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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, February 2011


Entered at Mon Feb 28 23:54:03 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: baseball

JQ- I always thought the 1950s was the golden era of baseball. Players had to stay with their teams unless traded or released. You really got to know the players on your favorite team and it was great to open up your first pack of Topps baseball cards and chew that little square of gum and see your favorite players again. About 15 years ago I had the entire '56 and '59 sets, but somebody made me an offer I couldn't refuse. Like a good stock, it was a mistake to sell.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 22:16:44 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Social Network

Updating the credits to Robbie's upcoming album -- it features Oscar-winning composer Trent Reznor.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 19:29:28 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: time zones / Cathy Young

sadavid: EST, as it says. Don't know how I missed it when I went looking. Also don't know why they wouldn't make it a rolling 10:00 given it's a cable station (isn't it?).

As for Cathy Young, the linked audio is well worth a listen, not so much for Cathy, who is good but not great, but for the three guest vocalists - Zeke Sheppard (who had longstanding links to Hawkins and our guys), Brenda Russell and Dianne Brooks. Dianne's the last one in, and the little cutting contest that she and Brenda engage in is quite something. If you click on the little description below the video you'll get a pretty interesting and thorough story of her history up to the time of the record. She's still around and still singing.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 19:11:36 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Ontario, Canada

Subject: Suze Rotolo dead at 67. RIP

LARS: No offense taken. I calls 'em the way I sees 'em. xo

DAVID: To add to your post on this sweetie...

Bob Dylan's 'Freewheelin' Muse Susan Rotolo Dead

Susan "Suze" Rotolo, who inspired several of Bob Dylan's love songs, died Friday night at home in her New York City loft following a long illness. She was 67.

When Rotolo was a teenager, she met Dylan backstage after one of his concerts. He described her in his book 'Chronicles' as "the most erotic thing I'd ever seen." The two began dating between 1961 and 1964. She is most known as the woman walking with Dylan on the cover of his album 'The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan.'

When she left New York to study at the University of Perugia in Italy, the separation inspired Dylan to write two love songs: 'Don't Think Twice, It's Alright' and 'Tomorrow is a Long Time.' The couple eventually split. In 1972, Rotolo went on to marry Italian filmmaker Enzo Bartoccioli and had a son, Luca.

Rotolo would later appear in Martin Scorsese's film 'No Direction Home: Bob Dylan,' a documentary focusing on Dylan's early career from 1961 to 1966. In 2007's semi-biographical Dylan film 'I'm Not There,' Charlotte Gainsbourg portrayed a character that was part Rotolo, part Dylan's early wife Sara.

Have a good day ...

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:49:10 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: young street doc

Bill M: thanks for the heads-up. The fine print at the top says Eastern Standard -- which is as standard as they come, but still past my geezerly bed-time (picture the mug of hot milk, the literal night-cap). I was surprised to see La Noise touted for EP: 3, I thought he was a regionalism. (Do megalopolises have regions?). Who the heck is Cathy Young?


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:39:43 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mr. Tangerine Man

Of course, Tangerine Records was part of Ray Charles Enterprises and distributed here in the U.S. by his label at the time ABC-Paramount. In the early '70s he left ABC and formed a new label Crossover when he went back to Atlantic. On his 1980 Crossover album "Brother Ray Is At It Again" he covered "Ophelia".


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:36:49 CET 2011 from (90.239.140.243)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Location: Pink painted doghouse

Subject: Saved

Interdum dormitat ipse Vineyus. Indignor quandoque bonus dormitat.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:24:23 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Subject: Yonge Street documentary

Further to Ari's post about the Yonge Street documentary, the above link is to the BRAVO TV schedule for March 21. The first of three parts airs at 10:00 pm, with the rest appearing on March 22 and March 23. (I'm guessing that it's a rolling 10:00 across all time zones.)

Peter V: Thanks for the link to the Raelettes.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:13:10 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "Bad Water"

Thanks, Bill. In return, "Bad Water" by The Raelettes posted. Tangerine only had a handful of 1971 releases in the UK … earlier stuff would have been HMV. Judging from "Single File" which is only about 95% reliable, Diane Brooks never got released in the UK.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:05:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Saved

In retrospect, you'd have to say that he used the music to power the relentless, crazed nastiness of his lyrics. In that way it might be musically successful. But listening to The Raelettes single "Bad Water" (or indeed The Staple Singers) you can see how the style can be done so much better. I think that's at the root of the problem! Someone needs to tell Bob that the Book of Revelations demonstrates classic symptoms of schizophrenia and was spat out by a hermit foaming at the mouth who had no contact with any of the original disciples. Some believe it a travesty that such appalling nonsense should be included in the bible, and it nearly wasn't.

This morning BBC Radio 4 had an item on the new Radiohead album, which is apparently mind-numbingly dull. The bit they played was and it seems that's the general reaction. It was damned with faint praise "the later tracks aren't as bad as the early ones." Then they interviewed DJ Andy Kershaw. He said he'd got up at 5.30 to listen to all four sides of "Metal Machine Music" in preparation for the interview. It was interesting (and relevant to the Cahoots discussion) as he said many musicians should be banned from the studio after 2 or 3 albums, because after that they inevitably churned out albums which were "bereft of ideas, but not of self-importance." A lovely phrase.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 18:02:00 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Tangerine records

Peter V: Here's a link to the soaring b-side to the only Tangerine reocrd I own. (It came out in Canada on Revolver, then was picked up for US release by Tangerine and by various other labels in Europe; don't know about the UK.) To tie things together a bit, Dianne Brooks was in the original version of Doctor Music (see my previous post), and before that played and recorded with various of our guys.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 17:43:41 CET 2011 from (90.239.140.243)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Saved(?) from "Saved"

I have been watching Arctic birds by the North Sea for a week or so and missed this "Saved" debate. - Peter, from theological point of view it must have been dynamite for not only non-believers but to some orthodox Jewish people,too. This is very interesting for me! Saved is not "religious" in common terms, it is new-born Christianity and evangelical album. I understand if you find it annoying. In your ears it must be only just another kind of vulgar propaganda. I still wait you and other gb master minds to come together and doing these analyzis on THE BAND.

GET TO WORK YOU LAZY ANGLO-AMERICANS :-)


Entered at Mon Feb 28 17:14:25 CET 2011 from (75.139.218.78)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 1953 Dodgers

Lars - You didn't mention the 1953 season where the Dodgers lost to the Yankees 4-2. But what I think is very interesting is the Dodger's offense that season; their stats left the Yanks' well behind. Here's a few:

955 runs, that's 1004 if extend it to 162 games.

Campanella: .312/41/142

Hodges: .302/31/122

Snider: .336/42/126

Furrillo: .344/21/92

Robinson:.325 with a .405 OB%

A superb defense that included Reese, Gilliam & Cox - with Robinson a utility role

The pitching was ho hum, but that offense was one of the best ever. You can imagine the fan's disappointment; acute in '53 & chronic through most of the 50's.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 16:29:23 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: "Where Do We Go From Here"

Because I didn't start picking up "Cahoots" until a couple of years after its release, the version of "Where Do We Go From Here" that I've heard most and know best is from Doctor Music's second album (see link). Doug Mallory's very low and mournful growl makes Rick Danko's vocal seem positively breezy in comparison.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 16:19:42 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Billy Lee Riley

Look at Granny Run Run is a great. I have it on one of the many Ace soul compilations. Billy Lee Riley is another Arkansas musician. It’s said that “Green Onions” came out of Booker T and The MGs jamming on a Billy Lee session. “Going Back To Memphis” is a Steve Cropper production from 1969. It confused me because it’s on the UK Stax label, but missing from the Complete Stax Singles, which are therefore not complete. I did a Google and it was on Stax’s subsiduary HIP in the US which explains it. Link is to the song.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 15:18:48 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 45s

Peter V: It's hard to beat those great old 45s and you got some good ones. I've got Howard Tate's "Look At Granny Run Run" on Verve. Some of my other scores Saturday were The Supremes' "Stop In The Name Of Love", Duane Eddy's "Rebel 'Rouser" and Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly".


Entered at Mon Feb 28 12:36:53 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Peter M., I was in that same audience at the Tower Theater for the Little Village show. One of the very best last minute decisions I've ever made. I would love to see them have another go at it.

Glad you got to experience that one.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 10:54:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Right As Rain

My other vinyl find this weekend was the British Capitol 45 of "Right As Rain." It's a demo, in mint condition. There can't be many copies of "Right as Rain" around! I've now managed to pick up every British Band single. Why? I don't know. But it was only £2.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 09:05:45 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 45s

David: I’ve been picking up odd Alvin Cash singles this year. My vinyl finds this weekend were Howard Tate’s “Stop” on Verve, “Going Back To Memphis” by Billy Lee Riley (Stax), “Deep in The Heart of Texas” by Dave Baby Cortez and “Bad Water” by The Raelettes on Tangerine (for a “Saved” connection). I was persuaded that J.J. Jackson’s But It’s Alright had a killer B-side … and the seller was right. It’s an organ-driven version of Ain’t Too Proud To Beg.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 08:11:38 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Cahoots

Cahoots is a funny beast. The first two tracks start you to thinking that this is going to be one of the great Band albums but then it fades away. A long tail as they say in cricket. There is some pretty good stuff in there. Some of their more complicated chord progressions and some great playing but it just lacks that X factor the first 3 had. Maybe the lyrics just don't draw you in. NLSC suffers from the same problem at times. Because I've played these two less than the others I actually enjoy listening to them more tham BP ot The Band.

I'm sure The Band had a couple more good albums in them. Pity it all fell to pieces.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 04:10:58 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: a lot of places

Subject: NLSC

I was stuck in Tulsa, Oklahoma in the first half of the '70s. I did enjoy a few benefits of being there, like performances by Elvin Bishop, Taj Majal with the incredible Howard Johnson, Leon Russell, Jerry Jeff Walker, Bob Wills' Texas Playboys, Merle Haggard, and George Harrison. To see bands like The Rolling Stones, The Grateful Dead or The Who required long road trips. During that time I spent there I had a few respites from the doldrums of living in the middle of America, away from the vibrant east coast. One of them was listening to Rock of Ages and Northern Lights, Southern Cross. I wore out the vinyl on those two albums and could not bitch about having to replace them.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 03:57:50 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: still hanging around hard shelled reptiles...

Subject: Hoy hoy Bob W.

Bob, I just had a great weekend. Caught Curley Taylor & Zydeco Trouble (again) Friday night after seeing them in Manhattan last week. Hung with nephews and loved ones after their gig in Conshohocken early Saturday and then hibernated a ridiculous 12+ hrs. When I Awoke (ouch!) Sunday, I watched the clip of Rick on that stupid "Real Story" show and gleaned from it a beautifully spare performance of "Stage Fright" from him. He played all the parts, and insinuated all the rest on ONE ACOUSTIC GUITAR (!) so beautifully. Afterwards there was the tense anticipation about "will he get to the DOG line in Blue River" before they cut him off? And then you posted Ry Cooder's stuff with Little Village. Holy sheeit! Was that awesome or what? My wife & I had the honor of seeing that ensemble out on tour at The Tower for the brief moment that it lasted. Right place at the right time. It was also really cool to see Friend0 comment on the world of us turtle nerds. I SO miss my little dog, Crackers. She was a very good friend of my box turtle, "Cheese" (matched set, eh?). They would hang together, nose-to-nose in my backyard. Your postings were refreshing, and much appreciated. Thanks, bud.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 03:51:09 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Where Do We Go From Here?

Bob F. I envy your Band concert experiences. That must have been something else. I would imagine that 1st row at the Palladium would trump a show at Monticello Raceway (which I'm guessing was an outdoor show?)

I have a 3 hour round trip drive tomorrow for a job. For my homework assignment, I'm bringing Cahoots and NLSC with me to enjoy to in my preferred listening room these days....the VW Passatt with the very decent Monsoon sound system. It's been while since I've listened to either straight through, so I want to refresh my ears and see if my earlier assessment of the two albums remains the same. I think the last time I tried it, I didn't get all the way through either of them without skipping around.

This may be sacrilege to some, but I actually think, with the exception of 'Street Walker' & 'Let the Night Fall', Islands is an easier listen all the way through. Maybe I'll bring that along with me too for the trifecta, and see if I'm still a Band fan by the end of the day. ;-)


Entered at Mon Feb 28 03:26:00 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, Weider & Randy, yes.I never doubted that or stated otherwise. But I doubt Richard Bell or Stan Stelezte would adress Levon as Boss or refer to him as The Boss. and I do think he would be uncomfortable with it coming from them. Guys who were his age and were his peers. I could be wrong, but I can't imagine it.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 02:38:57 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Not Brooklyn

Subject: The Duke

Just nitpicking Serenity, so don't take this personally. Duke Snider was home on the couch watching the '57 World Series. That was the year the Braves beat the Yankees, 4 games to 3.

In 1955 the Duke hit 4 homers in the series and Brooklyn finally won a world championship. Seemed like the Yankees and the Dodgers were always the pennant winners back in the 1950's. The Yankees only missed '54 and '59. The Dodgers missed in '50, '54, '57 & '58. The LA Dodgers won it in 1959.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 01:55:46 CET 2011 from (203.45.121.175)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: rip suze rotolo



Entered at Mon Feb 28 01:39:50 CET 2011 from (74.82.68.21)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Twine Time Is Tight

I scored a treasure trove of some vintage 45s this Saturday.Incuded was "Twine Time" by Alvin Cash and the Crawlers. This funky 1965 dance instrumental hit with vocal shout-outs was written by Andre Williams and Verlie Rice. It follows the formula of Mr. Williams' earlier 1957 hit "Bacon Fat", a groove later reworked by The Band. I also got a copy of Booker T and the MGs great Stax instrumental "Time Is Tight", recorded in Feb. 1969. These two fabulous singles are among many others that I will be reviewing in the future.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 01:12:17 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: The Band in Concert

I was lucky enough and old enough to see The Band in 1971(Monticello Raceway) and 1976(The Palladium). I saw them a bunch of times in between, with and without Dylan. The only time they weren't great was a show at Nassau Colliseum in I believe 1975. I had first row tickets for the Palladium and that might cloud my judgement, but I think that was my favorite Band show, not including the ones with Dylan of course. That's why when The Last Waltz was announced I couldn't believe it. They were still young and close to their prime. Like Derek Jeter today, they had a whole bunch more hits in them! As far as Cahoots and NLSC is concerned, I wish someone would come along today and make a record half as good as either of them.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 01:06:29 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: 4 Years

Peter, I wasn’t suggesting that the Band had been “absent” for four years. I said that there was a “lack of new Band material in the preceding years”. From a commercial standpoint they may have been doing well, but two of those projects were heavily Dylan related, and benefited from additional sales from his audience. I was thinking more in terms of an artistic and creative standpoint. In many ways, they spent the better part of 4 years treading water.

NLSC was their first new album since Cahoots, if we don’t count the covers album of Moondog, or the live albums or the Dylan material. For a band with an 8-year history together as “The Band” up until NLSC, four years is a long time to go between new albums of original material. It’s half of their career together as “The Band” and the album that they came up with had 8 songs on it. Three songs were excellent. The other five were decent. Cahoots had three excellent songs following a period of three years in a row of outstanding albums. It really was a heck of a streak.

Glad to hear that ‘Ring Your Bell’ was also played live on the 1976 tour, but I doubt that one will ever end up on my playlist. It just doesn’t do that much for me. Besides, the comparison I was making had to do with the albums rather than the tours.

Perhaps Cahoots can be seen as the end of the beginning, and NLSC can be seen as the beginning of the end.


Entered at Mon Feb 28 00:55:10 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: TV shows to come...

Some of you guys may be interested in the following line-ups.

Mon. 8:30PM Bravo [Can.cable #40] Chuck Berry's "Hail,Hail, Rock & Roll"

Tues.8PM Bravo "Live At Rehearsal Hall" with kd lang

Tues. 9PM Bravo [#40C] 2 hrs. of the Brit Awards 2011 with Katy Perry, Eminem, etc.

Tues. 8PM PBS: "Motown at the Whitehouse" 5 decades of Motown music.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Feb 28 00:38:21 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Dodgers Great Duke Snider dead at 84.

Sad news for baseball fans:

Duke Snider, the Hall of Fame center fielder for the charmed "Boys of Summer" who helped the Dodgers bring their elusive and only World Series crown to Brooklyn, died early Sunday of what his family called natural causes. He was 84. "The Duke of Flatbush" hit .295 with 407 career home runs, played in the World Series six times and won two titles. But the eight-time All-Star was defined by much more than his stats—he was part of the love affair between Brooklyn and "Dem Bums" who lived in the local neighborhoods.

A durable slugger with a strong arm, good instincts on the bases, and a regal style, Snider swung his way to a nail-biter title in 1957 over the vaunted Yankees. He was often regarded as the third-best center fielder in New York—behind Willie Mays of the Giants and Mickey Mantle of the Yankees—during what many fans considered the city's golden era of baseball. "Baseball-wise, I was born in Brooklyn," Snider said once. "We lived with Brooklyn. We died with Brooklyn."

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXOXO


Entered at Mon Feb 28 00:02:46 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Peter M., those Little Village performances are great, aren't they? Glad you enjoyed them.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:52:30 CET 2011 from (67.142.175.20)

Posted by:

Sue Stokke

Location: Ames, Iowa

I hope to meet Rick on the other side. luv his dear soul to death and can hardly imagine knowing him on this side, as all of you did, and losing him. I'll never forget or stop loving his essence, cuz he was so talented and such a gem in the rough!


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:50:14 CET 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: Buffy Sainte-Marie Sings "Cripple Creek" on SESAME STREET

The native Canadian singer-songwriter sings the original "Cripple Creek" with the original mouth bow sound.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:50:17 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: dubois

Subject: The Reformed Band

Jeff- I think you're right about Garth and Rick not calling Levon "The Boss." But the others did. Since I never got to hang around Rick or Garth I don't know....they probably called him "Levon." I've heard Levon call Rick by his last name a lot and I guess sometimes Lee called Garth "Honey Boy." If you listen, you'll hear a lot of nicknames when the Band "family" is talking. Even the songs had nicknames (ie "Chest Fever" was sometimes called "Chester")... Rando. Epp. Little Elmo. Weege. Rando used to call Danko "Ricky" and recently he's referred to Levon as "La-VON" with the emphasis on the second syllable. If you hang around long enough you'll get a nickname of your own, like "Larzini" or one that I'm less attached to "You Over There."


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:43:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: NLSC

Thinking back to 1975: I don't think there was a feeling that the Band had been absent for 4 years. They took 1972 off, then 1973 reappeared with Watkins Glen and Planet Waves. 1974 was very high profile with the Dylan tour (biggest tour till that date) then the rest of the year supporting CSNY (a billing I would have reversed). The "Before The Flood" album was massive and they had tracks without Bob. 1975 brought The Basement Tapes (at last) and again a lot of focus. That's two big selling double albums in a row. When NLSC came out they were high profile … higher than in say early 1973 with Moondog Matinee.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:30:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm sure Lars is right. I heard one "new" member call Levon "the boss" and so did Aaron, and both did so in front of Garth.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 21:11:05 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Boss Man /Dogs & Tortoises

Lars, I know that you are aware of this, and just typed your statement lacking some details, which happens to us all.I strongly doubt Rick, Garth, Richard, (or Robbie) ever referred to Levon as Boss or The Boss. I don't know for a fact, but doubt,that Stan or Richard Bell would have either. I've seen Butch do it, but he was a handler.

Turtle Peter, I've associated Rick with dogs ever since I The Weight hit the airwaves way back when.And I agree with you, he did always have that happy to see you attitude dogs have. I have a customner here who has desert tortoises that where his father in laws. They live in the backyard, there are some "houses" of sorts he built for them. It's frequently been a cold winter here in the desert ( high 40s, 50s, 60s sometimes) but the times I've been at his home and the temp been in the high 70s, one or two tortoises have come out to bask in the sun. Customer says they only come out in the heat, and live 60 or 70 years.

Friend of mine's girlfriend had turtles in her yard. One of my past dogs used to be strongly interested in them. Mike usedto call bandit a turtle dog.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 20:42:01 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Joan, I recall telling Garth that was one of my favorites and he had a funny reaction, kind of like "Really? Was it?" I assured him it was superb.

The boys also did Ring Your Bell in 76 and resurrected In A Station and Tears of Rage. They obviously regarded NLSC highly as they played a lot of it with gusto on their last tour.

Richard commented more than once that the post LW group didn't practice enough for his tastes. When you consider the amazing library of songs they had, the post LW songlists are disappointing, perhaps for that very reasoPr


Entered at Sun Feb 27 20:34:39 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: It ain't like it used to be

Peter, I took your advice and re-listened to Forbidden Fruit from the Palladium show version that’s on AMH. It’s definitely an improvement from the original album version……swings more, the horns help, it has a little more bounce, faster tempo….less pedantic, etc., but I was comparing the actual albums to each other… not live versions. I’m not saying that NLSC is poor, or that Cahoots is brilliant. Just that the best tracks from each album aren’t that far apart in quality and that Cahoots may not deserve the beating that it gets. NLSC is a very good album, but a lot of it still sounds like “Band Lite” to me.

Great playing great singing, but in my opinion only 3 great songs. As far as comparing live performances of the 1976 Band to the 1971 Band goes, which version would you rather see?

As I was to young to have experienced either album at the time that they were released, I’m judging both in retrospect. When Cahoots came out, I can appreciate that it may have been a disappointment coming on the heels of three great Band albums. And that after a long drought, NLSC was seen as a return to form or sorts and may have been appreciated more given the lack of new Band material in the preceding years. My point is that the return to form was not the form of the first three albums and that if all they had to do on NLSC was better Cahoots by a song or two, then the bar had been lowered enough so that NLSC was seen as a smashing success. I still like and enjoy both albums, but only play about three from each with any regularity. Heck some groups these days struggle to get even two great songs on an album. So the Band really only fell short in comparison to themselves.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 20:16:23 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: near Bob W's neighborhood

Subject: Little Village

Oh my goodness, whatta way to start a weekend morning! First Rick doing Stage Fright and Blue River, then a clip or two from the phenomenal Little Village. Thanks, Bob.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 20:09:39 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Robbie

From his Facebook page:"just finished some alternative mixes on some bonus tracks"


Entered at Sun Feb 27 19:32:31 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Sun Feb 27 19:26:01 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Sun Feb 27 19:18:45 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Sun Feb 27 18:06:41 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, you need the Paladium, NYC show from 1976 that was mentioned as a possible future release. They do Ophelia, IMND, Acadian Driftwood and Forbidden Fruit plus Twilight (an outtake?) … you should revisit Forbidden Fruit. Great live song. For Garth fans, Jupiter Hollow is a rich feast. NLSC was greeted with acclaim at the time because it is a great album, with a distinctive sound. The songwriting is right back on form. Garth is brilliant throughout. You notice it balancing from Richard more towards Rick too. I don't think that show even has I Shall Be Released … it's not on the tape. And This Wheel's On Fire is there.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 17:36:29 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Cahoots vs. NLSC

A great song on an album isn't necessarily a great song to play live. Regardless, both Cahoots and NLSC had to compete with the best material from the first three albums, so I'm not sure that what they chose to play live is a fair comparison of which of the two albums was "better". 'Carnival' and 'Masterpiece' are great songs. '4% Pantomime' is too, but since they didn't have Van Morrison touring with them, it's unlikely that we would have heard much of that. Another favorite of mine from Cahoots is 'Thinking Out Loud', but that would not be a great song for a concert.

'Ophelia', 'Acadian Driftwood', and 'It Makes no Difference' are the best songs from NLSC. I'm not saying that the best three from Cahoots are necessarily better than the best three from NLSC, or which ones would be better in concert. What I am saying is that the albums are pretty equal when you compare the best songs. So perhaps NLSC is the "better" album, because the filler material is better than the filler on Cahoots. But that doesn't explain the disparity between the praise for NLSC vs. the disdain for Cahoots.

I think the bigger issue is that Cahoots had to compete directly with the three previous albums....all masterpieces in their own way released three years in a row, while NLSC had to compete with 4 years of relatively little activity. NLSC was like having a decent sandwich after being very hungry for a long time. Cahoots was like having a decent sandwich after three nights out at the finest restaurants in town. The memory of the great meals out made the sandwich seem bit of a let down. By the time NLSC came out, people were just happy to have the sandwich.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 17:06:09 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Rick clip

I just spent all day Saturday with my nephews & their dad. Something I always enjoy when I'm there is romping and wrestling with their dog, a big, loyal goofy ball of energy. I keep pet turtles (some of them for 20 to 30+ years in my household). You can leave the house for a week and your turtles will not feel neglected or get dangerously hungry in your absence. A dog requires a bit more steady commitment. Although I have not had a dog in 2 1/2 years, I really miss my last one. For a long, long time I've always connected Rick Danko with dogs in my mind. Maybe it's that beautiful photo of him next to the silly dog in a top hat, maybe it's the "Jack my dog" line... and then maybe it was his basic personality. He always reminded me of a favorite canine friend with his "Wow, so glad to see you again" attitude. One of the best times I've ever had in my life was going to see him, Randy & Aaron play in the 8x10 Club in Baltimore. A few people had slipped in early for soundcheck, and were totally digging the relaxed, casual sounds of this down-to-earth guy enjoying playing so informally for us. Well, the management said they had to clear the room, but Rick insisted that they leave the front doors open. We stood on the sidewalk, along with a few passersby and street people, watching Rick play. A big yellow Labrador sat down next to me and leaned against my leg. I thought "Now THIS is the way to see Rick Danko". This morning, after a rare 10-11 hrs sleep, I went to the computer to check the guestbook. I saw that there was a clip of his playing on "a corny TV show called The Real Story" with a mention of the fact that his rendition of "Blue River" gets cut off. I watched it hoping that he got to the line, "He's just a dog, you know" before it cut off. Ah, what a great way to wake up on a lazy Sunday morning!


Entered at Sun Feb 27 16:45:58 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Ten years ago...

...or maybe it was 15, Larry Packer was playing a live show with Levon and the dreaded moment of silence came over the stage as they were getting ready to launch another number...the hair was standing out on the back of my neck as I waited for the Idiot to yell "DIXIE!" but to my surprise he called out "ACADIAN DRIFTWOOD!"

Larry told me a few weeks later that Levon's response was "Don't I wish..." just loud enough for Pack to hear. I think that was a telling sign that Levon had songs that he liked, but wasn't prepared to try to play live in front of an audience. And there was a period back before the turn of the century when the boys were jamming some Band songs in Levon's barn and when Lee walked by they called to him to join in. Levon never even turned his head, he just kept walking. Apparently he didn't want to play any more Band music at that point.

When the Crowmatix played one of their first shows at The Ironhorse Music Hall (it might have actually been their debut, I'm not sure) in Northampton, MA I was talking with Randy while Levon and Butch were downstairs making up the setlist. In any case, the music that Levon played was the music that he felt comfortable in doing. I suspect that was true during the years of The Reformed Band, although there were certain songs that Levon kind of HAD to play (like "The Weight") if he wanted to keep his audience happy. I suspect that Levon has probably sung that song so much over the years that he had to change some of the phrasing of the lyrics just so he could make it more interesting to sing. Since he's said more than once that TNTDODD is taxing for him to sing, you don't get to hear that one.

Another factor in song selection might have been the absence of rehearsals. The first time Randy sang a band song with Levon it was a live show (I know I've mentioned that about 17 times before, sorry to beat it to death). So the setlist was probably made up of songs that everybody knew fairly well. Every few shows a couple of different Band tunes might get included, but that was probably Levon making it interesting for himself and his band. I guess that's why the band members always referred to him as "the Boss."


Entered at Sun Feb 27 14:47:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great review, and nice to see C.P. Lee mentioned. It does what the best reviews do, arouse interest and make you want to hear it. I agree about the arrangements and backing vocals and 50s feel, but I fear the voice is just too far down the road now.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 14:02:08 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Christmas in the Heart

It feels silly to continue to discuss Dylan's Christmas record as we beg spring to come. However, if you haven't heard it, and want an accurate evaluation, check out Peter Stone Brown's review.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 13:11:50 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Whatever gets you through the night …

It’s subjective at the level of enjoying an album or not. We all like different things. For example, I found Paul & Paula’s “Holiday for Teens” Christmas record delightfully kitsch, and would prefer it to Dylan for setting the Yuletide mood, but I suspect the vast majority of people would describe it as crap, and many as unlistenable. Still, I got a copy for 50p because of the very early 60s sleeve, and it sounds virtually unplayed, and it’s £25 in Rare Record Guide. The 50 p was generosity, as the charity shop had no price on it, and the woman in the shop looked at it, grimaced, and said “10p”. I didn’t know the value until I got home. And yes, I do know that posters will be taking the piss out of me plus Paul and Paula for ages to come.

No one can tell anyone what they like. There is objectivity in statements like “a majority of reviewers found it wanting” though, which may indicate only that it appeals to a minority taste. But if the weight of opinion piles up like that, probably indicates it’s not as good.

Levon has said himself that they were lazy on rehearsing, which meant fewer songs in a live set. They also found that (say) Acadian Driftwood just didn’t gel live. They probably with the equipment available in 1976 could not have done Jupiter Hollow live even if they’d wanted to. They also reduced Richard’s vocal contribution as he got less reliable.

The limited repetoire of live Band recordings (and the limited variation between them) has always meant that they’re far less interesting to bootleg collectors than Dylan, Neil Young or Van Morrison. Because (thankfully) they didn’t do long jams or have long solos, they’re also less collectable than The Grateful Dead or Led Zeppelin, because those long jams meant variety. Van has been known to do two sets on successive nights in the same town, with 80% different material in them. That was good as many of us bought tickets for both shows. You might do that with Dylan too. That gives both a live advantage. It’s worth seeing multiple Van shows, and it used to be worth multiple Dylan shows when he could still sing.

I don’t think many would go two nights running with The Band even at their height, and almost certainly not the 90s Band where variety meant “Did Jim Weider play Many Rivers To Cross or Deep Feeling as his featured spot?”

But in general, you expect a band to have several numbers (not too many of course) from the latest album in a live set … it’s called “promotion” … and both Cahoots and Moondog Matinee were under-represented in live shows.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 12:33:48 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cahoots--Live Performances

Choice of songs for live performance may not be an adequate or sufficiently comprehensive approach to judging the quality of music.Bands tend to play what's popular for the audience & what works live for them.Making an effort on less played B-Side albums or songs is a more rare happening.Perhaps,it feels like too much effort.So,the quality of Cahoots & the frequency of its live performances may be merely disconnected variables,or a case of comparing apples & oranges.Finally music is a perceptual experience & what's good or bad is a matter,simply of strong belief,but as CS Lewis distinguished,belief is not reason.The art of music rests with the subjective ability for people to freely "FEEL" what they like--not sure it's a matter of thinking.Thus,personal taste measures our judgement,but it can never be more than a belief,not a reasoned fact.So,I like Cahoots,you may not--all subjective judgments based on perceptual,not conceptual feel!


Entered at Sun Feb 27 10:52:13 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cahoots

On my ipod Band playlist I have all the first three albums complete. I only have Life is A Carnival and When I Paint My Masterpiece from Cahoots. You have to assume The Band felt much the same, because little was incorporated live. OK, they were about to start their 1972 break, and they did Life Is A Carnival live in 71, then ever afterwards.

Life Is A Carnival was the only track from their latest album to make it to Rock of Ages. The later CD with "previously unreleased bonus tracks" adds When I Paint My Masterpiece with Dylan. So far, their own assessment of the songs equates with mine, then.

Then "Academy of Outtakes" bootleg reveals that they played Smoke Signal, but that even failed to make the RoA" bonus track" second edit.

When they resumed playing in 1973, Life Is A Carnival was retained, and Smoke Signal was also played, as it was at Wembley in 74.

The 80s and 90s Band just did Life is A Carnival, apart from the Dylan tribute show when they did When I Paint My Masterpiece (in fact, that would have been a good song for the 90s Band to incorporate).

So I'd conclude that The Band didn't think much of it either. You can do much the same with Moondog Matinee and live shows.

NLSC provides two songs that the later Band did every time they went out: Ophelia and It Makes No Difference. To me, Acadian Driftwood (very hard to carry off live as they proved in 76), Jupiter Hollow (never done live) and Forbidden Fruit (76 tour) are all as good or better. You'd have to conclude that The Band found the NLSC material better than Cahoots material.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 04:58:22 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Cahoots

I like about 1/2 of Cahoots. Which isn't exactly a ringing endorsement, but respectable. But, I also like about 1/2 of NLSC. I'm not saying that Cahoots is a better album than NLSC, but I'm not saying that it isn't either. NLSC might be a little tighter as an album, but there's only 8 songs on it. I find myself only returning with any regularity to 3 or 4 of them. If I had to choose between my favorite half of NLSC or my favorite half of Cahoots (assuming that I'd never again get to hear the one that I didn't choose) it would be a tough choice. It's curious..... NLSC gets the praise, while Cahoots get maligned, but I find the best half of each to be fairly close to each other. And if push came to shove, I'd probably choose the better half of Cahoots as my favorite of the two albums. Some of that is due to production values. Cahoots still had some of the organic feel from the early days, and more of the ensemble feel to it. Of course neither stands up to Pink, Brown, or Stagefright, but not much does.


Entered at Sun Feb 27 03:19:49 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Ben - I had to chuckle reading your defense of Cahoots as an excellent album. Does an album of excellence need phrases such as - 'not exactly All Along the Watch Tower but not bad' or 'admittedly less effective arrangement' or 'probably worst lyrics ever on a Band record' or ' a song that thankfully makes no sense' or 'not very good lyrics but cooks' or 'the generic Think Out Loud saved by Garth' or 'Volcano has fine lines' or 'Smoke Signal generally cooks' or ' backup vocals mar River Hymn' or 'Cahoots has transition awkwardness' or 'Robertson should have worked on the lyrics more'. These are attributes that you use to gush about an excellent album. I think you're not giving the word its justice. Would you use any of these phrases to describe the truly excellent performances that are the first two and just a notch below for Stage Fright? I think your defense speaks enough about Cahoots to render it sub par. In further writing of something excellent, I would use better adjectives to describe the effort. Instead you chose to make excuses for the weaknesses - never a good sign. Cahoots is weak, you pointed oput many of the weaknesses pluse missed a great many - but hey if you like it fine, that's great. But your description of Cahoots betrays the praise you believe its worthy of.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 22:10:52 CET 2011 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Cahoots Is a Fine Album

Cahoots is an excellent album. First, I don't think we have to debate the excellence of the opener, "Life is a Carnival." Abysmal albums should open with such a stinker! Next, "When I Paint My Masterpiece." I have always agreed that the arrangement of this great Dylan tune is a little precious, but it's still a toe tapper. Up next, the wildly underrated "Last Of The Blacksmiths" with Garth's most smoking Sax ever. The much dismissed "nostalgia" theme, spelling out what the Band's music had always suggested as an undercurrent anyway, rears it's dubious head. Yet are these lyrics really as bad as Cahoots haters claim? The opening is actually quite good: "Who robbed the cradle, who robbed the grave, who's the one who asked to saved? no answer came." Not exactly "All Along The Watchtower" but not bad. An admittedly less effective arrangement mars "Where Do We Go From Here?" and to be honest, these are probably the worst lyrics ever on a Band album. Still, Rick Danko saves them to some extent. 4% brings the side rocking home nicely, a duel between two great singers on a song which thankfully makes no sense. SIDE TWO starts with the raucous "Shoot Out" not very good lyrics but it cooks. Next up, the most maligned song in Band History (which sounds much better, by the way, on the remastered versions) "The Moon Struck One." After much impersonal philosophizing, Robertson trys to tell a tender and personal story of young lovers left to fend for themselves in a cruel world. Richard Manuel brings it off beautifully, and it is a big favorite among some Band fans. Next we get the rather generic "Thinkin OUt Loud" saved by Garth's piano. "Volcano" has the fine lines "I'm like an Ally cat up here, without a lick of sense." Smoke Signal" has some of Robertson's best playing ever and just generally cooks. Those "Where Do We Go From Here" back up vocals are back to Mar "The River Hymn," which should have been kept simple. Still, the feeling is there. Sure, "Cahoots" has a certain "period of transition" awkwardness. Robertson should have worked on the lyrics more. Yet mostly, I feel, the album has been found guilty by the judges for not being in demand.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 19:19:29 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Karla Bonoff

Pat thanks for that post. I played that album a lot at one point in my life, but I never knew that it was Garth. It is a wonderful performance.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 18:14:26 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Crumb's musical preferences

Check out "R. Crumb's Heroes of Blues, Jazz, & Country" (link above) by our favorite old pervo. Highly recommended, like most of his work.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 16:06:18 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: RIP

Guitarist Terry Clements, long a member of Lightfoot's band, at age 63.

Thanks David for the NPR link to Lucinda's latest. Very compelling on first listen.

And I can't pass up an opportunity to defend 'Saved' and 'That Christmas Album'. Dylan does gospel with a crack band, what's not to like? When he was experimenting with the Christian faith did you really think he was going to go High Church? The lone highlight of the 80s for Dylan (excepting "Every Grain" and some Infidels outtakes). The Christmas album has brought me much pleasure over the past two seasons. He melds the sacred and secular in mysterious ways and I'd play the record year around if the missus wouldn't have me committed. Actually it's the only Dylan record she lets me play in the car.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 11:38:15 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Counting Crows Tribute to Richard

I think this is a great tribute to Richard.

A thoughtful friend gave me a gift of an album and I read about the songwriter's love for the Band.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 08:20:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: R. Crumb

I got the "Genesis" book too. I spent a happy half hour on R. Crumb's website (linked). A man with that knowledge of blues, jazz, early country AND a close friend of Janis was definitely joking. I enjoyed looking at his prints in particular. He did after all create a style.


Entered at Sat Feb 26 00:41:22 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Rick on tv

Seeing Rick again, looking so young and healthy, was really sweet. Too bad they didn't get all of "Blue River" before they went to the commercial.

BOB F- Ask Neil if he remembers a guy from New Paltz (Dennis) punching out a Marlboro player (I can't remember who, but I never saw an angrier mob than that night in Marlboro). We were lucky the fans stayed up in the bleachers.

Glory Days.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 23:32:14 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Levon's Facebook page just posted this rare TV appearance by Rick from 1991.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 23:27:14 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: _Clairvoyant_ promo clip

Young Sebastian has posted the last of the teasers from the promo video. Even briefer than the others, and not much of a revelation . . . .

But it leads with a bit of the title tune's guitar solo, which is tasty, classic JRR.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 23:21:44 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: High School Basketball

Lars I remember those games! Neil is my older brother. The movie Hoosiers captured the feel of those games. You agree? I think his first name was Richard.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 21:50:27 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

One of Garth's top 3 performances.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 21:43:19 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter V on Saved

You are correct that the lyrics are quite poor.However it's Dylan's voice & the music & the songs themselves that shine.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 20:55:53 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Upstate NY

Subject: The Falcon

Bob F.- Thanks for your input on The Falcon, I'm going to have to get over there soon to check it out. They don't play a lot of Americana/ bluegrass from the looks of their schedule; that's the kind of music I like the best.

I've always liked the food & drink at the Raccoon Saloon, which I guess isn't too far away. Marlboro Middle School used to be the high school and in the mid-'60s we (New Paltz) used to play some heavy duty basketball games in that gym. I remember we needed a police escort to the team bus after a hard fought win against Aurigemma, Chando, Neil Fino, and fucking Falk (I forget his first name, but he was the guy I had to guard). I think that was the night that one of our players waited until the ref wasn't looking and he sucker punched a Marlboro player. That was wrong ;)


Entered at Fri Feb 25 19:33:41 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Short Footage from Robbie and Levon circa 1960ish


Entered at Fri Feb 25 19:30:38 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Yonge Street Story

Robbie talks about Morris Levy.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 19:03:59 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: PSB check out The Falcon

PSB, Please see my link for The Falcon. It would be a great fit for you.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 19:00:33 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Saved by the Rhythm Section

Along with Tim Drummond on bass, drummer exordinaire Jim Keltner, guitarist Fred Tackett and Spooner Oldham & Terry Young on keyboards saved Dylan by propelling the music above the lyrics.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 18:00:11 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

PSB, I said IN COMPARISON, Dylan & The Dead was a masterpiece, not that I liked it. I'm afraid I just can't get past the lyrics. Yesterday I picked up "Hollywood Foto-Rhetoric" by Bob Dylan & Barry Feinstein, the "lost" Dylan text to the photos. That's Bob.

SAVED ORIGINAL LYRIC:

Oh he bought me with a price freed me from the pit

Full of emptiness and wrath, and the fire that burns in it

See I wanna screw this Christian chick show her that I’m fit

I’ll do anything to get her, even sing this heap of shit.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 17:49:01 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Saved and other stuff

Bob F, pretty much agree with you on Saved. Peter, I don't know how you can say no melodies as there's quite a few on there. Saved grew on me over the years. As Bob F, said, compared to some of the concerts at the time, especially Toronto which was recorded and filmed, the album is not as powerful. But how you can say you like Dylan and the Dead, which is one of the worst things he did is beyond me. Bob, thanks for mentioning my Ochs article. And for those around Philly, since Asleep At The Wheel was recently mentioned in here, (in an act of shameless self promotion) I'll be opening for my long-time friend Ray Benson (leader of Asleep at The Wheel, who are just celebrated their 40th year)who will be doing an extremely rare solo show this Wednesday at the Tin Angel in downtown Philly.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 17:31:52 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Saved

Each to his own. Many (well, a few) people like Saved. But for me, Saved has a strong sense of rhythm (a plus), great backing singers, but no melodies and the worst load of lyrics Dylan ever wrote. There's nonsense, utter nonsense then the born again drivel on Saved. I guess it's where you stand on fundamentalist Christianity. It's odd, I smiled when people raved about Dylan going electric and supported Dylan. I smiled again when people raved against him going C&W in Nashville Skyline and supported Dylan. I like Self Portrait very much and it grows every time I hear it. I love New Morning and Street Legal. Mark Knopfler rescues the dubious lyrics on Slow Train Coming with fine playing. I wasprepared to go with anything Dylan did and assume there was sense, or humour or something there. But I found Saved horrible to listen to, and I found the lyrics deeply offensive and outrageously cruel. I'm sure it's my personal reaction to all that 'saved by the blood of the lamb' meaningless stuff, and may say more about me than Dylan!

In comparison, Dylan & The Dead and the Christmas album (whose title continues to escape me) are masterpieces. There is also no worse Dylan sleeve design.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 17:22:03 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Another Vote for Saved

The theme never turned me on,but I viewed it as another part of the Bob shtick & therefore found it as funny as his brief interactions with the Lubab sect in Brooklyn or walking through Jersey & getting picked up as a vagrant by police.All part of the act I've grown to chortle at over the years.Saved has some fine songs & musicianship & is a great B-Side album!


Entered at Fri Feb 25 17:18:38 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

The "Crumb" documentary from the mid-90's is awfully good, although it is equally disturbing.

Ray, The Rolling Stone panel that congregated to dice up Self Portrait included Jann Wenner. The "A Second Look at Self Portrait" was written by Bill Damon a few months after the original review. I was unaware that Wenner ordered/wrote "re-reviews" other than the Slow Train Coming one (which for some strange reason I still have somewhere).


Entered at Fri Feb 25 16:54:08 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley NY

Subject: Saved

Saved is loaded with great songs including the title track Dylan wrote with Tim Drummond. These songs have been covered by many great gospel artists. The only argument one can make is Dylan performed them so much better in concert then on the Saved record.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 15:44:19 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: He that keeps nor crust nor crumb...

I should point out that Robert Crumb did contribute an entertaining cartoon interpretation of "When You Go A Courtin'" to "The Rose & The Briar" compilation of essays on American ballads. He based it on an old 1930 "phonograph record" from his collection of 78s.

No essay on "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", nor any other Band song, was included in the collection. From Mr. Crumb's least favorites, fine essays on Randy Newman's "Sail Away" & "Louisiana 1927, Dylan's "Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts" and Bruce Springsteen's "Nebraska" were featured.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 15:30:09 CET 2011 from (41.97.175.231)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Mr Peter V : awesome !

Thanks Mr Peter V, this echo-post of yours must be archived as the ultimate parchment for proof that this GB is really the top place on the internet, and not for music only.
I am the day after discovering the group, the few I heard, those guys and the gal go straight into the matter.

[since I know – don't ask me how, I just know – that many GBers watch secretly the TVnews – I would like to demystify the word in the link above transliteration in English "tifinar"]
"tifinagh" is the Berber Alphabet, more exactly Berber Letters, textually meaning Phoenician at the feminine form. "ti" for feminine, and "finagh" litteraly Phoenician, distances have been short from the beginning of the story


Entered at Fri Feb 25 15:14:17 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: B-Sode Albums

Like Cahoots,Self Portrait is another in a long line of what I view as really great B-Side albums.The Stones Goats Head Soup,Lucinda Williams Live @ Fillmore West,Clapton No Reason To Cry,George Harrison Brainwashed,and many more all represent albums thaty are not the "primary"releases by these artists.They are B-Sides,perhaps a bit raw,edgy or error prone,but I always found a certain musical thrill in them.I recall being fascinated by B-Sides since listeningto 45's on my victrola(i think that's what mom & dad called the record player with no speakers!).


Entered at Fri Feb 25 15:01:11 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: R. Crumb gets the last word


Entered at Fri Feb 25 14:55:23 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: The Falcon, Marlboro NY

Lars, The Falcon is a great place to see a show. The couple who own the place are terrific people. The food is very good and reasonably priced.They pay the performers with donations from the audience. They have a donation box and on the way out everyone donates! It must work out well for the performers because he has a great lineup all the time. I saw Garland Jeffreys put on an amazing show there two weeks ago. Garland is in his mid 60's and his voice is even better then it was 30 years ago! He has a new record coming out in the spring that Larry Campbell played on. I'm so looking forward to hearing this record.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 13:54:56 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Just saw Elvis Costello's spectacle

With richard thompson, nick lowe, allan toussaint and Levon helm...

wonderful stuff. they do 'the weight' with alex lamontagne (Levon's voice was strained, so he couldn't talk)...


Entered at Fri Feb 25 11:09:39 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tinariwen

I saw them in Salisbury a few years ago. Quite dramatic, as an hour in to the show, the lead singer just collapsed on stage and we actually heard "Is there a doctor in the house?" There were three. But the concert ended there. They were brilliant. I have two albums.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 10:29:05 CET 2011 from (41.97.175.231)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Tinariwen

they were at the World Cup 2010 Kick-Off Celebration Concert in Johannesburg, Orlando Stadium

i thought the entire entertainment was going to be at the Shakira standard, since she was announced as the main attraction of the celebration in question


Entered at Fri Feb 25 09:25:40 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Probably joking …

That's how I read R.Crumb. He lumps in Dylan, Springsteen and Randy Newman. There may be a bit of truth in there though. Crumb did books with CDs of old jump jazz in the back inserts. Perhaps the Louis Jordan fan heard the 90s Band doing Caldonia.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 06:02:12 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: R. Crumb

R. Crumb did the album artwork for the Janis Joplin 'Cheap Thrills' album. I've always thought that Levon's Electric Dirt album artwork was an homage or at least a nod to that style. Kind of ironic that R. Crumb doesn't seem to have been a fan of The Band. But not knowing the context, it's possible that his comments were just meant to be provocative. He might have even been joking. I think his career has been based on being critical and satirical.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 05:40:42 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: That guy

I never heard of R. Crumb before today. After a quick search I guess he's a comic book kind of guy who created Fritz the Cat, who I never heard of either. I gather that he prefers Billie Holiday and Bo Diddley to The Band. It's a free country, but I don't like reading that stuff that Crumb wrote about the Boys.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 05:24:39 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Crumb?

What's with Crumb disliking The Band - could somebody please share?


Entered at Fri Feb 25 03:47:59 CET 2011 from (24.124.81.70)

Posted by:

ray pence

Subject: Crumb

I disagree with everything R.Crumb rants there, but have to admit it made me smile. Pretty entertaining. Certainly more style and energy than another rehashing of the feud--Crumb doesn't discriminate, he hates EVERYONE in the Band! And by implication, everyone who likes the Band!

Anyone here read Crumb's recent illustrated version of the book of Genesis? Great stuff!

The question emerges: We know what music RC hates. So what/who the f*** does he LIKE?


Entered at Fri Feb 25 03:42:12 CET 2011 from (24.124.81.70)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/lawrence kansas/flyover country/Blessed by Rachel Maddow's presence, at least for one night
Web: My link

Subject: dylan/wenner/stones

Pat B

Few remember that Rolling Stone published a positive counter-review of Self-Portrait soon after the Marcus-led skewering, somewhat similar to Jann Wenner's later defense of Slow Train Coming after the initial review in his magazine ripped it.

Pat, wasn't it actually Wenner doing a two-fer defense of the Stones' Some Girls and Dylan's Street-Legal in 1978, after Paul Nelson panned the former and Marcus panned the latter?


Entered at Fri Feb 25 03:35:47 CET 2011 from (24.124.81.70)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/lawrence kansas/flyover country/Blessed by Rachel Maddow's presence, at least for one night
Web: My link

Subject: robbie as auteur?

I don't subscribe to the Robbie as auteur theory. But I don't think the Band was really the Band without his participation. His post-Band work is uneven and I wish he'd be more prolific. I don't think his solo work, even the best of it, approximates anything he did with the Band. But he's made some fine music on his own and I think credit should be given where it's due.

Post-Band, Levon, Rick, Garth, and Richard were also uneven in what they recorded and performed. That's not entirely because Robbie wasn't involved, but his absence was a factor, just as theirs was with his music. The rumors about Storyville being an album on which Levon, Rick, and Garth could have joined Robbie--tantalizing. Good record, would've been great with Levon and Rick singing rather than Robbie. No argument there.

In some ways, I think the best work that Levon, Robbie, Rick, Richard, and Garth did was when they accompanied Dylan. But that doesn't mean I don't think the best of their work as the Band was spectacular. It was. It is. I can't imagine rock and roll without it.

The 1978 review in Rolling Stone of the Last Waltz album, which was quite a slam, pointed out that Robbie sounded like a man pressed to his limits during his solos on the 1966 tour and that none of the Band albums really had anything like that from him. I agree.

There's something about the fire they had when they were with Zimmy. And they brought out the best in him, too. Electric, in more ways than one. And the fact that the 1966 tour was one of the greatest in history, with Levon on the sidelines, doesn't diminish his contributions one bit.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 03:13:20 CET 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: R. Crumb

David: I had to laugh at that note from R. Crumb. I'm a fan of his art, and familiar with his love for fairly obscure vintage 78 rpm recordings. I remember the sad tale of his traumatic move to France several years ago and the difficulty of transporting his big collection of fragile 78s. What a character...


Entered at Fri Feb 25 01:57:20 CET 2011 from (74.82.68.16)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cahoots

If one subscribes to the Robbie as auteur theory, in my opinion, the rest of the group did the best they could with what they had to work with. It was with the added input of collaborators Allen Toussaint and Van Morrison, as well as Dylan's "Masterpiece", that they rose to te level of their prior work.


Entered at Fri Feb 25 01:57:27 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Mumford/Sons/Dylan

A bit ashamed that this rag is in my home,but the latest "Entertainment" magazine has an interesting item: "After the dress rehearsal,"Lovett recalls,"he did mention maybe doing it a different way.It took one of his bandmates to sort of tap him on the shoulder & go,"Man,Bob,not tonight." "So we stuck to the plan"(my personal bet it was Tony Garnier who told Bob not to do it--seems Tony is the only one able to sway Dylan on things....guess that's the role of the "bandleader")


Entered at Thu Feb 24 23:55:33 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Brien Sz: I don't know that I've ever encountered anyone, including here at the GB, who's gushed about the album. Like you I went through decades of not liking "Cahoots", but unlike you, apparently, I did eventually come 'round to it. For me it was the result of a simple coincidence: listening to my treasured copy of Jack Bruce's "Songs for a Tailor" immediately before putting on the CD reissue of "Cahoots" that I'd just gotten for Christmas from some well-meaning but (I thought at the time) misguided soul. The horns on the Bruce just opened me up to the horns on "Life Is A Carnival" - and the rest was easy.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 23:32:45 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Outside of 3 tracks, Cahoots is a failure. It's dull and bloated. It lacks the creative force, the core energy and spark that the prior recordings posessed. I've tried listening to this album many times over the years and could never catch on to what people were talking about that gushed praise over this effort. But that is also the beauty of music as well that one can experience their own poetry and bliss therein.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 23:09:50 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More Cahoots

Agreed that Cahoots as an album doesn't pull itself together like prior Band releases.Sometimes,however,an album can be excellent based simply on the number of quality songs.Of the original 11 tracks,if you listen song by song,there is greatness(to my ears) in most of them.Whether 4% Pantomine,Life is a Carnival,When I Paint My Masterpiece,Smoke Signal,Volcano,The River Hymn--these are fantastic songs compared to music in general & in relation to The Band's work in particular.It's certainly better than Islands!


Entered at Thu Feb 24 23:04:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Wavering?

But Peter, calling it abysmal connotes that it's unfathomable, wretched to the point of despair, or immeasurably bad. That doesn't exactly leave much room for a placement of "Cahoots" in a comparative analysis with the group's other work.:-)


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:50:14 CET 2011 from (71.43.66.106)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Cahoots, Dylan & The Band

The trouble with Cahoots is that there are good to excellent songs that stand alone (I like hearing them on I-Pod), but Cahoots as a whole is a bunch of misfit parts. MFBP and the Brown Album feel like musical novels that you can keep coming back too. Cahoots is discordant - there is an old Rolling Stone review that likened Cahoots to a grand failure - The Band's inability to cohese on their own and the nation's discomfort in the present day. BTW, Dylan put out a large amount of crap, most of it in the twenty year period commencing with the Last Waltz. Bob's RS comments on The Band occured when he was admittedly "at bottom" during the Petty tour -- I saw a horrible performance at Madison Square Garden. Face it, pull any Before the Flood performance on Wolfgang's Vault and it is apparent that the Dylan/Band combo was far better than anything else he has done live. Ironically, both the Band and Dylan were heading back to the same place on the map with Jubilation and the Time Out of Mind trilogy.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:43:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And "Saved" is worse than the Christmas record, which at least had a very funny video to commend it.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:42:33 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Worse records is different than "bad records". The worst Dylan and Band records are not "the worst records ever made" obviously. They simply fall below the standards they set. I even bought Bob's Christmas record and have the LP and three different CD releases of Cahoots. No "bad' is not THAT bad. Just comparatively.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:19:09 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cahoots & Dylan's 10 Worst

Once again,there is no monopoly when it comes to opinion,so enjoying Cahoots &/or most Dylan albums remains a great pleasure in my life.Suggesting these are some of the worst albums made is interesting,but doesn't change my mind or my listening choices.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:15:21 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

My apologies. I was riffing on the No Depression reviewer's myoptics.



Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:11:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Bob. This confirms what I was suspecting. You open up your e-mail and Linked-In says "So and So wants to link to you" and you think, "Really? Surprising, but that's nice." But in fact there's some arcane auto-trawl going on. I got several Carol ones too. This is useful information for the next one!


Entered at Thu Feb 24 22:10:07 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks for assuring me that "King's Speech" DVDs have been sent to Oscar Academy members prior to balloting. I must be sure to ask my friend how she voted.

Even if we decide that a 'Major Artist' means 'Successful Artist That I Like A Lot', I can't see "Cahoots" being anywhere near the Worst Album Made By, or even the Worst Album Made Right After A Great Album Made By. There's Dylan, there's Spirit, there's Moby Grape, there's Springsteen, there's Lou Reed, there's Bowie, there's the Stones, there's the Who, there's Jefferson Airplane ...


Entered at Thu Feb 24 21:50:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pat, define "major artist"? No, I can think of many worse. Metal Machine Music competes with Two Virgins. But neither of those were serious attempts to make records, they were statements. Bad records by major artists need the intent to be the real thing. Live albums don't count. So Cahoots qualifies, along with Chicago III (much worse) and Saved (much, much, worse). In fact Dylan has made a dozen albums worse than Cahoots. But that's no excuse.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 21:45:00 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, might it be the worst record ever released by a major artist?


Entered at Thu Feb 24 21:31:41 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Landy, Peter, FB can be interesting and contribute to creativity.. Gal I went to school with from first grade through two years of college found me, winter of 09. End of Jan 2010 we met at a reunion of some people from our grade school class. I was her first date ever, back in 8th grade. We then resumed something that never got off the ground when we were kids. I wrote the first love song i ever wrote for her. Then she gave me some poems she wrote cause of me and I took a few lines from the poems, wrote songs around em, we are cowriters.Haven't recorded any of this yet , but will.

I still don't like the digital age, but it can offer some benefits.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 21:16:14 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last time we discussed Cahoots, I listened right through with total attention. I think Sebastian had posted he'd done the same. On re-appraising it, it was far, far worse than I remembered. It's an abysmal record.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 21:13:53 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

You mean it might not be the worst album ever released by a major artist?


Entered at Thu Feb 24 20:55:51 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: _Clairvoyant_ almost-review

Purely a puff piece, but at least it's grammatical.

" . . . listeners who grew up with Robertson’s music will recognize pieces of their own past, but younger generations can still get a feeling for the sense of history that pervades the album. The tunes themselves, of course, come with no age requirements for their enjoyment, and Robertson’s followers can exhale at last, content in the knowledge that their pied piper is back at work."


Entered at Thu Feb 24 19:54:20 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Irritating Music Review

"Mr. MARCUS &
MR. WILENTZ:

RECEIVED YOUR LETTER WITH PROPOSAL FOR BOOK TENTATIVELY TITLED AMERICAN BALLADS, INVITING ME TO CONTRIBUTE. EVERYTHING LOOKED SORTA INTERESTING AND, Y'KNOW 'RIGHT ON' TO ME UNTIL I GOT TOWARD THE BOTTOM OF YOUR LIST OF 'BALLADS' AND SAW THE NIGHT THEY DROVE OLD DIXIE DOWN BY 'THE BAND', ONE OF THE MOST IRRITATING POP HITS OF ALL TIME. WORDS CANNOT DO JUSTICE TO hOW MUCH I HATE THAT SONG. I hATED 'THE BAND' AND EVERYTHING THEY DID -- ONE OF THE MOST PHONY, PRETENTIOUS MUSIC GROUPS IN THE hISTORY OF AMERICAN POP RECORDINGS. I ALSO LOAThE AND DESPISE SPRINGSTEEN AND RANDY NEWMAN. I DON'T EVEN LIKE BOB DYLAN! HE WROTE A COUPLE OF FUNNY SONGS IN ThE '60S, BUT MUSICALLY hE'S FERShTUNKINA [sic]* AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED...I NEVER UNDERSTOOD ThE APPEAL OF ThAT GUY..."

(excerpt from a letter written by the artist/musician R. Crumb dated August 14, '02, subsequently published in "The Rose & The Briar: Death. Love and Liberty in the American Ballad", edited by Sean Wilentz and Greil Marcus -- W.W. Norton & Company 2005)

*Farshtunken is a Yiddish expression meaning stinky, smelly, fetid, rotten, etc.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 17:55:27 CET 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Web: My link

Subject: Cabin Dogs

Local Philadelphia Band with ties to Professor Louie. Awsome sound and very BAND influenced. New CD contains a cover of Dylans New Morning. If you are in the Philadelphia area you should check this band out.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 17:55:06 CET 2011 from (41.97.177.69)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M - Re : Toumast

I don’t make the CD shops for a while, lost in the nebula of exposed new merchandises I often rather end buying for the 36th time the same old album of Dylan I feel confident with, anyone knows this usage ? – them recording / us listening, we cannot tie the balance, plus the youtube distracting easiness
Thanks for mentioning Toumast (== “the people”), presented as “group from Niger” . Every Targui possess 6 official passports, a millenarian way of life transcending national borders, which btw they figure as “Scars in the Sand”
leading to another Tinariwen (== “from Tenere”) have you heard them ? before I discovered randomly beneath the smoke rings of my own posts

these forums show no face, they casually show the beauty of life


Entered at Thu Feb 24 16:57:15 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: MoFi

Jed: Despite errors in their description of the music, Mobile Fidelity's hybird-SACD remasters from The Band's catalog are excellent. MoFi has released "MFBP", "Cahoots", "NLSC" and "Rock of Ages", with a remastered "Stage Fright" in the works.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 16:45:43 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: linked in/facebook

Never got into either of them.I've always preferred real human,face to face contact or telephones.I'd prefer my life to be real....so how can I explain my interest in posting on music & guitar GB's or Forums?!


Entered at Thu Feb 24 16:42:08 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cahoots

Agree 100%.Cahoots is an underrated and under appreciated album!


Entered at Thu Feb 24 16:05:42 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Lucinda Williams

I was able to get the vinyl version of Lucinda Williams' new album "Blessed" in advance of next Tuesday's official release date. The 2-LP set from Lost Highway is pressed on white vinyl and includes the deluxe 2-CD version as well. With her 10th release, Ms. Williams, ever the poet's daughter, once again has her wheels firmly rolling down the gravel roads of her imagination. This time round she's expanded her tableau with the aid of a fine group of musicians, including steel string master Greg Leisz and guests Elvis Costello & Matthew Sweet. The album, recorded at Capitol's venerable Studio B in Hollywood and mixed by Bob Clearmountain, was produced by Don Was, Tom Overby and Eric Liljestrand. For a preview, NPR (see link) is streaming the album in it's entirety until next Tuesday's release.

While the term Americana implies a blend of indigenous roots music, the composer Aaron Copeland once defined American music as "music that was written in America." This suggests that a skilled songwriter absorbs the influences of the surrounding environment and its music, translating it into his or her own vision. Thus, wouldn't Robbie Robertson, a Canadian by birth, be an excellent affirmation of that definition.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 15:57:20 CET 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Subject: Oops! Richard Helm

"Historically overlooked, Cahoots stands as one of The Band's finest efforts and includes contributions from iconic pianist/arranger Allen Toussaint and Irish bard Van Morrison, whose feverish duet with Band vocalist Richard Helm on "4% Pantomime" is the equivalent of two poker players trying to outsmart one another. A similar carnivalesque spirit infuses the entire set. If you're missing this album or simply never heard it, you're in for a treat. And there's never been a better opportunity to experience Cahoots. Remastered from the original master tapes by Mobile Fidelity's expert engineers, the record sounds more open, detailed, warm and revealing than ever before".


Entered at Thu Feb 24 14:09:17 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I am a memeber of both Linkedin and Facebook. Both have their merits and drawbacks. On Facebook, my highschool grad class has it's own private group page. Pleasant enough however, once I signed up, I got friend requests from people who I wasn't even friendly with back in the day. Which of course, leads to the ticklish dilemma of whether or not to accept. Then again, I got a request from a girl I went with to the first highschool I attended, who became my friend, only to drop me later as it turned out that she became ultra orthodox while I went ahead and married a lovely girl, who enjoys posting pictures of her Christmas tree with over 3,000 lights and plenty of ornaments, that it resembles the Liberty Bell more than a tree. As the man said, "you can't please everyone, you got to please yourself".


Entered at Thu Feb 24 13:59:52 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Peter, no offense taken. I signed on to LinkedIn a few years back at the recommendation of a business acquaintance. I never visit the site, haven't signed on in over a year. The site does seem to generate lots of "connections" and I receive countless email updates as well. I haven't had your email address in my book for quite a while but may have had it there when I registered.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 10:37:07 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Just read the review posted by Joe J...

Sheesh - at least it was positive. Eric Clapton was 'rumoured' to want to join. Eric himself started teh rumour...



Entered at Thu Feb 24 10:07:30 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Linked in

it's a professional networking site. there are some bugs - I and others got an invitation from Carol who didn't actually want to send the invite (as she doesn't use it).

I've never found it useful, finding Facebook a better networking site myself. But it gives the impression of a vibrant membership...


Entered at Thu Feb 24 10:06:08 CET 2011 from (41.97.177.69)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: epilog

I epilog the thread on a funny note. The traditional costume of the Hoggar's Touaregs "The Men in Blue" cited by Bill M, is all in silk and is very expansive. Listening ten years ago a Targui explaining with nostalgia that until recently the best quality costumes he used to buy them from the prestigious fabrics of Tombouctou or Gao. Showing a real astonishment at my question "and nowadays where you buy that ?"
as a matter of fact he enlightened
"from Taiwan"


Entered at Thu Feb 24 10:03:41 CET 2011 from (41.97.177.69)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: posting to much led serious mistakes

Thousands Thanks Mr Peter V, the book of George MacDonald Fraser enriches thoroughly the subject.

Mr Sadavid I thank you too, the site you linked is dedicated "to rating the accuracy of films with regard to real history"

Please note the following correction: the clip linked in my yesterday's post is from a TV series adaptation of Samson and Delilah. I completely got it wrong in the pqssqge

The true "Samson and Delilah" (1949) directed by Cecil B De Mille and filmed in Algeria, BouSaada, "the village of Zorah in the land of Dan" [link above]


Entered at Thu Feb 24 09:48:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: So what's Linked In?

Just a note. I’ve been trying to fathom the workings of “Linked In” which periodically sends me lists of people I may know and may like to link to. It’s weirdly knowlegeable. I was pulled in initially when it asked me if I knew an editor I worked with for 20 years but haven’t seen for ten, a ex-girlfriend from 1970, my neighbour who worked with me campaigning against a cell-phone mast and an editor I’d met briefly two weeks earlier. So I said OK, and filled in the form, but declined the “subscription”. Since then it sends regular lists, usually with two or three people I know … I’ve clicked “yes” to several people on this GB. This morning it linked me to Bob W. No offence, Bob, but our correspondence here hasn’t been friendly and we’re in different areas of work. You’re still in my address book from a few years ago. Am I still in yours? What I’m wondering is how it makes the links. A friend says the moment you express interest it accesses your address book and trawls for names already listed. But it has brought up several people whose addresses I didn’t know and who I hadn’t seen in years.


Entered at Thu Feb 24 09:23:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A little note in the review "Americana, or more accurately North Americana" shows a PC-addled brain in operation. In educational material, we're always careful to say 'North America' and 'The USA' rather than 'America' as South and Central Americans rightly object to being excluded. But in music? We have Latin music, and Latin-American music, so then it's fair to accept that 99% of people say 'Americana' as a blanket term for music from the USA and Canada. When record stores had enough CDs to warrant sections, they had "Latin" and "Americana" as two sections (now it's just "Specialist Music" with everything else).


Entered at Thu Feb 24 07:23:33 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: robbie's new stuff

People on facebook may have seen it - I like it. I hope his people don't mind me spreading it. ;)


Entered at Thu Feb 24 05:46:37 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link


Entered at Thu Feb 24 02:11:40 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

And Garth's "lowreyesque" runs are played on a B3. BrillianPr


Entered at Wed Feb 23 23:45:56 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Love these reviews

Link is to a review of a new 'Rock of Ages' release. The reviewer believes that Dylan wrote 'The Weight' and that Richard sang 'Caldonia Mission'. Makes you wonder.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 22:02:38 CET 2011 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Two Band Film Festivals

Band Film Festival: The Last Waltz. Festival Express. Carny. The Right Stuff. Coal Miner's Daughter. The Dollmaker. Smooth Talk. Band Film Festival, IN HELL: You Are What You Eat. Man Outside. Eliza's Horoscope. The Indian Runner. Fire Down Below.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 21:56:20 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Inception

With each year -- how quick they pass -- it gets a little harder to suspend disbelief. This one asks you to believe twelve impossible things before breakfast. Fair enough, but I couldn't keep them all straight. In the end you kind of admire the aesthetics of the bullet frozen in mid-air or the goblet tumbling endlessly through space, or whatever it was, but you don't really care which one hits first, because you can't remember why it's supposed to matter. Or maybe they need to dumb it down a bit, slower jump-cuts for the bifocals brigade, special version rated G for geriatric . . . .

On the other hand, I saw a bit of _Twelve Angry Men_ on the tube the other day. Buncha white men yakking around a table. Riveting.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 20:05:17 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter V: While bootleg copies are certainly in circulation, Academy Award "screener" DVDs have been sent out to those who vote on the nominated films. Many bootleg copies are derived from these screener DVDs, which are watermarked for the purpose of tracing back to the source copy.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 18:58:28 CET 2011 from (87.207.64.195)

Posted by:

rfdsfasd

Location: sfdgsfdg
Web: My link

Subject: sdgfsdfgs

sdfgsdfg


Entered at Wed Feb 23 18:45:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

King's Speech DVD? Wouldn't that be a pirate copy? Surely it's not on DVD yet?


Entered at Wed Feb 23 18:41:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Inception

The Oscar that movie does not deserve in a million years is "editing". If 30 to 40 minutes were cut, it would be truly great. Its issues are that the first 15 minutes are incomprehensible crashes and bangs, then it gets interesting, then it gets really, really good … then the end fight scene is more incomprehensible crashes and bangs, and because it's in the snow we hadn't a clue who was fighting who. Inception to me was a great idea, with some wonderful sequences squashed by Hollywood bangs and crashes crap. The SFX are very good otherwise.

I really want a movie like The Social Network (or from reports, The King's speech) to clean up the awards just to demonstrate that all that Catastrophe Canyon bangs and crashes stuff is BORING. You do the Disney ride. You see it done. Fine.

A comparison is between the low budget Wild Target (Bill Nighy, Emily Blunt) with the worst film of the year I've seen, Knight & Day. Both are basically chase capers, but Wild Target says it's about acting and script, not bangs and crashes. And Bill Nighy is so many leagues better as an actor than Tom Cruise. And Emily Blunt's even more attractive - as well as ten years younger - than Cameron Diaz. Though Diaz outshines the wooden Cruise throughout.

The Sunday Times Culture had a cover feature last week on why movies are dumbing down to the teen audience. This is why some thought-provoking movies or character movies need to get awards. And at 30 minutes shorter, Inception would qualify.

Personal favourite of the year is probably Cemetery Junction (written by Rickie Gervais & Stephen Marchant). Again, a movie where acting and dialogue count, and Gervais confines himself to a bit part. Dump the big bang, big car chase directors and SFX people!

Brien … if you e-mail me, I'll link you to more of my opinionated nonsense on films!


Entered at Wed Feb 23 18:24:06 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Another picture that is up for "Best" is Inception. My wife and I watched it the other night and it was fantastic.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 18:16:40 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Few remember that Rolling Stone published a positive counter-review of Self-Portrait soon after the Marcus-led skewering, somewhat similar to Jann Wenner's later defense of Slow Train Coming after the initial review in his magazine ripped it.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 17:25:02 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: You're the only person that I know that hasn't seen the movie too, which makes two of us I guess. I saw it just a couple of weeks ago when somebody absolutely raved about it and thrust a DVD into my hands. The intro was as slow and uninteresting as expected, but as soon as Geoffrey Rush's character was introduced things perked up considerably - to the extent that I'd now rave and thrust the DVD into passing hands if I hadn't already returned it to the somebody. Rush and Firth ensemble are amazing: one particular scene where they're trading rapid lines nose to nose will make you think, "Yes, that's why people make movies."


Entered at Wed Feb 23 16:28:34 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The King's stuff

Christopher Hitchens is challenging but rarely 100% reliable (cf. Michael Moore). I’m the only person I know who hasn’t seen The King’s Speech. George VI may have been a poor judge of politicians in 1939/40, but he grew to the occasion, and refused to leave London or England during the blitz. Churchill wanted him to go to Canada, possibly wisely, as it would have kept the figureheads safe if Britain had fallen. Edward VIII on the other hand continued to communicate with the Nazis through 1940 / 41, was clearly lined up to lead a puppet government, was implicated in a murder investigation in The Bahamas, and caused a near-scandal by money-laundering in the early 50s. This is why the present Queen and her mother refused to have anything to do with him and why he was never allowed to return to Britain. There have been several TV documentaries revealing what a creep Edward VIII was. Hitchens “Nazi-boy” is accurate.

Churchill is a complex character, and (in spite of being half-American by birth), had the sense to stand up to Hitler right away, rather than wait the eighteen months until Hitler had invaded Russia and over-reached himself.

My Great Uncle Ben was a Welsh miner, and never, never forgave Churchill for “doing a Gaddafi” (as we might say in 2011) and turning armed troops on his own people in the General Strike of 1926, an event at which he was present and protesting, though it was cavalry with swords. When I was a boy, Great Uncle Ben would lecture me for hours about what an unpleasant person Churchill was, then add, but in times of defence against absolute evil, you need a bastard on your side. Norman Mailer portrayed this dilemma in “The Naked & The Dead.”

Personally, I’d like to see Robbie and Garth knighted for services to music tomorrow.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 16:13:19 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: It's just me, speculating again, but I can't help but suggest that the well-thumbed book on Christopher Hitchens' bedside table is "How to Become a Tired Iconoclast". The one that encourages the deathly ill to pretend to still be in the game by chewing the scenery and nipping at the heels of the bit players. Churchill was a bit player in the movie (though not in real life) and his character could probably have ended up on the cutting-room floor without affecting the film. Ted 7 could hardly have been cut out altogether, but was clearly shown to be the dangerous nitwit that he was. As for the Order of Canuckistan, don't we have that so there's an honours program that doesn't directly involve the royals - i.e., Saxe-Cobourg-Gotha-Windsor Not? At least it's Robbie Robertson, OC rather than Sir Robbie. (Gag me with a spoon!)


Entered at Wed Feb 23 15:46:25 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

sadavid, I had just finished reading this piece when I looked in to find your post. It seems possible the US wasn't as late to the party as some accusers have offered up. Any delay might be accounted for by the time it likely took to figure out who was actually hosting.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 15:23:57 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: desecrating history, in film

As the AMPAS awards ceremony approaches, here's an article about some of the history that doesn't make it to the silver screen in _The King's Speech_. Personally, outside of the odd deserving musician being admitted to The Order of Canada, I'm pretty much over the Saxe-Coburg and Gothas.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 09:55:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Agora

Very under-rated historical movie from last year. Well worth watching for it's recreation of Alexandria in 391 AD, but the director made a dreadful mistake near the end when the fanatics go to stone Rachel Weisz and the costumes and dialogue are WAY too close to The Life of Brian.

Since Life of Brian, you just cannot have bearded fanatics clad in black sackcloth, picking up rocks, pointing at a near naked woman, and shouting “Stone the witch!” There were only three of us in the cinema but a large crowd would have burst into laughter at the key point of the movie. You’re just waiting for one of the fanatics to break out and say “Hey! But don’t throw the stones too hard!”


Entered at Wed Feb 23 09:48:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Hollywood History of the World

George MacDonald Fraser, no mean scriptwriter himself, wrote "The Hollywood History of The World" on history as portrayed in the movies. Fraser (author of Flashman) scripted some big ones, such as The Three Musketeers, but was also called in for years to rescue other scripts on historical subjects, usually anonymously. He has a volume of autobiography on his film writing career. Less exciting than the brilliant one on his WW2 experiences, but still worthy.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 09:20:15 CET 2011 from (41.97.196.122)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Band Connection

you can learn more on the anthropology of today's BouSaada from Samson and Delilah movie than from the linked above anthropological introdctory poster


Entered at Wed Feb 23 09:01:21 CET 2011 from (41.97.196.122)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: an other side of Life Of Brian

Sadavid, Peter V, David P : thanks you all for your interest, really all remarks are insightful

The dialectics in not really about the location only, where the commodity and financial aspects are priority. Everybody knows there's a whole area near Ouarzazate which is definitely a delocalization of Hollywood.

and dlew919 you can consider it very seriously as part of your concern "what do I think of Life of Brian" which doesn't stray from the general rule for that category of movies, The problem is :

Since the trend started with some great from the Hollywood era, Old Testament characters, and all the sight, specially THE CLOTHES, are pictured exactly as that you see today in the region, crude and with no additive effect, the phrase you hear at 3:46 in the linked clip from "Samson and Delilah" is in 2011 Algerian dialect of the mid-south steps [the guy says "keep away from the road, leave the place for the cattle!", no subtitle to preserve the Philistine clandestine]. Excuse me sir, it's incredible how Historical probity at the level of seriousness of these films, which used to be the History reference in the collective consciousness is taken with shallowness. The director is called Cecil B De Mille.
Filmmakers lend me a right to be irreverent toward a culture, it could be worse: Prehistoric movies. Conversely somebody posted once that the only way to be authentic is to visit these ages, the truth is no one can ever know what people from the Old Testament and their time looked like.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 06:48:40 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Ulster County, NY

Subject: "Blue Chicken" playing in Marlboro, NY

Randy Ciarlante will be playing drums in Jim Weider's "Blue Chicken" configuration at The Falcon in Marlboro, NY (Bob Fino's old alma matter & home turf, if I'm not mistaken) on March 11th at 9:00 PM (opening act goes on at 7:00). Brian Mitchell on keyboards, & Byron Isaacs on bass. I've heard a lot of nice things about The Falcon, but I've yet to get over there for a show. This one is tempting.


Entered at Wed Feb 23 03:45:09 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Renee Fleming,etc.

My link to another Renee Fleming vid,

Hi guys! None of you probably watched Elvis Costello tonight w/ Renee Fleming. [I mentioned this one on Sunday] At the end she sang "In The Pines" [the oldie], w/ Elvis, and another great guy. She was also joined by Kate McGargle. Don't know if this is an early show, or a newby. All sounded wonderful.

MIKE:Happy news for Rufus. I did read it, so next time I'll wake-up and post the "news". BTW, The city shovels our walks at this condo. [We pay for it out of our expenses].At my age I couldn't do it anyways.Thanx for thinking of me.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo



Entered at Wed Feb 23 01:22:06 CET 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

I never had a problem with Robbie's solo albums until the samplings I heard. His first one was a masterpiece. This one sounds like a Clapton album. Something in which I feared for a while now. Maybe it wouldn't have scared me when they came up with the initial idea around '92 or '93.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 22:50:35 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Marrakech Express

I do recall from reading about Martin Scorsese's films that he filmed "Kundun" (set in Tibet) in Morrocco, where he'd earlier filmed "Last Temptation of Christ". I believe the decision was necessitated by ability to receive cooperation from the host country.

As for DeMille's "Ten Commandments", the decision to film in Egypt, where most of the film is set, was naturally a no-brainer.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 22:18:34 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: yes, but books are hard . . .

Why bother reading? In these strange times, you can view all sorts of instructional material on the interweb. See [My link].


Entered at Tue Feb 22 21:53:40 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Good point. Maybe "How to Become Clairvoyant" and not "A Short History of the Civil War" was the book that Robbie borrowed when Levon drove him to the liberry?


Entered at Tue Feb 22 21:38:56 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's the beautiful "Lonesome Highway" by Jacksoul - the opening track on another CD that I got at the library the other day.

Ray P: "Copper Kettle" was not the first Dylan song I liked, but it was on the first Dylan record I owned - and I got that because its a-side, "Wigwam", was in the top 10 that I won from a local top 40 radio station in the summer of '70. It was a very exciting day for the adolescent me - getting the records from the program director, Duff Roman (i.e., the first guy to produce our guys post Hawkins) and seeing my radio hero, the GB's own John D, wander through the office while I waited.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 21:28:33 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: how to become prescient

Bill M: these hypotheticals get confusing. What if JJ had been a clairvoyant singer-songwriter: he could record all the tunes that came into his mind . . . they'd be somebody else's tunes, but JJ scoops the copyright . . . .

Or, I guess, you could just do a Dylan and cherry-pick the past; Mr. Marcus's take on "It Hurts Me Too" ("it's simply wrong") is pretty much what I thought about whatever Muddy song it was that Bob ripped off an album or three ago.

Re: The Peoples Democratic Republic of Tunisia: there's probably more people alive today who are conversant with the Skywalker Stories than the number who know their Numbers. (I don't have a dog in the fight; equal-opportunity ignoramus.)


Entered at Tue Feb 22 21:16:08 CET 2011 from (129.237.44.101)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/Lawrence Kansas

Subject: The feud with the No Depression guy, I guess

In addition to the blatant falsehood about Robbie trashing his former bandmates, here's what bugs me--the review comes out so far in advance of the disc that it has the potential to poison the well. I don't know who was behind the decision to make the CD available for review this early but it doesn't seem too smart. Yes, if it were a rave, I'd probably feel different.

As for the "overproduced" complaint, what exactly does that mean? Maybe I'll return to the review to see if there are specifics, but if there aren't, then it doesn't mean anything.

Many complained that the 1987 album was overproduced, but given the context of the mid- to late 1980s, I don't think that's an accurate assessment.

On some positive notes, thank you GBers for the information on Dylan's "Self Portrait"--not a good record IMHO but not what Marcus called it. "Copper Kettle" is a fine song but after that, little if anything to keep me listening.

And also for the Keith Richards and friends video==love that man and hope he defies those who'd write his obituary for years and years to come.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 21:02:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Star wars

Wasn't part of Star Wars shot in Tunisia?


Entered at Tue Feb 22 20:57:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All The Tired Horses

A great, great opening track … not joking.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 20:49:15 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Leopold Bloom, 65 years on ...

sadavid: What if James Joyce'd been a singer-songwriter and decided that instead of writing down a day in a life in complete and mind-numbing and discontinuous detail he'd keep track of all the songs that came into his head in the course of a normal day and then set about recording them all. Maybe if he'd been American and decades younger the result would've been "Self Portrait". Eh?


Entered at Tue Feb 22 20:29:23 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: What is this shit?

David P: here is that review, and thanks for bringing it up. A very long piece, and thoughtful; a cynic might say that the review has more to say than the art under review. I did have _SP_, back in the day, and played it quite a lot. I'd like to hear it again, but I'm not sure I'd pony up the necessary, even to hear the contributions from The Band, who come in for honorable mentions at (12) and (22), and elsewhere.

On Location in the Far East: E Now: I just read that much of what we took for Vietnam in Kubrick's _Full Metal Jacket_ was filmed in London's docklands; somehow shooting Bible stories in North Africa makes more sense . . . .


Entered at Tue Feb 22 20:08:09 CET 2011 from (41.97.196.116)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M / dlew919

At the origin, halwa is a Turkish or Greek word , used for the sweet taste in gustatory sense of the term, sugar impregnated foods, the rest is all contextual consequence. in Egypt the word is very used for beauty in the erotic sense of the word, it was my first translation of the world, in Syria it is rather thoroughly used for pastry cakes, etc… popular etymology is a fascinating subje
balad, bilad, has only one meaning everywhere == country in the state-nation sense of the word. The terminal "I" means "my"

Related : [in the tone of Ilkka], and dlew919 is surely interested : I just realize that Life Of Brian was shot at 200 miles from the place where I am posting [link above]. That confirms now an ex-insulting remark I did in the GB : all the Biblical movies are filmed in North-Africa, I even suggested an explanation "the reason I thought to is "the scenery didn't progressed here since the Biblical ages" Or perhaps all the film directors from Cecil B. De Mille to Martin Scorsese watch the various ethnic groups in northern Africa, and their natural environment and the scenery, the 3rd world sodden theocracies as you prefer, then say "people by the biblical ages should have looked like this"
any less insulting and more clever explanation is welcome


Entered at Tue Feb 22 19:24:52 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Record Reviews

Perhaps one of the most famous (often misquoted) lines from a record review was Greil Marcus' take on Dylan's "Self Portrait". He began his 1970 Rolling Stone review with the line "What's this sh*t?" In an interview years later, Mr. Marcus clarified that those three words were an expression of his opinion on the album's opening song "All The Tired Horses".


Entered at Tue Feb 22 17:59:15 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: that last one from Empty N was from really from me

Sorry about that.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 17:28:31 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Nux

Thanks Nux. I didn't know about Syd, but look forward to John's tribute album coming out. Hope everythig goes well with your recordings.

A good album to get would be 'No Little Boy' John Martyn -remastered. It has a complicated history, but it is a really good atmospheric album, involving the re recording of songs and Levon singing on two songs.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 16:51:00 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Empty N

Empty N: I imagine that you're familiar with Toumast, whose most excellent Real World CD I just borrowed from the library. When Abdelli was being discussed I recall that you went to the trouble of explaining the relationships of the various ethnic groups in northern Africa - Tauregs, Berbers, Arabs, Moors, etc. - but I forget. Also, regarding "Halwa Ya Balady", does 'halwa' connote sweetness and/or succulence (as well as goodness)? When I lived in Saudi Arabia in the '80s, the national song, if not the national anthem, was a ditty that seemed to be titled "Biladi Biladi". There was also Biladi brand butter.

Pat B: A Chicagoan with Wisconsin roots - what a great year of sports you've had, if nothing else!


Entered at Tue Feb 22 16:10:57 CET 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Subject: John Martyn

DUNC:Thanks for the feedback.To answer your question:I am mostly involved with Wild Life post production which involves composing and final mix.Not as active as I used to be,but still do the occasional gig.I still work with Syd and because of his condition,John Martyns producer is apparently coming out here to record all his unreleased songs.I have also done a few shows with Blondie Chaplin(band connection here)and we had endless chats about The Band especially Rick Danko.I am trying to finish a album before December but with long working hours and all it really is tough.I am going through a real"Band"phase at the moment and honestly discovering amazing intricacies within the songwriting and ensemble playing.These guys really were something!


Entered at Tue Feb 22 14:47:52 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Robbie's Review, Nux

The review is just what I would expect. I feel many reviewers will write reviews like that. I don't know why, but I think it's related to being what's expected of them. The reviewers become stereotypical and write stereotypical reviews.

In the guestbook when the album comes out, there will be two themes written about the album by some of my friends...Robbie's singing will be mentioned and the album won't be as good as Band albums. I think that the discussions on previous Robbie solo albums became too critical. Perhaps because they don't sound like Band albums?

Nux, looking forward very much to your friend's contribution to the John Martyn album. I didn't know anything about your friend and googled. I saw you've had some success in music yourself. Are you still involved in the South African music industry?

A Band connection to John Martyn is that Levon is reportedly helping finish the last album John was working on.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 14:25:14 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hi Dale...

I didn't have an issue with the review giving what appeared to be an honest appraisal of the music (the first track grew on me and I may well agree with the rest of it when I hear it)... but his tone about Robbie rankled. I mean, I love Dirt Farmer, and Electric Dirt, but if someone didn't like it, I'd accept it, no problem - tastes are different. But if the guy said 'Levon has continually disparaged all his bandmates', I'd have to question the review... /n Maybe I'm wrong...


Entered at Tue Feb 22 14:23:26 CET 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Location: Durban South Africa

Subject: Robbie Robertson

Just listened to the 30 second clips again and really,the albums not that bad.It certainly is not over produced and though a little laid back it seems like a fairly easy listen.Rolling Stone gave one of the songs a good review and i'm actually looking forward to the full album.I agree that Robbie has lost his"chops" a little,but still plays some really tasteful stuff.Been listening to "Before the Flood" and my golly,Robbie and The Band for that matter are really firing on all cylinders here!


Entered at Tue Feb 22 04:37:53 CET 2011 from (142.32.208.235)

Posted by:

Dale Rangzen

Location: SSI

Subject: the no depression review

Some good points, maybe Mr. Heselgraves' history isn't perfect and Ill not argue but what I do sense is a lot of defensivness. He does say that he likes Robertsons music and was excited to hear it and has good things to say about some of his lesser known work. It just seems like the music is cold and inorganic and isn't sung well. From what I've heard Im inclined to agree. Lets all get back and discuss this once weve all heard the album and then we can take Heselgrave down on the points he makes about hte music and not just his grasp of the minute bits of the Bands history. I enjoy a good critique and it seems his points are sound overall. Some great discussions here.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 04:23:47 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Ari

Ari, you just made my month. Really bad ass players. Thank you!


Entered at Tue Feb 22 03:54:31 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

From the sessions with Levon, Rick, Scotty Moore and Keith Richards. It's really great.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 03:30:47 CET 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

"How To Be Clairvoyant."

Not...feeling...it.

Listened to the samples of all the songs on iTunes. Must wait to hear the full thing to give a truly proper assessment.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 03:12:56 CET 2011 from (65.93.119.183)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: Gee, daddy!

Most interesting piece of entertainment news today (to me, at least) is that Rufus Wainwright has announced he is the father of a baby girl. [Link above.] I was hoping that Serenity would have posted it but she's busy shovelling snow.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 00:32:38 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Btw, having some pretty deep Wisconsin roots, I've been horrified by this new governor and his 140 page tome to solve the "budget crisis" there. Just how asinine is this guy? This crisis could be solved by every adult in Wisconsin sending $32 to the Gov. Wow, that's some crisis,especially in a state where 2/3 of the corporations don't pay taxes. Interesting: the education systems of the states whose teachers don't have collective bargaining rights rank 50th, 49th, 48th, 47th, and 44th in providing quality education. Wisconsin? 2nd.


Entered at Tue Feb 22 00:22:58 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Agreeing with Pat, where I'd shoot the messenger is that Robbie has strenuously avoided slagging off his Band mates even when pressed hard by journalists enamoured of Steven Davis's novel (as Bumbles memorably called"This Wheel's On Fire".)


Entered at Mon Feb 21 23:00:11 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Dale, the reviewer isn't saying anything that most people here haven't heard a million times before. Most of the criticism seems to note the reviewer's poor grasp of history, saying, for instance, that RR has constantly slagged the other members since 1976. That's ridiculous. "Over-produced" is another adjective that we've heard alot. I'll make my own decisions.

I was talking to my daughter in China last night, telling her about my new found interest in the Avett Brothers and Munford and Son, when she asked if the latter was a TV show. Man, I laughed.


Entered at Mon Feb 21 20:47:54 CET 2011 from (142.32.208.235)

Posted by:

Dale Rangzen

Location: Saltspring

Subject: the no depression review

Well,it's been interesting reading all of this feedback to Doug Heselgraves' reviw of 'how to become clairvoyant' now like you i've only heard what's available on the internet, and it has to be admitted that the songs are kinda lackluster compared to all his other work. it does sound cold and corporate to my ears and they songs have the reek or rewriting history. why cut Heselgrave down for telling it as he hears it? no one likes to see thier favorite artists smashed, but hat's part of the hard work of writing about music. He does give a good background to his complaints and dosn't seem to bear a grudge as some say. he sounds openminded and I did google his work, heselgrave rearely gives bad reviews, seems to have won some awards and is well thought of. so let's lsten to the record and stop shooting the messeger. DR


Entered at Mon Feb 21 20:12:33 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Documentaries

Speaking of Documentaries, Does anyone have any info on the Levon documentary "I'm not in this for my health" or at least I think that' the title. I was wondering when it might get to the NYC area.


Entered at Mon Feb 21 19:27:21 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Subject: Another good old man lost...

Unfortunately, it appears to be a time period of loss. We just lost a cool old friend by the name of Bernard "Skins" Watkins of Troy, NH. He was entering his 94th yr this yr & was a Pearl Harbor survivor of the truest kind. He was stationed on the USS Vestal, which was tied to the USS Arizona.

While giving last yr's Lebanon, NH Memorial Day ceremonial speech, he stated that the U.S. was "shelled," not "bombed." The ships were iron clad making horizontal & underwater piercing very difficult, so the Japanese recognized that dropping shells atop the ships would & did cause the incredible damage.

Last yr was "Skins" final visit to Pearl Harbor. Never knew how he attained such a nickname. He was quite a comedian & ironically always stated he was too mean to die. He was also known for his true patriotism & his beautiful "Sojourn Toast to the Flag" @ various ceremonies.


Entered at Mon Feb 21 19:26:01 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Subject: Richard Manuel's doc update.

Tim - last we communicated w/ Jeremy Kelly - co-producer - he stated that more financing, editing & interviews are necessary before completion. He has recently been busy w/ a Canadian golf program where filming is complete, but editing, etc has been necessary.

Much of the Richard Manuel doc has been filmed, but he still wanted interviews from Levon, Robbie & possibly Eric Clapton. We can't wait for he & his crew to wrap up the doc, but in the meantime we've got to wait patiently.


Entered at Mon Feb 21 16:26:57 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: for the very rich daft fan

Like the man said, these go about $8K.

See [My link]; the action starts about 3 minutes in.


Entered at Mon Feb 21 10:15:55 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Hotel California


Entered at Sun Feb 20 21:47:46 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Impossible way of life. I've always said, the music industry as it was, was not so gooddamn terrible.Of course there wwere many cases where it was, but in general, a lot of people got heard, got opportunities, and made a good living. In general, artists were much better off with it than without it. It wasn't perfect, people did get ripped off. It happens in every indutry.


Entered at Sun Feb 20 21:38:57 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Renee Fleming

Another one for you of this great lady. ENJOY!!!!

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Feb 20 21:38:47 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The knee-jerk reaction comments to something you haven't heard are weird. I liked the comment that the Robbie signature Martin is "pretty pricey at 8k for a non-pro player." Do "pro-players" really go and buy the "signature" guitars of other pro-musicians? I thought signature guitars were for the very rich fan daft enough to think if they get the right guitar in the right colour they'll sound like their hero.


Entered at Sun Feb 20 21:29:57 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Info...

Hi guys: Link to one of the greatest voices. I have mentioned her before, but is glad to have found her wonderful voice at the tribute for 9/11. Enjoy, as she is the best.

Great reading posts today .

INFO:

Mon. 9PM BRAVO [Can. #40 Cable]: Lou Reed, co-founder of The Velvet Underground, performs his 1973 album, Berlin Live. It's 2 hrs. long. [BEG will love this one].

Tues. 8PM BRAVO: The gal from my link will be on here. I just can't say enough about this great artist. She may do opera, but her voice is like an angel. As I like to say, "try it, you'll like it".

Love Monty Python.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sun Feb 20 19:22:08 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Richard Manuel documentary

Any news on the richard documentary? I thought it was to come out next month. The blog hasn't been updated for a year. Thanks Tim


Entered at Sun Feb 20 17:49:14 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.39)

Posted by:

JQ

Way back in the 70's, when the Celtic Tiger was just another 3rd world, sodden theocracy, the Life of Brian was banned there -


Entered at Sun Feb 20 17:44:16 CET 2011 from (24.124.85.86)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/Lawrence, Kansas

Subject: open season on robbie r. continues...ALL depression and ad hominem

Hello again everyone,

I like the Life of Brian conversation. But have to say I'm floored by the "No Depression" review of HTBC and the attacks it has "inspired" on that site.

Hard to think of anyone outside of Kim Jong-il and Michael Vick who outrages certain folks more than Robbie Robertson. My goodness, could the CD truly be so offensive?

I can't help but think this is another instance of a journalist letting his disdain for the artist get in the way of an evenhanded appraisal of the work.

As for the responses to the review on the ND site, all I hear are angry, hateful people who get some sort of thrill because they read the review--which does make some gestures toward fairness and praise--as validation of their vindictive attitudes.

These observers need to realize that harboring resentment is like drinking poison and thinking it'll kill the person you resent.


Entered at Sun Feb 20 16:39:30 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Brian's mother first meets Judith

"Leave that Welsh tart alone!"

"I don't really want to, Mum."


Entered at Sun Feb 20 15:12:41 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Life of Brian

So funny, so true... the Judean People's front is pretty much the description of many of the professions I've been in 'We're not the Judean People's Front - we're the People's front of Judea'...



Entered at Sun Feb 20 14:53:40 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Python

I cried with laughter through the original series. Then the films didn't quite work at 90 plus minutes … it became relentless, though Life of Brian was head and shoulders over The Holy Grail or The Meaning of Life. It's also survived the years, while so many of the original sketches haven't. Last time I watched a repeat compilation I couldn't believe how the show had aged. I saw a box set of everything they ever did in a sale for about £25 the other day and was tempted, but decided the Life of Brian is all i want to watch again. Perhaps I knew them too well - we used to play the LPs nonstop too. Lines still stick with me.


Entered at Sun Feb 20 14:46:19 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Don't throw the stones too hard!

I saw the original broadcast on this. Palin was particularly good, as I remember. Stockwood always was a pompous prat, and Muggeridge became this dreadful old whiner after he "saw the light". Ten years earlier he'd been an incisive interviewer.


Entered at Sun Feb 20 14:17:36 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Mervyn Stockwood - not Cosmo Lang...

Carry on...


Entered at Sun Feb 20 14:09:30 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Empty Now: My apologies - I cut and pasted the wrong link

Hope you all enjoyed that little piece of whimsy... what I wanted you to look at was (I hope) the attached, which is supposed to be part of a debate between John Cleese, Michael Palin and the arch-conservatives Malcolm Muggeridge and Cosmo Lang. As I don't think I need to remind you, profound truths come through laughter more often than not, and those who don't like to laugh get access to much less truth... this is true if you're Jesus, Muhammed, Buddha, Moses or Vishnu...



Entered at Sun Feb 20 10:39:40 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fernandel

Everything appears in this GB if you wait long enough. I loved the Don Camillo books, and the films too. I haven't seen the films in thirty or more years. Will now check availability!


Entered at Sun Feb 20 08:21:28 CET 2011 from (41.97.193.54)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

dlew919: thanks for the link, like it or not, Boris Karloff remains a handsome boy – who are the people who are supposed to take offense of your link ?

2 precisions about 2 mysterious phrases in my 2 precedent posts :

WWI : in clear, I am idiotic enough to need somebody to enlightens me how a war where every battle left hundreds thousands casualties (Caporetto - il Piave – Verdun – Gallipoli - …) could be seen as a victory from any camp…

Humour for the Bible : a good example is Don Camillo, check the link above for more.

Band Connection: the sentence which can be read in every preface of the pocket editions, from Giovannino Guareschi, creator of Don Camillo, replying to a reporter who inquired how he is living the overwhelming financial success of the Don Camillo movies and books character:
"I was a completely anonymous pitiful person before, with the fame of Don Camillo I became an important pitiful person"


Entered at Sun Feb 20 00:08:49 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Empty Now

the attached video might help explain...


Entered at Sat Feb 19 23:12:52 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR's Voice

There's a reason many virtuoso musicians, songwriter,& guitarists don't sing. It saddens me that what may indeed be good songs by RR solo, become hidden behind his poor singing & talk singing shtick.Too bad.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 21:54:38 CET 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: P.S.: RR's rehearsal

RR's facebook page says he is rehearsing. I wonder for what.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 21:45:40 CET 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: The Romans

Lars: Thanks for reminding me of "What We Learned From The Romans" A great series-I have it on tape- I'll watch it tonight.

Jeez, what a sad commentary, I should be on a date!


Entered at Sat Feb 19 21:25:31 CET 2011 from (79.202.165.247)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Gun's 'n Roses

Todd you're welcome, liked the story too (over dinner we just had a mature discusion 'bout it).

Before I dive in the German Saturday night life this.... Dlew's remark the other day about Guns 'n Roses made me look up Axl Rose in Youtube, he's a real "Fundgrube" when it come to (lost) temper. Anyway also saw him resque a guy who was beaten up by others in the crowd, speaks for the man and think he has written a few nice songs, listen to this, it realy rocks i.m.o.

Have a great weekend all, cheers.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 19:20:26 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I really like Robbie's 'When The Night Was Young'. Downloaded it and it has embedded in.

You can't win. If you're a songwriter who sings their own songs, at times your voice is criticised.

And conversely, at times, if you're a singer who sings other people's songs, for example, Joe Cocker or Maura O'Connell, both of whom I've hugely enjoyed in concert, you may be denigrated as 'only' a coverer of songs.

Also, I don't read any music reviews in papers or take any music publications here because they are rife with ageism. 'The new album is OK, but never as good as blah, blah, blah...'


Entered at Sat Feb 19 19:15:36 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

JEB S

Lars, had I known it was there, I would have arrived soonePr


Entered at Sat Feb 19 17:42:20 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Pythonland

Subject: What have the Romans ever done for us?

" Awright, apart from the aqueduct, sanitation, the roads, irrigation, medicine, education, wine, public baths, and public order...what have the Romans ever done for us?"

--John Cleese's character "Reg" in "Life of Brian"


Entered at Sat Feb 19 17:07:21 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Regina Havis & Dylan

Norbert, thanks for posting that. It really warmed up my day. It sounds like her experience with Dylan was very positive.

From the article where she talks about her limited knowledge of Dylan prior to meeting him as being a helpful thing.

"I am happy...I am blessed to have not known who he was when I auditioned. Because some people make the mistake of when they meet a person of Bob Dylan’s caliber, they tend to not see the man. They tend to see the fame and fortune; what he’s done and what he’s accomplished. I’m glad I didn’t know all of those things about him because what I saw and who I saw was a man. A man who had an awesome gift from God, even down to his other music."


Entered at Sat Feb 19 16:53:00 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.84)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: dlew919 : Re - Life of Brian

I can spend one year here to answer. Conversely, Life of Brian, i watched it the week it was released, i laughed from end to end. for the following 30 years, anthological scenes [that means all the scenes] from the film were regularly cited as reference in the so many circles I frequented, from the humoristic, the political, and even the biblical angle. I remember having referred the movie many times in the GB with The Band connected subjects, and the first example I have in mind in straight-link with my previous post below, is the “what have the Romans ever done for us?” . The ambivalent paradox has been used as the central metaphor in a hazardous debate I had one day in the very serious Learned Society.
I don’t exactly see who “the people they poked fun at” are, I can guess. As I can’t buy that anybody in the world could be offended by Monty Python. As a believer, I believe that the highest degree of faith is to accept the humour which harms nobody and questions ones faith, just because ones faith is what it is, indeed. Humour can be also used to defend Biblical faith, nothing forbids
I hope this exhausts what I think of Life of Brian, otherwise I’ll be pleased to keep the subject on


Entered at Sat Feb 19 16:50:22 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Album by Album

Uncut (Paul Simon cover, April 2011) has a Robbie section, where he does a paragraph on each of nine albums including the new one. It’s called “Album by Album: Robbie Robertson.” The most interesting bit is which nine records he selects, but I wouldn’t read any significance into it, because it sounds like a phone interview and I’d guess they assigned three pages and the magazine chose the nine. Anyway, they’re “Live 66”, “Basement Tapes”, “MFBP”, Before The Flood, The Band, NLSC, TLW, the first solo album and the new one. I would have to have found space for Stage Fright and Storyville, even if nothing else. I don’t think there’s anything in there that will be news to regular readers.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 16:01:51 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Southern Ulster

Subject: 125 captured wagons and a bookstore

James Ewell Brown- So THAT'S why you were late arriving at Gettysburg.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 15:47:53 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Phil Ochs Article by Peter Stone Brown

Great Phil Ochs article by Peter Stone Brown.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 14:39:43 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Empty Now - I'm interested in knowing what you thoought of Life Of Brian

You probably know that the people they poked fun at took offense for the reason that they poked fun at them...


Entered at Sat Feb 19 14:07:22 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: It's always good to read this stuff.

But boy that review was really unfair (as I said, keep posting it - I mean that).

Has Robbie run down his former bandmates? He got annoyed a couple fo times at Levon's claims, but there wasn't the level suggested by the author... I'm with Jeff on this one...


Entered at Sat Feb 19 12:55:40 CET 2011 from (79.202.178.171)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany (just)
Web: My link

Subject: Boxing Movies: The Hurricane

Planend to check out The Hurricane soon …. Did Dylan create a myth? raw trues? Guess it always will stay a mystery myth; we love ‘um .


Entered at Sat Feb 19 11:41:44 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

It appears to me that Heselgraves review actually was published in No Depression. I'm not a reader of the magazine, but , I'd be surpirsed that review was published in any real kind of rag. If so, just another indication of how poor the standards of everything that comprises intelligent life have become. Just another gift the internet has bestowed upon us, today everyone gets published, and the standards of everything have dropped to all time lows. I haven't heard the record, and may later completely agree with the poor rating, but, that review was an unmitigated disaster of writing.


Entered at Sat Feb 19 10:57:11 CET 2011 from (91.42.235.1)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Back up singers 01: Regina Havis (Dylan)

Back up singers stories (with thanks to uncle Sam): Regina Havis tells her "Saturday Night Live Show with Dylan" story (link).


Entered at Sat Feb 19 10:27:53 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.84)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

our victory à tous


Entered at Sat Feb 19 10:26:53 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.84)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: NorthWestCoaster / Linage

NorthWestCoaster : thanks for the linked news

Since I don't think any GBer would be interested to know that I just watched Monty Python's Meaning Of Life for the first time, I feel the need right now to re-evoke the subject I once posted about.

Even with the strongest effort of imagination, one can hardly believe today that this green space, the wood in short, which starts from the center of the city, then prolongs and surrounds it from every part, traversed by the now Band Connected Chemin Forestier, this harmonious forest "subject of daily marveling" is not a natural wood, but a reforested wood, fruit of a one person work. This forest was planted tree by tree by a Capt of the French army, Paul Linage, during his retirement after the conquest (or the fall, depending on which side you are) of Constantine in 1837. He settled just beyond the city walls, and resolved stubbornnessly day after day to plant trees everyday for years. I suppose the task required a seeds logistics, and all the hardware, historical evidence attests that it was a lonely effort, the early popular name of the forest was "la connerie de Linage" (the bullshit of Linage), next "La folie de Linage" (the Madness of Linage) as the forest began to grow, today the forest is simply named Snouber, local name of pinus halepensis ( Aleppo Pines ) that form the essential of the trees. Life is all about performing a meaningful act, Linage did it, letting deed for generations.

In the linked above picture, you can guess on the extreme top-right for the deads of WWI its a replica of Trajan Arch with at its top a replica of the Victory of Samothrace, that which allows me an opportunity to tease the local everybody here the non naïve question " so WWI was a victory ?"


Entered at Sat Feb 19 03:21:01 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

I bought Best of the Band on 8 track at a used bookstore in GettysburgPr


Entered at Sat Feb 19 02:49:20 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Small pleasures

Aye, it's been a long week and it's a pleasure just to be able to sit down with a glass of whiskey and peel the cellophane off a Dillard & Clark twofer.

It was 'Band of Joy' that got me to pull out 'Raising Sand' again. It sounds much better this time around. Of course it was this album that made me wonder where he had heard these Gene Clark songs, thus an Amazon search and the twofer.

In local news, indie faves, Hey Rosetta, has a new release; I've only heard the one song yet. And Ryans Fancy, best pub band ever, is finally available on CD. Fergus O'Byrne has collected forty of their best, curated from their numerous small label releases of the '70s. I still have them on vinyl; 'Newfoundland Drinking Songs' is one of my most sacred possessions. Link is to the boys singing 'Dark As a Dungeon' at St. Lawrence, silicosis capital of the country. With the twin occupations of fishing on the Grand Banks and working in the fluorspar mines, St. Larry's had the highest rate of widowhood in the land. I'll have another, thanks.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 23:39:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: How To Become Clairvoyant

Bill M … Traffic points? Yes.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 22:46:41 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: He was born on Christmas day

And Sir Elton's son is named Zachary Jackson Levon Furnish-John.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 21:23:54 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 8-track

I can't speak for Americans, but in the UK we had cassette, not 8 track, and I assume most people found 45 minutes was sufficient. Perhaps 8-track's more frequent breaks reflect a difference in national stamina :-)


Entered at Fri Feb 18 21:02:58 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: 8 tracks

Link is to a story on a 8 track tape museum. It does address the long forgotten issue of making out in a car to 8 track music: do you pause while the track changes?


Entered at Fri Feb 18 20:05:01 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR As Guitarist & EC Today

Just another comment on EC's playing:when I saw 2 nights of the Allmans & EC @ The Beacon in '09(& I think the world of Warren Haynes & particularly Derek Trucks)there was no question in my mind that EC was the most creative,nuanced,sweetest & most able player on that stage.Quite an accomplishment! I'd love to see RR do a blues album featuring his guitar playing.No,not aimless noodling or shredding,but pure down home acoustic & electric blues,backed by a first rate band & supported by able singers.RR might gain by recognizing that his singing is not good & he need not play that role. His songwriting,arranging,& guitar playing are blessing enough & boy,do I wanna see that blues album.Something to dream about.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 19:52:09 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Elton/Levon

I believe Elton recently told Rolling Stone magazine that the song "levon" was indeed named for Levon Helm.A nice tribute!


Entered at Fri Feb 18 19:49:03 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR Review

Wow,the album sounds downright scary. As a big fan of Levon's I felt he under rated Levon's recent work as well!(lol) To my recall,RR has never dissed the other guys.I know that he upset a bunch of people @ Rick's memorial service when he said he was grateful that Rick sang "his" songs.I'm not getting into this quagmire of a worn out argument,merely reporting what I saw & heard.So,I guess it would have been better if the reviewer had kept all the personal stuff about The Band out of it & stuck only to his review of the music.Consequently,I plan to wait & listen as well since his biases might be coloring his point of view.Or,not & that would be sad for RR.As far as RR's guitar chops,that's an interesting discussion:At Crossroads 2 he was limited & his guitar playing on both songs was very weak.At RRHOF events,I've seen & heard his playing & often,it stands alone as unique among other excellent guitarists.So,it's been a mixed bag the last years.It's true,having seen EC multiple times solo,with the Allmans,Winwood,Cream reunion,Derek Trucks,Beck,etc. that EC is at the top of his game.No,not the style of his early days,but like a fine wine,more mature & nuanced with a very sweet feel & flavor.However,it's important to keep in mind,if I'm accurate here,that EC contributed to writing about half the album's songs & EC's sometimes bland,pop style stuff can worm its way into the songwriting....& that can't help.Finally,I got a nice laugh when he described The Band's music as pop.Unless I misread that,one has to wonder about what this reviewer knows that I don't quite understand about pop music & how The Band fits into that?


Entered at Fri Feb 18 19:43:13 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: female backup singers

I liked Marcy Levy who worked with Clapton during the "Slowhand" album era. She sings some lead on "The Core". She cowrote with him also.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 19:33:29 CET 2011 from (90.239.131.155)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: Oil is leaking... again

A cargo ship from Iceland has been wrecked only 20 nautical miles west-southwest from the place where this site is situated. My link is pointing to Verdens Gang newspaper.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 19:08:47 CET 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: RR album

I think the cover could have been stronger. Looks to me like Robbie is taking fashion tips from Dylan circa 1990... ;)


Entered at Fri Feb 18 18:36:39 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Review of JRR's record

Wow! I guess he didn't like it. :-) But seriously, I wasn't that thrilled with the cuts I've heard, but I don't feel they are THAT awful. I agree with Peter, I'll just have to wait and see, I mean listen.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 18:01:14 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Do I get marks for clairvoyance for having spent some of yesterday listening to the two CDs of Traffic's "Smiling Phases" comp? Wonderful wonderful stuff - but not something that made me think, Wom, that Capaldi guy! Of course, offhand I don't get LH's helpfulness with the nooks and crannies either ...


Entered at Fri Feb 18 17:49:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Band

Very well put, SAdavid. Robbie has studiously avoided slagging off his Band mates even when pushed pretty hard. Yes, I see now that it’s a hooded casual jacket. Personally I’d prefer a hat to a hood, but if RR endorses it, I’ll have to change my opinion and seek one out.

In THE WORD, Elton John has nice to things to say about The Band:

“I’d listen to John Peel and I remember hearing him play Music From Big Pink on his Sunday Show and I freaked out. I HAD to have that fuck*ng record and I had it two days later … I bought a lot of Dylan and Band bootlegs.”(Elton John)

Then he’s talking about buying import LPs and says:

American cardboard was better. It was! American recordings were better. The Band’s second album came in a black box with 12 albums in – I still have that. .”(Elton John)\

He says he used to work in One Stop Records on Saturdays for fun, “even after I was Elton John.” Does he mean it came in some sort of in store counter display box?

In the same issue, Teddy Thompson chooses This Wheel’s On Fire as one of his favourite books. He says:

“I never dreamed about being in The Beatles or The Stones or anything like that, but I definitely dreamed about being in The Band. They seemed to have the quintessential musical experience; years on the road, bonding, honing their craft. They were workmanlike, collaborative, seamless – you almost couldn’t tell who was playing what. It wouldn’t happen now. You’d get six months into a tour, and one of them would say, ‘Sorry guys. I’ve had an offer to play on a T-Bone Burnett record in LA.’ “ (Teddy Thompson)

Then in the same issue, reviewing “John Barleycorn Must Die” reissue, David Hepworth says:

“Capaldi did for traffic what Levon Helm did for The Band, nudging them into all the nooks and crannies of the songs and supplying a relentless energy.”

Sometimes you think The Band are off the radar, then in 30 minutes you read three quotes in one magazine.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 16:31:04 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Nicely put. While I won't be rushing out either, it certainly will not be because of the magazine review that Joe posted. Any reviewer who flays someone else - twice in successive sentences - for 'self-indulgence', shouldn't insert himself so centrally into the review. The entire second paragraph in this case.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 16:23:54 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Young Singing Ladies

Bill M: Singing with Neil Young on that song were Merry "Gimme Shelter" Clayton, Brenda & Patrice Holloway, Gloria Jones, Sherlie Matthews and producer Jack Nitzsche's wife Gracia.

Another great group of backup singers was assembled for the Roy Orbison Black & White Night concert film. Along with the allstar band, background singers included Bonnie Raitt, k.d. lang and Jennifer Warnes. They were augmented with Jackson Browne, Steven Soles and J.D. Souther, who did the vocal arrangements. And then there were the two Bonnies, Raitt and Bramlett, who assisted Little Feat on the "Dixie Chicken" album.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 16:05:40 CET 2011 from (217.5.150.250)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: How To Become Clairvoyant

I never intended to rush out and buy this album, but if Joe's review is even half right I won't bother at all.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 15:48:41 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I've been listening to Neil Young's brilliant (I now realise) first album, especially "The Old Laughing Lady", on which Neil is assisted immeasurably by a cadre of women back-up singers. Although said cadre is surprisingly Coolidgeless, their work would have fit nicely on Robbie's "Native Americans" album. Also, compare the following:

"And there's a rumbling in the bedroom and a flashing of light. It's the old laughing lady and everything's alright."

"If there's a bustling in your hedgerow, don't be alarmed now. It's just a sprinkling for the May queen."


Entered at Fri Feb 18 15:31:19 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: chasin' down a hoodie there

Peter V: that's not a hoodie. Observe the buttons, the cuffs, the tailoring at the shoulder. Clearly a casual coat or rain jacket, such as any gentleman might don for a quick errand in town, perhaps to pick up the latest issue of _The Calendar_ from a neighbourhood health food shop. A gentleman who enjoys a measure of celebrity might well choose to wear the hood with dark glasses to improve his _in cognito_. Once again, I think the shot was chosen for the "mysterious hooded figure" angle.

Re: Mr. Heselgrave's review, I might consider his opinions more seriously were it not for comments like "he's never been one to hold back in the press about his former band mates" and "after years of slagging his old band mates." Heselgrave's certainly wrong there, and immoral and probably illegal. Killed his credibility.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 14:22:43 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Mad Dogs and Englishmen

Joe Cocker had great female backup vocalists on his early records especially Mad Dogs and Englishmen. Rita Coolidge went on to have great success with her MOR music but early on she truly was the Delta Lady. I saw the Mad Dogs show at SUNY New Paltz outside on the lawn. Great day. Of course many years later Rita Coolidge sang backup for Robbie.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 13:37:32 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On the trousers hanging down below the arse, comedian Jack Dee said last week he approved of the fashion. After all, it was the only fashion that's dafter than flares, and so it has stopped the younger generation taking the piss out of photos of him from the 70s.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 12:54:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sartorial standards and the mature rock star

But … (Taking Steve's pink scarf angle) … I do think the hoodie on the album cover is daft for a guy in his mid 60s. OK, we need to keep our ears warm, but it does appear a misguided attempt to fit in with a younger generation. It'll the trousers hanging down below the arse next! It reminds me of Levon singing Free Your Mind about "wearing hip hop clothes". Both are ill advised. I haven't owned nor worn a suit in 20 years, but I think Leonard Cohen definitely looks cooler in one than Robbie does in a hoodie.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 12:50:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'll wait and see. The reviewer comes from a "Levon Helm's book is 100% true" angle (again) let alone the disgusting comment below the article about RR's culpability in what happened to Bandmates a decade after he stopped working with them. Where does he get the unpopularity bit from? OK, from Levon devotees, but in general artists have seemed more than happy to work with him at the R&R Hall of fame and otherwise.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 12:39:42 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Joe j - thanks for that link - wow, pretty damning stuff. In the samples I heard, the album has more of the sound of his first two efforts than his later work - and being this guy wasn't too fond of that initial release, RR's new one is seemingly a much poorer version of those. I remember reading a review of RR's first and how the reviewer found that one cold and distant because he felt it was over produced. I have a feeling we'll be experiencing that again - of which I don't mind if the songs are strong. RR likes to over produce and layer his subtle tracks thick, which in the end usually works against subtlety.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 12:22:40 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Absolute disaster

See link. No Depression reviewer trashes Robbie's new release.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 10:16:44 CET 2011 from (41.97.197.100)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: on strings / Joan : a way to link

The original text I linked and translated yesterday is in pure Classic Arabic. I would add precision on the second occurrence of the word STRINGS in the translated text
The original word [phon. "watar"] has several different technical meanings :
the musical "oud strings", "oud chords", and the physiological "vocal cords", "vocal folds", "blood veins"
I think that all that different meanings are suggested at the same time, that what renders "the poetry must not be translated" ideology sometimes consistent, the epitaph overwhelming, and my translation widely perfectible, otherwise I would have posted it in the linked site.

At a lower level of literacy, the subject title of my yesterday post bears a suggestive evocation of the popular name of Place Negrier, "Souk Al Asser", translate as "Market of the End of the Evening" in connection with the traditional animation every Saturday at nightfall, at the end of Shabbat. Negrier is just a Capt of a former French army. Popular toponymy is much more in adequation with reality than the administrative one

Joan: thanks for sharing. This has everything to do with music, since the video is in full screen, man learn by imitation and henceforth I will use and abuse of this way to link


Entered at Fri Feb 18 09:18:50 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Female Backup singers...

In my view the greatest white female backup combo is Jennifer Warnes and Linda Ronstadt's wonderful, subversive backing on Warren Zevon's 'Excitable Boy'. As the ladies coo, ooh and aah, Zevon sings some of his sickest and most depraved lyrics... Dig it out and give it a listen if you haven't heard it. Like Lenny and Zimmie, Zevon's voice isn't great - but not only do Warnes and Ronstadt lift his voice, they hide (just a bit) his message... wonderful stuff.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 07:46:23 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Hey Norbert, I can't believe Coronation St is still running either.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 02:52:41 CET 2011 from (65.93.119.183)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Rollie. Just wondering: How are you doing?


Entered at Fri Feb 18 01:08:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

People who benefit from female vocals to lift the chorus include Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Robbie Robertson … and lots of rap artists. It's a good idea. Van is way better when he does it.

Today I was at the Royal Albert Hall, watching a Canadian-run company performing with Native American styled music. I wish it had been Robbie, but it was the Cirque de Soleil.


Entered at Fri Feb 18 00:22:24 CET 2011 from (67.6.40.201)

Posted by:

Jerry

Good catch Bill M...LOL,....Nice vid Joan, I've got a couple of motor head buddies that will get a kick out of it..Knowing them, they'll be looking for an old Jeep sometime soon..


Entered at Thu Feb 17 20:41:41 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Joan. Things looked a little threatening for the guys on the left of the frame at 2:35. If only they knew how close they came!


Entered at Thu Feb 17 20:22:05 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Jeep

This has NOTHING to do with music, but someone sent me this video. I think its neat and I wanted to share it.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 18:06:24 CET 2011 from (41.97.173.135)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: little translation exercise at the end of the afternoon that harms nobody

Artist my strings melodious
Converse with the conscious ones
Don't discriminate people
Nor law schools nor religions
Living of my art in the heaven of dreams
And in one day among the days
Blew on my strings tempests
No pity and no tenderness
Torn by a roaring flash
Lost their voice by the human foolishness


Entered at Thu Feb 17 17:48:03 CET 2011 from (90.239.127.77)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Canned Heat

The first basslines I learned were Canned Heat's "On The Road Again" and Peter Green's "Albatros". Try them and you can call yourself for a bassist in a minute.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 16:48:42 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Yes, I agree, years ago Dylan benefited from the use of female backup singers. One of them, Helena Springs, actually shared some co-writing credits, notably on "I Loved You Too Much". That song was covered by The Band on "High On The Hog" and was recently performed by Hawksley Workman on Garth's Canadian Celebration of The Band compilation. Likewise, Leonard Cohen has also collaborated with Sharon Robinson and Anjani Thomas.

The Sundazed label has recently reissued a mono LP version of Canned Heat's eponymous 1967 debut album, which I'll probably be rediscovering soon.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 16:18:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: all the tired voices ...

David P: Dylan, if I can call him that, has long been aware of his vocal limitations. "Self Portrait" has all sorts of fine qualities, but surely the loveliest thing on it is "All The Tired Horses". Maybe that's where Cohen got the idea of using camouflage?

sadavid: We all appreciate your attention to postage stamps, but don't give up your day job. After all, philately will get you nowhere.

On a more hopeful note, the original Canned Heat was proof that a gaggle of record collectors (which is what they were) could be cool. And they WERE great until Al Wilson died. But even if they lost their greatest talent they retained their sense of humour - which anyone who titles a song "Refried Hockey Puck Boogie" - must have in spades.

JQ: Good of you to push the Sadies, who our own Pat B has worked with in some capacity. Besides "Darker Circles", their most recent output includes covering "The Shape I'm In" and backing Neil Young on "This Wheel's On Fire" on Garth's "Celebration" album.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 16:00:32 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Female Backup Singers

David P, I loved when Dylan used the female singers. He had very good singers also, Clyde King, Regina Havis, Helena Springs and Mona Lisa Young. Many of the same people who now complain about his voice,complained when he used the female singers!


Entered at Thu Feb 17 15:04:48 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: L. Cohen

"I was born like this, I had no choice
I was born with the gift of a golden voice
And twenty-seven angels from the great beyond
They tied me to this table right here in the tower of song"

When comparing Dylan with Leonard Cohen, one shouldn't overlook the fact that Mr. Cohen over the years has sweetened his vocals by using lovely female backup singers. From Jennifer Warnes in the past to Sharon Robinson & the Webb sisters on recent tours, these angels have added a level of brilliance to the darkness of Mr. Cohen's vocal range.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:55:46 CET 2011 from (76.69.87.11)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Mystery Date Revealed: Robbie Robertson (or Was It Bob Dylan) Discovery Hirth Martinez!
February 11, 2011


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:53:39 CET 2011 from (76.69.87.11)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson gets his due
10. FEB, 2011
BY APTN NATIONAL NEWS


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:50:16 CET 2011 from (76.69.87.11)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Tuesday, February 8, 2011
Robbie Robertson Honored By Land of Snow

sadavid: I would also like to see a Canadian stamp with all Band members together....but yeah....I guess someone was listening to me afterall! ;-D


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:48:01 CET 2011 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Re: Ain't gonna croak on Maggie's Farm no more

And BTW, very much enjoying the discussion re Dylan live. Peter V, your earlier comments about Dylan's (mis)handling of vocals and sound on recent tours are quite interesting and thought-provoking. While it's hard to totally disagree, I guess I would gently counter by noting that in the mid-90s, Dylan's live shows featured acoustic sets with much more nuanced vocals, a la Leonard Cohen...for example, some beautifully whispery versions of Mr. Tambourine Man with more minimal acoustic backing. So while those acoustic sets would be a welcome return to his live shows...I'd push back a little at the idea that he's simply unaware that Cohen-style arrangements are a potential solution to his vocal roughness. He does in general seem to favor more of a high-energy rock/"punk"/garage-band sound and arrangements... and in general his quite ragged voice is better suited to his current material (which IMO, is excellent) than the oldies. Just my admittedly biased two cents. :) Link is to a haunting live "Forgetful Heart" (new song) ... a highlight of his three-night stand here in NY last November that itself was worth the price of admission, though even I would admit there have been shows where there wasn't such a highlight.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:42:39 CET 2011 from (94.172.128.233)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK

Subject: The Waifs

Bashfull Bill - the Waifs are very definitely still around. I first saw them some years ago at one of our local pubs in Moseley, Birmingham. It was a very small gig and two or three of us were chatting to a couple of them at the bar before they headed off in their van loaded with kit back to London. The week after they were flying off to the states to tour with Bob Dylan (for the second time). It was an instance of going from the honky tonks to the high times. I've just returned from Australia where The Waifs are about to begin touring behind their new album. They currently live in California - check out their web page for tour news (it's a pretty basic web site and there isn't much there).


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:30:47 CET 2011 from (91.42.253.59)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: MB W123

From 1976 till 1985 Mercedes Benz built de W123 (200 series) car. Most of these cars still run today (Afrika , Middle East, etc.). They are absolute bullit proof and are considered as probably the best cars ever built. Didn't Rick once had such a car?


Entered at Thu Feb 17 13:15:26 CET 2011 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: The Waifs

Bashful Bill, I was turned on to The Waifs from the same summer '03 Dylan tour you were, and they've become one of my favorite groups, period. I've been fortunate enough to catch them live a number of times... they usually swing through NYC once a year or so. They live and record in the US now, not Australia, and have a new album coming out next month. Link is to an excellent recent live album with a lot of (different) new material. Check it out!


Entered at Thu Feb 17 12:29:08 CET 2011 from (91.42.253.59)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Lyrics

What about these lines:

"If there's no one beside you. When your soul embarks. Then I'll follow you into the dark ..." (Death Cab)


Entered at Thu Feb 17 11:38:12 CET 2011 from (91.42.253.59)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Subject: Canned Heat, GetCapeWearCapeFly, Coronation Street, Daisy, Kitty and Lewis, Mumford 'n Sons and Motley Crue,

NB thanks for pointing my on Daisy, Kitty and Lewis, great version with indeed great harp. Ilkka, I Agree on Canned Heat.

Rod, just heard Mumford & sons on YouTube, what a good band thanks! AND didn’t know Coronation Street still runs! Unbelievable, from 1967 till 1975 they aired it in Holland every Saturday evening; our whole family in front of the B&W TV still remember some names Elsie Tanner, Ken Barlow, etc. ah!

Remarkable name for a band: GetCapeWearCapeFly (just saw it).

Motley Crue on You Tube (see the Link), this must be one of the worst concerts in history. It’s so bad that it’s got it’s own, almost morbid, fascination.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 07:36:43 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Zimmy

25 years from now people will not say, "I saw Bob Dylan live but his voice sucked. They will say, "I got to see Bob Dylan play LIVE"!

I figure that every time Dylan appears, plays, sings, interviews, is great. He's DYLAN. He's old. He won't be around forever. It seems to me that he'd have to do something a lot worse than sound like a worn out old rebel to hurt his legacy.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 06:51:48 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Mumford & Sons

It's good to see a band with an accordion and banjo doing well. They've had songs on TV shows such as Coronation St and Being Human and they're getting a bit of air play as well. I couldn't understand why Old Crow Medicine Show were opening for them recently as I thought they'd be the bigger of the two bands. Obviously not.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 04:47:25 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Dylan etc.

Thanks Charlie. I really enjoyed the energy of the acoustic set at the Grammy show. I wasn’t previously very familiar with Mumford and Sons, or the Avett Brothers, but I liked them a lot.

I do tend to give Dylan a pass most of the time, and a lot of that is probably goodwill for much of his past work. I’ve been listening to the mono box set of his first 8 albums a lot recently and rediscovering songs that I didn’t give much attention to the first time around. Songs like ‘The Ballad of Hollis Brown’ and ‘Ballad in Plain D’. Deep dark stuff that can really pull you into another world.

The first time that I saw Dylan was July 4th, 1991 at Tanglewood in Lennox, Massachusetts. Lyrics were mostly unintelligible. It was not a good show, and it was many years before I gave him another chance. I’m glad that I did, because the good moments at some of the later shows erased most of my memory of that 1991 show which was during his murky period. I remember reading a poll years later of “worst Dylan concerts”, and the Tanglewood show was at the top of the list. And I was there to witness the carnage firsthand!

One of Dylan’s television performances that stands out to me as being a success, was on a 80th Birthday special for Frank Sinatra in 1995. Dylan played ‘Restless Farewell’ and it was really spellbinding. I couldn’t really if Sinatra liked it or not. He had sort of a stunned look on his face, but I do think he was impressed with the performance and artistry. I couldn’t find it on YouTube. Years ago I had a copy on a VHS tape, so maybe I can dig that out one of these days. I suppose one thing those two have in common, is that Dylan is one of those people who can truly say; “I did it my way”.

Sadavid, Thanks for the update on Robbie’s PR activities linked to his site. Interesting that he’s referred to as “Robertson” so frequently on his own website. Must be OK with the name. Makes me feel better now about all of my flagrant references to Bob Dylan as “Dylan”, or the many times I’ve used the name “Hendrix”.

Of the song samples from Robbie’s new album, the one that seems to be catching my ear the most is ‘She’s Not Mine’. It’s kind of a simple song, but I like the presentation and simplicity and almost think that it could be a “radio” song.

And what’s with the trouble that Westcoaster was trying to stir up a few weeks ago saying that Robbie might have been using our questions to Sebastian as reference material for the new album? I doubt that’s the case, as it seems like this album has been percolating for as long time, but can you imagine the credit fiasco that will ensue if the entire GB needs to be named on the album sleeve?! Better buy the LP if you want your name to be legible! Wink Wink. ;-)


Entered at Thu Feb 17 02:13:57 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Bashful Bill

As far as I know the Waifs are still around. They were here on Saltspring in '03 and everyone thought they were fantastic. Can't understand why they haven't broke through. They sure as hell deliver the goods and most of it is original. Cheers.


Entered at Thu Feb 17 00:53:11 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill(again)

Location: Minoa, NY(still)

Subject: oh yeah.......

2 things : my pretty one saw me typing on here and asked me to say that she "likes the Decemberist's album a lot"....and, is anyone familiar with the Waif's? Are they still around, still sound the same, etc?


Entered at Thu Feb 17 00:47:26 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: "you can call me zimmie...."

I decided some years back(likely around the time Larry Campbell moved on) that it would take a combination of strong persuasion and someone else paying for me to go out and see him again, but I've been very fortunate in my Dylan encounters. I saw him 9 times - twice in the 70's, once in 88, and 5 times throughout the 90's(once with Joni), and once in 03. They were all very good shows, the latter being the best. If you have access to boots, I recommend seeking it out : 8/23/03 at the NYS Fairgrounds. My fond memories are partly emotional, as several of the road warriors with whom I attended a bunch of Guru's shows descended on my turf and we enjoyed the fair as well as the show, with much food&drink&laughter. We had great seats - 5th row slightly left of center. The Waif's opened, and it was the last night of a long tour for them and they were looking forward to returning down under within a couple days. I'd never heard of them and didn't expect much and was pleasantly surprised to enjoy them so much. Dylan and band were in fine form - I've listened to it a number of times and always enjoy revisiting it, and others I've shared it with agree. And Dylan was in fine spirits - he came out from behind the keyboard twice and booggied(yes, booggied - not for the faint of heart), and he cracked a joke about Larry Campbell stealing a pig from one of the agriculture barns and stashing it under his bed. He even gave a high falsetto drawn out "woowwww" at this notion.....The 88 show was so-so, but the other shows were good. Again - I'm fortunate in this department......


Entered at Wed Feb 16 23:35:05 CET 2011 from (32.177.221.77)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: New Music

Try The Sadies new one: Darker Circles. These guys are terrific & young and show a lot of respect to classic country styles while adding a new and invigorated sound & attitude too. Like The Avett Brothers that way -


Entered at Wed Feb 16 22:59:49 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: New Music

Kevin J, I couldn't agree with you more about the importance of new music. Some other young artists I really like are Josh Ritter, Carrie Rodriguiz, who use to play with Chip Taylor, and Michael Franti and Spearhead. I also agree with Peter V that The Duke and the King are a very good band. They played in Woodstock a few months back and I'm sorry I missed them. I'll catch them next time.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 22:11:36 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

To do list week of Apr 4…….Fire AR guy who picked “He Don’t Live Here No More” as lead-off single…….My repeated sampling of the 30 second clips has it as the weakest – albeit only weak track on the album – saved by a gorgeous guitar break which radio might well edit out…...


Entered at Wed Feb 16 22:10:27 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: . . . more about that postage stamp . . . .

I guess Canada Post Corporation has been listening (to BEG) . . . see [My link] under "July."


Entered at Wed Feb 16 21:52:51 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: . . . about that postage stamp . . . .

See [My link} for the "news" page on JRR's website . . . I think Sebastian R. is the webmaster / writer . . . not quite sure how to parse this:

"Heading into street date (4/5) Robertson will have the Wall Street Journal, Rolling Stone, LA Times, NY Times and other printed media in place. He will also be featured on late night television during street week. In addition, Robertson will be knighted in Canada, have his face on a Canadian postage stamp and will be the face of the JUNO awards in late March."

Etc.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 21:35:26 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M…….To steal a bit from Dave Davies……It wasn’t called New Wave when Yoko Ono invented it………Good one!.....not sure why but just remembered that classic clip of a few years back where you picked up on the LOOK chuck Berry gave Yoko Ono on the Mike Douglas show when Yoko suddenly added her bit to a number that John and Chuck were doing…….Something tells me he had never heard anything quite like it before….


Entered at Wed Feb 16 21:12:03 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: As you too like the Beatles, Arcade Fire and the future of rock and roll, perhaps you too have been struck by the thought that parts of the brilliant "Wake Up" sound like Yoko backed by the E Street Band (around 4:45 at the link, for example). Nice to see Borat on drums too.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 20:53:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Down On Silas' Farm (Hard Times in the Country)

It would have been a nice preface to the folk music segment at the Grammys to have shown a clip (from Don't Look Back) of Dylan singing "Only A Pawn In Their Game" at Silas McGee's farm in Greenwood, Mississippi back in the early '60s.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 20:36:35 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

And I hope more kids will be turned on by the spectacular that was the Avett Brothers and Arcade Fire and start playing real instruments rather than just Guitar hero and other E devices…….When Arcade Fire did that encore number to close out the show ( a first that I have ever seen on an Awards show ) I actually thought we might be seeing the saving of rock n roll………..

Bob F: Whenever someone tags an act or an artist as being “Great” or “Best we have ever seen” or something along those lines…..I am reminded of Paul Simon’s sobering – if a tad insensitive – remark on the death of Papa John Phillips…..Simon noted “Well, he did write 2 great songs”…………………..So, whether it be the Avett Brothers or anyone else we hope can turn us on for years – we do have to realize that the standards set by Bob Dylan and The Beatles are monumental……………….Think Arcade Fire………In 8 years they have put out 3 albums………..In an identical 8 year period…The Beatles wrote 100 great songs!


Entered at Wed Feb 16 19:43:43 CET 2011 from (70.61.80.3)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Subject: Dylan Again

It was also interesting to see the crowd reaction show after the Dylan-Mumford-Avett set. Jeff Beck smiling, Neil Young smiling. Jennifer Lopez looking dazed and confused...


Entered at Wed Feb 16 19:33:39 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: ROBBIE

Hi guys. Check this out. There's a vid of ROBBIE to see. Looks like a goodie album for his fans.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Feb 16 19:08:08 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan Again

Kevin J, your a fan of the Avett Brothers. I'm also a fan. But think about this, when Dylan was about their age in a 15 month or so period he recorded Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 and Blonde on Blonde. It kind of seperates him from the crowd doesn't it? We can go on and on about the amazing career he's had. Granted the other night was not his greatest performance. So what. It's still a hoot to turn on the tv and see him performing live. My kids grew up going to Bob Dylan shows and they couldn't wait to text me the other night laughing about his outfit. It's all great fun. Like I said these are his victory laps. By the way, I don't think Jeff Rosen or anyone else is going to tell Bob Dylan what to do.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:51:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, no … when I saw him, Sly sang a different song to the rest of The Family Stone, fell into the audience, had his wig fall half over his face. The rest of the band kept trying to tell him it was a different song. He just kept croaking I Want To Take you HIGHER and thumping random notes on the keyboard. Bob is nowhere remotely near that condition! There was a line of people demanding their money back after an 18 minute set with Sly.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:41:27 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: The last time I saw Dylan on TV was Live Aid in '85, which I thought was way way worse/sadder than Sly's appearance a couple of years ago (the one with Randy Jackson of "American Idol" on bass).


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:37:05 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan

The above link really does relate to B. Dylan.........at a show during his "foggy years" 1989-1992 - during an absolutely incomprehensible reading of a song - a guy behind me kept saying "he's talking to us man.....he is really talking to us"...........I knew then that Bob could never do any wrong for a certain segment......and in its own way that is a beautiful thing.........but sometimes the messiah really isn't the messiah but just a guy in desperate need of someone to tell him to sharpen up.....I doubt that Bob has had anyone around him in a very long time with the strength to do that.....and so we will continue to see the kind of shambles we saw on the Grammys and that is sad in my book......not Sly Stone sad but close...


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:36:41 CET 2011 from (90.239.103.26)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Ain't gonna croak on Maggie's Farm no more by Peter V

I have spent the latest 15 min by readind Peter V´s post over and over again in totally silence. I can't find a single thought to agree with him. I like following three words, though, for being a positive person who I am: They are "and", "if" and "emphasize".


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:34:28 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Danko & Stagefright

JEFF- Regarding the night of an ice storm and attending a Danko gig, my best guess is 1997-8 and it might have been the Towne Crier. I think it was over on that side (east) of the Hudson River.

BONK- I had stagefright when I was in high school and I remember it took all my courage to go up in front of the classroom for public speaking. Then, for some reason, I just got used to it. I think I remember picturing everyone in the room being stark naked and maybe that's what did the trick. Singing has never bothered me at all because I'm so intent on what's happening with the music that I can't even hear the boos. It helps to stand behind a bandmate if they start throwing beer bottles.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 18:26:10 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, I agree enough about the "magic moments" to revoke some of my comments. yes, there are always some, possibly based on prior experience rather than actuality. But at current concert costs, I wouldn't see Bob again (unless he had one of the Band with him). I'm looking forward to The Decemberists (Bristol), The Unthanks (Exeter) and Simon Felice (Winchester) over the next couple of months, and wondering about Dolly Parton for September … she's playing the local hall. I'd guarantee she has a first rate band. But I have a feeling that'll be an expensive ticket.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 17:51:01 CET 2011 from (70.61.80.3)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Subject: Todd's Words on Dylan's Grammy Appearance

Todd: I think your last paragraph about Dylan's Grammy appearance is the most profound comment I've read about it. Bravo! I agree 100%. It was great to see that little island of real music in that sea of plasticity--Lady Caca and the like.

My daughter and a bunch of her old college friends burn mix CDs for each other each month and this month hers was Dylan, Avett Brothers, Carolina Chocolate Drops and other Americana/roots tracks dating back to Hank Williams and even the Carter Family. Some of her friends are more attuned to Lady Gaga and her pop music ilk. With the song list she had a little notation, "suck it up." I think that's what Bob was saying with his little acoustic army...


Entered at Wed Feb 16 17:34:56 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Live Dylan

I’ve seen Dylan live about 3 or 4 times over the past several years, and have found that it’s best to go in with no expectations, or at least expect that the performance will be uneven. Each time, I ask myself why I’m bothering, but at every show, there’s usually a moment, or a few moments where Dylan brilliance still shines through. You never know when it’s going to happen, and maybe that’s a big leap of faith to take when you consider the expense and logistics of getting to a show these days, but I’m happy to at least get the moments. A few years ago it was ‘Shooting Star’. The year after that it was ‘Cold Irons Bound’. There are plenty of other moments in the shows that are enjoyable and other that are lackluster, but it makes you appreciate the peaks all that more when they happen.

The last time that I saw him was on one of his summer-time minor league baseball park tours with Willie Nelson. I brought a long time friend of mine, who’s really into music, but had never seen Dylan live, and only had a moderate amount of familiarity with his material. Before the show I was trying to prep my friend to not expect too much. It’s almost as if I was apologizing for a possible disappointment that hadn’t happened yet. When the show started, I warned him that Dylan’s voice isn’t the same as it was 30 years ago. I was actually pretty worried that my friend would have a bad time. After the first song, I asked my friend what he thought. He told me; “it sounds like Bob Dylan”. It turned out to be a pretty good night. So it seems to me that the casual Dylan fan is probably better equipped to enjoy a Dylan show than we obsessives, who know all of his vocal changes in minute detail over the years, from album to album and from tour to tour. We are always going to be harder on him. My take on it is that the more casual Dylan fan probably never thought he was a great singer in the first place, and is not as upset that he’s not a great singer now. And that there are other things to appreciate about the performances.

As far as the Grammy’s go, I was more disappointed by Jagger’s performance. But again, I wasn’t expecting too much from Dylan. It seemed that Dylan had fun, and enjoyed the moment. It looked like he had his harmonica upside down when he started to play it near the end of the song. He then turned it over and played a little more, but I thought I caught a little smile there as he realized his mistake.

In a way, I thought that playing ‘Maggie’s Farm’ was an inspired choice. That was one of the songs that was at the center of his electric set at Newport in 1965. At that time, it represented his transition away from folk to a more electric based rock sound, and Dylan’s distancing of himself from the folk movement that didn’t really want to let him go.

Now 36 years later, it’s come full circle, and the use of ‘Maggie’s Farm’ at the Grammy’s (another high profile event) was used to represent and celebrate the acoustic based Americana part of the night, as an antidote to the electric pop, rock and hip-hop that is so prevalent today. In my mind, the edgiest music of the night was performed by Mumford and Sons, The Avett Brothers, and Dylan. Although Dylan’s voice was not really there, the spirit of the moment was enough.



Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:59:45 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Bill M

Thanks man. I'm pretty stoked about this. Been trying for years to get in. The drum instructor is supposed to be awesome. Hopefully he can help me with this damm stage fright I have. Cheers!


Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:51:03 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Pursuit of Happiness

Hey! I Saw Rick and Sredni at the Pursuit of Happiness in Liberty, NY about 23 years ago. But it was summertime when I saw them, so no ice storm for me thankfully. Great show and great venue, although it's probably long closed by now. That's the place where I met Rick, and also Levon the the previous year. They used to get some pretty good acts there. Saw John Hammond there....Leon Redbone with Cindy Cashdollar, James Harmon Blues Band, Papa John Phillips & Scott McKenzie which was filmed by D.A Pennebaker, so I got to see him work.....good memories from Liberty, NY.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:44:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Spinning on the turntable this week is the self-titled album from Daniel Lanois' new group Black Dub. This LP set features vocalist Trixie Whitley (daughter of the late Chris Whitley), bassist Daryl Johnson, drummer Brian Blade and Mr. Lanois' trademark voodoo atmospherics. Put them altogether and the result is a fine blend of vocals and stripped-down instrumental musings with an emphasis on the interaction between the great drummer & bassist, as the dub name suggests.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:26:11 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Lars , are you talking about Rick & Sredni at The Pursuit of Happiness over 20 years ago? I drove to Liberty from Woodstock for that one. Really bad weather. Hate to say it, but i wouldn't be up for that drive in that weather at this stage of the game. Would have to be an emergency of some kind.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:13:07 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

That should read "Series of Dreams" from disc 2


Entered at Wed Feb 16 16:10:55 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Things that go to 11

Dunc: Always great to see your posts.......and yes despite me getting into a tizzy over B. Dylan's TV appearances......I still play "Love and Theft", "Tell Tale Signs" and "Togethet Through Life" as much or likely more than anything else over the last 5 years..........and "Mississippi" version from Tell Tale Signs disc 1 ranks as a top 5 favorite of Dylan all time for me.............. "Series of Dreams" on disc is fun as well.......So NO - count me out as wanting the old man to just retire to paint and write......but just wish his people would keep me off live tv!


Entered at Wed Feb 16 15:54:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Hornby Island Blues Workshop

Bonk: I hadn't heard of the camp you mentioned last week, but then got the following listserver post from one of the instructors:

"Now in it`s 12th year, The Hornby Isalnd Blues Workshop invites some of the finest roots and blues musicians around to share their knowledge and inspiration with approxiamtely 70 students. With small class sizes, participants get hands-on instruction, and one on one support to develop their musical talents. Workshops cover a wide variety of instruments and blues playing styles. Students will appreciate the positive and creative atmosphere that is everywhere during "Blues Week".

"This years group of instructors include: Julian Fauth, Rick Fines, David Gogo, Billy Hicks, Little Miss Higgins, Gary Kendall, Gary Preston, Lester Quitzau, Suzie Vinnick and Dave Harris."

Lester Quitzau is brilliant, judging from the one time I saw him. Gary Kendall is a very nice and approachable person who has some great stories from growing up playing with Paul Shaffer and hearing Neil Young and Steve Stills with their respective groups in Fort Bill in the mid '60s.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 12:50:05 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Ulster County, NY

Subject: Musicians

Peter- I had to laugh at your descriptions; for the most part they were very familiar to me. I've noticed that bass players are usually the first ones back on a bar stage, waiting patiently for the others to make their way back up after a break. Randy Ciarlante has a great work ethic and he's usually right behind the bass player.

I used to love seeing Rick Danko play at a local venue. For some reason the shows seemed special on the nights of an ice storm and the audience was small. Rick had a lot of love in his heart, God bless him.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 12:17:27 CET 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

nux schwartz

Location: durban South Africa
Web: My link

Subject: general

Stumbled upon some really nasty reviews on The Band albums,Rock of Ages gets 2 stars,tThe Basement tapes judged to be the worst Dylan and The Band have ever done,The Band accused of using"The weight riff over and over".However let me not dwell on this,it just left me feeling really angry and down.Our boys are like family to me you know.Been listening to a lot of 70's Band performances and hell the guys were really playing well (mid seventies)Rick singing brilliantly and generally energetic gigs.They broke up as they hit there peak performance wise,such a pity! My friend Syd Kitchen (I recorded a few of his albums)has just completed a track on the John Martyn tribute album and I am so very proud of him,Sad news though:Just been diagnosed with lung cancer-My thoughts and prayers are with you bud.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 10:09:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Doodling index - corrections invited

Lead guitar players – 11 (this is due to the belief that everyone wants to listen to every note tripping off their fingers.)

Keyboard Players – 6 to 10. 6 for piano, 6.5 for electric piano, 9 forHammond organ, 10 for synthesizers. Doodling is related directly to numbers of available knobs, dials and sliders.

Rhythm guitarists – 8. They’re guitarists.

Drummers – 8. But an annoying eight as they’ll spend ten minutes quietly adjusting screws and stuff, normally accompanied by a not-annoying womb-like thump thump of bass drum pedal, then suddenly hit the crash cymbal as hard as they can, preferably when another musician is close by with their back turned..

Bass players – 3. They have a lot less to doodle with and will get bored of doodling on four strings reasonably quickly. BUT many will then go and fiddle with a six string if one is lying around.

Horn players – 1 to 2. Very low doodling index, partly because they’ll be drinking beer and telling dirty jokes to the other horn players.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 08:27:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Back to the sound crew at that Mavericks gig. We were chatting about different artists and their attention or lack of attention to sound. They cited Ray Davies as one of the ones for excruciating volume. They said he was as deaf as a post. I agreed, because I'd seen him not long before and the acoustic / solo set was very good indeed, but when he got into the early Kinks hits with the band, the volume control went way past eleven. Great playing, just painfully loud.There are a lot of culprits there though, equating power and excitement with sheer brutal volume. Pete Townsend has said that most major rock musicians suffer from a degree of deafness … as he does particularly badly.

I always quote The Flying Burrito Brothers as one of the quietest bands I saw "back in the day" with little Fender amps mic'd into the PA, and for 1970 or 1971, the best stage sound I'd ever heard. They really rocked, but at a reasonable volume.


Entered at Wed Feb 16 00:59:44 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: playin it loud

I'm reminded of a Greg Allman show which the former Mrs Bashful Bill and I went to some years back, before the final implosion. Likely 10 years ago, at least. It was a good show, in a good theater which is known for good sound. I can't recall his name (Jimmy Hall?), but the singer from Wet Willie was with him. We sat about a third of the way back from the stage and it was so loud it literally was unenjoyable. Too bad, as again, it was a good show. We eventually moved back and wished we'd done it earlier. Many will recall that the ABB were notorious for being loud, away back in the day, I think they were one of the groups who were actually sued for damaging people's ears?


Entered at Tue Feb 15 22:44:43 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: musicians

Peter, when you say musicians I assume you are talking about guitar players. Guitar players who:

Don't bother learning the chords so just play blues scales over everything (including other solos and the singer)

Don't realize that blues scales don't work in every form of music

Keep everybody waiting at practice while they fiddle with their effects units

Bring 5 different guitars to practice and insist on playing them all - even if 4 of them sound like crap and won't stay in tune.

Play too loud

When they do play chords just use the standard "Mel Bay" voicings


Entered at Tue Feb 15 21:53:30 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Dylan, Reggie Young

I've played Highway 61 several times and Blood on The Tracks several times over the last couple of weeks. I always get something new when listening to many of Dylan's albums. Often I focus on different lyrics Ive never focussed on before.

I'm playing Tell Tale Signs Disc 2 and really enjoying the musicianship.(Hi KEVIN) I think Dylan is still there producing the goods. One of my favourite tracks of all time is 'Mississippi'.

I think Dylan's out there and everybody else is behind. My loyalty to the Band allows me to say my favourite solo act is Dylan and my favourite band is The Band.

I feel quite sure about this.

So why does he tour. I think for two reasons - it's what he does and he enjoys it.

Also it's related to alcoholism. He needs to keep working or doing something.

From a Scottish perspective my favourite Reggie Young album is Frankie Miller's 'Easy Money'. Love the guitar playing on 'Forget About Me'.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 21:32:39 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Shazam

I wouldn't mind having this job.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 21:30:42 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jed, I definitely hear you there, being in a creative down period myself! My son thoroughly enjoyed seeing Dylan 8 years ago, but he has declined pretty rapidly.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 21:27:31 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The rehearsal for technical crew thing shows a contrast between actors and musicians. Actors spend 75% of their time doing it. They're also as a profession somewhat obsessed with being liked by everyone. This may be a fault, BUT as a result they're much easier to work with than musicians.

The musicians' universal fault is doodling. No actor would decide to do vocal exercises while another actor was rehearsing a line, but musicians doodle around incessantly on their instruments, oblivious to the poor guy trying to check the bass sound or the piano sound. It's a form of masturbation. They are less patient than actors too. And, dare I say, a hell of a lot lazier. No actor goes on thirty minutes late, saying "It's OK. We'll jam it." That's why the musicians who do rehearse and sound check stand out. They sound better.

Another thing, what really pisses off sound people is "I'm saving my full, flat out performance for the show." You need the singer at full volume to set levels. You need to know if the singer is going to jump about and if so, where they're going to go.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 21:19:52 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: more Dylan

It's interesting to suggest that Bob should retire to his writing & painting.Many of us,in our work,vary over time in the quality & quantity of the work.We have up & down periods.Are musicians & artists different? In fact,it's not uncommon for our skills to diminish somewhat as we age,yet we continue onwards with our lives & our work.Are musicians & artists any different? B.B. King,Pinetop Perkins,Hubert Sumlin,Buddy Guy & other older musicians,some with diminished skills, continue to perform and skill level notwithstanding,they continue to bring joy to alot of people.Is Dylan different? It's been correctly noted that his last albums have been quite good,in voice & song,& having seen many of his never ending tour shows,there are certainly on & off(key!!) nights,but on outweighs the off! To be honest I've heard the retire refrain for many musicians & in Bob's case,to see all the youngsters digging him is very cool to experience.In the end,to judge Bob by tv performances is limiting. The man still has alot to give & that's a subjective fact.(joking!)


Entered at Tue Feb 15 20:14:08 CET 2011 from (32.177.232.29)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bob's vocal chops

I haven't heard his most recent studio recording but I thought his singing (studio recorded) on Modern Times, some of the newer stuff on Tell Tale Signs and Love & Theft were really good; in-key and even properly nuanced & emphasized when the lyrics called for an interpretation that way. It's his live singing and recordings that leave me cold, for some time now -


Entered at Tue Feb 15 20:11:21 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mixing Up The Medicine

With the Grammy broadcast you have one team handling the house system feed at the Staples Center and several others handling the broadcast feed mix out in the mobile truck. I don't know who the crew members were this year, but in past years the list includes some of the top names in the business.

With so many different acts performing, backed by countless musicians, the stage crew no doubt has their hands full just setting up all the microphones on the fly.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 19:41:16 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sounding - Off?

I agree with everything you have said Peter. I really don't consider myself an expert, but I have learned a lot from some pretty good guys.

Real time analizers blowing pink sound through a room, to start when it's empty give you a real basis for starting. But then when the room fills up with the bodies, if the sound operators can't move around as you say, they use sound spotters in all areas to be able to know what you have just described in your experience.

If this sort of care isn't taken, then obviously a singer doesn't give a shit about how he may be seeming to make a fool of himself. Perhaps Dylan at this stage of his career......"this stage':):):):) maybe he figures he's got nothing to prove and people are just naturally going to like him 'cause he's "Bob Dylan!"


Entered at Tue Feb 15 19:31:52 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Robbie Robertson in a raincoat?

Dig the new cover to the left........a new album cover for the RR album?......I preferred the hat to the raincoat.....yikes!


Entered at Tue Feb 15 18:56:46 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim

Web: My link

Subject: Our little man Garrett a Levon Helm fan.

Plowing the fields.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 18:36:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, I guess he might come back - I definitely felt the same after "Saved" which is less fun than the Christmas album, which after all did have the saving grace of a great video.

Sound people can do all sorts of things, but only if the performer wants them to spend the time and effort. You need a lot of rehearsal time in the actual hall to get the sound right however good the equipment is nowadays. I've recounted before how we went to see The Mavericks at Bournemouth BIC, a notoriously bad hall. In the raised section you couldn't hear any vocals and it was distorted.After ten minutes we decided to leave. We walked down and had to walk past the sound desk. The sound was fabulous down there. I spoke to one of the sound crew and said "Come and hear what it sounds like up there." He did and was appalled. And he got two chairs and sat us in the sound area for what turned out to be a great concert. You can only get it right if the band are prepared to work long and hard enough for you to move round and check from different angles. Even then it'll sound very different with 3000 human bodies soaking it up, but you should know how to adjust for that. Too often the stars won't soundcheck … noticeably at Cambridge UK last time I saw The Band the whole sound check was done by Jim, Randy and Richard Bell. None of the three originals presented themselves.In fact, those three could play all the instruments etc, but it's still no compensation for having the lead singers there.

And I still don't understand it when you have say three sound crew and they all stay in their seats throughout. I'd expect one to be roving around the hall for the first couple of numbers checking what it was like full of people.

On film sets, everyone knows that you rehearse stuff for the cameras, and the lights and for the sound crew, not just for the performance.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 18:12:20 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

And that would be “Christmas” and not “Christian” for anyone reading too quickly as I did……………………On another subject, .I am afraid the golden age of music on YouTube is over……..getting much more difficult to find old TV appearances – all of the Dylan debacles are now gone as are many other great bits – too bad.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 18:07:32 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lets be clear

So basically you're saying Bob Dylan is fired????

Lets get real, with the knowledge of sound people, and the equipment used now a day they can make anything sound anyway they want. Are there sound people working on these shows that are that inept? really. If the music is over powering vocals now, it's because the vocals really are that bad I would bet.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 18:00:04 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan

It's subjective only up to a point. There are technical issues like distortion, audibility of lead vocal, being in tune. Most of these don't interfere with the "spontaneity" (which is too often the lazy word for can't be fu*ked to rehearse), they just providethe setting to allow things to happen. I thought the last three times that most songs sounded the same, relying way too much on the blast of electric guitars except for the way better "country" segment. As to "arrangements", if only. Mostly it seems that he starts off and relies on having employed excellent musicians who can just catch up, and endings were cliched. I came to the conclusion with the Christmas album that his legend would be best served if he retired from active music tomorrow and wrote some books and painted.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 17:31:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sweatin Bullets

Jesusu Kevin........you're scarin' the hell outta me. Onliest good thing is, if I'm around in 2060, I'll be so deaf & blind it won't even matter. Now that's cool David.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 17:02:42 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Gammy cont.

In the year 2060……..Eminem is called upon to sing a tribute song to Robert Cray…….out he comes dropping F bombs and grabbing his crotch every few seconds…………..he can barely rap but the crowd on hand of 50 somethings – all of whom detested Rap when they were of the age – erupt in wild applause and no on – not a soul - is talking about Robert Cray the next day…………….enough to make you sick – isn’t it? Look….U2 killed rock n roll dead a long time ago but like cockroaches – it always manages to live – even if just a little…..and thanks to Kings of Leon and Arcade Fire - maybe there is a little hope left.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 16:59:29 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: Bringing things full circle -- Reggie Young played on Solomon Burke's 2002 album "Don't Give Up On Me", which featured a cover of "It Makes No Difference".


Entered at Tue Feb 15 16:23:43 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In my mind

I expect you're right David. There's too much information here for my feeble mind to retain.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 16:08:54 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Reason (NOT) To Believe

Norm: If I not mistaken, I mentioned Reggie Young here myself recently as an example of one of the great "Louisiana Hayride"-style guitarists, along with James Burton and Fred Carter Jr.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 15:53:38 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hard to believe

David Powell don't even know who Reggie Young is....harrmph!


Entered at Tue Feb 15 15:51:48 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Solomon Burke Sings Dylan

Coincidentally, Solomon Burke once covered "Maggie's Farm", as well as "The Mighty Quinn". He also later did "What Good Am I?" and "(Am I Your) Stepchild". Some may quibble with Solomon's wisdom in covering these songs, but, to me, he had one of those voices that never left me questioning his judgment about singing anything. (Excuse the Biblical puns)


Entered at Tue Feb 15 15:04:26 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: testing . . . testing . . . .

I found nearly all the Grammy performers had the vocals mixed too low. My guess is it's mostly a matter of fashion, maybe a bit of cover for artists who haven't had a good chance to warm up and may not be as on-pitch as they'd like to be. I thought Dylan's mic wasn't even in the mix at first, but it didn't make much difference when it was. And, as per Mick, he was there to push up the viewership -- every percent point of boomers is bigger numbers than a point of any other demo'c slice -- presumably everyone is aware that he can (only) sing like a frog.

The main exception to the vocal-mix rule was Ms. Streisand, who sounded fabulous and doesn't need to melismate all over the place to find a note.

[My link] is an article about the new book by Stieg Larsson's long time companion. The plot thickens.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 14:13:26 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter V on Dylan

Since musical opinion is more a matter of taste than fact,it's possible to hear & see things differently.I used to love Cohen.but frankly,these days he bores me.Whereas Bob's voice,song selections,arrangements & band are all quite outstanding.And,I enjoy the humor Bob provides in his phrasing & in his relatively new "performance" poses! His concerts attract young people because the energy of Bob & his band are superb & interesting.And,just TRY to sing along to get Bob to rearrange phrasing just to throw the crowd off.Ever the contrarian lives on!


Entered at Tue Feb 15 13:53:00 CET 2011 from (76.66.126.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rejuvenation: Robbie Robertson and dopamine
Saturday, February 5, 2011


Entered at Tue Feb 15 13:02:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Postscript … having seen Len three times since his return to the stage, I went over to his sound crew desk at the end of his Bournemouth show and thanked them. They were surprised and said no one ever does that. They deserved enormous credit for creating a soundstage where the singer could fulfill his true potential. I still can't figure out how they can get that volume without any distortion on the vocals … with the band going full pelt behind. It's a masterclass in sound mixing.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 12:57:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Len had a good rest, but in the last two years he's played more shows in bigger venues and done longer sets. And he's seven years older. My point was that Len has invested in brilliant sound mixing and crew. He uses a cable mic, never a radio mic, and they can have his gentlest whisper soaring above the band with no distortion. Thus he can make use of his ability to interpret a song. He has three women to lift the choruses and hit the notes.

Bob has never bothered with the quality of sound the other three can get. Paul Simon had a team analyse every hall months in advance and program the system for each venue before his recent tours. Again, you can hear every word, every nuance.

You mention Bob's studio albums … he could get that sound live with Len's crew. Instead he thrashes away, croaking relying on past credits of charisma and name to bully his way through songs whose melody he lost years ago.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 12:34:31 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan's Voice

Peter V, Bob Dylan has performed over a hundred shows a year for many years now. The great artists you mentioned only tour sporadically. Leonard Cohen spent years in a monestary. (During that time Dyaln created Time Out Of Mind, Love and Theft...etc. But I guess that's another subject.) No question his voice ie completely shot but there are thousands of kids who get to see him for the first time each year.In fact when you go see Dylan now, it's the young people that seem to be having the best time.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 10:29:19 CET 2011 from (41.97.249.63)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M ; Re - Steppenwolf

Sometimes I wake up with a parasitized mind about the best occupation out-the-GB to spend the continuously debtor account of the days to live. Indeed, as every GBer expects, to breathe the joy of living in Chemin Forestier is one option. According to the mood of the moment, I have the choice among the so many wonders that offers my city, I may step in the Learned Society for a one day long discussion whether some verse was in the original 1544 song version, I may go through the sweetness of the heavenly Rue Riviere, i may go upstairs in the spiritual world near Beit Hamidrache Place Negrier by the Jewish District, I may more prosaically go stepping under toes of real politics people, link above, isn't that what Joan calls the news ? and Brian Williams NBC meant by "we used to be a more civil society", etc….

Bill M : thanks for that post, it's those kind of posts that make the GB a serious place where to stay, and obsoletes the false worthiness of the rest of the internet


Entered at Tue Feb 15 08:41:09 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ain't gonna croak on Maggie's Farm no more

I looked up the Dylan Maggie’s Farm on the net. I thought he had a concept, though a flawed concept, and the wall of musicians desperate to say “I’ve backed Bob Dylan” were excellent. Given the state of his voice it was at least an attempt to be fun and he had a touch of style.

I guess he’s never listened to anyone on sound, and in 1966 was proved so triumphantly right that he still assumes he is. He’s not. For years he’s surrounded his shot away voice with loud volume forcing him to croak louder and without subtlety. Compare Leonard Cohen live. Cohen is older, and like Bob never possessed the range or natural tunefulness of a Caruso (or a Rick Danko). Cohen uses a ton of power on the vocal mic so that every nuance and whisper of his interpretation is absolutely clear. The backing is sublime and never, never drowns him out, which forces a singer of limited range to shout (or croak).

I’ve been enjoying Bob’s work for 48 years now. I never thought Cohen would surpass him, but nowadays there’s no competition. You could go on to compare Paul Simon, Paul McCartney and James Taylor, all vastly better live performers than Bob nowadays. But crucially all three were always singers with range and tunefullness. Simon and Taylor have looked after their voices too (I sense McCartney’s is getting harsher), and employ backing at the right volume, and have their mics loud to emphasize their subtlety.

The current Bob, and in fact the Bob of the last twice I saw him, would be ill advised to ever perform on the same concert as Cohen, Simon or Taylor. All three have better arrangements too, and thus better bands.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 05:15:59 CET 2011 from (99.141.25.77)

Posted by:

Adam2

It's unfortunate that Willie Nelson's recent albums have been overshadowed the past two years. If it wasn't for Electric Dirt, he would have won last year for the Bob Wills/western swing tribute album he did with Asleep At The Wheel. And if it wasn't for Mavis, he should have won again for his wonderful recent album Country Music (produced by T-Bone Burnett). Willie and Asleep At The Wheel are making a sequel album though, so there's a chance that one can get recognized.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 05:12:25 CET 2011 from (99.141.25.77)

Posted by:

Adam2

Chicago's own Mavis Staples won Best Americana Album for her recent album You Are Not Alone. Great album produced by Jeff Tweedy. I'm glad that the album was so successful, and that she's been introduced to a younger fan base. I'm also really glad she beat stupid Robert Plant. We're all very proud of her here in Chicago.


Entered at Tue Feb 15 04:52:05 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: George Shearing dead at 91

LINK: The great George Shearing playing Duke Ellington's "I'll Get Around". He was one of the greats even with his blindness. One of the best

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Feb 15 01:40:54 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Valentines Day

Almost forgot my annual link to a favourite Steve Earle song.

I never watch award shows (rarely watch TV) but I did watch the 'acoustic segment' on youtube. What's not to like about Dylan belting out one of his early 'electric' songs. The old coot looked like he was having a ball, and the back up band was in seventh heaven, drowning out the old fellow for the most part. Definitely not zippedy -do-dah music.

I'll have to check to see if Sir Mick's performance is posted yet. The missus, who loves these shows, said she didn't care for his singing but thought he still looked incredibly sexy.

Who won the award that Levon won last time (?Americana)?


Entered at Tue Feb 15 01:23:37 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: HAPPY VALINTINE'S DAY TO YOU ALL..

Here's a fave poem of mine to all you, my friends.

If I could catch a rainbow

I would do it just for you,

And share with you its beauty

On the days you’re feeling blue.

If I could build a mountain

You could call your very own,

A place to find serenity,

A place to be alone.

If I could take your troubles

I would toss them in the sea,

But all these things I’m feeling

Are impossible for me.

I can not build a mountain,

Or catch a rainbow fair,

But let me be what I know best,

A friend who’s always there.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Feb 15 00:16:24 CET 2011 from (142.32.208.230)

Posted by:

NB

Subject: Mick

Rolling Stones cover notwithstanding, the song by its very nature is one that gets shouted as much as it gets sung. I'd agree that Mick did fine with it. My point was that a different Burke number could've perhaps allowed Mick to show that he's still got (more) pipes (than came across on that number). NB.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 23:14:07 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: A Star Is Worn

I thought Sir Mick did okay last night singing "Everybody Needs Somebody" in tribute to Solomon Burke. It was after all a song that the Stones covered some 46 years ago on "Rolling Stones 2".

Kris Kristofferson, however, was definitely worse for wear merely introducing his former co-star Barbra Streisand. And Ms. Babs herself had trouble reading Arcade Fire's album title.

Making things worse, or better depending on your slant, for Dylan's performance was that his vocals were buried in the sound mix. Whether this was by design or negligent circumstance is subject to conjecture.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 23:14:24 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Peter V: You may well be right about the potentially suggestive nature of the "Wildwood Flower" lyrics, but I'm guessing few people's thoughts ran in that direction when Mother Maybelle sang it...

Canadians are rightfully proud of their many talented ex-pat musicians who have made it big in the States over the years (including four members of the Band, of course), so I'll note that while Arcade Fire is based in Montreal, it is an international band with frontman Win Butler and his brother Will hailing from this side of the border. As for Bob D's Grammy performance, I thought it wasn't so bad given that his voice just kinda sounds like that now anyway. Though I would have preferred a duet with Lady Gaga!


Entered at Mon Feb 14 22:58:40 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan @ Grammy

I think Bob has always gotten a perverse sense of joy from messing with very"big","public" events,particularly on TV. Sort of like Garcia's always humorous perspective on how the Grateful Dead used to eff up every big event they played(with the largest audiences)including Woodstock,Well,Dylan always seems to have that twinkle in his eye as he screws up these big moments,while continuing to sell out live shows,sell cd's,& in general,market himself quite effectively,as he's done through the years.Dylan,to the best of my knowledge,& I could be wrong,but,he never has been an artist who has been ripped off in this business.He's actually been rather shrewd.Not perfect,but like Mick,he learned quickly how to protect his name & his business interests. Perhaps,he believes any publicity is good publicity since in the end,it sells the product. From an artistic perspective,it's rather frustrating to know that while I love Bob,& want others to see/hear his genius,he uses these moments to be his ever contrarian self.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 22:45:24 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh ....all right then

Bill; You know damn well I was jokin'. I'm going to work tomorrow, I gotta get away from you guys for a while. You're filling my head too full of useless information.

I got to go back up to Rivers Inlet and get the last of that gawd damn junk up there.....amoung other jobs. Anyway I got to pay to put a new roof on my house concrete my driveway with that nice terracotta colour ceement. Install my hot tub, and 7 new windows then the place is finished. I can retire and rest, (I'm tired just thinking about all this.)


Entered at Mon Feb 14 22:33:55 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: John Kay

Westcoaster: Yes, it's long and ugly ugly ugly. Sorry about that. You should see me let loose on the Poppy Family! A decent source - way more accurate that Wikipedia - is Kay's autobiog, written with John Einarson. Of course he coulda taken out citizenship since the book. I believe his wife's Canadian and I even heard that he moved recently to your kneck of the woods.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 22:08:25 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whoooosh!

Bill! That monsterous paragraph biography of yers is too long and awkward. I ain't reading all that. I knew he was born in Germany, but they say he was Canadian. How do you know he didn't get a Canadian citizenship. C'man prove it!

I'm havin' another damn heart attack........


Entered at Mon Feb 14 21:15:18 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whose Toes?????? They're always in the way

Confessions. Peter if you are referring to my comments on what Brian Williams had to say, it was his words not mine, so it ain't just my feelings. There was a whole lot of confessions on that show last night that surprised me. David Letterman amoung others who were cheering for the Canadians in the gold medal hockey game. (maybe 'cause it was at home?)

I used to think I liked that Nettles woman's singing, but after listening to her more, she just gawd damn hollers too much. Maybe that's why the other one left.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 20:56:55 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

NB: Guess so, if you're thinking that yourself. As for me, I'm a hunched and hairless 27-year-old. Anyway, any awards program has been a near-total waste of time in my experience. I doubt that I would have cared for an Aretha-free tribute to Aretha (if that's what it was), but judging by Kevin J's report I wish I'd seen Arcade Fire. (I still feel all inspired whenever I hear "Wake Up".)


Entered at Mon Feb 14 20:52:38 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bob F: I have enormous admiration for Bob Dylan…….on many levels……..it just bothers me that he continues to be put/put himself in these situations that he is so ill suited for. Anyone who has seen him live at all over the last 25 years knows it takes him at least 15 minutes to settle down and get his voice……..his never ending tour/his new albums/his writings, etc. are all great achievements that deserve the honour and respect they receive……….but - and this is a big but -------- his last 4 or 5 major TV appearances - seen by a combined billion or so people - have been train wrecks ……..Paul McCartney is the same age, Leonard Cohen is older……as are countless other performers who manage to not embarrass themselves live over and over again…….We are not talking about something that has just started to happen either ……….he was in his 40’s at Live Aid and 50 in 1991 when his take on “Masters of War” might just have been the worst live performance by a major artist in TV history………also at the Grammys…..his speech that night was a classic and did save the night somewhat…………Jeff Rosen has done a lot of good for Bob – but he should keep him off live television – simple as that…………..See above link – just wish he was still capable of doing this…..


Entered at Mon Feb 14 20:38:17 CET 2011 from (142.32.208.230)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: The Grammaphonies / To Each His Zone (musically speaking)

After the tribute to Aretha Franklin, I thought the rest of the night was a waste of time. (Jagger might've done better with a different song). I must be getting old. NB.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 20:27:35 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sugarland

Peter V: I remember first seeing Ms. Nettles years ago when see was in an acoustic duo called Soul Miner's Daughter. They were playing at a great small club in Decatur, Ga. called Eddie's Attic, where John Mayer used to play also before he hit the big time. It didn't take more than a song or two before realizing that Jennifer has a unique voice. She's from Georgia and went to Agnes Scott College in Decatur. I believe she fronted another band before joining Sugarland, which was originally a trio until the other female vocalist, Kristen Hall, left.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 20:18:34 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Steppenwolf

Empty N / Westcoaster: John Kay was born to a German family in Eastern Europe and came to Canada (Toronto) with his parents in '58. He and the parents then moved to Buffalo, without taking out Canadian citizenship. Kay then drifted to California to play country blues, but was chased back north by the irate father of an offended flame. He chose Toronto over Buffalo and settled in with a local group called the Sparrows (by now consisting of drummer Jerry Edmonton, guitarist Dennis Edmonton, bassist Nick St Nicholas and organist Goldy McJohn). They all loved the Hawks and their blues-based repertoire included a number of songs that the Hawks also did, with material like "The Pusher" added. They moved to NY, where they recorded a bunch of things for Columbia, then to California where they did okay (now as the Sparrow). (When Steppenwolf hit big, their old label, Columbia, issued an album of their bluesy material from the vault, while their new label, Dunhill, released "Early Steppenwolf", a tape of an illuminating live show in LA that shows the Hawks influence.) Then two of the Canadians, Dennis Edmonton and Nick St Nicholas, left, to be replaced by two local guys. One of the LA guys, guitarist Michael Monarch, was on the first, second, fourth and fifth LPs (the 3rd was the Early Steppenwolf one); the other left after the first two, and was replaced by a returning Nick St Nicholas. When Monarch left after LP5, St Nicholas convinced the group to bring in Larry Byrom, with whom he'd played in the Hardtimes (aka TIME) in LA between stints with Steppenwolf. Byrom and St Nicholas were replaced an album or two later by Kent Henry and George Biondo, both of whom would stick with John Kay when he left the group circa '71, so were both on Kay's excellent version of "Moonshine". (The other two guys in Kay's band, Whitey Glan and Hugh Sullivan, were both Torontonians from the Mandala.) Then Steppenwolf reformed, followed by innumerable membership changes, most notably the departure of Goldy McJohn, and another split. Evenually Kay put together a totally new lineup consisting of just him plus younger guys who'd play for less money. Jerry Edmonton still had a 50% claim to the name, so Kay struck up a deal that had Kay paying Edmonton a flat figure annually for the name but keeping all other proceeds. I believe that that's how it still works, except that Kay now pays Edmonton's widow.

The big winner in all of this was the forgotten original guitarist, Dennis Edmonton, aka Mars Bonfire, who wrote "Born To Be Wild" and has never had to work in all the years since!!


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:48:47 CET 2011 from (90.239.169.210)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: When did you see a Band related artist on a cover of a mag?

It was _THIS_ what I wanted to post in the first place but there were other posts to comment. But now it is here.

Plura Jonsson in ELDKVARN (mentioned in Related) is posing in the cover of Swedish main stream men's magazine wearing a sailor's cap. He is a frequently guest in maritime NordKoster. See the link or http://cafe.se/10-skal-att-kopa-nya-cafe/


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:42:26 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan at Grammys

Kevin J, you realize Dylan is going to be 70 in May. He has hit more home runs then just about everyone else combined. These are his victory laps. I'm just glad to see him still performing.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:34:05 CET 2011 from (90.239.121.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: 1.) Bob Dylan 2.) Chronicles 3.) Canned Heat

1.) GIVE ME A BREAK!!! This Man is still alive. This site would not exist without Him. 2.) Chronicles have been written in Eastern Europe and in Byzantine for hundreds and hundrers of years. They all are all the same - in the end. JACK LONDON may have been sited in Dylan's "Chronicles". The most interesting point for me is that some gber are sited in Chronicles, too. They are good hearted people so we others should not be too jealous. 3.) CANNED HEAT; Norbert: Still playing on my turntable this amazing blues artist. I haven't visited the famous places too often but I made once a pilgrimage to Laurel Canyon (Canned Heat).


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:32:05 CET 2011 from (90.239.121.27)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: 1.) Bob Dylan 2.) Chronicles 3.) Canned Heat

1.) GIVE ME A BREAK!!! This Man is still alive. This site would not exist without Him. 2.) Chronicles have been written in Eastern Europe and in Byzantine for hundreds and hundrers of years. They all are all the same - in the end. JACK LONDON may have been sited in Dylan's "Chronicles". The most interesting point for me is that some gber are sited in Chronicles, too. They are good hearted people so we others should not be too jealous. 3.) CANNED HEAT; Norbert: Still playing on my turntable this beautiful blues song once a year. I haven't visited the famous places too often but I made a pilgrimage to Laurel Canyon (Canned Heat).


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:29:33 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Step on toes?

Norm, i always found, "Excuse me, sir, I inadvertently seem to have placed my foot under yours. I apologize," was best in those "Don't step on any toe, and never, never make eye contact situations."


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:18:42 CET 2011 from (41.97.201.131)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Norm

Thanks Norm, I appreciate
You wrote there a thoughtprovoking post. I don't believe any person today can be influential whoever he is, we are witnessing since a while an uncontroled history which achieves itself where sometimes some individual find himself a folding seat


Entered at Mon Feb 14 19:04:53 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

John Kay always put on great shows….one of the few of the “Tribute” set to consistently tear it up live….also of note…..only Stevie Ray Vaughan was able to pull bikers and strippers in equal numbers to shows the way Kay and his band did……a blast to see but one had to be careful not to step on any toes at the shows!


Entered at Mon Feb 14 18:52:06 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Empty Now - Steppenwolf

I guess I kinda missed one thing you said Empty, regarding Steppennwolf. Not entirely a Canadian band. More like the Band, they were Canadian - American. Opposite of the Band they were formed in USA, Los Angelis. Had several changes in members for one reason & another.

John Kay one of the founding and still only original member was from Canada of course.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 18:42:07 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Grammys

Kevin, I agree with you. However I did like Cee lo Green doing his cleaned up version of the F##k You song. I could have lived without Gwyneth Paltrow but it was light and funny.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 18:26:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Sugarland

I thought this had stopped happening. The power of TV to sell CDs, that is. Sugarland appeared on the “Graham Norton Show” on Friday, which is the UK’s top chat show, doing Stuck Like Glue live. We looked up the video on YouTube (linked) right afterwards which is hilarious and is showing 9.2 million hits. We knew nothing about them, except they were huge in the USA, and did sell-out tours. So today I thought I’d buy the album (The Incredible Machine). The manager of my local store asked why I was buying it. I told him. He said it was weird. His head office sent ten extra copies down on Friday with “TV promotion” attached. They sold out early on Saturday morning. He had ten more today, and had sold eight when I bought one of the last two.

Jennifer Nettles is (a) attractive (b) has a voice. It’s quite odd to see the album going into the Country & Western section, because to someone who's never listened to them before, it’s straight cheerful chart pop (and none the worse for that).


Entered at Mon Feb 14 17:58:00 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.229)

Posted by:

JQ

Kevin J - you nailed it perfectly, sin'E!


Entered at Mon Feb 14 16:53:24 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Brian Williams NBC

Time Magazine lists this man as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. On leaving the Winter Olympics here a year ago, he published a thank you note to Canada. He had a lot of one sentence really nice things to say.

Last night was aired the one year anniversary program of the Olympics. Brian Williams NBC hosted our Brian Williams, CTV sports caster in New York. Our Brian is a very popular guy, and these two fellows have obviously become good friends.

Our Brian asked NBC Brian what he meant by this comment. "Thank you for reminding some of us we used to be a more civil society."

His answer was, You remind me of the way we used to be......maybe back in the 60's. More Civil to people, more tolerant. We are now more hostile, not trusting, tense, suspicious. You people are still humble, but it was nice to see you finally really cheer for your athletes with out being shy about it. Without being brazen, being proud of them and who you are. I can't remember all his comments. There is a video, but it comes up not available just now.

I have thought about these things and experienced them for a long time. Even before 9/11. Many Americans who come here have become more surly and unfriendly. Having played music in bars in BC & Washington for over 30 years, it was always there. Canadians never did applaude as much as Americans when they liked you or what you're doing. I often wondered about that difference.

However, it's of course a small group of people here, and on internet, but that American attitude never seems to come across here as it does in person with a lot. I think I stack it up to a lot of the portrayal of the "image" handed out to American people and it can't be easy to deal with.

I guess only a guy like Brian Williams NBC can get away with saying some of the things he did.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 16:44:29 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Anyhow watch the Grammy’s last night?……….Thank God for Rihanna……the superb Avvet Brothers…….and Arcade Fire……..Arcade Fire might just have put on the best live performance at the Grammy’s in 20 years…………..Sadly the night was marred badly by a monumentally embarrassing performance by Mick Jagger…….He can no longer sing at all and to turn what was supposed to be a tribute to the great Soloman Burke into a vanity piece 30 years past its “best before” date says all you have to know about the man……A disgrace……..Burke deserved so much more…….( See Jeff Beck’s tasty tribute to Les Paul last year for class )

The other sad part of last night was another inept performance by Bob Dylan…..He came doddering out, opened his mouth and was worse than anything one would see at a church basement filled with no-talent drunks. Is it not a manager’s job to keep a client away from situations where one’s legacy can be so badly tarnished? I happened to be in a room with a few other couples last night ( as an aside – that was just the beginning of the torture I was about to endure )………Everyone was knocked out by the Avett Brothers and then on came Bob……………The ladies all burst out laughing ( btw…can this be mentioned in divorce proceedings? )……..when they composed themselves…..they concluded that at least the likes of Britney Spears had the decency to lip sync!! For the first time in my life – I was left with nothing to say…….I just felt sad that a great artist had been reduced to a joke and that should never be allowed to happen………………


Entered at Mon Feb 14 13:49:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.201.131)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: “shake your ass! grandpa!”\

Norm, Lars, Peter M, Bashfull Bill : thanks for Alamo, I think you valued the importance of the matter for me
------- --------

I developed very lately an unhealthy need and almost blasphematory quest for moments of joy. Moments are often connected with places, “magic places” as once qualified by the GBers, and as I once described “places where you feel having been by a previous life”. Chemin Forestier [pic linked] It’s there where I used to go for this kind of quest, and the only attempt when It almost worked was recently in by twilights, while staring beneath the whispering pines, all was fulfilled for that I was about to hear as the song says ghostly men and women marching by, at the right moment when I was really transposed to, which in every man’s imaginary bears better moments of life, not exactly daydreaming, it’s a much sweeter sensation. Then at this precise moment, I guessed the shadow of a car narrowly avoiding me, a bad horn, and behind the open pane one voice [for real this one] “shake your ass! grandpa!”

Voila, it’s like it used to be, nothing is worth reality, and the secret of happiness in life lies in the body's harmony to benefit from the temperature of each season


Entered at Mon Feb 14 10:41:43 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: which takes us to Elvis...

who never wrote a song, by his own admission. This leads to Ricky Martin being caught out when asked 'what key was the song you wrote in?' He didn't know...

Now, to be fair, I generally write lyrics, rather than music, and particularly with a new song, I'm flat out knowing the key. but by the time I've recorded it, I know what key it's in... and have arranged at least my parts...


Entered at Mon Feb 14 08:51:32 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wildwood Flower

You have to say that "I'll twine with my mingles" has that "It sounds rude but I don't why" air about it that used to go well in folk clubs. It's like the line in the stage comedy of the Hunchback of Notre Dame where someone rushes on, having been told off by all the citizens and says "I've been castigated by the burghers!' and the whole cast goes "Oooh!!!"

On folk clubs, Simon Felice is doing a solo UK tour in April, playing small folk clubs. I have tickets for a pub in Winchester. His solo album is apparently "vinyl only." I ordered a copy on Saturday.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 08:40:11 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As I pointed out last week, Dylan spends the "Folksingers Choice" interview sections gloating about the songs he's stealing from people way back then. There is a difference between stealing and a "quotation", which is something classical composers did to reference stuff all the time. A humorous quote of a couple of bars in a solo in the middle shouldn't land you with a stealing charge. Van Morrison is meticulous … if he sings a couple of lines of "You send Me" or "Sex Machine" in the middle of a seven minute song as a quote, you'll always find it listed as a medley and e.g. Sam Cooke or James Brown listed as co-writers. He's very sharp if people try to bootleg him or steal his stuff, but he's equally sharp in crediting others.

The main form of theft from songwriters isn't the straight actionable He's So Fine / My Sweet Lord plagiarism. It's trading in writing credits. Reading about the Lomaxes in "Perfecting Sound Forever" they were as "partial to a credit" on others songs as Morris Levy was at Roulette or his "associates" elsewhere. It was equally as rife in the folk community, sometimes straight, sometimes under "Trad. Arranged by …".

In the late 50s / early 60s, credits were so heavily traded that I think it the cause of much of the "fued". Robbie is concerned with actual concrete authorship, what are called 'parental rights' sometimes. Levon comes from an era where dubious (or to put it more nicely, generous and grateful) accreditation was a constant part of the deal (You Cheated, You Lied) so sees distribution of credits as fair play.

It's hard to feel (the correct word is "feel" which is different to "understand") the difference unless you've written something yourself. That is, money is not the prime concern. In UK books it says "The rights of X to be named as author have been asserted". There's the concept of moral rights, that you will be credited and the work can't be altered without your approval. That's why songwriters later in the 60s rebelled against the Elvis Presleys, and Tom Parkers and Morris Levys and Alan Lomaxes, and to their amazement refused to cut them in. It's why in the mid-60s,. Elvis found himself running short of decent songs. He worked out why Leiber and Stoller, and Pomus and Schuman lost interest in submitting songs. Col Parker couldn't understand it, and Elvis over-ruled him later when writers declined to cut Elvis in.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 07:01:44 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: stealing

Dave H: That "Wildwood Flowert" example you posted says it all really.

I'm inspired to write a song. What do you think of this:

HI JUDE

"Hi Jude, it isn't bad"

"Change that sad song, and you'll feel better"

"Remember to get it out of your heart"

"Then you can start, to feelin', better"

I think I have a potential hit on my hands :-)


Entered at Mon Feb 14 06:40:34 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Creative Borrowing

Jeff Tweedy of Wilco has “borrowed” lines from some of his favorite authors over the years. William H. Gass and Henry Miller are among the authors that Tweedy has been influenced by. In the song ‘Poor Places’ from the Wilco album ‘Yankee Hotel Foxtrot’, Tweedy readily “confesses” to this borrowing, while acknowledging that many Rock and Roll fans probably aren’t reading these books anyway.

“There’s bourbon on the breath
of the singer you love so much
He takes all his words from the books
that you don’t read anyway”

I realize that’s not in the same category as A.P. Carter, or Led Zeppelin, but it reminds of the old saying sometimes attributed to Picaso: “Good artists copy, great artists steal.”


Entered at Mon Feb 14 06:09:29 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Carter Family

BASHFUL BILL: I have a CD of the old recordings of the Carter Family; Very good if you're a fan. It's titled" The Original Carter Family: Can The Circle Be unbroken" AP Carter is credited for "Keep On The Sunnyside". It was recorded May 8th 1935.

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Feb 14 05:45:48 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Grammys

Another Canadian[s] to be proud of. Congrats to ARCADE FIRE for winning the ALBUM OF THE YEAR. Disappointed that Justin Bieber or Drake didn't win for BEST NEW ARTIST. Their performances were great, as was Bruno Mars & Co.Not a bad show this year, very "colorful" and a bit "weird".

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Feb 14 03:55:17 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Alamo music

To anyone interested : Asleep At The Wheel did an album of Alamo songs in 2003. I've always wondered how well it sold.....How many folks around here have actually visited The Alamo? To answer my own question : I've been there twice. The second time happened to be on the first 4th of July after 9/11 and security was intensely heavy, as it was at all national monuments. I intervened with my youngest son, who was 7 at that time,when he wanted to ask one of the many Texas Rangers on duty where the bathroom was. Most any other time it wouldn't have phased me, but on that day it seemed like a trivial, silly even, question to ask of people who were doing what could be argued by some to be almost a sacred kind of work.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 03:07:07 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: The Alamo

Empty, I was going to guess that it was sung by Marty Robbins. Sure enough in the "related videos" posted next to the YouTube screen there are other Marty Robbins songs listed.


Entered at Mon Feb 14 02:02:12 CET 2011 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

dlew: Agreed. And of course it supposedly took Willie Dixon's daughter hearing "Whole Lotta Love" on the radio 20 years later and saying, "Dad, that sounds like one of your songs" before LZ had to pay up for nicking from "You Need Love."

The first line of lyrics in "Wildwood Flower" as sung by the Carter Family is "I'll twine with my mingles and waving black hair"--which is, basically, gibberish, but a folk-process corruption of the original lyric "I'll twine 'mid the ringlets of my raven black hair." It's sort of a game of "telephone" played over several generations of songs being passed down orally...


Entered at Sun Feb 13 23:26:12 CET 2011 from (202.124.74.153)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: dylan and other love and theft

john lomax was shameless in credit stealing. The bob dylan encylclopaedia documents many of the known lifts in chronicles. Johnny cash fans should check out crescent city blues on youtube. Similarly deep purple fans should check out maria moite.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 23:10:03 CET 2011 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Creative Stealing

I had a creative writing professor in college who started the semester by telling us, "by creative writing I mean CREATIVE STEALING." He expected us to read good stuff and borrow from it. Bob Dylan once wrote "the great books have all been written, the great sayings have all been said," and he has borrowed from great source material as much as anyone (as the excellent book by Princeton professor Sean Wilentz, BOB DYLAN IN AMERICA documents). In A.P. Carter's day such borrowing was part of the folk process, though it's shocking to see the song was actually published before the Carter Family version. So that was indeed theft.

The Wilenz book says Bob Dylan not only borrowed from other people's songs--and still does--but lifted entire phrases for his National Book Award-nominated book, CHRONICLES, from sources including Jack London! That is not only theft but borders on plagiarism.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 21:33:36 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Dave H: that should teach me to read teh credits...

All of those songs indeed do predate the Carters... A P Carter - the Led Zeppelin of his time?


Entered at Sun Feb 13 21:22:37 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA

Subject: Remember the Alamo

EMPTY- I think Robbie said it best, "It's not like it used to be."


Entered at Sun Feb 13 19:35:20 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Alamo

Empty...........Marty Robbins


Entered at Sun Feb 13 19:09:57 CET 2011 from (41.97.205.125)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Joan

sorry, we "Leapfrog-posted" - i am fine... the news....


Entered at Sun Feb 13 19:05:21 CET 2011 from (41.97.205.125)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: it was good to be so young then in the season of plenty

dlew919 : i am glad you appreciate, thanks your mark has its Weight

Norm : i will give myself the time

Ask For Help to all the GBers : Who is the singer in the linked version of Ballad of Alamo ? the information will be much appreciated, Thanks in advance

Anybody who's not feeling what i am feeling right now [listening Alamo] is not from our barracks; there was a time when every brave soul in the world was American in a way, when everything was made for America to be loved [wink to Lars], i should say

movie songs Piss-Off


Entered at Sun Feb 13 19:04:28 CET 2011 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: A. P. Carter

Virtually none of the Carter Family songs credited to A. P. Carter as composer were in fact written by him, at least in their entirety. "Sunny Side," "Wildwood Flower," "Wabash Cannonball," "Can/Will the Circle Be Unbroken," etc. all predated the Carters for sure, and there are others that likely did but no documentation survives. I believe "The Cyclone of Rye Cove" is a candidate for a possible original Carter song, but there were few if any. A. P. Carter was noted for going on song-collecting trips in the mountains in order to find new material for the Carter Family repertoire, but the songs he came back with were usually credited to himself.

As for the question of how he got away with it, I can only imagine that the issue was never brought up in a court of law by the original copyright-holder of the material.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 18:55:53 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Sasm/Empty

Rick would sing Keep On The Sunnyside sometimes. I think I have him doing it on one of the bootlegs I have. I'll try to hunt it down.

Empty I hope all is well with you. The news says there has been some demonstrating there.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 18:35:00 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

A couple years ago I threw a trivia question up on the GB as to which Canadian singer-songwriter had played in front of the most people in his career. The second clue was that he had just turned one hundred. I don't recall ever getting a response but (see link) the gentleman is still going strong and received a lifetime acheivement Grammy last night. Anyway I've collected a couple drinks at the pub with this one and here's hoping you all (y'all) can do the same.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 17:44:20 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Moonshine friend of mine

Empty now; For a little more trivia for you. This song was written by Les Emmerson, guitar player, singer, of another Canadian band from Ottawa. "Five Man Electric Band",

Les also wrote "Signs" amoung other songs. It is said he gets enough royalty from "Signs" to live on if he never worked. You can find some pretty good videos of them on youtube.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 10:36:58 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bayou Sam; Empty Now...

It's only one bar in each chorus, too.... as I know you know...

Empty - I've missed your posts - it's good to see them back.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 08:48:44 CET 2011 from (41.97.205.125)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: movie songs / westcoaster

Hello, le soleil brille, brille, brille, Hello Tu reviendras bientôt, La bas Dans ton village, Au vert feuillage, Plein de chants d'oiseaux
It's the French counterpart of
Hitler had only one brass ball, Gorring had two but they were small, Himmler had something similar, And poor old Gobels had no balls at all.

"Demain la grande évasion, Voila pourquoi nous creusons" Great Escape

"Nous irons au cœur du monde Par la poudre et le canon" Longest Day

I am still in the movie songs, for the official GBer, the samples I am focusing on are rather movie themes, thus irrelevant for the thread.
They were songs, the best I got from America, those songs rocked the childhood which is mine, I heard them far before the songs of The Band and far before the songs of The Beatles

Westcoaster : thanks for the link, so Steppenwolf is Canadian and henceforth officially The Band Connected



Entered at Sun Feb 13 08:21:03 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

dlew: That's a great catch. Maybe you've got something there. This prompted me to hit YouTube and check a few other versions. None that I found had that time jump you mentioned. That included later performances by Maybelle herself, as well as June Carter, and even Johnny Cash.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 06:09:34 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I have somewhere an article

Which examines Keep on the Sunny Side' jumping from 4/4 to 3/4 in the chorus (that jarring effect you hear...)... I wonder if it was on this basis that AP could claim original authorship. change a lyric here adn there, and presto. You can't claim chord progressions or rhythms.... but a rhythmic jump like that affecting the melody might count...


Entered at Sun Feb 13 01:09:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sunny Side Up

You've started me searching too. I have a memory of Van Morrison doing this on a live show - he never recorded it, I think. But I can't find any trace on the internet.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 01:02:36 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: same

Oh and.....

I forgot to mention also that on the linked page there's a quote from Maybelle Carter about them "learning" the song from A.P.'s uncle. I wonder if the original writer ever made an issue of this.

I wonder why I care :-)

I still would love to hear any pre-Carter recordings though.


Entered at Sun Feb 13 00:56:59 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Keep on the Sunny Side of Life

Lately I've become mildly obsessed with this old classic. I started researching it a little and found conflicting credits on who wrote it. According to the website I've linked above (and few others, like Wikepedia) it was written in 1899 by Ada Blenkhorn, and Howard Entwisle.

However, the vast majority of places I looked credit it to A.P. Carter of the famous Carter Family. The Carter family did record what seems to be the first popular recording of it in 1928.

One website blatantly accusses Mr. Carter of "stealing" the credit for this song that was written almost 30 years before he recorded it. The funny thing is that Carter seems to have pulled it off. Even as recently as on the soundtrack for the movie, "O Brother Where Where Art Thou?", it was credited to A.P. Carter. I thought maybe it was one of those deals where a song that's been bounced around so much could be taken as one's own. Maybe like a public domain thing. But you can see on the site I linked, a photo of a page from a 1903 songbook where it's "copyright 1899". Somewhere between 1899 and 1928 the song title also got shortened to simply, "Keep on the Sunny Side"

I just thought it was an interesting thing and that some of you folks might have more knowledge that you can share about it. Also, if anyone knows of any pre-Carter family recordings that might exist please share that info. Thanks

Tom


Entered at Sun Feb 13 00:32:45 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

JED: Neither was I my friend. It's cool.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 20:01:23 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

At 1:58 you can distinctly hear Richard's organ line over the descending chords. Since there are some obvious edits in this version, I wonder what audio was given to the editors to make the cuts. Pr


Entered at Sat Feb 12 19:42:47 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Clarifying

Jed; I sure in hell wasn't singling you out, but with some of the questions that were asked when Sebastian was around, sometimes it seems that way. I think that many people in the public eye like Robbie is, are careful what they say. More often than not, it gets twisted, and people will believe only what they want to believe regardless.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 19:29:47 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Web: My link

Subject: Goin' Up The Country

Heard this cool take on the Canned Heat classic last night during the credits to the movie "Welcome To The Rileys". This live version is from Jimmy Fallon and the quality isn't top-notch. The song is given kind of a swing/rockabilly/jump blues treatment by the British sibling group of Daisy, Kitty and Lewis. One of the girls showcases some good harp playing. NB


Entered at Sat Feb 12 19:27:47 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR

Never intended to fuel any fire,merely expressing a thought. I have the greatest respect for Robbie's artistry & contribution to music.He is also one of the most interesting guitarists on the planet.And,yes,it would've been nice if The Beatles took a year or two off & came back.One can fantasize!


Entered at Sat Feb 12 18:56:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The short version

What do you want Robbie to say? In a youtube video clip, I think what he said was concise and to the point. For any long drawn out explanations of what happened over a long period of time, would be a book.

If you notice, what some of the people who loved to tear him down over was not present at all. He never said, "I did this or that." He said WE tried to help each other, and we couldn't. He never laid any blame, or cause for any of it. Had he done that in any way, it would only have been inflammatory. Perhaps that's what some people want. Fuel for a fire.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 18:31:03 CET 2011 from (91.42.251.187)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Canned Heat:: Al "Blind Owl" Wilson

"He acquired the nickname "Blind Owl" owing to his extreme nearsightedness; in one instance when he was playing at a wedding, he laid his guitar on the wedding cake because he did not see it"

A shame so much talented people didn't get old those days.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 18:06:10 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Jed: That's a wonderful plan on paper - to take a year off and reform. I wish The Beatles had done that. It doesn't always work though.

I don't think that Robbie is "dredging" anything up. If anything he has done the opposite since the Last Waltz. He has moved ahead with his career. If you listen to his words in that clip, he explains that it's only now that he feels he can visit this subject and express it in music. I think that's great, and I've been waiting for it personally. He's gotten his ass kicked in many discussions and forums, and now he's opening up on the subject a little. Even if you disagree with what he says you have to give him some credit for doing it.

I don't know. As a long time visitor of this GB, and the preceeding GB's, I found the comments by RR in that clip pretty incredible to hear from his own mouth.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 17:45:09 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Reggie Young

This is Waylon & band in Nashville with Reggie Young. Reggie did so much distinctive guitar work (like this) with so many people, he's incredible.

Bayou Sam, that soundtrack for Mr Majestyk is down loadable.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 17:21:26 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Goin' Back

Jawwing on the nostalgia of those old movies, and particularly Easy Rider, got me to singing this song. I'm sure a lot of you guys know what band this guy comes from. He's done a ton of songs.

He also did a great job of a song, that I'm going to put up with Waylon doing it because of the guitar player.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 17:04:47 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR Clip

Thanks for posting that clip. My reaction was to think,hey why not take a year or 2 off & go back to work with The Band? I love Robbie's music,but the reasoning of his argument is a bit lacking & certainly not the whole story.I wish he'd just put out the music & avoid dredging up these things.But,everyone is entitled to opinion & RR is entitled to express his. I realize many here may see it differently & am nonetheless looking forward to the album.Of the songs heard to date,it sounds really nice & might be even better if he hired a better singer!


Entered at Sat Feb 12 16:26:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.217.169)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Mitch Miller is also credited for "The Longest Day", along with Paul Anka, and independly of his credits for River Kwai - official evidence in the link above


Entered at Sat Feb 12 09:48:37 CET 2011 from (41.97.217.169)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: a simple exercise for delaying the alzheimer vacuum dive

NorthWestCoaster : indeed, I agree 100% with Jim Page

Joan : I'm glad you are following my desperate posts, in short your Fringlish looks a little like my Engfrench

it may seem unbelievable for a skilful ear that until yesterday morning the songs from three different movies were construed in my confused head as a same and one tune. True that all these tunes show some similarity, now let's proceed the big wipe

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) Dir. David Lean starring William Holden, Alec Guinness
Music Credits : Whistled by Alec Guinness with British Prisoners of War, Accompanied by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Malcolm Arnold

The Longest Day (1962) Dir. Ken Annakin Andrew Marton Bernhard Wicki starring John Wayne, Robert Ryan and Richard Burton
Music Credits : "The Longest Day" Written by Paul Anka, Sung by a chorus during the end credits

The Great Escape (1963) Dir. John Sturges - Steve McQueen, James Garner Charles Bronson Donald Pleasence James Coburn
Music Credits : Elmer Bernstein

From alternate serious sources
"Colonel Bogey March" was written in 1914 by Lieutenant F. J. Ricketts (1881–1945). Ricketts published "Colonel Bogey" under the pseudonym Kenneth Alford.
"The River Kwai" is a march composed by Malcolm Arnold in 1957. It was written as an orchestral counter-march to the "Colonel Bogey March"
The two marches have been recorded together by Mitch Miller and often mis-credited as "River Kwai March".


Entered at Sat Feb 12 05:41:03 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

I have a question about that "Three of a Kind" CD set.

It says it was done at Levon's request. Did something like this involve getting Robbie's blessing to release? I don't know the legal aspects of it, but if that's the case, then that's cool.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 05:34:00 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

ARI: Thanks for posting that Robbie link. It was great to see him talk about that. I thought Robbie said a LOT in that small clip.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 04:02:13 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hey Ari - Thanks for posting that...

Cant' wait for Robbie's new album.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 03:37:06 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Acceptable

Good for you Carl. I hope you really enjoy it.

This post about Robbie's "This is where I get off". You could check back a ways. I don't know, maybe it was a couple of weeks ago. We were discussing this new work of Robbie's I posted that I was quite convinced that this song was about where and why he left the Band. My observation in that post as well, (I'll bet it comes around soon.) When Sebastion was here a while back, compiling all the questions people had regarding the Band. I'll bet some of the answers will show up in the songs on this new album. The questions were probably food for inspiration of lyric in these songs.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 02:37:36 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: TUGMAN!

Norm. I got accepted to the Blues camp. Finally!


Entered at Sat Feb 12 02:35:32 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Ari

Good one Ari.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 01:51:49 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It's all in the timing........

Back in those days, it was a real transformation. The big movie men thought that Mash was absolutely insane & obscene. A low budget movie, (that came in under budget). With no stars at all. American Graffitti, another example.

To make any comment like, (he just stuck songs in anywhere) or like comments, just confirms a complete immature lack of understanding.

I remember watching, and many times over Coming Home, The Deer Hunter, (which was on just a couple of nights ago), Easy Rider and at the time, back then it took some time and paying attention to really grasp what it was all about.

But the point is, if you weren't around to hear those songs before, and all you relate them to is a movie they were used in, then you don't have a real understanding of it.

I believe it was Bayou Sam mentioning the sound track from Mr Majestic, I still have that movie here on Video. Being a great Charles Bronson fan. I'm going to see about that for you Sammy boy.


Entered at Sat Feb 12 01:19:42 CET 2011 from (208.57.247.136)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Movies and stuff

I'm going to challenge Peter V and claim that Easy Rider is a very good film. It's whole strange history is probably best experienced in the amazing new box set from Chriterion "America Lost and Found: The BBS series. This basically tells the story of how Bert Shinder took his Monkee's money, formed a film company and made enough scratch to finance what still stands as the most compelling portrait of the obscene war in Vietnam, "Hearts and Minds." The company had three huge hits ("Easy Rider" "The Last Picture Show" and "Five Easy Pieces") three interesting misses ( "Drive, He Said, "Head" and (the great) "King Of Marvin Gardens") and launched the career of Henry Jaglom, perhaps the worst filmmaker in American History with the terrible "A Safe Place." Since this is the Band room and the point is music, I will also put in a good word for "Head" which is a hell of lot of fun and features some of the Monkee's best music, including Carole Kings lovely "Porpoise song." Extra's galore all around!! So, what are these original mix things Levon is selling?


Entered at Fri Feb 11 23:37:52 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

This is where I get off


Entered at Fri Feb 11 21:44:26 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Alices Restaurant

By the way, I meant to say, regarding, Alices Restaurant. I'm sure some of you have seen that very funny movie "Wild Hogs" which has Alices, started by, and with a cameo from Peter Fonda. I thought it was pretty cool the way they worked that in there. The phycology of those guys ironing out there head problems in their lives out there on the road together, is not unusual. Some good comedy.

I give it a big "THUMBS UP" ...........Seeing as I'm a movie critic.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 21:29:52 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: You hadf to be there

The boat show was a gawd damn waste of time.

Ari! Get to your gawd damn room......you're grounded. First of all you better do some more reading. It wasn't me who said.....Why did he use the song? maybe because he liked it. Reread. However you're opinions out of a 19 year old head are......your opinions. What you think about how songs were used or are used no doubt will change a great deal in years. Too many times to count many people here have said how they revised their thinking as time has passed. Just over these movies discussed here some one,(I forget who) mentioned how the movie from the time that they were young to now being the age of those actors portrayed at the time, and how he changed his thinking.

Lots of people, who don't appreciate the open road, and don't live the life of a biker will never understand that. So sound off all you like. It is not an insult or a put down, to say that a 19 year olds opinion just doesn't carry the same "Weight" on how you feel about that song. As you get older, you'll get to understand.....or....we've all lived all these years for nothing. Now I'm upset......what a waste.

An example of the difference in how you see things, is weekend, or summertime boaters. Many of them have big, beautiful boats with every concievable convienence. Huge built in sound systems, washer & dryer, built in vaccumm systems. A ton of navigation equipment they don't even know how to use. They get a few miles away from home, get into a marina and spend most their time tyed to a wharf trading bragging wrights with all the other wouldbe sailors. There are a few of us tho' that get as far away from that as possible. Exploring inlets, beach combing, fishing prawns & crabs, shooting skeet in some deserted inlet where you bother no one. Enjoying the outdoors, and the boats the way they are meant to be. We don't head in 'till we're outta grub, (food), fuel, clean clothes and every other supply. When we get 'em we get the hell outta town for more fun......but......that's not for every body.

Some of 'em got to be on the links, or what ever other passion one might have. I used to race dirt bikes, motocross & flat track, but the open road never did it much for me. Too easy to get runned over by crazy drivers. I can still see how that open road, and the throttle in yer hand can feel great tho. Cruising in the big boat excited to see what's around the next point of land is great.

Hell who knows kid.......with your experience......you might be a movie producer!


Entered at Fri Feb 11 20:07:38 CET 2011 from (90.239.85.127)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: TV (Empty Now) and Seattle musician/activist Jim Page

Some simple phrases in some simple concerts keep haunting in my head. Like this from 1981 - Jim Page in Stockholm Mosebacke Establishement:

"I like hamburgers, TV is another story" (From Hiroshima-Nagasaki Russian Roulette by Jim Page)


Entered at Fri Feb 11 19:33:16 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Empty, I liked the Movie titles. They are like the way that my husband says I speak French. He calls it Fringlish. I have enough vocabulary, but I translate literally.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 19:11:48 CET 2011 from (90.239.136.226)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Easy Rider

I passed the test thanks to Easy Rider!

I took an elementary course in "Art, Drama and Music" at the University mainly because the girls were said to be S-O C-O-O-L. At the test my Professor wanted me to reflect over this problem: "The aesthetic Highway in motion pictures and what is the function of the music in those movies". Too good to be true. But it was.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 18:41:50 CET 2011 from (41.97.168.124)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: precision

inside one mis-reference in my previous post "Demain la grande évasion…" I unconsciously melted 3 parts from 3 Frenchized themes of 3 different movies "The Great Escape" "Bridge On the River Kwai" and "The Longest Day" [linked wonderful version by Dalida] have so much in common. Thanks to the internet a man can retrieve a living sensation of the cinema [and the soul] of his childhood.

Suddenly I have the sensation as if I am the only person in the world stay chatting on the internet, everybody is planted in front of the TV screens right now, what's the matter ? and f*** the TV screens, if there will remain only one line connected to the internet it will be me


Entered at Fri Feb 11 15:39:31 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: More of the Movees

Another Rafelson et al movie was "Head" featuring, and funded by, the Monkees. I saw it on a big screen many years ago and liked it, but all I recall of it now are some psychedelic swimming scenes and Frank Zappa in overalls with a burro.

I don't remember much of "Easy Rider" either, which I saw in the school gym in the '69/'70 school year. I don't recall anything at all about which songs where used where and how. In fact all I really remember is the ending. I'm sure someone must've said "Bummer!" out loud.

sadavid: I can't help but suspect that that jazz version of "The In Crowd" was the propulsive version by the Ramsey Lewis Trio. (Must've been Scottish eh Dunc?)

I thought "Born To Be Wild" was put to good use in "Repo Man", though it was a Tijuana Brassish version.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 13:01:27 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Thinking of you Rollie buddy.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 11:14:06 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: any mandolin players?

Check out the list of artists covered in this tabulature book...


Entered at Fri Feb 11 11:03:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks PSB. It was the cover I’d always seen, but it is the British pressing. It’s on Vanguard, but in the period when Vanguard was pressed and distributed by Pye. The muted colours are very attractive. I assume they thought that The Weavers themselves lacked the eye-candy factor on the original. It has VANGUARD QUALITY CONTROL in about five places, so they were probably fussy about checking sound. I’d guessed it was an early 19th century map, because it only goes as far as the Mississippi, but then I couldn’t understand why the New England states weren’t labelled, and nor was New Jersey. Now I suspect it is not a nice retro image, as I’d thought, but an inept British artist and "Washington" for West Virginia is plain ignorance. Vanguard Quality control” didn’t extend to the sleeve. It doesn’t make the Record Collector price guide, which just means it’s worth “less than £12”.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 10:15:06 CET 2011 from (41.97.168.124)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: "C'est nous les africains"

immortal anthem of the Corps Expeditionaire Francais during WWII, composed by Felix Boyer in 1942
Car nous voulons porter haut et fier Le beau drapeau de notre France entière Et si quelqu'un venait à y toucher Nous serions là pour mourir à ses pieds


Entered at Fri Feb 11 10:12:01 CET 2011 from (41.97.168.124)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: movie songs - at last

Listening right now to Joan's "Here's to you Nicolas and Bart Rest forever here in my heart This last and final moment is yours Your agony is your triumph" …Moriconne uses a Hammond organ, actually the big chill
-------------------

By the late 50's and most of the 60's, the American movies where I was nourished were all dubbed in French, thanks to some Studios as the famous Societe Parisienne de Sonorisation, and the folklore of the time when a French cinephile say "you have the same voice as Burt Mancaster" whereas all what he ever heard is the dude who dubbed Burt Lancaster.
The problem was also that those archaic dubbing techniques as soon as they substitute the original voices, everything is lost with. They had to redo the whole sound of the movie. Hence, most of the anthological movie songs were first discovered in French version, the irony is that the French performer was never made famous at the level of the original. There was
"Fais ta priere Tom Dooley ca peut toujours servir, fais ta priere Tom Dooley demain tu vas mourir"
"Si toi aussi tu m'abandonnes… [high noon; see the link above] some will find it simply awful
"Trois heures dix pour Youma
"Demain la grande évasion ce sera le jours le plus long"
etc.. the trends were to translate the literal meaning first
The weirdest dubbed thing worth GB-posting I have in mind is from a 60's Soviet movie, I don't remember the title, where the story relates a 19th century Bolshevik revolution, everything was dubbed in French from the troika wheels to the vodka clicks, a long movie explosive of actions when the final scene shows the Bolsheviks now organized in modern army entering in triumph the Czar Palace and chanting loudly all in choir "C'est nous les africains"


Entered at Fri Feb 11 10:00:59 CET 2011 from (91.42.226.67)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: To the park

-Man: It was the end of April, just such a day the weather was perfect .... and then Grandma said: “ I want to go to the park”. I said: "you’re crazy that’s way to far, we have to go to the Europestreet , cross the road and then it’s still far to the entrance of the park by the mill". But Grandma said: “ I feel that I can do it, I want to do it, and I’ll do it”.

-Woman: I was proud that I could do it, but the hills were difficult for me to push.

-Man: But when it’s very steep I can help to brake, I can help to brake with one hand. In some bushes we got stuck once, but there was a man that helped us out.

-Woman: And then we got up that hill.

-Man: And then Grandma took me back to the apartment.

-Woman: Yes

-Man: It all went well.

(to hear it check the link, click the first one "Naar het park" in Dutch, it's a trip around the world for them)



Entered at Fri Feb 11 08:14:07 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: you know by now

Subject: Elton/Leon

In the last few years Leon has used a laptop for lyrics. He had a crisis a couple of years ago (I'm thinking aneurysm) that he overcame nicely. His live shows are still exciting, great band, great repertoire. To hear him belt out, "She uses beauty like a knife, she cuts them even more, she changes right before your eyes into something ugly and sore"... is priceless. It takes me right back to seeing him in Tulsa in the early '70's, resplendently. Long live brother Leon!


Entered at Fri Feb 11 06:15:44 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: The Weavers At Carnegie Hall

Peter, I have no idea where that cover to The Weavers At Carnegie Hall came from. What label is your album on? Check the link for the real cover to The Weavers At Carnegie Hall the way it's been for a couple of months short of 54 years. The cover you have is no way the original cover and no The Weavers were not making any statement.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 06:01:26 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Kevi J: Thanks for that link. Elton John gets better with age. Where did that gruf blues voice come from? Fantastic.

What's the deal with Leon? Is he well. He looked a bit detached from things - and he seemed to be reading music off of a laptop. Elton kicked ass though.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 05:29:27 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Kevin, thanks for the RS / Dylan interview details. I've got the RS DVD set which covers the years 1967 - 2007, so I'll check it out in more detail.

Peter, thanks for the link to 'The Darjeeling Limited'. Somehow that movie slipped under my radar. I'll have to check it out soon.



Entered at Fri Feb 11 01:33:09 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, BC
Web: My link

Subject: Tonight's Neil Young Tribute Concert (Carnegie Hall)

Larry Campbell leads the house band. Guests include Jakob Dylan, Joan Osborne, Cowboy Junkies, Bettye LaVette, (plus NO Justin Bieber!) Scroll down the poster in link for the full line-up. NB.


Entered at Fri Feb 11 00:22:23 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Elton John and Leon Russel from last night.....the best music spot on Letterman in a long while....


Entered at Fri Feb 11 00:19:46 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Weavers at Carnegie Hall

It'd have to be pretty sloppy. Philadelphia and New York are marked as cities, but in different typefaces. I'd wondered about DC but the way WASHINGTON is written is like state names and a fair way from the city. As it's a graphic, I'm convinced there's a reason.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 22:37:23 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Surprised no one has mentioned “Be My Baby” and “Jumping Jack Flash” – two songs that Scorsese used prominently in his breakthrough film – the great “Mean Streets”


Entered at Thu Feb 10 22:10:42 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Until the wee small hours long before the break of dawn...

sadavid: Another highly evocative soundtrack choice was Mr. Scorsese's use of "T.B. Sheets" in the often overlooked film "Bringing Out The Dead". The haunting song certainly fits the mood of the lead character, Nicholas Cage, an emotionally troubled ambulance driver cruising the gritty streets of New York's Hells Kitchen, answering calls on the graveyard shift.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 22:04:04 CET 2011 from (90.206.50.144)

Posted by:

Specto

Location: Escocia

Subject: Big Chill

Just read the stuff about the Big Chill...Luv this movie..always have..great cast and soundtrack...have tried to get the film version of 'You cant always get what you want" by the Stones..the version on "let it Bleed " is version 2 and different from the Big Chill


Entered at Thu Feb 10 21:38:18 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: WVa

If you look at the attached nap you can see that a sloppy person could make that mistake and pu DC into WVa.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 21:33:07 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Speaking of songs in movies, I think that I was one of the few people that saw the movie "Hoax" with Richard Gere that was about Clifford Irving writing the Howard Hughes bio that was a sham. It was, simply fabulous to hear the song "Only You Know And I Know" by Dave Mason as part of the soundtrack. That song has to have my favourite, rocking, acoustic guitar intro ever.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 21:32:38 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Weavers

I have no idea why the would call West Virginia. I've never seen it referred to that way. At one time, It was part of Virginia, but split off as a separate entity. Perhaps the mapmaker just made a mistake and moved the Capital too far west. They are on about the same latitude.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 21:23:36 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Weight was very well known in the FM scene before Easy Rider came out, as were the Steppenwolf and Hendrix songs, with Steppenwolf getting some AM play. Since I distinctly recall seeing the movie (beautiful warm evening, the Esquire Theater in Chicago) and I already loved MFBP, I really liked that the song was in there. I also thought the tone of the song matched the scenes although I already knew the Band was holed up in the Catskills and would have preferred some green on the mountains.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 19:06:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

I mentioned The Weavers at Carnegie Hall recently. The sleeve of my US copy features a retro looking map of East Coast states, which doesn't stretch into New England. I'm curious as to why West Virginia is called "Washington" on the map. I know it was admitted during the Civil War, and I know the name Kanawha was originally suggested, and that there are towns called Kanawha and Washington in the state. But I never heard of it being called "Washington." Were the Weavers making a point? Did one come from the town? Just curious (and sure one of you will know).


Entered at Thu Feb 10 18:44:20 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: la musica di Marty

Ari: I don't wanna pile on, and Marty doesn't need my help, but if I understood you, you were claiming that Scorsese tends to just throw his favourite songs on soundtracks arbitrarily. I think he chooses and uses the music very carefully.

Take _Casino_. The obvious example is the scene where De Niro's character is introduced to Sharon Stone's character; we get a slo-mo shot of her from his point of view, and "Love is Strange" (what a wild guitar tone!) on the soundtrack.

Or take a look at [My link]. De Niro's voice-over is about how the casino management manages the high rollers: "the golden rule is to keep them playing. The more they play, the more they lose." So we see the marks being schmoozed -- with everything from hotel towels to hookers. The soundtrack is some nice jazzy piece; in fact it's a instrumental version of "The In Crowd."

When we see the Asian mark welcomed back to the casino, the music segues to Dobie Gray's hit vocal version -- the point gets a little more pointed.

And Dobie's line "spendin' cash, talkin' trash" emerges in a pause in the voice-over. This clip ends with a nice bit of choreography set to Les McCann / Eddie Harris "Compared to What."


Entered at Thu Feb 10 18:10:38 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: soundtrack

A soundtrack I've wanted to get for years is from the 1974 Charles Bronson movie, "Mr Majestyk". It was released in a limited number a few years back. It's on Amazon for a lot of money. I'd be thrilled to find a nice vinyl copy if one exists.

If anyone here can point me in a direction where I might look I would be very thankful. wipeout1960 AT yahoo dotcom


Entered at Thu Feb 10 17:37:57 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd: The interview was in the Nov/Dec 1987 edition of Rolling Stone magazine…….Thanks for that clip with the Kinks song – loved it………………Interesting thing about the Kinks…..very similar to the Band for me in that I never fail to get a real thrill when in some unlikely place I will hear a Kinks song……….and no not some kid flailing away badly on “You Really Got Me” in a guitar shop….but hearing something other than one of their 4 or 5 signature songs….always a pleasant surprise……..Like when they used Dave’s “Living on a Thin Line” in an episode of The Soprano’s………..

Ari: How tall is Richard?


Entered at Thu Feb 10 16:26:24 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: already?

I just heard that Mr. Dylan is to perform at the upcoming Grammy Awards . . . I might even try to tune into this one, which seems to have potential for true bizarrety.

Bob "will collaborate with Best New Artist nominees Mumford & Sons along with folk rockers the Avett Brothers in what's been described as a 'salute to acoustic music.'" . . . Kris will intro a performance by Barbra (ain't that cute?) . . . Mick will work with one Raphael Saadiq in a Solomon Burke tribute . . . a Gwyneth Paltrow and Cee-Lo duet??? . . . I'm curious to see what Janelle Monae will do, she seems to me a considerable talent in search of a direction. And both Jewel and Norah are presenting . . . and Esperanza Spalding is a trip . . . .


Entered at Thu Feb 10 15:53:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: They went looking for America...

The contemporary soundtrack selections are not the only music connections with "Easy Rider". The low budget film was financed by executive producer Bert Schneider's company. Mr. Schneider, along with his partner Bob Rafelson, created the Monkees television, film & recording projects, and subsequently earned a great deal of money which they used to fund other projects. Mr. Rafelson went on to produce Jack Nicholson in "Five Easy Pieces".

Another connection (pun intended) was the eccentric producer Phil Spector, who played the bizarre character at the beginning of the movie who purchased the coke, which in turn funded the journey of Wyatt & Billy. And finally, many have contended that those two contrasting characters were based on Roger McGuinn & David Crosby.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 15:35:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: And more …

On Wes Anderson, The Darjeeling Limited is also good for the Kinks fans here (trailer attached). Joe Dassin (in French) is very effective too, but that's the bounce of the music.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 14:52:59 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: More Wes

Here’s a clip from the Wes Anderson movie Rushmore. In the scene Bill Murray's character is at his kids' birthday party. The woman across the pool from him is his wife who left him for a younger guy. The backing music is The Kinks song, ‘Nothin' in the World Can Stop Me From Worryin' 'Bout That Girl’. I thought that Kevin J. might like the use of the tune.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 13:47:12 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: We hear it down under that it was indeed teh finest Dylan Cover Band...

the Manfreds... a fantastic band at their best...


Entered at Thu Feb 10 13:35:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sonny Boy

Looking at the next Record Collector, the Sonny Boy correspondence grows. Paul Jones tells the story of Manfred Mann being engaged to back him on "Ready Steady go". They had to give up because he was too difficult to get on with. "The final straw came when they had a disagreement on how many bars there are in a 12 bar blues."

Paul Jones wrote a song called "Sonny Boy Williamson". It's a B-side. Will have to listen to the lyrics.

So Sonny Boy could have been talking about The Moody Blues, The Animals, The Yardbirds OR Manfred Mann, a list including two bands credited with inspiring Dylan to abandon solo guitar!


Entered at Thu Feb 10 10:44:10 CET 2011 from (41.97.168.124)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: On a Concert of Joan Baez in Algiers, Harcha Hall

and Personality of Joan Baez
In 1974, I was not in Algiers, all what I report here is from a B/W record of a TV live, I was not there at the time, so all I can say is clear and lucid assertions.
The songlist included The Boxer, Gracias A La Vida, Diamonds and Rust, Here's To You, Blowin' In The Wind….
right after "Gracias A La Vida", the all leftist Algiers crowds of the time, sincerely or questionably, but entirely acquired for the after-1973 popular Chilean cause started an overexcited and seemingly unending "El Pueblo Unido, Jamas sera Vincido " – (The people united, will never be defeated) the Chilean motto chant of the time.
As the crowd voice dominated the sono, Joan Baez gently let them exhaltate all the political fury, and then gently approached the microphone, and with a smile "C'est certain que el pueblo jamas sera vincido, mais [showing her head with the finger] grace a la tete pas grace aux armes" (Certainly the people cannot be defeated but [thanks to] the brain not to the weapons"
thunder of applauses and she went into next song, voila for the record, worth GB posting

Gracias a la vida que me ha dado tanto
Me dio el corazón que agita su marco
Cuando miro el fruto del cerebro humano,
Cuando miro al bueno tan lejos del malo,

Thanks to life which has given me so
It gave me the heart beating its walls
When I see the fruit of the human brain
When I see the good so distant from the bad

Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval (1917 - 1967) , aka Violeta Parra, Chilean singer songwriter


Entered at Thu Feb 10 10:03:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Two wheels bad, four wheels good

Reflecting on the bikes in Easy Rider … it’s difficult to judge, because my views are coloured on two-wheeled transport. In the Mod era I owned an asthmatic Vespa 150 cc scooter, and a parka jacket. My friend owned a 175 cc Lambretta and we did several long (in British terms) trips. When I say long, in those days coaxing a scooter the 100 miles to London on pre-Motorway roads was a 4 to 5 hour haul. There’s no music, no conversation. You just try and keep it upright and try to stop the slipstream of passing traffic pulling you off the road. Scooters were fine for Quadrophenia – in town centres. But then only if it’s not raining. My pal’s extra 25cc meant that I lagged behind on every hill, and even on shallow inclines. And travelling in convoy is generally a pain. Vespas notoriously had the engine on one side of the seat and a (useless) empty compartment on the other, so once speed dropped too low, they inexorably started to follow the engine and fall sideways. The Rockers definitely had superior transport to the Mods.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 09:16:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, I liked Ari's point about it being a long and boring trip without entertainment. A motor cycle ride on empty roads through epic scenery would be fabulous for an hour or two, but after several days of it, I can only think back-ache, very sore arse, windburn. How much more pleasant it would be in an open-top car, even with only AM radio.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 09:08:31 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Easy Rider

Interesting points, Ari. It’s probably five years since I saw Easy Rider, but I have a copy and probably saw it half a dozen times. I once wrote an (unpublished) story which starts with people coming into the cinema lobby shell-shocked after seeing the film in 1969 too, and at that point watched the end many times. So I’m fascinated by your points. I can even remember when and where I first saw it.

A song in a film doesn’t need lyric relevance. In movies about the past like Forrest Gump, they serve to set the situation. I can’t see what’s wrong with that. It gives mood and ambience. I’m a nerd who picks out when a director has songs from a year or two late for the story, which often happens. The Wanderers is an excellent example of a music heavy film where the lyrics both set the period and comment on the action. It starts perfectly with the Wanderers swaggering along the street to The Four Seasons “Walk Like A Man.” (which already breaks the “1962” publicity by a few months).

As Todd points out, Born to Be Wild and The Pusher do have lyric relevance to the Easy Rider plot. Don’t Bogart Me also does. Wasn’t Born To Follow is seamlessly welded in too, but that’s sound also. If Six Was Nine too. The Weight has that “taking the load” and the meeting odd characters thing. On reflection it does work with lyrics as well as just fitting the ride.

Much as I dislike the “I was there at the time so know better” argument (partly because autobiographies are always laden with factual error) you have to use it here, which is why Norm did. The reason the song wasn’t cemented to the movie forever, does require history. Easy Rider came out in the USA in July 1969. In the UK release in those days was usually three months later – I saw it early October. The Weight was a full year old in the UK. There had been chart versions by Aretha Franklin, The Supremes + The Temptations and Jackie de Shannon. Spooky Tooth’s cover was very hip. I’d already spent a year playing it on the college juke box every morning while I read the papers. So at that point it was a very well-known recent song, already one that many live bands tried to cover. If you look at the tracklists for Vanishing Point, and Two Lane Blacktop and Strawberry Statement, they were also recent contemporary songs.

You may be right that it IS cemented to it for later generations (which might be anyone born after about 1955, so missed it first time around!), but is Easy Rider much more than a cult movie nowadays? It was very big at the time. It’s one film buffs would watch now, but it’s not one at the front of the DVD racks, or frequently broadcast or revived. Last time I saw it, I was surprised by how sloppy it seems now, but they were stoned and drunk when they filmed it.

For years, different editions of the MCA released soundtrack list “Ballard (sic) of Easy Rider.”


Entered at Thu Feb 10 06:20:37 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Music & Movies

Thanks Kevin for the follow-up to the Dylan / Kurt Loder interview the other day. I guess you never know which Bob you’re going to get! Was that in Rolling Stone magazine, or somewhere else?

I’ve only seen Easy Rider once, and it was about 25 years ago, so I can’t go into too much detail, but the songs (and group) that seem forever linked and locked to the movie are ‘Born to be Wild’ and ‘The Pusher’ by Steppenwolf. My exposure to the song ‘The Weight’ came years before I viewed Easy Rider, so I don’t have the problem of the song being only linked to the movie in my mind. I don’t know what kind of associations I might have drawn if my first impression of ‘The Weight’ was while viewing the movie, but I was only about 3 years old in 1969, so I wasn’t exposed to either at that time.

Whether it’s an appropriate usage or not is subjective, but it does seem that the film ‘Easy Rider’ and the song ‘The Weight’ have at least the common link of the Buñuel influence and the impossibility of Sainthood. While it’s true that the main characters in Easy Rider would not be confused with Saints, I get the feeling that the Peter Fonda character is on some sort of quest to find his way…whether it’s freedom or some alternate version of the American Dream, there’s the overriding feeling that he’s searching for something, and a lot of things are happening to him along the way, and the people that he’s meeting are influencing his experience, which is similar to the character in ‘The Weight’. Both pieces are full of religious metaphors and influence too.

In those respects, I think that ‘The Weight’ was appropriate to use in the film. That doesn’t necessarily mean that the film is appropriate to the song, and I think that’s what Ari has an issue with. But the song is portable, and I don’t see it as being shackled to the movie. And I think there’s more to Easy Rider than it simply being a “road movie”. That’s literally what it is, but it’s really more of a journey and a quest….and that’s where I think it parallels ‘The Weight’.

Speaking of films and music, I’ve always liked the way Wes Anderson uses music in his movies to accompany his cinematic style. He doesn’t necessarily use the music as a narrative device, but more to augment the visual. Check out the attached link from ‘The Royal Tennenbaums’. It’s a scene from the movie where Margot is getting off of the bus to meet Richie. The song used is Nico’s ‘These Days’. The music begins at about the 40-second mark and then the film switches to slow motion. At 1:09, there’s a shot of Richie sitting on the bench with luggage around him and as the camera slowly pushes in, five men in white sailor suits walk behind him in the background while the music continues. It’s really a simple visual device, but together with the music is quite beautiful and is the kind of thing that Wes Anderson does in his films as a treat for the viewer (and probably himself).



Entered at Thu Feb 10 05:12:08 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ari: I disagree with most of your assertions but will still offer you a friendly tip - cut back on the use of "He should have done this" / "He should have done that" thinking. /


Entered at Thu Feb 10 04:36:23 CET 2011 from (72.68.155.243)

Posted by:

David Schiller

Location: Virginia

Subject: Ari

You make a good point man.


Entered at Thu Feb 10 02:54:25 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Exceptions are the obvious ones:

Jockey Full of Bourbon - Down By Law The Man In Me - The Big Lebowski Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid Mrs. Robinson - The Graduate

Now if you wanna talk about a time capsule film, try Five Easy Pieces, Raefelson uses maybe one Tammy Wynette song.

The most abominable aberration: The Hands That Built America by U2 for Gangs of New York. What the hell was that about?


Entered at Thu Feb 10 02:47:57 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Don't belittle me westcoaster.

"Can someone explain to my why Dennis Hopper chose The Weight for one of his motorcycle montages in Easy Rider?" May I suggest this?: He liked the song.

Bayou Sam, I guess we're lucky Fonda didn't like Alice's Restaurant. Then again, you wouldn't mind, it sounds nice over the film, nevermind the fact the songwriter is telling his own tale. I wish I could pull an Alvy Singer and have Aaron Copland on standby. Yes the song is beautiful, but to paste it over a sequence is to objectify it. The Weight, as a result of the sequence, is now, and forever will be, a driving song. Just a reminder, driving music is about as worthless as muzak in elevators, bathroom reading, and Sweet Home Alabama. When an individual listens to a song they paint a vivid picture in their head, and unfortunately, the Weight, for certain individuals, will be inextricably linked with a stereotype. The film damn near demythologizes the song.

Peter makes a great point in saying that if they had ipods The Weight would be playing. Peter Bogdanovich did just that in Last Picture Show, instead of plopping Hank Williams over his fine film, he simply puts it onto the radio, easy enough, and it becomes part of the scenery. That is what it means to capture a time period, and in addition, the characters are aware of it and thus it affects them too. It's a shame Billy and Wyatt missed out on all those groovy tunes being played over them, that must have been a long a boring trip.

Yes, there are exceptions, doowop for example usually works as it can't help but lend itself to some sort of irony. These lyrics are interchangeable, and the sound is what is universal. The words blend in and create a mosaic.

I may be 19 years old, westcoaster, but there are things about YOUR generation that you simply would not be able to recognize by virtue of the fact that YOU were there. Now I know you're basing your understanding on vibes, but you simply would not be able to recognize the fact that The Weight's inclusion in Easy Riders soundtrack has irrevocably altered the songs image into something of a political statement. The same thing happened when Last Waltz came out, Robbie was inarguably seen as the leader of the Band. Of course, for the ones in the know, this does not affect, but for everyone else, once something is said, it's hard to forget about. For many viewers, Easy Rider was their first exposure to the Band and The Weight and like Todd said a few posts ago "First impressions are often the lasting ones." As a result The Weight is now easily identifiable not as a great American portrait of myth and culture, but a rebellion.

If you're a filmmaker and using a song with lyrics to represent a time, you aren't making a very convincing argument. It's like saying "Don't understand my film? Let me sing it out for you." .

It's unnecessary to use lyrics to spell out what you should be saying without using another storyteller of a completely different medium help to clarify. Ironically, Robbie says that most of the cinematic imagery in The Weight comes from Bunuels films. But he took it somewhere, he retell the story of the film in his song, no, that was The Moon Struck One, and I know how you all feel about that one.

When Forestt is running, and Jackson Brown starts singing "Runnin on Empty", (emotionally). Bob Seger, "Runnin against the wind". I think it's all a pretty good fit. Westcoaster, making a film and choosing it's score is not like trying on clothing. How brilliant it is for Bob Seger to sing "Runnin against the wind" just as Forrest is running. I suppose you think Lola should have been played throughout The Crying Game.

"There's no hope in trying to get the kid to understand what it was like, or what we did 40 years ago. He wants to be like Syskel & Ebert. Film critics are just about the biggest pain in the ass around."

If you're gonna reduce me to a cultural product, please put me in the right time slot with a dead critic, I was eight in 1999. Also, isn't everybody in here a music critic including yourself?


Entered at Thu Feb 10 01:09:58 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Beatles...itunes

I just received my remastered 'Revolver' CD, to complement my aged vinyl.

I can't seem to be able to back it up on itunes. Anybody ever have that problem before?


Entered at Wed Feb 9 22:51:18 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rev J-Hovah.....I can't help myself

Geehovah!.........I tried to stop and shutup, but I been snickering ever since.....I don't even like snickers.

David! Are you sure it wasn't the right Reverend Billy Sol Hargus.........awright, awright....I'm leavin now.

Been waiting on Susan to get her s##t together so I can get the ferry. I wonder how much of a man's life he wastes waiting on gawd damn wimmin!


Entered at Wed Feb 9 22:18:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Another Vanishing Point

Before he vanished from this site, leaving unanswered questions, I seem to recall that Sebastian Robertson mentioned that The Band live at Albert Hall 1971 was in the works at Capitol.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 22:11:24 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Vanishing

Any way, as that little Challenger barrels down the road toward those two cats, it always reminds me of that silly little joke...........What's the last thing that goes thru' a bugs mind when he hits your windshield????????? His ass!


Entered at Wed Feb 9 22:07:29 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: songwriters hall of fame

_The Globe and Mail_ story about the HoF nominees, w/ embedded CP video. Some glowing-if-predictable comments from the HoF president Sylvia Tyson.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 21:59:26 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Bigger Chill

With so many "needledropped" song selections "The Big Chill" initially spawned two soundtrack albums. "The Weight" was included on the second, "More Songs From The Big Chill", as well as on the later expanded CD deluxe version.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 21:31:37 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Reliable - Accountable

David; I knew I could count on you. I watched that movie not long ago, it came on some channel, I forget which. It always blows my mind, living quite a different life than most here, always working with heavy equipment. I always get quite a chuckle how that (kinda dumb) movie ends. They put two D 8 cat bulldozesr out in the freeway. It seems he just says, "Fuck it!" and smokes right into 'em......now I lay me down to sleep.

I guess my way of handling a lot of this David, is kinda like when you sing part of a line to a song, or say part of a sentence, and wait for some one else to finish it.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 21:20:39 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Anachronisms that work …

Born To Be Wild for Ben Hur … that would work. Just as Queen's "We Will Rock You" was great for the medieval tournament in "A Knight's Tale".


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:59:47 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vanishing Points

Norm: I would also point out that Delaney & Bonnie actually had a cameo role in "Vanishing Point", appearing as gospel singers at the Rev. J. Hovah's revival meeting. Appearing with them were their young daughters Bekka & Suzanne, along with their band members Rita Coolidge and Sam Clayton (later with Little Feat), as well as David Gates (of Bread) on piano, using a truck bed as a stage.

I seem to recall that "The Weight" was used as a chapter title on the DVD version of "The Big Chill".


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:55:51 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: act like there's music . . .

Joan: thanks for that clip . . . you gotta love how they sync it so Mick's singing the bit about "the Chelsea drugstore" just as the necktie lady hits on the reefer . . . .

This "making of" clip has some interesting comments from the principals about how the tunes were worked during filming.

BTW, Elton & Leon guest on Letterman's _Late Show_ tonight.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:52:31 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Interesting thing about The Big Chill……..when I first saw it I was much younger than the characters in the film…….I liked it very much…….I loved the music….Yuppies had yet to be officially invented even though they were being portrayed in some way on screen ( and unbeknownst to me already well on their way to destroying civilization as we know it )……I went back and rented it a few years ago when I would have been a similar age of the characters and didn’t think the film held up at all……….apart from the great opening funeral scene……………….A bit like seeing “Ben Hur” as a kid and thinking it was the greatest…..seeing it again as an adult and realizing it was really not a very good film……. “Born to be Wild” would have been perfect for the chariot race scene though…..


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:47:10 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: R&R HOF inductees

Hi all!!. Miss you guys. Thought I'd drop by to say "Hi".

Very busy of late, but like to let you all know I'm still among the living.

New inductees to R&R HOF:

The annual induction ceremony will take place March 14th at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City. It will be broadcast on Fuse.

Neil Diamond, Tom Waits and Alice Cooper Inducted Into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. [It's about time].

Also on hand that evening will be Rob Zombie to induct his hero Alice Cooper, John Legend to induct his fellow piano player Dr. John and Bette Midler to induct her singing idol Darlene Love. Elektra Records founder Jac Holzman will be inducted by Doors drummer John Densmore, while Speciality Records founder Art Rupe will be inducted by Lloyd Price, who was discovered by Rupe in 1952.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:40:20 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

Joan, the organ on the Stones' You Can't Always Get What You Want was played by Al Kooper who played on Dylan's first three electric shows, the last two with Robbie and Levon. He also reviewed MFBP for Rolling Stone. Connections everywhere. btw, that was JoBeth Williams who played church organ in The Big Chill, a movie I hated at the release but have come to somewhat enjoy.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 20:17:56 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Band connections

Joan; More connections than you noticed. In mentioning the soundtrack to the movie Vanishing Point, (I try to leave holes a lot of the time for others comments). One song in that sound track, was Delaney & Bonnie, "You got to Believe".

I had hoped David or Bill or some one would have filled that in as Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, Gregg Allman and many others played with them. Who the musicians were on that song I'm not sure.

I'm gonna split for Vancouver to the boat show for a couple of days before I have to go to sea.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:49:41 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Kevin Costner

BONK- Kevin Costner played "Alex," the guy who committed suicide. I thought I read something about him having a part in the movie via flashbacks, but those parts got cut out. So I guess all he did was act the part of a corpse being dressed at the undertaker's. They never showed his face.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:40:56 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Norm. I still got that 50.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:39:36 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Big Chill

Kevin Costners very first movie roll was in this film. Any one know which character?


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:28:50 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Band connection

Norm, you finally got the conversation around to a Band connection. Cathy Smith lived with Hoyt Axton and co wrote a song with him. She sure got around.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:25:05 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: The Big Chill

I was a bit off in my memory, it should have been "she played" A great scene.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:21:46 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I'm a lucky man!

Peter; I had that sound track double set given to me.

Sadavid; Don't you love the little guys hand movements as he's singin' Joy to the world.

I meant to mention that song Alabama did, the story I heard, a guy named Carl Graham wrote it and sold it to the record company for $50.

A long way back, I told about playing music with Hoyt Axton one night. The "Wrap Party", for the movie "We're no Angels" he was in with Robert Deniro & Sean Penn. When Hoyt came lurching up on the stage, particularly loaded, we first played Della & The Dealer.

After when we took a break, we were sitting out on this big deck in the moon light playing acoustic guitars and singing his songs. There were a lot of people sitting around and we were trying to get him to tell the stories about writing some of those songs like, joy to the world, never been to spain & della & the dealer. It was kind of a bummer, 'cause he was just too loaded and not in the mood to talk about it. So we just played a lot of them.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:20:04 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Big Chill

One of my favorite parts is the funeral scene where they play his favorite song on the organ. The guy steps up and pounds out "You Can't Always Get What You Want", It was perfectly incongrous in the setting.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 19:11:32 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Who'll Stop The Rain

I don't know which came first, the movie or the song. I remember this as a powerful movie and the song fit perfectly. A very young Nick Nolte.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 18:57:42 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: lest we forget

1983's _The Big Chill_

The soundtrack, I think, is basically the soundtrack of the characters' lives -- mostly Motown, but also "Whiter Shade of Pale," and pale-person R&B (Rascals, Spencer Davis). Plus "The Weight." (!)

I'd have to re-view to see if the tunes are used thematically, but "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" is, for sure - the opening sequence is terrific.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 18:41:27 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Youtube has some other clips from this one.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 18:38:38 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Forrest Gump

A double CD, no less. And laden with gems. That's one I bought … Easy Rider was another (Shame about Smith).

The OST has a double twist, in that they evoke years by using songs that were famous because of movies in those years … Mrs Robinson, Everybody's Talkin' and Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 18:23:32 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Soundtracks - Jukebox in my mind

That's good Kevin. A soundtrack that to my mind took a lot of work to make it fit as well as it did,(and I think it's great), was Forestt Gump. So if you had some body, say like young Ari. I believe not long ago he said he was early 20's? Anyway if some one that young took on the task of researching and creating a sound track like that. It would be impossible for them to feel. To understand the significance of some one like John Fogerty's contribution to those times, "you had to be there".

Five year plans and new deals, wrapped in golden chains,

And I wonder, still I wonder, who'll stop the rain.

When Forestt is running, and Jackson Brown starts singing "Runnin on Empty", (emotionally). Bob Seger, "Runnin against the wind".

When his girl friend drives up with some other guy, and they're playing "I don't know why I love you but I do"

I think it's all a pretty good fit.

It seems no one here likes Alabama at all, but I like some of their lyrics, like this song.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 18:21:06 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Strawberry Statement was pretty bad, another Hollywood take on campus unrest. Thunderclap Newman's Something In The Air worked really well but the movie was incredibly cliched almost from the start.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 17:56:56 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Strawberry Statement

Ah! I found this online. As I'd guessed the soundtrack is an issue.

QUOTE:

"There's also an excellent soundtrack, featuring Joni Mitchell's The Circle Game (sung with much vibrato by Buffy Sainte-Marie), Thunderclap Newman's Something In The Air, Crosby, Stills and Nash with or without Neil Young, Young solo, not to mention John Lennon's Give Peace A Chance sung by the protestors. Unfortunately, that music selection may well preclude a retail video or Region 2 DVD release in the near future, unless someone spends the time and money to clear the rights for home viewing. (Apparently ex-rental videos can be bought online - presumably very old tapes released before someone realised that the music in the film was only licensed for theatrical and TV showings.)"


Entered at Wed Feb 9 17:25:13 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Best Ever!

See above link for a perfect matching of song to film.....leaves one wondering how tall Richard was.....


Entered at Wed Feb 9 17:21:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Strawberry Statement

I say "weakish movie" but I haven't seen it in forty years, so it could be brilliant. I don't think it's been on DVD in the UK. I've often looked for it. Last time was after "Across the Universe" which is similar in one section.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 17:18:39 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Easy Rider set the trend. I thought about Vanishing Point, checked the IMDB, and found I was thinking of Two Lane Blacktop (same year, similar theme). The soundtrack that I was trying to remember was The Strawberry Statement (a few months earlier). Weakish movie, great song selection. See link.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 17:12:40 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: The Beatles

What were they thinking when they knocked down this place?.......one of tose clubs that I wish I had been to....see above link and stick around for the extra bit at the end ( re: Expecting Rain notice of today )


Entered at Wed Feb 9 16:57:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Vanishing Point

Bill! Do you recall this movie from 1971? There is a particular song in the soundtrack, played by a band we've been discussing a fair amount lately. It is a movie.....maybe, kinda, sorta similar to Easy Rider in some ways.

I think it's pretty hard for young people to understand, and impossible to feel a generation before. Some movies, with some very good acting on historical events try to put you there. Gawd damn! just as I'm typing this, on global news just now as they went to break, they are playing "The Weight". Anyway the one part, "you had to be there" is the music.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 16:20:20 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Film Critics.......^%#*%%##^&

There's no hope in trying to get the kid to understand what it was like, or what we did 40 years ago. He wants to be like Syskel & Ebert. Film critics are just about the biggest pain in the ass around.

It's like these critics who pick the 10 best & 10 worst dressed of these women at the oscars or some damn thing. There's no ryhme or reason. Just......making a statement!


Entered at Wed Feb 9 16:01:07 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ari: I'd say that "The Weight" could even have been the theme song of the whole movie. Protagonist arranges to deliver something for somebody else and runs into all sorts of weird characters and situations. At the end, having delivered the burden, he starts to head home. With the Band we don't get to see if he gets shot by cretins, but who knows ...


Entered at Wed Feb 9 13:44:10 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Fonda's musical tastes

I'm one who thinks The Weight works fine in that scene, and I enjoy it every time I see it......I recollect that Peter Fonda was very close to Roger McGuinn(and the Byrds) back in those days, and I seem to recollect reading somewhere(though I can't say where)that he lobbied, at least briefly, to make Easy Rider an all Byrds soundtrack.......


Entered at Wed Feb 9 13:20:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Blues So Bad

There was always speculation over the Sonny Boy Williamson quote (they want to play the blues so bad. And they do). A letter in Record Collector might let the usual suspects, The Animals & The Yardbirds, who made LPs with Sonny Boy, off the hook. The writer recalls going to see Sonny Boy in Autumn 1964. He was accompanied by a Midlands band the writer had never heard of. When Sonny boy left the stage for ten minutes to get into his second bottle of Bourbon, the band played their forthcoming single, Go Now. Then Sonny Boy returned, did one number, announced that the band didn't understand the blues and dismissed them from the stage. He finished the show solo. And drunk. There was "an unsurprising lack of demand for an encore."

So, the Moody Blues.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 09:53:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Exactly, though Born to Be Wild was originally put there while they tried to persuade CSN to write something. The Easy Rider OST is a great selection of songs. I thought The Weight worked brilliantly.

On songs, The Social Network ends with Baby You’re A Rich Man over the credits, and the sudden blaze of quality dwarfs everything else on the soundtrack … and the lyrics comment. But there’s no reason why lyrics should comment on the action. (Though if "take a load" has the drug interpretation it kind of works, as does the Western setting, as many listeners "hear" it set in the West.) In Easy Rider, it’s the kind of song they would have been playing if iPods and headphones had existed in 1969.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 09:18:01 CET 2011 from (41.97.250.27)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M / Joan Baez / Easy Rider

Bill M: when I hear you speaking Arabic, it suddenly sounds a beautiful language, halwa ya baladi == nice is my country

link above : For every Joan Baez fans, she's singing a capella a famous Tunisian hit, concert in Algiers 1974, I once posted about it

Easy Rider :

From what I know, it's not Denis Hopper who managed the soundtrack.
It was a budget movie; Peter Fonda injected his personal and complete vinyl collection (20 LPs) to fill and join the 2 ends of the soundtrack. nothing was chosen; It's just an awesome inspiration that The Weight was chosen for the Monument Valley footage.
I pondered lately about songs and pictures, I had the scene in mind

in the continuity. Question to any interested GBers: which moving picture starts in your mind as soon as you hear on the radio Steppenwolf's Born to be wild ? the most aired song in history.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 08:49:45 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

"Can someone explain to my why Dennis Hopper chose The Weight for one of his motorcycle montages in Easy Rider?" May I suggest this?: He liked the song.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 08:31:19 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

BONK, I'm not taking the meaning of the Weight into consideration at all. In fact, I love the way it works with the film, but you could do use for just about any scene and make it better. I'd like to revise my criticism of its and say that I care less about what it means in the context of the times. Sure it's enjoyable, but it's just a great song, and the film, without its music drowning the lulls in the film, isn't the same movie at all. I think my general dissatisfaction has more to do with ANY filmmaker using a song they think is great, and just pasting it over their own sequence (which they then get credit for). I don't feel that way necessarily about all films, in fact, I think it works well for Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head in Butch Cassidy, but I think it's obnoxious when Scorsese uses a lot of the music he chooses. Take Jim Jarmusch or Max Ophuls, their films are musical without having to necessarily use a song. Then you watch Casino.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 08:23:20 CET 2011 from (203.62.236.34)

Posted by:

Cwipple cweek

Subject: Empire Hotel

Seeing as we are on the subject of Joni,I noticed in the Toronto Sun the other day that the Empress Hotel burned down.Recently I have been googling to try and find the location of the Empire Hotel.Can any Torontonians help me out?Does it still exist?Or was it really the Empress?Or is it just the fictional name of a hotel in a pretty good rock and roll song with everyones favorite guitarist thrashing away on lead?


Entered at Wed Feb 9 05:32:37 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Tony, where did you hear that? Those 1980's Band cd's sounded bad and relied on post-mastering versions that had a ton of bass rolled off. Mine also quit playing after a couple of years. %5Pr


Entered at Wed Feb 9 04:56:14 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: ARI

Hey Ari. Just so you know, there is no malice in what I just wrote to you. 40 years ago times were different. I'm interested in YOUR interpretation of the Weight. And try to forget every one else's take on the song. Just yours.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 04:42:21 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: ARI

Ari. Stop trying to take everything apart. I'm not sure how old you are but that song fit perfectly with the film. Back in '69 the feel of the song, the sound of the song was perfect for the times. I don't remember, with my friends, trying to pick apart some great hidden meaning from the tune and I am sure the guys who wrote it and performed it felt the same. In fact, some one once asked Garth what they were thinking about when the song was put forth and his answer was, uh, oh I don't know, it was just a song that had been hanging around for awhile and some one decided to put it out. Ari. No deep dark meaning.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 03:32:15 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Can someone explain to my why Dennis Hopper chose The Weight for one of his motorcycle montages in Easy Rider? I think it makes the otherwise dull montages watchable but The Band doesn't seem to fit, in fact, the only thing the film and song seem to have in common are their release dates (which Hopper took advantage of). It reminds me of Leonard Cohen's score for McCabe and Mrs. Miller, it tells two stories at once. Sure, it sounds nice, but if you have an ear out for the lyrics, what story are you listening to, Cohen's or Altman's? Same here, whose story are we listening to Robertson's or Hopper's?

Yeah the film represents youth counterculture, but The Band seems like the OTHER counterculture. The one that finds young guys playing old music. Easy Rider should be re-edited as a bunch of short music videos starring Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 01:42:10 CET 2011 from (24.186.255.120)

Posted by:

Tony

Subject: Three of a Kind

Three of a Kind - Capital has gone back to the original CD mastering from the late 1980s and packaged them as a set at Levon's request. These CDs have the original mixes from the albums and are the same as the out of print CDs from the 80s.


Entered at Wed Feb 9 01:32:00 CET 2011 from (99.141.25.77)

Posted by:

Adam2

David P - I guess that means the 3 disc set uses flat transfers of the original master tapes (without the remastering/remixing and bonus tracks of the 2000 reissues). There are a lot of questions to be answered though. Why the sudden collaboration between Levon and Capitol Records, when their history together has been less than great? There's that funny comment Levon made back when the reissues first came out ("Don't mean nothin' to me, 'cept another screwin'!") where he mentioned they didn't even send him the new reissues. It's so weird that now Capitol has made a special release for Levon to sell exclusively, complete with new transfers at his request. Will this open the door for more Band archival releases with Levon's blessing/input?


Entered at Wed Feb 9 01:07:39 CET 2011 from (76.71.8.165)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

RE/P Files: The ‘Planet Waves’ Sessions - Recording Bob Dylan At The Village Recorder

From the archives of the late, great Recording Engineer/Producer (RE/P) magazine come interviews with Rob Fraboni and Dick LaPalm on recording a legend which first apeared in the March/April 1974 issue.

October 14, 2010, by Gary D. Davis


Entered at Wed Feb 9 00:17:58 CET 2011 from (76.71.8.165)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks again sadavid! He's such a tease when it comes to sharing what he can really do on guitar, huh? However, I do like all the props he gives to younger musicians. I'm sure they all inspired each other because they respect what each brings to the table. I am really looking forward to March 29 when Robbie's CD will be out in O Canada!

I saw Joni and Bob at Maple Leaf Gardens on a double bill. Guess who performed first? Guess if they performed together? You're all correct! Oh nooooo! Joni's been dissing Bob lately too....as in he's not authentic, etc.......Anyway, there was only one person Joni kissed at TLW and that's what counts for me! ;-D


Entered at Wed Feb 9 00:00:44 CET 2011 from (76.71.8.165)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's Joni!


Entered at Tue Feb 8 21:30:54 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Mention of Howlin' Wolf live caused me to check out YouTube for a caustic live version of "House Rockin' Boogie" that he did circa 1950 with Ike Turner on piano and Willie Johnson on guitar. Unfortunately all there seems to be is a relatively tame thing at the link above. the one I love is on one of those British blues comps of the late '60s - "All The Blues All The Time".

Bonk: I got my copy, along with a great James Brown comp LP, from Denny N of Zarathustra maybe 15 years ago.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 21:02:56 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oh, dear. I always thought Bob needed counselling. Now I know. I think he should be shut in a small space with The Shangri-Las, The Crystals, The Ronettes, The Impalas, The Avons, & Bob.B. Soxx and The Blue Jeans for company. He HAS performed Da Doo Ron Ron, though extremely badly.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:55:42 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dylan Interview cont.

And oh yeah……that Kurt Loder interview with Dylan was also famous for this exchange:

KL: Showbiz

BD: I don’t know. Showbiz ---well, I don’t dig it. I don’t go to see someone jump around. I hate to see chicks perform. Hate it.

KL: Why?

BD: Because they whore themselves. Especially the ones that don’t wear anything. They fuckin’ whore themselves.

KL: Even someone like Joni Mitchell?

BD: Well, no, but then Joni Mitchell is almost like a man [ laughs ]. I mean I love Joni, too. But Joni’s got a strange sense of rhythm that’s all her own, and she lives on that timetable..Joni Mitchell is in her own world all by herself, so she has a right to keep any rhythm she wants. She’s allowed to tell you what time it is.

-------------------------------------------------

When asked about the great live performers he’s ever seen, the great man lists Charles Aznavour and Howlin’ Wolf


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:36:59 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sadavid: Thanks for these clips…..so nice to see an instrument in RR’s hands rather than just talking…….

Three of a Kind: Go to the website and just take a gander at the list of songs again………..astonishing – especially Brown album…..


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:25:07 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dylan………..I think Todd got closest to the truth……………for the record the interview was in 1987 and there was no follow-up to the answer……..there was a sentence or two before it when he said there has been something about every band he has had that he liked and he had particularly liked the Street Legal band………………For people of my age who came to the Band in the mid-1970’s with an older brother saying “yeah, of course they are great…Bob Dylan and The Band”….it was just that automatic connection that was always there……….but reality is very different for the people like Dylan that were there! When the Band was Dylan’s band – they were not the Band – they were the Hawks …….so when he is asked some 25 years later to reminisce about his “best bands” it is only logical for him to make the distinction and point out that they were called Levon and the Hawks and that they were two radically different bands………………as to not playing a single Band song in years of radio shows…….who knows………..but for the record the last time he was asked to comment – just a few years ago - on the boys……he had this to say…….. “Gallant Knights all of them”


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:24:52 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

adam2: It appears to be a 3-CD set, sourced from the original Capitol master tapes, available only through Levon's website.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:22:26 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: another JRR promo vid

. . . another driblet of the _Clairvoyant_ promo interview . . . mentions of contributing guitarists Tom Morello and Robert Randolph . . . .


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:17:28 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: Dunno for sure, but I put it down to youthful exuberance on the part of the lasses involved. Your real football fan takes no pleasure in such carryings on; even Westcoaster admits that was so turned off by the half-time show that he went downstairs and curled up by the fireplace.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:14:12 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: and then there was........"THE BAND!!"

Now just shutup all this nonsense for a minute and listen. I just needed a shot of Rick Danko for a minute.........


Entered at Tue Feb 8 20:06:30 CET 2011 from (99.141.25.77)

Posted by:

Adam2

Check the News section. The "exclusive" package of Big Pink/brown/Stage Fright on CD is being sold at Levon's website. What is it? I still don't know. The description says how Capitol Records "pulled the original tapes from the vault at Levon's request". What does that mean? Very misleading and lacking information.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:54:49 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Norm, that show Cold Case Files is now of the air in the US. I was a fan of it when it was on. Each week they cover another musicians songs as the background music

I'm no authority, but I think Dylan has a "cruel streak". He doesn't seem to have a lot of tolerance and he can be very demeaning to people. I recall reading someplace that he dissed Larry Campbell at one time. It just seems to be a pattern of his that he "disposes" of people as he moves on in his life.

Bill M: If that was true about men and sports, why do they have cheerleaders in scanty outfits? :-)


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:51:51 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Facebook

Peter; Is this the latest with Facebook where some dating service highjacked 250,000 profiles from Facebook?


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:40:35 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Cracklin' Rosie made me broke ..

David P: If Neil'd been a country singer he could have written a song about it.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:37:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Social Network

Great film, mainly involving claims for pay offs around Facebook. Definitely worth watching.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:33:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Girl, You'll Be A Rich Woman Soon

Bill M: As I recall, Sir Paul's ex got a little under $50 million in settlement. That pales in comparison with that of Neil Diamond's former wife, who got triple that amount years ago.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:29:58 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Temptations

Lars! Today there isn't a cloud around, the water is flat calm and it'll probably get to the 40's in temp. I rototilled that strip where the peas go, and I keep eyeing it. But....I'm afaid if I put those peas in the ground, I'll bring on the snow. I hate that stuff. Only place I can stand to look at it is waaaay up that mountain or on a post card. I got to go to work here pretty quick so I think I'll do it when I get back.

I'm convinced it's that bad attitude y'all display back there. Pisses the old man upstairs off, so he keeps dumpin' on ya.

It ain't a lot different than Mexico here, 'cept little cooler.

That last woman Paul had was somethin' else huh Bill? Woulda bin a lot cheaper just to shoot here.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:24:56 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: Nirvana

Ha Ha Norm....that gave me a good chuckle!

I used to get mad more often, but I'm working on it.
I'll let you know the next time I feel some anger creepin' in.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:16:31 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the best things in life are free, but ...

"Yesterday" got me wondering. Who made more money off Paul McCartney - John or Heather? (This'd be gross, not net.)


Entered at Tue Feb 8 19:09:24 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan's taste in music

I recall an interview where Ray Benson (from Asleep At The Wheel) told Peter Stone Brown that Dylan only listens to "old music". I believe Mr. Benson's group at one time toured as an opening act for Dylan.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:51:59 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The glass is half FULL!

That's Todd, always positive.....never a bad word. Todd do you ever get pissed off about anything?


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:45:05 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Who Wrote the Most Songs Ever

I think it's gotta be either Robbie Robertson or Rick Danko.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:42:09 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Don't Look Back

I doubt there’s really much of a feud between Bob & Robbie. I think Bob looks at that time as something from his past, and would rather talk about the present. They both have “moved on” with their respective careers. It’s us fans that keep them tethered to their past.

Thinking about this a little more, I suppose it’s possible that Dylan respected the artistic achievement of songs like ‘The Weight’ and ‘King Harvest’, but as a music fan preferred the rock & roll side of the Hawks / Band. We’re looking at this in hindsight, but the interviewer was asking about The Band / Hawks backing Dylan. It would be natural for Dylan to think back about what most impressed him about the Band / Hawks in the early days when he first met them, and for whatever reason he seems to like their Rock & Roll (aka Motown?) side the best. We should keep in mind that ‘The Weight’ and ‘King Harvest’ didn’t exist when Bob had his first experiences with the Hawks and that his initial reaction to their sound was based upon what they were doing at the time. Oftentimes first impressions are the lasting ones.

Maybe there’s more to the interview, but that would have been a good thing for the interviewer to ask a follow-up question to or get some elaboration on.

Bob has also been a forward looking guy most of his career (Don’t Look Back), and perhaps it’s annoying to him to be asked about his backing group from the 1960’s and early 1970’s as being the “best”, at a time when Bob might be more interested in talking about his current projects and current musicians that he’s playing with. Or maybe Bob just wants to talk about Bob. Or maybe he doesn’t really like doing interviews.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:41:37 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: By whose account???

Charlie; Your right with Yesterday. The sources I find, say over 3000 recordings. However who wrote the most songs, seems to have a lot of controversy.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:37:48 CET 2011 from (86.120.206.158)

Posted by:

Mahjong

Location: London
Web: My link

I love your post, thanks for sharing.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:35:00 CET 2011 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Westcoaster Questions

Westcoaster: I think "Yesterday" used to be the most-recorded song, with over 2,000 different versions. Not sure about the most prolific songwriter, though the late Steve Allen supposedly churned out over 4,000--though only one was a modest "hit."


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:27:14 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Do you know????

What is the most recorded song of all time?? Who wrote the most songs ever??


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:26:21 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid / David P: Sorry for mixing you two up.

Empty N: Yeah, that's her. I prefer her "Helwa Ya Bilady" to her "Hava Nagila". Naqncy Sinatra fans might get a kick out of Dalida's "Bang Bang". Every song indeed!


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:17:47 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Lars: Do we really need to drag the letter W into it? Surely we can simply call it 'the fude'?

David P: Thanks for the hall-of-fame post. What a great bunch of songs - "Squid Jiggin' Ground", "Je suis cool", "Oh What a Feeling", "When I Die" and "Wildflower". The link above is to several versions of "Squid Jiggin' Ground"; the first is likely the best known, the Harry Hibbs is the liveliest by far, the crowd singing along to the Ryan's Fancy shows how much of a standard it was, and the Stompin' Tom one shows what the inside of the Horseshoe Tavern (site of the Band / Blue Rodeo jam) used to look like before they ditched their C&W-only policy.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 18:16:10 CET 2011 from (206.47.33.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

sadavid!!! Many thanks for your latest two Robbie links! Does this mean that he'll be on a Canadian stamp like Joni soon?

Btw...I first met Crabgrass on this site and in person many times when he tried to start a fued about Robbie and Bob. LOL


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:47:30 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "He Don't Live Here No More"

JRR discusses the genesis of the song -- life with Marty . . . .


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:47:26 CET 2011 from (41.97.239.156)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M, who is my singer ?

thanks for the reference to the year 2525 by Zager & Evans i guess you are refering to Dalida; i posted everything about her before over the GBs; her particularity is that she have sung every song ever written [no exception known]
it's true that she's a singer i like; but to call her "my" singer could be annoying to my business;


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:42:11 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR in Hall of Fame / "When I Die"

From the CSHF website:

SONGWRITER ROBBIE ROBERTSON AMONG 2011 CANADIAN SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES TORONTO – Tuesday, February 8, 2011 – The Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame/Le Panthéon des auteurs et compositeurs canadiens (CSHF/PACC) announced today their 2011 inductees, among them are Robbie Robertson, formerly of The Band, and French-Canadian songwriter Luc Plamondon.

The 2011 inductees will be honoured at the CSHF’s 7th annual gala, presented by BMO Nesbitt Burns on Saturday, April 2, 2011, at the George Weston Recital Hall, Toronto Centre for the Arts.

For the first time since its inception, the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame will induct songwriters and their entire body of work. “In past years, the CSHF has inducted specific songs from Canadian songwriters, but we felt it was also important to acknowledge their entire portfolio of songs, and their overall contributions as Canadian songwriters and storytellers,” says Sylvia Tyson, President, CSHF.

This year, the following songwriters will be inducted into the CSHF: Robbie Robertson and Luc Plamondon (Modern Era 1970 – 1985); Pierre Létourneau and Jack Scott (Radio Era: 1939 – 1969); and Roméo Beaudry and John Stromberg (Pioneer Era: Up to 1938).

Robbie Robertson has written such iconic songs as The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, The Weight, and “Broken Arrow”.

The following songs will be inducted into the CSHF: (Pioneer Era: Up to 1938) Votre avion va-t-il au paradis? by Roméo Beaudry, Squid Jiggin' Ground by Arthur Scammell; (Radio Era: 1939 – 1969) La chanson des pissenlits by Pierre Létourneau, My Heart Cries for You by Percy Faith/Carl Sigman; (Modern Era: 1970 – 1985) Je suis cool by Gilles Valiquette, Pas besoin de frapper pour entrer by Jacques Michel, Oh What a Feeling by Kelly Jay/Roly Greenway, When I Die by Willie Smith/Steve Kennedy, Wildflower by Doug Edwards/Dave Richardson.The CMPA (Canadian Music Publishers Association) Legacy award will be given to music impresario Yvan Dufresne.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:20:09 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the woods

Subject: Dylan vs. The Band

I never was one to participate in the LH-RR "feud." That would also be true if we have a lengthy discussion about Dylan vs. The Band (or, more specifically RR). But if it does evolve (deteriorate), could we call the Dylan-RR thing "the fewd" so we can distinguish between the two without a lot of repetitive explanation? Just spit-balling; it might not be a good idea...what the hell do I know?

Norm- I think "chicken shit" should be "chickenshit" (no space) I feel pretty strongly about this because now you're talking about something I know something about. You planting your green peas yet? We still have a ways to go before we till any gardens around here.

I'd better go feed the turkeys.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:16:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh.......and ........JOAN!

You sounded like sour grapes because your guys weren't in the big game. On the news this morning, they are saying this super bowl was the most watched program in US history, and the most watched super bowl ever in Canada.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:09:39 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Small things

When you guys got to start explaining your jokes....it's time to quit. "Dwarfing their songs?" of course he is, as you said he owns the catalogue. I too have a contract with Dwarf, for some of the songs I recorded.

This sounds like a real lot of pun....pun.......pun


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:07:27 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Dylan and The Hawks

Yikes guys! Don’t be so cynical…..

Dylan can be a mischievous guy, but there’s a chance that he was being sincere. There was something that he liked about the Hawks when he first heard them, and the style of music that they were playing at the time. I think we all kind of gravitate to the music that we first got turned onto in our youth, and in Dylan’s case, that was early rock and roll. He very often name checks Little Richard, Elvis Presley etc. as some of his favorites, and I think he’s being sincere when he says that. There had to be an element of that Rock and Roll edge that he heard in the Hawk’s music that attracted him. (Slippin’ and Slidin’ anyone?).

Still, there’s no doubt that he can be ambiguous about praise. On his radio show he mentions Ollabelle and that Amy Helm is Levon’s daughter, but then plays ‘Elijah Rock’ which features Fiona McBain on lead vocal. I’ve always wondered if that as a mistake, or deliberate.

In the 1966 show when introducing the Hawks onstage, he refers to them as “poets”. I always thought that was an interesting description, but I’m still not sure what he meant.

I also find it interesting that Dylan is very specific about referring to the group as “Levon and the Hawks”, yet there is no mention of “Levon and the Hawks” on the biography page of Robbie’s website.

I still think that Dylan was probably closest with Richard in some way…especially from a songwriting perspective.

While I think it’s possible that Dylan “may” have been using the opportunity to minimize the impact of the Band’s impact of their first two albums especially, I do think there’s a part of him that probably favored the more primal rock and roll sound of the Hawks, which hearkened back to the music of his youth. And I think that was the core truth behind his answer. The only thing that was a little odd was specifying it as Motown. But that may have just been the first thing that popped into his head.

And there may have been something to the notion that he was upset that he no longer had a band (that he had been keeping on retainer), once they blossomed on their own.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 17:03:26 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Dwarf as in Music...

See link.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 16:53:47 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Are you implying that Dylan was being a small man, or that he was selling the Band short?


Entered at Tue Feb 8 16:21:37 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Was Dylan dwarfing The Band's songs?

I wouldn't read that much into Dylan's comments. He seemed to be expressing a preference for the raw, hard-edged sound of the Levon & The Hawks era group over that more reserved sound they adapted when they became known as The Band. When The Band covered those two Motown songs, to his ears, it evidently harkened back to that sound of The Hawks, where they really cut loose at that higher energy level. Another similar cover from the early days was Little Richard's "Slippin' and Slidin'".

Remember too that Dylan, despite his comments about the group's original songs, owns the publishing rights to "The Weight" and the rest of the original material on "Music From Big Pink".


Entered at Tue Feb 8 16:14:23 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A theory

There is a TV program we got to watching quite a bit lately. One of these cops shows, (of which there are too many). This one is a little different. What makes it quite different is the back ground music.

Cold Case Files.....where many of the murders took place 20 & 30 years ago. They keep showing flashbacks of the people involved, what they looked like then and now. Last nights show was all Springsteen music. Mostly hits from that Born in the USA album. One night it was all Dylan music.

In watching all these I've noticed, (I suppose a lot of you have always been aware). The theory is all these people who wrote huge hit songs did this writing on dreams and imagination when they were mostly quite young. I sat there thinking about that. Every type of music, R&R, country, don't matter what or who I thought about.

In the years having faced more and more reality of life, those hits and the images they portray don't seem to come along in later years..........I think?..... and I agree with Bashful. If Dylan said that, it was pretty chicken shit. It would appear he didn't want to share any glory of writing and creative lime light. Only to put people below him. Maybe he had a burr up his ass because they didn't remain his lackies.......Glory Days! they'll pass you by, glory days......in the wink of a young girls eye......


Entered at Tue Feb 8 15:51:24 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Only one Levi Stubbs

Dylan makes a clear "Levon & The Hawks" / "The Band" distinction, then goes on to talk about The Band. Neither Baby, Don't Do It nor Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever was done by The Hawks. The first could have been, the second is too late. The only "Motown" song The Hawks did that survives is "Money" from instant recall, and while Barrett Strong's version is fantastic, it isn't "Motown" in style, just in label (well, Tamla in fact). It would be surprising if there were no other Motown covers in the New Jersey summer 1965 set, but there are no survivors on tape that I know of.

I'm more convinced that it was subtle but gratuitous nastiness on Dylan's part.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 15:26:28 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bashful B and Peter V: You make good points, but I still feel that Dylan may have been speaking more of the Hawks/Band as an onstage performing unit than as songwriters and recording artists. Relatively simple, danceable, tiptappable music may have been welcome balm to Dylan's ears after his own grueling tours and recording sessions. Still, in print it does add up to an unnecessary and unjust slam.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 14:47:12 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill(again)

Location: Minoa, NY (still)

Subject: Dylan's dis redux

I hasten to add(borrowing a phrase from Peter V), and wish I'd said this in my previous post, that if something feud-like is going on it's thankfully behind the scenes, where it belongs. I do think that comment was a cheap shot by Dylan, though. Of all the things he could have said about The Band in answer to a question, that's what he came up with, that their peak was with a couple of covers tunes? Sad.....


Entered at Tue Feb 8 14:02:25 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.170)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....and Bob and Robbie were so close at one time that Bob even whispers into Robbie's ear! ;-D

During that famous Dylan show where they yelled “Judas”, who was it who said “Play it f---ing loud!” Many think it was Dylan… Was it?

Mickey Jones: "I know the answer to that. For over 30 years everyone thought it was me. It was not me. In the documentary, "No Direction Home", Martin Scorsese tried to manipulate the film and sound to make it look like it was Bob. IT WAS NOT BOB! If you check it out, the picture and sound do not sync up. The answer is the true answer. In the film, Bob is whispering into Robbie Robertson's ear. The voice shouting, "Play F------ Loud was yelling LOUD. Bob was whispering. As I said, the film and the sound do not sync up and here's the kicker. The person shouting, "Play F------ Loud" has a British accent. My belief is that it was one of our stage crew sticking up for us in the moment. We had 6 road and stage crew members on the film and I truly believe that is the person responsible. I hate to open whole cans of worms but Scorsese got it wrong. I will stick to that until the day I die."


Entered at Tue Feb 8 13:48:33 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Dylan's Band Diss

I think along the same lines as what Peter posted. It was, in my opinion, a ludicrous thing for Dylan to say. There's also obviously some issues there(dare I say a feud?), as Dylan has pointedly, and for some time, seemed to largely block out his Band-related history in interviews, when writing, on the radio show, etc. Time will tell if the next volume of his Chronicles will cover that part of his life.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 13:33:39 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.170)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and then there's one of Bob with Louuu, Randy Newman and Tom Petty.



Entered at Tue Feb 8 13:29:47 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.170)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....another photo I don't think I've seen before. Many other photos were familiar but still good to see again.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 13:26:35 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.170)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Deee, Jersey Girl and Claire!

Speaking of Robbie and Bob....when they were tight.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 12:41:27 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: It's an odd attitude, isn't it...

I suspect there might be an element of Dylan's aversion to his own past - he's not a nostalgia act (somewhat ironically...) /n


Entered at Tue Feb 8 08:59:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bob is a Gemini

Thanks for the Dylan quote. I never know how to take Dylan quotes. He said that “Johnnie Ray was the first singer whose voice and style I totally fell in love with”. You never know whether it’s a heartfelt truth, or like his tales in 1962 on the radio show about working in a carnival full-time from 13 to 18 years old. Either a piss-take or a lie for fun. I always think Dylan is “underwhelmed” discussing The Band, and he doesn’t exactly support them on his Theme Time Radio Hour.

As The Band, they did just the two Motown covers, Don’t Do It and Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever. Both great live songs, the first of which they do better than the second, but as a version of the songs, eclipsed easily by Marvin Gaye and The Four Tops. I’d bet you anything all five Band members would agree with that statement. They functioned as apposite live covers, Lots of bands and singers do it without ever thinking they better the original.

I think Bob is (as so often) slyly damning with faint praise. If he thinks their somewhat strained, forced Loving You beats The Weight and King Harvest, he has cloth ears. His radio show indicates that he certainly doesn’t. Bob is a manipulator. A fair guess from lack of mentions in books and articles and radio play is that he has some grudge about Robbie, The Band or both. What he was doing in fact, was dissing two of Robbie’s greatest works. My guess is deliberately too.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 06:27:59 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

LARS: Looks like you got it now. That clip was when they were sick of touring and were getting sloppy on stage. Here's a good Harrison live vid that I came acroos recently that's pretty cool. Not a GH origianl - but still cool.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 04:48:21 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Puttin' it to rest

Thankyou for that Bob. I do appreciate it. I sang that song for years, because it meant something to me, even tho' I didn't know what.

I guess that final verse, maybe I saw myself at the end of the line, fishing around an old pile dock, looking out over that water, and reminicing. I suppose I'm a sentimentalist. I have an old propeller, along with a couple of old anchors that decorate my front yard, and with an old lantern on a rod holder. The prop is off my fish boat. It had been on there for over 20 years before I changed it. Some days when I'm mowing my lawn, I get engrossed staring at that old prop remembering how many rpm it may have turned. Driving me round and round Vancouver Island, to Prince Rupert, to Haida Gwaii. I shake my head to get back to where I am.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 04:46:12 CET 2011 from (138.88.150.3)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Oh, well . . . I read my version somewhere which means I should never believe everything I read.

Maybe that's why some people either won't say what their songs are about or say they are about "nothing."

J.F.


Entered at Tue Feb 8 03:50:23 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Norm, here is a page with Jimmy Buffet's comments regarding that great song. Bob Dylan is said to be a fan of Buffet's and this song in particular.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 23:34:59 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: He went to Paris

Thanks for that Jan, but I'm not sure. See wikipedia's claim is, it's about Eddy Balchowsky. A one armed vet of the Spanish civil war, who Jimmy met while playing in Chicago.

Now, I've heard many stories, and I think there is one on youtube, where Jimmy tells the story, (which should be the right one), but I don't know.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 23:28:18 CET 2011 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro DC (wish I was in Paris)

Subject: He went to Paris

Norm,

Jimmy Buffett’s “He went to Paris” is about an old guy he met in the Keys. The old guy rarely talked to anyone, hung out fishing most of the day. Of course, Jimmy got him to talking and the result of that conversation is a great song.

All that, and much more, from an Alabama boy who bought his first guitar to attract girls while he was a student at Auburn University.

J.F.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 23:11:35 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the woods
Web: My link

Subject: lynx

JOE & BOB- Thank you. That is easier.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 22:52:25 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter & Joan, you're welcome. Thank you for enjoying it.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 22:30:36 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: that drum track's gotta go!

Kevin J: I wonder which packerhead added it? Great version otherwise though.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 22:29:06 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: 1959 Ronnie & The Hawks

Most a you little punkers weren't even around yet. This is back when men were men and sheep were nervous. Lookit Levon Helm! His ears were so big, he looked like an old Ford car with the doors open!


Entered at Mon Feb 7 22:18:45 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Golden Oldies - one time! the Hawk sounds good, (mostly the band)

Billy Bag Ass.... yeah you so BAD!.....you probably watch Martha Stewart. Just can't stand to see all those big sweaty football players.

Dyin' songs...........:

Texas when I die

Streets of Laredo ...... and so on


Entered at Mon Feb 7 22:10:10 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Anyone in need of a shot of transcendent talent – after having to endure the Black eyed Peas ( LOL Joan but thank God for those short pants! ) and Christina Aguilera yesterday – dig Marvin Gaye and be humbled……


Entered at Mon Feb 7 21:56:18 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Smitty / Motherlode

Peter M / JQ: I meant to ask last week if you were aware of Smitty's involvement, as lead singer and organist, in Motherlode and their big '69 hit, "When I Die"? I suspect that the song's largely forgotten in the US, but here it's a staple of oldies radio and lives on in the hearts of many - including our own Landmark, who often placed it atop his Canuckistani Top 5.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 21:21:34 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: LARS

Bob W. beat me to it but follow his advice. Right click the URL and hit COPY. Go to the GB sign in page and PASTE in the proper place. Go ahead. Try it.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 21:07:47 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Lars.....hoping to offer some help.....try the "copy and paste" method of getting your links into the GB. Also, you can test your link in the "PREVIEW" phase of posting here. If it doesn't work there you can remove it and try again. Hope that helps.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 20:45:41 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Kevin J: thanks!

That's exactly the interview I remembered, but couldn't find - Adam, I think, was also interested - and (rightly) questioned my memory. I can now sleep again!


Entered at Mon Feb 7 20:33:56 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: The point of 'major-league' team sports is that guys drink beer and watch other guys run around wearing costumes - and cheer for those wearing the costume they like best. What the gals wear just isn't an issue.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 20:11:49 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.234)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob Dylan discusses The Band

Westcoaster: Sorry to hear about your cousin…..a tough one

bob w: Glad that the show was a great one….Levon sure knows a thing or two about putting together good bands…….I know all about Larry Campbell but had forgotten that Jim Weider is out with him as well……Not bad at all in the guitar department.

dlew: I believe it may have been you who asked about this a while back………moving house and in the process of packing found some old articles I had kept…….Here’s what Bob Dylan had to say about The Band when asked by Kurt Loder:

KL: A lot of fans would say that the Band, which was backing you in the mid-sixties, was the greatest group you ever had. Would you agree:

BD: The Band had their own sound, that’s for sure. When they were playin’ behind me, they weren’t the Band; they were called Levon and the Hawks. What came out on record as the Band – it was like night and day. Robbie started playing that real pinched, squeezed guitar sound – he had never played like that before in his life. They could cover songs great. They used to do Motown songs, and that to me, is when I think of them as being at their best. Even more so than “King Harvest” and “The Weight” and all of that. When I think of them, I think of them singin’ something like “Baby Don’t Do It”, covering Marvin Gaye and that kind of thing. Those were the golden days of the Band, even more so than when they were playing behind me.

Interesting that at Air Canada centre a few years ago…..Dylan asked the crowd if anybody out there remembered “Levon and the Hawks”…….


Entered at Mon Feb 7 20:06:59 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Lars for you.

Lars I hope this works.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 20:03:32 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Jeff: Thank you. As Peter said "nice song".

Lars: I too would like to see your link.

The Super Bowl wasn't bad and it wasn't great. I have seen a lot worse. They were pretty well matched. I still wonder what would have happened if the Jets had made it. Next year...

The Black Eyed Peas. How many people would watch them if Fergie wore pants?


Entered at Mon Feb 7 19:53:42 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: broken link

SAM- I don't know why, but I screw up a lot of youtube links. I AM trying, but I guess I miss the correct spelling in the URL a lot.

The song wasn't anything important, it was just a light-hearted song by Sir Paul McCartney called "Listen to What the Man Said."

I've been listening to a lot of old Beatles music recently and after watching live performances of songs like "If I Needed Someone" and "Don't Bother Me" it's occurred to me that I like the tunes with George singing lead. I'd never noticed that before.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 19:36:06 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Lars: AS you predicted, your link didn't work. Please try again. I was very curious about the song.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 19:31:10 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: In the year 2525 ...

Empty N: It took me a bit of thinking to identify why I recognised the "whoa-oo whoa-o" bits of your nice link, but the answer came to me - Zager and Evans's "In The Year 2525". If you know that song - a big hit here in '69 - and run it through in your head, I suspect you'll agree that your singer could do a nice version after translating the lyrics.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 18:55:47 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Misc.

Congratulations to the Green Bay Packers for bringing the Lombardi Trophy back home. Turned out to be a good game.

If I had to sum up my existence in only one word I guess I'd have to say "Grateful." I thank God for this gift of life. I don't know where that came from, but there it is. The link I tried to put in here (I usually screw them up) is one of my favorite songs as far as "shaking it off" and it always has given me a good vibe.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 18:27:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Hangin' Tough

Norwestcoaster; Hell of a thing for a man to have to live with. Looking for answers to questions that don't seem to make any sense. Some times you have to put 'em out of your mind to keep from going crazy.

Hangin' Tough is the name of a Waylon album. I suppose every one has experienced this. It happens to me a lot, every where anywhere. There can be not a sound, no music playing any where, and a song will make it's way into my head. I all of a sudden realize I'm singing this and try to figure out why.....I don't know. It happened with this song yesterday. So Joe J. this is for you.

I identify a lot with Ol' Waylon, he has chosen some songs to record, that I would like to have asked him what motivated them. Like, "Norweigan Wood". He did a song of Jimmy Buffetts years ago. I always played it myself. People would ask me why. I don't know Jimmy Buffetts story, why he wrote it. It's a life story called "He went to Paris".

The other day, thinking about how, you shouldn't out live your children, this verse rolled through my mind:

Well the war took his lady, the bombs killed his baby,

And left him with only one eye.

Hi body was battered, his whole world was shattered,

And all he could do was just cry.

As the teardrops were fallin', he was recallin',

The answers he'd never found.

So he hopped on a freighter and skidded the ocean,

And left England without a sound.

Now he lives in the islands, and fishes the pilings,

And drinks his green label each day.

He's writing his memoirs and loosing his hearing,

But he don't care what most people say.

After 86 years of perpetual motion if he likes you,

He'll just smile and say

There was some of it magic, a lot of it tragic,

But I had a good life all the way

He went to Paris, lookin' for answers...to questions....

That botherd him so..........


Entered at Mon Feb 7 18:03:44 CET 2011 from (90.239.87.33)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: To westcoaster : Me my mum and Adolf Hitler???

On a serious side: There are a lot of other things I'd like to wish have asked my parents of. They both were using alcohol and pills and committed suicide when I was young for many decades ago.

No harm done, we'll keep the beat, that's what bass players and drummers should do when solo guitarists forgot their fancy phrases, right :-)


Entered at Mon Feb 7 17:40:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Half time shows

David; I share your feelings for the entertainment?? they provide. I kept glancing in at my family room tv, as I wasn't sure the kickoff time, and caught Keith Urban.

That half time show, I had sent Susan down stairs, (as she is not a fan of football, and me swearing at everyone). I had to go down and beg her to let me join her. I couldn't handle that half time.

Dee; I have a feeling, as they are a very young team that young Mr Rogers is probably going to be another dynasty with his squad, and good on them. That young Matthews boy as well is a story all his own. It was good to see Michael Douglas looking healthier.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 17:19:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sad Songs Don't Always Say That Much

Peter: Portentous is a word that many would use to describe much of Sir Elton's work in the '80s and he still seems determined to continue reprising those candles in the wind

Norm: Sorry, I avoided the Super Bowl pre-game programming and wish I'd done the same with that half-time nonsense. I do, however, enjoy Keith Urban. His version of "Tumbling Dice" last year on the Jimmy Fallon show was great, as was his duet with Brad Paisley on "Start A Band".


Entered at Mon Feb 7 17:10:21 CET 2011 from (99.124.80.20)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Packerland

Thanks BEG for all your nifty posts.

Condolences Norm.

Norm,a GREAT BIG thanks for mentioning the Packers. The state of Wisconsin is overjoyed to say the least. Aaron Rodgers is a class act...on ESPN he mentioned the problem following a Legend, referring of course, to ol' number 4, Brett Favre. For a music connection....how about We Are The Champions!!


Entered at Mon Feb 7 16:56:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm sure both drummers were producing exactly what they were asked to produce with consummate skill, but don't you find what they were asked to produce was predictable and "portentous"? It has an awful 80s sound to me. The guitar over the top is more of the same. Mind you, I think it's a dreadful song.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 16:35:21 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Warehouse Eyes & Arabian Drums

I don't think you can fault the drummers on "When Love Is Dying", as it's a ballad and they, as experienced session players, were probably following instructions to follow the less is more approach and to not get in the way.

Jay Bellerose favors vintage drums and recently he's been using an old Slingerland Rolling Bomber kit. These drums were made during WWII when there was metal rationing, so parts that were normally fashioned with metal, such as lugs, hoops & rims, used mahogany, maple & rosewood. As a result, the kit has a very warm sound, similar to that of Levon's when he was using the old Ludwig set with wooden rims that he bought in a pawn shop.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 16:19:52 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A work horse Teley

David; A while back I turned you on to Arlo West, demonstraiting a little telecaster with a single pickup he called "old piney". A little guitar with a lot a balls.

I'm wondering if you may have seen any of the super bowl pre game show. Keith Urban was playing one. An old black, really road worn looking teley with a single pickup. Young Mr Urban really makes that axe talk.

Well the boys from the little town of Green Bay just dug in and kept on climbing the hill. I think it proved they were hungry enough. A group of young guys who hung together and believed in each other enough. Young Arron Rogers is so cool headed, he reminds me of a young Joe Montana.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 13:26:20 CET 2011 from (41.97.202.129)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Sorry....Here is the nice song


Entered at Mon Feb 7 13:24:43 CET 2011 from (41.97.202.129)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: addendum - official music video

i thought lately i've exposed a comprehensive lecture on the subject: the linked above music video is to be mentionned

in reality one shouldn't say "this is a nice song", but "everyday has its nice song"


Entered at Mon Feb 7 08:33:21 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the link to your song, Jeff. Nice one. It backs up what I said about drumming earlier, and a great vocalist.


Entered at Mon Feb 7 02:08:38 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: losses in life

I just got back from a 400 mile drive to see some creole friends play the zydeco in State College, Pa. We spoke of our families and departed friends, which made me think of folks here like Marge, Steve & Norm. All of us spoke of our circles getting smaller, and of those we dearly miss. If we're fortunate enough to make 80 some years intact, we're ahead of the pack. We celebrated those of us we've been lucky enough to cross paths with. Those who remain, and those who've left us, and how enriched we've been to share the journey with them. And now for something completely different... The State Theatre there would LOVE to host The Levon Helm Band, and would go out on a limb to accommodate them.


Entered at Sun Feb 6 20:52:57 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Choclate Valentine. on You Tube, Levon drumming

Recorded this during the Woodstock session for School for Fools, March 02. I had Pepper add vox in late 03. Mastered a project that included this in early 04, was never happy with the mastering. So been sitting on it all this time. Meant to master the project again, never did. Decided to let this one out now. You can hear Levon count the song in.


Entered at Sun Feb 6 19:29:39 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: jh

Jan, I love the "Justin Bieber" haircuts. :-)


Entered at Sun Feb 6 17:05:25 CET 2011 from (76.67.19.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sorry....Here are Steppin' In It


Entered at Sun Feb 6 17:01:07 CET 2011 from (76.67.19.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

See News and Updates for musicians of Steppin' In It....I think this was posted before but here are the lyrics and song to "The Ghost of Richard Manuel"

The Ghost of Richard Manuel

"In a thousand empty bottles
In a hundred burned out cars
In a house up in the Catskills
In all the honky-tonks and bars
All the way across the airwaves
And all the way around this land
The ghost of Richard Manuel
Is walking like a natural man

Last night around the campfire
We got high on homemade wine
We passed around the guitar
Tried to sing “Whispering Pines”
And in every sweet falsetto
That was more than I could stand
Was the ghost of Richard Manuel
Walking like a natural man

Along the keys of my piano
In the kick and in the snare
In getting your kicks out of parlor tricks
In a hound dog’s hungry stare
He’s getting frozen up in Canada
And burned in the south land
The ghost of Richard Manuel
Still walking like a natural man

There’s a room full of nicotine poets
And three harmony guitars
A shopworn tack piano
And 32 bars
And a Victrola in the corner
Spinning “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”
And the ghost of Richard Manuel
Walking like a natural man

Hey Richard, won’t you sing us “Tears of Rage” just one more time"


Entered at Sun Feb 6 16:48:55 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

What a time in Atlantic City! I've been lucky enough to see Levon perform with the original lineup, the reformed Band, the various Barnburners rosters and now his Ramble band. Just incredible. What a talented group of top tier musicians. Larry Campbell and Jim Weider together.....wow.

And those drums......amazing.

Such a night.


Entered at Sun Feb 6 16:36:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elton & Leon

When Love is Dying by Elton John and Leon Russell might be the new single, as I’ve heard it twice in a week on radio. It’s my least favourite track on the album, a hackneyed generic 80s style big ballad. It’s the one BrianWilson adds backing vocals to as well. Listening to it earlier today on Radio 2 made me come home and look at the credits. The reason I looked was I thought the drumming was truly horrible – predictable and hackneyed. You know exactly when it would come in and that it would have that “BIG” sound. I'd define it as "the opposite of Levon." Then there’s a predictable bit of guitar near the end. I thought it has to be Elton John’s band reproducing his 70s / 80s live sound, but no. In fact the offenders are stellar musicians … Jim Keltner and Jay Bellerose on drums, and Marc Ribot and T-Bone Burnett on guitars. I don’t blame them at all, I just think it means they’re good enough to sound like Elton John Band 1975-85 when asked, at the drop of a hat!


Entered at Sun Feb 6 10:14:36 CET 2011 from (99.141.25.77)

Posted by:

Adam2

The current issue of Rolling Stone features an Elton John cover story. In the interview he mentions his obvious influences (Leon Russell, Delaney & Bonnie, The Band). He even lists Garth in a small group of keyboard influences, and mentions the Band playing a show in Connecticut and coming to see him play or visit with him in the early '70s.


Entered at Sun Feb 6 09:50:10 CET 2011 from (41.97.136.58)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Re: westcoaster

Paul Simon
the rest is in the link above, since i always cultived the opinion of Norm as being of those who have a perpetual impulse to willing to make everyone happy


Entered at Sat Feb 5 22:49:54 CET 2011 from (79.202.157.137)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: the raven

lou reed the raven (link).


Entered at Sat Feb 5 21:01:49 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Hair Peace

This site's house DJ has moved on, indeed, latest project is the electronica duo Kinee with girlfriend. Appearing at Oslo's by:Larm festival soon (see link above for photos). Way to go, young jedi!


Entered at Sat Feb 5 20:45:26 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Logic???

Who said anything about logic Empty?


Entered at Sat Feb 5 20:42:00 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: IIlkka's dog said so!

Hell ya.....Norwestcoaster, I forgot. Your not a Northsea Chinaman, your a Finn. Now I remember telling you about our little Finnish town Sointula here. That is where a lot of my Finn, fishermen buddies live.

I wasn't bullying yuh. Those goofy nick names are what we all use. They are harmless. I still kinda think you might ba an A-rab tho' wanting all that oil. Besides, what 'er you doing letting your mum hang out with Adolf Hitler and his hoodlums for anyway? That's just not right.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 20:37:22 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The End of the Line

Thanks Joan. Life sure in hell isn't fair a lot of the time is it. I spoke with Wayne's mum just this morning. We have be friends our entire lives. About 1976 I worked with Wayne in a logging camp. He has worked for my frineds outfit now for about 25 years, ever since that boy of his was a baby. Wayne was a good logger, and excellent machine operator. Always very careful and safe. He told his mumhe is through with the bush now, he can't go back there. I don't blame him at all, but what a shit of a way for a man to end his career.

So....at the end of the line, our family and our friends are all we really have, all that is important. Just as Marge has her children to keep the feeling of her husband close and the love from those kids.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 19:09:44 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Norm

My condolences to you and your family. That is a very sad tale indeed.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 18:12:53 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.149)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Times Like These

Westie, My kids are amazing. They have so much of their dad in them. Sometimes it blows me away. And yet, they are hurting so much. Time, I guess, will be the great healer. Thanks for your thoughts.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 17:22:09 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Face the Music

Thanks for the link, BEG, to Paul Simon's new "The Afterlife" and Robbie's "He Don't Live here No more". The idea of voting one against the other reminded me of that LP in 1964 "The Beatles v The Four Seasons" where each had a side. The songs aren't similar in style, so comparison is odd. Apparently Paul Simon has suddenly decided he doesn't like bass guitar and is banishing it from the new album. He says he doesn't mind indistinct blurred bass, like early rock. It's odd for a guy who used brilliant bass parts on Hearts & Bones and Graceland. Maybe the old low frequencies are going instead of the usual high ones from his ageing ear.

Both Robbie and Paul have written better songs than either of the two in the contest. I'll leave it there.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 16:03:09 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Life's Trials

Thank you Marge. I hope you are able to keep holding up well. These things are so difficult. I lost my brother at age 21 to a logging accident like this. I don't think my Dad ever really got over it. I expect your children are a great help to you through this time.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 15:35:19 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.149)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Westcoaster

My deepest sympathies to you, and your friends and family. Life can sometimes be incredibly cruel.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 14:33:35 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: LATE NIGHT & BAND OF JOY

Robert Plant,Buddy Miller,Patty Griffin & the rest of the Band of Joy put on a great performance on the Letterman show.One of the most amazing bands around today. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEavtOGQdlQ


Entered at Sat Feb 5 12:28:17 CET 2011 from (41.97.210.166)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

westcoaster: "where do you find this stuff?" the answer is easy if you take it logically : in youtube [enjoy the link]
just kidding, actually I find it in wikipedia

David P: great mixed-references of Jim Gordon, thanks

NorthWestCoaster: I'll always remember the [best] quote I've heard from a very clever good friend of mine "everything ending by 'ism' is a calamity"


Entered at Sat Feb 5 11:25:25 CET 2011 from (90.239.107.120)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Highway Capitalism Revisited

NORTHSEA CHINAMAN, don't let gb bullying get you down! Just like the potentator from Commonwealth once answered to the late gb regular Steve: "We know him and we can control him."

The REAL capitalism is this: During the Internet boom I was a succesful investor. After the crash I losed the money. That was FAIR! - The REAL capitalism is NOT this: During the real estate boow in the US these Wall Street guys earned a fortune. After a crash... well it is you US tax payers who are paying in the long term. I was chocked when I read FORBES list of the twenty most miserable cities in the USA. I had visited more than a half of them in the nineties when CLINTON was President. They were good cities, at least for a tourist.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 10:32:46 CET 2011 from (90.239.101.240)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Capitalism

Westcoaster, somehow I must have missed this NORTHSEA CHINAMAN in gb whom you refer as a capitalist. However, this reminds me of my first political meeting in 1956. I don't remember anything of it but according to my late mother the legendary Finnish President Urho Kekkonen, accused to have been KGB agent, said:

"Even if every state in the world turn to communism Finland will still have capitalism."

BTW my late mother had watched - as a foreign pharmacy student in Leipzig - another biggie Adolf Hitler speak on a local square in the late thirties. A show for the lifetime!


Entered at Sat Feb 5 04:36:13 CET 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

Robin Latzman

Location: N.Y and Florida..U.S.A

Subject: lover of the Music

This music nurtured my soul when it needed it most..as an almost adult


Entered at Sat Feb 5 02:54:40 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Disraeli Gears

Sorry, wrong info re NPR but here's a link to 'Tales of Brave Ulysses' from the Smothers Brothers. Probably all I need to hear of Cream anyway.



Entered at Sat Feb 5 01:48:57 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Is it me, or does that sound at the very beginning of that RR song sound almost exactly like Billy Joel - "Miami 2017" I think. Just a thought that hit me.


Entered at Sat Feb 5 00:42:20 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.59)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks sadavid.

joebase wrote: "any word on a deluxe issue. there's some other artwork on his facebook page that looks like there could be although doesn't specify it as such."

"I think you're referring to the alternate artwork taken from the advance promo CD..."


Entered at Sat Feb 5 00:27:56 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.59)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Face the Music!

Paul Simon vs. Robbie Robertson

"Two music legends have new songs. Which do you like more?"


Entered at Sat Feb 5 00:20:02 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: ...on the other hand

Westie, you know your business, but around here nobody is doing any pruning. And yellow is the color of the snow where some critter peed, so I always just kick some fresh powder over it and keep on walking along in my snowshoes. I've been sleeping inside since before Christmas.

I watched that movie "Carny" and, although I enjoyed Robbie's acting, it is kind of a downer. I guess running away to join the circus doesn't appeal to me anymore. It looked like a tough way to make a living.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 23:06:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Garden Party

Lars! I know you'll find this hard to comprehend, but it's 56 degrees by your thermometer here today. I been out working in the garden stripping all the dead leaf and limb from all the plants. Many are peeking their heads above ground, including the rhubarb. February is a very fickle month here tho'. You can't get too ambitious. It can suddenly turn and dump a pile of snow on yuh.

I been trying to cheer myself up out there. Singing a couple of old tunes. Yellow is the colour of my true loves hair, and Fox on the Run.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 22:33:29 CET 2011 from (75.35.45.129)

Posted by:

Julie Barnoski

Location: Chicago, Il

Subject: I love The Band! I must have watched The Last Waltz a hundred times!


Entered at Fri Feb 4 22:30:18 CET 2011 from (75.35.45.129)

Posted by:

Julie Barnoski

Subject: I love The Band! I must have watched The Last Waltz a hundred times!


Entered at Fri Feb 4 21:49:15 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jim Gordon

Norm: You're correct, Mr. Gordon's first big gig was a tour with the Everly Brothers right after he graduated from high school. Hal Blaine was impressed with his talent and later began recommending him for his overflow sessions calls, and he soon became a fixture in the L.A. studio scene.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 20:41:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A long time ago

David; My first memory of Jim Gordon (which seemed to slide into my head while having brunch with Susan just now). He was playing drums for the Everley Brothers wasn't he. I don't know if that was his start.

I just got a real kick in the nuts. It doesn't matter what little trials and tribulations come your way. They soon seem like nothing to the problems others face. Sometimes too close to home.

I have a cousin, Wayne. We hadn't seen each other in a long time. He is a logger working for another friend of mine who owns a fair size logging outfit. Last year they called me to come and move their equipment. So I'm standing on my barge when this fellow is loading a huge grapple yarder aboard. He gets out of the machine climbs down the ladder and gives me a hug. It's my cousin Wayne.

Last week Wayne's son Kenny was killed. Just now I phoned my old mum to see how she's feeling. Wayne's mum and mine are best friends. Mum told me what happened. Wayne was yarding in a turn of logs. A log slid out of the grapple, rolled down the hill. Kenny was working in the landing. The log rolled right on him. Wayne had to get out of his machine, take a chain saw and saw the log off his son. Kenny was 25, with four little children, and to make it even worse his wife had just been diagnosed with breast cancer. This is too gawd damn hard. I got to muster the guts to call Wayne and figure out what in hell I'm going to say to him.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 20:09:34 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Music for a world in crisis

It's amazing how topical this Kingston Trio number from about 50 years ago is. Some thing never change. "They're rioting in Africa, there's strife in Iran..."


Entered at Fri Feb 4 20:05:05 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bing, Pow, Boom, Bing!

Bayou Sam: Perhaps Mr. Gordon was angered over Mr. Clapton's unplugged version of "Layla", a song for which the drummer received co-writing credit for contributing the piano coda at the end. Mr. Gordon in prison, however, continues to earn considerable royalties, presumably deposited in some sort of trust account, for "Layla" and countless other music credits. Martin Scorsese chose to use the piano outro from "Layla" in a key scene at the end of "Goodfellas", where numerous bodies are discovered of those who Robert De Niro's character Jimmy Conway ordered wacked.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 19:38:42 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jim Gordon

The list of Jim Gordon's accomplishments from the days of Delaney & Bonnie is far too long to remember it all. However one that forever stands out in my mind, is his work with Mason Williams on Classical Gas.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 19:10:47 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Jim Gordon

Jim Gordon is indeed one of the most unfortunate stories of rock and roll. The was was so good, and so respected at one time. I read somewhere that when Clapton was "cleaning up" at one of those award ceremonies (the unplugged/Tears in Heaven era), Gordon was watching it on TV and getting extremely angry at EC for whatever reason. Strange, and sad.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 18:52:27 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Clairvoyant" official album cover . . .

. . . according to this Facebook page.

The mysterious, hooded figure carries a copy of the freebie _The Whole Person Calendar of Events in Southern California_, which is "distributed monthly throughout Southern California and serves as a calendar of wholistic activities." Available at your local health food store (if you're in SoCal) or at wholepersoncalendar.com (if you're not).


Entered at Fri Feb 4 18:25:05 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mad Dogs.....back where it all began

Y'know David, I was thinking of that very thing while I was typing. I think that was pretty much my first exposure to those guys. Living where I did, we got 1 TV channel in those days, very little radio. In 1973, I moved from the north Island back to Sechelt. Bought my self this big waterfront home, and for the first time had cablevision. About 20 channels that you could actually see without snow. Also unlimited radio. Then my education in music really began.

Where has that old Northsea Chinaman been? Out walking that dog I guess. See your a capitalist just like everybody else. Got to have that oil and gas to be rolling in money. Are you sure your not an Arab??


Entered at Fri Feb 4 18:06:52 CET 2011 from (90.239.64.52)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: westcoaster: "I got some great real estate in Egypt and Yemen and Jordan. I can make you a hell of deal......so...whatdayasay? "

I say: "maybe". It depends on if nature gas or oil pipelines go thru your property. Just like my favorite US President said for thirty years ago: "To keep the energy transports in our control will be our main priority."

Footnote: Yes, that's the one, The Band fan.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 17:57:52 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Click Clack

In recording & film synchronization, what's known as a click track, acting as a metronome, is often used. (Not to be confused with the late Captain Beefheart's great song "Click Clack" :-)

Norm: As you know, the dream team of Jim Keltner & Jim Gordon, along with additional percussionists Chuck Blackwell & Sandy Konikoff, performed together as part of Joe Cocker's Mad Dogs & Englishmen revue led by Leon Russell. As the story goes, Jim Keltner was slated to join Eric Clapton, Bobby Whitlock and Carl Radle in Derek & The Dominos, but Jim Gordon eased his way by being on the spot first in England when Mr. Keltner was delayed doing session work in L.A.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 17:28:12 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Perhaps behind the time...

Peter: The sprechstimme style was most notably used by Arnold Schoenberg for "Pierrot Lunaire" in 1912. Van Dyke Parks mentioned that he learned to perform Schoenberg's melodramatic piece at the age of 12.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 17:27:13 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Metronome & Sundry useless musings

Man.......Empty, where do you find this stuff? I HATE metronomes. They are annoying.....and.....your listening to your life tick away.

Funny ....David mentions Jim Keltner again, who I was just thinking of yesterday after JQ commented about the Texas Tornadoes. A real great video to watch on youtube, is a concert Ry Cooder did. His backing band is, "Moula Banda Rythm Aces. The band consists of Flaco Jimmenez, Jim Keltner, Van Dyke Parks, and a couple other guys whose names my feeble old mind won't remember at the moment.

For me the greatest song to watch them play, and the Spanish rythm they fall into with that button accordian Flaco is playing, is my all time favourite song. Maria Elena. Those guys are so good, I watch them overe & over. I wonder if there is any body Jim Keltner hasn't played with. Watching the Travelling Wilburys, like End of the Line with Keltner is also great.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 17:18:37 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: blausprechen

Could be almost a Basement Tapes boot track . . . .


Entered at Fri Feb 4 17:05:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sitting in the back seat …

I was thinking about that earlier in the week. I heard "Somewhere down The Crazy River" on BBC Radio 2 for the second time in a couple of weeks … so it must have made the alleged current "1000 golden oldies" list. Anyway, I was thinking how much like so much rap / urban stuff it is … not in style, but because you have a long semi-spoken verse followed by a melodic chorus (adding another singer). The DJ said something about it being "unusual and ahead of its time" and I guess that's what he meant.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 16:19:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

While reading an interview with Van Dyke Parks I ran across a musical term he used, which could be used to describe the singing style often used by Robbie. It's a German term, "sprechstimme", which means spoken-voice. It describes a style, often used for dramatic effect, in which the melody is spoken in rhythm at approximate pitches, rather than sung in precise pitch.

Empty Now: Among his esteemed peers, such as Hal Blaine and Jim Keltner, drummer Jim Gordon was known as the "human metronome". Sadly, Mr. Gordon's own mental pulses led him to tragedy and a sad end to his career as a musician.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 15:36:19 CET 2011 from (41.97.218.85)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Metronome - Band Connection (a short stepping into athletics games)

Q: why most of world records in long distance races (1500m and above) are broken in Oslo, IAAF meeting ?
A: because the athletics public of Oslo is the most connoisseur in the world

Translation :
Unlike music, it is easy to recognize the runner's rhythm: it's each time one foot of him touches the track.
besides the tactical aspects of long distance races, the rhythm of a runner is of prime importance. Tactics could be primordial in a grouped race, the right speed being resolved by team effect. The common situation of someone running after a world record is to rapidly escape the group. then for the solitary racer, even the most well trained, it's really difficult when impossible to fix the exact speed for the record, too fast he tires, too slow he fails. the individual mental metronome is not enough.
In how many competitions have us seen the spectators clapping hands as the champion increases the distance beyond his competitors and approaches the record. Technically this is less an encouraging than a help. Remains one problem, do the public know on behalf of the athlete the exact hand clapping interval for the record ? For many athletes coming from the seven seas, in Oslo it worked, information recorded and verifiable.
On a humoristic note about the complex parameters interaction in distance races, and emphasizing the importance of the rhythm, in a right after race TV-interview, a coach from a former Eastern country commented the defeat of his athlete : "good tactic, bad tictac"
voila, unlike my posts, what's well thought is clearly stated.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 11:19:30 CET 2011 from (41.97.218.85)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Metronome, as a "musician's device that clicks audibly at exactly timed intervals as an aid to keeping correct tempo" was first experienced in 1812 by Dutch inventor Dietrich Nikolaus Winkel.
Johann Nepomuk Maelzel, German musician and inventor, after some technical adjustments, registered a patent in England on December 15, 1815, "Patent granted to John Maelzel, of Polland Street, in the county of Middlesex, for his Instrument or Instruments Machine or Machines, for the Improvement of all Musical Performance which he denominates a Metronome or Musical-Time-Keeper"


Entered at Fri Feb 4 10:42:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I always have a "current iTunes playlist" and a favourite last year was Jackson Browne and David Lindley doing Love Is Strange, which turns into Stay. Two great songs welded together for their live album. I saw Jackson Browne a few years ago, and he had an exemplary band. It was also sold out, and the audience seemed to mouth along to the words of every song, which mildly surprised me. He was also one of the "over 50% women" crowds (like James Taylor & Paul Simon & Leonard Cohen) , which I've noted before usually means more melodic songs and an absence of dull guitar heroics and drum solos.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 05:08:50 CET 2011 from (122.105.246.43)

Posted by:

Jeff Camilleri

Location: Australia
Web: My link

Subject: Music

Hi all, Jeff here from Australia. I saw the Last Waltz for the first time last week. What great musicianship. Was totally blown away. Thanks Band. Forever an ongoing inspiration. Cheers, Jeff


Entered at Fri Feb 4 04:55:13 CET 2011 from (72.237.79.129)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: accordion... keyboard? As we say in zydeco, "Yeah, ya right!"

JQ, the piano note accordion is considered a keyboard instrument. I'm less sure about the cajun single note, double note or triple button accordion. Flaco played "all dem kinds". In '89 when Smitty was sick we went to see David Lindley & El Rayo-X. We knew he would have someone great sitting in on keyboards. It was the incomparable Ian McLagen.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 03:24:20 CET 2011 from (138.88.150.3)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro D.C.

Subject: huh?

Jeff, I'm assuming you meant Jan H.

I'm "all Robbie, all the time."

J.F.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 02:53:08 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Location: Songwriting Royalties in the current digital age
Web: My link


Entered at Fri Feb 4 02:47:39 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Songwriting Royalties in the current digital age


Entered at Fri Feb 4 02:46:02 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Pat B: Have you ever found that track online? Roth and Kal David did some great stuff together on Merryweather's "Vacuum Cleaner" LP and I suspect that Ed's involved somehow when Kal David comes to town.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 01:49:20 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Not Barry McGuire.Pr


Entered at Fri Feb 4 00:58:53 CET 2011 from (76.66.126.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson headed to The Queen

JANUARY 31ST, 2011
AUTHOR: RYAN CORMIER

"Co-founder of The Band, Robbie Robertson, will come to Market Street for a special taping of “World Cafe with David Dye,” which will be recorded live on The Queen’s stage in front of an audience and aired in syndication at a later date.

Robertson’s appearance in Delaware will come about a month after the scheduled release of his first solo album in 13 years, called “How To Become Clairvoyant.”

Among the guest musicians on the album: Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, Rage Against the Machine’s Tom Morello, Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor and Robert Randolph.

While Robertson will not be performing at the conference, acts already announced include New York Dolls, Devotchka, G. Love, John Popper and his new band, Duskray Troubadors, and James McCartney, Paul McCartney’s singer/songwriter son. More acts are expected to be announced soon.

Robertson’s talk will be open to the public via weekend-long passes that are expected to go on sale in the next month or two. Last year, passes cost $75 for one or $100 for two, giving pass holders access to all musical performances over the weekend. This year’s pricing has not yet been decided."


Entered at Fri Feb 4 00:57:05 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Tornados

Jeez, JQ, we went thru' Doug Sahm & company from one end to the other quite a while back. There's nothing wrong with doing more of it tho'.

Doug Sahm spent a couple of years up here living at Shanaugan Lake on Vancouver Island. Used to show up at a pub here and there and throw in with the locals and play some music.

There is one great video, they did when they played, "Is Any body Goin' to San Antone", where most of 'em grew up. They are walking around the place as the song plays, reminicing over the way things were when they grew up there. Always been my favourites. I watch their youtube videos a lot.


Entered at Fri Feb 4 00:43:39 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.239)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Keyboards

Another really fun band that played smaller venues in the early 90's was the Texas Tornedos. Augie Meyers and his Vox rig, along with Flaco Jiminez's accordian, defined that group's instrumental sound. To me, A. Meyer's style was always a very happy, roller-rink type of deal.

Is the accordion classified as a keyboard instrument?


Entered at Fri Feb 4 00:27:23 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Over & Over & Over again...........

The eastern world it is explodin' violence flarin' bullets loadin'..........

It's gettin' way too musical around here.......hey listen, I got some great real estate in Egypt and Yemen and Jordan. I can make you a hell of deal......so...whatdayasay?


Entered at Fri Feb 4 00:21:23 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

"Ed Roth--known here for having played accordian on Lanois' Acadie"....

Bill M, as you know this should have read "Ed Roth--known here for his insane organ tone on Merryweather's "I Need Love". Please keep this straighPr


Entered at Thu Feb 3 23:39:44 CET 2011 from (32.177.20.69)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: El Rayo X

David Lindley's group was based in LA so I got to see them frequently. Smitty was a great part of that band. When he got sick his replacement for awhile was Ian McLagen

They were always a genuine blast; they were the regular New Year's Eve act at the Coachhouse in San Juan Capistrano - we lived close enough so that, on busy nights, it was faster for me to go home to take a leak and then back in under 10 minutes.

That first record: El Rayo X, remains terrific and has a regular place on the top of my record stack -


Entered at Thu Feb 3 23:09:03 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

RtO: Smitty's hard to find under his own name on YouTube, but he's on lots of Ry Cooder clips there. Also played with Dylan. Was/is, as Peter M says, very much revered among musicians. He comes in for a solo around 5:40 of this YouTube audio clip from Eric Mercury's great second LP, "Funky Sounds", produced by Steve Cropper. If you poke around the Mercury clips you'll find "Lonely Girl", on which Smitty's the organist. It's said to be one of the more sought-after items among Northern Soulites. Unfortunately this clip doesn't include the flipside, "Lonely Girl Part 2" (shades of our previous discussion!), which is mostly instrumental. Smitty was a regular at the Bluenote on Yonge Street back in the day, so likely jammed with our guys when they dropped in after hours.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 22:32:38 CET 2011 from (72.237.79.129)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: Mr Dave

Charlie Y, amazing! I was gonna add the same comment about David Lindley's "Garthlike" qualities, but as I had gone on a bit long winded, I edited my comments. By the way, have you noticed that this conversation is among "first name/last initial" guys (Joe J, bob w, Charlie Y, Bill M, Peter M)? And Bill, thanks for the mention of the great Reverend Smitty!


Entered at Thu Feb 3 21:51:48 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I second Charlie Y's emotion re the magics of Lindley and Hudson. Both men can be found on the title song to Lindley's "El Rayo-X" album - though most keyboards are played - RtO note - by the late great William 'Smitty' Smith. I see that another song on that album was written by Nancy Lindley (the wife of, one assumes) and Solomon Feldthouse, a fellow veteran of the daring Kaleidoscope group of the late '60s / early '70s. I believe that Feldthouse, or at least a couple of other Kaleidoscopers, played on Bruce Palmer's most excellent solo LP from 1971, along with Rick James (best known here for having been saved from a beating on Yonge Street by Levon and Garth and/or Robbie) and Ed Roth (known here for having played accordion on Daniel Lanois' "Acadie").


Entered at Thu Feb 3 20:10:41 CET 2011 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: David Lindley

I agree about David Lindley. I got to see him do a solo show in a small club a few years back and he was AMAZING--and he was very nice to fans who greeted him after the performance. I've seen Jackson Browne a few times over the years but the one time without Mr. Lindley in his band just wasn't the same. To me Mr. Lindley adds the same sort of magic to a band that Garth does--not fully appreciated until it isn't there.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 19:47:42 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: I think everyone should have Rotary Connection's first album for "Soul Man" and the "Lady Jane" / "Like A Rolling Stone" near-medley. Their LARS is my second-favourite version - after the Dylan/Hawks live in Manchester one but before Dylan's studio 45.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 19:42:08 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the turtle pond

Subject: Jackson Browne

Joe J, I have to second what my neighbor, Bob W said about Jackson Browne. Here comes a twisted tale about that. For years, my wife and I were big fans of his, only to gradually realize that for us, the big draw was the musical spice added to his ensemble by David Lindley. The entire late '70's, early '80's band was really something else, with Russ Kunkel on drums, Leland Sklar on bass, Rosemary Butler & Doug Haywood on background vocals, Craig Doerge on keyboards, Danny Kortchmar on guitar, and David Lindley on guitar, pedal steel, fiddle and some other stuff that were only instruments when put in Mr Dave's hands. What an impressive and capable lineup that was! As the '80's and the 90's rolled on, the band got trimmed down to a 4 piece, a 3 piece, or even a duo. When Lindley was not a part of the act, my interest waned. Meanwhile, we went out to see Lindley in El Rayo-X, then duetting with Hani Nasser or Wally Ingram, or solo. Always one of my favorite musicians anywhere. My (now)21 year old son used to request El Rayo-X's "Mercury Blues" or "Werewolves of London" on the car stereo when we were driving him to kindergarten. Well, Mr Dave plays a lot on the west coast these days, but he gets to the east coast less frequently. 4 summers ago my son & I drove 100 miles or so to see him in the Mauch Chunk Opera House in Jim Thorpe, Pa. What a great time that was. My kid got the honor of helping the guitar tech put away some of David's priceless stringed instruments. Last September, with 3 years between Lindley shows, I checked his schedule. He was due to play the Tower Theater as part of Jackson Browne's band. I took a chance, thinking that he'd get to do a few of his own songs, anyway. Well, it turned out that he was highly featured, and over half the material was his stuff or Jackson's songs that depend on his touch. I was incidentally so impressed with Jackson Browne this time, that I'd go see him even without Mr Dave next time.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 19:28:49 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Upon the beach where hound dogs bay...

And there's Ashes & Sand, the name of Bob Dylan's old production company.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 18:51:19 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, yup, Charles Stepney was the producer/arranger for Rotary Connection and his playing is all over their albums. I haven't listened to that stuff in years and I only have their "covers" album which includes The Weight. I saw them a bunch, including a concert in my high school gym, and we all knew Minnie was gonna be a star. Saw her a bunch too, just as she was taking off. She had an allstar Chicago band backing her, including the spectacular Cash McCall. She and her husband Dick Rudolph also lived next door to my brother in law when he was a kid--he and his mother babysat Maya.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 17:49:52 CET 2011 from (90.239.101.204)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Jackson Browne

Thanks BOB W. for the good news. Jackson Browne comes to Nordic Countries from time to time. I am very restrictive in visiting the concerts of oldies. I like to keep the good memories instead. Maybe I buy the tickets next time!


Entered at Thu Feb 3 17:38:02 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

I saw the Decemberists last Friday in concert for the third time and, as always, it was a great show. They only played for about an hour and 10 minutes and we found out later that Colin Meloy had the flu. Other than the shortened set we never would have known; they were energetic and spirited as always. On this tour the band is augmented by Sara Watkins, formerly of Nickel Creek, who helps out with fiddle and rhythm guitar while singing the female harmony parts performed by Gillian Welch on the new album.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 16:48:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And raisin cookies.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 16:39:58 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: I see that Karkwa's "Les Chemins de Verre" got a Juno nomination - unlike my other favourites from 2010: the new Garth and the new Fred Eaglesmith. Anyway, Karwa certainly deserves it. I pulled it out for a couple listens after a long break and it's still a brilliant effort, with echoes of Pink Floyd, Robert Charlebois, Arcade Fire, David Bowie, Spirit and even ...

Pat B: ... early Rotary Connection!! If you can find a way to hear track 8, "La Piqure" I'm sure you'll think you're listening to Charles Stepney.

So much to think about regarding the "Cripple Creek" and "Raising Sand" posts. Not only are there the trad CC and our guys' "Up on CC", there's also Skip Spence's "Cripple Creek" on "Oar". I liked the follow-on YouTube links to Peter Tork and Billy Connolly banjoising on the traditional song. Tork is, I believe, the closest thing there was to a Canadian Monkee, his professor father having been serving a sentence at the U of Saskatchewan at the time of their arrival on the pop scene.

Those southerners - they have poundin' sand, raisin' sand, raisin' cane, raisin' Cain (though that's most famously a Springsteenism), not-raisin' Caine (when he's in defeat), raisin' in the sun ...


Entered at Thu Feb 3 16:21:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David … don't forget the 45. As I mentioned on Monday, the B-side of the "January Hymn" vinyl 45 is a take on "Row, Jimmy, Row" running to six minutes.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 15:41:03 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Pale the winter days after dark...

My local music store had the vinyl version of The Decemberists "The King Is Dead" in stock last evening, so I couldn't resist picking up a copy. Upon my first two listenings (back-to-back), I was very impressed with the group's new effort. With the aid of guests Gillian Welch and Peter Buck, the album's finely-crafted songs immediately had me entranced. I don't know if the sessions were recorded with digital or analog equipment, but the presentation on LP certainly adds a layer of analog warmth that fully compliments the group's folk/rock sound. This is a record that seems to reveal more enjoyment with each listen, so it will no doubt receive repeated spins on my Pro-Ject turntable in the upcoming pale winter days.

With regards to Garth's gear over the years, there's a link above to Kerrin's fine article on that subject.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 14:58:36 CET 2011 from (69.177.242.210)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Garth & Synths

According to the liner notes for the 2001 remastered CD of NLSC, Garth was using “the new synthesizer technologies, including an RMI computer keyboard, ARP and Roland monophonic solo synths, a mini-Moog, an ARP string ensemble and the new Lowery Symphonizer”


Entered at Thu Feb 3 12:46:36 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Joe J, I'm a big fan of Jackson Browne and have seen him three times over the past five years. The shows were wonderful. He has been performing both solo acoustic and with a full band that includes the great David Lindley. Not sure which is scheduled for your area but I've seen both and enjoyed both. He's still in good voice and has an amazing collection of songs.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 11:50:25 CET 2011 from (61.68.48.75)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Weighing in on a subject i know nothing about.. but hey...

It wouldn't surprise me if Garth got his Lowrey sounding like a synth, just for effect. Synths were, you'll remember, highly controversial - only Townshend, Garth and a few others in the major acts used them - it took good ol' boys from Texas (ZZ Top in the late 80s, well after they'd become an acceptable instrument) to bring them to a blues album (a NY blues band, or a London blues band would have been crucified.) Of course, some acts used synths to sound 'cutting edge' (One band used a touch phone to get synth effects...)

So, while not knowing, it wouldn't surprise me if Garth tweaked the Lowrey to sound like a synth, just to see if he could get teh effect. Having said that, it wouldn't surprise me if he used a Moog, or a Roland or a Korg, either... David P will know.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 10:13:28 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Damn, Jan, are you becoming bipolar? I just noticed a reference to Robbie on What's New. Next, you'll refer to Levon as Helm. ..... I think you've done that already :-)


Entered at Thu Feb 3 10:07:27 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Joe, last time i saw Jackson Browne perform was in 85, 86 or 87. at the Sullivan County fairgrounds. It was a very good show. Back this past fall I saw Danny Kortchmar play for three hours in a small bar, now that was a treat. Kootch was part of JB's team, when JB was peaking commercially.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 09:09:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks … The Decemberists … I'll try, though we have a family birthday this afternoon UK time.

Thanks to IA for that Greil Marcus review of NLSC. Still one of my favourite albums. Is it a "souped-up Lowrey" though? I thought he was playing around with early synths by then?


Entered at Thu Feb 3 03:50:28 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Emphasis, Bama Baby

Don't Be.... is country or urban depending upon who is using it, and it is definitely vernacular , slang, etc, and ,meant to be more threatening. Contemporary Urban:Don't be thinking you all that, mutha fucka, or you be the bug &i be the windshield.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 01:36:55 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: The Decembrists

FY1: They will be the musical guests tomorrow (Feb 3) on "Q" (Steve's beloved CBC programme). Host Jian Ghomeshi is really big on their new album and is predicting it will be considered one of the best albums of the year. It airs on CBC ONE at 10 am. in all Canadian time zones. I hope Peter V. will notice this in time and catch the show via the internet. NB

PS. Thanks Bill M., for the reposting of the article you co-wrote on "Saved" by the Northernbluesmusic Gospel Allstars.


Entered at Thu Feb 3 00:49:04 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Jackson Browne

Jackson Browne is coming my way in a few weeks. Not a big JB fan and the timing's not good but I'm looking for a little positive feedback to tip the scales. Anyone seen the man in concert in the last couple years?


Entered at Wed Feb 2 23:38:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sometimes "all standing" is pure financial greed (see "Bob Dylan" packing 5000 standing into a 3000 seater). Sometimes as with Fleetwood Mac, it's ego stroking, like the orchestrated three rows only standing at the front for Lindsey Buckingham to get worshipped by (spoiling the show for another 100 rows).

Sometimes it's just a club / small venue without seats, and that's OK. You don't have to go. We're risking it for The Decemberists in March.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 22:48:34 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Joan - when I see shows at a venue (aside from lawn seats)I get first row mezanine. Folks can stand all they want and they aren't getting in my way. If I can't get those, Itry to find something that will come close to the same effect - if that can't happen, I'll try to catch them next time.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 22:47:20 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR

RR's playing on that u-tube clip of Cripple Creek was terrific.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 22:14:25 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Raising Sand

"Well, I stand up next to a mountain
And I chop it down with the edge of my hand
Well, I pick up all the pieces and make an island
Might even raise a little sand."

--Jimi Hendrix "Voodoo Child"

sadavid: James Gideon Tanner is one of Georgia's famed musicians. Down here in the South, "raising sand" means to raise hell, as in kick up some sand in exuberance or anger.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 22:00:51 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Buffy takes a bow

Buffy Sainte Marie plays the mouth bow and sings "Cripple Creek." Additional vocals by Fred the Wonder Horse.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 21:53:28 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: have axe, will paddle

thanks for that video, BEG, 'tho it's a little painful at times -- ol' PG looked a little chablissed-out there, but his solo was at least competent, unlike some of the singers . . . was that J. Taplin? . . . a goddamn impossible way of life . . . .

I was inspired to seek out the old-school "Cripple Creek" (see [My link]). As has been pointed out before, the lines "goin' up Cripple Creek / goin' in a run / goin' up Cripple Creek / have a little fun" suggest that the song's DNA showed up in "Goin' to Acapulco" before it came to The Brown Album. The Skillet Lickers' version is the only one I know of that has a verse about "raising sand."


Entered at Wed Feb 2 21:38:53 CET 2011 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro DC

Jeff, the grammar police? I think maybe Jan H. was correct. I could, however, be wrong, but I'm of German ancestry so . . . what's wrong with being Swedish?

PSB in Philly: you are correct, sir. That concert had to be in 1978 as I was pregnant with little J.C. at the time and he was born in 1979 so I don't think I went to many concerts in '79.

J.F.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 20:40:03 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Don't BE calling us Swedes


Entered at Wed Feb 2 19:34:15 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: IA and rude auduences

Welcome to the GB IA. hope you will stick around.

Peter V: One of my pet peeves is going to a show and paying for good tickets upfront and having people stand up in front. I like Mrs V am 5 feet tall and I have a bad back so I can't stand for a long time. The result: I just don't go to big shows anymore. The venue I saw Ollabelle is just the right size, About 400 seats, all with a good sightline.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 19:29:22 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.228)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Once again...Photos honouring Robbie that night at the 2008 Founders Award benefiting the EMP|SFM's youth-based education programs.
(November 19, 2008).

Could you add these photos to your site Jan?


Entered at Wed Feb 2 19:14:59 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.228)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Once again then.....Sorry....I don't like the singing here at all but..around five minutes....Robbie and Allen jammin'. Allen's having some fun with Robbie on stage, but all his wealth can't give him the talent that Robbie developed as a songwriter and musician. His wealth, however.....gave him the opportunity to play guitar with Robbie. ;-D


Entered at Wed Feb 2 18:18:47 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: life imitates art imitates life is a carnival

This article makes the point that the "freak show" is still with us, only now it's on the idiot box rather than under the big top.

Just to close the loop, there's a trailer for "a new reality-tv show based on the day-in and and day-out of some of the hardest working men and women in show-biz!" at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vS649_0_VEM&feature=related


Entered at Wed Feb 2 18:14:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And Paul Allen had Robbie's guitar on his office wall? I'm sure I read that somewhere.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 17:55:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Waltzing with Paul

Paul Allen received credit on the 2002 UA/MGM remastered DVD version of "The Last Waltz" and the companion Warner/Rhino 4-CD box set. My guess is that he helped fund the meticulous remixing for the projects. As mentioned here in the past, Robbie is a friend of the billionaire, who co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates. They both worked at DreamWorks, where Mr. Allen was a major, behind-the-scenes investor.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 16:16:48 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Grease

RTO: I saw the Hampton Grease Band perform countless times back in the day down here in Georgia. Both Glenn Phillips and the late Harold Kelling were amazing guitarists. Glenn favored an old Gibson Flying V, Harold played a Mosrite in the Ventures tradition and they both used Echoplexes. I remember seeing them play at the Bottom of the Barrel club in Atlanta after their Columbia "Music To Eat" double-LP was released. The band did a set where Bruce Hampton lip-synced along with one side of the album played over the house sound system. The rest of the group pantomimed their parts, with Glenn & Harold turning up the volume of their guitars every so often to duplicate their solos. HGB blended flawless, jazz/rock musicianship with a theatre of the absurb stage act. Having seen them opened for the Allman Brothers Band many times, I know that Duane Allman was a big fan. One memorable concert I attended featured them opening for the Grateful Dead in 1970 at the Sports Arena, where the Dead were later joined onstage by the Allman Brothers for an amazing set that included Duane & Jerry Garcia taking "Dark Star" to new heights. But I digress.

There's an indirect link to The Band. Col. Bruce Hampton (Ret.) appeared in Billy Bob Thornton "Sling Blade". He played Morris, a songwriter who was joined by Vic Chesnutt in the film's segment where Doyle (Dwight Yoakam) has a drunken jam session with his band that included drummer Mickey Jones.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 16:16:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Paul Allen gets thanked profusely so must have bankrolled it, but it IS unusually thorough remastering … the sort of thing The Beatles, Beach Boys might expect from Capitol. Have Capitol done the same for Glen Campbell, Bobbie Gentry and Steve Miller Band? They were probably the contemporary sellers at the same time. I'd suspect there is a mixture of prestige (from Capitol) and philanthropy (from Paul Allen). There is kudos tied to certain labels … which is why recent Paul Weller 45 rpm singles come as repro Island 60s and 70s discs. If that aura attaches to a label, you get better submissions from new artists.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 15:23:30 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: philanthropy theory

I still say the remasters project was underwritten by P.G. Allen (guitar and chief writer for Seattle's "The Grown Men"). I don't think Capitol would have done it otherwise; there's no entry for 'prestige' on the balance sheet . . . .


Entered at Wed Feb 2 15:15:12 CET 2011 from (67.158.178.219)

Posted by:

Lil

lol.... I knew the "swede" thing would do it :-)

Hope everyone stays safe in all this ice and snow.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 14:01:25 CET 2011 from (158.39.165.125)

Posted by:

jh

Testing after removal of entries and some IP-blocking. Go spew your hate and stupidity somewhere else, start your own blog, maybe get a life, but just stay away from here. And don't call us Swedes... :-)


Entered at Wed Feb 2 13:37:58 CET 2011 from (41.97.249.182)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: tender is the GB

on the road to school
we had five or six years
blond hair and foolish head
we were talking as seniors

on the road to life
we were strayed out of sight
everybody has their own game, their own play
some have bet countless stakes


Entered at Wed Feb 2 05:24:00 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The icy countryside of NY

Subject: Been there

I have a feeling I'm going to be losing my electricity after this ice storm, something I'm not looking forward to at all. It sounds like this ice storm coming our way is going to be a humdinger. When power in my area is lost, I'm one of the last ones to have power restored because I'm so far off the main road.

Gene, why all the anger? You should get a teenager in your house, it would teach you patience. Or buy a heavy bag. You kind of remind me of myself when I was young and going through my boxing period. My father once observed that I was the most even- tempered guy he'd ever met...I was always pissed off.


Entered at Wed Feb 2 02:18:45 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: David P

WOOOAH.....your local act was the Hampton Grease Band? My awe and envy knows no bounds...having searched for years for a copy of their first LP, been SERIOUSLY into Glenn Phillips - when I was younger, played more extended psychedelic guitar and was a lot more stoned. Fleetwood Mac? Pah!

This was the time that from a homegrown point of view I couldn't see any further than Man. Remember them? Micky Jones died last year and the world is a lesser place for it. Then my Dad started playing his old Band albums and I saw the value of proper, structured songs again!!!


Entered at Tue Feb 1 23:35:13 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Capitol to Capital

After some rocky years, you'd have to say Capitol have done very well by The Band since 2000 … the remasters were extensive. I mean, they remastered "Islands", hardly a profitable choice, but a worthy one.

I don't know about the USA, but The Decemberists record here is "Rough Trade / Capitol" … a strange collaboration between the classic indie label and the classic corporate one.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 22:50:07 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Band on the Run (to the Bank?)

Peter: Speculation is that EMI's recording & publishing assets may be bought by BMG Rights Management (a separate entity from the Bertlesmann Music Group that merged with Sony). Then there's the possibility of a merger with Warner. Can this get any more complicated? I guess this means that The Band's Capitol catalog has been taken over by a bank.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 22:20:24 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ouch! Do we hear the awful sound of asset-stripping?


Entered at Tue Feb 1 22:02:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Forget Love, All You Need Is Equity

Breaking news today is that Citigroup Inc. has taken control of EMI Group Ltd. According to reports, the London-based record label's debt will be reduced 65% and the U.S. bank will own all of EMI following a debt-for-equity swap.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 21:37:05 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: IA from SF with GM on AD et al.

IA - nice to see you, and thanks for the Marcus piece. He makes a good point about Mr. Hudson -- if _Northern Lights_ isn't his finest hour, it's gotta be among the finest.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 21:35:19 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Correction: That would be "emetically" as in emetic.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 21:27:38 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Two-Prong Crown

Bayou Sam: Saw Peter Green with Fleetwood Mac around late '69 / early '70 at the small Sports Arena in Atlanta. I was in awe of Mr. Green's playing and the group was definitely the loudest band I'd heard at the time. One of my favorite local groups, The Hampton Grease Band, was an opening act.

In the Lester Bangs review I mentioned, he also pointed out that, in addition to her manicurist, Ms. Nicks also credited two different hairstylists in the Bella Donna liner notes. By the way, "emitically narcissistic" is defined as narcissism to such a degree as to induce vomit.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 21:14:26 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fleetwood Mac 2003

My review cut and pasted.

Fleetwood Mac

30th November 2003

Earls Court, London

Arenas are not my favourite places to see … well, even Arena rock, and I’ve never paid £75 a ticket in my life before (though I guess Marvin Gaye in 1976 at £25 was quite a lot more expensive in real terms). So to Earls Court, and a thoroughly enjoyable show from Buckingham-Nicks, I mean Fleetwood Mac. It wasn’t perfect. For a start we had seats at the side and sadly it proved to be Lindsey’s Buckingham’s side rather than Stevie Nicks’ side.

The sound, considering we were nearly right angles to the stage was surprisingly good, in fact totally brilliant on drums, but John McVie’s bass was muzzy and somewhat lost from our angle. A shame, because I’ve come to greatly admire his springy propulsive style. Yes, any competent bass player could play the notes of his simple but insistent parts, but I doubt that any could do it with the same degree of bounce and rhythm. McVie and Fleetwood, two of the luckiest men in rock, have taken themselves a long way, and they exude an air of genial old buffers at the back. Except that Fleetwood’s drumming was extraordinarily good. I don’t mean the ten minute solo which includes a talking drum and patting electric drums on his waistcoat, I mean overall. He had two subsiduary drummers who were first-rate, but the interplay of the three had been so carefully worked out that the overall effect was astonishing.

Apart from McVie, each of the principals had a two person support section – two female singers for Stevie, two guitarists for Lindsey and two percussionists for Mick. Plus a keyboard player filling in for retiree Christine McVie (or Perfect as we old-timers think of her, and perfect she was).

The first thought is how hyper Buckingham is throughout. What must he have been like in the coke-fuelled days if he’s that hyper now? Anyone would be impressed by his guitar playing, but to me he’s most outstanding when he’s playing backing on semi-acoustic or acoustic. Part of the deal seems to be that he has to do the full 1970 guitar hero thing, including (gingerly) throwing guitars around and getting the front row to strum while he fingers the frets. Buckingham has decided to indulge in some private fantasy engendered by watching Springsteen, Neil Young and Chuck Berry. Bits of each are faithfully included. The first long guitar solo (appropriately called Come) was impressive. Why this particular wank-fest had to repeated almost exactly twenty minutes later was a mystery – complete with similar tantrums towards the guitar.

Worse I think was the way the setting was built around it. The unraked seats in the middle were an arm and a leg – £120, I think. Which is why we sat in the tier at the side, but only three rows up for the cheaper figure of an ankle and a finger. Before the show, about three rows of people walked to the front and stood in front of the central section next to the stage. Security seemed concerned at letting no more than this number go to the front, but they also made no attempt to clear them back to their seats (and the sold out show revealed the empty seats vacated by the standers in the cheap sections!) . As soon as the show started the whole centre had to stand up to see, and stay on their feet for two and a half hours. I’m sensitive to this issue as my wife is five foot nothing and in such situations might as well wait for the bootleg DVD because she sees nothing at all of the show. Fortunately we were in the tier, but I would have been mightily pissed if I’d stood in line to buy those £120 tickets. When you realized that Buckingham’s entire wank-fest was built round bending and appealing to the (carefully controlled numbers of) standers, you could see why security had allowed that many (and then no more) to obscure the view of the thousands in the flat central area.

Anyway, Buckingham can afford to indulge his Springsteen fantasy. He works his balls off all evening and performs superbly so good luck to him. Of course it IS the Stevie Nicks show for me. Stevie looks a bit short of puff compared to the boys and certainly has to save herself up for the twirls when they finally arrive. As she’s close to my age I’m hugely impressed that she can sing spot-on all evening, and fully understand the need to conserve energy in order to do it. She and Lindsey play up the “Fleetwood Mac- The Soap Opera” bit with hugs and kisses to entertain the audience. Stevie Nicks has a signature voice. She is a star. She did everything I’d hoped to hear, except “Thrown Down” off the new one.

In the end, I think the effort, show length and high level of performance do justify the price tag and their exulted status – they could have sold out many more large shows. They already added two. Everyone went away happy. The Earth didn’t move (as it did with James Taylor and Paul Simon recently) but you can see why they retain their following.

One “What if …” moment came at the end when Mick announced that Peter Green was in the audience. A sharp intake of breath there … would he? But in the audience he stayed. Instead we got Albatross through the PA as playout. The ultimate Mac for me is the Buckingham-Nicks one, but I wouldn’t have minded seeing Peter Green with them.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 20:53:22 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

David P = I must have been typing my post as you were posting yours. I'm evvious of you having seen both versions of FM. I would like to have seen Peter in his prime. Check out the link I added to my last post. I think you'll like that site if you don't already know of it.

I wish I could -high-five you on you Christine McVie comments. I remember getting the album that came out before "Rumors" - smply titled, "Fleetwood Mac, as was the first Peter Green era FM album - and wondering as I listened why the "other woman" didn't get the same press as Stevie Nicks.

I chalked it up to the fact that Christine, although quite a looker IMO, didn't have quite the same eye-candy quality that the tabloids liked in Ms. Nicks. Stevie doesn't stink IMO. But her voice gets on my nerves.

But after that album, and "Rumors", I just loved Christine McVie's music. Her voice I can listen to all day.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 20:52:43 CET 2011 from (63.198.186.90)

Posted by:

IA

Location: San Francisco

Subject: A Piece of Critical History

This is my first posting to the Guestbook; I'd like to try and make it a bit special by enclosing a somewhat hard to find article on one of the Band's albums: Greil Marcus's review of "Northern Lights—Southern Cross," written for the March 1976 issue of Creem.

Marcus briefly discussed the album in the discography section of "Mystery Train," but this review is more in-depth and positive (he seems to have slightly soured on the album over the years). I emailed the review to the webmaster a few weeks ago, but since I heard no response I thought I'd post it here. Enjoy!

------------------------------------------------------------

Drifting In and Out of the American Dream

By Greil Marcus, Creem, March 1976

THE BAND: Northern Lights—Southern Cross (Capitol)

A recent nation-wide telephone poll on Northern Lights-Southern Cross, the Band's first collection of new songs in four years, has produced a solid consensus. All respondents agree that the new album is the Band's best since Stage Fright, and probably their best since The Band. Representative comments include, "I can't stop playing it", "My favorite song changes every time I hear it", "This is the way a Band record is supposed to sound", and "What's the last verse of 'Acadian Driftwood' about, anyway?"

This consensus, however, includes only those who have listened to the record, and if the Billboard charts, which notch NL-SC in the middle fifties after nearly a month in the stores, are any indication, said consensus excludes numerous people who heretofore found great pleasure in the Band’s offerings, and who are now risking serious cultural deprivation for no good reason. This, to me at any rate, is understandable; I came late to the NL-SC consensus myself. When I first heard this album I found the music flat and the lyrics obvious, and stayed with the record more out of blind hope than curiosity. The album sounded inordinately modest. Bits I didn’t like—and still don’t much care for, though I don’t hear them anymore—kept me away from the music. Some choruses are sing-songy (“Forbidden Fruit” for one, though that now reminds me of some long-gone Coasters’ B-side more than anything else); the words are often too literal or too vague to be very interesting. “Hobo Jungle” is flatly sentimental: “And though nobody here really knows where they’re going/At the same time, nobody’s lost.”

However, I must confess that the album is so good I’m even starting to like that.

I like the feel of NL-SC. It is music of great confidence. After so long without a really “new” album you’d expect the Band to be a little nervous; maybe they are, but they certainly don’t sound it. Richard Manuel’s singing is restrained yet right on the mark; Levon is typically off-the-wall and sounding very pleased to be there. Rick Danko, though still troubled by the choke-in-the-throat mannerisms that began to affect his vocals around the time of “Stage Fright,” is as convincing as he is emotional on the new “It Makes No Difference.” But the real action is between the lines, in the playing. The rhythm section is lighter than in the past, but very firm; Robertson’s solos open up the tunes without ever by-passing them. Best of all, there is the way in which song after song the musicians break away once the singers have said their piece, and blithely take off, doubling back over the traces of the tunes in a way that is unprecedented in the Band’s recordings—or, for that matter, in their live shows. They sound as if they’re aiming their music at each other, not, as on Cahoots, at a finished product. They’re taking chances.

About Garth Hudson, who is in a word magnificent. He has never played with such imagination, nor with such deceptive anonymity—-I heard the album only when I began to hear him. Playing organ (and less often synthesizer, though a lot of what sounds like synthesizer, or horns, or strings, is in fact just his organ), Hudson takes an ordinary melody or riff and makes magic out of it (there is that moment at the very end of “It Makes No Difference,” when Hudson sneaks out of hiding, wraps the tune up with a shivery midnight hush, and steals the piece). At other times he seems to lead everyone else into possibilities in the songs that might otherwise have lain dormant. More often he is simply a presence, painting his tapestries in the background, letting a listener catch glimpses between the cracks left by the other musicians, until finally you see the tapestry whole.

Hudson uses a Lowery organ (“souped up” says Robertson) and makes it sound like an orchestra; this is not merely a technical accomplishment, but mostly an emotional one. What Randy Newman got from a string section on his luminous and tragic “Louisiana 1927” Hudson gets on his own, on almost every song. No nuance escapes him—no shading of feeling, no matter how elusive, seems beyond him. With supreme delicacy, he wraps his sound around the Band, enfolding their performance with a warmth of spirit (listen to him in the middle of “Jupiter Hollow” or all through “Rags & Bones”) that may well prove to be what this album is best remembered for.

***

“Acadian driftwood, gypsy tailwind,” runs the lovely chorus of “Acadian Driftwood,” the centerpiece song of NL-SC—-a tale of people who dream of northern lights as they bear a southern cross. The tune has to do with the Acadians, French settlers in the Eastern part of Nova Scotia, who were expelled after the British defeated the French on the Plains of Abraham in 1759. Acadia had perhaps the best farmland in Eastern Canada, and the British were not about to share the spoils; they herded the few thousand Acadians onto ships and sent them far enough to make sure they’d never come back. The ships went to New Orleans; the Acadians settled there, and became the Cajuns. They preserved, to this day, their own language (though of course it changed, and today a fight is raging over the government attempts to keep Cajun instruction out of public schools), their own music, and their own cooking—holding together and keeping apart, though a black Cajun culture, the Zydeco, grew up alongside the white. (Given that the French were forced to leave Acadia for America, it is neatly ironic that less than twenty years later Acadia was populated by Tory refugees from the American Revolution. There are virtually no French in Acadia even now, but descendants of the Loyalists hold a sort of anti-Independence Day celebration every Fourth of July.)

The story Robertson has made out of these events—all very low-key, with a little martial piccolo from Garth Hudson, mournful and tough Cajun fiddle from Byron Berline, and beautiful singing from Manuel and Helm—is quite interesting.

After the battle, an Acadian family hears from relatives that life is better in the south; and not forced to leave but choosing to, they set out for America. They head out of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, stopping at St. Pierre, a nearby island still under French domination. They attempt a further landing further down the coast, perhaps in Maine, but they are turned away. Finally they reach Louisiana—America, where they can start over.

The only thing wrong is that they don’t like it. They don’t accept America, its weather or its government; they don’t really make a new home. They don’t make peace with the new land or with themselves. They spend their days working the sugar fields, noting the color of the trees and the feel of the land, with “winter in their blood,” dreaming of the return they will never make. “Acadia, I am sick to my heart for my homeland,” runs the last verse of the song sung by Manuel in Cajun, the shift from English to Cajun representing the shift from French to Cajun, and giving a listener a sense of how far their journey really took the Acadians, how much it changed them in spite of themselves. “Acadia, the snow cries tears in the sun/You know I’m coming, Acadia…teedle-um teedle-um teedle-oo,” one last Cajun shout of joy as the tune fades out to Berline’s fiddle, repeating the same pattern over and over again.

I doubt that Robertson would have written this song in this way when he was writing numbers for Bing Pink or The Band; but today the tale he is telling must say something about the strangeness the Band still feels, that they cannot evade nor transcend, as Canadians living in America (and what must Levon Helm have felt singing this song, a Southerner imagining himself, for a few moments, as an exile in a land he truly knew as home?). “Acadian Driftwood” (and what an image that is!) reflects the Band’s story; it seems like an autobiography concealed in history. As with Levon’s performance of “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” that is the kind of history the Band has a claim on, just as their versions of such stories have a claim to make on their listeners.

***

When I first heard this record, and found it dull, the line that came to mind was from Crash Craddock’s hit: “Ain’t nothin’ shakin’ but the leaves on the trees.” Listening now to Garth Hudson and the rest of the Band play their way across the album to the final tune, “Rags & Bones,” a song that captures the Band’s idea of what music is about and where it comes from as well as anything could, I still think Crash Craddock’s line sums up the record—its success, not its failure.

After a time with this music, it doesn’t matter if nothing’s shaking but the leaves on the trees; that is, in fact, the point. When the leaves on this album shake, you hear them.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 20:38:40 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

That is exciting Peter. When was that concert?

Mick Feetwood has always spoken highly of Peter. I think that if Peter called Mick tomorrow and wanted to do something Mick would go for it. I was glad (and surprised)to see that Peter showed up with Mac when they were inducted into the R&R Hall of Fame. I wish they had all played. Greenie did appear onstage with Santana, because he of course wrote, "Black Magic Woman".

Check out the link above for just about the best FM info you could ask for. there's a guy in the Peter Green forum that has an "inside" connection to Peter. He shares info that he knows fans will appreciate without betraying the confidence of who he knows.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 20:33:11 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: jammin' with Mac, not

Peter V: Your post reminded me that when Fleetwood Mac was playing Toronto in '77 the word on the street was that they were going to head up to the Beverly Hills Motor Hotel afterwards to catch Ronnie Hawkins' show. The word on the street afterwards was that they got to the hotel but too late for the festivities. I have absolutely no idea what their intentions really were, or what they really did do, but they certainly didn't get up on stage. Would've been interesting, as that was the same evening that Levon, Jerry Penfound, Pat Travers, Dr John and a couple other RCO guys got up to jam with an already-talented set of Hawks that included King Biscuit Boy, Jack deKeyzer, Carl Mather, Mike Short (brother of Martin), Gary Oatridge and Ken Kalmusky (from the Revols). Maybe John D, who was also there, knows more?


Entered at Tue Feb 1 20:30:58 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Christine Perfect Sound Forever

The reclusive Peter Green was present at the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 1998 when Fleetwood Mac was honored. Both Mr. Green & Danny Kirwan were included along with the Buckingham/Nicks era lineup. Mr. Green even performed that night, playing guitar with Santana, who was also inducted, on Mr. Green's composition "Black Magic Woman". I got to see the early Fleetwood Mac with Green and the Rumours era version of the group perform and enjoyed them both. However, I've always preferred Christine McVie (ne Perfect) over Stevie Nicks.

I reminded of the review of Ms. Nick's "Bella Donna" solo album that the late Lester Bangs wrote in The Village Voice years ago. He posed the musical question "Stevie Nicks: Lilith or Bimbo?" and went on to conclude the following:

""Stevie Nicks may be a space case, a terminal mutation of the genus Superstar (her manicurist gets a liner credit), and at times emetically narcissistic -- the cover, which is thoroughly repulsive from where I sit as a man or graphix fan, is the worst thing about 'Bella Donna', her successful bid for solo stardom. The best thing about it are state-of-the-art production, the husky passion of her voice, and her melodies, which are so tenacious I'm still listening a full two months after I first bought the record and decided it was a bunch of sh*t."
--(The Village Voice review from 11/25/81 was included in "Mainlines, Blood Feasts and Bad Taste: A Lester Bangs Reader" -- 2003 Anchor Books edited by John Northland.)

Some may recall Philip Seymour Hoffman's portrayal of Mr. Bangs in Cameron Crowe's "Almost Famous".


Entered at Tue Feb 1 19:50:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Last time Fleetwood Mac played London, Mick Fleetwood announced that Peter Green was in the audience. 5000 people inhaled deeply and we all looked round. A pregnant pause, then they started into the next number. Mick Fleetwood had obviously been looking towards him, and I'm sure open for him to come up. I would have loved to see Oh, Well, Green Manalishi or Albatross, but it was not to be.(Mind you, I don't suppose any of them have played them in 40 years).


Entered at Tue Feb 1 19:09:09 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Peter V = Thanks for pointing me to “Perfecting Sound Forever”. It looks like something I will indeed seek out.

A few years back I was determined to add at least one 16 RPM record to my collection, just because. I found a bunch on ebay. They are a collection of "mood" type records with different genres on each side. They must have been made to play in some sort of special player because one glaring difference between these and most records is that the hole in the middle is huge - even compared to a 45 single. At least I do have an old Califone record player that does have a 16 RPM speed.

Regarding Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac - I love them. I was a teen in the 70's when the "Rumors" version of Mac was HUGE. I remember hearing something about an early version of the band but I never cared to check it out. After hearing Peter green's name so many times I decided to delve, and I found the story of this guy so interesting. He put that band together and even came up with the name "Fleetwood Mac". IMO Greenie definitely had "IT" for a few years there. The idea that he just got lost in drugs and mental illness is quite a story.

Actually, the three FM guitarists all went "batty" to an extent. Danny Koran was a fantastic young player that Green plucked from another band. I believe that he's still sitting in a room somewhere staring at the wall. But Peter Green went through a lot of stuff and has actually landed somewhat on his feet. He does play live today a little bit, but he seems like a fragile shell of what he once was.

I’ve linked a clip above of Peter that I like. It was a spontaneous solo spot during A FM show where Danny breaks a string. The rest of the band takes a break while he changes the string, and Greenie does this song. There is an interesting little thing regarding this song that I noticed. The later Mac seemed to tip their hat to this one, I guess. The song “World Turning” has Christine McVie singing, “I’m gonna get my feet back on the ground”. In this song Peter Green sings, “world keep on turning, gotta keep my feet on the ground. I have to guess it was an intentional nod to Greenie. Christine does go back in FM to the last days of him being part of the band.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 18:08:07 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.203)

Posted by:

Pat B

I saw Levon in the straight to DVD Tommy Lee Jones movie "In The Electric Mist." Levon played Confederate General John Bell Hood who appears before Lee's character a number of times in the course of the story. Buddy Guy was in it and did a bit of playing. Although the movie was somewhat disconnected, Levon was quite good, even great. Civil War buffs might quibble that Hood was a big man while Levon is pretty small, and I suppose Texans might find error in Levon's drawl (Hood was a transplant Texan), but Levon played it a bit eerie--which it was--and his eyes looked coal black.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 18:07:02 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: I like that Mac song, especially the flute 'n flamenco part. The early band could be brilliant, but only if they left the blues entirely - like this, like "Man Of The World", like "The Green Manalishi" (sp?), even like "Somebody's Gonna Get His Head Kicked In Tonight". Otherwise, plod plod plod, as you say. (Mick and John continued to plod in LA, but the songcraft and singcraft provided by the newer recruits made their playing easy to ignore.)

As for Part 1 / Part 2 records, I had the pleasure of hearing one of the ultimates, "Shout" by the Isleys, on the radio today. About two songs after "Since I Met You Baby" by Ivory Joe Hunter and immediately before "Baby Workout" by Jackie Wilson. I may lobby to go back to the same coffeeshop just for their choice in radio stations.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 15:56:30 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jimmy & Jim

Jim Weider stepped in when Jimmy Vivino made the move to L.A. with Conan O'Brien.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 09:28:26 CET 2011 from (75.34.50.171)

Posted by:

Adam2

Ignore the accidental "alongside" below.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 09:27:13 CET 2011 from (75.34.50.171)

Posted by:

Adam2

Larry and Jim Weider have been playing alongside together in Levon's band since 2009.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 08:42:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Undesirable Parts 1 & 2

I like "Oh, Well" too, but a Nicks-less Mac is not for me.

Another Part 1 & Part 2 NOT to enoy. Gary Glitter’s first hit, Rock and Roll Part 2, was the flip-side to the intended main release Rock and Roll Part 1. On Part 1 there is a lot of vocal. On Part 2 there isn’t. The B side is instrumental and heavy beat interspersed with an occasional chorus of “Hey!” – getting it known later as “The Hey Song”, a popular chant at sporting venues. But it was in Britain that Rock and Roll Part 2 first became an unexpected hit. As the notation on the original single clearly shows Part 2 is numbered as the B side. Like the even more successful Bony M, Glitter made his name gyrating to a beaty backing track while grunting rather than singing.


Entered at Tue Feb 1 08:23:14 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond

Subject: Hey Ben

Hey Ben, Welcome to the Cool Club!


Entered at Tue Feb 1 02:56:40 CET 2011 from (166.129.199.115)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Last Ramble

Ben - Has Jim W replaced Larry Campbell?


Entered at Tue Feb 1 01:31:37 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Well done PV - in all this talk of Part 1/Part 2 45s and a general (ahem) reassessment of Fleetwood Mac, you have done well not to tell Bill M that he WOULD have been disappointed with Oh Well Parts 1 and 2! Actually, that's one Mac tune I can sort-of enjoy from a "rock not plodding blues" viewpoint.

David P: the chord I was seeking to describe is a full suspension, thus one of those lush E substitutions where all of the seventh fret is used would be described simply as Esus. Not to be confused with sus4 chords that we all do just by moving a pinky up one fret to play Honky Tonk Women in standard tuning....


Entered at Tue Feb 1 01:25:51 CET 2011 from (72.82.204.186)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Midinight Ramble

I was at saturday night's Midinight Ramble, which was a Chanukah/birthday present from my wife. It was fantastic. I was in the front on the right side about 4 feet away from Levon. The show opened with "The Shape I'm In" with Brian Mitchel singing lead and ended with "The Weight" which Levon sang a verse of. The other Band songs performed were "Ophelia" and "WS Walcott Medicine Show" sung by Levon and "It makes no difference" sung by Amy Helm and Teresa Williams. There was a really nice version of "Going To Acapulco" sung by Byron Isaacs. It's nice to see that Jim Weider is playing with Levon again. So there is some continuity with the later day Band, although they didn't do any material from the 90's Band albums. "

"Before Levon took the stage, it was announced that the "Ramble At the Ryman" will be released on cd and dvd on May 3. It was also announced that they will be selling a set of the first 3 Band cd's with the original mixes, with 25 sets signed by Levon available at each ramble. I bought the set and listened to the cd's yesterday. They sounded fine, but I didn't really notice any difference in the mix. There was no production credits in the cd booklets, but the copyright on the cd is 2000, which is the year that the cd remasters with bonus tracks were released. However these cd's don't have any bonus tracks. I couldn't find any info on these cd's on Levon's site yet. I'm curious if anyone who posts here has any additional info on these cd's.

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