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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, October 2012


Entered at Wed Oct 31 23:37:50 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: HAPPY HALLOWEEN

Enjoy your day/night..

A little trivia:

Halloween or Hallowe'en (a contraction of its original title "All Hallows' Evening"), also known as All Hallows' Eve, is a yearly holiday observed around the world on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows. Most scholars believe that All Hallows' Eve was originally influenced by western European harvest festivals and festivals of the dead with pagan roots, particularly the Celtic Samhain. Others maintain that it originated independently of Samhain. Typical festive Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (also known as "guising"), attending costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, visiting haunted attractions, playing pranks, telling scary stories, and watching horror films.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Oct 31 22:03:25 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter, Yes the Faulkner lawsuits do seem frivilous, however, it is quite common to see "used by permission" credits for literary quotes. So one wonders why the film makers didn't attempt to negotiate in advance with the estate for permission, as the fee might be far less than the cost of potential litigation. The literary estates of James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot and Robert Frost are also known as staunch guardians of the respective writers' reputations & works, as is the estate of Dr. Martin Luther King.

As for copyright duration of "Requiem for a Nun", it was renewed in 1978 by Jill Faulkner Summers. I'm not certain, but I believe that extends the copyright for an additional period of 47 years.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 22:02:43 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Absolutely

I wish I'd said it myself Al. I think we should return to our normal custom of incinerating Guy Fawkes in effigy on November 5th and eschew all this recently imported "Fright Night" (as it says on the Poundland Trick or treat packs) nonsense.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 20:54:30 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: You Yankee Johnny Come lately's can shove Trick or Treat right up your collective Star Spangled arsehole

Down with American Imperialism

Overwrought Grandads call for the restoration of Duck Apple night's simple delights.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 31 19:37:46 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What do you think of their claims, David? The media lawyer on Radio 4 phrased it diplomatically along the lines of "If this were my case, I would be confident that a judge would strike it out and if it came to trial I would be confident of being awarded costs against the estate." In the movie, other real people portrayed include Scott Fitzgerald, Dali, Picasso, Hemingway, Toulouse Lautrec (I think) … there are about a dozen. Faulkner's direct heirs are also dead.

I can see the estate objecting to the defence connection, but basically famous authors are quoted, and certainly in the film, the "substantial quote / proportion" argument falls straight out. If the defence ad only relies on those couple of lines, it is a "substantial proportion" but Shakespeare's estate isn't chasing anyone. The Faulkner estate are clutching at the last few bits of possible cash … he died in 1962, so on January 1st is out of copyright in many countries, though they have 25 years left in the USA.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 18:45:46 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Judge & The Jury

Peter V: Last week Faulkner Literary Rights, LLC also filed a copyright lawsuit against Northrop Grumman and The Washington Post arising out of full-page ad the defense contractor ran in the newspaper that quoted 14 words that William Faulkner wrote in a 1956 essay for Harper's Magazine.

"We must be free, not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it. William Faulkner."

The quote was taken from an essay entitled "Letter to a Northern Editor -- On Fear: Deep South in Labor" which was written following the landmark Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, declaring racially segrated schools unconstitutional.

In addition to the attributed quote, the advertisement contains a large photograph of the American flag, thanks to the members of the Continental Congress for adopting the Declaration of Independence and the corporate logo of Northrop Grumman.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 18:27:11 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Don't have the time to really discuss this properly, but, the subject just popped up again and it's getting me going...... wondering if any of you had the same experience, i imagine you would have.Some of my musical heroes have politics that i find repugnant. Before digital communication and FB most of us wouldn't know the FULL EXTENT of MOST of our favorite entertainers politics. Anyway, two guys who's music i have always loved, over 40 years now since i heard them and loved em, one of em, i rpoabbly heard as a 4 year old, that woudl be 50 years, , have religious and political beliefs that are so far from anything i could undertsand it;s not funny.And their plitics are really dangerous. One of em, well, i just write it off and i can still listen to his music cause he always was kind of a jerk.But the other guy, wven though his religious beliefs are strong and i can't relate to em, i always thought of him as an exceptionally nice guy.But his politics, and his tying of his religious beliefs to his poilitcs., are making it hard for me to stomach him.And he has one of the most beautifl voices ever, and has always managed to project nice guy sensibility andf pure joy.But , it;s about ruined for me. i'm curious to see how i feel about his older music in the fiuutre.i;ll have to work it out.... but, alot of you know, I'm the guy who always looked at music, sound, tone, etc etc etc, as personal to the artist, .... so... where do you start separating things out .... ?


Entered at Wed Oct 31 16:56:28 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

...and here is one where kd lang managed to accomplish what Billy Preston and Ronnie Wood had only dreamed of - getting a songwriting credit on a Jagger/Richard........Mick claimed he had never heard "Contant Craving"......though the cocktail circuit he was on in off hours surely betrays that claim.......anyhow, they did do the right thing and they did it right away.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 16:31:00 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rotting in Hell

Bill M, we have to remember that Dylan counts himself among the 68% of Americans who believe in the devil and hell. Apparently 44% believe God created humans in the last 10,000 years while a mere 39% believe in evolution. (2008 survey from "The Real State of America Atlas" Enloe & Seager, Penguin).


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:42:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As I said when the box set came out, Move Me is Groove Me with the change of one consonant sound. I reckon they did it, hopefully inadvertently, then someone said 'Hey! That's a straight lift!' and that's why The Band (who were not plagiarists) scrapped it.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:33:46 CET 2012 from (71.43.124.98)

Posted by:

Dan

George Harrison got taken to the cleaners on My Sweet Lord. To my ear, Rick Danko's song sketch of "Move Me" sounds very similar to "Groove Me" from King Floyd. I don't think that either was deliberate, just that musical sources swirl around. Dylan, I think freely borrows more. It seems more obvious lately judging by what I read in reviews. Unfortunately, I could never be "in the room" to hear how Tears of Rage or This Wheel's On Fire were composed jointly whilst I Shall Be Released and some others are solo Dylan.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:31:58 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Joan Baez

Ms. Baez also included "Long Black Veil" in concerts during that time in the early '60s.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:30:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd never heard the Marty Stuart before. Brilliant. I was listening to Barb Jungr's cover version of Things Have Changed about 30 minutes ago.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:05:23 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

While on the subject, how do we explain Bob receiving an Acadamy Award for best original song for "Things Have Changed" when it is a straight copy of Marty Stuart's "Observations of a Crow" - See Above Link.

By the way, most of what is written on Bob as plagerist is complete nonsense and as credible as the idiot brigade that hand out 5 star reviews to 2 star albums......but "Things Have Changed" is one that bothers me because Bob was well aware of the song......Is it only ghetto black kids that are forced to add names to songs?


Entered at Wed Oct 31 15:00:44 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Copper Kettle 2

Dylan had once criticized Joan Baez for sticking to Copper Kettle as part of her act for ten years, so he was probably making a personal point in doing it on Self Portrait.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 14:58:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Copper Kettle

A.F. Beddoe on the CD, Albert Frank Beddoe on the LP. See, bigger labels do have a point. BUT over to Wiki. Pete Seeger (a man who may know a bit about plagiarism himself) says the song dates back to 1946 and is of folk origin. Albert (if I May) says he wrote it in 1953 for the folk opera "Go Lightly Stranger." Joan Baez's 1962 recording is the oldest one Wiki lists. I'd assume Dylan learned it from her.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 13:52:26 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

This Robertine call for those who cry "Plagiarist!" to rot in hell seems over the top here in the 21st century. Do we know for sure that Tampa Red did not write "It Hurts Me Too"? Is there solid evidence that it was assembled from the database of floating lines - a convenient concept for decades of theorists, critics and apologists, however true it may be? BTW, who got the credit for "Copper Kettle", the lovely b-side of Dylan's unlovely "Wigwam" 45.


Entered at Wed Oct 31 11:12:57 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Just call it "inadvertent plagiarism" and put them on 3 months academic probation....oh wait that happened to me in university. Never mind.. : )


Entered at Wed Oct 31 08:37:59 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stealin'

Dylan was open about “stealing” songs in that early radio interview that’s on CD. It Hurts Me Too brings up a couple of issues. Dylan, unlike most blues groups of the time, would have known it was by Tampa Red, not by Elmore James, who had in turn appropriated undue credit. The chance of Tampa Red’s estate ever receiving a cent if properly credited were extremely remote, and if anyone had obtained that publishing they were likely to be a crook. But “Trad. arr. and prod. by” was all it took to get the money, but on the original LP it’s a blatant “Bob Dylan” though as PSB points out not on the sheet music, though by 1970, the sheet music is academic. Dylan had a chance to credit Tampa Red for posterity if nothing else. He was wide open to criticism because given that it was actually a hit record, Elmore James earlier version was so well-known.

Take another one, With God On Our Side. Dominic Behan had used the melody of “The Merry Month of May” to compose The Patriot Game. Behan was incensed by The Clancy Brothers well-known version because they dropped the verses which condoned killing policemen, and attacked De Valera. The Clancy Brothers judicious edits improved the song, by lifting it from a narrow sectarian setting into a more generalized song on young men and war (though for passion and performance, I’d take the Dominic Behan version first). It’s certain that Dylan learned the song by watching Liam Clancy … both have said this somewhere. So to say Dylan re-used the melody of “The Merry Month of May” is untrue … he used the melody as filtered through The Patriot Game. Behan maintained that With God On Our Side also stole The Patriot Game’s “lyrical structure” which is stretching it. On balance, Dylan was reasonably fair in adapting an edited version of an adaptation of a traditional melody and calling it his own!

And then we come to the estate of Willian Faulkner versus Sony, where they claim that mentioning his name and quoting two lines in a movie is tantamount to William Faulkner “endorsing” the movie from his long cold grave. The BBC had a long piece on this on Radio Four where the media lawyer’s opinion was that it should be struck off at once with costs awarded to Sony. In other words the claim is full of Sound & Fury, signifying nothing. Whoops! Did that just plagiarise Faulkner? Or did it plagiarise Shakespeare who Faulkner was quoting?


Entered at Wed Oct 31 03:50:19 CET 2012 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia
Web: My link

Subject: woops

Dylan version of "She's love crazy" at the link above (3'30") -- sorry!


Entered at Wed Oct 31 03:44:00 CET 2012 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia

Subject: "She's love crazy' — Tampa Red vs Bob Dylan

Here's Tampa Red's 1941 version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uW1oNg51vHo

Here's Bob Dylan's 1978 version (at 3'30"):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uW1oNg51vHo

(cut & paste into your browser)

Bob Dylan had obviously re-arranged the song as a minor-key blues, had re-written the lyrics for the verses, and partially re-written the chorus for his 1978 performances (many), but the songs are clearly related. And here is a clear demonstration of why the whole "plagiarism" business with respect to Dylan is pure nonsense. He is clearly re-working the material he has inherited, as did Tampa Red and any number of other great musicians in "the folk tradition." Dylan's making his source material obvious is a service to those of us who might want to learn more about music, and a fitting tribute to his own mentors and predecessors. The sentiments he expressed in the recent Rolling Stone interview (that people who accused him of plagiarism are "wussies and pussies" who should "rot in hell") seem to me wholly appropriate. And I would be surprised if Garth Hudson would not agree (if not with the wording, at least with the general sentiment).


Entered at Wed Oct 31 03:12:46 CET 2012 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia

Subject: Tampa Red

Nice to see Tampa Red being mentioned here — he deserves more listeners, and more appreciation. Beyond "It hurts me too" on Self Portrait, one notes that the opening song on many dates of Bob Dylan's ('controversial') 1978 "Las Vegas" tour was "She's Love Crazy," one of Tampa Red's signature songs.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 21:24:36 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Further Connections

Peter V: Interesting about the connection between the Mississippi Sheiks' "Sitting On Top Of The World" and Tampa Red's "Things Bout Coming My Way". We know that Dylan is a fan of the Sheiks as he covered "Sitting On Top Of The World" on "Good As I Been To You" and later covered the Sheiks' "The World Is Going Wrong" and "I've Got Blood In My Eyes (for You)" on "World Gone Wrong". More recently on "Tempest" he borrowed the tag line on "Narrow Way" from the Sheiks' "You'll Work Down To Me Someday".


Entered at Tue Oct 30 20:01:15 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks for the extra information, David. I have a friend who has a whole shelf of American archive blues LP, and he can take you on a journey with several songs ever further back in time. And those very early versions are superb.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 19:02:03 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: It Hurts Me Too (cont)

I checked further and discovered that Tampa Red recorded not one but two versions in the '40s. In 1940 he recorded "It Hurts Me Too" on the Bluebird label with Blind John Davis on piano, and in 1949 he re-recorded it once again as "When Things Go Wrong With You" on RCA Victor with Johnnie Jones on piano.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 18:36:03 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: Songs that creep you out


Entered at Tue Oct 30 17:01:45 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Link to Tampa Red's earlier version, "Things Bout Coming My Way", recorded in the '30s and featuring his distinctive slide guitar.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 16:55:13 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: It Hurts Me Too

Tampa Red recorded two earlier variations of the song in the '30s ("Things Bout Coming My Way) & '40s ("When Things Go Wrong" link above), which were influenced by the Mississippi Shieks "Sitting On Top Of The World". Hudson Woodbridge a/k/a Tampa Red was born in Smithville in southeast Georgia. His bottleneck style influenced many bluesmen, including his friend Big Bill Broonzy and Elmore James.

Robert Dylan's copywrited "adaptation" was published by his Big Sky Music and is currently listed & licensed through the SESAC performing rights organization.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 16:06:34 CET 2012 from (70.192.19.34)

Posted by:

old timer

Subject: still Stills

After having worked on occasion with the aforementioned Mr Stills, i can say without equivication that he was- is- & always be a " churlish little prick " himself!! Nice to see nothing has changed.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 12:04:38 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stephen Stills …

And he says it in a very articulate way. Very good writing!


Entered at Tue Oct 30 06:00:02 CET 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

maxine

Steve Stills. Now there's a guy with something to say.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 05:52:28 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: For What It's Worth: Stephen Stills on Mitt Romney:" He's A Churlish Little Prick."

that link is a must read. God Bless Stephen Stills.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 00:55:48 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Songs From The Shipyards

Link to my review of The Unthanks "Songs From The Shipyards". The band perform live while the film is projected in the cinema. A near-unique and very special performance.


Entered at Tue Oct 30 00:12:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Self Portrait

The double LP (bought the week it was released) credits It Hurts Me Too to simply (Bob Dylan). No Prod / Arr. by. The CD, interestingly, credits most tracks but has no credits at all for It Hurts Me Too.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 20:06:05 CET 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

max

Web: My link

good stuff underlink


Entered at Mon Oct 29 17:32:11 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: I was surprised that the Cotton record is from '64, as otherwise I would have been firmly convinced that the title was a reference to Cook and Moore's Bo Dudley skit. But that couldn't've predated the release of "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" in '65. I see that Cook and Moore redid the TV clip for a 45, also available on YouTube.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 17:06:02 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

……indeed “Delia” is from “World Gone Wrong” which may be prophetic if Romney wins next week……Link above from 2000


Entered at Mon Oct 29 15:46:54 CET 2012 from (72.78.49.88)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: It Hurts Me Too

If you were to find a "Self Portrait" songbook, you would see that "It Hurts Me Too" is in the adapted and arranged category, every folksinger's favorite trick.

Dylan has not done anything from "Down In The Groove" this tour, though he did do one the other night from "World Gone Wrong."


Entered at Mon Oct 29 15:42:20 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Link to Fleetwood Mac taking Paul Simon......funny when the super rich take from the very rich but not so funny when the poor stay poor because the rich don't care.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 14:33:19 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Graham Parker & The Rumour -- the new album (and film)

On the geezer beat . . . a singer-songwriter from upstate NY reunites with another band named in homage to The Band.

_Three Chords Good_, the new album from Graham Parker and The Rumour, release date 20 Nov 2012.

GP&tR also set to appear in the Judd Apatow movie _This is 40_, release date 21 Dec 2012.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 12:50:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Beau Dudley

Another retitled and "re-composed" epic. Beau Dudley by The Mike Cotton Sound (linked). I found a copy of this single just last week and the name of Ellis McDaniel is not on the credits. The Mike Cotton Sound were The Mike Cotton Jazzmen, a trad band, until 1962, when they switched to R&B (and were extremely good at it). The horn section later backed The Kinks.

It reminded me of something I read last week about Chris Barber, who introduced so many blues singers to British audiences in the 50s backed by his trad jazz band. Barber also did some interesting R&B work in the 60s, and someone said "They would have done very well, except they kept their banjo player just a year too long."


Entered at Mon Oct 29 12:40:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncanny coincidences & Mel London

At least few of the writers of It Hurts Me Too changed the title. Seek out "Lonely and Blue" by The Downliners Sect. They wrote it themselves, but by a strange coincidence it has exactly the same tune and lyric as Jimmy Reed's "Honest I Do" (a song Rick Danko used to perform).

FROM AN ARTICLE I DID ON SELF PORTRAIT:

It Hurts Me Too

Actually by Big Bill Broonzy.

Or according to Tim Riley, by Elmore James.

Or according to a John Mayall single it’s by one ‘Mel London’,

Or according to Bob …

This was pretty well-known and a very risky one to claim full credit for. No doubt it was a financial pleasure to do so.

Archaeology time: Clinton Heylin asserts that the original was called When Things Go Wrong by Big Bill Broonzy, and that Dylan retitled it. The only listing I can find is Broonzy’s Last Sessions in 1958. However, you can find the song on any collection of Elmore James songs as It Hurts Me Too credited to Elmore James. James recorded it twice, in 1957 and 1963 and even had a Top 30 R&B hit with it in 1965. In most blues fans minds, the song is associated with James’s guitar as strongly as Dust My Broom is. Then again, the same song had been recorded as It Hurts Me Too by Tampa Red in 1940 with rolling piano backing (credited to Tampa Red). Two years after Dylan, The Grateful Dead credited it to Elmore James and Marshall Sehorn. A recent version by Corey Harris is credited to Whittaker, and one by Keb Mo is credited to Elmore James. Since both Broonzy and Tampa Red started recording in the 1920s, who knows the truth?… no wonder Dylan thought he might as well take the credit. It was part of the blues tradition. Whoever composed it, it’s 100% sure that Dylan didn’t. He didn’t even retitle it. Howard Sounes obviously thought it was by Dylan. He says it’s ‘an attractive song, in which Bob sang of his concern for a lover, maybe a child.’ Er, no.

Dylan smoothes it right out, in comparison to the Elmore James version; his delivery is much more similar to Tampa Red's version. Michael Krosgaard annotated the original Columbia sessions for a series of articles in “The Telegraph” Dylan magazine and notes it as “Tampa Red, arranged by Elmore James” which sounds fair to me. I wonder if this comes off the tape boxes or whether it’s his addition?



Entered at Mon Oct 29 12:05:50 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Who wrote "It Hurts Me Too"?

Just a funny coincidence the other day. - I sat down to the table in off-season coastal town market hall. Soon I realized that the old man on the other side of the table was legendary John Mayall. Mr. Mayall was here to rest his nerves between American and European tours. I wanted to ask "who wrote It Hurts Me Too" but I didn't have the courage. He is a big and strong fellow!


Entered at Mon Oct 29 09:38:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Billy Bragg sums up the "I can't take the way he sings but I love to hear him talk" line. Huge charisma onstage. I still chuckle at the memory of Billy Bragg and Martin Carthy suddenly breaking into the back-to-back Status Quo twin guitar stance with The Imagined Village.

On download-cards, that was something I was wondering. How do you "send out" review copies of electronic books? You can't ask a magazine or newspaper to pay for a download. Is there an e-book equivalent? I guess a download card. But it's a bit like saying "I can't send you a review copy, but here's a ten pound note. Please buy a review copy" which is kind of "loose."


Entered at Mon Oct 29 08:57:22 CET 2012 from (220.161.139.122)

Posted by:

Keats

Location: Belford
Web: My link

Subject: All human wisdom is

All human wisdom is summed up in two words ?C wait and hope.


Entered at Mon Oct 29 06:24:11 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Linked - an electric version of "Blind Willie" by Bob Dylan........Funny the great man played one from "Down In The Groove" the other night but still Temptest is being shunned........If only he had the courage to shun everything pre "Love & Theft" the shows would be so much more satisfying.

Norm: Really happy that you are ok.....you are in a very select group of people that can make me smile and laugh regularly by reading what you write.

John D: Belated congrats on the Hall of Fame. Imagine that in the first 15 years of your career, you had the peak of The Beatles, the birth of The Band, Led Zep, the deaths of Jimi and Janis, The Last Waltz, the birth and death of disco, the birth and death of punk, about 10 Stanley Cups by the Habs.........and if anyone asked what had happened since 1997, I think we would all shrug and say "not much really"..........


Entered at Mon Oct 29 05:28:37 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: actually, ridiculous as it is

Calvin- there is something called a download card.i've not looked into it, but i know i can buy em from cdbaby for my projects, and sell em. or give em away.It entitles the holder to a paid for download , i assume an MP3.So, believe it or not, there is sort of a way to auction off a signed mp3 on ebay. i can't imagine it happening, but..


Entered at Mon Oct 29 04:12:21 CET 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

max

Web: My link

too bad..


Entered at Mon Oct 29 01:33:41 CET 2012 from (198.179.198.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Billy Bragg hasnt taken to telling the joke in concert about how nobody has ever put a signed MP3 on Ebay. So yeah, we've lost a bit with each bit of technology.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 21:13:24 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Careening thru the night.........Ain't no mo' cain!

I'm spending the afternoon aboard the Festival Express....as we speak, Rick, Janis, Jerry, Phil....and a gang of others are screaming about no ' mo' caiiiiiin!!!


Entered at Sun Oct 28 20:43:33 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Norm & weather,,,

NORM: I'm happy to hear you and Susan are OK. Must have been scary to feel it.

It will be hitting close to here,[the hurricane]. The 6 Nations near Brantford,Ontario are being lifted out. I believe that's where MIKE lives close to..Be glad when it's passed,as many others do too. All we can do now, is pray for those who will get the worst of it, and hopefully come through it with no harm..

Thanx for responding, NORM, and wish you and all you the best..

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Oct 28 18:53:59 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Shake Rattle & Roll

Naaaaw......It's no big deal Serenity. I'm not really in the north. As far as BC goes, I live on the south coast.

However, when the quake hit last night, I was sitting right here at my desk. All of a sudden I felt like I was on waves. I'm thinking what in hell is wrong with me now? Susan yells down at me come up here and look at this!

I hike up stairs. In our living room we have quite large ceramic pots hung on chains with the plants. They were swaying back and forth pretty good.......then it hits me....you dummy! It's an earthquake! Susan says.....it couldn't be! Well why not you crazy old woman! She gets right on her tablet on line, and says, "Well there's nothing about it!"....Well it just happened a few minutes ago for chrissake!

So this morning when I get up and get on line, there is the big headline, "Canadas worst quake in 60 years. Third worst in BC.........so there you have it. The epicentre was in Haida Gwaii.


Entered at Sun Oct 28 18:03:28 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario.

Subject: NORM & the weather

Hi Guys, hope you are all safe and sound during these terrible weather conditons, and will stay that way..

NORM: Worried about you..Below is what I rec'd in my news alerts..PLEASE let us/me know if you are safe and sound?? I know you are in the north, so hope you don't get it...

"But much of the B.C. coast, including the northern and southern ends of Vancouver Island, remained under an advisory overnight Sunday, indicating a tsunami could produce strong currents that would be dangerous to those near the water."

MIKE: We should be OK, but may still get some of it.

JEFF: Sorry about the wrong info on Chuck Berry. I "calls 'em like I sees 'em" as the saying goes. I saw Chuck Berry live many moons ago. He was here with Bill Haley & the Comets.Good show.

Have a good day and keep safe..

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Oct 28 17:01:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apple has its faults, but I just got a Kindle Fire because we're publishing to both platforms. To try it, I've spent over an hour trying to redeem my digital copy of Prometheus, downloaded a load of crap, but still not managed. it took me about 30 seconds on the iPad to get it started …


Entered at Sun Oct 28 11:58:49 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All The Hits By all The Stars

I was laughed at for carrying the Cameo-Parkway album "All The Hits By All The Stars" around at school, because it included Bobby Rydell (well, fair enough) and Chubby Checker, BUT it also had Dee Dee Sharp, The Dovells and The Orlons, so now I realize it was the coolest of the lot and I feel vindicated.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 19:08:53 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Iconic albums

There are iconic albums to be seen holding, like Catch-A-Fire in the original Zippo sleeve, but Coltrane in the school playground? We mainly went for Chuck Berry or Bo Diddley US imports as the height of cool at my school.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 18:06:54 CEST 2012 from (184.71.181.22)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Anna Lee

Am still on the west coast. Can't play either version of Anna Lee on iPhone. It's my main gripe with Apple. My friends with other smart phones and tablets can play anything.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 14:59:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Anna Lee

I finally found the Earl Hooker one … a pretty generic blues and nothing like the Dirt farmer song. But it has what i remembered … a great tone on the guitar (linked)


Entered at Sat Oct 27 14:49:37 CEST 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Those happy golden years (home taping)

The look was important, too. Carrying a COLTRANE LP made you a more serious guy than carrying - let's say - TREMELOES. Worth an extra turn around the school yard. Cassette killed that fun, CD buried it, MP3 closed the graveyard gate and file sharing finally threw the key in to the river.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 12:58:40 CEST 2012 from (208.120.39.229)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Anna Lee/Dirt Farmer

It's interesting -- Anna Lee from Levon's Dirt Farmer certainly sounds like an old traditional tune that might have traveled around. But it was actually a new song written by Laurelyn Dossett, a North Carolina singer/songwriter. Link is to her site.


Entered at Sat Oct 27 10:34:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Earl Hooker

Earl Slick (Bowie guitarist) made me recall Earl Hooker, and then the conversation about going round to friend's places with new albums. I remember "Two Bugs & a Roach" by Earl Hooker fondly. In those days, when someone arrived with a rare album, we'd run an open reel tape, listening to a bit first to decide on 7.5 ips or 3.75 ips speed. For the young, this meant how much tape you were going to use so was a price / quality decision. This wasn't "home taping killing music" in the way cassette was, as decent open-reel tape was quite expensive, and we only taped rare stuff … which in those days in the UK meant American or Jamaican imports. If it was an album we liked and which was issued in the UK, we'd buy the vinyl album and re-use the tape. Anyway, we had a 7.5 ips of Two Bugs and A Roach that we played a lot for two or three years. It's long gone to the town dump with other boxes of open-reels. I just looked it up. "Not currently available" on CD.

I did notice that notable track was "Anna Lee". I don't remember. Is it the song that's on "Dirt Farmer"?


Entered at Sat Oct 27 01:11:41 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Serenity. not e everything in the info you copied and pasted in was accurate. Berry has a solid band for awhile now.His long time bassist, Jim Marsala.his daughter ingrid, and his son Charles Jr, Bob Lohr on piano, and Keith Robinson on drums.they have even been touring with him of late, both in the u.s. and in Europe.That doesn't mean they all make every show in this country, but they have been going out with him. Here in the StLouis area, they play once a month in Blueberry hill, in St Louis mo, in the university City Loop. the Argosy, formerly, the ALton Belle, in Alton illinois, is a riverboat casino, where he is probbaly good for 2 to 4 shows a year.

staten island, NY native Earl Slick will be ont hat RRHOf bill too.Earl been popping up in StLouis and playing with Berry, also just popping up and playing with other people.i don't know what his stlouis connection is, but i think he's been here 3 or 4 times this year, and has before this year as well.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 22:02:32 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: John D. ^ Chuck Berry.

Hi all! Sooo happy for you,JOHN D., a well-deserved honor for a great guy. God Bless you..

Have you heard???

Chuck Berry Exhibit, Tribute Concert Coming to Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Icon will perform at October 27th event By Andy Greene

October 12, 2012 12:30 PM ET

Chuck BerryBobby Bank/WireImageThe Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is gearing up for a weeklong celebration of Chuck Berry. The new exhibit Roll Over Beethoven: The Life and Music of Chuck Berry will open on October 18th, which is the rock pioneers's 86th birthday. The exhibit will include Berry's 1958 recording contract with Chess Records, a vest he wore at the Toronto Rock and Roll Festival in 1969 and a handbill from a 1961 show in Jamaica. The museum's permanent collection houses Berry's handwritten lyrics to "Carol" and "School Days" as well as a Gibson guitar he played onstage in the early Eighties.

The week will culminate on October 27th with a Chuck Berry tribute concert at Cleveland's State Theater featuring Merle Haggard, M. Ward, Darryl "DMC" McDaniels, Joe Bonamassa, Rick Derringer, Ronnie Hawkins, David Johansen and many others. Berry will attend the show and is scheduled to perform.

Other related events at the Hall of Fame include screenings of the 1987 movie Hail! Hail! Rock N' Roll!, a concert by the Rick Derringer Trio and a keynote lecture by writer and performer Greg Tate. The events are all part of the Hall of Fame's yearly American Music Masters series. Previous honorees include Les Paul, Aretha Franklin, Woody Guthrie and Fats Domino.

Chuck Berry's touring schedule has slowed down a bit in recent years, but he still plays once a month at Blueberry Hill's Duck Room in his native St. Louis, Missouri. He also has dates on the books at the Argosy Casino in Alton, Illinois and the Convention Center in Forth Worth, Texas. Berry usually tours without a band, relying on the promoter to provide a backing group familiar with his catalog. His son Chuck Berry Jr. often joins him on the guitar, and his daughter Ingrid sometimes plays harmonica with the group.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time PEACE AND LOVE xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Oct 26 21:31:49 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Professor Louie & The Crowmatix

Mike H, great post. I saw Professor Louie and The Crowmatix last night at The Bearsville Theater. As always, they put on a wonderful show. I love their new cd 'Wings on Fire' and I completely agree with that comment from The Stone House Music Club.


Entered at Fri Oct 26 20:19:36 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Subject: Crowmatix upcoming gig a tribute to Levon, Rick & The Band.

The Stone House Music Club presents:

- A Special Concert Event -

Dedicated to Levon Helm & Rick Danko

Professor Louie & The Crowmatix w/ The ROA Horns

Performing The Music Of The Band

Saturday: Nov 3, 2012

Doors: 6:00 PM - Show: 8:00 PM

Mexicali Live, Teaneck, NJ

Tel # (201) 833-0011

Professor Louie (Aaron Louis Hurwitz) co-produced, engineered and played on the lengendary group The Band’s final 3 albums. Along with The Crowmatix he worked with Rick Danko, Levon Helm & Garth Hudson on various studio and live solo projects. Professor Louie & The Crowmatix will be bringing in a full horn section for the Saturday night show.

This special concert is in musical honor of Levon Helm, Rick Danko & The Band.

Professor Louie & The Crowmatix have been on tour all summer & fall performing songs from their latest CD “Wings On Fire” and will change their repertoire for this event and perform The Music Of The Band. This show is by special request by The Stone House Music Club which for many years has brought great concerts to the Teaneck, NJ area. Professor Louie & The Crowmatix have performed two separate concerts in the past for The Music Club with Garland Jeffreys and Eric Andersen.

“Nobody plays the music of Levon Helm and The Band better than Professor Louie & The Crowmatix” - Stone House Music Club

The show will begin at 8:00 PM - opening act: Green Stop Sign

Tickets: mexicalilive.com

For more info: Professor Louie & The Crowmatix www.thecrowmatix.com


Entered at Fri Oct 26 08:31:36 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: John D

Brilliant,well done!


Entered at Fri Oct 26 01:38:34 CEST 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: John D

I echo all these congrats John. I googled you, you old rascal.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 16:58:47 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: John D

Well done. Well deserved.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 15:27:12 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Mastersons, Hymn To Her

Review of a great "Two x duo" concert added. The Mastersons and Hymn To Her in Winchester.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 10:34:52 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Well done JD

A champion of The Band amongst many others. Dear old Paul Godfrey will be gazing down and be very proud of you.

Wish we had a DJ like yourself over here! Since Kenny Everett was sacked by the BBC for simply telling the truth we've not had anyone as good as you for playing decent stuff.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 25 01:42:28 CEST 2012 from (124.171.43.109)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Congrattulations, John

A tremendous achievement.Well done.


Entered at Thu Oct 25 01:18:00 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

John D., Congratulations! What a tremendous accomplishment!


Entered at Thu Oct 25 01:16:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Congratulations, John. A well-deserved honour.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 20:54:07 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: John Donabie

Congratulations John. You are in good company with Red Robinson and many others. Well deserved.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 19:42:46 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

1969- i was an 11 year old whippersnapper in Brooklyn.However, I know of several of my friends here in St Louis did attend that Band concert at SIUE, they have spoken of that festival and great bands they saw deliver great shows there.. the town of Edwardsville now has a good venue called the Wildey theater. Of Course, music ainlt the same, but they have poulled in a wide range of good acts.

John D- Congratulations


Entered at Wed Oct 24 19:30:55 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

John D , congratulations on your well deserved award,


Entered at Wed Oct 24 19:08:01 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: dean of Toronto radio

John D: We don't have to tell you what we think about this award. Fantastic and well deserved. In my mind, you are 'dean of Toronto radio'. Enjoy this!


Entered at Wed Oct 24 19:04:19 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John D

Congratulations John D. I enjoy your posts very much, particularly when I read those related to information gained through your career activities.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 18:51:20 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Congratulations on a much-deserved honour!! I first heard you in 1970, and you were my radio idol then, and taught me so much about music. You were the Band's biggest supporter on radio here in the T-dot, and even "Time To Kill" found its way onto the 'FH chart. Plus, the first time I ever heard "The Stones I Throw" it was your copy - though played by your colleague Larry Green.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 18:50:33 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.73)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, there are some interesting resources about the Mississippi River Festival. No one had heard about it when it premiered in 1969--I guess it was primarily for students (although it was in the summer) and classical fans.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 18:34:04 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.73)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, congratulations on the well deserved recognition. A really great moment.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 17:33:21 CEST 2012 from (99.250.10.113)

Posted by:

GregD

Location: Foggy Southern Ontario

John D- Congratulations! You are most deserving of this award to mark such a long and successful career.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 17:22:23 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Congratulations John on your upcoming induction into the Canadian Broadcast Industry Hall of Fame (corrected link above).


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:59:11 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

John D. congratulations!


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:19:45 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Mississippi River Festival 1969

On July 14, 1969 The Band played at an amphitheatre on the campus of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, just east on the confluence of the Missouri & Mississippi. It was part of a series of the Mississippi River Festival concerts in June through July (see link). During the encore of The Band's performance Bob Dylan (announced as Elmer Johnson) made a surprise appearance, joing the group for four songs -- I Ain't Got No Home, Slippin' and Slidin', In the Pines and another song which hasn't been identified.

Were any Guestbook posters (Pat B or others) at that concert?

The following month The Band would perform at Woodstock and later join Dylan at the Isle of Wight Festival.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:16:28 CEST 2012 from (208.65.223.123)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Link does not work?

Perhaps it's the tag after net.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:12:14 CEST 2012 from (208.65.223.123)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

I just wanted to share this with you. I'm very honored.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 16:02:42 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: So I'm like come on over and we can sit around and text each other.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 12:21:57 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Not complaining, just curious

I was watching the BBC 4 documentary Blues Britannia the other night and something got me thinking. One of those interviewed (can't remember who) was talking about going over to a friend's place to listen to a newly acquired record, and it brought back some memories of my friends & I doing the same (albeit with rock LPs in the 70s & 80s). I wonder if any of the young folks (and by "young" I mean in their 20s or younger) still do that? Or has the digital age changed things?


Entered at Wed Oct 24 07:37:03 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Glad i was wrong

Thanks for the catch JT. A female singer posted RIP and the name spelled incorrectly, the way i spelled it, on facebook. this is a singer i know some, and i've been seeing perform since for about 30 years. i would have expected her to be accurate. I tried verifying it on google, but nothing showed. A few months back, I learned LArry Hoppen died on Fb, and it was correct.Nothing on google for a few days.Later on, i found out why noone was talking about it at first. Sorry for the misinformation today.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 07:02:57 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mixed Up Confusion .... careful

Gabrielle Roth (February 4, 1941 – October 23rd, 2012- an American dancer and musician in the world music and trance dance genres. (nothing to do with Gabriel Roth of Dap King fame


Entered at Wed Oct 24 06:40:14 CEST 2012 from (69.124.50.197)

Posted by:

John W.

Nothing about Gabriel Roth on the internet, at leasst not yet...


Entered at Wed Oct 24 06:35:22 CEST 2012 from (69.124.50.197)

Posted by:

John W,

Nice interview with Randy Ciarlante, it's been too long since I've seen him play. One of the all time nice guys. I will never forget talking to him one time at a Gurus show in Tribeca - I think it was 2002 - he does not even know me, except as a fan who has been showing up at Levon and Band shows since the early '80's. He asked for my address and next thing I know he has mailed me a videotape of the Honky Tonk Gurus rehearsal from the CBS Morning Show! He didn't have to do that, I mean I couldn't do anything for him, he just wanted to show appreciation for a true fan!


Entered at Wed Oct 24 02:35:42 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Fuck

Apparently Gabriel Roth, the still rather young cofounder and coowner of Daptone records, leader and songwriter for the Dap Kings, has died.What a fucking shame.


Entered at Wed Oct 24 01:56:04 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Towronto the good

Peter V: thanks. I will try to remember to check my 'source', which is a graat-great-uncle's rulebook for his Loyal Orange Lodge - all-powerful bigots here well into century 20. Anglo-Irish protestants and their fellow travellers, forever celebrating the Battle of the Boyne. Quite possibly the club of choice for Richard Manuel's ancestors, and maybe even Garth's.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 21:40:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, that was short-lived, a later addition and apocryphal. It goes:

From France and Pretender

Great Britain defend her,

Foes let them fall;

From foreign slavery,

Priests and their knavery,

And Popish Reverie,

God save us all.



Entered at Tue Oct 23 20:12:43 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

rosalind

I thought everybody knew of "A Face in the Crowd". Aside from being directed by Elia Kazan at his prime, it was the film that made everybody stand up and take notice of this Andy Griffith country bumpkin-type It nearly destroyed Griffith. Ruined his marriage and practically giving him a nervous breakdown because he couldn't understand how to get out of character once Kazan got him in. That damned method! And it was written by the same guy who wrote "What Makes Sammy Run" Now that's a book I'm sure EVERYONE who appreciates quality works would have read and read again. Budd Schulberg hit just about everything he put pen to right on the money. Schulberg had originally based the film on Will Rogers and at the outset of TV he imagined how dangerous it could become.. and it did. Kennedy/Nixon - Looky there at them teeth. Ain't he perty.. nice hair too. Ohh Nixon sweats too much and he's stiff and ugly. I'm voting for Kennedy because I'd rather screw him.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 19:53:50 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Sadavid: thanks for IDing the movie. I caught a very impressive bit on TCN and was wondering.

Peter V: the "Save us from papist plots" line verse three will turn of many too.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 19:45:17 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

rosalind

Where is Olbermann now ? Can't find him anywhere. I saw a photo of him in the Page Six section not too long ago. He was leaning against a wall reminding passers-by what his name was. I believe he was carrying a tin cup. Can't wait to see Matthews spit and tingle when his horse loses, And Rachel Maddow.. whoa.. stand by back boys and give her room cause she's going to whip it out and piss right across the floor


Entered at Tue Oct 23 19:42:20 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Mayberry Tapes

Sheriff Andy performing with The Country Boys, featuring Clarence White on guitar and his brothers Roland (mandolin) & Eric (Bass).


Entered at Tue Oct 23 16:54:14 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Lonesome Rhodes Beck

That's what Keith Olbermann calls Glenn Beck -


Entered at Tue Oct 23 15:57:16 CEST 2012 from (131.137.245.208)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: this man is dangerous

Recently TCN aired the 1957 Elia Kazan-directed _A Face in the Crowd_ -- well worth watching if you get the chance.
Andy Griffith is the lead as Larry "Lonesome" Rhodes, a drunken Arkansas drifter with heaps of down-home charisma, a guitar, and a talent for singing country blues.
Rhodes is discovered in a county jail cell, gets a local radio spot and a Memphis TV show. His sponsors (one is a caffeine-and-sugar pill Viagra forerunner) enjoy unprecedented sales and Rhodes is recruited to sell a Presidential candidate. The movie is prescient in a lot of ways -- and features the debut of Lee Remick as Betty Lou Fleckum, an overheated 17-year-old Miss Arkansas Baton Twirler . . . .


Entered at Tue Oct 23 13:16:25 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shocking new pop star!

My favourite secondhand record store had a pile of British “Picturegoer” magazines dating from 1947 to 1957. I particularly liked the 1957 cover ELVIS IS WASHED UP AFTER THIS FILM, which led to a review of “Love Me Tender.”

Picturegoer loathed Elvis. In July 1956 they had the headline “This Man is Dangerous”. The text goes:

I have never met Elvis Presley- but already I dislike him. And the news that he is coming to England next year fills me with advance revulsion. If the Musicians’ Union could prevent him working here, it would suit me fine. For I feel that I DO know Elvis Presley via the vicious effect he has had on American fans. I know that this man is dangerous and don’t want to see British youngsters hacking out his name on their arms with clasp-knives or see sex treated as an appallingly commercial freakshow. This is what is happening in America … At concerts his pwerful voice rises above the din like a mating call in the jungle. Audience-fever is spurred on by Presley’s suggestive leers and postures. Johnny Ray was never like this, I am told. Neither were Sinatra or Crosby. They did not, and do not, rely on a Tom-cat’s caterwauling to achieve their vocal effects. And their fans are not unhealthily stimulated to morbid hysteria.

With reviews like that, no wonder he conquered the world. What teen is not going to think, ‘I want some of this …


Entered at Tue Oct 23 09:24:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Deleted Woody

"This Land Is Your Land" also has a universally deleted verse:

In the squares of the city - In the shadow of the steeple


Near the relief office - I see my people


And some are grumblin' and some are wonderin'


If this land's still made for you and me.

Pity really. It seems pretty appropriate for 2012, and not just in the USA.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 09:21:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Star Spangled Banner

Jimi Hendrix is the version that comes to mind. It's notoriously hard to sing for a National Anthem, isn't it? It was only adopted in 1931. I remember a debate (in the 70s?) about its singability, and it was pointed out that Woody Guthrie deliberately wrote songs that "every voice could sing" and the article advocated "This Land Is Your Land" as a more suitable mass participation tune.

We have a debate here that was fuelled by Team GB in the Olympics football (soccer). God Save The Queen is a British anthem, There is some controversy over England sports teams singing God Save The Queen while the other UK constituents don’t. Wales (Land of My Fathers, God Bless the Prince of Wales) and Scotland (Flower of Scotland, Scotland the Brave) have their own anthems.

England athletics and cricket teams have started using Jerusalem (mentioned last week), on the grounds that their competitors are usually Commonwealth countries with an equal claim to the anthem. The Olympics caused controversy because Welsh members of Team GB regarded God Save The Queen as "English" rather than "British" because England football teams use it. God Save The Queen also requires everyone to remember to delete this verse:

Lord grant that Marshal Wade


May by thy mighty aid


Victory bring


May the sedition hush


And like a torrent rush


Rebellious Scots to crush


God save the King

You can see that that isn't going to win hearts and minds north of Hadrian's Wall.

Rule Britannia is another rousing unofficial anthem-like song, but with British rather than English reference. There have been suggestions that England should use Land of Hope & Glory. The Last Night of the Proms is a British institution, closing the BBC annual series of classical ‘promenade concerts’ in the Royal Albert Hall. The Last Night ends with extreme patriotic fervour and Jerusalem and Land of Hope and Glory are the two essential ingredients. Both share that essential ingredient … very strong tunes that are within most people's range.

God Save The Queen shares its melody with My Country Tis of Thee, which once competed for the role of US anthem.


Entered at Tue Oct 23 02:01:42 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Star Spangled Banner

In resent years at many sporting events, there are stars who..........in my mind try to glorify......themselves?? and make to much of this anthem in the way they sing it.

Just now.....before this final ball game, I was moved the way Susan Tedeshi......I hope I spelt her name right, (not to be rude)........that lady sang that anthem.....simply, beautifully, and with class. I was proud of her and happy to hear that anthem sung that way. Some how, sometimes it seems offensive.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 22:28:19 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Big oops!

David P,to whom I was responding,was the subject below. I'm still Jed.LOL


Entered at Mon Oct 22 22:26:56 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 12/31/73 or Watkins Glen

You are correct on the Glen festival.The 12/31 show(with Garcia and Boz's Scaggs) is superior quality playing and sound.The Glen show gets a bit messy.Perhaps too many cooks in the kitchen!


Entered at Mon Oct 22 22:12:59 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......Slowhand now has sufficient reserves to purchase RR's Special Deluxe Edition! Hope he uses his windfall to buy up all those guitars that keep ending up in the hands of these nutty 1%ers that can't play a damn but love to spend $30,000-$50,000 on instruments that were never intended for them.....makes me sick that whole area of waste...


Entered at Mon Oct 22 19:59:47 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the rich get richer

Eric Clapton worked with JRR on the 2011 release _How to Become Clairvoyant_.

Also in 2011, Eric bought three Gerhard Richter paintings for $3.4 million. He sold one (1) of the three the other day for $34.2 million.

Coincidence?


Entered at Mon Oct 22 17:28:47 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: ABB Hittin' the Note

Jed: Accordiing to the Allman Brothers Band website they played both "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and "Les Brers in A Minor" at the Watkins Glen concert with The Band and the Grateful Dead on July 28, 1973.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 16:36:01 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Randy Ciarlante interview in "Modern Drummer" magazine.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 14:28:41 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Spain to pay tribute to Levon October 25th.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 13:55:55 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Terry Cagle & The Cate Bros. - "King Harvest" - King Biscuit Blues Fest '12.


Entered at Mon Oct 22 12:19:25 CEST 2012 from (39.48.114.125)

Posted by:

Vintage Furniture

Location: usa
Web: My link

Subject: extremely good guy

http://www.thebellacottage.com/


Entered at Sun Oct 21 23:18:51 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

First Rosalind, now Tiny- the truth is: the greats always do come back....i understand Tiny barely more than Empty and Ilka NorthWestOcaster's Dog, but, great is great.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 22:07:39 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie update

I have no idea how I came across this as I don't even speak Spanish.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 20:51:32 CEST 2012 from (76.14.18.133)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There

Subject: Truth

The Truth Is Out There

...The X-Files...



Entered at Sun Oct 21 20:16:52 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: The Truth

The truth shall yet you free.

Who said that?


Entered at Sun Oct 21 19:18:30 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Neil Young ....... On The Beach

While sorting out part of our library today, (getting rid of a lot of trash). You know how it gathers up.

I came across this book that I guess I bought some time back. Wondered if any of yuz had seen it.

Neil Young is standing looking out over the water (cover I'm talking about). There is the fins of an old yellow Caddie sticking out of the sand, by a table and two chairs with a beach umbrella.

All the words to the songs, then with the music bars complete. Some pcycodelic art in the back. It's from 1974. Any body want it??


Entered at Sun Oct 21 17:42:58 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Peter Stone Brown's review of new Van Morrison

PSB, I really enjoyed your review of the new Van Morrison. On first listen I didn't think much of the new record and I still don't think these songs are among his best. The thing is I keep playing it. It just sounds so good. As usual, your able to put all that down in words. I wish there was a place where you reviewed new releases every week.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 14:37:40 CEST 2012 from (67.189.230.101)

Posted by:

Norman

Jeff, Thanks. unfortunately I don't think anyone cares about what really happened. It truly is a great story that should be told. Maybe one day someone will take the time to do the research on the whole Ramble story. It is certainly better than what has been told so far. I tried to speak to Barb about setting the record straight but she thinks I am looking for credit. Anyone who knows me will tell you I stayed in the background completely. Never on stage, never hung out with the "stars". Anyway, I'm glad someone knows what happened. Maybe I will tell the story on the GB some day. LOL Norman


Entered at Sun Oct 21 10:08:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You get to a point, I guess. A friend borrowed my black tie a few months back, realized it was the second time in a couple of years, and said "I guess I'm at a point now where I should buy one of these." The contemporary two I've been to in recent years both requested "no black, please" (one said "please wear bright colours") but for older people, I think it's still appropriate.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 05:54:10 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin, thank you. What the fuck, you and i can't even argue anymore :-)

One of these days, I'm gonna get to writing about JJ. i've wanted to.

I'll never forget the first time I drove him in my car.when we left his house, it was raining.Then boom, i t was pouring.the man was 80 years old, beethoven for our time,s and he's in my car, in a downpour. I'm driving like i had my newborn niece in the car with me, and praying that a helicopter didn't fall out of the sky and land on us.



Entered at Sun Oct 21 03:00:14 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

The performance of 'Scarlet Town' by Bob Dylan in Winnipeg was superb. He sang it and delivered it carefully and true-to-form. I look forward to other live renderings from 'Tempest'.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 02:30:23 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Low

'Warsaw' form 'Low' by David Bowie.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 02:29:05 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sadness

Sadness is exemplified by 'Warsaw', The David Bowie Album. There is no more sombre music and when I listen to it, it fills me with sadness. The cycle has its soundtrack.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 00:36:03 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Oops...forgot to mention

That Les Brer in A Minor is best from 12/31/73.At some point after Dickey Betts plays a beautifully poignant solo that could melt your heart,Jerry Garcia joins in for a romp through some of the most soulful and intricate playing we might hear.This is no all star jam.This is very very good.


Entered at Sun Oct 21 00:34:21 CEST 2012 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Thanks folks.

This has been a hard one. I've lost many friends and family over the years and cried buckets but for some reason this was a little different. Went right to my soul. I'm not a religeous person and neither was Jimmy. But we are both so spiritual. I remember when Steve, our guestbook friend passed and his wife told us about it. I cried my eyes out reading her post and I had never met the man. Talked to him a few times via e-mail and thought he was a prick before doing so. But his passing really upset me. Strange eh. Maybe getting older has something to do with it. Good words Jeff. Thank you. Kevin J. Joe Ely was what I was looking for. Sent a little photo montage to Jim's mom with that playing in the background. Peter V. I think you were trying to tell me something. I got it. Thank you. Joan, Dunc and everyone else. Thank you. Norm. You always know what to say. That old poem was so right. If this post sounds a little dis-jointed it probably is. Love you folks. Peace, Carl


Entered at Sun Oct 21 00:27:08 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Music To Die For

Sadly,there have been too many early deaths in the history of the Allman Brothers Band. They have most often played,In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,a fitting blues/jazz instrumental.Les Brer in A Minor works well too.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 23:15:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: And did those feet in ancient time …

Subject: Recordings

Jeff, I think for the average person, you're looking at recordings for funerals. A choir costs a fortune, a lot can run to an organist, but nowadays most such events seem to feature some recorded music. It's different for musicians who have pals to perform.

The strange fact is that "Jerusalem" is said to be the most played / sung tune at both weddings and funerals in England at least, though I assume Scotland, Wales and Ireland go for something of their own as Jerusalem mentions "England". There was a furore last year when some vicar or minister banned it because it isn't actually a hymn. It's a very good tune whatever.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 20:08:03 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Music for Funerals

I am reminded of the opening scene of "The Big Chill". The church is filled with thee deceased's friends.. One of them walks up to the organ and says "I/m going to play Alex's favorite song and launches into "You Can't Always Get What You Want'

Then there is the tombstone of a woman buried in the Key West cemetery. A famous hypocondriac it said "I told you I was sick"

Bonk, my condolences on you loss.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 19:36:00 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Yes........and while I do not think the state has any business in the bedrooms of a nation.....I would allow for license to have inspectors into music rooms......and any time they were to find the names of a Betty and a Biff both on a ColdPlay or U2 album.....I would grant them powers to dissolve the marriage immediatley..........Save the neighbors and the nation...


Entered at Sat Oct 20 18:03:45 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Wedding Bell Blues

Kev, so your saying if a couple has lousy taste in music their marriage is doomed?


Entered at Sat Oct 20 17:59:39 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Music for a funeral, well, that's a whole nother subject, as Pete says. I was just thinking music in general. in the days and weeks to come, beautiful music matters. I don't know about recorded music at funerals, live music at the inside funeral service, that's another story, and chosen properly that works.Live music at a wake or viewing, that works. but even so, i suspect each case, each person, each family is different. Recorded music, I don't know. But of course. to each his or her own.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 17:43:08 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Amoung Comrades.....for Bonk

Carl.....as you send some one to sea....there is comfort from John Masefield.

"SEA FEVER"

I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky.

And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by.

And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sails shaking.

And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the sea again, for the call of the running tide.

Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied.

And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,

And the flung spray and the blown spume and the sea gulls crying.

I must go down to the sea again, to the vagrant gypsy life,

To the gull's way and the whale's way where the winds like a whetted knife.

And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow rover

And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick is over.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 17:27:50 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

We crossed in the posting. Great song, Bill M. Here's to 20 more years.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 17:24:10 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Back from the walk

Peter V:two brilliant songs.

JT:All the Dylan songs are really good and it was hard not to include anything from Sweetheart of the Rodeo.

I'm playing Paul Brady's most recent now.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 17:16:39 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bonk: Condolences. Cockburn's version of "The Soul Of A Man" from "Nothing but a Burning Light" would fit the bill, I think.

Dunc: thanks especially for including "Have You Seen Her Face".

Twenty more years of the GB is a nice thought - and more likely than the other prognostications.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 16:56:47 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great list, Dunc. I thought you'd have to run with two Goffin-King in the end. After all, how could you miss either?


Entered at Sat Oct 20 16:07:06 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Chimes

Great choices, Dunc. With respect, I'm going to add one more to your list-- "Chimes of Freedom". The Byrds make it sound like what the song is. Twenty-one is a good number.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 15:53:46 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Woody Allen was once asked if he was happy to know that he would live on forever through his movies..........he replied "Well, I would be happier to know that I will another 20 years in my apartment in New York"

If I had to choose, I would take music at funerals over weddings......I have heard Otis Redding and The Band at funerals.........only ever seem to have heard Celine Dion and Bryan Adams at weddings.......remember those cringe scenes that seemed to last a decade or more where every couple getting married played "Evertything I Do, I Do For You"......Ya just had to know a lifetime of vanilla and misery was sure to follow - did you not?


Entered at Sat Oct 20 15:21:17 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: My Byrd Has Flown

Here it is - the top twenty Byrd songs - a bit different to Uncut. Really enjoyed playing every Byrd track I own over the last three and a half days. One thing I'll say, I think the Byrds playing Dylan are great tracks.

Not in order - I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better; Mr Tambourine Man; Turn, Turn, Turn; 5D; Eight Miles High; My Back Pages; Going Back; Wasn't Born To Follow; Ballad of Easy Rider; Chestnut Mare; He Was A Friend Of Mine; You Won't Have To Cry; I Knew I'd Want To; Set You Free This Time; Lady Friend; It's No Use; Wait and See; Get To You; She Don't Care About Time; The World Turns All around Her; Have You Seen Her Face;

So many great songs not included.

How did I do?

Coincidentally, I am away up for a walk on the braes that inspired Wild Mountain Thyme. The start of the song was written a mile from here in a house still standing.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 15:03:10 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bonk

So sorry. Deepest condolences.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 14:12:28 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Good morning all, I never thought that I'd see a comment about the facial bone structure of the Band, in regards to whether having or not having a beard come up. Goes to show, anything's possible if you wait long enough. Maybe we can get an alternate take from some of the ladies who used to (and may still lurk) post here. I seem to recall my comment about Robbie, at one time resembling "Yentl the Yeshiva boy" drawing heat, once upon a time.

My personal take on music at funerals is that I wouldn't want anything played. If you want it, great. There are more important things to plan and arrange rather than music. I was reminded of this when at the unveiling for my father's gravestone, we happened to walk by the grave of a friend of his. On his foot-stone, at the bottom of it was inscribed "I Never Had A Bad Day". Both my niece and I both looked at each other and said simultaneously: "Well one, anyway!" and proceeded to laugh. I didn't feel bad about it because I knew if my father saw it, he'd have done the same thing and said: "what a putz!"


Entered at Sat Oct 20 09:21:18 CEST 2012 from (99.141.59.74)

Posted by:

Adam

My earlier comments were just meant to inform - Ari has improved the footage nicely and lovingly shared it with all fans to enjoy!


Entered at Sat Oct 20 09:14:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mercy, Mercy, MERCY

Sorry, three x Mercy is the title. The two Mercy title is the Don Covay soul classic, also wonderful, but not appropriate.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 09:10:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’m separating this as the subject matter is so different. Music can bring great release by letting emotions out. The day my mum died I happened to have a mix-CDR I’d done of what I thought were just gentle and relaxing tunes. It had two tracks on it that really did bring about that catharsis. First, Cannonball Adderley’s Mercy, Mercy from 1966. And it has a well of sadness and pity in there that I’d call the blues. The other (without exploring the lyric too far) is Trouble by Little Feat. Two I’ve got written in my will are Adios by Weather Report and French Girls by Garth Hudson (well, it says “The Band” but it is just Garth). Adios was on the same mix CDR. It’s very short, and if you don’t know it, doesn’t sound “like” Weather Report at all. Of course the link is that both Mercy, Mercy and Adios were composed and performed by /with Joe Zawinul. So you have the world's two greatest keyboard players, Joe and Garth.

Music at funerals can be strange. An elderly neighbour and friend was a sailor in WW2 and to my surprise they played Rod Stewart's "Sailing" (his favourite song, which is also important) and we all welled up. The lyric is surprisingly appropriate too. I'd never liked the song, thinking it overblown, but in fact it was perfect.

The worst, which I've mentioned before was my ex- writing partner's funeral where he had requested "Je ne regrette rien" by Edith Piaf, and left the 45 with his will. And his brother recorded the frigging B-side which they played.

(the autocorrect here was most insistent that the title was "regret rain" but that's the trouble with autocorrectors).


Entered at Sat Oct 20 08:50:56 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: What a thrill, June & July

Both Robbie and Rick (like myself at their age then) were much too handsome for beards. Facial hair detracted from both because they had naturally good bone structure. It's been a good exercise, Ari, but I think you should go and use these skills on some decent source material, not old bootleg film. I'm sure you're doing that too, but if not, find a band who wouldn't mind being filmed for the sake of having the video for themselves and work on it. I know multiple camera set ups are hard (and music doesn't work with single camera + repeated takes), but I'd like to see you applying your skill to good film. Hope this doesn't offend.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 08:24:11 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Time to Kill

Nice work Ari. The song comes across very much as a Rick song here. It feel's very muched "lived in" even though it hadn't been officailly released.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 07:31:33 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bonk, musically, i'm at a loss for good reccomendations. Brain fog has been on the rise, and when i can't think of songs that work wonders, i;m in trouble. If you have Otis Spann Is the Blues, that cd should do the job Just he and Lockwood.Otis Spann Walking the blues is not as otherworldy, but it is very worthwhile.They and St Louis Jimmy Oden, who wrote Goin Down Slow....Geoff Muldaur, Password, shoudl do it too.....has gorgeous rendtiions of Sleepy JohnEstes,Mississippi John hurt,and Blimd Lemon jefferson songs on it, also some old old anglo #s...of course, there are albums like Europe 72,Blonde On Blonde, and gorgeous music, like the Jody girl/beautiful Loser (spiritually, that's a blues, noone knows it, but it is nothin but the blues) medley on Seger's Silver bullet Live. Eat a Peach, , or Gene Clark- No Other....Poco Crazy eyes..Gram PArsons, grievous angel, or any of the first 4 Burrito Bros albums.The music will come, and smiles will return... for now, you gonna hurt for a while.Take it in man, you own it, he was your buddy and you are honoring him and that. Being happy later, when the time comes, that will honor him too.....Joni Mitchell- Blue.Judy collins- someday soon, that album...


Entered at Sat Oct 20 07:09:03 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bonk, you're gonna be hurting hard for awhile man.No way around it... losing em is bad enough, sending them off is bare life. But you were fortunate to be able to do that... and fortunate jimmy and you were close fiends for as long as you were. i know, the older we get the harder it is to come upon those kind of friendships. Hang in man, you'll think about him every day, and you may hear some more sounds, or get some signs from Jimmy. It happens.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 07:00:42 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.253)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bonk: You're a good man......the attached from the great Joe Ely is a nice one......Not one of his but he has heart in everything he sings.

Jeff: Nothing you ever write here is more to the bone heartfelt and honorable than your thoughts on JJ.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 05:55:26 CEST 2012 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Jeff and everyone else.

Jeff. Keep those memories close. They will comfort you for the rest of your life. Just put the ashes of an old and dear friend of mine named Jimmy to rest. Put him on a piece of driftwood in Fulford Harbour here on SaltSpring. Sprinkled the ashes with Dom and sent him out to sea. I swear I heard a sigh as the current took him out. Not thinking too clearly right now but I can't come up with a tune or a song to put my mind, or his, at ease. Jim loved all music. Especially the blues and the Band. Jeez I miss him. Known him since I was 8.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 04:55:50 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

kevin, whilst i've not seen it first hand, reports from his piano player indicate Chuck Berry has been in top form for a while.Now, honetsly, i find this hard to believe, but Bob should be a reliable source. i have an odd connection to that piano spot in the lineup with Berry. You know about my friendship and work with Joihnnie. there was alot to it , and my conection to Johnnie goes back to when i was just a kid, but in 1982, i was a 23 year old whippersnapper, and was the sales trainer at acompany in StLouis named R.E.K.industries.Bob came in , knew a little about kitchens anbd baths. I was a siding, window man, but had sold kitchen and baths in home when i was 19 and 20, 21.And i was a closer. Ralph, the owner of the company, made me the sales trainer. So, i was 23, but, i was one of the two top guns in the company, there wers about 14 salesman and ralp went out and hired 5 more. Guys mostly in their 30s and 40s. My job was to make em closers....anyway,Bob didn't have it, and said, well, i;m just doing thii for a little while anyway, i;m really a musician. I say to myself, yeah, right....anyway, i quit, opened up my own co, then went back to NY in 85. 97, i'm back in st louis, hear a band lineup mentioned spot by spot on the radio, and the dj says, on piano Bob.... so i go in, sure enough, it;s him..... anyway, all thses years, i;ve only seen Chuck play once since the late 80s or ealry 90s in NY. that was at the tribute to Johnnie, after he died.i was not impressed that night, but neither were the guys in chuck's band. Ingrid, his daughter, was excellent, i was 2 feet from Chuck,I didn;t say a word, just walked past each time, t he wound was too raw, ..out o fmy love for JJ, i just don;t go see chuck play here, i ptroabbly should.......... but anyway, the word has been that c huck has been playing real well for the last year. But yes, no real comeback, no real production, i know what you mean by your statement...


Entered at Sat Oct 20 04:12:50 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Year 2032..........Adam, Ali and Ari rule the roost at the GB.......but they are locked in a squabble over who re-edited what in that great sequence of Levon doing "Acadian Driftwood" in the CBC special called "Floating Over Canada" - Bill M suddenly re-emerges with an autobiography and Bob F announces out of the blue that he knew it would be good because the "great ones always come back"......forgetting that Ray Davies hasn't, Prince hasn't, McCartney hasn't, Fogerty hasn't, Townsend hasn't, and Lennon and Berry didn't.......Bob Dylan did, Roy Orbison did, Robbie Robertson did, Leonard Cohen did, Johnny Cash did and block your dear ears Al Edge - the great Johnny Rotten did!


Entered at Sat Oct 20 02:34:23 CEST 2012 from (99.141.59.74)

Posted by:

Adam

Not to take anything away from Ari, but the Festival Express outtake footage originally appeared on an unofficial DVD from Japan. It was recently liberated and compiled as a fan project, with the alternate angles of tracks spread across the DVD. I prefer seeing each "reel" with alternate shots/viewpoints of the songs, though.


Entered at Sat Oct 20 01:53:18 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Waging Heavy Peace

I just finished the book Neil Young wrote 'Waging Heavy Peace'. I was wondering if anyone else on the Guestbook had read it. It's not well written like 'Chronicles' or 'Just Kids'. It's written more like a diary then a memoir. I don't think there was much editing involved. What makes it special is it feels like it was written as a form of meditation and it has a strong heartbeat. The book is filled with great stories past and present. I love everything I've heard from the new Neil and Crazy Horse record also. The great ones always come back.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 22:34:26 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Time To Kill

Didn't Richard play drums on the studio version with Levon on rhythm guitar? As I recall, at the time of the Festival Express, the group had just completed, or was in the process of wrapping up the decision on which mixes to use for "Stage Fright".


Entered at Fri Oct 19 21:04:49 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Great stuff, Ari. Loving the "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever" you have up as well!... linked here. Rick is just a force of nature in these clips.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 20:52:45 CEST 2012 from (70.53.47.132)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….A thought just occurred to me…..if only Ari had been around to sneak into Marty and Robbie’s debauched apartment/studio back in 1977/1978 and re-edit The Last Waltz to include more shots of Richard and Garth maybe all would have turned out differently……then again maybe not…………………..Good Job Ari….though I confess to never having seen this before so I am not sure what you did………by the way, has any man ever had his looks harmed more by a beard than Robbie Robertson? Almost two totally different people.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 20:49:37 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.73)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Ari, Richard is visible behind the organ in the TTK recorded by the Dutch crew which I'm sure you've seen. Great job on those edits.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 20:23:57 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill … but Stockport happens to be her home town.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 19:49:16 CEST 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Moondance

Hows about one more Youtube video. Van is joined by Etta James, George Benson, Carlos Santana, Tom Scott and Dr. John for a killer version of 'Moondance'.



Entered at Fri Oct 19 19:17:10 CEST 2012 from (216.165.95.64)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

I'm surprised this was overlooked. It's only real footage of Richard behind the organ at least that I'm aware of, at least where you can see him clearly. And I would've thought it'd warm the hearts of all Band fans who wish there was evidence of the once-strong bond between two of the leading forces in The Band. Skip it if you like, but it's a really good performance of them at their peak (although they always peaked) and I tried to do as much justice to it as I could. Unfortunately, between the three angles/cameras of raw footage from this version of Time To Kill, there is no footage of Garth on the piano.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 19:01:55 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Barbara Jung(e)r

Peter V: I suspect that "Stockport to Memphis" borrows from wonderful the opening lines of JT' "Sweet Baby James": "The first of December came covered in snow, and so did the highway from Stockport to Boston". Or very close to that.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 17:17:50 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What Yankees???

Are you there Lars??........or are you out sittin' in a tree somewhere....chewin on an arrow???


Entered at Fri Oct 19 16:38:23 CEST 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

BortMedSkavlan - aka NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Barbara Junger

Thanks Peter V for the link.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 15:12:01 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Van the Man

For those who like their Dylan punchier, the link goes to Van doing "Just Like A Woman".


Entered at Fri Oct 19 15:10:32 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Barb Jungr

I'd never heard of this "chanteuse" but heard her talking on the radio on Wednesday. She has specialized in Dylan covers for ten years and has two complete albums of Dylan covers (Every grain of Sand; Man in A Long Black Coat). All her other albums have a couple of Dylan on too. I've never seen them in stores either, but they're on the Linn label (audiophile, like The Blue Nile) and seem to be SACD / CD hybrids at £15, or 50% more than UK normal. Anyway she has a new album out on Monday "From Stockport to Memphis" and the songs from that on the show were good. Link is to a performance of "If Not For You."


Entered at Fri Oct 19 13:26:12 CEST 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Nordic media

There is a talk show named "Skavlan". I believe the anonymous poster "jh" knows it. Everybody wants to be there. I was happy when my former students - Sweden's greatest rock band - should sit on the couch and after that play their new song. I was _EVEN HAPPIER_ when they didn't do it. Their new song was too long for this most famous talk show up here, they were told. The boys said:"no, the whole song or nothing". It was - nothing. I'M SO GOOD DAMMED PROUD for their consequent attitude to their music!


Entered at Fri Oct 19 12:16:52 CEST 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Bruce Springsteen and politics

Thanks for several posts during the last months on this issue. At least Swedish and Danish public service channels had Bruce backing President Obama (and even playing harmonica) in their TV news yesterday evening.


Entered at Fri Oct 19 11:08:36 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Somewhere down the crazy river

never seen this one before


Entered at Thu Oct 18 22:26:27 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Emmylou Harris

Bill M: Since that interview was published Brian Ahern reunited with Emmylou Harris to produce her excellent 2008 album "All I Intended To Be". The title is a line from Billy Joe Shaver's "Old Five and Dimers Like Me", which Ms. Harris covered. Also featured were Kate & Anna McGarrigle and Dolly Parton. Former members of Emmylou's famous Hot Band, Glen D. Hardin and Emory Gordy, Jr. also played.

Mr. Gordy is from the Atlanta area and I first saw him many years ago playing with Wayne Logiudice & the Kommotions before he went on to greater fame. That group at the time also featured the young Barry Bailey, who would later become the lead guitarist for the Atlanta Rhythm Section. Back then he used to alternate between guitar & bass with Emory.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 21:44:30 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

rosalind

Web: My link

..just found this. I was the first viewer


Entered at Thu Oct 18 21:26:19 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Brian Ahern interview

Here's an interesting interview with producer Brian Ahern. Lots about Emmylou (no surprise), lots about equipment and techniques, but also a brief mention of Rick and Garth (who guested on an Emmylou album. Not sure about some of his more ancient assertions (e.g., that he played everything on "Snowbird", though a '71 interview sometime Tommy Graham, a sometime-associate of our guys '59-'64, has Graham playing rhythm guitar and percussion, which sounds right).


Entered at Thu Oct 18 19:39:11 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The 2000 Columbia/Legacy remastered CD versions of "Byrdmaniax" and "Farther Along" are apparently out of print, thus commanding high prices on the re-sale market. I believe download versions of both albums, however, are still available at standard prices. The former features another Clarence White lead vocal on a cover of Jackson Browne's "Jamaica Say You Will", a year before Mr. Browne's own version on his Asylum debut album was released. Another highlight on "Byrdmaniax" is "Kathleen's Song", a McGuinn/Jacques Levy collaboration.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 18:51:17 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: He Was a Friend of Mine

Bill M:I think that's made the list. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 18:47:12 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: A Byrd in the hand

I've spent the day playing Byrd albums.

Peter, I've read your review of Roger McGuinn a few times now and I think it's one of your best. I reread it today and noticed I've left three comments before. I bought the album for £20 and as his wife suggested it gave me Roger's autograph as well! I agree, Roger McGuinn of the Byrds would be better for marketing. But I really enjoyed the two shows (different) I saw and was glad I bought the album.

David, I don't have Live at the Albert Hall, but may get it.

I looked up Farther Along and it's scarcity in Britain is reflected in the price.

I play Sweetheart of the Rodeo from time to time, but I don't think a track from this album is going to make the list. It's the feel and musicianship of the whole album that does it for me, although I love the Dylan songs, but I've already got two Dylan songs in the list.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 18:29:30 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

A top-5 Byrds moment for me would be their 1990s remake of "He Was A Friend Of Mine" - principally for Crosby's stunning harmonies. And he thought Nash was the best harmoniser in rock and roll?


Entered at Thu Oct 18 16:11:20 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ballad of Easy Rider

Also for me, the alternate long version of "Ballad of Easy Rider", with Clarence White's tasteful solo, is the best. It was included as a bonus cut of the 1997 Columbia/Legacy CD remaster.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 16:10:07 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Yay Bruce!

Link...he'll be campaigning for Obama in Iowa and Ohio..


Entered at Thu Oct 18 15:35:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

peter V

I'm having e-mail trouble today. I can't send or get messages. Hope to resolve it soon.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 15:31:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Clarence Sings Lowell

Dunc: My vote for favorite Clarence White lead vocal with the Byrds would be their cover of Lowell George's "Truck Stop Girl". The Sundazed label release of the Byrds "Live At Royal Albert Hall 1971" (from Roger McGuinn's stash of tapes) is essential listening.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 13:52:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

I never bought Byrdmaniax nor Farther Along. Odd in retrospect, as I played (Untitled) to death, especially the whole side of Eight Miles High. The one that sticks in my mind is Tiffany Queen. Both albums I remember had AWFUL reviews in the UK, and I went with the reviewers. I came to Byrds albums late, with Notorious Byrd Brothers, Sweetheart of The Rodeo, Dr Byrds & Mr Hyde and Ballad of Easy Rider all bought in a rush. Until then, I'd only been interested in singles. I loved the (Untitled) band, but then interest dropped off.

Link is to my review of Roger McGuinn this time last year.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 12:12:49 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Byrdmania

Al, Thanks. Great interview. I have the Gene Clark collection and two Dillard and Clark albums on one CD, which I wouldn't know about at the time of recording.

I'm not far away from you, Peter. Goin Back is definitely on the list, but should I have two Goffin and King compositions on a list of 20 even though they are both great.

I like 'So You Want To Be A Rock n Roll Star' but it's not on my list.

Chestnut Mare will be on the list.

Peter, I'm hindered in that I've only heard Preflyte recently and have never heard 'Farther Along'. Did they not get much publicity in Britain?


Entered at Thu Oct 18 09:57:36 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More Byrds

I guess we're looking at the "UNCUT" feature. Their top two Byrds tracks (1 Eight Miles High 2 Mr Tambourine Man) can't be argued with in terms of general public perception. The next three … Turn, Turn, Turn / So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star / 5D are going to be in nearly everyone's Top Ten at least.

I looked at my "most played" and it's "Wasn't Born To Follow" (Uncut's 11th choice), and that's irrevocably linked with The Weight because of "Easy Rider". And "Ballad of Easy Rider" would make my top ten too. My next is "Goin' Back" (not in Uncut's Top 20), making two Goffin-King compositions. "Goin' Back" is a Sophie's Choice song … The Byrds or Dusty Springfield? They're both great interpretations, both essential, and also very different.

I had a long affection for "Chestnut Mare" but every CD version (and I have the first CD, the remaster and the box set) is horribly remastered and murky. I don't know what they did to it. I guess the original vinyl will suffer in the same way on modern equipment. I'll have to try it. It's one of the few favourites where recording quality gets so much in the way.

I see David Crosby's choice of best Byrds song is Triad, which is (a) an outtake or rather rejection by the others, and (b) he must know better than anyone that Jefferson Airplane, with his assistance, defined the song forever on "Crown of Creation."


Entered at Thu Oct 18 08:58:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dr Byrds & Mr Hyde

Dunc, you're looking at Top 20 hits. Guinness does Top 50, so you have in the UK:

Mr Tambourine Man #1

All I Really Want To Do #4

Turn Turn Turn #26

Eight Miles High #24

You Ain't Goin' Nowhere #45

Chestnut Mare #19

I'd be for Notorious Byrd Brothers for best album too, but Dr Byrds and Mr Hyde has its moments, especially Drug Store truck Drivin' Man. Both the Basement covers are excellent.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 08:12:43 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

I did a re-edit of a Time To Kill performance. Everybody should watch for sweet moment between Levon and Robbie at the end.


Entered at Thu Oct 18 03:38:01 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario. Canada

Subject: Bob Dylan/Johnny Depp...

Hi guys!! So nice to be back reading all your wonderful posts.. Keep up the good work, as you always do.

Heard tonight that Johnny Depp is to play Bob Dylan in a biopic. May be just a rumour, so will have to wait and see what comes of it.

KEVIN: A special thanx to you for those pics of our guys. I haven't seen a few of them before, so was nice to see them.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE TO ALL xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Oct 18 01:28:32 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The GENEius

Dunc. Superb interview by Gene - from 5 minutes in to around 19 minutes - in which he gives some fascinating insight into a variety of stuff from the early Byrds and Tambourine man to the cock up over making Feel a Whole Lot Better a 'B' side to the writing of 8 Miles High to his song writing technique to his friendship with John lennon et etc. He even mentions our Rick in passing.

What comes across most of all is what I've always felt about Gene - a truly self-effacing man with good grace and a good word for everyone - even paul Mccartney who he didn't know that well. Cut from the same cloth as Rick - with the added bonus for me of being a songwriter up there with the genre's finest ever.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 23:20:54 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Clarence

So what is the greatest Clarence White track? I'll need that for the list.

Or are all the great songs from the earlier period.

Is Sweetheart of the Rodeo a classic or an OK country album?


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:45:34 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Cajun driftwood

David P: It'd interesting to know what elements of their respective backgrounds Clarence and sometime-bandmate Gib Gilbeau (who I believe was of a much more distant Acadian heritage) found they had in common.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:34:52 CEST 2012 from (70.53.47.132)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Glad that so many enjoyed the link the other day. Here's one from Ry Cooder - not much of a video but a fun song....it was the opening that got my attention.

The Byrds: funny link to them for me is that when I was a kid, my mother had a music book she kept at the piano.....it seemd to have about 40 different pictures on the cover but the only one of interest to me was the one of The Byrds...It was a very early picture of them and I remember picking out David Crosby and thought he looked so cool that decided he was going to be my favorite rock star......I was only 5 or 6 and when a few years later I saw what he then looked like I couldn't quite believe it was the same guy!


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:34:51 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Yes indeed Bill, Clarence LeBlanc's parents were Acadians from New Brunswick.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:30:50 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks for the Byrds clip. Very satisfying - especially Flash Leblanc's work, but the others too.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:13:55 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Byrds and Ye Playboys & Playgirls After Dark

The Byrds serenading Barbi Benton & the Bunnies with "This Wheel's On Fire" as Clarence White's b-bender Tele explodes.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 22:11:15 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Byrds

But, also, the covers make the original songs so different. I've got to keep some of the classics in the list.

I really like Chestnut Mare. It was the third UK singles hit and in my part of Scotland was very popular. The American symbolism transferred to a tough, industrial Scottish town. I like the talking bit of the song, the middle different singing bit and the structure of the song in addition to the chorus. There's a film in that song. Remember 'Somewhere Down The Crazy River' was very popular in Europe and in a way reminds me of 'Chestnut Mare'. And I think both songs are great.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 21:58:46 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dr. Byrds & Mr. Clark

And McGuinn's later edition of the Byrds covered "This Wheel's On Fire", while Gene Clark covered "Tears of Rage".


Entered at Wed Oct 17 20:29:34 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Notorious Byrd Brothers

Two comments: 1) My favourite Byrds album is "The Notorious Byrd Brothers", an album I have listened to often over the years. 2) The Byrds are remembered by most as a cover band of others (Dylan, etc) music or for 8 Miles High, but like those of you who have commented today and yesterday, it is these lesser known songs from the early years that I love most. The Byrds hover for me and are airborne often.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 20:26:07 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Subject: Byrds' Singles Hits

Interestingly and surprisingly there are only three Byrds' singles which became hits.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:59:56 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

My favourite Gene Clark song is "The World Turns All Around Her". That I prefer the linked one to the original simply reflects the fact that it was the only one I knew for many years. Fergus Hambleton was half of the group Goody Two Shoes, whose '69 version of "Up On Cripple Creek" is listed in this site's discography.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:50:48 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

When Rick Danko performed with Gene Clark in 1985 the set list included "Feel A Whole Lot Better" and "Set You Free This Time".


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:35:24 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.73)

Posted by:

Pat B

She Has A Way is included on the Byrd's remastered first album, along with alternate versions of You Won't Have To Cry and Feel A Whole Lot Better.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:20:48 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks Dunc for reminding me of the Preflyte sessions, which includes another Gene Clark gem, "She Has A Way". They later re-recorded it during the Mr. Tambourine Man sessions, but it was relegated as an outtake until years later when it first showed up on the "Never Before" compilation.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 19:06:56 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Subject: OopsDavid

Forgot to put this on post, David. 'Feel A Whole Lot Better' may be my number 1. A lot of difficult decisions to make.

'Who'll Stop The Rain'. I know we've talked about alligators, polar bears and storms on this website, but the West of Scotland incessant rain can get to you. And I know you've got spiders, Dlew. Today I'd take my chances with a polar bear riding on an alligator carrying a spider if I could get a week of pure sunshine.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 18:47:57 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: David P

'I Knew I'd Want You' will be on the list. What about 'You Won't Have to Cry'.

Any information on Preflyte?

Chris Hillman says in Uncut the best years of the Byrds was 65-67.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 16:50:41 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gene Clark's Killer B's

Dunc: My favorite Byrds/Gene Clark songs would have to include "Set You Free This Time", "I Knew I'd Want You" (B-side of "Mr. Tambourine Man" single), "Feel A Whole Lot Better" (B-side of "All I Really Want To Do") and "She Don't Care About Time" (B-side of "Turn! Turn! Turn!").


Entered at Wed Oct 17 16:25:38 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: On Band Leave

Thanks Adam. I really enjoyed the article.

Enjoyed recent posts.

Have recently been playing Northern Lights Southern Cross. Absolutely brilliant. Adam, could you ask Garth what gave him the idea of using bagpipes (chanter) at the beginning of Acadian Driftwood? I love the way all the instruments combine to open this song. Brilliant lyrics, beautifully sung.

Have recently been to Edinburgh for a few days. Beautiful city. I bought Preflyte at a CD fair. I didn't know about this album until a couple of years ago. Could anybody explain the philosophy behind the release other than making money?

Al Edge. I'm going on Band Leave to work out the 20 greatest Byrds tracks. I think Gene Clark will feature. Thanks, Al. Really enjoyed Uncut.

I need something to lift the gloom. I was at Hampden for the two home world cup games against Macedonia and Serbia. But after the last two results we are bottom of the section. I think the manager has beeen unlucky, but the press are calling for his head.


Entered at Wed Oct 17 16:10:06 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Levon & The Hawks

Speaking of Levon & The Hawks, I noticed in the tape archive section that "Smack Dab in the Middle" was included in their set list when they played in Dallas on 6/5/65. This song was written by the great R&B songwriter Jesse Stone (under the pseudonym Charles Calhoun). It became the signature song for Big Joe Williams when he sang with Count Basie and was later covered by the Mills Brothers, Ray Charles, Ry Cooder, and Amos Garrett/Doug Sahm/Gene Taylor. Mr. Stone, an inductee in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, also wrote such classics as "Money Honey", "Shake, Rattle and Roll", and "Your Cash Ain't Nothing But Trash". Many of the songs from the Dallas set-list for Levon & The Hawks, including "Smack Dab..." can be heard on youtube, although the sound quality is poor.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 23:43:57 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: spotify royalties

link above


Entered at Tue Oct 16 22:07:41 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Levon and the Hawks

I've said this many times before here, Al, but it is always worth repeating. Levon and the Hawks were the best bar band I have ever seen, even to this date. I am not exaggerating. 'Moondog Matinee' gives one a taste of what 1960-1964 was like in downtown Toronto. I gained my appreciation of all that was rock and roll from Levon and the Hawks and like so many, I am forever in their debt.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 20:31:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wow

Thanks for that link Kev. Like Joan and Jeff I hadn't seen many of the photos before. Great to see them all but don't you just love Rick with his big woolly jumper. So reminscent of when I once saw him backstage yapping away to all and sundry with that endearing infectious grin. And isn't that a great song with Levon's vocals superbly suited to such lovely understated playing of Robbie and particularly Garth. I've badly neglected Moondog for far too many years. Got it on right now - Richard's wonderful take on Bobby Blue Bland's great pine for lost love.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 16 19:39:59 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Kevin J

Thanks for posting that video. I thought I had seen most of the The Band photos but there were some new to me.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 16:56:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: The best Spence example would be "Grey/Afro" - at link. By the way, the simple the dum-ti-dum-ti-dum-ti-dum that is played on rhythm guitar behind Tim Rose's version of "Morning Dew" and on vibes behind Lulu's version, appears here on bass - though later in the song, say 5:30.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 16:25:35 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: I Remember Chuck Willis

Thanks Kevin for the link. The late Chuck Willis, too soon gone at age 30, was from Atlanta. He was an incredibly gifted artist who often wore a turban when performing and became known as The Sheik of Soul and The King of the Stroll. I often play my copy of the posthumous Atlantic LP "I Remember Chuck Willis" which includes "What Am I Living For" (link). The Band's old friend Conway Twitty and Ray Charles also covered the song. "Hang Up My Rock & Roll Shoes" was the B-side to Mr. Willis' original hit single version. Derek & the Dominos covered another Willis classic, "It's Too Late (She's Gone)".


Entered at Tue Oct 16 15:52:53 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Yes, thanks for the link. That rumbling and rather aimless bass at the start is very remeniscent of a number of songs on Alexander Spence's remarkable "Oar" album. Another Canuck praised to the skies by Greil Marcus in "Rolling Stone" in '69. So now I'm listening to him.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 14:45:43 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

20-yrs ago today - "Paint My Materpiece" @ Bob Dylan's 30th anniversary.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 14:01:27 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Kevin

Thank you so very much for that. It's difficult to feel happy and sad at the same time in the early morning. I often wonder if there are far more outtakes out there. Beautiful.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 13:31:21 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

thanks kevin.Out of left field,.. for me anyway. Some of those pictures were sure something to see.....


Entered at Tue Oct 16 07:27:18 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK to "What Am I Living For" ........Robbie, Garth and Levon alone.........not recommended as a tattoo, by the way.....other than that......beautiful..........and the BEST 5 MINUTES OF PICTURES YOU WILL EVER GET OF THE BAND. DIG A FEW YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE SEEN.


Entered at Tue Oct 16 02:44:08 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Zimmer dysfunction? - Al,I'm thinking the pharmacist slipped you the uncircumsized variety - meaning, counterfeits of course.....


Entered at Tue Oct 16 01:07:01 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Ali

......just s wild guess, but is it possible the tattoo artist was so thrown off by Al's mix-up that he inked the lyrics to "The Moon Struck One" instead of the glorious "Acadian Driftwood".........a few weeks of laser and all should be fine.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 20:44:37 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.134)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: New essay

FYI: We had to remove the latest contribution to this site for now. It'll be back again in a few weeks.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:52:20 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ali.....oops

:-0)

Humble apologies Ali ...as Bill rightly said I'm adjusting the neck brace as we speak. They keep getting entangled in the Zimmer frame. Thank god Bill had a few spare ones to loan me!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:27:40 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ali Houston

Thank you for your beautiful essay I think Acadian Driftwood is one of The Band's finest too.

I hope this essay got you into the college of your choice.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:25:11 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: When in doubt, assume that Al E (as opposed to Ali) was readjusting his special neck brace.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 19:21:41 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I think that the nicest and most amazing thing about the story of Ali's essay is that a number of the people whose job it is to field all those applications care so much about the Alis of the world that they take the trouble to send along such an encouraging, out-of-scope note.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 18:55:02 CEST 2012 from (70.53.47.132)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….well that really does confirm that Al is not a Canadian………..he doesn’t know where he was when Paul Henderson scored and he’s having difficulty telling males from females….


Entered at Mon Oct 15 17:55:26 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Ali

Al Edge: She's not a lad . . . .


Entered at Mon Oct 15 17:36:17 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: How now?

NWcoaster: You're correct - it was the pig that was pink, and the cow that was brown. One must be scrupulously accurate in these things, Even If It's A Pig (with a part).


Entered at Mon Oct 15 17:06:38 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: More Set My Compass north I got Winter in my blood

We shouldn't forget to mention that Robbies lyrics are not the only aspect that makes those lines so moving. Levon's emotion charged delivery is surely one of his finest moments.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 16:52:39 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Set my compass north. I got winter in my blood.

ALI HOUSTON

As John D says - lovely little piece of writing. I think you should be very proud of yourself for the quality and content of what you've written. You've managed to convey so vividly the way in which the song touches you and moves you so deeply that it has somehow enabled you to unearth the pride in your national identity you never before felt mattered for that much.

As it happens I think the lines sentiments are universal and it's no surprise that it's also one of my own favourite Band lyrics. Many a time I've referenced it in stuff I've written. The lines never fail to move me - and I'm about as Canadian as Bob Hope's great uncle Bartholomew.

:-0)

The fact a single song line can do this is really quite stunning. And rare. Fact is it really doesn't, nay, can't get much more emotional than what Robbie captured in just those few words. They evoke so much aching, so much yearning for a homeland so far away. But not just that, for there's also a real sense of defiance within the lines that the song's protaganist summons up against all the injustices he and his people have suffered. Yet the defiance reveals itself not in any negative way rather in a homeborn pride borne not of any jingoistic nationalism but merely love for where he's from, his roots and his kinfolk.

That all this has so clearly reached out and touched your own sensibilities speaks volumes for not only the writer but yourself Ari.

Moreover, the beautiful piece you've written captures exquisitely all of these wonderful human sentiments. Ones Robbie so clearly had in mind when he penned those timeless lines.

Well in Ali lad! You'll do for me son.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 15 16:15:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks, Laura, for your kind comments.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 14:42:09 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ali Houston

Very nice link on Jan (the birthday boy's) Update page. Very well written; by this 17 year old; who appears to have a good grasp on The Band.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 13:47:22 CEST 2012 from (41.220.69.102)

Posted by:

joy

Location: uk
Web: My link

Subject: thanks

After being in relationship with emma for seven years,he broke up with me, I did everything possible to bring him back but all was in vain, I wanted him back so much because of the love I have for him, I begged him with everything, I made promises but he refused. I explained my problem to someone online and she suggested that I should rather contact a spell caster that could help me cast a spell to bring him back but I am the type that never believed in spell, I had no choice than to try it, I mailed the spell caster, and he told me there was no problem that everything will be okay before three days, that my ex will return to me before three days, he cast the spell and surprisingly in the second day, it was around 4pm. My ex called me, I was so surprised, I answered the call and all he said was that he was so sorry for everything that happened, that he wanted me to return to him, that he loves me so much. I was so happy and went to him, that was how we started living together happily again. Since then, I have made promise that anybody I know that have a relationship problem, I would be of help to such person by reffering him or her to the only real and powerful spell caster who helped me with my own problem and who is different from all the fake ones out there. Anybody could need the help of the spell caster, his email cafaispiritualtemple@yahoo.com) you can email him if you need his assistance in your relationship or anything.


Entered at Mon Oct 15 05:21:52 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Joan

No Joan thank you! I would not have found the outtakes had you not told me about it!


Entered at Mon Oct 15 00:59:49 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.99)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

You guys are correct, Jimmy Vivino is a great talent and a strong supporter of The Band's legacy. It's clear he and Garth enjoy playing together. These shows have allowed Garth to play more live dates, honor his friends in The Band and continue creating. It's a perfect combination, really.

Linked above is my recent review of the September 21 "Midnight Ramble". One of the finest nights of music I've witnessed. Garth is getting better and better, and the music is timeless. The upcoming Nov. 24 Vivino/Hudson gig will be incredible, and I believe a tour would be more likely if the show sells out. ANYONE in the right half of the U.S., take the road trip and see this show!


Entered at Sun Oct 14 23:19:18 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin- Like i wrote in the past- if it wasn't for Vivino ,Levon wasn't playing Band songs. When it comes to seeing The Band's music continure live, with the exception of Garth, noone is more dedicated. When Levon was playing anywhere he would or could, on the way back up, pre remus ramble days, vivino was there. nd Levon told me he wouldn't accept pay.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 20:20:10 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

the answer to the literal question- why was he important- is the music he was part of all through his musical life.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 19:05:11 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you JT - I always enjoy reading your thoughts.......and Jed - very well said.......especially about the Vivino/Hudson shows and really all the amazing heartfelt work Jimmy VIvino has done to truly honour Richard, Rick and the music of The Band.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 17:22:46 CEST 2012 from (24.126.43.243)

Posted by:

Laura Kristen Levesque

Location: Charles Town, West Virginia, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Pepote Rouge: What Came First, Language, or Music?

Dear Mr. Viney, Thank you for this informative and wonderful research. I am a Poet, published in some small presses in the US. I wrote a Post on my self-published site, Daymaresandotherdreams.com, called "What Came First, Language, or Music?" and Published it on Oct. 13, 2012. I am working on a manuscript of my own, however, I also am a busy working mother of three children- two teenage girls, and one 6 year old boy. I found your site, and read your post on "Pepote Rouge". I took the liberty of transcribing the lyrics out in strophes, as a poem. I posted them into my site, along with the song, via Youtube, embedded. This is in addition to my own comments, and hyperlinks to a Psychology Today Article, discussing the evolution of Language itself, and whether or not Music came before Language. I added my own comments, and put everything in one place, so that students like me, self-directed or not, could read and listen at the same time. This is a very beautiful song, and a wonderful poem. A timeless lesson. One that bears repeating again, and again, and again. It seems our people never remember, and are so quick to forget themselves, over and over again. Thank you for your work. Best Regards, Laura Levesque


Entered at Sun Oct 14 17:15:30 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Whole Lotta Love

Another person who invested alot of effort and also dough, in the resurrection of Levon Helm's career was one of The Last Hombres...remember them? Levon used to play drums with em on his way back up, played on their record.Paul Schmitz was one of the Hombres, a well to do, blue collar guy, large painting contractor.He was very involved behind those first two concerts at Levon's The Uncle Remus shows...Lots of people, lots of effort, rememebr the huge financial / legal problems that had to be dealt with to make the comeback viable, something that could last... so the money would not go into a black hole...

there was lot alot to this, the ground work was huge. The musical effort, may actually be no more of an accomplishment than the legal and structural....

Levon getting to perform as frequently as he did, amd share his music and joy with so many, was a great thing, Levon being happy, alos a great thing......how it happened, has not been told- it wasn't an organic grass roots effort of musicians jamming at Levon's house, , no one passed the hat to raise money to bring Johnnie Johnson to Woodstock ( it was so stated in an interview). one person lent the money to Levon, who did repay it immediately, i remember this vividly....there was a lot of sweat, alot of people , alot of work, and actually years of forethought put into it.... Whether or nto the story gets told truthfully, ever, remains to be seen....it's possible the players who got thrust to the shadows don't bother to ever tell the truth.... there was whole lotta love for Levon.... a few people laid down on the tracks, the train kept a rolling


Entered at Sun Oct 14 16:53:24 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tempestuous

Recital would fit stuff like Tin Angel and Tempest pretty well. That's the storyteller style of them anyway. I've been listening to the 1993 Leonard Cohen CD (it appears to be "self published" and even back then, nearly 20 years ago, he would recite the first verse before starting some songs, as he does today.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 16:08:45 CEST 2012 from (64.114.196.114)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan shows

Kevin: Disappointment? If there is difficulty with the voice, as there has been for a number of years now, that is a physical malady . It is what it is and and so a different way of presenting the material, lyrical 'recital' has been adopted with a musical background of tight band. I was at times disappointed in the band who failed to live up to the requirements of some songs in Vancouver at least (to my ear anyway). As for no new material: That was the chief cause of my disappointment, as noted earlier. When a painter (artist) paints new pictures,(Dylan especially will get this analogy), that is his/her latest expression of his/her art form and those who follow that artist would naturally expect to view that work, when it is ready for viewing, on the walls of a gallery. So with Tempest. The art has been completed and it has been put out for all to hear. The usual approach by the artist is to then 'display' the work to the audience. Perhaps the work is not yet ready for live display. Maybe the band doesn't know the lyrics and music well enough to perform it yet, even though they did it in the studio (where things are different and multiple takes can occur and they can stop and start and the lyrics are available and who knows what else) I have been told that Dylan does not use a 'teleprompter' in live performance to 'crib' (as some other major performers apparently do) and maybe there is still work to be done to prepare this material for live performance. One would hope that this will occur soon so these new pieces can be heard live. For the long-lived fans who have followed Dylan for decades now, the variations in set list are welcomed and anticipated and they do occur thankfully. I fully expect that we will soon here Early Roman Kings and Duquesne Whistle and all the others. Finally, I read that Dylan said in his recent interview something like "They don't like me. They like my songs". He follows his muse and does what he likes and what makes sense to him and it is not for any of us to deny that. We don't have to participate it we don't want to. Some choose not to. I go and wait for the gems, knowing that the gems will come and that they may be different each time. I do like him because of his art and he continues to craft it to the best of his ability all the time. I agree that like all art we can and should comment/ criticize (praise and concern when there is an issue) our artists if we are genuine participants in the art of that artist.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 15:44:22 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Remembering Rick Right

Rick died during a period when The Band was a distant memory for all but us die hard fans.He was honored nicely by the town of Woodstock and at a show the evening of his funeral.Levon and the Barnburners played for a small crowd of family,friends,and a few of us fans who stayed over after the services.On a larger scale,Rick as well as Richard were never provided the tribute and honors they deserved.Unlike Levon however,neither was blessed with a "second" career in the later part of their lives.In a way,the Love for Levon concert was the memorial show that Rick and Richard never had.Also,the show Garth and Jimmy are doing of Band music is,in a way,an honor for all 3 singers in The Band and I hope they expand the tour.Rick and Richard merit better than they got,but through Levon's later life work and memory they are receiving accolades once again.Somerimes people's memories need to be shaken.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 07:46:33 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....I had read the question as being - why the Love for Levon concert and why nothing of the sort for Rick - to which I would think my answer stands correct but if it was a larger one relating to the Rambles themselves then obviously it is much more layered as you explained.

On another topic altogether, just watched "Senna" ......loved it. After Gilles Villeneuve died in 1982, I stopped watching/following racing totally for a few years and it was the greatness of Senna that brought me back to the sport. Well worth picking up for any of the racing fans out there.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 05:34:08 CEST 2012 from (67.186.126.83)

Posted by:

Gene

Location: Bolingbrook, IL


Entered at Sun Oct 14 04:22:38 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Well, Kevin, B O'B wasn't the answer to the question asked, but, business was being handled.and she obviously was a dedicated, and very hard worker. It worked. Was extremely successful..There is a very important name that doesn't get mentioned, a guy named Norm Clancy, and without Norm nothing would have never happened any old way. Never wouild a gotten outa starting gate, and probably never woulda been viable for lts of reaasons. He walked over a strong disagreement with a family member.But Levon was talking to me about Norm in early 02. And there were other people without whom it never would have gotten off the ground. Pre B O' B......But B ' OB has worked her tucchas off for years...What is paid off, what isnt, I dunno, but i do know that, Levon could spend money like a world champ. Anyway, the operating team now wasn't gonna let any opportunity to keep consiousness and raise funds go by...... there are people who would just think it's supreme gall to raise money in a dead man's name to keep his studio and concert hall going- but, they've made it - to use a term presented by the author of thr article- "romantic".and that is a master stroke....Levon taught em well....

it is a great room, , it would be a shame for it to be silenced, that is true..I hope it keeps going, and i certainly hope Garth plays there a lot....Levon was a musical giant, that is unquestionable, and his idea to have the shows at home was a great one- that said- if he coulda charged to play from his bed- he might have..... things can be controversial, but one thing that isn't, is that great music needs a home.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 03:26:14 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: It's ok to be critical of legends

JT: If you indeed thought the band sloppy on a number of songs, couldn't make out the words to the other half then your disappointment seemed to be with a lot more that just the lack of songs off Temptest........In reading your review - which I appreciated by the way - I just wondered when the last time you might have seen him. If it was not within the last 8 years then your alarm at his voice is understandable.......if you have gone to see him on all his recent stops over the last decade and more and were still that disappointed - then this is telling and a bit worrying.

.....the pull this time for many of us is Mark Knopfler. I always find something to enjoy in seeing Bob but his band lost some jam when Larry Campbell left.......I have not seen them since C. Sexton rejoined though........The last time I saw them was after Larry but before Sexton came back and the show with Foo Fighters opening.........The band was not strong that night but the interesting thing about that night was Bob talking to the crowd about his memories of "Levon & The Hawks and Toronto"

Jeff: Thank you for that article..........and isn't the answer to L. Williams question......Levon's manager......she is a serious force. The rambles were grossing close to $150,000 a month and about $1.5 million per year....now this is all gross but there was serious income there and I am sure some full time salaries as well......In that last interview Levon did with PBS, I had thought he had said the mortgage of the barn had been paid off. .........anyhow, it would be nice if Rick's family is being helped out as well.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 01:55:27 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: New Yorker Article on Love For Levon

the questions raised (why was he important? And - did they do all this after Rick Danko died?) and the whole thing could be discussed to death- still, a good article. though it stuck to the straight ahead....Some of the usual hokey bullshit though- levon never threw rent parties, and it did not start out small time- it was fully engineered and starte dout full throttle.


Entered at Sun Oct 14 00:39:02 CEST 2012 from (64.114.196.114)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: To clarify my disappointment...

Subject: Dylan Vancouver

My disappointment as noted in my short review was mainly the lack of new material from "Tempest'. I am most interested in hearing live performances of these songs. I understand Dylan continues to evolve and present himself as he has over the years and I accept that with whole heart. This is the current Bob Dylan. I appreciate the interest and perceive the passion for excellence and it is in that spirit that I am disappointed by the lack of new material in concert. I know this will change and look forward to that. Of his commitment to his art, I have no doubt.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 20:54:31 CEST 2012 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland TX

Subject: Pines

I think my general reaction to the "Endless Highway" tribute set, now a couple of years old, is "nobody owns a song. Not even the writer who gets his well deserved royalties." At first I really hated it, but actually a lot of it quite good. I can even enjoy Bruce Hornsby's take on the Band's ultimate masterpiece. The Roches do a spot on imitation of the original record, but it's touching they cared enough to do it so spot on. The biggest problem of the record is probably too much reverence. Anyway, "Whispering Pines." Richard Manuel's incandescent ballad of longing, is really honorable in that he doesn't wreck the song. It's a tough one to pull off, and while he finds nothing much new, he does not deface it either. Dar Williams's take, I think, get's closer to the song's tender heart, and it has become my favorite Band Cover.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 16:41:30 CEST 2012 from (64.114.196.114)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan recital

Vancouver Mark and Bob show: Bob Dylan has given a poetic recital of his lyrics. Sometimes it works well and other times it does not live up to expectations. The high tempo bluesy material worked best. The gentler songs did not. 'Watching The River Flow" was a great opener performed well and 'Cry A While", "Thunder On The Mountain" and "Highway 61" were very good with "Ballad of a Thin Man" a highlight. When Bob was at his piano, his performance was at times lacking while when he got up centre stage with the mike and his mouth harp, he danced and pranced (for Bob) with an animation I have never seen from him in all the concerts I have attended. He seemed genuinely involved and delivered with a style and commitment that was welcomed. There was no guitar from Bob and the piano at times was elementary. But if you want to hear Bob Dylan singing, forget it. He has evolved to a recital style that spits the words out with only rare vocal music as we know it. As I said, this works at times and falls short at other times. I welcome "To Ramona" and have heard beautiful versions but this was not one of them. The band and Dylan were both dire on "Love Sick". At times, the band was excellent (again, the bluesy numbers) while at other times they sounded like they were out of tune and needed to go back to the rehearsal hall and practice. As one of the papers said, and as is true for many of Dylan's performances of late, this one was uneven. I heard some fans (notable a younger teen) praise Dylan's performance while other people walked out half-way. That's what is happening now at his shows. "Tangled Up in Blue" needed help as surprisingly did "Watchtower". He finished with a heartfelt "Blowing In the Wind" in encore. He spoke only to introduce the band. Throughout the show, he was as noted animated and positive and performed with a seemingly happy and positive interest. Sadly, not one note from the ":Tempest" was heard tonight. When that will happen again, who knows? As a committed fan, I was disappointed. L and J were enthralled and delighted by Mark Knopfler and his band. They were superb in a word. No Dire Straits material and a healthy serving of "Privateering" and the celtic Irish flavour was prevalent. And Mark gave us a big dose of wonderful Knopflerian guitar.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 12:27:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Early Morning Rain

It's easy to forget what a totally brilliant vocalist Elvis was. That "Early Morning Rain" has set me on a day of Elvis listening!


Entered at Sat Oct 13 12:00:47 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:25:29 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Grammar, Bill M! It is not Bigs Pink, it is Pig's Pink.


Entered at Sat Oct 13 06:46:54 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Encore LINK to Blaze of Glory........yeah yeah they were finished in 1976 and at times well before that but look at this and know that there was sooooooo much more that could have been.......


Entered at Sat Oct 13 04:09:59 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

JT : Good enough for The King......perhaps for Bob....Link to Evis covering Lightfoot......a songwriters dream......."So, how was your day? " Well, Elvis just did one of my songs........not bad really"


Entered at Sat Oct 13 00:42:12 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Yes.....I would be happy to see a few of the good ones off Temptest played rather than clunkers like "Joey".....agree with you Live and I never thought the studio version worked either..........Garcia apparently loved it and convinced Dylan to play with the Dead.

Speaking of Garcia......anyone who has seen Festival Express knows how much fun Rick Danko was having and "we all know what happens when you have too much fun" as Rick would say.......I would think Robbie was so relieved to NOT be on that train that a little bit of hovering by the great RD was of little concern.

......Say What about "never getting any better"? If you trace RR's playing back to the very early days, he was either as good as there was in his area or creating just the right touches of unique to masterpiece songs that there was nowhere to go to "improve".......


Entered at Sat Oct 13 00:26:10 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.99)

Posted by:

Adam

Peter V - I sent you an email relating to grammar, article corrections, etc. Please get back to me if you have time!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 21:26:13 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: New Neil Young and Crazy Horse "Ramada Inn"

Great guitar song.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:37:52 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: I believe Rick used a Fender Precision on the '66 Dylan tour. In the Festival Express footage, he was using his Ampeg fretless.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:25:29 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ari: Forgot to say thanks for the video. Nice especially to see the Robbie/Richard interplay towards the end; Robbie clearly liked it too.

Seeing Rick's bass reminded me to ask the bassists in the room about the one he was playing in the "Eat The Doc" footage (I think that's the source) used in Robbie's "Goin' Home" DVD. The neck on that one seems unusually long and skinny, whereas this one seems standard. I always thought that Rick seemed to be using loose (though in tune) strings on Bigs Pink and Brown. Would a long neck account for that?


Entered at Fri Oct 12 20:22:18 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Great Atomic Power

Bill M: The Louvin Brothers "Great Atomic Power" was included on their 1962 Capitol album "The Weapon of Prayer", echoing the foreboding of their earlier work "Satan Is Real". Bonnie Dobson's "Morning Dew" was included on her live Prestige LP "At Folk City" released that same year.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 19:50:34 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jan h /Ari

Happy Birthday Jan

nice job Ari. I have seen the original. Great improvement

Thanks for all the Morning Dew versions. It's amazing how many people have covered it.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 19:29:16 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Al E: Thanks for the link to the Taylor band version of "Morning Dew". There sure are a lot of great covers of that song, including Long John Baldry's (see link), which has very effective atmospheric touches in the instrumentation. I missed the Bonnie Dobson interview that you guys were referring to, but I suspect that the same material, and perhaps more, is covered in the few pages on her in Jason Schneider's 2009 book, "Whispering Pines: The Northern Roots of American Music from Hank Snow to the Band" (an over-enthiastic title, but a good book). Seeing the movie of "On the Beach" seems to have been her inspiration, but Schneider also raises a Louvin Brothers song, "God's Atomic Power" (or something like that).


Entered at Fri Oct 12 16:51:31 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rain

With rain forecast for this afternoon and evening and for the next 3 days in Vancouver, maybe we will here Rainy Day Women, Hard Rain's A Gonna Fall or even who knows Buckets of Rain (unlikely) or even less likely Gord's Early Morning Rain.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 16:47:37 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Festival Express Footage

Ari: Wasn't that footage of "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever" from a bootleg of outtakes? That might indicate that it's raw footage that was never really edited.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 15:38:42 CEST 2012 from (130.64.18.51)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Rick on the AMA 1978

This might have been posted before. If not Rick presents award to Barry Manilow.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 13:42:23 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Happy b'day, Jan!


Entered at Fri Oct 12 13:01:33 CEST 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Nice one, Ari.

How's the degree going, btw? Enjoyed he clip: haven't seen the original, so I don't know what the changes were, but I KNOW it was an improvement! Keep up the great work.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 09:25:07 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Ari

Nice work on that video Ari. Rick reminded me of Bob Wills (from the Texas Play Boys) who had an annoying habit of getting in the face of whoever was soloing or singing at the time. I imagine it could have been quite annoying though Rick was a bit more reserved.

I've also been thinking about your comment about Robbie not getting any better at his various guitar styles. I think you are right and he probably peaked around the 74 tour. Islands remains a bit of an enigma as there are fiew different styles there - including a Les Paul tone. Evidentally he broke his hand in a fight in the early 80's which may account for his drop off after then.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 09:01:11 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Ari: very nicely done.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 08:27:58 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: LIVE FOOTAGE OF LOVING YOU IS SWEETER

I was at the NYU film editing center when I decided to edit The Band playing Loving You from Festival Express. They had three cameras on them and they didn't edit it respectfully. This is my cut of that song. Watch Rick hover over Robbie when he solos.


Entered at Fri Oct 12 02:51:40 CEST 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: morning dew

Great link Al. Got to follow up on this group.

Been listening to Bonnie Dobson and Roy Forbes thanks to you all.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 23:51:40 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Random thoughts about Nobel literature and Tempest

Random thought #1:I have no doubt that the novelist who won the Nobel Prize in literature is an excellent writer and that millions have read his work. However, internationally, he is not well known and I am somewhat amazed that others who were listed as potential recipients were overlooked. Random thought #2: As much as I enjoy Bob Dylan's old catalogue, I would hope he would take a page from Mark Knopfler and give his ardent fans a taste of his new material at some point. Tomorrow evening would be an excellent time to begin given that we will be at the show. I am looking forward to both performers and the evening can only be enhanced if new material from Tempest is offered up for our consideration. Random thought #3: Perhaps Scarlet Town was played in Winnipeg on the first night because of the Red River but otherwise I am at a loss to try to understand why new material is not being played (yet). Random thought #4: If Bob Dylan is responding to requests from his audience (ie Shadows by Gordon Lightfoot) perhaps he could respond to me and play Duquesne Whistle or some other material from Tempest. Enough said.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 22:08:28 CEST 2012 from (24.148.123.124)

Posted by:

Lil

Awesome video Joan! Thanks for posting it!

Happy Birthday (tomorrow) to Jan!


Entered at Thu Oct 11 21:24:34 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight

I don't know if this was already posted but it;s just so good


Entered at Thu Oct 11 19:01:16 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Joey

Kevin J, tell the truth wouldn't you love to see him perform 'Soon after midnigt'? "I'm searching for phrases, To sing your praises, I need to tell someone, It's soon after midnight and my day has just begun". What great lines and what a great vocal on that song! Instead your going to get 'Joey'. I love the version on Desire but I don't think that song has ever worked in concert. I remember seeing him do 'Joey' one time where he actually sang the "one day they blew him down" line in the second verse. I think it was during one of the Dead shows. Not pretty.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 18:33:34 CEST 2012 from (80.58.205.35)

Posted by:

Pablo

Web: My link

I love this. Good job and go ahead with it :)


Entered at Thu Oct 11 17:43:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Down In The Flood

My copy arrived today. Don't know when I'll get to watch it though.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 16:49:03 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Morning Dew

Felix Pappalardi played guitarron (Mexican acoustic bass) on Fred Neil & Vince Martin's duet version of "Morning Dew", which was included on the influential 1964 Elektra album "Tear Down the Walls". Mr. Pappalardi also played bass on Tim Rose's later version of the song, included on his eponymous 1967 Columbia album.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 16:37:14 CEST 2012 from (66.214.71.48)

Posted by:

forever young

Subject: DVD Down In the Flood

Curious to know who has seen the newly released DVD on Dylan and the Band - 'Down In the Flood' - released late Oct 2012. I cannot get it to rent, want to see if, but not wanting to buy a copy unless I see more than the little clip on line. Few good reviews out there and none from Rolling Stone - makes me skeptical that if it's good, why are there no top reviewers publishing?


Entered at Thu Oct 11 16:34:07 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Al: a great link to that version of Morning Dew.......stunning version.

Bob played "Joey" in Calgary last night......Still nothing from "Temptest".


Entered at Thu Oct 11 14:33:10 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Stones

Their new one taking us back 40 odd years!!!!!

Jumpin jack Flash, Gimme Shelter and Brown Sugar will never die!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 11 12:51:58 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Morning Dues

....To everyone for the Morning Dew discussion

:-0)

Just finished a job and spent a well earned hour or so enthralled by the majesty of this amazing song. Toronto sure breeds great songwriters don't it folks!!!

Always loved the song but I'm sure it was only the Tim Rose version - which in the presence of some of the stunning versions I've just been listening to - pales somewhat. I guess, however, he may have been responsible for the familiar opening riff - so simple yet so good. Apologies if maybe I'm wrong on that.

Love the lady writer's version but there just seem to be so many terrific interpretations. Lulu's, Nazareths [very apocalyptic and dramatic] and Greg allman's especially appealed to these ears.

However, I've linked the one that I think moved me most. Some little known [as far as I'm aware anyroad] band from San Antonio, Texas. Stunning version of what surely is a song right at the forefront of not just protest but popular music per se with its simple yet incredibly powerful message and beautiful and dramatic melody.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 10:00:18 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Morning Dew

Thanks for the Bonnie Dobson link. I’d doubt that she was that active at University of East Anglia as she’ll be 72 now. But things move slowly in Norfolk, though as Bill M observed the locals get frisky and over-excited in the mangel-wurzel harvest season. Actually, I can’t think of much better towns to retire to than Norwich.

The interview (linked) left me hot under the collar about Tim Rose’s blatant theft of half the royalties on the song, particularly as she points out the minor changes in his version were originally done by Fred Neil. It also stirred up memories. I had thought the Tim Rose’s version was a reworking of an earlier acoustic version (I assumed by Tim Rose wrongly) because I recall the song strongly from my folk club days in 1964-65 when two girls with acoustic guitars used to sing it. I see it in my memory framed by Deportees and Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall, all three done with the utmost conviction. In the interview, Dobson describes how the song moved through the folk community in the old-fashioned way, from singer to singer, club to club. That was how the girls at Bournemouth Folk Club must have found it.

Morning Dew works incredibly well as a powerful rock song, an aspect that was always waiting for someone to bring out. Bonnie Dobson disses the Lulu version somewhat, but then she points out that it was advertised as “The Tim Rose hit” which would have justifiably prejudiced her against it. I would go and cross out Tim Rose’s writing credit on my copy of his single, but being a collector, I know that would reduce its £8 value in “Rare record Guide”. So I’ll just cross it out mentally.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 08:48:24 CEST 2012 from (209.73.132.160)

Posted by:

savannah

Location: usa

Subject: my testimony

“I ordered a ekakaspelltemple@yahoo.com I ordered money spell 1 month ago and just as Dr. Ekaka said, my numbers came out! he made me gain a bit more than 40,000 dollars and thanks to that money I will be able to pay all the debts I had for my house. Without a lady like her, my 3 children and I could be homeless today. I am grateful to this person who helped me when I needed it thanks to Ekaka!”


Entered at Thu Oct 11 06:07:46 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob Dylan Playing Requests

Bob Dylan did something quite unusual last night by moving away from his rolling list of songs and playing a rather obscure Gordon Lightfoot tune called "Shadows". More unusual, he introduced it by saying it was a request........

Beach Boys: The wild thing about that deal was that Love agreed to the very healthy cut be taken from gross revenues.


Entered at Thu Oct 11 02:26:38 CEST 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Beach Boys

Found that Beach Boys article very interesting. Leads me to ask, If Brian, Al and Carl' estate are 75 percent of the vote. Why not vote the band name back from Mike Love?


Entered at Wed Oct 10 22:37:48 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Herb Reed

Sadly Herb died awhile back. Got to know him in '68; when they would come to Toronto. A very kind man


Entered at Wed Oct 10 21:37:41 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Great Pretender

There's been ongoing litigation since the '70s over who has the exclusive rights to perform using the name The Platters, as various members battled in court. Earlier this year, a federal appellate court judge wasn't above using puns, playing on the group's hit song titles in his ruling. He first summarized the case as an endeavor "to determine who, of all the parties claiming rights to [the group's trade] mark, is 'The Great Pretender'." Later he wrote that "While some courts have held that one party has superior rights to the other, this Court has held that 'Only You,' Herb Reed, have exclusive rights to the mark", referring to the original member who continuosly performed with the group for the longest period of time.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 21:10:44 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: I'd heard the Lulu, but not the excellent Allmans and Robert Plant versions on YouTube. I suspect you bumped into the original but am posting the link anyway in the even others are moved to track down the CBC documentary that is mentioned in the comments. Last I heard, two or three years ago, Bonnie Dobson was an administrator at the U of East Anglia, in case you're up for a long drive. It's almost wurzel season up there, so watch out for big trucks.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 20:14:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Until today, I thought Tim Rose had written Morning Dew. I like most versions of it. Try Lulu from 1968 (link), an era when she was being made to sing crap and managed to slip the odd one like this into her act. It was a UK single.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 19:44:25 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V, Kevin J: John Kay tells a similar story in his autobiography. At the time, in the '90s, he was paying original drummer Jerry Edmonton, co-owner of the Steppenwolf brand, six figures every year to stay home while Kay toured with a backing band of ringers. You get the idea that Kay made more, but didn't get to stay home. (By the time the book came out, Edmonton had crashed his car and Kay was paying the widow the six figures.) I believe that original bassist Jim Kale still owns the Guess Who brand. As of maybe 10 years ago he would still lead a group of ringers on tours of US state fairs, and occasionally lease the name (and sometimes himself) to Randy Bachman and Burton Cummings for a national tour of Canada (where they are still gods). But then Bachman and Cummings realised that they could do better touring as simply Bachman-Cummings. And then Bachman realised that he could do better yet as touring without Cummings as the Randy Bachman Songbook or something. Leaving Kale with just state fairs, if that these days.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 18:52:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Morning Dew

A year after Tim Rose's cover version more rock fans would become familiar with the song through the Jeff Beck Group's version, included on their debut album "Truth", featuring Rod Stewart on vocals.

From the music group trade name department -- The J. Geils Band recently embarked on a reunion tour, minus their namesake, guitarist J. Geils, who promptly filed a federal lawsuit alleging trademark infringement.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 18:38:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Very informative article on The Beach Boys business deals. It’s hard to know the score really. Similar happened to me when my co-writer dropped out at the beginning of the fourth book in a series. We needed the series name, and it cost 25% of the author’s royalty to use it. I still resent getting 75% for 100% of the work, but I guess use of the series name put me into profit in the end. You have to live with it. Oops! I found myself in the Mike Love position on that one!


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:47:15 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iy-8D6PAU4

To Tim Rose's credit, he did a superb cover on "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away", and his "Rose Coloured Glasses" LP contains the only recorded version of a different, and powerful, Bill Henderson / Collectors song, "Apple Truck Swamper". Amazing that they considered it a throwaway. The Collectors' final hit before the name change in 1970 is both uncharacteristically Bandish in content and uncharacteristically Crowbarish in style - see link.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:24:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: a Rose by any other name ...

David P: Right on both counts - Tim not Tom, and writer Bonnie Dobson says she wrote "Morning Dew" by herself, and that the couple of word changes that found their way into Rose's version were really the work of Vince Martin, Fred Neil's musical partner back when they were all folkies in NY together. I suspect that I'm not the only Canuckistani male of my age whose first and lasting memory of the bonnie Bonnie was from her days singing on a beer commercial on "Hockey Night in Canada" circa 1970. At least I think it was HNiC; beer anyway.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 17:03:44 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: Wasn't that Al Kooper production for Tim Rose, best known for his earlier "appropriation" of co-writing credit on Bonnie Dobson's "Morning Dew"?


Entered at Wed Oct 10 16:38:39 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Rockin' Chair: I meant to note that "Lookin' At A Baby" is structure like a number of Joni Mitchell's telescopic or circular early classics - notably "Both Sides Now", but also "Circle Game", "Urge For Going" and even "Big Yellow Taxi". I asked myself if any of Robbie's songs was built that way, and the thought struck me that Nilsson's "The Rainmaker" (see link for the Northcott cover) and "The Weight" both start with a guy coming into some dusty small town and end with him leaving. Of course where Robbie's guy arrived half past dead and left with his tail between his legs, the rainmaker was supernatural, came with a plan and left with a cackle.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 16:09:42 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

See above link on how profitable it is for the other Beach Boys to sit on the sidelines while the nutty Mike Love tours relentlessly................I wonder how many other bands had such arrangements..........with touring now being the primary source of revenues for nostalgia bands - imagine some of those ex-Eagles are wishing they had similarly solid shareholder agreements!


Entered at Wed Oct 10 16:04:20 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Rockin' Chair: Thanks. I love that small-world-isn't-it? stuff. I think I told you that I took the bus up to Campbell River to visit Northcott around Easter '80. Lovely guy. A few years later I was at a friend's place in Toronto when her brother the UBC law professor dropped by. Another music guy, so we got to chatting. He mentioned that one of his students at the time was that old folksinger, Tom Northcott. As for Henderson, I wonder if Ab Bryant, bassist in later versions of Chilliwack and also Headpins, was also his cousin? I just have to post the Collectors' first record (and huge Canuckistani hit in '67). If you follow the links on YouTube you'll find Tom Rose's execrable version, which is notable for being Al Kooper's first production as the new staff guy at Columbia after leaving BS&T (according to his autobiog, "Backstage Passes"). Better than you spend your time hunting down the Collectors' follow-up, the truly original "Fat Bird" at:

youtube.com/watch?v=hdt86ZVM3RM&feature=relmfu


Entered at Wed Oct 10 10:17:17 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK
Web: My link

Subject: John Peel

Al - agree totally with your John Peel analysis and share your ambivalence. The only things I'd add to the balance sheet on the plus side for him are:

He presented an alternative when Radio 1 came along with a pretty uniform corporate poppy/bubblegum ethos. His radio programme was the forerunner of Whistle Test - a definite asset;

In the early days of his show (1967ish - Wednesday evenings) he played some great stuff. It's possible I first heard Leonard Cohen on his prog. As I said - he championed Fairports - and you're right, plenty of bands acknowledge their gratitude to him.

As for Jimmy Savile - everything that was wrongs with the BBC wrapped in a skin.


Entered at Wed Oct 10 01:33:58 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The ol' Home Town Gang......of BAND Guestbook

Gawd Damn.......there you are Lars.......how'er you doon ol' son?? I had forgotten about that. It's been too long. Completely my fault. Really good to hear from you.

Bill I got to tell you some nostalgia, and honestly this is true. Growing up and going to high school in Gibson's, I had a scrawny little pal there, named John Fellows. He was Tom Northcotts cousin. In early seventies I owned a big waterfront home in Porpoise Bay. We had just had our hockey arena built, many of us, (in our early 30's played a lot of hockey.) My winger, Robin Bryant is Bill Henderson's cousin. Robin and I did a lot of dirt bike riding together. One day after a ride, we were sitting at my place having a beer and jawing away and we got to talking football, it was the season and old Jim Young, "Dirty Thirty" who used to play for the BC Lions was a buddy of mine. Well Robin, who is quite a quiet guy, said, "I played quarterback in high school when I went to...I think it was John Oliver in Vancouver", the school name kind of escapes me at the moment. I said my cousin went to that school. Robin says what was his name? I says Ronnie Jones. He shakes his head and says.....I must have thrown a 100 touch down passes to that guy.....go figure.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 23:51:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've said for years that "Christmas Must Be tonight" was a Christmas number one waiting to happen. I think the original Band version with Rick as first choice. Of course Christmas songs don't date.

UPGRADES … the last tiny WORD upgrade cost me two hours messing around. It was supposed to deal with "Malwear". In itself it was the worst example I've had. Every upgrade seems to make stuff worse!


Entered at Tue Oct 9 23:40:11 CEST 2012 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: It's almost Christmas

Yep, it's almost Christmas, and it's time for the Pikester to obsess on the cosmic stature of "Christmas Must Be Tonight", as time goes by... I noted last year that interest in the song might have ebbed, but that might be changed for this Christmas. Sure, the high profile Hall and Oats cover has come and gone, somehow it's not in print anymore, and you can't even get Robbie Robertson's "Scrooged" version. Oh the other hand, "My Morning Jacket" has weighed in, and there are still the two excellent "soul" versions, by Joan Osborne and Darlene Love ( "It's Christmas, Of Course" is a must) respectively. Then you have: Three Bridges, Kolancy Brothers, The Dady Brothers, The Refreshments...... All in all, I see the song battling it's way back up this year... How bout Robbie and Garth do it together on Letterman round the big day???


Entered at Tue Oct 9 23:20:40 CEST 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Bam, Boom

Subject: Bim

NORM- Avast. If you'll recall, I was blown away by Bim's version of ISLICC and I still have the disc- close at hand- of that song that you made a copy of for me. Almost sounds like a hymn.

Stay focused and behave, Old Salt.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 23:11:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Rockin' Chair: Good thing you persisted, as I'd tried your link and it didn't work. This one does (for me anyway). And yes, it's a moving version, which I like better than Hank's. The Bim song that really gets me, though, is his "Don't Expect Me To Change", which was on his first LP, I believe, but is not on YouTube. To tie things together, Bim, really Roy Forbes, and Collectors/Chilliwack guitarist-singer Bill Henderson were in recent years playing around BC in the group UHF with fiddler-singer Shari Ulrich.

Another nice version of "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" was recorded in the mid-'70s by Toronto-based Zeke Sheppard before he moved to Nashville. He was part of Ronnie Hawkins' early inner circle when he arrived here in the late '50s. He surely would have guested with at least some of our guys on Hawkins' bandstand, and later played Jerry T's father's bar as leader of Franklyn Sheppard and the Good Shepherds. (An oddly dichotomised partial discography can be found online at cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/artist/Zeke+Sheppard/a/albums.htm)


Entered at Tue Oct 9 22:30:34 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: WB Loss Leaders

As Warner became the distributor for Bearsville Records, some of that label's material showed up on some of the Loss Leader compilations as well. "The Days of Wine and Vinyl" sampler from 1972 included Bobby Charles' "Small Town Talk" and Jesse Winchester's "Isn't That So".


Entered at Tue Oct 9 22:17:46 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: This & That

You are welcome Bill. You guys should still give a listen to Bim's cover of, I'm so Lonesome I could Cry.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 21:55:00 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: ITunes / Windows 7 or XP question

I am hesitant to download the new version of iTunes 10.1.7 I have been been reading everywhere the devastation it brings to one's PC. It also says that it affects your iPhone; if you should manage to get iTunes working and plug in the phone. Anyone having any problems? This is the first time I am hesitant to upgrade.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 20:45:28 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Landmark: I liked "Spaceship Races" a lot - much more than Northcott's cover of "Suzanne" (which others seem to think a lot of, judging by the comments on YouTube). "I Think It's Going To Rain Today" is also strong. "1941" was the first record of his I bought (for a dime in '69) but I always preferred the flip, his own "Other Times". Actually, I almost always preferred his originals to his covers. I was wandering around looking for something else to post and went down a Collectors rat-hole. The guitar on this one, released on 45 as well as their second album, is outstanding. Because they were being recorded by Dave Hassinger at the same time as he was working with the Electric Prunes on "Mass in F Minor", he drafted the Collectors to play most of the instruments throughout. They do a lot of the singing too, notably, and very obviously, on "Kyrie Eleison" - see youtube.com/watch?v=MMHNyNg6Ybw.

David P: I think that Prunes song is also on a Warner comp. I don't recall which is which, but I have the one with Northcott, one with the Collectors and one with "Kyrie Eleison". On "Easy Rider" soundtrack, so there's a tenuous Band link.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 19:59:54 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Tom Northcott

Thanks Bill M for mentioning the Warner sampler LPs. It turns out that I have one that includes Tom Northcott's version of "Sunny Goodge Street", which was included on the "1969 Warner/Reprise Songbook", the first in their series of promotional compilations known as Loss Leaders.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 19:27:49 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Let us not forget "Spaceship Races" and "I Wish It Would Rain". Sometimes I even hum along to "1941".


Entered at Tue Oct 9 19:09:00 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.23)

Posted by:

Pat B

That's a typo. He wrote it.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 18:35:49 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.23)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm fairly certain that is Moogy Klingman singing Kindness. We wrote it around the time he was playing with Todd Rundgren. He's probably playing the piano too.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 17:30:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

First, belated thanks to Joan, Jerry, John and Serenity (and anyone I missed) for the Thanksgiving wishes.

Ari: Thanks for the link to and note about the "Ruben Remus" instrumental. I really liked how you described Robbie's playing. As for the "Kindness" song, that can't be them singing lead, but I'd be surprised if the Bengali Bauls were the only outsiders who stopped by the basement to say hello and ended up being taped by Garth.

Rockin' Chair: Thanks for the Tom Northcott link. I love all his records, but I can see his voice being a barrier to some. I rooted around YouTube for "Iron Pines", his most powerful record in my view, but can't find it - so I've posted a proto-punkish thing from '66 or so instead. He recorded his first, Orbisonian, 45 in '63 and released it on his own Syndrome label. A few releases later, by himself and by the Collectors (and I highly recommend their debut, "Looking At A Baby" from '67, which IS on YouTube) and WB bought Tom, the Collectors and the label - so his and their stuff was released on a special label - Warners/New Syndrome. WB took him to LA, and put him together with Harry Nilsson, Randy Newman, Lenny Waronker, Ted Templeman, Leon Russell etc. "Rainmaker" was the closest thing to a big hit in the US, I think, though "Sunny Goodge Street" did well, especially in Canada. He's on a couple of Warner sampler LPs of the late '60s.

Al E: I like the Silvertones version of the Don't's song. Sorta like Bob backed by the Maytals rather than the Wailers. The original is awful - like the sort of thing that the US Army Choir would have performed on Ed Sullivan in the early '60s.

dlew: UK listeners may haven't had access to the wide range of musics that is available on the North American airwaves, but speaking of pop music alone, I found the British much more listenable than the Canadian when I lived in Britain (winter of '83/'84). So much interesting stuff that never would have seen the light of day over here - or at least not on top 40. For what it's worth, I found Australian top 40 pretty good in '82 as well, though my prime example would be Renee Geyer's remake of Lee Michaels' "You Know What I Mean".


Entered at Tue Oct 9 14:36:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks Al. As soon as I read it I downloaded The Silvertones and The Goodman Brothers from iTunes, and added the first verse of each to our annual quiz in GarageBand. I think they'll have to match the artists from a list and put them in chronological order. The Silvertones is 1971, a few months before Ry Cooder. I'd guess both were inspired by Wilson Pickett, but given his feel for stuff like FDR in Trinidad on "Into The Purple Valley" I wouldn't be surprised if Ry had heard The Silvertones. Ry Cooder went on to cover 634-5789 which Wilson Pickett had done. When I saw Steve Cropper play last year he recounted the ages they spent writing down combinations of numbers until they hit one with the right rhythm. The Wilson Pickett "Teardrops" is on iTunes.

Follow That Dream is one I can play with too … I used Viva Las Vegas by Shawn Colvin in a previous one. That's a stunning version.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 14:23:16 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Covers again

As I said below it really does fascinate me how a song that meant, at worst, so little or, at best, not that much to me in its original state can be re-arranged and re-interpreted by another artist to become something altogether richer and rewarding.

It's all down to personal taste, of course, but I'm sure most on here can think of other examples to the Teardrops song discussed below.

I've linked Bruce Springsteen's entirely slowed and re-worked version of Elvis's Follow That Dream. The song could be an entirely different one to Elvis's other than the basic lyric. I think Bruce has claimed it as one of his favourites growing up. Personally, I'm not so sure this is true. I think he just saw the potential in reflecting the power of the lyrical sentiment by a slower more poignant melody.

A few others that spring to mind. Shawn Colvin's incredible dark and sombre take on Elvis's chirpy Viva las vegas. And a recent one which I've championed on here a few years back and I still retun to quite a bit - John Doe's heart rending take on Buddy's Peggy Sue Got Married.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 14:07:53 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Teardrops and other covers

Thanks for all that Teardrops stuff PV/DP. As an amateur songwriter I always find it fascinating to see an apparently 'ordinary' and quite pedestrian and forgettable song can be so wonderfully transformed.

Frankly, even for a '50's pop song Dicky and the Donuts version sounded pretty lame - more How Much Is That Doggy in the Window than Runaround Sue. Had I heard it back then even at a tender age I'd never have given it a second listen.

Yet it seems they [he] had actually written a song that could be turned into something quite special. So much for what I know.

Hearing it for the first time I love Ry's version - never did get round to buying Purple valley [another glaring omission] - and I think John Cougar's version is a fine mid tempo rock/country take. Could only find a snatch of Wilson pickett's but even from that you could tell how he's made something special out of it.

The version I've linked Pete for you to add to your list is a reggae version from 1971 by a Jamaican group called the Silvertones. Not a bad effort, when you think that Bob M wasn't known by then. I found two other efforts too. A very listenable folksy version by a band called the Goodman Brothers and a plodding country one by someone named Ted Dr J Jablonski.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 09:50:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That link puzzled me too, John. I hadn't put a link, but as I typed my "Peter V" in the autofill cut in and put my full name and address … never done that before. I deleted it, but it seemed to have put a circular link back to the GB under link.

The Ry Cooder version is from "Into The Purple Valley" an album that stands in Ry's career like the brown album does in The Band's, and with wonderful cover art too. It still astonishes me that Wilson Pickett could take a fairly unremarkable pop song and bring so much out of it (with the assistance of Cissi Houston), and that then Ry Cooder could turn it completely on its head and find something totally different again. The melody and lyric was intrinsically there, but Dicky Doo & The Don'ts failed to bring it out.

He was much too successful doing film work, but when we discussed the theoretical single guitarist replacement for Robbie, Ry was at the top of my list, mainly because he would have brought songwriting, a new voice, an amazing ear for obscure existing material, and would have played everything differently to Robbie rather than replicating his lines.

It reminds me that in the rush of the last few weeks I haven't given Ry's latest sufficient airing.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 01:18:59 CEST 2012 from (67.77.5.148)

Posted by:

Hank Dewald

Location: Georgia (USA...)
Web: My link

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

Fantastic website! As a lifelong 'The Band' fan and imitator/wanna-be, I've always been intriqued by many of the song lyrics, especially 'Driftwood', which is not one of my absolute favorites, but it has always cast a certain spell over me when I hear or play it... Your discussion really cleared up a lot of the mystery, but also re-enforced some of the things I've always loved about the song....and the band. No matter what anyone says, if a song moves one, it is a good song; Robertson wrote many good songs I'll listen to forever.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 01:17:21 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

Peter, I hit the link on your post; about Teardrops Will Fall and it takes me to a Band page that only reads, "Nice try, but please enter through the guestbook." What's that all about?


Entered at Tue Oct 9 01:00:47 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Si and The Magical Werld of the Strands

Si, when we did those top 30 fave songs lists a few years back, I searched out moreorless every track on everybody's list that I wasn't familiar with in the hope of finding something truly great that I'd never before heard.

There were, as many may recall, some terrific song lists but I do recall your list contained what I would personally term the most gems that I wasn't already acquainted with.

Now that could mean a lot of things I guess. It could mean you and me have shared taste in music that is unequivocally great. Or, alternatively, it could mean that we share a taste in music that is mediocre or even shit and it just so happens we both happen to think it's great.

:-0)

As it is, I'm confident enough after all these years to doubt the latter. Otherwise I'm sure I wouldn't be right now on this particular Band website attempting to spout my usual gibberish.

Whatever the case, I'm delighted the music of Mick Head has found you as that is all that really matters.

As regards how good it is?

JT [from on here] and myself debated in our own attempted pseudo intellectual way via lengthy E-Mails many moons ago - triggered by talk on here of the stature within rock music's pantheon of Music From Big Pink - the definition of what constitutes truly great music or more precisely great art in music. And now, like back then, it is always going to be a disputed area of greyness.

Are there absolutes in music as to greatness or otherwise? Even if I knew for sure that there were, I sure as hell would never be able to convince even those closest to me that it was the case that there are.

Hell my son Chris, a true champion of the notion of beauty being in the eye of the beholder, has walked the walls and ceilings of our house and much of the surrounding neigbourhood on many occasions as I've refused to budge on my firm belief that Astral Weeks, Big Pink and the Brown Album represent the unequivocal peak of musical excellence.

:-0)

Anyroad, back to our shared taste.

I'm just so thrilled you have latched onto Mick Head. I can't recall exactly how many years I've had the album now - I guess about 7 or 8 years. Is it up there with the likes of Astral weeks and our Band albums? Who knows.

What I will say is that now you have discovered its beauty I am sure you will have found one more of those rare albums like the ones I've mentioned that you can return to time and time again. And each time you do will hopefully unveil a further layer of the beauty concealed within - as it has done for me.

Anyroad Si - once again just in case I've not mentioned it enough already I'm made up you've found Mick Head - not forgetting of course his guitarist genius brother John - the minstrels from the streets of Kenny!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 9 00:10:59 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Link above to Paul Weller's new single "That Dangerous Age""...........hand it to the guy, he's not perfect but he is prolific and always finds a way to be fresh and interesting.


Entered at Tue Oct 9 00:10:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Teardrops Will Fall

Thanks for the link, David. I hadn't heard it, though I do have Dicky Doo & The Don'ts doing Leave Me Alone (not the same one). Very useful, as I was including the Wilson Pickett, Ry Cooder & John Mellencamp versions in our annual quiz. I now have a fourth, but I think all three later versions found something in the song that wasn't there in 1959!


Entered at Tue Oct 9 00:01:33 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Funny......and don't I wish I had the great man's ear.....I would have straightened out that "never ending tour" a long time ago...... That all said, I have been with him at every bump along the way dating back to when it started - the never ending tour that is!

Reading more on the shows and setlists, it seems Mark Knopfler is doing 80-90 minutes a night - so really a co-headline rather than an opening act.....and he is getting great reviews even though sticking almost entirely to his recent material with just a single nod to DS.

Paul Weller: Just working my way through the new one......so far "The Attic", "Be Happy Children" and the great "That Dangerous Age" stand out.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 20:14:21 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Ha ha - jolted you out of your post Cohen bliss there eh Rog

Ha ha Rog - just read your Peelie response - I'm tickled pink sat here chuckling like I'm some dimwitted juvenile...hmmmph ..yeah....hmm better move on I guess...

:-0)

BTW whatever you don't look at the link!!! It'll put you off your cornflakes.

:-0)

Actually Pete's already articulated my own thoughts on Peelie far more succinctly than my own drivel could ever do but whatever I guess I should still try to clarify my own take a bit.

Thing is I’ve always been pretty much ambivalent to the fella and have never taken to his core musical tastes. I guess I have, however, always rather enjoyed his drollness, his LFC devotion [which goes without saying] which I think in fairness was pretty genuine and not borne of being a professional scouser. Also I think he was a pretty straight and frank bloke. Also I know there's many bands – including some local ones to me - who owe him big time.

And yet , Rog, when all is said and done it was his friggin job to play whatever the hell he liked. I’ll leave JD out of it as he’s obviously a special case but I mean imagine PV or your goodself or some of the other great music lovers on here such as DP, Jeff, Bill M, Pat B, Kev, Si, Charlie Young, Joan and so many more in the same role with the same sort of freedom bequeathed to Peelie. Blimey, the service to mankind any of that lot could have provided!!!

You only have to take Dylan and Steve van Zandt who are doing it now - and whilst I haven’t heard that much of their shows - what I have heard would knock much of Peelie’s selections – and certainly those late ‘60’s/early ‘70’s stuff - into the back of beyond.

In my humble opinion, I hasten to add.

As for Birchill. Well she certainly is not and never has been my cup of rosy lea to put it mildly.

However, I think credit where it’s due. I think she's written a storming piece right there. Okay so in saying that I guess I am swayed a bit by what I’ve admitted to about my ambivalence to Peelie as well as my having always had a problem with mates who swore blind by JP and every blessed sound that ever came out of his studio including stuff like Kraftwerk which did my head in.

Also I have never forgotten his own admission [again the honesty coming out] that he was at heart a prog rock snob and regrets enormously that did turn his nose up because of that at so much decent ordinary pop including all the Motown and Atlantic/Stax stuff, not to mention Love Grows by Edison Lighthouse [which I am not ashamed to say I loved :-0)].

So getting to my long winded point I have always wondered just how good John Peel’s musical ears actually were and how much he just happened to fall on his DJ feet and never look back once his American and Radio Caroline sorties had given him the meal ticket. Just how much did he simply play anything he felt might earn itself – and by association himself – credibility with his devoted listeners. I’ve never been convinced that he really felt the music or the lyrics. Never got the impression that it stirred any deep emotions within him like great music does with many of us and with those I perceive as the great DJ’s.

When you add to that the fact that I perceive him as someone who never had to do anything in his entire life other than immerse himself in playing records and that so few of his seemingly benign musical recommendations never seemed to gell with my own, I guess, fairly or unfairly given that music is so subjective, it leaves me pretty cool on the guy’s musical taste. Little wonder I have him down in the quantity not quality camp.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 19:27:40 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Teardrops Will Fall

Peter: Have you heard the original version recorded by Gerry Granahan in 1958 under the guise of Dicky Doo & the Don'ts?


Entered at Mon Oct 8 19:21:25 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Bim - I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry

This cover of Hank Williams song, is probably one of the best you'll hear. Bim, (Roy Forbes) is a very small little guy from Northern BC, Dawson Creek if I remember right.

Bim has a very unique voice, and plays some great acoustic slide guitar, especially on this song. This is from his first album about 1970, "Kid Full of Dreams". It is worth a listen.

I can't seem to get this link to work, but searching Bim I'm so lonesome I could cry on youtube brings it right up. This guy has the most haunting voice on this song, it is worth hearing.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 19:01:41 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tom Northcott - Girl From The North Country

David P, not sure if you know of Tom Northcott. Late 60's, I'm not sure when he recorded it. Tom had pretty good success up here with this song.

Tom and I share the same birthday, he is one year older. He is from Vancouver, and when we were young rockers, his band was "Tom Northcott's Vancouver Playboys". He was one of the fellows who started "Mushroom Records" here, a production company. Later he took up commercial fishing, like I did. Then he went to law school and became a lawyer. Last I heard of him, he lived in Campbell River here on Vancouver Island.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 18:50:11 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ari

Thanks for the Reuben Remus cut I really like it.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 18:24:34 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Atlantic Soul Legends

The one that caught my attention today, not having heard it for years, was Wilson Pickett's Teardrops Will Fall, because I'm SO familiar with the Ry Cooder version which is on my essential "Desert Island Playlist" on the iPod of about 100 songs.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 18:20:50 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Girl from the North Country

While the arrangement itself is fine, thanks to Jerry Ragovoy's production, my problem with Howard Tate's cover version is in his delivery. From me, he just just tried to wrench too much emotion out of the lyrics.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 18:19:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm surprised he hasn't used Howard Tate's arrangement too … after all it loses much of the melody and all of the tenderness of the original, and Dylan seems to go for that live! Nice horns and bass guitar, but it's Atlantic. That's a given.

I don't think much of Howard Tate's Jemima Surrender either, but it does make me wonder what someone funkier, like Otis Redding, might have made of the song.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 17:51:56 CEST 2012 from (72.78.49.88)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Howard Tate's version of "Girl From the North Country" is not forgettable at all. Since Dylan has developed the (usually annoying) habit of borrowing other people's arrangements of his songs, that's one I'm surprised he didn't use.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 17:44:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That's the Howard Tate album included in the box, David. I wouldn't think a great deal of money accrues to the writers!


Entered at Mon Oct 8 17:13:58 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Atlantic Soul Legends

Howard Tate's eponymous Atlantic album includes his forgettable cover versions of "Jemima Surrender" and "Girl from the North Country".


Entered at Mon Oct 8 16:24:44 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT & LvdB

Thank you for your very kind words Jerry, much appreciated. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving. Gobble, Gobble. Won't hear that sound at our house. We have Capon; which I find out through thorough investigation; does not exist on the west coast.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 16:11:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Atlantic Soul Legends

Don't know if this is available in North America. Atlantic have just produced a box set with TWENTY original albums on CD in card replica sleeves. It costs £35.99, or £1.75 an LP. The contents include Otis Blue, Green Onions, In The Midnight Hour, Knock On Wood, Hold On I'm Coming, What'd I Say, Walking The Dog, Lady Soul (all obvious) but also some real rarities by Sam Dees, Howard Tate and Clarence Wheeler.

This has to be the bargain of all time. Perhaps they think they've milked the catalogue dry and might as well, but it's still incredibly cheap. You have to wonder if (a) it's devaluing the music and (b) if the artist will ever see any money. But it's a collection of twenty albums, at least ten of which are "must have in any serious collection".


Entered at Mon Oct 8 09:00:25 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Gabriel, is a DJ here on KDHX in StLouis.he runs the midnight to 5 Am shift,Sunday to Monday, though the hours might be less these days.Gabriel must be about 90 by now, was a musician, i think a pianist and trumpet player, plus a dj. for ages. Anyway, he is one of the most interesting and colorful djs anywhere, a little past his prime,but a treasure.i was just in the car, had him on(for some odd reason i don;t listen to radio at home much).Gabriel introduced a song, said- now this next song is a blues.i don;t think the guy intended it to be a blues when he made it, but it is.In fact it is one of the best blues ever made- and then he played "the fire down Below" by bob Seger. I;ve heard Gabriel play this song before, but to be honest, till he just remarked what he did, i never thought of the song as a blues.But a blues it is. Now, it certainly is not one of the best blues ever made, but it;s a blues of sorts..... and listen to the words, its about men catering to the the world's oldest profession... Personally, i never thought it was a good song.... weak lyrically, and run of the mill musically. well executed, but hell, all ya need is a firing squad for that...


Entered at Mon Oct 8 04:25:37 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

Subject: Thanksgiving

Hi all!! Have a Happy Thanksgiving.

Something different here. Everyone needs a laugh once in awhile and thought you guys would like this one. It's an oldie, but funny.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Oct 8 03:10:19 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Ruben Remus: Instrumental

This is great for someone like me who is constantly trying to find out how Robbie plays the guitar. Robbie changes his playing style pretty drastically every 3 years or so which I find pretty incredible and exciting. The funny thing is he doesn't seem to necessarily get better at the instrument but seems to have been a master of each style for his whole life. This phase (1967 - The Basement Tapes Style) is one of my favorite periods of his guitar playing. It's like somebody whispering to you on a walkie talkie or something. The recording of this specific type of guitar really adds something to the playing too; extremely fragile, extremely thin, like walking on ice. I don't think many people can play like this, if you're not dexterous and very consistent, a mistake will be evident. FOr example, Ron Wood uses a lot of fuzz to mask any mistakes, I think if he played with this tone it wouldn't go over to well. Anyways just thought you'd all enjoy listening to this.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 02:46:02 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Band bootleg: Ain't That Kindness

Anybody know what this is? It is listed in rare bootlegs from the basement tapes. It's called Ain't That Kindness (which I know Johnny Winter does) but it says it's The Band here. It doesn't sound like any of them but the recording indicates that it was recorded in the basement. It also sounds a little like Rick is doing back up vocals. Maybe it is slowed down?


Entered at Mon Oct 8 01:07:45 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dean (of Toronto radio) D and Messers K and D

And Happy Thanksgiving to all of you in Canada and especially to John D., dean of Toronto radio and still at the top of his game. We will be seeing Mr. Knopfler and band and Mr. Dylan and band in Vancouver on Friday and then again in Toronto. Given his history as one reviews previous concert lists after new albums arrive, I think we are in for a few new ones as the tour evolves.


Entered at Mon Oct 8 00:09:44 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan Set List

Kevin J, maybe Dylan heard you weren't loving Tempest and he's so disappointed that he doesn't feel like playing anything new. Happy Thanksgiving!


Entered at Sun Oct 7 20:27:06 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Scarlet Town

Dylan played Scarlet Town on his first show in Winnipeg. Nothing last night from the new album. Somewhat disappointing. I trust this will change. Winnipeg review was good nevertheless. Knopfler review excellent. I think Dylan will roll them out slowly.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 19:42:56 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Thanksgiving

Hoping you have many reasons to be thankful for. Happy Thanksgiving Canada.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 19:06:43 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: HAPPY THANKSGIVING CANADA!

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving day; in Canada and I just wanted to wish all my Canadian friends on this board a very Happy Thanksgiving. We're actually celebrating today; with family.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 19:00:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mod

Kevin mentioned Paul Weller. The latest "Mojo" features The Jam, but I mention it because it's the best covermount disc in years: "Move On Up: A Modernist Compendium" which has a sleeve pastiching 'Sound affects" and I assume had Weller's input. It runs from The Jam, to Laurel Aitken, The Beat, Curtis Mayfield, Lee Dorsey and Paul Weller. Outstanding tracks from Andy Lewis (2003) and Dexy (2012). I also picked up Weller's That Dangerous Age vinyl 45 yesterday.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 18:48:36 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Anyone else holding tickets to upcoming Bob Dylan concerts starting to get a little worried about the set lists..........see Link above.....he's down to 14 songs in recent shows, 90% of which are the tired old ones ......good to see Blown in The Wind back but he has yet to add any of the new ones and has pulled way back on Love & Theft and Modern Times.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 15:08:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Libby Titus is at least one of the choir.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 14:20:18 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Question

On Cahoots,The River Hymn,there seems to be a "choir" of sorts singing.Is it a choir,and if so who are they? If not a choir are they the voices of Rick,Richard,Levon? Thanks to anyone who can help.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 14:14:32 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Peel

John Peel. I think he was addicted to novelty in music, but actually had very little musical taste. An accidental but beneficial result of his addiction to novelty was radio exposure for a large number of new bands over a long period. But the history of Peel’s Dandelion record label also indicates a tendency to put out total crap as long as it was different. His co-director Clive Selwood (who later ran British CBS marketing) more or less says that.

He had annoying traits. He may have been born near Liverpool, but he was educated at an elite public school as a boarder, so his accent was an affectation which got him work in the USA during Beatlemania. The other thing was that he’d get hugely enthusiastic about a new band (e.g. Supertramp in 1970) but once they became successful, he talked them down. This was true of just about any band he espoused. I think he liked rock musicians to be worshipful, needy and grateful and couldn’t stand them once they ceased needing to kiss arse.

In the later versions of his show, he’d play completely incompetent cassette recordings by young bands. No one is THAT eclectic in their taste.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 14:05:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ken Dodd picture

It struck me that our North American readers may not know Ken Dodd. So a link. The red hair, the cheery wave? I think they're cousins.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 14:05:33 CEST 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: John Peel..

Being Antipodean, I've had little exposure to John Peel, but since when does that stop me commenting? I think Peel was vital to help English audiences navigate through the rather non-eclectic market that was Britain (as compared to the States (Yes, let's not talk australia...). Whereas in the US, you had exposure to nearly everything, in hte UK you had what? the BBC (which seemed to ban all the cool stuff), Top of the Pops, adn pirate radio. Peel was useful for that. Ian meldrum here (who was on the roof of Abbey road for let it be) fulfilled a similar function...). Shoot me down if I'm wrong... ;)


Entered at Sun Oct 7 11:17:21 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Something in the Air - the Liverpool air that is.

Funnily enough, Pete, I was looking in the mirror this morning and the guy staring back at me looked just like Ken Dodd!!

:-0)

I said to him 'did you know Ken Dodd's dad's dog's dead?"

He said no and told me to go and play in the road. So I did.

PS I don't really look like Doddy. My teeth are much bigger and yellower!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 7 10:10:49 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, no, I was at the 90s Band show in Vancouver. The Reunion Concert VHS is the 80s Cate Bros tour aka "The Too Many Cooks Tour." It's probably my absence that lowered the price and made it a bargain. Big Time Operator was on EMI's Columbia label in the UK. Until 1967, Columbia, Parlophone and HMV were run as separate entities within EMI. HMV was the weakest on rock … Manfred Mann & The Swinging Blue Jeans were their main artists. Andy Summers (in his various spellings) was Zoot's guitarist.

On The "Magical Mystery Tour" documentary last night there was a bit about the pink chiffon scarf that one of them (George? I haven't rewatched) was made to wear. As Martin Scorsese kept popping up to comment (for no apparent reason) I realized that Robbie's pink scarf in TLW might have been Marty's subtle homage to Magical Mystery Toiur.

What age does to us. Sir Paul McCartney is beginning to look uncannily like Ken Dodd, another Liverpudlian. Are they related? Also the guy from International Times kept being cut in after Paul, his contemporary, and his dignified white hair contrasted with Paul's bright red, and made Paul's bright red without a touch of grey come across as somewhat silly.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 08:07:24 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Link to a review of Down in the Flood..........is this better than we all might have thought?

..........and Jeff ....thank you.

Happy Thanksgiving to those that are celebrating this weekend.


Entered at Sun Oct 7 06:18:39 CEST 2012 from (65.95.93.46)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Peter V: You mentioned Zoot Money. This afternoon I spent a couple of hours in a new record shop / coffeeshop. They had Zoot's "Big Time Operator on Canadian Capitol, which is what most British Invasion bands ended up on (Beatles, Manfreds, DC5, Georgie Fame, Adam Faith, Cliff and Shadows, Dreamers, Animals, Dakotas, Nashville Teens, Swingin' Blue Jeans ...) B-side was "Zoot's Sermon", co-written by future Police man Andy Summers. Besides a handful of 45s I walked away the Robbie's "Going Home" CD and two Band VHSs - "The Authorized Video Biography" and "The Band Reunion" (recorded live at the QE Theatre in Vancouver, so with you in the audience?).


Entered at Sun Oct 7 05:21:39 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

If Obama wins, and is able to get more accomplioshed this next term, then Hillary could win next time around.And i'd be the first one at the polls to vote for her and Bill. ....Kevin, I like your neighborly concern- apparently you're not just another disrespectful canadian punk after all.... "Wine, women and boomboxes" was pretty good btw


Entered at Sun Oct 7 04:44:06 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"I really don't know anything about music but the Sex Pistols seem to play as well as anyone I’ve heard, and I’ve heard Jimi Hendrix and Pete Townsend records." - Julie Birchhill 1977 in her review of Never Mind the Bollocks

......so a gap toothed tubby in safety pins that admittedly knew nothing about music when it was happening is given a platform to put in perspective now what she didn't understand then..........."Ever get the feeling you've been cheated?" Indeed Johnny...............and just in case anyone has any doubts about Ms. Birchill, she also once wrote that she was happy John Lennon had been murdered......

Peter: a sharp guy your friend....and The Clash really were just that......as were Pearl Jam for those late to grunge.....after all, Kurt Cobain was just a little to raw for the bankers wives............back to punk for just a minute, Paul Weller was one of the few guys who had the confidence to nod to The Who and The Kinks in 1977 while at the same time being an important part of the new scene with The Jam......Meanwhile jokers like Elvis Costello were pidgin toeing it around, doing 35 minute concerts, insulting Ray Charles all in the pursuit of credibility to a movement that always knew he was an imposter.......now's he' married to someone posing as a jazz artist......Ha!

Todd: Just having fun with Mongolia......and my concern with Romney getting elected is not for Canada - our economy has remained robust and our banking system the most solid in the world even as economic carnage has hit US and Europe since 2008 - but rather with the US itself....I very much worry about getting another guy in there being controlled and directed by the right wing nut jobs. It killed too many and destroyed economies the world over the last time that gang was in power. Obama to 2016 and then Hillary & Bill to 2020 should be what's needed to properly repair the damage.......


Entered at Sat Oct 6 18:41:09 CEST 2012 from (86.163.176.246)

Posted by:

Simon

Al - re. your question about Michael Head and The Strands ... I'm embarrassed to admit that up until today I'd not heard anything. Still, better late than ever. Just listening to "Something Like You" and I'm literally enchanted by it. Don't think words could do it justice. I know I'll be playing this a lot. I shall take my time exploring this album.

One Julie Burchill line I'll always remember was when she described Ray Manzarek as "the thinking person's Mrs Mills."


Entered at Sat Oct 6 18:28:13 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

This morning (as ever if I can) I was listening to "Sounds of The Sixties" on BBC Radio Two, presented by DJ Brian Matthews, as erudite as ever at the age of eighty-four years young.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 18:06:18 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: British DJ's

Let's not forget Tom Lodge; who was born in England. Started his radio career here in Canada. In 1964 Lodge joined England's first offshore pirate radio station Radio Caroline, as disc jockey and programme director. His book The Ship that Rocked the World describes his time there.

After the outlawing of the pirate radio ships in 1967 by the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act, he worked as a disc jockey for the BBC's newly created Radio 1.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 17:39:53 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: British DJs

Tony Blackburn (a) comes from Poole (b) genuinely,as Julie Burchill says, had a very good ear for soul music. He was a singer before he became a pirate radio DJ. He was the support act to Zoot Money in 1963, when I saw him at the Pavilion in Bournemouth every week. Zoot Money used to take the piss out of him (gold sequin jacket in one set, ice blue in the other) and indeed Tony was known to get on the 11.10 pm Number 3 bus to Winton where his dad was a doctor with his guitar after shows. But he did have a very good ear for soul, and made a couple of credible soul-styled singles for MGM in the late 60s, which I have. Back in 1963, I admired his choice of cover versions. He did a great What Kind of Love Is This? (the Joey Dee song) and also a superb Devil in Disguise and Little Sister. His current Radio 2 show on 1970s Top Tens is very well-presented. I like him.

John Peel? I have to say I had heard tales before. I thought Julie Burchill's polemic was great writing, running head on at her target, and her asides on punk brilliant.

Savile, a foul figure if ever there was one, owned nightclubs down here and was renowned for employing under age kids at a pittance to work in the kitchens in the evening. And I heard plenty of rumours like the recent stuff too.

So all points to Tony Blackburn.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 16:04:46 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham

Subject: D'ye Ken John Peel?

whoaarrr.. bit harsh eh Al. Weigh it in the balance - JP or Tony Blackburn? While I stopped listening to John Peel in the 70s when he booked a personal season ticket in Pseud's Corner, he did introduce my young ears to Fairport Convention, Frank Zappa, Tim Hardin and others back in '67.

And there's a big difference between his sexual behaviour and that of Jim'll F*x It. The women coming forward to complain of Savile's behaviour were by no means queueing up like groupies. Maybe I just can't ever agree with Julie Burchill!


Entered at Sat Oct 6 13:17:33 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Punk synopsis from the horses mouth via the punk arguably most responsible for its promotion

Never seen this before [article linked]. It's been posted on one of the footie websites I go on in connection with the Jimmy Saville/young schoolgirl uproar. It's linking similar behaviour by John Peel.

Anyroad, it's written by Julie Birchill who I cited in my earlier disparaging of punk as one of the fame seeking cretins responsible for projecting it. It's a brilliantly written polemical piece whether or not you agree with its trashing of John Peel.

personally, I always saw Peelie as someone who wouldn't know a decent song if he had The Band playing in his back yard but I'm biased as I was one of those who had to listen to his crap semi-scouse accent and shite prog rock programmes in the late '60's early '70's.

Ironically, it seems like 20 years after the event [the article was written in 1999] she concurs that punk was indeed a complete and utter pile of shite

Here's the relevant bit

....I hated him [John Peel] in the Seventies, too, because he liked punk, long after punk - the whitest, malest, most asexual music ever - should have been left to die an unnatural death. I'd been a punk, and knew that the whole thing was, frankly, SHIT IN SAFETY PINS. We came to bury the music industry; we ended up giving it one almighty shot in the arm.

Incidentally, Pete I just don't get the Elvis Costello connotation. perhaps for a year or so either side but hindsight tells us he was merely around at the time and was actually no more punk than Bruce Springsteen or Bob dylan.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 13:00:34 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Adam

Sorry mate. Forgot to include my thanks for your celebration piece. Amazing set list and you make the emotion of the night almost tangible. Thank you.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Oct 6 11:00:57 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.99)

Posted by:

Adam

Thank you so much, Dlew.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 10:45:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was talking to a friend about 12 years younger than me and brought up our punk discussion. He took Kevin J's line on The Sex Pistols, and took up my comment on The Clash. His point was that nearly every rock fan likes The Clash, or did by the time Should I Stay Or Should I Go was a Levi's advert hit. Being my age and saying you like The Clash, is akin to saying "But some of my best friends are … (black or whatever)."

A fun discussion. We decided Elvis Costello was punk for people who dislike punk, Johnny Nash was reggae for people who hate reggae. He added The Eagles are country-rock for people who don't like country rock, but there we differ!

But I started thinking about The Who's impact on stage circa "I Can't Explain". Not a lot of difference in attitude to the Pistols, but one hell of a gap in musicianship.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 09:50:43 CEST 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Without taking anything from Adams excellent work

Here's what Jon pareles had to say


Entered at Sat Oct 6 05:31:55 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.99)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Thank you all, again, for your beautiful comments and kind words. It means a lot to me!

The link for tickets to Garth & Jimmy V, at the Keswick Theater in Glenside PA on Nov. 24, are linked above. I truly mean this, if you anywhere near the east coast, you really need to be at this show. It will be worth it! I don't think there has ever been more Band material in one show like this since the original quintet concerts of 1970 and 1971. Truly historic and just incredible music.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 02:46:44 CEST 2012 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Keven J

Kevin. I had forgotten all about Kathi. Seen her a couple of times in the early 90's with Long John at some bar in New Westminster. It had some kind of Caribbean motif out front but can't remember the name. But I remember her. Incredible blues voice. After watching your link and 20 years later, it's pretty obvious where Beyonce got her rendition of the song from.


Entered at Sat Oct 6 00:22:16 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Adam

Adding to the chorus,darn great work,Adam.And,I agree--Garth and Jimmy should take this out on the road.Jimmy may be one of the only people living who can sing Richard's songs with authenticity in his sound.In fact,at Love for Levon,some performers got in to a mess attempting the phrasing on Richard's songs.For example,Lucinda Williams,who I enjoy very much,tried Whispering Pines.A train wreck.Happened a few times,but heck,these songs are not musically simple to play.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 22:45:00 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.99)

Posted by:

Adam

Joan & Eddie - Thank you SO much for your kind words! Is is unbelievable that Jimmy & Garth are doing this more often. As was reported, they are doing a road show in PA that I really hope to attend as well. To anyone even in the same half of the country, you really need to see this show!


Entered at Fri Oct 5 22:30:23 CEST 2012 from (72.229.226.99)

Posted by:

Eddie

Location: Queens

Subject: Adam's review of Ramble

Thanks Adam, for sharing your thoughts on a rare evening of all Band songs at The Barn. I too was so impressed with Garth's playing, he did not take a break all night. All the players were key, Byron Isaacs' harmonies and bass playing, Randy (he should have been at Love for Levon show) was excellent on drums, Jim Weider (Mr. Telecaster) even sang lead vocal on Time to Kill. Of corse the producer, Jimmy Vivino (I wonder if Levon had a nickname for him) ran the show behind the piano. An unforgetable night for a Band fan. Glad to see they are taking it on the road.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 20:50:18 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Adam

Good work Adam! Another excellent review.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 20:49:07 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Reconstruction of the Fables

"Maybe he's caught in the legend
Maybe he's caught in the mood
Maybe these maps and legends
Have bee misunderstood..."

Al: I've always thought that "Fables of the Reconstruction" was one of their most adventurous works. Often described as murky and lanquid Southern Gothic tales, replicating the effects of summer days in the South, when the oppressive heat & humidity are so thick you could cut the laden air with a knife. The album also marked a geographical departure for the group, as it was recorded with Joe Boyd in London.

I previously neglected to mention that "Automatic for the People" was recorded in part at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 20:30:59 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: This high pitched whine I've had since Nostell Priory...

...never should have taken that jump suit off the grumpy little twat. Knew it was a mistake from the first time I squeezed into it.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Oct 5 20:12:46 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Si/Todd/DP and REM

Si.

Wow. Mega impressed mate. Not many 16 year olds dared enter the Royal Court back then and lived to tell the tale.

:-0)

Seriously, that's a major major notch on your giga counter as far as I'm concerned. I wasn't even so much as a twinkle in Michael Stipes eyeliner at that time.

My intro was much later and boring by comparison. Purely a chance reading of a workmate's 'Q' mag that had a review of Lifes Rich Pageant, likening the group to you know who from West Saugerties.

Needless to say it went on the 'must buy when I've got a few spare bob' list which saw me get the album a month or so later and a few listens of Begin the Beguine, Fall on Me and Cuyahooga had me hooked. Backtracking followed over the next few months with the first three albums.

Rather bizarrely having got them I hardly played them - not sure why - and it wasn't until our Chris started to play them several years later - possibly around the time of Green - that my interest was reawakened. He tells me that I even had to ask him who it was he was listening to. I have to take his word on that as my memory is shit.

Once the splendour of Murmur revealed itself it became a major player as far as I'm concerned and I really do have it up there with the very best I've ever connected with.

As seems to have been the case with you and Todd - not sure about DP - the more successful they became the more my own fervour for their stuff seemed to wane. That said, I still think Out of Time and, especially, Automatic are terrific albums by any standard. For me, though, they just lack that certain something - authenticity or originality perhaps - that seemed to seam so effortlessly through the first four albums.

Favourite track?

Difficult one Si. For me Murmur is just such a consummate whole I'd struggle to pick a favourite - bit like The Brown album in that way. I know what you mean about Perfect Circle as it is such a unique song but I'll stick at no fave on Murmur

Overall the one unmissable track for me from all of theirs - the one that really kills me every time I hear it? Has to be 'Life and How To Live it' off Fables. If Michael Stipe has ever sang better than he does in those frantic few minutes then I'm yet to hear it.

Apologies for prattling on but you've unlocked a few doors there Si/Todd/DP. I think it's great when fellow GB'ers share the same musical passions as well as for the four canadians and Levon.

BTW Si - can't recall whether you mentioned John Head and the magical World of the Strands. Have you ever heard it?

:-0)


Entered at Fri Oct 5 19:06:13 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Automatic for the People

R.E.M., despite having disbanded, has been in the news here of late. It seems that Weaver D's Delicious Fine Foods, the Athens soul food restaurant whose service motto "Automatic for the People" became the title of R.E.M.'s 1992 album, is in danger of closing down due to a sharp decline in business. In the last few days, however, people are lining up to eat there after hearing the news reports. I also wouldn't count out the possibility of one or more of the former group's members stepping up to help out.

"And everybody hurts sometimes
So hold on, hold on..."


Entered at Fri Oct 5 18:54:31 CEST 2012 from (81.151.190.208)

Posted by:

Simon

You're welcome, Todd. I'll give those tracks you recommended a listen over the weekend. Perhaps there was a sense that they sacrificed something when they became a mega stadium band. Their first three or four albums were both melodic yet slightly enigmatic and mysterious. You could only really understand some of the lyrics and that seemed to be a strength rather than a shortcoming.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:26:16 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for the Kathi MacDonald clip. John King can still pull a great solo out of his hat, as he showed whe Danny Brooks pulled together his old Memphis Brothers band for a gig at Hugh's Room this summer. Richard Bell woulda been on keyboards for that, but sadly wasn't, of course.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:13:00 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.154)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Music Post - REM

Simon, I know your post was for Al, but thanks for sharing that.

I never got to see REM live for some reason, and I kind of regret it now. I actually invited a girl who I knew in college, to go and see them when they were in the area around 1985, but she said no, and then I didn’t end up going either.

The first few albums are still some of my favorites, but like you, I kind of lost interest after a while. I was happy for their success, but something changed along the way. For years I purchased the albums automatically as soon as they came out, but most of them never got played as much as the earlier ones. The ‘Reckoning’ album is probably my favorite, although one of my favorite REM songs is ‘Carnival Of Sorts (Boxcars)’ from the Chronic Town EP.

‘Shiny Happy People’ may not be their greatest work, but ‘Out of Time’ still had some fine material. ‘Country Feedback’ is extraordinary, and ‘Me In Honey’ is quite strong as well.

“A paper weight, junk garage
Winter rain, a honey pot
Crazy, all the lovers have been tagged”


Entered at Fri Oct 5 17:08:19 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.154)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Swing States

Yes Peter, I suppose it’s an inherent problem in any democracy.

One of the downsides of democracy used to be referred to as “The tyranny of the majority”. Whereby 51% could essentially make the governing decisions for the other 49% (excepting situations where super-majority’s are needed).

But now we have a situation (and I think it’s been made worse by the constant polling and over saturation of media), where a relatively small percentage determines the outcome. I’ve voted in every election since turning 18, but my State consistently votes the same in every major election. It almost doesn’t seem to matter if I vote or not, and I’m not a party line voter. I generally base my decision on the quality of a particular candidate.

So I think the solution is a viable third party (which is unlikely), or a change in the voting strategy where they forget about the state-by-state results and just base the National election on an overall result from all voters. Surely we have the technology these days to achieve that. Or maybe even a “no-party” system. We’re all on the same island. It might eliminate some of the knee jerk divisions that seem to dominate the process.

Bill, I’m not aware of a perfectly democratic country either. But I there's a rumor that Mongolia may be worth a closer look.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 16:51:10 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Roger: An early Band / Cohen link was Mary Martin who managed the latter while championing the former. I can't imagine that they weren't acquainted. And then there was the time when Leonard offered Little Bessie tea and oranges and she tore them up and threw them in his face. Very punk, eh, Kevin?

Todd: I'd say that the need for a limit on the number of terms is inversely proportional to the purity of the democracy. Who knows - there may be a perfectly democratic country out there; let me know if you hear of one.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 16:44:36 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutemUp(Friend0

Kevin, you are wrong about the royalties, sometimess as much as 24 cents a month...... actually,considering the bare minumum of promotion that i did, there are s few songs that have done surprisingly strongly at different times. One of em is Blues For Brooklyn, which Levon was dead set against me including on the School For Fools album. Told me it would make us a laughing stock.... Beyond mailing out discs for play and review, , there was no proomotion. Yet, the song has always gotten play, and now, 10 years later, the song just did strongly again on my quarterly Sound Exchange statement-Digital royalties my label receives as the owner of the sound recording...

it illustrates the importance of labels, a industry structure. Promotion can be figured out, but when people have to choose between making a living or supporting something, there really is no choice. And when real labels don't really exist ina way anymore, well... and small labels, can't afford the kinds of promotion that works, cause the returns aren't there anymore and don't have a crytsal ball to be able to pinpoint what to spend on and what not to..... for a long time people lost their industry jobs over one or t wo choices that didn't work.... well.....


Entered at Fri Oct 5 16:20:12 CEST 2012 from (86.159.96.83)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: REM (for Al)

Al - I was in about fifth form when a good friend of mine who was two years above suggested taking a chance on this new band called REM. He bought the tickets and we went to the Royal Court ... it was a mid-week night and I have a memory of having something hanging over me, perhaps an overdue essay. I remember it was freezing cold and inside a less than half full venue we could see our breath. They were fantastic. I didn't know a single song by them but in the following days i could sort of hum three or four tunes. That's how much of an impression they made. They played "Femme Fatale" by the Velvet Underground and "Radio Free Europe" and "Talk About the Passion" . I suppose they must have played most of the album.

I bought Murmur the following week from Penny Lane Records (the suburban branch, me in a school blazer) and played it to death. Thinking back on the gig I can recall seeing a bunch of bikers as we were leaving and they were raving about it. Also we got a friendly slap on the back from a giant rasta who wanted to know what we thought. I saw them again after the Reckoning album was released and the Court was sold out and uncomfortably chokka on that occasion. Thing is, I didn't really keep up with them after that. By the time Green came out I developed a bit of a dislike for them - can't really explain why - and when they came out with Shiny Happy People I couldn't stand them and would almost gag when their newest stuff came on the radio. I could never recover my initial enthusiasm.

It's funny because they were still manifestly a decent bunch of guys ... but I can still appreciate their early records. "Perfect Circle" might be my favourite. I loaned the first two albums to a school mate over the summer holidays and come September he'd moved away from the area. I never got those back. That first gig was special though. The audience seemed to float out of the venue as complete strangers talked to each other. Me and my mate had enough money for a couple of pints ended up in the nearest boozer with some of them.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 16:07:06 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Leonard Cohen Live

Roger, I'll be there (albeit in the cheap seats) when Leonard and company play Madison Square Garden this December. Very excited to finally be attending one of his live shows.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:39:52 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: L. Cohen

One thing about Mr. Cohen's songs, they cover really well.
'Billie covers Leonard' is a combination I wouldn't have thought of, but I'm glad Madeleine did . . . .


Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:38:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Swing states

There was a lot about the swing states in "The Times". Surely that's true in any democracy, Todd (that 20% of swing areas determine results). I mean, Bournemouth East will forever be Conservative and Ebbw Vale in South Wales will be forever Labour. You win or lose in the areas where the result isn't pre-determined. I suppose some form of Proportional representation would balance out the "first past the post in one area" problem, but no one has explained a way where this just wouldn't mean electing various losers (in the election) from party lists.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:27:55 CEST 2012 from (86.159.96.83)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Just catching up and want to say I'll remember the Pistols by the linked clip. Part of me understands the disdain people feel but I wonder if certain folks in Huddersfield feel the same way. Probably not. The stuffed shirt at the end of the clip was rumoured to be the top freemason in Britain at that time.

Some memories of seeing REM at the Royal Court back when "Murmur" was released to follow. Just for you, Al.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:12:44 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.154)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Term Limits

And just for the record, I was a Clinton supporter for his second term. But I do think that term limits are absolutely essential. Sometimes I think the limit should be 4 years. Many folks with jobs here are subject to annual performance reviews. Employment for us commoners can be terminated at the drop of a hat. I think a job as important as the Presidency should have more in the way of performance reviews. A lot of damage can be done in 4 years.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 15:02:00 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.154)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Mongolia?

Kevin, Why would you have to move to Mongolia based on the outcome of the US election, regardless of who wins?

Projections are that we'll have enormous deficits and high unemployment and high fuel prices for as far as the eye can see. I don't think either candidate has a magic bullet to fix the problem regardless of what they say on the stump. It's just another shell game. One thing is clear. We can't pay for what has been promised.

Just out of curiosity, though, how does that affect your situation in Canada? Does Canada generally do better or worse when the US does better or worse? If we get more jobs, does Canada get fewer. If our deficit goes up (or down), does that affect yours?

I know that you're probably joking about moving to Mongolia, but I do wonder about your concerns. Has Romney threatened to harm Canada in some way. Has life in Canada improved with Obama in office?

I'm starting to think that we should open up voting to our friends in the North. As it is now there's only about 10 swing states in the US that determine the outcome of our election. That's only 20% of the Country.

I'd be all for the United States of North America. More voters, a larger tax base, and possibly more jobs. Might help us out, although I'm not sure if Canada is ready to help subsidize us. But we could really use the help if there are dollars available!


Entered at Fri Oct 5 14:33:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fred, no … TLW was earlier than Nostrell. What happened was Van saw this guy dressed very much as he had been at TLW, and inadvertently made eye contact (a muttered "Fuck me pink!" was heard), which opened him up for the handshake. Does that maroon jump suit still fit you, Al?


Entered at Fri Oct 5 14:09:05 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Can we blame Van's lack of sartorial nous at TLW on Al's handshake too? : )


Entered at Fri Oct 5 13:22:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van's right hand man

Al, I think he mentions being severely injured by an over-enthusiastic handshaker at Nostrell Priory in one of the interviews. He says he's never been able to play guitar or sax as well since, and mentions that his shriek of agony damaged his vocal chords for years.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 13:19:00 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beatles Gaumont

Sorry, it was six nights.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 13:17:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Wish I'd been there, Roger … I was at Bournemouth Gaumont to see The Beatles, but they played for five nights so chances are it was a different night. It was August 1963, not 1964, which was the Winter Gardens, but i think you were at both. The link has the poster.

I've said many times that Len is the peak concert experience at the moment, with a band head and shoulders above everyone else … I've only made three and every time we walked out afterwards saying 99.9% perfect, but we wanted to hear Alexandra Leaving (as we may have said to you after Bournemouth BIC!) … and you did! I'd have flown just for that.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 12:44:40 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Leonard Cohen

I could probably work out how much I've thrown into Leonard Cohen's retirement pot since he returned to touring again in 2008. Six concerts in four years; average purchase of approaching three tickets per concert at around £60 / $100 per ticket. The guy owes me. But he repaid it all the other night in Barcelona. Even the £30 spent on beer (which bought just four pints). Still, having flown 1000 miles and rented a posh gaff for two nights, £7.50 a pint for ale - huh!

From the opening bars of Dance Me To The End Of Love to the closing strains of Save The Last Dance For Me it was an outstanding event. Straight in at number one concert ever (along with The Beatles at the Gaumont Cinema, Bournemouth in '64 and The Band at the RAH in '71. Oh, and Len himself at Manchester Opera House in 2008.

The must see highlight for me this time was Sharon Robinson's rendition of Alexandra Leaving. She sang it with the Webb Sisters crooning in the background and just to listen to this was worth the price of the ticket. Leonard stood at the back of the stage, head bowed, listening along with the audience.

The hall was pretty full but I think there were tickets still available right at the back. Wikipedia says it can hold 24000 for music events but the top balconies were roped off and there was generous floor room. Maybe Leonard's reached his level of sales at around 12,000.

The sound of the band, as on all previous occasions was excellent - and an example to others. The hall however had an irritating echo. That's one of the prices of fame - playing basketball arenas with crap sound rather than concert halls designed for music. Manchester Opera House seats 1900 people. We were towards the back then - but still nearer to the band than we were two nights ago in very good seats.

The night began late - 9.15. I've been at Dylan concerts which finished earlier. Len turned 78 last month. Does that make him eight years older than Bob? He played until 12.45 with just a brief interval. Leonard didn't talk as much to the audience as I've heard him do before. But he showed his trademark exceptional respect to the individuals comprising the band. Javier Mas on a variety of intersting double stringed instruments comes from Barcelona and this made for a special connection. Dino Soldo - the '...master of breath on the instrument of wind...' has been absent on this tour. His part has been taken by an outstanding violinist, Alex Bublitchi.

Word on the street is that Leonard's planning his next tour. I'll go again.

There several connections between Leonard and The Band. Garth's played with him of course and the ever smiling percussionist, Rafael Gayol from Mexico, credits Robbie Robertson with giving him his big break when he invited him to join his band for the San Remo festival in '88.

Al - I remember the wren on the farthing. But what was on the other side of the threepenny bit? A portcullis? A thistle? Twelve blackjacks for one of those.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 12:14:24 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Van the amiable man

Hey Pete, maybe he's overjoyed at having finally recovered the use of his right hand following my interminable handshake at Nostell Priory all those years ago.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Oct 5 10:21:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tempest toss't & No Plan B

A good test for an album is hearing it a public place. Particularly for Tempest, which I think is a kind of headphone / in car album a lot of the way, in other words intimate and you want to hear the words. I’ve heard most of Tempest twice in public areas. Simone Felice played it before his show in Bath and I heard about 40 minutes browsing in a secondhand record shop in Chichester. It passes both tests. In the record store I was just beginning to find it mildly relentless. The only track I have doubts about it Narrow Way, because you could say it’s based on an over-used blues riff played too fast, or you could also say that it’s based on an iPhone ringtone AND the one I use. At the Bath concert I was chatting and twice put my hand to my phone during Narrow Way.

Van Morrison’s new one presents a first. Elaborate sleeve notes praising it by someone else are not a normal Van feature, plus two interviews (both claiming to be “exclusive”) in which he chats cheerily to the interviewers. He must want to sell a few.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 09:53:06 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: J Date

Wow. Just googled. Jeff's very own dating agency

Holy Avashag! And I'd no idea single Jewish people even existed. 'Pon my soul this is an entirely new ball game.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Oct 5 07:12:18 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

rosalind

Web: My link

..


Entered at Fri Oct 5 07:07:26 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......somewhere in Mongolia Fall 2013 shuffling around in a daze still recovering from Romney having been elected president of the USA a year earlier, a punk named Kevin will come across a Mongolian Jew deeply immersed in his Days of Awe........repenting for this and repenting for that....."I am an editor and I should have been there for him"........."I told him not to spend all his royalties - sometimes up 12 cents a month - on wine, women and boom boxes".....and even louder for all of Mongolia to hear "Pat B, Get me the fuck out of here!"


Entered at Fri Oct 5 06:12:39 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Garth /Vivino road show

Thanksgiving Weekend, see above link.

Surprisingly, or not surpisingly, depending upon how you look at it, a portion of the proceeds go to Keep It Going.

It's great that Garth is gigging!


Entered at Fri Oct 5 05:49:04 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, now that i think about it, i think kevin punked out on you.I know you had hopes for him....

BTW, i have a cousin, she'll be in england, early next year. she has falsies, and gelt. About a late 1940s model...should i fix you up?


Entered at Fri Oct 5 04:55:13 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For Bill M - enjoy the link.........and sad news.... I saw Kathi McDonald with Long John Baldry and she was sensational.......On a good night, that band blew the roof off......something about this clip I love.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 04:54:19 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin, why geez, i'm touched.

unfortunarely, today, if you get an album with 3 or 4 great songs, it's a miracle. masterpiece? especially by standards we expect from Zimmy, i dunno, but i think the music is gorgeous. ...roll On john, the lyrics are- well, whatever they are, but the music is gorgeous. Maybe that mattered more to bob than different lyrics. i dunno, maybe he's lowered his standards.... but the music, is fucking gorgeous. Sound, recording- i'd need a better system to listen on,but so far i haven't detected real warmth, so i'm guessing digital.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 03:53:41 CEST 2012 from (74.198.164.128)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Thanks Jed........above link is to the Rolling Stone review of the show.....Roger Waters on TNTDODD and his hanging onto that hat is endearing.....I knew I was right in siding with him in the battle of the floating pigs!

Temptest: I don't dislike the album enough to argue against it - not even with the sporadically entertaining and informative Jeff - and I love Bob Dylan too much to even discuss in public how easy it is to find enough people that can always be counted on to just believe the hype.......Truth be told, I buy everything BD releases and other than the horrific Christmas album and mindblowingly bad live TV performances, he hasn't disappointed me since the Dylan/Dead fiasco.......I still listen to "Under The Red Sky" for Christ sakes......If pushed to a desert island or Mongolia, I would take "Love & Theft" over anything released in the 1960's.....the best 5 songs on "Together Through Life" and 3 or 4 on "Left-over Love & Theft - Modern Times" are better in my view - much better - than anything on "Temptest" and that is my problem..........this is simply not a masterpiece as it it being described by critics......no album with lame efforts like "Roll on John" or the the Titanic song or "Early Roman Kings" can be described as one..............Buy it for "Dequesne Whistle" and "Pay in Blood" and be happy that one of the all time greats at even less than his best is still better than most.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 02:48:30 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: R&R HOF & THE BAND

HI ALL!! Hope you haven't forgotten me? xoxoxo

Love to read all the posts here..

Here's something you probably know already, but just in case for those who haven't heard..

October 4, 2012

The nominations for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's Class of 2013 are in. This year's hopefuls are Albert King, Chic, Deep Purple, Donna Summer, Heart, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Kraftwerk, the Marvelettes, the Meters, N.W.A., Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Procol Harum, Public Enemy, Randy Newman and Rush. The top vote-getters will be inducted on April 18th, 2013 at the Nokia Theater L.A. live in Los Angeles .

For the first time, the public gets to vote alongside the artists, historians and music industry insiders of the Rock Hall voting body. From now until December 3rd, fans can vote on RollingStone.com for the nominees they'd like to see inducted. The top five acts will comprise a "fan's ballot" that will count as one of the more than 600 ballots that determine the Class of 2013. The results will be announced in mid-December.

Vote for the 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees

"The definition of 'rock & roll' means different things to different people, but as broad as the classifications may be, they all share a common love of the music," commented Joel Peresman, President and CEO of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation. "This year we again proudly put forth a fantastic array of groups and artists that span the entire genre that is 'rock & roll.'"

Rush have been eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame since 1998, but this is their first time appearing on the ballot. Pioneering rap groups N.W.A and Public Enemy also both made the ballot in their first year of eligibility. If they are inducted, they will join fellow hip-hop acts Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Run-D.M.C. and the Beastie Boys in the Hall of Fame.

The ceremony will be held in Los Angeles for the first time since 1993. It's usually held in New York at the Waldforf Astoria, but it was held in Cleveland in 1997, 2009 and 2012.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This from a recent readers' poll from Rolling Stone mag.. no surprise here at the winner..

1. 'The Last Waltz' The farewell concert of the Band was extraordinary from the start: five hours long, with scores of special guests including Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton, and a loving audience that had been served turkey dinners before the show (it was Thanksgiving). Director Martin Scorsese was prepared for a once-in-a-lifetime musical event and came with cameras in tow, maintaining a nuanced eye for action from set opener "Up on Cripple Creek" through "Don’t Do It," the band's encore cover of the Marvin Gaye song. It wasn't an accident that his cameras captured seemingly each solo and vocal delivery with perfect timing; he had painstakingly story-boarded each song beforehand.

Despite the affectionate nature of the evening, shooting The Last Waltz was not without its egotistical showdowns. Bob Dylan, in particular, came armed with stipulations about when he could be shot, and the restrictions were many. "When Dylan got onstage, the sound was so loud, I didn't know what to shoot," Scorsese once explained. "[Concert promoter] Bill Graham was next to me shouting, 'Shoot him! Shoot him! He comes from the same streets as you. Don't let him push you around.'"

After Scorsese fleshed out the project with backstage footage and interviews with the bandmembers (especially focusing on guitarist-songwriter Robbie Robertson), it was ready for release. It was immediately embraced by music fans (although Levon Helm disliked its focus on Robertson) and is still considered a landmark of concert filmmaking.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Oct 5 02:37:54 CEST 2012 from (199.19.138.101)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" alternate take

I hope all my old friends here are well. I thought you'd like this. Peace.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 02:23:34 CEST 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Love for Levon

Jed Thank for the concert review. I tracked the setlist for a while online last night. Nice to see Dixie thrown in there, since it seemed Levon refrained from that song. (at least the dozen or so times I saw him live) I thought the "special guests" would have been more significant but a show to see none the less. Hope it comes out on DVD. I've seen about a dozen or so youtubes thus far including one from a few rows back that looked pretty professional grade.


Entered at Fri Oct 5 01:48:58 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Jed, in fine tribute to the words of The Man himself, Edgy is just trying to keep it going. He knows he's buying the record. This masquerade, he's just trying to keep us busy so we don't unmask his entry on J Date.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 20:46:01 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

Yesterday I bought the Empire Youth Annual 1948 in a charity shop. Though this one is printed in the UK, the intro is by the Canadian prime minister and half of it appears to be about Canada. Thus I'm shocked at the lesse majestie Bill, and from a boy scout too!


Entered at Thu Oct 4 20:18:40 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bill M: It is to laugh.

Bill M: Ha ha ha. The dollar bill 'rite of passage' reminder is recalled. We all knew and for a while it was all the rage.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 19:50:29 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Thanks David P

I'm really enjoying this song alot.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 19:16:34 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

A Jenny wren, I think. You could get one fruit salad chew or one blackjack chew fr a farthing.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 19:11:07 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: The same posh bird was on the front of our dollar bill until we turned it into a coin - and she's on the coin too, unfortunately. (There's a loon on the back, so we call the coin the loonie.) Anyway, until her picture on the bill was updated in the late '70s, careful folding in the area of the neck and shoulder would yield something remarkable. I guess you could say it was a rite of passage to be asked by a wore worldly schoolmate or fellow Boy Scout if you'd like to see the queen's ass.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 19:02:25 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Marc Cohn's "Listening to Levon"

Jed: Here's an earlier rendition of Marc Cohn's "Listening to Levon", the opening cut on his 2007 album "Join the Parade".


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:27:59 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Al Edge-Am I missing something?

Am I supposedly alligned with Jeff about something related to a tempest I may be involved with? Perhaps your jesting passed me by,but if I offend you,so sorry. Although I remain clueless.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:16:08 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha, the bird on the back of a farthing...

...as distinct from the posh bird on the front

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:15:55 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Love for Levon

A very good evening of music despite the horrific sound system in that ugly Izod shed.Garth was a personal highlight and some I thought would do well were awful(Prine,Hiatt,Hornsby,Jorma,Lucinda) and some I thought would do poorly were great(Dierks Bently,Eric Church,Joe Walsh,Joan Osbourne).Gregg Allman,Warren Haynes,Alan Toussaint,Jacob Dylan,John Mayer,Roger Waters,Bromberg, the Midnight Ramble Band were tremendous.Jaimoe of the Allmans sat in on percussion for a bit,but was never mentioned.Mavis was excellent,but would've preferred a different song for her.Robert Randolph contributed nicely,but John Mayer,for you gee tar buffs,was awesome on Tennessee Jed--great dueling with Larry.Marc Cohn sang a sweet song about Levon.Good crowd,nice and old so not too many texters,drunks,and other typical concert nudnicks! A very enjoyable,moving and fun evening of the finest songs in music.Cant say enough about how great Garth sounds! The only real complaint was the sound quality and Grace Potter managed to create sounds that soiled the dignity of I Shall Be Released.Her lack of talent led her to scream the last verse thereby managing to defecate on the whole proceeding.She is some special turd.Well,overall a great night and glad we went.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:10:24 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: When the red red robin comes bob bob bobbin...

Ha ha - love Bill's bemusement at our quaint old monetary system. My favourite - and I bet Pete, Dunc and Roger's too - was the old brown 10 bob note - before they stopped re-issuing them and they got tatty.

A half crown felt great in your pocket but the knowledge that you had a ten bob note in there made you feel like Rockafeller. That's no doubt because it was the only paper money I ever got my grubby mitts on back then. The 50p piece which replaced it was shite.

Which leads me conveniently to the monetary expression I used to love most of all. Not sure if it was used everywhere but 'queer as a nine bob note' used to hit the right note for me. Not that I ever knew what one was back then but it sure sounded great.

Question for Pete or Rog. Without looking it up can you recall from memory the bird on the back of a farthing?

Meantime back on centre court The Tempest rages and Jeff - aided by his coach and mentor Jed - has just hit the most audacious backhand return from Kev's lob that I can ever recall. It surely now is game set and match. Though as we all know so well such is Kev's resourcefulness even a lost cause can be turned around with a few clicks on his mighty keyboard.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:03:09 CEST 2012 from (173.165.182.249)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: The Tremelos: I Shall Be Released

Hmm... I always liked, and still do, their: Here Comes My Baby. Did this one ever get any airplay here?


Entered at Thu Oct 4 18:03:13 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: My view, based only on reading "Mystery Train" and "Old, Weird America", is that Greil is brilliant in his way but seriously undervalues the Hawks' knowledge of music that they brought to their time with Dylan and their contributions to the music made in the Basement.

A bob's a shilling, and a florin is two - so a guinea's 10 florins and a bob?


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:40:05 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter V

I used to agree with Marcus but haven't for years. I dot think he suggests the band are less than excellent, what he does mean is that they are backing musicians (of the first order) but not creative partners in the way The Band were in the basement or as the guys on Blonde on blonde were encouraged to be. Or in the way the Graceland band were for Paul Simon. Not that Marcus was in the studio so he is extrapolating and could be wrong.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:30:29 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

Bill, a florin is two bob. A half a crown is also called half a dollar, though it isn't half a dollar, but it was once when a dollar was five bob. A tanner is half a bob. A four bob bit never existed but it is a colloquial term for gays. Twenty one bob is a guinea.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:29:14 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan's Band

Greil Marcus makes me wonder whether I wasn't paying attention to the last 50 years of musical education I have experienced.How 2 people could listen to one thing and hear such distinctly different things is interesting to say the least.Marcus,has always tended to read way more than may been intended into context and lyrics.Always seems to know whats in the composers head and his intent.Perhaps,he simply missed the elements that go into making a good band and for good music.The intellectualization of music might only take you so far,sometimes far enough to lose sight of the very sound,and its effects on ones spirit and emotions.Amazing reaction by Marcus to possibly the finest working band on the road today.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 17:09:58 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: A duodecimal system? You mean twelve pennies in a shilling, twelve shillings in a pound, and so on? It is to larf. Dylan aside, remind me what a bob is? A florin?


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:56:28 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Kathi MacDonald, RIP

A post from Brian Blain that arrived in my inbox:

"Kathi MacDonald was one of the all-time great female vocalists in rock,blues and R&B. She passed away yesterday, apparently slipped into a coma and never came out.

"She had an incredible resume, an Ikette at 19, part of Mad Dogs & Englishmen with Joe Cocker, Big Brother (post-Janis), recording with Delaney & Bonnie, Rita Coolidge, Nils Lofgren, Dave Mason, Freddy King, The Rolling Stones and a twenty-year collaboration with Long John Baldry. She spent a little time in Toronto and had a strong Canadian connection via Long John Baldry who toured the world with her. Baldry's band always had a few Canadians, Papa John King, Butch Coulter, Al Webster and others including yours truly when I subbed for Papa John in Brampton (or was it Brantford). Kathi & John made some classic recordings and the bands gave some unforgettable shows. I toured Germany with Kathi & Butch Coulter for 3 weeks maybe 5 years ago and I could see in every venue we played there were framed pictures or posters of Baldry and Kathi was treated like royalty.

"I must share my introduction to Kathi McDonald: I arrived in Frankfurt ... [more at link]"


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:53:17 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Punks and Zimmers , my money is on bob.

New Paltz to Astoria- sounds like the title of something. those are well traveled routes, i hope that there was a good astoria style meal at the end of the first leg of your journey bob.And yes, that is still and wll always be one helluva record. thanks for relating about it

time to address the two punks,Marcus and Kevin, who is a real punk, just read his recent posts on the subject :-) From the first listen, once you get past song 1( which is thoroughly energizing), you can't help but notice that the music is frequently, or mostly, based on repetition. First listen, and a day a half later.But, immediately, and since,my thought has been dylan was going' for this. Past listening, i;ve not given real thought to anything in this record,i;ve enjoyed the subtly layered repetitive beauty immensely. you can't help but notice some of the odd song structures, and the repetetiveness immediately, and on the firsst listen my immediate thought, and my since persistent thought has been that Dylan has gone for a more obvious return to the work of the traveling musical storytellers of the time of medieval kingdoms etc,. just with more modern instrumentation. Dylan is Dylan. i doubt he'd be releasing anything he wasn't proud of or satisfied with. wasn't what he wanted us to hear.Had he not wanted us to be listening to his stories over subtly layered beautifully semi repetritve music, semi droneful in a manner that incorporated muscial styles stretched over thousands of years, we would not be. He has an intention, and a part of it is a more obvious return to the form that folk music and so much of his music stems from.No matter what he's played, folk, rock and roll, anything he's done, it harkens back to many centuries back too.And in this album, you can gear so mnay gorgoeus things, SLeepwalk, and some of the beauty of the classic soul songs, and at the same time, you hear the highwaymen, and the music of the many centuries past england, Scotland, etc etc etc.there's more..Gotta run... wrote this once more eloquently, and then the computer flipped out. Maybe dylan's intention is simply that this is what he wants to hear now......Me, i don't give a fuck right now, i'm just enoying the hell out of it.....


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:28:14 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I believe Greil Marcus was too harsh in his assessment of Dylan's band on "Tempest". They ARE back up musicians after all and execute their individual roles with skill under Dylan's direction without getting in the way of the singer & the song. As an example, listen to Tony Garnier's amazing acoustic bass on "Duquesne Whistle".

Bob F: Poco's "Deliverin'" is also one of my favorites and I got to see them perform at the University of Georgia colossum in Athens just after the release of that album. I recently picked up a copy of the quad-mix LP version of "Deliverin'".

Solomon: Greg Brown's wife Iris Dement has also just released a new album, "Sing the Delta", her first recording of new material in 16 years.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:17:37 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

Al, before they hit the classic 6/8d, the price of Love Me Do, issued this very week 50 years go, there was a period where singles were six shillings seven and a hapenny. I've found a few with that price on them.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 16:13:01 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

EPs weren't much of a bargain. They varied between about 11/8d and 13/4d so resolutely twice the price of a single. But you got the glossy sleeve.

Golden Guinea were 21 shillings of course, though stereo was 25/6d. Then the true budget Lps arrived with cover versions for 10/6d.

Bill, the duodecimal system was behind British mathematical supremacy for years, e.g. Turing. When you can divide by 2,3,4,5,6,8,10,12,20 and 240 you get good, and we were doing that every day. Eight half crowns in a pound. ten florins in a pound. Ten was never a problem.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 15:52:12 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Poco Deliverin'

Jeff, yesterday I was driving from New Paltz to Astoria Queens and I had the IPOD on Shuffle when the closing medley from Poco's Deliverin' came on. The one with Just in Case it Happens,Yes Indeed/Grand Junction/Consequently so Long. After that I had to listen to the whole record! After all these years still one of my all time favorite live albums.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 15:48:28 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: in transit (destination: Ulan Bator)

Al E: Why would you people even have needed a word like 'tenner' when you so scrupulously avoided counting money in tens until the rest of Europe came and slapped you into rationality? 32 shillings and 6 pence - is that like a pound, 12 and 6? Or a guinea, 11 and 6? Still, even if I've miscounted, it's easier to figure out than cricket.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 14:27:59 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: A tenner for a Bob

...ahhh them were the days eh Pete. Was it 6sh/8d for a 45 and 32sh/6d for an album?

For our American cousins that's almost 7 bob and 33 bob.

:-0)

Nothing's coming to mind for the price of an EP. Any recollections Pete?

And the thing was back then a new album for a Christmas present was a huge deal for a freshly emerging teen.

I remember like it was yesterday getting With The Beatles for Christmas 1964. The thrill never since equalled of seeing that amazing pristine glossy cover with those four icons in all their stunning black and white magnificence. The sealing of a love affair as firm now as it was then. Them staring at me and me staring at them for what seemed like yonks before daring even to take the album out the sleeve let alone venturing to play the damn thing.

:-0)

And now as you say you scarcely think twice about a tenner for any old shite? And before anyone pulls me I'm not talking Bob here who of course has richly rewarded us so many times down the years. No I'm merely taking a glance at some of the CD's that litter the Edge household and never even see the light of day let alone enthrall this willing listener.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 13:00:05 CEST 2012 from (78.141.40.219)

Posted by:

Peter v

Al, I'm a cynic when it comes to Dylan, and I think Marcus has a point, but it is a great album, and some of his best work for years. What else can you get for a tenner? But the deluxe edition definitely isn't worth the extra.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 12:20:55 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

Nux

Subject: Ophelia The Last Waltz

ROD:No worries,I tend to agree with you!


Entered at Thu Oct 4 10:17:12 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hmmm...

...weekend purchase of Tempest now seemingly in the balance. Following what I thought was Jeff's sensational winning volley along comes Kev with his trusty old Greil Marcus racquet to somehow dig out an amazing recovery lob back over Jeff's head sending up a cloud of base line chalk dust to send this epic contest into a deciding set. Feck me, it never used be this tough buying albums.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 4 08:31:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, Memorex, a name I’d forgotten. We used to buy cassettes by the thousand at the group of language schools I worked for. The language laboratories, running all day, ate them up, plus we had dozens of self-study machines. I was in charge of purchasing and we had a full time engineer maintaining equipment. Memorex had a tape called “audio tutor” which was advertised as sturdy, and also hard for students to steal because one face of the shell was red, one blue, which also meant you could be clear about which side to put on. We were given samples, and we ran frequency response tests and durability tests. We were hugely impressed. They were loaded with chrome tape, and sounded superb. So we bought a thousand. The ones they delivered had the cheapest oxide-shedding hissy tape we’d ever seen. In other words the samples were loaded with their best tape. The ones you bought with the worst. We never touched them again and I’ve retained “brand aversion” since!


Entered at Thu Oct 4 07:02:24 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Link above- Arlen Roth remembers Rick, Richard, and Levon.

Kevin, we agree on something- God forbid Romney wins. i can't imagine how bad it would be. I hope you don't go to Mongolia for that reason, but if you go to Mongolia, and find a Jew, we're probably related.Take pics for me.My father's father's mother was Mongolian.

I've got friends thinking on where they would go hide if Romney wins- thinking the best thing they could do is get out of his way.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 06:55:32 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.141)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Greil Marcus from Expecting Rain on Bob Dylan's band

What do you think of the band on this album?

The band that Bob Dylan works with now is not a strong band. They’re not a challenging band, except for Charlie Sexton, the lead guitar player. There’s no one with an individual sensibility, with his own grasp of a song and where to take it, to challenge Dylan as a singer. The music for the most part is backup. It’s often a repetitive figure played over and over again, so that all your focus is on the singing, on the voice. But Bob Dylan has always sung best, he’s always been most alive, combative and finding surprises in a song, when a band is challenging him, when the musicians are going somewhere he couldn’t have anticipated. I don’t think that’s happening here.


Entered at Thu Oct 4 06:39:24 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.141)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: I am voting for Justin but until then..........

.......Just watched Obama get clobbered in a debate that has me dumbfounded.........This was a drubbing so thorough I still can't quite believe it........Obama's incompetence was surpassed by the debate moderator who might well have done the worst job in that area ever witnessed in a major debate..........Up until a few hous ago, I had thought that the worst thing that could happen in 2012 was my pal Al Edge having to spend one minute more thinking about those oh so influential PIstols......but alas a Romney Presidency - until tonight unthinkable - could happen......if it does, I am definitely off to Mongolia ( and by the way...."Love & Theft" is coming with me and the overrated "Temptest" is not )......Damn term limits.....Bill Clinton should still be President!


Entered at Thu Oct 4 02:57:45 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

David, i was needing a boom box, with cd and potential to record cassette in it, back in 04 i think it was.My sony was in NY. i was in StLouis. this could also havebeen 0 2, but i think not.Anyway,i found some great sounding memorex boomboxes, ridiculously inexpensive, at Walmart and Target.Like 19.99 or 29.99.And they sounded great.When i was done, i gave it away. A few years later, again, out of town, needed sound, found the memorexes, but this time there was a variety of sound quality, ranging from poor to damn good, and of course, the price was up a bit. But still reasonable. . I think the last memorex i bought might have been in 09. this time, the Sony made the trip with me, but it could be it's last hurrah.I'd hate to see it go.



Entered at Wed Oct 3 23:10:19 CEST 2012 from (92.18.190.168)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Greg Brown

Greg Brown has a new album out called Hymns to What Is Left. It took me a couple of listens and now I'm loving it.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 22:15:26 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Tempest & Other New Releases

Favorite Songs from Tempest.

Long And Wasted Years

Pay In Blood

Scarlet Town

Roll on John

Not a big fan of the new Killers release or Most of Mumford and Sons.

The New Neil and Crazy Horse songs being played on NPR sound real good - cant wait for this one.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 20:52:32 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Alex Harvey

Thanks Peter, Al, Roger. Enjoy the show Roger.

I finished Alex Harvey's book last night. Found ending sad. Drug of choice up here, though Alex lived in London, is alcohol. But what a long career, once crowned as Scotland's Tommy Steele and guitarist in the Hair band, which I saw.

David P. My googling confirmed a special relationship he had with Cleveland.

I only play the greatest hits, but watch this version of Delilah, which he played from the same time as Tom Jones.

Link to this site. Scarlet Rivera was married to a one time SAHB member.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 20:34:55 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Buck's cleaner non-J Lo sound

Jeff: In the magazine article Scott Litt mentioned that boom boxes are hard to find nowadays. He was hoping to keep the one he got for Dylan as a souvenir, but Dylan ended up with it after the sessions.

Buck Owens, having worked in radio as a DJ and station owner, was very aware of the sound properties of AM radio. As a result, he and his producer Ken Nelson used to preview their mixes through the small speakers of car radios of the era. As Mr. Owens once explained, "I cut records for AM radio and I was always conscious that AM used to have a great big old bottom on it. So I took most of the bass out of the records and put more high-end -- that made'm sound cleaner than the others." Even more astutely, he ended up owning his Capitol master recordings.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 20:31:51 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFP0gNYJcDQ

I've posted this link to a great song from Fraser and Debolt's first (1971) LP because I just read that John Oates covers it on his new album. It's a very Bandish song from a very Bandish scene.

Allan Fraser's still around - mostly the Eastern Townships of Quebec (the land of Steve, RIP) but sometimes Toronto. The massively talented Daisy Debolt, who was relegated to the background on this number, died two years ago this month.

Kevin J: If you were following the local punk and post-punk scene, you may recall the Defayds, whose principals were Fraser and poet Robert Priest, and whose song "Long, Long Way To My Knees" was a highlight of one of those Q-107 "Homegrown "LPs. I never caught them, though I did encounter Fraser when he and I were hired by my best friend to help sell home insulation door to door. Priest I saw many times with a later band, the Great Big Face.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 19:02:21 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

David- listening to mixes, rough and finished, on a good boom box , is indispensable. Any speakers you know and like, actually, is indispensable. Two different pair of speakers in the studio control room, and my trusty old Sony boom box, is how i worked on final mixes. Right now my trusty boom box has a mold issue- was in a room somewhere that turned out to have mold growing in it.. I'm curious to see how it works after a solid day long ozone treatment zaps the room and everything in it.

I'm getting that itch as time passes, but i got a feeling Scott Litt is prized out of my ballpark.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 17:41:39 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Correction: Scott Litt's prized microphones are Neumann omni directional. As THE NEW YORKER article mentioned that they were worth around $25,000 each, I believe they might be the old M-49 or M-50 tube condenser models.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 17:23:31 CEST 2012 from (130.64.18.51)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Tonight show Online Blog

From NJ.com I will be covering this concert with a live blog from the press seats at the Izod Center. I'll keep a running set list at the top of this post (refresh page to get the latest version), but for my thoughts on the show, and NJ.com users' comments, see the comments section at the bottom of the page. Unfortunately, those with mobile apps are not able to see the comments; the best way to access this is on a computer, at NJ.com/entertainment.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 17:23:14 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Old Adventures in Hi-Fi

Scott Litt was brought in to engineer the recording of Dylan's "Tempest". R.E.M. fans are familiar with Mr. Litt, as he co-produced DOCUMENT, GREEN, OUT OF TIME, AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE, MONSTER and NEW ADVENTURES IN HI-FI. In a short piece in the Oct. 1 issue of THE NEW YORKER Mr. Litt revealed that Dylan likes to listen to the rough mixes of his session recordings through the system in his pickup truck and on a boom box, which Litt was instructed to provide. More importantly, he also provided two of his prized microphones for the sessions, old ownidirectional Neumanns, which can be set up in the middle of the room to record the musicians in the round. This old school approach to recording appealed to Dylan. Litt pointed out that the resulting "soundscape" allowed Dylan's voice to stand out, without the need to do much else in the way of studio adjustments.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 17:05:38 CEST 2012 from (108.89.71.39)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

David, thanks for the link to the Dirt Farmer Band appearance on Imus. Also cool memories of Athens.

Kevin, I liked your Rock & Roll High School vignette.
Although, I must admit that I started getting confused about Grandma's Ronnie Wood Rooster hair style.

JT, good points about Garage vs. punk.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 16:18:08 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, it all makes sense now. I just returned from the chrysler dealer. Was taking my trusty old Dodge in for a pair of inner tie rod ends, and an alignment. Was fully prepared to wait the 3-4 hours and wander the neighborhood, but it looks like rain, and it turns out they rent Compasses there, and i was wanting to try one out, as it seems to be one of the two or three new vehicles whose seats don't destroy my already beat to hell spine. Not having the foresight to negoitate a loaner, i rented a almost brand spanking new one.. Just before i skeedaddled i had momentary mindfulness and grabbed the Tempest Cd...

Well Al, it was revelaceleboratory. My ears experienced that old wonderfulness, And the only comaprison of contrast of the experience of beauty on the two different systems i can make is to a few years ago when i was dating a woman i grew up with and at the end, met a 19 year old gal, a month or so before i left for arizona.

i wasn't going to talk about that but, of course, your perfectly tuned, inquiring mind loosened my tongue-

now a direct answer to your natural curiosity would be the bst advise i can give- and a great excuse- the guise of scientific research for the greater good- Find thineslef a willing zoftig young yiddishe momma and, Physician- hopefully heal thineself. Well, she don't have to be young, but..... clean.

Speaking of tongues, before i rented the Compass, i was thinking that the skillfulness of this record might be compared to the cunning an older man brings to a recording session soemtimes makes the difference.

i'll be in no hurry to pick up my van, new pair and all.The New Compass got me by the short hairs already.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 15:12:57 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Dirt Farmer Band

The Dirt Farmer Band performing live on the Imus in the Morning program yesterday. Larry Campbell tearing up the Telecaster on "Time Out for the Blues".


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:11:45 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Wandering International Brotherhood of XTC

Bill M: we are a select few destined to prosthelytize far from our homelands to the few who care to listen. : )


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:08:06 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Kosher salt infused water

Jeff, does a dip into that concoction work for revitalising other more extreme parts of the anatomy or is it limited just to the tonsils?

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 3 13:04:01 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sensational Alex harvey and Espana

Got to admit, Dunc, to a big blank spot on him. I always seemed to have been aware of them and especially around the time of Boston tea party but never got close. In my mind they sort of occupied territory that Ian Drury and the Blockheads went on to. I may be way out on that but it's sort of stuck as my perception.

Your take on the Byrds article will be interesting Dunc now you've devoured so much of their stuff.

Rog: Rub it in why don't yer. Jammy sod! :-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 3 12:58:05 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: 3 Day Cialis

Al, though I imagine you will thoroughly enjoy the music, the man's singing is clear and inspired enough on much of this recording, that I've imagined that he gargled with kosher salt infused water prior to each session, maybe even a few times each session. Really, there is enough juice going, enough enjoyment and engagement in hs voice that on a level it reminds me of many great shows I saw him sing from approx 86, 87 till 2000, ish. Of course, much older, and alots happened, but... a Zimmer , for sure. ....i've not yet even gotten near thinking about what the hell the man might have been going for with a couple of these #s, but, i think he is having himself one helluva good fucking time. .....


Entered at Wed Oct 3 10:42:39 CEST 2012 from (80.224.132.122)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Barcelona
Web: My link

Subject: Alex Harvey

Hi Dunc, I missed out on the Alex (pronounced Alec) Harvey band but I've certainly looked at them on YouTube (possibly due to your prompting way back) and loved the passion.

Currently over in Spain for a Leonard Cohen concert tonight.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 09:59:36 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Deep throat and matchstick legs

JEFF: Been wavering a bit "should I, shan't I?" due to my "aversion" to or should I say "aural discomfort with" the gravel in that old Hibbing larynx. But your terrific little plaudit has now pushed me over the...er edge. I'll get it this weekend.

KEV: Loved your child rebuke post. Nice one mate. If only the Sex Pistols "musical offering" had been as substantial, witty and inventive I might have given more than a milliseconds shrift to your original claim of their parity with the true greats.

:-0)

As for Pete Buck's stage show - first off thanks to DP for posting link - absolutely loved it even Mike Mills mousy hair! Surely though, Kev, Buck is doing his best Pete Townshend impression, having gone out the day before to purchase a pair of articial Jarvis Cocker legs years before Jarvis himself bought them.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 09:50:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Biff & Rock & Roll 101

Kevin, I know we’re supposed to remain strictly anonymous, but I was the external examiner for the “Rock ‘n’ Roll 101” test used at Biff’s High School. His dad was quite correct, except in one detail. The actual essay question was “Describe Jamaican sound systems before Bob Marley,” and we expected mention of Duke Reid for example. Biff’s short piece describing the Bose clock-radio in his hotel room in Montego Bay where he spent a short holiday was not acceptable, in spite of the almost competent small sketch accompanying it.

I’m sure Professor Edge won’t mind me mentioning the module he moderated, “From Mersey to Manchester.” The examiners enjoyed Biff’s comment “That Leem Gallagaga was trying to sound what like Jon Lenin did in The Beetles, but he was no good plus he is an ugly sod.” We all sympathized with the accurate assessment of Mr Gallagher’s capabilities and appearance, but I’m afraid we do apply considerations of both spelling and grammar which rendered his attempt unacceptable. His later comment in the “Rock in Century 21” module that Lady GaGa “must of been Nole Gallagaga’s daughter” was, in a word, cretinous.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 07:18:43 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.141)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: REM

Can anyone watch that clip of REM on David Letterman and not laugh at how dated and imitative it is.......those steps right out of the New Wave handbook......only thing good in it is Michael Stipe.......I came to love REM and rank them in my favorite 5 bands of all time.....But as a live act....it took them a long time to find their footing.

Trust me on this one: If you want a great music DVD experience....rent or buy "New York Doll"......it is a movie produced by Michael Stipe about the life long desire of the bass player in New York Dolls to reform the band.......following his life working in a library to what becomes a reunion of sorts......it will break your heart and give you some rock n roll highs..........oh and Michael Stipe states that he wouldn't exist as a musical entity had it not been for the New York Dolls.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 05:47:07 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Nux, Ophelia

Sorry about that Nux - my memory ain't what it used to be. Either way I think that is the definitive performance of that song.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 02:45:13 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I picked up Tempest yesterday. Listening on my car stereo, which has driven along with me for over 236k miles.Once stellar , it is now a mere minor fascimile of it's former magnificence yet performs dutifully, as a result of good breeding and desire. But it don't quite have the complete robustness it once did.Yet since swallowing a Zimmer yesterday, it sounds fucking gorgoeus. The Zimmer is still lodged.That's the best way to describe the music in this recording.Gorgeous. All sorts of things occupying my thoughts,work, finding a home for a dog i found running down the middle of a four lane a bit back,other stuff, so i 'm not following the words for long. Some jump out, and are just fucking wonderful.But the music, the music is fucking gorgous.Masterful, old sounds, executed at the highest level of musicianship, not stodgy or "produced sounding".But, yes, this was produced, there was thought in this- MAYVBE not a lot of rehearsal, but they definitely had to run through these songs a couple of times......these guys are the real deal, as good as it gets....the music is so damn good, not to draw comparions, cause there's no point, but ,I just couldn't help but wonder how some of the songs would have sounded with The Band. If you haven' heard it, that tells you how good these guys are, how gorgeous this music is.


Entered at Wed Oct 3 00:03:16 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.141)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Some time in the future, a little kid somewhere will be scolded by his dad for flunking out of rock n roll high school............."Oh Biff....ya didn't go with The King again - did ya? You Rocket 88 deprived little munchkin you......how many times have I told you.........Green River NOT Nirvana, some unknown in Jamaca NOT Bob Marley, Dave Davies NOT Black Sabbath, Ramones NOT Sex Pistols,........Damn it, did you not get a single question right all year?"........."Good news Dad, I did get a few right.......remember when I asked you all those years ago if Rod Stewart had invented the Rooster haircut......and you said no that your mom looked like Ronnie Wood in the morning......so I answered that Grandma invented the Rooster and got it right! Also, that thing about the Moonwalk......everyone said Michael Jackson but I said Ronnie Hawkins......I think I got that one right as well...but not certain...."


Entered at Tue Oct 2 23:37:47 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Alex Harvey Soul Band

Never saw them unfortunately, but I knew the record.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 23:25:51 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I was going to post something like this earlier, but I'm glad I waited, as you've provided a better coathook. By the mid '70s California-based enthusiast and critic Greg Shaw (and others) were calling the snarly music played by snotty teenagers in garage bands like you mentioned 'punk rock'. So the legal "Nuggets" and the bootleg "Pebbles" series were seen as being largely 'punk rock'. So when newer groups appeared a couple years later playing that sort of music, they were naturally called 'punk rock' too. Somehow the term stayed stuck to just the newer and more intentionally obnoxious subset - and the old guys went back to being just 'sixties garage rock' or something like that. BTW, a decent example of a harbinger of new punk was "Hit Him With Another Egg" by Chilliwack (of all people!!) from ca '73 - both musically and attitudinally.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 22:26:04 CEST 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Am reading a biography of Alex Harvey just now, Was he a forerunner of punk? Saw him live once, What he was about could not be captured on CD.

Peter, Al, Roger - did you ever see the Soul Band? I was too young.

Al, I'll get that thanks. Just one album to get and I'm complete on basic Byrds.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 22:08:47 CEST 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Nitpicking

I may be nitpicking - I often do- but garage rock is not the same to me as what is being discussed herein as 'punk'. The attitude (I used that word before) may be similar, but the output is totally different to my ears anyway. I love the former and have little tolerance for the latter. ?/Mysterians, Kingsmen, Standells, and so many others were my sustenance. I hear the Kinks, Smithereens and many others the same way. I understand the impact of 1970s punk on changing the direction music was heading (I for one didn't mind the prog rock - not my favourite but OK) but hated what was called glam rock. I agree that 'punk' had a great impact on moving things in a different direction. I just cannot hold up any one album ("Never Mind" included) and say - this one was important to me. The discussion has been interesting. Its great here when music is central.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 21:42:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rickie Lee Jones

Listening to "The Devil You Know", a humorous title because the idiom is "BETTER the devil you know …" i.e. the original not the new cover. It is interesting, but as I'd guessed Cat Power provided the template for sparse whispered female versions. I can't think many Band fans would appreciate "The Weight" but I'm giving it a try.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 21:23:55 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Athens, GA

"Going down to Allen's for a 25-cent beer
And the jukebox playing real loud '96 Tears'"
--"Deadbeat Club" by the B-52s

Todd: The B-52s were indeed an essential part of the Athens music scene early on. They immortalized my favorite bar during my college days, Allen's. Below Allen's was another club, then called Between the Hedges, where I first discovered Randall Bramblett sitting in with Terry Melton and the Laughing Disaster on many nights. Randall, as I've often mentioned here before, later worked with Gregg Allman, Sea Level, Steve Winwood, Levon and Robbie (on the film Carny). "Mad Dog" Melton was an interesting Ronnie Hawkins-like character and a pioneer of the Athens music scene (see link).


Entered at Tue Oct 2 21:16:12 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pistols / VU

Can't find it offhand, but Robbie went to see the VU in NYC and also walked out. John Cale is of course a genius and was responsible for "Fear" in 1974, Squeeze's first album, and Patti Smith's Horses. Both collectively and separately, you have to credit Cale & Reed for what Wikipedia calls Protopunk. Cut and pasted from Wiki (which fails to note John Cale individually):

QUOTE: American acts like The Seeds, Paul Revere & the Raiders, The Monks, Shadows of Knight, The Velvet Underground, MC5, The Stooges, The Modern Lovers, The Sonics, New York Dolls, Lou Reed, Big Star, The Fugs, Television, Death, Captain Beefheart, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Rocket from the Tombs, and Love, German acts such as Ton Steine Scherben, Neu! and Can, and acts from Britain including The Kinks, The Troggs, The Who, David Bowie, T.Rex, Faces, Brian Eno, Mott The Hoople, Roxy Music, Doctors of Madness and Hawkwind[1] are commonly cited as the most noteworthy artists that would ultimately influence punk.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 20:39:04 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: REM

David, cool link. Letterman must have been pretty cutting edge at that time, as commercial radio (at least in my neck of the woods) hadn't caught up to REM yet.

After that video, there's another link to South Central Rain from the same show. Amazing that they got to perform two songs on National TV at that time.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 20:27:55 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Punk Meets The Godfather

I don't think the point is that the Sex Pistols specifically, were a direct influence on REM. It's more about a shift that was occurring in music around that time away from the bloated glossy industry rock sound, towards a more independent & edgy alternative beast, which happened to include Punk as part of the transition. There was a lot of energy going on in the alternative universe away from industry behemoths like Fleetwood Mac, Styxx and Disco that enabled a lot of groups like REM to even have a chance.

I was also a fan of the early REM albums, but the only place I heard them in those days was on my college radio station. More direct musical influences on REM were more obviously The Byrds, The Velvet Underground, Big Star etc.

David, cool connection to Athens and early REM locations. Didn't the B52's also come out of that scene?


Entered at Tue Oct 2 20:24:49 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.E.M. plays R.F.E.

Al: Calling out in transit, this link's for you.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:45:07 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Middle Age

The definition of Middle Age is anyone 10 years older than me.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:42:37 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: REM and punk - rant

Not having even the merest teeny weeny link. Sorry.

No matter were Michael Stipe, Bill Berry, Pete Buck and Mike Mills to write it down in their own blood, no way as far as I'm concerned did they owe anything to that Sex Pistols garbage.

Individually, they were wonderfully gifted, creative and innovative artists. Collectively they were sensational. They owed everything to their intrinsic musical gifts and hard work and perseverance and nothing whatsoever to some ramshackle hype that had been put together to further more insidious moneymaking causes - in sobering antipathy to the musical pioneering the hype merchants would have us believe it represented.

Their utterly amazing debut album Murmur is the proof positive of this. For me the finest debut album after Big Pink and Astral Weeks. Yes even above Greetings from Asburuy Park - that do Jeff lad? :-0) And not a nod to the Sex Pistols in a solitary note of Murmur's exquisite whole. And their earlier debut EP Chronic Town whilst not in the class of Murmur was equally devoid of the Pistols barren drone.

And breathe

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:22:48 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: High Fidelity

Todd: Peter Buck, the future R.E.M. guitarist, snuck into the Great Southeast Music Hall to see the Sex Pistols debut here, but was soon caught & thrown out. At the time he'd dropped out of Emory University and was working at the nearby Wuxtry record store. Around a year later he moved to Athens where he worked at another one of the Wuxtry stores there. It was there that he first met his future R.E.M. bandmate Michael Stipe.

I first heard R.E.M. one day when I was at the Wuxtry store near Emory, where the group had recorded a few songs in the back of the store. While perusing through the used record racks, I noticed that the owner was playing a video tape of the group and asked him who they were. After a brief explanation of the origin of their name I remember being impressed with their unique sound. I'd graduated from the University in Athens a few years before and later found out that R.E.M. played their first "gig" at a party in a converted church where some friends of mine had once lived.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:21:27 CEST 2012 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: pubunk

PV - On that, were Brit New Wave and Punk closely linked, coincidental, etc? Were talent, musicianship, etc the biggest differentiation? Were Pub Rock and New Wave essentially the same thing?


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:19:04 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There's a 2CD version of the 5 CD too. I'm definitely waiting!


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:18:57 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Subject: No Joke

You're absolutely right Bill. I remembered the joke wrong.
So much for my comedy debut!


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:15:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: Thanks for the reminder. I always liked that joke, but I'm pretty sure it was told to me as, Why did the punk rocker cross the road? Stapling was still involved, of course.

As for grunge, before Seattle there were bicycle couriers wearing shorts over leotards, and before bicycle couriers there were hockey players.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 19:06:40 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Kinks

No Peter, the version I have is the 2 CD set "1964-1977" which came out about 10 years ago. The Box set looks promising, but I'd personally wait for a lower price, unless it's a severely limited pressing, and you don't want to take the chance of it selling out.

I waited a year or so for both The Beatles Mono Box set and The Bob Dylan Mono Box sets, and was able to get them for about 1/2 the price they were selling for when they were first issued. It was difficult to wait, but was definitely a better deal.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 18:45:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, The Darjeeling Limited. Mrs V’s favourite film as she greatly admires Angelica Huston’s attitude to the kids. Three great Kinks songs too, though the final “Aux Champs Elysses” by Joe Dassin is the one on her playlist.

Todd, did you manage to get the 5CD set of The Kinks at The BBC or the two-CD? I was going to order the 5 CD set one night from amazon for £40, decided to do it the next day, by which time it was sold out and going for £55. I thought that excessive profiteering and that I’d eventually see it at £40. Today it’s £119 to £165. That must be the fastest price rise yet.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 18:18:43 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Punk-Alternative-Grunge

Of course, how could I forget the Kinks! I felt like there was something missing from my post. Thanks Peter.

The funny thing is, before checking into the guestbook today, the 3 CD's that I was listening to in the car yesterday were: The Kinks 'BBC Sessions', a Ramones compilation, and Squeeze 'Argy Bargy'.
I was recently on a Wes Anderson kick, and re-watched 'Rushmore' and 'The Darjeeling Limited', which led me to grabbing the Kinks CD, and I then I grabbed the other two as sort of companion pieces.

I never owned the Sex Pistols album, but it seemed like everyone in college (aka University), which I started in 1984 had it, so it was always around. Some of my friends had the leather jackets with many zippers, "Mohawk" hair cuts, and safety pins as jewelry. I never went down that road personally, but appreciated it on the level that it seemed designed to shock and get a reaction…..the music itself was a mechanism or venue for the shock and horror. Of course in college, we thought it was funny, but it was never going to replace my precious Doors albums. ;-)

There was a joke that my father told me at the time:
"Why did the chicken cross the road?"
"Because it was stapled to the punk rocker."

As much as I enjoy the Ramones for a quick burst of energy, I usually need to switch to something else after about 5 or 6 songs. Fatigue sets in now that I too am in the "Middle-aged" category. Groups like Squeeze, Nick Lowe, and Elvis Costello may have appropriated some of the punk energy, but brought much more sophistication, melody and musicality to the party. I also thought that groups like The Pretenders had much more going on than some of their punk era counterparts.

As David mentions, groups like REM grew out of the punk movement to some degree, or at least grabbed some of that energy. They were very popular on college radio in 1984 and seemed to enjoy a lot more mainstream success once 'Green' and 'Out of Time' came out a few years later.

Shortly after that came the Grunge movement, and the thing I remember more than the music, was all of the flannel. I remember thinking at the time that people like John Fogerty and probably Neil Young, were dressing the Grunge look some 20 years or so prior.



Entered at Tue Oct 2 18:00:47 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, are ye well, mate? That's 10 or 11 posts without mention of .......


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:36:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… while in Britain Stiff Records and pub rocker Ian Dury got on the bandwagon, creating well-played punk, or "Pubunk".


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:11:23 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Here in the South there were many who did appreciate the raw energy aspect of the so-called Punk movement. Not long after the Sex Pistols debut in Atlanta, a new alternative music scene came into fruition some 60 miles to the northeast in the sleepy university town of Athens. Groups like the B-52s, R.E.M., Pylon and Love Tractor developed a following that would soon spread. While quite different from Punk, their music incorporated a similar raw energy level that added another letter to the brand, resulting in what could be called Spunk.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 17:01:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Ramones were certainly one of the ones I meant by antecedents … but that direct line from Eddie Cochran passes through The Kinks. As Ray Davies has said, they invented both punk and heavy metal with those early singles. (Well, not "invented"). The great thing about You Really Got Me, All Day & All of The Night (and Louie, Louie and Hang On Sloopy) is that they were easy to play for novice bands … not easy to play well maybe, but easy to play recognisably.

Al … I should mention that Billy Haley & The Comets featured a great bass player … he used to ride the double bass across the stage. AND for those following the brilliantly-remastered London-American Years on Ace, the latest volume, released yesterday, is 1956, and it has the Bobby Charles version of See You Later Alligator NOT the Billy Haley one!


Entered at Tue Oct 2 16:07:16 CEST 2012 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: NPR review of Tempest


Entered at Tue Oct 2 16:06:03 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sex Pistols in the Southern City

Strangely, the debut U.S. performance of the Sex Pistols on Jan. 5, 1978 was in the most unlikely venue, The Great Southeast Music Hall in Atlanta. While the national media was there in full force, a lot of local music fans, including myself, weren't fooled by the hype and stayed away. Apart from the novelty factor, the Southern audience in attendence was underwhelmed by the musical skill of this brand of pistol and left wondering, in the words of Ronnie Van Zant, "give me back my bullets".


Entered at Tue Oct 2 15:55:02 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: were they pushed or did they jump?

Fred: So you're a Canadian XTC fan/authority living in Japan. I know your mirror image - Shigema, a Japanese XTC fan/authority living in Canada. Given that the only other XTC fan I know is also expat (T.O. to NH), I detect evidence of a trend.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 15:51:23 CEST 2012 from (108.93.169.14)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: 1-2-3-4! Hey! Ho! Let's Go

All this talk of Punk, and no love or even mention of the Ramones?! I was always under the impression that they were among the first of the "modern" punk movement, even if they never achieved the notoriety of the Sex Pistols. They certainly must have at least inspired the likes of the Sex Pistols and the Clash. The difference is the Sex Pistols always seemed angry whereas the Ramones seemed more fun.

In many ways, I think they set the trend rather than followed it, and had more authenticity than some of their contemporaries. I think an almost direct line can be drawn from Eddie Cochran to the Who to the Ramones.

The thing that's cool about the Ramones is that even though most of their songs sounded very similar from one to the next, you got the feeling that they were being themselves and it was not just an act. Their music can be called Punk, but bubbling under the surface is early sixties rock influence, a Beach Boys surf rock vibe, and even a Ronnie Spector / Martha Reeves girl group sensibility in addition to Iggy and the Stooges. They took these influences along with a Queens, NY attitude, turned it up and floored it.

It wasn't always pretty, but it always seemed real, and always seemed fun. You got the feeling that they were not playing for the critics, or any kind of glory, but were playing for kids who just wanted to hear some straight up rock and roll. They were very pure in their direction and I think acted as an antidote for some of the bloated rock that was starting to dominate the 1970's.

"Chewing out a rhythm on my bubble gum
The sun is out and I want some.
Its not hard, not far to reach
We can hitch a ride
To rockaway beach."

Kind of romantic, eh?


Entered at Tue Oct 2 15:27:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Best selling singles of 1977, UK …

1 Mull of Kintyre Wings

2 Don't Give Up On Us David Soul

3 Don't Cry For Me Argentina Julie Covington

4 When I Need You Leo Sayer

5 Silver Lady David Soul

6 Knowing Me Knowing You Abba

7 I Feel Love Donna Summer

8 Way Down Elvis Presley

9 So You Win Again Hot Chocolate

10 Angelo Brotherhood of Man

Yes, that's the impact punk had! In 1978, the only Top Ten best seller was Rat Trap by The Boomtown Rats.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 14:21:38 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: Ophelia The Last Waltz(again..sorry)

Rod:Just checked the unedited version and it's the same.The verses are jumbled,not the same as studio version at all.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 14:02:11 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

Nux

Subject: Ophelia The Last Waltz

Rod:Thanks,will check it out


Entered at Tue Oct 2 13:50:31 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The XTC of a Half Man Half Biscuit

Al: you forgot that I also predicted the height and quality of the grass on the pitch, too.

I never really got into the Super Furry Animals, either.

With XTC it was their album Black Sea that piqued my interest and English Settlement sealed the deal.

Hit and miss (a bit) with Half Man Half Biscuit for me. The Dukla Prague ditty is one I like very much. I should really buy a CD of theirs one of these days. I don't know if you are familiar with the retro football jersey maker/store TOFFS, anyhow,every so often I tell myself that I should buy a Dukla Prague replica kit from them. One day perhaps. : )


Entered at Tue Oct 2 12:31:23 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV , Dunc, Rog and other UK folks

Uncut this week has a big feature on The Byrds including a top 20 best Byrd tracks - 8 Miles High is their number one - which isn't for me but kind of predictable I guess. Looks pretty inviting feature though haven't read it yet.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 12:26:10 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred the oracle

You did mate. If I recall correctly you even named the team, the size of the crowd and the referee's eyesight deficiency for Saturday's game way back in August.

:-0)

I once tried to get into XTC after various recommendations but try as I did could never quite manage it. I've since had similar problems with the Super Furry Animals and their off the wall stuff. I know both bands were/are quality but try as I might I just can't reach the spot.

Fred - just thought on whilst onthis subject but I'm sure you're sense of humour would be tickled pink by the Birkenhead group Half Man Half Biscuit. I've never latched on to them myself so I can't recommend anything specific but various younger mates over the years have sworn by them. I recall one of their songs was entitled "All I want for Christmas is a Dukla Prague away kit" - right up your street I'm sure.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 11:23:03 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Norwich 2 Liverpool 5

Al: didn't I tell you things were going to get better, game by game?: )


Entered at Tue Oct 2 11:21:20 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

When punk appeared on the scene I was a teen living in Italy, most of my friends (myself included) were into heavy metal (not so much by me) & hard rock (definitely), and being Italians prog rock, too. (I'm still grappling with this issue decades later). One of my mates rated The Clash as a very good hard rock band, not punks.

Personally, I always prefered the Two-Tone "movement" to the fabricated punk of the Sex Pistols. However what I really, really liked that came out of the punk movement (and still like today) were The Clash, The Jam and XTC and The Police. : )


Entered at Tue Oct 2 10:44:40 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Billy Haley and the Pistols

Really good and insightful post that Pete. Love it when someone calls it as it actually was rather than how recorded history has conveniently gone on to represent it.

As you say it simply wasn't representative in the slightest. It was taking place in the columns of initially the NME and, a bit later, the tabloids and other publications.

On the street, meanwhile?

Jack shit - as distinct, that is, from dog shit which had always been present most noticeably in its white form.

Got to say Pete. I think you're being a bit harsh on Bill and the Comets comparing them to Sid Snot and his oppoes.

I know Bill and the lads were more than a mite tame and boring but they weren't as far down the rung as Sidney and Jonathan.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 2 10:34:52 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Zimmer...Schimmer

I empathise Pete. But I avoid the shit these days by sending my middle aged next door neighboour for my viagra.

He's only 59 so he doesn't need a zimmer!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 2 10:13:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I just re-read Kevin … 29 was middle-aged? Bloody hell. What does that make me now? I was thinking 50 was middle-aged!

Al, what Zimmer frame do you recommend? The rubber feet on mine keep getting covered with dog crap when I totter down for my prescription on Tuesdays. Any advice? And was the Zimmer frame invented by a relative of Bob's?


Entered at Tue Oct 2 10:04:32 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bill Haley & Punk

Punk …

Kevin: It always feels like that. I remember my sister getting into rock and roll and teddy boys. I remember The Beatles exploding on the scene. The first to get rid of the stage gear and wear old clothes were The Rolling Stones. Then I went to university in 1966. Not a hippy in sight. At the start of the second year, the first years (US: freshmen) all had flares and tie dye shirts and were starting to grow their hair. A mere three years or so after punk you have the New Romantics wafting about, from ABC to the eventual Culture Club. Every teen generation has its icons.

The position you’re putting the Sex Pistols in is wrong though. I’d liken them to Billy Haley & The Comets. In this case an ageing bandleader with a cow lick and a silly jacket “invented rock and roll”. That’s what the manipulated media thought, who knew nothing of “Rocket 88” or several dozen other earlier contenders. Elvis Presley wasn’t the first guy to combine white and black styles: he was just the first to do it THAT well. Bill Haley was the one the media picked on, very nicely for Bobby Charles, who wrote See you Later alligator, to maintain that Band connection.

Others I’d liken the Pistols to are Lonnie Donegan, who became the spearhead of British skiffle (rather than The Vipers, who actually were), and who really started kids buying guitars, and Cliff Richard, who perfected the Elvis snarl and was fortunate enough for a TV producer to flip his weedy first single and propel the excellent B-side, Move It, to an iconic place in British rock history. That’s the company I’d put The Sex Pistols in: Bill Haley and Cliff Richard.

As Elvis to the Sex Pistol’s Bill Haley, you could probably put The Clash. The work I’m doing now is heavily into sleeve design, and the Sex Pistols (except for the LP) don’t figure very highly. The Clash, financed by the mighty CBS / Columbia, had the great sleeves and one-off centre labels. Others like The Buzzcocks, The Undertones, The Damned also did more for the icoography. The Sex Pistols were very short-lived, after all.

Back in 1977, I was working at a language school, and every summer we quadrupled in size and recruited young language graduates, often in their first teaching job. I think it would be 1978 when the first ones with safety pins turned up. I met them all as I was teacher training. One became a friend, due to his persistent efforts to turn me on to punk. I got mixtapes, and he used to come round and play me cassettes … don’t forget the cassette was the icon for punk, not the vinyl 45. Anyway, he reckoned The Buzzcocks and The Clash were the two good bands (he disliked the Sex Pistols too). The British rock TV quiz shw is called “Never Mind The Buzzcocks.”

As far as fashion went, the one with leggings under a skirt, with artfully applied holes in the leggings and a deliberately "not trying" voice, was … Blondie. Another then thirty-year old who could take an old Randy & The Rainbows hit from 1960-ish, Denise, thrash up the guitars a bit, and be hailed by the daily press (not the NME) as "punk." Looking about nineteen, and being one of the most desirable women on the planet did her no harm, obviously.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 09:08:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hype

Kev - hype to me was an ailing musical publication [NME], desperate to regenerate itself, using two young gunslinging and remarkably persuasive journos - Parsons and Birchill - to convince its readership that an intriguing yet localized and almost wholly talent barren musical/fashion scene represented the very centre of the future cultural universe. And them succeeding in their mission better than anyone has ever done before or since. Getting good young folk even as far away as Toronto to buy into the scam.

:-0)

Meanwhile, as regards your original proclamation that The Sex Pistols have a merited parity in musical history with the true greats?

Well you don't have to read too far into the title of their own uniquely overhyped album to find your answer.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 2 07:58:10 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Nux, Ophelia

Hi Nux, just watched the Lost Waltz footage again and Levon seemed to get the verses right on the night. Must have been rearranged for the movie. The Lost Waltz mix is interesting as the horn section is more prominent. robbie's guitar is lost in the mix but seems very similiar to whats in the film.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 05:27:50 CEST 2012 from (208.120.39.229)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Richard Manuel in 1978 film?

Yeah, I kinda thought it was unlikely. Thanks for that, Ari, much obliged.


Entered at Tue Oct 2 04:24:20 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.141)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Almost perfectly summed up Bill M.......a few final points...... Peter was honest....he was 29.....and all revolutions strike less at the shins of the married/middle-aged than they do the history making and history writing teenagers. I was there to witness rock n roll streets in my hometown being turned into punk streets overnight.........to in as quick a blink of an eye have everything big and extravagant in rock n roll that was universally accepted as great be seen as just a joke. For Al........Hype is Billy Ray Cyrus and "new country".......substance is looking around at a rock n roll universe that still dresses like you, still has thoussands of bands from USA to Tokyo enter the game each year that sound just like you and to a collection of rock n roll journalists that all hated you vote you into their Hall of Fame in Cleveland.........All this on just one album - the great Never Mind The Bollocks.......


Entered at Mon Oct 1 21:37:10 CEST 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Hey Jon. It's not our Richard. In 2007 I looked into this and ordered Eliza's Horoscope from eBay from some guy in Peru and Let's Get Laid from California. I ended up posting Richard in Eliza's Horoscope who actually happens to be in a scene with my professor Chitra Neogy at NYU. She is 18 here and leads the orgy scene. But in Let's Get Laid it ain't him at all. In fact the guy isn't even American or Canadian or British.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 20:01:53 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Speaking of Richard Manuel ...

Here's a link to an article that appeared in the "Toronto Star" over the weekend. It's mostly about the closing of a local indie movie theatre, with TLW being the last film shown. Note that the journalist, who was also the theatre's caterer, is Richard's nephew.



Entered at Mon Oct 1 19:39:00 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Richard Manuel in 1978 film?

Some online travels led me to Richard Manuel's wiki page, and I was intrigued to see he has a filmography footnote for a role in a 1978 British comedy called Let's Get Laid. Was this actually 'our' Richard?


Entered at Mon Oct 1 17:10:11 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I met Terry Evans several years back, maybe 06 or 07. It was a off night show, in a good club, probably for little money, a fill in show to help pay the road costs. Hotel rooms for the night. He is aperformer, can't help himself. Though coasting for Terry is more effective than putting out hard for most , he seemed to coast effortlessly through a portion of the show, but still, when the times came, he couldn't hold back. And it still was effortless. He has a gorgeous, thoroughly rich voice, and adds some chord changes to some standards, giving more of a church feel to the songs.He still goes out on the road, and still hits some of the lesser markets. He is a big guy.Real tall, kinda resembles Apollo Creed a little (think Rocky), but taller. Athlete's build, and has a scar or too on his face, possibly round the eyes if i recall correctly.A real gentleman, conversational, had a fine band.Drummer been with him a real long time.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 16:24:27 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: Ophelia The Last Waltz

Mmm...I have only now after many years come to realize that the verses in of Ophelia in the Last Waltz are completely switched and all over the place.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 16:01:49 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

So Peter I went back to iTunes and found the "Call Me" album. Sounds good. I also found a CD by Hans and Terry Evans; from 2008 Called "Visions." I love your line about buying albums that had any Band member even breathing softly near. Going to be 19 degrees Celsius today. That would be 66.2 Fahrenheit to our American cousins. Nice day.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 15:54:17 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I thought then and I think now that almost all punk records are unlistenable. And that the music was even worse live. Still, Kevin J is right - it did take out the old and usher in the new. That such tripe managed to accomplish this so quickly and effectively shows how sclerotic the 'old' was (disco and waddling holdovers from the late '60s/ early '70s). Fortunately punk also had to good sense to lie down and die shortly after, leaving the truly talented to sort themselves out and develop the great music of the post-punk period.

As an aside, I will admit to PIL's "Public Image" 45. I was living with some university students in Melbourne in '82, and they'd play it really really loud at every party they had. I would probably have liked it for the 'good times' memory anyway, but it's also attached to the memory of one of those students clearly using the record as a means of dancing away the pain he felt from his mother's cancer.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 15:29:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hans Theesink

Thanks, John. I hadn't thought about Hans Theesink in years. I have his album "Call Me" from 1992, on the Dutch MW label. It says recorded in Munich, Hollywood and Woodstock. Rather cheekily, the MW is similar to the old Mowest logo. I got it in the era when I bought anything any of The Band had even been breathing softly near. Both Garth Hudson and Rick Danko appear on "Sail On" while Richard Bell and Colin Linden appear on most tracks. Colin Linden produced it. Terry Evans is on there, as are both Maceo Parker and Pee Wee Ellis on saxes, and Fred Wesley on trombone. I can't say I have any memory of it, but I'll listen to it next this afternoon!


Entered at Mon Oct 1 14:41:53 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V David P Hans Theessink & Delta Time

OK. Going to turn you boys on to a pretty good record. Yesterday, I was watching on Youtube, the movie, Let's Have A Ball; with Ry Cooder. I love this show. One of the best versions of "Jesus Is On The Mainline and Down In Mississippi."

Anyway that lead me to check out Terry Evans work (one of Ry's ongoing backup singers; with albums of his own). Wanted to see what was available. I came across a new release called "Delta Time." The CD was by Hans Theessink and Terry Evans; featuring Ry Cooder. Now that had my attention. Went to iTunes and started to listen. Hans is from the Netherlands. I don't know if I would have bought this album without Terry Evans and Ry Cooder; but the review on Amazon saying that this was like listening to the Ry of the 70's really caught my attention.

The fact is he plays on only 3 cuts and I believe sings harmony on 5; along with Terry Evans and Willie Green Jr.; also from the Ry Cooder Band of days gone by. What a bass voice.

Hans does a soulful rendition of "Blues Stay Away From Me"; which Levon did. On the track "How Come People Act Like This" it's classic Cooder. I also learned that the 60's hit, "The Birds and The Bees by Jewel Aikens; from 1965 had a young Terry Evans on harmonies. They do it here. Check it out. I'm guessing the European folks on this site have heard of Hans. I never have; until now.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 11:16:45 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hype

KEV said: In short, The Sex Pistols stand with Elvis Presley, The Beatles and Bob Dylan as the most important artists in the history of rock n roll... and 100 years from now people of rock n roll interest will know Johnny Rotten and his band that changed music

I'm not even going to try to emulate PV's eloquent erudition on the subject. I'll just reiterate what I said before.

It was always hype without any real lasting substance - other than the hype itself which in time has actually become its substance.

Kev, no matter how many journalists who wanted the things you allude to to be true - for whatever reason it was that motivated them to desire it [read my earlier take re Malcolm maclaren and Anthony H Wilson and jealousy re Beatles] - it will never have any more real basis than anything else that relies on its own hype to project it.

That said, the hype has indeeed sadly become the reality in this instance and passed into recorded history as representing something it most definitely never actually did.

I'm pretty sure the fact that decent music loving folks like yourself have actually swallowed this hype will safely secure the Sex Pistols place in rock history as a late 70's equivalent of the true peerless icons you mention.

That will never alter the reality, however, that all it was was hype without substance. A movement and a popular music explosion that existed purely on the pages of the NME, those British tabloids who fell for the 'fuck' garbage on Bill Grundy's chat show and every other credibility seeking rock journo who has since championed the vacuousness of it all as something special.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 10:07:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Punk

I disagree on the Sex Pistols to this extent. We are in an age with fascination for the past and antecedents, and they’re all available, so that people can trace the many pre-UK punk explosion “punk” records. Kevin … re-listen to Somethin’ Else by Eddie Cochran (the one the Pistols covered, and I’ll admit to quite enjoying their cover), the first three hits by The Kinks, White Light White Heat by the VU, or indeed “Red” or “USA” by King Crimson or a dozen American garage bands. What Malcolm McLaren brought to the mix was a zero in musical terms, but major in terms of attitude, fashion and lyrics. The perennial teenage resentment thing had the addition of a political faux-underclass dimension. I say “faux-underclass” because like Joe Strummer, a good few people, or perhaps “chaps” I’ve met who were in punk bands were actually middle-class lads.

The other thing they added, (fuelling guitar sales, as did skiffle / The Shadows / The Beatles / The Stones before them and Nirvana later) was the myth of musical ineptness. A couple of years ago the session drummer on Dave Clark Five’s hits described the effort he had to go through to play basically enough for Dave Clark to follow on stage. Dave Clark apparently wasn’t good enough to play even the simplest parts in the studio. As Sex Pistols fans will know there are various urban myths about which star prog musicians played on Never Mind The Bollocks. I mentioned it to one of them, and he says it’s definitely not true, though definitely amusing. But does not discount the possibility of session men, because there were many sessions for young bands in the 60s and 70s where session guys were asked to “play down” – i.e. not play anything too flashy or hard to imitate, but play simply but tightly in a way novice bands rarely can. Just as did The Hawks for The Barbarians on “Are You A Boy Or A Girl.”

As subsequent work shows, Steve Jones and Glen Matlock were naturally talented. Even the recent book on The Clash maintains Joe Strummer only took up guitar when he joined the group and couldn’t play before. To which I say, “Yeah, right.” So I think the ineptness was a myth, which McLaren boosted by bringing in Sid Vicious who was truly and totally inept. Going back to the 60s, there’s an article at the time which claimed that The Small Faces had only been playing for six weeks when they made their first record. As various autobiographies show, this was total spin and mirrors.

John Lydon (who starred in I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out of Here) is an interesting and amusing raconteur. In the recent Mojo feature he reads very well, and adds the obligatory lines like “Fuck your magazine!” but he’s maintained the act for 35 years.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 09:00:45 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I never was able to listen to punk. Not for a minute.

Calvin- Poco was here on the 15th, free show, i didn't go. they've been working on a new record, on and off, for a a long time now.Seems odd, i doubt that they ever had to work so hard at it before.Go in, work, cut it. Rusty, and three guys, just ain't never gonna be Poco.He made a mistake not giving Paul a legal share.Paul certainly had earned it.


Entered at Mon Oct 1 08:54:42 CEST 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Pub bands

Punk is interesting. The uk scene is different to the US scene, which is different to the aus scene, which is different to the French scene, yet they're all lumped in together.

The boomtown rats are perhaps the most egregious example of a pub band calling themselves punk. Geldof only wanted to be the Rolling Stones. His autobiography, is that it? Is worth reading. (Even if the parts about Paula Yates now stick in the craw. )


Entered at Mon Oct 1 07:05:08 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.244)

Posted by:

Kevin J

All sorts of bands and people - from diplomats sons like Joe Strummer to seasoned/label sponsored songwriters like Elvis Costello attached themselves to Punk such was the power of the movement. "Never Mind The Bollocks" changed lives, changed the entire music industry, changed fashion, encouraged millions of young people all over the world to pick of instruments, killed pretentious/bombastic prog rock, and in a delayed bonus led to an American form of Punk called Grunge 10 years later ( Nirvana ) that killed off "hair metal" and just for the fun of it re-killed what lingered of the pretentious and bombastic................In short, The Sex Pistols stand with Elvis Presley, The Beatles and Bob Dylan as the most important artists in the history of rock n roll...............Funny thing is their main songwriter Glen Matlock was tossed from the band before the great Never Mind The Bollocks was recorded because he admitted to liking Paul McCartney and an even greater sin in the punk world of the day - to washing! Hard to defend that........but it is a laugh and 100 years from now no one will remember an album by or members of King Crimson or the much vaunted Velvet Underground or U2 but people of rock n roll interest will know Johnny Rotten and his band that changed music.


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