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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, December 2012


Entered at Mon Dec 31 23:27:24 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: New Year

Well.....Susan and I will treck off down to our ship in a couple of hours. Have a couple of pizzas and a bottle of wine. Probably watch the Lord of the Rings series. At midnight the air whistle on that Rockin Chair will sound.

A happy new year to y'all. What ever you do ...be safe. Think positive for a good year coming up.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 22:53:44 CET 2012 from (24.29.232.184)

Posted by:

Groundcat

Location: Ohio

Subject: Rock of Ages SACD

I purchased Rock of Ages, the SACD version today. I own a SACD player and a decent stereo system (Tekton M-Lore speakers, Marantz amp). I am somewhat disappointed in the sound quality. It sounds to 'muddy'. I'm curious if anyone else has an opinion on the sound quality. I am not finding much as far as reviews, besides on Amazon. Regardless, I will listen to this New Year's Eve recording like I do every year. Happy New Year everyone!


Entered at Mon Dec 31 22:43:56 CET 2012 from (69.182.179.43)

Posted by:

Whistle Stop

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Rock of Ages Footage

Does anyone know if this YouTube video of The Band performing Don't Do It is actual footage from the Rock of Ages concert in NY? I've never heard anything about the concert being filmed. If it is real footage, does anyone know where I can find more? Thanks.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 21:02:56 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: 2013

Wishing everyone a happy and healthy New Year. Let's hope it is a better year with more joy and less pain.

Be safe!


Entered at Mon Dec 31 20:54:51 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Jeff Healey....When the Night Comes Fallin'

For any body who has never seen Jeff Healey play, this is a great video. The camera man gets really good shots of Jeff's fingers, doing the excellent string bends he does.......upside down. It's a real cool guitar he's playing too.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 17:59:07 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jeff Healey

JT, In Courtenay there used to be a big room called "The Loft" It was a seperate building on the end of "The Mexicana Motor Inn", which became the Washington Hotel, after Mount Washington.

This building used to be an old barn it was huge. I played there many times, and it had super acoustics. There was an upstairs balconey where you could walk all the way around looking down on the dance floor and stage.

Many times groups like Powder Blues came and played, but that building never sounded so good until Jeff came and played there. The sound was superb.

I've never been much of a guitarist, so watching Jeff play the way he could and being blind makes you weep with envy.

I'm sure you know of his jazz record collection, apparently over 30,0000 vinyl.

The Loft is gone now, they tore it down. That reminds me, my younger brother wrote a song about all the places we've played that are gone, "They're tearin our Honky Tonks Down"


Entered at Mon Dec 31 17:10:37 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Starlight Lounge


Entered at Mon Dec 31 17:08:49 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jewels

Well if you want the Jewels & Binoculars CD now it will cost you anywhere from 47-79 dollars; from Amazon.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 17:04:29 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jack Ruby's Club

WW: I recall reading an interview in which T Bone Burnett (who is from Fort Worth) mentioned seeing Bobby Blue Bland perform at Jack Ruby's Starlight Lounge back in the day.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 16:31:15 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Jewels and Binoculars: jazz Dylan

One more. There is a jazz trio called Jewels and Binoculars with 3 superb players. They have their own independent careers but have a few cds out. They cover Dylan (hence the name of the trio) in a most unusual way which is interesting and unique. We saw them a couple of times on a tour through Vancouver Island and spent some time with them while they were on tour. Check out their web sites and consider this if you like Jazz and Dylan. These are excellent musicians with a solid track record.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 16:04:51 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: It's 2013...

and still no flying cars! Nevertheless...Happy Year of the Snake everyone!


Entered at Mon Dec 31 15:25:42 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Stephen Fearing

While I'm thinking about shows I saw locally in BC, aside from BARK, I have had the pleasure of hearing/seeing and spending time with Stephen Fearing while in Victoria and Duncan (The Garage). If you don't know his independent work for the past 15 or more years, you are in for a treat. Stephen Fearing is an emerald! Find him on line and listen to some of his performances or find him on NPR or other sites. You may end up spending $$$. Best wishes to all for the New Year.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 15:07:49 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Happy new year everyone

Link is to one of my favourite artists, Sam Bush, with John Cowan, doing a cracker version of littl feats sailing shoes.

Saw Jeff healey live Gee he was a good player and performer. Too soon...


Entered at Mon Dec 31 14:09:12 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Jeff Healy/the essence of a music artist

Jeff Healy was always a favourite. I saw /heard him a number of times. I love "Live At Grossman's". We saw him a few years before his death in Victoria at the local small theatre with his jazz band and then met him afterwards. He always had time for everyone and his love of music came out of his pores whenever he played anything. He is missed by all of loved him.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 12:03:18 CET 2012 from (86.171.130.66)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Levon and Amy

Just by chance I watched a programme on BBC Alba, the Gaelic station, last night about Celtic Connections being taken to Chicago. The musicians played at the Ryder Cup, played small and large concerts in Chicago and held workshops at the Folk Music school.

What was interesting was the director of Celtic Connections was filmed speaking to Ron Kaplin (?) (who had a wonderful collection of musical photographs) and what had been planned was to bring Levon to Celtic Connections last year, then we saw them talking about bringing Amy to Celtic Connections this year.

She'll play two concerts one with her band then one in collaboration with other musicians in the form of a ramble.

A theme of Celtic Connections is collaboration where musicians play together setting up unique situations.

My link is Eric Bibb, Jerry Douglas and Ally Bain playing on the Transatlantic sessions. Great stuff.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 10:16:19 CET 2012 from (92.18.191.156)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Little Feat

Look up Electrif lycanthrope.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 07:07:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Little Feat

The fact that they used Little Feat's (Rad Gumbo) in the sound track for "Road House" was Fitting.

Also Jeff Healey's cover of "When the Night Comes Fallin'" was great. I have a DVD of that movie, and Rowdy Harrington's narration and explanations of the movie and sound track are interesting.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 06:16:50 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

If you think the overdub questions here were interesting, take a few moments to check out the debates on the inet over Waiting For Columbus.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 05:46:45 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: Had brunch, including lattes, with the author's editor today. Turns out that the author will be in Japan for six weeks starting early Feb. Mostly in the north. Maybe the Easter Bunny could be convinced to procure a signed copy for you?


Entered at Mon Dec 31 05:19:09 CET 2012 from (172.5.72.18)

Posted by:

WW

Location: Currently OK

Subject: Skyline Lounge

Happy Holidays! Anyone know of the where-abouts of "The Skyline Lounge" in Ft. Worth that Robbie talks about after playing "Creek" on "Waltz?" I lived in the FtW area for 30 years until last year and have a few ideas of where this place may have been when the boys played there according to the story, but nothing concrete. Although it was condemned and demolished in '69, could Robbie have been referring to the "Skyliner Ballroom?" Otherwise, nothing under "Skyline Lounge" pulls up on the search engines I've checked.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 04:46:25 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Little Feat

Archive.org has a lot of Little Feat shows. The ones from the Lowell George era are my favourites.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 04:04:35 CET 2012 from (75.73.168.174)

Posted by:

Zzzz

Web: My link

A good documentary if you like The Replacements or Paul Westerberg.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 03:14:22 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT Little Feat

Sometimes I think that Jerry and I are brothers; from other Mothers. Waiting for Columbus is my absolute favourite Little Feat Album. Join The Band into Fatman In The Bathtub is just plain awesome! When Richie Hayward's drums come in I get a real rush. Real rush? How 60's of me.


Entered at Mon Dec 31 00:41:39 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Nothing sounds like Little Feat

Strange to see Little Feat in that grouping but what luck for those who get to see them. They have been consistent from the get-go and I have always been a big fan. For Anyone who is a novice, 'Waiting For Columbus" (live Little Feat) is a great way to understand this band at its prime. I have heard live shows of more recent incarnations...they still sound great.


Entered at Sun Dec 30 22:21:26 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Bill M: Sadly, no I don't have that book. I guess I'll have to be a good little boy during 2013 in order to make Santa's Nice List and get it. : )


Entered at Sun Dec 30 19:51:58 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Not Fade Away

I guess this movie has just been released in December. Does anyone have an opinion of this yet?


Entered at Sun Dec 30 17:42:34 CET 2012 from (92.18.164.185)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Scroll about halfway down the above link.


Entered at Sun Dec 30 17:33:22 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Solomon

Solomon, I went to the Celtic site and although Amy is appearing there, I couldn't find anything; about a tribute. They have over 200 performers appearing. Where did you see this info? Just interested.


Entered at Sun Dec 30 14:30:09 CET 2012 from (92.18.164.185)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Tribute to Levon @ Celtic Connections 2013

Amy Helm will be leading a tribute to her late father Levon Helm, who passed away earlier this year. Levon achieved fame as the drummer and frequent lead and backing vocalist for The Band. Among the artists appearing at Celtic Connections 2013 are The Mavericks, Darrell Scott, Transatlantic Sessions with Mary Chapin Carpenter, Steve Cropper & The Animals, Old Crow Medicine Show, Salif Keita, Kate Rusby, Little Feat,Carlos Núñez & the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Amy Helm, Dougie MacLean, Roddy Hart and the Lonesome Fire, Fiddlers Bid, Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares, Aimee Mann, Caravan Palace and Bellowhead. Great line-up as ever.


Entered at Sun Dec 30 13:28:14 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Toronto

Bill M: I haven't been to a record show in a long time. I had gone to the Thornhill Community Centre, to Kipling, to Dixie and I even remember others (i.e.. Keele St).

Is Michael Rosen playing solo in Toronto or is he a sideman for a local band? Where can one hear him?


Entered at Sun Dec 30 02:41:34 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno
Web: My link

Subject: XTC, Eclection, etc.

Fred: do you have this JapCan book on XTC?

Nice to see that some of our old friends are still lurking, and took the trouble to check in at year's end.

JT: Michael Rosen's still around. Of course he now has a straight job - but still plays on the side. As for Don, yes, that's the guy. While record shows come and go, there are only two with legs. The downtown one (well, Riverdale) is co-run by Don's son. The other one, twice a year on Dixie in Mississauga for 10 years, Queensway and Kipling for years before that, and in Thornhill before that, was started by Don himself ca 76, and passed along to someone else in the '80s. You can always find me, Don and John D's friend at that one. One of the earliest Thornhill shows is where I got my copy of the Paul London and the Capers 45 (with Garth) on Fascination.


Entered at Sun Dec 30 01:15:44 CET 2012 from (24.105.216.125)

Posted by:

Lil

Molly??? Wow! Merry Christmas/Happy New Year! It's been a long time! Hope all is well with you.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 20:43:39 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Molly

Thanks for sharing your video. It is so sweet. Lucky your Dad recorded it, Are you still in the "Music Biz"?


Entered at Sat Dec 29 18:45:27 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Eclection

I listened to Eclection this AM. I don't know where Michael Rosen is now. He is supposed to be in the Toronto area. The female vocalist sure sounds like Grace Slick to me. Pretty good overall! Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't know about this one at all.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 17:46:39 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C.(Friend0

Heard a acoustic banjo etc ionflected version of Only You Know And I Know by John McEuen and his boys. On the radio here. Album out in 2012, For All The Good, The McEuen Sessions.

And similar treatment of Tequila, done by Chris DiLillo. Not sure oof pronunciation or spelling of his name.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 17:44:18 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Don's Discs

Don is still around doing record shows here in town. Randy Sharrard previously of Sony music is there as well. They sell their product there and for an extra fee, you can get in early and have first dibs.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 12:27:05 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Record Stores in Toronto

I don't remember Don's Discs in Toronto, Bill M, but I did know a Don Keele who I often met at 'record shows' in Toronto in the 80's and 90's. Is that the same 'Don'? I got many of my Dylan singles from Europe from him and others at those shows. Thanks for correcting my title names for Levon and the Hawks singles. I thought it might be 'I throw' and Liza in retrospect.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 12:12:57 CET 2012 from (95.195.15.73)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Northwestern coast

Subject: John Wesley Harding

Thanks DAVID P for reminding. I learned (?) my English by trying to translate "The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest" to my own language in 1968. I love archaic Biblical language.

Thanks ROCKIN' CHAIR for your reminiscenses. Although we are in different continent we are on the same coast. (Oh boy, this was a deep thought.)

God rest ye merry, gentlemen ;-)


Entered at Sat Dec 29 11:46:51 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Bof F - Len's lifelines

Bob - Santa brought me a copy and I'm reading it now. With such books I tend to jump around (I read the bits about the revival of his fortunes and the conception of his never ending tour first). I've got two or three books about LC but this is the most readable, and the most comprehensive. I read The Favorite Game over 40 years ago and appreciated that it was autobiographical at the time. It's interesting to relate characters from the biography to my memories of characters in the book. I'll go back and reread it.

Leonard returns to these shores next summer. I've got tickets for Mark Knopfler, Bruce Springsteen (thanks Al), Neil Young (thanks Santa) and hopefully LC all within the space of a few weeks. A few days for the first of those three.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 10:02:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Eclection

I've been playing "Nevertheless" for a couple of days now. The Bunch is a must-have album … especially the CD with bonus tracks.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 06:17:59 CET 2012 from (75.64.89.111)

Posted by:

Molly Z

Location: Previously Ca, now Memphis, TN
Web: My link

Subject: Happy New Year Band-Land

Heyaz everyone in Band-Land! I miss you all! I hope you all have had a great year, and looking forward to a better new year for 2013. Love y'all, and looking forward to something positive, and keeping The Band in our hearts.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 04:14:16 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

JT (and John D): I got my first copy of "The Stones I Throw" ca '75 at Don's Discs at Queen and Parliament. An extremely important place in the making of me. Went the first time the day after Labour Day 1974, a couple days after John D directed me there. We didn't know each other then, but I called CHUM-FM During his show (you could do that then) and asked where I'd find old Toronto stuff. He told me, I went - at least twice a week for the next four years. But like you I got my copy of "Go Go Liza Jane" at Kop's - but in the late '70s at the original store at Queen and Carlaw. A teenage Colin Linden lived around the corner and was there a lot. He'd just been introduced to Robbie's old Toronto style, and to Fred Keeler and Bobby Starr, and had set his sights on mastering that style. But he was already moving in elevated circles, partly due to the patronage of local wiz David Wilcox, which had already led to an association with Amos Garrett.

Then Kop's moved Queen West, and Kop sold the store to two big Band fans, including Rob Bowman. I believe they got out of it some years ago; last time I was in, this past summer, Kop himself was back, quite reinvigorated with the interest younger people were showing in roots music. My last great find there, maybe six years ago after 25 years of searching, was the Dianne Brooks 45 with Robbie Robertson on guitar.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 02:48:16 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F,

Subject: Leonard Cohen Biography

Has anybody else read this great biography on Leonard Cohen called 'I'm Your Man The Life of Leonard Cohen' by Sylvie Simmons. Cohen participated in the process so the author had access to everyone in the Cohen camp including his relatives, childhood friends, Marianne, both Suzanne's and all of the great musicians who've played with him. It's a beautifully written biography. Leonard comes off as a sometimes depressed person but he really has lived a remarkable life.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 01:16:25 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Dlew: Wasn't Rabbit in the final days of Free as well?

John D: Interesting that you posted about Fotheringay today, as it would have built nicely on the post I wrote yesterday but lost in the ether. My intent was to note that I took to heart Peter V's prompting and went back yesterday to pick up the Eclection LP (down to 20 bucks thanks to the Boxing Day sale). I made the point that three of five Eclection members (Trevor Lucas, Gerry Conway and Michael Rosen) turned up on the Sandy Denny and the Bunch album. Lucas and Conway of course went on Fotheringay (whose version of Lightfoot's ""The Way I Feel" was standout), and Rosen eventually returned to Toronto. You may even have seen him playing trumptrumpet once a week with Prakash and the Lincolns at the Biermarket.


Entered at Sat Dec 29 00:47:54 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Rabbit Bundrick is an American, in fact from Texas.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 23:51:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rabbit Bundrick

He has had a few great moments, but probably the "greatest" was adding keyboards to The Wailers' existing tapes to create the "Catch-A-Fire" album, which gave it a British / American edge on top of the Jamaican feel and so broke Bob Marley to the world at large. He'd previously played with Johnny Nash, so knew the genre. Then add The Who and Free.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 23:01:18 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Rabbit bundrick

Later played for the who, after moon died. He's a bit of a powerhouse in English keyboardists.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 22:46:15 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: When I was born.....I was very young

Interesting conversation. There is a real cool FM station out of Parksville now. 99.9....The Lounge. they play a lot of really old stuff, and right up to date. The other day as we drove along....I forget what was playing, but Susan and I got to reminising. So I had to tell her my begining.

We lived on Read Island, my dad had a little logging show. My two older brothers were at school, (we went by boat). I was 5 and at home alone that year. My mom had been given a real cool windup gramaphone. I had a couple of 78's.

Mt favourites were "Cigareets & Whiskey & wild wild women." and "I won't go Huntin' with you Jake, But I'll go chasin' women." My mother used to just shake her head. So Susan looks at me quite soberly and says,"You haven't changed much.have you." I was cut to the quick. That was the beginning of my singing career.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 22:28:25 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Kops Kollectables

There is a store in Toronto on Queen St. called Kops Kollectables. It sells almost exclusively 45s. I haven't been in there for a while. I bought "The Stones That You Throw" and "Go, Go Lisa Jane" there. It is a terrific store.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 22:18:54 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Discovering all the time

So recently I discovered a Bob Dylan "cover" by Fotheringay. The group that was born out of Fairport Convention. The track is "I Don't Believe You." What blew me was the organ playing. You would swear it was Garth; by the "feel" of it. It turns out is is John "Rabbit" Bundrick. I have never heard of him; but I'll bet Peter has. Check it out. It is on the album Fotheringay - 2 finally released in 2008. Trevor Lucas sounds a little like Lightfoot on the track.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 21:43:19 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Good Prices David

When I was a boy, 45's were 66 cents each. Then the price went up to 99 cents each. JT talked about prices of albums at the time. Most sold for $3.98 and others for $4.98. A fortune for me in those days. I would go to Wilson & Lee in Oshawa a buy a new 45 almost every week. I only remember my first two purchases.

She Say by the Diamonds

Personality by Lloyd Price. After that it was all a blur.

The most exciting time was when I walked into the store and looked over at the album rack; where all the pop albums were being sold. It was a sea of black and white. BEATLEMANIA HAD ARRIVED and my musical life would change forever!


Entered at Fri Dec 28 20:44:43 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Soulful Dress

Catherine Russell sang it on tour with Levon's band a few years back. Great song that I was not familiar with before.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 20:41:23 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: 2012

A musical tribute to the musicians lost in 2012. Levon is in there. A lot of losses


Entered at Fri Dec 28 20:23:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David, I got the impression that US prices for 45s are way below UK ones. 96 Tears rates at £35 mint ($56) in the UK Guide. I've never seen a copy under £15. Fortunately, I always had one.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 20:16:50 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 45 Singles

I still enjoy buying classic 45 singles at used record stores, which can often be found a bargain prices. Among my recent purchases, totalling $3.00:

96 Tears -- ? and the Mysterians (Cameo Parkway)
Poor Side of Town
Summer Rain -- both by Johnny Rivers (Imperial)


Entered at Fri Dec 28 18:46:30 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Back Then.......and even now

I still have a collection of 45's. About 1986 when I lived in Langley, I played a lot for a guy who owned the Langley Hotel, & Gabby's Cabaret. He bought a club in Couquital that had been a rock room called "Insomnia".

He reno-ed it and named it Boone County. We opened it for him with my band, (I talked before about meeting Ian Tyson there when he came to do a one nighter). There was this old DJ booth up in a corner where you had to climb a ladder to get into it. Well Ron, the guy who bought the place and I got up there just while he was doing his reno.

There was a pile of 45's a lot of real good old stuff. He says to me, take all you want. So I still have a great collection, and my old Gerrard turntable and analogue system are still a lot of fun. Stuff like Soul Deep, by the Boxtops.

Now I gotta say here, just when I went on line here, there is a blurb about Jimmy Buffet. You gotta like his style. He hasn't had a hit record since 1979. He only tours 40 days a year, but....he is worth hundreds of millions. I remember watching him one time. He says, I ain't a very good guitar player, and I'm not much of a singer, but I'm really good at being Jimmy Buffet. Now as in that link I showed a while back of him and his gang at Wrigley Field when he was singing, Brown Eyed Girl, you see the kind of turnout he gets.

By the way, where in hell is that Brown eyed girl here........Get back here!


Entered at Fri Dec 28 18:25:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: My Boyfriend's Back

Another link to The Wanderers … this time the dance scene. 1963 nostalgia here we go …


Entered at Fri Dec 28 18:19:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Soulful Dress was, with Rescue Me, a Mod classic in Britain.

JT … If You Want To Be Happy by Jimmy Soul is an all-time great, as is Bristol Stomp, as is Sherry. I love that stuff. I bought If You Wanna Be Happy new and still have that Stateside single.

The link is to the opening sequence of 'The Wanderers' featuring "Walk Like A Man". One of the Baldies was Nick Giangiulio who later featured in one of my videos, and he told me a lot about making the film.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 17:40:48 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C.(Friend0

Pete, as of a couple years ago, Sugar Pie DeSanto was still performing occassionally and i think put out a record too. Bay Area, San Fransisco.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 17:25:28 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Carol- Chuck Berry

There was a record store on Eglinton near Oakwood, about a mile away from where I lived as a kid in Toronto. When I was about 12 or maybe 13, I bought my first record. It was Chuck Berry, Carol, a 78 with a purple label, I believe. ('I'm gonna learn to dance if it takes me all night and day") It was less than a dollar Canadian. I did not buy any more 78s. The 45 was the 'new thing' and for the next 3 years or more, it was "If You Wanna Be Happy", "Bristol Stomp", "Ruby" and many others.(unfortunately, like my sports card collections of the 50s and 60s, these are long gone). LPs were too expensive to buy for a 13 year old with no money. That didn't start until 'Sherry" by 4 seasons. Since then.....and the hits just keep on comin'.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 16:06:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Chess soul

Ah, I forgot the name that stands up there on the Chess Soul compilations with Fontella Bass, Little Milton and Billy Stewart. Link to Soulful Dress by Sugar Pie DeSanto.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 15:31:10 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Ray Collins

For those unfamiliar with Ray Collins' work with Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention here's a link to an example of his fine singing.

Peter V: As for a Band connection, there were two Chess recording artists that added a Louisiana flavor to the musical gumbo -- Bobby Charles and Clarence "Frogman" Henry.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 09:26:44 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting. I was stumbling around this when I said Fontella Bass would have been better off on Atlantic or Motown. Chess had some decent soul like Bass, Little Milton and Billy Stewart, but on the whole they were "R&B" rather than "soul" and maybe that shows the line. Chuck Berry is definitely R&B in my mind, probably because Chess were on Pye International labels in the UK, and Chuck, Bo and The Wolf had a great big "R&B" stamp on the centre label. When Chess got their own label in the UK in 1965, Fontella Bass was way their biggest hit.

Worried Life Blues by Chuck Berry is a favourite track, as is Wee Wee Hours, but in fact his blues tracks are "smooth" compared to most.

In the UK the R&B boom in bands mutated into the soul boom around 1965, and I look back and think that soul was a whole lot harder to play - more varied too. I see quite a strong line, with few artists crossing it successfully … Etta James is one who did.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 06:40:55 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C.(Friend0

Fuck Me, I need an editor. I left out Chuck Berry. Still kicking. While we tend to count Chuck as Rock and Roll, he did/does play some great straight bluz with the big lip and you'd count him in R&B too, and since JJ & he incorporated a gazillion things when they created R&R , it just plain wouldn't be right to not count him in those other musical worlds either. Chuck is the last one standing in St.Louis. .....sheesh- wrong again. Editor job doesn't pay, but it would be life enriching.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 06:01:42 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Ray Collins, guitarist dead

Link to the death of Ray Collins guitarist for Mothers of Invention with Frank Zappa..

For someone who very seldom posts, I'm surely going to extremes today. And all sad news.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 28 05:04:42 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C.(Friend0

Thinking about it, Fontella is the last one from the R&B, Soul, or Blues world in St Louis that really made a mark outside.

There's a woman here named Jeannie Trevor, who had a decent degree of success, in jazz , and then there is Denise LaSalle,m who has had some good degreee of success on the Southern Soul, type circuit. But, success on a large, worldwide scale, Looks like Fontella was the last one standing.

Young kid on the way up here, may make a nmark.Marquise Knox. Just past 20 or 21, First time i saw Marquise play he was 15 years old. And he thought he was something. Some of the older women folk here straightened his ass out, and he was smart enough to listen to them. Henry Townsend too, Henry took to him, kinda took him under his wing till he passed away. The kid is a now a well mannered, personable, and smart young man, matured into a fine player, singer and getting better and better.....Marquise says he got the blues from his grandma.


Entered at Fri Dec 28 03:39:56 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, dead at 78

CNN Breaking News

Friday, December 28, 2012

Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, who commanded coalition forces during the Gulf War, has died, a U.S. official said. He was 78.

After Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, Schwarzkopf directed 700,000 coalition troops that engaged in a six-week air assault of Iraqi forces in January 1991. That was followed by a swift ground campaign that pushed the Iraqis out of Kuwait.

Schwarzkopf went to the U.S. Military Academy and graduated in 1956, according to Britannica Online.

He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army. The officer served two tours of duty in Vietnam.

In 1988, Schwarzkopf was appointed commander of U.S. Central Command.

++++++++++++++++++

Craig Ferguson [repeat] has Lynyrd Skynyrd tonight CBS at 12:35

Jimmy fallon has Dave Mathews [Repeat]

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 28 01:13:52 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Fontella Bas
Web: My link

Subject: Fontella Bass

What a cutie she was. RIP dear Fontella.Sing with the angels as you are one now..

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 28 01:04:43 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Fontella Bass dies at 72...

Follow-up to BILLY C's post.."Rescue Me" was a great song..

"Rescue Me" singer Fontella Bass dies aged 72 (Reuters) - American soul singer Fontella Bass, who topped the R&B chart in 1965 with the song "Rescue Me," died in St. Louis. She was 72.

Bass died in hospice care on Wednesday night from complications of a heart attack she suffered three weeks ago, her daughter, Neuka Mitchell, told Reuters. Bass had also suffered from strokes in recent years.

"She's going to be missed," Mitchell said. "Her big personality. Her love for family. Her big, giving heart and her cooking." She was known as the "queen of soul food" to her family, Mitchell said.

Bass was born into a singing family in St. Louis. Her mother, Martha Bass, was a singer in the Clara Ward Singers gospel group. Her brother, the late R&B singer David Peaston, scored a handful of hits in the 1980s and 1990s.

Bass first achieved success dueting with Bobby McClure in 1965 on songs such as "Don't Mess Up A Good Thing" and "You'll Miss Me (When I'm Gone)," both of which were hits on the pop and R&B charts.

Bass' biggest hit came with "Rescue Me," which shot up the Billboard pop charts in the fall of 1965, becoming one of the most popular soul hits of all time.

"It held a special place in her heart," Mitchell said of the song. "She sang it every time she performed." The song has been covered and sampled numerous times over the years, including by pop stars Linda Ronstadt and Cher, and more recently in 2000 by UK group Nu Generation, who remixed the song into a dance track.

Nu Generation's remix, "In Your Arms (Rescue Me)" hit the top 10 of the UK singles chart. Bass had moderate success in later years with a gospel album in the 1990s, but was unable to emulate the popularity set by "Rescue Me."

She was married to jazz trumpeter and composer Lester Bowie. The two spent time living in Europe in the late 1960s and early 1970s before moving back to the United States.

Funeral arrangements for Bass have not been finalized. The singer is survived by her four children.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 28 00:41:08 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C. (Friend0

I almost forgot- Fontella Bass was married to Lester Bowie, the jazz trumpeter, who though he wasn't native to St. Louis, grew up here.. He died in 1999.



Entered at Thu Dec 27 23:46:02 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rescue Me

Rescue Me is one of the best dance floor fillers ever written, and one of my favorite all-time songs. Fontella Bass was a fantastic singer … if she'd been signed to Atlantic or Motown instead of Chess (sorry, but Chess screwed up in its later years with multiple owners) she would have been an even bigger star. RIP.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 22:30:05 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C. (Friend0

Fontella Bass has passed away. A St Louis native, who began performing gospel, her commercial career took off at a young age , under the tutelage and guidance of Oliver Sain. Oliver i believe cowrote Rescue Me with her, and wrote Don't Mess up A Good thing, which scored as a duet by her and Bobby McCLure, another native St Louisan. ( McClure was amazing, died very young ).

I saw Bass perform a couple times here.On bills with Oliver and Johnnie. I'm pretty sure she performed a gospel # at JJ's funeral also.. I remember the Bosman Twins and Kelly Hunt performing vividly, pretty sure Fontella did too.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 22:14:58 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All Along the Watchtower

Dylan's "John Wesley Harding" album was released 45 years ago today.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 21:35:46 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: ARA

And the Amazing Rythm Aces.....the best of them all.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 20:41:28 CET 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

This is the first "snow day" I think I've taken since the 11th grade, way back in 1973.Going through my homemade tape collection from which, I'm collating what songs I will purchase with the load of Itunes certs I received for the holidays. Also looking at the mayhem on my street as people, contractors, private and civic digging out, only to have the others push the snow back where they just ploughed. It also helps to have a high up member of the city council living on our street, ensuring prompt removal. Would still prefer summer at this point.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 20:36:52 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Hendrix

JT: Vanilla Fudge, Amboy Dukes and Soft Machine opened for the Jimi Hendrix Experience (see link) here in Atlanta. After the show, my buddies & me were out by the back entrance to the auditorium when Jimi & his entourage came out & jumped in a limousine right next to us. I can still recall the hilarious image of one of my friends banging on the limo trunk as it sped off, yelling "JIM-MIE, JIM-MIE!" :-)


Entered at Thu Dec 27 20:27:18 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Good Morning Vietman!

That was just for you JQ. Now listen here youze guys, that's all good and fine, but back then.....see we weren't a bunch a stuffed shirt college boys out here. Mostly a bunch a high school drop outs like me......I got kicked out by my old man to work when I was 15.

We were into CCR....and mostly the West Coast music, except for the BAND. But y'all listen to Mick Taylor on this link, and what he's doing to Blind Willie McTell. I listened to him and Mark Knofpheler way more than Clapton back in those days. Lovin Spoonful, the Dead, stuff like that. Like Chris Hillman once said, "If the Dead started out now, they'd be a country band." Same with NGDB.

NOW LISTEN TO THIS!..oh......my heart


Entered at Thu Dec 27 19:49:08 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: James Marshall Hendrix

I saw The Jimi Hendrix Experience in NYC on a rotating stage in the summer of 1967. The first album was out and Axis was on the verge or had just been released. The concert was less than an hour in length (maybe 45 minutes) and there were no other acts if I recall properly. They were superb. Though I appreciated Hendrix efforts after 'the undressed girls' album, (it was superb!) it was never the same for me compared to the triumvirate.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 19:46:02 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Led Zep 1

I was stationed outside of Danang in 69/70 and we had a very limited library of music to play - the GI radio only played the pop hits. When Led Zep 1 arrived I thought it was great and, as a big Cream fan, I thought LZ was different & interesting in that power-blues way. But the biggest bonus was that LZ1 replaced In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida as the most played record!


Entered at Thu Dec 27 19:30:50 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Heavy Metal Thunder

I saw the Jimi Hendrix Experience at the Atlanta Municpal Auditorium in August 1968 and Cream (second show) at Chastain amphitheater in Atlanta the following October (see link). Led Zeppelin was among the performers I caught at the first Atlanta Pop Festival on the July 4th weekend 1969 at the Nascar speedway at Hampton, Ga. For me, all three were memorable performances.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 19:09:43 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I saw The Who in a small club just after "I Can't Explain" and they were incredible. Total flat out full on power. Then I saw them just before Tommy came out and they were between mediocre and poor. I haven't seen a later version, but both Live At Leeds and the recent Live At Hull show them as an first rate live band. The "just-before" Tommy show was at a point when it looked as if they'd peaked and were on their way down. It was a surprise when they turned things around.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 18:47:20 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Blind Faith

Peter: I never witnessed Cream, though I bought each LP sequentially as it came out. I saw Blind Faith the summer of 69 (I think) at Varsity Stadium during the 'Clapton is God' period. That was a superb show and all the players were on top of their game. Led Zep was often 'over the top' and that is what made an impression on a 20 or 21 year old. I still hear it when I see it. I didn't think the Who was that good in the early years and felt they grew over time. They had a couple of good singles (Can't Explain, I Can See For Miles, etc) but I wasn't bowled over just as you weren't by Zep.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 18:41:11 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: One Thing Leads to Another

As The Fix so eloquently put it.... Recalling the first years of LedZep reminded me that aside from Donabie, Karsh, Griffin, and others, UofT Radio was a wonderful station in the late 60s and early 70s. They had cutting edge material of all types and they played it without bias. And I bought "Music From Big Pink" not at Sam's or A&A (where I got most of my LPs), but at the UofT textbook store. They had a small collection of LPs in those days and this one was among them. It was the first time I had seen it (didn't know about it till I saw it) and I bought it that day on first sighting. I had not yet heard the Basement Tape material from the Great White Wonder (that came later in the year).


Entered at Thu Dec 27 18:35:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: LedZep

LedZep remains one of my great "fail to gets". At the time, they didn't seem any more proficient than The Who (with the same line up), but certainly on the first album, a lot less original. I couldn't see what they had that Cream didn't, nor did I think them as "good" at churning out riffs as Spooky Tooth. Funnily enough, I think it's a major age thing. None of my close contemporaries in the UK were bowled over by Led Zep, but I know loads of people 5 to 10 years younger who were.

Mind you, go back a couple of years, and both Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones were all over a number of fantastic releases, on the Immediate label among others. I've got to quite like Robert Plant solo, and I have sat down and tried a number of times, but they just don't reach me. BUT I have a stubborn streak and thought The Lemon Song (and others) were such dreadful ripoffs AND wrongly attributed to boot, that I guess I was against them from the outset.

I was studying bootleg CDs at a couple of Record Fairs a few years ago, intending an article, and I would guess they come third in quantity. Dylan is the bootleg king, but there are piles of Beatles, even though they only really have a handful of unreleased rarities - and the anthology series cleaned up most of them.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 18:13:16 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: LedZep

I want to talk about my introduction to Led Zeppelin. I had just finished grade 13 ( we had 13 years of schooling in Ontario in those years). Had written my final exams and was ready to go to university. I heard this band on the radio and it was like nothing I had ever heard. Yes, by then I had heard some blues via Stones and others. But there was nothing like LZ. I remember saying to anyone who would listen at the time that this was the greatest barrage of sound that I had ever encountered. The first 2 albums were just outstanding and I continue to listen to them to this day. And then came the other side of LZ and it was equally magnificent from STH to Kashmir and on and on. Having talked about the evolution of musicians and how they are different over time and how we should give them some slack (like Dylan for example whose greatest time was in 1965-66 and had another peak in the mid 70s and then other smaller peaks), in this case I have consciously decided to avoid the current material and stick to what I love. This is not my usual approach to musicians, but here I make an exception. Why? Not sure. Its some kind of emotional commitment to the way I felt way back then.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 16:27:55 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Just so dang happy he got re-elected!

Watching the Prez and First Lady groovin' to the music last night- it was easy to see and totally reassuring how much kop-on they have for American music.

I hope I'm not just piling on Romney or being elite, but could you imagine him or any of his crowd feeling it all like the Obamas?


Entered at Thu Dec 27 15:49:50 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bless Their Heart

Watched Led Zeppelin on Letterman last night. Jimmy Page agreed that he really liked Heart being a part of the tribute. They ALL loved the use of a choir; on Stairway To Heaven.

However I think in all of us; when we watch a show like that we wonder how we would have cast it. I think Tina Fey, Baldwin and Ray Ramono were just fine. However I would have loved to see Regis there. His humor is really appreciated by Letterman. Howard Stern as well. Regis is so close to Letterman and he would have been really funny like Fey.

In the Buddy Guy tribute I would have used Clapton. I would have taken Beck and moved him to the Led Zep tribute. We're all Program Directors; in our mind. I'm not a fan of Kid Rock; but I thought he was good. Lenny Kravitz is one of my fav's; but I thought misplaced; when it came to Led Zep. BB King also would have been great for Buddy Guy. That's just my 2 cents worth.

I did enjoy the show; but could have done without the strobe lighting.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 15:42:12 CET 2012 from (95.195.102.89)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Northwestern coast

Subject: Webmaster's julebanjo

Let me explain. - Webmaster plays a Norwegian preheated banjo. You tune it in the warmth of your kitchen and just keep on playing in the coldest Winter landscape thanks to "vaermeslinger". This seems to be an evolution model because it can keep warm even your toes! Very practical, indeed.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 15:11:07 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Bless Their Heart

Ann & Nancy Wilson of Heart, with John Bonham's son Jason on drums, along with a large cast of supporting musicians & singers, brought the Kennedy Center honors tribute to a climax. The looming fiscal cliff was transformed into The Stairway To Heaven that evening in D.C. as President Obama, his wife Michelle and the honored guests watched from on high.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 06:08:50 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C. (Friend0

Serenity- Walter Davis was one of the all time blues piano greats. And an infleuntial figure. At times, i 'll think of St Louis as a piano town.Then i realize it was a guitar town too. Kind of hard to forget Chuck Berry, Ike Turner, Benny Smith, Albert King, Big Bad Smitty, Tommy Bankhead. But piano, it goes back further. Henry Townsend, Petey Wheatsraw, Lonnie Johnson, all were equally dangerous on piano and guitar. Piano you had Roosevelt Sykes too, Johnnie Johnson, Clayton Love, Many others,i'd have to start thinking. Sunnyland Slim lived here on his way to Chicago. Lonnie Johnson's brother, James, was supposed to be an even better musician than he. I've been told this by some of the real old timers here, and many of the guys now in their mid 60s whom grew up here, and had been told this their whole life long. Go to the old bar's here, there's old photos of these guys framed and hanging, paintings too.

Frankie and Johnny, Duncan and Brady, Stagger Leee- Three songs that have been covered countless times, three songs that have huge musical importance , all those songs were written here, about true life events that happened here.

The musical history here is staggering.


Entered at Thu Dec 27 05:38:27 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Dave & Led..

Dave Letterman, [who was also honored at Kennedy's Honors] has Led Zepplin tonight on CBS,,,

CYA soon


Entered at Thu Dec 27 04:34:00 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Ronnie Wood, Kennedy Honors

Jack Black is inducting Led Zepplin now on Kennedy...

December 24, 2012 9:25 AM ETThe Rolling Stones' Ronnie Wood married fiancée Sally Humphries in London last Friday, The Sun reports. Last month, the Daily Mail reported the couple showed up at the British Fashion Awards sporting matching silver bands, sparking speculation if the two had secretly married after announcing their engagement in October. Rod Stewart served as Wood's best man, and Paul McCartney was among the estimated 50 or so attendees, though fellow Stones Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were not in attendance.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Dec 27 04:24:36 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Jimmy McCracklin dead at 91..

R&B singer and songwriter died on Thursday in San Pablo, California at the age of 91, the New York Times reports. McCracklin was best known for his 1958 dance hit, "The Walk," which he recorded for Checker Records with his band, the Blues Blasters. After McCracklin performed the song on Dick Clark's American Bandstand, it reached Number Seven on the Billboard pop charts and was later covered by the Beatles during their Let It Be sessions.

McCracklin was born on August 13th, 1921 in Helena, Arkansas, and he grew up in St. Louis, where he learned to play piano and sing from the blues musician Walter Davis. After three years in the Navy during World War II, McCracklin made his home in California, where he recorded his first single, "Miss Mattie Left Me," in Los Angeles in 1945. He soon made a move north to the Bay Area and came to be recognized as an innovator of the West Coast blues style, notable for its dominant piano work, guitar leads and horn arrangements.

McCracklin went on to release more than 20 albums, scoring hits with songs including "Just Got to Know," "Think," and "Shame, Shame, Shame." The song "Tramp," which he co-wrote with Lowell Fulson, became a hit when Otis Redding and Carla Thomas recorded it in 1967, and was eventually adapted by Salt-n-Pepa. In the 1960s, he founded the record label Art-Tone and later ran San Francisco's Contintental Club. He released his last album, Hey Baby, in 2010.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

LUVYA xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Dec 27 03:53:23 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Kennedy Honors..

Hope you guys watched this show just now? A wonderful tribute to Buddy Guy,etc. If it's repeated, [and it should be]. don't miss it. CBS is the channel.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Dec 26 23:07:41 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ladies in Black

That is interesting David. Is it in song or story?? I just got in from cutting a load of firewood. I better go and stack it before I get to lazy.


Entered at Wed Dec 26 22:37:14 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Ralph J. Gleason

From Mr. Gleason's 1969 Rolling Stone review of The Brown Album:

"That is how the music is made, out of the flesh and blood of human beings and part of their flesh and blood and its humanity sings to you, music that you feel you know. It has the sound of familiarity in every new line because it is ringing changes on the basic truths of life, you have been there before, and like the basic truths of life itself, it nourishes you. As the old pitchman used to say, 'it's good for what ails you and it gives you what you haven't got.'"

(Link to complete review above)


Entered at Wed Dec 26 19:56:58 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Lady in Black

Norm: There is the folktale of another Lady in Black, a haunting apparition of a widow akin to the one depicted in "Long Black Veil". The story involves a Confederate soldier from Georgia imprisoned at Fort Warren on George's Island in Boston harbor and the tragic attempt by his wife to free him. In this sad tale, however, it's the lady in question who goes to the scaffold to die after her husband is killed in an accident.


Entered at Wed Dec 26 19:20:25 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I wanna know.......in my heart

All morning that damn Uriah Heep song Lady in Black been stuck in head........I tried to think if it was in some movie I just watched or something.....I can't figure it out.


Entered at Wed Dec 26 17:24:39 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The phenom

This is Ralph J. Gleason on the first time he saw the phenom: (In 'The Children's Crusade').

The first time I saw Bob Dylan, a frail, insolent- looking, scraggy youth standing on a stage sing- ing folk songs, I thought he was a drag. Worse than that, pretentious and only a faint echo of Woody Guthrie. But listening to that same voice has changed my life, fundamentally. him, really. I only thought I did. Then, almost by accident, I was swept up in "The Times They Are A-Changin' " and "A Hard Rain's Gonna Fall" and some of his epic work. Then he came to Berkeley, California, and I heard him. Really heard him. And "hear" is the key word. When I met him I apologized for not digging him atfirst."Y'didn't hear me, that's all," he said softly and shook hands.


Entered at Wed Dec 26 15:08:07 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John D mentioned the late Ralph J. Gleason the other day. I would also point out that he co-founded Rolling Stone magazine with Jann Wenner, a very significant outlet for music criticism at the time.


Entered at Wed Dec 26 11:50:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Downton Abbey

If you watched the Downton Abbey Christmas Special, you might like my short piece "The Curse of The Crawleys: Downton Abbey - Series Ten" on my blog. It uses a crystal ball to jump forwards seven series and twenty years, to what happens in 1942. If you haven't seen the Christmas Special, but intend to, this one has plot spoilers!


Entered at Tue Dec 25 12:28:34 CET 2012 from (86.171.130.66)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Merry Xmas


Entered at Tue Dec 25 11:07:45 CET 2012 from (68.199.199.39)

Posted by:

John W.

Web: My link

Enjoy the link to the Band doing the Weight.


Entered at Tue Dec 25 08:24:44 CET 2012 from (68.199.199.39)

Posted by:

John W.

Had to stop in to wish MERRY CHRISTMAS to all the regulars here on Jan's "Band" website. I have not commented very much recently, but I'm always catching up on the comments here. I love reading all ya'lls comments. And Merry Christmas to some of my music heroes who I only got to know because of being a fan of The Band: Professor Louie and Miss Marie, Jim Weider, Randy Ciarlante, Amy Helm, and the families of dearly departed Stan Szeleste and Rick Danko. And Merry Christmas to Garth and Maude and also Don Fagan has "Band" connections despite being one of the all-time greatest rock and rollers with his own band "Steely Dan." Love you all, Merry Christmas.


Entered at Tue Dec 25 08:01:06 CET 2012 from (67.85.103.137)

Posted by:

Jersey Girl

Thanks for the shout-out, Norm. I'm never far away, just quiet. Warm wishes for happy holidays to all.


Entered at Tue Dec 25 05:46:58 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Ontario, Canada

Subject: HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL

Merry Christmas and a very Happy NEW YEAR to everyone.

Wishing you joy

Throughout the holiday season

May you have all the things

You desire for whatever reason

Don't let worries and troubles

Come to your door

May each and everyday

Be filled with happiness and more

May your Christmas be happy

And right from the start

May the New Year bring all

That is dear to your heart!

My Best Wishes for the Christmas Season!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Dec 25 03:32:22 CET 2012 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Merry Christmas. JT

Merry Christmas JT. It'll come around. Just a little weird with no Levon. AND MERRY CHRISTMAS TO EVERYONE!


Entered at Tue Dec 25 00:04:02 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: We salute you...

Over the years, there have been some excellent contributors to this site. While some have passed away, others have just disappeared (hopefully for only a period ... maybe to return). To those contributors.. come back and participate... we salute (I think I can speak for many of us) you.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 22:41:53 CET 2012 from (24.105.216.125)

Posted by:

Lil

Subject: Merry Christmas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt2BcETxmug


Entered at Mon Dec 24 22:30:01 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: 'Forever Young'

Happy holiday to you all. We watched 'The Last Waltz' last night. 'Forever Young' with the man and the boys was stirring. The final scene was poignant again. It reminded me of what people can do if they desire something special in their lives. These 5 had that yearning and they accomplished.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 22:10:47 CET 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Ditto!


Entered at Mon Dec 24 20:31:40 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.86)

Posted by:

Bill M

Merry Christmas all - and thanks for the the gift of the past year at the GB. Particularly our host and minder, Jan H.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 19:18:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacifc Northwest

Subject: Turn the stern and point to shore

To the lady from Kingston, hoping you and your family are well and comfortable. Yes Harry Belafonte has a very beautiful version of Scarlett Ribbons. Although not really a Christmas song, always some how reminds me of Christmas.

Fred & Joe checking in, but there's Bayou Sam, Bones, Roz, Jersey Girl,Dee from Wisconsin, Abby, Jojo and many, many more, some we've lost like Paul, Steve and Jeff, so to their families as well, and I guess some one some where knows what became of "Knockin Lost John". Merry Christmas to all.

And what call ye this boy child?.....Oy calls 'im Brian!


Entered at Mon Dec 24 18:17:57 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Happy Tuesday everyone!

Merry Christmas to one and all.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 17:38:11 CET 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

Joe J

Subject: Seasons greetings

The Dylan album is becoming a Christmas tradition in these parts as well. I also made a disc that alternates some of the Dylan tunes with some from Willie's 'Pretty Paper' and that goes over pretty well too. A couple friends asked for a copy but I suggested that if they would buy the Dylan album (proceeds to charity) I'd lend them the Willie one and they could make their own.

Everythings good; the family are gathering; stockings are hung. All the best to all you good GB people. As we tend to say around here, have a wicked effing Christmas.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 13:56:33 CET 2012 from (208.120.39.229)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Season's greetings to gb dylanologists

We had the Dylan Christmas album playing last night. Funny but it actually is becoming a family tradition this time of year.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 13:17:38 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Eaton's and Benjy

No Bill. I don't remember groups playing at Eaton's in the early 60s. I wasn't very worldly in those days. I lived in midtown and then north Toronto and we didn't get downtown that often. I'd go down to Bloor St. to the Concord on Saturdays and thats about it. And John D, you know how I felt about CHUM FM and Benjy. That was my introduction to great music in the mid 60s and I remained an adherent for many years. Your group of DJs was absolutely the best and the music played directed me to what I bought at Sam's and A&As.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 09:00:15 CET 2012 from (78.78.201.97)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scottish-style snow storm

Subject: Season's greetings to gb dylanologists

Merry Christmas Album and Happy New Morning!


Entered at Mon Dec 24 08:27:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Eclection

I like to think I only buy bargains and never pay book prices … but "Eclection" with original gatefold sleeve goes for £50 mint / near mint. I've been looking for a copy for years, and think I'd have stretched to £20 if it was excellent or above. They have one track on the Elektra box set ("Nevertheless") which I'd forgotten about. Will play it when I get back with the turkey in a couple of hours.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 05:08:12 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

New Fan: Welcome.

JT: Does the following ring a bell for you? I called an older singer friend who attended Central Tech in the mid '60s. He said that when the schools were closed down for a week for spring break, Eaton's would attract student shoppers by having groups play on the third floor of the main store on weekday afternoons. He said he saw Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks there one time, with Robbie Lane and Jay Smith as special guests. Remember, if you're still in town on Jan 13, Jay Smith will be playing that record store / coffeeshop in New Toronto I mentioned, 2:00-5:00 (as Eugene Smith). Of course, he lives in Duncan so you can catch him anytime in BC, I suppose.


Entered at Mon Dec 24 04:45:05 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Ontario

Subject: ROBBIE, etc...

ROBBIE was on CKCO/CTV tonight in "1st Story". It was an oldie, but good to see the aborginal arts & crafts, and of course ROBBIE. It can be seen on the net at: kitchener.ctv.ca and click on it. That's what was said.

NORM: I remember "Scarlet Ribbons" by the Browns. [Harry Belafonte has a nice version of it too.] I have it taped on a cassette when I was getting rid of my 33 LP's.Jim"Ed" Brown had a nice voice.Loved their "3 Bells" too...I remember seeing Cab Calloway in a white suit many moons ago. He sure did have a lot of energy.. Nice guy too.

NORBERT? where art thou? Have you forgotten your friends here? xoxo

Good posts and links from all of you..Thanx heaps..

JT: Very funny!!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXOXO


Entered at Mon Dec 24 04:09:32 CET 2012 from (172.5.72.18)

Posted by:

WW

Subject: New Fan

Add me to the millions of fans of The Band. Like many Band fans, it was "The Last Waltz" that introduced me to the true brilliance of this group. As a 30+ year drummer, I've always heard of the respect and adoration towards Levon and the rest of The Band, but thanks to recently viewing Waltz within the last few months (DVR'ed it via the Paladia channel in 11/2012), I now know why. Although I have much to look foward to in discovering their discography, other films, and biographies, I am saddened to hear of the members who've already passed. To the two original surviving members, thank you for providing your craft that will forever give your fans pure enjoyment...old fans and new like myself. Now, if you will excuse me, I have The Band's catalog to begin listening to!


Entered at Mon Dec 24 01:51:47 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.87)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: nice to know that Benjy's still with CHUM. I always liked him when he filled in for DJs off on holiday or sick, but I had no idea that he was such an anglophile. I guess I just assumed that FM listeners everywhere were hearing what I was hearing. Sister station CHOM in Montreal was, I believe, also playing lots of UK stuff. Anyway,how did you get him to let you play the band?

Thanks to Landmark for mentioning the Strawbs' lovely "Benediction", which has been running through my head all day.

Kevin J: I saw a copy of the "12 Songs" LP for sale today at Pandemonium in the Junction. In one of the new arrivals bins as you walk in. Second from the left.

Peter V: They also had a copy of the Eclection LP (speaking of Mogul Thrash). But I couldn't bring myself to spend $28. t


Entered at Sun Dec 23 23:21:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Major segment on the main BBC News tonight, Al. 250,000 copies. So 45,000 ahead of the X-Factor single.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 21:40:54 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norm

It's Joe strummer's old mate from the Clash Norm. Mick Jones. He's been involved in the justice fight this past year or so performing concerts with the likes of pete hooton of the Farm and Pete Wylie of Mighty wah.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 21:34:14 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pickers

Yeah Peter, but who is that on the guitar just before Paul??


Entered at Sun Dec 23 21:27:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: He Ain't Heavy …

Watch the video … I spent a day puzzling out who was who, and it lists it! Sir Paul on a gold Les Paul too.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 21:24:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Being Humbled

Thank you for your words Bob.......humbley, that is a burden I'll gladly bear here If I could inspire anyone to do better and look after themselves better I would feel a great accomplishment.

I hope the weather will let me get out to cut a little more wood this afternoon. Besides loving my fire in the fireplace and woodstove, I'm afraid if I ever stop, the arthritis will take over and I'll seize up:):):)

Al, happy to hear you are reaching your goal, and thank you for bringing this to our attention.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 21:02:42 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: He Ain't Heavy, he's my Brother


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:57:39 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: CHRISTMAS NUMBER ONE

We did it. A monumental effort and achievement right down the line

In bits listening to it here. So emotional for those of us who've lived this for 23 years to finally arrive at this moment in history where justice is not only done and seen to be done but is now celebrated in landmark style with a song as meaningful and emotional as it gets. So many haven't lived to see this day but they'll know. Somehow.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:48:03 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

I disagree Norm. Your the rock around here and inspiration for all of us to go out and get some work done. I always enjoy your posts.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:36:16 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: 60 Minutes

That's the one alright Bob. I'm getting pretty feeble I think.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:31:05 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Dylan

Since Love and Theft it has felt like a different style of writing. I give him all the more credit because obviously writing these songs must take a tremendous amount of work. I don't think they come easy anymore. If anything it just adds to how a great a songwriter he is. I think it was the 60 minutes interview with Ed Bradley that Norm was refering to.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:29:55 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've got a lovely bunch of coconuts

here they are standing in a row

big ones, small ones

some as big as your head …

give em a twist, flick of your wrist

That's what the showman said …

I didn't have to look that one up!


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:18:16 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Only in England you say???????

Well gawd damn! the song was writ the year I was born. Of course I heard it forever, but didn't realize.....written by Fred Heatherton, and published by Box & Cox....awwwwwwwwwwwhawhawhaw..that's funny. Sold millions in the states in 1949.

Some of those crazy foot ball teams over there still play the damn song.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 20:03:09 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Forevermore & Grandma

That is real good Peter. Two things I really like there is the stepup and the kind of banjo tuner style licks.

As I made brunch for Susan and I this morning, I was thinking of my old grandma. She was my best pal as a kid, bought me my first bike when I was seven. When I was eight, our mum was having our next brother. Every time that happened grandma showed up to take over and ride herd on us guys.

Well that time I was 8. I remember grandma dancing around the kitchen, lifting her skirt up and showing us her Knees! She was showing us how the dance hall girls in London did it as she sang in her great English accent, "I've got a lovely bunch of coconuts." Now I don't know where that song came from. Maybe some of you Brits know it from medievil times.

Now and then we were able to piss grandma off. Sneak in the kitchen and yell HEY!, just to see her jump and scream "OH MY GOD!" then it was "You little wretch" as she came after you with the wooden spoon....but she sure knew music and history of it.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 19:22:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On "Beautiful Afternoon" listen out for Gorrie's bass playing. Phew! I remember seeing them at The Marquee and thinking the same.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 18:38:20 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Beautiful Afternoon

I don't know exactly how well they did, but Forever More in 1970 were saying the only place they ever sold records was Canada … they went on to become the core of the Average White Band. As Dunc will attest, their two albums are among the "great unreleased CDs".

The link goes to their "Beautiful Afternoon" single … the album cover on YouTube is the Canadian cover, I think … I remember seeing it in 1970. The British one is different.

They were on RCA and those 1970 / 1971 RCA signings are ill-served on CD, the other hard to get one is Mogul Thrash, which was the other half of the Average white Band (and the Mogul Thrash horn section play on "Beautiful Afternoon". The Mogul Thrash LP did emerge on CD in Japan, but not UK / USA.

Anyway, do listen to Beautiful Afternoon, with the great Alan Gorrie singing. I reckon it had "1970 number one" hit all over it, but it never happened. One day a film producer is going to slip it into a movie set in the era …


Entered at Sun Dec 23 17:29:19 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Favourite Christmas songs

Kevin J, mentioned his favourite the other day. Mine is a toss up between Silver Bells, and does anyone remember "Scarlet Ribbons" by the Browns?


Entered at Sun Dec 23 17:26:38 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: For JT & Bill

Just to keep things local here for a moment. In Toronto, there was only one radio station to get your feel of Folk, Rock, Progressive Rock etc. The station was CHUM-FM. There was no Q-107, CFNY; or even Magic from Buffalo as yet. So how did Toronto become so obsessed with everything British; in the late 60's and 70's

The reason was that there was a young Jewish kid from Midland Ontario that became music director. Benjy Karch. Benjy followed everything from England. From Amazing Blondel, Barclay James Harvest, Pentangle, the Strawbs. I could go on and on and on. Too many categories of British music and he loved it all. He had a great deal of freedom to add music to the airwaves; with the blessing of Bob (Shlanger) Laine the program director.

Benjy's favourite? Genesis; with no one but Peter Gabriel fronting. When they came to town, Benjy was in a frenzy.

So for those who wonder why Supertramp and others say they "broke out" in North America; from Toronto, it was because of Benjy and CHUM-FM. I always tell him that and he modestly chuckles. Benjy is still with CHUM radio as a salesman. We remind each other of the day we both dreamed of making $10,000.00 a year and we would have then made it.

I'm reminded of the old saying. "Remember when we didn't make much money; but had a lot more fun."


Entered at Sun Dec 23 17:13:23 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dylan on Writing

I caught part of a Dylan interview the other day. I forget who it was interviewing him, and I'm not sure how current it is. On the question of his early stuff, can you do that now. He was quick to answer, NO....I don't even know where most of that came from, it was......magical, it just appeared.

No one can keep on forever, and aging dictates the mind will change. Yesterday on youtube, I watched Joni in 1970, with her guitar singing , "Both Sides Now." that was from her imagination. The next one I watched was 2000 Joni. A very mature, woman in a beautiful dress with an orchestra behind her. Entirely different take on the song...slower with more emotion in the voice. She realy has "looked at life from both sides now", She is not the same woman.

Dylan is not the same man. Don't expect him to do the same things. The cockyness is gone, the answers are not the same, to any question. Don't we all like what he has become too, as we all age?


Entered at Sun Dec 23 16:57:38 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I read the Michael Gray piece … he's forty years into Dylanology, so it's somewhat of a surprise (killing the goose that lays the golden eggs?) I've heard him speak and I'm sure it's a sincere, very carefully-considered opinion. Being Michael Gray, he homes in on the lyrics.

I thought the lyrics generally powerful, and there's a typical bit of humour in rhyming honey / money and harlot / scarlet BUT I had noticed a build up of lines about women running through the album … pimps and gamblers, then harlots, then flat-chested junkie whore, then bitch or hag, then greedy-lipped wench, and murderous queen and bloody wife. It doesn't mean the lyrics are weak though, and he's always had that aspect. I just thought after a thorough "sit down and listen" that he might not be doing as well romantically as he did in the past.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 16:50:12 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Musical Evolution

The other day, after mentioning that old song, St James Infirmary, it got my mind to wandering back. (Can't you just see Cab Calloway dancing across the stage singing that.) As I mentioned, Dylan used that music for "Blind Willie McTell."

Bands like Amazing Blondel,evoke, the court, with lutes, recrders, harps....Dylan is the court jester. Hell you could make a movie of this.

The Moody Blues, 1964, "Go Now", evolved into the Justin Hayward, "Nights in White Satin" again the court style band, nothing the same as before.

Those of us like many here, when you hear a song like St James Infirmary the first time, you go........what in hell is that all about. For me, it was Louie Armstrong. My source of information was my mum's mother. My grandma was born and raised in London. She was an encyclopedia of this stuff. Long ago here I mentioned her father Frank T Bullen, who wrote......I think 47 books. He was one of the journalists covering the sailing of the Titanic, (that thanks to Norberts info.) Merry christmas if you're around Norbert.

Much of this folk music was brought across the water, and evolved.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 16:07:20 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Believing Dylan

Who knows or will ever know what Dylan is thinking or intending.Can't be quite certain either what Dylan believes or intends for others to believe about his writings.Dylan's thought and creative processes are a moving target,intangible in so many ways,thereby leaving the listener with a multitude of opinions that may or may not be correct.Thus,the beliefs or lack of belief,by a particular critic are in all likelihood merely a set of imaginary images conjured up in his mind.Perhaps Dylan's publicly expressed thoughts about critics merit consideration here.If he's not conning or toying with us!


Entered at Sun Dec 23 16:02:39 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Thinking too much

Here's a good one...

"He was so narrow minded he could see through a keyhole with both eyes'


Entered at Sun Dec 23 15:45:01 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Folk

Actually, there's a lot of really good stuff around in a folkie vein … Bellowhead, Unthanks, The Staves, The Imagined Village, plus there was the Sandy Denny Tribute tour, and Steeleye Span keep doing the rounds. It seems one of the most productive areas at the moment.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 15:36:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bellowhead

Ah, if you're in the mood for English folkie stuff with violins and horns and harmonies … try Bellowhead. The link is to "Jordan" live from 2006. They were backing the Sandy Denny tribute this year, or rather some of them were. I'm seeing them in February and have been playing them a lot.

I think this links straight back to the 70s stuff (mainly on Island label).


Entered at Sun Dec 23 15:36:11 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Belief

Michael Gray has recently to some degree "trashed' Tempest. While I have no worry that anyone might not like an album, I was dismayed by one comment on his blog. He said 'I cannot find his agonised fulminations credible. I don't believe him'. My concern is that the critic implies that where he 'believed him' before, he no longer 'believes' him. If Dylan had put us all on before, with words that sound lovely together but have no relevance to him or to his life, then Dylan is consistent in Gray's view of not believing him. If that is the case, Michael has never said that before in any of his writings (his book or his encyclopedia) or his blogs If Dylan was sincere and reflected his emotions and concerns about life, love, death, and unfairness before, then this albums reflects that continued emotion and concern in lyrics. Michael cannot think that Dylan has just put together a bunch of words with nothing driving him. The motivation to put lyrics together in a musical form hasn't changed for Dylan in my view. I have no reason to think it has, whatever it is, and I have always enjoyed and been provoked by those lyrics set to music. If Michael has somehow come to the view that the motivation has changed, he has given us no insight into how he has come to that view. Innocence ls lost as we grow and see the rotten world around us. For me, Dylan remains a constant in his creativity and I do believe him when he writes.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 15:23:04 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Music Renaissance

OK John and Peter: Now you've done it. You two have got me thinking again about things past. I marvelled then and continue to marvel at the work of Jethro Tull,Procol Harum and ELP and Moody Blues and others, who revived a classical aspect to popular music with instrumentation that fused with the current and enriched us all. Of interest, most of that came from your side of the water, Peter. It was enriching and when I listen again as I often do, the effect is mesmerizing. Ridiculed by some as bombastic and over-the-top, I view harmonic, melodic, orchestrated music and the music of Amazing Blondel, Pentangle and a few others as the natural outcome of a maturing of the musical culture of the time. In short, I think it is a reflection similar to what Mozart did after his predecessors. Now that I am thinking about this, one might say there is nothing unique under the sun. Dylan followed Guthrie with his 'talking songs' but then he did something that I cannot find anywhere. He wrote LARS and DR. He put poetry into music in a way that others had only dreamed about.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 15:16:24 CET 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I remember seeing the name Amazing Blondel but never heard a song nor have I seen a picture of them. I seem to recall maybe hearing that Dave Stewart of the Eurhythmics was involved somehow or somewhere with them. Reading about them and it being Sunday, it reminds of the group Strawbs. Every Sunday, they would play the song "Benediction" from their "Brave New World" album, which I had at the time. Later on, they electrified their sound and had some minor success here.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 14:38:57 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Amazing Blondel

Thank you Peter & Bill. The reason I asked is that going through some old vinyl, I found Fantasia Lindum. I used to play this album on CHUM FM back in the early 70's. I can see the "Robin Hood" feel; if you will.

It was such a departure of what was going on at the time. Again, thanks and Happy Christmas; or Happy Holidays. Trying to be politically correct here.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 11:30:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Amazing Blondel

The odd answer is “I don’t know.” I know “Pavan” well, but that was on Island samplers so “a virtual single.” I looked on Wiki, and it says they were inspired by the pseudo-medieval incidental music on the 1950s Richard Green TV series “Robin Hood” (hence the name of Richard the Lionheart’s troubadour, Blondel). It also says that TV music was all done by Elton Hayes. I’ve found a couple of his EPs recently. Amazing Blondel were mentioned in the context of the Globe Theatre’s recent West End Shakespeare productions, where they have a large band playing only Elizabethan instruments, and that’s studiously “the real thing” rather than inspiration.

The reason I don’t know set me thinking back. I may have seen them in Norwich, and have a vague memory, but to misquote Paul Kantner, if you can remember gigs at East Anglia, you weren’t there. When they were taking off, in 1970, I was at about five shows a week in the second half of the year, many with two or three bands on the bill. On some Sundays, there were shows at the Roundhouse in London with maybe eight bands between 2 pm and 10 pm. They had multiple stages, so there was no gap between bands. As one finished, the audience wandered over to the next stage. So bands were setting up, and taking down, while other bands were playing “round the corner.”

What set me thinking, was how few bands bothered to watch others on the same bill on the college circuit, which was the typical three band venue. Often they’d take the chance to go and eat, or after their set, were surreptitiously packing up for a quick getaway at the end. If you were faced with a four hour drive starting at midnight, the thought of getting off at 11.15 rather than 12.15 was enticing. Also because agencies tended to book a list of bands, they often played with the same ones on the bill, and had seen them.

I think there is something else to it. When I was doing lots of educational conferences between 1978 and 2005, I would avoid watching another talk directly before mine, or directly after mine. Sometimes I did, because it was someone I really wanted to see, but usually I found I had no concentration before, and too much adrenalin after. I suspect it’s the same for a lot of bands. Often you’d look from the back or the top (if there was an upstairs) to gauge the sound balance, but you weren’t really listening. I have a strong nagging memory of a bill with Amazing Blondel, but I suspect I would have been having a curry or Chinese meal along the street during their act (all you could get in the English provinces in those days). I missed a lot!


Entered at Sun Dec 23 04:57:07 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: I absolutely adore Amazing Blondel's ""England" - their Big Brown. I even had a second copy of the LP so I'd be okay when the first wore out, but then they went and invented the CD.

Anyway, that and a latte - luxury!


Entered at Sun Dec 23 02:40:15 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JUSTICE FOR THE 96

By all accounts it does look like we might just have gone and done it!

Thanks to all.

And for those who have only just been made aware do please still purchase this most poignant song as every sale counts in driving home the powerful message of Hillsborough which is that by sticking together the little man can come through in the end when all seems lost.

After 23 years of unbearable torment from lies and misrepresentation I think it's safe to say the good folks who lost their loved ones in that awful disaster finally have smiles wider than the Mersey itself.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Dec 23 01:40:29 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The clip

Hey John, the clip I found is different. If you google He ain't heavy, justice collective, you get the new clip. at the end it shows a website to buy "physical copy". It seems that is just for the UK tho'. I'd tried the amazons too and found nothing.


Entered at Sun Dec 23 00:48:21 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

Peter, did you ever see Amazing Blondel back in the day?


Entered at Sun Dec 23 00:43:31 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Rockin Chair

Found the clip here; but haven't found a CD of any kind; on any of the Amazon family.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 23:12:01 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C.(Friend0

Subject: Lu Lu

Feb 16th, B.B.King's, NYC.

Lu Lu.Her band will include Vivino, Will Lee, and Paul Shaeffer.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 20:06:51 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Woodsmand

I'm goin' cuttin' firewood right now......if I see some big Scandinavian sittin' up in some tree......I'm gonna fall it!


Entered at Sat Dec 22 19:51:52 CET 2012 from (74.198.164.180)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

One of Robbie Robertson's finest songs which Rick Danko makes so perfect. My favorite Christmas song along with the absolutely perfect "Silent Night"


Entered at Sat Dec 22 19:05:18 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Christmas song

Wishing every one a Merry Christmas. May it be happy and safe.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 18:49:09 CET 2012 from (74.198.164.180)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Justice Collective

Meant to mention last night during my ramblings about iTunes, that a purchase of "He Ain't Heavy" on iTunes is clean and easy to find.........$1.29 well spent.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 17:47:07 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I Wish You a Merry Xmas

The Darlene Love 2012 version is better than the original, thanks! It always was the best track on the Phil Spector Christmas Album. Christmas singles revolve around the same twelve or fifteen in Britain, with at a guess, Slade's getting even more airplay than the other suspects. This year, the one I singled out to play a lot is Big Dee Irwin & Little Eva on "I Wish You A Merry Christmas". Not only is she good, but it's also funny. Linked.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 17:05:46 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: He ain't heavy ....the collective

John have you heard the clip on this yet?? I'm trying to find the CD on line, but I can't find it yet.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 16:49:27 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: More on He Ain't Heavy

Also never knew that Elton John played piano on the Hollies version. I'd heard the Father Flanigan story before; but this gives great detail about the phrase, He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother and it's origin.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 16:42:41 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge He Ain't Heavy

Thanks for the list Al. I never would have know there was a version; before The Hollies. Ho Ho Ho.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 16:40:20 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Darlene Love Last Night On Letterman

Now this is my annual Christmas Tradition!!!!


Entered at Sat Dec 22 16:11:27 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: He Ain't Heavy …

Sir Paul also plays the lead guitar solo.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 16:06:43 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Got it

Thanks for that Roger. I'm going to have to get the disc. It sounds great.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 15:56:03 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Brum UK

Subject: Liverpool number 1

Norm - the disc you spot as the UK Christmas Number 1 is the one Al has been urging us to buy. It must have just crossed the line as I bought my copy yesterday. Actually this city's all sold out. Have a great Christmas.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 15:51:36 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Music

Hey Peter I just watched a bit on our news about the next #1 out of England, a cover of the Hollies old "Ne Ain't Heavy". Vocales from amoung quite a cast, Paul mcCartny. They played a clip, and it sure sounds great.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 15:28:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Two questions there: 1) How many people had to shoot someone dead in their home? and 2) Was their life or property in danger? At 3 a.m. it might be a close decision, but do you remember that Japanese student who walked up someone's drive to ask for directions because he was lost? Shot dead. I think that was New Orleans.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 15:04:00 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Arm Yourselves

One further scarey part of this debackle. Apparently for the first time a spokesman for Wal Mart agreed to give a televised interview,which I watched. Although he pretended to be some what remorsful of this situation. He was calouse in being very clear. Wal Mart is the biggest seller of these guns, for one reason...Money.

They sold more in 2011 than ever before, increased the inventory in stores that always sold them, started selling them in more stores that never sold them before. However he was clear on one thing, "If a law is passed that these are illegal, then we wouldn't be selling them". Therefore the solution is simple. How can a country of so many intelligent people behave in such a reckless manner?

As one man on Piers Morgan pointed out, when the second amendment was drafted, they were using muskets with ball and powder which took much longer to reload, and they generally missed. How could they have forseen weapons of mass destruction.

One thing I haven't seen with all these statistics flying around. How many private citizens have had to use one of these guns to shoot some one dead in their own home to protect their lives and property??


Entered at Sat Dec 22 14:03:33 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gun Totin'

JT, you should have watched Piers Morgan last night. Many victims of previous violence, such as the Oregon mall had their say. However some of the gun crazies were there.

One guy who is without a doubt one of the stuipest men I've ever listened to would not admit these semi auotmatics have to go. His idea, "If you were faced with more than one criminal a bolt action or lever action rifle takes to long to reload." That is the biggest pile of crap. There was no one there that agreed with him that that was a valid reason to keep assault rifles.

They are not a tool of protection. They are what they are ASSAULT rifles. A tool for mass destruction. If this guys thinking is shared by that many down there, that is why it is one scary place, and they talk about how dangerous Mexico is.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 12:17:54 CET 2012 from (76.69.138.69)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Voices of Reason

Voices of reason after the ridiculous and frightening NRA statement yesterday.

Outspoken gun-control advocate New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called the statement "a shameful evasion of the crisis facing our country." "Instead of offering solutions to a problem they have helped create, they offered a paranoid, dystopian vision of a more dangerous and violent America where everyone is armed and no place is safe," he said. "Enough. As a country, we must rise above special interest politics."

Someone else said "The most revolting tone-deaf statement I have ever heard.'


Entered at Sat Dec 22 08:49:09 CET 2012 from (85.255.44.134)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Adding "faces"/"smileys" to GB posts

This site is old-school, and does not allow you to add images/graphics to guestbook entries (we did have an 'add photo' option in the mid '90s that was removed when uhm... explicit pictures started showing up). If you want to share your mood/facial expression here, we suggest you use a textual 'smiley', aka emoticons. See link above. :-)


Entered at Sat Dec 22 07:51:00 CET 2012 from (74.198.164.180)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Looking for Randy Newman in vain on iTunes

....meant Toy Story but everything gets confusing when searching for "12 Songs" and all you can find is Frogs and Princesses and Toys and 60 different "I Love LA's"..........bring back record stores damn it!


Entered at Sat Dec 22 07:39:26 CET 2012 from (74.198.164.180)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Never be fooled by getting a shiver up your leg!

Year 2038.....the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame is forced to admit 75,000 new members all with reps for outstanding live performance, great Neil Young covers and.....count them 4 to 5 very good original songs.......the old timers running the joint, when asked why...just shrugged and said these performers were of a different generation and therefore "excusably less prolific"

On a serious note, just downloaded Jason Isbell - thanks David........also purchased Randy Newman "Sail Away".......a bit of a challenge navigating through what seemed like 1001 Toy Soldier compilations and the like - yikes! Looked for that 5 set greatest that Peter had mentioned but could not find........Why is it that some artists are so unevenly represented on iTunes? Frustrating.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 06:57:14 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

Billy C. (Friend0

The party hasn't worn off yet, and I almost didn't realize that just like last time, my posting name has undergone an organic reaction. In lieu of it all, Billy C., Friend0, or my name, will do. Just Billy, would be too confusing.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 05:20:30 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Perspective

Funny how things play out. I spent some time with some old friends and two clergymen today. Various faiths were represnted.The clergy men, one was white, the other black. One was actaully an old friend. It was interesting day. No one is too old to ezpand their horizons.

Norman! I forgive you. Ever so humbly.

Bd. I forgive you.

Norman. I'm going to always think of you as Norman, not Norm, not Westie, Westocaster, Wetsie, Westcoaster, Rockin Chair, or any of those other names. The reason being, I assoociate Norman with that calf that Billy Crystal grew attached to in that movie he was in with Jack Palance. I'll try to think of myself as Billy, and you as the calf. It'll make it impossible to be upset with you.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 03:30:25 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: motel of lost ambition, with heated pool and bar

Peter V: "Thrasher" is a truly great song, though perhaps best sung by someone else. I point you in the direction of BARK's Stephen Fearing on the "Borrowed Tunes" comp, which can be found listed in this site's discog due to Rick and Garth's contributions. David Wilcox shows how lovely ""Transformer Man" really is on the same CD.


Entered at Sat Dec 22 02:16:28 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Hi guys. Great reading as usual..never, ever boring..

My link is a follow-up to the concert I posted earlier for Leonard Peltier. Some very good artists performed. Now if only the president will take notice!!

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 21 21:56:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, I can't think that Neil Young has written 100 "GREAT" songs, though Bob Dylan easily has. Thirty? Forty? Fifty? I'm too tired to try a list though. It's still a mega achievement.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 21:51:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Best of 2012

Oh, all the pleasure in Best ofs is in the disagreement.

Simone Felice … I’ve seen him three times live. I know you’ve seen him too. OK, he’s 36, so compared to Bob, a slow developer, nor did he write Visions of Johanna (probably my desert island #1 disc). He does Helpless better than Neil Young can nowadays though. Funny, I wouldn’t have listed those Neil Young songs (except Old Man) … I’d have said “The guy who wrote Out Of The Blue, Into The Black, Powderfinger, Helpless and Heart of Gold, which is a tribute to Neil Young’s range. BUT in terms of charisma and power, that is what Simone Felice exudes live. It’s a different generation, so excusably less prolific, but both Duke & The King albums are absolute masterpieces, and so is the new one. OK, he was not at 21 as good as either Bob or Neil were at 21, but he IS in the same class as they were in 1977. Really. He is in a way higher group than Lyle Lovett for me. I have lots of Lyle CDs, all impeccably performed, but the songs aren’t as good. I know very little about James McMurty so can’t comment.

Live, Simone Felice is astonishing every time.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 21:33:35 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Peter V's Blog

Peter V, I also enjoyed your year end blog. I was a little suprised with what you wrote about Simone Felice, " Simone is like watching Bob Dylan or Neil Young early in their careers, and the songs are that good too". Now I hope you know I have a great deal of respect for Mr. Felice but the guy is 36 years old. Dylan was born in 1941 so he was 36 in 1977. Do you really thing Felice has written anything to compare with what Dylan had done by his age? The Neil Young comparison is almost as absurd. I don't think Simone has written anything anywhere as good as Neil's 100 greatest songs. We're talking about the guy who wrote Sugar Mountain, Everybody knows this is nowhere, Thrasher, Cortz the Killer, Old Man. In fact you do Felice a diservice by comparing him to these guys. He's not yet in the same class as a Lyle Lovett or a James McMurthry. So I hate to end the year this way Mr. V, but I'm afraid I have to disagree!


Entered at Fri Dec 21 20:57:53 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Confirmation

And to you as well JD. Your accolades for Mr JT are well deserved he goes quietly amoung the throng. I know more of him, because he is very well thought of out here in what he specializes in. There are many who have left their feelings of his help on the internet here. I sometimes wonder how he has time to write a few lines here. Helping to heal and comfort people is a gift that needs to be acknowledged and appreciated.

Don't sell yourself short JD, your award was well deserved.

Lets all hope we can look forward to a good new year with a little more love and a little less strife and bitterness Everyone world wide should take heed of all those clergymen of all those denominations in one room in that high school with one common goal. To bring comfort ansd healing to all the families there, and hope that example could spread world wide. Peace, health and happiness be with all of you.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 20:23:17 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: guns, guns, guns

This puts the statistics in some perspective . . . a (non-official) project to report US gun deaths shows 86 deaths AFTER Newtown, up until yesterday . . . .


Entered at Fri Dec 21 20:04:38 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

I just want to say Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all others. I want to wish you the best of the season. It has been so great and warm to connect with JT; on a regular basis.. He plays down his calling in life here; but take it from me he is really one of the host highly thought of people in his trade. He has also been very kind to me; when it comes to Bob. Thank you all for a great place to visit.

Oh another thing quick. I ordered the DVD of the Beach Boys reunion. I immediately canceled it; when reading the reviews.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 20:01:17 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: NRA said plenty . . .

. . . such as, video games, movies, the media are to blame.

Etc.

Transcript @ [My link] (spoiler: it doesn't get better . . . .)


Entered at Fri Dec 21 19:58:52 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fantasy Land - perplexing and concerning

'National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre defiantly blamed violent video games and movies, the media, gun-free zones in schools and other factors during the organization's first public statement following the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn. last week. ' He said this also.

I am flabbergasted and saddened that other than expressing sympathy, there is no leadership or suggestion of any limitation by this lobby group. Avoiding responsibility is taking no responsibility. Just like the nations of the world did in the 30s when you-know-who spewed his venom and many millions gassed and executed were the result. In the land of the free and the home of the brave, this statement is a statement of cowardice and lacks any sense of responsibility or decency. Maybe we should arm our schools/maybe we shouldn't. But come on... what about public gun acquisition, types of guns and all the rest. Where is this lobby group when important questions are being asked? Will we get any more from them other than this? Or is this what they represent ultimately. If so, shame on them! More tragedy is the likely result unless others act and for once ignore this lobby because of its lack of concern about the central issues for all society. The banks protect the money. The airports have good reason now to protect the airports and planes. Should the answer now be that all public sites should have protection such as is described here? I don't know the answer. I do know that too many individuals not in positions of protection responsibility still get guns too easily. The NRA must comment on this if they have and sense of responsibility.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 19:55:52 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Shoot out in China Town

Yeah that's what he said Jerry. This is just getting crazier. Obviously he didn't consider bullets flying around little children anyway. I would bet this would only incite these crazies to do it more. I'm betting they'd love engaging in a war.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 19:13:44 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Holy s..t: Is that all he said?

The reports are that the NRA guy made the following statement.

"NRA calls for gun-toting police officers in every U.S. school in wake of Newtown school massacre “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun,” said Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of the National Rifle Association, noting that banks and airports are patrolled by armed guards, while schools typically are not."

That may be so or not, but that is not the point! Where is the rest of the sense of responsibility. Is this still the stance regarding the public acquisition of guns by this organization? Are they living in the world of murdered children where the guns came from a private home? Was the approach they suggest - Let him find the gun, take it to the school, get shot while getting ready to kill kids so he gets shot first and the kids don't! Is that what NRA is saying? And no more? Tell me they said more than this.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:59:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Christmas TV is full of surprising stuff … Girls Aloud 10th Anniversary, Kylie Minogue is now an older artiste, The Spice Girls started 18 years ago … all stuff I think of as "new".


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:49:26 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Whoops again : Beck Hansen

Beck Hansen is now 42 years old. He made his first tape in 1985. 'Loser' came out in 1993-94. So depending on how you count 27 or 18-19 years. Time flies when you're having fun.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:16:43 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: 'Saying the same thing twice'

Pat B: That was a test. You are good! Not twice. Only Dylan or Cohen should be on any list twice.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:15:12 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

JT, Death Cab For Cutie is good, but I don't think they deserve to appear on your list twice.

My two favorites remain Passion Pit and Sigur Ros.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:13:36 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Mumford and Sons and opera

I forgot Mumford and Sons. And yes, Peter. I wish I had seen as much theatre as you have. We love live theatre. And we have a wonderful opera house in Toronto now. I have not been there yet and though I have only seen one opera in my life, it is something I'd at least like to experience in the next year or two.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 18:09:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thank you, John. I'm highly flattered. This year has seen us shifting quite a bit from concerts to theatre … there's not that many music things I want to see touring, and theatre always starts on time, and often has live music too. We've been watching a bit too much this year, and not getting any work done. Royal Shakespeare at Stratford is highly addictive … quality of performance!

I suspect seeing younger and folkier acts is because they're the ones around. I certainly think there's no sign of the well of talent drying up, and lots of great people coming through.

This must have been much the same in Canada. When I go back to Zoot Money and Long John Baldry and Davy Jones (aka David Bowie) in the dance halls of the 60s, they easily got a thousand people in. Support bands (usually two) got to play to that many. Friends in R&B then soul bands regularly played four or five nights a week as semi-pros, and regularly packed in 400 to 500 people. The young bands just don't have the same outlets, or chance to learn their trade in front of an audience, but talent will come out, and I'm delighted to see so many great twenty-somethngs playing.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 17:56:25 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Tiger

Whoops: I meant - sharing a boat with a tiger on a long voyage. Makes about as much sense out of context, but some will already know...


Entered at Fri Dec 21 17:53:03 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The Beat Goes On

John D: Happy holidays. I agree with you regarding keeping an open mind to what is new. There are kids that have come up in the past 10 years or more who are worth our attention. A few that I have recognized are 1) The National 2) The Shins 3) Death Cab for Cutie 4) Dandy Warhols 5) Metric 6) Stars 7) Arcade Fire 8) New Pornographers 9) Beck (now 15 years) -still innovating 10) Civil Wars (who knows - maybe they'll come back; but maybe not) 11) Braids 12) Grizzly Bear 13) Okervill River 14) The Weeknd 15) Beach House 16) Destroyer 17) Japandroids 18) John Mayer 19) Jack White 20) Fleet Foxes 21) Ben Harper 22) Anais Mitchell 23) A.C. Newman 24) Broken Social Scene 25) Decemberists 26) Death Cab For Cutie 27) Bon Iver and many many more.

There are many genres here. They share the spirit of creativity and though there is nothing new under the sun, they provide shades on the common theme and so they continue to be interesting. That is what drives us all. Its just like sharing a tiger in a boat on a long voyage-- imagination is provoked and the result is neuronal ecstasy. Have fun with the music. Yes John. It costs time and money but its worth it. It has been since I heard 'Searchin' on a juke box in Jackson's Point in 1958 and the rest is history.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 15:38:07 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V's Blog Again

Just one more thing Peter. I don't think there is a lot of difference in our ages and I truly have to commend you for staying current. It's hard to do. You have to really love music and leave your mind open to new things. Much like the late Ralph Gleason did.

From Wikipedia

Gleason was the first critic to review folk, pop, and jazz concerts with the same attention and space as was given to classical music. He interviewed such luminaries as Frank Sinatra, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, and Fats Domino. Gleason was one of the first critics to perceive the importance of Lenny Bruce, Bob Dylan, and Miles Davis. His liner notes for the 1959 Sinatra album "No One Cares" and later for the 1970 Davis album Bitches Brew set the standard for the form.

Gleason was both an observer and a contributor to what is sometimes termed the San Francisco Renaissance, the era of increased cultural vitality in that city which began in the mid-1950s and fully bloomed in the mid-to-late 1960s. In the later 1960s, Gleason was a widely respected commentator and he chose to write supportively of the better cut of the Bay Area rock bands, such as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead. By the way, Gleason was born in 1917 and still on top of it till he passed away.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 15:30:20 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V's Blog

Peter, I really enjoyed your blog. Two questions? When do you sleep and have you figured out how much money you spent in 2012 on entertainment?

Signed,

Jealous

I would insert a happy face here; but this site won't allow it.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 13:42:19 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Apocalypse

Man oh man, how are you making out getting around Peter? I couldn't sleep and just got up very early. Watching the news there is horrible weather your way and a lot of flooding. But we're still here.

David, I meant to say to you yesterday after you had mentioned Johnny Horton's Whispering Pines. I still have it on vinyl. Greatest hits album. I'm sure you recall a great old rock a billy song of Johnny's, (I used to play a lot when I first started playing dance halls), "Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor"

After we were discussing Eagles, and on wiki I see that Steve Martin was tight with those guys, it occurred to me, I wonder if he did the banjo work on the back end of the original "Take it Easy", he is a banjo picker.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 11:50:54 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well said, Norm. Every time I pass a Christmas tree with presents, I think of those presents that were probably bought weeks ago, as parents do, and will never be opened.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 06:06:08 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rckin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The light went out

Hey Bill; Not to be morbid.......but. Other day we were reminising over music from our youth. I metioned this 63 Pontiac convertible I had. These thoughts came back to me. I was 21, had no thoughts of marriage. Some of my friends were in their early marriage years, with little kids.

I used to get ribbed about this a lot,....but very often on a weekend I had my car full of these little folks. I have no explanation, I just loved kids. I would buy them all ice cream it would be all over my car. Some of their mothers would say, Norm how can you do that. Well they were always fun, happy, never judging you interesting. I just always loved them. I have 5 children, and 9 grand children. This is without a doubt the worst Christmas I've ever had.

Whe I look at these little folks, I can't put away what some of these folks are going thru. I remember talking about my Christmas out on a ship here when I was 5. I still remember that feeling of excitement. The sparle of exciement in those eyes and little faces that has been shut out is hard. Susan says to me, quit torturing yourself. I was getting along pretty good.

Tonight I was watching Anderson Cooper. I really admire that fellow, I think he's a real straight shooter. What he was showing will rip your heart out. There are the lowest form of life we have, on the internet, using these little lost souls names to solicit money fraudulently. I can't image anything lower. It's hard to keep your faith in humanity.

Hold on tight to the little ones for every day you have them. They are gold.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 04:27:07 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Zevon and Levon and the Hawks ...

... are both on the 2009 British before-they-were-famous comp at the link above. Zevon was half of Lyme and Cybele.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 01:01:09 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Wrong Again. Oh My.

Actually, I typed wrong info. All Music does not list a composer for Heaven In A Pontiac. Easiest thing for me to do was write what i wrote, maybe he did,. Maybe he wrote it with Bill Perry. I've been at shows where Jimmy and Perry performed together and Jimmy introduced songs as songs they co wrote..... But see, how easy it is to write- hey, i wrote the wrong thing...

All Music needs complete info.. one of the things a producer does towards the end of a project, is see that the digitization part of the mastering process includes all the correct coding regarding song legalities , which leads to people getting paid. The aftermath of the final part of the musical production includes things like getting All Music straight, registering songs properly with PROs. unless they already have been. The minutae are endless, and keeping after it impossible if you have better things to do. at a a smaall label, years later, this kind of stuff goes out the window,


Entered at Fri Dec 21 00:21:07 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: BEST OF 2012

Just in time for Christmas …my personal best of 2012 albums, concerts, songs, theatre and films is now up on my blog. See link.


Entered at Fri Dec 21 00:09:22 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: JUDGE this for yourselves

When i viewed the video of Vivino and friends doing Heaven in A Pontiac, it stated he wrote it. To the side of the you tube page, there was another video of some one else doing Heaven In A Pontiac. I opened it, and read that it was a Bill Perry original. Jimmy and Perry have written songs together. The link above shows that All Music has it listed as a Bill Perry composition. So, not knowing what was correct, I pasted the link to the great performance, and I wrote the following:
"Subject: Heaven In a Pontiac
Link to a good Vivino performance. The type says he wrote this. Maybe, maybe he and Bill Perry."
Though Bd claims i wrote that Vivino wrote the song with Perry, I did not. I simply proposed he may have written it, or he may have written it with him. Maybe Bd should rule on All Music's actions. All Music does get things wrong. If you can prove them wrong, meaning you have to be the legally correct person to make the case for a change, and possibly even prove you are the legally correct person, they will change things.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 23:45:51 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Bob f, and mandolins

Hi bob, the kentuckys are pretty good bang for your buck, I think. Can you give me some indication of budget? They're similar to guitar in that you check action, intonation and tone... But I think you could do worse than a Kentucky. (Just for the record, I have a crafter, which looks like an ovation guitar and a JBovier solidbody). You can email me on davidlachlanlewis at hot mail dot com. Ora's Joan said, facebook..


Entered at Thu Dec 20 23:11:51 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Right you are

Thanks David, you are right. It's funny how there is conflicting stories right on wiki. On the Eagles beginning, it even tells about their teuqila night on the desert, and the coming about of the name.

I didn't realize Steve Martin was tight with the group, and had some input into the name.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 23:08:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

May Leonard roll on and on … "Old Ideas" is definitely my album of the year, 2012.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 22:47:02 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Leonard Cohen at MSG

Tuesday night I had the pleasure of attending Leonard Cohen's show at Madison Square Garden. A wonderful concert; all the raves I've read from Peter V and others were very easily borne out. The setlist was largely similar to that of his recent Live in London album, so no major surprises, but with the addition of about half of the new "Old Ideas" songs, which were riveting live and meshed seamlessly with the older material. Leonard is a great singer and a fascinating presence; he held the audience spellbound, and created what felt like a very intimate show even in this vast arena. He and his excellent band played for 3.5 hours with unflagging energy, and there really was nary a slow patch or a dull tune. Gorgeous arrangements of the songs, which included harmony vocals by Sharon Robinson and the Webb Sisters, violin and Spanish guitar. A footnote possibly of some interest for fellow Band fans was his use of a Jew's harp to the song Democracy, which gave the song an interesting kind of Cripple Creek-ish country twang. Outstanding show!


Entered at Thu Dec 20 22:43:59 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: Henley, Frey, Meisner & Leadon were the founding members of the Eagles. Felder wasn't brought into the nest until their third album, "On the Border", a couple of years later.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 22:01:15 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Zevon Biography

Warren Zevon's ex wife, Crystal, wrote a great biography on Warren called I'll Sleep When I'm Dead. He was a brilliant, complicated man. I remember going to see his first Bottom Line shows in NYC for Excitable Boy. Jackson Browne came out and introduced him. However, the best shows I ever saw him do were at The Chance in Poughkeepsie, NY. It must be that country air.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 22:00:39 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Intertwined

I was just reading on Wiki David. The take on it there is that Bernie Leadon replaced Steven Stills in that band down there, (the name was then changed and they ended up in New York. ) They state that Bernie & Don were two of the founding members of Eagles.

I haven't had that straight in my mind for a long time after they were backing Linda Ronstaad, just who decided Eagles. I know she had a big part in encouraging that band.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 21:47:34 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: One of Tom Petty's early groups in Gainesville, FL, Mudcrutch, featured Tom Leadon, older brother of Bernie Leadon. Later it was Bernie who helped recruit Don Felder into joining the Eagles.

Bob F: I haven't heard that Rodney Crowell collaboration, but will have to check it out. Recently it was announced that Mr. Crowell and Emmylou Harris will be releasing an album together entitled "Old Yellow Moon" in February, produced by Brian Ahern.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 21:27:39 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lawyers Guns & Money

How could you not like Warren Zevon. He is another piece of that big family of music, that came together in the late 60's and early 70's.

When you look at who his close friends are and who put effort into his albums. Many of these guys go back further than some people realize.

I got to recalling music from those early years just the other day, and going thru my collection of vinyl. It is a lot of fun now to have this internet for exploring Things I was rememberin, so I did some searching. One interesting youtube piece with Don Felder.

He is back standing in front of this old run down shack where he grew up, explaining they were very poor, but his neigbour had an old guitar in his attic, and traded him something for it. Guitar playing came very naturally to him. When he was 14 he was in a band with Steven Stills down there in Florida. Wasn't long before he was teaching guitar, and one of his first students was Tom Petty.

Warren Zevon was obviously very close to Jackson Browne and Eagles as there is always much backing put into much of this early recorded work by all of them. Even Hank Williams Jr. has a cover of "Lawyers Guns & Money."


Entered at Thu Dec 20 21:07:27 CET 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Zevon

I love Warren Zevon. My mom, who turned 51 yesterday, runs a yoga studio and she told me recently that Zevon's father is a regular there. I told her, "That's so awesome why didn't you tell me?" She responded, "You never asked."


Entered at Thu Dec 20 20:23:59 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Joan, thank you.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 20:12:54 CET 2012 from (24.168.42.194)

Posted by:

Bd

Subject: Don V

I'd like to pop in here to correct that RUDE BRAGGART ,,, Jimmy Vivino aka Don V, wrote Heaven inna Pontiac FOR the Late Bill Perry !!! Not with him,,, That amazing band in that video is James "Worm" Wormworth on drums- barefoot, btw,,, Scott Healy & Jeff Young on piano / organ Jimmy Powers - Harp Rick Reed - bass Any band with Jimmy V is an amazing night, We were Blessed to have him play in ur Wedding Band in 2005 & his Highway 61 still echoes in the halls of Mohonk Mountain House,,, Bill Perry is still sorely missed by many of us here in the hudson valley & his Riverboat Gambler's hat he gave me the week before he passed is still in a place of honor on my mantle !!! Bd


Entered at Thu Dec 20 19:59:47 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What's in a Name

Jeepers Bill, The "Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band??" Oh yeah! That might be even better than "The Society of Smokers & Drinker."

Although I'm sure we all agree that we much preferr to keep the flow of the rhetoric here to the music, and particularly the BAND, current events dictate that comments will be made here other wise.

We are all guilty of mistakes from time to time, however for the most part, most people try to keep posts short and to the point. On most sights like this it seems to be courteous to try and check what you have written and at least make some attempt to make it coherent for others to understand with out having to read like your deciphering some code. Ranting on about historical political heroes with typing that is not easily decernable seems to be sort of disrespectful to people who generally try to read and respond. I'm sure everyone remembers the days when some freaked out over a misspelled word.

Glad to see you a Hobbit fan Peter. I was introduced to the Hobbit book, probably over 20 years ago by my daughter Amanda who read it when she was 9 or 10 and became infatuated with it.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 19:37:05 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bob F

Bob, DLEW is a mandolin player.He is around. If you use Face Book you can ask directly. It's David Lewis.

"Everybody get together try to love one another right now" We sure need some peace and love now.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 19:25:30 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Jason Isbell/Rodney Crowell

David P, that is a great version. I love the guitar. I'm going to get that cd. Thanks. Have you heard the new collection of songs Rodney Crowell wrote with Mary Karr called KIN?


Entered at Thu Dec 20 19:18:38 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Hobbit Habit

We often discussed movies in the past … we're aiming to see Life of Pi this weekend, having seen the trailer before The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. if anyone is interested, link is to the short review of The Hobbit on my blog. Happy to discuss here or there (though there is a delay till it's approved "there").


Entered at Thu Dec 20 19:02:59 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Dennis, to answer your question, I will not respond to anything else from Westie regarding this. I do suggest that since Norm had the first word, it's equitable he should have the last word as well.



Entered at Thu Dec 20 18:10:12 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

It's all good, thx folks....Have a wonderful, joyous and loving Holiday Season.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 17:34:58 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Whispering Pines

Kevin: Getting back to music, you mentioned the Brown Album earlier. A few days ago I was listening to my reference LP copy (the green label early Capitol "RL" pressing mastered by Bob Ludwig) and became lost in the haunting "Whispering Pines". Garth's organ & RMI Rock-Si-Chord just seem to add just the right honey behind Richard's vocals, and when Levon comes in to sing in echo'd tandem on the last verse, it just gives me chills.

For further listening check out Johnny Horton's 1960 recording of another "Whispering Pines" song (www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCVkLrwJTxg)
The Candymen's 1967 song "Georgia Pines" (www.youtube.com/watch?v=br6PerLu7lc)
Jason Isbell's "Alabama Pines" on the aforementioned "Live From Alabama"


Entered at Thu Dec 20 17:17:43 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The Genius

I too miss Warren Zevon a great deal. He was consistent and some of his personal songs struck directly and spoke to me. A while back there were some comments about the passing of famous people and how they affected us. For me, Warren Zevon was one of a few who 'gave himself' to his listener in his lyrics and music. Aside from that, I love the sardonic and the double entendre and just about everything else he did so well. I listen to him a lot.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 17:10:59 CET 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties

Gentlemen, this is (and has been) a very literate site for fans of The Band to discuss the ups 'n downs and ins and outs of this wonderful ensemble, their influences and their history.

There are many hundreds of sites for flaming, can we please take the personal stuff somewhere else?


Entered at Thu Dec 20 16:33:41 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Zevon

Kevin J, I love that Zevon song. I think Dylan does also since that was one of the songs he covered when Zevon was sick. Another Zevon song I love is Veracruz. Sometimes I play it over and over just to hear him sing "someone called Maria's name, I swear it was my father's voice". I love those lines and I really miss that guy.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 16:32:18 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Norm, your posts to me inidcate that you cannot understand the written word, or subtract. Not once, did I request you apologize to me. Stating that you did not have the balls to admit you were wrong, is not requesting an apology. I did state that you should apologize to the citizens of the U.S. and the memories of MLK and RFK. I am a U.S citizen, that is the only way you could stretch this to say that I asked you to make an apology that would include me. I don't give a fuck about how you treat me, but when a angry, wrongful buffoon is giving a great demonstration of his incompetence, might as well get an encore. And like I said, probably saving some animals from getting smacked around, all the better.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 16:09:19 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.237)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thank you David P.....Didn't know anything about this release........I really like Jason Isbell.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 16:08:02 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Mandolin Advise

Folks any mandolin players here? Back when my daughter was in high school we picked up a very old Italian mandolin that she has been playing for the past 8 years. We want to surprise her for Christmas with a new or good used modern mandolin. I've been looking at the Kentucky Standard F Models. Is anyone here familiar with them or can recomend something else?


Entered at Thu Dec 20 15:50:43 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: In the wardrobe of my soul, in the section labelled 'shirts' ...

A friend sent me this link to the Bonzos on YouTube, and I'm sharing it with you all because it's Christmas time.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 15:36:53 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Jason Isbell

One of my favorite releases of this year is "Live From Alabama" from Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit. Backed by a tight trio, augmented by a horn section on a few cuts, Mr. Isbell recorded a compelling set of songs at two different venues in his home state of Alabama. Included is a chilling version of his "Danko/Manuel" (see link to HD b&w video), a song he performed earlier as a member of the Drive-By Truckers. Along with other fine originals, there are great covers of Neil Young's "Like a Hurricane" and "Heart on a String", a classic R&B tune recorded by Candi Staton at FAME studios in Muscle Shoals in 1970. While I went with the 2-LP set released by Lightning Rod Records, this album is available on CD and I highly recommend it.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 15:26:45 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blessed are the Cheeze Makers

Good time to count your blessings Jerry. The worlds gonna end tomorrow anyway. Isn't there some people in some little town up in the mountains in Switzerland some where who have taken this real serious?


Entered at Thu Dec 20 14:53:50 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Count blessings

Count our blessings

1. Serious review of guns

2. Hillsborough revisited with justice

3. Financial review because of fiscal cliff occurring and long overdue (may impact more widely internationally..who knows)

4. We've still got the music and we talk about it, including the Band and we have a site at which to do it

5. We can express our views freely and ideally without anger towards one another (most of the time)

6. John D. is getting his due, richly deserved

7.Rolling Stones, Springsteen, Dylan, Cohen and McCartney roll on

8. The Life of Pi (see it)

9. Serenity (you see, it can be infectious)

10. The cycle of life continues despite us all. If this all sounds 'pie in the sky' it is. Despite the bad stuff there is still some good out there. Its a good time to reflect. Happy holidays to all.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 12:26:21 CET 2012 from (99.141.50.161)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Festival Express petition

From Richard Manuel's Facebook page: the link above is a petition for the release of The Band - "Festival Express: Live In Canada 1970". Sign it!


Entered at Thu Dec 20 09:32:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brien, you are one of the most valued posters and I always look forward to seeing your name. Apologies for sarcasm … I thought you'd immediately see the Jan Harald Brunvald link on stories circulating on the net becoming the latest medium for urban myth. It is a highly emotive issue. Keep posting!


Entered at Thu Dec 20 07:33:57 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One plus one equals one

While your doing your research there Put 'um up. See if you can count how many people you've called a liar and told them they had to apologize to you. It's really pretty funny. Keep up the good work.

Kevin, you sound really stressed. Get some sleep boy. Santa Clause will be here soon.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 07:23:20 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.237)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.......and on the seventh day, DVD BOX turned to LED LIGHT and said "I still think the Brown album beats Big Pink...don't you?"

The US needs serious changes to its gun laws.....Pat needs hockey.......Rockn Westcoaster and Putemup need a week on the water......we all need a break.......besides, Boom Boom Mancini is fighting Bobby Chacon....


Entered at Thu Dec 20 07:18:27 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Heaven In a Pontiac

Link to a good Vivino performance. The type says he wrote this. Maybe, maybe he and Bill Perry.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 07:09:10 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Norm, I'm saving some poor dog, maybe a few dogs, from getting kicked. That's a good thing. BTW, you have no friend who knows me or has ever met me. Twelve years ago, I did not know about this site.. If you can't subtract, use your fingers. Just over ten years ago is when Big Joe told me about it. You Apologize? Snowball's chance in hell, but ya never know. It never hurts to give you another chance to show your true colors though.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 06:46:38 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: The Tooth Fairy Sent Me

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91151292
Review of Jack Newfield's book about RFK, i read this one too.

http://www.planetthoughts.org/?pg=pt/Whole&qid=2530
Great blog article about Pete Hamill's letter to RFK, urging him to run for Pres. Hamill didn't write the letter till after RFK announced he wouldn't run. This artcile includes the letter. The letter gives a small inkling of what RFK meant to people back then.

The book i was referencing in my last post was Arthur Schlesinger's RFK and His Times. This was a real candid book, cut him no slack when it came to the downside and the past history. But it told of a guy who changed radically. had the ability to change, to learn, to consider, and alter course, which is a huge requirement for a leader. RFK's assassination, coupled with MLK's, those 2 killings delivered this country into the hands of the likes ....... whom i already discussed.

We have a shot now.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 05:58:15 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dullusional

Put 'em up? The name says it all. When I first started to post on this site, about 12 years ago. You started out by becoming very insulting. You didn't believe who I was, and at one point, a friend I have who knows you e mailed me, and said you thought Steve and I were the same person, and we were both imposters. You coninually called me a liar, about whatever it was that you didn't want to believe. Non of it made any sense.

Apologize to you! You still are in some kind of dream world. Go ahead any continue on and leave my name off your posts as I do yours. This Kenny Rogers comment you got on to, is some other dream of yours I guess. To amuse yourself, get back there and find any post where I mentioned that. It's beyond me, other wise I would have understood your reference.

Do you ever bother to read anything you pound out? It's kinda like some sort of jigsaw puzzle to try to put together and figure out. There was a documentary on just the other night about your Kennedy boys, "the party boys" well documented with a lot of written proof about that bunch. But you go on singing their praises. Try to do it so it's a little more legable tho' ok. Maybe that will make it a little more believable. While you are doing that and your research keep track of how many people you have battled with and insulted on the site here, and then "Put 'em up."

Maybe you are autistic, or unrealistic, or very ambitious, or bored or lonely, or rebelious or just plain funny I can't figure it out.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 05:33:49 CET 2012 from (65.94.114.154)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: STATs

As I said, stats are important wherever they come from. Those stats are sobering and add to the complexity of the issue. I read them carefully and appreciated them as part of the overall picture.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 04:38:55 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

So Norm, i was waiting to see if you had the balls to admit you were wrong. And that you attacked me personally wrongly and for no factual reason.,. Honestly, you owe an apology to all U.S. citizens for what you wrote inclusive of MLK and RFK:Here is what you wrote: ".You portray that absolute ignorant attitude of the American people that every one hates, ( and that certainly is not all Americans). You think that "people came and shot down your heroes". Get a grip for chris sake. These were some of the most dispicable dishonest ,into the worst graft people on this planet. You revere them, like they were heros. Do you really believe all this shit"

MLK was one of the most important U.S. leaders ever.. RFK would have been. His metamorphosis while working as Attorney General and then later, after his brother was killed, was enormous. .RFK had everything a leader of people and a society needed and then some,balls, intelligence, empathy, understanding, legitimate caring for all people, a sense of justice, vision, and an unyeilding will to fight for what he knew was right. And he had charisma..He was having a impact as a politician and was having a huge impact as a Presidential candidate and societal leader. They absolutely were heroes - in life. During their life. Important leaders of society in the U.S. and if you can't see that, you are more of an ignoramus than even i thought you were..

BTW, credit MLK and the tide of history for encouraging this in RFK.But once exposed and opened up, the man came through. On the job training. A metamorphosis secdond to none. We Learned about them,MLK and RFk, and what they dreamt, desired & were trying to accomplish every day in school.At the age of , 9, 10. Probably earlier too, to some samll degree. Current events was important in my school then.Probably most people's. There's a great book on RFK. Vewrey candiud and open, honest. I'm not presently certain who wrote it, but it was one of the people that had been close to the Kennedys, long term. Close personally and in working with them, during campaigns and administrations. Either Sorenson or Sclesinger. Maybe they both wrote books, but the book i'm talking about was a bio of RFK , and dealt with his transformation as a person and politician. Geez,Norm, now that i think about it, maybe you read it already. Maybe you have a copy written by the tooth fairy.

If you were drunk, & wasn't able to read properly, just admit it , say you're sorry, and that you'll go to AA meetings before you respond to anything else I write. If you want to stick to your guns, that's fine too. Call me whatever you like. I'm sure no one will think less of you.

BTW, don't forget to apologize to the memories of MLK and RFK.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 03:50:54 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, now you know know what a half Jewish, half Italian successful restaurant or nightclub owner, with some class, and in the NYC Metro area(Joisy and parts of Connecticut included), looks, coiffs, and dresses like. New car dealership owners, home improvement bums, race horse owners ( who are lawyers, doctors, or home improvement bums), on a night out, may dress the same way, or damn close to it. Some attorneys too. I stress though, ya gotta stay with the Jews and Italians to achieve this look or something akin to it. The Irish, Puerto Ricans, Russians, Blacks, do it different. Though you will find Blacks who get pretty damn close ... and then they can go in another sartorial direction entirely.



Entered at Thu Dec 20 03:41:14 CET 2012 from (50.136.76.12)

Posted by:

Lynda Dignam

Location: New Hampshire..USA

Subject: Still a fan

The love of your unique style of music still remains ..Now 2012..."Thanks for the memories"!


Entered at Thu Dec 20 03:09:15 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jay Collins

If you have a chance, please read the article; on Jay Collins in Roll Magazine. Jan has a link to the site. I met Jay twice. The first time in Woodstock. All that I knew was that he was Amy's husband and a fine horn player. He really bears his soul in this article and I found there are many layers to this musician.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 03:01:14 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Brien

As Norm rightly says you're highly respected on here Bri. You bring a lot. And as Pat affirms it is simply such an emotive subject.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 02:51:56 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Hillsborough song - He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother

Linked above the Justice Collective's version

For the record

'He Ain't Heavy' has been covered and re-recorded on 26 previous occasions:

Kelly Gordon: 1969 original version

The Hollies: 1969 recognized definitive version

Neil Diamond - Released as a single on November 7, 1970 and on his album 'Tap Root Manuscript' released two weeks later

The Ruffin Brothers (David & Jimmy) - Covered on their 1970 album 'I Am My Brother's Keeper'

Bobby Goldsboro: On his album 'We Gotta Start Lovin' (1970)

Cher: On her 1971 album 'Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves'

Donny Hathaway: On his eponymous 1971 album

The Osmonds: In 1971 (and frequently in concert as a finale)

Alex Harvey: In 1972 on 'The Joker Is Wild'

Brotherhood of Man: On their 1974 album 'Good Things Happening'

Olivia Newton-John: In 1975 (as the B-side of her single 'Let It Shine')

The Housemartins: Recorded an 'a cappella' version in 1986 as a B-side for the 12" vinyl release of their single 'Happy Hour'

The Shadows: In 1989 on the album 'Steppin' to the Shadows' (instrumental version)

Gotthard: In 1996 BMG Ariola version of their third album 'G'

Rufus Wainwright: For the soundtrack to the Ben Stiller film 'Zoolander'

Clay Crosse: On his 'Stained Glass' album

The Choirboys Austria3: Recorded a version in the Austrian dialect of the German language: 'Weusd' mei Freund bist' (Literal translation: 'Because you are a friend of mine')

Roger Whittaker: On his 1996 album 'The World of Roger Whittaker'

American Idol Season Four's Top 12 contestants for a Red Cross charity single

Sanchez: On his album No More Heartaches (2003)

Barry Manilow: On his 2007 album 'The Greatest Songs of the Seventies'

Radka Toneff: Recorded live at the Kongsberg Jazzfestival in 1977, released on Toneff's posthumous album 'Butterfly' (2008).

Paul Carrack: On his 2008 album 'I Know That Name'

Glen Campbell

Ali Campbell: Covered the song on his 2010 album 'Great British Songs'

Tommy Emmanuel: Made an instrumental cover on 2010's 'Little by Little' with Dr. John Knowles CGP, William Robert Scott and Sidney Keith Russell.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 02:38:13 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Hillsborough song purchase

Cheers PV for purchasing.

I'd humbly urge others to do the same. I've linked the Amazon MP3 site where it can be downloaded for a pittance. Notwithstanding that it's actually a fine recorded version of the song which I'm sure Pete will vouch for, the main aim is simply for it to outsell its main X-Factor rival Christmas release and reach the Christmas number 1 spot to maximise coverage to those who might otherwise turn a blind eye and deaf ear to the justice issue.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 02:36:31 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Friends - Teach your children well

Stay friends you guys, you are both very important people.

How many have seen the letter by the little boy John to his friend Jack Pinto who was slain in this horror.

Very short and powerful this six year old ended his short letter. "I'll talk to you in my prayers Jack, I love you Jack, Love John".

With these guns is this the way we teach our children well. The pictures of these two little boys together are gold, because a man should be able to see his son when they are grown with their arms around each other.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 01:40:16 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sorry, Brien. No personal offense intended. It's such an incendiary topic that one can easily wonder why you would post a meme so easily debunked. However, I know your effort was well-intentioned as all your efforts are.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 01:26:03 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Hey guys...Thanks for reaffirming why dropping out of this place was a good move. I simply sought clarification on something i came across, then get lambasted for my stats I posted from someone elses page, so when I get snide back...well, I learned my lesson. By the way...see the Facebook observation I made earlier...applies here as well.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 00:57:36 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Two more good things: Spielberg's Lincoln is a hit, and the Rascals are ripping it up at the Capitol Theater.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 00:39:12 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Philippe... watch this!

Has anyone seen this bulletin, Eric Clapton's Philippe watch just sold for 3.6 million.......for a watch to wear, while people starve everywhere. I can't make sense out of any of this.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 00:31:52 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: A less emotive subject - Billy Joel

Just got round to watching the New York concert.

Billy Joel!!

Wow! Him and his band blew everyone else off the stage. Bruce was like so much Mickey Mouse by comparison. As for the Stones and Who - more Minnie Mouse.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 00:13:26 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Well, if I do post statistics here, I'll make sure they aren't from a mostly misleading 11 year old internet meme.


Entered at Thu Dec 20 00:10:57 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

There are 89 guns to 100 people is a statistic. Then it can be interpreted and most gun owners have more than two weapons.

But 27 dead, 20 small children is not a statistic. It is a fact. There is no room for interpretation. They were killed by high power weapons banned in most countries. Fact too.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 23:48:33 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Pat: just remember that the next time you decide to use them...


Entered at Wed Dec 19 23:16:17 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

The right wing meme that gun violence only occurs where guns are outlawed reminds me of Romney's various lies. No guns in movie theaters? Malls? Army bases? How stupid does the right wing think normal people are?


Entered at Wed Dec 19 22:57:15 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Brien, Mark Twain immortalized the great saying about numbers: "Lies, damned lies, and statistics."


Entered at Wed Dec 19 22:18:48 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gun Semantics

Fine articles from Sadavid but really for all the illuminating historical insight and revelation contained within them the essential premise of both simply arrives at the self same destination that common sense and common decency also arrive at.

This being first that determined self serving people will distort anything to further and protect their own interests and second that guns within the civilian population of any society let alone a purpoted civilized one lead to nothing but unwarranted bloodshed.

I wouldn't know the Second Amendment if it smacked me in the gob but I knew instinctively that the self serving people who advocate an American's right to arm themselves could never in a million light years be at one with those amazing good and decent men who founded the United States of America.

There is one solution and one solution only, namely civilian ownership of any guns whatsoever has to become a serious criminal offence. The cancer within the USA has to be cut out. Total eradication is the only way. It will be an unbelievably difficult route but pussyfooting to those self serving bastards who cling to a blatant misrepresentation of the American constitution is no longer an option. A score of bloodied and desecrated six and seven year old innocents provide all the testimony that will ever needed to that perverted and criminal misrepresentation.

People - and I include Obama - can cling all they like to the alleged complications and the delicacies involved but other than pandering to self-serving, blinkered twats who care nothing for anybody but themselves there really is no complexity other than the enormity of the process required to be employed to cut out the festering cancer that makes a fool of any pretensions America has to the true greatness to which it otherwise alludes.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 21:27:49 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Bill M. because in this case with this friend, they would think i was simply pissing in a fan and telling them it was lemonade. Or, I've traveled this road before and have rendered it a pointless counter. It's ok though, because I know what they are and accept it.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 20:58:46 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

correction: The Illinois law was struck down by the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 20:38:00 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Recent Gun Control Rulings

Recently two different U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals have ruled on gun control laws in Illinois and New York. In Circuit Court cases parties can attempt to have opinions reconsidered in the Circuit Court and/or seek review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Last week the Second Cicuit, in a 2-1 decision, struck down an Illinois law banning individuals from carrying ready-to-use (uncased & loaded) guns in public, with exceptions for law enforcement personnel, hunters and target shooting. The court decision, however, allows the Illinois legislature 180 days "to craft a new gun law that will impose reasonable limitations, consistent with public safety and the Second Amendment as interpreted in this opinion, on carrying guns in public." Illinois is the only state to enact such a law and the Supreme Court has yet to specifically address the question of whether the Second Amendment creates a right of self-defense outside the home.

Last month the Second Circuit, in a unanimous 3-0 decision, upheld a New York law requiring that applicants prove "proper cause", special circumstances, to obtain licenses to carry handguns for self-defense. In its ruling the Court cited that "...the proper cause requirement is substantially related to New York's compelling interests in public safety and crime prevention."


Entered at Wed Dec 19 20:35:52 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Inflamatory Thinking

This Pratt guy from, (I think the NFA is it). He is really something else. As far as he is concerned the teachers all should have had guns so they could have done something about it.

All of these people just cited here as being involved in "gun control" then, have done a piss poor job of it. This thing of buying fire arms at a show is just nonsense.

Right to bear arms..... needs to be tuned up to more specifically show WHAT arms. The last word on this is still, no one need to own a gawd damn arsenal of semi automatic weapons. Any collector of guns should be held resposible to keep gun collections disabled PERIOD.

Any one who has shot an animal, and inspected the damage that bullet can do......then consider multiple bullets hitting the body of a small child the damage is horrifying.

I think of the poor people who do the work having to inspect all those little folks. Then watch this no brain fool try to justify owning weapons like that....insanity.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 20:24:24 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: very, very weird

"The Secret History of Guns":

"The Ku Klux Klan, Ronald Reagan, and, for most of its history, the NRA all worked to control guns. The Founding Fathers? They required gun ownership—and regulated it. And no group has more fiercely advocated the right to bear loaded weapons in public than the Black Panthers—the true pioneers of the modern pro-gun movement."


Entered at Wed Dec 19 19:56:50 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Brien Sz: I dunno, why not credit the friend with having as much sense as you showed in seeking confirmation / contradiction / input from this esteemed courtlet? Why not post our 'findings' where the friend will see them, and assume - perhaps wrongly, perhaps rightly - that the friend will look into it as assiduously as you did.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 19:32:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the link to a very clear and erudite article from "The New Yorker"


Entered at Wed Dec 19 19:16:48 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Charlton Heston

Mr. Heston recited a poem by Ray Bradbury with Richard & Garth on "Our Lady Queen of Angels" in 1980. In 1997 he became a NRA spokeman, first as its vice-president, and a year later as president. His bona fides in that role were questioned by some NRA hard-liners, as it came to light that, following the assassinations of Dr. King and Robert Kennedy in 1968, he, along with fellow actors Hugh O'Brien, Kirk Douglas, James Stewart and Gregory Peck, had endorsed stronger gun control legislation in a letter to President Lyndon Johnson.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 19:06:57 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: just bring money

"In many states, to purchase a gun from a licensed dealer you need a permit, which requires you to complete firearms-safety training, not unlike driver’s education. But, even if all states required this, not everyone who buys a gun would have to take a class. That’s because forty per cent of the guns purchased in the United States are bought from private sellers at gun shows, or through other private exchanges, such as classified ads, which fall under what is known as the “gun-show loophole” and are thus unregulated."


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:51:48 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Metaphors and illusions

I agree. We have to look seriously at properly collected statistics. My point is only that groups and individuals in all areas use statistics to their own advantage. Statistics can be massaged and often are. The numerator and denominator and who was counted and what the size of the sample space counted was and so many other variable contribute to the statistic. It is not often like baseball where every at bat or every pitch is the denominator while the resultant experience is the numerator. In the latter, all events are counted. In many other human endeavours, who knows what is counted. Anyway, yes, it is the best information we have so we have to pay attention. They are often kind of like polls before an election with a sample space of individuals counted. If all events or people are not counted, then trends may not be accurate and inappropriate conclusions can be the result.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:44:45 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Complex

The one comment that the president has just made that makes the most sense. "We can no longer say that this problem is so complex that we just do nothing."

I don't really know what the regs are for buying a gun in the different states, or I'm not sure how they handle our federal law in other provinces. However here, I have a card, very much like a drivers lisence, (now of course these as anything can be counterfeit.) But you can't just go in show the card and buy a gun over the counter immediately.

You show your card with picture & FAC #. The dealer records it, then it takes a couple of days to check you out with police and what ever, then you get a call to go pickup your gun. Now that pertains to rifles. Hand guns are even more complicated.

When our gun registry came about, you had a choice to register your gun, or hand it in to be destroyed and you didn't get paid anything for it. I don't know any stats, but I know there were thousands handed in.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:33:26 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

What Facebook has taught me is that people will believe what they want and very few people want to believe their thoughts are misguided or worse... wrong. Trying to set someone straight on Facebook is a mostly pointless exercise. There are a few with open enough minds to reason with but I have found that number to be very few whether liberal, conservative, middle and everywhere in between. As for those stats, until disproven with some kind of information, metaphors and allusions expressing otherwise are simply just that...


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:10:02 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Brien Sz: Can we count on you to set your Facebook friend straight?

JT: Apparently Allah too so loves the idiot boy.

Does anybody know which came first for Charlton Heston - being hired to spout NRA propaganda and being hired to recite Rod McKuen's words on Garth's magnificent "Queen of Angels"?


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:01:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brien, did you ever hear about the babysitter who microwaved the baby by mistake? It was around the time that courting couple found a bloody hook on the car door, you know, when the papers were full of that hitch-hiker who vanished as the car passed the graveyard.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 18:01:37 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A change is gonna come

The president to speak momentarily on gun control. Vice pres. Biden to head up inter agency actions to address this problem.

The president does have the power to unilateraly creat control change.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:56:13 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

One of my Facebook friends posted it. I thought it interesting enough to share here and see 1. People's thoughts 2. If this was true? Yes, stats are strange and stats can be culled to reflect nearly every arguments stance. That's what makes stats so....uh, unpredictable. The truth about facts is that the assembly facts can often equal different truths.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:51:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: But it's about The Band …

My son reports that his kung-fu site has given itself over to the gun law discussion, as has an animation site. This is why the British press is saying that a "tipping point" has finally been reached, or the last straw that broke the camel's back.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:51:10 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I encourage everyone to have Snopes on speed dial. Brian, this particular bit of clap trap you reproduced is 11 years old.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:48:50 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mama put my guns in the ground

Well Brien, even if those statements were true, ne could expect that kind of thing to happen in the short term. It would also take firmer laws for these crimes, also the criminals with guns are gradually found, and their ability to get more guns easily will certainly be controlled.

Some guy named Pratt? arguing with Piers Morgan, says to him ,"Well you'd sooner be a victim than have the right to defend yourself." Well that attitude makes no sense to argue that one must possess an arsenal of automatic and semi automatic weapons to defend yourself. That also is stupid.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:47:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: ABC News, today

This is what ABC News had to say today (much what the British press is saying):

QUOTE: If there is one country that best represents the possibility of cutting gun crime by increasing gun control, it is Australia.

In 1996, 28-year-old Martin Bryant finished his lunch in a café in the seaside resort of Port Arthur and pulled out a semi-automatic rifle. In the first 15 seconds of his attack, he killed 12 and wounded 10. In all, he shot more than 50 people in six locations, killing 35. The worst mass shooting in Australia's history capped a violent decade of mass shootings that killed nearly 100 – and Australians had had enough.

Only 12 days later, Prime Minister John Howard – a conservative who had just been elected with the help of gun owners – pushed through not only new gun control laws, but also the most ambitious gun buyback program seen in recent memory.

The laws banned assault rifles, tightened gun owner licensing, and created national uniform registration standards. Howard knew they might be unpopular among some of the same voters who helped put him into office -- during one particularly hostile public town hall, he wore a bulletproof vest.

But something extraordinary happened: the laws tapped into public revulsion at the shooting and became extremely popular. And they became extremely effective.

In the last 16 years, the risk of dying by gunshot in Australia has fallen by more than 50 percent. The national rate of gun homicide is one-thirtieth that of the United States. And there hasn't been a single mass shooting since Port Arthur.

"It's not that we are a less violent people and that you are a more violent people," says Philip Alpers, an adjunct associate professor at the University of Sydney who runs GunPolicy.org, which tracks gun violence and gun laws across the world. "It's that you have more lethal means at your disposal."

UNQUOTE

The thing is Brien, all that dates back to 1996. The bit you found just proves how rabid the gun lobby (i.e. the 2nd amendment right to murder at will, lobby)


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:45:45 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Murder again!!! The whole world is watching. Hand held weapons of potential mass destruction

We are a strange species. We have been blessed with the ability to discern right from wrong with murder perceived to be ALWAYS wrong At least many think so. Not so for these fanatics/murderers. Guns again for some horribly misguided view of the world and what should be done about it.

"Gunmen shot dead a woman working on UN-backed polio vaccination efforts and her driver in northwestern Pakistan on Wednesday, officials said, raising to eight the number of people killed in the last 48 hours who were part of the immunization drive."

As for the Australian statistics. I am always suspicious of STATS but its the only 'science' we have and so we have to pay attention. Nevertheless, reducing the numbers of guns and taking away those that can accomplish a massive destruction in a few seconds is an absolute need. Nothing in this world is 'all or none'. The need to eliminate' weapons of mass destruction' (in the hand gun/rifle/assault weapon type / not the traditional meaning of that term)from the hands of civilians is still absolute despite these statistics


Entered at Wed Dec 19 17:13:33 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Truth or Fiction

Saw the following on Facebook and was wondering whether this was vaild or not, Dlew may be able to shed light on this or possibly someone else. If true, it doesn't make for a strong repeal of the second ammendment argument:

Hi Yanks,

I thought you all would like to see the real figures from Down Under.

It has now been 12 months since gun owners in Australia were forced by a new law to surrender 640,381 personal firearms to be destroyed by our own government, a program costing Australia taxpayers more than $500 million dollars.

The first year results are now in:

Australia-wide, homicides are up 6.2 percent

Australia-wide, assaults are up 9.6 percent

Australia-wide, armed robberies are up 44 percent (yes, 44 percent)!

In the state of Victoria alone, homicides with firearms are now up 300 percent. (Note that while the law-abiding citizens turned them in, the criminals did not and criminals still possess their guns!)

While figures over the previous 25 years showed a steady decrease in armed robbery with firearms, this has changed drastically upward in the past 12 months, since the criminals now are gua ranteed that their prey is unarmed.

There has also been a dramatic increase in break-ins and assaults of the elderly, while the resident is at home.

Australian politicians are at a loss to explain how public safety has decreased, after such monumental effort and expense was expended in 'successfully ridding Australian society of guns....' You won't see this on the American evening news or hear your governor or members of the State Assembly disseminating this information.

The Australian experience speaks for itself. Guns in the hands of honest citizens save lives and property and, yes, gun-control laws affect only the law-abiding citizens.

Take note Americans, before it's too late!

Will you be one of the sheep to turn yours in?


Entered at Wed Dec 19 16:44:52 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: peace on earth, etc.

I draw your attention to Track 5 at [My link], an engaging, home-grown cover of "Christmas Must Be Tonight" by one Afie Jurvanen, presently touring under the stage name "Bahamas." Released last year, but I think it flew under the radar here . . . .


Entered at Wed Dec 19 16:41:11 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Outside the Gates of Hades Sits a Three-Headed Dog

It was announced yesterday that the private equity firm of Cerberus Capital Management, the majority shareholder in the Freedom Group would be selling its stake in that company. Freedom Group manufactures & sells the .223 Bushmaster semiautomatic rifle used in the Sandy Hook school shooting, as well as other weapons & ammunition. In its public statement Cerberus said "It is apparent that the Sandy Hook tragedy was a watershed event that has raised the national debate on gun control to an unprecedented level,"

In Greek & Roman mythology, it should be noted, that Cerberus was the three-headed dog who guarded the gates of Hades. Heracles in mythology completed a series of tasks, one of which was to capture Cerberus, without the use of weapons.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 16:21:53 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Westie, I haven't time to reread what i wrote, or to answer you properly, but there most likely was a difference between whom was behing the killing of JFK and whom was being thre killings of RFK and MLK.When it comes to whom was behind it, i probably did not group the people behind JFK's with those behind RFk anbd MLK, together. Far as JFK being a good president, i think alot of good was accomplished during his administartion. And the general population thought differently under JFK. The country was headed in a good direction, far different from where it was headed once, Nixon, and especially Reagan got in, and under all the Republicans after..Whatever, i wrote, you;d do well to calm down and read it again, rather than explode.The other night, you did not explode, but you had a hard time understanding a very simple name. Kenny Rogers. I didn't argue it with you, but it took 4 or 5 passes till you got it through your head. And yes, over the years, you have mentioned Kenny Rogers in here... Far as Bill Clinton screwing around- i couldn't care less. I might answer you properly later, or not. But as i worte, RFK and MLK were good men, who were pointing the population of thios country and history of this country in a far differebt direction than it went once they were killed.For examplwe, dickhead, if neither were killed, the path this country would havce followed probably would have included implementing gun control along time ago.... After all this time, after decades of this country being run by fiscal and ethical pirates and pillagers, we have another shot here. Alot of good did happen as a result of the brief time with MLK and RFK, , alot of what MLK and RFK were talkign about , did happen.But alot got sidelined. Alot of gresat things, and Obama being PResidnet, well, are an outgrowth of those times.But alot got sidelined and we can never get all of what would have happened back. We do have a shot here now.And we are in a pivotal time in the U.S.Right now.Far as i am concerned, this is a very crucial time in U.s history. It's not as stormy a time, becuase of the storms of those times in the 60s. But it is a crucial time. And honestly Westie, i don't give a fuck what you think about me. I'll spare the rest of the peopel here javing to read my opinion of you.But i don't think anyone will have a hard time inagining it.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 16:06:41 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Adams Family - John and Fanny

John W: Sticking with your off-thread point about the guys who wrote the Constitution, were they the same guys who wrote the first and second amendments? When? Why? Years later after experience and reflection, or in a tizzy minutes later?: "Damn it John, we missed George's corrections - the one about free speech and the one about bearing arms. And now he's gone back home and for the life of me I can't figure out what he meant. Well, I guess we'll have to use it as is and hope for the best." Or something like that.

Getting back to that poor new visitor who happened to stumble in and helpfully point out a Band-related item just before the hell of Newtown broke loose: If you're still there, guy, you're absolutely right about Paul McCartney calling out "take a load off Fanny" in a live (ish) version of "Hey Jude". You might try tracking down the book that came with the first pressing of the "Let it Be" LP and/or the book "Get Back: The Unauthorized Chronicle of the Beatles' 'Let it Be' Disaster" to get a sense of how influencial our Fab Five was on the late-stage Fab Four. And then there's the musical / lyrical evidence: "Get Back", "Bungalow Bill", Rocky Raccoon", "Carry That Weight", "In The End", ... and why not "Hey Jude" itself?


Entered at Wed Dec 19 16:01:34 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: a very slight aside

There are more deaths per year due to alcohol about 34,000ish with over 25,000 of those because of drunk driving. There are roughly slightly less deaths by guns per year with over half those self inflicted. Niether is a good stat, both are violent types of deaths but since you'll never get alcohol out of the country, thinking that something that is so wrapped up in the Constitution as David P. so aptly pointed out, you aren't ever repealing the second ammendment. You are better off working within the parameters of it rather than thinking you can wipe it out.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 15:59:15 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Justice Collective

The Hillsborough CD single is sitting next to my computer. HMV had piles next to every till, so hopefully it can get that Xmas number one.

Reading about guns today. Pension funds are pulling out investments of gun companies at speed, the largest being the California Teachers Union, and the holding company is divesting itself of Remington, and shares are falling. On the other hand it reports that assault weapon sales have doubled as the vicious and unprincipled stock up in expectation of a ban. The same started happening with tobacco years ago, and companies diversified. With many pension and unit trust (or mutual funds) you can check an ethical investment box, or a "no armaments, no tobacco' box, which we always do. The more people who do this, the less profitable these businesses of death are.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 15:42:55 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Realistically, I don't think it would be easy or foreseeable to repeal the Second Amendment. The first ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, protecting liberty & property, are just too ingrained as part & parcel of the fabric of the Constitution. The Eighteenth Amendment, dealing with prohibition, is the only amendment to take away a right, and the only amendment that has been repealed.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 15:11:20 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The grievous wrong of Hillsborough finally righted in the High Court - a lesson for America?

Like many on here I have wept at events in Connecticut. I have bridled as the no-brainer desire of the majority to banish the weapons that permitted the heinous carnage has been rebutted by self-serving imbeciles devoid of brains steeped in any sense of humanity. I've winced as they have attempted to justify that self servitude with weasel words that dredge up romantic notions of self defence and armed resistance that in fact saw out their day by the turn of the century before last.

In England today ordinary people finally achieved a legal breakthrough that only a year or so ago seemed as remote as some distant star. In time the significance of what happened in England today should resonate through the hearts and minds of those decent Americans who wish to see their country swept clean of the hideous armed evil monster that stalks it day and night.

Guns can be driven out from the inner core of American life. They have to be. Ordinary folk across the Atlantic have shown how the voice of the little man can overcome stonewalling from on high. Little Americans can now do the same using the current tragedy as their wedge to drive home the urgency for change until any desire for gun ownership is seen for what it is.

Belief in the ultimate sanctity of the truth when allied to an unstinting dogged determination to ensure that truth is finally heard can sometimes turn the corrupted reality of this godforsaken world on its head and permit the voice of the small man and woman to be heard and justice to be done.

Today is a landmark not just in British legal history but in that of the civilized world. Decency and integrity have triumphed over establishment's vested interest and its vile contempt for the small man.

The following article from Tony Barrett of The Times summarises what has taken place and its immense significance.

After 23 years of banging their heads against a succession of brick walls put in front of them by an establishment that didn’t seem to care, the Hillsborough families and their supporters have spent the past three months pinching themselves.

From David Cameron standing up in the House of Commons and apologising for the cover-up that followed the deaths of 96 Liverpool fans at Hillsborough on April 15, 1989 to Dominic Grieve, the Attorney General, applying for fresh inquests, the past 99 days have been as remarkable as the 281 months were soul destroying.

The stream of small but significant breakthroughs that led up to the Hillsborough Independent Panel producing its history changing report on September 12 has now become a tidal wave, one that threatens to wash away the lies which allowed a tragedy to be tainted by an orchestrated police smear campaign.

Today there were two more major breakthroughs, ones that seemed impossible as recently as last year but which in the light of recent events have taken on an air of almost normality. The quashing of the original accidental death inquest verdicts on the 96 had been widely anticipated but the announcement of a new police investigation into Hillsborough was, in its timing at least, unexpected.

Within this new normality, such advances seem almost routine but they need to be viewed as the seismic shifts that they are. All of a sudden, the justice which had been so cruelly denied to the victims and their families for more than two decades is starting to be seen to be done. How such an incredible turnaround came about is a story of people power in its purest and most inspiring sense, of families, loved ones, friends and strangers coming together to give the truth a chance of emerging from a litany of lies.

The scandalous, unforgivable attempts to shift the blame for Hillsborough on to the victims is now seen for what it always was – a disgraceful cover-up that Michael Mansfield QC believes was the biggest in British legal history.

Vindication is now coming on almost a daily basis but even that does not take away from the fact that the families have been forced to waited more for more than 23 years to get to this stage. That is unforgivable and it was put into its proper context by Barry Devonside, a father whose 18-year-old son Christopher perished on the death trap that was the Leppings Lane end. Although so much is changing, Mr Devonside said, one thing never does: “Those we lost still won’t be coming home.”

Still, as Andy Burnham, one of a number of MPs who have campaigned tirelessly on behalf of the Hillsborough families, pointed out outside the High Court, today’s events are “the most significant so far”. The accidental death verdicts were always one of the biggest thorns in the side of the families because they meant that no one was responsible for Hillsborough, it was just an unfortunate consequence of events rather than the act of criminal negligence that they believed it to be.

So inappropriate was the original verdict that the families refused to accept it, with many of them refusing to collect their loved one’s death certificate in protest. As one of the mothers told Brian Reade, the Daily Mirror journalist who has been at the forefront of the media campaign, back in 1990: “While I have breath I’ll fight that wicked verdict because when you bring a child into this world the words on the birth certificate are accurate. When they leave the least they deserve is the right ones on their death certificate.”

There is now, finally, belatedly and thankfully, a chance that those mothers and fathers will at last get the death certificates that reflect how their sons and daughters were killed, rather than the meaningless pieces of paper which claimed they were the victims of an accident.

As the Hillsborough Independent Panel proved in its remarkable report, Hillsborough was no accident, especially as it was proven that as many as 58 of its victims could have been saved had they received proper medical attention. This was negligence on an unimaginable scale and justice will be served only if that is recorded officially and reflected in new and accurate death certificates.

But even if that does happen no one should be grateful, instead we should be angry as a nation and as a society that it has taken so long and that so many institutions of the state worked against the Hillsborough families and their battle for justice when they should have been coming to their aid. That is a stain that can never be wiped clean and with every new breakthrough that is made, the scale of the cover-up and the callousness of those perpetrated it heaps even more shame on the establishment.

A grievous wrong was being righted at the High Court today and its significance should not be understated but it has taken 23 years too long for justice just to begin to reveal itself and had it not been for the unstinting determination of the Hillsborough families and their supporters it might never have done so.

[End of article]

Decent Americans can learn from this display of determination from ordinary folk to ensure a wrong is righted. America is faced with a major cancer within its very being. It needs cutting out. Anybody who doesn't see that is not looking properly.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 14:46:24 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.237)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

A famous basketball coach speaks out.........maybe the tide is turning.......just maybe.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 09:13:10 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You’re right that it’s easier to repeal the 2nd amendment rather than argue semantics, but one of the issues is that a written constitution leads to arguments over semantics, especially when a proportion of the right wing are “literalists” over the Bible, so that they will bring the same mind set. Both were written by fallible men … I should say “people”, but it was men. And to outside observers with no vested interest in guns, the semantics mean a well-regulated civilian force to be called up in time of emergency, and the Militia Act soon afterwards supports this interpretation.

The Band discussions went out of the window for a few days as they do, because the enormity of the massacre of the innocents was right in our faces. I do see the argument that it’s happening in Central Africa on a daily basis, but that is out of our sight, and in a different context. This context is one we can all relate to and place ourselves and our loved ones in. "Music From Big Pink" will still exist next week or next month. Those little ones won't.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 08:51:09 CET 2012 from (69.126.138.157)

Posted by:

John W.

Peter V. - Not to dispute your opinion on what should be done regarding gun control in the US, but I will argue with your statement that "the 2nd amendment has been misinterpreted." The authors of the US Constitution were most concerned about saving the people from tyranny. They felt the "milita" -- substitute today, "military" -- not "the people", but the government's armed forces, the ruling power's stormtroopers -- ought never be able to enforce their will over the people's freedom. Therefore the individual people's right to bear arms shall never be infringed. I know, it's an ambiguous sentence and the meaning has been disputed for 100 years. But I just think you'd have a better chance repealing it rather than fighting over the semantics of it. Meanwhile what ever happened to the Band discussions on our little one-thread website? Everything is suddenly political here. Anyone see that Jim Weider show on Livestream? Any memories of Levon at the Lone Star? LOL


Entered at Wed Dec 19 07:15:05 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: FANTASY

Jeff; What gawd damn dream world do you live in?? Very often some of the outbursts you come out with here, I fear for your sanity......really I don't think you have any.

You are convinced that John Kennedy was a good man! Give your head a shake. He was one of the worst whore mongers the Usa has ever seen. Bill Clinton, getting a blow job under some table in the White House, was nothing compared to John Kennedy's actions.

Kennedy, got a lead pill from the Maifa, or organized crime in your country. If you don't understand that, then..........like I've said before. You probably believe in the tooth fairy.

You portray that absolute ignorant attitude of the American people that every one hates, ( and that certainly is not all Americans). You think that "people came and shot down your heroes". Get a grip for chris sake. These were some of the most dispicable dishonest ,into the worst graft people on this planet. You revere them, like they were heros. Do you really believe all this shit??


Entered at Wed Dec 19 05:56:47 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Yes, Calvin, and everyone else.

John Kennedy was killed either the day or the day of my mom and stepfather's wedding ceremony. i'm pretty sure we watched while Ruby was shot, or repeats, while we were getting dressed the day of the reception.Which i think was another day,but maybe it wasn't. I was pretty young, so which day etc etc, is hard to pin down. i remember what i remember. I was 10 when MLK and RFK were killed. That i remember well- both were heroes.We talked about Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy in school all the time.Current events were part of the curriculum. So, at 10, i knew these were both good , important men, men who were trying to improve the lives of everyone.Even those who hated them would have benefitted from these men living and leading this society and this country. In their short lives they both improved the world, but had they lived.....

i've, and i'm sure a host of people, have always said that had RFk and MLK not been assassinated, this country would be a very different country than it is now.Our society would be different.King was talking about economic equality- the garbage man strile in memphis, right... not just equal rights.So they killed him.RFK, woulda restructured everything- so they killed him. their figurative and literal (business) descendants are the people and businesses who backed Busch and romney, and now are the same people and businesses who do not want gun control.. Hopefully we are in the early stages of another poaitive societal adjustment.

both Kennedys, and King were talking about a better society, a better world.Not a society where how much you earned, how many big tvs you had, how many fancy cars yoiu had, defined you, they were talking about people doing good, people making a difference in their communities, people accomplishing good things, helping others. you didn't hear kids saying they wanted to grow uop to be stockbrokers- noone aspired to be a corporate raider when they were in high school or college. The assasination of RFK and MLK was the beginning of the dark ages.We still aren't out of the dark ages, however, there is a light. We are at a pivotal time. Right now. This is it. i don't mean the next day, or the next week has to be the deciding period forever, but, right now, we are in the middle of a pivotal time.Obama won a second term.he had a whole bunch of things to deal with- huge things.This massacre right now, this adding the gun control issue to the job.... we all knew this was a big time, but now this last one more thing- we are in one of those times in U.S.history right now, it couldn't be more clear. the lines were drawn, fortunately the election landed where it did.Still, huge work to be done.And it waqs important.But this, this one more thing, this one more huge issue that is a GREAT DIVIDE, one of the defining divides, added now. It's go for broke time in the U.S. of A. No guns drawn. no Black Panthers, no Ohio state, no Chicago 7, no Vietnam War, no Watergate.But still, it's go for broke time.


Entered at Wed Dec 19 04:47:18 CET 2012 from (68.106.150.126)

Posted by:

Calvin

Yes, the Supreme Court has come along way from the 1950s and 1960s when the court, led and filled by a number of Ike appointees, rewrote the laws concerning civil rights and discrimination in this county because it was the right thing to do, regardless of political affiliations.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:51:39 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lay That Pistol Down

I understand what you say JT.As a gun owner myself for the purpose of hunting for game to eat, (not trophy). Also some of the places on this coast that we load equipment in these logging camps, the grizzly bear danger is very real and these are pretty necessary.

Having said that I will never agree to automatic or semi automatic for ANY REASON. There is no reason. I have fired an M16 and a Garan with 30 round clips of tracer in them. A friend of mine who was a gun collector had them. Believe me if you ever have, or even been close to them, particularly watching tracers come out of them. For me that's all it takes to say these things have to go.

As one Aussie fellow said, have a buy back. Melt the sons-a-bitches down and make potatoe peelers out of all the gawd damn things.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:38:34 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Happier Times

Thanks JT. It seems ironic to me. All of you fellows here have a lot of good input here, that all of us can clearly understand, and I'm sure we all get it.

However one of thes advocates of that second ammendment from the states who is a man with some important title for those rights and I can't remember his name. He is on Piers Morgan and they get right into a fight over this.

I'm listening to this guy who is so serious about these rights, and I'm looking at him like he is a comedian, are you for real man? None of this makes any sense. Now here I go! I apologize. Now enjoy the music.

Jerry you certainly have put a lot of work into the concert scene and I'm sure everyone appreciates it.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:31:29 CET 2012 from (65.94.114.154)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: I guess they read....

Just one more, Rockin'

'The National Rifle Association said on Tuesday it is “prepared to offer meaningful contributions” to prevent future massacres like the Connecticut shooting on Friday, marking a sharp change in tone for the nation’s largest gun rights group. “The National Rifle Association of America is made up of four million moms and dads, sons and daughters—and we were shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the news of the horrific and senseless murders in Newtown,” the organization said in a statement sent to reporters. The NRA plans a news conference on Friday after staying silent out of respect for families in Newtown, Connecticut, and as a matter of common decency, the statement said.'


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:26:58 CET 2012 from (65.94.114.154)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The Band concerts 1960 and on; corrections & additions

Yes Rockin' - Time for the music and less guns. I've been getting additions (from Tim) and corrections and revision suggestions from all over and will send in the next couple of weeks a revision of the The Band concert list with these changes to Jan. People are indeed finding mistakes and Tim's 1985 additions will be a major addition. Thanks to all.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:10:12 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

JD

Subject: Video

That is from "The Voice" last night. Best show of its kind.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 23:06:45 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Voice - Loenard Cohen's Allaleuliah

Stop the talk about guns for a while. Not sure if any of you have seen this. It has just been displayed. Listen to these people sing.

It's a little hard to watch, each of them holds a card with the name and age of each of the children on here. However the sound is very beautiful.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 22:30:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The basic flaw in the Supreme Court is political appointment. It stands as two Reagan, two Bush jnr, one Bush snr, two Cinton, two Obama. So "Republicans" win 5:4. And they vote on party lines. The Supreme Court was intended to be a check on politicians, but it turned into a mindless party-oriented rubber stamp. Shit! I learned that in the 60s.

In the UK, we have a problem with the High Court who seem to follow an agenda on human rights (we can't send known terrorists back) which are at odds with majority opinion. But they aren't direct poltical appointments,


Entered at Tue Dec 18 22:09:43 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Terror, politics and guns; What a day

'Gunmen shot dead five women working on UN-backed polio vaccination efforts in two different Pakistani cities on Tuesday, officials said, a major setback for a campaign that international health officials consider vital to contain the crippling disease but which Taliban insurgents say is a cover for espionage.' Had enough yet?


Entered at Tue Dec 18 21:17:32 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: 'bad form'

It was 'bad form' to discuss Jews and immigration into Canada and the USA in the 30s (isolationism was rampant). It was 'bad form' to discuss human rights in a country that had discarded slavery in certain parts of the USA throughout the first 1/2 decade and even now. It was 'bad form' to consider the degree of terrorism possible in the USA in the 1990s when the obvious was obvious. And now it is 'bad form' to speak up when the speaking is effective. The best form of grief at a time like this is action in words. I'm sure the parents of those 20 and the relatives of those 6 might forgive them for making a noise during their grief. If this sounds like rhetoric, it is because it is!


Entered at Tue Dec 18 21:14:52 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The blood below his feet..

Union general Ambrose Burnside, a former gunsmith who took part in the Civil War battle at Antietam, the bloodiest single day on American soil, was chosen as the first president of the National Rifle Association.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 21:06:49 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: turn, turn, turn

JT: the NRA is always silent at such times . . . they consider it "bad form" to discuss policy when it's time for grieving . . . .


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:58:18 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: A Change is Goan Come

Susan came home yesterday from here arobics. Her and her lady friends had been raving over this song that Jiam Gomeshi had used in relation to this most resent tragedy. They couldn't figure out what it was. Susan finally found his show to replay so she could show me........crazy old woman. I told her I've played that for you many times.

Here's Sam Cooke.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:58:26 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: How do they sleep?

'NRA silent as gun debate mounts'/'A siege mentality has taken hold at NRA headquarters, a five-storey office complex on the outskirts of Washington, D.C., where the leaders of America’s most vocal and influential gun lobby are maintaining total silence as the clamour builds for a national debate over access to firearms'.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:55:16 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Executive Branch Militia

In 1804 vice-president Aaron Burr mortally wounded his political rival Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Charges were later dropped and he was never tried in a court of law.

202 years later, vice-president Dick Cheney carelessly wounded fellow hunter Harry Whittington. While attempting to shoot quail, VP Cheney accidentally hit his lawyer friend with birdshot. No charges were filed. Apparently, they must have some big orange-vested quail down in Texas.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:39:32 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Headline - just now!

At least 4 dead in apparent Colorado murder-suicide.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:36:16 CET 2012 from (86.85.238.17)

Posted by:

Matthijs

Location: the Netherlands

Subject: thanx

Thanks s much for making this amazing website. Found all the tabs i looked for! Let the Bands music be played on and on!


Entered at Tue Dec 18 20:31:20 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The Times: always a space in time for Bob

"""Come senators, congressmen Please heed the call Don't stand in the doorway Don't block up the hall For he that gets hurt Will be he who has stalled There's a battle outside And it is ragin' It'll soon shake your windows And rattle your walls For the times they are a-changin'. '''


Entered at Tue Dec 18 19:59:16 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: The good news is that if the Supremes can do a 180 between '38 and '08, they can no doubt repeat that feat in much less time now, given the new technologies available today. Steroids, Viagra, applause, adulation ... - give them whatever it takes.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 19:42:34 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Militia

Thank you David. So, it is crystal clear to me. Pass laws that deal with the militia and their requirements. Pass laws that are unique to individuals and that make safety of the public the priority. There is no unifying act or set of laws that can deal with this issue effectively. The reality is simple. Deal with the reality.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 19:25:19 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Prior Precedent

Conversely, in 1938 the Supreme Court focused on the prefatory clause of the Second Amendment relating to militia purposes. In the U.S. v. Miller the Court upheld a ban on sawed-off shotguns which also imposed a high tax on the sale of such weapons. The court ruled that the Second Amendment doesn't protect guns that don't have a reasonable relationship to the purpose of maintaining an efficient well-regulated militia. That Court interpreted the Amendment's protection only as a "collective", not an individual right. In other words, the right protected "the people", unified collectively for a common defense militarily, not to individuals possessing guns for personal self-defense.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 18:21:10 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: true conservative thinking prioritizes safety

I don't mind conservative thinking. I do mind thinking that places some misplaced rights argument ahead of human safety and wellbeing. This is not conservative thinking. A true conservative would target safety in order to eliminate danger. The argument to maintain status quo is counter to any logic given the recurrent events of the past 30 years wrt to guns in the world and in USA. Domestic ownership of guns has to be reviewed with safety of the public the absolute priority. Anything less is extremist thinking...not conservative (small c) thinking. Its time!


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:52:19 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

It is typical thinking of these asshole conservative "originalists". They skew things their own warped way and claim they are only transmitting what was in the Founding Fathers' collective heads. All they are really doing is a function of partisan politics for their friends and benefactors, with the usual lack of irony.

Scalia claims he has the right to declare what is moral in society while he accepts big money and free weekends from his right wing pals. He's a cur.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:51:42 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Gun sales increase

The Guardian reports that gun sales in USA are sharply increased because of concern and anticipation of future restrictions. 'The horror'.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:31:34 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks. Was it you who said the other day that Scalia is an 'Originalist' - which I take to mean a self-defined 'fundamentalist' who is happiest sniffing the bottled effluent of his prophetic forebears. But even there he falls down on the job. If the guys who wrote the thing had meant 'individuals', wouldn't they have used the word instead of 'people'?


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:23:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It really is bullshit. British constitutional law is unwritten and is based on precedent, while the Founding Fathers, operating in the spirit of rational enlightenment in the 1780s and 1790s, opted for a written constitution instead with careful definitions. So you can't then base law on the "history" of the clause. it's like saying "Because people have wilfully misinterpreted the clause we'll stick with misinterpretation." There is not a word about self-defence in the second amendment. It sounds military right the way through. The purpose is stated as "the security of a free state" that is the nation, not "the security of individual householders".

With judges like that you really are in trouble. But so are we, our judges in the UK ruling stuff on terrorists that very few of the people would agree with.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:16:31 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Welcome to...

Billboard entering Newtown: 2nd Amendment as banner. Bold CAPITAL LETTERS. Then... Welcome to our town. A fitting memorial and a message to all citizens of the world.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:12:03 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: It was a 5-4 decision, common with this Court, with Justice Scalia delivering the opinion of the majority, and Justice Stevens writing the dissent for the minority,


Entered at Tue Dec 18 17:01:32 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Obviously the 2008 court was a dickhead.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 16:51:03 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Uphill Battle

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."
--Second Amendment

One would hope that the tragic events of the last week, will help sway the opinion of those previouly opposed to any & all attempts at gun control, especially those aimed at assault weapons and various forms of ammunition magazine clips. In recent years, however, the District of Columbia, the city of Chicago and the neighboring village of Oak Park, have enacted laws banning handguns, only to have them struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 2008 the Court ruled, in Distict of Columbia et al. v. Heller, that "the Second Amendment protects an individual's right to possess firearms and that the city's total ban on handguns, as well as its requirements that firearms in the home be kept nonfunctional even when necessary for self-defense, violated that right."

The Court, in ruling that individual self-defense was "the central component" of the Second Amemdment right, held that:

"1. The Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.
(a)The Amendment's prefatory clause announces a purpose, but does not limit or expand the scope of the second part, the operative clause. The operative clause's text and history demonstrate that it connotes an individual right to keep and bear arms."


Entered at Tue Dec 18 15:31:18 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: in the words of Ron Sexsmith ...

God so loved the idiot boy
Gave him two eyes so he could explore
Gave him two hands so he could destroy
All the good things that he found


Entered at Tue Dec 18 01:58:09 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: More of the violence

Now we have a man in China gone burzurke and cut up an elderly lady with a knife, and then 22 school children going to school. Insanity obviously. The olny good example here...he wasn't equiped with automatic fire power. Although some of these children are badly injured, non are dead.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 00:48:14 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

JT- there is an incredible amount of racist thinking amd hatred in the U.S. Alot of it is "white is right." And it goes beyond "white is right." As most people know, white supremacists generally hate anyone who isn't like them, white and maybe christian, pro gun, anti abortion, what ever neliefs they may embrace. Just for clarification, i'm not saying that all white people who are christian , and pro gun or anti abortion, are white supremacists...... My fathers parents had tattoos near or on their wrists. i don't recalll them ever talking about it.. i know nothing about their families that i recall. My grandfather didn't talk much, died when i was still 12.My grandmother talked all the time, but not about the holocaust. I'm not certain, but i think my stepfather's father had a tattoo also . I notice racism, and see it most days....this spring and summer i needed to put together an additional roofing crew. I won't put illegal aliens to work, and i'm not putting guys on roofs who can't speak adequate english to communicate with me or a homeowner. and being a taxpayer is important too. Other than that, i could care less about new guys ethnicity. Ya just gotta be excellent at what the hell you are doing, show up, be safe and pleasant on the job, and work as hard as the next guy. I got daily calls, guys sayingh that they had an all white crew- that immediately ruled them out. Regardless of who reccoed em, who they knew that i knew, howe good thewir work was.Cause when they say ' We are an all white crew" , they are telling me who they really are...., and that comes with a lot of other bullshit too, not just being racists.. All American Crew, i'd listen to that. All white crew i'm not listening to. My longtime roofing crew here, all Missouri boys , i know em along time.Crew leader is a farm boy, but if you have an eye, you can see that there was American indian him.And there was. One of em is Vietnamese, grew up here, one of em is black, the rest are mostly mutts, like most U.S.citizens really are. and you don't hear any racist shit out of these guys or they wouldn't be working on my jobs....But this hatred thing- its' rampant. Racism isn't going away any time soon, be nice if ti could in a few more genrtaions.....What the white supramcists, and the people who want to think that Obama is giving things away to poor black a(nd hispanic) people who don;t want to work don't get, is that hard working black people are harder on black criminals or black lazy bums than anyone........Telling an older black lady the story of my car being stolen, and some of the kids involved in this resisting arrest and then filing abuse complaints against the cops, she said"..........I hope he got em gooooood."And this same woman, i remember when her grandson was in college and living home and not given a penny more than he needed to get to school so he had to get a job.... Kid has a little business of his own today. and he saves his money.... Most of my black female friends, their fathers warned em not to bring nobody else home- meaning, don't get knocked up. Hard working people don't cut NO ONE any slack- get your ass working, no matter what it is, get to work, stop crying. Racists usually are progun idiots too.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 00:33:18 CET 2012 from (220.233.229.98)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Kevin J: you're right, of course...

We do such a good job of shielding ourselves from the other dangers of the world that when a supposedly 'safe' place is affected... We expect (and this is a terrible, terrible, thing) that say, Kabul will be bombed. (We shouldn't expect it, but we've been conditioned to). As a result, we can filter out the tragic and disturbing issues that arise from that. (I suspect there's some latent racism in the media too: not individual journalists, mind you, but as a whole). I'm not saying we should filter this stuff, but we do. And it is a grand tragedy as well.

Humans: the stupidest species on the planet.


Entered at Tue Dec 18 00:27:08 CET 2012 from (220.233.229.98)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Australia...

Hi Doug: you put the buyback (which was controversial in some corners, but yes it worked) much better than I could have. I can only remember 3 shootings on this scale in australia: one in Strathfield in Sydney, about 1992, one in HOddle Street, Melbourne, maybe 1987, and of course Port Arthur: I'm pretty sure I'm missing at least one other. I visited Port Arthur for the third time not long after it happened: the grief was palpable. The guide assured us the right thing to do was to visit, spend money, keep them going... but, as an already tragic place (it was a jail for convicts), there was an extra level of darkness.



Entered at Mon Dec 17 23:43:31 CET 2012 from (203.10.111.38)

Posted by:

Doug

Location: Sydney, Australia

Subject: Gun Buyback

Just to comment that we had our own gun tragedy in Australia in 1996, with 35 innocents killed. The result was that the government of the time made owning automatic and semi automatic weapons illegal, and had a compulsory buy back of these weapons, with hundreds of thousand of them destroyed. It was done and it worked.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 23:40:13 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The mindless football posters are mind boggling, Pat. I don't call them "football fans" because i warrant these are dumb couch potatoes who never get into the fresh air in an actual stadium. That said, if anyone posted such racist abuse on the website of a Premier league club, they'd find themselves banned from the stadium for life.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 21:38:07 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In retrospect

President Obama's speech is I think one of the best I've heard. Apparently he would not accept any speech written for him, and wrote it all himself.

He really didn't sound like a president, and came off more like a father and family man. I really hope that his government, and your congress will do what's right as he said. We can't go on doing nothing.

I think that the USA likes to come across like "big brother" in the world who looks after all their neigbours. A situation like this I'm sure leaves a lot of people with the feeling, How can you let this sort of thing happen and do nothing about gun control and expect everyone else to respect you.

Thought a lot about how this must affect you folks close like that Todd. As I said before, folks just trying to recover from natural disaster after "Sandy" being kicked in the guts like this, how much are people to endure?

It is necessary for all of us, who hope to consider ourselves sane that we take EVERY precaution to do our own house keeping in look after any weapon we own. As Jerry asks the question, how many guns do you need just to target shoot? Automatic and semi auto matic weapons are not the thing for people to own and keep in their homes. There is no reason on this earth for it.

When our gun laws changed and the gun registry came into affect, I and many of my friends were first to have our hunting weapons registered. Although I wasn't required to, because I have hunted most my life, I went and paid and took the gun safety course to have that citation on my FAC anyway. The plain truth is, now it's many years since I've hunted, and more and more with this kind of thing, I loose my ambition to hunt or kill anything. However rather than sell them to who knows who, or what will happen, I know where two guns are that will always be safe.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 21:21:06 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Guns

First off, I just wanted to tell everyone that I'm so impressed by the level of civility and intelligence of this current thread. Thank you everyone for the discourse .

The 2nd amendment calls for a state controlled militia, i.e the National Guard. That indicates that there are checks and standards, not anyone who just wants to own a gun..The way that Norm describes the Canadian system sounds very rational. When we want to add or remove an amendment we have done so. (Prohibition) Times change and the Constitution was fluid allowing for things to change. I can only hope that the death of these innocents doesn't go unanswered.

Pat , I was horrified by those "football" comments. I know on some level they exist, but to see that virulent hatred is so upsetting.

I just find myself tearing up when I think about this tragedy. I hope I will never again have to


Entered at Mon Dec 17 20:47:19 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Target shooting

An increasing love of target shooting.... one article said. (Toronto Star) - a friend commenting on her background.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 19:44:06 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Why did she have (?3 or 5) guns?

There is the large overriding issue here regarding human interaction with guns and the tragedy of massacre. However, I still have one question (really many questions), a question that no one has adequately answered: Why did this kindergarten teacher possess 3 (or 5) guns? Why were they in that home? Did she inherit them? It was said on CNN, I think, that they were purchased (by her?). My question is at the core of the motivation, presumably not of a hunter or a person who goes to the shooting range or who knows what else? It relates to if a gun is needed for protection from the unknown (as my neighbour said to me when I was living in the south during training); but if so, why 3 (or 5)? Not that such protection should be the norm or acceptable. But in this particular case, can anyone address the issue of why?


Entered at Mon Dec 17 18:54:50 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The Insane Asylum

I lost most of an entire family because of 'the insane asylum' in another country. I never had grandparents and my parents were in labour/death camps. The lessons of history are seemingly never learned. Its just another manifestation of power corrupting meshed with hate and stupidity. The 'football' comments by the fans who missed the first quarter of their evening game (preempted by Obama's speech) are one manifestation of the ignorance of stupidity of some of the populace. Be wary. No country, no matter how brave and free, escapes unscathed. It can happen anywhere that the wrong approaches and resultant laws lead to things like massacres and genocide. We protect what is ours. Our most precious is our children. We cannot ever feel safe again for them or all of us until this is resolved.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 18:38:19 CET 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: The Insane Asylum AKA America

Subject: Guns

In a heated debate with a gun supporter last night, I was told that cars kill more people and we don't ban them. My reply was 'using your logic, you would sit behind the wheel of an idling car waiting to ram the first reckless driver you see'. I could debate this all day, but I'm tired. I have a six-year old daughter in first grade, and those classes were her classes and those teachers were her teachers. Last year when she was five, she asked what 9/11 was, and I showed her videos of the planes striking and explained as best as I could for her age. I later took her to the 9/11 Memorial. As bad as 9/11 was, I could explain it to her honestly. Now, a year later, how do I explain to a first grader that what happened to children her age at while at school? It's bad enough I have to worry every time I get on a plane, but that's just my safety and my personal terror. That First Graders have to contend with this is beyond the pale. I was proud of President Obama last night and I sincerely hope his speech portends a serious push for strong gun control measures.I don't care how hard that might be, I don't care about the resistance there will be from the right wing. I'm tired of respecting other's views in this matter and agreeing to disagree. As I said, I have been wrapped up in this tragedy since it began 3 days ago. I'm from CT. I know people who know some of the children. I'm tired of debating it. The guns have to go, the culture of violence has to go, and those who disagree will just have to be pushed aside or run over by what I hope will become the tide of history.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 18:26:32 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The time is now. Better than...

I agree. We should never forget or let go of the negative things that leaders do and we should bring those to the fore any time we can when there are issues. But, we should also applaud and be supportive when (finally)someone does do something right. The system has been too slow to respond and the politicians have been political rather than humane when they needed the reverse. And so Sikhs died and many other died when something could have been done. Its often (NOT ALWAYS) never too late to begin to do the right thing. Why the stupidity and the less than adequate timely response after all the previous 'events'. Politics and power ruled and determined the course. I am very cautious because politicians often do not do the thing that is best for humanity because votes and other lesser matters run the show. I think the time that those determinants and human needs have intersected may be here now and maybe, just maybe, even the recalcitrants will bend a little. Kevin J: No massacre is acceptable! Of course there should have been a similar and sensitive outcry then and at every one of these horrors. But if the time is now to change, then so be it. Better late...


Entered at Mon Dec 17 18:05:28 CET 2012 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

And here are some more reason why resistance from the right wing will be so furious. Warning: offensive language for most humans.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 17:53:01 CET 2012 from (108.223.60.236)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Hard Times in CT

Tough couple of days here in Connecticut. This tragedy is beyond heartbreaking, and has been a total shock here. I was working for one of my regular clients on Friday morning in the next town over from Newtown/Sandy Hook. My client lives in Newtown and has a daughter in the school system. We first found out about the shooting when she received a reverse 911 message on her cell-phone saying that the schools in town were on lockdown and that there had been a shooting at the elementary school. Her daughter was not in the school that had the shooting as she is in the middle school, which is a couple of miles away, but it was much too close for comfort. Accurate information about the specifics of what was happening seemed to take a long time to get, as the events of the morning unfolded. Needless to say there was a lot of worry and uncertainty. It wasn’t until early afternoon that she received the message that she could go and pick up her daughter.

Still trying to come to grips with this nightmare that occurred in a town that was once referred to as one of the safest towns in America. I feel for all of the families that were affected, as well as the community as a whole. It just feels too close to home. My client’s parents live about 2000 feet from the school where this happened. I’ve spent a fair amount of time at their house and have gotten to know them well. Her father just retired as a bus driver for the school system and knows many of the families in town. I’ve photographed weddings in one of the churches that they’ve been using for vigils, which just had to be evacuated yesterday because of threats. A friend of ours is a pediatrician in that town. My daughter told me that two of the young victims of the school shooting had been patients of his.

Most of Friday was spent trying to figure out exactly what was going on, and the full extent of the violence. One of the most moving accounts that I saw on television later Friday night, was an interview with the first grade teacher who saved her student’s lives by locking them in a bathroom, barricading the door with a bookcase and keeping them calm and quiet. She said in the interview that she told each of the children that “she loved them”. As their situation seemed pretty dire at that point, and she had no idea if they would get out alive, she wanted them to feel love as potentially one of their last emotions rather than fear or horror. I’m very impressed with the bravery, courage, and responsibility that the teachers, administrators, and young students displayed on Friday. In the wake of this tragedy, it gives me hope that there are still many good people in this world.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 17:43:47 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Stop the Sobbing

........this is the 5th mass killing by gun since April.......indeed he will be remembered for this......I forget - did everyone weep when those Sikh's were massacred at their temple a few months ago or was it just this latest one that has everyone so teary eyed? Over 100,000 deaths by guns in US over the last 10 years, almost double the death total of US soldiers in Vietnam.......but the first term was all about preserving the "Bush tax cuts"......got to keep the boys on Wall Street happy.......


Entered at Mon Dec 17 16:18:56 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Barak Obama

I am not one to support public services that display grief. I am pretty private when it comes to personal loss and share with the few close to me. However, the opportunity to see the president of the USA speak plainly and with what I perceived as genuine caring to a group of people who were suffering was overwhelming for me. I am as cynical as the next person when it comes to politics and power. This conversation, shared with the entire world, between a president and parent and people who lost their kids and loved ones, was on an entire other level. When he read the names of the children, we wept. He will be remembered for this. It is his 'Ich bin ein Berliner' speech. He connected!


Entered at Mon Dec 17 09:33:56 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dlew, Australia is being quoted as a successful "pull-back" on weapons by the press here.

I don’t think anyone believes it can happen overnight. Though the assault weapon ban could be reinstituted immediately and should be. But you could institute a process … it’s hard to believe how powerful the tobacco companies were, and for years they had pet scientists contesting the clear facts about smoking and health. But once the house of cards started to shake, it tumbled pretty quickly. The time from when you’d go in a teachers staffroom and half of them tried to smoke two in the ten minutes between lessons, and a total ban in pubs, restaurants, then the workplace, then vehicles used for work by more than one person, was incredibly short. I strongly suspect in car smoking will be banned soon … using a phone already is., and drivers have been stopped for eating and drinking at the wheel. Ten years is short for this kind of thing. I think it was less.

It’s an education process. It probably has to involve voluntary self-regulation by the media (stop making TV programmes where guns resolve every conflict), but it needs straight bans on violent video games, and soon.

I saw today that from April next year, all open access public wi-fi will have to filter deep porn content in the UK. It doesn’t stop people accessing it on their own devices, but it ensures there’s a trail via the network. Some will say it’s censorship, but it’s not stopping people accessing stuff on their own systems, just protecting others in public systems.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 09:12:11 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Lawyers guns and money....

I agree with Calvin that the issue runs deeper. I have fired guns, and at one time owned a slug gun and a .22 magnum rifle. My uncle had a marvellous collection of world war 2 weapons... Most of which were never fired.

One of the most relaxing things I've done is shoot 50 bullets ata tin can. But killing even feral pests sickened me (yes I eat meat,I'm a hypocrite). So I got rid of my weapons. Movingz to a city helped that decision - as I'd rather collect guitars books and music. Bu I know where the lawful owners are coming from. /n Nonetheless, regulation might stop some massacres... I can barely bring myself to think about what happened. I weep with all of you.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 06:25:11 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

As long as there is a prominent political party schizo enough to oppose gay marriage yet support private ownership of assault weapons--both on a constitutional level--nothing will happen.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 02:31:14 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Angels Amoung Us

You gotta believe. On Tuesday, my youngest, Amanda comes up to see me, and brings my two youngest grand children. I'll hold on to them and give thanks for what I have. They are so little, thank fully they won't even know why.

They are angels. There is angels amoung us I'm sure of it. You have to believe. As I watch this service, I'm sure, never before in my life have I seen so many different faiths join together in one room to be united in their greiving and love. Were these little folks a pawn of some kind to help bring this fucked up world a little more together??


Entered at Mon Dec 17 00:58:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Change

I guess about 10 minutes from now, President Obama will be addressing the people in Newtown. He is apparently saying it is time for action in this gun situation. As he doesn't have to run for office again, theye are saying, it's likely that he will take a much firmer stand for change.

As a gun owner myself, I know that our laws are a lot different. Unless some one had the mechanism to make one of my guns fire, they could never use one. Our guns must have locks on them, or be disabled so they can't fire. Mine are. The bolt action and firing pin is removed from my guns until I take them out to use them. The cartridge clips and shells are locked away, and only I know where they are. Possessing a FAC, (Firearms accussition certificate) which must be renewed every 5 years, the police can come in my house at any time to check that my guns are either locked or disabled. If they are not you risk heavy fine and loss of the guns.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 00:37:19 CET 2012 from (65.94.114.154)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Cynicism

It is refreshing. I respect the cynicism here. Also refreshing are the ideas on how to resolve this horrible and vexing problem. Too bad people here don't 'run the show'. Maybe Barak reads this site.


Entered at Mon Dec 17 00:03:36 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just watching the BBC news, where they named the children with photos. Five to seven years old. We wept. Obama is starting his second term. He can’t do a third. So this is the time to act. If he doesn’t, he’s culpable on the next one. The Supreme Court has ruled that definitions in the Constitution go back to Dr Johnson’s dictionary because that was what the framers used. Therefore, the second amendment clearly meant a government regulated militia. i.e. it meant The National Guard. Period.

The insurance idea works. You legislate that all guns must be insured against third party harm. The insurance company pays in the event of harm. They bring in the actuaries, assess the risk, and charge accordingly. You pay per weapon. No blanket rate for arsenals. So you have young driver rates, and the more powerful the weapon the higher the charge. If your kids access your guns and do harm, you go to jail. All guns must be inspected and checked by the police annually. The police charge a commercial rate for the time in doing so in the form of an annual licence. No annual licence? Go to jail. That is "well-regulated."



Entered at Sun Dec 16 21:57:48 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Continuing violence

I have just come in from getting a load of firewood. Going on line here, the first thing I see, is a bomb threat in the Catholic church in Newton Conneticut. A male voice calling the perish and saying "My friend didn't finish the job." Yesterday a note scribbled on one of the posters at the church giving service times, the note claiming, "This is just the beginning.'

What is going on??


Entered at Sun Dec 16 19:41:45 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Kevin - I'm so well aware of the stats. The stats are sickening I understand. By the way, comparing the US to Canada in being homogenous is silly. The amount of people that make up Canada's black, arabic, asian, african and American Indian (classified as thus) equals 10% of the nation, hardly makes for a great argument for diversity. ANyway, go back to 1980 and prior and you'll see that death by firearms, although high, not nearly at the escalation rate since Americans became dependent on their Pharamcueticals to help them with all their issues. Let's face it, the US alone consumes 50% of all the prescription drugs manufactured, if that doesn't help define connecting the dots, then I think some folks just aren't paying attention. Again, not against gun control laws being stricter or removing semi-automatic weapons but if people would like to continue so, please do. Just stating what I think is how things play out. People nowa days don't have the passion, time or true want to make real change...they want someone else to do it for them. Jeff, I hope you are right and that change does come but I will bet next to nothing comes of this. First there will be Christmas, then New Years to distract, then football playoffs, then the Oscar nominations, new season of American Idol (will Mariah and Nicki Manaj play nicely), then something else, then, then, then...what was that terrible thing that happened...oh yeah, that's right. Hope I'm wrong but lets see what if any significant momentum gathers, lets see if by the end of winter any steps to a gun law with teeth emerges...hope it does, doubt it will.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 19:34:11 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 2nd Amendment: 1 sentence, ver batim, including punctuation

This is it:

"A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

That's it. Obviously, and regardless of what a so-called originalist like Scalia thinks, there's plenty of room for discussion here -


Entered at Sun Dec 16 19:23:11 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"trying to make an argument in this country based on models by small, mostly homogenous cultures in far away lands isn't going to sit well" - Brian Sz

Murder by firearms 2010 - USA: 10,520

Murder by firearms 2010 - UK: 48

Average number of murders by firearms 1974-2010 in Canada - 224..........a country that is "not far away" - is very large and non homogeneous. .

........anyhow, Canada's gun laws are really not that strict.....so the good news is that just a reasonable rewriting of US laws could make a real difference........They won't do it though........already we are hearing about video games and "mental health" being the real culprits.....as if only young people in the US are affected by these things......Such nonsense.........deaths by motor vehicle were reduced by seat belt laws.....not because there were less mental cases driving firebirds at high speeds.......


Entered at Sun Dec 16 18:59:09 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Brien, i disagree with your premise that banning guns would require altering the basic fabric of the consitituion. I think Peter has an excellent approach to the subject and it would not be altering the basic fabric. I do not see this happening easily, it may never happen at all. I do see big trouble on the horizon, and regarding nuts like the Oath Keepers ( subject of my earlier linked article), nuts like them could come into play if right wing gun nuts take any kind of armed stance against giving up their weapons. Separately, or relatedly, and stretching things: Could the advancement of gun control ironically lead to armed resistance, types of guerilla warfare, or individual armed protests? absolutley.

I also think that although this country has too many idiots,you do not give enough creedence to the reaction of people this time. People have become used to slaughters, but will not get used to the idea that their little kids could be mass slaughtered. Of course, it always could happen, it could be a playground sitaution too. but if guns are abolished, it is far less likely.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 18:33:47 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter you can wish on that star all you want. Americans in general don't want to hear about how the Swiss have it or England or any other country for that matter. I understand your point and can sympathize totally with the spirit in which you make your case but the simple matter is that the gun culture is part of the fabric from the word go. You mention the 13th ammendment and I'm sure there are people still spitting over that one but lets remember this, their was a strong movement within the founders who wanted slavery out at the outset. It became the bargaining chip in which the colonies had to compromise in order to get the idea of We the People going...Slavery was contentious from the get go and less than 100 years later, hundreds of thousands spilled blood to end it. So the slavery argument was really essentially a matter of time before that ended (as coldly put as I have). And yes their are mcehanisms to adapt the Constitution to the times, however, when it comes to touching the sacred cows of free speech and guns, you start touching at the core. Again, I'm not against really strict gun laws or even outlawing carnage making weapons like powerful semi-automatics but I don't think you are going to get a strong enough movement with momentum, money, organization and passion to see it through to the ends in which you recommend. You can claim and believe in all the logic you like, but human beings are not, by any stretch logical. Some may like to claim they are but no one truly is. I appreciate your passion but trying to make an argument in this country based on models by small, mostly homogenous cultures in far away lands isn't going to sit well nor be worth one iota of consideration when it comes to altering the basic fabric of the Constitution. Just my feeling on the matter, no more or less.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 18:19:15 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Militia

WIKI:

In colonial era Anglo-American usage, militia service was distinguished from military service in that the latter was normally a commitment for a fixed period of time of at least a year, for a salary, whereas militia was only to meet a threat, or prepare to meet a threat, for periods of time expected to be short. Militia persons were normally expected to provide their own weapons, equipment, or supplies, although they may later be compensated for losses or expenditures

The first legislation on the subject was The Militia Act of 1792 which provided, in part

That each and every free able-bodied white male citizen of the respective States, resident therein, who is or shall be of age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty-five years (except as is herein after excepted) shall severally and respectively be enrolled in the militia, ... every citizen, so enrolled and notified, shall, within six months thereafter, provide himself with a good musket or firelock

I think it’s crystal clear that a militia was an organized body, under state or federal control, acting together for a purpose, with rules, and a command structure, not just a general permission for anyone to own an arsenal.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 18:09:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brien … There are 27 amendments, but the 18th (Prohibition) got repealed by the 21st. The mechanism is there to repeal them, and the framers would have choked on their tobacco pipes if they could have foreseen that the 13th would abolish slavery. Apart from the world having moved on in every way, even if you take a strict Biblical word-for-word view, “A well-regulated militia” surely points to the Swiss model, where gun ownership is “well-regulated” and if you’d told the framers about weapons firing seven rounds PER SECOND as this week, the framers would have thought the results would be like allowing people to have cannons with grape shot in them. In 1789, the right of the people to bear arms was in the context of a war against a colonial power, with three colonial powers, Britain, Spain and France, all holding or claiming parts of what is now the USA. It was clear that they were thinking about defending the “security of a free state” against a foreign power. Not taking up arms against your fellow citizens. I think it easy to argue down the second amendment.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 17:19:09 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter, you are a gazillion percent correct on your observation. However, guns are tied to the original fabric of the constitution, while the others are not. The issue then becomes, once you begin to strip away at those core values, what stops the next thing and the next thing? You can then start the discussion that the basic fabric of that document is outdated in many aspects. Playing with the Constitution is sticky business. I don't think you will ever see a ban in this country on them. With that said, high powered semi-automatic weapons may see their end days in the not too distant future but who knows. There's a also the absolute near zero attention span of the public. Politicians and power people know this, pay lip service, wait three months or 5 and this will be fairly forgotten because the next great i-phone will consume their wants and needs or some other electronic gizmo or maybe some blistering personality will capture the attention of the drones who can't miss American Idol or Dancing with the Stars. GUn control and changing the constitution is too much effort and the public doesn't (sadly) want to commit to that and the politicians quite frankly don't want to really get into that hornets nest for the same reason. They will reflect public opinion; declare outrage now, simmer down the rhetoric and then move on to something else...sad but true. Would love to see it prove out otherwise but too much history supports my scenario at this time.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 16:52:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: About face

I think you're unduly pessimistic about 180 degree turns. OK … go back half a century - add a couple of years maybe as things were shifting in 1962), so say 1960. Go on TV and tell them in fifty years time, you won't be able to smoke at all in public places, and in California you'll be banned from smoking within 25 feet of your office building. Also, the President will be black, and any CEO who suggested a female secretary wear high heels to work, and sit on his knee to take dictation would be fired and probably prosecuted too. Add that in the UK, cigarettes would be sold in plain packs with health warnings on both sides, from a closed cupboard in shops. No one would believe you.

It happened though.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 15:40:24 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I think we should be looking further on on this gun thing. I will bet it will come out that this kid was on some kind of medication or had recently switched medications. The pharamaceutical companies have been polluting the pipeline with drugs that they knowingingly admit can cause suicidal and violent thinking. If you look at many violent crimes that seemingly come from nowhere, it generally ties back to that person taking some kind of mood altering drug. Anti-depressant drugs and the like of similar makeup increase the risk of suicidal and violent thinking by 50% in kids 18-25. In adults its estimated at about 30%. Sure the drug companies make this perfectly clear on the labels that the FDA pronounces as being responsible but this doesn't take into account that the users, whose minds and thinking has now been altered will think clearly enough as to report such an effect. A friend of ours took one of these meds and within a short amount of time she told us she had all these terrible thoughts about death and suicide but she is in her 40's and was able to get a grip quick enough and flush those things away.

I am not against guns and to ask the culture to doa 180 is close to ridiculous. However, I am in favor of stricter laws and the more powerful the weapon the more certified training and recertification training those individuals should have to take.

But the real culprit, i believe, is the runaway abuse big pharma gets away with. Every year they are paying out millions, sometimes biliions, in suites because of the carnage their products create. But it won't stop...hell it rarely gets reported in the news becasue the control roughly 1/3 of the advertising dollars and they are a huge lobbying force. If something was amiss with Adam Lanza and drugs, you watch how quickly that story gets buried or manipulated.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 12:09:57 CET 2012 from (68.106.150.126)

Posted by:

Calvin

US Gun ownership numbers are heavily skewed though Peter. In 1970 the amount of US Homes with a Piston or Shotgun in it was roughly %40, it is now %20. THe amount of household with total firearms has dropped as well, but not as significantly, yet the number of guns owned by an average gun owner has raised significantly. /n While the couple studies Ive read did not make this statement. My guess is 40-50 years ago there were a lot of homes that just had Dad's Shotgun in it-now there are a lot more homes where Dad doesnt have a shotgun-but a lot more homes where an arsenal resides. /n I guess while Im in total support of some stricter gun lawns my feeling it Guns are just a symptom of a much larger issued-as a society America is significantly more violent than most others.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 11:37:10 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: best Genetic Method ?

3 weeks ago at the "Songs of The Band" show that Garth & Jimmy put together at the Keswick Theatre. He played the 80 or so year old pipe organ 5 minutes before Chest Fever emerged. Lotsa "Dixie" in the earlier part.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 11:07:10 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: UK guns

Just looked up UK gun ownership. Apparently registered firearms were 1.46 per 100 people in 1999, but 3.48 per 100 in 2009. It's still low compared to 89 per 100, but I'm very surprised that it's doubled … mind you, you have to register everything.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 11:01:13 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Switzerland has the highest guns per capita count in Europe by a very long way: 46 guns to 100 people (compared to the USA’s 89 per 100). Switzerland is a unique case though, and probably what the framers of the 2nd Amendment had in mind rather than anarchic gun laws. After six months military service, men have to do three weeks a year for many years, so it is indeed a “well-ordered militia” constantly re-trained. Part of this is keeping a rifle (owned by the military, not the individual) at home. It’s a much more orderly country than the USA (or the UK for that matter), and these are not handguns so hard to conceal. In fact, Switzerland has a far higher than average gun suicide rate because of availability, but tends not to have gun crime.

An example from 25 years ago. My morning story … I was on a lecture tour of Switzerland, and it was December. We were driving around in freezing fog. We decided to drive to the next town after the talk so as to get two nights in one hotel (very useful on a tour for laundry service) and because of the fog arrived very late. Our only hope of food was McDonalds, but we got there just as it was closing. My colleague had a brainwave. The railway ran 24 hours, so we could get food at the station buffet. We got there about midnight and the car park was empty except for three police cars. We walked to the buffet and there were two policemen on the door. They said we shouldn’t go in. We explained that we were hungry, and they said, ‘Well, you can go in, but you’ll come straight out.” We walked in and it was like bedlam. People were shooting up openly at the tables. We walked straight out. “I told you,” said the policeman. Apparently, they liked to have all the trouble in one regulated place (with police on the doors) not spread all over the town. Which is why the streets, at least in those days, were safe and calm. But it was also a very strict society: forty years ago in Zurich, it was illegal for unmarried people to share a hotel room (or an apartment), and women couldn’t vote.

The "keeping all the problems in one place" philosophy is one we saw in Britain about five years ago in the beautiful city of Bath. We used to park in a car park in the centre, and one Saturday, instead of arriving at 9 am as usual, we got there about 7.45 and drove down to the underground level. There were about thirty people sleeping rough along one wall. Not really where you want to leave your car. In fact it's right next to the central police station, and that's the place they allow people to sleep rough, where they can see them.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 06:48:39 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Re Garth- i'm hoping that 2013 brings a host of performances.It would be nice to see some performances in smallish venues again (The Iridium comes to mind), and it would be nice to see performances in larger venues too. I'm hoping 2013 keeps me in N.Y. and if so, if Garth is playing, i'm there.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 06:36:19 CET 2012 from (68.106.150.126)

Posted by:

Calvin

Im pretty far to the left-so Im in no way an NRA Supporter when I say this. But a couple quick facts.

1) Gun Ownership, measured by the amount of households have guns in them, is pretty much at an all time low and has been dropping steadily in the US for 50+ years.

2) There are a few countries out there that buying and owning a gun is as easy, in not easier, than than the US. Switzerland and Israel quickly come to mind-but their murder rates are significantly lower than that of the US.

Clearly eliminating guns, especially ridiculous fire arms like those just used in Connecticut, would lower the homicide rate. It also a fact that the states with the lowest homicide rates have the strictest gun laws.

But I also think its more a matter of the US is an extremely violent culture, taking away guns may limit the amount of deadly outbursts that result in multiple deaths, but its just a band aid on the bigger issue. That as a people, if I can call Americans a "people" in the cultural/ethnic sense, we just seem to be extremely more violent than other cultures around the world seems to be an unarguable point. Guns arent to blame for that, with or without them I dont think that would change.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 05:46:46 CET 2012 from (69.183.34.107)

Posted by:

Whistle Stop

Location: CT

Subject: The Genetic Method

Speaking of Garth, I've been listening to many different versions of The Genetic Method, and all of the versions are so creative and downright brilliant that I'm shocked Garth doesn't recieve more publicity. He's definitely the greatest rock keyboardist of all time; he's the Jimi Hendrix of the organ. My favorite "Genetic Method" has got to be the absolutely majestic version from "Rock of Ages", with the synthesizer-laced rendition from "The Complete Last Waltz" being a close second. What's your favorite version of "The Genetic Method"?


Entered at Sun Dec 16 05:35:50 CET 2012 from (69.183.34.107)

Posted by:

Whistle Stop

Location: CT

Subject: Garth's Solos

I'm pretty excited to hear about Garth's new solo album. I thought "The Sea To The North" was absolutely brilliant, and it's one of my favorite albums of all time. Garth's solo music is like abstract art: it evokes emotion without necessarily having a distinct "form". I've heard "French Girls" is brilliant, but I've never been able to find it on the internet, and to be honest I can't really afford to buy the CD at the moment. So does anyone know where I can find "French Girls" on the web? Thanks.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 05:32:51 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Oath Keepers

Concerning article about a large , and growing larger group of armed right wing U.S. of A. Americans convinced that the President is getting ready to turn the Armed Services on the American peoplw and is getting ready to resist the government. This group also contains parts of other groups that are even nuttier. the amounbt of dedicated , intelligent, and logical civil servants it would take to protect this country fro enemies inside and otisde is stupefying. the only intellignetthing i read regarding any thing any Oath Keeper stated is that if German Servicemen and Policemen resisted Hitler he could have been stopped. It's a big if- but a good hypothetical.ut, we do not have a hitler for PResident.

Kevin, my quarterly performance royalty statement doubled. Last quarters was nice, this one is very surprising. I know you are pleased :-)


Entered at Sun Dec 16 05:11:19 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Understood

OK Jeff That's fine. I had just made a comment, and I thought your response was to that. Now we're on the same page........so..........fine.

I'm going to bed now, in hopes that I don't have the night mares tonight over these children. God bless all of them.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 04:28:19 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Norm, i addressed you regarding Kenny Rogers cause you've often spoken in reverence of him. ...


Entered at Sun Dec 16 00:58:36 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Ani DiFranco To the Teeth

Ani captured the outrage and horror so many years ago in this song. It's so sad that nothing changes.


Entered at Sun Dec 16 00:06:54 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A miscommunika

Well Jeff, I thought you were making some reference to the horn player with the toilet plunger I was refering to with Van the Man..HIS name is Kenny G.

Kenny Rogers is just.........Kenny Rogers


Entered at Sat Dec 15 23:56:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Major Dundee

In my search for "Heaven's Gate" in HMV, I failed, but being in the Western section opted for the Director's Cut Restored Special Edition of"Major Dundee." We just watched it. Fourth rate, badly paced, appallingly-acted film. It may be understandable loathing of Charlton Heston in the present situation … I wouldn't prise his gun from his cold dead hand, but would rather shove it up his warm living fundament, which is what he deserved … a man whose legacy is these massacres … but it is in the end a very mediocre, poorly-scripted movie. A shame.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 23:48:57 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Women and Weapons

It's where you are and who you are with.......Two women i know. two weeks back, One asked me if i had a can opener in my car. As much as i travel, it's a reasonable question. I said no, didn't have one or anything resembling one.So, Stepahnie asked Susan. Susan said no, but you can open that can with a knife.I said, nope,Steph, you'll mess yourself up.Susan told stepahnie (30) bring me that can... i just looked at her, and smiled.City woman, 63 and a half years old, knows how to use a knife...i know alot of women here in st louis, got guns, will shoot you if they have to, have already shot when they had to..

i don't want to sound like an idiot- i am definitely against guns, and hurting people, with guns, knives anything. But, this is one fucked up world we are in, there's no debating that.And it ain'tchangin anytime soon.

insurance Pete- good idea the mrs had , but it would seek the same opoosition here.

arizona- stores that sold guns ahd guns for sale signs and loans available signs in the windows.Want a gun in arizona- they'll sell it to you on installments, join the book of the month club...


Entered at Sat Dec 15 23:31:11 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Kenny Gee Rogers

Westocaster- nope, unless Kenny Rogers middle initial is G. There's been this Kenny Rogers special on one of the country tv stations for about the last year.Sometimes i caught it flipping channels.Kenny's rather old in it, but in great shape.There's interviews with him, other people too, and lots of performances from a live show he was part of and it featured lots of other srtists, duetin with him, or i think even doing his songs without him. No joke. i'm surprised it ain't seen you yet. Islands in the stream, with dolly, i know that was in it.Kenny did pretty good, dolly's voice had a big hurt in it. i guess gravity finally effected her vocals chords.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 21:06:56 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

peter V

We were talking about this outrage over dinner … I think everyone with kids / grandkids in the 5-10 age range is doing the same.

Mrs V came up with the answer to the second amendment. You make insurance against Third Party harm, as with cars, obligatory for all gun owners. You own a single shot gun? $100 a year. Semi-automatic? $2000 a year. Fully automatic? $20,000 a year. Then you just let market forces (this will play with the Republicans) solve the problem.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 20:31:25 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: guns

I have always been opposed to gun ownership. sadly Newtown has pushed me over the edge. I am not naive enough to think we will ever get them banned completely but there has to be for starters a ban on Semi automatic and automatic weapons.There is no reason for them to exist, save mass killing. our fare father never envisioned this when the wrote the Constitution.

I once heard a policeman say that having a gun in your homr is a very dangerous thing. If you hear a noise at night and go to check it out carrying your gun, then you better be prepared to shoot first without asking,It might be your child going for a late snack, but if you don't shoot you are shot if it is truly an armed intruder. It is better not to have this "false courage"

this morning I had 2 solicitations to attend a candlelight vigil. My real fear is that this will die down and we will once more be in the thrall if the NRA./n These were babies 5 years old. The age of my beloved Eloise, 20 children who will never grow up. It all makes me sick.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 20:26:58 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: First Concerts??

In the Elks Hall in Courtenay when I was 6. Wilf Carter, he became friends with our mom, and that night he bought us a bottle of pop. His drummer at that time, was Taller O'Shea, (he can be found on the web). In 1975 I would play music with him in the Sechelt Legion.

1953 Hank Snow, Slim Whitman in Vancouver. 1957 Hank Snow, Queen Elizabeth Theater Vancouver. 12 years old, first time getting drunk with this nut case that my mum let my older brother and I go with...even gave us cigarettes. I puked myself silly....I didn't forgive her for that for a long time. I was too shy to say no to that asshole.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 19:14:47 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Unfortunate Rake

Well it's the weekend, so I'll let you guys off. What is the "Band Connection" of St James Infirmary??? I figured some of youze would be all over this. Where in hell is Sadavid?

Well it is supposedly a song of anonymous origin, coming from an 18th century English folk song called, "The Unfortunate Rake". It refers to the woes of a young soldiers life getting caught up in the sins of a prostitute giving him a venerial disease so that he had to go to the St James Hospital in London. There are many variations, and names for the song, most notably made famous by Louis Armstrong in 1928.

The Band connection........Dylan used the music line for "Blind Willie Mctell"

After I thought about that old guy in Gastown Peter M, I remembered he had a bike, with 2 wheels on the front, and the steering wheel behind him and he pedalled every where. He had it rigged with a high hat and kick drum with pedals in front of his driving pedals, cymbals, a bulb horn to honk with the rubber bulb. A trumpet and sax and his guitar. It was just a big pile of music.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 19:01:38 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Mor on Evolution

Of Course, as i think Peter alluded, going to concerst was part of the relationships to artists.. My first concert, i was in 9th grade, a freshman in Midowood High School.Hadn't yet turned 14.Kingfish opened,Zappa and the Mothers headlined.Second or third row, left side of the concert hall, Brooklyn College, cross the sidestreet from my high school.. And it never stopped after that.Back then,i did start out keeping alist. The Brooklyn Collegeg shows were great, woudl love to have that liost now, so i could be certain whom opened for whom. i am sure that John Sebastian opened for Steve Stills, and pretty damn sure that Chick Corea and Return to Forever opened for Mountain.Don't recall whom opened for The Beach Boys, or Poco. I don't think that people had these kind of opportunities , in volume, and close to their homes in the 30s, 40s. In the 50s it was starting, but still, no way had it yet snowballed to the levels thatit beagn to taske in the 60s, then even more, inthe 70s.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 18:55:45 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mistaken Identity

Jeff, it's Kenny G your talking about idn't it??


Entered at Sat Dec 15 18:52:10 CET 2012 from (24.161.85.52)

Posted by:

smh

Web: My link

Subject: GARTH HUDSON

This post is humbly submitted for those interested in The Band. Only a few selections here. Please read Adam Betley 2012 reviews Mr. Høiberg has installed at this site.

Dec. - The Band's Garth Hudson is at work on a new project, marking his 75th year, by Nick DeRiso: http://somethingelsereviews.com/2012/12/11/the-bands-garth-hudson-is-at-work-on-a-new-musical-project-marking-his-75th-year/

Nov. - Best of November 2012: Readers pick Garth Hudson number one!!! Something Else! Thank you to everyone who read the interviews!: http://somethingelsereviews.com/2012/12/01/best-of-november-2012-readers-pick-garth-hudson-monkees-king-crimson-beatles-aerosmith/

Oct. - GARTH HUDSON made a few appearances at "LOVE FOR LEVON" and The Band keyboardist received the biggest ovations of the night – a fitting tribute to the only original member of the group on the bill. Here is GENETIC METHOD / CHEST FEVER: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bo48PwNKOEY


Entered at Sat Dec 15 18:46:47 CET 2012 from (99.247.206.89)

Posted by:

bb

Subject: hey jude band tribute

listening to q107, toronto classic rock station, whilst driving home, and the dj played "hey jude, live from david frost". about two thirds through you can hear, "take a load off fanny, take a load for free" sung/screamed by paul mccartney. apparently paul was a huge fan of the Band, and payed a tribute to them. check it out on you tube


Entered at Sat Dec 15 18:32:27 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Okay- yes- pure entertainment does have cultural significance and artistic relevance too, in a different way.And yes, those guys are having hold over effect and appeal to younger audiences too- I think. Or at least, it is getting sold that way, packaged that way.

Kenny Rogers (yes Westie, , he is phenomenal) tribute , all over the country TV stations not long ago- they had lots of younger artists there. The Lionel Richie tribute album and concert- done by country artists- not one of the remakes was as good as the original version, but so many young artists.....the Eagles are holding strong- i don;t see them performing with young artists , but The Eagles are out there frequently enough,- and aside from t he huge appeal Southern California and the faux desperado pose had for so many back in the early and mid 70s, the Eagles had/ have no culutral import.

alot of both aspects of this (the dylan/Peter, paul and mary crew versus the pure entertianment crew) this is just that the world went through some big changes (yes, , tv, radio, from the beginning) and music became more important on a bigger sacale. the dimensions widened so deeply, the relationships people have to srtists and to music changed.- for one----- in the 30s, 40s 50s, how many teenagers, - had their own advanced(for the time) sound system? By the 50s, kids had transistors often enough, but in how many households did peopel have personal victrolas or turntables of any kind? I was born in 58, but i know that by the time i was 5 or 6 i had my own little turntabke fo some kind in my own bedroom.And had begun amassing my own record collection.( my older cousin mike was an influence this way, so when i wanted something it was music.)By the time i was 13 i had a cheap stereo in my room, and by the time i was 14 i had a kick ass stereo, I worked, went and got a peioneer 828, KLH 5 speakers, and a dual turntable.My dad bought me a sony reel to reel. The relationships to music and artists were very different by the 60s, maybe by the 50s even , and hell, we ain't all died off yet. Also The relationship to artists- as a result of promo, magazines, media, also, a much bigger scale than what our parents had... that is another reason, ( and of course these are all related too) why the old acts are still everywhere. They are a different pasrt of our lives than music was to generations before.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 18:00:35 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Guns do have to go-- But, I do believe that in the USA, unless people live in groups, clans and tribes it is necessary to own guns to protect yourself...The modern day equivalent would be going back a few generations and having 12 to 20 people of one family living in large houses, or housews very close to each other, like used to happen here.- crime here is so rampant, people so screwed up, that gangs will be out ravaging innocent families wihout fear. In urban areas, and in rural areas.....alot of poeple here have seen alot of things, and alot of people lurk here who don't say jack shit about what they've seen and know....but, from what I've seen, there are alot of people in this world who don't give a fuck about anything but what they want or desire at the moment- regardless of anything else..... if guns are banned- how are those people stopped?? can there be one crime fighter for every three people?- do not get me wrong- i am against guns...i barely would kmow how to use one- but if i lived out in the boonies again, with women or kids in the house, trust me, the first thing i;d do is become proficient and get a gun, if it was still legal.Dogs, sure, dogs can help.But dogs get shot and poisoned pretty easily.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 17:41:07 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: That ol' time feelin'

Jerry T, for a lot of the bands you just mentioned, you need to google "Bands of the Pacific Northwest". It's a good sight with a lot of nostalgia. You can even find the "Norm Jones Band " on there, the 1980 onward category.

Some of yuz got to look on youtube, St James Infirmary, Van Morrison live 2003. Tell me who the guy is beside Van using a toilet plunger for a mute on his trumpet. I don't remember his name......yeah he's really playing trash. It's funny.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 16:59:00 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Real State of America Atlas

A fascinating book packed with statistics displayed state by state. Anyway, it says the USA has 89 civilian firearms for every 100 people, with 43% of households owning a gun. The next highest civilian ownership is The Yemen with 55 civilian firearms per 100 people. Iraq is 34.

In 2008 the Supreme Court over-ruled Washington DC's attempt to ban firearms in the home, and in 2010 it ruled that the city of Chicago could not restrict the right to own guns.

Nuff said.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 16:37:01 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: USO etc

Bill M: Good point and critical to remember. USO shows I think (from what I know) were the 'Hurricane Sandy' shows of the 40s and 50s. Those men were insulated and afraid and alone and what those performers brought to them was 'home' and a little of that sensibility and emotion that filled the increasingly empty vacuum. Disaster and 'support' concerts and shows were not a feature of popular culture in those days as far as I know. Maybe others know more.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 16:26:44 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Getting ready for TO

As we ready to shift cities, Peter V, I am reflecting back (yet again) on early 60s songs that I enjoyed. Dion and the Belmonts, Flamingos (one of my favourite songs in the universe is 'I Only Have Eyes For You'.), Four Seasons, Kingsmen, etc. This was the backdrop of my maturation (a funny word, maturation. I'm in my 60s and still... Some would say that is immature. One should leave garage rock and all that behind? No? I think not.). They dripped with innuendo and all aspects of what really mattered when you were 13. So more power to them. that's what Sinatra and others delivered. Buble and Bieber (maybe not as well, but there is talent there, like it or not) are doing that now. The beat goes on.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 16:26:52 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: thanks for being a good sport. It's the time of year when my main roles in life are driving to malls, watching the shopping cart and carrying bags. I was in watching mode when I finished the sudoku and had nothing better to do than wander in here and spot your post. But speaking of social relevance, did many of those older stars do much in the way of staging or playing pop fests for people in need? Not counting USO shows and the wartime like.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 16:15:08 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ostrich mentality

I am paraphrasing and addiing to something I read in a comment from someone in response to a news article, so this is not an original idea (few in fact are).

-They prioritize fear of the unknown and personal rights ahead of the well-being and safety of the public (including children) in defending the possession of guns legally (knowing full well that there is the possibility (and based upon recurrent events over the past 30 years) and likelihood that (often disturbed) individuals can and will use them to murder. The ostriches continue to win as they turn the other way and observe the slaughter. I can't wait to hear the defence of gun ownership by their proponents now.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 15:45:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Keep Your Hands Off My Baby

My first live show was in 1962: Brian Hyland, Tommy Roe and Little Eva. I don't recall who topped the bill, but Little Eva didn't, and totally stole the show. Sometimes I think we could do with a little more Pure Pop For Now People (as Nick Lowe said).

Sealed with a kiss, Ginny Come Lately, Sheila, The Locomotion …


Entered at Sat Dec 15 15:38:19 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: (Mr) Bad Example

Bill M: Yes, not the best example to make my point... 'Mack The Knife" does have some oblique social reference and in fact deals with (negative) social interactions among figures of potentially ill repute. But I know you know what I was getting at a concrete level.. just the change of direction by Darin. Maybe its too simplistic to dismiss the 'Sinatra/Williams/Teresa Brewer et al' gang this way. Social relevance has to be put into context. When times are tough, escapism with the one-dimensional performer who makes us smile and feel good, may be absolutely socially and culturally relevant. We go to shows not to have our troubles rubbed in our faces but to have a brief respite. That is socially and culturally relevant. We need some of that right now, in fact.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 15:19:10 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: "Mack The Knife" by itself may be of little social import, but with a bit of stretching we can bring in his backstabbing Judean predecessor, Judas the Knife, without whom ... (And that ties in to Peter V's note about Roman times.) And then there's Brecht's involvement in leftist politics -along with Aaron Copeland, Pete Seeger's father, et al - or at least that's what I recall from Sean Wilentz's facinating "Dylan in America" book. Of no social import is the line about the line forming on the right, but that reminds me of Wanda's first impression of Ronnie Hawkins.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 14:57:47 CET 2012 from (126.19.86.249)

Posted by:

airmax

Location: fr
Web: My link

Subject: air max pa cher

chaussure nike air max tn requin france pas chers


Entered at Sat Dec 15 09:06:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Roman writers warned against taking kids to gladiatorial contests. They were right, weren't they? The Roman Empire collapsed, its people titillated by orgies off sadistic killing. Nero was particularly fond of them. All societies have unhinged individuals, but even when they run amok with a club or knife, the damage is limited.

I have driven back roads in Arizona and Nevada and I can see that fear of crime would be very high if you live three miles from the nearest other house. So you chip away as well.. Banning guns in the east and west coasts and big cities would be easier. Then you make it a major federal offence to transport a gun over state or city lines.

On the other hand, these massacres seem to be more smaller town already where gun ownership is higher, so that has to be addressed. An immediate ban on automatic, semi automatic and high powered guns. Six months to hand them in to be destroyed. Then start on handguns.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 06:18:46 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Prayers for Healing

As we prepare for bed this evening, Susan and I are holding on to each other. It's hard not to feel for these people going to bed without their children to tuck away safely. Having lost them in this horror. How do you cope?

We pray and try to send our strength for help to these poor people. You live in a quiet safe little town where you feel you can raise your family in happy harmony. Does such a place exist any more?

We pray as well for the family of this poor misguided young man who some how has been lost to humanity, to only be remembered as the perpetraitor of something so horrific. Just aways back I copied the words of gentle souls from a better time in our history, carved into an old hemlock tree. "God is love, and this is his world"


Entered at Sat Dec 15 05:45:50 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: 3 weapons

They keep showing these 3 guns that were legally owned by this woman. Why would she have 3 guns? Why would she have 1 gun? Why would she have a rifle (banned since 1993) like that? (they said it was legal if she owned it before 1993 - but why does she even have it?).Why is no one asking on CNN? Is it the norm that many individuals own guns (not only in states where we think it may be the norm) all over the USA? Why are these questions not being asked? It is troubling.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 04:55:32 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Diversion and cultural and societal relevance

Put em up: Thanks for the diversion from the reality. Cultural relevance and societal impact are right on the money. Reminds me of Bobby Darin, who started out with you no what and then went sideways from Mack The Knife to societally relevant music. Some of the list fall into the relevance phenomenon. Some skirted societal relevance while all were culturally relevant. The perception of the Sinatra/Bennett/Williams/Clooney camp was that they were there for the pure goal of entertainment and so in the sense of your discussion they were one-dimensional. Not so for blues singers who ache with physical and emotional pain or singers and groups who sing about the human condition- love,death, life and everything in between. So as I watch CNN, its nice to be writing this and diverting just a little. There is of course some overlap here as I think about the human condition.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 04:09:08 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Musical Longevity, Cultural and Societal Impact, And Guns

Obviously there are mulitple reasons the acts we grew up with, the old acts, are still popular, and readily visible. welcomed, and hankered for, and the kids rush to perform with them, are mulitple.

Various reasons, not in any order, not fully examined, and not also, obviously, there would be more 1)Societal, culutral relevance.the acts we are talking about, acts like Dylan, Stones,Who, Grateful Dead,Allman Brothers, CAROLE kING, jAMES tAYLOr, Paul Simon,Chuck Berry (if he was out and about, when he is, he's welcomed, sought, etc etc) etc etc, had vast cultural impact and societal impact.Elvis,.... even the more well known blues men that were and are revered,let's pick out BBking, and posthumously Muddy, really had more societal and cultural impact than Dino, Andy Williams, Frank Sinatra, Tony bennet etc etc.Even LesPaul did...HE was revered and worked and would hav ebeen welcomed anywhere, right till he died.Artists that performed with him at Iridium were plentiful.The music, and the lifestyles were part of and or/ to a degree led, and reflected a huge change in the prevalent culture .Any one still standing, we, and the society, are still effected by, love, and need what ever they have left to give us.And we need and seek, their artistic expression/vision.And of course, we love the music....Sometimes we are disappointed, some not.

2) the young kids have nothing as powerful or as artistic of their own

3) the mechanism that might develop[ and support great new artists are gone. The music industry really is gone a long time, the economy does not support huge growth for new artists, but, fact is, besides all this, noone new really has anything all that great to say.When the guys we love started out, some of em had to kick and crawl their way up, but, once the cultural explosion hit, and the music mixed with politics, it was off and running.And the indiustry was there to support the artists t hat were cuilturally and socitally relevant. Or musically appealing....None of that is happening today. Also, the acts that were just really muscial, well, they had the indiustry to back em.Money was moving.And peopel had money to spend.

I apologize for the incopmplete thoughts and hasty writing.Gotta run...

David P. thanks for that answer.I had forgotten, but i knew a very little of that, that there had been Beatles legal acrimony and the Laine thing, but you probably told me more than i forogt.

Guns- gonna be a battle here over this....Out here in white supremacist country, they are all for guns... No bullshit- in my industry, and also out of it, when i meet someone i did n't previously know and they hear my accent, it is not unusual for soemoen to say- well, you being fro NY and all, how do you feel about the second amendment..... And they ask how Easterners and NYers feel about it.And they are quick to decalre themsleves pro gun, think everyoine should be able to carry...For quite a while, in NY, if you get caught with an unlicensesd gun, you do a year.No way out of it.That is a start.. but again, that's just NY. Gun control is necessary, but i could see more opposition to that than universal health care. ANd i can almost guarantee,Arizona will be ready to go to war over this



Entered at Sat Dec 15 03:56:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 61

From the Washington Post, today:

“Since 1982, there have been at least 61 mass murders carried out with firearms across the country, with the killings unfolding in 30 states from Massachusetts to Hawaii,” they found. And in most cases, the killers had obtained their weapons legally:


Entered at Sat Dec 15 03:45:25 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: 27 Dead

......Obama has assured the families as he does every few months to other families whose kids die in gun deaths that his government will do everything in his power to help them.........everything but take on the gun lobby! And hold on, any minute now the Republicans will tell all that are willing to listen that this could have been prevented - if only those kids had been armed they could have fired back............This lack of common sense and courage is mind boggling.......makes you sick to your stomach doesn't it?


Entered at Sat Dec 15 03:30:26 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The REAL Blues

Holy Shit!........some of you may have seen this before. I have not. I'm trying to get this web page to work. If it doesn't, search on youtube, St James infrimary live Van Morrison.

Jesus that old son of a bitch is so tasty with that sax. This is great.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 03:12:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One man Bands

Reminds me Peter of one of those "sidewalk musicians" who have their spots down in the middle of the city to eak out a living. In Vancouver BC there is a part of town called "Gastown". Named for the founder of that part of town called "Gassy Jack". It's interesting you can find it on here.

Anyway there was this old guy, he may have been crippled because he was always in this little cart, (long before these electric things.) He had cymbals, horns, drums, played the guitar and sang. I always remember, because he did a great job of "St. James Infirmary."


Entered at Sat Dec 15 02:58:29 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Nothing new to say but...

I have nothing new to add to this horror. It is a recipe for disaster. An unstable individual (for any reason, mental illness, drugs, etc) and guns. The former is difficult to solve. Mental/psychological illness remains one of the most difficult areas of medicine. But guns! So easy to get for anyone? How can that be? Its harder to get a driver's licence in some places. Because the mixture of psychological illness and guns is potential lethal, massive changes are needed wherever guns are easily acquired. Reform is long overdue. This is so sad, needless and potentially preventable. The lawmakers must act now. They should have acted before Aurora. They should have acted before Virginia. They should have acted before Columbine. Its time!!


Entered at Sat Dec 15 02:18:47 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: All those years ago

David P- The Who/Herman's Hermits show was 1967. I was already a Beatles & Stones fan, and had some pop music tastes. Listened to Philly dance music on Jerry Blavat's show.I liked the spooky old music in Merry Melodies cartoons, and corny old "one man band" novelty acts. Already had a taste for African music via documentaries and bad Hollywoodized renditions in Tarzan movies. One of the Chicago stations was WLS. Don't remember the call letters of the blues one though. I also listened to the WMCA Good Guys on AM in NYC. Was amazed at how the local celebrity disc jockies on one of those stations would move to another one over the course of the years. And now, why do I want to put on a pair of Dr Dre earbuds, and carry a bootleg designer handbag, or two?


Entered at Sat Dec 15 02:11:43 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Great Nosalgia

Good post Peter. Aren't those great memories. Down on that wharf I mentioned, I listened to a real lot of Johnnie Rivers in those days. He had taken Reg Dorman's "Mountain of Love' to great new heights.

Jan......OH JAN!! look what's happening. Get this shit off here.


Ad. posts removed


Entered at Sat Dec 15 02:03:07 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: earlier generations' music

In 1967, I was 14 years old and had an AM radio with an antenna wire I ran up over my roof. I have 6 younger siblings, and when it was finally quiet, in the early morning hours I'd tune in (from the Phila suburbs) to Chicago Top 40 radio and blues stations and WWVA in Wheeling, West Virginia. WWVA played hard core old country music, songs about truck drivin', drinkin' and fightin'. I also babysat for the children of Jay Cook, a disc jockey on WFIL, one of Philly's Top 40 stations. As a delightful benefit, he gave me access to countless records "not fit fot AM radio". Among them were Captain Beefheart with Ry Cooder, The Who's "Tommy" (before it was chopped into 3 minute 20 second bits for radio), Miles Davis, Dylan's "New Morning",Jefferson Airplane live, Willie Dixon, stuff featuring Hendrix, Janis Joplin and the Dead. Albums by The Fugs, Frank Zappa, Biff Rose, "Alice's Restaurant". Stuff that Charlie Daniels was on as an unknown sideman for folk artists like "Mr & Mrs Garvey". Another rejected one was "Love Chronicles" by Al Stewart. It featured the word f*cking, and a sideman named Jimmy Page. I also got a copy of Van Morrison's "Astral Weeks". All of which was deemed "not suitable for Top 40". Never listened to my parents' music. Hated Sinatra till I was 40. Came over to Tony Bennet in the late '70's when he was a guest on SCTV's "Great White North" with Doug & Bob McKenzie (Rick Moranis & Dave Thomas). Now, I appreciate all kinds of stuff I had no time for as a teenager. A local radio station plays an hour of Glen Miller as I drive home from work Wednesday nights. On my drive in on Tuesday afternoons, I listen to WPRB, Princeton NJ public radio for "Rockabilly Roadhouse" which is similiar to the old WWVA format, only wilder, and edgier with Los Straitjackets and Dave Alvin stuff sandwiched in between Johnny Cash, Bob Wills and Conway Twitty numbers. And lastly, a little anecdote about The Who. My friend Maureen went to see Herman's Hermits with her older sister at Steel Pier in Atlantic City, and was blown away by the opening act, The Who. Small world, eh?


Entered at Sat Dec 15 01:20:10 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Relatively Normal

Iskander, your comment is like an oxmoron. How can you define who is relatively normal. Many of these young people have seemed "relatively normal". That is why this kind of thing goes undetected, and they are under the radar.

How can you determine what effect this is having on many of them when this sort of thing is becoming more frequent. Too often now many of these youngsters who thrive on the violence are coming out with wanting to know what it really feels like to kill some one. Others who engage in suicide pacts.

Any one who doesn't think these games, (that are so realistic) aren't having such a heavy negative influence is just plain crazy, or bullshitting themselves.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 00:48:03 CET 2012 from (80.61.9.3)

Posted by:

Iskander

Location: the Netherlands

Subject: Sandy Hook

I just read through Peter's last comment about the influence of video games. When I was younger (coming from a twenty-year old, heh) I played video games too. Yes, some of these were violent, and I don't know whether or not it's become much worse nowadays, but I would be careful in putting too much blame on things like these.

From what I understand, several Roman writers warned against taking children to gladitorial games, and when the TV came around, everyone was talking about how awful the effect of simulated violence on children is. Sure, it may not be healthy to be exposed to violence 24/7, but I don't believe it turns relatively normal people into serial murderers.

I don't know too much about the person who did this thing, and I don't think anyone does at this point. I'm not saying that there's nothing wrong with unnecessarily violent video games, too. It's just that we shouldn't conflate matters.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 00:29:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My thoughts too, Norm. These video games have decapitations and shootings. Who designs, draws and manufactures this filth? That all has to go too. It should never have been allowed in the first place … and very young kids are playing these things. I was shocked at the Tin-Tin iPad App … a Speilberg kid's film, so when requested I downloaded it. It's designed for under tens, and I thought it excessively violent and deleted it.

As for the second amendment, repeal it. It's simple. There have been amendments before. Lots of them. Add another. You're talking about something written in the time of pikes and one shot muskets by men who cheerfully held slaves as chattels, and had no thought that women or servants (they classed them together) should ever vote. Well, those women and descendants of slaves and servants can vote now, so turn it over. You don't follow the (say) standards of hygiene of the Founding Fathers, so why hang on every word?

I watched Obama twice and he spoke well, and I'm sure sincerely and from the heart. So do something about it.

Can you put the genii back in the bottle? There is an example. After watching a play last week, I read about the Malayan Insurgency from 1948 on. The British succeeded in defeating communist insurgency in Malaya, while the french and US in Vietnam failed. An initial problem was that after WW2 the country was awash with firearms. They simply allowed a period to hand them in, then imposed a mandatory sentence on anyone possessing them. You certainly couldn't be as harsh as they were (the mandatory sentence was the extreme penalty), but it worked. Look at Singapore and Malaya sixty years later.


Entered at Sat Dec 15 00:00:31 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Horror

Jesus Lars. I just took a look in here before heading out to the store and down to the boat. I had to look to see what you guys were talking about. I was busy this morning and hadn't looked at the news.

Isn't it enough we have to be upset with natural disasters here every day, and now this mentaly unstable disaster that keeps happeneing.

It is difficult to understand why the country allows the unchallenged sale and use of these automatic weapons to anyone. As I have just read, it seems this young person took this as a game like one of those video games. I have never really seen any of these games, except the ads on TV. I really cannot understand how dreaming up every possible way to harm and kill can be considered "games". To profit from selling these to young people so they can practise simulations of how to go out and do this is beyond me.

Good to hear from you Lars......although I am in shock. Little children, right before Christmas this is gut wrenching.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 23:47:03 CET 2012 from (98.15.190.173)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the trees

Subject: Westie

Forgive me, Norm...I just scrolled back in here for the first time in a while and I read your post about my days tied to the mast. Or kissing the gunner's daughter. Hope all is well with you. Run back aft to the fantail and I'll meet you above the bosun's locker. We're going to store the ship's guns in Davey Jones' locker.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 22:45:32 CET 2012 from (98.15.190.173)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The woods

Subject: Second Amendment was a mistake

Right on, Peter. As a former member of the NRA and a lifelong hunter, it's time to give up the guns and I mean all of them. I can still harvest an animal with my bow & arrow.

At least go after the automatic, semi-automatics, & the handguns. The only possible exception I would possibly make are shotguns with plugs. They can only fire three rounds and the shot doesn't carry over 100 yards. And right now I'd even include them.

Another thing I'd want to go after are the various games "for the soldier in all of us." You want to be a soldier, enlist.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 22:34:01 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Primary kids? Right before Christmas? 100 rounds fired? I was going to write "no OTHER civilized country has gun laws like the USA" but it should just read "no civilized country has gun laws like the USA." If Obama has the tiniest shred of either integrity or courage, it's time to ban all repeating firearms. There's no way the other side would have done so, making him the only hope. Seize the time.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 20:57:48 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Haul that scurvy dog up the yard arm!

I'm pretty sure one of these guys was Lars......I was looking at something that reminded me of that movie with Kelsey Grammar, "Down Periscope" they ended with this song of these "Village People"?


Entered at Fri Dec 14 20:08:38 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: LEONARD PELTIER

LEST WE FORGET..Remember when ROBBIE tried and failed to have this poor man released from prison? Looks like this concert should do better with the president than the last one [Clinton] he contacted..Let's hope so!!ROBBIE also has him [Peltier] on one of his albums. Would be nice to have ROBBIE at this concert too.

I have read that the FBI have locked up evidence that won't be released. Watch Robert Redford's, "Incident At Ooglala" for more on this heartfelt story...This man is innocent for sure...

My condolences go out to all the children and adults who have been killed in the CT elementary school shooting.27 dead, and the kids are having a hard time coping naturally. Gunman [24yrs.]is dead as reported by CNN. GOD Bless them all in this heartbreaking thing to have happened to them..

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 14 20:02:48 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Samantha

Welcome too the Guest Book. Hang around here and you will learn much if you love The Band.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 19:46:49 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Those Who Were Once Outlaws Are Now Grandpas

Calvin: In 2009 another popular tv series, NCIS, featured Dylan's "California", a rare 1965 outtake from the "Bringing It All Back Home" sessions, which evolved into "Outlaw Blues".


Entered at Fri Dec 14 19:32:03 CET 2012 from (68.106.150.126)

Posted by:

Calvin

I think the big difference JT is that the Stones, Who, Beatles, Dylan and so many others are heard on radio, commercials, Movies, TV Shows that are part of the entertainment made for 16-25.

One of the most Popular TV Franchises in the States over the past 10+ Years, CSI, has had all 3 of the different shows use a Who Tune as a Theme Song.

You sit down and watch the AMA, Grammys, MTV Awards and the Stars of today are lining up to do Duets with Elder Statesmen. Its just different now, and better for the old guys.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 19:04:41 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Slim Harpo's Over On The Radio Box

Before I heard the Rolling Stone's cover, I can remember turning the radio dial to WLAC Nashville late one night and hearing the ethereal sounds of Slim Harpo's "I'm A King Bee". Later on I would discover other gems broadcast out of Atlanta by DJ Steve Canyon, "the long, lean lizard from Lake Charles, Louisiana". Once, previewing "a new song from Dylan", he electically chose "From A Buick 6", which was then the B-side to "Positively Fourth Street". The first time I heard The Who was late one Sunday night listening to WLS out of Chicago when they played "My Generation".


Entered at Fri Dec 14 18:46:37 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Those early days............

I worked in Port McNeill, which became my home as a young guy, from 1964 up wards. Where I first met my Susan. It was not much of a town, but the people there took us bunk house guys in like family. It was just a happy little town where you never wanted to leave.

Our only place to get desent radio reception in the evening was out on the wharf. C-FUN with Red Robinson would come in pretty clear. So there would be a bunch of us all sitting along the railing of the wharf drinking a beer and listening to the radio from some one's car. Some times the girls would get us dancing on the wharf.

Well one summer evening, just before dark, we are sitting out there, (I had a '63 Pontiac Pariesenne convertible, with the top down and the radio blasting). I should say here, we all had loud pipes on a car back then, y'know Thrush mufflers, or Walker continentals. So anyone coming down the wharf would wind'er'up, and then drop down a gear and let 'em rumble out the wharf. On this particular night we are sitting there, and some one says, "Oh here comes Buffy." Buffy Johnstone had a '56 Merc convertible, and he was pretty haywire. He comes smokin' out the wharf pretty hot. Well unknown to him, (all the roads were gravel back then), I guess a rock had flown up and broke a brake line. Here comes Buffy, there goes Buffy.....right off the end of the wharf. The tide was pretty low.We all run for the edge. Just about the time of the big splash! as he had the top down Buffy makes a real nice dive, yelling.....Awwww shit!


Entered at Fri Dec 14 18:26:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh! Oh

Now yuh see that!........Jerry made a mistake too....signs of gettin' old..........


Entered at Fri Dec 14 17:49:03 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: sometimes you have to cut the cards

Bill M: see [My link] for some info on the "hula-hoop of the space age," the fad that almost was.

Most intriguing about the magic uncle, and a very good thing that JRR chose to emulate the music-playing relations more so than the pulling-rabbits-out-of-hats relations . . . .


Entered at Fri Dec 14 17:48:49 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: corrections: McCoys

It was the McCoys in Toronto who I saw... not Blues Magoos.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 17:20:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Chris Barber, Alexis Korner, Cyril Davies, Long John Baldry … then the baton passed to The Rolling Stones and others, but these guys played a major role in bringing the blues to wider attention. I'm listening to the audiobook of "Rod" by Rod Stewart, and he has tales of wanting to borrow Long John Baldry's rare in the UK copy of "Muddy Waters At Newport" but it was out on loan to earliest version of The Rolling Stones who taped it on open reel, and someone else had had it just before.

Also, Rod "found his voice" obsessively listening to the first "Bob Dylan" album during 1962, and he could play and sing every track.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 17:17:44 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Toronto local concerts

David P: My earliest concerts: (after the boys at the Concord in rehearsal at the Saturday afternoon coke and fries shows) ; Dylan with Levon and the Hawks: Nov 15, 1965, Massey Hall; Simon and Garfunkel 1967 or so: Massey Hall: Chicago 1969: O'Keefe Centre. Johnny Winter; early 70s : Massey Hall. Didn't get to too much in those days. Never went to Yorkville... a mistake. Didn't really understand in those years what was happening there. I saw Teegarden and van Winkle, Blues Magoos and Kensington Market in the early to mid 70s as well.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 17:07:45 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All Those Years Ago

JT: In my early teens I acquired a wide palate of music through listening to the radio late at night. Many decades before the internet expanded the web of awareness, through the experience of tuning in stations through the ether of static from far-off cities, I became aware of musicians like Slim Harpo, Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and the Staple Singers. That static, like the surface noise of vinyl records, is part of the background of my treasured music memory. At the same time, I enjoyed hearing the British wave of musicians interpret the American roots songbook.

In 1967 I first saw The Who, as an opening act with the Blues Magoos, for Herman's Hermits at the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium. Seven years later I saw Bruce Springsteen & the E-Street band open for NRBQ at Richard's nightclub in Atlanta.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 16:49:40 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie's first recording?

For some reason I missed the fact that Jan added "Orbiteer Twist" by Dianne Brooks to this site's discography somewhere along the way. I'm pleased that Jan took the rumour of its existence seriously, unlike Greil Marcus, the fifth (2008) edition of whose "Mystery Train" I picked up yesterday because its ever-expanding discography includes a footnoted dismissal of Robbie being on it - on the grounds that Robbie didn't recall it when asked.

Well, I first heard of it in 1980 from its producer, Billy O'Connor, a well-known songwriter / produced / bandleader / radio and TV host / booking agent from the olden days. He told me then that Robbie Robertson was on guitar, future booking agent Bud Matton was on sax and future Guess Who (etc.) producer was on bass. Matton later confirmed that Robertson was on guitar, and added that Art Talbot was on piano. And O'Connor added that Robbie had just returned from his first trip to the US with Hawkins, but hadn't recorded with him, and that he got the gig (and I see this as significant) at the insistence of one of his uncles, also called Robbie Robertson, whose bookings as a professional magician were handled by O'Connor's agency. Unfortunately, almost everybody involved, aside from Robbie and perhaps the reclusive Art Talbot, is dead - O'Connor, Matton, Richardson and Brooks.

From Dianne I know that she did three records for Savoy Records in New Jersey (where she was from) in '57 and '58 as a member of a trio of teenage girls, the Playmates / Three Playmates. She first played Toronto in '59 or '60 as vocalist with a band led by Dionne Warwick's husband, Bill Elliott. O'Connor spotted her and offered to sponsor her immigration to Canada and to find her lots of work - which is what happened.

Anyway, it's unfortunate that the records doesn't seem to be on YouTube or anywhere else on line. Robbie was already very good and very aggressive.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 16:37:42 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 40-50 years and still going

Recent discussions gave me pause to wonder what the 16- 25 somethings think about The Rolling Stones, Dylan, Cohen, McCartney, Springsteen, Simon, the partial Who, and others who keep 'showing up' on stage and tour. I remember still those years as I grew up. We wouldn't give our parents great stars the time of day. There was not even a healthy respect for the likes of Sinatra, Damone, Bennett et al. They were never an attraction. I realize that the music form is somewhat different and that these performers 'fit' into a music form that is still the roots and source of what is coming out now by the newer performers. My thought is that there is still a healthy respect for these performers by the youth, but that may be only in households where music is central and the old performers still get 'onto the cd player or even turntable'. Even though old, and when I was 16, 50 was old, I think at the least there is a grudging admiration by today's youth of these performers and an understanding of the role they played in the development of music. At 16, we didn't have that same understanding of Sinatra et al. We sure as heck did not know Robert Johnson or Slim Harpo or Muddy Waters until the Brits started to bring them forward and emulate them. Today's musically interested youth, I think, often understand the longevity of music and some of them see where it has come from and appreciate that. I'd love to hear from some of you in your 40s with kids in their teens or early 20s (are there any of you out there that actually fit that description?) to see if you have an thoughts on this. Our son saw Springsteen in England and thought he was great. He has some appreciation of what came before, but is not an adherent, concentrating, probably rightly, on what is new and exciting. That is what we all did in those days.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 16:26:28 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bring Your Lawyer and I'll Bring Mine...

Jeff: I don't recall if he's been sued himself, but at the end of December 1970 it was Sir Paul who sued John, George, Ringo and Apple, essentially over finances. It was an outgrowth of his vehement distrust of Allen Klein's management, as he sought to dissolve the Beatles partnership and have a receiver appointed to properly manage the group's assets. No need to go into further details of the long and winding road of this litigation, but it definitely left a bad taste for his former bandmates.

Subsequently, there was some talk of a serious rift with his former Wings bandmate Denny Laine. When Mr. Laine went through some financial difficulties following his tenure with Sir Paul, he sold his co-publishing rights to the song "Mull of Kintyre" to McCartney. This situation certainly has a familiar ring to it. That McCartney/Laine composition didn't fare well here in the U.S., but became a chart-topping hit in the U.K. & other countries at Christmas time in 1977. It's been reported that Laine & McCartney have reconciled in recent years.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 15:38:15 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Macca

I agree that Paul McCartney is in the upper echelon. His lesser work is better than most and every album has something to admire. He's got it all when it comes to performance. ' Ram' and 'Band on the Run' are wonderful. Its his attitude toward his audience that is especially appealing. It is believable. He knows that the people are buying the tickets and he aims to please. Singing "Blackbird" the other night was just one example. Trying new things for their provocative effect (even if he knew it would be pleasing ) is laudable. (Nirvanese) He can still be Paul the screamer in a welcome Paulese. So 'way to go, Sir Paul'. Keep it up.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 14:55:47 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Testimony of ex sidemen- literal or figurative? Has McCartney been sued?


Entered at Fri Dec 14 12:37:58 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Location: Northwestern suite of doghouse

Subject: Dylan's voice

For Peter V's sake I met Irma, a former teacher (in reality with another name) in Home For Elderly in Hibbing. I asked:

- Dear Irma, you knew Bobby as a youngster. Would you describe his accent as Minnesotan-Finno-Hebraic?

- He sounded like an arrogant bastard.

-Do you think...has his current voice influence of Southern blues men, intellectuals from Greenwich Village, young guitar players...?

- No, he still sounds like an arrogant bastard.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 09:23:21 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Part of having a large string / horn section, is that in the 60s and 70s these would be wheezing old boys with a pint of beer and a union card stapled to their chests. Now when you see these string sections they're all female, and under thirty, and the guys in the horn section are classical background, not old jazzers, and also young and keen. There are a lot of people going out with string quartets / sections now. After his thrashy section, John Cale brought them all back on and they joined in for Gun and Walkin' The Dog (link to my review) and they really went for it.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 09:16:59 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sir Paul

I didn't see the Sandy concert. The Diamond Jubilee and Olympics appearances were probably similar. To repeat myself repetitively, I think Sir Paul is a genius, and that even his worst albums always have at least a couple of melodic gems on them. He's also innovative trying stuff anonymously (The Fireman) and venturing into classical. BUT he is also reputed to be frugal verging on mean, according to the testimony of ex-sidemen, and he's frugal with himself. He sent his kids to state schools and never used to live in splendor.

This relates closely to my Dylan criticisms. He likes a younger guitar based, somewhat thrashy small band, and the arrangements cause him to shout. That's why the Diana Krall + old jazzers recordings were so interesting. Paul can certainly afford it, and he needs to go out with a full 13 or 15 piece band, as Brian Wilson did with SMILE, and John Cale for the one-off Paris 1919 shows. Horns, a string section, a good arranger / band leader (as Leonard Cohen and Brian Wlson have) to run stuff. He could still do the guitar / thrashy section … John Cale did, dispensing with the small orchestra for about 40% of the show, but he could also do justice to the other stuff. Doing a huge concert with a synth is where he goes wrong … Live & Let Die worked like that in 1975, but for a world wide broadcast to millions, it\s cheap.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 02:54:22 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin, I am glad that i was of some use yesterday :-)....i wasn't sure if that was Zak Starkey, or Jason Bonham, thanks for clearing it up.He is one helluva drummer , for sure. Townsend's windmill hasn't lost much. I was hoping he didn't get carried away and smash his guitar, y'know flashbacks. . In lots of ways, they were powerful as could be. They got an enormous reception from the crowd too.

The amount of emotion involved in seeing all these old bands can't overlooked. It's nice when they mostly live up to our hopes (hopes being a very different beast than an expectation).



Entered at Fri Dec 14 02:07:19 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: TV tonight

Hi guys!! Great reading as usual..

Some of you may be interested in watching the COLBERT REPORT tonight...He has Mavis Staples & Sean Lennon as guests. Sounds like a musical show[?]

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Dec 14 01:50:41 CET 2012 from (68.106.150.126)

Posted by:

Calvin

I saw Sir Paul Twice, an outdoor stadium show the summer of 1990 (I believe). And a Arena Show (1/3 the size) middle/late part of the last decade.

The Reaction was different-in retrospect I think it probably had a good deal to do with in 1989 he was riding great reviews of Flowers in the Dirt, and had a single on the charts getting significant airplay. He was still PAUL MCCARTNEY.

Now he is the nice old guy who use to be in the Beatles. Hasnt Produced any significant in almost 20 years and is essentially an oldies act-just a step above Rod Stewart.

It's fairly easy to write him off now considering the decades of mediocrity and ignore the 30 years of amazing work. I know I'm prone to do it.


Entered at Fri Dec 14 00:00:21 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Speaking of Stan Szelest, today's visit to a nearby used record store netted a 1973 LP by country singer Allan Capson on which Stan plans organ and piano and his formner employer Jerry Warren (leader oF the Hawks farm team of the early '60s) plays rhythm.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 23:37:47 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

The only Ravi Shankar track I own is a good one, "Sitar Todi" on a strange and wonderful late '60s (?) comp that I picked up for various reasons and kept for one - the presence of the Rising Sons' stunning version of ""Candy Man", one of the best 45s of all time. But the rest of the tracks are all great too - see link.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 23:31:10 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.180)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bravo Jeff........it was your posts that alerted me to the thing and had to watch it on my IPad as MTV Canada was playing the atrocity that is "Pop Up Video" to be followed by "1 gal - 5 gays" or some such nonsense........watched a live feed on Bloomberg web link.......anyhow, just in time to see the Stones lay an egg.......sad to see but at least Charlie is still perfect..........and David P is spot on...the Jagger comment rankled.....it was not just the silliness of it but they way it was delivered.....simple point is that if you decided to help then shut-up and help don't ever make someone feel like you have had to got out of your way to do so...............I guess having The Who go on after the Stones bothered Mick but all he would have to do is look at the tape to see that as with all these events The Who wiped the floor with everyone.....No Contest........he was very lucky to not have had to follow them..............Ringo's son is a force of nature......so is Daltry with the body of an 18 year old....how?


Entered at Thu Dec 13 22:07:16 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Okay.On McCartney, i kinda give a curve.When i say he was great, and WOW,i mean it, but it is with the reservations I expressed, and maybe some i didn't.Like you Joan, he doesn't exactly reach me.But, his personality never did.Musically, I can't help but totally admire him.And yes, though his two other stringed accompaniests are totally professional, very high percentile etc etc, they lack a little depth or soul in their sounds and choices sometimes.But, they are killer players. And McCartney still plays his ass off.I don't like his cuteness, or tghe way he goes for that.He did much less of that this time, i 'm not sure what it was, but as well as he played, there was a woodeness to his person .Maybe illness, maybe something else, maybe he's fighting off aging.But, musically, i can't help but admire the guy.Still got it. Still a musical genius. So, because i am so prejudiced to love the other 3, and enjoy the other 3- Beatles that is- more than MCartney, I might overcompensate when it comes time to respect the man and give him his due.Whilst he leaves me a little cold, i have 30 yard containers full of respect for him. And to be honest, anyone left right now, i'm bound to cut them a break. Even Neil Fucking Diamoond singing Dry your eyes might get a hall pass from me.......


Entered at Thu Dec 13 21:04:10 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apart from seeing Ravi Shankar in Salisbury, back in the early 70s we saw "Ravi Shankar's Group" without Ravi, playing at Poole Technical College. It seems they had a few days left after a Ravi tour and booked themselves a few extras. The second sitar player was brilliant as first sitar player too. An amazing evening with a small audience.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 21:01:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Music of India

Thanks John. BGO is a British reissue label, so it should be easy. I'll seek one out.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 20:12:22 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Concert

Jeff thanks for the running commentary. It was an amazing concert.Bruce and Billy Joel were tremendous I liked Bon Jovi. Loved Adam Ssndler hated Kanye. I think the best performances came from the NY/NJ "natives". I was a little disappointed with Sir Paul's set. It didn't reach me. Liked Blackbird and Live and let die. The song for his wife was sweet.

I know there was a "relief concert" the Wednesday after Sandy, but I never knew about it at the time because we were blacked out.

I sort of have "Survivors guilt". We were inconvenienced but .just a few miles from here is incredible devastation. Give to the relief funds if you can. These folks lost everything


Entered at Thu Dec 13 19:41:43 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Time Not On Their Side

I found the Rolling Stones' performance last night to be very lackluster. Maybe they limited themselves to just two songs to save strain on Sir Mick's voice in light of their big pay-per-view concert Saturday night. Jagger's comment, "If if rains in London, you've got to come and help us", however, found him straining the bounds of humour. And after 50 years of developing that certain image, Keith Richards now appears to be more of a spectre than an actual presence.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 18:55:05 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Found it Peter; on CD

Music of India.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 18:02:25 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Aww Al- finally someone who undertsands me...Not a good sign for you my friend.

McCartney- was great.It sounded like he might have had a slight cold.But he was great. Some of it is a little lost on me, maybe it's that he still thinks he's cute....Maybe he is.... it just always rubbed the wrong way, but he is fucking great.Skinny as a toothpick, a healthier skinny than Jagger, or Woods though.,But still, so fucking svelte it's enough to piss a normal guy off....unless it was a cold, his voice is starting to wesar more, but again, WOW. i think i enjoyed the Wings song the most..... and Live or Let Die, they could have done without the explosives. that Valentine song, sucks. Kinda crazy to see hime wityh The Nirvana guys. But, he was right there with em....


Entered at Thu Dec 13 17:14:47 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

John D, I'd avoid that "Sounds of India" one you mention for sure, as most of the tracks have spoken introductions where Ravi gives background information on Indian music. Maybe some folks don't mind, but I found them irritating (back when I had the cassette of this album) as they greatly interrupt the flow of music.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 16:27:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ravi

Hi John, It’s “Music of India – Ravi Shankar”, HMV (Classical) # AIP 1893, recording first published 1962.

The tracks are: Side one: Raga Hamsadhwani, Dhun Kafi, Side two: Raga Ramkali. He;s accompanied by Kanai Dutt – tabla, and Nodu Mullick- tamboura. It’s got a dark green sleeve with an oval on it with an old Indian picture. The link goes to discogs.com, which has a picture.

Mrs V bought it before she met me, and I was highly impressed at such esoteric musical taste. I spent ages trying to find a CD version, but that was five years ago, and I made the CDR, complete with hiss and crackle!


Entered at Thu Dec 13 14:14:57 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ravi / Peter V

Peter, could you check the exact title of that Ravi Shankar album from 62? I went to a discography and couldn't find it. The closest I could find was "The Sounds of India" which was originally released on vinyl in 1957. I saw it again mentioned as being released in '68? Thanks Peter. Oh..on this album the first cut is called An Introduction to Indian Music.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 12:03:35 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Christmas must be... this morning :-0)

Early Chrissy prezzie!

From Poole!

Ho ho ho!!

Many thanks mister V. You are a gentleman and a scholar.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 10:54:41 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff's posts

Best spate of posts on the GB

Ever

Well in kiddo. Really felt it. An intensity to match Bruce's. Don't get any better.

Sky Arts for me 10pm tonight. Sorry Pete, I know, I know...a slave to the footy :-0)


Entered at Thu Dec 13 08:48:29 CET 2012 from (69.126.138.157)

Posted by:

John W.

I was very pleased when Sir Paul announced Diana Krall who played piano with him on "Valentine". She did not get to sing but it was nice to see her out there, I'm a big fan of her (Mrs. Elvis Costello). I kept hoping Ringo would make an appearance but that did not happen. :(


Entered at Thu Dec 13 08:25:32 CET 2012 from (69.126.138.157)

Posted by:

John W.

That was really a great show. I wish my brother (who passed away three years ago) could have been there to see it, and I know for sure he would have been there at the Garden if he was still with us; they were all his favorite bands. Maybe he was "there" watching from above, I doubt it but certainly he WAS there in the sense that his spirit carries on in all of us who love rock and roll and these great artists who produce it. Anyway, my personal feeling is it was absolutely great to see all of these old time British rockers looking so trim physically and playing so well at their advanced ages. I loved all those classic songs and the way they played them. But it was the guys from the New York tri-state area, like Bruce and Billy Joel, who really brought the meaning to the show, simply because they are from our area and this was a show to help people in the aftermath of hurricane Sandy. But overall, this might have been one of the best shows ever, with all the stars that played and it was almost six hours long. Not sure if it tops the best concert I ever saw, which was Springsteen at Nassau Coliseum on 12/28/80, or the Last Waltz, but it was right up there on the list.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 06:11:26 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Young drummer my ass- a few better glimpses, and listening to him , think it's anton fig. Whomever, this is one great drummer.And i must be ancient, i'm really enjoying Billy Joel live..... more influences, more apparent, liv. Hot band. Sanborn enjoying the hell out of this.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 05:50:59 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Billy Joel kicking ass- with that gotta be David Sanborn on incredible sax. Youngish band- chick percussionist/horn player, young guitarist, great and a young drummer. Joel looks like a restaurant owner dressed for a night out with friends and family.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 05:42:00 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kanye's on- break time. Aside from the seriousness of the situation, the devastation, and how will things evr return to what they were- the concert sheds some light on other things. aging rock and rollers........The Who seem to have gotten more time than anyone... Waters and Vedder were great-, kick ass band.... the stones...well, ya got to hand it to them......but i'm not sure what to think....Richards was deep, deep into his chords and time.Woods, still amazing and one happy son of a gun,Charlie Watts- all i could think of was what songsa do i want to record that he would be the right drummer for? i tihnk i'd go to see The Stones even if it was down to Charlie being the reason to go....Jagger- I'm not sure what to think or say. amazibng for a 70? year old, or what ever age he is... but hard to watch

Clapton had JJ's buddy Steve Jordan on drums...Johnnie loved him, and there's stories there.Willie Weeks. Not Cream but damn good. i enjoyed it and tehre's years and years left for Clapton to do what he does...

The Who. First thoughts.Townshend and Daltrey look great.But why does Roger have to leave his shirt half open? They are definitley int o it, powerful, and of ocurse, the songs are too complex for aman of Roger's age to sing.The only one i could think of at this stage who might have that kind of range is Richie Furay.But that doesn't stop Roger.Townsends into it, playing well. Roger sings "Who the Fuck Are You?' pretty early in. Nice to hewar the old songs buty,i;m thiuking- okay- would anyone want to hear these songs if they did a Dylan, reinvented em?- but for the purpose of Roger being able to sing em? I doubt it- on the other hand- what's the virue in delivering musicllay enjoyable perfromances of these chestnuts with poor vocals? When the beauty of the vocals are so important? i still dont; know- but- I'll say this- See Me,Feel Me, Touch Me...... roger had some of it, and the power, the intensity, the desire to, that need to create, to be artists and do what they do- you could feel it all right there. It was palpable, right through the tv set, even with the digitsal sound...and then Rain- again, Daltry can't pull oif the vocals long enough, but Rain was probably the most successful song of their set........,Are we better off with The Who out here doing what they do the best they can? i guess so- Woudl i run to buy a ticket- fuck no.Do i admire their balls, and teir need to perform- yes- What i;d like to see though, is them write new stuff, that Roger can sing- get closer- get close to having successful vocals, ands to saying something new-

But,still, I can't help but marvel at and admire that need to get out and perform and and do what they do- it never goes away-

but, fucking daltry has to unbutton that shirt the whole way- kinda ridiculous, but- hey, it's only rock and roll.

The stones- i think you have to admire that they are still doing it, and still enjoyibng it.It would help if the quality of their new work was better, and if Mick's dancing was less freakish and weird.but, hey, he can do it. but for me, of the Stones, i'm thinking that it's Woods and Watts that made it musically entertaining tonight. Odd, Bernard Fowler and Lisa Fisher were on back up vox, but without Blondie chaplin.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 03:08:33 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: second track BonJovi

Thank God- Dead Or Alive came through.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 02:59:51 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Adam Sandler--, Paul Schaeffer---- reworking Hallellujah n.f.g.= no fucking good.

n My car was stolen Saturday night. out here in the burbs...10 years old, dents or scratches on three sides. 240+k.No shit.they broke into a different van a few spots over, screwed up the column, couldn't start it, stole some stuff from it, then stole mine........ cops called me from the city last night. HaD SPOTTED a suspicious vehicle,,, observe, turn ont heir lightrs to pull it over, chase ensues.....turns out the car was a stolen rental car, with my plate on the back....... the 17 year old drivewr woudl only say he bought the car for 20 bucks form some guy in a gas station..... and the kid stuck to his story. This morning, i get a call form adiifferent cop, he has my car, they are about to tow it back to the burbs here where it was stolen, wants me to meet him at the police dpratment.... Fingerprints m e so they can eliminate my prinbtds...l they caught a whole ring, 7 or 8 people in custody, two resisted arrest, it's fucking amazing...what are these kids thining, stealing an old car, joy ridinbg in it...... weed all over the car, cig butts, couple bottles of crown royal,, and- a norelco hair sheers plugged in to the outlet- what the fuck, were they giving each other haircuts??// tore up a seat, hit something real good, destroyed my right side sliding door.... now i gotta battle with the ins co cause they want to fix the car, give it back to me, i say no friggin way---- haven't driven it yet, but you can bet these kids tore up my tranny, god knows what they did to the suspension...

First song- Bon jovi sucked as a band too, i'm hoping for the second to be better, starting out stronger.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 02:49:40 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Roger/Eddie

They were sensational.Superb band.


Entered at Thu Dec 13 02:40:10 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Bruce, Bob,Jed,, and Jon

I got home during a phone conversation with an important woman.Then realized the show was on, got off the phone politely, and turned the concert on early in Land of Hope and Dreams.By the time Bruce and band were a minute or so into Wrecking Ball i had tears in my eyes. It was the two songs. the lyrics, Bruce, the band, and......

As much as i've loved Springsteen's music at dfifferent times in my life, i've never felt like i was a huge fan, or couldn't live without his music. Maybe it's the state of the country, maybe it's the state of the music economy, maybe it's age, maybe it's everything, but i got to say, i consider Bruce AND THE E Streeet Band an essential act, The Boss is an essential artist and though he is the songwriter, that band is very important somehow. It's the conglomeration of such very different personalities, all great musicians, but all so different. I miss Clarence but i love seeing Clarence's nephew in his place, sounding a little like him but different all the time.Something similar in the tone , and other things, and then alot more like his uncle on a signature Clarence solo on Born to Run, but still, different........ But i dig the band, the whole thing..Silvio (Steve), old NYC forwever act Soozie Tyrell, Clark on trombone, Nils,Gary ,even Max is still essential.There is something right about seeing his labored yet dogged and powerful drumming- don't forget, he has suffered thorugh wrist problems....Like i miss Clarence, i miss Federici, but there's something comforting about seeing longtime local guy Charlie Giordano in his seat....And the percussionist, and the back up singers....the horns....everyone so damn different, yet everyone fitting just right, jiving perfectly..... and it's songs that mean... songs that matter- listen to the words, watch the conviction- Big Fucking Medicine.

But Bruce,The Boss means it.His words mean so much, and he means what he sings and he sings it with conviction and joy ands all his soul and might.the man delivers.And i got to say, in this world, in the world we live in, in this ocuntry, Bruce is important.No joke Al, if the man ran for President, i'd vote for him.No joke, not to be demeaning.i would....

Jed- Jon Bon Jove absolutley weak on Born To Run- couldn't hurt the song, or Bruce, but, it was quite a contrast between Jon and The Boss. I hope he comes round and down to earth before he goes on, and i hope his band lives up to the good performances (TV) i saw before.

Bob- I go far back regarding Mindy J.Back to the late 70s, Mindy J. and the Cyclone Rangers, all over NYC but especially in the opening years of THe Lone Star cafe. there was another band she was in, prior i think, but i can't recall the name. i also saw Mindy sing back up with Danko and Fagen and company,on new YEar's Eve at the Bewrsville theater. i believe two years in a row, one year Weider on guitar, the other year Vivino on guitar.i tihnk gary gold was the drummer one year, maybe Fig or Parker the other.Maybe Gold both but i doubt it. And seen Mindy with Steely Dan, some other acts too. Remember the first Rosendale Care, in the small joint, across the street? Saw Mindy and John Herald double bill there, might have been 99? Was defintiely sometime between 97 and 99, i remember being stupefied that night by Mindy ...Mindy J takes me way , way back .Really sad that she died. What a beautiful, beautiful, and vast talent. John Herald too, but at least he didn't go so young .


Entered at Thu Dec 13 00:46:22 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: PutEmUp

Based on your say so I will check out the musicianship of Bon Jovi. Thanks. I think!


Entered at Thu Dec 13 00:28:20 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Sir Paul and Nirvana Tonight

Sir Paul is going to be closing the Sandy concert as a member of Nirvana.He's playing the Cobain parts.Should be an interesting evening.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 22:35:28 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Professor Louie & The Crowmatix

Jeff, it was a great show. They have a Hammond at The Falcon so when he played there Saturday it was all about the blues. Last night was our local radio station WKZE's Christmas party so it was all about rock and roll and it always turns into a full out dance party. When John Platania shows up it just adds to the magic. What get's overlooked is how a great a jam band they are as well as everything else.

Jeff, when you lived in the Hudson Valley did you ever get to see the late Mindy Jostyn perform?


Entered at Wed Dec 12 21:41:35 CET 2012 from (24.12.127.176)

Posted by:

Samantha

Location: Valparaiso, Indiana USA
Web: My link

Subject: Where are all the fans?

Hi everyone! I'm a huge fan of The Band. I guess you'd say I'm sort of a new fan as I only just discovered them a couple of years ago. I'm also a huge fan of The Beatles, especially George Harrison and in reading about him realized he loved The Band which lead me to buy Music From Big Pink (Thanks George, you had great taste!). Well needless to say I listened to Big Pink and fell in love! I've been collecting their albums ever since. I really just can't get enough. I'd love to find some people to discuss The Band with. I've included a link to my Facebook page, if anyone wants to talk, friend me! Here's my email if you aren't on FB: smilves@yahoo.com I'd also love to find a Band tshirt and poster, I've found a couple options, but if anyone has any suggestions, I'd love to hear them. Well I hope to hear from some awesome fans, thanks! I love the website, keep up the good work!


Entered at Wed Dec 12 21:19:08 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: not so exceptional

Bill M: from the King Tyrant on down, we've got a whole government of prehistoric lizards . . . .


Entered at Wed Dec 12 20:41:27 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Manifest Dentistry

Pat B: Given your interest in both American politics and American exceptionalism, you're bound to appreciate this snippet from the linked article about a prehistoric lizard named for your president:

"And Longrich riffed on the symbolism of such incisors and cuspids as they pertain to the gleaming mouth of his current national leader. 'He’s got a good smile (and) at the risk of offending you Canadians it’s an example of American exceptionalism,' he says."


Entered at Wed Dec 12 20:37:40 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Paul Simon

If a major singer/songwriter could be underrated, then it is Paul Simon. No matter what he has achieved, he has constantly simmered under the surface. His songs and styles are provocative and his delivery is superb. Unlike some, he continues to be an enjoyment to hear and his voice is sustained. I love so many of his songs. Many from Graceland are a joy. 'The Boy in the Bubble' is wonderful. I agree about Cecilia. I also like many of the songs from the lesser albums. In short, I'm glad to see him get his due here, there and everywhere. And his work with Art Garfunkel is still timely and great to listen to. I saw Simon and Garfunkel in Massey Hall in 1967. The audience was not kind but they were excellent. Audiences were not appreciative and somewhat angry in those days despite 'the summer of love' (what a joke). I remembered being perplexed by the reaction at that time.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 20:29:33 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Randy Newman and S&G Singles

As I've mentioned before, I got to see Randy Newman premiere "Good Old Boys" with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Ry Cooder in October 1974 (see link to newspaper review of concert). It was quite a memorable experience. In addition to performing the album in its entirety, he also included many of his earlier songs such as "Sail Away".

I have the 45 single versions of the following Simon & Garfunkel releases:

The Boxer b/w Baby Driver
Bridge Over Troubled Water b/w Keep the Customer Satisfied
Cecilia b/w The Only Living Boy In New York

These 7" vinyl versions feature dedicated mono mixes that pack a powerful aural punch that leave the listener quite satisfied.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 20:24:41 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: "Cecilia" the best, and it's not even April Fool's Day?! I will accept no more abuse about my taste in anything. Gag me with a latte!

John D: Thanks for the very prompt response. I believe that Bill Dillon is one of the very few people who makes an appearance on all of Robbie's solo (ish) CDs. Which says something about something.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 19:33:29 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Hustlin' 'round Atlanta in their alligator shoes …

Subject: Randy Newman / Bridge Over Troubled Water

My advice is to go to amazon and look up "Randy Newman Original Album Series". That's a 5CD set with the first five albums on it complete. The whole set is only £10.98 inthe UK, so it's a bargain. Numbers 4 and 5 are "Good Ol' Boys" and "Little Criminals" both absolutely essential. I'd rate Good Old Boys the best of all, with two The Band covered in the 90s … Kingfish and Louisiana 1927, plus Rednecks, Birmingham, but the entire album is essential. Randy Newman's "third album syndrome album" was in fact his sixth, "Born again" which I like but most critics panned.

Bridge Over Troubled Waters … I had many years where I couldn't play it. Many of you know this story, but a friend decided to cut his Hammond L100 in half for transportation. I assisted, and still have the solder burns to prove it. We worked out we could do it in a day, and the going rate for doing an L100 was about two weeks wages for us. So we thought we were in business. L100s are easy, so we thought nothing of taking on cutting a B3 in half. Trouble is the innards aren't balanced and it fell apart. The band were going on the road, so we worked two nights and a day straight through to do it and rebuild the inner frames. All we had was a record player and one copy of Bridge Over troubled Water (which the band had been given to study production) and we left it on replay all the way through. So I knew every note backwards, forwards and sideways. And we never took a saw and soldering iron to a Hammond again.

Then in the late 70s, when we were doing theatre shows for teaching English, we had a backing band and one of the actors could do a perfect Art Garfunkel imitation, and we had a great pianist, so we did The Boxer or Bridge Over Troubled Water every show. This is when the drummer discovered that if you bring your fist down on a Watkins Copicat, it makes a BOING sound which is ideal for The Boxer. So again I left it for a long time. Then I bought the gold remaster and re-entered the riches in there. Cecilia is one of my all-time favourite tracks. But it's all brilliant.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 19:21:48 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Yes Bill you are right. The other two I had to check out were Dave Lewis on drums and lo and behold, Amy Sky on back up vocals.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 19:09:37 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: In the Stan clip, who's the Lennon guy on guitar, Bill Dillon?


Entered at Wed Dec 12 17:51:04 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: This is what makes horse races

Jed, I too am looking forward to The Hurricae Sandy Relief concert tonight.But, i gotta tell ya, Bon Jovi is a band full of terrific musicians.Deosn't mean they are not purveyors of shlock, but it is high quality schlock. some of their performances are musically excellent and interesting ( is it time for a hearing test?). And The Boss and The E Streeters, - I'm a fan. And yes Fred- The Boss looks like Casey Stengel, Jimmy Durante, and Robert DeNiro had a middle aged son.

Butterfield Blues Band does belong in THe RRHOF.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 16:50:44 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Randy & Linda

Al: Here's another clip from Randy Newman Live at the Odeon, where's he joined by the lovely Linda Ronstadt who sings one of Mr. Newman's beautiful "serious" songs, "Texas Girl at the Funeral of Her Father".


Entered at Wed Dec 12 16:48:04 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Sandy Concert

Looking forward to the hurricane sandy benefit tonight and hoping they raise lots of money.Glad they have Bruce,Bon jovi,Kanye,Alicia keys,and others I have no interest in so I can take food and restroom breaks.The Who,The Stones,EC,Sir Paul should be interesting.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 16:44:47 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Albert King

Glad to see Albert finally made it into the (meaningless) R&R HOF.Stange that Paul Butterfield remains left out,but I guess old Jann just feels obligated to the disco and rap side of the HOF building. Is disco/rap even considered to be R&R?


Entered at Wed Dec 12 16:19:12 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Randy and Ry

Nice spot DP. Great quality. Shall be relishing those 12 Song clips with Ry later tonight.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 16:15:29 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Rog

Don't be daft. They're your tickets Rog!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 12 15:53:13 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Randy Newman

Randy Newman performing "Let's Burn Down The Cornfield" (from "12 Songs") with Ry Cooder live at the Odeon in 1983.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 15:29:05 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Quincy Jones?

Yes, rush was overlooked for too long. But I'd have thought Quincy Jones would have been pretty much inaugral...


Entered at Wed Dec 12 11:37:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RIP, Ravi Shankar.

Mrs V who is the Ravi expert here, says ignore the Concert For Bangla Desh stuff, and as we will be, play something early in memory. Our favourite is an old HMV LP, "Music of India" from 1962, which we put on CDR and gets regular play here. It's the best of the dozen CDs we own of him.

I saw him in Salisbury Cathedral on a magic midsummer evening with Anoushka Shankar. Earlier, walking past, we saw him dismounting from a white Roll-Royce, looking as dignified as the Emperor of India. Which in musical terms of course, he was.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 10:51:53 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: I'm calling you Al

With you there Al. I haven't played Bridge Over Troubled Waters through for ages - but some tracks are on favourite compilations. 'Only Living Boy in New York'. Bought the CD for my kids in the past too.

I've seen Paul Simon in concert on both his last visits to UK and he is outstanding - and 'Bridge' is always a signature song.

Some years ago there was a discussion of the best horn sections. Surprisingly I can't recall any mention of the horns on 'Keep The Customer Satisfied' - what a track.

Cheque in post today - unless you tell me you'd rather use the tickets yourself!


Entered at Wed Dec 12 08:05:49 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob F- i understand you saw a helluva show.Friends of mine were there, said The Cromatix were great, played alot of new material, and had John Platania and Larry Packer along.One of these friends has real ears, will bitch about bad sound, or too loud sound, and did no bitching at all.i don't know if that means there was nothing to bitch about, or if he was on good behavior cause he was calling from his new old lady's.

Kevin- i think the caption helped the post :-)



Entered at Wed Dec 12 07:18:24 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.165)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....a few things:

"Just do it" has its origins with Gary Gilmore - brother of famed Rolling Stone contributor Mikal - and mass murderer........but I am looking for some music to add for Christmas travel so some Randy Newman it shall be......."I Love LA" was the last memory and while fun at the time - a reviisit to it didn't take........anyhow looking forward to the two mentioned......

Stan Szslest: multi-thousands of his greatest hours playing music were never captureed on tape but always great to hear him do anything.....Thanks John................and to any young guys watching that clip...........remember two things........Stan was truly great and never ever have someone with you on stage who can't dance......thankfully the cameraman spent more time on Stan than her but it could have been worse.......

Jeff: I like those bits of information you provide on some of the out of the spotlight musicians.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 06:44:03 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Sons of Lovejoy

quite a few King raised pickers here. a particular standout who toured with Albert is a guy named Vince Martin.This guy did a stretch, for what i don't know, then did several years on cruise ships, making money, now is home in st louis and playing. Guy is excellent, and a good singer too.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 06:19:34 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Lovejoy

Brooklyn, Illinois, also known as Lovejoy, was where Albert King made his home for many years. Just a couple miles outside East St Louis, Illinois. It's not hard to figure out why Lovejoy was and is called Lovejoy. King had some great bands comprised of St Louis and East Side musicians, including Johnnie Johnson, Gus Thornton,Kenny Rice, Harold white... . Over here, East Side means across the river in Illinois.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 05:21:43 CET 2012 from (24.244.23.1)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Geddy et al

Bill M: probably a little too young as you say.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 04:31:06 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.86)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: never mind "12 Songs":the brilliant "Sail Away" is usually pretty easy to find in used CD stores. But I'll echo Al E on the "just do it" bit.

Rush's very first, and rarest, record was a 45 - their cover of "Not Fade Away"; JT: did they hang out at the Concord to see our guys do that song, to your knowledge? (Too young, I'd say.)

Re Albert King, his "Lovejoy" LP has two drummers - Jim Keltner and Sandy Konikoff. I forget if Stan's on it as well, though he and Sandy certainly recorded together with the Ravens, BB King, Jesse Ed Davis, Taj Mahal, Garland Jeffries, John Cale, et al, and toured together backing Lonnie Mack and Ronnie Hawkins (a couple of stints more than 10 years apart). Demoes with Van too, come to think of it.

The Brothers D (John and Greg): I suspect that Neil was dissembling / backtracking in that quote, saying that Omemee was just one of several. He was earlier quoted as saying that Omemee was the one, but that was likely in Omemee in one of any touring artist's "You guys are the best anywhere" moments - moments that will happen less and less frequently as artists learn that universal photo-taping and YouTubing of such moments makes them look like idiots. Thunder Bay (really Fort William) is really the only contender as far as I'm concerned: it really is in northern Ontario by anyone's definition, and it reaaly was where so many changes were made - he left Winnipeg, thrived on tour, met Stills, impressed new peers with his songs ... See Jon Einarson's "Don't Be Denied" or "Neil Young Nation", both of which go into considerable helpful detail. As does ""Shakey" for that matter.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 02:34:31 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Stan Szelest

WOW!

Just wow. What a clip. Looks like he's nonchantly riding a sit up and beg push bike but plays like a man possessed. Fabulous.

Cheers for that John

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 12 02:24:43 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: R&R HOF

Hi, guys!! Thought I would post this for all to see. More Canadians to be proud of..

By CBC News, cbc.ca, Updated: December 11, 2012 5:23 PM

Rush to be inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Canadian power trio Rush will finally be inducted into the Cleveland-based Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The Toronto band had long been overlooked as the Hall of Fame announced its inductees, but it has made the final cut for 2013, it was announced Tuesday.

Canadian-American rock outfit Heart also earned a nomination, along with:

- Record producer and Roxy Theatre owner Lou Adler.

- Producer and composer Quincy Jones.

- Rap group Public Enemy.

- Bluesman Albert King.

- Pop singer-songwriter Randy Newman.

- Disco queen Donna Summer.

The induction will take place April 18, 2013, at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, the first time since 1993 that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony will be held on the West Coast.

It’s been a long haul for Rush fans, who have waited since 1998 for the rockers to even be considered for the Hall of Fame. Musical acts must have a 25-year track record to qualify.

A staple of classic rock radio and an enormously influential band, Rush was never among those put forward in a long list created annually by a group of musical experts, headed by Rolling Stone magazine co-founder Jann Wenner.

But this year, fans were allowed to have a say in the voting process and that may have figured in Rush’s inclusion.

The band released a statement Tuesday saying they are “honoured to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.”

“The three of us are especially appreciative of our loyal fans whose support and dedication has gone a long way to making this possible. P.S. And special thanks to our moms for voting 6,000 times!” said the statement signed by Alex Lifeson, Geddy Lee and Neil Peart.

Lifeson, 59, the guitarist for Rush, was willing to overlook the long wait.

"First of all, it's all water under the bridge and it was a very tiny bridge," he said in a phone interview from his home in Toronto. "I think our fans are more upset than we were because they feel a real bond to this band and it's been an important part of their lives in some form, and to be snubbed was snubbing them at the same time."

“Perhaps there were times when I thought if this ever happens I'm not going to bother going, or who cares or whatever, but at the end of the day positive karma is an important thing and this is an important thing to a lot of our fans and people we know."

But Lifeson lamented that progressive rock groups such as Yes and King Crimson had never made it into the Hall of Fame.

Heart was Vancouver-based in '70s

Heart, rockers known for hits such as Barracuda, Dreamboat Annie and Magic Man, was based in Vancouver in the 1970s as the band’s male members Mike and Roger Fisher evaded the draft.

Sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson, the lead vocalists, hail from Seattle and still sing together, touring Canada last year.

Summer, known for hits such as Love To Love You Baby and Hot Stuff, died at age 63 in May. She had been nominated six times before.

King, a legendary blues guitarist who had a deep influence on Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn, is also a posthumous entry.

Newman, who had pop hits with Sail Away and the satirical Short People, is also a film composer for Ragtime, Awakenings, Meet the Parents and Toy Story.

"I'm very happy," the 69-year-old Newman said from his home in Los Angeles. "I thought I'd have to die first, but I'm glad I'm around to see it."

Quincy Jones wonders why he waited so long

But Jones wonders why he didn't get recognition sooner after producing artists such as Michael Jackson and Ray Charles and striking a high profile in American entertainment.

The 79-year-old said he never expected to wait so long for his own entry.

"I was pissed off about it at first, because I saw how it was going down and who was going in and who wasn't," Jones said.

"But I'm used to it, man. I've been around a long time, and I know how it works, you know. It's still an honour, man."

With files from The Associated Press

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Dec 12 02:25:25 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Question

Is there any other arl arse on here who will admit to never having played the album Bridge Over Troubled Water since initially playing it to death when they bought it 40 odd years ago?

Thought not.

Well I watched a BBC documentary tonight on its making and listening once more to its majesty I am thoroughly ashamed to admit to this despicable aberration. I have never played it for my own pleasure or to attempt to enrich the listening pleasure of any of my now grown up kids and have never replaced the original album or bought the CD.

Call myself a music fan? Why I deserve stringing up. I have, however, attempted to mitigate the gravity of these aberrations tonight. I have immediately purchased a copy of the CD for everyone including myself. What a complete and utter bozo.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 12 01:58:02 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Randy

Kev - just buy 12 Songs.

Like now. Today/tonight. Just fuckin do it.

Your question mark will then disappear as if by magic. n :-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 12 01:35:59 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob, if you see this in time, give my regards to Aaron. Something tells me you and I have friends in common. Have a great time at the show...


Entered at Wed Dec 12 01:31:02 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Stan Szelest

A couple of weeks back; when I worked with the Hawk, he said that the greatest piano player he ever had was the late Stan Szelest. Richard would take his place in the Hawks. Years later in the late 80's he would return to The Band; after doing time with Lonnie Mack. Sadly he died of a heart attack in 1991.

Here is Stan The Man doing Jerry Lee Lewis. Just watch those fingers.

I miss the hell out of you Stan.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 00:23:08 CET 2012 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: My Favorites, 2013

Here are ten of my favorite albums released this year. Four of 'em have direct connections to The Band:

1) Carolina Chocolate Drops- "Leaving Eden"

2) Bob Dylan- "Tempest"

3) Ruthie Foster- "Let it Burn"

4) Dr. John- "Locked Down"

5) John Hiatt- "Mystic Pinball"

6) Lyle Lovett- "Release Me"

7) Tedeschi-Trucks Band- "Everybody's Talking"

8) Jerry Douglas- "Traveler"

9) Bonnie Raitt- "Slipstream"

10)Black Prairie- "A Tear in the Eye is a Wound in the Heart"


Entered at Wed Dec 12 00:10:40 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I think it was Esquire,, I looked at it in the shop on the motorway, and they had the twenty albums "every man should own." Number one was Sail Away by Randy Newman and it was chosen by Brian Wilson, so yes, Randy deserves a place in the Hall of Fane.


Entered at Wed Dec 12 00:02:37 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rush and Randy

Wonderful to see a boy from North York make it to the RR Hall of Fame. Those boys sure have been at it a long time. Nice to see that recognition. (Not my favourite though I do like some of what they do. Isure like the music but the voice unfortunately grates at times though earnest and effective. Lyrically superb often.)

As for Randy Newman, what can one say. He has done everything and is superlative. I am partial to the early work but have a healthy respect for the film work and love his delivery live. He deserves the recognition.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 22:49:08 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Hall of Fame

Rush, Randy Newman ( ? ) and the great Public Enemy have been selected for the 2013 Rock n Roll Hall of Fame.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 21:44:48 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Professor Louie & The Crowmatix

Jeff, Josh is on guitar and Frankie C is on bass. They're doing a lot of songs from the new cd 'Wings of Fire'. It's probably their best cd and most of the songs are originals. Miss Marie has one called Top of the World that is so good. Tonight they play in Rhinebeck and John Platania may be sitting in. It's going to be a great night of music.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 19:46:43 CET 2012 from (50.70.35.42)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Omemee & Finland

Omemee could be considered in "northern Ontario" by a good many Southern Ontarians the same way that Barrie is considered "up north" even though, geographically, that's hardly the case.

I would believe the statement that Thunder Bay has the most people of Finnish heritage outside of Finland proper. The small towns of Suomi and Finland are located west of Thunder Bay.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 19:28:18 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ari: The last I saw of Spader was the final episode of "Boston Legal". Did he and Shatner marry as planned?


Entered at Tue Dec 11 18:43:55 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Responding

The link is from our local newspaper on Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah". I like kd lang's, but since I've become a huge fan of Il Divo, I like it best.

PETER V: On Brit coms. It wouldn't be Saturdays without them. Never missed, "On The Buses", "Father Ted", "Fawlty Towers", "Keeping Up Appearances" and my fave was, "Are You Being Served?" That 'Mr. Humphreys' was something else... Anyone interested in these wonderful oldies can see them on youtube.com..Type British sitcoms and take your pick!!

Thanx, guys, for all the great posts and links.

RIP, dear Rick. As long as we have your music, you will NEVER be forgotten.

Until Next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Dec 11 17:35:25 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Levon remembered by "Turner Classic Movies" in its 2012 memorial video @ approx 4:06.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 13:26:27 CET 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

FINALLY...Jim Weider looks like James Spader. How did I not see this earlier?


Entered at Tue Dec 11 06:00:10 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

A different one from Rick Danko....above link.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 04:56:31 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Aaron always had a kick ass band. Whomever the geetar player was, he was great. Mike DeMicco, Jimmy Eppard, Josh Colow, all great. Mike Dunn, Frank Campbell, both fine bassists, and All you had to do was mention Gary Burke to Levon. He'd break out in a big smile, "Burky. I alwsy liked a lefty drummer..." He's also known as a nice guy, was the stepfather to my cousin's twin girls....Miss Marie, Aaron.... .


Entered at Tue Dec 11 00:31:17 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Professor Louie & The Crowmatix 12/15

If anyone is going to be in the Hudson Valley on Saturday 12/15, Professor Louie and The Crowmarix are doing a benefit in Kingston for the local food bank. They played the Falcon in Marlboro NY, this past Saturday and absolutely tore up the place. Truly one of the great live bands playing today.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 00:28:13 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Never to argue about anything Canadian but....

This is a quote from Neil Young.

The "town in North Ontario" referred to in the opening line of the song is often presumed to be Ontario native Young's hometown; Young himself cleared up the rumors in a 1995 Mojo interview with Nick Kent:

"Well, it's not literally a specific town so much as a feeling. Actually, it's a couple of towns. Omemee, Ontario, is one of them. It's where I first went to school and spent my 'formative' years. Actually I was born in Toronto..." Omemee, just west of Peterborough, is well within what is now considered Southern Ontario, and 130 km from Toronto by road.

Neil did play up in Thunder Bay and has an honorary doctorate from the university there.


Entered at Tue Dec 11 00:09:24 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I’ll admit these last few days have been tough……..our Bill M…a man of exquisite musical tastes and a first ballot GB Hall of Famer……has admitted to a love of Latte, Hudson Hawk and a distaste of Westerns............my oh my…


Entered at Mon Dec 10 23:49:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Latte! Bill! I'm shocked. Get a double espresso or ristretto down you.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 23:00:12 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

Excellent Bill…..I did not know that about Thunder Bay……..”Helpless” is a beautiful song……..His latest about Ontario is lame – LINKED above.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 22:33:05 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "Helpless" town in North Ontario

A used record/CD store has opened up nearish us, and not only does it serve very good designer coffees for those of us in the latte-drinking classes, it provides live music every Sunday afternoon - including former Hawk Eugene 'Jay' Smith on Jan 13.

NWC: This past Sunday they had two young guys from Thunder Bay. The one who introduced himself to the audience as Timo (hint #2 that something Finnish was going on) wore a teeshirt that said just 'Suomi' (#3). We got talking to them at the break; Timo said that Thunder Bay is the largest Finnish town in the world outside Finland.

Both of them were very much aware that TBay was very significant in the development of the young Neil - and is in fact the "town in north Ontario".


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:57:36 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Remember the good times

Whenever I think about my dad or others who I have in my heart who are gone now, I immediately focus on some event or interaction that recalls why I loved those lost. That helps and mourning mutates to a positive feeling and love abides. Rick and Richard and Levon are in my consciousness playing their instruments and looking at each other and putting out that heartfelt music of Big Pink and that good old rock and roll. Remember the good times!


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:55:22 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Nothin but the truth

Bill I lied to yuh........there is a couple of horses, but not in Texas where they live....in the middle east where they were swash buckling......by the way what in fuck is swash buckling???

Anyway, Peter my all time favourite line of Slim's is when the cowboys are teaching the railway workers to sing "De camptown ladies" and they're dancing around, Slim comes ridin' up, shoots his gun and yells,"What in the wide world of sports is a'goin' on here. I hired you guys to get a little track laid! Not dance around like a bunch a Kansas City Faggots!

Well thank you Kevin.....in all that I did and where I played my music I was well received enough, and my ego was stroked enough for me, so I am content. To share time with the group here is time well spent.

Now I gotta go back down to my ship and fight with those gawd damn Christmas lights Gawd those things piss me off.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:39:09 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Mongo? Santamaria!

Crazy Chester advocating for (Trail)Blazing Saddles brings us full circle. As much as I howled at Slim Pickens' demise at the end of Dr Strangelove, I choked up at the scene of him, gutshot and staggering while Knockin' on Heaven's Door played. Speaking of which, it's 13 years since the man who brought us Crazy Chester left us. Miss him so.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:38:38 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Rick Danko

Sorely missed and fondly remembered.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:12:45 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rick

RIP.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 19:09:07 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Norm…..Your story about Mr. Pete was great……..and not to worry, you are famous…….from St. Louis to Liverpool to Toronto – we all know you and that’s good enough.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 18:41:21 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

From Robbie Robertson’s FB, list of ten he is listening to:

1. Alabama Shakes / Be Mine

2. Gary Clark Jr. / Bright Lights

3. Band of Skulls / I Know What I Am

4. Bon Iver / Flume

5 Michael Kiwanuka / Rest

6. Van Morrison / Tupelo Honey

7. Charles Mingus / Goodbye Pork Pie Hat

8. Sly & the Family Stone / Life

9. Prince & the New Power Generation / What Is Hip?

10. Bonnie Raitt / Angel From Montgomery

Probably more than any other musician, I miss Rick Danko. Such a great spirit.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 18:16:32 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ain't no easy Horses

No horses Bill. If you haven't seen the movie, you really need to. I'm terrible with names, but the fellow who wrote it, fought with the big film outfits for a long time to get his way so he could direct. I think it was well worth while, for the job he did.

The movie also stars, as well as Robert Duvall & Michael Cain, the youngster, "Haly Jo Osment". His mother is Kera Segwick. She dumps him off with these two old rebel uncles of hers, (on the pretense she is going to take a course) while she goes for a fling in Las Vegas. The old uncles don't want no kid around, they are old war veterans who do nothing but sit around, drink, and shoot at all the travelling salesmen that come by.

I'm sure if you look it up on wiki, I won't have to waste space here, but it is without a doubt one of the flicks I've seen.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 18:13:36 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 1980 in Film

While "Heaven's Gate", featuring Ronnie Hawkins, was certainly a colossal box office & critical failure in 1980, there were two successful films that featured the involvement of Band members that year. Robbie worked on the soundtrack for Martin Scorsese's "Raging Bull", with assistance from Garth & Richard. Robert De Niro won the Oscar for Best Actor for his role. And Levon c-starred in Michael Apted's "Coal Miner's Daughter", which garnered the Best Actress Oscar for Sissy Spacek. While both these films received critical praise, "Coal Miner's Daughter" was also one of the top grossing films that year at around $67.2 million.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 18:03:59 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: Got the photo, thanks. Must say that I was expecting something less svelte and more barge-like. As for the Lions movie, I like the sound of it; doesn't have horses, does it? For some reason, the scene your described brought to the surface an ancient memory of the closing scene of "The Magic Christian" - a commentary on capitalism, much like "Heaven's Gate" I s'pose.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 17:20:20 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It's all Relative

Yeah Bill......couldn't you just see Crazy Chester in the Rockin Chair. Come to think of it Bill, I don't think I ever e mailed you a picture of that ship. I'll have to do it.

Now it occurs to me, what is (all relative). Most of the derilicts that frequent this place should relate to the flick, "Second Hand Lions" It's great. I could really see Lars & I standing knee deep in that pond shooting fish with shot guns. I love the lines there, (Duvall) "Get 'im, he's making' a run for it." (Cain) "We're runnin out of ammo." (Duvall) "You get us some more, I'll keep 'im covered."........crazy???

My older brother and I spent most our lives together. One day I was mentioning this movie to him. He just turned 73, and I thought this was quite appropriate. He'd never seen it! I bought a copy and sent it to him, now it's all he watches. What brings this to my mind, there's something I want to know. My copy of that DVD is the only one I own that has a choice you can switch, either wide screen or full screen. Why in HELL don't they all have that........it's annoying.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 17:06:50 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: I'd say that Crazy Chester followed you and caught you in the fog. Apparently he's still there. I'd also say that the gods invented records because they knew that TV was coming. And headphones so that spouses are able to share the chesterfield without being bothered by each other's choices of entertainment.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 16:48:53 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Remembering Rick on this day, a day which for me mixes the bitter with the sweet, as I first saw The Band play at the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium on Thursday, Dec. 10, 1970 (see link).

My favorite line from "Heaven's Gate", delivered by Jeff Bridge's character: "It's getting dangerous to be poor in this country."


Entered at Mon Dec 10 16:13:34 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: On the Buses

Peter was not , "On the Buses" one of the biggest sitcoms, way back when. I recall at one point when they made a movie of it, it outshone one of the james Bond, (Sean Connery) films.

I used to get quite a kick out of that show, I think it was late 70's here if I remember right.

It would seem Crazy Chester is my Blazing Saddles advocate.........watch out for Mungo. In the 30 anniversary DVD the interviews like with Mel Brooks are interesting. Richard Prior , who was supposed to play the sherrif to begin with, was in his party & drug days, and became too unreliable to work with. He did however write quite an amount of the script. Heady Lamar, sued them for defaming her name. Brooks just laughed and said, "Just pay her so we can get on with it."

Some of the white cast found it difficult to use some of the racial lines and slurrs in the film. However they worked their way thru it. The one man, (one of my all time favourites) Slim Pickens comes off well with all of it and every one involved can't help but enjoy him. When they worked out on the prairie, he just camped out and stayed there. He really is a cowboy, it's his style.

One of the greatest parts ever, I think is in Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, when he was shot in the guts and he went down by the river and sat on that log to die...."Knockin on Heaven's Door" couldn't have been more appropriate.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 16:03:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, David. DVD is never a problem. Some DVD machines region-code by asking the dealer to "switch on region coding before sale" which means they simply don't. Others, like Sony, had a code you could put in. Blu-ray seems tighter, and I couldn't get the region code switched off on mine. Criterion Collection are imports here. Pity, but I guess if they sell a few they'll issue a Blu-ray version in the UK, though if it looks far away, I might just go for the Directors Cut DVD.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 15:53:34 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Heaven's Gate

Peter: Last month the Criterion Collection released a Blue-ray 2-disc version of "Heaven's Gate" that features a restored transfer of the director's cut supervised by Michael Cimino. It is, however, Region A only, requiring a multi-region capable player for those outside North America.

Jim Keltner sat in with the Levon Helm Band in 2010 with they played the Greek Theater in L.A. (see link).

Mea culpa -- I was wrong about the Grammy eligibility period and Dylan, along with many other deserving musicians were indeed overlooked.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 14:07:57 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Heaven's Gate (Directors Cut) is not easily available. My interest was piqued … I saw it years ago and it didn't get to me really, or rather I don't remember anything, but that was the Hollywood Slash version, not the Directors Cut. I looked in HMV this morning … none. Amazon.co.uk has an import DVD at £21.99, which is watchable as my DVD player isn't region-coded, but Blu-ray IS region coded so the £29 import blu-ray isn't watchable. £21.99 for a DVD is about double the UK going rate, and as the reviews on amazon are so fulsome noting how sumptuous the picture is, I'd like to stick out for a UK Blu-ray. But when?


Entered at Mon Dec 10 11:05:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The basic problem in US adaptations is that British sitcom works in blocks of six, or at the most eight, episodes. There are only twelve Fawlty Towers: two series. The US model starts with twenty-six episodes, which means a lot of new material will need to be written. Writing styles are totally different. The majority of good British sitcoms use a team of two: Cleese & Booth (Fawlty Towers), Perry & Croft (Dad's Army, Hi De Hi, It Ain't Half Hot Mum, You Rang M'Lord), Galton & Simpson (Hancock's Half Hour, Steptoe & Son), Grant & Naylor (Red Dwarf), Gervais & Merchant (The Office, Extras, Life's Too Short), Jay & Lynn (Yes, Minister), Crane & Klarik (Episodes), Ahearne & Cash (The Royle Family), Marks & Gran (Goodnight Sweetheart). Some are solo … Johnny Speight on Till Death Us Do Part and John Sullivan on Only Fools & Horses.

Because of the season length, US comedies use large teams. Some of the best sitcoms ever are written this way … Cheers, Frasier and Friends for starters. But they're conceived that way, and it's very different. The spark of British sitcoms is a duo interaction, not a team, and when it gets handed over to a team, the spark is dissipated.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 10:30:08 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rick; Heaven's gate; UK to US sitcoms

Amen, Ari.

Heaven's gate is nearly a masterpiece. It's Marxist overtones turned US audiences off, but a part from a few slow moving bits, it's a brilliant movie. And a terrific performance from The Hawk. Ronnie Hawkins. You all know him.

The US pick up quite a few british sitcoms: Steptoe and son became Sanford and Son; Robin's Nest became Three's Company; George and Mildred became The Ropers; The Office became The Office. There were short lived versions of Fawlty Towers and Dad's Army. It used to amuse me when I'd see 'George and Mildred' followed by the Ropers, and the scripts were identical, excpet instead of a joke about Hampshire, it'd be New Jersey. The joys of growing up in Ausralia...


Entered at Mon Dec 10 10:28:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: TV

First seen, like first heard, is a major factor. I thought All in The Family, The Office (US version), Fawlty Towers (hugely extended US version) were all lesser in quality than the British originals. Johnny Speight who created Alf Garnett, and Warren Mitchell who played him, were as good as you got on TV at that time. Obviously it all creaks a little now … interestingly, still getting re-runs on prime time TV, Dad’s Army does NOT creak at all with the passing of years, but being set in the past in the first place is a major factor in that.

My favourite TV sitcom of the last however many years is “Episodes.” Series 1, Episode 1 is perfect on how adaptations from UK TV to US TV work, and the whole series is perfect on the British interface with American media. It took me years and two American publishers to work out that saying they liked something and agreed with your idea was pure hot air, and they’d go and change it however without telling you. The British, though devious or they wouldn’t be in business at all, don’t lie straight to your face in quite the same way.

Link to one of the more outrageous (at the time) Alf Garnett rants.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 09:29:02 CET 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

It's that day again, always seem to remember. 13 years. We miss you Rick, we really really do.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 04:23:05 CET 2012 from (208.124.36.240)

Posted by:

Crazyt Chester

Location: Austin, TX
Web: My link

Subject: Blazing Saddles

"C'mon Bill! Get it together Gawd Damn it!......Tell me you don't like westerns......"Nobody move or the n----- gets it!........"Lawwwd do what he says....I think he means it." " WHAT'D HE SAY? I THINK HE SAID THE SHERRIF IS NEAR! NO GARDBLANG CONSARNIT...


Entered at Mon Dec 10 01:46:07 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.86)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: dromedary aria

JT: As noted, maybe the camel makes all the difference.



Entered at Mon Dec 10 01:39:36 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: At the movies

I just read an interesting article on here. It took Steven Spielberg 9 years to finally get Daniel Day-Lewis to play Lincoln.......and it was Leonardo Decaprio who apparently talked him into it.

It would have been ineresting to hear that conversation. They must have a good relationship since "Gangs of New York".


Entered at Mon Dec 10 01:05:37 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Breaker Morant

Bruce Beresford - great director: 'Breaker Morant' - great movie! Not a horse opera.


Entered at Mon Dec 10 00:56:42 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blazing Saddles

C'mon Bill! Get it together Gawd Damn it!......Tell me you don't like westerns......"Nobody move or the n----- gets it!........"Lawwwd do what he says....I think he means it."


Entered at Mon Dec 10 00:50:44 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: You are right insofar as most horse 'n' hat movies I've seen have been westerns, and westerns I tend to avoid like the plague, except if they're comedies. However, when someone asked me two weeks ago what my faourite movie is, I said, off the top, "Breaker Morant" - which has both horses and hats. But isn't there a camel too, though not an important one like in the magnificent "Ishtar"? Maybe thats the thing?


Entered at Mon Dec 10 00:01:41 CET 2012 from (198.179.198.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

I'd agree with you about Heaven's Gate JT, and add on Waterworld as a film not deserving the wrath surrounding it critically. Ishtar was awful though-I dont know, I think the critics all like to pile one-they dont want to be the one that disagrees with all the othes. Kind of the opposite of Dave Marsh's Sprignsteen effect.

I dont Peter, I think its a matter of first seen-Carrol O'Connor's Archie Bunker is one of the most itneresting character ever on American TV. Ive seen Til Death do Us Part-I greatly prefer All in the Family.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 23:55:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Norm, Archie Bunker was an American adaptation of Alf Garnett in the British sitcom, Till Death Us Do Part. The idle son in law was played by Cherie Blair's father. Google Alf Garnett YouTube. Archie Bunker was shown here, but the original Alf was way better. It is an unusual case of an American version f an existing Britsh seres.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 23:19:36 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Archie Bunker's take on England

I don't know if you guys in England know of Archie Bunker, "All in the Family".

Peter V , Al Edge.......you guys need to watch this...c'mon, it's only a few minutes. You'll understand England much better..........This stuff started coming up on my youtube side bar....don't know why......Archie Bunker was my hero!


Entered at Sun Dec 9 21:50:59 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: the Toronto first screening

I was somewhere in the middle, John, but I knew the big players were near the front. One was the person who invited me. He was big into the film industry and I was fortunate enough to be asked to attend. I agree. Cinematically, it is one of the most stunning films I have ever seen. And the scenes at Harvard, on the wooden tent-filled dance floor and even the fighting scenes, alone are worth making it among the most provocative films ever made by a US director. And the mood created by Mansfield's music had the same effect as Leonard did on 'McCabe and Mrs. Miller'. Bravo!!


Entered at Sun Dec 9 21:46:38 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Bill M: Its time frame as you probably know was in the late 19th century as the country changed rapidly with immigration from Europe occurring at a steady pace. This is the basis of the film. It deals with the interaction between what was and what was fast becoming a changed environment and culture. The only thing 'western' about that film is that horses still were a the significant mode of transportation. The culture of that movie is far from what is perceived as a typical western. If you knew all this, then I apologize for this communication. In many people's opinion, horses and hats make a film a western and so be it.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 21:12:19 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins

I hadn't seen; or spoken to Ronnie in a few years; but got a call to ask if I would join him on stage; in my home town last Saturday night to talk about his life; on stage at the Regent Theater. My parents first took me to the theater; when I was five.

It was an interview format. This article only touches the surface of what would be a two hour conversation. I believe it was filmed. He was extremely open; about the boys and just about everything else.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 21:06:28 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Heaven's Gate

I had the pleasure of being invited to the premier of Heaven's Gate; at the University Theater in Toronto. Ronnie Hawkins and Kris Kristofferson sat; in front of me. I believe the movie closed; after just a few performances. Remember it was rumored that it was one of the most expensive movies ever made.

Michael Cimino got in a lot of trouble; over that one. It was basically called a major failure at the time. Years later people would change their minds.

I thought it was one of the most beautiful cinematic films I had ever seen. Some of the scenes could have been stand alone paintings.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:57:34 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Scenes from a life: Ronnie Hawkins


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:46:01 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.86)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Always seemed like it'd be a western.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:22:25 CET 2012 from (86.171.130.66)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Kenny Sutton

It Makes No Difference is a great song. Hope you enjoy Jan's site.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:19:17 CET 2012 from (209.193.97.103)

Posted by:

kenny sutton

Location: colorado rocky mountains

just came across this site and say the band's music ment alot to me great songs and good times when I so them in concert along with seeing rick danko and levon helm to geter many times hearing rick sing it makes no difference still gives me chills


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:18:20 CET 2012 from (86.171.130.66)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Enjoyed recent posts. Have been really busy.

Personally I have been playing Gene Clark's music. Absolutely great stuff - The Byrds, a collection I have and the Dillard and Clark albums.

Amy Helm is playing two gigs at the Celtic Connections festival, the New Year festival in Glasgow. One is in the spirit of a Midnight Ramble abroad. Just Google 'Celtic Connections'.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:05:43 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Subject matter

Bill M: What is the issue with the subject matter of 'Heaven's Gate"? Just curious.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 20:00:43 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: As you know from music, criticism often devolves to schoolyard piling-on. I'd never go see Heaven's Gate because of the subject matter, but I thought Ishtar, Hudson Hawk and Bonfire of the Vanities. Were all excellent.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 19:41:19 CET 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

And I forgot Dr. John too! Holy smoke...


Entered at Sun Dec 9 19:35:42 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Reflections

After responding to Jerry's comments about people we have lost, my mind wandered back to 1959. I was in grade 9 in Elphinstone High in Gibsons BC.

We had a school teacher, we really loved the old guy, he was just really good to us. His name was Lester Peterson. He was born in San Joseph Bay a few miles below Cape Scott on Vancouver Island. I'm sure many of you would very much enjoy his book. "The Cape Scott Story." (It can be found on the web)

Mr. Pete's book is a history of northern Vancouver Island, the settlers who settled there and the hardships of pioneering that harsh land. World War 1 pretty much brought an end to most of those communities for lack of communication. Some of the Danish people are still in the area, and many friends of mine.

If you'll allow, I'll copy the last paragraph of Mr. Pete's book.

My only hope is that those who follow will appreciate the splendor of the forest, with it's soft carpets of shaded mosses, tiny scented star-flowers, and abundance of lilles, the laughing streams, the lazy lakes and the shimmering sands. I hope that they who come may find the peace and contentment that we enjoyed; and that, in doing so they may find and remember the text scribed deeply into the bark of one tall old hemlock tree. "God is love, and this is His world."

Mr. Pete died years ago of cancer, I played hockey with his son. In 1959, my school bus to Roberts Creek from Gibsons was the last one of the day, so we had an hour from 3 to 4 before we could go home.

There was a group of us (some who lived in Gibsons) who had a ritual. Down to Mr. Pete's room, and play our music. A couple of guitars fiddle, accordion and drums. Mr Pete had an old reel to reel, and he would record us. Our days of playing Buddy Holly music........right thru to the Kingston Trio.

Elphinstone High burned down, (and was rebuilt) so long ago I don't remember when. One night at hockey in the mid seventies, Dale Peterson, (Mr Pete's son) told me. "Y know Norm, Dad managed to save that old reel to reel of his, and he always had those tapes he made of you guys. He always said, some day some of those boys will be famous."..........I'm sorry we let him down


Entered at Sun Dec 9 19:35:33 CET 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

How many Last Waltz participants has Jim Keltner recorded with? I count 10 (not including members of The Band): Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris, Pops Staples, Mavis Staples, Stephen Stills, Ringo Starr, and Ronnie Wood. Can't imagine any other musician could beat that total.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 17:11:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Knocking On Heaven's Gate

Just been re-reading the Ronnie Hawkins autobiography in the "Heaven's Gate" section. An explosive went off under his horse in the battle. The horse had to be destroyed later and Ronnie was thrown 20 feet through the air and they thought they'd killed him. They rushed over and Cimino shouted "Give him some water!" Ronnie says he shouted back, 'Water! No! Heroin!" as he was in agony.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 15:32:23 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Heaven's Gate Michael Cimino

I read critic's reviews of music and films often. I was at the premiere of Heaven's Gate in 1980 in Toronto when most critics panned it and it eventually gained the reputation of a film disaster. In a few words, I loved it. The story was interesting, the filming by Vilmos Zsigmond was superb and the music by David Mansfield was up there with the soundtrack of 'McCabe and Mrs. Miller.' (As you know, Ronnie Hawkins had a small but important role in the film). Anyway, the critics hated it and even with time most still do. I understood that it was long and not for most tastes and that American audiences might have a problem with the anti-establishment flavour of the story. (a very conservative time in the US had arrived). As I understand it, it did well at Cannes and in Europe it was highly regarded. On this side of the Atlantic, it did poorly and its negative reputation grew quickly. It became the calling card for film disasters and excess.

But how a director could make one of the great films of our time ('Deerhunter') and then soon after go out and make one of the worst movies ever (up there it is said with 'Ishtar' and 'Waterworld') was beyond me. I never understood why/how this movie could be reviled by so many critics, some of whom I respected. I never doubted my instincts and even then and still wonder about critics and their motivation.

Anyway, it seems that a healthy respect is developing for this film in retrospect by some of the film industry's thinkers and movers.

(from Wikipedia) In the fall of 2012, the film was re-released to acclaim (described as "soaking up acclaim") as a 216 minute "director's cut" at the 69th Venice Film Festival] on August 30 in the presence of Cimino, followed one month later by screening at the New York Film Festival, and then at at the Festival Lumiere in France. Venice Film Festival director Alberto Barbera described the film as an "absolute masterpiece" that had disappeared, and whose 1980 cutting was characterized as a "massacre" by nervous producers and had been "one of the greatest injustices of cinematic history" that had destroyed careers (Cimino and Kristofferson) following "annihilat[ing]" critical reviews.

If nothing else, I highly recommend the soundtrack. Listen to it with 'McCabe and Mrs Miller' and with the soundtrack of 'Little Big Man' (John Hammond (Jr)).


Entered at Sun Dec 9 12:21:31 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: A different Watkins Glen story

Story of a pirate radio station set up during the concert.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 10:08:24 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Jim Keltner

Played with Dave Mason, Joe Cocker, with Charley Watts, Hal Blaine Cal Tjader, Leon Russell, Carly Simon, Delany & Bonnie, Eric Clapton, Arlo Guthrie, BB King, George Harrison, John Lennon, Nick Lowe, Freddie King, Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner, Jesse Ed Davis, Little Village, Ringo's first All Starr Band, Bonnie Raitt, T Bone Burnett, Traveling Wilburys and more...


Entered at Sun Dec 9 01:30:01 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The ol' light bulb went off

It just came back to me! Keltner also played with one of my all time favourite bunch of banditos......amigo.

Ry Cooder, Flaco Jimanez, and the Moula Banda Rythm Aces. AAAiiiieeeeeeee those guys are mucho goodo!


Entered at Sun Dec 9 00:21:11 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And also

Thank you Jerry. Your absolutely right, can't remember why his name escaped me. For a while there, it seemed Jim Keltner was in nearly every band you looked at.

I watched some one else the other day, I forget who now, but all of a sudden I realize, there he is again. He really got around, which was not surprising because he is great.


Entered at Sun Dec 9 00:12:22 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Jim Keltner

Jim Keltner was that drummer. About same age as Dylan. Has played with everyone, from Beatles to Rolling Stones to Dylan to Wilburys.

"In 1973, Keltner was the session drummer on Bob Dylan's Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, which includes the hit "Knockin' on Heaven's Door". Keltner says that session "was a monumental session for me because it was such a touching song, it was the first time I actually cried when I was playing"


Entered at Sat Dec 8 22:34:49 CET 2012 from (68.80.180.80)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Wrecking Ball

Enjoyed Al's link to Bruce at the Isle of Wight. And who's that on slide trombone? The great Clark Gayton, of the Levon Helm Band.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 20:15:03 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The day the music died

Jerry, I too felt a huge loss when Geaorge Harrison went. I keep on my favourites The Travellin Wilburys youtube vid, "End of the line" George's lead intro, and singing at the beginning, Tom Petty, Bob, Jeff and.......shit what's the drummers name......loosing my mind. The cool part too is the black & white picture of Roy Orbison, (as in his black & white concert), his guitar sitting on the rockin chair, and it's rocking. That is one of the most perfect videos.

However consider,......as a young kid just really getting into the music in early high school, and that fatal night that plane crashed. At that time, my life WAS , Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, the Big Bopper. I had so much Buddy Holly music on 78 records.......you can only imagine.

Many years later, in Vancouver, I chanced to play music with Buddy Knox. Some of you may know his song, "I named my little girl Holly." He named his daughter after Buddy because he was so devistated when that plane crashed. We sat and shed a few tears together. Buddy Knox was a pretty important Rock a Billy in his time....I was a nothing but we shared that bit of time. At that young age, having some guys with the potential they just vanish was gut wrenching for some one like me.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 19:22:02 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Departures

There were only a few times that I felt a personal loss when a person of fame who I did not know died. One was George Harrison. Another was John Lennon (for the sheer absurdity and waste that had occurred to a man who should never have met up with the word 'assassination'). A large part of the problem is the 'gone too soon' effect. So too for our Band members. As for Levon, it was distressing even though he had made 70. I listen to the music partly to keep them alive in my heart.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 19:17:42 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dylan and Cohen

Agreed Jerry/PV. Especially for myself in Bob's case and I speak as one who struggles manfully with Bob's current vocal delivery but can comfortably see past it to the exquisite majesty of the songs themselves.

A feckin outrage if those qualification dates are true. Makes a mockery of the whole thing.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 19:14:00 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bob F - Hard Times Come and Hard Times Go Just to Come Again

Yeah Bob lad. Gets me too. Every time. I'm an emotional guy and find myself filling up whenever I hear that extended interlude. Seeing and feeling live the spirit of sheer defiance in which it is drenched is for me as moving as music can ever get.

Linked at 3min 51sec


Entered at Sat Dec 8 19:08:56 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The digital and cellular age

The number of potential scams that have emerged over the last 15 years is huge. We have to be so much more vigilant today as we use our computers and cell phones. As we can see from the media, Mr. Barnum was correct. Tread carefully, friends and keep your cards close to your chest. The best are the bank notifications and credit card warnings. They look very authentic. Phishing is prevalent. Beware.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 19:02:51 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norm - mobile phone scams

Ah, see what you mean mate. My mistake.

Yeah, I have heard of those things. And I seem to recall people have been caught out. You did well to tread with caution. Years of vigilence up and down that pacific west shore eh norm lad. Nice one.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Dec 8 17:19:53 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Al Edge.......The SCAM!

I only just noticed your post Al. The scam I referred to has nothing to do with your computer.

I have some things for sale on Craigs List. I was contacted by some one calling themself, Susan Buckley, from Englnad I found, asking me to call them back on a mobile number.

After some e mailing, it seemed pretty phony to me. I e mailed Peter V, and he was good enough to get back to me and explain what he had heard. Phone numbers in the UK are very different than over here. However he explained these numbers are follow me numbers.

Now every one should note this. I googled, "0703 number scam". The site I found that explained it very well is MRS BLOG. If you call back to these numbers, you are charged a huge charge, that comes back to you on your phone bill for calling these numbers. BE WARE!


Entered at Sat Dec 8 17:11:17 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Happy Chanukah!


Entered at Sat Dec 8 15:30:50 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: ... and Hibbing

It is said that "the Maestro (=Dylan) speaks like a Finno-Hebraic Minnesotan, by way of Greenwich Village".


Entered at Sat Dec 8 15:04:13 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rolling Stone Top 50 of 2012

How can the Grammy awards not consider 2 albums which the centrepiece magazine, Rolling Stone, had in their top 13 of 2012 (Tempest 4, Old Ideas 13)? I think there should be an enquiry into how two such highly regarding works could be missed on ignored . Is this idea a tempest in a teapot? I don't think so.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 14:31:08 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Northwestern coast

Subject: Hibbing

I feel sorry for Mr. LeRoy Hoikkala, the Finn who played in Dylan's school-boy band Golden Chords. He has always positive/neutral comments to give (No Direction Home) even if they have no contact since the sixties. Makes me sad.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 13:49:55 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Roll On, John

12/8/80 will always be the saddest date in music history.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 08:42:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Old Ideas

Old Ideas UK releae date was 31 January 2012.

It came #1 in Uncut.

Tempest was September 10th 2012, so near the end, but still in by three weeks. Travest is appalling in both cases.


Entered at Sat Dec 8 04:36:42 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Travesty confirmed!!!

From the official Grammy site;

What are the eligibility requirements? For the 55th Annual GRAMMY Awards, albums must be released between Oct. 1, 2011 and Sept. 30, 2012. Recordings must be in general distribution in the United States, i.e. sales by label to a branch or recognized independent distributor, via the Internet, or mail order/retail sales for a nationally marketed product.

Travesty confirmed!!!


Entered at Fri Dec 7 23:20:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Old Ideas is several months before Tempest, too. Odd.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 22:44:16 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: A Travesty

More newspaper articles attest to the exclusion of Tempest Dylan from Grammy nominations. As you know, I have been confused about inclusion dates for consideration of an album. The most recent article I read suggests that albums released up to Sept 30, 2012 are considered. If that is so, then Tempest and Old Ideas have not received consideration. If this end date is indeed accurate, then these voters have absolutely missed the boat!! Someone confirm that the dates include 2012. I have been the author of some of this confusion on this site and would like to be sure that some of us should be dismayed by the exclusion of Old Ideas and Tempest from this award for the past year. If so it affirms again my previous assessment/opinion of these awards.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 21:30:20 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I saw Spirit in 1975, in The Golden Bear, HuntingtonBeach California.Small club, we sat about 10 to 15 feet away from the band.Amazing show. Also saw Kingfish there.can't recall if it was the same bill. but i doubt it. This was February, or very early March.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 18:39:07 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Family That Plays Together...

Bill M: Remember Spirit spanned two generations, as Ed Cassidy was the step-father of guitarist Randy California.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 17:46:55 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

David P: Thanks for the news about Ed Cassidy. I knew he was older than everybody else, but 89? The only post-Spirit record I have with him on it is a weird thing called "Rainbow Red Oxydizer", with Kim Fowley and our John D's old schoolmate, Mars Bonfire. Maybe Gary Marker too, come to think of it.

Among the many albums featuring John Davis's blues piano is at least one engineered by Daniel Lanois - see link.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 17:43:37 CET 2012 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittentlyc

Subject: SLE mortality

Deaths that occurred with SLE often involved 1) infection associated with treatment early in the course and at times throughout this chronic illness and 2) cardiovascular deaths later in the course of the disease. Death from renal complications or central nervous system complications were uncommon and remain so. Death from clotting issues can occur. In any case, lupus today is an imminently treatable disease and its outcome is much different that it was 20-40 years ago.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 15:05:10 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Ed Cassidy

Ed Cassidy, former drummer in the Rising Sons and Spirit, died yesterday at the age of 89.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 14:22:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Also e-mail me, Al. Address further down.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 13:00:41 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Al's a pal - we're going to Wembley...

Thanks Al - understand the dilemma, been there myself. Two tickets for Wembley - wonderful. If you email me roger.woods AT bcu.ac.uk with your bank details I'll transfer money to you. Or send a cheque - you say.

Rog


Entered at Fri Dec 7 12:21:35 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

You're a good positive soul Pete. But it'll be a 7-15 to 7-30pm start Pete so I'd guess you'll be able to fit in the two without too much trouble.

I'm more disappointed I couldn't get you the reserved seats

And I have to say I am so pissed over the Coventry thing. But I'll keep trying on the phone to see if I can sort something.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 12:03:38 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well tried, Al … it's a swine trying to get stuff like this. We're already booked for "The Cripple of Inishman" in the West End on the 15th of June at 14.30. It says 17.00 for Bruce. Is that right? It seems very early. We could make it out there for 19.30 or 20.00. But we can take them anyway and hope, or see if we can switch the theatre tickets to Friday night and stay over.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 11:40:28 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV and Roger

Did my best but its of a disaster I'm afraid.

First time Badlands has ever let me down.

Dashed back from taking the grandkids to nursey/school. Got back just in time for the 9.00am start time for ordering tickets online.

I was after your two pairs of reserved seats and six standing for myself all for Coventry on the 20th June.

The Coventry ticket allocation was stated as a limit of six seats and two standing per member. So I was two tickets down from the kick off. In the minute or so I was trying to decide what to do, it had reduced the seating to one ticket whilst the standing stayed at two.

Panic stations.

Anyroad, after trying unsuccessfully several times at my original desired numbers, I made the decision to try Wembley for your goodselves and Glasgow for my lot.

Wembley unfortunately had sold out of seating so I took the decision rightly or wrongly to get you each a pair of standing for wembley for Saturday 15th June.

Hopefully they'll be okay for you both. Not what we'd hoped but at least it's a saturday.

As for my lot, I've got to steel myself for their whinginh and bleating about the long midweek trek up to Glasgow.

Why the feck the Bruce management opted for such a small venue as Coventry is beyond me.

I will try to ring Badlands later today to get a swap but I'm not overly hopeful.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 09:34:05 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

JT wrote about the origins of the name of Lupus. Recently i read that the scars on Seal's ( the singer, is or was married to Heidi Klum) face are a result of Lupus.

i can't recall the name of Seal's songs, but i can recall Heidi.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 04:42:20 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Doctor my eyes.........

Have seen the world. I have had two friends die from Lupus, both of them ladies. It's something you don't want to remember.....it's horrible.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 04:12:13 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittentlyc

Subject: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

SLE is a multisystem disease, predominately of young women (unless it is drug-induced) with a female to male ratio of about 9 to 1. It can involve many organs in the body including skin, joints, heart and lungs ,kidney and central nervous system. It is an autoimmune disease (the body makes antibodies against its own organs). It is treatable but the treatment drugs can have potential side effects. It was often a disease that could cause death years ago but today few die early of this disease with careful management. Infections and heart disease (disease associated or from the treatments) are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Death today is much less common than it once was. It is called 'lupus' because of the facial rash, noting it suggests that person with the disease looks like a wolf (lupine).


Entered at Fri Dec 7 02:27:47 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Blind John Davis C.C.Rider, Piano Blues

Link above.Wonderful version. Bio is available on the you tube page by clicking "show more." One of the positives of you tube is that you don't have to stand to watch it... Pete, i hope you laughed, cause i did. Really just joking.Unless we find out that Dylan owns a big chunk of it.....honestly, standing through an opening act, then a main act, would bite at this stage of the game.


Entered at Fri Dec 7 02:21:17 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob F-Kevin McHale's daughter recently died from Lupus disease. If I recall correctly, she was 22.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 23:34:37 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Kevin McHale

The great Boston Celtic basketball player, Kevin McHale, was also born in Hibbing. In 1996 he was voted one of the 50 greatest basketball players of all time.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 22:29:04 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Mike Nomad: I don't know if it is the same band you refer to, but Dan Brubeck was the drummer in the Digital Dolphins, a mid 80s to early 90s Woodsotck area band. Thelate Rob Leon played bass,Mike DeMicco guitar,Vinnie Martucci was the keyboardist. i caught em in Tinker Street a few times, they were excellent. i've no idea what Dan Brubeck is doing musically these syas, but Martucci's name pops up occasioanlly, and Mike Demicco , after weathering some health problems, seems to be performing a good amount. He has a trio thing going with Pete Levin (brother of Tony) on keys, and Peter O Brien on drums.That's a kick ass trio.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 21:15:50 CET 2012 from (130.64.254.42)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Music Surveys

Good source for Surveys, you can check by Station, city, artist, etc. a few with the Band here.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 19:08:52 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: See the man with stage fright ...

The link is to an article titled, in the paper version, "See the man with stage fright: Rheostatics reunion called off". Even if our guys are no longer selling, it is nice to see their lyrics continuing to have stature as references.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:58:46 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittentlyc

Subject: Hibbing

Hibbing: The population was 16,361 at the 2010 census

Not bad for a small town. Kind of like Canada and the number of major stars emerging from a population of 30 million.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:46:53 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: number 2 with a bullet

David P: Looking through some boxes of old stuff the other day, I came upon CHUM radio's top 100 for 1968. A pretty good year over all, but Ohio Express and Gary Puckett and the Union Gap had four singles each on the chart. Gary Puckett was of course Hibbing's second-most successful singer of the era.

John D: The same box had a couple dozen CKFH charts from '70. You looked younger back then. There were also some CHUM charts from late '65 with "The Stones I Throw" moving up the chart. And then "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" right after. I'm planning to send scans to Jan H in case he wants to post them somewhere.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:32:33 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Hibbing Famous Sons & 61

One of Hibbing's other famous sons, the late baseball star Roger Maris, hit his then record-breaking 61st home in Yankee Stadium on Oct, 1, 1961. The following month, on Nov. 20 & 22, Bob Dylan recorded his eponymous debut album in that same city.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:31:58 CET 2012 from (184.145.69.245)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Brubeck progeny

If memory serves, I believe that one of the Brubeck sons, either Dan or Darius, was part of a group that either opened for the reconstituted Band during a homecoming concert at Festival Theatre in Stratford, Ontario, in November 1985, or else was part of the Band ensemble itself, playing along with two other musicians. I think it was the latter. The "homecoming" part was to celebrate Richard's return to his hometown.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:19:07 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Grammy Time Fades Away

"Fourteen junkies too weak to work
One sells diamonds for what they're worth
Down on pain street disappointment lurks..."

Neil Young & Crazy Horse released two albums this year. While "Americana", released on June 5, was completely passed over for the 2012 nominations, "Psychedelic Pill", released on Oct. 30, may be eligible for a 2013 awards to be presented in Feb. 2014?


Entered at Thu Dec 6 17:08:51 CET 2012 from (130.64.254.42)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Concert History

Bill M, that would be great to see those pics. I can give you my email at some point if you locate (I have that show as 10/29/85 date) If you have anything else (Tix stub, ad) would love to see those also. thanks Tim


Entered at Thu Dec 6 16:57:37 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan fom New Mex... err... Hibbing

A goood article on Dylan and Hibbing in the leading Swedish paper. It can be found translated in Minnesota Brown website, Sunday, December 02, 2012 (see link). Unfortunately the comment which followed was deleted soon here in Sweden. Too hot, maybe... but to whom?


Entered at Thu Dec 6 16:36:51 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Subject: Old Ideas and Tempest

'Old Ideas' and 'Tempest' will likely be 'duking it out' at the (somewhat irrelevant) 2013 Grammy awards. Hopefully, we will witness the emergence of Metric, Stars,Fleet Foxes, The National, and other highly regarded musicians. If these performers (some have been around for years already) are identified as a seminal part of music today, instead of being largely ignored, (the identification of Bon Iver last year was a step in the right direction) that would certainly make the Grammy awards more in step with the times. On a positive note... its nice to see RAM (McCartney et al) get appropriate attention.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 16:34:20 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

JT: No apologies necessary -- the process leads to confusion, as the awards are presented one too many mornings & a year behind the time :-)


Entered at Thu Dec 6 16:08:23 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittentlyc

Subject: Tempest 2012 my apologies

David: So sorry. Thanks. Another goof. My comments regarding Grammy awards stand. No excuses for this flub. More care is required!


Entered at Thu Dec 6 16:01:56 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Tempest

JT: "Tempest" was released Sept. 10 of this year, making it eligible for the 2013 nomination process for releases between Oct. 1, 2011 and Sept. 30, 2012.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 15:44:14 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittentlyc

Subject: Tempest Dylan

Al: The nomination period ends on Sept. 30, 2011. Tempest Dylan was released on Sept. 10/11 2011. Once again, and especially after reading the overall Grammy nominations, I am struck by the irrelevance of this award (worse than most awards). Most of the indie-type music is ignored (or missed). I'm not sure who is ultimately making these choices but I can't believe that this is the essence of excellence in music today. Yes, they do manage to find some of the better albums (Springsteen, Mumford and Sons, Avett Brothers, Black Keys, Jack White, Esperanza Spalding, Corea and Burton are examples) but they miss so many who put out excellent work. That 'Tempest' was not present in its potential category (I know not all agree) is blatantly wrong. And where is "Old Ideas". Come on, ladies and gentlemen! Smell the coffee.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 15:41:08 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Wrecking Ball

Al, I'm with you, I love Tempest but Wrecking Ball was my favorite record of the year. I can relate to so many of the songs on Wrecking Ball. Just the way he sings "hard times come hard times go yeah just to come back again" does it for me. He's always gone out of his way to do the right thing and as a fan I'm always proud of him. I love that guy.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 14:22:14 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Hollies

I'll try and dig that out Rog. They usually repeat. Don't tell Wacker Viney tho cos he hates me putting my snout into Murdoch's trough. Agree with him like and the mind is so very willing but the flesh so very very weak - I simply couldn't survive without the footy and I just can't bear watching it in the pub.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Dec 6 14:13:24 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bob F/Jeff

Bob - looked up a few of those albums in the list you posted. Think I might request a few as presents from our window cleaner - the Shovels and Rope and Sharon Van etten albums sound very enticing from a few 30 second snatch listens of the tracks

Jeff, I'd have thought both Dylan and Bruce would have made the nominations for best album. Bruce is nominated for BEST ROCK album yet bizarrely Black Keys is nominated for BEST ALBUM as well as best rock album.

I love the black keys album - and there's riffs within it that I'm sure will survive for a long time to come - but I'd have had them the other way around.

As for Bob's wonderful Tempest I assume it must have come too late to qualify for these Grammies. Otherwise it surely would have been a favourite for best album.

As it is Brucie's old faithfuls at Rolling Stone have put him at the very top of their own list [linked].

For my part I agree with them. Not only because he seems to be the sole major artist sufficiently pissed off to his eyeballs at the obscenities which have affecting so many of us to come up with such an outpouring but because the close of the album has four stonewall classics even by his own high standards of writing - Wrecking Ball, Rocky Ground, Land of Hope and Dreams and We are Alive. Sure two of them were written quite some time earlier but they fit so seamlessly into the album's theme of despair, anger, defiance and ultimately hope that for me they are now indelibly cast as integral and pivotal parts of Wrecking Ball.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 13:43:07 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Alrite wack... :-0)

That's exactly why I joined the Badlands thing Rog.

So frustrating. Redialling like the clappers. Time after time. Engaged each time. Then finally it rings...and then ...sold out.

So I'll be delighted to do the honours. I can only say they've been superb on so many previous occasions. My only little niggling doubt is the smaller capacity at the Ricoh. But I'm sure it'll be fine. Fingers crossed anyroad.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 02:39:09 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Tim: I saw that lineup here at the Diamond Club. Went with a phtographer friend, who I'll try to remember to call to see if she took photos. She was pretty tight with Levon and Rick, so I'm guessing she did. Found myself standing beside John D and wife in the line to get in, by the way./n The only Brubeck I have is Darius - the "Chaplin's Back" LP, which I chased down only because Amos Garrett is on it, and even sings one of the songs. A couple of years before, Amos and Darius had been in an Ottawa group together, the Heavenly Blue (hence Darius's later New Heavenly Blue). Amos's predecessor on guitar in Heavenly Blue was a guy named Bruce Cockburn.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 12:53:25 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The Great Bruce Springsteen Ticket Resale Controversy of 2012

Al - I didn't get tickets. Picture me, there at 8.55 with my bank of one computer and the little wheel kept spinning and spinning saying 'site very busy' etc etc. Then - NO TICKETS.... So I went and watched the Test Match.

Therefore I'd be mega grateful for either 1 or 2 tickets and would thrust a cheque into your hand toute suite. For Kevin of course, that would be tout suite. But I don't want to presume or impose so count me last in line.

The Vernons Girls! Amazing. And I didn't know the 'wack - Peter' connection. I've done two or three days work in Liverpool this term (at Hope University). I was in a cab going down Menlove Avenue on the day I turned 64 in October. Didn't have time to visit either of the houses. I'll chip in for a Hillsborough single. Incidently Sky Arts 1 has been showing an excellent documentary on the Hollies.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 07:15:43 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

3 Grammy nominations for Springsteen.


Entered at Thu Dec 6 03:51:44 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Paul McCartney & Bob Dylan, Grammy HOF

Great news for these guys. Sooo happy for them..

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Dec 6 00:12:53 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Concert History

I have the entire CSN 85 Tour ininerary with lots of tix stubs, ads and articles. (about 50 shows) plus some other random dates, mostly reunion era date 83-86). I have TONS of ads from shows from this era, not seen on these pages yet. I hate to overload Jan with these but would love to share.. Hope he's up for it. will forward soon. Tim


Entered at Thu Dec 6 00:04:50 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: An American icon

For those of you who watch 'Jeopardy', there was a mildly humorous event that occurred in yesterdays' program. The Final Jeopardy question related to American Icons and asked about a performer who was in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Minnesota R&R Hall of Fame, and had received a Pulitzer prize and another award. None of the contestants knew the answer. Two guessed Prince, who hails from Minnesota, while one speculated on Eric Clapton.(clearly a guess of desperation). None knew it was Bob Dylan, though Minnesota should have been a giveaway. This was a group of under 40s for certain. They had no knowledge of the accomplishments of this American icon. They sure had a lot of other knowledge but missed Dylan. Maybe the information given somehow threw them off the track.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 23:27:27 CET 2012 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Updates

Tim: It sounds as if there may be updates/corrections to the BAND concert listings. I look forward to these when you have them ready. Thanks in anticipation from all of us.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 23:21:50 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Concert History

My research into The Band concert history continues and I have a lot to share with Jan/Jerry soon. While not quite the holy grail, Finding pictures of The Band live with the Weider/Manuel line up (which only lasted about 8 months) has been elusive, until now. Not positive of the date but some beautiful black and whites photos on the link above (of which I purchased the one with Levon playing mandolin, Garth on accordian and Richard on Drums) I got to see this line up 3 times and remains one of my favorite concert memories


Entered at Wed Dec 5 20:33:46 CET 2012 from (131.137.247.6)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: whores, hats and homicide:

the Stagger Lee stories.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 20:33:00 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: iTunes 11

JUST A WARNING! Do NOT upgrade to iTunes 11 if you have multiple libraries. Your main library will not recognize the other libraries. In fact it won't really let you create a new one.

Let me explain. If you try and open another library; or create one, your main library will "leak" into them. I wish I had had never done it. Your main library will be OK.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 20:11:10 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Brubeck

I had the honor of working with Mr. Brubeck in June of 2011. He was extremely fragile; but when he sat down at the piano, he was magnificent.

Take 5 Dave.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 20:09:23 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Two Generations of Brubeck

In the early '70s I got to see Dave Brubeck perform with his sons Darius, Chris & Dan, along with Paul Desmond & Gerry Mulligan at the Univ. of Georgia Fine Arts Theatre. It was quite a memorable evening of music.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 19:42:46 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Dave Brubeck

Sad to hear of his passing. He introduced "Jazz" to a lot of people


Entered at Wed Dec 5 18:40:49 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Blondie with Lou Pallo, plus.Having fun.

Maybe a decade ago, i noticed how Blondie and Keith began to resemeble each other in some small way.

Yes, his voice has aged some, but still great to see him at it, the guys a treasure.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 18:39:55 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dave Brubeck

Jazz FM just reported that Dave Brubeck pased awat this morning. A very productive long life but sad nonetheless as he seemed to still be active.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 18:34:40 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: As promised a few weeks back the full version of the Hillsborough Tribute song

It sure has been a long long road - 23 years long to be exact - but Justice is now within reach


Entered at Wed Dec 5 18:15:18 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Blondie Chaplin, Anton Fig, 2 days ago Can't Find My Way Home

His voice has changed a bit, still amazing.Thse guys go back to their teens together.

Arrangement is changed too, but the audience did not have to stand.

Another one of these guys that will go out performing. Any time anyone can see BLondie, with any band, go.If he's in the show, it's gonna kick.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 18:13:04 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Is there anything more annoying than Cockney rhyming slang? Amazingly, the answer is yes - the Liverpuddlian eqivalent.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 17:58:01 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: L. Cohen

"Then let us compare mythologies.
I have learned my elaborate lie
of soaring crosses and poisoned thorns
and how my father nailed him
like a bat against a barn
to greet the autumn and late hungry ravens
as a hollow yellow sign."

--Leonard Cohen (from the poem "For Wilf and His House", first published in 1955)


Entered at Wed Dec 5 17:09:56 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Old Idea Leonard

Yup! John D. Nothing has changed. When she saw him (I wasn't in Victoria that week) she was knocked out and overwhelmed (she sat near the front) and was enthralled by every aspect of the concert. That was about 3 years ago perhaps. This sounds like the continuation of a superb presentation by a man who knows how to relate to an audience. New songs and the old mesh in a true concert of the works of a true genius (an overused word, I know, but appropriate here). I'm sorry I'm not in Toronto. I'll catch him next time. I've seen him a few times before. What he can do is improve on the studio music with his persona, something that many (even the best) cannot.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:40:14 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norm and his E-mails

Got to say Norm - I never open any e-mail that I was not expecting or can trust 100%. I've deleted every single one for years now. Once caught and all that.

true, you end up like a feckin hermit but at least your computer still functions!!


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:33:58 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Big Time tout

Kev: This was the scene of my first touting foray. It was a scream. Literally!!!

:-0)

Thanks for the Vernons Girls link Pete. superb. Only ever knew one guy who used the term 'wack' in the way the Vernons used it in that song. A lad called Bobby Bigger. He was quite posh.

Ironically enough P, the term comes from the scouse nickname for someone called Peter. In Liverpool back then you would have been called Wacker Viney. It came from pea soup - peawack soup - so lads with the name Peter were called Peawack which in most cases became just wacker. I had two cousins with the name Peter both called Wacker.

aaah - them were the days

Incidentally, the linked Beatles concert at the Empire was my first ever. My cousin Steve and his mate took me. I actually went in my school uniform - grey short pants, school tie and all. Couldn't spot myself in the crowd. Thank fuck!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:31:07 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Landmark: I also have a copy of the 45 single version of Neil Young & Crazy Horse's "When You Dance I Can Really Love". Jack Nitzsche's piano sounds a bit more prominent in this mono mix. The single version has an extended ending, running about 10 seconds longer than the album version.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:21:05 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Stir it up!!

Kevin! What in hell are you smokin' this morning???????

I have just averted a real internet scam with the help of Peter Viney. It is good to have internet friends all over the world that you can check things out with. Seriously! I was contacted by e mail about an add I have on Craigs list. It urned out to be a scam to get you to call back a # that will cost you a heavy fee for calling these mobile numbers. Something I knew nothing at all about. A wake up call.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:19:58 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: ..his fortieth copy of Big Pink

Ha ha. Now THAT is funny. Made me howl. nice one kev

:-0)


Entered at Wed Dec 5 16:03:09 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

News Flash: Rioting breaks out at a little known discussion forum dedicated to The Band when an enterprising promoter unilaterally applied a 25% surcharge on Bruce Springsteen tickets. One of the aggrieved parties is now claiming the outrageous surcharge has prevented him from buying his 40th copy of Music From Big Pink. The promoter known in some parts as Edge has claimed he is now out of the promotion business, is off The Boss and has dedicated his life to having The Civil Wars reform.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 15:32:21 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: You Know What I Mean

Link to the Vernons Girls 1962 novelty minor hit. A bit of fun on a cold Wednesday.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 15:30:32 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Review of last nights Leonard show. 2nd show tonight.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 15:27:55 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vernons Girls

On my penchant for girl singers, I found a demo of "Boy Meets Girl" - the theme song to Jack Good's TV show pop music the other day, it's by The Vernons Girls, who were recruited from Vernons Football Pools in Liverpool and were popular in the UK, covering stuff like Lover Please.

I know Al is about to tell me his Grannie was a member.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 15:23:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Top Tens

Interestingly it neatly reverses the Uncut choice (Cohen - 1, Dylan - 4). Mojo has the Leonard favoured too (I think that was Len -4 to Dylan - 10). It's all academic, because as I pointed out no one but rock journalists has heard enough of the Top 50 to judge. Having listened to both a lot, both deserve high ratings, but I favour Len too.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 13:43:08 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: American Songwriters name 'Tempest' Record of the Year

What's interesting is many of the top 50 were discussed on the Guestbook during the year.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 13:12:16 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Roger

The Badlands membership has always allowed me multiple ticket purchase. This time around the purchase day is Friday.

I usually end up ordering half a dozen but I'll be adding two extra this time for PV. If you weren't able to get any yourself then let me know how many and I'll include them in with mine and Pete's.

They've never let me down yet so it should be fine.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 13:00:47 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Hallelujah Article

Expecting Rain has link to this interesting article on Hallelujah.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 12:17:18 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Bruce tickets

... Just notice you said 'no limit' Al - if that's the case - would you count me in?


Entered at Wed Dec 5 12:12:57 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Nr Coventry

Subject: Bruce tickets

I'll be trying for tickets tomorrow morning. I may be able to get spares.


Entered at Wed Dec 5 07:17:35 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above link to Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones on David Letterman last night.....a fun interview. Wish you were here Julie.

Great to see you back Joan.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 23:44:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent, Al! Thanks.

One of my recent finds was the sequel, "My Mother-In-Law" on the UK Vocalion label. 50 cents is extremely good. A British copy of Mother-In-Law (on London-American) would be around £15 mint. The sequel in mint condition in the original sleeve is worth £20 (being far rarer).

On collectability, I recently bought Sean Wilentz's "360 Sound: The story of Columbia Records". It cost £28. It's such an attractive book I thought of getting another for a Xmas gift for someone. So I just checked amazon.co.uk - sold out. One reseller copy at £362.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 21:18:09 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sending Pete to Coventry

Will do P. There's not usually a limit so should be ok. I'll know on friday.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 21:01:16 CET 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Funny that "Mother In Law" is mentioned. I too, always loved the piano solo. We discussed the solo at supper with friends over the weekend. That solo plus the piano work in Neil Young's "When You Dance" are two of my favourite "off-key" sounding piano lines. Of course, I was looked at as being nuts and off-key myself. Not the first time nor the last time that will happen.Food was superb.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 20:25:51 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Ernie K-Doe

Picked up the classic 45-single from Ernie K-Doe, "Mother-In-Law" (Minit Records). Written & produced by Allen Toussaint, who also contributed a great piano solo. The lesser-known B-side, "Wanted $10,000 Reward", another Toussaint composition, is not too shabby either with some fine sax from Lee Allen. Great foot-tapping New Orleans music at the bargain price of 50 cents!


Entered at Tue Dec 4 19:42:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Coventry … Al, can you e-mail me? (peter then the at sign then viney then dot then uk dot com). We're travelling all day Thursday (coincidentally to Stratford-upon-Avon and back for the matinee of Merry Wives of Windsor) so aren't going to stand a chance in the line. If you can get two, I'll send you an old-fashioned cheque.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 19:10:40 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Just in.......bookmakers have the odds set on names of the Royal twins.......Elvis and Garth are tied at 100-1

JPJ's answer was not related to questions on a reunion but rather to whether Zep had ever recorded with, played with, hung out with Kinks, Beatles, Stones and Who.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 17:39:33 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

I should have guessed you'd already be all over them like a nettle rash P.

Your dishy girl singer antennae are damn near faultless

:-0)

BTW if you wanted me to get some tickets for Coventry let me know as my Badlands [Brucie fan club] membership ...hmmph... usually gives me guaranteed tickets with reasonable seating choice [if the usual Badlands arrangement applies to the Coventry gig]


Entered at Tue Dec 4 17:35:48 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Northwestern coast, simple like that.

Subject: Mistaken identity

Yes, I always found westcoaster's (Rockin' Chair) handle very cool during the years. If you'll see handle "Electric Chair" in the future, it might be me.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 17:23:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The lion's Roar

Al … I alerted the world to First Aid Kit some time ago. It's like The Civil Wars, The Unthanks, The staves, The Mastersons … it's a year for glorious female vocals!


Entered at Tue Dec 4 17:20:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lady Godiva

I might try Coventry, Al … though further than London from us, it might be quicker. We do Stratford (145 miles) faster than Central London (105 miles) though whether 33,000 feels more intimate than 85,000 is another question.

Today's listening, VERY loud in the car, was The Who "Live At Hull" recorded after I'd left the city. Much as I dislike Keith Moon, you have to whistle in admiration at the sheer effort, and "Substitute" in particular may be one of the best live recordings of the era. I remember the original "Live At Leeds" as the first album I heard right through on headphones, though trying to put dates to it, I might be confusing it with "Tommy", I still remember thinking Entwhistle's bass felt like the chinstrap on a helmet. There is something to be said for guitar / bass / drums + separate vocalist. In the line up, everyone is working so hard that you need a separate singer. It's a rewarding line up to play in too, especially for a bass guitarist, though necessarily falling short on light and shade and texture … well, especially in The Who's case, but it still is a phenomenal document.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 16:33:17 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "Come all you writers and critics..."

That 'The Telegraph' gave Rupert Christiansen even a small column to write about Dylan's 'Tempest' in review after reading what he had written is bad judgement. I never mind a constructive criticism that is thoughtful. This critic writes about Tempest as lazy and meandering. It is the review which is lazy. Having pointed out his shortcomings, this critic then proceeds to nevertheless skewer a very good album with a lazy review. He should perhaps stick to opera assuming he thinks a little more about what he writes when he reviews that form of music. Worse still is his comment regarding all work since 1974 by Dylan. He clearly has not taken the time to listen. Comments which 'shoot from the hip' are demeaning not to the artist but to the author. He should know better!


Entered at Tue Dec 4 16:05:54 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Mighty Zep

So the Mighty Zep is on Letterman hawking the one off show they did a few years back that is now on sale in cd/dvd formats. Just in time for the holiday gift season of course. They just get so annoyed when the silly talk show hosts and reporters ask if they are going to reunite. God they make me sick. I'll just play the great John Lennon's 'Give Me Some Truth' real loud. That always makes me feel better.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 15:52:57 CET 2012 from (99.255.116.43)

Posted by:

GregD

Location: Grand River country

Bill M-Interesting to note that Molly j. is part native along with her African-Canadian heritage. Yes, there is a river that flows through Caledonia and part of the adjacent Six Nations Reserve-the mighty Grand River.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 14:55:23 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Leaving [out] of Liverpool

Just been on the blower to Bruce. He was counting his money so it was a bit of a rushed call. Turns out he's not coming. Seems like Fred was right. He was all set to come but seems he's got a thing about Luis Suarez's toothy grin. Twat.

Ah well. Feckin Coventry it is.

:-0)

The link is a duo I've just been alerted to this morning . First Aid Kit. Evidently they're Swedish but sound as if they could have been raised in Tennessee. I'd guess some on here will love the sound.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 14:06:36 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Good to see Joan back.

keep posting. And look after yourself.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 08:05:35 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I rehearsed with these guys tonight for the two shows on Wednesday. Adam, if you go--which I highly recommend--be sure to say hello. Everyone else, too bad you aren't in Chicago for this. Really remarkable.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 07:24:06 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Link to Bob Dylan on Johnny Cash....love the little tribute..........totally unrelated, great to see Led Zep,on David Letterman tonight......Jimmy Page is looking fabulous.......tight black trousers and nice black boots is a lesson for all not wanting to look baggy and ready to go..........."how many times do you want me to say no" is the answer of the year for all guests and all hosts to remember...........JPJ in response to a silly multi question question from Letterman.


Entered at Tue Dec 4 05:30:47 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mistaken Identity

Serenity; The quote you have set out is from "NORTHWEST COASTER" some guy from the Scandinavian countries who had to copy my old handle. It had nothing to do with me.

You'll have to read a little closer, who is who before making your "deliberations" .


Entered at Tue Dec 4 05:09:03 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Whatever??

NORM: Here's your quote without mau. LOL No need to mention me, as I'm not here steady..Thanx for the response.

"Good to see names like BRIEN SZ and BAYOU SAM back here in gb'.

KEVIN: Nah, I don't get upset over being forgotten.. That PBS show is still on, and it is great to hear all these folk song oldies. Wonder what happened to Judy Collins. She sang with Pete Seeger. Now they have what they look like today. John Sebastian looks good, but never would have recognized Barry McGuire, etc. His "Eve of Destruction" is always good to hear..

JohnS. says The Byrds are still performing, "Turn!Turn!Turn!" Don't look bad for their ages...

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Dec 4 03:43:40 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.172)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I must be high.........Serenity is getting edgy........Norm had me temporarily thinking the King of Schlock had produced a very classy movie.......I may have bumped into Bob F at Wanda's in 1988 after watching Bob D on one of the hottest nights I ever remember at the old Montreal Forum.......and Al Edge might just be on the verge of slagging The Boss for skipping out on a visit to Liverpool........Halleeljuh.........give me more.......


Entered at Tue Dec 4 03:29:03 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Late Show With David Letterman NEW

John Krasinski, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Paloma Faith (Guest) (Musical guest)

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Dec 4 03:22:23 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: ?????????

Serenity.........if you are addressing me,....I have no idea what you are talking about?


Entered at Tue Dec 4 03:08:24 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: PBS music

NORM: Not glad to see/hear from mau? [boo-hoo]

Thought some of you might be interested in this..WARNING: On pledge breaks..

Summary... Credits... All airings....

John Sebastian Presents: Folk Rewind (My Music) REPEAT

Episode title not available

Performances by artists of the 1950s and '60s include those of Pete Seeger, Judy Collins, the Kingston Trio, and the Chad Mitchell Trio.

Channel:WNED (PBS) Ch.15/61..Time:Today, 9:30 PM ETDuration:120 min.

Jackie Evancho is on now. She's such a sweetie, and can sing well too..

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Dec 3 22:04:46 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bill M

Bill, thank you for The info on Molly. They used her voice in a Canadian Tourism ads couple years ago. She does have a lovely voice. I'm not surprised she sold out.

Thank you for asking, We have returned to relative normal (minor trees down and the discomfort of no heat or light for 8 days.) but I can't say that that is the case for the folks who live just a few miles south of us. It's a big messy tragedy. It will be a long time till they are able to go "home". In some ways Long Island and the Jersey Shore are like post Katrina. It's very sad.


Entered at Mon Dec 3 20:47:54 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joan: I think it was you who mentioned liking singer Molly Johnson. If so, you may be interested to know that she managed to pretty much sell out Massey Hall on Friday. Great show. No Band songs, but a lovely version of Daniel Lanois' "Still Water". The friend I went with said that her father is Mohawk from the Six Nations reserve, just like Robbie's mother. And Caledonia - and Caledonia river too, if one exists - is immediately east of the reserve, and right next to Lanois' hometown of Hamilton.

And speaking of water, is your life back to normal, sorta, after Sandy?



Entered at Mon Dec 3 20:24:19 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: The Dead

For all the Dead Heads A long and interesting article from the New Yorker. Even a mention of The Band and Levon.


Entered at Mon Dec 3 16:24:11 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

John D: JB and the Playboys were a great band, as you say. Nicholls was/is obviously very talented, and guitarist Bill Hill could play rings around his peers. Totally unknown, though. (Is he still around, Landmark?). And bassist Louis Yacknin (aka Lou Atkins in the Playboys - see previous note about names from central casting) struts his stuff impressively on the intro to Lighthouse's timeless "One Fine Morning" (see link). Formed quite the rhythm section with drummer Skip Prokop, who was on Bloomfield and Kooper's "Live Adventures of", so played on their version of "The Weight". (On the other hand, Lighthouse murdered "Chest Fever" on their first album.)


Entered at Mon Dec 3 15:54:48 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.240)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Inventing David Geffen

Above link to Robbie Robertson from PBS doc on David Geffen........note to self - check the "update page" more often.


Entered at Mon Dec 3 14:19:12 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Allan Nicholls

Bill, I loved J.B. & The Playboys. We used to bring them to the UAW Hall in Oshawa for Saturday afternoon dances. I got to know Allan and; when he did Nashville, I was working in Montreal and interviewed him there. You know I never put him and Dave together as brothers. That's why your the Canadian Content King. I loved "I'm The Lonely One and My Delight."


Entered at Sun Dec 2 19:19:49 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Another former Montrealer whose music was/is approved of by both Robert Altman and John D is Allan Nicholls. As Landmark will confirm, his mid '60s group, JB and the Playboys, were le talk de la ville. By the late '60s he and the band (David P: now with Jean-Pierre Lauzon on guitar) was in LA. Somehow he fell in with Altman, who used both his acting talents and his music-writing talents through the '70s and '80s. I don't know that he's in McCabe and Mrs Miller, but he is one of the performers in "Nashville". He's also in "Slap Shot" (the willy waver), not because it's an Altman movie but because he could skate. Does anyone know the Morganmasondowns album from 1970, which Nicholls produced? I believe it's an upstate New York thing, presumably a bit Bandish. A trio - Cass Morgan, something Mason and Steve Downs, but if you believe those to be real names rather than names chosen by central casting - you are way more trusting than I. Link to our guys: his older brother's lounge band, Dave Nicholls and the Coins, were Yonge Street fixtures through the first half of the '60s, so must have been acquainted.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 16:47:57 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Aunt Mimi's House

Brilliant idea, Bob … tell him he gets the keys to Aunt Mimi's house on condition he plays locally. Aunt Mimi's later house is about a mile from mine in Poole.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 16:45:52 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bruce Springsteen has three venues on the 2013 UK tour … Wembley Stadium, London, Hampden Park, Glasgow and The Ricoh Stadium, Coventry - a fair spread in a sense. So three football stadiums. Would it be down to Liverpool FC and Everton not using their stadiums for concerts? The Ricoh Stadium at 33,000 is smaller than either Liverpool venue, after all, but it is an easy drive from Birmingham. In general though, I'd put it down to the fact that he never does "intensive UK tours", so it tends to be "London, Middle, North, Scotland and sometimes Wales." I notice that because he's never come to Southampton, Brighton, nor as far as I know, Bristol.

Annoying as it may be in Liverpool, the close proximity to Manchester would make a promoter feel there was no need to do both … just as you wouldn't necessarily do Leeds AND Sheffield, or Portsmouth AND Southampton … or for that matter, Bristol AND Cardiff. Logistically, it would be easier to do two dates in any one of the pair, rather than play both. The trouble this time, is the choice is "two UK, one Scotland."


Entered at Sun Dec 2 15:21:05 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Old gb regulars / Which country, which currency?

Good to see names like BRIEN SZ and BAYOU SAM back here in gb. I have missed Brien's posts on Christianity and Sam's post on Robbie. - And for what is worth: it was Danish - not Swedish - edition of Guinness Book Of Records I was referring to earlier today.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 15:15:46 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Bruce in Liverpool

Al, it really is odd that he's never played in your home town. The Beatles were such a huge influence on Bruce and The E Street Band. You should contact Little Steven by way of his radio show. Tell him you have been authorized to give them the keys to the city and lunch at Aunt Mimi's house!


Entered at Sun Dec 2 15:04:25 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Thanks Norm.

Norm, thanks for the McCabe movie info. Interesting stuff.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 14:58:01 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge & Bruce

Al, I was really shocked at reading your post. The "Boss" has never played Liverpool? The Home of The Beatles. The city that changed the world for all of us.

Seriously I'm very surprised; because I would think that Bruce would want to go there and probably get a very special VIP tour of the former Beatle haunts. He's never been shy of being a fan of others. As he got popular years ago, I could see him asking...er....telling management, "I want to play Liverpool!"


Entered at Sun Dec 2 14:36:11 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: No Boss in Liverpool...

Then it must be the fault of Luis Suarez. : ) Just kidding.

Odd that His Boss-ness has never played in Liverpool. Could it be down to logistics? As in "all our tour dates are in this direction and Liverpool is in the other direction." Although that seems like a theory with more holes than a piece of Swiss cheese.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 13:40:30 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: SPRINGSTEEN touring Europe agin this summer

Just put the following up on several of the Springsteen website forums in the hope that the overbloated fat jammy leech that is Jon landau [btw only joking Jon if you ever happen to catch this - your not jammy :-0)] might see it and add an extra date in this pleasant little spot up in North West Ingerland.

SERIOUS QUESTION - Why never Liverpool on the Springsteen tour itinery?

Without the seismic impact on popular music development of my home city and its natives there'd likely never have been a Bruce Springsteen and both Bruce and Jon Landau might now be having to hold down a proper job to earn a crust.

So for just one measly time couldn't Bruce and his entourage manage a nod in our direction with a concert there?

No disrespect to the good folk from everywhere else he plays - particularly the outposts of Europe - but just what are your contributions to the idiom in which you so joyously revel courtesy of Bruce and the boys? I realise the criteria for venue selection tend not to take account of a town or city's musical heritage but couldn't the Springsteen management team just for a solitary time make an exception to the rule for a place to whom everyone who loves popular music in any of its forms owes a massive debt of gratitude for its historic legacy in acting as one of THE vital - if not THE MOST VITAL - catalysts to the idiom's development.

Just askin' like.

:-0)

Any thoughts GBer's?


Entered at Sun Dec 2 12:37:50 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Contries

Subject: The Band Guest Book Related CHRISTMAS GIFT OF THE YEAR

Our record in ukulele playing is mentioned on page 80 (at least in Swedish edition) in Guinness Record Book 2013. - Getting National Geographic Channel with Pat Brennan as Christmas Gift might be good but better is always better.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 07:27:13 CET 2012 from (74.88.137.123)

Posted by:

John W.

Funny story, yesterday I mentioned to my mother (77 years old) that Earl Carroll had passed on. She said Oh my god, was he 110 years old? I said no, Mom, not Earl Carroll the old Broadway guy. I meant Earl Carroll who was Speedo from the Cadillacs. His real name was Mr. Earl.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 04:09:50 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.240)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

....on the subject of "best of's" the above link is my favorite R n R HOF induction speech ever......the opening play on the famous quote by Springsteen's manager was perfect - especially considering all the talk at the time coming from the neanderthal rock community questioning the selection......................travelling - more next week on L. Cohen.......great topic.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 00:42:04 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: McCabe

The whole project from the book McCabe, is quite interesting how it evolved. David Foster got the idea for the movie from being exposed to the book from the authors agent, a friend of Foster's. He was smuggled in for the viewing of M.A.S.H. by Bob Altman. As Foster was one of the producers of McCabe, agreed to have Altman direct it.

Altman was a great fan of Cohen, but had forgotten about his favourite album for some years. On the post production of McCabe & Mrs Miller, rediscovered Cohen's music. As he had done with the speakers, and audio in M.A.S.H. He edited the Cohen music into McCabe & Mrs. Miller. It was apparently at first a difficulty as the movie is Warner, and Cohen's music Columbia. Cohen asked Columbia to allow the use of his music (cheaply), with some coin from the use of his music going to Altman, (an unusual agreement) because he was a fan of an Altman movie.

A case of "scratch each others back" it would seem. The movie was shot here in West Vancouver, and up in Squamish. It was a popular place for movie making, "economically" back then. Another movie that had been shot in the same area, in mid sixties, (also on Bowen Island and Gibsons) and employed the last steam tug on this coast the "Master". The movie was called "The Trap", and starred Rita Tushingham. The tug "Master" although no longer steam driven is a charter boat. It was in Port Hardy just the other day.


Entered at Sun Dec 2 00:19:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I picked up the Leonard Cohen "McCabe and Mrs Miller" EP a few months back. 1972 was an era when EPs had virtually disappeared, so it's something of an oddity. The songs date from 1968 … Sisters of Mercy, Winter Lady, The Stranger Song. Agree. Great film.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 23:03:50 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Absolutely Leonard Cohen

I agree absolutely, Bob F, that Leonard's music made McCabe and Mrs. Miller the wonderful film that it is. It is good to begin with, but the soundtrack becomes the mood and it is almost as if what you see on the screen is illustrative of the lyrics rather than the other way around.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 22:49:30 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: McCabe & Mrs Miller

Funny Bob, I was just watching that old flick the other night, on an old video casset a friend gave me. I agree about Cohen's music. That's the biggest reason I watch it. Do you know it was filmed out here in BC.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 22:12:22 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Lenny

Those early Cohen records are magnificiant. How about the way his music was used in the film McCabe and Mrs Miller. I can't thing of a better use of music in a film. I think my favorite Cohen song is 'Everybody Knows'. Every line of that song is a story within itself.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 18:35:58 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Record Thief!

Peter yuh otta be ashamed.....stealing some baby sitters records.......reminds me of a Jerry Lee Lewis story.

A guy saunters up to Jerry Lee when he's on a break and says. "Y'know my girl friend thinks yer real hot stuff. I think yer a piece a shit. So know what I did? All yer albums she's got, I smashed 'em all!"

Jerry Lee says "GOOD....now she's gotta go out and buy 'em all over again."


Entered at Sat Dec 1 17:39:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Maybe the sophisticated types hadn't, Bob. I said "rather like me" because I'll play a rock snob card here (a King rather than an Ace though) … original LP copies of The Songs of Leonard Cohen and Songs From A Room, bought new in the late 60s. OK, I'll admit it, they belonged to an ex-girlfriend rather than me, but I lost enough LPs the other way to hang on to those two. Those were his lonely girls in bedsitter days, a constituency shared with Al Stewart at the time, then inherited by Cat Stevens.

Yes, Neil Larson's organ playing is a joy.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 17:01:27 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Leonard

All this Leonard talk. I went back last night to watch the video of Hallelujah Live in London. Neil Larson's organ playing and solo is awesome. Made me nostalgic for the time; when Bob Dylan used the organ as an integral part of his band.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 16:08:19 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Leonard

Peter V,in 1988 you sophistacted types hadn't latched on to Cohen yet. In the 80's Cohen played places like Carnagie Hall or the Beacon Theatre in NYC. I think I remember even seeing him in a large club called The Ritz. Now he plays Madison Square Garden and The Barclay Center in Brooklyn. That is quite an achievement and well deserved.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 10:11:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bob: I guess that a Leonard Cohen fan in sophisticated Montreal might (rather like myself), smile gently as it began and later say over a glass of Sancerre, “How pleasant it was to hear that cover” while as you say the Deadheads would be jumping on their seats, throwing beer in the air, and screaming ‘Yea! Fuc*ing A!”

It’s true that you can’t bottle the experience of any live show. There’s dynamics, build up, charisma and I’ve often heard recordings of stuff I was at and been amazed at fluffs, and ragged bits, and words sung out of tune. I never noticed any on the day. That even goes for The Band Wembley 74. In fact, Len at the O2 in London (as on the DVD) is a rarity … it sounds exactly as good as it did on the night. Thinking about it this morning, one of the two or three best ever shows was Marvin Gaye, but I saw a DVD of a different show on the same tour and couldn't believe where the "perfection" of the live experience had dissipated to.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 06:17:09 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Il Volo

Jay Leno has these young singers on tonight. They toured with Barbra Streisand this year. They are very good, but not what Il Divo has. [yet!!] They are very good. As I like to say,"Try it, you'll like it"[them].

CYA soon


Entered at Sat Dec 1 06:06:45 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Ginger Baker

NORM: Right-on. Without our music we'd have very few memories. I have quite a few in pics too. I've seen a lot of C/M stars in my younger days. Today is not a good time in history.

Found this in my inbox, some of you guys may be interested in it...

Movie Review

Beware Of Mr. Baker (2012)

MPAA Rating: Unrated

Reviewed by Owen Gleiberman | Nov 30, 2012

Details Limited Release: Nov 28, 2012; Rated: Unrated; Length: 92 Minutes; Genre: Documentary; With: Bob Adcock, Tony Allen and Carmine Appice; Distributor: SnagFilms

Keith Moon died before he got old, but Ginger Baker, the other legendary wild-man drummer of British rock, lived to be a cranky, clear-eyed old man. Beware of Mr. Baker stays true to his recklessly free spirit. Spitting obscenities at the film's director, Jay Bulger, Baker recalls his days as: the '60s thrash caveman who gave Cream and Blind Faith their transcendent power surge; the pioneer of druggy hotel-room rampages; and the damaged purist who left the pop world for Africa. The movie salutes the rhythms and the wreckage. B+

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Dec 1 03:52:05 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I saw a pile of Dylan shows in the 85 or 86 to 88 range, and i know i saw a pile in the early and mid 90-s.All great shows. When i saw Dylan and theDead in giant stadium, it was a pretty damn good show. Bob- chris Parker and Christopher Parker probably are one and the same.Chris Parker is one of the finest drummers anywhere.Always was.Comes from that Parker family of like 7 drummers. One time, i was at my graphics lady studio in Palenville.In walks a guy dropping off something for her.She introduces me, says this is ....Parker. I said, you must be a drummer. Of Course he was, he was one of the 7 rbothers. Well, everyone's jaw dropped, cause i was right and they figured how the hell would i know, we had bnever met...but it wasnlt a BD GUESS, CAUSE he was a Parker and HALF THE MusiciANS IN the WOODSOTCK area HAVE JOBS EITHER IN CARPENTRY, OR RECORDING or spomething related,.... i tihnk the last time i saw chris Parker play was oct 2010, with Robbie dupree and Larry Hoppen.killer show. maybe once in summer of 2011, but not sure.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 02:42:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Memories........well

I spent some time watching some. The 60's & 70's were the best for me. Sometimes it all comes together. There is John Fogerty singing, "Who'll stop the rain" with Bruce singing back up for him, and Robbie Robertson playing the solo licks, so sweet, and many others I watched.

There was Eagles , Taking it to the Limit, in '77 in Houston. There is always "The Band" where it "Makes no Difference".

Now a days, it's war in the middle east, Egypt and Isreal. Financial strife in England, Europe. The "financial cliff", weather disasters in north america.

What I've linked here is Brooks & Dunn being backed by ZZ Top. Just watch Billy Gibbons pull some of the sweetest licks you'll ever hear out of a Gibson, Les Paul.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 02:18:20 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan and "Hallelujah"

Hi all! Speaking of Bob Dylan? Nice page on him in RS.

PETER & POSTERS: The best version of "Hallelujah" is by Il Divo [Brit's Got Talent winners],Rufus Wainwright's version from "Shrek" is good, and anything k.d.lang sings is always beautiful..

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Dec 1 01:09:55 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Memories

Peter V, it was a long time ago and that's how I remember it. I don't remember a loud response when he did that song. If any of the Canadians were there maybe they have a different memory of the evening. The biggest response I've ever seen Dylan get for a cover is when he use to perform 'Friend of the Devil' or 'Alabama Getaway'. When he covered the Dead the hall would go nuts. I don't remember that kind of a response for the Cohen song. Also can you really compare a one off version that the band probably learned during the soundcheck to studio versions? I'm just saying the music Dylan made in 1988 was outstanding and I'm going to leave it at that.


Entered at Sat Dec 1 00:27:58 CET 2012 from (65.128.36.117)

Posted by:

Jim Brown

Location: Steubenville, OH (then) & Denver (now)

Subject: The Band, Rodney King & the Fiscal Cliff

As we approach the Fiscal Cliff, we should remind our politicos of Rodney's words -- Can't we all just get along? -- and if they are listening to The Band, maybe -- just maybe -- they'll actually get it.

The Band's music is so beautiful and mournful that it can make you cry one moment, and so joyful the next you're up and dancing. Indeed, they were, they are THE Band!


Entered at Sat Dec 1 00:02:14 CET 2012 from (99.141.55.17)

Posted by:

Adam

Ari - The release was delayed due to a production error of some kind. No announcement was made, and a new release date has not been announced either, but I've heard Dec. 4.

I had the unbelievable honor of attending another Jimmy Vivino/Garth Hudson "Songs Of The Band" show in Pennsylvania last weekend. Greatest concert I've ever seen in my life. The majority of Music From Big Pink, The Band, Stage Fright played live, with deep tracks from The Basement Tapes and Cahoots included as well. Vivino, Jim Weider and Randy Ciarlante, as well as Byron Isaacs, all in immaculate musical form. Garth was extraordinary. He played The Genetic Method on the Keswick Theatre's 84 year old authentic pipe organ. Something I will never forget. Full review to come.


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