is "speculation?" on our part. Is that the right word. But if you bothered to watch, for example the clip, I think Kevin J put up. I lost his name just now, who interviewed Carl. He introduced him as "one of the pioneers of Rockabilly". If you bothered to watch the concert for Ronnie Hawkins 60th birthday. When Ronnie introduces Carl. He introduces him as "The King of Rockabilly".

Watch the video of "Carl Perkins & Friends". All of those people, even Johnny Cash's daughter, and her ex, Marty Stuart, (who was nothing then and is now a guitar god, mandolin and force in country music.)

You can't think that they are just patronising Carl Perkins. Listen to the way the music plays out. It is the "brand" of Carl Perkins.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 02:52:20 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Just checked out the Dylan "Bootleg Series 12" tracklist. There seems to be a rough list of about 30 tracks from Discs 4, 5, 6 that feature Band members...


Entered at Thu Sep 24 02:35:44 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan: BS Vol.12 - 6 CD track listing

Too late here for me to absorb but I've posted it here anyway:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Cutting-Edge-1965-1966-Bootleg/dp/B015NDBZ3Y/ref=mb_oe_o


Entered at Thu Sep 24 02:31:45 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Cherokee Cowboy

Probably the best country voice ever. I sang his music in bars for so many years to great success.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 02:21:22 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Rockabilly?? Carl Perkins & friends - NON-STOP!!

Good way to end the day's discussion....Carl Perkins and the people who idolized him.......just getting it done!

I love those kids from the "Stray Cats". That stand up bass kid has a meter and one of the most prolific musicians you could find. Watching the looks on the faces of George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Roseanne Cash and all the rest tells it all.

David, thanks for that clip. Some of the words that people have said there are really something. One guy who is totally enamoured because he never heard Danny Gatton before. "When I pick my jaw up off the floor" -:)


Entered at Thu Sep 24 01:54:08 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Rockin Chair, You're quite right that Carl Perkins may have started performing prior to Elvis. The only problem is that to the best of my knowledge no recordings of these early performances exist. So, without hearing a Perkins set from 1953 or 1954, it's very difficult to know whether he was playing country or rockabilly at that time.

Have you listened to the "Million dollar quartet"? That is a fascinating recording of Elvis, Perkins and Lewis. Cash was only there for the famous photo. You really get a sense from this recording that Elvis was the dominant force and that Lewis was trying to prove himself.


Entered at Thu Sep 24 01:28:23 CEST 2015 from (70.194.69.195)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: covering the Beatlefront

Wouldn't the record for having the most songs of yours done by The Beatles be held by Larry Williams? Just asking.......


Entered at Wed Sep 23 23:40:24 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: DYLAN: BS vol.12

Just found this:- https://www.sainsburysentertainment.co.uk/en/MP3-Music/Bob-Dylan/The-Best-of-The-Cutting-Edge-1965-1966-The-Bootleg-Series-Vol-12/product.html?product=V6503984


Entered at Wed Sep 23 23:30:06 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan's BOOTLEG SERIES vol.12

Dave, that report confirms what ISIS magazine put on its website back on 21 July (item 4).....

http://www.bobdylanisis.com/dylan-digest

..... and expands on it a little - title and release date in particular.

I do not understand how the "Rolling Stone" sessions could be described as "whirlwind". He made 5 attempts at the song at a the end of a session on 15 June - a session that produced no material released in 1965 (indeed, nothing until 1991, as I recall). Then he came back the next day and devoted an entire 3-hour session to "Rolling Stone". The exact number of takes is slightly unclear in that there were rehearsal takes, unslated takes and individual takes that involved several stabs at the song rather than a clean attempt at a take but something like 15 or 16 in all. In the whole session, he managed just one take that we would regard as full length and that's the take that appeared as the single and then opened the HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED album. Hardly "whirlwind"!

The comment about "Mr Tambourine Man" surprises me. The Byrds recorded their version of it on 20 January 1965. Dylan recorded his BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME album a few days earlier. He had attempted "Mr Tambourine Man" at the ANOTHER SIDE OF BOB DYLAN session in June of 1964. It was "released" last year as part of Sony's "Copyright Protection" set but that was no "plugged-in version".

Years ago, I spoke to someone who had heard some of these recordings and was told that they were more like jazz sessions than a "pop" session - individual songs were tackled in different keys, different tempos, different "feels" and, indeed, with lyrical variations. Maybe this explains Al Kooper's "fairly shapeless" comment. Again, we shall see (or, rather, hear).

I have not heard any rumours or reports about live material on this Vol.12 release though I guess we'll know pretty soon. If the 18-CD set is indeed all studio material, then it must be a comprehensive representation of what went down in-house and will indeed include contributions from members of The Band.



Entered at Wed Sep 23 22:28:16 CEST 2015 from (136.167.102.146)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Looks like a new version of Bob Dylan's Bootleg Series is on its way this November, focusing on the '65-'66 sessions for Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, and Blonde on Blonde. There will be 2-disc, 6-disc, and 18 (!!)-disc versions. The track list for the 18-disc version doesn't yet seem to have leaked, but there's speculation that it will contain some live material from the '65-'66 tour. The Band will be represented to varying degrees, as Dylan used members of the Hawks for some sessions in late '65 and early '66 before cutting the rest of Blonde on Blonde in Nashville with RR in tow.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 22:22:58 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Huff post


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:56:08 CEST 2015 from (98.223.186.203)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Subject: Huffingtonpost.com.

New article just posted about THE BAND on Huffingtonpost.com.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:49:53 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Jan's link - Sebastian, here are some packaging materials for the "Royal Albert Hall 1971" release!!!


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:34:53 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Danny Gatton

Norm: As I recall, Danny Gatton had a Maestro Echoplex in his arsenal. Here's a link to an amazing video of Danny from the late '80s.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:17:31 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Shaking Germany

Driving home from work this afternoon, out of the blue, I noticed a black cloud was following me and my little VW. I stepped on the gas, fast left, fast right, tried to brake-it-off but couldn’t shake-it-off. And just moments ago, outside, straight in front of my door, that black smother tried to choke me …… cough....still smell it.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:06:20 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tony Joe White

Joe J how goes it you old snow man. On the side bar from your video link have you pulled up the more resent vid. of Tony Jo playing PSA. Look at his rattle snake guitar strap. It has the fangs sticking out half way between his shoulder and his guitar.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 21:01:07 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

And Rick's white outfit is dazzling, jh.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:58:49 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: An interview that Carl Perkins did with Tom Snyder a year or so before he died.....at the 6:30 or so mark he refers to meeting Elvis and tells a funny story about what his brother thought of Elvis's chances of making it big.

Whenever I think of George Harrison, I always remember his chartering a plane to get to Carl Perkins funeral and despite his own shyness at the time about performing, how he delivered a song as eulogy - such was his love and respect for Carl Perkins.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:54:05 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, your love of "facts" is pretty funny.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:50:31 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Cash

I just had to watch that video again of Cash, Perkins & Clapton (thanks David); reminded me of another classic from that show (there were a few); link is to 'Polk Salad Annie'.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:42:53 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Spinning yer tires

This is pretty funny Ben. What I have said is what I have read. You obviously haven't because your comment "I never even heard this before today" means you haven't read it.

If you took the trouble to read about it you would understand why. The fact that some one recorded first doesn't mean they started playing, or writing the material first. You don't seem to get that.

So you just seem to like the arguing part of it. I'm done with you Forrest Gump. Now you get the last word.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:36:11 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Rockin Chair, I like all of these artists. I am not trying to diminish Carl Perkins as artist in anyway. However, despite your protests, I don't see how you can keep referring to him as the "Pioneer of Rockabilly" and a major influence on Elvis, when Elvis recorded before Perkins. That is a fact. Facts are important. If you are going to make a grand claim, you should have something to back it up with.

I don't think calling someone a "Pioneer" is a subjective call. If you are not the first or even second, how can you logically be described as a pioneer?

If you want to call Perkins your favorite rockabilly performer. No problem. But to keep referring to him as the "Pioneer of Rockabilly" is simply inaccurate.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:32:52 CEST 2015 from (84.215.171.237)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Photo auction, looks serious, check link.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:23:08 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Slap Back

You are right for sure David. I read somewhere long ago that Scotty Moore actually came up with the echo idea, something about putting his amp in a closet. Did you ever hear about that?

On another note......guitar pickers. Danny Gatton just blew me away. One particular youtube vid. (which I can't find any more). Delbert McClinton is singing a medley of those Sun hits and Danny is playing lead. On their best day, I don't think Scotty Moore or James Burton could ever play like that.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:18:15 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

C'mon guys, it's Yom Kippur. Without getting involved, when some one recorded would not be the defintive factor as to who came first or who was the pioneer. Nor would an article. but i believe i recall reading that Perkins heavily influenced Elvis. For whatever that's worth.

No brou ha has today guys.

I gotta go.

You can't keep God waiting.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 20:09:42 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Facts?

Ben what you consider "facts" are what you derive from recordings. That does not necessarily tell the whole story. Seems to me you have not read the history of these guys. Your idea of facts are what you see them as.

If you took the trouble to read a lot of the link I put up just a while back you might see.

Fact - Carl Perkins was the first artist ever to have a million seller number 1 at Sun Records.

Fact - other than their own music the Beatles covered more Carl Perkins songs than any other artist.

I could go on but read it for yourself. Peter thought Johnny Cash the best song writer of the four. On the link I put up, take a look at Carl Perkins catalogue.

I never said he was my favourite, I am only looking at "facts" that you may not have seen. You can pick what ever "facts" you like I suppose.

The comments of artists who attended Carl's funeral, and oh yeah people always say something nice, but this is a little beyond that.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 19:57:52 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Rockin Chair, Musical preferences are subjective. So, I to don't think anyone would argue with your stated preference of Carl Perkins over Elvis. If you want to state that Perkins is your favorite rockabilly performer, Great, more power to you.

However, when you start making the claim (which I have never heard before today) that Carl Perkins was the "Pioneer of rockabilly" and was a major influence on Elvis, you should expect people to disagree with you and to question what you base that on.

In my view, What you are claiming runs contrary to the facts. As I've stated several times, both Haley and Elvis recorded before Perkins. Haley began recording several years prior to Elvis, actually. Those are facts. So, how can you claim that Perkins was the "Pioneer" of a style that many others had recorded before him.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 19:51:49 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

An integral part of the sound of those early Sun rockabilly recordings was Sam Phillips' way of adding the "slapback" echo effect. He achieved this by using two Ampex tape machines, allowing him to mix a dry signal with a delay echo signal. Scotty Moore also used a custom built EchoSonic amp that had a built-in tape delay. On "Mystery Train," for example, you can hear the combination of the echo effects.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 19:24:26 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"It wasn't called Heavy Metal when I invented it" - Dave Davies


Entered at Wed Sep 23 19:08:09 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The King of Rockabilly

Charlie Feathers made this claim - see his A Man In Love; it includes pre-Buddy Holly hiccuppy vocal sounds. I don't think rockabilly had an inventor, rather it just morphed from ordinary country stuff. Scotty Moore, Carl Perkins, etc all started as country players. I still love it: it's easy to like, requires some good chops (Eddie Cochran) and really sounds great loud and in a smallish venue/bar. Lyrically, however, it's normally found lacking -


Entered at Wed Sep 23 18:42:54 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Apples & Oranges

You can peele your apple anyway you like Ben. What I have said is what a lot of people said back then. If you choose not to feel that way about it, fill your boots.

If I thought about it real hard for a very long time....say 20 seconds I can't imagine what difference it makes what you think or what I think. If it upsets you....well we don't need to discuss it.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 18:36:55 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Rockin Chair, I don't understand why you are focused on trying to prove that Carl Perkins was the "Pioneer of rockabilly". Rockabilly wasn't created by one person. These guys were roughly the same age, from the same part of the country and from similar backgrounds, so it's not surprising that they had similar influences and recorded and performed music in a somewhat complimentary style that has been lumped together as "rockabilly".

But, to single Carl Perkins out as the single pioneer of this style runs contrary to the facts. Bill Haley was recording similar music before anyone on Sun, so if you feel the need to anoint one person as the "Pioneer of Rockabilly, it should be Haley.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 18:24:13 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Getting Back to what I said

I know you are not disrespecting Carl Peter. You only said you felt Johnny Cash was the best song writer of the four. I'm not sure about that.

Elvis proved himself the more popular singer, no contest.

I never said anything about any of those things, my only point was and still is, (Carl Perkins was the pioneer of "Rock-a-billy music").

This point was not to compare talents amoung any of the four or anyone else. Carl spent a great deal of time when on stage watching peoples reactions, figuring out what would work and writing those songs, and if you read that article his guitar licks are copied today by a world of musicians. Even Chuck Berry stole from Carl.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 18:14:39 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm not dissing Carl Perkins … where would Ringo Starr be without his songs. As well as originals, I have the GO CAT GO! tribute album. It's a bit like The Beatles and Bob Dylan. Elvis, in his field, is unassailable.

Elvis never wrote songs (except in Colonel Parker's imagination). He was a good strumming rhythm guitarist early on in terms of tempo. He never claimed to be a great guitar player. He's not in competition in those areas. But as a 20th century music icon, The Beatles … Elvis … Bob Dylan. No one quite matches that status.

As for singing ability, the others of the Sun quartet were not in his league.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 17:21:58 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Carl Perkins - Rock-a-Billy Hall of Fame

If you take the time to read this Peter, you may have a different perspective. Perhaps you didn't know of all the songs Carl wrote for other artists.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 17:00:13 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

When MuchMusic branched out to MuchMoreMusic I discovered Robert Bradley's Blackwater Surprise others maybe via MTV. An inspirational artist making timeless music.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 17:05:24 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Unmatched

In two categories, as an influential guitarist and songwriter, Elvis couldn't match Carl Perkins. To his credit Elvis knew and respected Carl for his talents as a rockabilly pioneer. Over in England, the young musicians paid tribute to Carl, even after his career faded here in the U.S. I've posted a link to a video that points that out -- Eric Clapton, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash performing "Matchbox" on Mr. Cash's tv show.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 17:00:36 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours

Sympathetic ears, love his quotes.

Mr. Berra thanks.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 16:41:18 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Clarifying

First of all, Ben, I'm not using Wikipedia to win any argument. I only referenced that because they confirm what has been long said. Carl Perkins was the pioneer of rock-a-billy. Just look at the names of his songs he wrote.

I'm not sure I agree Peter that Johnny Cash was the better song writer. I just don't know whose songs sold more, were more popular.

I'm not trying to say Carl Perkins was more popular. My only point was Carl Perkins was more responsible for the beginning of rock-a-billy music.

Many of the books I have show all genres of music that "influenced" rock-a-billy.

As David has brought up Allen Freed, I'm sure you remember David the movie "American Hot Wax" which deals with Mr. Freed coining the rock & roll label for the music. I believe that movie some what sensationalised a lot of what took place back then, so who knows.

I have never implied that Carl was in any way more important or more popular than Elvis. As I said Elvis took all the music he covered and put his own spin on it to great success. That goes with out saying as we all have seen. My only point which I still maintain is Carl Perkins was mostly responsible for the beginning of "rock-a-billy music". To the day he finished he never changed. Youtube is full of concerts, with people every where who played with and appreciated that music of his and he never changed it.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 16:15:35 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You got me looking on a few sites. As with rock n roll, every time you mention someone, another one gets mentioned earlier. So before Bill Haley, was Hank Williams crossing the line into rockabilly? Before Hank, were The Delmore Brothers crossing the line?

The best quote, after mentioning Bill Haley, was one that "Elvis crystallised rockabilly."


Entered at Wed Sep 23 16:04:25 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Moondog

Disc jockey Alan Freed began using the nickname "Moondog" while working at WJW radio in Cleveland. The name derived from an instrumental song entitled "Moondog's Symphony" (link above), complete with the sounds of a howling dog, recorded by the blind, eccentric musician Louis Thomas Hardin a/k/a Moondog. Freed used the song as a theme during his radio program, rapping & howling along with it. He also used Moondog in the title for his shows, which evolved into The Moondog Rock 'n' Roll Matinee.

After moving to WINS radio in New York Freed lost a lawsuit filed by Hardin for appropriating the Moondog name. Years later The Band used the title of Freed's radio program for their album that paid tribute to the classic R&R and R&B songs from that era.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 14:57:36 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Can't add

Not 1952, '56. I was 12. There was a public swimming pool we all used to congregate at that summer. There was a hamburger stand and an old Wurlitzer juke box that stood out in the dirt with speakers hung on poles. Rock around the clock played damn near steady on that thing that summer.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 14:41:30 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blue Swede Shoes and other footwear

Sam Phillips wanted to record a lot of black blues men like BB King that's where he started 'cause that's what he liked. As it went back then he was unable to have that music played on white radio stations. In frustration he said I need a white guy who sounds like he's black.

As the story goes Elvis came along wanting to record some songs for his mother. I forget what they were just now, so he did. Sam Phillips decided to have him record a few other tunes which he did. From those black guys came "That's all right Momma" which is what they first gave airplay.

There are several stories of those guys hanging around Sun Studio together. In one book I have mostly about Johnny Cash. When Johnny was in Germany he had a friend, a black guy. When this guy was getting dressed up to out he would say to Johnny how do I look. Johnny would say you look real sharp. The guy would say, "don't step on my blue swede shoes." Johnny told them about this I don't remember who all was there but from that story Carl wrote the song. Is that true? I don't know but there was more guys in bands, like Bill Hailey, and "rock around the clock" was out around 1952 for sure but I don't think the term "rock-a-billy" was even used then.

When Elvis started recording I doubt he considered himself rock-a-billy. Apparently when he went to record Sam Phillips asked him who he sounded like, he said I don't sound like nobody, I sound like me.

They started calling that music "Rock-a-Billy with what came out of their sessions at Sun.



Entered at Wed Sep 23 14:01:42 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Sun Records

Rockin Chair, I think you're on pretty shaky ground when you base an argument on an unattributed anecdote from wikapedia.

It is a fact that Elvis was the first rockabilly artist who recorded at Sun. And to dismiss 'That's all right' as Elvis aping Carl Perkins' style is a wild claim. I don't think Elvis had any idea who Carl Perkins was when he recorded 'That's all right' in July, 1954.

Yes, Elvis covered 'Blue Suede shoes'. Well, Elvis wasn't a songwriter, so every song he recorded was a cover. Whose version was better? That's a matter of opinion. Who had the greatest influence, there's no question that Elvis stands head and shoulders above the others, with Johnny Cash a distant second.

Who was the first rockabilly artist? I would suggest that Bill Haley was. His recordings predate Elvis and all of the others on Sun.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 09:46:26 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

At one time, a Karl Wallinger used to post here, from memory. Maybe it was Karl W on the site, but we corresponded once or twice. I just tried to find him, without success, but found a post from Bob Margolin.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 09:30:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Million Dollar Quartet:

Well, Johnny Cash was the best songwriter, Jerry Lee was the fastest piano player, but in all other categories you’d have to put Elvis first, surely. Elvis came as a package at Sun, and was a very good rhythm player, but the package involved Scotty Moore, the best guitar player of the five mentioned.

At Sun Studios Tour they told a Blue Suede Shoes story. Elvis recorded it for an album but declined to have a single released because Carl Perkins was a good friend. He didn’t want to “steal the hit.” Carl was riding high in the charts and had a road accident, so Elvis had Blue Suede Shoes released several months later to maintain Carl’s income stream. Great song, but the magic ingredient in Elvis’s version is attitude. You can’t learn or acquire that.

In the USA Carl got to #1 with his version. Elvis got to #20, but then he also had it on a #1 LP and two EPs. Elvis In the UK, “bigger hit” was marginal … Carl #10, Elvis #9. Elvis later did a near facsimile version on GI Blues.

In the C&W Museum in Nashville they have Carl’s original shoes. They’re a much “greyer” shade of blue than I had imagined.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 07:07:34 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Sun Records, Rock & Roll = Billy Lee Riley.

Billy C. Riley. In 2003 i was home in NYC when my friend Larry Johnson had his annual Outdoor at Lincoln Center House Party. Larry's co stars were all Arkansas boys: Sleepy La Beef, James Cotton, & Billy Lee Riley, Everyone played together. Billy C. defined rock & roll.It was him, he was it. No other explanation.



Entered at Wed Sep 23 06:40:40 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rock-a-billy

Ben, if you just google Rock-a-billy and read the Wikipedia site, for example, Carl Perkins and his brothers played, and Carl started writing his own music first. They were into that music before Elvis started.

Elvis first recording at Sun was that old black blues man song, That's all right Momma from 1946. The style he put that song to was the rock-a-billy style they were playing.

It's too long to stretch out here, but in Nick Tosches book "Country the Biggest Music in America", a full chapter he deals with those guys. Elvis recorded Carl's song Blue Swede Shoes after Carl and of course had the bigger hit with it. I expect the reason is because he speeded it up more as he did with a lot of his music when he began to get more and more into rock & roll. Rock -a - Billy had more of a groove.

Elvis became more diverse in all styles of music than any of the other 3.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 06:16:33 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Rockin Chair, I'm a big fan of all of the Sun artists, but I just don't see how Carl Perkins was a big influence on Elvis. What do you base that claim on?

The fact is that Elvis was the first rockabilly artist recording at Sun. It's been pretty well established that Cash, Perkins, Lewis, Orbison and many others came to Sun after hearing Elvis's first singles.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 05:49:53 CEST 2015 from (70.194.101.205)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: The book of Genesis

Yeah, love "Shame on the Moon" too. Kevin J., I just recently got in touch with a high school friend from the old days who I fought endlessly with about Prog (him) vrs. real music (me). We met for some neutral ground with The Beatles. "Mad Man Moon" is a Trick of The Tail song that is a softer ballad along the lines of their hit "You Have Your own Special Way." But it's really another mad at the British Public School system ala Pink Floyd and Jethro Tull. According to my friend they have never performed it live. And they did not do it when he dragged me to the "Trick Of The Tail" tour, the first one where Phil Collins sang live. My only Prog show to this day.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 04:08:44 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And further more

To me it's pretty sad. A great deal of Elvis legacy is a lot of idiots running around in white jump suits making a living pretending to be Elvis. How gawd damn lame is that?


Entered at Wed Sep 23 03:55:27 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The best of the MOON!!

Just sitting eating my supper.....I had to jump out of the chair....HOLY SHIT...we all forgot SHAME ON THE MOON!.....Bob Seger's cover of Rodney Crowell, the best.

Ben from Joisey. I agree with most of what you have said...but, Johnny Cash was entirely different as was Jerry Lee. Elvis most surely developed his own style over time. In those first days his biggest influence was Carl. As I have said Carl Perkins is known to be the pioneer of Rock-a-billy. You have never heard Elvis play lead guitar the way Carl did right 'till the end. The boys from England and every where had 3 influences. Carl Perkins, Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly. Many copied Carl Perkins Rock-a -billy riffs. Those first songs of Rock-a-billy Elvis did them the way Carl did...and started to put his own spin on that stuff but it was influence by Carl.

I started singing that stuff in 1956 when I was twelve. My old man played guitar. My brother Howie played accordion, then got into guitar. A gang of guys around our place always got together playing that stuff and I would sing. Howie and I got to doing the Everly Brothers harmonies. I started playing guitar when I was 15. That was our history.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 02:52:47 CEST 2015 from (24.114.76.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ben P.......My older brother was a huge Genesis fan and so I have spent most of my life trying to get them out of my head ! He was also a big fan of our guys and a great brother, so it balanced out.......for the record, I thought "Carpet Crawlers" and "Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" to be great songs. I looked up your Moon song ( which I had no memory of ever hearing before ) and saw a YouTube to a song from the same album called "Squank" which I remember getting lots of radio play and - at least - seemed related to rock n roll.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 02:06:57 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Ian

Gary Burke played with countless name artists, amongst them Joe Jackson, back in the day. You might want to get my email address from Peter V.


Entered at Wed Sep 23 01:33:21 CEST 2015 from (70.194.101.205)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Thanks!

Thanks, I got more than I bargained for, but I still don't know if anyone else remembers Genesis's "Mad Man Moon." I have a strange history with this song, though I pretty much have no use for Prog, and I COULD NOT GET THE DAMNED THING OUT OF MY HEAD FOR ABOUT A FULL DAY! Did anyone hit Chuck's "Havana Moon" or Frank's "Fly Me to The Moon?"


Entered at Wed Sep 23 01:19:08 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Prof. Louie / Crowmatix

Thanks for the feedback. I'm trying to see if we could possibly fit a particular show of theirs into an already tight schedule/itinerary that, apart from anything else, involves other people, who have no idea that I am even contemplating this idea and are currently in a very different time-zone.

Obviously, I know of Gary Burke, too, from his involvement in the second Rolling Thunder outings and, as it happens, the venue has a resonance with me, as well. There are also logistical considerations. For the moment, I shall cogitate.

Meanwhile, any other comments would be most welcome.



Entered at Tue Sep 22 22:48:12 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

First Aid


Entered at Tue Sep 22 22:41:35 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ian, Aaron (Louie) is a straight up guy, & you would enjoy talking with him. You could end up having several in depth interview/ conversations with him if you meet him. His contributions to the business & production end of the latter day Band were numerous & of note. A lot wouldn't have happened without him, and there's alot more.... Then, aside from all his Band involvement, he worked at one of the big record companies long ago, i think it was Capitol....Musically, they are all lifelong pros... They will rock & roll for sure...John Platania or Josh Colow on guitar, Gary Burke on drums, Frank Campbell on bass. Aaron & Marie, they'll deliver the goods. BTW. Marie is a Brooklyn girl...


Entered at Tue Sep 22 22:04:08 CEST 2015 from (24.161.13.51)

Posted by:

Someone

Location: Ulster (county)

Ian W, yes, many times both supplementing The Band in 1997 (while Rick was "busy"), and many years out on their own. A quality act, you really can't go wrong.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 22:04:02 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Old England


Entered at Tue Sep 22 21:00:11 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Sun records

Rockin Chair, I'm also a big Elvis fan as well as a fan of the other Sun artists. I don't think Elvis took his style from Carl Perkins. That seems like quite a stretch.

All of the Sun artists were Southern, roughly the same age, and from similar backgrounds. So, it's not surprising that they had similar styles. Although, Cash was much more country then the other three.

Some of the greatest artists who began recording at Sun didn't make it big until years later. Those would include Roy Orbison and Charlie Rich. Unfortunately, Charlie Rich seems to be half forgotten at this point.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 20:27:44 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Feelings

Nothing wrong with that at all Solomon. All of this music affects each of us differently. I got quite a kick out of the discussion of "Cahoots" and The Moon Struck one. Very different feelings about those things.

Todd that is a very good take you have put on those four. I don't think I could argue with that at all.

I probably told this before. In 1986 we had our Exposition in Vancouver. So that the Canadian Country Music awards were in Vancouver that year. The main hotel housing all the people attending was Denman Place.

There was a bunch of us up in the RCA Suite. There was Dicky Dameron, Eddy Molyski....damn I forget who all. Any way we were sitting around with acoustic guitars playing tunes. In comes Sam Phillips and hands out these licence plates that have "Sun Records" on them with the Sun Logo. I had mine on several different pickups for years. It started getting pretty rock worn so it now is a decoration in my music room.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 20:04:40 CEST 2015 from (32.216.253.208)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Best - In this order

I realize it's subjective, but here is my list of the four Sun brothers.

Johhny Cash - Most soulful
Jerry Lee Lewis - Most talented
Carl Perkins - Best rocker
Elvis - Most influential


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:58:14 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Rockin Chair

I just think that particular version has an eerie timeless quality to it. I'm not a big fan of Elvis.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:47:44 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Professor Louie and the Crowmatix

Professor Louie and the Crowmatix?

Anyone seen them live?

Do they offer a good night's entertainment?


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:46:36 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Nothwest

Subject: OK Solomon

Solomon, if you are in England, that video didn't come up. I've noticed that happens a lot videos over there don't show over here. I don't know why.

When it comes to Elvis, there are songs he made his own, but not all. My sister in law is one of those swooning die hard Elvis fans. She makes the trek to Graceland all the times just like the Muslims and their Mecca.

A lot of Elvis fans think any song he sang he did best. BULLSHIT! I'm an Elvis fan but he doesn't do everything best or own them all.

When the big four started at Sun Records, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee and Elvis, for my money Carl Perkins is still the best.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:37:48 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

This was the one - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LVO1sJO6mM I was talking about.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:21:06 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blue Moon - You saw me standing alone

This is what yer talking about........it's hohum.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:09:21 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Little Feat - Spanish Moon

JJ Cale - Cajun Moon


Entered at Tue Sep 22 18:50:22 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: moons

Rod Stewart and Eric Clapton doing Blue Moon'


Entered at Tue Sep 22 19:06:42 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Different Phases of the Moon

Moon River -- originally written for Audrey Hepburn to sing in the soundtrack to "Breakfast at Tiffany's" by Henry Mancini and lyricist Johnny Mercer.

Cajun Moon -- same title for two different tunes, one by J.J. Cale and another by Ricky Scaggs.

Once in a Blue Moon -- a country hit for Earl Thomas Conley

Monkberry Moon Delight -- check out the cover version of the Paul McCartney tune sung by Screamin' Jay Hawkins.

Then there's a song from Howlin' Wolf's last album, "Backdoor Wolf", with a rhyming pejorative term followed by "on the Moon." Despite its title, it boasts of black achievements and predicts both a black astronaut and president. The song also features some great lead from Hubert Sumlin.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 18:48:48 CEST 2015 from (32.216.253.208)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Breaking rocks in the hot sun

BEG, thanks for the compliment, but one of the reasons that I became a photographer is that I can't draw or paint. I can see form and light, but need the lens and machine to get the images from my eye into print. I appreciate photography as an art form, but I have so much more appreciation for someone like Edward Hopper, Andrew Wyeth or that even that Spanish fellow called Pablo.

Proletariat is a great name for a band from that era. Our band was called Dirty Bird (our bass player had a strong resemblance to the great Celtics player Larry Bird)...and I guess we thought Dirty Bird sounded a bit edgy. A previous band I was in was called 'Cigarettes, Whiskey and Wild Wild Women', but that was little too wordy, and we knew that when we started playing stadiums that it would never fit on a tee shirt.

Another song that I tried to sing back in those days but could never really pull off was 'I Fought The Law'....wanted to do it like The Clash, but I didn't have enough attitude to do it justice.

Ah... the Bangles. more of a guilty pleasure, especially their cover of 'September Gurls', but my favorite girl group of all time is The Ronettes.

Thanks for the World Party link. I liked them a lot back in the day, but it's been years since I've listened to them.

The Cowboy Junkies used to do a song called 'Blue Moon Revisited (Song for Elvis)'. That was a pretty nice version.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 18:43:29 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Moon

Rockin Chair : I was talking about Blue Moon (Alt. Take) by Elvis. It's not the same song.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 18:18:38 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Solomn

Elvis - "Blue Moon of Kentucky" is actually an old Blue Grass song that was revved up by Carl Perkins first of all.

If you listen to Carl Perkins shows in England when he brings all his friends on stage, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and all you can see where Elvis Presley got some of his rythmn, phrasing and energy from. They call Carl Perkins, "The Pioneer of Rock-a-Billy".

In a link I put up a ways back Toronto 1995, the concert for Ronnie Hawkins 60th birthday, listen to Carl Perkins set. He sings Blue Moon of Kentucky and that is the style Elvis recorded.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 18:05:44 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Take It Up...World Party.

Hey Todd very cool that you were in a band. You're obviously a very creative person as you were in a band and you are a great photographer. Your love for Amy's music is ever so appreciated. If I didn't have tickets for Van's show I would have seen her again with Emmylouuu......Both inspiring women. In University..... punk/new wave arrived and I was asked if I play a little bit of piano or could I sing? It was all about the energy then and the dislike of the status quo. I wanted to name the band....The Proletariat.....right in your face, eh?

I did buy all of World Party's recordings as they were all on sale and I only kept one.....Private Revolution. The recording you mentioned....few songs were fine. See link for TIU. In general I think why I gravitated more to Mike Scott is because he was more influenced by Van and Karl was more influenced by The Beatles. So glad I had the opportunity to see both of them on the same stage as the year later he left. Another reason their music resonates as we're about the same age so have similar sensibilities and experiences.....except mine are not quite the same as there are gender differences that have shaped us differently.

Off to work shortly so no more manic posts today. Which reminds me Todd......your favourite girl group....The Bangles.....Manic Monday.

I got an extra glimpse
Of the truth today
Staring at my breakfast
When I thought I heard it say

Fighting is no good
Success, an empty lie
The treasure hunt is lonely
Until you realize

We came to take it up
We came to take it up, we came to take it up
We came to raise it up
We came to take it up, we came to move it up


Entered at Tue Sep 22 17:38:39 CEST 2015 from (32.216.253.208)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Inside my TV eye

BEG, Back in my college days, I had what could loosely be called a "band" (we never had any formal gigs - could never find or keep a good drummer). We had a female singer for most of our songs, but occasionally I would get to sing one or two. We used to do "Way Down Now" from Goodbye Jumbo by World Party. Another one I used to get to sing was 'Me And The Boys' by NRBQ. I was NOT a great singer, but I did have the benefit of a limited range. My vocal stylings could best best described as "timid"! I also knew a few chords and played a somewhat passable rhythm guitar.

Speaking of NRBQ, they did a fun 'RC Cola and a Moon Pie'. Another Moon song that I haven't seen mentioned yet is 'Havana Moon' from RCO All Stars. Wilco had an outtake from A Ghost is Born called 'More Like The Moon'.

David P, That Staples Box sounds good. Will be keeping an eye out for that one.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 17:20:16 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Staple Singers

Recently announced that Stax (Concord Music Group) will be releasing a 5-CD box set of recordings from The Staple Singers, "Faith and Grace: A Family Journey 1953-1976", on Nov. 13. Track details not yet available, but judging from time span, it looks like it will include tracks from the various labels that they recorded for over the years.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 16:01:17 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

King Harvest...Dancing In The Moonlight


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:58:11 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Dancing In The Moonlight...King Harvest

DITM was played all the time on the radio while in high school. I previously posted Thin Lizzy's "Dancing In The Moonlight" as well.....I really miss Phil Lynot's voice......I really do.

JT...Sure we could all google lists of songs about moons. I tried to list only songs I have in my collection or songs I remembered from memory. Strange once again, that although I have the Neville Brothers' "Yellow Moon".....seem to always forget that one. I also included the great film Moonstruck with Cher in previoius post. To include blues and jazz genres I asked the expert at home. It's all good....sometimes posters just want fast and easy responses.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:42:19 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: How did that happen?

That should be 'reviled band' and not 'reviled Band'.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:41:06 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'To The Moon, Alice'

There are countless more songs with 'Moon' in the title if you go to Google and check it out. The moon gets a lot of attention in song. One of my favourite cartoon characters - Moon Mullins- and of course there's "To The Moon, Alice", when suggested violence to the opposite gender was not reviled. Fortunately we've come a long way since then (though verbal abuse by political candidates still occurs with reference to physical characteristics) I will mention 'Moonlight Drive' by the Doors (reviled Band by some here) as a song I really like.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:31:09 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Moon

brown eyed girl : that was the first GB album I bought and still play it a lot. I think Blue Moon (Alt. Take) by Elvis is up there with the best of them.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:19:46 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

When Karl Wallinger left The Waterboys he formed World Party. I checked out some of his recocrdings but only a couple of songs really stand out for me. This one is my fave....Ship of Fools.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 15:11:34 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Fave Moon song so far...Kevin J's Waterboys of course. Here they are with Karl Wallinger on keys, although I don't remember any back up singers.....performing in the year I saw them at the Diamond Club, now called the Phoenix Club in my Hood.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 14:55:10 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Solomon...My fave song by Greg Brown.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 14:48:01 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Moonwalk...Bill Bailey, The Hawk, and Michael Jackson
Moonies
Moonlight Serenade...Glen Miller Orchestra (expert at home again)
Moon and Sand...Chet Baker (via expert)
I wished On The Moon...Billie Holiday (via expert)
Moonies

Hey Peter. Once you shared "Yellow Moon" by the Neville Brothers I realized....old thread again. Oh well.....I like lists. In the past more posters would get involved.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 14:16:00 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Lest we forget...

Full Moon and Empty Arms


Entered at Tue Sep 22 11:32:07 CEST 2015 from (92.18.166.13)

Posted by:

Solomon

Milk of The Moon by Greg Brown.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 09:11:25 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I Didn't Moon To Do It

Blue Moon - The Marcels

Yellow Moon - The Neville Brothers

Pink Moon - Nick Drake

Silver Moon - Mike Nesmith

Red Moon - David Gray

Black Moon - Wilco

White Moon - The White Stripes


Entered at Tue Sep 22 07:13:51 CEST 2015 from (32.216.244.124)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Glad that you guys enjoyed the Amy Helm clip. There's other videos out there of her singing TNTDODD, but many of them are from outdoor festival type settings and don't quite have the intimacy of the City Winery gig. The other cool thing about Amy playing the drums on that tune, is that Dave Berger (her regular drummer) was able to move off of his kit for that song, and play a little pump organ in the back. I also like Byron using the bow on his bass towards the end.

Another salient Amy moment was from around 2004 or 2005, at an Ollabelle show at Banjo Jim's on the lower east side of Manhattan, when I first heard her sing 'All La Glory'. I don't know if all the people in the room got the connection, as there were a large percentage of younger hipster types, but a few of us grizzled fans there certainly felt the significance of that song choice and performance.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 06:14:11 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I should have asked the blues expert at home.
Moanin' In The Moonlight...Wolf


Entered at Tue Sep 22 05:48:14 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Moonage Daydream...David Bowie
Bad Moon Rising...CCR
Howlin' At The Moonlight...A hooooo....Howlin' Wolf


Entered at Tue Sep 22 04:31:11 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And then

Blue Moon of Kentucky - Dark Moon..Bonnie Guitar


Entered at Tue Sep 22 03:47:30 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Moondance...My Man Van
Dancing In The Moon light...Thin Lizzy
Moon Shadow...Cat Stevens


Entered at Tue Sep 22 03:38:49 CEST 2015 from (24.114.77.218)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....and how can we forget Television's great "Marquee Moon"


Entered at Tue Sep 22 03:35:31 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Keith Moon
Moon River
Dark Side Of The Moon
Moonstruck
Moon Pie


Entered at Tue Sep 22 03:35:58 CEST 2015 from (67.84.78.46)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Paul Simon , Live recording Ground Zero on 9-11. Sounds of Silrnce. Linked.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 03:18:58 CEST 2015 from (24.114.77.218)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"The Whole of the Moon" by The Waterboys and REM's great "Man on the Moon" - two of my favourites.


Entered at Tue Sep 22 01:41:44 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I just been mooned

Harvest Moon...........Neil Young


Entered at Tue Sep 22 01:04:22 CEST 2015 from (70.194.71.228)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Choosing Moons

O.K, what do you like better, "The Moon Struck One" or "Mad Man Moon by Genesis?


Entered at Mon Sep 21 23:34:33 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Love the drum! Excellent rendition of TNTDODD by Amy Helm.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 19:40:43 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, just brilliant. Whew.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 19:30:07 CEST 2015 from (24.114.77.218)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, Todd. Beautiful.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 19:10:50 CEST 2015 from (32.216.244.124)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: TNTDODD - Amy Helm

Really sweet rendition of 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down', from an Amy Helm show at City Winery earlier this year. It's quite an homage, and has particular resonance when Amy sings the line: "Like my father before me, I will work the land".
She's singing her heart out, and beating on a big bass drum.
Stunning.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 17:20:17 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Devil Music

The multi-talented Georgia musician Randall Bramblett has just released a great new album, "Devil Music" (New West). Long known as a "musician's musician", Randall over the years has worked with Levon, Robbie, Gregg Allman, Chuck Leavell (in the group Sea Level), Steve Winwood, and many others. This new collection of songs is drenched is swampy layers of guitars, laying down atmospheric grooves with tinges of jazz. The title track (link above) recounts the story of how Howlin' Wolf's mother, a sanctified woman, rebuked her son for playing devil music. Featured are guest appearances by Mark Knopfler, Derek Trucks and Chuck Leavell.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 15:48:57 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Peter....Thanks for the additional info.
I have to admit that when I watch TLW......"Caravan" is one of my absolute fave songs to watch. Wow! Pow!

Not from the same show from this past weekend but someone has posted my two fave songs from Sony show together here.
Van Morrison - In The Afternoon / Don't You Make Me High


Entered at Mon Sep 21 15:28:32 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van live

The long band play out, usually, but not always Gloria, has been a standard Van Morrison ender for years. It is simply “Van has left the building.” I was told by backstage staff that it’s straight into the wings, walk through, straight into the car and a mile or two away by the time the band finish.

Caravan … I don’t think he’s done it for many years. As I’ve often said, every show in Southern England had a guy shouting out “Radio!” (by which he meant Caravan) but Van never did it.

Funny, I was asked “How old is he?” at a Van concert too.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 15:15:07 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Van Morrison defies time at 70
Excuse the source publication but only review I could quickly find.

I haven't been to the Sony Centre since I saw Dylan with G.E. Smith....not a great show as it seemed to me that Bob couldn't wait to get off stage and was rushing every song....my opinion. The Hawk was also in the audience....

Once everyone around me at Van's show saw that I knew practically every song Van was performing I was being asked questions like......How old is he? I said I think he was born in 1945 and he had a birthday near the end of August so he must be 70. How come he doesn't say anything? Well he doesn't say anything as I've seen him twice before and after reading three bios on him everyone seems to confirm that he's a miserable old sod.....also has struggled with depression like many....I think he's just not comfy in his own skin. ;-D. When Van sings cleaning windows I tell them.....He actually did clean windows in his youth.......How come Van doesn't come back for a second encore......I don't know the answer to that one but I'm figuring he gave us his heart and soul for 90 minutes and then let's his musicians....keyboard/hammond organ/trumpet player was my fave btw....10 minutes to streeeeeetch out "Gloria" at the end....I taped it as everyone was standing anyway....but what I really wanted to tape was, "In The Afternoon" and "Burning Ground".......Van also performed "Moondance"........but what I really wanted was........"Caravan"!!!!!

At Ontario Place Van performed "Brown Eyed Girl" but at Sony, "Gloria".......I'll take beg anytime as it just makes you feeeeel really young and joyvial and hopeful.....great bass too. Again....This concert will be remembered as one of the most special and magical shows I've ever seen. as he's one of my top five fave writer/musicians.....I don't care what he's like personally.....He brought so much joy to me that night and I'm still revelling in the joy.......

The only time Dylan's shows were just as special was when I saw the Rolling Thunder shows in Toronto and Niagara Falls, New York as he was on fire.....missed him previous year with.....The Band!!!!!!! Van is still on fire at 70...the new 60/50.40? Something was happening here.....for both musicians. :-D

I will be back at the end of the month for three nights of various dance performances. I used to have dance and ballet subscriptions and really miss this art form as well. Probably the Alvin Ailey Dance Co is my absolute fave from NYC. I couldn't resist at 10.00 a night!!!!

Ah....recollections.....I just realized the other day that it wasn't my high school that organized the trip to Toronto to see Yes. It was the only music store in town. Again......why they didn't organize the trip to see Bob and The Band is beyond me. Especially since they were promoting Blood On The Tracks. Oh well....You can't always get what you want......:-(((((

Sun, Sep 27 Van Morrison - Heineken Music Hall ...
Sun, Nov 8 Tom Jones & Van Morrison - The O2, Greenwich, GBR
Tue, Nov 10 VAN MORRISON - Teatro Circo Price, Madrid, ESP


Entered at Mon Sep 21 12:32:03 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van's the Man

BEG: Great to hear Van was on form … nothing beats Van when he's up to steam. Apparently Some Peace of Mind (with Bobby Womack, from Duets) is the new single, albeit virtual. They played it on Radio Two this morning and said it was their Record of The Week this week.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 11:24:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The heat pipes just cough

The way I heard it, Bill, was that Visions of Johannesburg was the original title. Bob had the idea of getting South African Musicians to back him. Anyway, he ran into Paul Simon and asked him what he thought. 'No chance,' said Paul, 'There'll never be a market for that sort of thing.' So a disconsolate Bob truncated the title and wrote about Joan instead.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 04:11:50 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.19)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Fascinating! I think this means that "Visions Of Jochestnutmare", which was mentioned in the later "Idiot Wind", must've been Robert's halfway house on the way to "Visions of Johanna". Anyway, it's nice that McGuinn picked the the discarded bit and built it into a wonderful song.


Entered at Mon Sep 21 02:17:39 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whaaaaaaaaaaat!

Is this turning into Looney Toones now??


Entered at Mon Sep 21 02:00:35 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Retitled

Me too. I suggested that 'Like a Stuffed Cabbage' and 'Visions of My Mama' might be better named and Robert went home and thought it about it a while and came back after he cleared his head and...well... you know the rest.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 23:49:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert: Phew! Just like me! I ran into John and Paul in early 1967, and they had this idea fora few songs. They felt the titles were wrong. Ray's Crude, Raw Cherry Fried Forever and Rennie's Pain. They played them, I made a few suggestions and the rest is history,


Entered at Sun Sep 20 22:53:45 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Of all the..........

Norbert sounds just like Forrest Gump!


Entered at Sun Sep 20 22:38:39 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: How The Band met me

Ok, one more time for Norm.

A long time ago I worked for a car rental company here in Germany. One day, on a sunny afternoon, just before closing time a young man walked in. In English with an American accent he asked me if he could hire as Porsche 911 to drive to France. I said sure if you can effort it (to be honest I doubted his credibility). That turned out not to be a problem at all and he handed me his driving licence, Mark Lavon Helm it said. It didn’t ring my bell, I didn’t know him and I didn’t know The Band at that time. I handed it over to our secretary to take care of the insurance. On the polished hood of a white 911 Porsche TC outside we waited, smoking a cigarette. We came to talk and he told me that he was a drummer. He told me about The Band and Dylan, song writing, about their plans for the future and so on.

I told him about my visits to my nephew Virgil Caine, who lives in rural Nazareth with his wife Fanny in the south of the USA and his work for the Danville Train Company. We talked about the Canon Ball and the low sinking bag, about Crazy Chester and Miss Moses and so on.

Levon turned out to be a nice guy and I really got to like him in that half hour on the 911. Already he had to go, we shook hands and just before he drove away (fast and loud) he thanked me for giving him ideas that he would discus with a Robbie Robertson.

This was our first brief encounter. Half a year later, on a rainy Friday evening, driving home from work late, I heard The Weight for the first time, I smiled and shook my head before I turned the volume up and kicked the throttle out loud.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 19:01:13 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'If your memory serves you well...'

That's OK, Bonk: It'll come back to you.

Despite Bill M's confidence in my memory, I am starting to doubt that I heard 'The Stones I Throw' on 15 Nov. 1965, even though I really thought I did. I sure wish someone else would confirm or deny (Robbie said no and despite what Bill M said, he should recall, I would think). Thanks for the confidence, Bill


Entered at Sun Sep 20 18:05:19 CEST 2015 from (24.108.19.210)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: JT

My Mistake. It was 1981 so it couldn't have been the boys. Now I can't remember who the hell it was that I saw at the Hall.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 17:55:10 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Being over 70

Very interesting to see the 70+ performers surrounding themselves with superb (often highly regarded studio) musicians to provide the musical background for their performances. It increases the enjoyment dramatically. Witness L. Cohen, V. Morrison, B. Dylan and so many others who are known for their solo efforts engulfed in this sea of riches on stage as they create new magic from their old magic. The musicians love it, the audience love it, and the performers are engaged and feel the magic and so elevate their delivery. Lucky for us.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 12:09:49 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: FANYs

Nothing to do with The Band but while on the subject of Fannies ....

What is now the Princess Royal's Volunteer Corps was founded as the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry, shortened to "FANY (PRVC)". At one time, the women in this service were called FANYs.

In WWII, some of the FANYs were amongst the very bravest. Of 50 female agents parachuted into enemy territory, 39 were FANYs, thirteen of whom were captured by the Gestapo.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 05:11:57 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Van!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

One of the best shows ever. Few highlights....It felt like being in a club and Van was absolutely on!!!!!!! I had seen him twice before, (Maple Leaf Gardens, Ontario Place), but this time.....His singing, his harp, sax, acoustic and electric guitar playing......He's never sounded better!!!!!!!!! ....."Motherless Child", "Days Like These", "Cleaning Windows"......."In The Afternoon".....He surprised all of us when all of a sudden he interjects.....singing about if you touch his leg then you'll want to touch his thigh and then you'll want to loosen his tie........Oh Van......Ohhhhh! Ah, I'm a sucker for words......At the end.....A different version of "Burning Ground"......slow tempo......The only song where I was fooled.......Again......every song tonight.....He just marinated it. All his musicians were spot on.....Van came back for "Gloria"....not one of my fave....bet I surprised you here.......and then he left tthe stage and let the musicians show their stuff for about nine minutes.....and then lights up. Worth every cent.....Thinking about maybe seeing him tomorrow too.....Well.....maybe......After work again......Thank you Van.......As I left work today I said to everyone that I hope Van performs, "And The Healing Has Begun" as it was a rough week........He delivered on that one too!

"When you hear the music ringin' in your soul
And you feel it in your heart and it grows and grows
And it comes from the backstreet rock & roll and the healing has begun

Richard Young interview about Johnnie Johnson & Levon Helm


Entered at Sun Sep 20 03:09:01 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Remedy 2

Bonk: Are you sure it was the early 80s? Colin Linden was with them when I saw them and he supercharged 'Remedy'. Maybe later? Or did they play Convocation Hall twice?


Entered at Sun Sep 20 02:50:53 CEST 2015 from (24.108.19.210)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: CABBAGETOWN

Subject: Convocation Hall

JT. I was there. I was also there in the early 80's when they played the Hall.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 01:59:51 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

The Weight on 45, then all the albums in chronological order, starting with MFBP. From Stage Fright on, on the actual day of release, except Levon solo albums, never released in the UK, which I got whenever they turned up at Virgin Oxford Street.


Entered at Sun Sep 20 00:58:47 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Convocation Hall UofT

Convocation Hall, for anyone who cares to see it.

http://osm.utoronto.ca/conhall/


Entered at Sun Sep 20 00:11:09 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Remedy

Norm: Sept 1968; just finished grade 13 and off to UofT and the Band all at the same time. It all came full circle when I saw the reformed Band at Convocation Hall in the early 90s. They played 'Remedy' and it was one of the best concerts I have ever seen.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 23:28:31 CEST 2015 from (70.194.71.92)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: How I got hooked

My older brother gave me Big Pink and Brown along with a little record player he didn't need anymore when he got a fancy tape deck. I played them a lot. I would really get lost in the dreamy side one of Big Pink. I thought King Harvest was a song that really ended an album, and very spooky. It was all vert different then my steady diet of Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, and Bob's Greatest Hits. Later I bought my brother Moondog for Christmas and he put up the poster. I picked up the always bargain priced "Rock of Ages" in High School and that when the true mania set in, about the time NLSC came out. Got to see them on the last tour.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 22:29:10 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Music is a cruel mistress (older musicians)

"The saddest part is when these guys sell off gear they have owned for decades...and some of it has not held it's valuse, and some has definitely gone 'vintage'. The money is not enough, though; you can see the sadness in their eyes when you ask what happened to your such-and-such, and they say, I had to sell it off to pay for the dentist, doctor, rent, car insurance, etc.

Sadly I know too many in this situation. And it isn't just musicians...road managers, soundguys, lighting guys...there comes a time when they know they are not gonna make another round trip. Some are lucky enough to pick up some studio work here, but most are working clerical temp jobs, temp warehouse, etc.

In many ways, they lived the life I gave up on early in my musical career, when I found out that I was not cut out to be a sideman on the road...and I didn't think (correctly at that time) that I was strong enough to front my own band then. I see these guys with great roadwarrior tales, letting their Bluesbreakers go, selling off their mid sixties Strats, Teles...SGs...Twin Reverbs...and think to myself, dang...that was the tradeoff in life, look at that great gear they accumulated...but some of them won't even qualify for Social Security because they worked under the table for decades.

Music is a cruel mistress..."


Entered at Sat Sep 19 21:48:53 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

-30-


Entered at Sat Sep 19 19:42:35 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

This is at least the third time Norm has complained about people repeating themselves.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 18:28:28 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.139)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: I thought GB rule #2 is that we all act like we've never heard each other's stories before. Not that GB rule #1 - don't mention the fued - isn't ignored on occasion.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 17:58:58 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tranna 1995 - Ronnie Hawkins, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis & Jeff Healey

Was any of you Tranna kids at this concert? The sound on this vid is pretty damn good.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 17:10:33 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Musical History

I found this just now. A lot of you will want to see this album cover picture........the way things were.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 17:01:18 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The awakening!

That's cool Jerry. What year would that have been? I have told my history with Levon and the Hawks, and Ronnie Hawkins. I started playing Dylan, Lightfoot and Ronnie and the guys in 1963. I was working in the logging camp Mahatta River here in Quatsino Sound then.

We could only get radio reception late at night then. I had my old tube radio in my room in the bunk house and listened to as much as I could learning music. I relied a great deal on Red Robinson......I met Red years later when I was playing a lot down Vancouver and the Fraser Valley. Funny thing is Red and I were both born in Comox hospital. Him a few years ahead of me.

Do you recall when Ronnie covered and recorded Lightfoot's "Home From The Forest"?


Entered at Sat Sep 19 16:47:56 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: MFBP -how I came to this incredible phase of LATH

OK Norm: Here goes: You know I saw Levon and the Hawks live in TO at the Concord. You know I saw Dylan with them at Massey Hall. What you haven't heard from me is how I got to Music From Big Pink (I don't think anyway). I was starting the UofT year. I went into the UofT bookstore to buy some texts for the upcoming courses. I went to the album rack and there it was. I had NEVER heard any of the album (maybe The Weight but I'm not sure.) Anyway, there was this weird-looking album with a funny drawing on the front and no name and I asked what it was.I had never seen the album. The knowledgeable salesperson told me and I was blown away. In those days, most of us never knew when records were going to be released or if they ever were released. I bought it without listening. Again I was totally blown away. The rest is history. So there you go....


Entered at Sat Sep 19 16:34:46 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Spinnin' yer tires!

Can't believe you guys! That question, "when and where did you first hear the BAND?" has been asked here so many times over the years......y'all must be getting senile.

Billy bad ass Munson says, "Good question". You've answered it before you crazy old fart! I remember very well when we all "fessed up". I couldn't believe how many found them from "The Last Waltz" when they were quitin' ferchri-sake.

I was drivin' down Vancouver Island late at night getting to just above Campbell River where you could get some radio reception. I thought it was 67, maybe 68 I guess. I'm pretty sure it was Red Robinson on C-FUN radio that introduced the song and told the story of how Bob Dylan's band had holed up in Noo Yawk and came away with MFBP. Red loved to be the historian and tell those stories. Then he played "The Weight"......now back then the force of that song immediately got your attention.

I ain't telling this story agin.....fugetabatit.....you can't make me.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 13:42:45 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

Just poped in

Absolutely loving hearing how everyone discovered the boys.

Hope there's a LOAD :-0) more to come - even from those who scarcely post any more but still pop in for a ganzie - including Sebastian!! Now that would be interesting.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Sep 19 11:52:26 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Jobs before they went famous

"Kurt Cobain – Janitor Kurt was once asked to describe grunge from a janitorial perspective, “It's a fine mixture of cleaning solvents, not to be used in the toilet. When I was a janitor I used to work with these guys Rocky and Bullwinkle. They'd clean the toilet bowls with their bare hands and then eat their lunch without washing their hands. They were very grungy.”

David Bowie – Butcher's delivery boy In the 60s when he was 13, David Bowie took a job as a butcher’s delivery boy to help pay for saxophone lessons with legendary sax player Ronnie Ross.

Noel Gallagher – Inspiral Carpets’ Roadie “I was the best-dressed roadie in the history of music. I used to wear white jeans and never got them dirty. I was too quick for the dirt,”

Ozzy Osbourne – Abattoir Before he became the prince of darkness, Ozzy Osbourne used to work in an abattoir. “I had to slice open the cow carcasses and get all the gunk out of their stomachs. I used to vomit every day; the smell was something else.” Nice.

Kele Okereke - Cinema attendant

Brandon Flowers – Bellboy Brandon Flowers worked as a bellboy at the Gold Coast Casino in Las Vegas. A huge Morrissey fan, Brandon once went through a bag which belonged to Morrissey's guitarist, Boz Boorer. “I shouldn't have done it, and I still feel bad, but I went through one of them. I just wanted to see what Boz was listening to.”

Mick Jagger – Hospital porter Jagger worked part time as a porter in Bexley Psychiatric Hospital when he was 18. An unlikely place for romance, legendary lothario Mick actually lost his virginity in the hospital to a nurse in a store cupboard.

Debbie Harry – Playboy Bunny In the early 70s Debbie Harry worked as a Playboy bunny at New York’s legendary Playboy club. Whilst she was there she developed a novel way of dealing with the dirty old men: “I fooled around with drugs and was consequently often half-asleep.”

Freddie Mercury – Market stall owner Freddy Mercury owned and ran a stall in Kensington Market, which opened in the summer of '69. Freddy sold his own artwork as well as second hand clothes. Helping him on the stall was Queen drummer Roger Taylor. Freddy kept up the running of the stall, even after Queen released their first album.

Rod Stewart – Gravedigger Rod Stewart served a brief stint as a gravedigger at the Highgate Cemetery in London. Although, according to his autobiography, his main job was to mark out plots rather than actually dig the graves himself. He also worked in a funeral parlour in North Finchley.

Patti Smith – Toy factory worker Patti Smith used to work in a toy factory, fixing boxes and testing toys. She didn’t seem to have had the best time there: “The stuff those women did to me in that factory was horrible. They’d gang up on me and stick my head in a toilet full of piss.”

Keith Richards – Ballboy From the ages of 8 to 13 Keith Richards would watch his dad play tennis. Gradually, Keith got roped in to act as ball boy and eventually worked for a while at his local tennis club fetching balls for players at weekends.

Courtney Love – Stripper Courtney Love used stripping to fund her music, and danced at Jumbo’s Clown Room in Hollywood. “Stripping funded my band. There was a lot of temptation in terms of drugs back then. I was like, OK, when I make a million dollars, then I'll do all the drugs I want. Which I did, by the way.” Kanye West – Gap sales assistant In his teens, Kanye West worked at Gap. He raps about his experience of working there on 'Spaceship'. “Let's go back, back to the Gap, Look at my check, wasn't no scratch… Oh now they love Kanye, let's put him all in the front of the store, Saw him on break next to the 'No Smoking' sign with a blunt and a Mall… So I quit, y'all welcome.”

Ian Curtis - Civil servant Destined to destroy his legacy as brooding vagabond forever, Joy Division biopic Control showed Ian Curtis clocking in as a civil servant in an unemployment office in between gigs.

Art Garfunkel - Maths teacher Art Garfunkel of Simon & Garfunkel was working as a Maths teacher when ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ went to Number One. The record went on to sell over 3 million copies in the UK alone.

Tom Waits – Pizza house cook In the mid ‘60s Tom Waits got a dishwashing job in Napoleone Pizza House in San Diego, and was promptly promoted to pizza cook. Waits penned 'The Ghosts of Saturday Night (After Hours at Napoleone’s Pizza House)' about his experience of working there). "

Glad it’s now confirmed: to become a famous musician you just need a nasty job to escape from ;-)


Entered at Sat Sep 19 10:57:52 CEST 2015 from (86.182.215.188)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Rag Mama Rag

Rag Mama Rag was my introduction to the Band. It got a lot of airplays here.

When Music From Big Pink came out, I wasn't aware of it as I was into singles at the time - The Beatles, The Kinks, The Stones, Tamla etc.

I bought the Brown album in 1971 and bought Moondog Matinee, Rock of Ages, Islands and the greatest hits. At that time I was buying albums.

Fell away from the music scene from the late seventies to the late eighties. Then I found time for it again and felt that music from the Band had never dated and was as fresh as ever. Bought the other albums in no particular order, and really still enjoy the music.

Incidentally the second Dylan album I bought was Planet Waves, but I never knew that The Band played on it. The Basement Tapes were bought at the time. Also I think Unhalfbricking is a great album and I didn't realise it was Band influenced at the time.

And coincidentally I bought Solid Air at the time it came out, John Martyn became a lifelong love and didn't know about his Woodstock connections.

I'm with Glenn in that The Band and The Beatles are up there for me.

Though I love many bands and artists and have a wide taste.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 10:31:02 CEST 2015 from (92.18.208.220)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: The Band

I found The Band on a cheap K-Tel Various-60s & 70s Rock Anthems UK 2-LP vinyl record set- classic rock from 1964 right through to 1977, including anthems from Mott The Hoople, Deep Purple, T-Rex, The Band & The Kinks.

The newly-formed channel 4 showed TLW a few times in the 1980s. I was 14 and went to bed just as The Hawk came on wondering who are these old men? I discovered TLW again at a local library on VHS and fell in love with it at 18.

My Brother-in-law had The Best Of The Band on vinyl! I recorded it on to a A TDK D-C60 cassette and played the hell out of that that thing for years.

The Classic Albums series about the making of The Band was shown on TV back in 1997. My Interest in The Band was now at fever pitch.

I bought most of the Remastered CDs on the same day and then the Remastered CDs with bonus tracks a few years later.

Long may my Band travels continue with all the rare concerts and footage found on the Internet.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 07:01:38 CEST 2015 from (173.172.37.17)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: discovering The BAND

i remember singing the chorus to the weight while playing "pickle" with my brother and a neighbor - perhaps getting some airplay around the time of easy rider (but not the soundtrack version by smith). then i remember my brother asking me to listen to the stage fright lp when it came out. didn't catch me immediately, but later that day when he was away i felt impelled to re-listen to the title track: the drumming on that studio version is really special. that hooked me.

then there was the afternoon our folks left us to dig up the trunk of a tree stump in our backyard: my brother moved the stereo speakers to the back window towards our work area and we listened to the newly released rock of ages straight through (all 4 sides).

don't remember the particular order i acquired my albums, but i know i got moondog matinee at time of release, then rock of ages, then probably music from big pink, brown album, stage fright, cahoots, and everything thereafter at time of release. and of course the albums with bob (and most of his output too over all these years; planet waves is a favorite).

no other band, in my opinion, has ever matched the amazing balance of individual instrumental prowess & the quality of ensemble playing, the song topics, the unique and diverse vocalists, and sheer surrender to the music they discovered and played together. i find the beatles equally amazing in a different way. i can't imagine growing up without the music of those two groups as a backdrop to my early years.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 05:31:38 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Brown Album

May 14, 1970 - The day I got back after 356 days in RVN. At the PX at the Long Beach, Ca base. The Time Mag article had made its way over (1/70?) and I think that was quite motivating. The Weight was frequently on the radio in LA before I left (5/69), but I didn't buy MFBP until after Brown. After that, pretty much around release time on the balance -


Entered at Sat Sep 19 05:30:56 CEST 2015 from (70.194.69.195)

Posted by:

BenPike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Various

Well, I am glad I got everybody to examine their preconceptions about Cahoots. Can't believe somebody doesn't like "Jupiter Hollow" which some of us rank among The Best Of The Band. Peter, I saw The Roche Sisters close with "Irish Heartbeat" one night. Memorable. Roz, how do think Cahoots holds up? I wrote a little essay on my FB page in response to Bloom's take on "The Weight." Basically, I think he misses the songs keatonesque humor, how things keep going progressively worse for the singer.


Entered at Sat Sep 19 03:13:02 CEST 2015 from (64.229.12.114)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Luke: Good question - though one I cannot answer so fully completely as Joe J has.

My first Band record was the "Rag Mama Rag" 45 from the delete bin at Sayvette's in Ajax, Ontario - a dime each or three for a quarter. For Al E's sake, I'll point out that I also picked up the at least the following 45s from the same bin in that period: "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" by Bob Seger, "Fancy" by Bobby Gentry", "Walk A Mile In My Shoes" by Joe South" and two each by the Paupers and the Ugly Ducklings.

My first Band album was "Stage Fright" at Sam the Record Man on Yonge Street in '72 - $2.99, overstock. Next was "Cahoots" at Sam's - also overstock. Then "Moondog Matinee" - likely ditto, then NLSC - full price! (an extreme rarity for me), then "Islands - full price! The rest I would have picked up around that time, but at various secondhand stores and garage sales - except the first two, which I got last for the simple reason that they weren't deleted, they weren't overstock, and they didn't show up secondhand because nobody sensible got rid of his or her copy. Come to think of it, there is one more slice of vinyl that's worth mentioning - the 'reproduction' of the original BT demo that was produced for Record Store Day earlier this year.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 22:24:51 CEST 2015 from (69.124.54.81)

Posted by:

Gypsy Tail Wind

I first discovered the Band around 1980ish. My family visited my grand parents who had cable television. We lived in the sticks and cable was a thing that you only heard about, wondering if it really existed. A concert came on whatever channel was on - I want to say HBO but I'm not sure. This music poured out, so full and lush. Loved it. The guys smiled so much and everyone looked to have such a great time. I remembered the name The Last Waltz. Upon going into a record shop, I spotted the album and lo and behold it was three lp's. And the price was out of my range. Instead, I bought Rock of Ages Vol 1. It was live and hoped it would be something like I heard on the tv. It was even better. I remember endlessly playing that record. In time, after squirreling my money away, I bought The Last Waltz and these two albums basically lived on my turntable. It took a while before I bought another record of theirs, afraid the studio stuff wouldn't match the live stuff. I bought Big Pink. I have to admit, I didn't find it as exciting as the live stuff. It took some time to develop an appreciation for it. After that, I bought the Brown Album, followed by Stage Fright. I never bought the others on vinyl. It wasn't until CD's made their entry into the mainstream listening sphere that I rounded out the rest of the catalogue, including the reformed ensemble.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 21:08:16 CEST 2015 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Luke

1., 2., 3. - Stage Fright, Cahoots And Moondog from my brother's collection

4. Rock of Ages. Epiphany. Heard on headphones. Bought next day along with...

5. Basement Tapes

6. MFBP- bought about the same time

7. NLSC- bought on release

8. Islands - ditto

8A. Rick Danko - ditto

9. Last Waltz - bought at Eaton Centre in TO. Damaged and had to return it next day.

10. Brown Album - Never heard it in it's entirety until about 1980. Crappy cassette. Bought CD when it became available. Still don't have it on vinyl.

Going to hear the Ennis Sisters at St. Peter's Church tomorrow night. They did do a great cover of "Christmas Must Be Tonight" years ago (it's noted on this site). Doubt they'll be singing it in September. Sherman Downey (check him out on Youtube)in town next week. Link is to his "Anna Lee". Not any Anna Lee we know.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 20:54:12 CEST 2015 from (24.114.77.218)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Luke's post - thoughts cont........Although we vary in age here, most will no doubt remember that period in all our lives when going to house parties was a a big thing. From mid-1970's to mid-1980's, part of being at someone's house or apartment was checking out their record collections......I still remember being somewhat shocked but - in a male sort of way - also being excited to learn a quite shy girl had EVERY Stevie Ray Vaughan there was ! Anyhow, the point of this was that during my era of checking out record collections, the vast majority had most of the predictable albums, Dark Side of the Moon, Hotel California, Beatles, etc. BUT (in Canada at least), a huge percentage of collections had "The Best of The Band" album......and almost none that I recall ever had MFBP or surprisingly The Band brown album.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 20:14:39 CEST 2015 from (100.34.146.123)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: Outside Philly

Subject: Kevin J.

Kevin, Great stuff! Interesting to see how many people didn't buy/borrow MFBP first.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 19:55:32 CEST 2015 from (24.114.77.218)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Luke

1.Rock of Ages - my older brother's album. Played it on his great system one afternoon late 70's to impress a friend with something a little different. Still remember the sounds of TNTDODD drifting up from downstairs. Hooked for life !

2. TLW 1978

3. Stage Fright........Still remember loving those songs that weren't in the movie or got any radio play.

4. MFBP.......early 80's vinyl and was disappointed at first few spins.

5. The Band album - early 80's...on cassette and walking all over town with new Walkman believing I was listening to the greatest album ever made.

6. 1987 Robbie solo and hearing the lead single on the radio "Showdown at Big Sky" ........euphoria ! 28 years of every kind The Band related shows and purchases since......ordering Rick's solo album from a 2nd hand record shop on Yonge Street stands out.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 19:28:38 CEST 2015 from (100.34.146.123)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: Outside Philly

Subject: Band Album purchases

I don't post very often, but I sometimes wonder how and when people became Band fans, and in what order. I know many younger people started with TLW. Here's my chronological list of the albums I bought: 1. The Band 2. Rock of Ages 3. Cahoots 4. MFBP 5. Stage Fright 6. NLSC 7. Moondog Matinee 8. TLW 9. 10,11. Reformed albums 12. Compilations and remasters. Any thoughts on yours?


Entered at Fri Sep 18 18:26:46 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bruce Bruno

Imagine being a guitarist in a band with Clapton sniffing around wanting to join ( funny as that story is, it was long after the boys were already unbreakable )….but……..now imagine being a singer and trying to find firm footing in a band knowing Richard, Levon and Rick are already on board. A guy like David Clayton Thomas with that spectacular voice of his likely had the confidence to not give it much thought….but for most folks it would have been a bit daunting.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 17:33:03 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bruce Bruno

Bruce Bruno was vocalist with the Hawks Jerry. He was the 7th member. Before my time. BTW I met Jerry Penfound's widow and daughters at Hugh's Room one night.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 16:56:01 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: hops??

. . . what a bitter end for a sweet child!


Entered at Fri Sep 18 16:15:11 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The real Fanny Adams

There was apparently a real Fanny Adams, an 8-year old girl who was murdered in a hop-garden in Alton (Hampshire) in 1867; her body was gruesomely dismembered. Around the same time, the Royal Navy introduced tins of preserved mutton for its sailors. The sailors, with the sort of black humour not unknown in the services, referred to the mutton as (Sweet)Fanny Adams, the name coming to mean something not worth much. Later, rather than the contents,the name Fanny referred to the tins themselves, which were found by the sailors to be useful receptacles.

In due course, the word fanny was used for a naval mess kettle, similar in size, shape and function to the army's dixie. In this case, "dixie" does not refer to the southern states but derives from "degshi", a Hindu word for a pot or kettle.


Entered at Fri Sep 18 15:40:32 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: find Frances too fancy?

Bill M: "Fanny" -- familiar form for "Frances."

E.g. Keats's squeeze Fanny Brawne. I disremember the context, but I think she's got a cameo somewhere in "Apple Suckling Tree."


Entered at Fri Sep 18 15:32:00 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Septet

Bill M (or anyone else) : It is interesting to see the photo of 7 members of Levon and the Hawks. I never saw them play as a septet. Did it ever happen as far as you know? When and where?


Entered at Fri Sep 18 09:14:19 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rhyming name æ no, I don't think so.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 23:31:25 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

And Tedeschi Trucks just did a fantastic tribute to Mad Dogs and Englishmen that included The Weight.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 23:16:40 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Rolling Stone mag weighs in on Scorsese's top 10.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 22:23:27 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: A question for you. Is/was Fanny ever used as a rhyming nickname for Annie? Like Ned or Ted for Ed, or Bill for Will or Bob for Rob or Peg for Meg or Dick for Rick?


Entered at Thu Sep 17 22:21:42 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Garth

Garth was asked about the words and Nazareth in particular in ‘The Weight” in a lehigh 2012 interview and seemed stumped as well….This is the beauty of the song actually. Takes on so many meanings and feelings.

So does Hudson have any insight?

“Hmm. I’m trying to think through the words to see if there’s a clue further on in that verse,” Hudson says with a chuckle in a recent telephone interview. “That’s all I can do.

“Well, No. 1 is why did he choose that word?" Hudson says "It does have a zing to it — an unforgettable choice of words.”

But he says Robertson never shared the explanation with him, and not being the song’s writer, “I can’t extrapolate any further on that one.”

I’ve always felt that the “Jack, my dog and feed(ing) him when you can" line ( or rather the feeling it creates ) is the clincher to greatness in The Weight…..often great songs or poems just have that one line that cement an attachment and elevate them to true greatness. The song and that brilliant opening line was great anyway but Jack the dog makes it perfect.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 19:17:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Terrific version of Short Fat Fanny with the house band. Surprising that The Band never did it.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 19:06:02 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Short Fat Fanny

Levon performing "Short Fat Fannie" in 1993 on the Conan O'Brien show with the Max Weinberg 7, featuring Jimmy Vivino.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 18:53:22 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

That should have been Short fat Fanny


Entered at Thu Sep 17 18:50:23 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Danko Fest/ Fanny

I think the name of the gal who went to Danko Fest was Nancy. Cathy Smith wrote in her book that Levon used to play a song called short Fanny, and she said he would play it when he saw her. Perhaps that was the derivation of Fannie.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 18:46:33 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Timeline

Significantly, 1993 also saw the release of "Jericho." The following year the group was inducted into the R&R Hall of Fame" and Capitol released the box set "Across the Great Divide."


Entered at Thu Sep 17 18:28:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It is said that Barney Hoskyn's research for Across The Great Divide in Woodstock prompted Levon to do This Wheel's On Fire, and we know that people were told not to speak to Barney Hoskyns. As it was, the Hoskyns was well ahead in publication, in spite of being Allan Lane / Penguin who never had a name for being quick off the block.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 18:16:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Stephen Davis' biggest claim to fame, or should I say infamy, is his unauthorized biography of Led Zeppelin, "Hammer of the Gods," published in 1985. At the time he worked with Levon on "This Wheel's On Fire," one should remember that he was no doubt aware of the competition they would face from Barney Hoskyns' "The Great Divide: The Band and America."


Entered at Thu Sep 17 17:02:39 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.137)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Angie :-) , I'm told it was Amy W., Abby,The Canadian gal who only posted on the GB for a short while, and Glenn at the second Simcoe Tribute to Rick. Terry, Duane Rutter, and Jim Atkinson performed, as did two of Blackie & the Rodeo Kings,and Prof Louie & the Cromatix.

The Dankettes were a whirlwind.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 16:11:23 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Last one.....Ophelia...Ray Charles!!!


Entered at Thu Sep 17 16:01:05 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I was searching for a Levon interview I had posted a long time ago where he states that Davis had to sell books so one way of course was to have a ffffff......Levon also said he didn't like that it came off so much like sour grapes.....Still referred to Robbie as Robbie here.

I found this radio interview instead which I hadn't heard before.....Cates, RCO All-Stars, Legend of Jesse James, Carny, Jesse Winchester, Coal Miner's Daughter.......Referred to Robbie as Robbie here.

Thomas Grooms interviews Levon Helm on the Georgetown Waterfront in October of 1980 for WHFS 102.3 FM. Posted July 5/15.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 15:22:46 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Stephen Davis

Peter, I think that referring to 'This Wheel's on fire' as a novel is a bit off the mark. Is Stephen Davis a hack? Quite likely. He certainly is no Greil Marcus. I agree that his letter to the Wall Street Journal was pretty idiotic, particularly taking a load off of Annie.

However, the songwriting and financial issues raised by Levon in the book was a serious one and was never resolved. Please refer to 'Ain't in it for my Health' for a refresher on this.

It seems to me in would have been in Robbie's best interest to engage Levon on this issue at some point and come to a resolution. I don't know if Robbie ever attempted to do this or not. I can't help but think of the John Simon story in which Simon was approached by Robbie to work on the last waltz, asked Robbie about unpaid royalties for the first two albums and magically a large check appeared.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 14:32:14 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I recall seeing a band called Big Pink here in town who played Band covers.....but now I see there is also The Big Pink from the UK.

"Robertson "Robbie" Furze and Milo Cordell started working together as The Big Pink in 2007, taking their name from the debut album by The Band."

Good observation Bill M. My eyes only looked to the right of him and thought of the photo we'd all seen many times of The Hawks. Was it in Mystery Train......Bruce Bruno was a sometimes utility singer in The Hawks?

Peter....You were always good with words but..... ;-D


Entered at Thu Sep 17 14:10:07 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Try again...August 4, 2006.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 13:56:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Grammar from Grandad

That’s the point about lyrics and rhythm. If you get the lyric right in the first place, then you don’t need to insert a spare auxiliary verb (did) to force the line to scan as in “The tears did fly”.

As you know, English is “The tears flew”/ “The tears didn’t fly”. You can of course say “The tears did fly” but that’s an emphatic use of the auxiliary verb “did” used for correction of a disputed statement.. So …

A: The bike went over a bump, I came down hard on the saddle right on my testicles. Phew, the tears flew!

B: No, they didn’t. You’re exaggerating.

A: No, really, the tears flew.

B: I don’t believe you.

A: Well, I’m telling you, the tears DID fly. My testicles were the size of tennis balls.

You also get inversion of word order “To this we swore” and doubling to get the rhythm “really really hurt.” Robbie’s had similar to say about the lyrics to Cahoots himself.

Having said which, after listening to Cahoots on Sunday, “Thinking Out Loud” has been my constant earworm this week.

Here endeth the lesson.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 13:44:30 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Jeff...We attended the first Rick Danko Tribute in Simcoe. Julie really wanted to attend. I would have liked to have met her and all the Dankettes as they were a positive force in the GB. I was also really hoping Carol Caffin could make it. We've had great exchanges. Everyone seems to prefer giving Face these days. If the regulars stop posting here no more GB. Anyway, the second Tribute included some of the members of BARK....partner would have preferred that show.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 13:15:51 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NortWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Cahoots / Mr. Robertson's lyrics

Mr. Robertson's lyrics are complex. The most complex album is 'Cahoots'. I came to think of the pic where he is standing together with the "official" poets Dylan and Ferlinghetti and Ginsburg. Maybe he didn't come to the top with 'Cahoots' but it was a good try. And Peter V, the rhytm in lyrics follow the rhytm in music, that's why they "did fly" and not "flew". (Congrats btw, in my own language we just "flew"). The rhytm in 'River hymn' combines at least two funeral marches from New Orleans. CREATIVE, like JT use to say. 'The Moon Struck One' could have managed to be a poem in Poe's 'Spoon River Anthology'. Switc from 45 rpm to 33 rpm and give it another change, Peter. Read the lyrics only, even better.

The sound of 'Music From Big Pink' reminds me of walking in a swamp, 'The Band' is thin like classical chamber music (not necessarily negative!), 'Stage Fright' is easy-listening main-stream while the sound in 'Cahoots' is SWINGING LIKE AN ELK. I don't know if you have this saying in English but we use it in Finnish. Sure, Canadians have it, right?

Passed the test.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 13:08:26 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Fanny Be Tender With My Love


Entered at Thu Sep 17 13:06:42 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....and then there was Fanny.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 12:13:14 CEST 2015 from (109.158.43.31)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

New Criterion edition of "Don't Look Back" on Blu-Ray and DVD. Out in November.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 10:49:17 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The This Wheel's On Fire novel

Stephen Davis’s novel. There’s a lot of subtext. First it’s odd for an “autobiography” to go off into long quotes from others involved, particularly Rick to fill in the gaps. The other was that comment from Levon that he was surprised how bitter it came out. i.e. when he eventually got to read it. I’d assume Stephen Davis took hours of taped interview (which is why it sounds like Levon), selected and transcribed, but also I suspect goaded Levon, and directed the conversations, which a journalist knows how to do when digging for dirt. I doubt that Levon burnt the midnight oil over a typewriter nor agonized about assembling the story.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 09:02:35 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As you also know, "fanny" in British English means vagina, not buttocks. With "of" ending in F and "Fanny" stating with "F" there's ambiguity in "of" or "off" - I'm sure they're singing "off" though which is also the sheet music. But it's a possible double entendre. 'Take a load OF Fanny …" in Britain is quite different. They were in England in May 1966. I think the lyrics to The Weight are so rich and complex that all sorts of layers are in the song. It interests me that one of the biggest films of late 1967 had a deserted girl called Fanny.

Incidentally, I've known two people called Fanny and in spite of the crude meaning, no one ever made fun of the name.

Again in British English 'Fanny Adams' as in 'Sweet Fanny Adams' is a minced oath, i.e. a substitute obscenity. 'Sweet Fanny Adams' is said as 'Sweet FA' which really means 'Sweet Fuck All.'


Entered at Thu Sep 17 05:44:58 CEST 2015 from (64.229.206.196)

Posted by:

Bill M

Looking at the septet in the photo at jh's link, and comparing it with the more commonly seen shot of the sextet, do you think that Bruce Bruno on the far left, was airbrushed out of the other one or airbrushed in to this one. I believe that Bruno (who'd done a couple 45s for Roulette) initially sang with the Hawks as Ronnie Hawkins' second singer but then left - only to be taken on by the Hawkins-less Hawks as THEIR frontman some months later - to the chagrin of many fans. I find it interesting that there seemed to be a general sense both within the group and outside the group, that they needed a frontman. They probably looked at David Clayton Thomas, who, like Bruno, had sung with them and Ronnie; and they most certainly did a live audition with, and offered the job to, John Finlay. And Jay Smith toyed with the idea of offering himself.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 04:24:09 CEST 2015 from (24.108.19.210)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Cabbagetown

Subject: Fanny

Sebastian. I could be really wrong here but when I was growing up in the 50's and 60's, your fanny was your ass. i.e. 'he smacked her right on the fanny' or 'sit you fanny down and shut up' etc, etc. My friends and I have never wavered from the belief that Robbie meant I'm/you're tired. 'sit your ass down and take a load off' Regardless, great song writing.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 02:29:00 CEST 2015 from (32.216.244.124)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Let's shake it downtown

Since the subject has come up, I was curious if Fanny (or Miss Fanny), was based on an actual person like many of the other people mentioned in the song. Has Robbie ever commented on this? Was Fanny someone who the guys in The Band knew?


Entered at Thu Sep 17 02:01:46 CEST 2015 from (45.49.144.203)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Fanny

I realize that for the most part I'm preaching to the choir but the lyrics in the chorus of The Weight are Take A Load Off Fanny. Not Annie. Well done Stephen Davis. Your fact checking skills rear their ugly head once again.


Entered at Thu Sep 17 01:51:10 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.173)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Angie, there was a whole group of women from the GB that went to a Rick Tribute in simcoe years back. I know Abby ( that's not her real name, she & I are still friendly) was one of the women, there was another gal who posted briefly, then took leave, nice gal, and i think Amy Woodard, from Massachusets went too. I could be wrong. but think there were 5 or 6 gals, & Glenn Silverthorn i think his name was met them, took em around. And I think Carol was there. I have to ask Carol and Abby who else went, and I'm wondering if it was the same one you went to.I think Terry's band performed.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 23:00:40 CEST 2015 from (84.215.171.237)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

The days run away like wild horses -- my "kid" is about the same age now as Garth was when this photo was taken: The Levon Helm Septet promo pic, 1964. Robbie, Rick and Richard all were 20/21, Levon 24, Garth 27.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 21:31:39 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: left is right

Peter V: I too miss Steve's voice - I would love to hear his take on this Manifesto (not kidding) published in yesterday's _Globe_.

The lead author is Naomi Klein, the wunderkind Montreal anti-corporatist intellectual -- but the byline is shared with David Suzuki, Donald Sutherland, Ellen Page - and Leonard Cohen.

Naturally, the manifesto has a web page, and it lists a bunch of other signatories, including Neil Young and Bruce Cockburn.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 20:20:04 CEST 2015 from (173.239.156.3)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

You are correct JD. I was just making connections as the boyz were continuing to disect words. Btw in our hotel lobby I overheard someone ask if Jr. Danko would be present. We also checked out the Butcher shop where Rick apparently worked. And one of the restaurants was featuring a forbidden fruit smoothie. The day after Rick's Tribute we checked out Port Dover. Wish that other people from the GB could have been at this Tribute.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 18:53:02 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Beg / Annalee / Anna Lee

So beg, what your saying is that a Canadian car with the name Annalee was there; but not thee Anna Lee; I believe is American and mentioned in the song? Just wondering.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 17:21:25 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

At Rick Danko's Tribute in Simcoe, Ontario....Annalea was present.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 17:13:15 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Lossless Bootleg Bonanza: The Reformed Band – New Orleans, LA (04/22/94)

I forgot that I grew up with someone who we called Fanny....Fani....not sure how she spelled her name.......as she was closer to my brother's age. After highs chool we reconnected. Anyway, I didn't realize at the time that her real name was Fanoula. Her family even lived closer to the Grand River as she lived downtown. Our home was in the same town but we didn't live downtown since I was three or four years old. Our store/home now is a taxi hub.

Meaning of her name: "Fani is a very charming woman who likes having a close relationship with her family and friends. She is very rational and she is the right person to trust if you have any kind of problem."


Entered at Wed Sep 16 15:45:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Over here …

Ah, Steve! I think of him often. What a discussion we could have about our new Labour leader, who yesterday refused to sing The National Anthem at the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flypast. Can you imagine an American politician refusing to sing the anthem?

While the lurch left might appeal, what would he make of appointing a spokesperson for food and rural affairs (i.e. Farming) who is a vegan (Corbyn is a vegetarian), but a vegan to the extent of refusing to wear not only leather (like Sir Paul) but even WOOL. I guess it makes the sheep cold when they’re sheared. In particular, she has spoken in the past of the need to stop farming for meat and dairy products. I expect she’ll get on really well with farmers then.

I’m not unsympathetic to some of her views and have been a vegetarian twice for extended periods (though I'm not now)… beef cattle are about the least “green” thing on the planet in their consumption of food and water … but the whole thing seems to be dissolving into farce.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 15:35:56 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: All Along The Watchtower

"Ezra Pound & T.S. Eliot, fighting in the Captain's Tower …'

See link to Ezra Pound's Lament of The Frontier Guard.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 15:09:20 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: another Fanny(s)

According to imdb.com, there's a Marcel Pagnol story _Fanny_ with film versions in 1932, 1961 and 2013. The '61 version seems to depart a little from the original plot (but features the full-court press of Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer). The plot features the title character carrying a burden of choice and an unplanned fetus.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 14:47:12 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: princes kept the view

The etymology of "Nazareth" is ambiguous.

"Alternatively, the name may derive from the verb na·ṣar, נָצַר, "watch, guard, keep," and understood either in the sense of "watchtower" or "guard place", implying the early town was perched on or near the brow of the hill . . . . "
-from _Wikipedia_, The People's Encyclopedia


Entered at Wed Sep 16 13:53:29 CEST 2015 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

Shakespier

Location: 325 000 Barleycorns from Hamlet's castle

Subject: Sir Peter's Deck of Cards

King of Denmark, Queen of France, Knight - a brother to Earl of Northhumberland, Joker, Servant

ACT I, SCENE I, Castle of Kronborg

"I gave Sir Peter the guitar, I should have been credited", saith the King.
"No, I taught him to play. It should be me", saith the Queen.
"Never forget who taught him to play cards. It was me", saith the Knight.
"You are all wrong. I told him the story", saith the Joker.

SCENE II

Enter the Servant. Everybody yelled except the Servant who murmured underneath his breath: "Nothing is revealed".
Two riders were approaching and, surprisingly, the wind began to howl.


Entered at Wed Sep 16 06:19:56 CEST 2015 from (74.12.48.89)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I'm fine with your line of thinking. It bolsters my contention that the reason the protagonist in "The Shape I'm In" is looking for his maker, a woman, in a body of water is that Donovan's "Atlantis" was on the radio and Robbie decided to repurpose that line that goes "Way down below the ocean, where I want to be, she made me".


Entered at Wed Sep 16 04:26:12 CEST 2015 from (24.108.19.210)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Cabagetown

Subject: Sheeney Man

When I was a kid in Cabbagetown I never heard that name, the Sheeney Man. It was always "here comes the junk man" or, and this is how I remember him, as the "Beg a Bit man. And that's what he said and sometimes sang. Beg a Bit, Beg a Bit. I remember my Mom giving me broken toasters and radios to take down to the curb and give him. It seemed like he was hauling an incredible amount of weight behind him. No horses, just two long poles attached to this huge cart that was full of junk and broken shit. Well I just learned that this old dude, and he was one of many, retired with a lot of coin to leave his family. I guess he would fix up some of this junk and resale it for a huge profit. There's a bit of Band connection here because I understand he had an interest in the Warwick Hotel. Which he ended up owning!


Entered at Tue Sep 15 23:51:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When I was paying out Tom Jones' mic cable in 1968 he seemed at least forty (he was 28) but then later he got a bit younger and just stayed there. Englebert Humperdink was born aged 65.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 23:47:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Far from The Madding Crowd and Fanny

We were just watching the 2015 “Far From The Madding Crowd” on DVD, and of course comparing Terry & Julie in 1967 who did not inspire Waterloo Sunset. As we know West Dorset well, the 2015 DVD was interrupted by exclamations. The first screen says:” Dorset- 200 miles from London.” Well it’s only 150 miles to the furthest point in Dorset at Lyme Regis, and the coastline shown was more like 135 miles, but then we thought, why would anyone want to know the distance in the first place? Bizarre.

But then the Annie / Fanny posts came into my mind. The (superior) 1967 film was a major hit on its release in October 1967. OK, stick with me …

So “The Weight” according to its writer is about guilt and redemption. A vital character in Far From The Madding Crowd is the abandoned girl who dies in childbirth, causing a lot of guilt. And Sergeant Troy seeks redemption by swimming out to sea. Her name is Fanny.

So there’s a new angle. I don’t believe for a moment it was a conscious choice, but with the lack of entertainment then, it’s hard to believe a cinema fan like Robbie had not seen the film. And the load is on poor Fanny Robins in the film. Maybe it planted not so much a seed, but another level of name association. With RR’s lyrics there’s so often multiple levels.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 22:43:32 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.150)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thank-you Peter V! I espcially like the 'hole' line, though I'm inclined to blame the world's human residents rather than a deity.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 22:16:50 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you, Peter. I’m not as pretty as Pattie Boyd but I take all songs and dedications seriously………anyone else ever baffled by time?……just saw a headline that states Prince Harry is 31…..seems to me he was just born a couple of weeks ago, whereas Engelbert Humperdinck was 65 when I was 10 or 11 and he is still the same age…..what is happening ?


Entered at Tue Sep 15 20:35:07 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Guthrie tribute concert

I've seen that photo taken at the Guthrie tribute concert before but, as someone noted, the look on Dylan's face, in particular, is something to behold. The programme notes for the audience said that "cameras must be checked at the house manager's office". David Gahr appears to have been the "official" photographer and you may recall that Elliot Landy got grief from Grossman for taking photos. I have also seen photos credited to Ken Regan.

I have a copy of the final running order for the Guthrie concert and a copy of an early running order with handwritten changes. Notes by Robert Shelton indicate that they didn't always follow the running order. Anyway, I believe that the photo must have been taken about half-way through the first half and it looks as though members of The Band sat on stage throughout that half.

While Dylan's three songs were split up on the LP, they were, in fact, performed one after the other at the end of the first half (that is, immediately before the intermission). The sequence was: Grand Coulee; Mrs Roosevelt; and I Ain't Got No Home.

Although Dylan had limited involvement in the second half, he did sit on stage then, too. I wonder if The Band returned to the stage for the second half and sat through it all.

I do recall a photo of everyone singing together at the end but they could just have returned for that.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 20:27:11 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Martin, Woodstock & The Weight

Link above to Robbie's 1951 Martin D-28 used writing "The Weight."


Entered at Tue Sep 15 19:59:12 CEST 2015 from (70.49.46.80)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: There are times when you just...

Jeff A: I didn't go to hear Robin Hitchcock and the Sadies cover The Band album at the Drake for the same reason, even though I am in Toronto.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 19:08:16 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Deck of Cards

For Kevin J:

Everytime I look into the soundhole of my Martin guitar and see Nazareth, I think about The Weight.

Indeed when I lift up my Martin guitar, I feel the weight. in my hands.

When I look at the hole, I think of the world our lord created.

When I look at the neck, I think of the pathway we all must take,

And when I see the frets, I see the stumbling blocks in our way.

When I see the tuning heads, I remember that we must not wind ourselves too tight

When I see the five strings, I remember the five members of the Band

But when I see the six strings, I remember that guitars always have six.

When I see the six strings, I see the six members of the 90s band.

And when I break a string, I remember the feud.

And when it’s out of tune, as Martins sometimes can be,

I remember Stephen Davis’s novel about The Band.

So you see my Martin guitar is my bible, my prayer book, and my favourite album.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 18:22:55 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: I four-wheel drifted into Nazareth . . . .

Kevin J: Mario going to work at the Nazareth Speedway is the gearhead equivalent of The Band going to work at the Woodstock festival . . . .
When the Speedway closed, its events were moved to Watkins Glen . . . .


Entered at Tue Sep 15 18:16:51 CEST 2015 from (67.84.76.79)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: A Dirty 50th Anniversary

I was thinking on heading to Nashville for this, but, the holidays intervened. Me & Sandy Koufax, well, there's things you do and things you don't.

Helluva show last night, it'll air on PBS.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 17:46:36 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Take the Load Off

Following the biblical Nazareth reference, one seeks spiritual help to bear "the weight" of the burdens he or she faces in life.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 17:43:33 CEST 2015 from (24.114.66.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Every time I look into the soundhole on my Martin guitar and see Nazareth, Pennsylvania written, I think of "The Weight". And also about how in the 2008-2009 world economic collapse where most companies laid off workers, the Martin guitar company refused to do so. One of the Martin family members running the place simply said "we will make less money for a a while, that's ok"

Racing fans also hold warm thoughts about Nazareth, PA as it is the home of the legendary Mario Andretti and family. How good was Mario Andretti.....F1 champion, Indy Car champion, winner of the Indy 500 as well as stock car's signature race Daytona 500 as well as just about every other type of dirt track and endurance race ever run.......and he makes pretty good wine as well !


Entered at Tue Sep 15 17:26:30 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:49:52 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Inside the Pennsylvania Flattop Box

In 2007 C.F. Martin & Co. introduced a couple of Robbie Robertson signature model guitars. The company's promotional material mentioned the "The Weight" connection with the location of their Pennsylvania factory:

"While the Band was living in Woodstock, New York in 1967, Robetson began writing 'The Weight' on his [Martin] D-28, but struggled to come up with lyrics. At some point he looked into the guitar's soundhole and saw the word 'Nazareth,' along with the rest of the C.F. Martin hotstamp on the back center brace. It became the focus of the song's opening verse, and the rest of the lyrics quickly fell into place. He said looking inside the guitar 'gave' him the first line of the song."

That peak inside provided a "lightbulb" moment of inspiration. While the Martin factory location in Nazareth was the literally the spark for the opening line, there's no doubt that the biblical New Testament site of the birth of Jesus provided an underlying meaning to "The Weight", as the song would take on the spiritual fervor of a gospel song in its choral delivery.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:49:37 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick, Dylan and Robbie....1968 and many other photos from the same source.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:33:23 CEST 2015 from (24.114.66.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: JH's photo....

.....actually, Rick is thinking, "Damn Bob, he shoulda told me John Lennon was coming"

Robert.......thank you for your posting of that Bloom link in the first place.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:31:31 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garth Hudson - Medley Teaser 5-31-15 BB Kings, NYC

Didn't Pete Seeger come from a very privileged family and attended Harvard and was drawn to communism as did Picasso?

L'shana tova to Joan and all who are celebrating. A sweet new year to all.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:23:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The photo

Look at the photo again. Bob Dylan and Rick Danko. One or other of them was thinking "Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, stuck in the middle with you."


Entered at Tue Sep 15 16:20:27 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What a great photo! Look at Bob's eyeline and his expression. He seems unimpressed!

As I had my afternoon cup of tea, I was looking at Mojo or Uncut "This week x years ago" and it was September 1963, on Pete Seeger not being allowed on Hootenany by ABC-TV unless he swore a loyalty oath. He naturally declined and was banned!


Entered at Tue Sep 15 15:56:36 CEST 2015 from (158.39.165.128)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Seeger to the left

Stumbled across this photo on FB the other day. First thought was to "rescue" a copy for our web site. But of course it was here already, submitted by the great Dag Braathen years and years ago, but forgotten by yours truly. Must be one of Peter V's favorites -- The OQ, Bob and Pete Seeger shakin' it up :-)


Entered at Tue Sep 15 14:31:02 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I wondered too, if Robbie had a copy or remembered that Melody Maker interview reproduced in UNCUT: 1966.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 14:24:43 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: traveloguery

"There are still travellers who are simple enough in their minds and enthusiastic enough over what they see, to think it of interest to write, "We steamed into Fort William at 10.15 p.m. and pulled out again at 10.17". Such people always 'steam in' and 'pull out': they identify themselves with the machinery. If they are feeling even better, they 'blow in' and 'strike out'. I didn't 'pull into' Fort William. The porter did it for me; and I didn't 'pull out'. I slept there."

Stephen Leacock, _My Discovery of the West: A Discussion of East and West in Canada_, 1937


Entered at Tue Sep 15 14:02:56 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Anna Lee, Fanny

Geez, guys, take a sedative, please.

Hello, Sebastian, perhaps you could kindly step in here. Maybe? Please?


Entered at Tue Sep 15 09:28:45 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Incidentally, and obviously, there is no indication that "Young Anna Lee" is the same person as "Fanny" … in fact they're asking, "What about young Anna Lee?" (I always thought she was back home, somewhere else).


Entered at Tue Sep 15 02:06:52 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

PETERBIO: Bill Avis As road manager for Ronnie Hawkins, and later, The Band, this Peterborough resident has uniques memories but it’s his friendship with the late Levon Helm he treasures most“

A lot of people have said I should write a book but I’m not much of a writer. I’ve got stories but most couldn’t be printed. They’re pretty good stories though.”

“People still have strong memories of where they were at the time these songs came out. But there’s also a whole generation of young people who have an appreciation for the music. As long as people want them, these songs won’t go away. Robbie (Robertson) wrote great songs but Levon fed him about how it was in the Delta. One needed the other. It was a very unique partnership.” Bill Avis

During one of our conversations the late Paul Godfrey also told me that he hit it off with Levon. When I asked him about it he told me because they both grew up dirt poor. The general consensus among many people was that Levon was very loyal to his friends but if you crossed him.......You're out! As far as Robbie.....Paul really respected him as a musician and business person.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 01:18:30 CEST 2015 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia

Subject: Stephen Davis/The Weight

Thanks Kevin J for the text of Stephen Davis's letter to the WSJ -- I was curious. Reading it, I'm dismayed to say the least. I agree completely with Peter V and Pat B, but think it may be even worse. Of course the substance of the composition point is long past discussion ("controversial since 1968"? Where?), and his "corrections" (Annie/Fanny) -- the pretext of his letter -- are nonsense. The point is that Mr Davis is a professional "writer" with a product to sell. Perhaps he hopes reminding people of the soap-operatic "feud" narrative (or, in the case of WSJ's readership, alerting them to it for the first time) will have copies of that book flying off the shelves, and money likewise, into his pocket. It's a shameless marketing ploy. What an a**hole.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 00:55:25 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

I guess Steve Davis wanted to prove in public that he's full of shit.


Entered at Tue Sep 15 00:28:37 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.29)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: A BIT thick? You're far too kind. If the Miss Annie that the narrator's going back to at end is really Annie Lee of Arkansas, then what's Annie Lee of Arkansas doing in Nazareth PA in the middle of the song? Or is that support for the two-authors theory?


Entered at Mon Sep 14 23:27:04 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Mr Davis sounds a bit thick, forgetting references to Miss Fanny, I suspect in TWOF plus the deliberate abiguity. Plus as noted from the first reviews, the joy of Nazareth is the double meaning - I mean, the narrator is looking for a place to sleep. No room at the inn. The composition point is long past meaningful discussion.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:40:18 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Wende Snijders


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:34:28 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Weight

As if Stephen Davis has not done enough harm in the past with all sorts of nasty bullshit, he's at it again in the pages of the Wall Street Journal - see letter he sent in a few days ago:

"As the co-author of Levon Helm’s 1993 autobiography “This Wheel’s On Fire,” I can offer a few comments on Harold Bloom’s appreciation of “The Weight” (“Playlist: Heavy Ideas in ‘The Weight,’” Review, Sept. 5).

First, the singer is actually going to Nazareth, Pa., where the Martin guitar factory is located, as opposed to Jesus’ hometown.

Second, he’s singing “Take a load off Annie,”—not “Fanny.” This refers to a childhood friend of Levon’s, Anna Lee Cavett, referenced earlier in the song, who was confined to a wheelchair all her life. All the names in “The Weight” —Carmen, Luke, Chester—refer to real people from Levon’s Arkansas milieu.

Third, Robbie Robertson is credited with writing “The Weight” for publishing purposes, but the song was more a collaboration among the five musicians in The Band. Mr. Robertson’s claim of sole authorship has been controversial since 1968 and was bitterly disputed by Levon Helm until his death a few years ago.

Stephen Davis"

Of course, no mention by Mr. Davis as to Richard Manuel putting his name on 'In a Station" or "Lonesome Suzie" - oh, the deviousness of it all !


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:21:35 CEST 2015 from (68.232.68.198)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "rags, bones and old city songs"

Dunc: Good question. Not rags or bones, but old city songs. Music was in the air, coming in the windows, and I went off in search. Hard to do, as it was bouncing off big school buildings and big apartment buildings in the neighbourhood. Never found it, and came to the conclusion it emanated from a street festival a couple miles to the west. My guess is Jerome Godboo, meaning a founding member (Eric Schenkman) of the Spin Doctors on bass and BARK's Gary Craig on drums.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:14:40 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncut 1966

It's a great magazine … full of stuff on The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Who too. Plus they used to get guest record reviewers some weeks then … Paul McCartney & Steve Marriot among them. Particularly interesting is a piece on the stars giving their vociferous views on "Ballad of The Green Berets" - The Beatles, Jagger etc. They really hated it. Jagger thought it "sick." Only Alan Price found it acceptable.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:07:31 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

‘Is the fear of The Scream in the 20th century surpassed by someone? Sure;

In 1953, Bacon was inspired by the portrait of Pope Innocent X (1860) by Diego Velázquez. Velazquez shows the pope himself as an authority figure who wants to be respected. But Bacon changed that same pope almost two hundred years later in a hopeless figure, constricted on his papal seat - as on an electric chair.

On Bacon's Study After Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent it seems if the entire history of art is stifled by an unbearable cry. Here perishes, with the Pope, the whole of humanity. like a tsunami of fear is flooding the world right now.

Bacon smothered all hope, faith and love in that one picture of unspeakable horror. Bacon's Pope stayed in the hell that will swallow us.’

RIP Joost Zwagerman


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:06:35 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Nice choice of words....respected friends "retire".......band mates that you really want to see leave "quit".


Entered at Mon Sep 14 22:03:00 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More from 28 May 1966

More from UNCUT, Robbie clearly picking up on Dylan’s answer mode:

‘Has Robbie’s group recorded with Dylan?’

RR: ‘Well, we’ve got a new record just about to come out,’ he revealed. ‘There’s a whole bunch of people on it. There are a lot of different kinds of sounds, and I play on just about all of them. But there are a lot of young musicians who are good at that kind of thing, and were brought in. It’s a double album lasting about 90 minutes. I’m the only member of the group on Rainy Day Women. There is a Salvation Army Band on it.And none of the guys belong to the Salvation Army except me.’


Entered at Mon Sep 14 21:51:14 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The earliest Robbie interview?

UNCUT have just launched “The History of Rock” starting with 1966. It draws on the original files of New Musical Express and Melody Maker, putting reviews and interviews from the actual year.

Bob Dylan … he is asked in two interviews to name his band, claims there are 14 or 15 of them and makes up names.

BUT Melody Maker interviewed Robbie. May 28th 1966. They name the men in “Robbie’s group.”. All … except Richard Manuel from Stratford, Mickey Jones from LA … coming from New York.

‘There is no name for this group,’ admitted Robbie. “We have been playing together for a long time, working with different people, just for fun, mostly in the South. Bob asked me to play a couple of jobs with him. I did. Just for the sake of science fiction, then the other guys joined him. Our drummer retired, and we got Mickey Jones. Mickey is a very famous drummer in the States. He has played with a lot of people, including Trini Lopez and Johnny Rivers and a lot of blues groups.”

Read the rest (on the “new album we’ve got coming out” (Blonde on Blonde), but wouldn’t this be the first major Robbie Robertson interview?

Note the “no name group” was already a talking point in May 66, and that “Our drummer retired” and that Melody Maker clearly saw it as “Robbie’s group.”


Entered at Mon Sep 14 20:31:07 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

L'shana tova A blessed new year to my lansmenand women


Entered at Mon Sep 14 19:09:41 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Correction......"They ain't gonna do to me what I watched them do to you." Bruce Springsteen Independence Day.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 18:55:37 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I also remember men walking up and down my street by the Grand River who were available to sharpen your knives.

Everything was different then as most of my family or relatives either owned their own restaurants/stores or worked in factories.....Textiles, shoes, iron......most gone now.

When I first heard Springsteen's Factory....I was floored with images of a school mate's father who I would see return from working in a factory with his lunch pail when school ended. My own parents worked in factories after my Pop had to sell our store/home to pay too many bills for early deaths and operations........So my dad's dream of continuing to play soccer in Canada was taken away and he worked instead in an iron factory......When I was old enough I would walk past this factory and I couldn't even take the toxic fumes and I was outside!!!!!!......My mom worked in a textile factory....at least she was unionized.....until it moved to the USA and then life was was so difficult that just like Bruce I said in Atlantic City, "I'm not gonna let them do to me what they did to you.".......My only hope was staying in school and becoming a professional with good benefits even when you retire.

I learned from my working class family that no matter what job you have.......You take pride in your work even if you're on the assembly line......and since you only own your labour power; you better have a union. It was only while studying political philosophy at University that I learned to take pride in my classbackground. Thanks Karl!


Entered at Mon Sep 14 18:25:59 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Coal was delivered on horse drawn carts up to the late 50s round us. It was like milkmen using horses long after everyone else stopped. Early engines didn't take kindly to being stopped and started every few yards,


Entered at Mon Sep 14 18:10:16 CEST 2015 from (86.182.215.188)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill's walk

You weren't collecting rags and bones when you were out for your walk, by any chance, Bill?


Entered at Mon Sep 14 17:49:56 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Visual history of Bloor West also only shows photo from 1911.

Previous thread on pop versus soda. We only called it pop.....and Pop for Grandpa. The only time I called pop soda was when I drank the drink called ice cream soda.

Once glass bottles of pop changed to cans of pop I no longer liked the taste so stopped drinking pop except maybe once a year I'd drink Canada's Dry ginger ale. Once while in NYC I came down with a cold and Crabby brought me some ginger ale and other cold remedies as I was in town once again for music and visiting with my NYC and New Jersey friends. Nope....The ginger ale made in US does not taste the same!!

Also, when I'd see films in Kitchener, Ontario I noticed that the machine would have two spouts....one for the syrup and one for the soda water. Ånyway, many years later I learned that diet pop....only tried once and couldn't stand the taste.....creates neurotoxins. One of our MD/ND's who left Canada to do research in NYC has research in this area......Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Btw in one of my vegetarian newsletters I read that in Medieval times sugar was considered a drug......not surprising of course as we all know what too much sugar does to us phyrsically, mentally and emotionally. I think it was Jed who also referred to the book from Chocolate to Morphine which I also have in my library.....I would agree that chocolate is one of my fave drugs but also nitrous oxide.......unbelievable.......not only are you high as a kite so I don't feeeel a thing and my dentist and hygenist can have an easy time.....but I can actually think outside of the box and see others with new eyes.....Since it's supposedly a very addictive drug.......good thing I can only access it occasionally.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 08:29:57 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Sheeny / Sheeney… I see where Bill M gets the Irish connection. It’s used in “Ulysses” by James Joyce as an ethnic slur. Both Shorter Oxford and Websters are uninformative, merely stating ‘derogatory, Early 19th century, origin unknown.’ If you’d asked me yesterday I would have said it was an Irish derogatory term for Jews, because that’s where I’ve heard it … I’m sure there are other uses by Irish writers. But still tracing word origins, I found a site on the uses of sheeny around Detroit and Toronto is mentioned, and that mentions ‘Sheeny man’ not only as a rag and bone man, but a scavenger at urban refuse dumps, and as a “bogey man” (sheeny man).

See the many entries on “Word Detective” plus the link to another discussion on garbage collectors - there are also memories of black and Italian ‘Sheeney men” (rag and bone men), but summing up all the entries, this looks a later derivation.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 05:08:20 CEST 2015 from (65.95.178.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Shana Tova

3/4 ain't bad, Norm. I'll take that anytime. Shana Tova to you Jeff and to Joan and anyone else who I missed. As for the Drake, I'm sorry I can't be there tonight as I am in Toronto for a couple of days to be with my family.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 04:35:22 CEST 2015 from (64.229.206.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

The rag and bone men, and the terms 'sheeny', 'sheenies' and 'sheeny men', survived in Toronto into the '50s, as did the occasional horse and wagon. But only downtown, where there were and are laneways running behind the old houses. Although to me 'sheeny' sounds as Irish as it does Yiddish, both Bumbles (where is that guy?) and Joan made it clear, when I used it innocently in a post on the same topic years ago, that it's a derogatory term aimed at Jewish people in particular. Does it mean anything in particular in Yiddish or come from some other derogatory term?

I was out for a walk an hour or so ago and a song from the Five Man Electrical Band's "Signs" album came into my head - "The Man With The Horse And Wagon" (see link). An Ottawa group, so horses and wagons abided in the '50s in the Nation's Capital too.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 00:51:17 CEST 2015 from (70.193.172.163)

Posted by:

David P

I've had my Grado headphones for 20 years and never had a problem with the plug connection or the chord. Did wear out the foam ear pads and replaced them with Sennheiser pads which fit perfectly. Also have Koss Pro4AA Titanium headphones with the big closed ear cans. For many years I also used a Grado phono cartridge that I enjoyed.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 00:13:23 CEST 2015 from (24.114.66.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Stage Fright

..... a musician friend from Winnipeg just let me know that Robyn Hitchcock and The Sadie's are at the Drake tonight performing The Band's Stage Fright album, full through. Apparently they have been doing this at various stops across Canada for months. I'm not available but this could be a very enjoyable evening for those able to attend.


Entered at Mon Sep 14 00:05:35 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.106)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Doctor, also. In case you don't meet any of the prior criteria, if you have a Jewish doctor...........


Entered at Sun Sep 13 23:44:59 CEST 2015 from (173.3.51.106)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

To my lantzmen and lantzwomen here, I wish you a Happy and Healthy New Year, and a blessed year coming. May your name be inscribed in the Book of Life. For those of you who are not Jewish, but if have been mistaken for Jewish, or ever did something nice for an animal in need, or i just happen to really like you, or I don't know you really well but would like you if i knew you better, or if you have a Jewish accountant or Jewish lawyer, i wish you the same too :-) Shanah Tovah Tikatevu...

Norm, I covered you. I think it's your accountant.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 23:41:01 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Of course you can buy new leads easily to go with any headphone with a detachable lead.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 23:39:21 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Headphones

Have Grados got captive leads? I am always surprised at good headphones with captive leads because I've had so many sets die with crackly leads, where they bend near the plug, or near the phone. I always look for "detachable" leads. I guess it can be argued an extra interconnect causes loss, but I got fed up of throwing away good headphones after 18 months or so. I'm currently on Sennheiser Momentum On Ear and they come with two sets of detachable leads … one with volume control, one without. I use the one without, but when it starts crackling I'll move on to the other lead. I dug out my 1971 Sony that I bought with a Sony Open Reel Recorder … the rubber's perished on the ear pieces, but actually they sounded very good, except you need a full size jack plug socket. I only tried for ten minutes (then spent another ten trying to clean my ears) but they had a very "open" sound.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 23:03:46 CEST 2015 from (86.182.215.188)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Jewish rag and bone man

Thanks Simon, JT and Kevin et al.

If you scroll down this site you'll find great photographs of old Toronto, you'll find one of a Jewish rag and bone man. Apologies to all you Toronto folk, who will probably know this site.

Adam. I assumed the song was biographical and I visited Toronto twice, once for educational reasons and once for a holiday. The song tied in with not very academic Band research I did. I did make sure I had my shoes cleaned by a shoe shine boy!

Commisserations, Al. Another long season in store.

David P. Enjoyed post. Sounds good. I've got a pair of 80 Grados. Really recommend them. And built in Brooklyn, Jeff.

Enjoyed the post, Norbert.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 22:50:21 CEST 2015 from (70.193.172.163)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cahoots

There were some technical difficulties in recording Cahoots, as they werue still "working out bugs" with the new Bearsville studio. Robbie also expressed displeasure with the way Capitol mastered the album, applying compression and EQ choices following the trend towards louder sound.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 21:56:13 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Up's & Down's

OK Jerry, they win a double header....what? yesaday, get their asses kicked 5 - zip today. Still up 3.5 games....ok?


Entered at Sun Sep 13 21:26:48 CEST 2015 from (87.152.116.115)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: The Bamd in your mouth

Just got two new dental crowns. At our company meeting yesterday I showed them to my colleagues. With my right hand middle finger I pulled my cheek away, all had a look and I got some compliments.

One other man took his dental art work out of his mouth and passed it along, it went from hand to hand around the conference table. I heard snipes of technical details and saw approving head knots. Now another colleague fumbled in his mouth some and came up with a nice teeth plate. By then the ice was broken and all took out their dental art works and passed them along. I held a beautiful golden teeth with an engraving, in tiny letters it said ‘The Band’.

After all dentals where clicked in place again, we quickly wiped fingers dry on our trousers under the table and went on as if nothing ever happened.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 21:24:16 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

I agree with Peter about Richard Manuel's voice on "Moon Struck One" - the performance is very nice, but it really sounds like he's straining to make it great.

I'm listening to the SACD of "Stage Fright" as well, David P! I prefer this official mix over any other. It's interesting to hear the more 'wooden' sounding DCC alternate mix, but hearing "Stage Fright" sound more like "The Band" sonically undermines the importance of their 3rd album being a forward step for them in sound/production.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 20:53:52 CEST 2015 from (70.193.172.163)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Listening Session

I'm breaking in a new inexpensive tube headphone amp. Right off the bat it provides a rich midrangr, warm smooth highs and tight bass. Today I've been listening to an original lime green label Capitol LP version of The Brown Album mastered by Bob Ludwig and the Mobile Fidelity remastered SACD version of Stage Fright. Both never sounded better. The amp teamed with my Grado SR-60 headphones presents a wonderful big bang for the buck sound.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 20:50:40 CEST 2015 from (65.95.178.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Acronyms

And John D: Sorry. Yes. Levon and the Hawks (LATH). But now you already know that.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 20:49:45 CEST 2015 from (65.95.178.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Cahoots and ragmen

So I listened to Cahoots on the plane just now on my way to Toronto. IMO, it is very good and for me has much to commend.

As to Jewish immigration in Toronto, many went to the 'Shmata (rags/clothes) industry' after the world wars in the 'fashion district' in Toronto (really sweat shops). My dad worked for nickels and swept floor and learned to be a presser (use the iron). He did that for about 4 years before he saved up enough to move on. We lived in downtown Toronto in an attic on Shaw St. and protein was rare in the diet (fish mainly - it was cheapest). There may have been ragmen then. I can't remember it but somehow I remember men with bells and sharpeners walking up and down the streets to sharpen knives.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 20:43:21 CEST 2015 from (65.95.178.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Derogatory

Kevin J: Thanks for that. I didn't know that Robbie said that. There were indeed wagons pulled by immigrants in the earlier part of the 20th century collecting stuff to make a living. By the time I was aware, that was a rare event in Toronto.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 20:25:57 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Carpetbaggers

While watching Hell on Wheels this morning, I had to chuckle when a thought came to mind.

As David Powell is from Atlanta, Georgia, I expect that he would most surely see Donald Trump as a "Carpetbagger". :-)


Entered at Sun Sep 13 18:12:12 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting. We always had rag and bone men (or persons, not that I ever saw a female one), and they were generally thought, perhaps wrongly, to be of Romany origin (i.e. gypsies).


Entered at Sun Sep 13 17:55:19 CEST 2015 from (24.114.66.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Rags and Bones

Robbie Robertson talks about "Rags and Bones" with Nick DeRiso:

“It wasn’t until my mid-teens that I was aware that when people referred to the rags-and-bones man who came up and down the back lanes of downtown Toronto as the ‘sheeny man,’ that it was a derogatory remark,” Robertson tells us in an exclusive Something Else! Sitdown. “I didn’t know that the heritage from Eastern Europe of Jewish people had a connection to the person whose song cried out in the back alleys, and that he was of Jewish decent. I certainly hope to reconnect with this part of my heritage in song again.”

"As with so much of Northern Lights-Southern Cross, this song feels more direct, more revealing, than earlier character studies — as if we’re peeking, for the very first time, behind a veil of Robertson’s own construction. After all, his great grandather — once recognized as a scholar in Israel — was reduced to peddling upon his arrival in the New World. He walked these same alleyways, unfolding a roadmap of discovery that is on-going for Robertson."


Entered at Sun Sep 13 17:52:29 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, an afternoon of photo sorting with Cahoots on. The first overwhelming point is how good Rick’s bass work is throughout. I recall something about him getting more involved and working particularly hard on this album.

On the lyrics, in Shootout in Chinatown’ I notice that they manage ‘you can gamble and ramble in a brothel’ (which is hard) but have trouble getting ‘Below the surface crime and love they go hand in hand’ and we have the same intrusive pronoun problem with that “they” (in fact, “will go hand in hand” would have been an improvement).

The Moon Struck One. Richard knows ‘Little John was my cohort’ is a dreadful line. You can hear it. ‘And to this we swore.” Feck me! (having just come from Ireland). ‘And the tears did fly’ indeed, and he has a problem stretching out “o-o-o-ver by the lake”. All the pleasure in it is Garth who saves any Band track when it starts going wrong. No, my low opinion on The Moon Struck One is in its 44th Year and unchanged.

Thinkin’ Out Loud has aspects of a great soul song in there. Wonderful piano. Tasty guitar solo too … unusually. It reminds me that when it came out, it was a favourite track.

Smoke Signal – I sense a degree of disbelief in the lyric from the singer!

Volcano – nice playing, shame about the melody.

The River Hymn – tries much too hard to fill the King Harvest / Rumor slot and fails.

How they rejected Endless Highway, Don’t Do It and Bessie Smith defeats me.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 17:29:02 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Legacy Never Dies

I don't suppose there are many "Hell on Wheels" fans here.

For my birthday 2 weeks ago Susan got me the complete Season 3 & 4 of Hell on Wheels on DVD.

This morning as I watched the final episode of season 4 on the last disc, at the end Cullen Bohannon stands on a hill looking down into a valley where they will continue with a rail road. the music behind him plays?.........."I Shall Be Released".........Bob Dylan and the BAND!

All these years later, the legacy endures and for that scene there is no other song that could make sense for the situation. It is very satisfying to have that music in our lives to enjoy in so many situations........


Entered at Sun Sep 13 17:13:32 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Simon

Thank you sir!


Entered at Sun Sep 13 16:40:17 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Can you please elaborate how "Rags & Bones" is set in Toronto? That's fascinating.

I learned Robbie's acoustic guitar part to "Acadian Driftwood" on my Martin, open D tuning. Listen to his playing in "Where Do We Go From Here" - it sounds almost like a demo 4 years earlier for the main riff in Driftwood!


Entered at Sun Sep 13 14:53:06 CEST 2015 from (173.68.71.190)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The distinction of Cahoots/Lesh -Santana--Haynes

Canhoots,an album I enjoyed a lot,was distinct in that unlike the previous albums the songs didn't have the feel of belonging together.The first 3 albums sounded unified in some imperfect yet unique way,whereas Cahoots,IMO,consisted of a bunch of very good songs that seemingly had little musical relationship to one another.On a different topic,last night I watched Phil(Lesh) and Friends featuring Carlos Santana and Warren Haynes.One of the most transcendent and beautiful performances I ever watched/heard.Having them perform Dark Star was a great experience.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 14:35:38 CEST 2015 from (86.148.228.99)

Posted by:

Simon

John - It's Levon and the Hawks.

Dunc - We still get rag and bone men in the area most Monday afternoons ("Any old iron"). Agree that it's a great song. I like Hobo Jungle and The Moon Struck One too.

Joan - Thanks for the Carny link.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 14:15:50 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: LATH

Ok Jerry & Bill. Going to show my ignorance here. Who is LATH?


Entered at Sun Sep 13 13:31:41 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Blows Against The Empire

Politics is best avoided … but it is fascinating to see how 177,000 brand new members to 254,000 established members changes an election. It reminds me of that Paul Kantner song on "Blows Against The Empire" about hi-jacking the starship. Corbyn has already been acclaimed by Gerry Adams, the President of Argentina, Hamas and Putin. Is it just me, but this doesn't sound like a list of our nearest and dearest friends.

The ironies abound. There was no way Labour was going to vote for a woman, not even in the deputy campaign. So having complained that Labour was run by a London-based Blairite elite, they go for a London-based hard-left elite and choose the MP for probably the wealthiest labour-voting constituency in the country. A million pounds won't buy you much of a house in Islington.

Last time it happened, my favourite politician, Shirley Williams, left and started the SDP.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 13:18:58 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rags And Bones''

Dunc: One should never receive 'no response'. I didn't perceive Toronto in the song right off the bat...but sure, it could be Toronto. It is a great song with evocative lyrics. Worth teaching for sure.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 13:14:23 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd never thought about "Mull of Kyntyre" in that way, but I'm sure you're right, Dunc. It will survive. It sounds Scottish too … it's not just the place name (nor the pipes on the record) but the main melody. It is slightly reminiscent of The Skye Boat Song.

Acadian Driftwood is a direct narrative ballad, a rather different form for Robbie.And those narrative ballads hang on … but unlike traditional folk, it seems less likely that these songs will end up with a dozen different versions of the lyrics, because the recording fixed it. You can get really tied up tracing the lyric changes of older ballads.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 11:43:57 CEST 2015 from (86.182.215.188)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Clicking along the cobblestones

Thanks, Robert - really interesting article. What type of music is 'The Band'? Many years ago, I made contact with this GB wondering if the music of The Band would last, in that it would become part of a country's culture - folk music. There are many songs that are standards in Scotland, taught to Scottish children and their children's children. I have no doubt 'Mull of Kintyre' will survive.

Bill M, JT, Jersey Girl and other Toronto people. I wrote about 'Rags and Bones' a couple of weeks ago. Sadly got no response. This is a great evocation of Toronto at a certain time through sound. Line after brilliant line. I would teach this to Toronto children - compulsory. Love Richard and Robbie on this. I know on this track it is Robbie playing. But as always the Band are great.

Down By The Henry Moore'. Great verse, Bill M. Absolutely love that verse. But I love some of the other lines as well 'bought me a fish to fry', 'a fat girl came up to me'. I think BARK are brilliant at that song. And remember the guy who wrote it was born two miles away from where I live.

Have played a lot of folk music, Jimmy Cliff, Frankie Miller and Van Morrison lately. Such a catholic taste.


Entered at Sun Sep 13 02:00:25 CEST 2015 from (64.229.12.9)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Reading the Bloom article at Robert's link, when I read that "No American ever really feels free unless he or she is alone, and there’s something of that solitary quality in “The Weight"", I couldn't help but think of "Down By The Henry Moore": "Alone but never lonely, that's how I like to be; if I want to have fun like some rock and roll bum, don't think the worst of me". Now off to google "17th century Enthusiasm" ...


Entered at Sun Sep 13 01:16:01 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Robert: Thanks for the link.

Ben P: Good call on the Lightfoot, though not so much on LotBlacksmiths "How're you gonna replace human hands?" is still an excellent question, even if we all know the unpleasant answer.

John D: Thanks for posting the Dr Music WDWGfH featuring, in this case, Doug Mallory. From the Brantford area like Rick Danko, and from more or less the same vintage. I believe he still lives in Halifax, where we caught him playing solo maybe 15 years ago.

JT: According to a totally credible source, LatH played TSIT at Massey Hall in Toronto in the fall of '65.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 23:18:13 CEST 2015 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia
Web: My link

Subject: Harold Bloom on The Band in WSJ

Apologies if this has already been discussed here -- but at the link is an article in the Wall Street Journal by the eminent literary critic Harold Bloom on The Band. I see there is also a response to Bloom by Stephen Davis (the co-writer of Levon Helm's book), but it is behind a paywall.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 19:49:06 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'The Stones I Throw' live?

With great trepidation I ask: As far as anyone knows, was "The Stones I Throw" ever played live anywhere by LATH?


Entered at Sat Sep 12 18:13:15 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Carny

Someone has posted the entire movie Carney on YouTube


Entered at Sat Sep 12 17:10:39 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Dr. Music

Not everyone's taste; but here is Doug Riley and Dr. Music doing WDWG From Here.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 17:06:33 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ben Pike Cahoots

Have to strongly disagree with your weakest track selection Ben. "Where Do We Go From Here" is just about my favorite track on the album. Great harmonies. Was covered here in Canada as a Jazz/R&B version by Dr. Music.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 17:06:05 CEST 2015 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Republic

Hi Peter - I'm back last night from a biz week in Dublin. I haven't been in 7 years and the pubs/clubs have changed quickly to the American thing of micros, fancy whiskey & crafty cocktails. There was fine Guinness available but with Justin Beiber blaring. Not quite the Celtic Tiger again but much better than in the late aughts. The (world's best) cabbies were the only Irish-only staff I encountered this round -


Entered at Sat Sep 12 14:49:15 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Cahoots

With all the recent talk about Cahoots here, I decided to give it a fresh listen last night. One song did strike me as better than I remembered, that song was not 'The moon struck one' or 'Last of the blacksmiths' which I still find dreadful. It was 'When I paint my masterpiece'. I enjoyed it more than previously, although I still prefer Dylan's stripped down version from 'Greatest Hits, Vol. II'.

Regarding a song for Canada, the one song that sticks out for me as an American is Gordon Lightfoot's 'Canadian Railroad trilogy'. It is an epic, sweeping song about the building of the Canadian railroad, (hence the title). I think it's one of Lightfoot's finest songs.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 13:37:11 CEST 2015 from (86.148.228.99)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"Moldy Goldies - Colonel Jubilation B. Johnston and His Mystic Knights Band and Street Singers Attack The Hits"

A rare 1966 album from some of the Blonde on Blonde crew. RIP Bob Johnston.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 11:37:59 CEST 2015 from (122.60.111.136)

Posted by:

Rod

Location: TMSO

just catching up on a few unread posts ..... I like TMSO. Sure the lyrics are a little clumsy in places but it works and the performance is good. For me the real RR Band clangers are Jupiter Hollow and Living in a Dream. There are some real awkward lyrics in JH. Home Cooking should have been on Islands instead of LIAD (just creating some new acronyms).


Entered at Sat Sep 12 11:24:19 CEST 2015 from (122.60.111.136)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Cahoots

almost sounds like I should cough it "Cah-hoots". OK, it's not as good as there first three records but still very enjoyable - and still prefer it to anything that came after 1978. Most other bands would have been proud of it.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 10:58:55 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I meant Caldonia. Excellent song, well-played, but it's not King Harvest, is it? I definitely didn't mean Caledonia Mission!


Entered at Sat Sep 12 10:56:30 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Back last night from four days in Northern Ireland. I must say nothing beats the beautiful winding twisting coastal road from Belfast right round to Giant's Causeway with "Irish Heartbeat" on the rental car's CD player as you drive past road signs pointing to Carrickfergus. The big surprise was Giant's Causeway … last time, 20 years ago, we parked in a gravel car park, wandered down and had it more or less to ourselves. Now you have a huge visitor centre, rows of tour coaches, £9 admission each. But it's still magical.

Our big discovery … well, I haven't touched beer for years as it gives me an instant headache, but was persuaded I must try Belfast Black Dry Stout (microbrewery, like Guinness but much, much better). No headache. Loved it.

The most interesting though was the "political taxi tour" of the murals - just a few of the 2000 in Belfast. Brilliant guide who gave such an impassioned but even-handed account of the troubles that we had no idea which side he was on. Northern Ireland really is a great destination. Good food, very friendly everywhere.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 08:16:36 CEST 2015 from (178.20.55.18)

Posted by:

roz

I'll be your man if you want me to, Pat. You want me to?


Entered at Sat Sep 12 08:14:39 CEST 2015 from (178.20.55.18)

Posted by:

roz

Still harpin' on the old polictics, huh Brennan? You and Pike. Two blide Obama-Mites. Haven't you learned yet? This is a music site. Talk music.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 05:06:40 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, do you mean roz is actually a man? Oh dear!


Entered at Sat Sep 12 04:50:07 CEST 2015 from (70.194.106.148)

Posted by:

BenPike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Various

Roz, you are the Ann Coulter of the guest book. Adam, to me Volcano is a fun track. Others are worse. I do think there was a general attempt to downplay Cahoots over the years as "ah, we weren't really trying." I think the group was already splintering, Robbie didn't have the songs and they should have bagged some of the stinkers and done covers or "Home Cooking" or something. But it was a full out effort. I am intrigued by Peter's bottom of the barrel list: by "Caledonia" does he mean "Caledonia Mission?" And "Country Boy" was my favorite off that album, not that I really count the post original line up stuff.


Entered at Sat Sep 12 02:26:40 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.6)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Yes, Tim does grate, but it's good to know he likes 100th Meridian. I heard Rich Terfy explain his apt choice, the Canuckisised "This Land Is Your Land" by the Travellers, which I grew up with so found myself singing along to. The Travellers did a zillion LPs for Columbia, I'm sure partly because the group's leader, Jerry Gray, was destist to legendary producer (e.g., Robert Johnson, the noted bluesman). They were all done in Toronto, except the one instance when they went to Nashville with Amos Garrett to record a 45 as the Munn Singers (a Canadian political joke that Nashville would have missed!)


Entered at Fri Sep 11 23:35:30 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, one of the great ironies of our time is the way "Values Voters" cast aside their (supposedly) deeply held beliefs to hitch their wagons to an amoral reality TV star.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 22:55:06 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: great minds

Bill M: '100th Meridian' is already listed (16/22), nominated by Tim Tamashiro, perpetually chirpy host of the _Tonic_ show. Tim's manner grates at times, but he plays some good shit.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 22:30:37 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.147)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm glad that Kevin J mentioned Canada's francophone songwriters. Gilles Vigneault's "Mons Pays" says much of what there is to say: "My country's not a country, it's the winter". Joni Mitchell's "The River" builds on that basic point. As for the Tragically Hip, I plump for "At The Hundredth Meridian"(Where The Great Plains Begin). Great song, great lyrics - including the arresting opening lines: "Me debunk an American myth, and take my life in my hands?"


Entered at Fri Sep 11 21:46:52 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Tears of an Orange Clown

REM isn't the only problem Candidate Trump has from Georgia. There's that former Georgia beauty queen Marla Maples that everyone seems to forget, along with the details of adultery and a daughter born out of wedlock, leading to a messy divorce from his first wife Ivana.

Strangely, there's one verse in that REM song that seems appropriate to the situation:

"Team by team, reporters baffled, trumped, tethered, cropped
Look at that low plane, fine, then
Uh-oh, overflow, population, common group
But it'll do, save yourself, serve yourself
World serves its own needs, listen to your heart bleed
Tell me with the Rapture and the reverent in the right, right
You vitriolic, patriotic, slam fight, bright light
Feeling pretty psyched."


Entered at Fri Sep 11 21:45:32 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Cleaning vinyl records

Peter, some time ago you wrote about a method you had for cleaning vinyl records you wanted to make copies of. Unfortunately I've forgotten what it was exactly. Would you mind running through it again?


Entered at Fri Sep 11 21:43:53 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: ain't gonna study war no more

There's this one, with the chorus

"We’ve been in politics for a long time . . . twenty years’ war against the mosquitos . . . "

and the comment

"Le samedi c'est le soir du hockey".


Entered at Fri Sep 11 20:32:37 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Stan the Man

Good God! how could I forget Stan Rogers. As well David Foster has done a great amount of Canadiana work, as has Neil Young.

Celine Dion is back playing in Lost Wages again huh.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 19:46:12 CEST 2015 from (213.205.252.240)

Posted by:

Peter v

Location: Belfast

Subject: Song forCanada

I'm a Lumberjack by Monty Python


Entered at Fri Sep 11 19:37:21 CEST 2015 from (76.71.7.163)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I really like Amy’s reflections on Massy Hall. I truly love that place. Thank you, John D.

Canada captured in song….some of the prominent Quebec songwriters like Robert Charlebois, Claude Dubois and Michel Rivard really succeeded in creating some songs that left the listener with vivid and lasting impressions of places – especially Montreal. If Steve was around, Stan Rogers would have been mentioned and rightly so !


Entered at Fri Sep 11 19:14:49 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ian Tyson and Sylvia Fricker sing Canada

Norm: I was waiting for you to bring 'Four Strong Winds' to the fore. There are many, many more. We have troubadours from sea to sea. I particularly like Kevin's Cockburn suggestion. It reflects so much of how I feel about Canada and says it all.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 19:12:44 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Amy Helm reflects on Toronto & her upcoming date on thev17th.

Coming with Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 18:17:46 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Songs from the heart

There are a great many, I'm surprised no one has mentioned "Four Strong Winds", Summer wages, My Home By the Fraser, Edmond Fitsgerald..........somebody stop me now!

Have some of you noticed on the news, (with the regular Donald Trump cartoons). The band REM has told Trump to "Cease and Desist" using their songs without permission for his "ridiculous sharade of a champagne". Wasn't he also chastised by Neil Young for the same sort of without permission behaviour. It would seem he has no respect for any one and can do as he pleases.....shameful!


Entered at Fri Sep 11 17:28:04 CEST 2015 from (24.114.66.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Coldest Night of the Year

Not easy to nail a feeling many Canadians share....that is, we love the place but also want to step out and escape to more exotic destination. Anyhow, Bruce Cockburn touched it all in this song.....love lost, music, cold cold nights and the dream of being in the south of France........

"I was up all night, socializing/ Trying to keep the latent depression from crystallizing/ Now the sun is lurking just behind the Scarborough horizon

And you're not even here/ On the coldest night of the year.

I took in Yonge Street at a glance/ Heard the punkers playing/ Watched the bikers dance/ Everybody wishing they could go to the south of France."


Entered at Fri Sep 11 17:26:21 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Every Canadian kid should learn: "Here Come The Hawks, The Mighty Blackhawks." Except for Coach SD's kids.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 16:53:44 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Great Lakes Swimmers

Great Lake Swimmers

"I will never see the sun

Spadina, St. George, Bay, and Yonge

One for nothing, all for one

Spadina, St. George, Bay and Yonge"


Entered at Fri Sep 11 16:37:01 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: What to teach Canadian kids? The songs matter.

Many others listed at a site on line suggested: Gordon Lightfoot ('Railroad Trilogy', 'Alberta Bound'): Blue Rodeo ('Montreal'); Guess Who ('Going Back To Saskatoon'); and many others. I would also look at songs by Joni Mitchell from the early days. Stompin' Tom Connors sang a ton of Canadiana worth exploring (hockey, Sudbury, etc.) A look at Vancouver (The Odds songs) and the maritimes (Great Big Sea and others) should be considered.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 16:21:45 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Canadian curriculum songs

Interesting choices; Tom Wilson (Blackie and The Rodeo Kings) has my respect. Some songs from the 3 individuals in that group and particularly those of Stephen Fearing should be considered. How can any curriculum in Canada be considered without Bruce Cockburn? "Helpless' by CSNY (Neil Young) and 'Bobcaygen ' and '50 Mission Cap) by the Hip. I'll think on this some more.


Entered at Fri Sep 11 14:38:00 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: ring ring goes the bell

CBC Radio 2 is running a cute little back-to-school feature [My link]:
"What Canadian song do you think should be taught in school? We asked some of your favourite musicians what song they would pick for Canada's curriculum."

The Band gets 2 picks (as does The Hip) -- predictably, "Acadian Driftwood" and less predictably, "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." The lead graphic is also lovely . . . .


Entered at Fri Sep 11 10:04:34 CEST 2015 from (59.147.202.188)

Posted by:

june

Location: china

Subject: hello

"I weather is nice today m005star@yahoo.co.jp"


Entered at Thu Sep 10 20:44:52 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Sadly, no, Angie. My T.O. haunts, when I was there, were generally on Yonge downtown, up and down the strip, and in Peter V's favorite site, in London, Ont. The Brass Rail was where I first experienced the Hawks. Needless to say, it was a defining moment in my otherwise drab existence. Also Grand Bend, when they were there on occasion. The Bend. Think Jersey shore


Entered at Thu Sep 10 16:37:13 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Concord Tavern Toronto

Thanks for the suggestions. If you have any further success, I look forward to seeing those photos.


Entered at Thu Sep 10 15:52:03 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

JT....Or contact James Reaney of James' Brand New Blog who posted photo of Concord Tavern.

Nomadic Mike...Weren't you at the Concord Tavern? No photos or memories? Everytime I'm across the street (The Concord Tavern/Long and MxQuade) to take-out food from a Portuguese restaurant; I always think about what I missed as I would have been too young to experience......The Hawks!!!


Entered at Thu Sep 10 15:44:42 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

JT...If you haen't done so already.....contact Carol Sewell?

"Ronnie Hawkins (but you knew that, right?) flanked by Carole (Regan) Sewell, right, & her girlfriend at the old Concord Tavern in Toronto c. 1961. Courtesy of Carol Sewell." Zoooom in for a peek at the interior of Concord Tavern..


Entered at Thu Sep 10 15:36:03 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

JT...You're most welcome. Photos mean a lot to me too, especially when they have personal significance.

Hi Al. Yes, I had also checked out a post card site (fabulous site btw) as well but only thing that turned up was the Çoncord picture of a photo cover that has been seen on other sites.


Entered at Thu Sep 10 07:06:51 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rollin with the punches

Yer right Jerry, of course. I was just looking for a little communication. Funny how the Yankees has a little burp at the same time.

This next series should be good fun. Keep the Rah, Rah going. think we need to get Pat B involved. This next NHL season is looking to be quite different, and exciting.


Entered at Thu Sep 10 04:31:22 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Peaks and valleys

Don't worry, Norm. Every team has a few clunkers. Tomorrow is another day. Orioles beat Yankees and we stay 1 1/2 up. Good on the Orioles!!


Entered at Thu Sep 10 04:28:28 CEST 2015 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

I think CAHOOTS is an essential part of the Band story. Instead of Stage Fright being the point of "showing weak songs and internal issues", it's really Cahoots. Stage Fright is the third part of the classic first 3 LP trilogy, CAHOOTS is where things really took a different turn. It has a very unique and acquired taste sound, and the whole thing seems like a dream or alternate reality for The Band. The cover suggests even a nightmare, showing echoes of the greatness ("The Band" painted figures) in the turmoil of the present.

I see CAHOOTS like one of Martin Scorsese's lesser praised works like "After Hours", another chapter or journey from a Band/group of auteurs. They played Carnival, Masterpiece, Where Do We Go From Here, Shootout In Chinatown, Smoke Signal at live shows. They just plain believed in some of the material to perform it.


Entered at Thu Sep 10 04:27:50 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: "For Love of the Game

Awright Jerry! What's goin' on?? Our Jays have taken a couple of beatings here!


Entered at Wed Sep 9 21:24:17 CEST 2015 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

I love CAHOOTS, "Moon Struck One", but Volcano is by far the weakest song. The only one I can really name when asked "Which Band song do you not only dislike, but think is bad?"


Entered at Wed Sep 9 17:06:44 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Levon and the Hawks- did you hear?

As I continue to look for other photos of the Concord Tavern, I was struck by how many comments in any photos related to this question noted that they had been to Saturday afternoon shows at The Concord or had seen Levon and the Hawks with or without Ronnie Hawkins in the 60s (Tony Mart, other Toronto bars etc.) I am sure we'd like to hear from them at this site. If any of you are reading this, please write and describe your recollections. Thank you.


Entered at Wed Sep 9 10:18:52 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JT and Angie

Just a thought

Have you thought of going to one of those Antique Fairs where one of the stalls may have loads of boxes of old postcards?

I know we have found stuff like what you're looking for of our old haunts in Liverpool and the South Wales valleys when we've gone to them by us.

:-0)

Hiya Roz - good to see you alive and well and stirring the pot as devilishly as ever!!!

;-0)


Entered at Wed Sep 9 08:05:19 CEST 2015 from (89.234.157.254)

Posted by:

roz

Subject: slow weak indeed

It amazes me that a group of people can keep alive a conversation centering around three dead guys, a mute accordian player (well, Garth'd be enough to fill this book up) and a Hollywood wanna-be who's actually a big old mush-mouth. Does he still wear that flappy old rug on his head? That's hilarious. Robbie's a really talented guy but he been saying the exact same half-baked stuff since 1980. Where's Diane? Yu know.. Captain Mama..


Entered at Wed Sep 9 06:15:02 CEST 2015 from (98.223.186.203)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Subject: Cahoots

Slow week............let's trash Cahoots (smh).


Entered at Wed Sep 9 05:12:50 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Concord Tavern photo lateral view from a distance

Wow! BEG: The first one ever! Thank you.


Entered at Wed Sep 9 04:55:22 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Last try for Concord Tavern Photo.....Zoom in for a little peek.

Sandy Beech
"Bloor and Ossington looking west on Bloor.The Concord tavern is a dead giveaway."


Entered at Wed Sep 9 04:17:40 CEST 2015 from (70.194.77.28)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: no where to go but up

I'm going to say Cahoots bottom and all time worst Band track is "Where do we go from Here?" It is not rescued by either Garth's Sax ( Last of the Blacksmiths) or piano (Thinking out Loud). The background vocals mesh poorly. It's a rather desperately poor notion to build a song on. Even the Buffalo rebelled by becoming less endangered.


Entered at Wed Sep 9 04:09:26 CEST 2015 from (70.194.77.28)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Moonstruck

Thanks guys, I knew I could get you going. An interesting counterpoint to Harold Bloom's not very swift take on "The Weight" we also got this weekend. I put my take on the more celebrated song on my FB page, and alerted a couple of my college profs that I was doing Bloom a turn or two better. I always thought of the couple in MSO as a young teen couple, maybe left on there own by any real authority figures, playing house before there time like Jimmy and Natalie in Rebel Without a Cause. Little John is another abandoned child from the neighborhood, who they treat as their kid. "Cohort" is sort of mock affection, like the men who call the boy "sidekick" in "Desperados Waiting For a Train." I was also thinking, since I see her as a spurned figure, socially hopeless yet given to unpredictable bouts of affection and good wishes, maybe Roz is Miss Fanny?


Entered at Wed Sep 9 04:08:01 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: No Concord Tavern photo (yet)

Looking at all the old bars and taverns and clubs was fun. I did the same as you.

Long & McQuade does NOT have a photo of the Concord Tavern. Vintage Toronto (Facebook) has not today provided a photo (yet). Maybe someone who looks at that Facebook site will come through. But so far, the photo is elusive.


Entered at Wed Sep 9 00:56:52 CEST 2015 from (203.10.111.131)

Posted by:

Doug

Location: Sydney

Subject: Moon Struck

I've enjoyed the discussion on Moon Struck One. But in my opinion it is not remotely the weakest song on Cahoots. I would probably give River Hymn that honour.


Entered at Wed Sep 9 00:34:08 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: A microphone question

I have come across the same photo in two places - one a record company advertisement, the other a picture sleeve from a 45. The difference between the photos is that the one on the sleeve has a number stamped on the microphone, whereas it has been removed in the advert.

The number is "952" and the photo was taken in a major U.S. studio in the mid-1960s. The question is whether the "952" indicates the model number of the microphone (as applied by the manufacturer) or whether the record company has numbered each of its microphones in order to keep track of its stock of microphones.

Does anyone know if there was a model 952 microphone in use by big record companies in the mid-1960s?

And, if so, who was the manufacturer?


Entered at Tue Sep 8 22:37:36 CEST 2015 from (65.93.140.73)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Apparently in Gil Evans' book Out Of The Cool; he loved Robbie's Moonstruck One.

JT...I also couldn't find any exterior photos of The Concord Tavern. I only found a site that had a photo of Bloor and Ossington but from 1911. I did however really enjoy looking once again at all the other bars and clubs as some of them I couldn't remember like the Clinton Tavern where I'd see the Cowboy Junkies, very first bar I walked into was the Piccadilly Tube for BB Gabor?, Nuts and Bolts was a great dance spot where we'd dance the night away to Billy Idol....One place I couldn't find was on Isabella and Yonge and it was another dance spot where I remember dancing to not Joy Division...Oh yeah, New Order....Larry's Hideaway and The Gasworks for Wilcox and Hotel Isabella for Paul James and Tony Bird, Hotel Cali for Downchild Blues Band, etc.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 22:06:44 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gil Evans

Apparently scheduling conflicts prevented Gil Evans from completing an arrangement for "The Moon Struck One" in time for the release of "Cahoots." As an artist with a lot of irons in the fire at the time, it's understandable. However, he must have had a demo recording from Robbie Robertson and/or sheet music for the song to use as a guide, and at some point over the years worked on scoring an arrangement before his death in Mexico in 1988. Here is a revealing excerpt from Stephanie Stein Crease's biography "Gil Evans: Out of the Cool":

"Gil's plans kept growing in the last few months of his life...When Gil left for Mexico, one of the scores he took with him (possibly meant for his own album) was an arrangement of a Robbie Robertson ballad, "The Moon Struck One," that he had been working on sporadically for several years. According to Gil Goldstein, a member of the Gil Evans Orchestra who has studied this score, it was a carefully crafted piece whose subtlety and detail rival Gil's scores of decades earlier. It remains a work in progress."

With the digital technology of today it's possible for one to prepare a new mix of the song combining the elements of Mr. Evans' score with the version The Band recorded. Perhaps the Evans arrangement could be used as an opening, followed by The Band's recording. Regardless of the lyrics, this mix would shed some new light of the possibilities had Mr. Evans been availble at the time to complete a collaboration with The Band.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 21:43:07 CEST 2015 from (174.236.33.120)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Wiggle Wiggle

Not weighing in pro or con on 'The Moon Struck One' or 'I Must Love You Too Much', as I don't have strong opinions one way or another about either song, but perhaps all songs in consideration should have to live up to this shining example from one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century.

"Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle like a gypsy queen
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle all dressed in green
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle ’til the moon is blue
Wiggle ’til the moon sees you"
-Bob Dylan

Hmm. moon reference....gets me thinking about this possibility:

"Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle 'til you've had your fun
Wiggle, wiggle wiggle 'til the moon strikes one"

Jackpot!! I just noticed that Mr. Dylan also used a snake motif in his song:

"Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, rattle and shake
Wiggle like a big fat snake"
-Bob Dylan

Inspires me to add:

"Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, over by the lake
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, getting stung by a snake"

In actuality, 'The Moon Struck One' isn't all that bad of a song, and while not perfect, it does have some strong imagery, such as this line:

"Julie came running through the pasture - she was screaming at the sky"
-Robbie Robertson


Entered at Tue Sep 8 20:30:07 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

David P: Thanks for that; sweet.
I noticed Howard Johnson & Bones Malone listed among the players . . . .


Entered at Tue Sep 8 20:13:22 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Moonstruck One

Evidently Gil Evans did actually work on an arrangement for "The Moon Struck One." Working from his charts the Gil Evans Orchestra recorded a in live version in Italy as part of "A Tribute to Gil" following his death. I've included a link to a later live version recorded in 2012.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 20:04:41 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hmm, Clapton and Lanois vs. Viney. Cage match.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 18:59:49 CEST 2015 from (82.70.34.132)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Belfast (today)

I love simple lyrics (Peggy Sue) and I love sloppy lyrics (Sealed With A Kiss), but I Must Love You Too Much isn't even a lyric but a throwaway, and yes few would pass up on the chance of a rare Dylan song, but this was one to pass on.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 18:25:44 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

The Moonstruck one always brings to mind for me Springsteen's spirit in the night." Crazy Davy got really hurt,he ran into the lake in just his socks and his shirt"


Entered at Tue Sep 8 17:41:34 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band - The Moon Struck One - by Daniel Lanois

"A stirring rendition on The Band's "The Moon Struck One" by Daniel Lanois at Robbie Robertson's induction into the Canadian Songwriter's Hall Of Fame."


Entered at Tue Sep 8 17:04:42 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: The Moon-struck One

I wonder if the lyrics' lack of polish might be due to JRR's attempt to create a 'child-like' atmosphere / narrator-protagonist. Remember that a pair of children [My link] were originally chosen as the cover art, to represent the concept of "cahoots." (And, of course, "in cahoots" is the default state for cohorts. "Cahoots," apparently, is also a bar in London built inside a tube carriage. Cocktails starting at just £8.)

I don't know from Truffaut, but TMSO scans like a spooky-movie treatment (always spookier with kids involved -- "they're baaack!").

Hickory dickory dock
The mice ran up the clock
The Clock Struck One
And the rest escaped with minor injuries


Entered at Tue Sep 8 16:46:00 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: They Played At Life and Lost

Drawing upon the cinematic influence on Robbie Robertson's songwriting, an obvious inspiration for "The Moon Struck One" is Truffaut's "Jules and Jim." While the lyrics fail to develop the thematic potential, the emotional edge of Richard Manuel's vocal performance breathes life into song.


Entered at Tue Sep 8 16:28:04 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: primeval odes

About 'finding value in lyrics': Peter, I know you know this, but some of the best oldies have inane lyrics and 3 or 4 chord 'garage band' riffs that are earworms and live on as classics. I don't think 'I Must Love You Too Much' falls into that category but it is of the same ilk. There are so many and I think they form the foundation of an important part of rock. Many of these songs are primeval odes to our simple human feelings. I revere them for what they are and how they affected me as a kid. They stay with me. 'Oh Charlena, Oh Charlena, big brown eyes, long ...Don't You know I care.'


Entered at Mon Sep 7 19:19:12 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: My mission: Concord Tavern photo(s)

I'm on a mission: I've written to Vintage Toronto (Facebook), Long & McQuade (925 Bloor St) (Facebook), to ask if anyone has an exterior view of Concord Tavern. We have photos of L'Coq d'Or, The Hawks Nest, The Friars, and so many more. But no Concord. Someone must have one!


Entered at Mon Sep 7 18:17:10 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In general, The Band's lesser songs are better than most band's best efforts, but I would draw the line at I Must Love You Too Much, Dylan's worst cast-off and not even interestingly played. There is some lovely playing lingering in The Moon Struck One, great singing too. Just a shame about the words … and you're right, Jerry. Little John was no David Crosby in the threesome stakes.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 16:58:44 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Damn the corrections

correction automatic again; 'trois' not 'trios'.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 16:57:41 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: interpretation

As for 'Triad' and TMSO, friends from childhood (my interpretation of TMSO) is different than menage a trios. But then its interpretation and that's what its all about.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 16:54:51 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: A bit harsh

The Band's 'worst' songs are better than many band's best songs.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 16:33:46 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Let’s face it, if the debut album by The Band had consisted of Caldonia, The Stuff You Gotta Watch, The Moon Struck One, Country Boy and I Must Love You Too Much none of us would be here now.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 16:29:49 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I wouldn't erase any work of art. One person's meat is indeed another's poison. But I might prefer an instrumental version. How Clapton could find any value in the lyric astounds me. From my notes on Cahoots:

This appeared on the box set, for no apparent reason. Levon Helm says it was written in the hope of getting Gil Evans to add arrangements, but it didn't happen.

I've tried hard to get into this to no avail. There's something about a great triangle between the singer, Julie his sweetheart and little John Tyler his cohort. (His what?) If you're into that kind of thing go for David Crosby's Triad, in the Jefferson Airplane version of course (Crown of Creation). Musically this is one of the few Band tracks to show any Beatles influence (Abbey Road ). It's there in the harmonies on lines like "as fast as we could run".

Julie came running through the pasture

She was screaming at the sky She fell down to her knees

And the tears did fly

Little John was stung by a snake, over by the lake

And it looked like he was really really hurt

He was lying in the dirt,

Oh, we went as fast as we could run

But we lost little John as the moon struck one

If I want to hear this kind of tear-jerker, I'll stick to Elvis on Old Shep. At least Old Shep arouses tears, if you're pissed enough, rather than the odd snigger (and it looked like he was really really hurt). The first sign of drying-up as a lyricist is padding out lines with unnecessary auxiliary verbs (And the tears did fly instead of the natural And the tears flew). This is Robbie's lowest point. It's awful.

The interest is Garth's keyboard work. Richard Manuel sings.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 14:32:19 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.28)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Band meets "Nineteen Eighty-Four"

No! Ironically, 1984 was, I believe, the year the OQ started talking about the setlist on their upcoming tour. I doubt the TMSO was even mentioned.

1984 was also a great spirit song.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 15:41:57 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Over the moon

I just reread the lyrics. I like them, though they are a little 'stilted'. It is an OK song and should be respected IMO. And if it strikes home, as I'm sure it does for many (like it does for Kevin) that speaks volumes.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 15:27:20 CEST 2015 from (24.114.97.36)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Moon Struck One - does have some fans.....

Rolling Stone : Are there any other people you feel that way about?

Eric Clapton: Yeah, the same with Robbie Robertson. If I sat down and thought for ten minutes about what he’s given me, I wouldn’t even be able to have coffee with him. I’d be awe-struck. I was devoted to the Band, and every song that he ever wrote for the Band had a profound effect on me. The story of the relationship in the song “The Moon Struck One” is so profound. It brings backs o many memories of my own childhood that is seems like Robbie must have been there. And when I see him, I just have to throw all that out the window and be who I am.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 07:33:19 CEST 2015 from (153.132.219.109)

Posted by:

Fred

An infinity plus one of Yeses.


Entered at Mon Sep 7 05:38:22 CEST 2015 from (70.194.100.137)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Yes or no question

O.K. If you could flip a switch, and erase any record or knowledge of the existence of "The Moon Struck One" forever, would you do it?


Entered at Mon Sep 7 04:44:33 CEST 2015 from (208.181.205.152)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Hell on Wheels - Makenzie Porter

For any one who is a fan of, or has watched "Hell on Wheels', in season 4 Cullen Bohannon marries a Mormon girl, that he has got "with child".

This girl who plays the part of Naomi Hatch, is Makenzie Porter from Medicine Hat, Alberta. A dynamite country singer, listen to her latest recording.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 22:25:41 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Where is a photo of the exterior Bloor St. Concord Tavern Toronto?

Bonk: Thanks. I've seen these. I just reviewed them. A photo of a buffet spread, photo of an ad, photo of Frolic Room, but no outside photo.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 20:19:26 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: One for Calvin and the other Gene Clark/Byrd fans on the GB

Glasgow and the UK's finest doing their best earlybyrd impression

:-0)


Entered at Sun Sep 6 19:59:41 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.73)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i'm wrong about the band. The band i met was Joe Yule on drums, Buddy Whittington on Guitar, and a Pittsburgh bassist named something Van Zandt. they all lasted with him a long time, prior & after, and I was under the impression this was still his band. a trip t his website now indicates otherwise. and i had his age wrong too. I met them in 2002 or 2003, so it wasn't his 75th birthday. Much younger than that, but it was his birthday .


Entered at Sun Sep 6 19:54:13 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.73)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, he's had this band for a long time. I met them at his 75th birthday show in NYC. His bassist & i have a mutual musician friend. I met Mayall, and must say, I wont forget him. An eccentric gentleman...I was backstage when Mayall was presented with this ginormous rectangular chocolate mousse birthday cake. He disappeared into his dressing room, came back with a goddam big zip loc bag, the size of which i had not yet seen. Mayall then held the bag over the cake, to gauge size. He cut the right size piece, inserted it into the bag , then sealed the bag. Then he went back to the dressing room again, returned with a big fucking book, lifted it way over his head, and lowered the boom onto the cake. Flattened it, squished it in to the bag. Satisfied with himself, he took it in to the dressing room. For later. wit the dinners that BB Kings had brought for him, in tin foil to go pans, pbviously, he was taking it all back to the hotel room for later. not unusual. guess.

None of the band members reacted like this was unusual, two of them indicated to me that this was rather mild.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 19:38:08 CEST 2015 from (108.36.197.190)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Mayall

I went out to see Dave Mason last year and John Mayall opened. His current band is a group of hand picked greats. I was so glad I showed up on time. Could have stood much more than an hour of their playing. Hadn't seen him play since he opened for Jefferson Airplane in 1969. Wish I'd caught a lot more of his stuff in the interim.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 18:31:56 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Revisit ROIO for a better version of Washington DC 1976.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 18:26:50 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jonny Almond died in 2009. Jon Mark is in New Zealand (Wiki) - that drummer less line up were the best Mayall band I saw. And I saw him several times before that!


Entered at Sun Sep 6 18:16:59 CEST 2015 from (207.81.32.57)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Concord

JT. On Facebook if you go to Vintage Toronto. Under Bars, Taverns and Pubs, there's a picture of some sort of the bar's interior with a book of matches I think. I have the pic on my desktop but can't seem to put it up here.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 17:43:37 CEST 2015 from (173.3.49.73)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Mayall on the road at 81. No one told him ........It would be kinda cool to have a Bluesbreakers band blowout.... Don't know how feasible it is financially, if people would pay to see that, or a backer would materialize, but Fleetwood & McVie, Taylor, Clapton, Green, are alive, others (Sugarcane Harris, Mark & Almond, might be) Some big names....


Entered at Sun Sep 6 16:02:34 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Concord Tavern photos

Bill M: Your mention in your recent entry of the Concord Tavern prompted me to ask this question. There are photos on the internet of the Long & McQuade building that once was Concord Tavern on Boor St. near Ossington. There are old ads for LATH and there is a few other references to it in photos. But, does anyone have photos of The Concord Tavern as it was from the exterior in those days in the 50s and 60s? Unfortunately, and I have looked, we have NO PHOTOs of the building exterior or interior.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 11:07:38 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, but as you need fifteen players for that World Cup, so it excludes countries with a population of fewer than 15 fit males between 16 and 40. So while San Marino can make up a soccer team, rugby is a stretch too far.


Entered at Sun Sep 6 09:21:39 CEST 2015 from (122.60.111.136)

Posted by:

Rod

Peter, the World Cup Starts in October


Entered at Sat Sep 5 23:51:06 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shooting fish in a barrel

As the nation applauds England's 6-0 victory over San Marino, you have to think it's well past time for Qualifying Rounds for the European and World Cups . It's of no relevance to England now, we have qualified, but so often qualification can depend on whether you beat San Marino, Andorra or Leichtenstein 7-0 or 8-0. There are teams there simply to be beaten by large scores, and frankly, in spite of the hype, anything less than 20-0 is a disgrace.

It's like Wayne Rooney equalling Bobby Charlton's record for England goals. But we really shouldn't count goals against medium sized towns with amateur teams.

I like San Marino. I've been there twice, even given a lecture to teachers there once. But they really should't be competing in international football … you need a qualifying round for the minnows.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 18:26:53 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.7)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the photo of Debbie Fleming with the Hawks in the early '60s. I believe she was a Duncan until she married Gord Fleming in the mid '60s. Gord was the best of the crop of young organists of the time (after Garth Hudson of course) and would eventually be among the team of local all-stare assembled by Ronnie Hawkins to replace the Disciples, who'd replaced our guys on Ronnie's bandstand - Stan Szelest, Sandy Konikoff, Gord Fleming, Eugene 'Jay' Smith, Bobby Starr ...

Her friend Bill Cudmore's group, Robbie Land and the Disciples, were a mixture of three teenage groups from relatively far flung parts of town - Mimico, Don Mills and the Danforth. It hadn't occurred to me until now that the Concords matinees may well have been where they all first met and saw each other in action (i.e., when Hawkins let some onstage as guests. '


Entered at Sat Sep 5 15:44:20 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Wallsend. Nothing wrong with sharing photos we've already seen as there's always someone who hasn't seen them. And some of us keep sharing the same photos as we've been posting here toooooo long! ;-D

Debbie Fleming "Yep - Teenage Saturday matinee at the Concord - 50 cent cokes - That was VERY expensive in those days. (I think a regular glass of coke was maybe ten cents?") smile emoticon

"Debbie is seen here onstage with the Hawks - singing "In the Still of the Night" backed by the Starlighters vocal group, Robbie Robertson on guitar, Rebel Payne on bass, Will Pop Jones on piano and Levon Helm on drums. — with Rebel Payne, Will Pop Jones, Debbie Fleming, The Starlighters, Robbie Robertson and Levon Helm."

The other reason music is so important to me.......energizes!

E=MC2
Energy equals Motivation, Commitment and Clarity

Have yourselves a Healthy Happy Fun Labour Day Weekend!


Entered at Sat Sep 5 15:19:53 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I also taught Music Appreciaton at school so I always wanted to know what the kidzzz were digging but I would also share the music that was in Robbie's book.......I was a head of Robbie there!

Here is ASAP Rocky and Twenty One Pilots.....What I liked here is that 21 Pilots rapper/singer looks and sounds like a very young Eminem......ASAP who lived in shelters in Harlem with his Mom and now lives in a Penthouse in Soho is charismatic and eye candy....but what really hooked me......The rap beats changed to a reggae grooooooove and then at the end they give a shout out to their moms in their rap. Alright!


Entered at Sat Sep 5 15:02:58 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Greil Marcus "Bob Dylan" part 1 of 4

"This book begins with a rumor in Berkeley in the mid-1960s and ends on Election Night in Minneapolis in 2008. In one moment a small crowd holds its breath as a person pretending to be Bob Dylan performs from inside a wooden box; in another, Dylan appears for the first time at his erstwhile alma mater, the University of Minnesota, and on a night when the country voted for change, invests songs he has carried with for nearly half a century with new meaning. Between these two events, Greil Marcus, (Mystery Train, Liptrick Traces, and the Old Weird America) has followed Bob Dylan's work with a fan's intensity and a detective's persistence. Here, that ranges from a Rolling Stone piece on Dylan's 1970 Self Portrait to a recognition of the depths of Time Out of Mind nearly thirty years later. And a whole lot of in between - long investigations into the tangled stories told by old American music, and pithy twenty-five or fifty-word comments on records, books, concerts, radio commercials, and nearly anything else under the sun. The end result is a sparkling and enduring chronicle of a more than 40-year engagement between an unparalleled singer and a uniquely acute listener. Discussion with Matt Friedberger of the Fiery Furnaces."

Thanks for reminding me that one day I have to get back to reading the two Greil Marcus books I have.....Mystery Train and Invisible Republic Bob Dylan's Basement Tapes. As far as his interviews.....It would help if he'd modulate his voice.

Al Edge....When I was very young we didn't play on the streets because there were fields around as subdvisions hadn't been built yet. So we were able to skate on rinks outside, build snow homes, play baseball with the boyzzzz. The other thing we did which probably started my love of music was the boyzzzz would pretend they were The Beatles and we'd pretend we were The Supremes. Movies were another escape so when The Beatle movies came out.....I was there at a very young age. When we'd go to each others homes......We'd listen to The Beach Boys, Tommy James and The Shondells, Mamas and The Papas, Beatles, etc.....no music players at my place until my brother bought an 8-track player when he was in high-school, and I was given a small record player when I started high-school....first 45's "Hey Jude" and "Whole Lotta Love". My brother had his bedroom walls plastered with posters of musicians....especially British ones.....the only female up was Rita Coolidge. I would watch all the music award shows, and watch The Midnight Special, Dean Martin shows, etc. It's no wonder that my musical tastes are ecletic because I was always open to anything musical. In high-school I'd receive the newspaper Rolling Stone via of mail. Also at this time my school organized a bus trip to the big city of Toronto where we saw Yes. I only knew one song and wasn't a fan but I had to have this experience. Sadly....very sadly it was the year The Band and Dylan also performed. Why? Why? Why? Why did the cool kidzzz organize a trip to see Yes and not The Band with Dylan??????????????? :-((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((
Next year I saw The Rolling Stones in Buffalo, New York where Jagger would throw water on fans and..........Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue in Niagara Falls, New York and in Toronto!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Oddly enough my first flame in Toronto was at the The Band and Dylan show. He was the one who took me to see The Mighty Clouds of Joy at the Colonial Club here. I find trying to keep up with current music keeps me young but also engaged.......as we can learn from anyone and also receive joy from anyone. I can't stand when people say "rap is crap"!!!!!! No.....Their thinking is crap as how can a whole genre be crap????? Another treat for me watching the Video Music Awards was being exposed for the very first time to ASAP Rocky and Twenty One Pilots......so creative! It might not be timeless music......but for now.....I dig it!

Today would have been Rollie (Jeff Newsom's) 57th birthday. I will always have fond memories of my friend who I met via of the Chat Room on this site. He was able to attend TLW because of his sister's connection with Garth. I was lucky to have spoken to him many times and share music with each other. He was always so funny and had a kind heart. I don't know how to share the very short blues harp piece he sent me, otherwise I'd share just so you could also hear his voice as well. This was the little tune that I shared with my class at the time and the young students played along with him. Jeff also loved children and hiking and always told me not to get involved with a musician. He was from Joisey but ended up by the Teton Hills. I miss you Jeff. Thank you for the time we shared together. :-D


Entered at Sat Sep 5 14:28:35 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: "Maggie Mae' video

If this is what you are referring to... the Peter V linked ... 'Maggie Mae' video with (I think) John Peel at the end for a couple of seconds... John D (not S)... I could see it here on the west coast.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 14:17:43 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

That should be John D. Haven't changed last name. Haha.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 14:16:31 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John S

Subject: Peel

Unfortunately Peter that video is not available for us to watch in Canada. Too bad.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 14:16:08 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The politics of guilt

Is the western response an attack of conscience or is this a craven mix of politics and guilt?


Entered at Sat Sep 5 14:10:37 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Invisible Republic (The Old Weird America) G.Marcus

While not a huge fan of Invisible Republic, I think you have to view it as an abstract approach (metaphors and all) to the topic of The Basement Tapes. It again is hard to read and at times comprehend, and so, it has its flaws. But I see it almost as a kind of poetry, describing in abstract ways how this group of songs fits into an evolution of the folk tradition of music in America. As such, I think it succeeds.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 13:24:55 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mystery Train

When I first read it, I thought it the finest book on rock then written. I've done Toppermosts on Sly Stone, Elvis Presley, Randy Newman and The Band, so our tastes must be similar! A lot of the meat was hidden in the appendices. I have three editions, but have stopped wanting the latest revision. Sure the first one had errors on The Band, but nobody knew much anyway.I followed his writing for years, but Invisible Republic was near unreadable for me.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 13:19:37 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: D'ye ken John Peel

John Peel was perhaps the most influential British DJ. His finest hour- miming mandolin with Rod Stewart & The Faces (LINKED) was a defining moment in British rock TV. You need to watch to the end if you don’t know it. The show was mimed (or sung to a pre-recorded track) and The Faces were fond of giving the game away, as here. There were the two classes of DJ, and Top of The Pops was the “pop” end with the Likes of Tony Blackburn and Jimmy “Yugh!” Saville. John Peel had done a few, but he really was not their thing.

As to his tastes, I have strong doubts. He was an early champion of Rod and The Faces, and a pal, but apparently switched when they got too famous. For example, he enthused hugely about Supertramp (Mark 1) in 1970 when they did his show. Of course they weren’t famous then. Five years later, he totally reversed. He had a strong affection for the different and the odd, and a strong distaste for commercial success.

He went to the elite Shrewsbury “public” school (i.e. hugely expensive private boarding school) and got started in Texas as a DJ, where it is said he first adopted the Liverpool accent … he was born in Liverpool, but the son of a wealthy cotton family. I know a Liverpudlian friend in the early 70s reckoned his accent was totally fake.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 13:00:53 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mystery Train: My take

Mystery Train: Recollections - I read it early on in its first iteration and found it highly interesting, informative, well-written, and a cut above most of the other books discussing music in those years. I met Mr. Marcus years later after hearing him speak and he was true to form in his lecture, very personable and as a first impression, quite passionate and committed to his craft. All fine attributes. Mystery Train is one of those books that you have to read a number of times and sentences in it have to be pondered. Not a bad challenge for prose.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 12:53:47 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Even further 'empathy' clarification

I should clarify even further - a Canadian/American "fraternity" that at the time were afforded the privilege of lavish 'Band' saturation yet appear singularly unaware of the fact that their fellow Bandophiles across the ocean were inestimably less indulged to the point of virtual Band expropriation beyond the 12" vinyl discs clutched lovingly and forlornly to their UK bosom.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Sep 5 12:37:31 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Clarification

I should clarify - "Empathy" amongst our far more abundant non-UK fraternity

:-0)


Entered at Sat Sep 5 12:34:41 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: UK Band deprivation

Ian/Pete - good posts and points.

Clearly my take is a personal interpretation and you may well be right about the likes of John Peel - who I have to admit I chose not to listen to.

However, from what yourself and Pete say it is reassuring to know that there wasn't in operation some clandestine Band devoted secret radio station that yourself, Pete, Dunc and Roger were tuned into whilst I wandered the desolate path of Band deprivation all alone.

:-0

John Peel is a funny one. Despite his Merseyside roots and huge devotion to that other love of my own life [LFC] I simply never "got" the fella. Or his musical taste. In fact I'm unsure to this day whether he ever actually had any musical taste worthy of the name or whether his taste merely extended to 'getting off' on the kudos that he gathered in huge swathes for playing stuff nobody else did and thereby creating a fan-base interest in that particular act.

Very likely a warped cynicism at play there but sometimes I think you need a decent dollop of that to counter the more prevalent empathy.

Which term brings me onto the complete absence of it on this site down the years whenever the subject of UK Band deprivation has ever reared its sad rather pathetic head.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Sep 5 11:01:24 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Researching

Thanks, Ian. I'll follow that up. For the earlier period I've been writing fiction about (1964-1969) I picked up the odd old copy of Radio Times when they turned up, just one or two a year, but it gives a good general feel. I also spent hours researching local newspaper microfiche, so the details and prices are all correct for "Music To Watch Girls By," the 1967 novel (linked), though aspects of the variety show in the story utilised three or four different real ones from 1966 to 1968.

There's a great Vintage Magazine shop in Soho, where I could spend hours. The magazines that are really hard to find are the throwaways of the era, like Weekend or Tit-Bits. People often stored music papers … New Musical Express, Disc and Melody Maker are around in quantity, as are magazines like Vogue and Queen. The cheap read it and bin it ones give the most fascinating details on the period. I can't imagine why people stored up Radio Times (basically the weekly BBC TV and radio listings) for years, but they did. Part of it must be some of the fine commissioned illustrations they used on the radio pages … woodblocks by the likes of Eric Gill.

I always keep my eye open for magazines. I picked up an OZ last week in a secondhand record shop - not one of the famous issues, but still, a 1971 OZ in very good condition for £4. (They start at around £25 in London and climb steeply). The biggest music ad is Mike Harrison's first solo album on Island (ex-Spooky Tooth). Also, judging from OZ, apparently in 1971 men had to wear a moustache for sex.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 09:58:43 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Band and the Beeb

Peter, though I cannot give you the information, I am confident that the BBC Written Archives (in Caversham, as I recall) will contain the information. They have kept many (maybe all) of the Beeb's documents and that includes details of all the programmes and what was actually broadcast. I do not know the process to obtain access.

I know this from my various Dylan activities and enquiries in the past. Around 35 years ago, an academic librarian in Germany of my acquaintance came up with an interview Dylan for a radio show called "Teen Scene". Dylan was at London Airport (and there are photos of him there with headphones on) and the interviewer was in the London studio. No tape exists but the BBC made and kept a transcript as part of a document giving details of the whole programme. I still have the photocopy I was sent.

The same happened for TV. When I helped with a programme about Dylan's first visit to Britain to take part in a TV play, I was given access to a lot of material (scripts, contracts, even copies of newspaper reviews of the play).

NOTE: for those outside the UK who may not know, the "Beeb" is colloquial for the BBC - perhaps a bit less so these days but certainly back in the period we're talking about.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 08:28:09 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Band in the UK

UK media – my example of Time to Kill / Just Another Whistle Stop from Stage Fright on a Saturday afternoon is … true. Time to Kill was eventually a single, but Sleeping was the UK B-side, so I guess it was tracks 3 and 4 from the LP in order. It’s surprisingly difficult to Google who had the mid-afternoon show. I think Stuart Henry, even though he was later famous for the Saturday morning show/

The Weight (UK #21) and Rag Mama Rag (UK #16) both got decent air play. Rag Mama Rag remains by far the most likely Band song on UK radio, as it was on Radio Two’s quite short “Golden Oldie” list for years. Terry Wogan was fond of it. The “Top 20 or not Top 20” line may be important.

John Peel? Might have played them early on, but by the early 70s they weren’t his sort of thing, as their songs had both melody and musical competence / technique, neither of which seemed to appeal to him in later days.

I am certain they were in the cartoon slot on one of the very first Old Grey Whistle Tests. They used to put a “Steamboat Willie” era cartoon on and it would appear to synch with the music, presumably an illusion. I have mentioned this before, and King Harvest was one of the first they did. No record of it whatsoever, but I’m sure it was in the Richard Williams era (1971). In the article on the song I said it was where I first heard it in 1969, but that can’t be right as the show started in 1971, but I do recall Disney farmyard animals to King Harvest. I once spent ages Googling to find out if they kept those sequences.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 04:23:41 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.95)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Linked, for anyone who can read. Talent agents think social-media-is-more-important-than-acting talent


Entered at Sat Sep 5 03:42:20 CEST 2015 from (76.66.114.225)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lisa: I take it that the BF wasn't David Wiffen. Just before or just after his Bunkhouse LP he joined a Prince George rock band, the Pacers, whose drummer, Brian Hilton, who subsequently was in a band with David Foster, Dwayne Ford and Hugh Brockie that Ronnie Hawkins hired en masse in '71 to be his newest Hawks. Foster and others left, Terry Danko and Jim Atkinson joined, and the resulting aggregation left Hawkins to gig and record as Atkinson Danko and Ford (with Hilton and Brockie) (aka Bearfoot). Hilton rejoined David Foster's new Vancouver group, Skylark, who hit immediately with “Wildflower”, the singer of which, Donny Gerrard, is now Mavis Staples's vocal foil.

Ian W: You're welcome. Perhaps serendipitously, I just finished the text of “Young Neil”, and am now onto the appendices, one of which is Neil Young's long-time bassist Ken Koblun's (Squires, Four to Go, briefly Buffalo Springfield) gig list from '62-'66. Some of the venues may be of interest to you: the Cellar Club and the Fourth Dimension in Winnipeg as far back as '63. Later, in late '65, Koblun left Young and backed the Dirty Shames (Amos Garrett's group) for a couple gigs, and then signed on with US duo Jim and Jean, who played a bunch of US clubs and also the Riverboat and the New Gate of Cleve in Toronto and La Femme Fatale in Montreal.

Perhaps this is how Neil Young became acquainted with Jean of Jim and Jean, the inspiration for both “Cinnamon Girl” and “Cowgirl In The Sand”. Jim and Jean opened a number of shows for 3's A Crowd, which must be how Koblun got hired as their bassist – but only after a stint with the Stormy Clovers, a very influential but unrecorded Galt/Toronto band who, at about the same time, Hawks mentor Mary Martin had managed to get into the studio and had hired Garth Hudson to transcribe some songs in NYC shortly after Dylan's Euro-tour.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 01:38:40 CEST 2015 from (82.19.62.64)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Bill M, Richard and Mimi Farina, Greil Marcus, Band in the UK

Thanks, Bill M, form your efforts. It is appreciated

I know that Richard and Mimi Farina played the New Gate of Cleve. This was mentioned in Variety, no less (no. 239. June 2, 1965. p. 60. "New Acts"). It was a review saying they had an audience of six!

I mention this now because I fairly recently saw a documentary about Greenwich Village on TV and it included a clip of them playing "House Un-American Activity Blues" that I have never seen before. The credit was to a Canadian source, which probably means that they were on a TV programme in Canada. I wondered if anyone might know which programme that was or might have been - around May 1965.

Al is right re Greil Marcus; quite hard-going at times but, more often that not, worth the effort. I only have the original paperback of "Mystery Train" and having read it through the once, I often took it on journeys to delve into along the way. As well as being an interesting read, it had the advantage of being quite a small paperback, fitting neatly in a pocket. I had another (non-music) paperback, slightly smaller, that served the same function. Neither was a simple read and both yielded more on subsequent readings.

Al also raises the interesting question of the coverage of The Band by the UK media in the late 1960s and early 1970s. I'd have to have a think about that. Did John Peel not play them? What about Stuart Henry? Possibly even Noel Edmonds on his Sunday morning shows on Radio One in th early 1970s?



Entered at Sat Sep 5 00:49:10 CEST 2015 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: The Bunkhouse

Bill, I used to go to the Bunkhouse around 1966/67. My boyfriend at the time was a folk singer with a group (and they were quite good, too), so we used to go to hootenanny nights. I saw Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee and Jose Feliciano several times. I think Pat Paulson (comedian who made a mock run for the U.S. presidency) used to play there too.

It was a tiny, crowded downstairs venue on Davie Street, run by Les Stork, who I always found a little ... intimidating. Before my time, he almost had his licence suspended for introducing Vancouver's first-ever topless waitresses. City council quickly put a stop to that. It was strictly a coffee place, no liquor licence, though I would have been far too underage to care about that.

That mention certainly brought back a lot of memories!


Entered at Sat Sep 5 00:17:57 CEST 2015 from (97.127.57.243)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

JT, I like your take on the 11/15/65 show, same as mine on 11/05/65. Witness to history, but didn't know it then.


Entered at Sat Sep 5 00:04:15 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Enjoyed that, Al, you missed Time To Kill on a Saturday afternoon in the summer of 1970, played on BBC Radio, and then they followed with Just Another a Whistle a Stop. Both previously unheard of. I fell out of the deckchair in my mum's garden in sheer shock, banged my elbow on the teapot, and shouted 'Fucking brilliant! ' so loud the neighbours complained, but otherwise I think you have the complete British media coverage until Marcus.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 23:41:25 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.139)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: I finally got around to emailing Harvey Glatt, who called right back. He doesn't remember having a formal list, but could still name a few: the New Penelope in Montreal, the New Gate of Cleve, the Purple Onion, the Riverboat and the Bohemian Embassy in Toronto and the 4-D mini-chain (Fort William, Winnipeg and Regina). Ironically, I was just reading about the latter in "Young Neil"; Neil played the first two (and Joni Mitchell likey all). I'll add the Bunkhouse in Vancouver, where Sonny and Brownie recorded an album, as did David Wiffen circa '65.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 22:51:43 CEST 2015 from (70.194.72.104)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Various

Never been a big "Stones I Throw" man but I do enjoy some of the pre Big Pink Singles quite a lot. I even found something online, "Having a Party" or something, that wasn't on any of the box sets. Levon lead vocal. Griel Marcus has really come to rub some people the wrong way, the critic Chris Morris has become really nasty about him, though he admits he was inspired by Mystery Train. I can go either way. He does get childishly nasty about artists he has always hated (James Taylor, Paul Simon) and his attacks on Joan Baez border on the sexist. But he's usually worth checking out. I found his recent Van Morrison book a bust, but his one on the Doors surprisingly interesting. I picked up The Rolling Stone Reviews books, volume one and two, on Amazon not too long ago, think I had to go ten bucks for each. They are really fun to own. Marcus has a long piece about Them and Van Morrison that is really good.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 22:44:35 CEST 2015 from (173.3.50.95)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sadavid, Ben, yes, i agree the article is definitely interesting, and worth a read. It raises points, and as a bonus, raises the subject of viewpoints.

After I wrote you here Sadavid, i returned and finished the article. My point when i wrote you was that at point in the article the author's view was a misconception, based on a total miscalculation, and therefore was wacky, impossible to be correct. (It jumped out so hard, i had to stop reading and point it out). Sadavid, you take another view, or a similar & connected view of it, that he was blinded by prejudice, and yes, it would be accurate to say that. Yours is an accurate & interesting way to look at it. Thank you... His prejudice caused him to miscalculate or misconceive & present a failed argument or failed argument there.... . Interesting & timely....


Entered at Fri Sep 4 22:17:44 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.31)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Well said. The torah is an interesting comparator, though I much prefer "Mystery Train".


Entered at Fri Sep 4 22:08:16 CEST 2015 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

Hey Sebastian, any news on "Royal Albert Hall 1971" or a live show box set? Thanks!


Entered at Fri Sep 4 20:16:01 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Can you hear that singing? Sounds like gold...

Link to live version of Jason Isbell performing "Danko/Manuel," a tribute he originally performed while he was a member of the Drive-By Truckers.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 20:00:45 CEST 2015 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: A UK take on Greil Marcus's two tomes

It's quite some time since I read Invisible Republic and it was back around the late '70's when I was loaned Mystery Train by a mate whose daughter had bought it on the recommendation of her College lecturer who we used to call Skunk not because he stunk but on account of the fact he was dead spit of the man himself - Jeff 'Skunk' Baxter.

:-0)

Anyroad - contrary to the negative reception the fellow has had on here over the years I love Marcus's writing. Sure it can be a mite impenetrable and long-winded at times but for me not to identify so effortlessly with such a style would be akin to a young kid not liking Santa.

As it is the philosophical meanderings of Invisible Republic grabbed me from the start. Obviously I never understood a fecking thing he was waxing lyrically about yet it still all made the most perfect sense to me.

Indeed, so taken with its powerful images of the 'American Community' was I, that rightly or wrongly it compelled me to begin a footy book I'm still to finish with the following Greil Marcus derived sentiments.

WARNING - skip the ensuing 13 paras unless you are a masochist or have in the past ever enjoyed any stuff I've written.

:-0)

"" "" In Invisible Republic, his insight into Bob Dylan’s and The Band’s Basement Tape legacy, the American writer Greil Marcus offers us a vision of America as a single broad community to which all Americans belong; either willingly or otherwise. He views it as a part of the American Dream accessible to any American as well as one to which many of that nation’s romantics allude.

What Marcus infers is that from the inhabitants of every hicktown community to the sophisticates of every neoned metropolis, every American from cradle to grave is fed – and has an inherent right to be fed – with the need to feel American in order simply to exist.

Now this may be a rather crude over-simplification of Marcus’s intricate prognosis. It may be, too, an even cruder over-simplification of what is an overtly complex and highly sophisticated state of existence. After all, we are talking here of two hundred odd million souls – a good many, indeed, exceedingly odd – not to mention countless sub-cultures scattered across zillions of square miles bridging two great oceans and spanning several time-zones. Generalisations, frankly, can be rendered ludicrous; presumptions invalid.

And yet Marcus’s sentiments do capture nicely some essence of what it means to be American. Sure, it may exist merely as an ideal as far as many Americans are concerned. Sure, too, its sense of some universal rootsy American belonging may present a rather bewildering homely paradox to the overwhelming might and potency of the American nation and the sheer lunacy of some of its inhabitants.

Nevertheless, that same elusive homeliness really does give Americans something – however nebulous – on which to focus and aspire towards being a part of. Consciously or otherwise. Indeed, it may even be that the unconscious nature of such focus and aspirations in many cases lends an almost spiritual emphasis to the notion of being American, bequeathing it a panorama that to the outsider can seem both romantic and mystical.

A youthful John Lennon gazing over the stern of the Mersey ferryboat towards this – and his own – land of dreams was surely one such aspirant who felt this surge of wistful attraction to a place to which he had never been other than in such dreams. Of course, whether in John’s particular case, he was merely puking up the remnants of his previous night’s bender we shall probably never know for sure. Likely he never even knew himself.

No matter. Whatever the reality may happen to be, one thing would seem irrefutable. This underlying sense of attachment – this virtual 'mother earth' American identity – is something we British do not appear to possess. There would seem to be no corresponding epic-scale British equivalent to that broad American community.

Sure, we have those British who are patriotic. Some jingoistically so. The repeated cycles of brouhaha over whatever happens to rank as our latest fleeting glimmer of Bitish triumphalism be it a Golden Jubilee or Jonny Wilkinson’s golden boot more than reinforce the existence of that particular characteristic. We also have the whole Celtic thing with its heartfelt yearnings that on occasions can approach almost a sense of desperation. And, of course, we have some regions with identities as strong as the national one; possibly stronger. The Geordie; the Liverpudlian most certainly.

Yet such identities – whether parochial, heartfelt, jingoistic or just plain conventionally patriotic – lack the sheer depth and scale of their American counterpart. They can find no real parallel with that all-embracing homespun American ethos that Greil Marcus finds so fundamental to – and so conspicuous within – his countryfolk’s Americandom.

Yet, as if to balance it all, we British do still happen to possess something of our own – with, indeed, a rootsiness all of its own – to which we can cling. Something of which we all can be a part that is perhaps intrinsically more substantial than ourselves.

For over a hundred years in this country, football clubs have provided huge swathes of the British people with a connection. Demonstrably, such connections may be nowhere near on the same cinematic scale as in actually belonging to America. Certainly, too, they lack the corresponding dramatic impact to compare – although it might be interesting all the same to have seen just how your average American would have coped with the tension of a penalty shoot-out featuring Chris Waddle. But let us not be churlish here. Chris Waddle, after all, has always been a British problem.

The bottom line is, of course, not even the most demure follower of, shall we say, Watford AFC can ever possess quite the same dramatic aura or street credibility cool as a denizen of the Bronx or some aspiring mid-western James Dean in blue jeans and white T-shirt. Regardless of however many times Elton John sprouts a fresh head of hair that Watford supporter will simply never be able to pull it off. The same – we would hope – goes for the hair.

And yet, emerging from out of it all, there is still that sense of attachment. And it is an acute and significant attachment. Perhaps, some might even submit, vital. Indeed, in a country that in recent decades has seen any sense of the real community it developed throughout the first seventy odd years of the previous century being eroded year by year, a connection of such unifying emotional intensity might well be far more significant than anybody cares to recognize. Or concede. When all is said and done that inherent human craving for attachment is not just confined to the bloody Yanks. Nor, for that matter, Elton John’s follicles." "

And as for Mystery Train - in response to Kev's query?

Suffice to say it came out a decade or so after Big Pink had first beguiled us Bandophiles with its majesty. In that intervening period I had read only the odd fleeting reference to The Band in UK media publications. In fact, other than the sleevenotes on that initial Big Pink album cover I'm sure the sole references to The Band had been:

1]A back to back airing of 'Rockin Chair/Cripple Creek by a UK disc jockey called Kenny Everett on his Saturday morning show

2] The weekly playing on the Alan Freeman Sunday afternoon radio show Pick of the Pops of 'Rag mama Rag' while it briefly charted during 1970

3] A new 'singles' release review show that featured a brief snatch of 'The Shape I'm In'

4] A one liner glowing NME comment from George Harrison

and

5]A similar fleeting mention in an NME interview with Donald Fagan and Walter Becker as they basked in the comparatively mega publicity for 'Can't Buy A Thrill'.

As you can see we UK Band fans were starved to death. Against such a backdrop, the reason why Greil Marcus's indispensible rock masterpiece was so voraciously devoured by UK fans of The Band despite the comparative brevity of the section that dealt with them is not hard to fathom.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Sep 4 19:20:37 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Ralph J. Gleason's review of The Brown Album in the Oct. 18, 1969 issue of ROLLING STONE took a scholarly approach to The Band's music. Greil Marcus was influenced by Mr. Gleason's columns in San Francisco newpapers while growing up there. Years later, after Gleason co-founded ROLLING STONE with Jann Wenner, he hired Mr. Marcus as an editor of the music review section.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 19:17:03 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: don't be so insistent on second-guessing yourself. I'm my experience musicans never remember gigs as well as fans do, so even neither Garth nor Robbie remembers it doesn't mean it didn't happen.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 19:11:16 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Peter, I've pasted the link to the article. Ken Gordon is a high school friend of mine. We saw The Band a couple of times in the 90's. I can relate to much of what he writes, however I disagree with the conclusion that Robbie won and Levon lost.

I agree that 'Mystery Train' is a great book, I have 3 or 4 editions of the book, with the discography expanding with each edition. The book was originally published in the mid 70's, when the OQ was intact and Elvis was alive. Maybe someday Marcus will expand the orginal text and bring it up to date.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 17:59:13 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Uhhhh....I just realized that I have been confusing the two Bens. There is Ben and Ben Pike. Sorry.

I was so happy that Sebastian inquired about a photo that was taken by a female photographer (Penny Wolin) as it appears all photos on this site have been taken by men.

Another photographer who took photos of The Band, in B&W and in color, when they played Fillmore East on May 9, 1969 and also with Bob Dylan on January 29 and 31, 1974......is Amalie Rothschild. I sent her an email in 2010 when I discovered she took photos of The Band and Dylan at the Isle of Wight. It is important that all photos on this site are given credit. Anyway, hoping she'll either contact me back or JH as she said she was willing to contribute with credit.

UgggggH! My sincerest apologies if you read this Amalie.....I just checked my first email to you and I didn't include the link to this site!!!!!! I feel so dumb. Oh no.......I just received email.......old email.......I'll keep trying.

Sebastian....I noticed that when Robbie is promoting one of his books that he leaves signed copies in LA stores but not in Toronto. Is there any chance he could do the same for his real fans here in Toronto?! Sometimes I can't make the meet and greets.......In case I and others can't be present next year when he's at Indigo Books in Toronto can he leave some copies with his friend Heather Reisman CEO of Indigo Bookstore...........If I can attend I'd also would like him to sign his last book. Btw there were only two of us from this site (I think the other fan only dropped in to say so.) who attended his performance at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival......very expensive for me but.......worth every cent! Also.......I'm in a video with Robbie. That's right! It was a bad hair day for me as it was sooooo hot in Indigo Bookstore downstairs where Robbie was signing......but someone took a video and I'm in it!


Entered at Fri Sep 4 17:37:51 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

For most, Mystery Train was the first time the OQ's history received an academic treatment. The rest of the book also shone. One of the more important books on rock/etc.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 16:56:58 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Jeff A.: re "Call Me Levon," stick with it. I think Mr. Gordon is more concerned with conveying his personal reaction than trying to provide any kind of objective assessment. The thing is, when you hear a song, what you think and feel is more a product of the psychic baggage you bring to the experience than anything intrinsic to the track itself. When I hear Richard sing "I had a goal in my younger days, I nearly wrote my will; but I changed my mind for the better, and at the still had my fill, now I'm fit to kill" - well, I can't hear that without the knowledge of his demise pushing its way in.

Re: Mr. Garner's take on _Mystery Train_, amen. For me, "Pilgrims' Progress" _is_ the Torah. According this music as much respect as _Moby Dick_ is in itself a kind of manifesto.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 16:44:25 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ben's Link

Peter, Sadavid has the link down below.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 16:06:52 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Perspective of 1965

One more thing. In 1965, having already seen LATH at the Concord and having become a Dylan fan with what that meant in 1965, I had little idea of the monumental event that I had been witness to. I think I got it that this was more than a regular performer on a stage and that Dylan was something special. But this was before I really got it that here was one of the now emerging voices of popular music culture and maybe the most important one. And of course, no one knew then that the supporting musicians would have the future they had. The Band was something no one could have envisioned on Nov. 15, 1965.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 15:56:31 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 15 Nov 1965

John D: Maybe my mind is playing tricks on me. I really thought they came out alone and played the first song (TSIT) alone before Dylan arrived on 15 Nov. 1965. Now I am having doubts. RR should know and if he said they didn't, maybe it was just wishful thinking. But I really thought so. Indeed, maybe Garth can confirm RR's recollection.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 15:23:54 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: No 'country bumpkins' these 5...what if?

Kevin J: The OQ were far from 'country bumpkins' in 1964. They were a mature, hard-working, organized band who took their professional responsibility to put on the best show they could in the best way they could seriously. To portray them as some ragtag bunch from the backwoods is dead wrong. Though from small town Ontario in a few cases and from the US south in 1, by the time Dylan had them, they were ready for stardom. Had it gone another way, given what I heard in 1964, they would have become a major force in their own rite. I don't think they would have given in to the difficulties of Canada. They had already gone to New Jersey and to New York to cut some singles and they knew their way around the business by this time. Their bar shows were tight and solid and those of us who were fortunate enough to have heard them in '64 knew they were destined for something greater. That Dylan found them and took them in a direction different than I think they would have gone is a boon to American music. Had they stayed in the rock/R&B area wherein they 'grew up', we would have gotten the likes of 'Moondog Matinee' and that wouldn't have been half bad. What they created because of the change of direction was unique. What they would have done without that change of direction would have in my view been great. Would they have separated themselves from the many groups out there with that approach...who knows. I think yes.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 15:19:03 CEST 2015 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Stones I Throw

JT and I went on separate nights. Again, I remember well it was not done the night I was there. It was Dylan acoustic for the first set. Intermission. Dylan and the Hawks second set. All songs from Dylan.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 14:19:36 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben … no link to article.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 12:27:25 CEST 2015 from (72.82.139.194)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Call Me Levon

This article was written by a friend of mine. He sent a rough draft of it to me last year when he was writing it. I made some comments and sent it back to him and forgot all about it.

Yes, The tense in one sentence is mangled, which Jeff was very kind to point out. But, besides that mistake, I think it's a very thoughtful article and well worth reading.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 07:19:17 CEST 2015 from (24.114.105.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Bravo on all sorts of fronts..... With you on TSIT and the missing "that".....though it seems to me, and not doubting JT's memory, odd that they would have played it one night and skipped it the next......hopefully Garth can confirm one way or the other.......maybe Adam could ask.

.......The Marcus position on enlightenment as border's crossed is exactly the type of press that got up my nose when reading all the press that surrounded the Basement Tapes release last year......Rick Danko had been singing country and folk songs since he was 5 years old and he and the other guys in The Band were portrayed as county bumpkins that were wholly schooled by Bob Dylan.......Yes, Bob had very significant influence on their development as people and songwriters - no doubt - but not nearly as one-sided as the rock press has stated.

Mystery Train: Thanks to Rhythm Jimmy, Joan and Bill for the comments on the Marcus book.......I've not read it.....picked it up a few times and a quick read of a paragraph or two at a store had me putting it back....not always a reliable test as I've had more than a few cases where I had similar experiences and ended up finally reading a book and regretting I had waited so long........love reading any thing Band related but Marcus can be way too much banana on the peanut butter...........heading out on the road soon and would welcome other views on this.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 05:30:03 CEST 2015 from (74.12.50.218)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Thanks for discussing "The Stones I Throw" so often this week. One of my favourite 45s of all time by anybody. Don't really know why - just is. Like you, I'm always thrown by the missing "That" in the title. "The stones that I throw" is what the guys are singing throughout, so why the record company would let some pedant near the label-printing machine is beyond me. Also, if you remember LaTH playing TSIT at Massey Hall, then I'm prepared to accept that LaTH played TSIT at Massey Hall. I'd certainly trust your memory of such a thing over Robbie's (or anyone else's). The more I think about it the more I see how pissed off Levon must've been to see the Hawks choosing to stick with Dylan rather than pushing what could easily have seemed to be a better horse in the race to the big time. Imagine how much begging would have been involved in getting Dylan to give them three minutes to sing their one song in their own hometown?

Re "Mystery Train", while I couldn't comprehend Marcus's style when I first picked up the book when I was 20, I've matured since then, and have come to appreciate his enthusiasm, his way with words and his ability to draw in references from all over the place. But one thing I didn't like at 20, and still don't like now (and it's something that bleeds into "Invisible Republic" / "Old Weird America") is his tendency to ignore the fact that minimise the abilities of the people in the Band before they crossed the US border - and got together with Dylan. Come to think of it, if he'd lived a hundred years earlier, Marcus could have been the guy who invented baseball out of thin air in Cooperstown NY.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 05:15:53 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.255)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Santana Projects

One with original plus other Santana Band members, another with Shorter, McLaughlin, Hancock, & Mrs Santana.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 04:05:08 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The media strikes again... and apologizes

The media in all its 'splendour' strikes again. They got it wrong and put it out wrong to the entire world. The application for refugee status was for another brother, not for the man who's wife and 2 children (including the now famous photo of the drowned 3 year old) drowned. Clearly a tragedy, but again the journalist(s) did not do their homework well and put out an erroneous story that impacted the world in a huge way on this day, only to admit that they got it wrong. An absolute and stunning error. Is it not astounding that such an important story was put out inaccurately?


Entered at Fri Sep 4 03:16:09 CEST 2015 from (173.3.48.255)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sadavid- i just got this far right now, to this point in your linked article. And I have a problem. The guys gone plum loco, gone way too far, overboard. He's reading things that happened after the Brown Album was recorded into his attempted analysis as follows:

"But there is a complicating factor here, at least for me. There is a necessary confusion between Virgil and Levon. Their various forms of bitterness blend and blur. Are we, when we hear it, angry at the North? Yes. At Robbie? Yes. Virgil is angry about his dead brother; Levon about his late, beaten-down bandmates, Richard Manuel and Rick Danko. And it’s this double antipathy, combined with the visceral thrill of the Band’s superb collective musicianship, that makes the magic go.."

An honest assessment of the song, the vocal performance, any aspect of the song or how anyone relates to it, could not follow that line of thought & timeline.


Entered at Fri Sep 4 01:28:30 CEST 2015 from (97.127.57.243)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Subject: Greil Marcus, "Mystery Train"

Anybody else here tried to read "Mystery Train" and gave up in frustration from not knowing what the hell Marcus was talking about (the "Notes and Discographies" excepted)?

I offer this example, a sentence referring to Robert Johnson: "Only his weakest songs move on an even keel; the greatest shudder and break and explode, or twist slowly around quietly shaking strings into a kind of suspension, until Johnson has created a mood so delicate and bleak one feels he cannot possibly get out of his song alive" (4th rev. ed., p. 27).


Entered at Thu Sep 3 23:05:55 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

...followed by Van performing on the actual Cypress Avenue.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 22:22:16 CEST 2015 from (66.99.114.250)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Julie and litte John Tyler....

I got turned on to this Jason Isbell and some other stuff on the ITunes Band station. Anyone else ever tune in? It's a mixed bag: first they ONLY play songs by the Band off The Band's greatest hits album. Then they will overplay Crosby, Still and Nash into the ground. But they do find some interesting solo stuff and some groups I never knew like the Jayhawks. Then some stuff that is hilariously UNBandlike. Roz, do you dig "The Moon Struck One?"


Entered at Thu Sep 3 22:19:58 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here is one of Avedon's books............Performance: Richard Avedon Hardcover – Oct 1 2008.

I first found this book many years ago in Rochester. Inside was the photo of The Band in NYC 1969. This is not the photo that's in the archives under "sandwiches and cokes" with Taplin.....This book has the other photo I posted without Taplin
No wonder I didn't buy it as it's a huge book with a huge price.....Today I confirmed my recollection of the book and photo....price tag 138.00 in Toronto stores.....98.21 online.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 22:12:03 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jimmy Cliff "Trapped"

This is just SO good I have to put it here as well as Toppermost. Jimmy Cliff on Trapped" - originally the obscure 1972 single Bruce Springsteen knew and covered.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 21:41:28 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jimmy Cliff

Up on TOPPERMOST, my article on Jimmy Cliff - one of the Toppermost's I've most enjoyed. There are great video links from our webmaster, particularly "Terror" and "Trapped."


Entered at Thu Sep 3 19:01:41 CEST 2015 from (108.41.170.168)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Mystery train

From todays NY Times


Entered at Thu Sep 3 18:07:21 CEST 2015 from (24.114.105.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I used to think the "feud" was the most irritating thing imaginable.......I now believe the spellcheck here that changes every "of" to "if" actually tops the irritation meter !

TSIT : Thank you JT. Such a good song and an interesting link/point in time in the whole should they have or should they not have closed down the Levon and The Hawks machine for several years right at the time they were ready to launch.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 17:59:00 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Call Me Levon"

A nice think piece (warning: marked Levonisto perspective) from a truly superb webzine I discovered yesterday: _The Bitter Southerner_ -- it does a fair number of music features, perhaps we'll eventually see Mr. Isbell's new release in "The Best Southern Albums of 2015."


Entered at Thu Sep 3 17:55:35 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

“The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it.

[These words are also inscribed upon his grave]”

― Karl Marx, Eleven Theses on Feuerbach

Blind Willie McTell....First time we met was at Cafe Wha? and second time at Hugh's Room for Steve Forbert!!!!! Long live Steve Forbert!!!!!!! Mr. Maximus took photos of us. Forbert's music is sacred to me as it helped me deal with grief. His voice......very soothing and his musicality.....unbelievable, right? He performed by himself with his guitar and his feet stomping to the beat......Loved every moment.

Photo I posted of the OQ by Wolin......Garth looks like he's letting loooooose with his arms up! Great to see. I would say performance wise the two times I felt he let loooooose at a show.....The one we saw at the Hard Rock Cafe (did not meet you this night as too many people wearing baseball caps...lol...hats cover ears, right?) with The Crowmatix and at Massey Hall with The Hawk and Levon.
Speaking of Levon.....well the name at least......Toronto Blue Jay Josh Donaldson's dad has the same name.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 17:51:53 CEST 2015 from (24.114.105.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jason Isbell

Yes David......and in a somewhat surprising though fully deserving turn the new Isbell album is really selling - in big numbers. Unless, I was dreaming this, I reall a headline somewhere a while back that the album was number 1 on a few different charts.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 17:30:19 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: RR knew the eternal wrong

'till I can see the light of day

shining at the world

and I realise that something here sure is wrong'

Read more: Band - The Stones I Throw Lyrics | MetroLyrics


Entered at Thu Sep 3 17:17:04 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Jason Isbell

As Ben F mentioned previously, Jason Isbell recently released an excellent new album, "Something More Than Free." I'm sure it will show up on many of this year's best releases lists, including mine. He & his wife Amanda Shires, who plays fiddle & sings with her husband on the new album, recently welcomed the birth of their daughter. Mr. Isbell's music is like a breath of fresh country air in this day & age of stale, soulless cookie-cutter tunes.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 16:31:53 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: V

Subject: Addendum: Apathy or isolationism?

Addendum: Has apathy set in or are these problems too far away? The former, maybe. The latter, I don't think so. They may be too far away from the Americas (even if the drowned little boy's family wanted to come to Canada and so Canada gets headlines today) but they are certainly not too far away from western Europe where countries are embroiled in a migration crisis,.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 16:22:54 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Where is the outcry?

Spoiler alert: This question may offend or may make some uncomfortable.

Where is the outcry from our performers as the world goes crazy with people on the run and heads being cut off and people being jailed for speaking out and antiquities being blown up? Clearly, as always, there are no facile answers to solve the problems described. For 50 years, I have been watching the conscience of our favourite musicians and performers crying out that this planet needs to respond to genocide and rape and economic strife. They did it with benefit concerts and with public statements and the like. Where is that outcry today? All I hear right now is a deafening silence.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 16:12:32 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: ..'not To be'

Thanks, Peter, for your 'Hamlet' review. Like so many I'm a huge fan of Cumberbatch and the other reviews sounded largely favourable of his personal presentation. It sounds from yours and from others that the director forgot that a great production depends upon the support it receives as much as it does on the star. The problem is that if the theatre is sold out every night, the director will not likely make adjustments and what could have been a great production will continue on with its flaws. Reminds me of music and backing musicians when a band plays. Leonard Cohen today is remarkable not only because of Leonard Cohen but because of the brilliance of everyone who supports him on the stage. It is a total show. Maybe, this 'Hamlet' may come to New York City at some point if the sales success continues. Maybe adjustments will be made and we will see the support rise up to expectations. If not, a tragedy.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 15:51:34 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hamlet

As it's the hardest ticket to get in years, link to my review of Benedict Cumberbatch in Hamlet in London.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 14:33:53 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: TSIT by LATH live?

So, has "The Stones I Throw' ever been played live in concert by LATH?


Entered at Thu Sep 3 09:30:52 CEST 2015 from (58.104.4.92)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A couple of pictures of Robbie and Levon from 1960 I don't recall seeing before.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 05:04:41 CEST 2015 from (99.233.208.199)

Posted by:

Blind Willie McTell

Web: My link

For brown eyed girl. We met again at C'est What in Toronto, October 23, 2003 - Quill and Tolhurst with Garth Hudson and Maude. Link above is to your pictures.

I have walked by Cafe Wha? in the village many times but never inside. A few hundred meters west is Hudson Street. Further west is the Hudson River which might have been named after Garth.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 02:08:07 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Little Feat

Thank you. Always appc this band, which I saw only once, but what a night! I was close enough to Richie Hayward to wipe the perspiration off his brow, had he needed assistance. Proximity to the amps, however, rendered me semi-comatose for the remainder of the evening. One of my personal highs.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 01:18:18 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Two Band shows followed by this Little Feat gem.

Ben Pike, look out. Them's fightin' words in some quarters.


Entered at Thu Sep 3 01:07:35 CEST 2015 from (4.15.249.166)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Moon Timing, a sensual obsession

Well, as long as I am back here I will bring up the most controversial subject from the old days of the Guest Book, "The Moon Struck One." I think Raine Maida does a fine job on the Canadian Tribute to the Band CD and generally I like the song! And mostly I like Cahoots better than those who now sometimes completely write it off (save maybe "Carnival"). I think it defies the Richard Aveldon Curse. I wonder if Roz has even heard it.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 21:48:32 CEST 2015 from (184.66.163.29)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria ^ Toronto intermittently

Subject: My dotage

Thank you, Sebastian. I really appreciate your asking him. Best regards. As I said, and you will appreciate this, my dad (Concord Tavern owner after Mr. Fisher (with partners) thought that young Robbie Robertson was a gentleman and said so to me on many occasions. He also recommended my first starter guitar.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 20:50:28 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Wolin

Yes, I agree, Angie. What a great shot. As Kevin said, a fleeting moment in time.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 19:36:08 CEST 2015 from (24.114.105.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Penny Wolin photo: Thank you, brown eyed girl. I love that picture, like 5 guys so happy to be arriving somewhere and looking forward to the future. Fabulous shot. To think just one year later it would all be over.

Bill M: Many thanks for your thoughts and help with the Geoff Muldaur.....and happy that you enjoyed TLW tribute. Your mention of Jimmy Bowskill reminded me of early 2000's and seeing Jimmy hanging around the guitars at Steve's on Queen St.......he was just a little kid but dressed like an old bluesman and always had that hat on !


Entered at Wed Sep 2 19:06:49 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: priceless Confederate sword to be repatriated . . .

. . . from the capital of Canuckistan to The Citadel military college, Charleston SC.

Three events will mark the return, one at Antietam National Battlefield, two at the college, September 16 - 18. Details at citadel.edu.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 17:51:16 CEST 2015 from (45.49.144.203)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Stones

My dad does not believe they played Stones then. Hope that helps JT.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 16:13:30 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

My partner wearing my Band T at Rick Danko's Tribute in Simcoe, Ontario. I somehow got him to wear it hoping if anyone from the GB was present that maybe we'd have a connection. He didn't like the T to ever wear again, so I gave it to my brother. He tells me whenever he wears it someone always comes up to him to talk about The Band. Too bad he's not into The Band either but does like Dylan's art work.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 15:57:42 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Besides the Eastman House we also always go to the House of Guitars....and Dinosaur Barbeque.....and we always see Donna The Buffalo perform for free......while in Rochester. I guess Rick Danko bopped into the HOG once as well.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 15:25:43 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'The Stones I Throw' is a great song

While I'm thinking about Robbie Robertson, I think that 'The Stones I Throw' is vastly underexposed. In my view, it is a great song. Had it been released with a proper approach, it would have impacted greatly. It is solid and stands up well with songs of its ilk. Maybe it should be released again?


Entered at Wed Sep 2 14:49:10 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'reckless'

And before I get appropriately corrected for the title, it is 'The Stones I Throw'. Leave out the 'That'. How reckless of me. I know better. Sorry, Bill M and everyone.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 13:09:46 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Indigo RR

Great! Thank you, BEG. Please send it to me. You have my e-mail, I believe.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 09:02:24 CEST 2015 from (83.249.160.204)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Vogue and The Band

The francophile she is Mrs. NWC has copies of French Vogue (actually Vogue Paris). In No 883 there is a picture of The Band on page 273. Nothing special, "just" the cover of Basement Tapes. It is a Charlotte Gainsbourg special issue and the connection is this: The film I'm Not There - Charlotte Gainsbourg - Sara Lownds - Bob Dylan - The Band.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 07:35:03 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sebastian....Here is another photo by Penny Wolin and The Band......Looks like Robbie and Richard are wearing the same shirt as in photograph with the watermelon.......1975.

Jerry T and Nomadic Mike...Thank you.
Jerry T...Btw while searching for the photo with Taplin and without him.....Hopefully I will know which book photo is from this week.......pretty sure now it's also by Avedon.......I finally found the photo I took of you and Robbie. Would you like me to post it here or send it to you? I still laugh when I think of that time at Indigo Bookstore and I'm behind you in line and somehow we realized that we both post here. A similar thing happened when Blind Willie McTell and his brother were sitting beside me at Cafe Wha? for a Garth show with Quill and Tolhurst 2003.

Todd...Too much.....I sent the very same Avedon photo of Dylan that you posted today to a young Dylan fan who only saw him for the very first time last year in his mid-thirties. Of course I went on and on about all the times I saw him. ;-D


Entered at Wed Sep 2 05:51:17 CEST 2015 from (45.49.144.203)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Penny Wolin

Penny is the name of the photographer. I'll check A Musical History.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 04:37:25 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Stones That I Throw

Sebastian: I apologize for asking this question again, but its important to me. I'm still trying?

Was 'The Stones That I Throw" played on Nov. 15, 1965 at Massey Hall in Toronto? Am I dreaming or did I really hear it there.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 03:41:39 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sebastian, page 76 of A Musical History.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 02:22:06 CEST 2015 from (76.66.114.138)

Posted by:

Bill M

Hmm, the Avendon photo. With no beards to pull, Rick and Robbie are left to twiddle their moustaches - Rick like Snidely Whiplash and Robbie like Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp.


Entered at Wed Sep 2 02:11:36 CEST 2015 from (45.49.144.203)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Band photos with watermelon

Anyone recall some photos of The Band at a kitchen table (i think at shangri-la) with a watermelon cut in half? My dad has a white hat and jacket buttoned all the way up. Looks almost like a gangster. Been trying to find these online or find out who the photographer is.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 20:42:45 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Another of Avedon's album cover credits is Joan Baez's "Farewell, Angelina" from 1965.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 20:09:53 CEST 2015 from (32.216.248.152)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Someone showed me a picture and I just laughed, Dignity never been photographed

Avedon also photographed Bob Dylan at various points in his career.
At the link above is a 1963 portrait of a young Dylan near the Harlem River in Manhattan with the Park Avenue / Harlem River Lift Bridge in the background.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 19:20:56 CEST 2015 from (66.99.114.250)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: This and that

Roz, did you and I happen to jump back in at just the same time...... Grail Marcus snarked, back before we used the word, that a Richard Avedon shot was the "pop curse" and always appeared on a bad album. He also did the famous sessions with The Beatles, of course. Sly Stone I'm pretty sure. And "Walking Man" which I might concede IS James Taylor's worst album. In her way Roz reminds me how long the site has been up and how lucky we are as Band fans to have had it. Levon and Rick were both still with us when it all started. So in a spirit of thanks I made the effort to dig out something that should be in the archives.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 19:05:20 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Richard Avedon also took the cover photo for Simon and Garfunkel's 1968 "Bookends" album. John Simon worked on recording the early sessions and played the Moog synthesizer on "Save the Life of My Child." While Paul Simon later sang about Kodachrome, the album cover was in stark black & white, one of Mr. Avedon's trademark styles. Viewed up close, one can see Avedon's reflection in Mr. Simon's irises.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 17:39:16 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Richard Avedon was actually on staff at Vogue when he took those shots of the OQ. It's interesting that after he spent 20 years photographing models and famous people, he spent years traveling through the backroads of the West shooting normal people. He compiled those photos in a superb book called In The American West--kind of like his own Brown Album.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 17:28:45 CEST 2015 from (64.229.236.80)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: photos

I second JT's motions. Thanks.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 17:18:05 CEST 2015 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Thanks Ben for unearthing the Richard Avedon photo! While more familiar in the world of fashion, Mr. Avedon was no stranger to capturing portraits of musicians. Previously, of note, he had photographed the Beatles and Janis Joplin (see link). As Ms. Joplin was also a client of Albert Grossman, I wonder if that connection led to Avedon photographing The Band a year after his work with Joplin.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 16:46:36 CEST 2015 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: OQ photos

Thank you to Ben, Pat B, BEG and jh for participating in expanding the excellent photos of the OQ. Greatly appreciated!


Entered at Tue Sep 1 16:16:50 CEST 2015 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

All I did was forward Ben Pike's fine work to the webmaster. Ben deserves all the credit.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 15:59:36 CEST 2015 from (131.137.34.213)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Willie's new royalty stream

GQ profile of Mr. Nelson and his new joint venture.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 12:50:30 CEST 2015 from (158.39.165.130)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Avadon photo from Vogue, January 1970, in the article "The Band...The Best?", by Richard Goldstein. Thanks to Pat B. et al for digging it up.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 11:14:03 CEST 2015 from (109.148.23.96)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Small Town Talk

Thanks for that version of Small Town Taslk. Really good version.

This is the version I play by John Martyn. He doesn't play guitar on it. It's understated and Arran Ahmun's drums move the track along. You hear lyrics clearly. It's from an album of covers.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 09:20:46 CEST 2015 from (92.18.161.31)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Vacation at Big Pink

Don and Susan LaSala, who purchased the historic home in 1998, began offering the dormer portion of the property for overnight accommodations for the first time this summer. As Big Pink's description notes, that includes "Levon Helm's bunk area," a sunroom ("Rick Danko's quarters"), the Central Staircase as well as "views of Overlook Mountain." The 1,850-square foot Big Pink comfortably sleeps nine and features updates like Wi-Fi and limited cable television.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 08:59:44 CEST 2015 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lazy bones

Lazy Bones … a great song from Sweet Potatoes with Amos Garrett. Linked.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 04:59:23 CEST 2015 from (68.171.246.141)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Kevin J: Re discovering Geoff Muldaur, you have many hours of listening pleasure ahead even if you do what I do and limit yourself to his records with Amos Garrett. So, the Butterfield / Better Days albums (my least favourite), the two brilliant Geoff and Maria albums ("Pottery Pie" and "Sweet Potatoes", Geoff's "Having a Wonderful Time" and Geoff and Amos's album on Flying Fish. If you've seen Terry Gilliam's great dystopic film "Brazil", you've heard Geoff singing what the outro tune of the same name - borrowed from "Pottery Pie", a hugely surprising appearance of an obscure gem 15 or so years later.

Gotta say that the last copy of the "Sweet Potatoes" LP I've seen was in a used record shop in the old fish market on the Seattle waterfront during the WTO Battle in Seattle in '98 (I think it was). I'd left my wife in a quiet Starbucks while I nipped over to record-shop; came back 30 minutes later to find most of the seats occupied by tear-gassed protesters with wet rags and paper towels over their eyes.

I'll add that I saw Geoff and Amos (with a stellar local rhythm section ca '77 at the Midwich Coockoo (west side of Jarvis around Shuter). Also first saw former Hawk Eugene Smith (and the Warm-Up Band) there at around the same time. Eugene and the WuB are doing their second annual reunion at Wasaga around now, BTW.

Speaking of local shows, attended the TLW tribute at the CNE last night. Awesome. Paul James, Terry Danko, the Webber Brothers, Jerome Avis drumming like Levon while singing like Levon and, surprisingly, just like Rick on "It Makes No Difference". Oh, and Jimmy Bowskill did a magical "Helpless" with terrific organ backing by Rob Gusevs.


Entered at Tue Sep 1 04:46:33 CEST 2015 from (74.209.23.21)

Posted by:

monty diamond

Location: new york city
Web: My link

Subject: pete seeger comments

Just thought I'd mention that I wholeheartedly agree with your bold comments about Pete Seeger. I'm old friend of Peter Yarrow's and Levon's, and Peter of course revered Pete Seeger, but I always found him preachy and boring, frankly. Can't deny he pushed his agenda, a particularly good one where the Hudson River was concerned, but he bored me. There I've said it!


Entered at Tue Sep 1 04:13:48 CEST 2015 from (174.91.166.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ben, Pat B, Peter V, rozzz and Rod.....Finally I can share the photo that was in my iPhotos of The Band from the same shoot as the one previously posted. This is the photo I took from either Avedon or Vogue's book in Rochester in 2003. Really not sure anymore. Only Garth has food in this photo and Taplin is no where to be found.
Anyway, it turned out not to be the same photo Ben found. So glad that Ben found another one. Way to go Ben!


Entered at Tue Sep 1 02:06:35 CEST 2015 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Geoff Muldaur

Thanks, David, for the Small Town Talk clip. I saw Geoff Muldaur give a free concert at NY's Lincoln Center circa 2000 or so... he did some great blues material, and (unless memory is playing tricks) a lovely version of Tennessee Blues from the Bobby Charles album. After the show, I asked him about his involvement with that album, as the credits have always been in question... he said that he played just a bit of rhythm guitar on it and not much more. Nice fellow and a very talented musician.


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