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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, March 2012


Entered at Sat Mar 31 23:59:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Hassles

…and seemingly out of print. The Best of The Hassles is going for £17.99 which is high, especially as the track listing (A Taste of Honey?) suggests You Got Me Hummin' is their best track. And very good it is.


Entered at Sat Mar 31 23:23:30 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: The Hassles did at least two LPs, and Billy Joel and another Hassle recorded a third as Atilla.

Al E: I thought my latest hypothesis was that it's about the economy.


Entered at Sat Mar 31 22:45:29 CEST 2012 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Vox Continental

Subject: Her brains they rattle and her bones they shake

(I'll just sneak in and out quickly and nobody will be any the wiser)

Springsteen is it? That live footage of Thundercrack from 1973 is all you need; therein you can see all his strengths in as small a combo as is needed with all the people he truly needed (Clarence, Danny, Gary T) and eschewed the extra guitarist, pianist etc and moreover is free of all the "fat" that his kitchen-sink ethos sometimes - for me at least - makes him sound more like Meatloaf (which he doesn't deserve) than Van Morrison or even a more showman-like one-man OQ (which on occasion he does merit). So, for myself: Thundercrack, and then as an occasional treat, the studio demo of The Promise. Curiously, two songs he neglected to release properly at the time of conception but has never ditched completely. Thundercrack, for sure, would have livened Greetings From Asbury Park up and done no end of good. And that footage of Thundercrack - five guys making a hell of a racket, and all of it relevant. Where have we heard that one before?

"Rob, you on that guestbook again? I thought you'd promised to finish the CD before you went back on it! Your tea is getting cold!"

"Coming dear!"

(Empties cache and resets browsing history)...


Entered at Sat Mar 31 20:55:46 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Norb, check link above to see who'll win the Flanders Tour this year. Go, Edvald!


Entered at Sat Mar 31 20:38:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Hassles

This afternoon I was putting my 45 of "You Got Me Hummin'" by The Hassles onto CDR. This is Billy Joel in 1967. Did he improve? There's a question.


Entered at Sat Mar 31 20:31:13 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Norbert, just looking at those riders made my muscles ache.

Al, you are welcome in my house any time, but I currently live closer to Billy Joel. :-)


Entered at Sat Mar 31 18:23:03 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Tour of Flanders

p.s. here the link: Tour of Flanders documentary.


Entered at Sat Mar 31 17:27:45 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Finished that soundtrack a long time ago al..thought the page was a slice of cheese, ate it in a burger......Chewed up & ..... Not the first time my best work was compared to a pile of excrement


Entered at Sat Mar 31 17:14:29 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Tour of Flanders [Cycling’s Greatest One-Day Race]

Peter thanks for the "weather" joke yesterday, we had a great laugh here!

Tomorrow is the greatest one-day cycling race in Belgium the tour of Flanders, following the horror trenches. On this day Belgium shakes off the monstrosities of WWI, the dome of desperation, the impossible, hopeless, futureless, existance of life without a chance. Bitter people, born, raised and die, enslaved between bigotrious clergi and corrupt establishment. Where unemployment is a fact of life after they wrecked your body and broke your will. Living in damp little houses in the twilight zone on triste flat muddy land with no trees where only potatoes will grow and alcohol or suicide is the only way out.

But not tomorow! tomorrow all of them, hundreds of thousands of people, right after church will march out on the streets and see heroes born in their Tour of Flanders. It's the party of the commen men, this is where they live for, the only thing to endure the missery. The one winning tomorrow will be a God in Belgium till he dies, a God of the lowlands.

Tomorrow afternoon live on TV, don't miss it! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

"We’re on the course of the Tour of Flanders, walking to the summit of its most infamous cobblestone climb, the Koppenberg, which is perhaps the best way of trying to understand why men come here to suffer on their bikes. The humped road, at first more than 20 feet wide, narrows as it climbs and plows upward between two steep, muddy, grassy banks lined with leafless trees, until it forms a fearsome little trench only 10 feet across. Climbed by the riders in this Belgian classic since 1976, the diabolical wall, 600 m in length, carved into what would be called a hill in any other country, has been the stage of the race’s most dramatic moments. The “Torture Chamber” is one of its most pertinent nicknames."



Entered at Sat Mar 31 15:12:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've been waiting forty years for someone to say I had the longest in Dorset. I'll have a T-shirt done.

I just read UNCUT with Dion on doing sessions with Bruce. The first thing he said to Dion is "What goes for the janitor, goes for me."

Just in case anyone doesn't have, the first Jesse Winchester got reissued as a 2-on-1 with 3rd down 110 to go, or 110 down, 3rd to go (I never understood the title anyway).

Same issue has a long Dr John interview. He recalls his buddy Marcel Richards playing on a Buffalo Springfield session and they wanted him to "play some of that New Orleans shit you do" to which he replied "I'll play some New Orleans shit as soon as Y'ALL play some New Orleans shit." He adds he'd already been paid so didn't mind when they fired him from the session.


Entered at Sat Mar 31 13:47:23 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bruce and the GB

So then, the Springsteen discussions? Good? Sure, but what exactly has it brought to the GB table? What’s it told us not only about Bruce Springsteen but about all the dear folks on the GB who’ve taken part in the debate?

Well let’s have a little reflection shall we - starting with the mouthy scouse twat with most to say for himself

1. Al Edge: Well what we know about Al is that when he’s not busy writing earnest eulogies about Bruce Springsteen, Al likes nothing better than to chill out and write an even more earnest eulogy about Bruce Springsteen

2. Kev J: It seems Kev was born with a unique genetic disorder which enables him to read Al’s earnest eulogies without ever actually falling asleep

3. Joan: Joan loves Bruce and lives next door to him. Al is insanely envious of this and would like to move in with Joan and her family.

4. Roger: Roger still breathes a huge sigh of relief that he bought seats in the gods and managed to avoid Al and his crazy crutch waving antics at the Royal Albert Hall

5. Bill M [part one]: Bill is convinced Born To Run has something to do with escaping or something.

6. Bill M [part two]: Bill likes nothing better than to post his Born to Run hypothesis every other day on the GB

7. SADavid: SADavid still pines for 1984 when Bruce’s biceps bulged bigger than the Appalachians

8. PuTmEuP: It seems that the character of Wimpy was inspired by Jeff’s uncanny knack of sniffing out a burger sizzling in Brooklyn whilst stood in Central Park. Jeff’s still working on writing the soundtrack for Popeye the movie.

9. PV: Pete's shelf is the longest in Dorset. It’s rammed solid with forgotten musical gems.

10. Todd and Jerry: Todd and Jerry dig Bruce. So it seems do Dlew and Joe J. Not sure about DP and PB.

11. Bruce needs to brace himself as he won't be getting his annual Xmas card from Carmen this year.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 31 05:24:15 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Canadian Music/Bill M

Gordon Lightfoot. I went with one of the safest choices. Plus, he is one of my favorites. I don't meet many younger people who know him. I get the feeling my professor didn't really know him; he isn't much older than me though.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 22:18:01 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Levon & Earl Scruggs in '89 "Will The Circle Be Unbroken".


Entered at Fri Mar 30 22:00:12 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kristie: Way to go! What was your topic in the end?


Entered at Fri Mar 30 21:54:50 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: A boatload of lawyers just sank …

Robert Cray had the last word on that one. See link.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 21:43:19 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Canadian Music/Bill M

Hey, I got an a+ on that Canadian music/history paper! Much better than the d- I usually get in here...

Thanks, Bill M. I am looking forward to it. I am also going to see Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. I am going to request they sing "Acadian Driftwood" again. The last time I saw them, they sang this beautifully.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 21:33:19 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Bob F. - please thank her for sharing those photos w/ all of us.

PSB - nice Scruggs' link for "Down On The Flood". Here's a link to an article called "The Ballad of Bob Dylan & Earl Scruggs," including a list of Dylan tunes Scruggs covered & the number of times he covered them.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 20:39:22 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Fab Faux Photos

Mike H, it's a small world. My wife took the Fab Faux photos you posted.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 20:15:53 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Come to think of it, I wonder if it's not time for Jackson Browne to finally release his long-delayed "Bankers in Love" album? Though I wish he'd call it "Weightlifters in Love" - the kind of people who'd find "The Load-Out" an absolute breeze.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 19:25:12 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Some of my best friends …

… used to be bankers. In fact, most of them took early retirement, in many cases involuntary early retirement, 10-15 years ahead of expected, as the banks in the UK changed. I know several "ex-managers" and they all got very disillusioned when banking changed from the neighbourhood role Carmen describes to selling "product" - insurance, pensions, loans whatever, and they were instructed to pressure-sell too, which had never been their role. I agree, Bruce is not railing against bank employees, bank managers or any other consumer level of banking. It's investment banking that gambled and lost. Isn't it Ry Cooder who had the strongest recent song on the topic?

In the UK, with two of the four major banks largely owned by the taxpayer, we find these multi-million pound bonuses for the investment bankers obscene. They're paying virtually no interest on the money they borrow, failing to loan to people, and paying themselves huge profit-related bonuses in taxpayer-funded enterprises. It's extremely hard not to make a profit in banking when you're borrowing (or storing) people's savings at 0.5%, then loaning it out at a minimum of 4.5%.

I know that people in banking get very pissed off about the bad stuff said about their industry in general, but, hey, lawyers have had to get used to it.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 17:42:37 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Jimmy V & Fab Faux pics @ UPAC earlier this yr.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 17:22:09 CEST 2012 from (72.78.32.5)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Flatt and Scruggs

The link is to Flatt & Scruggs great version of "Down In The Flood," which was the first recording of this song to be released in January 1968.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 17:21:42 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bruce

Bill M - you are correct, however, the average person does not make this distinction. Even so, the owner of the bank has a right to make as much as makes sense from a business perspective just like a Rock and Roll Star who can fill a Stadium. Thos who produce get paid. If Bruce really felt for the little guy (by the way white collar folks are in this catagory), then he should sell his CD's at a price that eliminates his profit - after all he has enough according to his lyrics.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 17:09:24 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Bob F: Over the last decade or so Mr. Springsteen did a lot of his recording at Southern Tracks studio here in Atlanta with Brendan O'Brien. However, the recording scene here suffered a blow when Southern Tracks abruptly closed down last year and sold their equipment. Band connection: In 1999 Garth worked with the Indigo Girls on their "Come On Now Social" album recorded at Southern Tracks.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 16:41:35 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Todd, your right about how bad the sound is on Magic and Working On A Dream. I hate that Brendan O'Brien production with that crap Pearl Jam sound. When he performed the songs from those cd's in concert they sounded so much more alive. I'm so glad he didn't use O'Brien for Wrecking Ball.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 16:32:24 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Cortez the Killer

Todd, Cinnamon Girl is way to early to give up on Neil. That's before After The Gold Rush, Rust Never Sleeps, Zuma, On The Beach...etc! Cortez The Killer is as close to perfect as music can get. Go back.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 16:20:10 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: I like it. Have your heard Dion's answer song, "Why Can't I Be A Weightlifter In Love?" I feel the same, which is why I have only the BtR LP (for the title song) and the Greatest Hits CD (for "Atlantic City") - and will replace both with 45s if I find them.

It occurred to me yesterday, and I'm not saying it's never occurred to anyone else, that the phrase 'born to run' can be taken as referring to the a guy planning to get outta here, or it can be taken as referring the US industrial economy. BITUSA et seq can be taken as Bruce's reaction to the train going off the rails.

Carmen: I think Bruce's target was the guy who owns the bank, not the guy who manages a branch. I take it that you're closer to the latter. Also, are you saying you think you have a socialist president (i.e., of the USA, not of the bank)??

Kristie, belatedly: Good that you're getting to see Fred Eaglesmith live. I've seen him twice - once phenomenal, once (with NB and NG) not so much. I don't think I mentioned it here, but he recently snuck another CD onto the market, "Six Volts". Well worth purchasing, but not brilliant like the previous two, "Tinderbox" and "Cha Cha Cha". Enjoy!


Entered at Fri Mar 30 16:10:11 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Born in the U.S.A.

"Born in the U.S.A." was heavily promoted by Columbia Records. Seven hit singles from the album were released. They also took advantage of the emerging power of MTV with a series of videos. A series of alternate mixes of many of the songs, prepared by Bob Clearmountain, were also released separately as 12" vinyl singles. This provided another avenue of promotion through play at DJ'd dance clubs which were very popular at the time. Through this intensive promotion all the bases were covered -- radio, tv and clubs, with additional merchandising promotion and in-store appearances at major record store outlets which still wielded a lot of clout at the time.

The album was recorded on analog tape and released on LP, cassette and CD. As it was the first commercially released CD manufactured at a U.S. plant, it truly was born in the U.S.A., with Columbia acting as mid-wife.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 15:57:44 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bruce etc.

Peter etc - I am a stone cold capitalist and do not begrudge anyone making money - including Bruce. The problem I have is that once Bruce made it he changed. I go to work every day to make a living as a Banker. I get a salary that would put me somwhere in the middle class. I have a mortgage, send my kids to school, save for their education, have car bills, donate to my church and other causes etc... As I said I am a banker which to many on this site is a bad word. In reality, as a small community Banker, I help the community I serve. I help my clients get loans, save etc. According to Bruce - I should be shot for being a banker when my wealth is so small compared to Bruce that he could spend what I am worth on his children's private horse lessons and not even see it missing. Are there inequities in the world - sure - but I don't need a multi millionare or a socialist president telling me I am the problem. Just shut up and sing.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 15:33:21 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: minority opinion

Bill M: Guilty, my lord. We have Alanis on cassette somewhere around the shack; used to have a copy of _Thriller_, no Hotel Cali or BITUSA. Used to have a copy of _Born to Run_ (born this, born that, starting to look like a X complex?) -- only ever played the title and occasionally 10th Avenue Freezout. Must confess I'm Boss-deaf, all sounds the same to me, sounds like a weightlifter trying to describe true love. Means well, seems like.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 14:57:54 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rod: Seems like "Native Americans" is a watershed of some sort, though in my case I liked it so much that I went back and made serious efforts learning to like the earlier ones. I think "Clairvoyant" is very good, but it's just fluff compared "Native Americans" and "Redboy".

Peter V: It's a universal problem - you raise your daughter to like good music and then she goes and hooks up with some guy with really bad taste. Betcha the kids' favourite bit is the "squirming like a toad" line, where they get to shriek and say "eeouw" to each other in the back seat.

Re monster records, I probably don't know anybody who doesn't have at least two of "Born in the USA", "Thriller" and "Hot-L California", but I can't think of anybody I know who's likely to own "Jagged Little Pill", which sold 30+ million copies to somebody.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 14:49:12 CEST 2012 from (108.89.71.115)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Bruce's Cash Box

Thanks Jeff, yes Rosalita is a great example…it really kicks you in the ass, right out of the gate. Another classic intro where you know right away that it’s Bruce is the intro to ‘The Promised Land’.
Joe J. ‘The song 'Sherry Darling’ is the track that prompted me to buy ‘The River' in the first place….great song.

Carmen, I kind of hear you on Bruce and the money thing to some degree, but as a fan I’ve decided that I ultimately don’t care how much money Bruce has, Neil has, Dylan has etc.. I’m sure they each have more than I’ll ever have and they’ve all gotten some of my hard earned dollars over the years. Likewise there are plenty of wealthy rock stars whose music doesn’t do it for me and will never get anything from me.

I enjoy Neil a lot, but for me personally, he kind of peaked with 'Cinnamon Girl' which is one of my favorites.

Here’s a cut and paste from a 1984 Rolling Stone interview where Bruce talks about the financial success of Born In The USA.

"Yeah, there's a change [in me]. [Being a rich man] doesn't make living easier, but it does make certain aspects of your life easier. You don't have to worry about rent, you can buy things for your folks and help out your friends, and you can have a good time, you know? There were moments where it was very confusing. (...) I don't really think [money] does change you. It's an inanimate thing, a tool, a convenience. If you've got to have a problem, it's a good problem to have. (...) Money was kind of part of the dream when I started. I don't think...I never felt like I ever played a note for the money. I think if I did, people would know, and they'd throw you out of the joint. And you'd deserve to go. But at the same time, it was a part of the dream."

My biggest beef with Bruce lately is the mastering on some of his recent CD’s….most notably ‘Magic’ and ‘Working On A Dream’. I like many of the songs, but I get so weary of the sound; I can’t play the albums all of the way through. But that’s another topic…


Entered at Fri Mar 30 13:59:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Weather forecasting

Me again. I'm off out because it's so sunny, but before I go …

Weather forecasting. Norbert we have unusual weather forecasting techniques here in Dorset too.

A friend was walking in the country near Lyme Regis and he realized his watch had stopped. There was a farmer in the next field.

‘Hey! Could you tell me the time?’ he called.

‘Yes.’ said the farmer.

‘Well, what is it?’

‘Oh! Said the farmer,’ You mean WILL you tell me the time? Hang on.’ The farmer went over to the bull standing in the corner of the field. He bent down and examined the bull’s testicles carefully. ‘It’s a quarter past three,’ he said.

‘That’s amazing, ‘ said my friend, ‘But how can you tell the time by looking at the bull’s balls?’

‘It’s easy,’ said the farmer, ‘If you look right between his balls, you can see the church clock on the hill over there.’


Entered at Fri Mar 30 13:50:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Carmen, surely it's more uplifting to look at the sky "I could be as great as Bruce" (if only I could sing, play the guitar, compose, move on stage and run a band), rather than to gaze at the earth (I'm like Neil Young. Neil Young can't sing that well either).

Seriously, (and apologies to Neil, who I like very much … it's Mrs V who can't stand his voice) I don't think anyone can really predict a "Born in the USA" sales bonanza (or for that matter a Thriller or Hotel California bonanza). I never thought that Bruce sat down and planned a strategy for having a multi-platinum album. It's a bit like the oft-told story. It's been applied to several record labels, but Clive Selwood tells it particularly well in "All of The Moves - None of the Licks." He was working for Polygram, and the new boss arrived from Germany. He had been analysing the record business and had worked out its fatal flaw. But he had a solution, "In the future we shall only release the records that will be hits."


Entered at Fri Mar 30 13:40:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The End

It all comes back. Today I was in the car with my grandkids. I put on my 1961 Playlist (The Lion Sleeps Tonight, Blue Moon, happy Birthday Sweet 16, Rubber Ball) thinking this is all cheerful stuff. My granddaughter said "Can't we have some pop music instead?"

So I found my 2012 Playlist and put on Gotye (recent number one single). They found it a bit dull. She said 'Can you put on Dawes?'

I was amazed, and mortified that there isn't any on my iPod. So I said which Dawes do you like?

"Riders On The Storm." Daddy plays it in the car.

Oh, DOORS, I said. Well, I've got "Hello, I Love You".

One minute in, "This is RUBBISH."

Well, I said, nearly all Doors tracks are rubbish, but there are two good ones, Light My Fire and this.

You should get Riders On The Storm, they advised.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 12:43:04 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: uhh ....what did I come here for?

I'm getting old.(only: hearing aid, bold, thirt tees, limp, high bp, runnig nose).


Entered at Fri Mar 30 12:14:22 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: John's weather forecasting stone

" This unique weather forecasting chart offers a little help in predicting the unpredictable weather of Donegal. John’s Weather Forecasting Stone puts the guessing to rest and lays it out plain and simple. Donegal Weather Channelshared the photo with their Facebook community, and though the photo was not actually taken in Donegal, they are still finding the forecasts handy. Who needs satellite weather tracking technology when you have a stone!

This is definitely what an unusual forecasting method looks like. This chart offers help in predicting the weather -that sometimes seems to be so unpredictable. This method puts all type of guessing to rest. Now the big question is: Where can we get one? This is so plain and simple that even meteorologists would know how to use it!"

I googeled "John's weather forecasting stone" on the www: 446.000 results in 0,12 sec. Must be the most fotographed weather station in the world.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 11:49:58 CEST 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bruce

Bruce is estimated to be worth $250,000,000 and I would bet more. I was a huge Bruse fan for the music but when he became the poster boy for those who claim to have been born on the wrong side of the yellow line, i became turned off. I think this quote take from Thrashers Wheat says it all for me.

"You know the differance between the greatness of Bruce Springsteen and that of Neil Young - Bruce makes you think you, too, can be as great as he is. Neil makes you think that he is really no better than you are to begin with, Remember That" By: Dr Eric Alterman


Entered at Fri Mar 30 09:17:40 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: robbies best post Band songs

I stopped buying buying RR's releases after Native Americans but here's my top 10

Between Trains

Fallen Angel

Show Down At Big Sky

Broken Arrow

Somewhere Down The Crazy Rover

Night Parade

Soap Box Preacher

Go Back To Your Woods

Ok - thats not 10.I could probably find 10 Levon tracks (mostly from the Dirt releases) but only a hand full from the others. Though Java Blues and The Sea From The North are massive.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 08:12:21 CEST 2012 from (183.83.222.248)

Posted by:

Questico

Location: Germany
Web: My link

I want to put something out there. If you had to pick RR best 10 songs post THE BAND material, what would they be? Also indicate which of his 10 best would qualify as being BAND worthy good enough.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 07:37:49 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd,I also love the River, always have. Rosalita - another one of those songs that the beginning is full throttle sheer rock and roll, and also, quite incomparable. Thunder Road, another unique song. i don't think the man has made a bad album, pretty much there is greatness in every one, one way or another..i admire the guy, at the same time, there's music i enjoy more, and can't get away from. Whilst i love Bruce's music, his music has been easier for me to live without than others..extending that, for example- if i had to choose between bruce and hot tuna, i;d take tuna- which is probably a bad way to look at things- bruce's music is more lots of things- but, on a very simple level- i;d rather miss the born to run recording than burgers..that said, he's an irreplaceable talent and i agree with almost all the positive remarks about various songs and the man as a person.... fuck me- apparently i;ve turned into the mitt romney of this Gb thread.....

a lot of the writing here about bruce has been quite good and interesting- fucking scouser finally decided to stick around long enough to whip you guys into shape..


Entered at Fri Mar 30 04:53:14 CEST 2012 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Simone Felice

Peter V: Many thanks for turning me on to Simone. One of the most exciting 'new' musicians I've encountered in quite a while. I agree, 'Shaky' is pretty much a greatest hit and I think he'd be wise to do it at every show... I suspect some would leave disappointed if they didn't hear it. The song was somewhat rearranged to suit his current touring band, and for the first minute or two IMO it was missing some of its normal funk and 'punch', but then the energy did finally kick in. I'll be curious what you think of the new arrangement, and of the show in general.

Bob F, agreed on Simi... from what little I've seen (like you, I've caught this recent show & one about a year ago), she has enormous talent and I hope she will pursue solo projects when not supporting Simone. I'd love to hear a full set by her someday. As for the crowd last night, average age was probably right around mine (39), maybe a touch younger. (Which was actually something of a novelty for me, as I'm used to being one of the youngest in the audience when seeing artists like Levon, Mavis etc. The venue was much hipper than I'm used to, too...!)


Entered at Fri Mar 30 02:47:44 CEST 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

JOE J

Subject: joe on bruce

Lived and died with Bruce for a few years. What a run of albums, 'Born to Run' through 'Born in the USA'. Sorta jumped the shark at that point and his later music doesn't resonate with me quite as well.

Nevertheless, the best live show I've ever seen. "Hey, hey, hey, what'd I say, Sherry Darlin'".


Entered at Fri Mar 30 01:50:16 CEST 2012 from (124.170.209.216)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Springsteen

I went and saw him at the Sydney cricket ground a few years back with the e street band. Now, the ground was underpowered. The power cut out 5 times. You wouldn't have thought so. Maybe it was 3. The energy, the performance. One of the greatest shows I've seen.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 01:34:18 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Jerry on Bruce

Jerry, you said it all in a few sentences. Great job.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 01:29:08 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Simone and Simi

Jon, when I saw Simone solo last spring he had Simi Stone open the show with a short set and that was great. This time he didn't and I really missed that part. I wish he would at least have her sing 'No Easy Way Out'. What was the general age of your audience?


Entered at Fri Mar 30 01:01:22 CEST 2012 from (67.6.53.148)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Bruce comparison

I'm not sure it's really fair to compare anyone to Dylan. Bruce was smart enough to know that a Dylan comparison was a death sentance. Asked once about being labled the next Bob early on, Bruce replied that nobody is Bob...

Does Bruce have an off night?...I'm sure he does but you'd never know it because of how high the bar has been raised at his live shows. His song writting and performing ability speak for itself. Where Bruce is a cut above anyone else, in my opinion, is his devotion to his fans and the relationships he's maintained with the people who knew him before he was the Boss.

My link is an example of this. Bruce goes to a park dedication for his former manager of his first band and his bandmates in Freehold 2006...


Entered at Fri Mar 30 00:28:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, he DID do Shaky. My reading skills are going.


Entered at Fri Mar 30 00:27:29 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Simone Felice

Thanks, Jon. I just lost a bet. In the car yesterday, playing it for the n'th time, I said "You And I Belong" is such a natural encore / last number before encore that I reckoned it would come there.

No Shaky is a surprise (and possibly a mistake in the UK where it's the best known song) BUT it's very exciting to see how much of the new album he's playing. I'm looking forward to a week tomorrow.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 23:28:04 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Simone Felice show, 3/28/12

I saw Simone Felice's show at NYC's Mercury Lounge last night. Another excellent show, and the new material sounds just great. He and his band can take you from the soulful, delicate lyrical songs to the stomping crowd-pleasers (and back). The only modest disappointment compared to last year's SF show was less prominent vocals from Simi Stone (whom I believe was introduced with a new last name... newly married, or an in-joke?)... but on the final two songs, she took a solo verse of each and really cut loose. Wonderful show. As an aside, while waiting for the set to start I met a friendly older British couple who were huge fans of the various Felices...they already have tickets for a few of Simone's UK shows in April, but were visiting New York, saw he was playing and decided to catch this show too. In general, the crowd seemed quite knowledgeable and enthusiastic, and stayed pin-drop quiet for the quiet numbers... would it were always that way at a show! Also, Simone's CDs were $15 and no LP need be purchased with them... guess they had the opportunity to rethink their business model. :) Link is to a pic of the show.

Set list (approx) :

New York Times
You and I Belong
If You Ever Get Famous
Shaky
Charade
Gimme All You Got
Stormy-Eyed Sarah
Summer Morning Rain
Hey Bobby Ray
Don't Wake the Scarecrow
Radio Song

(encores)
Your Belly In My Arms
Helpless
Knockin' on Heaven's Door


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:51:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wonderful essay, Al. Can't fault the analysis.

I do much the same as David … I have piles of CDRs from singles. I buy lots of old singles. I often buy stuff because it's a good year, a good label and I've never heard of it. I don't do a CDR so often from LPs as I'll play the LP. but the single 45 mix is often outstanding. I have Betty Wright's Shoo-Rah-Shooh-Rah on 45, LP and CD. The 45 knocks the others right off the stage, and still does so copied onto a CDR because you retain the mix and compression even if you lose the indefinable magic of analogue.

Today's finds were Muddy Waters "I'm Ready" EP on UK Chess (a very quiet recording strangely) and an MGM test record of the Five Satins "Your Memory". It came with handwritten label, and the B-side was on a separate disc in the same sleeve. Not an acetate either … it says "Microgroove Test Record." I don't know, but I kind of think it's valuable.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:38:39 CEST 2012 from (108.89.71.115)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Bruce

Once again I'm late to the party, but I wanted to say that I've enjoyed the Bruce conversation.

In my book he deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Dylan, Robbie, Woody Guthrie, and other great song-writers. Of that group I'd compare him most closely to Woody.

What make him great, apart from his songwriting chops, is his all around talent. He can play, sing, lead a band, and entertain the biggest and smallest crowds. And he cares about his audience and always seems to put his heart into it. Yes, he's ridden the wave of commercial success to some degree, but has never lost his core as far as I can tell.

Aside from Bruce's appeal as a political and social force, I'm of the opinion that, in his heart, he is a Romantic and that's what enables so many folks to identify so closely with his themes and music.

Besides some of the obvious favorites, I've always had a soft spot for 'I'm Goin' Down' from Born In The USA.

"I pull you close now baby
but when we kiss I can feel a doubt
I remember back when we started
My kisses used to turn you inside out"

Another favorite of mine is 'The River' from The River. It's such a desperate and sad song that shows the empathy that Bruce is capable of and can channel so successfully. Bruce has the ability, while writing about desperation and sadness, of also incorporating an evocative and palpable sensuality.

"But I remember us riding in my brother's car
Her body tan and wet down at the reservoir
At night on them banks I'd lie awake
And pull her close just to feel each breath she'd take"

You're a good man Bruce Springsteen.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:22:45 CEST 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Joan makes a very good point about Bruce's performing. I've never heard of him having on off night on stage, ever.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:16:31 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Re banjo meets accordion, the first time I met Garth I told him the dumpster joke that I'd read here just days before. He liked it, and noted that in his day the word for dumpster was 'skip'.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:09:18 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Crowes

For BC fans, an hour Black Crowes (link).


Entered at Thu Mar 29 22:00:18 CEST 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

If this place were ever to shutdown….I wouldn’t want much.......just David P’s record collection and Al Edge’s posts.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 21:57:05 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Earl Scruggs

Thanks Jan for the link to the photo of Earl & Garth. It gives a complete twist to a couple of old musician jokes.

Q: When do banjo and accordion players get together.

A: At the Grammy awards! :-)

Link above to video of Joan Baez performing Dylan's "Love Is Just A Four Letter Word" with Earl and his sons Gary & Randy.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 21:38:41 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Garth & Earl Scruggs photo

Rest in peace, banjoman.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 21:06:19 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Subject: Bruce

I agree with Joan. And I would also like to mention that he put on one of, if not the best, shows I have ever seen. He is an incredible showman, and he really engages the audience. Even the people in the worst seats were having a great time dancing, singing along...walking the twelve blocks home in Vancouver with a huge crowd, everyone was talking about how amazing the show was.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 20:40:20 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Very astute of Bruce to measure his output in terms of "We've Got To Get Out Of This Place" (my favourite Animals song) and "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood". (Reminds me that I was at one poing going to nominate Mann-Weil as #2 on Calvin's list of influential songwriters.) For fun, I'll suggest Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car" as the closer to the great American get-me-outta-here trilogy - along with the aforementioned M-W song and "Born To Run".


Entered at Thu Mar 29 20:36:46 CEST 2012 from (24.186.38.53)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Earl Scruggs. He was a great player.

Sometimes people throw the word "great" around too easily. Not in this case.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 20:24:05 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bruce

Great analysis Al. For me Bruce affects me on very emotional level. I joke that as a Jersey Girl i was obligated to like him, but it goes much deeper. When Bruce performs I believe him. I believe he means what says and he cares about it. I'm sure he is a millionaire many times over, but he has managed to stay "working class When he performs, you feel you got your moneysworth. You get a feeling that he doesn't have "bad days".

Anyhow...That's my story


Entered at Thu Mar 29 16:24:45 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Rod: As evidenced in my frequent posts on the subject, I still buy the vinyl versions of many new releases, in addition to used vinyl copies of older LPs & 45s. Often I make CD-R copies from my vinyl purchases and can attest that these copies, more often than not, can sound better than standard, compressed mp3 digital downloads of the same material. One thing I really enjoy is making CD-R compilations from mono 45 singles, since it's rare to find those mono mixes available on CD.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 16:00:11 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Kev's bemusement with Springsteen

I tell you what, for someone who's never been a fan you certainly offer some astute observations on the guy and his music Kev.

Yet I can see you are really struggling to come to terms with the paradoxes that characterize Springsteen's career. Nor will you be the first who struggles to reconcile the apparent contradictions.

Forinstance, your critical comments re the keyboards [organ] and drumming will resonate loudly with many of the early Bruce diehards who initially embraced him so lovingly, seduced as they were not only by Bruce's burgeoning star [and guitar virtuosity] at the start of his recording career but by the classy promise of the musicians who accompanied him. Not just Clarence's unique sax journeys but the organic, jazzy drumming of Vini Lopez and intricate organ of david Sancious. You can hear it all on the barely cited track I've linked but its actually all over Springsteen's first two albums - Greetings and most especially Wild, Innocent.

Those diehards still rue the day Bruce forsook the subtleties of Lopez and Sancious for the more overt power play of 'Mighty Max' [Bruce's term] and the pop oriented organ of Danny Frederici.

But that was Springsteen. He was a man in a hurry to reach the top and he knew the musical and lyrical finesse of those first two albums, whilst rating musically and lyrically in the eyes of many critics in the very top echelon of such music alongside the likes of Van Morrison, Dylan and our own boys, were never going to be enough to capture the huge audience he was hellbent on winning over.

That was where Born To Run entered the equation. He was no longer after music to beguile his listeners and gain him artistic credibility. He knew by that stage how good he was. Now, he needed everyone to know it. This was not simply another musician revelling in his art. He was also a pop/rock wannabe who craved the stardom a new direction might bring. He was now hellbent on blowing his audience out of their seats. Which he did. Possibly as convincingly as anyone has done with a single album.

I guess the key aspect, Kev, is that whatever style Springsteen turned himself to, he could master it with relative ease. And from what I can see I think this came about for three simple reasons.

First there's little disputing he had a huge talent across the entire musical spectrum - songwriter, vocalist, musician, entertainer, communicator. He had the lot. In bucketfuls. Second – he was bright as a button. A very intelligent, aware and articulate individual. Third - and possibly the single crucial factor in what makes him what he is - he lived totally and utterly for the music. He was genuinely obsessive where music was concerned. Any music you care to name. It consumed him. Drugs, tobacco and alcohol never figured in his equation. Sex was perfunctory and only as good as its inspiration for his writing and, I guess, for the power its allure to the audience wielded him on the stage. Everything revolved around the music.

All told, the full package he’d been dealt was a potent concoction. And reflecting back over his whole career, I think it is his instinctive attraction and consumption by music of so many genres that was possibly his luckiest trait; the one that gave him an edge all along the way. He has never got stuck in one groove. Such was his voracious appetite and receptivity for all music it meant he became imbued with every genre there was.

In that fabulous video covering his recent lecture at the Austin Music Festival which I linked a few weeks back – and probably no fecker watched :-0) - he said that The Animal's 'We Gotta Get Out Of this Place' and 'Don't Let me Be Misunderstood' were basically every song he'd ever written. That everything he'd done was simply a variation on those themes.

He was being hugely overly simplistic of course. But the genuine passion he showed as he demonstrated how those songs had morphed within his own personal blender into the likes of Born To Run and Badlands revealed just how completely such music had consumed his very being. And it’s likely the same was true of all the music that ever touched him. He was in essence a walking, talking, living musical sponge.

The musical heroes he cites stretch forever. Yet more telling in the music of Springsteen's career is the eclecticism of the music those heroes imbued within him. The early popular music of Sinatra and Darin, the doo wop of Dion and Five Satins, the folk of Woody Guthrie and Dylan, the country of Hank Williams and Johnny Cash, the Blues of Bo Diddley and big Muddy, the British rock/pop of the Beatles, the Stones, the Animals, the Faces, the Who, the progressive rock of Zeppelin and Floyd, the soul and stage pyrotechnics of James Brown, Sam and Dave and Otis, the sheer joy of Motown.

The thing is Springsteen never simply listened to this music. He absorbed it lock stock and barrel until it had consumed him and become an intrinsic part of him. All of it. Crucially it seems it was not just instinctive back in his early days but has remained so throughout his career, an ongoing process - as was evidenced by his recent championing of America's pioneering roots musical heritage with his full Seeger Sessions entourage.

Once marinated and mastered those musical influences have clearly then poured out of him. At times, as you rightly say Kev, he has been as prolific as Dylan at his most prolific - with quality songs that fail to make it onto albums. So, as you trace his career the various rites of passage of each genre can be clearly seen. Right from his early Steel Mill prog rock right through his early pop phase through the sophisticated jazz folk through the Spector power plays, through the hard bitten stark folk of nebraska, through the commercially driven pop/rock pomp of BITUSA and so on right up to these latest mini orchestra led exhortations of anger and hope to his fellow Americans.

The song rage is pretty awesome. From the linked jazzy triumph of Kitty's Back to the pure Tin Pan Alley 3 minute pop joy such as Janey Don't You Lose Heart and Secret Garden [which Steve van Zandt reckons could have been Springsteen's main calling] to the folk of Tom Joad to the exhilaration of Born To Run to the understated darkness of Stolen Car.

Never once in all this time has Springsteen ever been what you could justifiably term innovative. I’ve never seen his stuff in that light. Much of it can certainly be said to be distinctive but whilst he’s immensely popular with so many artists, current and past, and whilst many have recorded his stuff he’s never been at the vanguard of any new movement in music. As stated above, his own styles of music are so varied but always pay homage to what’s gone before in some form or another Some do argue that the cinematic themes of Incident on 57th Street, Born to Run, Thunder Road, Badlands, Backstreets, Promised Land etc etc warrant the mantle of innovation and I can certainly see why they’d argue that line. It’s all moot anyroad, I guess.

Anyroad, Kev. Hope that helps. I guess, your genuine puzzlement about the guy in broad terms and why he’s never quite made it onto the very top tier of The Beatles and Dylan or even Marley or such like clearly triggered me off. I honestly think that train had left the station by the time Springsteen bought his ticket. Don’t think there’s much disputing he caught the very next one though.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 09:59:18 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fender: The Golden Age

I was browsing Ace compilations on Amazon (getting their THIRD Goffin & King set) and I saw the CD to accompany the book "Fender: The Golden Age." It features "Who Do You love?" by Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks, rubbing shoulders with Fun, Fun, Fun by The Beach Boys, Walk Don't Run by The Ventures, Louie Louie by The Kingsmen Fun by The Beach Boys, Wonderful Land by The Shadows, Beginning To See The Light by the VU and Barabajagal by Donovan. Eclectic? You're n to joking.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 08:21:18 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Location: NZ

Subject: Vinyl

If I was in the music business I'd be pushing Vinyl really hard. It supposedly sounds better, allows better art work and most importantly can't be copied with out loss of quality. The perfect solution to the "down load" era.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 06:06:17 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Earl Scruggs RIP

My link is a follow-up to DAVID's post..

Came in my inbox, so the copy & paste...

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Son: Bluegrass legend, banjo pioneer Earl Scruggs dies in Nashville at age 88; changed music...By Chris Talbott, The Associated Press | The Canadian Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Bluegrass legend and banjo pioneer Earl Scruggs, who helped profoundly change country music with Bill Monroe in the 1940s and later with guitarist Lester Flatt, has died. He was 88.

Scruggs' son Gary said his father died of natural causes Wednesday morning at a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital. Earl Scruggs was an innovator who pioneered the modern banjo sound. His use of three fingers rather than the clawhammer style elevated the banjo from a part of the rhythm section — or a comedian's prop — to a lead instrument.

His string-bending and lead runs became known worldwide as "the Scruggs picking style" and the versatility it allowed has helped popularize the banjo in almost every genre of music.

The debut of Bill Monroe and The Blue Grass Boys during a post-World War II performance on The Grand Ole Opry is thought of as the "big bang" moment for bluegrass and later 20th century country music. Later, Flatt and Scruggs teamed as a bluegrass act after leaving Monroe from the late 1940s until breaking up in 1969 in a dispute over whether their music should experiment or stick to tradition. Flatt died in 1979.

They were best known for their 1949 recording "Foggy Mountain Breakdown," played in the 1967 movie "Bonnie and Clyde," and "The Ballad of Jed Clampett" from "The Beverly Hillbillies," the popular TV series that debuted in 1962. Jerry Scoggins did the singing.

After the breakup, Scruggs used three of his sons in The Earl Scruggs Revue. The group played on bills with rock acts like Steppenwolf and James Taylor. Sometimes they played festivals before 40,000 people.

In a July 2010 interview, Scruggs said in the early days, "I played guitar as much as I did the banjo, but for everyday picking I'd go back to the banjo. It just fit what I wanted to hear better than what I could do with the guitar."

Scruggs will always be remembered for his willingness to innovate. In "The Big Book of Bluegrass," Scruggs discussed the breakup with Flatt and how his need to experiment drove a rift between them. Later in 1985, he and Flatt were inducted together in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

"It wasn't a bad feeling toward each other as much as it was that I felt I was depriving myself of something," Scruggs said. "By that, I mean that I love bluegrass music, and I still like to play it, but I do like to mix in some other music for my own personal satisfaction, because if I don't, I can get a little bogged down and a little depressed."

He said he enjoyed playing because "it calms me down. It makes me satisfied. Sometimes I just need to pick a few tunes."

At an 80th birthday party for Scruggs in January 2004, country great Porter Wagoner said: "I always felt like Earl was to the five-string banjo what Babe Ruth was to baseball. He is the best there ever was, and the best there ever will be."

In 2005, "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" was selected for the Library of Congress' National Recording Registry of works of unusual merit. The following year, the 1972 Nitty Gritty Dirt Band record "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," on which Scruggs was one of many famous guest performers, joined the list, too.

Scruggs had been fairly active in the 2000s, returning to a limited touring schedule after frail health in the 1990s. In 1996, Scruggs suffered a heart attack in the recovery room of a hospital shortly after hip-replacement surgery. He also was hospitalized late last year, but seemed in good health during a few appearances with his sons in 2010 and 2011.

In 2001 he released a CD, "Earl Scruggs and Friends," his first album in a decade and an extension of The Earl Scruggs Revue. Over 12 songs, he collaborated with an impressive stable of admirers: Elton John, Dwight Yoakam, Travis Tritt, Sting, Melissa Etheridge, Vince Gill, John Fogerty, Don Henley, Johnny Cash and actor Steve Martin, a banjo player, were all featured.

Scruggs, born Jan. 6, 1924, in Flint Hill, North Carolina, learned to play banjo at age 4. He appeared at age 11 on a radio talent scout show. By age 15, he was playing in bluegrass bands.

"My music came up from the soil of North Carolina," Scruggs said in 1996 when he was honoured with a heritage award from his home state.

He and Flatt played together in Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys, then left to form the Foggy Mountain Boys in 1948. Their popularity grew, and they even became a focal point of the folk music revival on college campuses in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Scruggs' wife, Louise, was their manager and was credited with cannily guiding their career as well as boosting interest in country music.

Later, as rock 'n' roll threatened country music's popularity, Flatt and Scruggs became symbols of traditional country music.

In the 1982 interview, Scruggs said "Bonnie and Clyde" and "The Beverly Hillbillies" broadened the scope of bluegrass and country music "more than anything I can put my finger on. Both were hits in so many countries." Scruggs also wrote an instructional book, "Earl Scruggs and the Five String Banjo."

In 1992, Scruggs was among 13 recipients of a National Medal of Art. "I never in my wildest dreams thought of rewards and presentations," he said. "I appreciate those things, especially this one."

Louise Scruggs, his wife of 57 years, died in 2006. He is survived by two sons, Gary and Randy. Gary Scruggs says funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Mar 29 05:45:37 CEST 2012 from (124.170.209.216)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Earl Scruggs rip

One of the greats. Band link? Bluegrass.


Entered at Thu Mar 29 03:25:57 CEST 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Winter In My Blood

Thanks Carol.

Been listening to the Link Wray collection a whole lot lately. Thanks again Peter.

Listening to Bobby Charles as well. 'Tennessee Blues'.

Harbour froze first time in several years. Old fashioned winter. Did the times really go ahead?


Entered at Thu Mar 29 01:35:47 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Kevin J

That is interesting. I also admit that I enjoy the smoky quality of her current singing voice...but I also love the heights her voice could reach while singing songs like "Carey." Her talent certainly hasn't diminished.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 23:44:24 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The drums were the sound of the era and because they could record drums like that at last… but I always liked Dancing In The Dark. It might not age too well, but at the time (the important thing) it was fine.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 23:37:44 CEST 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Here and there:

* I liked reading about Tunnel of Love – very much actually – and won’t say another word on Civil Wars but if you two ever feel a Coldplay day coming on……………the Mongolian evacuation plan will be put into action – and fast!

* David P: Thanks for the Johnny Cash and Joni clip……….Lovely for Joni was the right word……………..funny though as she might be the only singer I know of that benefitted tremendously – for my ears – from multi-thousands of cigarettes smoked. I have liked her singing more as she has aged in other words.

I rented “Promise – The making of Darkness on the Edge of Town” on the weekend. It doesn’t aspire to be entertaining in the way some music docs are but it was – for me anyhow – very revealing about that particular time in Springsteen’s career and specifically about how he works in the studio……..Not even a hint of collaboration with the band……other than taking side bets on the length of a particular cut or trying to figure out which of the more than 70 songs he had written were going to be worked up on that day…….the E Street band were very much sidemen doing what they were told……..an interesting bit was Springsteen literally pulling his hair out as he struggled for months on end ( no kidding ) just trying to get the drums to sound right……………also funny was Miami Steve being completely flummoxed at the ease and number of songs Springsteen could write but then not being able to make up his mind about whether they would go on the album or not……..I hadn’t realized that Springsteen is so Dylanesque in this regard….many great songs were shelved or just given away due to not fitting the mood of the album…………………..Springsteen also comes across very well in the current interviews reflecting back on that period……………………..I enjoyed the doc very much but couldn’t help wondering about a few things………….Is this an artist that would have attained a much loftier reputation for greatness ( meaning inarguably in the Beatles, Bob Dylan club ) if the album Born in the USA ( with that inglorious wretched video of Dancing in the Dark ) had never been released? Also, while he did have some great musicians with him along the way ( keyboards ) , would he have not benefitted by having a different drummer and better guitarists for more of his recording career…………I might be way off-base here as I am not a fully knowledgeable Springsteen fan, but I couldn’t help thinking this while listening again to the great playing on Wrecking Ball – especially the guitar and percussion.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 21:46:13 CEST 2012 from (99.54.146.108)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: civil wars live download

once again, thank you peter v, for the link to the civil wars free download...can't wait to hear those tracks!


Entered at Wed Mar 28 21:41:48 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Mostly I was having a little bit of fun, though I was serious about Max. I just listened to the great ""Shazam", so I'd now likely cite Bev Bevan rather than Bonham.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 21:37:27 CEST 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: McCARTNEY, JOEL, CLAPTON, SPRINGSTEEN - let it be - R & R Hall of Fame 1999

Don't let the titel of this post ya, there is a stronge Band relation at 1'11" (link)

p.s. Jan thanks for helping out on my last posts (and I always thought Norwegians are humor albinos haunted by polar nights, .... :-)


Entered at Wed Mar 28 21:28:05 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M [aka Victor Fiorillo] :-0)

Just 'cos I ghosted an article Bill, it doesn't mean you had to go and do one [link].

Fair play though it's as funny as feck. especially the recommended therapy for Bruce haters! LOL

:-0)


Entered at Wed Mar 28 21:18:20 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Joan Baez Review

Peter V, really enjoyed your Joan Baez review. She plays in the Hudson Valley or gets close to us every couple years and my wife and I always try to get out to see her. I love the set list from your show. Last time she played here she was still touring on Day After Tomorrow cd that Steve Earle had produced. That is a fine record and the Earle song 'God is God' is brilliant but given the choice I'd rather she did all the classics your show had. Her show is as enjoyable now as when we first saw her in the mid 70's. I can't think of anyone else I can say that about. You mentioned the fact that she played a half hour longer then The Civil Wars. We had the television/Broadway star Bebe Neuwirth at The Bardavon in Poughkeepsie a few weeks ago. With the encore which she didn't leave the stage for, the show was 75 minutes long. Ticket prices started at 60 dollars. No opening act. We don't see to many Broadway acts in a concert setting so I didn't know if the short show was the norm. Very disappointing. I always enjoy and look forward to your concert reviews.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 20:56:19 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Civil Wars

Pete - my copy of Sleepy Hollow landed today. It's been next to me all day. Have to say I'm totally beguiled by it. Mind you I haven't actually listened to it yet. I can't take my eyes off the photos of Joy.

:-0)

Joy?. Most definitely.

Seriously, three listens in and I'm mightily impressed. Several tracks are standing out but as we were saying with TOL there seems to be a seam running through that holds the whole thing together as an entity. I will say C'est la Mort, Joey barton Hollow and Poison and Wine are leaping out but I'll not jump to conclusions just yet.

But thanks for the nod.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 19:22:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Civil Wars

Go to the Civil Wars site. They're giving away a free download of their second-ever show, Live at Eddie's Attic. Ten tracks in great quality. Just scroll down to find it. It works! Brilliant show and it comes as 320 kbps files, so better than straight MP3s.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 17:51:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Man in the Long Black Veil

Roger: A couple of years ago Rosanne Cash released "The List", an album condensed from a list of 100 essential country songs that her father compiled for her to learn after she'd graduated from high school. One of the selections was "Long Black Veil", which Ms. Cash recorded with Jeff Tweedy for the album.

Mr. Cash's recording of the song was included on his 1965 LP "Orange Blossom Special". No doubt he'd probably learned to play it years before when Lefty Frizzell's version was first released, as Ms. Baez' story about learning it from the Man in Black confirms. In 1969, when Mr. Cash's popular tv program debuted, he performed a duet version with the lovely, young Joni Mitchell (see link).


Entered at Wed Mar 28 14:54:49 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Swing Low in Poole got the story of singing it to the sleeping Dr King to wake him up, and he awoke to say "I've just heard the voice of an angel."


Entered at Wed Mar 28 14:45:08 CEST 2012 from (136.148.180.27)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Bruce and Joan

Al - we were up in the gods at RAH for Bruce. Sorry - didn't see your crutch...

Peter - we say Joan B. in Birmingham a few days before she moved on to Poole. Up to the mid 90's I liked the idea of her rather than her repertoire. Although I've played lots of folk music myself, while I like the songs she sings I could never quite like the shrill voice.

That's changed and as your review emphasises she is folk royalty and was there when it all happened. In Birmingham she intro'd Sweet Chariot with a fantastic story about Vaclav Vavel (whom she's smuggled into a concert in Czecho when it was still eastern bloc) and talked of getting Long Black Veil from Johnny Cash. She said when she first met him he introduced his first wife Vivian to her as just that - 'My first wife...'.

I saw her a few years back with an electric band and the version of Diamonds and Rust brought a tear to my eye. As did her version a couple of weeks ago. Perhaps the most memorable moment was listening to a full hall sing the chorus to TNTDODD.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 14:07:43 CEST 2012 from (62.140.137.140)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: Walk of Fame voting/ Spam

Is it possible people from outside Canada can not vote? Because I can't seem to get the Spam thingy right! The answer should be 7 in my book but then again I was always better at spelling than math...... Help !


Entered at Wed Mar 28 11:26:56 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Doing the spam maths

I hear old Bill M got it right first time.

Mind you he did use his abacus. An original prototype I believe.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Mar 28 11:11:22 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The 2 + 5 spam filter. I got it wrong first time, answering "10". I read the plus as a times … it wasn't weak arithmetic. Or I hope not.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 09:45:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Band

Terrific post from Kev.

Absolutely spot on for me. I so share those sentiments it gives me the chills.

Some 44 years ago or so The Band as an entity reached far out from the confines of their home city and touched the hearts and lives of so many folks not just on the American continenet but worldwide.

The stalwart who created this board and those who have graced it down the years stand as testimony to the fact. Nor are we talking about fly-by-night flavours of the month either. The likes of PV, Roger and myself are tried and tested. From the moment we first experienced the artistic majesty of those four Canadians and Levon - yes 44 years ago for Chrissakes - our admiration for their unique contribution to the world's musical heritage has never wavered for a single moment.

Still our passion for what they bestowed upon us all burns as powerfully now as it did back then.

That they were not the very first recipients of any canadian hall of Fame is feckin travesty enough. The prospect of them as a single entity not being so even now should see those responsible for such an outrage dumped in the Great Slave lake.

Now!

I'm not joking either.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Mar 28 09:17:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joan did The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down as the first encore, and did it with piano … as Robbie composed it. I can't recall whether she put her guitar down, but I think she did to conduct the singing. So I think piano (rolling, magnificent) plus the light percussion from her son Gabe, who only had the wooden box he was sitting on, a cymbal and bongos as far as I could see, and the bongos barely got used too. If you're going to use one instrument for Dixie, piano's the one.

The use of acoustic bass guitar (brilliantly) was unusual. I heard it said jokingly that they were invented for "Unplugged" as so many bass guitarists can't play double bass (or unfretted), but I can see people wanting them for practice. It had a fabulous sound … neither like double bass nor electric bass guitar. I think he had an acoustic guitar pick up on it. Having heard it, I'm surprised they aren't more common.

SIMONE FELICE & vinyl … the way the LP was marketed was a bit like DVD … where they throw in a digital copy with recent releases, or like Blu-ray where they often enclose an ordinary DVD in the pack for convenience on "your second system". 3D Blu-ray usually has a triple pack … 3D blu ray, 2D blu ray AND DVD, and then adds a digital download too. So you get "every format" for your money. If you're buying the vinyl, the enclosed "free" CD makes sense. With "Live From A Lonely Place" I went straight home and made a CD copy of the LP for the car and computer. But it's all based on the premise, illogical I fear, that the vinyl is the primary format. Sensible would be to sell CDs separately, but still enclose a "free" CD with the vinyl.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 05:15:31 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: cd/vinyl combo packaging

Bob F - funny that Felice is doing only that at all, and like you suggest,it is possible he sold out the discs only supply he had...Far back as 2005, i incurred the ire of a very well established indy record store owner by not asking his advice on how to market Johnnie's record...well. there was a slight issue with timing, some of you know what i am referring to. anyway,the man told me that had Iasked him first, he would have told me to press vinyl and sell it as a combo... like you, i would want to offer either option, and i think that if he and i developed the thread of that conversation, that is where it would have led.

BTW,kids,and i mean people in their late 20s,early 30s, are starting to own turntables again.


Entered at Wed Mar 28 02:25:40 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Joan singing "blood"

Peter - did she sing it a capella? When I saw her about 12 years ago,I think it was(perhaps even longer) it was her second or third song. I've heard from others who've seen her more recently that she usually does it sans musicians or backup singers. I had the exact same experience of dissecting every line she sang and noting what she's changed in it - how could I not?! I passed on seeing her and one of my heros - Kris Kristofferson - a couple months ago. They were only 1 1/2 hour away, but a) money is extremely tight, presently, and b) I saw them on one of the last night shows (Letterman, I think) and squirmed through it. We were debating going, as I have never passed up a chance to see him, but they didn't sound too good and that made the decision........


Entered at Tue Mar 27 23:47:23 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

I voted. Thanks for the link, Carol.

Bill M, Fred Eaglesmith is coming to Nelson in May! I will finally get to see him live.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 23:33:29 CEST 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I just voted for the Band.......though hope I got that 2 + 5 spam filter IQ question right.....come to think of it how did Nickelback get in anyway????

Fred...........you take of care of the Gilles Villeneuve vote............


Entered at Tue Mar 27 23:08:20 CEST 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The only sensible approach would be to vote for the Band. None of the individual Canadian members apart from Robbie had achieved any measurable fame in Canada. Should we vote for the guitarist in Rush – he’s quite good……..the bassist from Beau Dommage?

I loved Rick Danko and I can think of no musician live that gave me more pleasure over the years. The pure joy in his eyes as we would be almost levitating as the crowd before him would be going bananas during a Band song is something I think about often…………….but the Band ( all five ) was simply the best, the first and by far the most influential rock band to ever come out of Canada………Never mind that they were called the Hawks as that 4-5 years on Yonge Street early 60’s set a standard for singers, players and bands to follow and helped shape an entire country’s musical destiny……………………….The city of Toronto not having the Band – all five – on a Walk of Fame is outrageous………………………Calls to Canada Post also welcomed for those that have the time.

Gilles Villeneuve should also be there with his son……………RIP though Gilles………you would have hated Nickelback more than the most evil Didier Pironi and they are in so perhaps good you are not............

Any thoughts on Rick singing “Golden Feather”


Entered at Tue Mar 27 22:10:01 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I voted for Rick. I never went with Levon's "Richard was our lead singer" stuff. To me, it was always when Rick opened his mouth that I got that "This is THE BAND" sensation.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 22:05:41 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Carol. I did so - for both Rick and Richard. I was pleasantly surprised to see that one doesn't have to be in any condition to walk to be nominated.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 21:57:21 CEST 2012 from (108.58.253.98)

Posted by:

Carol

Web: My link

Subject: Rick/Canada's Walk of Fame

Hi Everyone~

I hope you are all well & enjoying the newness of spring. I thought I'd post to let you know that nominations are being accepted for Canada's Walk of Fame and it would be great if Rick could finally get the recognition he deserves by being honored by the organization. ALL of The Band members deserve to be included (though Levon couldn't be, as he's not Canadian) and, though Robbie has been honored (2003), Rick, Garth, and Richard have not.

It's easy to submit a nomination; just go to the Walk of Fame website (click link) and vote.

Thanks!


Entered at Tue Mar 27 21:42:42 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Crowbar again

And here's Crowbar's most excellent very first 45, a rock version of bluegrass classic "Uncle Pen". This is the original version of the group, with Richard Bell, Richard Newell (King Biscuit Boy), John Rutter (Johnny Rhythm) and Larry Atamanuik in addition to mainstays Kelly Jay, Rheal Lanthier and John Gibbard.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 21:39:27 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Your mention of Manfred Mann reminded me to get back to you re Keith Hampshire and his three covers of UK hits - "First Cut", "Day Time, Night Time" and "Big Time Operator". I agree that he's not a great singer and that his "First Cut" is overblown, but I'd say it's overblown in the magnificent way of "MacArthur Park" or some of Spector's annual productions from the late '60s. I'm okay with his DT-NT (though prefer the Manfreds' original), but his BTO totally poisoned the well for me on that one, so that I find even the Zoot Money or Georgie Fame original hard to listen to.

Not sure why exactly, but I've been on a bit of a Crowbar kick of late, their first album specifically. Love their "House Of Blue Lights" - see link


Entered at Tue Mar 27 20:48:54 CEST 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Great to see Roger’s list…………..His analysis is spot on though I would change up the list up a bit by exchanging “This is Where I Get Off” for “She’s Not Mine” and I also prefer “Sonny Got Caught by the Moonlight” over SDTCR………………more when I have some time but watch the above LINK………………A beauty from “Songs for Native Americans” which is criminally underrated and I believe to be a minor masterpiece…………….Think of Rick Danko singing “Golden Feather” and know that “It Makes No Difference” didn’t have to be the last great Danko-Robertson tour de force.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 19:50:29 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Merchandise at gigs

Bob … yes, Simone Felice had “Live from a Lonely Place” as a vinyl-only release last year. I suspect the Neil Young connection goes deeper than looks and cover versions but extends to belief in vinyl. He also had his book, at cheaper than shop price. He strikes me as sincere and not after the money. He may not have thought it through. I strongly believe you should have SOMETHING on sale at £10 UK prices. With a CD, that’s easy. When I see a £15 good quality T-shirt, I’m tempted. At £25, I’m not. The price to the band for a short run is around £3.

The merchandise issue is one that some can’t get right. I mention it from time to time. Bap Kennedy had all his CDs … but every person there virtually had all his CDs. He needed a live CD, sold only at gigs (which Van did with Live at Austin). Then the number who fork out money is amazing, and of course … ahem … this stuff gets labelled PROMO ONLY NOT FOR SALE to avoid tax, and at £10 the profit is £9 if you release on your own label, and take cash at gigs.

On to the Manfreds … lots of CDs from the various members. But pricing is the issue. I wrote in my review:

The Manfreds / Paul Jones CDs were £13. The Tom McGuinness were £10. I think Tom has it right for a live gig where you expect a round number and a discount, because the retailer share is eliminated. I heard a couple examine the Paul Jones solo CD Starting All Over Again, and say ‘Let’s check on amazon.’ (I just did … £10.97 and amazon are taking a bigger chunk of that than £2.03). At a straight tenner, you don’t check. On the other hand, the current tour CD wasn’t on amazon at all.

The ultimate way to do it is the “instant live CD” that you order in the interval, and it gets printed straight off the soundboard and is yours 30 minutes after the gig.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 19:27:20 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Easter must be tonight

And eggs Bill. Don't forget the eggs. I know the old memory plays up at your time of life but those great great grandchildren of yours will still be awaiting Easter bunny!


Entered at Tue Mar 27 19:12:37 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Professor Scharmer the charmer

Enjoyed that Bill. 5000 stray dogs in Detroit!!! Jeez, that's even more than in our street!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 27 19:10:08 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: It's not like you to spare us from one of your long stories! Must be Easter - a time of regeneration, not to mention hope.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 19:05:56 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Roger and out

Hi Rog. Good to hear from you. Not sure exactly where you were for that one. We were central, near the back of the rear circle. If you were anywhere near you might recall a guy waving his crutches in the air to attarct Bruce's attention [I failed] - It was 2005 and my left leg was in plaster having snapped my achilles tendon celebrating our away draw at Juventus to reach the European Cup semi final [long story].

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 27 17:36:03 CEST 2012 from (136.148.180.27)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: It was a slow day...

Carmen - Robbie's top ten

Fallen Angel

Broken Arrow

Soapbox Preacher

Between Trains

Somewhere Down The Crazy River

Resurrection

Breaking the Rules

Straight Down The Line

This is Where I get Off

When The Night Was Young

Actually I find it hard to choose because I love all three mainstream albums. I find the Redboy material interesting but don't play it much. All the mainstream stuff could be great Band songs. Robbie's voice is a constraint as we've many times noted here. It suits some songs perfectly but others would benefit enormously from The Band's vocalists.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 17:20:33 CEST 2012 from (136.148.180.27)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Devils and Dust

I'm with you there on the Devils and Dust tour Al - saw him at the Albert Hall. Ace concert. Though not as memorable perhaps as the Seeger Sessions concert at the (awful) NEC which was such an amazingly joyous occasion. And Bruce hung around afterwards outside signing things and chatting...


Entered at Tue Mar 27 17:15:55 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: (trad)

Bill M: thanks for the link to the _Star_ review.
Interesting that Mr. Springsteen's "Land of Hope and Dreams" quotes from "W.S. Walcott Medicine Show."
And "Bound for Glory."
And "People Get Ready."

Good company to travel in . . . .


Entered at Tue Mar 27 17:09:58 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Simone Felice vinyl/cd combo

Peter V, at the Simone Felice show the other night the only way he was selling the new cd was in combination with the vinyl copy. The price was 25 dollars. I was fine with that but I did think it was kind of strange. Some music fans have working turntables but I think at this point most people don't. It just seemed like a bit of a turn off if you just wanted the cd. I see the cd is available by itself on Amazon so maybe he just didn't have it in that format to sell at the show. That would also seem odd since it is early on in his tour. It makes me wonder who a young artist like Felice thinks or hopes his audience it. The few times I've seen him solo or with Duke and The King the majority of the audience was at least in their 40's if not older. That must seem strange for a young artist. I'm sure he wants the Mumford and Sons/Avett Brothers young audience. If that is the case does he really think they have 25 dollars to spend on his new music? I don't know. He seems to be a great kid and I'm rooting for him all the way.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 16:41:43 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Tennessee Blues

Tracy Nelson recorded a fine cover version of "Tennessee Blues" on her 1972 "Mother Earth" album. That record also featured a cover of Bobby Charles' "(Staying at Home and Singing) Homemade Songs" and Tim Drummond's "I Want To Lay Down Beside You" (a/k/a/ "Sip the Wine" as recorded by Rick Danko). Link above to hear that album (just click on the play icon for each song).


Entered at Tue Mar 27 16:27:55 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

And you, Pat B, will appreciate the editorial cartoon in today's "Globe and Mail" - see link.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 16:26:07 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Al E: Congratulations on getting your op-ed, "The Righteous Anger of Bruce Springsteen", published in today's "Toronto Star". How'd you come up with the pseudonym?


Entered at Tue Mar 27 14:12:41 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Great shot of Dylan & The Band '74.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 14:03:15 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Adam - TOL and full band swamping

I've ordered the basic album for now Adam. Must admit i can't put a feeler gauge between the versions of Tennessee blues by Bobby and Doug Sahm. I think both are just divine.

Pete, I think you're spot on re the purposeful avoidance of the full band accompaniment. The Tunnel of Love tour goes down as my least favourite Springsteen tour for, I think, that very reason. The songs just didn't suit the full treatment. The subtleties which make the album such a treat tended to be lost.

In contrast his Tom Joad and Devils and Dust tours - each with lesser material overall - were purely solo efforts and rank for me as probably my favourites musically - even if they could not provide the huge adrenaline rushes which Bruce can invoke with his the full band.

Also the solo performances come with the added bonus of coming in smaller hall venues specially the Albert Hall gigs where he seemed to pull out that bit extra on each song.

I'm delighted TOL is doing it for you second time around. The album that most did that for me was Murmur by REM. I'd bought it after reading of parallels with The Bandin in a review of their third album Lifes Rich Pageant magazine. I loved 'Pageant' and thought it merited backtracking but was not sold on Murmur on the first few hearings. It languished on the shelf for several years until one day I overheard some great sounding music my son was listening to and it turned out it was my Murmur album. We shared it after that!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 27 13:46:48 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Cool music artist cartoon.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 11:49:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Crossed in the ether … special CD box sets are an exception. They do retain value. From the UK, you have to be slightly careful. Stuff is much cheaper from America, but add postage. Then every so often it gets stopped at customs, and you get a 20% VAT charge plus £8 customs charge for the cost of sending you the bill. It doesn't happen every time, but when it does (as to Mrs V last week), you can add nearly £20 to a £50 item.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 11:45:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: CD collectability / Bruce

Unlike vinyl, CD and DVD prices vary wildly depending on availability. Because they press a certain number, then sell out, CDs and DVDs can reach spectacular prices, only to fall to nothing when a new print run or issue is done. In contrast, pricey vinyl has some intrinsic value, though the Everly Brothers, Little Richard, Fats Domino and others of the late 50s are dropping quite alarmingly in price. A lot are appearing as owners pass away, or downsize homes, and the "rarities" are turning up more and more often. Also, the stuff shooting up in value is psych, mod and soul, so the 50s stuff is plain out of fashion.

I'm very wary about premium prices for deleted CDs even when feeling flush, though I did shell out £20 for "The Best of Planet" CD which has been out of print for years … it contains Shel Talmy's Planet label, which only lasted for a couple of years and 22 singles.

Do you remember the eBay thing on "American Son"? One sold for $350, from memory. But then it gets available again.

I had a few hours in the car yesterday. Thanks to Al's essay, I went through Tunnel of Love two and a half times, getting better every time. I can see why he didn't use the band … each song makes some musical reference that he doesn't want to swamp with the full on sound. I was very struck by the way I Ain't Got You not only utilises the Bo Diddley beat, but uses the same "tall talking" style as Who Do You love? as the list of things he's got gets more and more extreme … just like "I got a cobra snake for a necktie". Then you get fairground organ, only really one prominent electric guitar solo, something relevant or interesting on every track. So it made me look at my groaning shelves of music and think how many other gems are sitting there ignored, but which need taking out and dusting off.

Bobby Charles today, then. But just the basic album.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 11:32:10 CEST 2012 from (99.141.21.196)

Posted by:

Adam

Al, mine was $50 from the Rhino Handmade website. I thought it was still available there, and it's also on Amazon for more. It is very much worth it, though. You get 36 tracks, all of Bobby's Bearsville recordings, a 30 minute interview, and a beautiful wooden box package with great photos. A couple with Robbie, Rick, Butterfield, etc. If you don't want to spend that much, you can download it for free somewhere to sample.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 11:22:50 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Location:
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie's top 10

Robbie's top 10 (mostly from his first 2 albums) will always suffer because of the thinking that "The Band would have done it better". It's probably true in most cases but The Band weren't there for a number of reasons. The songs are mostly pretty good though. Not his greatest work but up there with most of the stuff done from Cahoots onwards.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 10:09:16 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bobby Charles

Adam, cheers for nod. It's selling on Amazon for 70 quid. I also looked on Rhino Handmade and it looks like it's no longer available. How much was yours? As keen as I am I can't justify stretching to anything like that.

:-0)

What I think I will do is get the 2008 re-release of the original 1972 album - it's an album I've never had - which is available for around a tenner.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 09:33:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie solo top 10

Carmen, ALL of his top ten or top twenty are "Bandworthy." The whole of Storyville is not only Bandworthy, it's Bandlike.


Entered at Tue Mar 27 05:36:26 CEST 2012 from (74.192.127.20)

Posted by:

Mary Miner

Location: Texas

Subject: Bonnie Jo Hunt's discography

I loaned my Bonnie Jo Hunt's CDs several years ago, and so lost them. I miss her glorious voice. Can anyone help me find new copies?


Entered at Tue Mar 27 03:04:40 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Womack

Hi all!! Sad news, so let us all pray for this wonderful musician for a speedy recovery.

Check out my link for the article in RS mag.

Get well, dear Bobby Womack.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 27 02:30:49 CEST 2012 from (99.141.21.196)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Bobby Charles

Rhino Handmade released an excellent deluxe edition of Bobby Charles' 1972 Bearsville album last fall. I just started to really dig into the bonus material in the set, and the whole thing is fantastic. The set essentially contains a "Disc 2" for the 1972 Bearsville album, containing demos, outtakes, alternates, etc. There is also a full, unreleased album from 1974 with Dr. John and Paul Butterfield participating. It's the perfect music as the weather starts to warm up. I think this set may have gotten a general release, as it's listed on Amazon under a different distributor and release date now. Either way, everyone should grab a copy of this release.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 21:09:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Burl covers Marijohn

Burl Ives' 1961 cover of "Long Black Veil" appeared on the LP "The Versatile Burl Ives". The hit single from that album was a cover of Hank Cochran's "A Little Bitty Tear". The B-side of that 45 featured another Marijohn Wilkin song, co-written with Mel Tillis, entitled "Shanghied".


Entered at Mon Mar 26 20:47:44 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

I want to put something out there. If you had to pick RR best 10 songs post THE BAND material, what would they be? Also indicate which of his 10 best would qualify as being BAND worthy good enough.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 20:42:11 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Long Black Veil

Peter: Ms. Baez first began performing the song solo in concert in early 1963, with a live version appearing on Joan Baez In Concert Part 2 released later that year. She subsequently recorded a studio version in Nashville in the '70s with musicians led by Grady Martin. I can't recall, but that version may have featured fiddle.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 20:16:55 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Web: My link

Subject: Joan Baez, Joni Mitchel

I wonder if the fact that Joan never smoked (at least not that I know of) saved her voice? Joni Mitchel's has lost so much of the beauty to it due to years of chain smoking.

If Baez comes through Canada, I will for sure go! It looks like she will be in Europe for the rest of this tour so far...

The link is for an interview she did for Oprah magazine.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 20:06:33 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Long Black Veil

Thanks, David … I didn't know she'd done it that early … another correction needed (which i'll do as a comment). The fiddle playing in it was magnificent and very jaunty, and that gave it a "Dankoesque" mood if you see what I mean. Was there fiddle on the original? It was just fiddle, her guitar and light percussion.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 20:03:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joan Baez takes everything lower down … but it sounds richer. She can soar up there, but she doesn't have that high pitched sound. She's dropped down quite a way, which is much better than trying to hit stuff and missing … which she never does. There But For Fortune is another that was originally quite high (from memory) and Farewell Angelina was from that era … but they sound great lower. If she's coming your way, definitely she's an artist who is still up to the grade!


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:58:38 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Diamond without Rust

Joan Baez' first began performing "Long Black Veil" in early 1963, making her one of the first to cover the song following the versions by Lefty Frizzell (1959), Burl Ives (1961) and The Kingston Trio (1962).


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:48:43 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Joan Baez

In her book "a voice to sing with" she mentions that her voice no longer hits the high registers (it is still incredibly beautiful), is there any truth to this in concert? This may be one reason that she didn't sing "Silver Dagger," as it is in that soprano type register. "However" from what I recall in "Don't look back" she still sings fairly high.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:38:51 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Tennessee Blues

Looking on You Tube for Doug Sahm's wonderful version I came across Bobby Charles's own gorgeous version of his classic which I've linked.

Seems like it's been up almost a year and had 32 views. Criminal. It's opening guitar intro is just so sweet and delicate you could peel a grape with it. Doug's version has a piano intro and makes you weep it's so good. Sadly it doesn't seem to be available on You Tube.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:20:08 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Twilight

Sometimes I choose not to see an act that I really loved perform in their dotage. I"d rather enjoy the memory as it was.

But that's just me.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:17:36 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Levon Helm coming to Philadelphia Area

THE LEVON HELM BAND Thursday, July 12 • 7:30pm Longwood Gardens Kennett Square, PA PRESALE: Mon, March 26 (10a-10p) PREFERRED PASSWORD: MUM | REGULAR PASSWORD: LILY Public On Sale: Tuesday, March 27 at 10am Visit us on the web and at all of your social networking sites March 26, 2012 Join the BRE Presents PREMIUM PLAYERS CLUB! * * * * * * * * * * * Premium Free Tickets! Excellent Seats! Exclusive Invite! & more! All for only $175 • Click for details! UPCOMING EVENTS ---------------------------------------- This Friday! MELANIE plus JEFFREY GAINES Fri, 3/30 • Dennis Flyer CLICK FOR TICKETS! ---------------------------------------- This Saturday! TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS Sat, 3/31 • Dennis Flyer CLICK FOR TICKETS! ---------------------------------------- This Saturday! BONEY JAMES Sat, 3/31 • Scottish Rite CLICK FOR TICKETS! ---------------------------------------- PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO Wed, 4/18 • Scottish Rite CLICK FOR TICKETS! ---------------------------------------- GREG LAKE "Songs Of A Lifetime" Thu, 4/19 • Keswick Theatre CLICK FOR TICKETS! ---------------------------------------- THE LEVON HELM BAND Thursday, July 12 • 7:30pm Longwood Gardens Kennett Square, PA PRESALE: Mon, March 26 (10a-10p) PREFERRED PASSWORD: MUM | REGULAR PASSWORD: LILY Public On Sale: Tuesday, March 27 at 10am Visit us on the web and at all of your social networking sites


Entered at Mon Mar 26 19:13:10 CEST 2012 from (70.60.190.33)

Posted by:

Calvin

For the most part Twilight acts are about the concert goer, not the act. It's about getting a babysitter and going to a concert and acting a little like you did 20+ years ago. I dont think as a whole this group is a good representation of those folks though. I'm 47, and go to 20 or so shows a year still-and Im guessing a lot of other folks on here do the same. Most folks though, as music has mattered less and less to them as they've gotten older, well-that Rod Stewart/Stevie Nicks show is the only show they are going to this year. It isnt about the music to them, its about being "back then" again. I'm guessing the folks at that show have seen at least one of those acts many times-unless your the child of a parent dragging you there I'd doubt a lot of people who went to that tour were seeing both of them for the first time.

That said some older acts still seriously bring it. Oddly enough it really seems to me that they acts they still delivery are playing in front of 300 people, and not 15,000-20,000.

And while we are talking about elder statesmen-any hear Joe Walsh's first single in 20 years? Sounds pretty much like a Joe Walsh song, and therefore fairly enjoyable to my ears.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 18:52:47 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Twilights

It is a problem. Joanie is in much better voice and shape than Bob, that's for sure, and at 71 looks about 55. My Glen Campbell review was on reflection too generous … I heard a bit of the actual show later on the radio. Often with the greats charisma and presence compensates. BUT there's always a difference in energy between new acts and … er, yes … twilight ones.

But to resurrect an old story, one resurrected here before, recall the tale:

Two bulls were standing on top of a steep hill looking at a herd of cows. "Wow!" said the young bull, 'Let's run down the hill and screw one of those cows each!" "No," said the old bull, "let's walk down the hill and screw all of them."

I nearly repeated that Saturday in response to Al's twenty press-ups. But it's true that the "twilight" acts can sometimes work wonders with economy. It's like seeing Fleetwood Mac a few years ago. Stevie Nick reserved the twirls to a couple of very short bursts, but when she twirled, she twirled with skill and gusto.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 18:44:33 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeez! Where the feck did Stormont come from? Northern Ireland on the mind maybe, plus "tired and emotional." Thanks for the correction which has been made. I added also that she got "Robert E. Lee" not "THE Robert E. Lee" too.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 18:11:50 CEST 2012 from (70.60.190.33)

Posted by:

Calvin

Thanks Landmark,

It's such a crap shoot seeing acts in their, mmmmm, "Twighlight". Especially when you are seeing them for the first time. Had a awful experience with seeing a 70+ Ian Hunter a few months ago, but 75+ Leonard Cohen was amazing last year. Some age well, and some don't.

Still, you wan't to see them when you get a chance, my only solo Rick show was a week or so before he passed.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 16:47:56 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Scored a few gems at my local used record store Saturday. I found the original 45 version of "Bald-Headed Lena" by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns. This great novelty song was performed by William Lee Perryman (aka Piano Red, aka Dr. Feelgood), who co-wrote it with Edward Sneed. It was produced by Don Law & Frank Jones. My copy is a radio station promo on the Okeh label with Mr. Perryman's "My Gal Jo", another fine song, on the flip side. "Bald-Headed Lena" was most famously covered by the Lovin' Spoonful, with Zal Yanovsky on vocals, and included on the group's second album, "Daydream". (cost $5)

Also found a rare 1955 10" LP copy of "In A Sentimental Mood" by the legendary jazz guitarist Johnny Smith on the Roost label. Accompanied by a piano/bass/drums trio, the great Mr. Smith performed eight instrumentals, including the original version of his composition "Walk, Don't Run", later covered by Chet Atkins and the Ventures. In addition to the title cut, two other stand-outs are his versions of "Autumn in New York" and "Someone to Watch Over Me". (a bargain at $10)

Also picked up a nice, clean pressing of Derek & the Dominos' 2-LP "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" on the Atco label to replace my old worn-out copy. ($8)


Entered at Mon Mar 26 16:36:53 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: so much cavalry

Stoneman, Peter, Stoneman.

Fighting Joe Hooker and an independent cavalry corps.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 16:24:31 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc (especially): An acquaintance in the UK sent me a link to David Wiffen singing his classic "Lost My Drivin' Wheel" on YouTube. A bit of farting around got me to the related link above, which is to what I believe to be the first writing credits for Wiffen, Bruce Cockburn and Murray McLauchlan - all from the Three's A Crowd LP from '68 - produced by Mama Cass. On bass is Ken Koblun from Neil Young's Squires, and on guitar is Trevor Veitch, later Tom Rush's righ-hand man - and after that the producer of Toni Basil's '80s pop hit, "Mickey".


Entered at Mon Mar 26 15:18:35 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I saw Aretha about 15 years ago and she does put on quite the entertaining show. Plenty of hits but my favourite part was when she sat down at the piano and belted out a gospel number. She plays all those chunky gospel chords that I love.

It was at Foxwoods casino where I saw her so I do not know if she plays a different show for a different sort of venue. The cost I can't recall but wasn't too expensive.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 14:30:43 CEST 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Anyone see Aretha Franklin live? Especially lately? She is in town for by Burgh's Yearly Jazz Fest and Im considering whether to add her to my list of shows. Jack Dejohnette and Esperanza Spalding are both, respectively, a very affordable $30. But Franklin's good seats are $70 (Diana Krall's are $85, yet David Sanborn's top tickets are $45 but I have little interest in them-Ill never figure out how they price tickets).

So anyone see her lately?


Entered at Mon Mar 26 08:22:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd have liked to hear Silver Dagger too. Someone called out "We Shall Overcome" but she just smiled. It's reserved, I should think, for appropriate times. If she had sung it, I'd have to have marched off to occupy a public building and the only near one in Poole is the bus station, which has too many dodgy characters at that time of night!


Entered at Mon Mar 26 05:58:27 CEST 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Joan Baez

Great review, Peter! You must have had a great night. The only fault I would have found with the concert would be that she didn't sing "Silver Dagger," which I have always felt is one of her best vocals.


Entered at Mon Mar 26 00:57:58 CEST 2012 from (99.54.150.205)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: joan baez review

peter, thanks for the link to your review of joan's concert (and really for all the reviews and music info you've shared via this site). my very first concert was joan at the hollywood bowl (i believe it was 1971). just joan, solo, on a beautiful summer evening. very nice. haven't seen her since.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 23:48:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Simone Felice

The Duke & The King stuff is better than The Felice Brothers stuff. Where to start?

Shaky, If You Ever Get Famous, The Morning I Get To Hell, Union Street, Shine on You, and One More American Song for starters, all The Duke & The King.

His previous solo album “Live from A Lonely Place” revists Felice Bros stuff with just him, particularly Don’t Wake The Scarecrow, which is chilling and more like the new one.

On the new one, start off with New York Times.

That’ll keep you going. I’d buy the two Duke & The King albums before anything else.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 23:28:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Joan Baez

I saw Joan Baez tonight. Stellar version of Long Black Veil and … I really enjoyed The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. See link!


Entered at Sun Mar 25 21:13:50 CEST 2012 from (198.228.211.109)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Simon Felice

PV - I have the Felice Brothers: Yonder Is The Clock from 2009, and I need to dig into that record again. But in light of the lavish praise for this gent, alone, can you recommend a few tracks of his to get me started?


Entered at Sun Mar 25 19:13:37 CEST 2012 from (72.78.36.193)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Al Kooper on Blonde On Blonde

Here's a link to a fairly long but pretty cool video of Al Kooper talking at a seminar on March 13th of this year at Nashville's famed Quonset Hut about what really went down at the Blonde on Blonde sessions.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 16:36:38 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Bob. We're seeing Simone Felice on Good Friday. Same venue in Winchester, but the bigger room. I'm enjoying the new one.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 15:02:35 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Simone Felice

Simone Felice and his Magic Band featuring the great Simi Stone performed at The Falcon in Marlboro NY last night. This excellent show consisted of songs from Felice's new solo cd, several Duke and The King songs and a couple from his time with The Felice Brothers. He closed the show with 'Knockin' on Heavens Door'. Simone in his young short life has already had two near death experiences. A brain aneurysm when he was 12 and emergency open heart surgery just two years ago. Although in the Hudson Valley we're just country folk, the performance of this song to end the show and the meaning of the song seemed very clear and direct to everyone in the audience.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 11:42:32 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Relating to albums and artists

As you say Pete, it’s the simple clarity and directness of Springsteen’s lyrics which grab you. That high emotion with which he’s always laced his writing is there still, of course, but on Tunnel of Love it’s coupled with such brutal candour and honesty as he exposes the pain of his fragmenting relationship with Julianne Phillipps that it can leave you wincing as you relate in one way or another with his baring of his soul. Especially on side two you can find examples in every song. In fact, let’s face it, in virtually every line.

We’ve already shared some of those sort of lines on Walk Like a Man and Valentines Day but just a few of those on other tracks which still to this day I often find myself singing to myself, so powerfully must they have resonated at the time as I became so immersed in the album’s beauty.

On ‘One Step Up’
"It’s the same thing night on night
Who’s wrong, baby who’s right
Another fight and I slam the door
Another battle in our dirty little war"

"When I look at myself I don’t see
The man I wanted to be
Somewhere along the line I slipped off the track
Moving one step up and two steps back"

On ‘Brilliant Disguise’
"Tonight our bed is cold
Lost in the darkness of our love
God have mercy on the man
Who doubts what he's sure of" On ‘Cautious Man’
"On his right hand Billy tattooed the word ‘love’
And on his left hand was the word ‘fear’,
And in which hand he held his fate
Was never clear".

On ‘When You’re Alone’
“But there’s things that’ll knock you down
You don’t even see comin’
And send you crawlin’
Like a baby back home
You’re gonna find out that day sugar
When you’re alone, you’re alone
When you’re alone, you ain’t nuthin’ but alone"

Thankfully at that time – nor since I’m happy to say - it wasn’t my own marriage that was in ruins. However, the album’s release did coincide with a very harrowing time. Mag and I became so embroiled in similar heartbreak as the first port of call for my sister in the painful disintegration of her marriage and for three of our closest friends [two marriages] in the disintegration of theirs. It was almost as if Bruce was writing the fuckin scripts

:-0)

Like with only those albums that effectively become part of you – as so many of us on here know so well with Big Pink, the Brown album and Stagefright – every word of every song gets emblazoned in your heart and soul. So it is with me on Tunnel.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 05:40:54 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: R&R HOF & ROBBIE

DAVID: You're welcome...xoxo

My link is about the R&R HOF presenters,etc.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sun Mar 25 05:16:46 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I heard Ruthie Foster's version of It Makes No Difference the other day and was thoroughly unimpressed with her singing, and the arrangement.I also thought the drumming was over the top and inappropriate.


Entered at Sun Mar 25 00:19:45 CET 2012 from (124.170.209.216)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Thanks Vi!

That was lovely.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 20:56:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Valentine's Day

The line that haunts me (and probably many others is):

They say if you die in your dreams

You really die in your bed …



Entered at Sat Mar 24 20:51:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Valentine's Day

Drivin' a big lazy car

Rushing up the highway in the dark …

I got one hand steady on the wheel

And one hand's trembling over my heart …

Al, there are ten or twelve song quotes that play in my head again and again (and again). They just click in with the situation. That one hits me every time I'm rolling down a country road at night (like Thursday night after The Civil Wars driving Bristol to Poole along tiny lanes taking the short cuts over the Dorset hills between 11 pm and 1 am). You do need six cylinders though. Bruce would appreciate that. No snarling gear changes or rocking around corners, just swaying through them.

After a day with Tunnel of Love, the hardest thing in the world is to be clear and direct, rather than ironic and abtuse (as Dylan). It is truly a great album.

Going back to that drive, for some unexplained reason I had "Third Week In The Chelsea" by Jefferson Airplane (actually Jorma Kaukonen) on repeat.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 18:32:50 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DAVID

DAVID LEWIS: For you my friend...

IF I COULD…

If I could catch a rainbow

I would do it just for you,

And share with you its beauty

On the days you’re feeling blue.

If I could build a mountain

You could call your very own,

A place to find serenity,

A place to be alone.

If I could take your troubles

I would toss them in the sea,

But all these things I’m feeling

Are impossible for me.

I can not build a mountain,

Or catch a rainbow fair,

But let me be what I know best,

A friend who’s always there.

Have a good one, DAVID xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Mar 24 17:36:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Joey Dee

Apart from producing one of the earliest credible live albums, Joey Dee's "What Kind of Love Is This?" is an all-time favourite.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 17:04:11 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: thaks for the Rascals post. I think it wa the Brigati brothers' voices together that elevated Joey Dee's records. I keep two of their 45s - "Peppermint Twist" and "Hot Patrami And Mashed Potatoes" (or similar). They support my contention that you generally won't go wrong in picking up part 1 / part 2 records. "Shout", "Twist And Shout", ""Cold Sweat", ""World", ""Sky Pilot", ""American Pie", "One Nation Under One Groove"", "Lonely Girl" ...

I guess it's worth noting that the guys who became the Young Rascals moved from Glover/Roulette to the Atlantic family, as did our guys.

Joe J: I had both of those too, now that you mention it.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 13:37:27 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tunnel of Love

Playing it now. My copy has the "Q Sleevenotes" by Mark Cooper tucked inside. I'm trying to think where these came from … I assume they were free with the mag, and they did a few for "5 star albums." Cooper says "Springsteen has frequently spoken of it as the favourite of his albums,' and goes for the divorce / remarriage theme.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 13:25:37 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV - Tunnel of Love

Pete, not sure if you did tune into it. I did - and it's been some years since the last time - and have to admit i'd forgotten just what a complete entity it is.

Anyroad, I dug out this take on it on a Springsteen site. It's not mine but it certainly conveys how I see the narrative arc of the album and if you are revisting it, it might just be of interest.

All the songs fit the album. I'm pretty convinced those who say otherwise are talking about music, when the album is intrinsically about the stories. Although, admittedly I have a bit of trouble placing 'Spare Parts' and 'Cautious Man'. They fit the over all theme of the album, but in my mind they don't fit the arc of the album.

'Ain't Got You' is the narrator seeing his love from afar and realizes that despite all he has, he doesn't have her, so he's not complete. In 'Tougher Than the Rest', he's asking her out. Nothing really more than that. He's talking himself up to be some big badass, which comes back into play several times later throughout the album. By the time 'All That Heaven Will Allow' comes along, he's with the girl and this really represents the innocence of new love and the ideal of it. The hardness of a real relationship hasn't started and he's just aware of all her perfection. That song would not fit the context with any other type of sound and the fairground organ at the end tucks in perfectly both with the breeze of new found love and the Tunnel of Love metaphor.

Now heres where 'Spare Parts' and 'Cautious Man' come into play. They're the only two complete story songs (rather than being a part of a whole) on the entire record so it's quite feasible that they're intended as related 'love' stories that the main character is hearing around the time of being with this girl. Kind of the cautionary tales and even though Cautious Man turns out well, it turned out that it may not have been the best idea for him to shed his cautiousness while persuing the girl. In fact, I will go outright and claim that Cautious Man is someone telling him to be careful with this, maybe after he said he wants to marry this girl. It fits perfectly as someone telling him a story and comes in the perfect place for that to make sense. Cautious Man can also be considered the entire plot of the album in one song, despite there being a twist at the end. I struggle to find a corresponding shelf for 'Spare Parts'. Perhaps again it's intended to highlight a possible cautionary pitfall of relationships but, whatever, 'Cautious Man' is such a beautiful song if you just look at the words. It could stand as my favorite Bruce song lyrically.

'Walk Like a Man' is the easiest one on the album to pinpoint. It's where our protaganist gets married and kind of sees how his whole life has brought him to this point and it's the first song on the album where he probably feels like he really is now a grown up, the stature of adulthood up to then haveing scared the shit out of him. Reality hasn't quite sunken in though. It also stands as the most directly autobiographical on the album. So Act 1 so to speak, has begun with him meeting the girl of his dreams, being beguiled by her, dating her, and then marrying her. We pick up in Act 2 with the reality of love and marriage now setting in. To counterpoint this he writes about it in a fantastical carnival metaphor in the side two opener 'Tunnel of Love'. They're still remaining steadfast. "The ride is haunted and the ride is rough." "It's easy for two people to lose each other." "Then the lights go out and it's just the three of us, you me and all that stuff we're so scared of." All show them becoming aware of the problems in their perfect love, but they learn to live with them or at least acknowledge that they have to.

'Two Faces' is where it starts to become even more real and they can't hide from it and what's more important is that the narrator realizes its his fault. His evil twin so to speak is slowly ruining things by hurting his woman. And all of this makes him feel awful, but it's inevitable. 'Brilliant Disguise' goes one further on the same point. Now real doubt and suspicion is part of the equation and she's becoming part of the problem. Due to his problems, walls are starting to creep up in her, so she's creating her own disguise, so they're becoming two people rather than one entity. It also kind of shifts back and forth between who he's talking about and I think that kind of represents how it can feel like a couple is grasping at the threads of the tatter love. We've all been there.

In 'One Step Up' he's about to leave her or she's about to leave him. In my mind, it's actually the latter but perhaps i'm biased for bruce. But pretty much the whole world is dark and upside down. It's gotten so bad that there are no positives in the relationship and he feels it's all his fault. "He's not the man he was hoping to be" when he set out. No matter how tough he said he was, he couldn't prepare for this. 'When You're Alone' takes it further. Not much to say here, other than it sounds like he may be trying to save face or reflect back to the time before them when he was alone. He knows what it's like and perhaps the lack of loneliness is the only thing worth having in the relationship anymore. But he's telling her that it's not always fun to be alone.

Now finally we have Valentine's Day. The album's dark gem. It's over. I don't think there's any dispute there. Personally, I like the idea that this takes place after a couple of years and he really doesn't have anything. He now truly knows the riches that he spoke about in Ain't Got You were not or could never be everything. back then it represented a sort of superficial knowledge. Now its accompanied by a gnawing emptiness that he's having to live with. He sees his friend with the untold joy of a son. meanwhile, all he has is the road. His friend tries to reassure him by saying that he can travel fast because he's alone, but that's not what the narrator wants. He wants his girl back or at least the girl that made him feel so alive. Yet all he has been able to take from love is bitterness. But now he longs to wake up from that. And now he wants the one person he can truly love. Now especially in the case of All That Heaven Will Allow and Ain't Got You, the whole story falls apart if those are left out. You need to see the rise or the fall is pointless. And I feel similarly about Cautious Man. It's the piece that foreshadows the ending. Less essential but still super important. I'll also argue that it's his best titled album, except maybe Greetings. Call Darkness, Badlands, Call BitUSA, Glory Days, Call Nebraska, Reason to Believe, Call Magic, Long Walk Home. But here Tunnel of Love is the centerpiece of the album and fits perfectly with the story as a whole, whether he planned that or not.

Sorry about the essay. I'm just really passionate about this album and I had some time to kill.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 24 12:57:22 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Bonnie Raitt's version of Dylan's 'Million Miles'

This link was on Expecting Rain. From Bonnie Raitt's new record "Slipstream". Great guitar from Bill Frisell.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 12:25:16 CET 2012 from (90.233.191.78)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Vibraphone by Norbert

Poor lad. That's how it is growing old: going to buy a vibrator and coming home with a vibraphone. Buy a pair of "EasyReaders" next time.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 04:58:50 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, an interesting figure in all this is David Brigati. He was the original lead singer in Joey Dee & The Starliters, and when he left, his brother Eddie took his place. Joey also hired Felix and Gene who subsequently left with Eddie and formed the Rascals. A bit later (mid 1965), Joey hired Hendrix. So what if Hendrix had been with Joey Dee when Felix and Eddie were around? Gene was solid, but the Rascals with Jimi? Yipes.

David was an unofficial member of the Rascals and sang with them in the studio a lot. He also showed other groups how to harmonize, one of his successes being King Harvest's "Dancing in the Moonlight" on which he also sings backup.


Entered at Sat Mar 24 02:03:44 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Bill, I had the James Gang and Brooklyn Bridge. Corn syrup?


Entered at Sat Mar 24 00:01:58 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Maybe it's just a scouse thing...

...but I cannot for the life of me enunciate the words 'lure' or 'allure' without sounding like a frustrated Inspector Clouseau impersonator.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 23:15:04 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For fans of Daniel Lanois.......an interview heads up from Expecting Rain


Entered at Fri Mar 23 23:00:40 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Hunger Games

Thanks, David. Just ordered the CD .. two Civil Wars tracks can't be bad.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 21:38:39 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Civil Wars

The Civil Wars franchise is getting another big boost through new film The Hunger Games. The soundtrack features a collaboration with Taylor Swift and The Civil Wars on the song "Safe and Sound". The group's also contributes their own recording "Kingdom Come", not to be confused with The Band's song. The Hunger Games is anticipated to be a blockbuster, already drawing $19.7 million in a limited midnight premiere screening last night.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 19:25:28 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

The Civil Wars.............The female half certainly is alluring – almost impossibly so.......shame I guess the ladies in the audience have to stare at Russell Brand for two hours a night though........talent to burn – no question.....awareness of influential songwriters like L. Cohen and MJ..hmmm......good........but I feel obliged to repeat a story I told in this or Norbert’s/PV’s GB years ago:

.....A friend takes his Dad to see Cirque du Soleil.....the old boy was coming over from Wales...first time visiting Canada and his son wanted to treat him to a special evening.....what better than a Canadian company that had truly taken the world by storm.........anyhow.....45 minutes in and no doubt after having seen 1000 or so people ascend and descend from the roof 50 times.....his Dad looked over at his son and in a not too quiet voice said... “So....where are the fu*king tigers?”

I saw the male half of Civil Wars refer to their “brand” and being on the Grammys as being good for the “franchise”............yuck, yuck, yuck, yuck, yuck...yuck, yuck, yuck....and yuck!


Entered at Fri Mar 23 19:13:20 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: The heck with what we were thinking! What were they 'thinking', they being the idiots who awarded Olivia Newton John over 1) Roberta Flack, 2) Joni Mitchell, 3) Elton John and 4) Maria Muldaur.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 18:55:21 CET 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Grammys

Looking at John Lennon, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel's attire, All I can say is "What the hell were we thinking" :-)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 17:13:14 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Young Rascals

Pat B / Bashful B: Around the time of Fotomaker (disgraceful album cover, btw), Dino and Geno sidelined as producers of big Canuckistani arena rockers, April Wine - their live album for sure, and I think another one. As for their many links and parallels with our guys, my favourites revolve around facts that Hawkins and the Hawks and Joey Dee and the Starlighters shared both a label (Roulette) and a producer (Henry Glover). Plus, there's the Starlighters-Jimi Hendrix - John Hammond bridge. Who was with Joey Dee first, Hendrix or Cornish?


Entered at Fri Mar 23 16:58:55 CET 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: the garden
Web: My link

Oops, a little wrong in the previous post, here the correct one, enjoy!

[...]


Entered at Fri Mar 23 16:54:15 CET 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Famous Band song finaly written down for vibraphone

We've got a vibraphone with numbers on the vibrons. For those who also play vibraphone I've written out the Band's classic TNTDODH in vibraphone numbers (could also work for marimba, you don't have to thank me).

[...]

Bobby Womack, Bobby has written hits for the Stones and is, with one arm, tight on the Band I guess. We here to little of him, let's not forget the man.

For the other Dutch Band fan: Morgenavond (Zaterdag) N3 Classic Albums The Band.



Entered at Fri Mar 23 16:50:11 CET 2012 from (64.129.187.2)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill(again)

Location: Minoa, NY (still)

Subject: Hilda

Don't feel bad about hanging posters. I'm also 60 and have my Last Waltz poster and a couple of Levon's ramble posters scattered around, all framed. I also have that old greenish pyramid poster from the Dark Side of the Moon album hanging in the family room. Just a couple pins in it.......


Entered at Fri Mar 23 16:45:28 CET 2012 from (64.129.187.2)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: posters and rascals, or is that rescals and posters......

I'm older than you Charlie's Angels guys. I had the famous Raquel Welch from 1,000, 000 BC movie. I just happened to have seen it recently, on TCM, for the first time. Big fun! re The Rascals : I saw them a couple times back in the heyday - 67 or 68, then saw their reunion show in, I think, 87. I've seen Felix's various lineups 4 times over the decades, most recently just last Summer. They were all good shows, the most recent one was best of the 4 solo shows, by far. I kept buying their albums right up to the bitter end. Dino Dinelli is much underated and under appreciated. I remember being thrilled when I learned that he was drumming on Stevie Van Zandt first album, back in the mid or late 80's. I would have bought it anyway but even if I hadn't been interested Dino's precense alone would have been incentive enough for me to buy it.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 15:14:52 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: A friend just sent me a scan of a poster announcing Status Quo + Crowbar (i.e., Kelly Jay's band of former Hawks) at Leeds university on some Nov 25 in the early '70s. 50p advance, 55 at the door!!


Entered at Fri Mar 23 14:29:26 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rainbow Hair

An 11"x17" version of the Milton Glaser "rainbow hair" Dylan poster is still available, packaged as an insert with the Sundazed label's mono LP reissue of Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 13:29:05 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Best of British luck with talking yourself out of the play. (I'm fortunate in that regard, as neither of us would accept free seats, even to get out of a downpour.)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 12:37:34 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Something completely different

Norbert: thanks for posting. yeah I thought Milliband did well in that speech. Credit where it's due even though he's not my cup of tea. He did seem to have them pinned against the wall and squirming a bit - if squirm is the right term for self serving vermin in so called public office like Clegg and Cameron & co.

The problem Norb is the British media will distort matters until the obscenity of what's been perpetrated is diluted. last night the main populist political debate programme - which I have to say I haven't watched for many years since I have little regard for any politicians these days but I tuned in last night specifically to see how this particular outrage was handled - saw a solitary Labour [left wing] panelist and THREE right wing panelists one of whom purports to be a Liberal democrat but in reality has become since the coalition just one more hypocritical toadie of the right.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 12:27:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, Stevie Nicks used to run a training school back in the 70s. I've been thinking about it. Drop the 20 press ups. You'll need to conserve all your energy.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 12:19:53 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Just an ad hoc question

Is there a place where you can apply to be a male groupie? I can still just about manage 20 press ups on a good day.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 12:19:09 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Autumn tour

Al, I just picked up The Civil Wars tickets for Brighton, 7th November. Annoyingly, they're playing Southampton on the 10th, a 70 mile shorter drive, but we already booked to see a play in London .. matinee, but it'd be a "will we make it in time?" situation.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 11:57:21 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Barton Hollow

Al, you should probably watch them doing "Barton Hollow" from the same show (linked). Take an aspirin first to thin out the old cholesterol.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 11:38:21 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: I only have eyes for you

Okay Pete first time i've ver set eyes on them so I wasn't there but I bet a pound to a pinch of shite that not one solitary gaze of any hot blooded male in that audience left the wondrous vision that is Joy Williams for a single nano second whilst she was on stage. Boy is she hot.

On the strength of your clip I've just booked my tickets for the L'pool Phil on 1st november.

Now if you'll just excuse me I've just got to go and ogle for a few more hours at that Billie jean clip.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 10:31:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Civil Wars

Up early and review of The Civil Wars done. See the link. We discussed them here and some found Barton Hollow a bit samey. You REALLY have to see them live. Phenomenal.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 10:25:10 CET 2012 from (109.166.132.112)

Posted by:

Monika

Location: Romania
Web: My link

Subject: Hi

My friend told me how nicely done your website, congrats! Really it’s so nice, come and see ours, http://shuttle-paris-airports.com


Entered at Fri Mar 23 10:15:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Far canal? Whale oil beef hooked.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 06:56:09 CET 2012 from (124.168.33.27)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Band names

There was a legendary alleged Sydney band called far canal... (think about it...)


Entered at Fri Mar 23 03:36:33 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Carmen: Crazy Horse yes, but otherwise I'll suggest, after not much considersation, Stark Naked and the Car Thieves, the Rogues, Simply Saucer, the Mothers of Invention.


Entered at Fri Mar 23 02:42:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Having just seen them live (review tomorrow), I reckon The Civil Wars is a brilliant name for a duo with one man, one woman. One from Californian, one from Alabama.

I found my first ever 16 2/3 record today. They're a 3 x 7" set on the American Express label, 1964. You rented a machine from Amex in Paris and carried it around Paris with the audio guide singles, and stood holding it on a flat surface (e.g.) facing Notre Dame. No doubt ignoring the cries of "Plonker!"


Entered at Fri Mar 23 01:18:03 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: 5 best band names

The Band

Crazy Horse

East Street Band

Rolling Stones

Greatful Dead


Entered at Thu Mar 22 21:45:22 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: John Lennon and Paul Simon

Check out this classic Grammy bit..........funny and telling about the merit of these awards..............Joni was robbed but John was perfect!


Entered at Thu Mar 22 19:52:57 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Ian Tyson and Jerry Jeff Walker


Entered at Thu Mar 22 19:21:35 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Ian Tyson - not bad for a 78-year-old

Just got this news release:

IAN TYSON RELEASES NEW SONGS ON A SPARKLING NEW STONY PLAIN ALBUM

14th album for the Edmonton-based international roots music label comes as All The Good ‘Uns, his 16-year-old “best-of” compilation, finally goes Gold

Canada’s legendary songwriter, Ian Tyson, may be 78, but he’s not slowing down.

He still runs his working ranch in the foothills of the Rockies south of Calgary, he still performs some 40 shows each year, and how he’s released a new album of sparkling new songs.

Raven Singer, his first album in four years, will be released internationally on May 29; it’s his 14th for Stony Plain, the Edmonton-based international roots music label.

The new album comes on the heels of the announcement that his 1996 “best-of” compilation, All the Good ’Uns, finally earned a gold record, indicating sales of more than 50,000 copies.

Tyson, always remembered for classic songs such as “Four Strong Winds,” “Navajo Rug,” “Someday Soon” and “Summer Wages,” made the record over a three-year period, as he wrote the new songs.

Tyson’s songs always have the ring of truth, and his travels have provided the background for two of the 10 remarkable songs — “Under African Skies” and “Back to Baja.” The first is partly travelogue and partly a story of “running from the memories” of a broken relationship. The latter has a distinctly southern Californian feel and is a song that Jimmy Buffett would feel at home singing.

Other songs that maintain his reputation as one of Canada’s most distinctive writers include “Blueberry Susan,” which offers a tribute to the first guitarist he ever heard, and some of the players — Red Shea, Monte Dunn and David Rea —whom he worked with and who passed away since Tyson’s last album. “Charles Goodnight’s Grave” and “Saddle Bronc Girl” are warmly-observed songs of the real West, not the romanticized version shared by weekend cowboys and Nashville “new country” singers. One of the most moving songs on the CD is a new version of “The Circle is Through” which he originally recorded almost 20 years ago with Nashville singer Suzy Bogguss.

Tyson himself says the record is a collection of songs built around the road back from the much-publicized loss of his voice in 2006. “I think I’ve learned how to make my ‘new voice’ work,” he says, and the new record seems to bear out his assertion. Tyson’s voice is less “grainy” that it was on his last album, Yellowhead to Yellowstone, but it carries an emotional punch that suits the new songs he has written.

The album’s Dali-esque cover is by Calgary teacher Paul Rasporich; it depicts a raven’s skull. The title of the CD followed a sweat lodge ceremony at the Nakoda First Nation, near Banff Alberta, when Tyson’s name — Ka-ree-a-hiatha (Raven that Sings) — was chosen.

NOTE: Ian Tyson will join singer and songwriter Corb Lund on stage for five shows — July 9, 10, 11, 14 & 15 —at Calgary’s Epcor Centre for the Performing Arts. The concerts will celebrate 100 Years of Calgary Cowboys, and part of the annual Calgary Stampede celebrations. The two artists are close friends who have performed on each others’ albums.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 18:35:53 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: I had that same "Indianola Mississippi Seeds" poster, which came to me in a roll of similar posters of ABC-label products. "Steppenwolf Live" was one for sure, and Three Dog Night's "Golden Biscuits" another. Don't recall the others offhand - maybe a Grass Roots? I believe I got them in return for sending in enough corn-starch box tops and corn syrup collars to the fine people at Billy Bee - but maybe that was who sent me the sepia-toned hockey pictures.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 18:29:06 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: plan your vacation

Link is to recordshops.org, tipped in the local paper today as "an ambitious new crowdsourced project to catalogue and rate record stores around the world."


Entered at Thu Mar 22 16:23:15 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

...so was it the designer sunglasses or headphones that stopped the presses? Seems like it has been 20c-25c all winter in TO and I hate it! Give me back some winter or turn off the f**king heat in the buildings.

Link to Keef and Willie. I like this one.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 14:25:26 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Gravediggin Man Video. Larry Thurston & Levon Helm


Entered at Thu Mar 22 11:29:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan poster

It was a different standard one here. The cover of OZ magazine "Blowing In The Mind" was done as a poster in red, yellow and orange and became the standard Dylan wall hanging. Link is to the Oz cover. Some of the posters had the OZ removed.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 07:07:41 CET 2012 from (125.141.224.8)

Posted by:

cheap designer sunglasses

Web: My link

A mutual acquaintence said I would really like your site. Glad I listened to her! I like how you really scrutinize and get to the point but can you go over that last part again? Just a bit?|Glorious data here. This interesting post made me smile. Possibly should you throw in a few pictures it would make the entire thing extra interesting. Anyway, in my language, there usually are not much good supply like this.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 07:03:13 CET 2012 from (125.141.224.8)

Posted by:

dr dre headphones

Web: My link

so great!!


Entered at Thu Mar 22 03:45:08 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, good ol' #4, Hjalmarsson could take a lesson.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 01:50:02 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Wrecking Ball

Link is to an Amelia Curran original, 'Wrecking Ball'. I'm also partial to Emmylou's cover of the Neil Young tune of the same name.


Entered at Thu Mar 22 01:00:20 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Land of the Frozen Sea

Subject: Band posters

I inherited my older brother's bedroom complete with the Stage Fright and Moondog foldouts. I never took them down. I added a cool poster of the 'Indiola Mississippi Seeds' cover, guitar neck and strings on the half melon. Maybe Jaclyn Smith too.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 22:39:29 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Al: Thank you. Your nod to the great Gilles Villeneuve means a lot and I guess I should remember that feeling the next time I pile on someone else’s hero. Love ya!

The attached link was thought of in the context of being called affable.......also, that great scene in Goodfellas when Joe Pesci takes offence at being called funny.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:46:46 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

BillM

Pat B: No Elmer Vasko, you young rasco?


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:34:53 CET 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Pictures/posters

I do have an autographed and framed photo of a boat taken by Brien Sz hanging in my house if that shows my good taste.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:30:25 CET 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: same old torries

ps. this is the right link for the Ed Miliband speech.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:27:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norb, like his brother The Ed Miller Band is a Martian. If you can't have a huge lead over the bastards currently in power there's something seriously wrong with you. He's merely keeping the seat warm for Ed Balls. Also a bastard, but not a Martian.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:25:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: You Got Me Hummin'

Pat. Link to The Hassles .. this is exactly what the white soul bands around here sounded like in 1967. Fabulous. Put next to The Rascals doing Too Many Fish In The Sea. While you're on YouTube their version of A Taste of Honey is related to Vanilla Fudge.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:22:48 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Joan, same one which bedazzled thousands of long haired apartments and is now evidently a collectors item.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 21:10:34 CET 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: same old tories!

Driving home from Holland I heard Ed Miliband's 2012 budget speech on the radio .... it was brilliant! (British Parliament must be the best, check the link)

from the www

" My own favourite gag/trick was when the Labour leader asked members of the coalition cabinet, seated opposite him, to raise their hands if they would be personally benefiting from the cut in the 50p top rate of tax. It was a cheap shot - but it hit home. Millionaire ministers shifted uneasily in their seats; some - I'm looking at you William Hague and George Young! - looked away and pretended not to hear. "Just nod," proclaimed Miliband, deploying a favourite put-down of the Prime Minister to great effect. It was, in my view, a brilliant speech - especially given how difficult and awkward it is for leaders of the opposition to respond to Budget statements in the Commons, at such short notice. One friend of Miliband told me: "We were pretty pleased." Well, that's an understatement! Another source close to the Labour leader said the speech was a "group effort" but that "Ed and Torsten [Henricson-Bell, Miliband's economics adviser and the Labour Party's new director of policy] get most credit" for writing it. If only his conference speech had been delivered with such gusto. . . The former Labour minister and ardent Blairite, George Foulkes, who backed David Miliband in the 2010 leadership contest, tweeted: Ed Miliband has delivered the best Budget response I have heard from Opposition Leaders in 33 years in Parliament



Entered at Wed Mar 21 20:22:56 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Posters and stuff

My favourite poster is our Kev throwing his toys out of the pram

:-0)

Joke. Honest to God Kev. You really are my fave poster. ;-0) And honestly I didn't know affable or Canuck were offensive to someone from Toronto. As for apologist - I guess we all are when it suits.

Your Villeneuve/Arnoux link is incredible. I used to love Jim clark years ago but I've never been a great follower of F1. However, that clip simply takes your breath away. I followed it up by reading up on you and Fred's hero and I can see why he achieved that cult status. It seems Jody Scheckter rated him the fastest ever.

Pat B: Don't think I ever got around to thanking you for tipping us off about the Rascals. They were never big over here so i really only ever knew 'Groovin'. It's a while since I backtracked on them but hey I love them. So much so we had 3 of their songs on my daughters wedding night. Went down a storm too.

Fred. I'll be honest, we've no chance of 4th place and I'd say that even if we weren't 10 points off the pace for 4th spot. Both the manager and team are far too inconsistent - so we've got to hope they find form in the semi final and then, if we get through, the final. If we play to our best I think we have got the ability to beat any English side on the day. The problem is there's no consistency and even when we do play well we invariably lack the clinical finishing and composure to complete the job and get the ball in the onion bag. Which is the object of the exercise.

PS Fred - I hope me writing us off comes back to haunt me. fingers crossed eh. :-0)

PV - did you have a TOL day? :-0) Valentine's day hmmmmm


Entered at Wed Mar 21 20:05:36 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I was too young to catch the Rascals in their heyday but have a vivid memory of sitting with friends late 80’s to watch a Led Zeppelin reunion – much hyped – at an anniversary party for Atlantic records. It was broadcast over regular TV in Canada. Zeppelin were truly awful that night but the Rascals were great – jumped off the screen..which was a revelation to all of us assembled as it is certainly not the norm when old-foggy bands got back together for events like that...so fresh was the sound.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 19:55:15 CET 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Posters

My very small college dorm room, that I shared with two other women had cinderblock walls and with a triple decker bed, 3 desks and 4 chairs, there wasn't much usable wall space. I did mange to put up the Milton Glaser Dylan poster. Not much else but personal photos and school memorabilia.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 19:48:35 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, I don't know if you recall the parallel paths I drew between the Hawks and the Rascals oh so many years ago. That whole blue eyed soul thing in Jersey and NY/Long Island was huge in the mid-late 60's. Vanilla Fudge emerged from the same scene.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 17:52:13 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Fred..........The above link to relive just some of the greatness of Gilles Villeneuve.......The poster I had was important to me because it came late in my time at home just before heading off to university and the real world. Dreams of playing pro hockey had faded, music was still important but at least in my world it seemed only my brother and I knew about F1 racing. It was like a new step, a new interest and my love of F1 has endured strongly...which is amazing given the group of nuts involved in running the sport ( Bernie “show me the money” Ecclestone,and Max “Hello Gertraud” Mosley to name just two )................Anyway, my older brother worked at the race in September where Gilles won his first GP and snapped a great action shot of Alan Jones ( inexplicably he didn’t get one of Gilles despite being trackside for 3 days! )...we had it framed and almost inexplicably it has stayed with me for over 30 years and many moves....The Gilles poster was a headshot with a car in the background but not sure what model...I would guess the 1978 Ferrari....It got packed away shortly after his death in 1982....years later just after Jacques won his World Championship I purchased a beautiful Gavin Macleod print of Gilles in the no 27 Ferrari ( from the 1979 season I believe ) at the Montreal race and had it done up. It has been prominently displayed in my office ever since.

By the way, for F1 fans, Gerald Donaldson’s biography of Gilles is wonderful. Highly recommended.

Racing quote I always loved...........Near the end of his career, Stirling Moss was asked about his struggles...........he paused and said “Well, you make more money at the front of the grid but you do meet a better sort of person at the back”


Entered at Wed Mar 21 17:29:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: THe First Cut Is The deepest

Interesting, but that IS an overblown version. Good taste in choosing the song and Big Time Operator, but the guy has neither a signature voice, nor a rock voice. Obviously an accomplished singer but should stick to ballads!

Funnily enough, while looking up Twinkle earlier, I did listen to P.P. Arnold doing this very song (linked). About an hour ago, I booked to see the "Homage to Sandy Denny" tour in May which has P.P. Arnold, Maddy Prior, Thea Gilmore, Joan As Policewoman and others. P.P. Arnold seems to be headlining (well, no one would ever try to follow her onto a stage).

Pat, on The Rascals .. I picked up You Got Me Hummin' by The Hassles yesterday. This is a young Billy Joel's band doing the Isaac Hayes / David Porter song. It's extremely impressive for 1967 white soul .. which reminded me of The Rascals.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 17:09:11 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

The first stuff I put on my wall were pictures of the Blackhawks from the early to mid 60's. Bobby and Dennis Hull, Stan Mikita, Pierre Pilote, Glenn Hall. Then big color posters of the Rascals and the Vanilla Fudge walking dogs. B/W of Dylan--mostly tangled hair, the multi-colored Dylan hair from Greatest Hits, the Beatles (which is now up in my son's room).


Entered at Wed Mar 21 16:55:07 CET 2012 from (62.140.137.153)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countries
Web: My link

Subject: posters

A few years ago there was a big Richard Avedon retrospective at Foam museum here. They put several of his more famous pictures up as ads in the bus stops. One of them was the picture he took of Dylan on a wet street. Most of them disappeared overnight. The one at Central Station was still there when on a late saturday night I got bodysearched by a policewoman for no reason. They can do that over here on weekends in the city centre. But me...a respectable 60 year old lady? Anyway I wanted to take a picture of myself in front of it the next day bujt by then it was also gone! I went to see the exhibition the next day and asked if there were any posters left. Yes....3....they would be sold the next day....the last day of the show. I could not go tbe next day and it was also my birthday. When I told them what happened to me and showed my passport they let me have one at a fair price! So now I have a lifesize picture of Dylan above my bed like an effing teenager.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 16:47:24 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Speaking of pirate radio, I ran into a Radio Caroline dj, Keith Hampshire, last fall at a tribute to Robbie's boyhood chum, Peter Traynor, last fall. (Traynor's still with us.) He, like you I believe, didn't like the movie at all. When he returned to Canada around '69 he joined our own John D at radio station CKFH, and then switched microphones to become a fairly successful pop and jingle singer and star of a successful music show called "Music Machine". Because I know you like the song, even if not this version, I've provided a link to his hit version of "The First Cut Is the Deepest", magnificently arranged by former Hawk Gord Fleming. Down the right margin you might see another Hampshire version of the song, which is worth a look because the intro has him talking (in recent years) about how his days at Radio Caroline introduced him to songs that weren't known in North America, so he recycled them successfully when he got back home; "Day Time, Night Time", "First Cut" and "Big Time Operator" were all hits for him in the early '70s.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 16:15:02 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I didn't recognise the voice. Emperor Roscoe was American (Joe Pasternak's son) but he was pirate radio, but maybe not at this point. To get that I had to listen to five seconds of "The Wedding" an experience I don't wish to repeat.

Twinkle was normally in mini skirt and long boots, and did way better miming as I said. According to Wiki, she was only 16 and her boyfriend was Des McCusky of the appalling "The Bachelors." I'm very glad no one told me at the time. The guitar on the single of "Terry" was by Jimmy Page, but not on this live show. In fact, one of her later discs, Micky, is highly sought after as one of the very few releases on Immediate's sub-label, "Instant."


Entered at Wed Mar 21 16:05:03 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: That was awful! YouTube invited me to view several other selections, including Terry Jacks singing his immortal "Seasons In The Sun" and a Julie Rogers singing something else. For some reason I went (very briefly) with Rogers and though it was BBC, the announcer clearly wasn't B. Any idea who it was?


Entered at Wed Mar 21 15:20:18 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: British culture

The link takes you to one of the postcards we had on the wall. It's 1972. Most were about this bad!


Entered at Wed Mar 21 14:45:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Twinkle

Bill M .. you don't know Twinkle? Link to her major hit "Terry". While you're on YouTube, the picture on "The end of My world" is the actual one I had. The YouTube link is to a live show, I think the NME Poll Winners Show, which was a bit hard on her. A "Ready Steady Go" miming bit would be better.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 14:38:52 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Given the poster's placement next to Ronnie Spector, I take it that Twinkle is not the same as Twink, who I thought you were referring to yesterday. I suspect they don't have much in common - a little mascara perhaps?


Entered at Wed Mar 21 14:07:15 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Bill M: Gilles was hugely popular in Italy when he was with Ferrari. I was back in Canada when he died, but my Italian friends told me it was as a time of national mourning.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 14:03:25 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Posters on my wall growing up?: the one from "Let it Bleed" and the one from McKenna Mendelson Mainline's "Stink" - great albums still. I was so unhip when "Let it Bleed" arrived that I thought that the great big face was Brian Jones, intended as a tribute to his recent passing. And that the cool-looking guy who was really Wyman must be the famous Mick Jagger.

Re Villeneuve, in '83 I hitched a lift in France from just south of the Belgian border in a big arc around Paris to Lyon with a trucker heading home fron England to Milan, the home of Ferrari. He spoke about 10 words of English and half that of French, and I spoke no Italian (though it turns out that French words said with an Italian accent often works), but we managed to converse the whole time, which included a stop for dinner. I suspect he picked me up because of the maple leaf on my backpack, because he quickly noted how devastated he was with Villeneuve's untimely demise. Whenever there was an awkward silence, conversation could easily be restarted by slapping the forehead while mournfully incanting, "Villeneuve, trista, trista."


Entered at Wed Mar 21 12:54:20 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Posters, more posters and then some more posters

Had the walls covered with F1 cars, sports teams & individual athletes, a fews cantily clad (tastefully scantily clad) young ladies (sadly no Jaclyn Smith), some rock posters, assorted maps and a poster depicting various Soviet Red Army uniforms (why? I don't know. I do remember it came with a military history magazine I bought...the prevailing modus operandi at the time was that a free poster from a magazine whose subject matter interested me meant it was going up on a wall somewhere). And a newspaper article from WW I with my grandfather in it, and an uncle's Silver Star for Military Valour citation (lacking the the medal)

Then while I was away at university, my mother took down the posters and up went a poster-sized photo of my father when he was 20 sporting a pencil thin 'stache, other family photos and lots of Royal Wedding (Charles & Diana) paraphenalia. Mothers...go figure, eh? : )


Entered at Wed Mar 21 12:24:31 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: On the walls

My folks weren't much for letting us pin things into the walls. They did allow me to put up a Jaclyn Smith poster. Most of my friends had the very famous Farah Fawcett poster but I preferred brunettes. By the time I went to college posters weren't that big of a thing - at least not with the crowd I ran with. I believe I had a Pink Floyd poster. When I got my own apartment in college I did take all my album covers and adorned one of my long walls with all of them. In my office today I have some art I bought in Egypt, & Greece. I have a pencil sketch my parents bought for me when they traveled in Hungary. I also have a piece created at an Indian Reservation and of course I have a nice big Eliot Landy print of the Brown album photo signed and framed.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 12:17:08 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

the thumbnail for that vid is wrong, should be the billboard....Youtube is being slow about correcting it.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 11:25:01 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Happy Hour Video. Larry Thurston, Levon. & Johnnie Johnson.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 09:24:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pinned on the Poster's Walls

So what do we all have on our walls?

Posters? Luxury! When I was a teenager you cut them out of magazines. I had a collage, but The Ronettes and Twinkle did feature. And Ronnie alone. I liked lots of mascara.

Then when I got to university, like most British universities then, we nearly all had single rooms. Two sets of unfortunates on each floor had to share a double. We worked out that every poor bugger that got put in a double had been to a Catholic school, and eventually found out it was a ruse by the Catholic chaplaincy to limit sexual activities. Well, heterosexual ones, anyway.

Being 19 and judgemental, you judged people by the posters on the large pin board. I had spent six months working in an art museum, and had high quality genuine exhibition posters .. the ones they didn’t sell .. over the wall. This launched me into the status of an intellectual with supreme artistic taste that I have enjoyed ever since. But you looked askance at some choices. The spotty lad with pictures of scantily clad girls from mags (probably Health & Efficiency or Tit-Bits) .. you knew he’d be singularly unsuccessful romantically. As would the two lads who shared a room totally covered with pictures of Chelsea footballers, then, as now, not a handsome bunch. One lad had Everton pictures (but that was a double room for historical reasons which Al will appreciate). Then there was a guy whose wall was covered with Vietnam atrocities and slogans. He went into politics.

Then you leave and get your first flat. It was essential to have Frank Zappa at stool on the toilet wall, and we did. And the tennis playing girl scratching her bare bum.

Then came hippy posters with Indian patterns. At that point we put two pin boards in the toilet covered with seaside postcards, acquired in Bournemouth, Weymouth and Llandudno. In the early 70s these were hilariously filthy. We had to take them down because everyone who went to the toilet spent 15 minutes in there reading them and cackling with laughter. We put the cards in a photo album which I found recently.\

Then came limited edition prints and photos.

Then came originals.

In my office, I have three 7” display strips, each holding five EPs. The selection is not musical, but cover design. Ruby Braff, Duke Ellington, John Barry. And a limited edition large print of an illustration of Bournemouth Square circa 1963 ("Circling the Square at Bournemouth.". The original was apparently drawn to order by a car enthusiast who wanted drawings of his car and bus collection in one place. He commissioned one of those railway artists and allowed him to run off 750 prints. So not very limited. But three of my old pals who grew up in Bournemouth have seen it and bought a copy because it's extremely accurate on buildings, buses, cars, clothes and shouts "1963" at you. I just Googled it and I see the artist now has greeting cards, "non-limited edition" posters and even fecking jigsaw puzzles of it. It's definitely naff, but very popular locally.


Entered at Wed Mar 21 03:19:39 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin J: two thumbs up for having had a Gilles Villeneuve poster grace your wall. Just out of curiosity which year's Ferrari was he driving, in aforementioned poster?

Re: Tweeter and The Monkey Man. I vaguely remember a review (Rolling Stone?!?) that mentioned how Dylan had out-Springsteened Springsteen on this tune. I always thought that it was a nice little homage from His Bobness towards The Boss.

Al: which do you think would be considered more of a successful season for LFC this time around: to win 2 cups (FA & League) and possibly finish 7th or no cups and finish 4th (access to the Champions League)?


Entered at Tue Mar 20 23:17:47 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Broken Arrow by the Dead

Marley for sure and what about Garcia (although this is Lesh)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 21:07:00 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: That clip is one stone soul picnic, eh?


Entered at Tue Mar 20 20:55:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Walk Like A Man

Yes, right up there with the greats, especially if you grew up by the sea and walked on the sand with your dad (and lost him early) .. the image of the bride and groom entering that long black limousine (a careful Elvis nod, but reversed) before they "take that mystery ride" is brilliant. It gets me every single time too. I feel a "Tunnel of Love" day coming on for tomorrow.

I once compiled a Desert Island Top 20 where Walk Like A Man appeared twice. Two totally different songs. Bruce, and The Four Seasons.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 20:52:53 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bob F........A link for you....a rousing drunken shambles of a song but exactly what great rock n roll is........it definitely isn’t dancing in the dark and it isn’t thriller............thank you for saving me from myself – it’s just being called affable and a Canuck in the same sentence set me off..........only posters EVER on my wall growing up were Bob Dylan from Greatest Hits, Gilles Villeneuve, Guy Lafleur and Faces.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 20:17:04 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Kevin J.

Kevin J, you crack me up! We really need to forget about all this most influential songwriter stuff for awhile and start celebrating The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2012 induction of The Faces and Laura Nyro!!!


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:51:01 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: always look on the bright side ...

Kevin J: You mean Al and all his fellow Brucians? That would be an 'orrible fate, but still ...

BTW, another worthy North American, right up there with Chuck and Willie at or near the top, would be Bob Marley, no?


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:39:05 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Tying together a couple of recent GB threads -- It's interesting to note that Bruce Springsteen brought in Bob Clearmountain specially to mix the sound of his performance of "We Take Care Of Our Own" at last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. The two have worked together previously over the years, beginning with "Born To Run".


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:34:19 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Neil and Crazy Horse CD News

Neil and Crazy Horse CD due out June 5.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:17:07 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Impossibility of Sainthood

I have...but be most careful Bill M...you risk having the wrath of millions and millions of the most earnest, suffocating fans the world has ever know descend upon you......for the sin of just pointing this out........at final judgement...they will ask ‘So, shall it be Firing Squad or death by Affability? Firing Squad Please!!!!!!


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:16:11 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: old man: take a look at my life

Another ageing artist feels the urge to confess / explain / correct the record / spin the message / etc.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 19:17:02 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

the Gb has been fun and interesting so i tend to check in even when i'm rushed-- ...no time for more than this now--Dion is still very chrismatic, and yes , he is extremely intelligent. Talent- off the charts....His personal politics are pretty hard right wing.Any of you who have been FB friends of his for a few years would know this. Of course he is entitled to all his beliefs and opinions, but, his opinions have caused lots of people to stop reading what he writes on FB. I'm a fan of his, but i stopped reading anything he writes that is not musical a long time ago. It's possible he has toned down his political posting, but i doubt he has,Dion seems to be the type that goes a thousand per cent.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 18:53:01 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Thanks Mike...would be fun to hear the alternative takes....a flip to what Dylan has done by giving us the un-Lanois takes.

Link above to a great songwriter.....voice rubs but I like what he did.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 18:49:06 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: take a load off Evra ...

Kevin J: Re Suarez and Evra, you do recall hearing about the impossibility of sainthood, don't you?


Entered at Tue Mar 20 17:11:28 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Kevin J on Kevin J:

“He writes from his heart and his gut and only ever has a good word to say about his fellow GB posters. The real McCoy.

Vive la difference.”


Entered at Tue Mar 20 17:08:07 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Bruce, Stones and Wilbury's

Al, I remember in the 80's The Rolling Stones and Bruce were on tour at the same time and Rolling Stone did a review saying how much better the Bruce show was. The Stones were so angry they threw Chett Fillipo(?) who was interviewing them for Rolling Stone off the tour. I always felt 'Tweeter and the Monkey Man' was the best of the Wilbury's. I took it as a funny tribute to Bruce not as a rub. Bruce gave Roy Orbison's career a shot in the arm with the A Black and White Night concert film and cd. I remember Dylan being qouted somewhere that Bruce was like a brother to him. Bruce inducted Dylan into the Hall of Fame. When Dylan received the Kennedy Center Honor he had Bruce as one of the performers. Dylan has also been known to go see Bruce in concert including a show at Giant Stadium in 2003 where Dylan performed with Bruce and The E Street Band. I think everyone in The Wilbury's was a Bruce fan.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 17:04:29 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: So, Kev, these Michael Jackson posters....

....You taking them down for good then?

Or just waiting for things to settle down before you put them back up?

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 17:00:48 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha - The Luurve machine [post correction]

Sorry Bill. I was getting you mixed up with Barry White. :-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 16:48:03 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Yuck!

Dear Patrice Evra: From the bottom of my heart, I am truly sorry.....your sense of fair play, never giving in to the petty, mean spirited taunts from the likes of evil Bob and scary Keef elevates you to Sainthood.....just no other way around it........from a fully humbled AFFABLE APOLOGIST........ Sincerely, Luis Suarez


Entered at Tue Mar 20 16:24:20 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: previous post not me

Stay away, Al E!!


Entered at Tue Mar 20 16:20:30 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: The Luuuuuuuurve machine -- Ha ha

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 16:18:38 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dion DiMucci

Bifillo - I'm sure Jeff will be able to give you some sound pointers on dion but I love some of his stuff. For me Runaround Sue is as good as a pop song can get.

I followed him up some years back. I can recommend the album Return of the Wanderer [ alot of it is very Bruce-like] :-0)

Also deja Nu is similar territory. His recent stuff is excellent if you like a modern take on slow burning blues. I do quite like it but it's not really what I turn to.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 15:56:00 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Aw Shucks Pete

Jeez Pete. You sure know how to press the indulgence buttons. You've got me singing the whole album now. First Nuts in May. Now Tunnel of Love. Whatever next. I'm dangling here like a puppet awaiting the next move from the puppeteer.

:-0) You're right about Walk Like A Man. It came out right after I'd lost my own father. Exactly the same time as Robbie's first solo album. I'd drive for hours soaking up Bruce's heartfelt sentiments especially Walk Like A Man and Valentine's Day. Never since been able to get through the damn thing with dry eyes.

I remember how rough your hand felt on mine
On my wedding day
And the tears cried on my shoulder
I couldn't turn away
Well so much has happened to me
That I don't understand
All I can think of is being five years old following behind you at the beach
Tracing your footprints in the sand
Trying to walk like a man

By Our Lady of the Rosa's we lived in the shadow of the elms
I remember Ma draggin' me and my sister up the street to the church whenever she heard them wedding bells....

...Well now the years have gone and I've grown
Yeah, from that seed you've sown
But I didn't think there'd be so many steps
I'd have to learn on my own
Well I was young and I didn't know what to do
When I saw your best steps stolen away from you
Now I'll do what I can
I'll walk like a man

Simply beautiful. An artist of high emotion, rare emotion


Entered at Tue Mar 20 15:42:12 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Glyn Johns & Stage Fright Mixes

I dug out my copy of Capitol's original CD reissue of "Stage Fright", mastered by Larry Walsh at Capitol Recording Studios in August 1990. As discussed here in the GB, the mystery regarding the various mixes of that album has been cleared up. Both Glyn Johns and Todd Rundgren had separately prepared an initial set of mixes, which were rejected by The Band. After each engineer mixed the album a second time, the group selected all of Mr. Rundgren's second mixes, except for "All La Glory", "The Shape I'm In" and "The Rumor", which were chosen from Mr. Johns' second mixes, for the original 1970 LP, mastered by Bob Ludwig at Sterling Sound. The remastered 2000 Capitol CD and Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab's 2011 hybrid-SACD & LP reissues featured the same set of mixes used for the original Capitol LP. MoFi's excellent reissues were transferred "flat" from the original master, engineered by Rob LoVerde last year, who subsequently posted insightful information online regarding the mixes at the Audio Speakeasy Forum.

I'd hung on to my copies of Capitol's first CD reissues of The Band's catalog, even after I picked up the 2000-2001 CD remasters with bonus material. As I hadn't listened to the 1990 CD version of "Stage Fright" in quite some time, I thought the time was ripe to dig it out. Although I haven't had time to compare it with the DCC gold-CD counterpart and subsequent reissues, I think the sound of those "alternate" mixes add an essential perspective to the "Stage Fright" listening experience.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 15:14:10 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the info on the TCSS OFF button, Bill.

On a totally unrelated subject, I was surprised to hear that posters have Michael Jackson or Bruce Springsteen adorning their bedroom walls. I wouldn’t be allowed to put blu-tack or drawing pins on the pristine Farrow & Ball paintwork, so I have to go back a long time to pictures on the bedroom wall, but I always found Ronnie Spector worked for me. Twinkle maybe too, but that was more realistic.

But seriously .. I had about an hour’s driving around this morning, so summoned up the Bruce playlist on the iPod, and didn’t go for Wrecking Ball but back catalogue. The one that leapt out (three plays) was Walk Like A Man. The other songwriters we’ve mentioned rarely have the knack of hitting the lump in the throat emotional mood so directly. Bob Dylan definitely does it on Sara, but it’s not really his thing.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 14:26:15 CET 2012 from (99.247.228.217)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: john lennon imagine that

just surfing thru you tube a few weeks ago, looking up dion and the belmonts. came accross an interview dion did a couple of years ago. it was very interesting, giving a glimpse into his life's journey. at about the thirty minute mark, he made some comments about the weakness of lennon's imagine, although he called it a good song. never realised how interesting, intelligent and talented dion is. for those interested, ii believe he was interviewed by some one named arroyo.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 14:04:06 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the TCSS OFF button

Peter V: I asked around, and it seems that some high-end North American cars come with the related ORGSMTRON function. Presumably this reflects the tendency here towards larger cars, so fewer solo experiences. Special sensors, collectively called the Santorum Spillage Limiter, ensure that it only works when the car is occupied by one man and one woman.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 13:15:32 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Great little clip of an Elvis Costello impersonator playing the bongos

40 seconds in - no, it's not Bruce in 20 years time conducting his band complete with baton, it's Declan's dad, Ross McManus, the Birkenhead dapper.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 12:47:57 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

RR to present the "Award for Musical Excellence" to Cosimo Matassa, Tom Dowd and Glyn Johns @ the April 14th R & R Hall of Fame ceremony.

Sebastian is looking into the Daniel Lanois recordings some of you were asking about.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 10:52:39 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

Great insightful post Pete. Not just because I happen to agree with its sentiments but because I think you do happen to have nailed it with that insight into what does and doesn't work at the sort of high level we're talking about. It's like the closing punchline of the interlude before the drama of the songs closing verse "I wanna die with you Wendy on the street tonight in an everlasting kiss". It's complete bollocks we know but in the context of the rest of the song you cannot remotely contemplate any other lyrics working as well and setting the scene for the song's closing poignancy.

Have got to say, though, I thought all Martians were called Mork or Mindy. Or are they Mekons?

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 09:59:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Most influential (and useful) drug for rock musicians: penicillin.

Keef’s comment is in character .. A rock journalist described how laid back Keef appeared strolling into a room, and how angry he was when he realized two people had not stopped talking on his arrival.

There’s a line between overblown and magnificent, or full-blown. Take “at night we ride through mansions of glory on suicide machines”. I always thought Bruce takes that within a razor’s edge of “overblown” musically and lyrically, which means it remains on the “magnificent” side of the line, but only just. He pushes right up to the edge, which is why I’d use that bit to demonstrate the magnificence of FULL-BLOWN rock to a Martian. BTW, Al, those little buggers see the 6 minute single as the standard length, due to their year being twice as long as ours. They have 160 minute CDs too, which can be a bit dull for them on the flying saucers when someone (usually Zog) pulls out Ten Years After’s Greatest Live Performances.

I suspect Bruce might irritate Keef because Mick is liable to flirt with that line too (Let it Bleed? You Can’t Always Get What You Want? Sympathy for the Devil?) .. and it wasn’t till after 1972 that he ever got on the wrong side of it.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 09:20:13 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Nitpicking and stuff

I'm not one to pull up a fellow scouser but c'mon Lenno lad - how the fuck can something 'shrink' once it's already feckin 'vanished'? :-0)

Meantime, you've got to hand it to our Kev - nobody defends his corner quite like our affable apologist Cannuck. Typo my arse. :-0) Admit it Kev - your bedroom is a shrine to lickle mikey. Mind you I'm going to have to make room in my own for this latest batch of Bruce pics!! :-0)

Which brings me around nicely to Keef and the Wilburys's comments on Bruce.

Keef's snide put down of the man I love :-0) and the fact the Wilbury giggling tittle tattle schoolgirl society felt compelled to lampoon the guy kind of pinpoints how over the years I've come to view these people. It's why I can admire and love so much of the fantastic work they have all created yet remain completely detached from them in any emotional sense. It contrasts so starkly with why I cherish the work of the guy they lampoon yet at the same time also connect with that guy on such an emotional level.

On the one hand you've got snide twats with feet of clay who just so happen to be amazingly gifted musician's/artists. On the other hand you've got a 'salt of the earth' sort of ordinary Joe who just so happens to be an amazingly gifted musician/artist.

And doesn't need chemical assistance to invoke his craft because he writes from his heart and his gut and only ever has a good word to say about his fellow artists. The real McCoy.

Vive la difference.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 20 04:07:25 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: John Lennon & the Beatles..

This came in my messages/jokes. Thought it was so interesting, I had to share it.

Get a KLUE

True story.

In an interview in the London Evening Standard on 4 March 1966, John Lennon of The Beatles compared the band's popularity to Christianity:

Experience has sown few seeds of doubt in him: not that his mind is closed, but it's closed round whatever he believes at the time. "Christianity will go," he said. "It will vanish and shrink. I needn't argue about that; I'm right and I will be proved right. We're more popular than Jesus now; I don't know which will go first -- rock 'n' roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting it that ruins it for me." He is reading extensively about religion.

In 1966, there was no Twitter to flash headlines around the world, making stories go "viral" in 20 minutes. It took months for those comments to be published widely in the U.S., even though the band was already famous here -- they had been on the Ed Sullivan Show two years before.

But when news finally did spread here, some were (shall we say?) peeved. The Rev. Thurman H. Babbs of the New Haven Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio, called for churches to excommunicate all Beatles fans.

Some protests were a bit more ...well... typical. Time for an update on book burning! "We are inviting local teenagers to bring in their records and other symbols of the group's popularity to be burned at a public bonfire on Friday night, August 13," said the station manager of KLUE radio (1280 AM) in Longview, Texas.

The next day -- a Sunday -- a bolt of lightning hit the radio station's transmission tower. The station's news director was rendered unconscious, and damage to broadcasting equipment was so extensive, the station was off the air for months.

The station eventually lost its KLUE: those call letters are now assigned to an FM station in Missouri.

Hope you all got a charge out of this one..xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 20 03:30:56 CET 2012 from (184.66.107.77)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island (by way of cabbagetown)

Subject: Bill M

Now that's gonna stir up some shit. Good one.


Entered at Tue Mar 20 02:47:53 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan

Hi all!! Great posts and love the links.Thanx to all of you guys for your time and thoughts.

My link may bring back memories of early Bob Dylan.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 20 02:16:12 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thoughts on the most important / influential drugs in songwriting?


Entered at Tue Mar 20 00:47:58 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bob F.........It was never about Bob D

Bob F: I had meant James Brown......but more than happy to support my own typo and answer your question......As to Michael Jackson’s influence........other than about 80% of the professional songwriters responsible for about 50% of the world-wide Pop hits over the last 20 years for the likes of MEGA STARS like Justin Timberlake, Chris Brown, Usher, Rihanna, Beyoncé, etc., I can’t think of any.

To avoid making myself ill, I will pass on the Garth Brooks discussion only to add that influences don’t always have to be for the betterment of art or design.........Enzo Ferrari must turn in his grave every time one of those grotesque SUV’s occupied by a soccer mom playing Coldplay has its engine turned on......but there you have it.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 22:33:46 CET 2012 from (86.183.34.113)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter

Never, ever, Peter. Not even on a Saturday, now.

Dunc's wild years are hung on the line.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 22:00:29 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Al Stewart

I love those old Al Stewart songs like 'Road to Moscow'. I haven't listen to that in years but now I'm going to. Thanks Peter!


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:52:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, never open the third bottle of wine.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:50:03 CET 2012 from (86.183.34.113)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Folk club

Two pints and a singer at the folk club on Monday night. Life couldn't be better.

But would I go out tonight in this pouring rain as in times gone by.

Finished the homework... now three units of wine coming up. Is that less than 2 pints?


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:45:28 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan and Sam Cooke

Peter V, check out this Greil Marcus article. Also, this was in Peter Guarnick's biography on Sam Cooke. But yeah I agree, I'm sure Dylan was influenced by the great Sam Cooke. He was so good.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:40:47 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apart from the fact that Sam Cooke is doing Blowing in The Wind atrociously badly (a huge surprise), how does that influence him as a songwriter? You mean, he couldn't have thought of A Change Is Gonna Come on his own???


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:35:40 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Petition

What better place than here in Jan's GB to start a petition urging the release of ROBBIE ROBERTSON: THE GREASY LANOIS MIXES :-)


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:33:49 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Sam Cooke performing Dylan's "Blowing In The Wind".


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:30:50 CET 2012 from (86.183.34.113)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Tom Waits, Paul Simon

Really like Tom Waits, Hilda. Bought 'Big Time' on Saturday and playing it just now. Must be near complete.

At times, Paul Simon's later work is criticised, but perhaps this is unfair. Perhaps people don't give the new material a chance to bed in. I think 'Father and Daughter' is a great song.

Or did he suffer from writer's block as I have read.

Thanks David P:I picked up Hearts and Bones at Xmas also and am enjoying the Simon albums I couldn't get before.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:24:02 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Springsteen

After warm-ups at the Apollo and South-by-Southwest, Springsteen's tour began in earnest last night with a 2 1/2 hour concert at Philips Arena here in Atlanta. I did not attend, but here's the set-list:

We Take Care of Our Own / Wrecking Ball / Badlands / Death to My Hometown / My City of Ruins / E Street Shuffle / Jack of All Trades / Seeds / Easy Money / Waiting on a Sunny Day / The Promised Land / The Way You Do the Things You Do / 634-5789 / Shackled and Drawn / Lonesome Day / The Rising / We Are Alive / Thunder Road

Encore: Rocky Ground (with Michelle Moore) / Land of Hope and Dreams / Born To Run / Dancing in the Dark / American Land / Tenth Avenue Freeze Out


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:11:43 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: And Al Stewart

I used to watch him doing "Desolation Row" every Monday at the folk club. And Paul Simon very clearly too.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 21:05:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

10 great songwriters influenced by Bob Dylan would have to include Robbie Robertson. And Donovan, whether great or indifferent. But Sam Cooke? Really? Don't you have your vices versa?


Entered at Mon Mar 19 20:39:15 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Michael Jackson Influential as a songwriter?

Kevin J, I'm not sure I follow you about Michael Jackson being so influential as a songwriter. Can I ask you to name 10 great sonwriters he influenced? If you asked me to name 10 great songwriters influenced by Bob Dylan I could easily say, Sam Cooke, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, Jimi Hendrix, Van Morrison, John Lennon, Laura Nyro, Ani DiFranco and I'll go young on the tenth with Josh Ritter. We could probably name 100 very good to great songwriters influenced by Dylan in 5 minutes time. I would like to see you name 10 great songwriters influenced by Michael Jackson. After that please name 10 great country songwriters influenced by Garth Brooks. Take your time.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 20:37:25 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I have a feeling I'm a minority of one in preferring Bruce's stripped down original to the Band's version. (I spent a good decade thinking the opposite, under the misapprehenstion that Bruce's version featured the usual full-group sound.) But now it'd be the b-side to "Born To Run" on my dream Springsteen 45. Nevertheless, however heartfelt and powerful I find his song, it still troubles me that he can get away with an attitude that makes it okay to insist that his date put her makeup on (as if she needs it) and fix her hair up pretty (as if it's not already) and meet (i.e., not be picked up by!) him tonight in Atlantic City. Maybe it's just jealousy, because he has looks and talent?


Entered at Mon Mar 19 20:10:47 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

....and a link to warm your hearts....how the Band post Robbie soared when they had A+ material.....only Manfred Mann has covered Springsteen as well.

Bill M: Indeed the 'Ain't no Fortunate Son" ened up looking just like the Fortunate One............If Ray Davies ever morphed into Dick Cheney.....I'd kill myself immediately!


Entered at Mon Mar 19 19:50:46 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

The Vivinos are from north of the oil refineries. Patterson, Glen Rock.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 19:06:21 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bruce Springsteen will tell you the best band to come out of New Jersey (although Felix Cavaliere was originally from NY and Gene Cornish was Canadian) was the Young Rascals.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 19:00:02 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Perspective

The reason that Robbie, Bruce, Jim Keltner and other musicians were performing with John Fogerty at the 1993 R&R HoF, when CCR was inducted, was due to the fact that Mr. Fogerty refused to allow his former band members Stu Cook and Doug Clifford onstage to perform with him. His brother Tom had previously passed away. So, on that night, it seems that Mr. Fogerty might have agreed with Robbie's past assessment of CCR.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 18:52:28 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for the clip. Look at Fogerty, 2:10-2:20 - does he not look like Dubya with '70s hair? Robbie adds a bit of lustre to his TLW-halo as the go-to guy when you've dropped your pick. Also, are you saying that there couldn't have been a "Born In The USA" had there not been a "Born On The Bayou"? Essay question: how much did "Proud Mary" have to do with Robbie's choice of location and other details as he transmogrified "Bessie Smith" into "Up On Cripple Creek"?


Entered at Mon Mar 19 18:28:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent. Did John Fogerty remember that Robbie said CCR was "just John Fogerty and some guys". Did he like it if he did? Who knows? I was going to post the Levon / Bruce version of Up On Cripple Creek from the Stone Pony, but the film and sound quality is awful.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 17:55:13 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Encore of 3 first ballot Hall of Famers playing together...Bruce Springsteen, Robbie Robertson and John Fogerty.......


Entered at Mon Mar 19 17:44:01 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jersey Boys

While Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi are among its most famous living musicians, the Garden State has also produced Donald Fagen, David Grisman, Frankie Valli and Jerry & Jimmy Vivino.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 17:15:39 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Link to an influential Rock n Roll Hall of Famer - wink wink Al

“The undercover cop was found face down in a field/ The monkey man was on the river bridge using Tweeter as a shield/ Jan said to the Monkey Man "I'm not fooled by Tweeter's curl/ I knew him long before he ever became a Jersey girl" - B. Dylan

Keith Richard(s) on Bruce Springsteen:

“That's a tough one, because I like the GUY... I love his attitude. I love what he WANTS to do. I just think he's gone about it the wrong way. These are just my opinions, and OK, I'll annoy the lot of you. Bruce? Too contrived for me. Too overblown.”

Keef on Rap:

“I mean, I've had enough of bloody rap. (Imitates rap over knee-slapped beat.) I mean, Mary had a little lamb, her fleece was white as fucking snow. What's the attraction of that? This is kindergarten shit. It's like karaoke. But I'm making records that people can listen to. Obviously, the attraction is there, until they all shoot each other - and they're doing a good job of it. If you want to hear good rap, you should listen to early Jamaican dub, which is some really interesting stuff. At least they didn't keep it to just one meter.”


Entered at Mon Mar 19 15:27:10 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Go West

The bestest part of Jersey is that section where it snuggles with NY and Pa. Newton,Blairtstown, Flatbrookville, etc etc..that be West, generally speaking the Delaware Water Gap area.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 14:50:04 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: tossing lobs, not

Al E: Thanks for the heads-up. A sense of decorum prevents me asking for clarification - but consider the lesson learned.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 14:49:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tossing a lob

Al, my wife's Suzuki Splash has a switch on the dashboard labelled TCSS OFF. I have no idea what it actually does, but when we got the car, I assumed it read TOSS OFF and marvelled at the ingenuity of car designers. What accessory wlil they add next, I thought.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 14:33:57 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Okay Bill - I'll tackle this by a process of elimination

To start with. It's not Frank Sinatra.

:-0)

Hmmm. Or maybe it's a trick question and it really is? Hmmm.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 14:30:14 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M

You do realise you can get arrested in the UK for tossing a lob in public.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Mar 19 14:13:32 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: New Jersey and the performing arts

Al E: Since you seem prone to seeing even complex questions as opportunities to plump loudly for his Bruceness, I'll toss you a lob - Who is the best living performer with New Jersey roots?


Entered at Mon Mar 19 11:43:51 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: The conventional cutting up of NJ

Depending on where you are from in NJ, it is cutup in many fashions. Having lived in the three major parts: Born and lived my 10 years in north jersey, then went to central jersey (Howell) the town south of Bruce (i had teachers who taught him), then college in south jersey (Glassboro, now Rowan University), - the conventional wisdom is that anything below the Driscoll Bridge on the Parkway is considered central jersey (currently I live just north of this bridge). This essentially is the marker for exits that lead to the jersey shore. Central Jersey then ends (and this point is fuzzy) at Seaside/Island Beach State Park/Toms River. Some might say Long Beach Island but I put that location in the neutral zone as it is a stand alone location with a mix of Philadelphia and NY and north jersey folks - more the latter. Regardless, anything south of LBI ( as Long Beach Island is referred to in this central northern part of the state) is considered south jersey. South Jersey is AC, Stone Harbor, Avalon, Wildwood, Ocean City, Cape May...all that is considered Philadelphia destinations. Rare for people in the northern part of the state and NY to go there unless you are a south jersey/Philly transplant. Back in the 70's, south jersey was a world away. Atlantic City wasn't even thought of as a destination until they brought gambling back because the area was so depressed (it still is but now has casino's) and Wildwood was this distant place rumored to have enormous beaches and a pretty good boardwalk ( it does on both counts - well the boardwalk was impressive when I was last there in the mid-eighties). Two other Jersey observations - Seaside Heights (home of the enigmatic tv show, The Jersey Shore) is the frequent destination for the NY thug crowd and Wildwood is the destination for the Philly thug crowd.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 11:00:45 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: North and South

195 cuts NJ in half but when it comes to the Jersey Shore -anything below AC is South and is a suburb of Philadelphia in the Summer and North of AC is North and a suburb or NY in the Summer.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 03:12:46 CET 2012 from (72.78.36.193)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Joisy

Put'EmUp,I don't think there's a clear definition, but I'd say anything south of Exit 6 on the Jersey Turnpike, (Exit 6 is where it meets the PA Turnpike), or south of Trenton is a good bet. Bruce is from North of Exit 7-A. I bet Patti Smith who is from pretty damn far South in Jersey, where the used to press them Columbia Records would know.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 02:46:45 CET 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Glad to see someone jumped top the Kinks defense so I didnt have to. I know a lot of folks who think the Kinks best work was 1977-1984. Me Im 66-71, but Low Budget, Misfits, Give the People What They Want, State of Confusion and Sleepwalker are 5 damn fine albums in the 77-84 era.

A few people commented on the possibility of a Lanois Mix of Robbie's first album. From page 87 of Lanois's Biography Soul Mining (A great read by the way)

I finished the Robbie Robertson record on the sweet little API console in a backroom studio at A&M Records. The mixes were greasy, salty, punch and raw. I believe the limitation of the equipment of that little mixing room pushed me to build clear and full-bodied blends. Sometimes a lack of options makes for better work. Robbie's record was remixed by Bob Clearmountain. It would be an interesting study to compare my greasy mixes and Clearmountain's mixes, now that much waster has passed under the bridge.

Doesnt really settle whether they exist, but it sure sounds to me like Lanois believes they do.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 00:44:23 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hilda

How could I have left the incredible Tom Waits off my American list. Johnsburg Illinois and Soldiers Things are just perfect.


Entered at Mon Mar 19 00:39:13 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Getting down to brass tacks

Who cares about feckin importance and influence anyroad? The 'Hen' and Madonna can go feck themselves. I bet she probably does too. Broooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooce is yer man!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Mar 19 00:27:55 CET 2012 from (62.140.137.98)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low countries

Subject: JQ/ Hell Broke Luce

I found an interview with Tom Waits on a blog from someone called Slate where he says it was written like that on the wall of a cell in Alcatraz. He had seen it and decided to use it just like that!


Entered at Sun Mar 18 23:45:25 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Whilst this might be heresy, and i really should listen again before i write this, the first minute of Born To Run might be almost, if not as thrilling as the first minute of Like a Rolling Stone. Mind you nowhere as important or influential in the scheme of music or history, in any way shape or form.but as thrilling, yes..the song is one helluva song.

PSB, i had cousins in Edison, Freehold (Springsteen territory, or was that Englishtown?), and Willingboro. The Willingboro cousins moved to Mt Laurel and Cherry Hill. One would think that geogarphy is fixed, but as you yourself wrote, alluding to the area where Springsteen grew up, "It's more like Central Jersey but only sort of."

Whilst my subjective geographical refernces are just that,I don't know that there are stronger lines. While I do think of Edison as central Jersey,in another reagrd, i consider anything south of the refineries as South Jersey. Doesn't make it right. . "But i;ve been wrong before and i'll be wrong again." Actually, maybe we can expand the defintion of South Jersey as anywhere you can buy a panzarotti in a pizza place. For a defintion of a panzarotti, you gyus best check with PSB. i don't think i;ve seen one in 40 years, but i can't forget the name.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 23:44:32 CET 2012 from (74.198.87.91)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Lee ?????????? Really Now.....

....missed that show but have been litenning to Beak, Honey Boy, Ricky and Royal all afternoon...........


Entered at Sun Mar 18 21:12:55 CET 2012 from (99.141.40.150)

Posted by:

Adam

Another fantastic Levon show in Chicago on Friday. Seeing Lee, Jim Weider and Randy Ciarlante together again was great. I not only met Jim, Brian Mitchell and Howard Johnson, but got to talk with my personal hero Larry Campbell. What a special evening.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 21:09:23 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I had thought Carmen’s question was ”most influential” not “favorite”..................Chuck Berry, Michael Jackson and BB King have had far more influence than any of the names mentioned..................Springsteen may have provided some great recordings over the years but he wouldn’t even rank on any list in terms of importance or influence..........Again sticking with Carmen’s parameters of North American songwriters........as much as none of them turned my crank......Kurt Cobain ( Grunge ) , Madonna ( Dance ), Garth Brooks (Country ) and even Henley and Frey ( in the grotesque category of New Country ) had far far more influence than Bruce.

.............a few other points, RR has written many great songs post Band......including “She’s Not Mine”, Straight Down The Line” and “The Right Mistake” from his most recent release................As to my beloved Kinks......their mid 80’s album “Word of Mouth” is brilliant......get by a bit of irritating 80’s production and there are more very good-bordering on great songs than any of their contemporaries ( Stones, Who, Eagles, Queen, The Band, etc. ) had during the entire 80’s, 90’s................


Entered at Sun Mar 18 21:07:29 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, rest assured, the Sardinians would have been rooting for Dundee. Anybody against Roma, they told me.

One Trick Pony is a greatly under-rated album. Douglas Adams said he wrote "A Hitch-hikers Guide" while listening to it non-stop.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 20:58:40 CET 2012 from (198.228.220.55)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hell Broke Luce

Hilda - I totally agree with you on this one, although I'm not sure what the "Luce" spelling is about. Maybe Henry Luce, an ardent war monger here in his day -


Entered at Sun Mar 18 20:42:49 CET 2012 from (86.183.34.113)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Posts

Thanks Al - really been busy, but have enjoyed reading all the posts the last hour or so. All artists mentioned I really enjoy, but, as I mentioned before, I feel I've missed Bruce, but my son is really into him.

Just now, I have been playing 'One Trick Pony' and 'There Goes Rhymin Simon Live' and really enjoying them. Paul Simon keeps growing with me.

Peter and Al. On a football note Peter's meal in Sardinia struck a sour note with me. Roma beat my favourites, Dundee United,a small team, in the semi final of that European Cup. Last summer, the referee admitted he had been bribed by Roma. But nothing has been done about it.

For me, it's still Dylan and the Band.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 19:11:23 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Martian Boogie

Mention of Brownsville Girl, then Martians, inevitably leads to "Martian Boogie" by Brownsville Station which is linked.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 19:08:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Kast Off Kinks

In fact the Kast Off Kinks (with no Davies brothers) are still alive and touring. See link, but be aware that it goes straight into loud music.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 18:39:20 CET 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bruce

For me Dylan appeals to my head, but Bruce appeals to my heart.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 18:16:57 CET 2012 from (72.78.36.193)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Jersey geography

Put Em Up, While where Bruce Springsteen is from is South of New York City, Newark, Boston and Canada among other places, that is not South Jersey. South Jersey is a whole other story. It's more like Central Jersey but only sort of. On another note, the Kinks definitely made it out of the '60s.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 18:06:03 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: My Favourite martians

If you had to explain the total thrill of rock and roll to a Martian, there are few things better than the first minute of Born To Run

I've tried it Pete. The awkward buggers insist on the entire 6 minutes.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 18 17:50:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If you had to explain the total thrill of rock and roll to a Martian, there are few things better than the first minute of Born To Run.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 16:38:36 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bruce is for real. Whilst it is not a calcualted ploy, but part of his music, his "presentation", or how he presents his expression is widely different than the other artist being discussed. That might contribute to some of the opinions that cast him off somewhat. The man is from South Jersey, and that is quite a major obstacle for anyone to overcome, let alone to become as expressive and creative as he has. Growing up downwind of the oil tanks and gasoline factories like he did, it's a miracle anyone could think straight at all.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 16:06:39 CET 2012 from (62.140.137.125)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low countries

Subject: Al Edge/ Favourites

I think you should not have to defend your preferences ! Whatever music pulls at your heartstrings is fine by me. Explaining why they do so is another matter. I can only applaud you for doing so and doing it so well! For me it was hearing Subterranean Homesick Blues at 16. He has never been boring me ever since. Van Morrison has been a good second for a long time but lately Tom Waits took over. His song Hell Broke Luce is right up there with Masters of War as far as I'm concerned. So there you go..... Keep up your very readable posts.....I enjoy them.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 14:48:33 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Favourites again

In fairness to Jed and anybody reading these posts - most if not all of whom are seasoned music veterans - any post which doesn't have Dylan above every other songwriter bar John & Paul is justifiably open to question and may well induce a sense of indignation or at least an urge to set the record straight.

As such I feel my own preference for Bruce over Bob should carry some sort of explanation as to why. After all, Bob is unquestionably the gov'ner. He set the stone rolling - set the marker which nobody has ever passed - and has kept that stone rolling longer than anybody. Nobody can seriously deny his place at the top of the creative pantheon alongside the two scouse musical geniuses.

The fact is whilst both Bob and Bruce are the creators of some of popular music's finest ever moments - fantastic songs with superb melody and staggering lyrics, it remains unquestionable that the songbook and music of Dylan and its impact and influence stretches infinitely further than that of Springsteen.

So why isn't Bob top of my own influence and importance chart? Why do I place Bruce so much higher?

Well, speaking on a personal level, I think the answer is quite simple. Bruce reaches me in an emotional way that Bob simply doesn't. Sure I adore so much of Dylan's songbook. And his music has always resonated with me but I can honestly say I have never been moved by Dylan or his music in the way I have by Springsteen and his music.

Maybe Bruce simply speaks in a more direct way that enables a more instinctive connection and identification with what he's saying for someone like myself.

I guess also an individual emotion levels - perhaps even sentimentality levels - come into play in this context.

Whatever the case, coming from a city of high Celtic emotion, supporting a football team of uniquely high emotion - YNWA is not simply a song to Liverpudlians and hasn't been since it was first sung in '64 - it's hard for such emotion not to end up coursing right through your veins. And Bob's music as amazing as it was never tapped into that emotion that has become so much a part of me in the same way as Bruce's did.

I'm probably explaining all this in a very hamfisted manner but the following two random batches of lyrics from each artist may - or more likely may not :-0) - illustrate what I'm trying to say.

Each are typical of the two artists. Both are without question from songs that are for me as good as such stuff gets yet only Springsteen's connect with me in that deep emotional way which I guess I must crave.

Bob's

You used to be so amused
At Napoleon in rags and the language that he used
Go to him now, he calls you, you can't refuse
When you got nothing, you got nothing to lose
You're invisible now, you got no secrets to conceal.

I'm a-thinkin' and a-wonderin' walkin? down the road
I once loved a woman, a child I'm told
I give her my heart but she wanted my soul
But don't think twice, it's all right

I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are a many and their hands are all empty...
...Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I'll tell and think it and speak it and breathe it
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it
Then I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin'
But I'll know my songs well before I start singin'
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

And though our separation
It pierced me to the heart
She still lives inside of me
We've never been apart

Bruce

Remember all the movies, Terry, we'd go see
Trying to learn how to walk like the heroes we thought we had to be
Well after all this time to find we're just like all the rest
Stranded in the park and forced to confess
To hiding on the backstreets, hiding on the backstreets

Inside I felt like I was carryin' the broken spirits of all the other ones who’d lost
When the promise is broken you go on living, but it steals something from down in your soul
Like when the truth is spoken and it don't make no difference, something in your heart runs cold

Talk about a dream, try to make it real
You wake up in the night with a fear so real
You spend your life waiting for a moment that just don't come
Well don't waste your time waiting

Now those memories come back to haunt me, they haunt me like a curse
Is a dream a lie if it don't come true, or is it something worse


Entered at Sun Mar 18 14:12:46 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Joan, thank you for your kind words. Peter V, If we're talking songwriting, Knocked Out Loaded has 'Brownsville Girl' on it. There are not many songwriters who have anything like that in their tool box.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 14:03:41 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Just curious

Couldn't that be said about Dylan, The Beatles and The Band, too...that they were carrying on musical traditions?


Entered at Sun Mar 18 11:31:36 CET 2012 from (174.44.143.11)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bests

Bruce is an energetic performer carrying on a musical tradition. The Beatles,Dylan,The Band--they are originals with distinct talent.Bruce is not in the same league as them.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 11:31:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: apple, Apple and Apple

The autocorrect function in Pages just corrected 'apple' to Apple. They must have built this in, which is a swine for people in the cider industry, but OK for those writing a history of The Beatles.


Entered at Sun Mar 18 00:52:31 CET 2012 from (184.66.107.77)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Peter V

My personal opinion is there's the Beatles, and then everyone else. Over the last 42 years since they called it a day, I've asked myself a million times why I feel that way. For the life of me, I can't explain it. I am so into the blues the last few years and the difference between the two is major. OR IS IT? There's Dylan, there's the Boss, there's Motown, there's the Wrecking Crew etc, etc, etc. I was into music a long time before the Beatles but, as a comfort zone I still go back there. I probably have in my collection everything they ever did. But I only pull it out about once a year. When I want to feel good! Randy Bachman is my neighbor here on Salt Spring and guess what he warms up with? Beatle tunes!


Entered at Sat Mar 17 21:57:50 CET 2012 from (64.220.124.210)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: 2 new guys

Although some of us geezers might consider their stuff to be too new to be considered, I'd add in E Costello and N Lowe.

Randy Newman's a must and I think Richard Thompson should be in there too.



Entered at Sat Mar 17 21:32:52 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Strawberry Fields Forever

The Beatles never produced the equivalent crap of Saved, Dylan & The Dead, Knocked Out Loaded or a dozen others. That boosts their rating considerably, but while Visions of Johanna remains number one on my Desert Island discs selection, John & Paul have never been surpassed. Not even by Bob.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 21:01:13 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Onario, Canada

Subject: HAPPY ST. PATRICK'S DAY

Hope you all have a good one!!

Irish Blessings

Wherever you go and whatever you do,

May the luck of the Irish, Be there with you!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

May your glass be ever full

May the roof over your head

be always strong

And may you be in heaven

Half an hour before

The devil knows you're dead.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

May your troubles be less

And your blessings be more

And nothing but happiness

Come through your door!

Wonderful posts and links. Wish I had more time to comment on them. ROBBIE is and always be my fave of faves in everything he doea. Solo: "Broken Arrow" and Rod Stewart's version is also a goodie...All ROBBIE's solos are great...

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sat Mar 17 20:22:28 CET 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Catching up

Haven't checked in for a few days.First off Bob F, sorry to hear about your situation. Hopefully something good will come your way soon

To add to the "jersey" conversation. I'm a knitter and I have some historical patterns for seafaring men called "Gansies" They are done in all wool with definite patterns. Each village had their own patterns which helped them identify sailors who had drowned.

Chanel's new perfume called "Jersey" amuses me. Perhaps they could call the next one "Bayonne" It would capture that great NJ Turnpike "aroma".


Entered at Sat Mar 17 19:47:24 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

It's impossible to put anyone ahead of Dylan. Everything the Beatles did was perfect but they had a very short time span. They broke up before their juices began to dry up and based on their solo career those juices were going to get weaker. Bob Dylan has been writing great songs for over 50 years. No one else has even come close to matching that milestone. The Stones haven't recorded anything worth listening to since Some Girls, The Who, Who's Next and The Kink's never really made it out of the 60's. The solo careers of these artist are very hit and miss. I would take Springsteen and Neil Young over everyone except Dylan and that is world wide.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 19:12:34 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Jeb Stuart

I can barely think of him without crying.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 18:59:07 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: worldwide

If we're doing WORLDWIDE, not just North America, like Al, I put Lennon-McCartney above Dylan. No question. And then we bring in Ray Davies, Jagger-Richards, Pete Townsend ..


Entered at Sat Mar 17 17:17:31 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: none

AL- a melting pot- yes, indeed. This place has always been a melting pot.

In fond remembrance of the Boy Major, I once again toast the memory of the Gallant Pelham (1838-1863).


Entered at Sat Mar 17 13:23:48 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Influential, important....or just plain favourite

Whichever way we care to dress it up subjectivity is bound to distort objectivity to some degree or another when contemplating such judgements.

Sure we can all home in on Dylan as our communal numero uno selection. But where does that leave the guy in overalls who first inspired a young Robert Zimmerman? How can we say with any real conviction which of those pair is more influential or important?

We've been down this same route many times before. It's always fascinating but ultimately always destined to remain inconclusive.

To some extent or another every single thing derives from something else. It's a physical law that governs life itself. So, in a way every piece of music owes at least something to some musical form or another that preceded it. None of us know - or rather can know - remotely enough to make such a call as to which or whom stands as most inluential or important.

So it remains simply the greatest of fun in trying to do so. And nobody relishes such posers more than yours truly as witnessed by the lists I instigated some time back - and yes I did, I'm sure, take care to label them "favourite" which is all they can ever be.

Listening to Springsteen's wonderfully inspirational and honest address to the Austin music assembly I think gave you the best possible answer to your question Carmen.

He took us through many of his own influences in that sparklingly corny yet fun and entertaining manner Bruce makes his own and made you realise there can be no single influence but merely a conglomerate of so many of the buggers.

You'll have to view the video to see just how many he gets through - and I can assure everyone it's 51 minutes of joyous viewing - but what it did bring home to me more than anything was just how mixed up and confused the entire concept really is.

It's a melting pot and we as individuals - with our native biases for fellow scousers or cannucks [spell] - cannot fully even determine the constituents of our own particular melting pots let alone that of the collective universal one.

So at the end of the day all's I know is that from my own perspective of influential and important - for me worldwide it's the two scousers whilst of the North american songwriting wizards the lad from New Jersey is numero uno, followed by Dylan, followed by Robbie and Richard, followed by Hank Williams, followed by Stipe/Buck/Mills/Berry with Woody Guthrie, Blind Lemon Pie and all his Blues brothers, Chuck Berry, Lowell George, John Fogerty, Bob Seger, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman, Dion di Mucci, Stevie Wonder, Paul Simon, Sam Cooke, Lamont Dozier, Brian and Eddie Holland, Smokey Robinson, Jimmy Smith and Kevin Russell, Black Francis, Brian Wilson, Carol King, Doc Pomus, Mort Shuman, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, John Hiatt, Boz Scaggs, Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham all vying for sixth spot in the canon.

:-)0 - that was so tough me nose swapped places with me gob.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 11:57:46 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

By the way - RR is one of my favorite of all time and ahead of Bruce. Unlike many other here in the GB, I found the Band via RR rather than the other way around. I think he has written some great songs since the days of the Band. Between Trains, Broken Arrow, Crazy River, She's Not Mine and a bunch of others.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 11:51:35 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bob, Bruce & Neil

4 favorite from each

Bob - Blood on the Tracks, Blond on Blond, Highway 61 and Desire

Neil - Harvest, After the Gold Rush, Everyone Knows This is Nowhere and On the Beach

Bruce - BTR, Darkness, River, and The Rising.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 10:30:59 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Nice to know that I'm not the only one to be seduced by the black label. Something appealing in its simplicity (and I'm not particularly fond of black), BUT the "beer" tasted worse than sludge." Never again. Never again." were the words that passed my lips after spewing out that swill. Still, that label...

Neil ahead of The Boss, but only slightly and mainly due to a larger and a bit more diverse body of work and of a sense of patriotism on my part. Had Mr. Young not been from my home province, Bruce would have come ahead. Trans....really Mr. Young?!? I don't think so. : (


Entered at Sat Mar 17 09:56:47 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It’s hard .. Willie Dixon was a very good call. Smoky Robinson? That’s who Dylan and Robbie variously mentioned in the 60s. Brian Wilson has to be Top Ten. Laura Nyro had the ability, but wasn’t with us long enough for a Top Ten placing. Randy Newman? What’s difficult is that Brian Wilson always called in other lyricists, otherwise he’d be my number three after Paul Simon.

Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen and Robbie Robertson differ from Dylan and Neil Young in that their lyrics are carefully crafted over long periods of time (according to all of them) rather than inspirations of the moment. I don’t know where Bruce fits. Much more prolific than Simon, Robertson & Cohen, that’s for sure. As a result a few albums aren’t as great as the new one. But even Paul Simon did The Capeman and Leonard Cohen did Dear Heather.

But I'll throw in another one: Carole King. Or maybe Goffin & King. Just get the three Ace CDs of their compositions for other artists, as well as her solo stuff (not that I listen to anything much after Tapestry which was a LONG time ago). I'd rate them on the basis of stuff in the 60s.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 07:56:52 CET 2012 from (99.141.40.150)

Posted by:

Adam

Another fantastic Levon show in Chicago tonight. Seeing Lee, Jim Weider and Randy Ciarlante together again was great. I not only met Jim, Brian Mitchell and Howard Johnson, but got to talk with my personal hero Larry Campbell. What a special evening.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 07:35:14 CET 2012 from (124.168.33.27)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: No.1 is Bob...

Bruce? hmmmm.. for no. 2. A strong call. Neil? no.. way too inconsistent. Paul Simon? hmmm.... it's a tough one... We could have later writers, of course... Robbie? Certiainly deserves a high place... Stevie Wonder? He's gotta be up there, but sometimes his lyrics need more work. hmmm...


Entered at Sat Mar 17 02:59:45 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Carmen, I'm not sure if Bruce or Neil Young would be number 2, but they are the only songwriters I would mention in the same sentence with Dylan. I guess it would depend on who had the last great record. Right now it would be Bruce. Laura Nyro would be in my 4th spot and Robbie would round out my top 5. I don't think Robbie has written a great song in the last 30 years but his Band songs keep him in my top 5.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 01:07:09 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Willie Dixon if the dead can apply.

Thanks Hilda. Expertise.


Entered at Sat Mar 17 00:30:08 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

i just received my 91% of my mechanical royalties collected by CdBaby from rhpasody for streams of my songs in Jan and Feb of 2011..it is possible there are more on the way, these things do not always appear at once. i did not pay attention last time, i may have been paid partially for these months already and also. But right now, as i just looked, I've been paid for 70.4 streams, yes 70.4 streams. The grand total the mechanical royalties have reached for these 70.4 streams is 16 cents. Fortunately, I also get paid for the sale of the stream, that usually comes in about 9/10s of a cent per stream .....:-) LOL!


Entered at Fri Mar 16 23:55:43 CET 2012 from (62.140.137.90)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countres

Subject: Jerseys and such...

I think it takes a woman who has done some sewing to tell you that any material that has been knitted and not woven is called jersey. It was named after the island because it was one of the first exporters of knitted goods. At first it was wool but later on also lighter materials like cotton and silk. Eventually every knitted material became known as jersey, including synthetic fibres. Coco chanel was the first designer to use it for women's clothing but enough with the history lesson.............. I would like to rate Tom Waits at number 2..............so there you go!


Entered at Fri Mar 16 23:31:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Carmen, I'd put Paul Simon number two. No question.

Then you have to look at soul and folk too before deciding. I'd put Bruce in front of Neil, but I'm not sure yet that's third place. I 'd have to consider Joni Mitchell, Robbie Robertson, Leonard Cohen, James Taylor too. Robbie would get number three for me. Leonard four .. hmm. Bruce at five?


Entered at Fri Mar 16 22:44:57 CET 2012 from (91.52.120.25)

Posted by:

Norb

Location: Germany

Subject: Time

Time's the most precious thing we have, a few tips to squeeze your Band time;

1) Realize that time management is a myth.

2) Never make plans.

3) Flex your pubococcygeus.

4) Waste time.

5) Think disgusting thoughts.

6) Don't get organized (ruthlessly).



Entered at Fri Mar 16 22:36:20 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Carmen- most influential and most important can be two separate things, and then there is also the consideration of in what or which aspects and to whom. For whom, you could look at it a lot of ways.... just to start : to those who are lyricists, to thos who are primarily musicians ( all 3 of your guys have distinct sounds, more than one distinct sound btw, BOb being the guy who really busted the sound barrier), to the average person on the street culturally, to the cultrue in whole... in lifestyle, thinking, etc. Songwriters that reach the masses can effect many things.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 21:53:23 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Perhaps Mike H can ask Sebastian/Robbie directly.....Thanks David.....I remember that Bill Flanagan article well as it was the first I knew of the return of RR and I remember how thrilling it was to see it on the newstand........loved it all except the champagne story.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 21:34:59 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: JRR & Lanois

It's not surprising that Daniel Lanois prepared some earlier mixes for Robbie's eponymous solo album, as it was over a year in the making, interrupted by Robbie's work on the "Color of Money" soundtrack. Whether Mr. Lanois' early mixes ever see the light of day is anotheer matter, but those tapes may still be stored somewhere. Bob Clearmountain was brought in towards the finish of the album to do mixes at Bearsville Studios. For a brief history of the recording process see link above to Bill Flanagan's article "The Return of Robbie Robertson", published in the Sept. 1987 issue of MUSICIAN magazine.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 20:34:36 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Landmark: O’Keefe as it was simply called had a short but strong period of affection with the francophones mid 70’s – early 80’s before the microbrewery period really hit......The Anglophobes drank Labatt's and ‘Molson” as it was called in Quebec ( simply X in Ontario ) and the Molson and O’Keeffe rivalry and breakdown largely by language lines reached a peak during the glorious Quebec Nordiques-Montreal Canadiens Battle of Quebec wars ( the Nordiques were owned in part by Carling and many fans with an allegiance to them drank their product) .............I actually never did ever see anyone eat a Pepsi and May West together as the myth had it..............perhaps we will meet on the Main one day and figure this all out......

Pat: Any more patronizing jokes? Such a laugh.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 20:22:40 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bruce vs Neil

I would like to hear the GB'ers opinions. Assuming that the majority would say that Dylan's ranks # 1 in terms of the most influential or important N American songwriters - who would you say is Number 2? Neil or Bruce? I vote Neil


Entered at Fri Mar 16 19:51:33 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bruce isn't wearing a guernsey, a jersey, jumper, sweater, pullover or jerkin ..but

Feck me - get on this before they pull it off you tube. Bruce on the universal language of music.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 19:36:39 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Grouser: Canada is full of whores and hockey players.

Shocked Bystander: Say here, bub. My wife is from Canada.

Grouser, recovering: Well then. Who did she play for?


Entered at Fri Mar 16 19:33:56 CET 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I don't know what neighbourhood he is referring to but it certainly wasn't mine. There is an urban legend that French Canadians would have a Pepsi and May West for breakfast but I never witnessed that. A gram of hash, not for lunch but definitely after work till whatever hour. Cigarettes aplenty. Roll your owns, perhaps. And nobody, regardless, of language or ethnic background would drink O'Keefe or any other Carling products because they tasted horrid. I once asked a friend to pick up a 2-4 (Canadians know this one) of beer for a poker game I was hosting at my place. I gave him money and he came back with a case of Carling Black Label. I asked him why and he responded that he liked the colour of the labels. I sent him back to get some better tasting beer. Can't recall which one. The labels were ugly but it tasted great.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 19:33:43 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The time for grousing is long past. Come enjoy the glory of today. BTW, by far the most interesting thought of the last week--besides mine--is the possibility of the existence of a Lanois-mixed version of RR 1.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 18:20:35 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Leningrad Cowboys Go America?

NWC: Loggers, strippers, whiskey and minors - sounds like the old days on Yonge Street that Ronnie Hawkins likes to recall.

Landmark: Do you remember if Kevin J is right about that?

Peter V: Self-correction. It struck me over lunch that it's not a skirt, it's a plaid dress with a bib front. Antipodeans told me they call that a pinnafore; your lot too, I suspect. Likely something Margaret Thatcher wore in her yout', speaking of politicians.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:43:12 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

OOps...It's Just Lars

Location: Not quite on my second cup of coffee

Subject: (blush)

NWC- Sorry about that.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:40:00 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Amerika

Subject: Finland

NWCoaster- How about a proper toast when I have a drink with my Finnish friends? I mean, other than, "NOW!"


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:40:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

As you know, Bill, an English politician found wearing a vest and suspenders may well have an orange in his mouth, and a banana elsewhere.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:38:35 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....a discussion of “entrée” anyone?.........3 course meal in Montreal in the 70’s was an O’Keefe, a May West and a gram of hash..........i

Bob F: Great news to hear of your retirement......Stress always comes with change but a beautiful thing to get out alive and live life. Live it well....

Bill M: Thank you. The other one that rankles in the hockey world is the use of “locker room” in place of the correct “dressing room”...

Al: Glad to be a fan of a team that has you as one also......and I always hold out hope for the return of the lovely and talented Julie........BTW, rumours are that RTO has “shuffled the deck” and is now recording a double Jazz album....limited editions soon to be available at just $3300 a piece.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:28:43 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: coincidence?

Some sort of conspiracy here . . . first it's all Bruce, all the time, then the conversation switches to . . . Jersey . . . .


Entered at Fri Mar 16 17:27:17 CET 2012 from (90.233.194.229)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: All those words in English came to Finnish too

Logger = lokari, miner = mainari, jersey is pronounced as "yersay", rocker = rokkari, stripper = strippari, whisky = viski.

With this help you will survive your first three days in Finland.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 16:34:47 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: That low moan you hear on the west wind is Westcoaster expressing his displeasure with you using the term 'lumberjack' instead of the approved Norman term, 'logger'. I'm sure he'd be fine with 'forestry worker' too. People in the UK did look at me funny when I used the word 'jumper' that way, but not as funny as when I said that a three-piece suit consists of a jacket, a vest and a pair of pants.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 16:11:58 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Why not just burn some Holy Books and ne-name Robert Johnson’s instrument while we’re at it....

From Don Barrie of the Peterborough Examiner....and yes there is a Band link here.....

"This insidious encroachment of American terms into the Canadian language, especially when it refers to something so important to both of Canada's national sports, must stop.

The Americans have high-jacked our toque, renaming it a stocking or knitted cap.

They refer to our pop as soda, our couches as davenports, our hydro as electricity and our baby's dummy as a pacifier.

Not to sound like a Jerry Sienfield rant, but we Canadians must draw the line when it comes to our hockey sweater.

The name sweater for a sports' apparel, apparently originated back in days when hockey players needed ways to differentiate teams but required warmth on the outdoor rinks.

Everyday sweaters, some with turtle necks, were knitted in different colours and crests and later numbers were sewn on for the teams.

When hockey moved indoors and later into heated arenas for the comfort of the growing and demanding fan base, the need for heavy, knitted woolen sweaters was not needed.

Lighter materials were sought. The emerging chemical industry came out with synthetic materials, much lighter that wool. Legend has it many of those chemicals came from New Jersey, so the sweaters adopted by hockey and later lacrosse, were called jerseys, at least in the U. S. to distinguish them from the heavier knitted sweaters.

Most Canadians could immediately tell the difference between the two without needing to rename them; simply, there were wool sweaters and not-wool sweaters.

Here in Canada there are three accepted definitions for "jersey" according to my Funk and Wagnall Dictionary.

Jersey is a breed of a top milk-producing cow that looks like a Guernsey cow but for the black tip on her tail; it's a type of wool and "a tightly fitting elastic jacket for women."

There are also two geographic "Jerseys;" an island in the English Channel where the above mention cow hails from and a state in the U. S. , whose only purpose many claim is to hold up one end of the bridges and tunnels going into Manhattan.

No where do our linguistic compilers consider jersey an apparel to wear over hockey and lacrosse padding.

Prime Minister Harper met with President Obama on Wednesday in Washington, D. C., over trade restrictions.

Hopefully he also brought up this sweater crisis and the effect it is having on Canadian sport.

The solution is simple; leave "jersey" where it belongs; in the toxic swamps across from Manhattan or with the cows on that English Channel island and let us Canadians have our sweater back."


Entered at Fri Mar 16 15:02:44 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, in Scotland it would be a tartan skirt, not a plaid skirt. Plaid is what lumberjacks wear. You called a skirt a jumper?


Entered at Fri Mar 16 15:00:53 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: What did Della wear?

Subject: Perry Como

She wore a brand new jersey

that's what she did wear


Entered at Fri Mar 16 14:33:03 CET 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

In Daniel Lanois biography from a few years ago he mentions, with no anger or resentment mind you, that his mixes for Robbie's first album were greasier that the finished product that Bob Clearmountain mixed. Anyone ever hear the original Lanois mixes, or do they even exist?



Entered at Fri Mar 16 14:20:21 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Yes, confusion abounds - and long-held beliefs are again under threat. Growing up, the real sports were hockey (where it was 'sweater'), football ('sweater', but only by extension from the main sport, hockey), and baseball (obviously not a sweater sport, but I don't think 'shirt' was ever mentioned - just 'uniform'). Who knew, or cared, what they wore in those less-real Euro-sports like soccer and rugger and cycling. 'Jersey' for cycling, once we started to hear about the Tour de France. In any case, I doubt that I heard 'jersey' applied to anything but Euro-sportswear until I got to New Zealand in '81 and found that that's what they called a sweater, except for the relative few who'd adopted what I learned a few months later was the Australian term, 'jumper'. Both seemed so weird and cute, especially 'jumper', which to me is a plaid skirt fastened with a blanket pin, as worn by girls and private and Catholic schools. Anyway, I've always assumed from the NZ experience that 'jersey' was the standard term in England too. Scotland I would expect to be different.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 13:19:09 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: channelling

Dlew919: the words of the prophets:

After closing time
at the Guernsey Fair
I detect The El Supremo
from the room at the top of the stairs

Just like Scarborough Fair, only with knit goods instead of cambric shirts . . .


Entered at Fri Mar 16 09:09:22 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Guernsey [and Jersey

Wow pete. never come across a guernsey. Thought it was a breed of cow.

That is deffo gonna be the term for our mike's pullover from now on. We'll have some real fun with that one.

My elder son's 'partner' hails from Jersey. never seen her wear one yet :-0)


Entered at Fri Mar 16 09:03:44 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Upper body attire

My 5 year old grandson - Mike - raises his world weary eyes and groans 'Grandaaaad, it's a sweater' every time I refer to his top as a 'pullover'. I actually do it instinctively since that's what I've always called them but, of course, even if I didn't I'd still say the wrong word [a] just to derive the pleasure of hearing him correcting me and [b] because I'm a tormenting sod anyroad.

:-0)

It seems 'jumper' is out of vogue too theses days. I'm gonna really throw him a curved ball from now on though with 'jersey'. Also I might even start throwing in 'jerkin' [my dear old mum used to call any short coat a jerkin]. That's really gonna put the cat amongst the pigeons.

Now - time for today's early morning Bruce fix.

:-0)

BTW I know we all drop in and out of the GB depending on our other commitments some of us more than others but just scanning back a week or so the other night i didn't see any posts from Si, Dunc, Bob W, Empty, Rob the organ, BEG, Deb, Brien SZ, Roger, Todd, westie, Jon L, Landmark and the young fella from pat's neck of the woods whose name escapes me. Hope they're all ok and just otherwise engaged.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 08:59:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A guernsey is thicker and oiled wool (and always blue). I started looking up jersey. It's the "correct term for a uniform top pulled over the head" so that police and army sweaters are also jerseys. It is also the top of a "team uniform in sports". It's also a woollen pullover or sweater. On Adidas' website they sell replica football "jerseys". I looked at a couple of old 50s football programmes I have (as one does) and they use "shirts." They were also called jerseys, but if I saw a yob kicking in a shop window in an England replica garment, I'd call it a "football shirt."


Entered at Fri Mar 16 06:30:24 CET 2012 from (124.168.33.27)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Location: But, like that ever stops me...

Subject: I'm the last person to talk about sport

What then, is a guernsey? Do the channel islands hold some kind of geopolitical trademark on sporting gear?


Entered at Fri Mar 16 04:03:13 CET 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Im probably overthinking this Peter, but I rarely if ever hear American Football players refer to their uniform as their "jersey", and yes it is made of a very lightweight yet durable fabric. There is actually an odd debate going on in College Football as some of the universities have a couple of different uniforms and they seem to be getting more colorful and over the top.

On the other hand you always hear folks referring to the shirts they buy, the numbered shirts with a players name on them, as their jerseys. And they are hardly the same as the shirts the players wear.

Like I said, Im probably overthinking it.


Entered at Fri Mar 16 00:31:06 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: jerseys, sweaters and shirts

I'm confused, Bill. In the UK, the everyday word is "football shirt" and "rugby shirt". I know of "jersey" but it sounds archaic .. these sports all have some thin techno fabric now. Only a goalkeeper would wear a jersey?


Entered at Thu Mar 15 21:23:00 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Wrecking Crew

John D: Thanks for the recommendation of the book on the Wrecking Crew. In case you missed it, I'm re-posting the link to a copy of the actual session contract for "Mr. Tambourine Man / I Knew I'd Want You". I guess it's safe to say that none of the Wrecking Crew were harmed in the recording of Mr. Springsteen's "Wrecking Ball" :-)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 21:01:00 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Levon & Randy drum solo from last night in Milwaukee.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 21:00:27 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Thanks for that post. Will look for the book. I did spot, just last week, the illustrious Steven Davis's new book on Carly Simon. Mentions Robbie a few times (she had a crush on him), and retells the story about the '60s session with some of our guys. Not sure if it was the lineup from her 1970 or '71 story in "Rolling Stone" or the slightly different one from the RS story some years later. Based on the other Davis book I've read, I don't see him having spared much trouble to get the story right.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:55:38 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Good work today, both the rumination on the place of sports and the necessary corrective re hockey non-jerseys. Though on that point, I have been bothered by the ever-more-frequent use of 'jersey' instead of the proper 'sweater'. I put this down to the influx of British newspaper editors (the ones not in jail for phone hacking) and female sports journalists, neither of which group was steeped in the proper traditions. Imagine Roch Carrier's titled his classic story being titled "The Jersey"? Tabernouche!


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:50:11 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

We call them jerseys here in civilization.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:49:18 CET 2012 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bruce / Wrecking Crew

Going to take me a few more listens. Not quite there yet. Also run dont walk to buy Kent Hartman's " The Wrecking Crew." Just when you think you knew everything about that era, a book like this comes along. Hartman is a great story teller. One of which (David P take note). McGuinn was the only Byrd to play on Tamborine Man. The rest were the Wrecking Crew. Jimmy Webb having to convince the 5th Dimension that Up Up & Away was going to be their first hit and why did Carol Kaye give Brian Wilson the finger recording Pet Sounds. One of the BEST books documenting that era. I cannot say enough good things about this amazing book.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:41:48 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Sports

Kevin J, I know what you mean about the hold sports has on us. I go from football (Jets) to basketball (Knicks) to baseball (Yankees) and love every minute of it. Nothing makes me feel more like a kid then that first spring training photo of Derek Jeter taking grounders. A couple of weeks ago after 38 years with IBM I was informed I was no longer needed. This has caused me some stress and anxiety. However, when I list the positives, high on my list was the fact that now I can stay up and watch the Yankees and Knicks when they're playing on the west coast!


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:36:11 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....Oh My.....For the record, hockey players wear sweaters NOT jerseys....


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:13:07 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

You malcontents at least know hockey jerseys--members of the Band used to wear them. Soccer jerseys? Hmmm, I don't think so.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 20:10:34 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al,I'm in st louis, and may head up to Minneapolis for a visit, and then home to NY for a spell. and may not..I really should just stay here and work, but I feel like going home. The # of days- i don't drive anywhere near as long in one spell as i used to....


Entered at Thu Mar 15 19:59:17 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

..at least he didn’t call it “Ice Hockey”.....Canadian hockey aficionados will know what I am referring to.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 19:41:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pat? Hockey? Is that the game they play at girls' schools in England in the winter when they're not playing rounders (aka baseball)? Or is it the theatrical wrestling match on ice beloved north of the 49th parallel? ;-) (I hasten to add)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 18:09:29 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

All you heathens talking about sports other than hockey is making me sick. I'm going to get the new Springsteen album because of the stirring reviews by Al Edge and PSB, but mostly to clear my palette.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 18:04:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Agreed .. another repeat anecdote .. one of the best meals in my life was in Sardinia in the 80s. Liverpool were playing Roma and we were the only customers. The antipasti was dumped at speed and the waiter raced back to the kitchen. When he raced over with forks, I asked the score. He shrugged, looked round the empty restaurant, and invited us into the kitchen where we joined the staff round the steel preparation table and watched the game. Liverpool won. As the only English person present (my companions were Italian), I apologized. 'No problem,' they said, 'This is Sardinia. We support ANY team that's playing Roma."

And they refused to let us pay as we had become their guests.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 17:58:57 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Good Vibrations

I guess I'm late to the show, as I haven't checked out the new recordings from Bruce Springsteen and Paul McCartney. I did catch the Boss last week on Jimmy Fallon's late night show, where he performed two new songs and one old classic, and liked what I heard. As for Sir Paul's album of pop standards, if I want to hear "It's Only A Paper Moon" for instance, I'd rather listen to the Nat King Cole Trio's version on the fine LP reissue of the album "After Midnight" on Pure Pleasure Records.

Lately I've been catching up on some archival reissues. This week I've been enjoying the recent vinyl reissue of the Beach Boys "SMiLE" sessions. Capitol really did an excellent job, with Mark Linett & Alan Boyd co-producing and the vinyl cut by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. The mono mixes of the songs are spread out on three LP sides, with the fourth side presenting the stereo mixes of several songs.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 17:52:50 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“Could have saved Aouda but watched Liverpool Instead”........Sports is an interesting area....a confusing one really as it has a strong hold on most of us because it was the first subject in our lives (usually around ages 9 or 10) where we could be taken seriously and not just join in on conversations with parents and their friends but often be well advanced on them in terms of knowledge. Only the nerdiest of the nerdy would be looked upon at a similar age as an equal in a conversation on economics or politics.....but sports, that was the area that we first experience what is feels like to be an expert in an adult world............Fast forward 30-40 years and even after great memories of athletic accomplishments at the rink, court, hill or pool.......many of us sadly come to the realization that most of professional sport is not really worth much of anything..........poorly educated, bad tipping, cretins playing for highly educated, bad tipping cretins, playing to a mixed bag of badly tipping cretins all of whom now love Coldplay, did once love Phil Collins and no doubt will love The Civil Wars in the future...................and yet that night in the rain in Bali when Liverpool won I felt much better about life than I would have if Man U had won..............I either need help or sports has got a serious hold on me that I will never shake....


Entered at Thu Mar 15 17:05:47 CET 2012 from (72.78.36.193)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce

Al Edge, thanks, and it was absolutely fine that you posted the article at other forums. I haven't really checked the Bruce forums. If there's been any responses, you can contact me through my site. Email at bottom of home page.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 16:10:21 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Nuts in May

I'm going to watch it again tonight too. It was a one-off TV drama written / directed by Mike Leigh, and the great Alison Steadman is Candice-Maria, in the follow-up to her totally different but equally hilarious role in Abigail's Party. Nuts in May was filmed within 25 miles of me in Dorset .. the car ferry at the start is a mere two miles down the road. I've seen Alison Steadman on stage three times in the last few years, and as an actress she has immediate "presence" in any role.

If you're getting into Mike Leigh, try "Another Year" (2010) and in the video rental stores right now. Link is to my review of the film.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 14:54:36 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / Al E: Thanks for the link to "Nuts in May" - hilarious. I also watched the chewing bit. I've never seen the show, and in fact have avoided it studiously, I think because I've been confusing it with a hideous Britcom called something like "The Buds of May".


Entered at Thu Mar 15 14:01:18 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Well, thanks to PV I know what I'll be doing tonight

Nuts in May for us tonight.

One of the funniest things ever. So it's 35 years since we first watched it Pete. And it must be all of 20 years since I watched the video with my lad Chris and we laughed till the tears streamed as we watched Ray's face as he was forced into the camp fire sing song with candice marie. Wonderful stuff.

Footie link? we were on our way back from some away game and there in the motorway service cafe drinking a cup of coffee was none other than Mike Leigh. If i say he was entirely underwhelmed as I went over and enthused about nuts in may then I'd be doing a great disservice to the term underwhelmed.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:51:17 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred - Paris '81

Fred - now you're really trying to upset me.

:-0)

No. Should have been. Heart, soul and mind was there and thoroughly deserved to have been based on attendance that year. I can picture now my good mate dave power begging me to go but we'd booked a caravan holiday in St Austell Cornwall and I don't need to tell anyone on here, least of all yourself fred, what comes first - even before the reds in a European cup final against real madrid.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:42:06 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M

Ha ha.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:41:01 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Mildly offensive?

I can see what you're saying Pete and I really enjoy reading your experienced insight into these areas but wouldn't you say the term that conveys more accurately the underlying 'mood' of anyone in the position of Suarez with some half crazed loon such as Evra haranguing him over some non-event foul several minutes earlier is initially "genuine bemusement" at the over the top behaviour of such an out and out knobhead and then immediately transforming into "assertive indignance" with his "porque negg-grow". This being as distinct from "offensive". As you rightly say racist doesn't come into it but doesn't tally where pre-determined agendas are concerned.

That's how I see it anyroad and the video evidence certainly seems to back up how i saw it from my own prime elevated spot in the main stand front row above the paddock stand. My sole regret is not having a gun with me to shoot the vile paranoid wretched creature and put him out of his misery and the misery he's unnecessarily inflicted on so many others.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:29:17 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Al E: When I first saw the mention of Kenny in your note to Fred I thought of the backyard chum in the Van Halen song and the numie-hanger in the Mothers' "Let's Paint The Water Black". But then it struck me that if you'd just mentioned a few more names in that paragraph you'd have a new set of lyrics to the Nails' epic "88 Lines About 44 Women".


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:20:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Football to Nuts in May

Sorry for the non-football people, but I’m enjoying the discussion. When Sir Alec Ferguson puts an avuncular arm round a rival manager’s shoulders, you see the recipient wincing as they wait for that stabbing pain between the shoulder blades. That’s why Sir Alec is the most successful manager in British football history. Look at how he talked up Harry Redknapp for the England manager’s job just before Manchester United played Tottenham. It was disconcerting to the team (you’re about to lose your boss) and quite rightly he’s been banned from mentioning the England job again, or he’d have done it every match for the rest of the season. Gamesmanship. I have to say from the extreme distance of the South Coast, I suspect his machinations will be more directed at Manchester City, Tottenham and Arsenal than Liverpool in the run in. But when you’re a right bastard, it’s instinctive, and you might as well keep in practice. Having said that, I’d appoint him England manager tomorrow. By the way, I think Harry Redknapp’s pragmatism would have cooled the whole business (just apologise nicely, with your fingers crossed behind your back, then go home and throw darts at his photo in private) a lot quicker than Kenny, who exacerbated it.

Yes, Suarez’s “Why, negro?” is similar to the use of the N-word within the peer group in “The Wire” and not racially offensive at home. BUT it probably was meant to be mildly offensive, (though NOT racially offensive) as all friendly terms are in any language when applied to someone you don’t like.

They demonstrate this brilliantly in the 1976 Mike Leigh TV play “Nuts in May.” It’s so good I’ve linked an extract. This is one for all Pete Seeger friends (and enemies). They’re camping in Dorset and have just approached Ray, a guy on the same campsite to take their photo. Anyway, in a later bit, they get stopped by the police. I can’t find the extract, but it’s happened to me. The police stop you. ‘Good morning, sir. Can I see your licence.” You show them and they say, ‘Right, Mr Smith .. I’m just going to check your tyres.” They do, and say, “Oh, dear, Peter. We’ve got a problem,” Next comes, “OK, pal, get out of the car and ..”. In other words the address gets friendlier as they get more aggressive. Works in every language.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:06:29 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Al: are you in this picture?


Entered at Thu Mar 15 13:00:55 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Al...

me? educated? Them there's fightin' words LOL! : )

To be honest (and this is something I forgot to mention earlier): I agree with you on the fact that the prosecution/persecution of Suarez was/is too much of a farce. Did Mr. Terry get the same treatment? He should have, if he didn't. I know he lost his England capitancy, but big whoop in my opinion.

However it's the 21st century and the world isn't as insular as it once was so certain terms (regardless on their pronunciation) while in the context of one's safety zone may be OK, they may be detrimental to one's situation somehwere else. Just sayin' is all.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 12:31:27 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PSB

Many thanks for that link. What a wonderful piece of writing that is.

Thanks also for your fabulous review PSB. I re-posted it on several other forums. Hope that was okay.

As we all seem to agree, it's an astonishing piece of work from someone who's been round the block so many times you'd simply wonder from where he summons the reserves to unearth such a gem for us to savour. What's most disturbing [if that's the right word pete] is it seems to be getting better with each play.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Mar 15 12:23:52 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Unpleasant term??????????????????????

Fred - simply cannot fathom how you an educated man with your experience of race and the vagaries it can unearth is struggling so much with the concept that the term 'negro' is not unpleasant to a Uruguayan from Montivideo? Again just to reinforce some clarity here it's the 'negg-row" latin pronunciation not the 'knee-grow' English one that was used by Suarez. It is what a Uruguayan says. Multiple times a day to friends, family, colleagues, strangers.

Why should we as English speaking charge someone with racist behaviour for merely uttering a term that the average Uruguayan might use many times a day. By all means educate the lad that some black folk might find the particular term offensive in a racist vein but prosecuting him? Come on. It's fucking ridiculous and pernicious. More especially when the perpetrator of the episode has lied so wilfully about the context.

Fred, you'll have gathered this is a highly emotive area for me. I can't be in the least bit glib about it. It's a huge injustice and forgive me if your reasoning from afar which seems to accord with the self righteousness of some of those I've waged a tirade against makes me feel a mite queasy.

As regards the team the problem is quite simple. Kenny fucked up badly with those he signed and two of those he shipped out. Adam, Downing, henderson cost close on £50 million and whilst each has shown snippets of decent play they have all been shoehorned into the team no matter how they've performed and are all one variation or another of an attacking midfielder. In 110 games between them they have managed 4 goals. Carroll cost 35 million and whilst improving of late from his woeful performance levels is so far short of the pace, skill, positional awareness, movement, anticipation, toughness and heading ability that his fee demands of him it seems inconceivable that he will ever attain the levels we need. Aquilani and Meireles, meanwhile, are both class players who whilst not as good as an alonso or a mascherano certainly offered us a level of skill and invention which we have cried out for and manifestly should have been at least encouraged to stay.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 12:09:05 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Upstater...thanks. MMW, too? Wow must have been a good one. At first, I thought they'd be out of place there, but thinking about it longer, it does seem they'd fit right in.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 12:06:08 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Tokyo..Joe J

I'm too far from the Big T. If you're coming in June be prepared to enjoy rain (perhaps) as rainy season starts sometime in June. However every year the "official" start is different. Only the weatherman seems to know when. Add to the mix Japan has been having a horrible winter (except for where I am) and who knows what kind of weather you'll encounter... maybe you'll get decent weather instead. Fingers crossed. : )


Entered at Thu Mar 15 11:58:27 CET 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Upstater

Location: West Saugerties

Subject: Wood Brothers

Fred, yes the Wood Brothers have played at a Ramble, January 17th, 2009. MMW has also played a Ramble (believe it may have been a New Year's show). Both were excellent shows.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 11:50:10 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Now onto some music...

For the past several months I have been listening to (and really enjoying) the Wood Brothers. Anyone know if they've ever played at one of Levon's Rambles?


Entered at Thu Mar 15 11:45:48 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Al

Regardless of his background, lack of English ability(no excuse there....he's got the cash and a lot of time to take English lessons), etc., Suarez should have avoided that unpleasant term. Perhaps had he serenaded Evra (no saint either in my book of footballing saints) with a few bars from "Loving you is sweeter than ever" things would have worked out smoothly. Whaddya think?!? : )

Wonderful win against the toffees....but I believe that at the end of the season time to clean house at LFC (keep on Reina and some promising up & comers) King Kenny, too, sadly. : (


Entered at Thu Mar 15 11:05:13 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: My mates Fred and jeff

Jeff. I'll be trying to envisage your listening pleasure :-0) [or otherwise!!!!!! :-0( ] as you drive the rattlesnake speedways through the Utah desert. Fingers crossed it connects with your attuned ear.

Fred. First off, you're right, of course it should have been nipped in the bud. Liverpool handled it badly but it was not going to go away no matter how Liverpool would have handled it, fervent apology or not.

Alec ferguson and Evra, I assume under ferguson's guidance, saw an opportunity to inflict severe damage on their despised rival. The FA saw the ideal high profile sacrificial lamb for their high prifile anti-racist campaign.

So it was never going to simply be brushed away. And so the lie became embedded and used as the sword of damocles to besmirch an innocent man. It stinks and will always stink to high fuckin heaven but whilst there is a media who are determined to push through agendas at the expense of the truth then some innocent bastard is always going to get shafted.

It's going to be hard to say this without sounding patronising here as i know you're such a grand soul but what your post shows is just how powerful the authorities/media are in presenting information that totally misrepresents the truth and thereby makes up the minds of decent folks. It must be happening all the time.

You honestly think I would be so supportive of suarez and so ontemptuous of Evra if I thought there was the merest substance in this entire affair or if I felt suarez was the sort of character who 'bites' opponents a la mike tyson.

At Anfield that day there was but one despicable character doing the goading, one despicable character intent on confrontation, one despicable character doing the lying. And it was not Luis suarez.

You ask why not leave it at 'Porque'. As PV alluded to those from ordinary Montividean backgrounds would never not use the the term 'negro' in such context. it is their equivalent in that context of the american "buddy" or the English "mate" or the Scouse "pal" or "la". It has not even the remotest racial connotation and Suarez who even now let alone 6 months ago scarcely speaks a word of English would not have been remotely aware of any racial undertones at all.

He's a feckin street reared Uruguayan not some self pious up his own politically correct arsehole English media [worst culprit daily mail] fed zealot.

Sorry for the vehemence and outrage Fred but the injustice in this affair - whilst for something on a different level altogether from Hillsborough - has been so wrong, so pernicious and so deliberately sustained by so many evil bastards merely to gain political mileage it has re-awakened the deep feelings of contempt for media and authority that were embedded back in '89.

Fred, n the 'biting' incident not wishing to trivialise any such behaviour but do go and dig out on you Tube the lead up, the 'incident' itself and the 'aftermath' and see if the lad merits the starkness of being labelled a 'biter'.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 06:53:15 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: If she thinks i told her no, she serves me blues to go

i hesitate to even call this a slideshow, but there are a few minor changes in it..

couple more coming up not long from now, got a few busier ones that will cause laughter...


Entered at Thu Mar 15 05:32:06 CET 2012 from (72.78.36.193)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce and other stuff

Here is another take on Wrecking Ball also from CounterPunch. While I'm here, I want to thank Bob F for linking to my article on the same subject and his comments. Now I saw some stuff here earlier today about the cars driven by members of The Band. Having hung around Woodstock quite a bit in the very late '60s and early '70s, Rick had a maroon two-door Lincoln with a port hole window in the back just like the first T-birds. The one time I saw Robbie at the Bearsville General store, he was driving what had to be ('cause it looked just like it) Bob Dylan's blue '64 Ford station wagon. But as the lead singer of my brother's band The Montgomeries who also was a member of Borderline said to me, "Every week you see another Band car wrecked down at the gas station."


Entered at Thu Mar 15 04:48:52 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Thanks for the iBooksAuthor info Peter. Al, i may soon be doing a whole lot of driving, 2 days in one direction, then pretty quickly another 3 or 4 in another..If so, i'll get The Boss's new one before I get rolling. Looking forward to hearing it.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 03:54:27 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Al: Those dumbass T-shirts didn't help matters... : (

This whole Suarez-Evra mess: there's enough blame to go around that both LFC and ManU should feel equal amounts of embarassement. It should have been nipped in the bud from the beginning. A simple "oops my bad" would have worked. Then again this is the same Luis Suarez who stuck out his hand at the World Cup, who bit an opponent during a league match in 2010(?) and regulary flops around at the slightest breeze and recklessly tackles hither and yon (not the only one to do these last two points mind you), so maybe "simple" wouldn't have worked. Perhaps he should have just stopped at "porque?". Remember his comment was directed at someone not from the Spanish speaking world, so there was always the likelihood things would be taken the way they were...with enusing shit-storm as a result. Just my two yen-worth of an opinion that's all. I'm not a fan of adversary- baiting using racial epithets however innocuous the intention may have been. There are better and more creative ways to do that. ; )

That said I do understand your point of view (and stance) Al. : )


Entered at Thu Mar 15 01:38:41 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The 'C' word

A ridiculously stringent '50's catholic upbringing means I'd never dream of using the word even when emotionally charged. Mortal sin and al that kev :-0) Of course, I'll 'fuck' with the best of them I do admit but the 'c' word is taboo even for me.

In print, however, on a forum trying to convey my feelings re that odious liar who was prepared to perpetuate a lie across many months and besmirch the character of a fellow player I have to admit even the 'c' word doesn't do it for me.

I do take your point though Kev. It's not nice.

Are you the new Phileas Fogg btw Kev? :-0)

BTW - it tickles me to see you taking to the Reds like you have. Terrific stuff. Their inconsistency and inability to finish teams off is driving us all nuts but re Luis Suarez - I believe he's the sort of determined and resilient character to stick around for a while to come.


Entered at Thu Mar 15 00:27:40 CET 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Interesting clip of Little Steven-not sure if I agree with his definition of a garage band, or his list-but interesting.

The premise was theyd get 4 guests-a guy from metallica, David Cassidy, Rick Springfield and oh Gene Simmons-basically 4 different guests each week you wouldnt see hanging out together normally. And they all have to come up with a list of some important topic-like top 5 song from the 1970s-and sort of argue it out. It was actually a lot of fun.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 23:09:32 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Al: I was having a bit of fun but it did stem from the always jarring witness of the “C” word being used in casual print/conversation that is more common than it used to be in the UK but still thankfully almost unheard of in North America......As to L’affaire Suarez-Evra – I am somewhat aware due to recent travels .......you will recall that I adopted Liverpool as my team at some point last year as the EPL dominates the sports pages all over Europe and Asia and I figured it would be more fun if I actually had a rooting interest. On the theory that if Al Edge is a fan then at least Liverpool has one literate Band fan which no doubt is one more than any other football team in the world, I joined up.....fast forward to January and after stops in Shanghai and Australia, I was in Bali sitting outside at a roadside bar drinking beer in a rain storm but watching a great game between Liverpool and Manchester United where to my delight Liverpool scored late to win................anyway, next morning and in the days that followed I did read about the Suarez situation and while on the surface it did seem to be just another case in the endless cases of idiotic athletes saying stupid things I quickly became almost endeared to the guy and realized that all was not as it might seem........I don’t recall verbatim but one of the most hilarious transcripts of a hearing I have ever seen was the Suarez one......unlike Hockey ones of which I am intimately familiar where the offending player has usually used a graphic racial slur with venom and extreme prejudice, this one had the makings of a comedy......JUDGE: “Did you use the word “negro’?......PLAYER:” “Yes but not in a bad way”....JUDGE: “Do you accept that ‘negro’ could be hurtful?”...PLAYER: “No, my wife calls me ‘negro’ and so does my son!”....how can calling a negro a negro be hurtful?.......................................Or something along those lines.................I had not even heard the word “negro” outside of the into to that Long John Baldry song.....all is clearly not as it seems – so I am with you on this....But if the little guy jumps to Paris to play – all bets are off!!!!!


Entered at Wed Mar 14 21:53:41 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: in the locker room at half time....sitting on my helmet

Subject: MAD DUCKS AND BEARS

Peter, you Limey BASTARD....I'll see you out on the FOOTBALL field.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 21:07:06 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Negritude

Al, The other thought that struck me is that M. Evra should know what Wikipedia says:

"Négritude is a literary and ideological movement, developed by francophone black intellectuals, writers, and politicians in France in the 1930s."

In other words it was a proud description, cf. "Black power."

The thing about abuse is judging intent. If some of the regulars here said "Why are you Limeys discussing soccer?" I'd only be offended by the silly word "soccer." However iof someone antagonistic said, "You Limey .." I would be offended. You kinda know.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 20:45:14 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Steven Van Zandt ranks "The Band" #5 in his top garage bands behind the "Beatles", "Rolling Stones", "The Who" & "Yardbirds".


Entered at Wed Mar 14 19:50:07 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Yeah, but did Suarez really help write the song, or did he just play on the record?


Entered at Wed Mar 14 19:00:42 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: BM in the dark/PV in the light

BM - Ha ha. In this context "arsed about" means concerned about in the sense that a normal person has more than enough going on in their own life to become embroiled in the semantics of something that really only Liverpudlians, Uruguayans and pernicious self pious hypocritical elements of British society are concerned about - with the latter element only concerned enough so they can have a convenient scapegoat and appear 'right on' about what they term as racism.

The thing is it's too involved a business to represent precisely enough in any precis but I'm sure you are only too aware I was certainly not alluding to any shortage of profundity amongst the folks on here least of all your goodself :-0) - merely that it's a matter far removed from the stuff the GB tends to concern itself with.

Very interesting what you say Pete. Ties in precisely with the more erudite insights I've read from Latin American language experts - specifically relating to Montividean street language - and of course it is precisely why Suarez had no hesitation in admitting to the fact he had asked the question "porque negro" of the demented loon haranguing him in the penalty area.

My own insight was informed from being less than 20 yards away from where Suarez first made mincemeat of Evra with his rare skills and then clipped the Frenchman's knee as the ball ran loose. As a seasoned fan and regular player you simply know those times when injury is being feigned. And this was without doubt one of those times, underlined by Evra's sly antics to the crowd as he walked to the touchline.

What followed this innocuous "dozen times a game" episode defied belief as Evra pursued Suarez clearly intent on having it out. Suarez's 'what the hell's up with you pal?" questioning ties in perfectly with the scenerio we all witnessed.

Regrettably the good sound smack in Evra's teeth which was certainly the order of the day - and which would, whilst resulting in its own ban, have averted all the ridiculous and pernicious fallout and the unjust smearing of Suarez's character - was not implemented by Suarez.

Of course, had it happened the way it should have the FA would still now be craving for the politically high profile scapegoat it needed to demonstrate just how hard a line it is prepared to take on so called racist behaviour.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 18:42:31 CET 2012 from (99.179.75.184)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Rolling Stone Reader's Poll: Best Concert Film

Hope the link works. The Last Waltz comes in at number one.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 18:23:39 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I see from the What's New section that Jan H has posted info on another reissue of the Paul London and Capers 45 (with Garth on keys). The note says that it was recorded at RCA studios in Toronto, but I'm sure that's not the case. More likely Armen Boladian's usual studio in Detroit, which is where the group worked and just across the river from Windsor, where they lived. There's a bit of a Bo Diddley beat at the end, by the way.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 15:48:08 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Pull another string...

Bill M: As I recall, James & Bobby Purify's version of "I'm Your Puppet" was a hit around the time of the Basement Tapes recordings.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 14:27:37 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: miscellaneous

Al E: Before I can tell you whether or not I'm "remotely arsed about the affair", you'll first have to tell me what it means to be remotely arsed.

I believe it was Morris Levy would said, upon seeing the new Apple on his desk: "Look at that - I don't know whether to sign it or fuck it!"

Now that I've worked my way through all four Basement Tapes CDs, a few general comments:

1) Garth never ever just 'dialed it in', even when nobody else was taking it seriously. Listen to him on either "Apple Suckling Tree" - always masterful and never the same bit twice, aside from recurring nods to "Red Red Robin", "Old Grey Mare" and the "I'll make my stand in Dixieland" song.

2) Dylan comes across at all times as an admirable leader and colleague - endlessly inventive, instructive (in the sharing, not pedantic sense), supportive, fun ...

3) It's always interesting to hear bits that would be added to "The Weight" scattered here and there - "Too Much Of Nothing", "Odds And Ends" ...

4) The guys must've loved "I'm Your Puppet", since they used it as a placeholder tune at least a couple times; is "All YOu Have To Do Is Dream" a Dylan song or is it really the Penn-Oldham song that it sounds like it should be - asided from the Miami-sound guitar?

5) I'm going to listen to it again for confirmation, but I think the one that goes from "Four Strong Winds" to "I Shall Be Released" is the one that's most relevant to the Band rather than the Hawks, insofar as Levon's been contacted and is on his way back into the fold. Which is why, it seems to me, there's a notable uptick in the number of what can be taken as references to / echoes of that great American TV trilogy, "Beverly Hillbillies", "Green Acres" and "Petticoat Junction". (Always by Dylan, not the others.)


Entered at Wed Mar 14 12:38:46 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Suarez

Al, I taught Latin Americans for many years, and I can confirm that the word "negro" is normal descriptive use in Latin America, and was used to describe fellow class members in front of them, and by black students themselves, and it never caused offence. Now the Swiss and Germans used a term which to them was inoffensive too, but would be called "The N-word" here. It meant I usually did a bit on avoiding both in English, and several textbooks make the same point. I'd be very surprised if Suarez had never been told that, but in the middle of action, it wouldn't be offensive to him.

BUT on the whole racism row in English football, I believe that professionals like the Chelsea gentleman are fully adept at winding up opponents in order to get punched, resulting in someone being sent off from the other side. In other words, I don't think the intent is "racist". They'd have used fat, ugly, ginger-haired, Northern, Southern, Scottish, Irish or your wife's screwing the milkman, or any other words they thought likely to draw a violent reaction. So I suspect in that case, the offence was "cheating" rather than "racism."


Entered at Wed Mar 14 12:14:44 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Me Kev, Evra and maturity

To be fair Kev I'm not sure whether your reference to Evra is tongue -in-cheek [as it would surely be if you were genuinely appraised of what a lying, cheating, pernicious, obnoxious c**t the man is and how he has tainted forever as racist an innocent man who as it happens is one quarter black in any case] or whether you are under the prevailing misapprehension fed by the lies and misrepresentations of the institutionised corrupt Football Association, its puppeteer judgement panel and the morally bankrupt British media.

Whatever, if terming the odious little lying scumbag in the terms I have done is considered immature then so be fucking it.

;-0)

Re Wrecking ball. Chuffed to mintballs that you like it. And thanks for kind words. Clearly we see the inclusion of the title track and LOHAD in entirely different ways but, hey, that's what it's all about. I'm just delighted Bruce gave you some genuine pleasure after so long.

PS If you do want to know more about the brutalised predetermined miscarriage of justice re Luis Suarez and the other vile character I'll be pleased to e-mail a piece I did on it a few months ago[regrettably unfinished due to my frustrating aforesaid submergence with other stuff]. It should still give you some insight into why i feel like I do - apart from me being a rabid Liverpudlian that is :-0)

I'd post it on here but I think that would be abusing Jan's hospitality and the sensibilities of the good folk on here who aren't remotely arsed about the affair or its travesties of justice.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 11:04:34 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bravo jeff

What a paragraph of genuine and justified revulsion for the de-humanisation of this current age.

"whatever happened to developing your skills,, and what about the fact that the more you do anything, the sharper you get..... the more music you do, the more musical you are ,,,, what about the more you think, the more avenues you might go down, the more associations you make, the wider your options, whatever happened to working at something, and what he fuck everhappened to thinking and pride in one's own work? when you take the person out of it, what the fuck do you have? computers writing songs."


Entered at Wed Mar 14 09:28:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I should add that the clue is in the name .. iBooksAuthor. A lot of writers have tried it and expressed surprise that you can only write iBooks with it! For those who haven't tried it, it puts together highly illustrated ebooks with consummate ease, and you can incorporate sound and video. Compared to using (say) InDesign, it's ridiculously easy, fast and powerful. Our photographers here in particular should download a copy.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 08:59:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Compter Intercourse

iBooksAuthor, which is a brilliant programme, and free from Apple, is the great discovery this year, BUT it only lets you publish what you write as iBooks. So basically, in a music comparison, you've bought your Sony microphone, and Sony mixing desk, and you can only release your records on Sony / Columbia. In other words, Jeff, Apple have done with it just what Morris Levy would have done with it.

In my case, I'm happy enough to try stuff for iBooks only, as the iPad is the best platform, getting better next week too. But then as Bob and Bruce will tell you, Sony's Columbia is just about the best record label.


Entered at Wed Mar 14 06:38:40 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: fucking computers-- not the same as computers fucking

which they might eventually try to do for us... for clarification, an adjective began and a verb ended that subject line, no computers werre actually fucked or harmed.

this might seem off topic, maybe not-- there were comments that speak to being glad that any new material from an over 50 or 60 artist doesn't suck---- i'll extend it to new material from any artist, regardless of age...... a few years back, in some recording magazine, i first saw an ad for a program that helps someone write a song, and i was disgusted and disappointed..... then i started seeing it in more industry magazines, by now, these programs are all over the place and the internet--- just about any service -Taxi for example.. i think CDBaby too, and other sites like Music Connection--- every one under the sun is hawking thse songwriting programs--- which i find disturbing and insulting.

whatever happened to using your brain and imagination?

whatever happened to developing your skills,, and what about the fact that the more you do anything, the sharper you get..... the more music you do, the more musical you are ,,,, what about the more you think, the more avenues you might go down, the more associations you make, the wider your options, whatever happened to working at something, and what he fuck everhappened to thinking and pride in one's own work? when you take the person out of it, what the fuck do you have? computers writing songs.

which leads to a ridiculous concept/question, does the program creator or owner get a songritng credit and portion of the copyright, pubslihing, etc.... or, does the act of running the program entitle you to full copyright? (is this really what the act of artistic creation has come to?) If leonard chess or Morris Levy were marketing such a program, bet your bippee they'd get a cut!


Entered at Tue Mar 13 22:14:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BMW manufacture fine cars, which are way better finished than Mercedes .. but I have to tell you that in British racist slang, BMW was not held to mean Bob Marley & The Wailers but "Black Man's Wheels." I say this as a student of British slang, and also the happy driver of a BMW.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 21:39:06 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Born To Run

Kevin: I should also mention that Emmylou Harris recorded a song entitled "Born To Run", which was written by her former husband Paul Kennerly. It was included on her 1981 album "Cimarron". In another twist, the cut the followed that song on her album was Bruce Springsteen's "The Price You Pay." At least Ms. Harris didn't have the audacity to use "Born To Run" as the album title :-)


Entered at Tue Mar 13 21:29:51 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

"Little Feat's" Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett gig March 31st @ NYC's "Highline Ballroom".


Entered at Tue Mar 13 21:18:21 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Rick Danko's '58 Dual Ghia convertable.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 21:07:29 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the stars and their cars

... and let us not forget that other great Minnesotan - and his little red Corvette. At the other end of the size spectrum is Fred E's: "Twenty eight feet, bumper to bumper / The last of the old-time gas-guzzlers /... / Elvis had one and so did Hank / Don't look like money, they look like the bank / That's a mighty big car".


Entered at Tue Mar 13 21:06:37 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.115)

Posted by:

Pat B

Let's not forget Iron Butterfly's album "Ball."


Entered at Tue Mar 13 20:55:46 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Levon Helm

..Risking overexposure..did want to add that the PBS clip of Levon’s interview is very enjoyable...it’s at the “What’s New” page...


Entered at Tue Mar 13 20:27:09 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....and who could forget, the greatest rocker who ever lived and his “coffee coloured Cadillac”..........on the subject of BMW...the first time I really became aware of the brand was mid 70’s when Cream magazine criticized Bob Marley for driving one....He replied that it stood for Bob Marley and the Wailers so all was fine......excepting the spliff burns on the leather!


Entered at Tue Mar 13 20:11:27 CET 2012 from (91.52.122.100)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: cars & musicians (Rock-'n-roll-cars)

Pat, (little late) great you made that big block Mustang (great car b.t.w.) together with your son. Starting the engine up the first time togehter must have been a great moment, will last for ever! (lucky you).

Anyway a lot of musician are car nuts:

When Elektra Records offered Jim Morrison a car of his own choice, he choose a 1965 Shelby Mustang GT 350 (his hairdresser had one and he thought it was the coolest car at that time.

Lennon bought a Rolls-Royce Phantom V.

Mc Cartney a Goodwood Green Aston Martin DB6 in 1966 (on the Conolly leather he recorded the first lines of Hey Jude).

Janis Joplin bought a used Porsche 356 SC in 1968

Neil Young ("there's already too many Dasuns in the town") has a 1959 Lincoln Continental Mk IV (7.5 Liter V8!, but he let that rebuild into an electric car ;-).

Zeppelin's John Bonham owns 30 cars, Jaguar E-type, Jensen Intersepter, T Ford.....

Bruce Sprinsteen bought a 1960 Corvette after Born to Run became a hit (before he had bought in 1975 a 1957 Chevy Bel Air Convertible for $2,000.-).

The king had all kinds of cars, Italian sports cars and even some BMWs, but most famous is his " Elvis Rose" Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special

Levon owns a Corvette? Robbie a Mercedes Benz?

" Every day I'd watch them beauties roll by

And sometimes I'd hang my head and cry

'Cause I always wanted me one that was long and black."



Entered at Tue Mar 13 19:55:55 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David: Again evidence of that little chink in Bruce’s armor that is frustrating. The album should have been called “This is My Depression” but this would have sent the nutty little MBA’s at the label into a tizzy to end all tizzy’s......So in a nod to market forces, Bruce no doubt gave in and called it “Wrecking Ball”.........”Derivative” is not something that folks who spend Sunday afternoons pissing on each other’s backs at football games really care about – now do they?


Entered at Tue Mar 13 19:52:09 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Bruce at the Apollo audio on youtube

For anyone interested there is a great audio of the entire Bruce and the E Street Band live at the Apollo Thea. last Friday on youtube. This show was streamed live on Sirus Radio. Because we are a sensitive group about copyrights I'm not posting the link. The show is a beauty with whole lot of 'soul'.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 19:38:51 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Wrecking Balls

There was Neil Young's song "Wrecking Ball" on his 1989 album "Freedom". Then Emmylou Harris covered that song in 1995 on her groundbreaking album by the same name, produced by Daniel Lanois, with Mr. Young singing harmony on the song. Not to be outdone, Gillian Welch & David Rawlings wrote another song entitled "Wrecking Ball" on their 2003 album "Soul Journey. I would also note that Ms. Harris covered Ms. Welch's "Orphan Girl" on her "Wrecking Ball" album.

I may have missed it, but I don't recall anyone mentioning the derivative angle regarding Mr. Springsteen's use of that title.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 17:45:16 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

...a few additional thoughts on Bruce Springsteen and Wrecking Ball after many more listens: •

* No one in music has benefitted from an easier ride over the years from critics than Bruce Springsteen. I shared Calvin’s suspicions as to the inevitable 5 star reviews that you just knew would surface. Truth be told, I find it a chore to listen to most of Bruce’s back catalogue. With the exception of “Nebraska” that sounds as fresh and great as when it was released and most of “The River” the rest of his albums just don’t stand up for me. His recent albums ( last 15 years ), I have tried but just discarded due to lack of any great songs really. Interestingly, the songs he did for “The Wrestler” movie knocked my socks off and generally liking the cut of the guy’s jib and respecting Bob F’s and PSB opinions on matters music, I purchased “Wrecking ball” and, as stated in an earlier entry to this GB, believe it to be a minor masterpiece. Stands with “Love and Theft” as Bob noted as the best release from an “Over 60” artist in rock history.

* It is not perfect, however....The two weakest songs that both should have been left off the album in my opinion are the title track – “Wrecking Ball” and “Land of Hope and Dreams”. Not surprisingly, one was written for a football stadium ( could there be a more perfect example of the bad Bruce and his square headed legion of fans than something like this...yes, yes. I know the reviewers are all contorting themselves to explain that it has now been given a bit more gravitas here but it’s nonsense really....should have been nixed along with ‘Hope and Dreams”

* First 6 songs are as good an opening to any album I can remember.

*Al: Majestic stuff. As good as writing on rock music can get but I must ask ...for someone capable of such insight and beauty, could you not find a more mature way to describe Patrice Evra?


Entered at Tue Mar 13 16:08:39 CET 2012 from (70.60.190.33)

Posted by:

Calvin

Hmmm, actually considering buying the new Bruce album now. Frankly when a beloved artist post 50 gets a good review I usually equate it to the reviewers being overly happy that someone they once loved put out something that doesnt suck.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 15:09:14 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Standard Time

For me Harry Nilsson set a high standard long ago in 1973 when he recorded his album of standards, "A Little Touch of Schmilsson in the Night", with Gordon Jenkins. I provided a video link as a reminder of this great collaboration.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 13:40:56 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al's Springsteen review is great. I hadn’t got into it yet .. I had the new Bap Kennedy and the new Simone Felice at the same time, and am still playing Leonard Cohen’s new one, which left it little space, always the problem when several major releases appear together. Bap took priority because I was going to see him, then Simone Felice is my current favourite artist. The new one is more like “One More American Song” than it is like the rest ofv The Duke & The King .. less soul, more folk.

The Springsteen track that was an instant earworm for me is Death to My Hometown, and I don’t get far past it, because it finishes and I press “repeat.” It fits in with my obsession with The Waterboys “Appointment With Me Yeats.’ in the Irishness of the sound, and yet it starts off like Gary Glitter stomping. Incredible. The stuff I’ve seen the last year or so in very small venues has been so good that I’m not drawn to standing with 99,999 others in Hyde Park to hear Bruce. I wish I could get to a good seated show.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 12:34:48 CET 2012 from (151.67.94.159)

Posted by:

antonio rigo righetti

Location: Italy
Web: My link

Subject: Celebrating The Band

ciao from little old italy, thumbs up for your site, it's so complete and you can feel that is a matter of love. we will celebrate the music of the Band on 17 march listening to vinyl records and playing some stuff and also reading together things... just to let it know to all of you http://www.facebook.com/events/248708155221691/


Entered at Tue Mar 13 11:32:17 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Cheers for comments on Brucie's pretty awesome offering.

meanwhile...

PV said "A BBC Radio 4 programme on Lounge Music last week, played Mel Torme's Coming Home Baby, and said the singer hated it. It's about the only thing by him I've ever enjoyed too!"

I laughed me bollocks off.

Nice one pete. :-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 13 11:11:22 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Japan

Fred, plans are in process but it looks like Tokyo in June. The missus has a sister there she hasn't seen in thirty years. I'll keep you informed. You never know.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 09:15:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Coming Home Baby

On standards, A BBC Radio 4 programme on Lounge Music last week, played Mel Torme's Coming Home Baby, and said the singer hated it. It's about the only thing by him I've ever enjoyed too!


Entered at Tue Mar 13 09:12:48 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Standards

Thanks for the link to the "standards" article. I agree with most of it, though I'd be more critical of Sir Paul's latest. it's true he's chosen excellent and not quite so obvious songs, but I find his delivery faltering, unsure of itself. This may be the issue of performing with a band, but not playing, for the first time in his life. Or maybe he's striving for that 1930s Noel Coward play lightness of delivery. As on every McCartney album, the bass playing is wonderful, but this time it's not him.

I agree about Rod's cruise ship backing, but he does benefit from lack of fear in belting them out (or perhaps it's lack of taste or lack of sensitivity), and his Blue Skies is the only one of his standards that ever made it to my iPod. I don't listen to Rod after 1972 either. What the article will make me do is revisit the Bryan Ferry .. he always had a way with the odd standard, again lacking the awe and respect that undermines Sir Paul's performance for me. It sounds as if Paul's voice has weakened too, and quite suddenly.

Unfortunately, I can't take Willie Nelson's voice, especially on standards. It's funny, I love Johnny Cash, but Willie Nelson takes the "will he hit the note or won't he" tension over the edge of the precipice that Johnny Cash skirts around.

One solution is to buy an out of copyright "Original Hits of the 40s" / "Original Hits of the 50s" 3 CD set for £1.99.


Entered at Tue Mar 13 01:24:41 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Joe J: Japan---when? Where?

Al: Nice. Good thing I'm on vacation. : )


Entered at Mon Mar 12 21:04:12 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Aretha on Shindig!

Another Shindig! clip featuring Aretha Franklin performing in 1964 with Leon Russell on piano, Larry Knechtel on standup bass and Richie Frost on drums. Mr. Frost previously played in Ricky Nelson's band with James Burton. Guitar aficionados may have noticed in the previous clip I posted that Delaney Bramlett was playing a cool-looking Danelectro Longhorn bass.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 18:32:12 CET 2012 from (71.34.52.132)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Wrecking Ball

Al, wonderful assessment of this great album. I'm a fan and like most of what the Boss has put out over the years, some more than others. But since I bought WB three days ago I've not been this excited about a Sprinsteen record in a long time. It is indeed right up there with all of his best


Entered at Mon Mar 12 18:18:26 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Once you've watched David P's clip from Shindig!, you might follow the link to what's identified as Leon Russell leading the troops through "Delta Lady" (though it's actually "The Letter"). There you'll find Sandy Konikoff wielding the tambourine at O.41.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 17:46:50 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Shindig!

Bill M: Leon Russell often sat in with the house band on the tv musical variety show Shindig! the first year it aired in 1964. Link above to him performing "High Heel Sneakers" with other band members that included James Burton & Joey Cooper on guitars, Larry Knechtel on bass and Leon's buddy from Oklahoma, Chuck Blackwell, on drums. The house band became known as the Shindogs and Wrecking Crew member Ray Pohlman was musical director. Later on Glen D. Hardin took over on piano and Delaney Bramblett handled bass & vocals. Billy Preston also occasionally appeared with the band. Here's another Shindig! link featuring the later group members doing the Beatles' "Ticket To Ride" with Joey Cooper & Delaney Bramlett singing and Billy Preston on camera at the end of the song.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyxSguSF-zM


Entered at Mon Mar 12 17:43:12 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joe J: Al Cherny fiddles on Jesse Winchester's first LP, as you say, and David Rea plays lead guitar. Cherny's guitar-playing colleague in the Tommy Hunter band was Red Shea, whose main gig at the time was as Gordon Lightfoot's guitarist, a job that had previously been David Rea's. In the early '60s, Shea had been in Larry Lee and the Leesures, whose first album he'd played on. That album included covers of a couple songs from the Hawkins/Hawks 1961 R&B session with Henry Glover session. Although the Hawkins version weren't released at all until '65, the Leesures roomed with the Hawks earlier on, so likely got to hear tapes. The link above is to the a-side of Red Shea's 1962 instrumental, backed by the rest of the Leesures; it's very Hawksish in places.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 16:42:46 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: standards

When Tony Bennett was on E. Costello's show, he said the 'songbook' stuff was the US's classical music, and would still be played 200 years on.

I loved all the Linda Ronstadt / Nelson Riddle records. I've got a Willie Nelson 'great American songbook' one with impeccable playing -- and it's pretty dull. Don't even mention R. Stewart unless it's about '72 or earlier . . . .

Linked article discusses why rock singers' standards albums don't work. Also some that do.

Arguably, there was a 'great American songbook' of blues long before Porter, Gershwin, Mercer, Ellington et al. -- look how many artists have covered e.g. "Trouble in Mind" which was written in the 20s.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 16:40:24 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: mondegreen of the day

We've just agreed to take our holidays in Japan this year so naturally I've been singing 'Move to Japan' all morning. I wasn't sure I had all the lyrics right so I googled them.

Instead of "Girls with almond eyes eatin seaweed and rice", I'd been singing "Girls with almond eyes; you can see the sun rise". I figured it had something to do with the whole Land of the Rising Sun thing.

Oh well.

Just got 'Jesse Winchester' on CD from Amazon. Features a couple of our boys of course and our old friend Al Cherny, late of the Tommy Hunter show.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 16:12:59 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P / Peter V: After jumping ship towards the end of '65, Levon seems to have stayed for a time in LA, where he did jobbing gigs with a crowd that included Leon Russell, Roger Tillison, Carl Radle and others. He also let Sandy Konikoff, a subsequent ship-jumper, sleep on his couch for a time, and introduced Sandy to his musical chums. Which is how come Konikoff ended up in the Mad Dogs and Englishmen band that Leon Russell put together a couple years later.

Still working my way through the Basement Tapes boot (four CDs). The standout on the most recent is "People Get Ready", which I find very moving. It's one of the very few I've heard so far that seems to be arranged for a vocal group (like the Impressions - how 'bout that!), with Rick and a falsetto-ising Richard - and maybe Robbie too. Plus someone (Richard?) on autoharp. (Greil Marcus calls it a "groaning" version in "The Old, Weird America", which I don't think he intended as a compliment - a sad lapse of taste in my view.)


Entered at Mon Mar 12 15:58:51 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Leon Russell

Peter: Leon Russell, in addition to playing keyboards, arranged a couple of interesting songs ("Echoes" & "So You Say You Lost Your Baby") on Gene Clark's 1967 album with the Gosdin Brothers. He was joined by fellow Wrecking Crew members Glen Campbell & Jerry Cole.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 15:42:16 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Just passing by

Subject: Heavy seas

GAWD DARN IT, Norm...just reading the words "Cape Horn" made my gut go sour. I remember those days...up & down...back & forth.... Gotta go eat some Ritz crackers and get my stomach back to normal.

For anyone who follows Garth, he most likely will be sitting in with the Bush Brothers at High Falls Cafe, High Falls, NY (845) 687-2699; on Sat, March 24th. Garth always gets there late, like around 11:00 PM. I don't know if I'll make this one, I'm getting a new left shoulder installed on the 19th...bound to sting a little bit. I'll be whigged out on painkillers, wherever I am.

It's warm around here today, I guess we have an early spring. Daffodils are coming up, along with the snow drops and crocuses. Migratory birds are back. My family in Denmark tells me they had the hardest winter in 26 years, but here in upstate NY we had the mildest winter I've ever seen. Seems like it's always windy. Global warming.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 14:19:15 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Cape Horn........Revisited

Not for the faint of heart. LARS!! DO NOT WATCH THIS VIDEO! I was to be away to work this morning. It's blowing so hard here the ferries aren't running again.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 08:19:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Can't Judge a book

Many thanks, Paul .. I'd forgotten that, though as a teen, this was my favourite Bo Diddley number and one we played in every spotty garage band. The Strangeloves did the original of I Want Candy, one of the better derivatives of Bo. On their compilation at least five songs have the Bo Diddley beat,including a superb Willie & The Hand Jive. So, yes, they clearly were inspired by Bo.

In the 61-64 era when Van Morrison was a sax player in various bands, Can't Judge A Book was one of the British R&B staples. A Shot of Rhythm & Blues was another that everyone did. or "rock standards".


Entered at Mon Mar 12 06:59:46 CET 2012 from (212.60.65.174)

Posted by:

Antonia Benson

Location: Canada
Web: My link

Subject: We Need Workers to join Sunshine Dairy Company Canada.

JOB OFFER TO ALL INTERESTED APPLICANTS . I am the Human Resources Manager , under the employment section in Sunshine Dairy Foods Company here in Canada Branch , we need workers from all parts of the world to join the company , whether Skilled or unskilled they are all qualified to join the company . You can also invite any of your friends and relatives to join us either the Branch in Canada , United of America or United Kingdom ,all approved applicants are to be granted free air plane ticket and free accommodation and hospitality benefits.Applicants are only responsible for work permit visa fees requirements. Contact us through this email; sunshinedairycompany@rocketmail.com Your best Cooperation is highly appreciated . Mrs. Antonia Benson, Employment Consultant Officer , Human Resources Department . 150-6th Avenue SW Calgary Alberta T2P 3Y7 , Canada.


Entered at Mon Mar 12 03:27:45 CET 2012 from (108.93.33.188)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago
Web: My link

Could have been the Strangeloves as well as anyone else, but Bo Diddley tells people to "turn it up" in Can't Judge a Book by Looking at the Cover. There's a great live version on youtube (link), with a bunch of period touches from some Shindig-style show.


Entered at Sun Mar 11 21:08:01 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wrecking Ball ..

To sum up, Al, are you saying it's worth getting?


Entered at Sun Mar 11 21:02:34 CET 2012 from (108.200.221.36)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Band Songs

Jeff, the context that I was posting from was as a fan sitting in the seat at a Ramble and noticing a trajectory and evolution in the set from the very first Ramble, the mid phase rambles, and the current phase Rambles.

At the very first ramble there were no Band songs played. Then some songs started filtering in that had been performed by the Band....I include songs like 'Don't Ya Tell Henry' and 'Back to Memphis'. Let's call those cover songs with Band connections so as not to take any credit away from the songwriters. Then in the third phase, full fledged Band classics started appearing in the set. This would include things like 'The Weight', 'Chest Fever', 'Ophelia' and 'The Shape I'm In'.

So yes, Levon did not start playing "Band" songs until a certain point in the Ramble cycle. But it was not as abrupt of a transition as it might appear. There was a mid period when cover songs that had also been covered by The Band were performed. I referred to those as "Band" songs because I like to live on the edge.



Entered at Sun Mar 11 19:23:11 CET 2012 from (74.108.30.41)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Al

WOW! What a return!


Entered at Sun Mar 11 18:39:19 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Words will not suffice to register my reaction to Al's post.

So:

:-)


Entered at Sun Mar 11 17:53:32 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Resurfacing for Bruce

Still submerged with so much shit these days. So apologies to all for the absence. As it is I have resurfaced only to wage a fight against the lies of that odious c**t Patrice Evra and now to register my take on this astonishing, triumphant offering from the genre's master craftsman.

WRECKING BALL assessment

Within the realm popular music it is one thing for an artist to reflect their passion and concerns for a particular issue within their musical offerings. It is quite another for an artist to successfully translate that passion into a coherent musical form which not only conveys the artist’s strength and depth of feeling across the entirety of an album but also manages to leave his targeted audience – or should I say significant sections of it at least – breathlessly craving to play that album over and over again to delight in what the artist has created.

To read the cool detachment and glib dismissals of some music critics in their critiques of Bruce Springsteen’s Wrecking Ball album – albeit many of whom despite such glibness have still registered positive reviews – you would think that there is a surfeit of albums of this genre littering the rock canon; that for an artist to achieve such a feat is akin to shelling peas and is, consequently, the preserve of many. In reality, albums that are not only thematic but at the same time consistent across the board in their quality and ability to both enthral and give pleasure are the rarest of musical commodities.

The fact is the musical landscape for all the delights it yields is by no means awash with such seamless treasures. Sure many artists and many albums have aspired to reach such heights. Few, however, have managed it. On a personal level I am only too painfully aware of this because they are precisely the sort of musical offerings I have made it my ongoing mission to track down and cherish ever since back in 1969 I sat awestruck listening to The Band, four Canadians and an Arkansian, managing to pull off this incredibly elusive trick with their second album which logged so evocatively the theme of a backwoods America, up to that point and, indeed since, the sole preserve of film and literature.

That I have rarely been fully rewarded in my efforts does not mean that I view disparagingly albums not quite reaching such levels of unerring track to track thematic consistency of giants such as the aforementioned Band and the likes of Van Morrison, Bob Dylan and REM or that I regard any such albums as being necessarily of lesser majesty. But it does explain why one artist in particular has rewarded me on more than one occasion with his efforts in this cinematic area.

On Born To Run, Darkness, Nebraska, Tunnel of Love, Tom Joad and The Rising, Bruce Springsteen certainly made it his business to aspire to the heights I speak of. Whether he achieved those heights on all of them is open to debate.

What is not debatable is how definite themes seam through all these albums. Nor, I guess, would there be too much dispute that the themes of a young buck’s quest for escape on Born to Run, the sense of entrapment of Darkness, the human alienation and desolation of Nebraska and the fragility of loving relationships on Tunnel of Love saw each of those four albums also reach musical heights to rank with any.

By the same token – or certainly as far as I see it at least – the worthy themes present in Tom Joad’s despair for discarded immigrants and The Rising’s concern for the victims of 9/11 did not succeed in taking those two albums to corresponding heights. Clearly even for an artist of Springsteen’s stature and supreme craftsmanship a worthy theme is by no means a guarantee of hitting the target.

So against this thematic backdrop, where can we place Springsteen’s latest offering, Wrecking Ball, and its take on America in 2012? Does Springsteen still possess the artistry to create another soulmate to warrant comparison with his amazing earlier quartet? Or are we to be content with yet another admirable yet ultimately inferior attempt at greatness?

Well, regarding the theme of Wrecking Ball, the underlying catalyst is clear. In the wake of what has transpired economically these past few years both in his own country and – as a result – worldwide, Springsteen is an angry man. Whilst, as we shall see, this is by no means the sole theme of Wrecking Ball, on certain tracks such as Shackled and Drawn, Jack of All Trades and Death To My Hometown Springsteen is a man seething, a man utterly despairing of the greed, self indulgence and desire to exploit innocent folk of the mercantile classes; of the irresponsibility of the peoples’ chosen and elected government to protect and aid ordinary folk against the ravages of both nature and the economy; of the very concept of those he views as guilty of turning a blind eye to the plight of the impoverished or merely paying lip service to it.

The ire oozes from every pore of such tirades. Why even the protagonist who seems the most placid of all those Springsteen conjures up on the album – the literal Jack of all trades – would gladly bag himself a banker if he had him a gun.

Of course, some critics baulk at the irony of a multi-millionaire railing at other millionaires. Incredibly, some even find the anger contrived. Well, okay, there can be no doubting there has to be a certain degree of irony involved. Yet contrived? Nah. Anybody with even a modicum of genuine compassion will know you do not have to be a victim of plight to feel genuine empathy with those experiencing it. And just a single listen to the venom Springsteen spits out on some of these tracks at such contemptible folk or at those who have aided and abetted them with either wilful pandering or inadvertent irresponsibility is more than sufficient to dispel the slightest notion of any insincerity. This is a man feeling genuine contempt for those culpable for marginalising so many of his fellow Americans. It is not a man up for mere posturing. And with Springsteen’s track record of deeply held convictions how in any case could any such notion withstand even the most fleeting scrutiny.

But Wrecking Ball is not simply an outpouring of anger. True, anger has clearly been the catalyst for Springsteen’s writing and informs much of it. But, as is the case with any true artist and craftsman, Springsteen employs such anger to enhance rather than engulf what he is attempting to create. And so other emotions, other concerns, other reflections gradually come to the forefront of the album’s landscape.

From his scorn in the opening track for a government he feels manifestly fails to care of its own through his Easy Money nod to the reality of how the darker criminal aspects of life can be induced by a ravaged economy via his overt aforesaid triumvirate of pure angry songs, the album explores the nooks and crannies of how the broader economic plight impacts on the vulnerable. It culminates in This Depression, one of his bleakest ever offerings in which Springsteen’s protagonist is so down and so lost he resorts to seemingly alluding to the plight of Jesus on the cross to convey how he, too, feels so “forsaken”.

Having reached rock bottom in the chronicling of the ravaging of his fellow countrymen in the first half of the album, Springsteen then does what he does better than anyone else in the album’s second half. Spitting full in the face of adversity, he draws on the indefatigability of the human spirit to take the album to heights that, despite repeated plays, remain unimaginable amidst the despair of the opening six tracks.

He does this with the not inconsiderable aid of two songs – the title track Wrecking Ball and the tenth track Land of Hope and Dreams – each of which has been around for some time, the latter for a decade or more. Each now re-emerges triumphantly on Wrecking Ball, each riding in like the US Cavalry on its bugler’s fanfare, each integrating seamlessly with the rest of the album’s material to become not only its two cornerstones but to lend relevance and true stature to everything else on the album. As we tune in spellbound to each of these incredible pieces of music at long last finding their true spiritual home, an album which would still be a pretty fabulous one transcends quite simply into a uniquely emotional listening experience.

The defiance of Wrecking Ball, in its former life a defiant yet, at heart, little more than parochial lament for the demolition of the New York Giants football stadium, becomes the pivotal gauntlet for those the album seeks to champion. Fittingly it is singled out as the album’s title track. Equally fittingly it heralds an entirely different ball game.

“Come on and take your best shot, let me see what you got” is no longer merely defying a demolition man to destroy a stadium of brick and concrete but explodes into Springsteen’s call to arms, reaffirming human resolve to overcome whatever hardships may have been inflicted and whatever impoverishment may have threatened to destroy lives and, indeed, may already have destroyed many. In such context, the song’s defiant mantra forged to a climactic build up which Springsteen clearly revels in stage managing is as emotionally uplifting and exciting as such music can surely ever get.

Three tracks later Land of Hope and Dreams somehow manages to eclipse even that emotional charge as the full impact of lyrics that have been around for so long hits home so resonantly it simply defies tears not to trickle with pride that a fellow human can encompass so exhilaratingly the fortitude of the human spirit. So long a mighty blue whale of a song, yet seemingly destined to languish forever without a fitting expanse of sea in which to swim, Land of Hope and Dreams now swims majestically in the ocean of an album for which its yearning spirit was manifestly always destined.

Two of the remaining three tracks in this closing quintet of uplifting spirit stand nobly alongside the might of the older established two, albeit in their own less voluble manner, and each again lend significance to what has preceded them. The third, meanwhile – albeit not at the same level – still rides ably enough the crest of the same emotional wave created by the others.

The lesser track, You’ve Got It, can be interpreted in two ways. Either as an earthy sexual distraction from the plight or, with the term ‘Baby’ interpreted generically, as yet more affirmation of the prevailing depth of human resource. Rocky Ground, the first of the final two gems, requires half a dozen plays to bed down and unveil fully the magnificence of its own spiritual splendour and biblical message. It sees Springsteen offering a reaffirmation of those stirring trademark live concert evangelical forays of his but delivered this time with tender restraint amidst the simple poignancy of the song’s melody that fits the ascending mood perfectly. The second new gem, We Are Alive, closes the set with fitting divine homage to cherished souls, a wonderfully poetic ending with wry whimsical notions evoking the spirits of those fighters for justice and freedom gone by emerging to stand shoulder to shoulder with their impoverished descendants. In some hands such a notion would fall short of its target; perhaps embarrassingly so. In a master artist’s warm and loving embrace it works stunningly on both a lyrical and musical level.

With these final spellbinding outpourings, Springsteen completes his narrative arc. The stirring defiance of Wrecking Ball; the understated realisation and life affirming perspective of Rocky Ground; the faith, hope and salvation offered by Land of Hope and Dream’s spiritual train; and the final redemptive communion with the departed souls of We Are Alive have taken us to a place scarcely imaginable.

A little more than 25 minutes earlier Springsteen’s caustic sniping, naked rage and bleak despair cast such a dark shadow over the first half dozen tracks that the outcome we now share with the protagonists was never a remote possibility. Now, uplifted in spirit and with souls ignited, we see precisely why such a dark opening was not simply needed but pivotal in allowing the album to work as spectacularly as it does. Without it the album’s climax would be shorn of its closing focus and intensity. With it, the entire thing becomes exultant. The album’s protagonists and those of us privileged to listen to it are transcended.

Each track may now be seen for the vital piece of the whole it is, forming the nigh perfect cohesive entity Springsteen clearly envisaged as he welded his individual tales amidst the disparate musical idioms of folk, rock, pop, soul, gospel, Celtic fire, latin horns et alia as only a master marinated in such music could ever do. At the same time, the question as to where Wrecking Ball slots into Springsteen’s pantheon is rendered a superfluous one. As with any great art, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. And here we are reminded triumphantly by the artist that we are feasting at the table of a master chef without peer.


Entered at Sun Mar 11 17:38:31 CET 2012 from (24.186.38.53)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Macca

When I first heard the title of Paul's new CD I did wonder what the heck it meant exactly. But when you hear the phrase in the context of the song, it makes perfect sense. It's actually nice

XXXXXXX


Entered at Sun Mar 11 15:11:59 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Kisses on the Bottom

I mentioned this before .. Sir Paul says his CD title was considered too risqué in the USA. As it's a quote from "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down & Write Myself A Letter" I think he's bullshitting. Did it cause any fuss?

He said it's the music they listened to on the BBC Light Programme (Family Favourites?) as kids, while mum was preparing Sunday lunch. (We assume in 1950s England, Dad didn't assist) We just tried it. He's 100% right on the tunes, and my mum could have sung all of them while cooking the cabbage, but I think he fails to get them pretty comprehensively. He's much too tentative and respectful, so comes across as light and a bit quavery. We agreed here that Rod the Mod makes a much better job of oldies, mainly because he doesn't seem afraid of them. Sir Paul seems afraid of them.


Entered at Sun Mar 11 13:05:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wrecking Crew

One of the singles I picked up recently was chosen purely on credits: Arranged by Leon Russell. Produced by Snuff Garrett. Liberty 1965. Hmm, early for Leon Russell to get a credit, and right under the artist name .. I'd ignored the artist. It's Save Your Heart For Me by Gary Lewis & The Playboys. And it's f*cking dreadful. I hadn't heard it before .. they didn't figure in the UK at all. What's odd is that it's 1965, but sounds old-fashioned for 1962.

The B-side was co-written by Leon Russell, and it's Without A Word of Warning. It's not great, though much better than the A-side and it also has some excellent production touches in the backing. Still sounds as if from 3 or 4 years earlier though.

It's interesting to see what the Wrecking Crew were doing most days, rather than the days when they had good stuff to work with!


Entered at Sun Mar 11 00:23:43 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, the context was relatve to when Levon started playing Band songs again..So, for the conversation to be accurate or even sensible, Band songs needed to be Band songs.. that is where this came up. There never was any issue for Levon that would keep him from performing Back To Memphis, Don't Ya Tell Henry, or Atlantic City.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 23:52:21 CET 2012 from (124.168.25.103)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: As Bob Dylan said about 'All Along the Watchtower'

It's Jimi's song - I just wrote it.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 21:33:25 CET 2012 from (174.252.44.239)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Songs

Jeff, I agree with you. I'm not trying to take credit away from the songwriter. Just for clarification, when I refer to hearing a song like 'Don't Ya Tell Henry' as Levon doing a Band song, It's just to differentiate it from a song like 'Scratch My Back' etc. It's more of a nod to The Band's history with the song and is quicker than saying: "Levon performed a cover version of a song called 'Don't Ya Tell Henry' written by the songwriter named Bob Dylan, which a group known as The Band also recorded a cover version of in the late 1960's."

I know that it was written by Bob Dylan, but in many ways it will always be a Band song to me. AKA a song that the Band performed back in the day. Dylan is still the creator.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 18:43:30 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Turn your radio up ..

The phrase 'Turn your radio up ..' makes any of us here think of Caravan at TLW. I've been listening to Night time by The Strangeloves, dating from 1965 on Bert Berns Bang label, the label Van Morrison recorded for. That's got the line in it. Do you reckon Van got it from The Strangeloves?


Entered at Sat Mar 10 16:21:36 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Too early--- i meant that serious blues performers have historically incorporated popular songs into their repertoire,,, popular being both standards and contemporary popular songs. this goes for some great songwriters too- Lonnie Johnson for example..


Entered at Sat Mar 10 16:10:17 CET 2012 from (90.233.214.122)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Ravi Shankar

Well Peter, Serenity made us both confused. Maybe we deserved it and learned our lesson. - I posted once that KLAUS VOORMAN has passed away. I read it in EXPECTING RAIN website. A nice guy like me didn't notice that it was only ...... a joke?


Entered at Sat Mar 10 14:50:56 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Yes,Peter,I know you did........and yes, you are correct on the standards....Berry/Johnson songs are in the first set of standards,,ROll Over Beethoven often, for example....but I don't know if we cant count Johnny B Goode as a Berry/Johnson #, or if that one would really be just a Berry. Green onions, yes, if an organist is there.There are standards. Dock OF The Bay is another.Alot of what are standards that get played has a lot to do with the ability of the singers...There are a couple of women her who can really sing...Renee Smith can really do Aretha, Al Green. On Valentine's Day she closed with a damn fine version of I WIll Always Love YOu, no easy feat. Said it was the first time she sang it in public. I'm probably gonna see her tonight, and you get lot sof Aretha, and you get Love and Happiness, she is a serious blues singer too..spent the best part of several decades in Asisa, making a living....Gal named Kim Massie, same deal, the woman can sing, you get the Motown standards, and you get the contmeporary stuff,Alicia Keys..., and you get Whole Lotta Love, and you get the blues- down and dirty and nasty blues too, , Memphis and Mississippi juke joint shit, so if the performer is up to it, you get the whole gamut of standards....the thing is Gals like Renee and Kim grew up int he church and with the blues too, and that, going back to the beginning, blues performers have historiclly incoporated STANDARDS into there repertotire.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 12:56:43 CET 2012 from (124.168.25.103)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Ari: Levon at berkelee

He talks about it in his memoirs... He's just plain 'mark', and does a course. I assume he comes out with a b. mus, or perhaps a diploma. I wasn't impressed with parts of Levon's book, but certainly some parts struck me as really admirable. That was one of them...


Entered at Sat Mar 10 10:04:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, you know I meant "Chuck Berry / Johnnie Johnson" songs. That was shorthand!


Entered at Sat Mar 10 09:08:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Standards

Standards shouldn’t shift much from generation, though new ones can come in. I’m going back a few years, but I was present at a good few ‘Why don’t you get up and do a number with us?’ situations. I’d say there are rock standards. As everybody shuffles around picking up instruments, I have a feeling that a guitarist will play the intro to Johnny B. Goode, or someone will yell , ‘Way down in Louisiana close to New Orleans ..’. For some reason, though everyone on stage will know half a dozen Chuck Berry songs, in the UK they’ll go for Johnny B. Goode most often. I’d put it at Jam Number One (see The Band + Allman Brothers too). With an organist present it’ll be Green Onions. If they’re leaning to R&B, Hoochie Coochie Man or Got My Mojo Working are obvious choices too. The three Jeff mentioned are up next .. In The Midnight Hour being even ahead of those three, but just as the soul stuff is easier to jam than Stairway to Heaven, it’s harder than the R&B stuff.

Ain’t That A Lot of Love

Every November every year about a dozen of us from my old school class meet up, and we always have a music quiz, mainly recognizing songs from a few bars of intro, or a solo. We always have a section with “versions” and we did Ain’t That A Lot of Love a couple of years ago (I prepare the quiz) which is why I have several versions in iTunes. We discussed this before. I think The Band comes a long way down the list, definitely behind Levon’s RCO All-Stars live, but also below several others. The song is originally by Homer Banks. The Spencer Davis Group shamelessly lifted it as Gimmee Some A Loving. Taj Mahal for me is the definitive version, with the Flying Burrito Brothers as the next best. Beverley Knight’s fairly recent one is more radical than most. Tom Jones did it too. If the song came to mind, the Taj Mahal is the one that would play in my head first, but I’d still think of it as a Homer Banks song. I’d never think of it as a “Band song”.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 06:38:13 CET 2012 from (98.14.145.48)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Levon at Berkeley College

I've always thought this was pretty hilarious and I only remembered it because my friend is applying there. Is this true and does anybody have anymore details on Levon attending Berkeley College in 1972. I understand the appeal, especially so Levon can exercise his Cannonball Adderley . Does nobody think it's crazy that a major rock drummer go to college after having released their masterpiece. Before I heard this I'd always thought I'd noticed a change in his style. I have a bootleg of Don't Do It from after 72 and he does something I'd never heard him do before, he doesn't separate the bass drum with the snare as he normally did before hand. He doesn't use that mini roll in between notes as much. He just goes through the whole bar ignoring the snare and symbols 1-2-3-4. From Watkins Glen on the jam he does 8 bass drum kicks straight. Seems like a jazz reflex.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 06:00:09 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEUp(Friend0

Subject: calvin

you do make an intersting point...... yes.... but there are some standards that venture into the same listening demographics-- such as Mustang Sally, Knock On Wood, Dancing in the streets...that kinda song.....no. not Rock and Roll per se, but, far easier for an above average band to p[lay well than Stairway To Heaven ..... there are beatle Songs tha are sorta standards...... maybe thr range is so darn wide that their canlt be standards covering it all......


Entered at Sat Mar 10 05:24:13 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Calvin, you did it, you brought it back up.....

Versions of songs is one thing-- but whose song is it--- it's a matter of who the creator is...now that can become a very sticky conversation---hendrix's version of All Along the watchtower is the iconic one, but the strong seeds of that were in Dylan's recorded version, yes they were...(similar in advancement to a acoustic blues song from the 30s being recorded by Johnny Winter in the 70s)- so, being that the song is already copyrighted, it is cleary a mtter of interpretaion or a slight rearrangement, and instrumentation is a heavy change of course..the song is still Dylan;s song,there ain't no way around it...Associating it more with hendrix, hearing neil Young's version at thr Dylan tribute and someonr thinking more of Hendrix, well okay, but that is a personal problem or thing -it reminds you of hendrix, but it is Dylan;s song. Hendrix;s version might be the best known, iconic version but it is a Dylan song..Hendrix did not write it and couldn't have..two people will not write the same song separately-.give em the same title,, it still won;t happen......Same as Tambourine Man is a Dylan song.I remember being akid and knowing The byrds version sooner, but to me it is Dylan song.

Todd being a creator, i;m suprised that you don't agree with me on this....Now there is collaboration.... and where collaboration takes place combined with what the preagreed or understood arrangement was , is the whole thing.. unless htere is some other agreement or understanding ,Song is already copyrighted and recorded, that's it, unless the orginal copyroighter adds you to the copyright. yeah, i know, we are entering into dangerous territory..... I do not have the time or inclination for a Band songwriting battle, hope we do not go there... somebody get a trumpet and blow 'Retreat!"

Now this get combobulated-- it's related, but it is different too. we re getting into direct collaborations, not future interpretaions.
Todd, one more-- if you are shooting a model, and you have agreed that you are the copyright owner... but the model contrbutes a lot to the shoot,, you have collaborated.. but you are the copyright owner...You alone...that is the deal,,, you both agreed to that up front....Now if you are inclined, you can add her to the copyright,,, or if you work with her again, and you know she is going to make the shoot,,not just by virtue of her looks but by virtue of her unique character and take on things, etc , she will help you make your skill as a photographer shine, and garner more attention, hey, you might strike a deal to share copyright ahead of time, and maybe pay her less too (you are paying her, not a magazine or product co)..... People are going to think of the photograph as your work- you are the photographer, unless you blaze a trail and make her co copyright owner, then everyone is more inclined to think of the photograph as both of your work..separate issue, but as a creator, you should get this,, that is why it is so important that the creator is credited.. there are songs that i think of the Band's performance of, but , i wouldnt think of as Band songs...Burrito's- Ain't That A Lotta Love, the version of the song that comes to my mind.. but it ain't their song...


Entered at Sat Mar 10 04:49:58 CET 2012 from (24.252.146.188)

Posted by:

Calvin

Interesting conversation about versions of songs. I always though it odd that Rock n Roll never seemed to develop standards. There simply doesn't exists a Salt Peanuts or Cherokee that every group takes a swing at one time or another. Never could figure out why.


Entered at Sat Mar 10 04:17:53 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Bob F- more

Krisitna Train was the fiddle playing lady Petruzelli was performing with at Kooper's 66th birthday show. the between song speak gave me the impression he was possibly producing her, but at the very least was a guide or possibly manager /collabrator, some sort of influential guide, at the time.

Kooper was quite a fan of the woman's music....


Entered at Fri Mar 9 23:26:20 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: I'm not really sure, but I'm guessing that Mr. Webster was a musician/arranger hired by producer Terry Melcher to act as a go-between in directing the session with the Wrecking Crew.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 21:57:11 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Who's Roger Webster, the session leader on "Mr Tambourine Man"?


Entered at Fri Mar 9 21:25:49 CET 2012 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bap Kennedy

Peter....that is one show I would like to see!


Entered at Fri Mar 9 21:13:14 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Thanks Jeff for Fab Faux Info

Jeff, thanks for the Fab Faux band members info. I look forward to buying a copy of your song when you record it.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 19:33:00 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....and as Ravi himself said in 1971..”well if you enjoyed the tune-up...wait till we start playing”.......


Entered at Fri Mar 9 19:14:00 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thank you for that correction, David P. I hadn't told Mrs V yet and he's one of her all-time favourites!


Entered at Fri Mar 9 19:10:55 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bap Kennedy

I saw Bap Kennedy last night, in an unusual small setting. A tremendous show too. Review added with link.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 18:45:51 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ravi Shankar Sharma

Although often confused, I beleieve it was not the better known Ravi Shankar, the sitarist, who passed.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 18:45:33 CET 2012 from (90.233.139.225)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Ravi Shankari

RAVI SHANKARI was the synonyme to classical Indian music here in Northern Europe in many decades and especially in the late sixties. Later on BOLLYWOOD films and the music from other parts of this big country overtook his place. - I still listen to him every Sunday when cooking our Indian style Sunday lunch, mostly for the deep and warm feeling.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 18:37:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ravi Shankar

That's very sad, and also hairs standing up on the back of the neck weird. I've spent the afternoon looking through Ravi Shankar albums on line, and ordered two Ananda Shankar albums about three minutes before coming on to the GB and seeing the news.

One of the most magical musical evenings I've ever had was Ravi Shankar & Anoushka Shakar playing in Salisbury Cathedral as the sun slowly went down behind the stained glass windows. RIP indeed.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 18:13:21 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Ravi Shankar dead at 86...

Sad news. Loved listening to this great musician.

Renowned music director of yesteryear, Ravi Shankar Sharma, dies at 86... By Indo-Asian News Service

Thu, Mar 08, 2012

Renowned director of yesteryear, Ravi Shankar Sharma, popular called as 'Ravi' passed away in Mumbai late Wednesday night, according to family sources. He was 86 and had been ailing since some time when he breathed his last at his Santacruz residence.

He is survived by his estranged son Ajay and daughter-in-law Varsha Usgaonkar, a leading Marathi and Hindi film actress.

Ravi lost his wife in 1988, and hit the headlines when there was a family dispute over a property issue last year.

His end came just four days after he celebrated his 86th birthday among a few friends and relatives.

"Ravi was noted for his heart-touching, soft, melodious tunes, which made his songs and music immortal and is hummed even today, decades after he composed them. Plus, he was a very fine gentleman, and a great human being," said an old friend A. Krishnamurthi, among the leading former film-makers of Bollywood.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE


Entered at Fri Mar 9 17:58:04 CET 2012 from (90.233.139.225)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: More of unforgetable intros often played by other artists

"All Along The Watchtower" (A Bm G) and "Knocking On Heaven's Door" (G D Am7)


Entered at Fri Mar 9 17:34:15 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Levon featured in a promo video for Ulster County (tip from Expecting Rain)... see link.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 17:33:56 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

SCTV did the same bit much better.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 17:30:11 CET 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thanks David for one of the most interesting attachments I've seen here.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 17:16:29 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Byrd's Mr. Tambourine Man

Russell Bridges, aka Leon Russell, played electric piano on the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man", but it all be disappeared in the mix. (Link above to the AFM session contract for "MTM" and B-side "I Knew I'd Want You). In addition to Mr. Knechtel on bass, other Wrecking Crew members included Hal Blaine on drums and Bill Pitman & Jerry (Kolbrak) Cole on electric guitars, joining Jim McGuinn on Rickenbacker 12-string. Mr. McGuinn sang lead vocals, with Gene Clark doubling his part and David Crosby adding high harmony.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 16:56:24 CET 2012 from (90.233.139.225)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: David P about "Mr Tambourine Man"

David P: "Most music fans of a certain age immediately recognize the song when they hear just that short intro."

What a coincidence: It was played in the gastronomic TV show run by the Band related artist PLURA JONSSON (ELDKVARN). Plura's brother played a few Dylan intros in the dinner table, and the guests had to guess what it was. One of the intros was just this

"blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding...

blingdiddle dingdingding blingdiddleding dingding..."


Entered at Fri Mar 9 16:10:04 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Larry Knechtel

Bill M: Mr. Knechtel, in addition to keyboards & bass, also played guitar & harmonica. Like other members of the famous Wrecking Crew group of session musicians, he learned that proficiency on many instruments led to more session work. Producer Paul Rothchild brought Mr. Knechtel in to add electric bass on some of the early Doors recordings. The Band connection would be that he played piano on the cover of "The Weight" by the group Smith, who he played with before joining Bread.


Entered at Fri Mar 9 15:30:46 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the main problem with The Band

"The Weight" meets _Pulp Fiction_ . . . .


Entered at Fri Mar 9 14:44:13 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: I didn't know that Larry Knechtel played bass at all, so that it was him on "Mr Tambourine Man" is a surprise. I think I first heard of him as the piano-playing piece of Bread, back in the days of "Baby I'm A Want You".


Entered at Fri Mar 9 05:40:37 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob ,you wrote:"Jeff, we had the Fab Faux at UPAC in Kingston a couple weeks ago. They're great and a lot of fun. I know they all have real jobs and it's just for fun, blah blah blah. They're all great players and everyone in the band can really sing. I can't help wondering why they haven't tried as a band to do something original and timeless that would belong to them. Maybe they have and I wasn't paying attention. Any thoughts on this?"

Bob,the only one of those guys i know at all is Jimmy. I've seen Rich pagano drum with him several times, PRsioners of Second Ave, and i;v seen Will Lee live plenty of times... he's aces of course..Petruzelli I;ve seen twice i am aware of, once with Donovan (Garth,Vivino, Will Lee, all on that gig too), the other in a band with a singin , fiddle playing gal that opened Kooper's birthday show, I think in 2010.If that was the year, the only memorable thing about the whole night was that it was the first date i had with a particualr woman since we were 13 years old, 40 years prior. the night led to a key verse or two to a song that if i ever record it could make me a rich man.. the other guy in the faux,i don't think i ever saw perform..... though it is very reasonable, and probably a low ball #, to say that i;ve probably seen vivino play well over a thousand times since 1985, yet,i;'ve never seen the Faux...no special reason, just no reason to..... when i am home these last several years there are plenty of shows to go to, and as great as the performance must be, it has no real appeal for me. I'm alwayss ready to go see jimmy with felix cabrera,or if the J band did a gig again, or if jimmy is playing iwth Brian Mitchell, or he has a Black italians thing happening,or something else, I'm there...Jimmy in a club, yeah man i;m there..the shows with hubert, johnnie, sebastian, son seals,, real gifts

Now as far as your worldy line ".....it's just for fun,blah blah blah" while this might be a little out of school, and i have no real knowledge of this.... it is fair for me to say,hey, i doubt these guys, some or most of them at that A+ level, are running all over the damn place for peanuts. Or pork chop or sushi money. This probably is surf and turf- USDA, handfed aged, butler to shovel the cow's dung off the barn floor before the cow can step in it, filet mignon/ rock maine lobster tail, pay grade. i take tha back--- probably caviar, escargot, and chateua brion pay grade. And i hope it is. why else fly all over the damn place when you are already busy with a good paying job doing what you love- playing music every day. But, you got the gig, you protect the gig..unless you are already so damn rich (and your kids are our of college and your ex wives remaaried and alimony is over.) you can say fuck it.... all these guys could be just as occupied without going but a few miles from home, or could stay home.why do this unless it is just too good to pass up.

Original material, i don't know of any they've done, but i do think i recall the possibility of them recording some original stuff.... and if the conversation is the time i think it was, that was two years ago last month...I do think time constraints could be an issue for most or all of them.... you don't see vivno producing records endlessly like he used to,,, not for a long time now... the man;s too busy... recording something top notch, seeing it through the way it needs to be,is a huge commitment. .... but,for all i know, they have stuff in he can... no idea....

hey, i tihnk pagano has a studio where he teaches how to record particular drum sounds---- like how to get a studio sound like Ringo's, or Bonha'ms, etc....


Entered at Thu Mar 8 22:40:12 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mr. Tambourine Man

Of course The Byrds version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" featured the distinctive intro played by Jim McGuinn on electric Rickenbacker 12-string and an electric bass run originally played by the late-great Larry Knechtel. Most music fans of a certain age immediately recognize the song when they hear just that short intro.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 22:02:50 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Good example Bob. Dylan in general is a good candidate for that type of thing as so many people have covered his songs and left their own mark on them.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 21:55:41 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Song Connections

Todd, I get what your saying. Mr. Tambourine Man is another good example. I think when people go see Roger McGuinn and he does Tambourine Man most of his fans are thinking The Byrds not Dylan first.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 21:31:24 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Rambling

Kevin I’m not really disagreeing with you or Jeff. I know logically & technically that ‘Back To Memphis’ is a cover of a Chuck Berry song. My reference to it as a “Band song” was more about the gut reaction and feeling that I had to hearing Levon do it at a Ramble. Sitting there and hearing the familiar riff and realizing what song it was brought up a warm fuzzy feeling of recognition.

My reaction wasn’t, “Wow, cool. Levon is doing a cover of a Chuck Berry song.”
It was more like. “Wow, cool. Levon is pulling something out from back in The Band days.”

But had there not been that history and connection to the Band there, I probably would have though of it first and foremost as the Chuck Berry song.

I understand the marketing aspect of including Band songs at the Rambles along with the wide range of other material that’s performed, but I will say that for me personally it was a thrill to hear Levon sing anything at all after his voice was silent for so many years. At the first Ramble back in 2004, (which was called "Uncle Remus and The Whole Show"), I think the very first thing that I heard him sing was Ray Charles ‘I Want To Know.’ It was a pretty amazing moment to witness, and I can’t speak for anyone else, but I certainly wasn’t disappointed that it was that song vs. something like ‘Up On Cripple Creek.’....although that would have been fun too.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 21:11:01 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Fab Faux

Jeff, we had the Fab Faux at UPAC in Kingston a couple weeks ago. They're great and a lot of fun. I know they all have real jobs and it's just for fun, blah blah blah. They're all great players and everyone in the band can really sing. I can't help wondering why they haven't tried as a band to do something original and timeless that would belong to them. Maybe they have and I wasn't paying attention. Any thoughts on this?


Entered at Thu Mar 8 20:58:48 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Wrecking Ball

Kevin J, I think it's the best record anyone has made since 'Love and Theft'. I hope you read Peter Stone Brown's review because it's perfect. The kind of music writing we use to find in Rolling Stone. When I was a kid I use to hitchhike 20 miles to get the latest issue. It was always the best day. That was a long long time ago. Before yuppie writers like Rob Sheffield ruined it. PSB is the kind of old school music writer that you can't find anymore.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 20:44:20 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bill, your extension of market, was integral.... The common sense /$ factor was an enormous part of what you referred to as urgings. Keep in mind the price of a ramble ticket (was it even higher back then?) and the precarious state of the entire situation those years ago.

Kevin, you got alot of friggin nerve agreeing with me gawddamit!


Entered at Thu Mar 8 20:16:12 CET 2012 from (79.109.2.251)

Posted by:

Ryan

Web: My link

I found this web usefull. I was lookin for another thing, but google give this and know I konw you work :)


Entered at Thu Mar 8 20:05:34 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

In addition to Jimmy V's urgings, there was also the market. Disappointed fans tend not to come back, especially for what are perceived, however unfairly, as oldies acts. When the Guess Who got together without Burton Cummings, after a hiatus of maybe three years, they declared that they'd be playing only their new stuff, or material that guys in the reformed band had had a hand in writing. Surprise surprise, they soon changed their tune and their tunes - because what the people at the shows wanted to hear was "American Woman", "No Time" and all the other hits they'd grown up with. As has been pointed out, life can be a bitch.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 19:49:15 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Atlantic City

In recent years Bruce Springsteen & the E-Street Band's live performances of "Atlantic City" sound similiar to The Band's cover version in that they also use the mandolin & accordion.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 19:34:59 CET 2012 from (70.53.45.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd: As long as the band or acts in question are both known for songs that they have written, then covers will always be covers. Not the case with a Frank Sinatra, Elvis or Whitney Houston but with cases like Dylan, Hendrix or the Band and Chuck Berry or Springsteen then certainly.....Unfamiliar territory for me to be agreeing with Jeff but I see his point on this one....Also, an interesting fact on Jimmy Vivino’s role in getting Levon to go much deeper into the Band’s vault of songs.

Bob F: Thanks for the prodding on the new Springsteen......I downloaded from itunes Tuesday and it is sensational. Rocking, joyous and very serious all at the same time. Is it just me or is he singing better than he ever has? Leaps and bounds better than anything he has done since Nebraska.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 18:34:21 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: She drove it to a different town

Jeff, Yes I realize I'm playing a little fast and loose when I call ‘Back to Memphis’ a "The Band" song as opposed to a Chuck Berry song, but it was intentional and I say it within the context of how it was performed at the Ramble and with consideration of the Band’s history with the song. Back in the day when the Band did it originally, I would classify it as The Band doing a Chuck Berry song. When Levon did it for the first time at a Ramble, it felt more like Levon pulling out an old nugget from The Band days rather than covering Berry. When Levon does ‘Atlantic City’ he is doing a Band song from Jericho..even though it was written by Springsteen. When Levon does ‘Don’t You Tell Henry’ he is doing the Band song from ‘The Basement Tapes’. If Levon started doing ‘Don’t Do It’ at Rambles, I would probably consider it as a Band song rather than a Marvin Gaye or Holland–Dozier–Holland song. When the Band performed it in the 1970’s I would consider it as more of a cover song.

For what it’s worth, when I hear the Band doing ‘The Weight’ I consider it to be them doing a Band song (as opposed to a J.R. Robertson song) And even when I hear 'Long Black Veil' from MFBP I consider it to be a Band song rather than a Lefty Frizell or Wilkin/Dill song.

I realize that it’s somewhat inconsistent, but I consider ‘Tears of Rage’ to be a Richard/Band song but consider ‘I Shall Be Released’ to be a Dylan song.

After Jimi Hendrix covered Dylan's 'All Along The Watchtower' and very much put his own stamp on it, Dylan started doing a live version that sounded more like the Hendrix version than a Dylan version. I would almost go as far as saying that 'All Along The Watchtower' became a Hendrix song that Dylan covered.

I don’t and never will consider TNTDODD to be a Joan Baez song. She put too much of her own stamp on it and her version should almost have a different title.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 17:23:46 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Is The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down a Band Song or a JoanBaez song?

Todd, - now this is semantics and noh necessarily more than a small issue in the past discussion, just a sidebar- a good way to put the Band song or not thing into perspective--- You associate ,Back To Memphis, Atlantic City and Masterpiece with The Band cause you like their versions,,possibly prefer their versions, and you therefore call them BAnd songs......I agree that they are great versions,,,but to me they are songs The Band covered more than memorably, songs they put their stamp on....... songs in their repertoire, not BAnd songs.They are Berry, Springsteen, and Dylan songs. Joan Baez'z version of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down is probably still the most well known version, and she put her stamp on it too (not to my liking though)...Would you call TNTDODD a Joan Baez song?...Atlantic city and Masterpiece by the BAnd may not even be the best known versions of the song, maybe Atlantic city is , possibly..

When you consider Baez and TNTDODD the disitinction is clear and it is an important one.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 16:49:08 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Weighing In

Luke: You're correct, Dylan's company owns the publishing rights. As I previouly mentioned in discussion about the Cingular commercial, a separate licensing agreement was negotiated with Dylan's Special Rider Music for use of "The Weight" for the commercial. Generally, the songwriter, Robbie, would get a 50% split of the publishing fee, unless some other arrangement was in place. Another licensing agreement had to be negotiated with EMI/Capitol for the use of The Band's recording of the song. Under their Capitol contract, the group is entitled to 50% of that fee, with each member or their estate getting 20% of that share (10% of the total).


Entered at Thu Mar 8 15:59:41 CET 2012 from (69.253.167.212)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: PA

Subject: Coke Commercial

I'm not sure about this, but I think Dylan owns the publishing rights to The Weight which he took as payment for The Band staying in Woodstock prior to MFBP. I heard that Dylan split the Coke commercial money with the guys in The Band.


Entered at Thu Mar 8 14:27:37 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Ramble Set Lists

Yes, Jeff, we are not in disagreement. I just wanted to relay some of the Band tunes I remembered hearing them as they worked there way into the Ramble set-lists. I know that the early ones that I mentioned were Chuck Berry and Dylan etc., But I still consider them to be Band songs as the Band had done versions of them and those were the versions that I would have expected. Same as with Springsteen's 'Atlantic City'. In fact I think there was a very deliberate direction at the early Rambles for it NOT to become a Band greatest hits concert. The Band material has increased over the years due to Jimmy's influence (as you mentioned), along with Larry Campbell bringing things like 'Chest Fever' into the mix, and Brian Mitchell doing 'Shape I'm In', Teresa with 'Long Black Veil' etc.

Especially with the Road Rambles, as compared to barn Rambles, there is more an an expectation to hear some of the Band classics. But it's still less than half of a typical set. I know that Levon has said that he is pretty particular with who sings Richard's songs. A consideration that Jimmy V. is pretty respectful of and does a nice job with them.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 21:36:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't know, Bill .. they could have sent a postcard to everyone that tuned in.

The Robbie section on "Give A Little Bit" is great .. I'm sure the writer (a HUGE MFBP fan) was thrilled to see this.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 21:31:55 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: a perfect face for radio

Peter V: All the ones I mentioned were radio jingles, so pictures wouldn't have helped much.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 21:31:24 CET 2012 from (124.168.25.103)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I too prefer the TLW version

But as David P pointed out: Levon's only lead vocal on MFBP - just incredible - what a performance.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 20:44:32 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie's Give A Little Bit Ad

A few years ago Robbie was among the singers who contributed a little bit of a Supertramp song in a Gap commericial (see link).


Entered at Wed Mar 7 18:42:48 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I never saw the diet Coke one, but the point about Levi 501 ads was they were all little stories, and filmed in high quality. That's why The Weight would have fitted so well.

Now I'd find them objectionable to advertise because Levi 501s were never shaped for me, but for the scrawnier bottom.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 18:15:34 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm sorry. The Weight was used in a Diet Coke ad.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 18:14:55 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, I reckon that Mandala coke ad would be more effective if they had a picture of the product or even its logo.

Advertisers have brought new life to a good few careers .. Peugeot cars had good music on their ads for years. Volkswagen is odd .. in Britain they've been showing that Ghostbusters sketch at the cinema (VW support film) for so many years that now the audience groan and boo it, which has to be counter-productive.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 17:43:03 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight

One novelty of "The Weight" was that it was the one song on "Music From Big Pink" that featured Levon as the principal vocalist, except for Rick's "crazy Chester" verse. On "We Can Talk" Levon shared the lead vocals with Richard.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 16:49:31 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, Back to Memphis was a chuck Berry tune, Masterpiece and maybe Henry too, dylan tunes.......Vivino is the reason actual Band songs got done. take it to the bank. Same as......


Entered at Wed Mar 7 16:33:27 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd,there is no disagreement between what you wrote and I wrote. That is how it happened. JV snuck the odd song in very occassionally at a BB show.The rambles it was slow, but there apparently was a reality that gave weight to jimmy's influence.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 16:00:27 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: By the Light of a Pink Moon on the Streets of Rome

Peter: Another beneficial example would be the Volkswagen ad that brought the late-great Nick Drake to the attention of the general public.

Jeff: And it was Levon who once effectively sang "Oh to be in the land of Coca-Cola".


Entered at Wed Mar 7 15:30:16 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's one of the Mandala Coke ads. Note the Robertsonian guitar work. Their other ad is on YouTube too and is worth finding, if not for itself then for the follow-on link to something called "Ronnie Hawkins - Bo Diddley Medley", where you have the massed forces of David Clayton-Thomas, Zal and Denny, John Sebastien, Michelle Phillips, Domenic Troiano, John Kay and both of the Mandala's lead singers helping Ronnie. Kevin J, hang on til the end when Troiano does the Robbie thing very impressively.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 13:50:52 CET 2012 from (124.168.25.103)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Not sure if this has reached here...

I suspect that 25000 dollars will be needed... see link...


Entered at Wed Mar 7 09:54:35 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Weight

The Weight may have been thrown together rather quickly but the simplicity worked in it's favour. I like the BP version but much prefer what they did on TLW. I've never liked any of the live renditions of the song - apert from the very early ones - or for that matter any other artists version. The reformed Band in particular choked it by adding too many isntrumentals and it all became a bit senitmental and over blown.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 09:50:40 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Levis ads

The Levis 501 cinema ads were so good and chose such good music that they did an album of them .. Muddy Waters, Eddie Cochran, Steve Miller, The Clash, B.B. King, Erma Franklin, Sam Cooke, Marvin Gaye, Percy Sledge .. and all the singles were reissued with Levis 501 tie-in picture sleeves, and most were UK hits again on the back of it. For example, The Joker by Steve Miller was number one in 1990, When A Man Loves A Woman was number two in 1987. Should I Stay or Should I Go was number one in 1991, and on the back of revived interest, two other Clash reissues charted.

The Weight was the screamingly obvious selection and I always wondered why it wasn't chosen. Were they foolish enough to refuse it? It would certainly have focussed interest on the 90s Band (and that Sony album would probably have come out then rather than being melted into Jericho in bits).

On Coca Cola, I doubt that Etta James was upset by having a number five UK hit in 1996 after I Just Want To Make Love To You was used in a Coke Lite advert.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 07:13:34 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Pat, I see.......I thought the discussion at hand was about the use of 'The Weight' for the Cingular cell phone commercial. Makes more sense now.

Jeff, I was at a lot of the early Rambles. The Band songs were very few and far between back in those days. There were quite a few Ray Charles numbers. The first couple of Band songs that got worked into the sets were things like 'Don't You Tell Henry', 'Atlantic City', and 'Back To Memphis'. Stuff like 'Evangeline' 'Ophelia' and 'The Weight' eventually got worked into the set as well. I think the first time I heard 'The Weight' at a Ramble, Anna Lee was actually there which was pretty cool.

Jimmy V. was a big influence on getting even more Band material into the set, and he seems particularly partial to Richard's songs. The first time I heard them do 'Tears of Rage' was pretty moving and Jimmy really did it justice.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 06:05:36 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, go back and look. I didn't tie it in. I was talking about how the other songs on BP had a lot of obvious rehearsal while the Weight seemed much simpler.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 05:12:56 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, that simple formula has oftened resulted in great songs and great recordings over quite some decades... the monetary cost of Levon's fight must have been enormous...


Entered at Wed Mar 7 04:51:31 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Pat, I'm willing to concede that 'The Weight' isn't Rachmaninoff, so I understand your basic point about it's apparent simplicity. I'm still not sure how that ties into the Cingular commercial usage of it though. Do simple songs have different contractual concerns re: commercial usage?

It's somewhat amazing that one of their most famous and iconic songs came about so easily. The way Robbie tells it, the song was put together fairly quickly, rehearsed, and recorded in about four takes.

It's almost as though the song wrote itself right there in the studio! (wink)


Entered at Wed Mar 7 03:08:58 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Here Brother- have a coke

coca cola missed the boat- i can't imagine any one person drinking more coke, or dispensing more coke to friends than levon. they should have tapped him for a commercial long ago--- though the demographic he probably most appeals to has, generally speaking, tried to get itself off soda by now- i still think it could be one helluva commercial - even now.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 03:01:57 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin- you can give Jimmy V. credit for any of Levon's band performing Band songs...he started it, and it;s that simple....And he is proabbly the only person, or one of the only two or maybe strecthing to three living people who could have pulled that off and kept increasing that when he did the way he did.....I'm thinking Garth could have also, but don't know that garth would do that. He might, but he might not. But then again those two were not performing regularly togther or much at all back then,,, the beginning of a Levon band performing Band songs again (A.R. after rick died) predates the rambles , but the amount of performances of Band songs grew and took hold at the rambles.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 02:49:24 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Getting in very very late last week......

......and that’s just about what I said last Friday morning when asked if there had been any women at the party the night before....


Entered at Wed Mar 7 01:50:55 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Thanks for that Vinall Fudge thing. Reminds me that the VB's big hit, "You Keep Me Hanin' On" was said, and widely believed here to be, a re-do of the Mandala's version. I once asked Troiano about that and he saidAn basically, "Nah ... Well, come to think of it ... Could be ... Yeah, I guess that's right". I'm just sayin' ...


Entered at Wed Mar 7 01:02:37 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The Vanilla Fudge for Coke.


Entered at Wed Mar 7 00:56:48 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: postscript

... Not to forget "When I Paint My Masterpiece". Rhymes with Gondola - who'da thunk?


Entered at Wed Mar 7 00:52:00 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

"Move To Japan" would be the obvious choice from the Band's oeuvre for a Coca Cola commercial. On that topic, any number of worthies recorded Coke jingles in the '60s - Moody Blues, Fortunes, Mandala, Guess Who, Five Man Electrical Band, David Clayton-Thomas and the Shays, Nucleus, JB and the Playboys, Big Town Boys, Bobby Curtola ... NRBQ sang about RC Cola in the ,'70s (though not a jingle), sometime-Hawk Eugene Smith sang about Dr Pepper in '71. Landmark's brilliant co-urbanites sang about Pepsi in '68 ...


Entered at Tue Mar 6 23:47:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Drinking coca-cola while using a cell-phone doubles your risk. You get it for heart AND brain.

Seriously, there IS an argument .. one tiny response is to hold the phone away while it's seeking the number. Maximum waves. Levon should have gone with it.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 23:16:36 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

Of course, we are all ignoring the medical studies that prove 36 oz. of Coke a day will lead to a longer, healthier life.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 23:01:26 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Given the court's recent decison, I wonder if the statement that "It is Cingular's custom and practice ..." Becomes "It was Cingular's custom and practice ..."

Pat B: Not only is "the Weight" simpler in all those respects, but it is also Levon's only lead vocal on Big Pink - something that I still find it hard to get my head around. It'd be nice to hear how Richard or Rick sang it back in the BT days with Dylan.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 23:00:08 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Bees and Cell Phones

It has been studied that if you place a turned on cell phone or two by a bee hive, that in over a short amount of time, the signals coming to the phone will disorient the bees and lead to the destruction of the hive.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 22:41:18 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

Dsvid P

Following Peter's concern for safety issues, it should also be noted that the Cingular ad in question featured a cross-country road trip in a car. Despite the ad's touting of the coast-to-coast cellphone coverage, one would hope that they weren't encouraging texting or extended phone conversations or downloading "The Weight" to a phone app while driving :-)


Entered at Tue Mar 6 22:30:38 CET 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Location: Richmond

Subject: cell towers

Peter, the bulk of my job involves meeting with cell tower antenna engineers and what they tell me in private would make any normal person cringe about the dangers of both cell tower and cell phone transmissions when you hold that phone against your head. I will not stay in a highrise hotel if it has those rectangular cell antennas installed on the roof, for example.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 22:14:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What Levon should have done, or should do, is sign up to a campaign against cell phone masts near schools and play areas. There is increasing evidence that EMFs from cell phone masts are harmful to children. If he (quite rightly) helped campaign against them, he'd have a strong position in saying he didn't want to be used to promote cell phones.

In our road we campaigned strongly against a cell phone mast. We won. Local government informed us cell phone masts were totally harmless. I was speaking for the anti group and said, 'That's fine then. Put them on the town hall roof.' They came straight back with, 'We can't do that, we have to consider the health and safety of our employees!'

We won a unanimous vote against the local government and the cell phone company.

That should be Levon's angle: cell phones are a time bomb waiting to explode on our children's' future. I will not be used to promote this harmful stuff. This is a totally tenable position.

P.S. he should have engaged me as his attorney! And David P too. Between us, we could have won this!


Entered at Tue Mar 6 21:53:55 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

Note that David P said written agreement was reached with everyone in the group for Cingular except Levon and there is some question that there was a verbal agreement with Levon for its use.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 21:47:13 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, please note: the point is that the Weight is the simplest song on BP and probably the easiest one to come together quickly, which is how the members of the Band recall it. I'm not talking about its objective merit as a piece of music. It is the simplest guitar part on the record. It is the simplest drumming, the simplest bass playing, even Garth is uncharacteristically restrained (think Rag Mama Rag or any number of live versions of the song). Compared to everything else on the record it would appear to be the one song thrown together quickly.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 20:09:03 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Yes Peter, agreed. Each situation is unique and should be judged on it's own. For example, If I licensed a photo to Apple computer, I may or may not want to license the same image to Microsoft.

Pat I disagree that Robbie was reduced to a "hated strummer" on 'The Weight'. In fact the opening guitar lick to that song combined with the drums is one of the sublimely beautiful elements that contributes to the greatness of that song and lets you know that you're in for something special. Kind of a similiar effect as the opening lick to 'Beast of Burden' by the Stones. It's just classic.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 19:43:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Put it this way. Imagine you've written a song. Not only that. it's closely identified with you. It's requested every time you perform.

First, the World Health Organization wants to use it to promote vaccinating babies against River Blindness. Great.

Next, Apple want to use it to promote the iPad. Nice. You like the iPad.

Then Marlboro want to use it (in countries where cigarettes can be advertised) to promote their new ultra-high tar brand, 'Marlboro Three' (for Third World Addictive Blend).

Then in comes a defence contractor who want to play it while a jet fighter does a straffing run over alleged insurgents.

Now, do you think you should be allowed a say in how your voice is used?


Entered at Tue Mar 6 19:31:12 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Pat, Yes simple, but perhaps it's deceptively simple. Which could explain why none of the 200 or so cover versions of the song have ever bettered the original. Must be something hard about what The Band did with it.

Yes, the use of the Weight by Coke seems to contradict Levon's position that 'The Weight' wasn't meant to be a jingle. But that doesn't mean that an artist should give up control of his work to every other corporate entity, which I think is the real beef.

Kevin brings up an interesting point. Can a songwriter prohibit anyone (whether it's a former band mate or any average Joe) from performing a live version of a song.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 19:23:38 CET 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thanks for the shout-out. I am not worried about it. I only go for takeout now as parking is horrendous. I order and the missus circles the block. Truth be told, I go to a place in the West Island called Abie's, who's owner worked at Schwartz's for many, mnay years.

Besides where would I move to? Anyway if you come back to town, let me know and we'll swap coordinates and hook up for dinner at Schwartz's

Bill, you also have standing invite as well.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 19:19:02 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, the execution of the Weight is very simple compared to everything else they did. That was the point of my ramble. It's one of the few songs where RR is reduced to becoming the hated strummer.

I'm just quoting whoever said it here that Levon opposed commercial use of the song. Letting Coke use it for commercial purposes would represent the exact opposite position, no matter what the extenuating circumstances.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:57:51 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

..a more interesting question has to do with ex band mates allowing usage of songs on solo recordings and live shows....Take for example “late stage” band songs that not even Levon questioned authorship of like “It Makes No Difference” or “Evangeline” that have become staples of Levon’s live act and recent recordings......now, one might ask why RR would object to usage of his songs....after all, Levon and colleagues (thinking of the great Jimmy Vivino, Jim Weider and Larry Campbell, in particular ) do them superbly but what if he was cranky about things and wanted to cause a bit of a fuss............ Recall Don Henley – years before the fake cowboys patched things up and launched their full on frontal assault to empty the bank accounts of as many 1%’s as possible with endless tours and even more grotesque “corporate” shows - had threatened Joe Walsh publically to stop “ruining my songs” by doing them live.....The funny bit was, even in his most foggy period, I had never felt Joe Walsh had ever done anything but remind everyone that the only parts of Henley’s songs that were great were Joe’s guitar parts ( think “Life in the Fast Lane” )..... but could Henley have stopped Joe from doing his songs?


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:54:21 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: It's The Real Thing

Pat, Simple at 'The Weight' may seem structurally, it's execution is anything but. I suppose it' the quality of the voices and tone of the musicianship that makes it work. And why even the Smith version, which is a reasonable facsimile, pales in comparison.

'The Weight' may have been used to sell Coca-Cola (which unlike Cell phones has been an American institution for over 100 years and existed in 1968), but the underlying issue is an artist being able to control how their work is used. Shouldn't that be up to them to decide? Maybe Levon likes Coca-Cola better than cell phones. Who knows. One usage isn't necessarily an blanket approval for any other company that may come along.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:37:23 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

David, I hadn't even considered the ringtone business. I do recall reading a few years back that labels were still deducting the "breakage" percentage to digital sales that were originally intended to apply to physical copies of a recording. Is this accurate. or am I remembering it wrong?


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:34:59 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Weight has been used in at least one other commercial--for Coke. In that light, I don't think Levon's argument that it can't be used in a commercial makes sense.

As far as the work that went into the Weight, a lot of the songs on BP have audio roots. Tears of Rage, WoF, and Released all BT; WCT has that great work tape; Lonesome Suzie's versions; Long Black Veil as a cover. Kingdom Come and In A Station are pretty complex and no doubt demanded some real work time. Chest Fever is still a puzzle--I don't know how it happened. That leaves Mission and Weight. Mission is more difficult than it seems and it would definitely take a lot of time just to get the parts to stick together. The Weight is the one song on the album that could come together quickly. Simple guitar strumming and bass, steady drum pattern, and Garth noodles. The original had Richard on organ but they did their best to remove it from the master with some success. Figure out who sings what as the melodies are modest and the chorus is simple. No other song on the album is as simple which might be why it is THE song in their entire repertoire.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:31:54 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Peter, yes I suppose a sound alike would/could open up another can of worms.

Jeff, Yes, I could see film or TV as a potential usage to consider at the signing of the original contract given that both technologies existed in 1968.....but not a cell phone commercial. I think they had to know that 'The Weight' was a solid piece of work....especially after it was recorded. Maybe they didn't think that it would be a hit in the conventional sense of the word.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:28:21 CET 2012 from (99.40.90.220)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: the boss channels levon?

Here's a snippet from NPRs review of Bruce Springsteen's latest: "And "Rocky Ground," my favorite song on the record, draws on gospel and hip-hop and maybe a bit of Levon Helm singing "The Weight" to create the impossible: a great Bruce Springsteen song with a rap, delivered by gospel singer-cum-MC Michelle Moore." Interesting. There's lots of talk that it's his best in years. Anyone heard it yet?


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:23:57 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Contract from the Underworld of Record Boy

Todd: You made some interesting points regarding contracts. Another important issue of controversy in recent years has arisen from the sales of permanent downloads and ringtones, which have surpassed the sales of CDs. The record labels have been treating downloads & ringtones under the "Records Sold" provision of contracts signed with artists years ago. Under this provision the artists, depending on the individual contract, are paid a royalty rate in the neighborhood of 10% to 20% of the adjusted retail price of all full price records sold. More and more artists have filed lawsuits contending that downloads & ringtones should be treated under the "Masters Licensed" provision of the contract which provides that the artists should receive 50% of net receipts on masters licensed to third parties for their manufacture & sale of records or for other uses.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 18:07:38 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd,while i'm very familiar with the type of clauses you are talking about, and in agreement about the ceasleess , offensvie attempts at grabbing inapporpriate and valuable rights in contracts (i've dealt with it since 2002, and it's despicable..i've not yet been offered a contract that was signable in it's original form),I feel it is was reasonable to expect that when MFBP was recorded it was a good possibility that he songs might be used in Film, maybe even TV.

now regarding The Weight a little differently, did not one or two band members go on record as saying that The Weight was a song they did not give alot of weight too, maybe even that they eeded more material to fill out the record, and went back to it, theat it was something they had been fiddlign a round with? Personally,i've never bought that, i don't think it 's possible. Much to heavy duty for them not to have very strong feelings about that song.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 17:39:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, very good point. Cingular could have used The Smith version from the Easy Rider LP for instance. What has to be watched (and in this case I think it would be impossible anyway) is the practice of employing "soundalikes" for voiceovers. Though that can be argued as "passing off" there used to be a lot of it.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 17:30:19 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Landmark & Montrealer's Only

Celine and her nutty husband buy Schwartz's..............Landmark is seen fleeing the city in horror.............Band connection: None - I don't think....perhaps Domminique used to eat there.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 16:52:39 CET 2012 from (108.192.67.221)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Pen Is Mightier Than The Sword

I'm no legal expert and I'm not privy to the legal wranglings specific to the Cingular / 'The Weight' lawsuit, but I have some thoughts about the matter.

It's my understanding that the purpose of a written contract is to formalize an understood agreement between all parties. The purpose of the legal document known as the contract is to clarify the spirit and terms of an agreement.

It's not unreasonable to presume that the original recording/performance contract that includes 'The Weight' was intended to govern it's usage as primarily a retail sales entity. Song is written, song is recorded, physical copies of the recording are manufactured, marketed, and delivered for retail sale for consumers to play at home. It would also be reasonable to expect that other people could record performances of the song and release their own retail sales copies of their performances. Radio play and live performance could also be expected.

Beyond that, it would seem that any other usage, especially commercial endorsement of an unrelated product, would be a separate and unique usage that should be negotiated separately. It's unreasonable to expect that a contract signed in 1967 or 1968 that was intended to cover the typical usage at the time for such a song would extend to endorsing a product that hadn't been invented yet and wouldn't be in common usage for decades to come. That's where I feel that the spirit of the agreement was not honored.

Levon is clear in his public comments that 'The Weight' wasn't intended to be an advertising jingle at the time of it's conception.

During many of the songwriting discussions that have taken place here over the years, it's often been pointed out that a song like 'The Weight' is the same song no matter who is performing it or what the arrangement is. If this is true, then it seems to me that any one of the numerous cover versions of the song could have been used instead for the commercial product endorsement, thereby avoiding any reticence on Levon's part to license advertising use of The Band's performance of the song. But for some reason Cingular was not interested in the other versions of the same song..hmmm.

In my photography business, (I mainly license images for commercial print usage) I'm often confronted with boilerplate contracts from potential clients that include unlimited usage, in perpetuity, for technologies that haven't even been invented yet. That is a relatively new phenomenon and is becoming more common as clients try to grab as many rights as they can for a usage fee that should really be a one time usage with any additional usage to be negotiated. As the economy tanked, clients (especially the larger ones) have become more and more brazen in the their attempts. The only solution in these cases is to renegotiate, or walk away from the deal. Photographers who give away their rights for inadequate compensation will not be in business for long. Many times these contracts don't even represent what the client's real needs are, but are written by the lawyers to protect the company from any potential liability past, present, or future. But this is a relatively new situation. Years ago, my contracts with clients were typically one page and could be understood by a layman. These days, contracts could very well be a dozen pages and require a law degree to fully understand the ramifications of the legal language contained within. I've even had contracts with clients that tried to prohibit me from using my own images in my portfolio. These contracts either get changed or walked away from. Not always easy to do.

And the point whether the ad usage is good or bad is not the most important factor. It's nice to hopefully enjoy a positive effect from any usage of your work, but the overriding concern is one of retaining control of your work and your legacy.

Dave Z, Thanks for the heads-up about Slim Dunlap from the Replacements. Sorry to hear the sad news about his stroke. I hope that he has a good recovery.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 16:53:06 CET 2012 from (74.90.6.234)

Posted by:

Ray

Note to a friend:

Butch,

I want you to know that I appreciate the fact that you've added a lot to the Band community with some seriously cool insights.

Also, I appreciate the things like introducing me and my nephew, Billy, to Hubert.

I think you should be commended for your efforts on behalf of Ritchie Hayward because you were a REAL friend to him.

I appreciate some cool memorabilia you've given me.

And I appreciated it when the Mrs. and you pointed me towards some job openings after I'd gotten a pink slip 5 years back.

On top of all that you are to be admired for all your civic activities because they have made a positive difference in your community!

Your a good man Charlie Brown!

Your friend, Ray


Entered at Tue Mar 6 16:23:28 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: Regardless of the conflict in the agreements as you described, compliance with the more recent SAG commercial contract terms has become the standard in the ad industry. With the company that brokered the deal for the use of "The Weight" for Cingular, it's their custom & practice that, after a song has been approved for license, they obtain the consent of vocalists before using the song in a commercial.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 14:41:52 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Walter E. "Furry" Lewis was born on this day in 1893 (d. 1981), a great American country blues guitarist & songwriter. Joni Joan Mitchell wrote "Furry Sings the Blues" in honor of Lewis & here's the unedited The Last Waltz rendition.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 08:34:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: British film

A feast for the HD recorder, there. Saturday Night & Sunday Morning + Room At The Top were free cover DVDs when the Daily Telegraph did a week of British films a couple of years ago .. none of the newspapers are doing that anymore. We watched both. I had Morgan- A Suitable Case for Treatment in my hand at the British Film Institute Shop last week, but was dissuaded. The Entertainer i haven't seen since the 60s, but I'm not an Olivier fan. On similar, we did buy Up The Junction at the BFI (still looks great) and a Ken Loach BBC set with Cathy Come Home.

I remember Morgan twice fondly. I saw it in 1966 when it was new, then again in 1970 at a late-night showing. I met my girlfriend of the next year in the line to see it.

A controversial Private Eye joke in 1966 was when the fuss was going on about Sir Roger Casement, the Irish revolutionary executed in 1916. Some diaries had just been published revealing that he was gay, and Private Eye changed the film poster to "Morgan: A Suitable Treat for Casement" managing to offend Irish nationalists, gays and David Warner. A triple was a good result for Private Eye in those days. It's funny how things stick, and that's still what I think the title is.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 06:18:12 CET 2012 from (24.186.38.53)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: mike h's link

Thanks for posting that vid Mike. How in the world did Richard end up with that gig?

Lame song, but an interesting mix of people. It's a crime that Richard didn't sing, but he layed down a totally nasty, funky beat on those skins.


Entered at Tue Mar 6 04:51:43 CET 2012 from (198.228.223.173)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: British New Wave

The next 24 hours on TCM - Room At The Top, The Entertainer, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Morgan and some more. Great stuff I think. Any thoughts PV?


Entered at Tue Mar 6 04:11:57 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie Montrose dead at 64

Hi guys:

NORBERT: Wondered where you were "Hiding"? Not here too often, so haven't seen your posts lately.

My link came through in todays RS mag.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Mar 5 23:53:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In both the cases I linked, the artists (or their estates) got a major boost. Actually, I think in both cases the ads were nicely done too.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 23:43:19 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

It would seem one thing Levon has done is make advertisers shy away from using The Band's music for anything. I used to think the commercialization of music was bad, but now its all in the game. Oddly, I recall some usage in movies of questionable value, and others where the impact was really something. Masterpiece began some horrible movie, but The Weight in Easy Rider was sublime.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 23:03:01 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.38)

Posted by:

Pat B

Noted promoter David Fishof on the problems with the Ringo tour:

interviewer: There were also then substance issues with several of the musicians.

DF: So everybody warned me that it wasn’t going to work and that I was nuts to do this. Meanwhile, I had mortgaged my townhouse in Manhattan to invest in putting this Ringo and the All-Starr Band together, and by the fourth show at the Garden State Arts Center in Holmdale, New Jersey (now The PNC Bank Arts Center) the tour was about ready to implode.

I was having dinner backstage and Clarence Clemons walked by my table and he said to me, “I am quitting the band.” I asked, “What’s wrong?” He said, “Joe Walsh and Levon Helm are fighting over songs.” Then Nils Lofgren walked by a second later, and he said, “Fishof, I’m out of here. I’m quitting.” And I said, “Oh no. What happened?” And he told me the same thing.

So I went downstairs and walked in on this fight between Levon Helm and Joe Walsh. Levon had a glass bottle in his hand, and there was blood running down his hands. Joe Walsh had a knife and there was blood on his lips and all over this face. Dr. John, and the late Rick Danko were there. I screamed, “You guys are a bunch of babies. Can’t you behave?”

They both turned around, and stuck their tongues out at me.

What they had done was they had the tour manager Max Loubiere get fake blood, a rubber knife and a glass bottle that looked like it was made out of sugar. They staged a fake fight, and I walked in, and tried to break up. I will tell you that I was surprised that I didn’t get a heart attack because I almost saw my home go right down the drain. But Jim Keltner videotaped it, and I have the video.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 22:59:17 CET 2012 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Call me a clown to your right or a joker to your left, but I think that one should also not overlook the fact that an agreement between party A and party B cannot be erased by party B simply because he or she got a better deal a decade later from party C. Naturally, all parties are free to cry if they want to ...


Entered at Mon Mar 5 22:18:50 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stuck in the Middle

Brien: Your comment reminded me of the character Norman Mushari, the shyster lawyer in Kurt Vonnegut's "God Bless You Mr. Rosewater." Mushari lived by the creed that his favorite law professor taught "Just as a good airplane pilot should always be looking for places to land, so should a lawyer be looking for situations where large amounts of money were about to change hands...In every big tranaction there is a magic moment during which a man has surrendered a treasure, and during which the man who is due to receive it has not yet done so. An alert lawyer will make that moment his own, possessing the treasure for a magic microsecond, taking a little of it, passing it on. If the man who is to receive the treasure is unused to wealth, has an inferiority complex and shapeless guilt, as most people do, the lawyer can often take as much as half the bundle, and still receive the recipient's blubbering thanks."


Entered at Mon Mar 5 22:16:52 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Video ('86 - about 1-mth prior to his passing) w/ Richard Manuel backing John Sebastian on NY's "Deja Vu" tv show.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:55:38 CET 2012 from (24.186.38.53)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: Tom from NY
Web: My link

Kevin J posted:

"First met Richard when I was 17. This was months before he joined The Hawks. He liked to laugh more than anyone I knew. He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve... and could sing like Bobby Blue Bland. How can ya beat that? Love him and miss him." -RR

It's funny but I was just looking at the vid liked above and I was struck by that very thought that: "He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve".

At the end of this song when Richard stands up and bows like a kid in a talent show, he just seems so damn sweet and genuine. I so wish he were still on the planet singing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM_ZqESUuFU


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:42:13 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

David - though it seems I'm not a word, or science or math or a language, which I admit, I'm none of those in certain sense but I am in another, I thank you for your diligence in working to add clarity to the muddy issue that is the Levon case. It is apparent that there is no clear answer - it seems lawyers are great at writing vague language that can sound both solid and shaky, leaving it so that interpretation can be an endless resource of revenue which niether parties who are involved will ever see but they, the middle-men, do.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:38:27 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: In the argument you can't overlook the point that a committee, acting on behalf of advertisers and advertising agencies, was a signatory to the contract with SAG. As producers of commercials they agreed to the terms, specifically "realizing the singular nature of this kind of service and that the reuse of a commercial may limit or curtail further employment opportunities for the principal performers appearing in the commercial, has agreed to this unique method of compensation."


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:29:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Another classy ad with music

This links to the Boots pharmacy ad which rediscovered Ernie K-Doe's obscure "Here Come The Girls."


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:27:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Are ads all bad?

The link is to "Diamond Day" by Vashti Bunyan, lost to most of the listening world until someone revived it for a UK ad.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 21:13:13 CET 2012 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: What seems novel to me is not the circumstances but that somebody would have the nerve to make that argument. Seems like seeking backpay from the minimum-wage job you had back in university now that you've joined the union.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 20:51:57 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All The News That's Fit To Post

Interesting that the New York Post ran an article on the appellate court ruling in Levon's case last week. When the Cingular commercials first aired in November 2004 the Post's headline was "THE BAND CELLS OUT -- CLASSIC '60S ANTHEM 'THE WEIGHT' RETURNS 30 YEARS LATER AS CINGULAR SENSATION". The article went on to mention that "the haunting, classic tune written by Robbie Robertson" was the latest in a trend of rock songs to be used as jingles in commercials. Just prior to the use of "The Weight" Dylan's song "Love Sick" was licensed for use in an ad for Victoria's Secret. The Post article closed with the phrase "Ka-ching", evoking the sound of an old cash register ringing up dollars.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 19:25:14 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight

It should also be pointed out that written consent was obtained from Robbie, Garth and representatives for Rick & Richard's estates to use "The Weight". Although no written agreement with Levon was introduced as evidence, there's some question as to whether an oral agreement was obtained through someone purportedly acting on Levon's behalf prior to airing the commercial.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 18:08:34 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

From RR's Facebook page:

"First met Richard when I was 17. This was months before he joined The Hawks. He liked to laugh more than anyone I knew. He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve... and could sing like Bobby Blue Bland.

How can ya beat that? Love him and miss him." -RR


Entered at Mon Mar 5 17:18:40 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David, I can see a parallel issue on retrospective rights. I don't know about the USA, but UK book illustrators gained retrospective ownership of their original artwork and licensing rights. This covered things like those fabulous 1950s / 60s paperback book covers. The original contract with the publisher was a straight purchase of rights, but some of the illustrators found a box arriving with their original art from 30 or 40 years ago in it, which they were then able to sell as artefacts (NOT including reproduction rights) and they found they owned the rights to license the illustration for other purposes (with limitations).

Also related is "image rights." We found this one out when we wanted to use a "Titanic" still in a textbook. The film company said "fine", Kate Winslet said "fine" but DiCaprio's "people" said "No way." Interestingly several other books have used stills and I think my publisher made the fundamental error of asking.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 16:58:19 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Weighing In

Brien & Peter: Levon's attorneys presented issues involving two separate contracts, which seem to be at odds. The first is the 1968 recording contract with Capitol, which the lower & appellate courts have ruled granted the record company the "exclusive and perpetuall right to use and control" of The Band's sound recordings and the "performances embodied therein."

The second contract issue involves the collective bargaining agreement between the Screen Actors Guild union and the advertising industry governing contracts for commercials. While the lower court previously dismissed the other causes of action, it ruled that "a triable issue of fact is thus presented in the carved-out [SAG] contract action." In the context of labor law, "carve out" refers to establishing a separate bargaining unit with employees who were previously included in a larger unit. The appellate court has not specifically addressed this cause of action and the lower court has not ruled that SAG contract is trumped by the earlier recording contract. It indeed seems to be a novel situation, in that the recording contract gave the record label exclusive rights to license "The Weight" for use in a commercial, yet a latter collective bargaining union contract requires that the advertisers who obtained the license to use the song bargain separately with Levon as a principal performer.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 15:24:09 CET 2012 from (75.72.126.40)

Posted by:

Zzzz

Web: My link

Just getting back to listening to some Van myself coincidently... starting with Beautiful Vision. I find myself returning to his long rambling songs that the critics so hate. There was a time when I only listened to Van for a while... I can't seem to get excited about the Live Astral Weeks though. Some of his vocals sound like he's Rolling Stones lazy bored or something... when I so want to hear the subtleties from the original revived anew... Anyway, we had a local music legend recently suffer a stroke here, and he's on a road to recovery... See link above for one of his tunes... And I'm recently back from Maui mid Feb... highly recommend it... there's something magical about the Trade Winds... very welcoming... way better than I thought it would be...


Entered at Mon Mar 5 14:03:22 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley NY
Web: My link

Subject: Wrecking Ball review by Peter Stone Brown

I posted Peter Stone Brown's great review of Springsteen's Wrecking Ball last week. With the album coming out this week I would like to put the link out there again. This record is loaded with heart and soul but more importantly guts.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 09:20:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van and critics

I woke up this morning and added several paragraphs to the Van Morrison review (the link in the previous post still works) on Van and critics, something that exercised him more than usual last night.


Entered at Mon Mar 5 01:00:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Van Morrison

Saw Van Morrison tonight, on very fine form (see link). Always a privilege to see a "Last Waltzer" but especially one who is still in such astonishing vocal form, with such a great band.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 20:55:25 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Sunshine......Johnathan Edwards

Just home for 2 days, (until tomorrow morning). It's kind of nice out there, in that I don't see much news. When I come home to the depressing constant barrage of politics and war, I'm reminded of this song.

Johnathan Edwards timeless song exhibits the frustration of being fed up with this. In the pictures of this video, one stands out in my mind. A young black soldier, (strong good looking young guy) with the tear running down his cheek in the dust and pain. When will it ever be enough.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 20:55:32 CET 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: where do you find these videos?????

I really like that video, Jan.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 20:35:55 CET 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Richard Manuel, April 3, 1943 - March 4, 1986. Too soon gone.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 19:43:31 CET 2012 from (198.228.216.24)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Marc Maron/Nick Lowe

Pretty dang funny music video -


Entered at Sun Mar 4 19:06:29 CET 2012 from (198.228.223.173)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Band's dress code

I've always thought the guys dressed pretty well, more classic than fashionable. Richard might been the one fashion guy. The rest dressed blue collar, post-Hawks.

Levon, even at his most casual, appeared at least thoughful in his look.

But now when I see Levon's new choppers I think that his subtle taste has moved on.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 16:41:55 CET 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Complete Pop Instrumental Hits Of The 60's

Is anybody else enjoying these 60's pop intrumental collections? This English label is starting with 1960 and releasing collections by year of every pop instrumental that charted. I just picked up the first set and it is a fun listen! Check out the song selections on the Amazon link.


Entered at Sun Mar 4 15:50:31 CET 2012 from (24.186.38.53)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Witt??


Entered at Sun Mar 4 10:43:47 CET 2012 from (90.233.197.95)

Posted by:

Spirit of Wittgenstein's Dog

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Wovon man night sprechen kann, daruber muss man... SHOUTING OUT LOUD! / David P and Brien Sz

1. Mathematics is a science and a language.

1.1. Juridic is a language. too. But not a science

2. "Sz" is not

2.1. Two letters.

2.2. And Norbert: do a pilgrimage to your own soul instead.


Entered at Sat Mar 3 19:16:59 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Norbert, we've already done all those things except it was a 1966 Mustang (289).


Entered at Sat Mar 3 16:52:04 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Pat, saw your youtube road movie last. Nice you made it with your son, it's good to do such things. Also consider a pilgrimage together to Woodstock, teach im how to drink liquor straight up, restore a 1990 Porche 911 (964, or better the later 993) together and show him the importance to own a roll of duct tape, anyway thanks mate.

Bill that sound man was, Pieter de Jager. Pieter could do miracles with the old dynamic Philips microphone and only a simple reel to reel taperecorder and some rugs ;-)


Entered at Sat Mar 3 04:48:32 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Engelbert Humperdinck

A real fave of mine. Saw him live and he was great. Have all his music.

Engelbert Humperdinck, 75, chosen to represent Britain at Eurovision

LONDON - Who best to guide Britain to glory after years of disappointment in Europe 's leading pop music competition?

Apparently Engelbert Humperdinck, the sideburned, square-jawed, 75-year-old crooner who famously beat the Beatles to the No. 1 spot in the U.K. charts in 1967. The BBC has surprised pop fans by choosing Humperdinck, whose last hit was almost 40 years ago, as Britain 's entry in the 2012 Eurovision Song Contest, the international competition renowned for kitsch balladry and plastic pop.

The singer, best known for his 1967 song "Release Me," said he was honoured to be representing his country and was "raring to go."

Enlisting the septuagenarian singer to compete in a pan-European talent show usually dominated by packaged pop acts was seen either as an audacious gamble or an embarrassing wrong note.

Daily Telegraph newspaper rock critic Neil McCormick called it "an act of desperation or a stroke of genius." "Clearly, the notion that our thriving national pop culture should be embodied by a 75-year-old cabaret crooner is someone's idea of an ironic joke," McCormick wrote Friday.

On the other hand, Humperdinck might be able to draw on his large international fan club to boost the U.K. 's voting total in the lighthearted contest that many believe is determined by regional sympathies and animosities. Humperdinck — whose former name is Arnold Dorsey — was a 1960s sex symbol whose "Release Me" topped the British charts in 1967, keeping The Beatles' "Penny Lane"/''Strawberry Fields Forever" at No. 2. He also had a top 10 U.S. hit in 1976 with "After the Lovin." Britain has failed for years at Eurovision, which Britons watch and mock in equal measure. Since the U.K. last won in 1997, a selection of British boy bands, reality television contestants and bubblegum pop singers has failed to impress viewers and juries who vote for the winner.

Even the 2009 decision to call in music impresario Andrew Lloyd Weber wasn't enough to boost Britain 's standing past fifth place. Last year, British boy band Blue scored a modest 11th place.

Previous winners of the contest include '60s chanteuse Lulu , Sweden 's ABBA — victors in 1974 with " Waterloo " — and Canada 's Celine Dion, who triumphed for Switzerland in 1988.

The 57th Eurovision Song Contest will be held in May in Baku , Azerbaijan .

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sat Mar 3 04:35:31 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Lou Reed, etc.

Hi guys!! LINK: For you, BEG. ENJOY!!

1st time in a long time that anyone responded to my post. Thanx,and to KEVIN J.,JOHN W.+ and DAVID. BTW, DAVID, hope everything is better after the floods?

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sat Mar 3 01:00:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Copyright interests me .. I can't see how you can join something in (e.g.) 2003 that affects a contract you made in 1968. It's the "signed, sealed, delivered I'm yours" for better or worse. I've actually had it the other way round where the publisher thought its 1978 terms too generous and tried to change the contract retrospectively. But surely that's a basic principle, that you can only change something that's agreed if both parties sit down and agree to change it

I do think that Levon's case has an angle, in that none of the parties in 1968 could or would have envisaged the offending use. But if Capitol / EMI's lawyers were half awake, then the license would be an all-embracing blanket.

I have had problems myself in a minor way, where stuff I've written has been licensed to exam boards as texts, and then bits have been rewritten ineptly by non-native speakers and my name still put on the bottom. It's not then a case of whether they pay, but the damage you feel to your reputation .. which is why I sympathise with Levon over gross commercial use.


Entered at Sat Mar 3 00:14:03 CET 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Kevin J

Oh, crap. I just put it in the dvd player. I can't believe I got the story wrong. Actually, I can; I am writing so many papers right now that I have started to put milk in the cupboard and cups in the fridge!


Entered at Fri Mar 2 23:48:54 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Yes David but didn't Levon sell his rights to that performance? In other words, has Levon made any money from those songs over the years on radio, etc...? If not, then what would it matter what SAG said because he no retains the rights to the performance in a legal manner? So what negotiating stance is there if you have no legal ownership? I must be missing something on exactly what Levon owns or doesn't own....


Entered at Fri Mar 2 23:15:53 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Brien: Under the SAG contract what matters is whether or not the advertiser bargained separately with the principal performer in advance of using their performance. I believe the terms that apply to SAG members relate to the time of the commercial use of the performance, rather than whether or not the actual recording might predate the performers membership.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 23:02:54 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: The court record shows that EMI licensed the use of the song for $135,000, with the group to receive 50% of the net revenue, minus certain expenses. Each Band member or their estate was to be paid a 1/5 share, or 20% of that net amount. That would work out to be 10% of the total license fee, minus expenses. That ad agency also negotiated a separate licensing deal with Dylan's Special Rider Music, on behalf of the publisher and Robbie as songwriter, in the amount of $140,000. Since the ad campaign did indeed use the song for a certain length of time, one would assume that certain amounts were paid out under the licensing agreements.

It is interesting to note that, under paragraph 6(c) of that latter contract:

"Licensee shall not advertise, print, publish, exhibit, broadcast, disseminate, promote or in any way exploit or permit or authorize others to advertise, print, publish, exhibit, broadcast, disseminate, promote or in any way exploit Robertson's name, likenesss or photograph or Robertson's biographical material or Robertson's recordings or in any other manner refer to Robertson in any manner, whatsoever, directly or indirectly. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing."


Entered at Fri Mar 2 22:50:00 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

David - i understand your point but the other point is, did Levon sell his rights to the song prior to getting his SAG card? If so, then what right(s) would he have...if any? Now if he sold his shares afterwards, then that is a different kettle of fish.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 22:36:47 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: How does one weigh an ad?

Brien: The gist of my earlier post was that there was still an unresolved issue, apart from EMI's exclusive & perpetual rights to license the sound recording, relating to the alleged violation of the SAG Commericials Contract. That contract was negotiated in 2003 between the Screen Actors Guild, on behalf of its union members, and a joint policy committee acting on behalf of advertisers & advertising agencies. Under the agreed upon contract terms SAG contended that "a principal performer rendering services in a commercial performs, to a great extent, the duties of a demonstrator or salesperson of a particular product or service and as such, tends to be identified with that particular product or service." The contract requires that advertisers separately bargain with those performers who are SAG members and obtain their consent for the use of their performances in commercials.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 22:27:01 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Brien Sz: Levon also missed a payday, because I believe that Cingular would have had to pay the Band money for the use of their recording - and not just Robbie as songwriter. That was his choice, but as collatoral damage, Garth would've missed HIS payday, and also the estates of Rick and Richard. Kinda took removed the entire catalogue from play, as well - as who else would have used some other Band song for their ad - thus adding to the collatoral damage.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 22:08:17 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Oopps - sorry about that.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 22:00:35 CET 2012 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Brian SZ You got the wrong guy!!!

I think you meant David P. Not me. I only wrote about Robin Hood today. Peter can you fix this?


Entered at Fri Mar 2 21:58:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

From my mild knowledge of copyright, I thought he was extremely ill-advised to go to law. No doubt a few people thought after hearing the advert, 'Oh, I'll get a CD of Big Pink." It's hard to see what damage that did. EMI have behaved badly over The Weight for years and treated it with disrespect. I have every sympathy with Levon's view, and if I were the judge, he'd have won, but I couldn't see it happening.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 21:34:55 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

John D - what reputational damage does one think happened. How was the piece used in a way that would harm Levon's reputation - what is he going to be accused of selling out? Isn't that a bit abstract? It sucks that Lvon essentially sold his rights to the song(s) years ago but that is now a personal accountability issue. If count 1. is in some way violated in regards to SAG then get your due, however the question then is, when did he sell his rights and when did he get his SAG card. If he sold his rights prior to SAG, then he really doesn't have a lot to go on - though i must say I have no idea what is entailed with SAG stuff and how it relates to artists prior to them joining.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 20:33:44 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Levon Lawsuit

NY POST ARTICLE ON LEVON AND HIS LAWSUIT REGARDING USE OF THE WEIGHT BY CINGULAR.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 20:08:48 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: 26 years ago this Sunday - Richard Manuel


Entered at Fri Mar 2 19:54:33 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: an attempt at cut and paste

Robert Johnson At 100 Tuesday, March 6 Apollo Theater, New York City -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Robert Johnson at 100 tribute at the Apollo Theater on March 6 has added more A-list talent to the bill for the centennial celebration of the legendary bluesman including Macy Gray, Chuck D, Living Colour, James Blood Ulmer, Savion Glover, Pedrito Martinez Group, Otis Taylor, Sarah Dash, Dough Rollers, Sugar Blue, The Harlem Blues Choir, and The Rev. Steven Johnson, grandson of Robert Johnson. They are joining previously announced artists The Roots, Shemekia Copeland, Bettye LaVette, Taj Mahal, Keb Mo, Sam Moore and Todd Rundgren. Directed by Joe Morton, the night will be lead by Musical Director Steve Jordan and special guest Jeffrey Wright. Speaking about the tribute, producer Joe Morton explains, "This unique concert, steeped in the tradition of a barrelhouse, is an interweaving of Robert Johnson's genius as a musician with bits and pieces of his bedeviled life into a multi-faceted fabric laid out by a diverse group of impassioned artists." Produced by Steve Berkowitz, Michael Dorf, Joe Morton and Patricia Watt in association with The Blues Foundation and Legacy Recordings, proceeds from the concert will go to The Blues Foundation and The Robert Johnson Foundation to provide funding for the building of The Blues Hall of Fame in Memphis. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Entered at Fri Mar 2 19:14:47 CET 2012 from (78.79.43.211)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: The Weight law suit / David P

Thanks DAVID P for explaining it all jurisprucendly... exept that I didn't understand anything. Only this: DON'T RENT A CAR IN THE US!!


Entered at Fri Mar 2 18:26:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, John. I'll get it. I'd forgotten Ivanhoe was the third of the middle ages series too. It was a timely link, because I was just about to buy a new DVD player this afternoon, and region coding was something I'd forgotten about .. all the ones we've got play region 1 and 2 though.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 17:07:50 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Bravo to Serenity for truly breaking the news........Kristie is moving from guaranteed A to D territory for mixing up TNTDODD with The Weight...

Eton John: He was my older sister’s favorite, not mine and much of his catalogue is pass over stuff but I always enjoy hearing “Rocket man”, “Painted Lady”, “Bennie & the Jets”, “Tiny Dancer” and Rod Stewart’s take on “Country Comforts” is superb....I have also come around to liking the guy for what he has given back..the Leon Russell situation is a case in point.....See encore of a link I posted a year or so ago.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:59:50 CET 2012 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Robin Hood DVD

Peter I bought the entire series; over a year ago on DVD through Amazon.com Here is a link to Amazon.uk; but it appears to be a U.S. Import. Strange; since it was indeed a British series through and through.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:39:29 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight Lawsuit

Although yesterday's appellate court ruling upheld the dismissal of the main weight of Levon's lawsuit, I believe that there's a couple of issues that have not been resolved. The original complaint included four causes of action, which included (1) breach of the Screen Actors Guild Commercials Contract, (2) violation of Levon's right of publicity by using his voice without consent, (3) unfair competiton and (4) unjust enrichment. The judge in the lower court has previously dismissed counts 2,3 & 4 and yesterday's appellate court decision specifically unheld the dismissal of the main cause of action, count 2. The only remaining cause of action involves count 1 relating to the alleged breach of the SAG contract for failure to separately bargain with Levon (a SAG represented artist) and obtain his consent for the use of his vocal performance in the commercial. In addition, the issue of whether Levon can recover significant reputational damages that exceed SAG scale payments if he prevails on this count is still pending.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:23:55 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Don't forget "Ivanhoe". Is it just me, or did all theme songs really sound alike - and all like the Python classic, "Dennis Moore" (dum dum dum di dum)? Speaking of TV theme songs, I've always wondered if one of our guys inserted a snatch of "English Country Garden" into Dylan's '66 show in Manchester because it was the theme song for "Maggie Muggins", a CBC kids show of the early/mid '60s.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:20:36 CET 2012 from (78.79.15.149)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Why you should not to move Denmark

Danish society is negative to foreigners, even to qualified Korean engineers. But American citizens... hmmm.. maybe. Norway has a lot of jobs for young people. But why not SWEDEN for yourself, Lars? A south-american friend of mine told that the only reason he moved just to Sweden was a movie where naked girls bathed in a fountain in Stockholm.

It happens every day ;-)

BTW Engelbert Humperdinck and ESC: I asked my wife at 5.00 this morning: "Who...etc?" She said, still in asleep: "Cilla Black, Cliff Richard?" Close enough, don't you think!


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:16:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Weight advert

EMI have done some dreadful license deals on "The Weight" anyway .. it's on stuff like those Disky "Sixty Songs of the Sixties" triple CD sets for £3.99. You don't get Dylan, The Beatles or The Stones on those things. I mean at 60 songs for £3.99, the amount getting to the performer must be minuscule. I'd always guessed they'd had a bad deal at the time .. certainly without ends being tied up.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 16:12:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My granddaughter's in a Robin Hood play at school, and I'd love to find the Richard Greene series on DVD. For me, all other Robin Hood versions look "wrong". It was around the same time that they had William Tell on TV in Britain .. I think we had Robin Hood one day and William Tell another. Both had memorable theme tunes. I have Dick James' Robin Hood on the "Kids Playlist" in the car. I don't know who did the vocal version of William Tell .. I must look it up.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 15:42:11 CET 2012 from (68.199.198.175)

Posted by:

John W.+

From today's NY Post: The Weight” is over for the drummer and singer of the ’60s rock group The Band — he’s lost his eight-year legal battle over the rights to its signature song. Levon Helm had sued ad agency BBDO Worldwide in a Manhattan court in 2004, charging it used “The Weight” in a TV ad for Cingular Wireless, now AT&T, without his permission. BBDO said that it had gotten permission to use the classic from The Band’s former record company and that it didn’t need Helm’s OK because he had signed a contract in 1968 allowing the record label to license it. In a unanimous ruling yesterday, the state Appellate Division sided with BBDO, finding that “although [Helm] claims that he never gave written consent for the use of his voice . . . he unambiguously authorized the defendant to license the recording.” Helm’s lawyer, John O’Neill, says the contract gave the label permission to promote the music, not products


Entered at Fri Mar 2 14:58:11 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Two mentions for Richard Greene today - must be a record.

Nux (and Peter V): Do you think the reviewer's saying, in a kind of back-handed way, that Elton's album is "fashionably bucolic and ... superficially rustic"? As for getting it together in the country, was that a Band thing or a Traffic thing?

Link Wray's "Rumble" was surely the inspiration, title-wise at least, for Jerry Warren and the Trembler's "Tremble". The Tremblers were something of a farm team for Ronnie Hawkins, with Stan Szelest and Rebel Paine having been hired into the big leagues from there; Scott Cushnie, whose job was taken by Szelest, then took Stan's place in the Trembler (taking fellow ex-Suede Pete Traynor with him to replace Paine). Sandy Konikoff also did time with Jerry Warren, though a bit later on, and another early Tremblers bassist, Zeke Sheppard, was also part of the Hawkins crowd in the late '50s (e.g., the gang in the dancehall where we see a very young Levon and a very young Robbie playing in in the Yonge Street documentary).


Entered at Fri Mar 2 13:33:21 CET 2012 from (124.168.25.103)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Serenity: here's that article

Looks like it was an appeal.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 13:02:46 CET 2012 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Robin Hood / Peter V

You made me think of the wonderful series, starring Richard Greene. I remember that Dick James sang the theme song. He would later be the publisher of the Beatles songs as head of Northern Songs. Also DJM records. Memories.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 12:15:09 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Image

I’m going out this morning to see if I can find a pink foulard square that can be tied as a cravat (or “Ascot.”). I believe now that you should live up to your image, and the Ascot has become fixed. I’m going to go with it.

As I’ve often recounted, it’s a DEET soaked Morrocan print scarf, dating back to 1969, and it’s been reversed because we were plagued by mossies and black fly. It reminds me today of the where and when. It’s 12 years old. We were filming an ELT comedy sketch about Robin Hood, and we were right by the exact big tree used in the “Robin of Sherwood” TV series. It’s at Clifton, on the opposite side of Clifton Gorge to Bristol. From the tree you have a panorama of the industrial city in one direction, and a view of houses in the other. Yet as so often on film (if you’ve watched the TV series) it looks as if in the middle of a deep 12th century wood as long as you point the camera forward and not left or right. We needed a portrait for a publisher newsletter that day and the location photographer took it.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 11:56:47 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Link & Elton

“Wray’s Three Track Shack” is the one to have .. the other compilation, Guitar Preacher, has all of the “Link Wray” album but then selections, which means you get the version of Tucson, Arizona from “Be What You Want to Be” but then they miss out Precious Jewel from Mordecai Jones, and that’s one you have to have. It was Richard Williams writing either in Melody Maker or the short-lived British edition of Rolling Stone who first compared the "Link Wray" album to The Band. Williams' taste was reliably close to mine, so if he gave something a glowing review, I bought it. What a shame he switched from rock journalism to sports journalism. A great loss!

I’ve even got the LP “Broth” which lists everyone from the albums except Link himself, and is produced by Steve Verroca. That one’s so obscure that the Link Wray website didn’t even know about it.

I mentioned the Neville Brothers version of With God On Our Side from “Yellow Moon” earlier this week. That album also covers Fire & Brimstone from the Link Wray album, and on the follow up, “Brother’s Keeper” they covered Fallin’ Rain, so it looks like The Nevilles had discovered Link too. Calexico did Fallin’ Rain as a bonus track on “Feast of Wire.”

Well, that’s what I’ll be listening to today, plus Tumbleweed Connection, thanks to Nux. I’d always say ‘I like Madman Across The Water” but I only ever play the same two tracks (Levon and Tiny Dancer) which are on my iPod, and remember nothing about the rest of the album. Tiny Dancer was a piece of superb film soundtrack selection when used in “Almost Famous.” If I could only have one Elton John on my desert island playlist, it would be Tiny Dancer. Mind you, I'd be happy enough with fewer than five. Daniel, Your Song, Bennie & The Jets definitely. Candle in the Wind definitely NOT.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 09:42:13 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Blue Velevet Band...Richard Greene,Eric Weissberg (guitar),Bill Keith(banjo),Jim Rooney, Andy Kulberg.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 08:28:04 CET 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: Classic Albums

ELTON JOHN Tumbleweed Connection By Richard Haslop- The effect that the Band’s Music From Big Pink had on the sound of rock - and even the approach to it - in the late ’60s and early ’70s should not be underestimated. At a time when it was just starting to become acceptable to populate your albums with fiddles and pedal steel guitars in the quest for your inner Merle Haggard, and getting it together in the country was about to become compulsory, the Band was a totally different beast. Eschewing the fashionably bucolic and the superficially rustic in favour of the real and the earthy, and avoiding the more obvious trappings of country-rock as they accommodated a vastly broader range of roots music influences, the group inhabited an older, simpler, sepia-tinted time without the slightest hint of artifice or self-consciousness, virtually singlehandedly inventing what we now know as Americana.

Suddenly everybody seemed to want to sound like that, and not only in America. Eric Clapton let on that Band guitarist Robbie Robertson had the musical job that he, Clapton, wanted most and, perhaps most improbably from this end of the rock ’n’ roll telescope, Elton John proved, albeit temporarily, to be a particularly diligent disciple. Apparently it was lyricist Bernie Taupin who caught the bug first, but the piano player fell right in step.

Now, the fact that Tumbleweed Connection is my favourite Elton John album by not so much a street as a six lane highway might not seem that impressive given my relationship with most of the rest of his oeuvre, but, approached entirely on its own merits, it meant a great deal more than that in those days, and I find that, remastered and expanded, it means a great deal more than that all over again. It was John’s third album, his second to be released in 1970, so he was still closer in style to the former Reggie than the future Hercules, but, even so, the introductory interaction between his rolling piano chords and Caleb Quaye’s stuttering guitar, and the opening line of Ballad Of A Well-Known Gun, “I pulled out my Stage Coach Times and I read the latest news”, set an unlikely mood that never falters, all the way down to the epic, gospelly Burn Down The Mission and then on into the memory.

That first song, about an outlaw of the Old West rethinking his life on the run, with a great Southern rock ’n’ soul chorus featuring the backing voice of Dusty Springfield still relatively fresh from her musical trip to Memphis, continues to stir the blood, despite the odd clumsy line (“I tapped my foot in dumb surprise”?!?) and mangled mid-Atlantic vowels (it still sounds like “darn surprise” to me). It announces what was touted as a concept album but, where most albums deliberately constructed around a concept in those days – and there were enough of them – felt like they were trying way too hard to stretch a flimsy idea past breaking point, Tumbleweed Connection flows extraordinarily well.

The concept, if there is indeed one, is a mythical American past somewhere between the Old West and the Civil War, not the same place at all. Nevertheless, a couple of the songs don’t obviously fit even this loose concept, which only serves to highlight those that do. Lesley Duncan’s pretty Love Song, for example, sounds uncommonly like Crosby, Stills & John, while Talking Old Soldiers is just a moving song about getting old. Only Country Comfort, complete with fiddle, steel and more farming community images than you can shake a pitchfork at, and already well covered by Rod Stewart, seems a bit forced. Yet it’s such a likeable song it hardly seems to matter.

Perhaps it’s time to revisit Madman Across The Water or Honky Chateau .. then again, maybe not.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 04:03:56 CET 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Link Wray

Some time back Peter V. wrote an article praising a Link Wray album and comparing his work to that of The Band. I'd heard little Wray except 'Rumble' so I gave it a pass. Mistake.

I just received a three-fer of "Link Wray", "Beans & Fatback" & "Mordecai Jones" on a 2-CD set called "Wray's Three Track Shack". I'm playing the 'first' record on repeat; still have to get around to the rest; maybe this weekend. Not at all what I expected. Some very greasy roots music.

Hats off to the pink ascot wearing Brit. I should have taken his advice a long time ago.


Entered at Fri Mar 2 01:04:49 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Hubert Sumlin Tribute...

For those who don't read RS. This is one that must have been a real goodie to see. Keith Richards and Eric Clapton together, what a great combo!!

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 2 00:46:48 CET 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: LEVON

Hi guys!!Anyone hear about this? It came through as a headline, but couldn't get into the article. Doesn't give the source where it came from...

Court rules against The Band drummer Levon Helm in suit over cellphone ad -

NEW YORK, N.Y. - A Manhattan court says Levon Helm long ago signed away rights that let an advertising agency use a famous song in a cellphone commercial decades later.

I thought this had been settled..

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Mar 1 22:28:18 CET 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Jon Lyness

I agree on those two choices. Thank you for answering. I think "It makes no difference" is my favorite in a lot of ways: For Robbie's guitar intricacies; it is also my favorite Rick vocal; and it is my favorite song they perform in "The Last waltz."

"King Harvest" is an incredible song. I think Robbie's guitar solo is wonderful to watch and listen to.

There is also something really subtly beautiful about his work on "The Weight" It doesn't stand out like the vocals, but it sets the mood. I always loved the bit in "The Band: classic albums" where Robbie is at the piano explaining how he wrote "the weight" while trying to accommodate his baby daughters sleep schedule.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 22:27:24 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I don't have time right now to look at the interview Kevin J posted, but the/a story is told by Mary Martin in the book "Whispering Pines" where Garth was tasked by Mary with turning Cohen's songs into readable music for a recording session with another of her charges, the Stormy Clovers, a Yorkville group that she also managed and who are said to be the first to cover Cohen songs. Another Yorkville group under her wing was the Dirty Shames featuring Amos Garrett.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 22:14:01 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

....and here is one more link of a truly beautiful Leonard Cohen acceptance speech....wonder if MOJO got this bit of inspiration.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 22:00:10 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mary Martin

Ms. Martin also introduced Leonard Cohen to Judy Collins around 1966 and shortly thereafter Ms. Collins recorded her versions of "Suzanne" and "Dress Rehearsal Rag" for her successful album "In My Life". Those recordings helped create a buzz about Mr. Cohen as a songwriter, which was perfect advance publicity for his 1967 debut Columbia album.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 21:57:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mary Martin

That's an astonishing tale, and one Mojo totally failed to pick up on in their "Songs For A Room" article. Apparently, they spent months. First John Hammond, who Leonard didn't rate, then John Simon, and again Leonard didn't like the bass and had specified "no drums" and John Simon added drums. Then Leonard brought in Kaleidescope (featuring David Lindley) to finish the album the way he wanted it. The Garth story is a major addition.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 21:38:02 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Mary Martin

.....and the Day of the Attachment continues......Mary Martin on Garth Hudson's role in getting L. Cohen passed in that first pitch she made for him..


Entered at Thu Mar 1 21:17:58 CET 2012 from (70.31.50.102)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Dig this "Behind the scenes of behind the scenes" interview with Bob Dylan.......charming in ways...


Entered at Thu Mar 1 21:06:37 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: not your father's garage band

Forty-five years on, workouts in the basement are more popular than ever.

Note the "tears of rage" sub-text . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:57:48 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Endless Highway

Bill M: The six days would have been a round trip run from Alabama to Pittsburgh & back with stops in between in the days before all the interstate highway system was complete. Tuscumbia is just down the road from Muscle Shoals, Florence & Sheffield.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:56:20 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Thanks for the links, especially to the Robbie interview, talking about the rug, etc. Do we know the identity of the friend he talks about? Maybe Peter Traynor? Maybe someone from the Dylan crew?


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:26:19 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Robbie guitar work

Kristie, re "best Robbie guitar work in a Band song": I'd go with King Harvest and It Makes No Difference, off the top of my head. (Interesting how different his playing is between those two songs!)


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:17:02 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

me and my old ms-dos pc (link). (gonne walk the dog now)


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:14:02 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Wembley (2-3)

link


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:11:15 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Robbie & Otis ...


Entered at Thu Mar 1 19:00:47 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie & Jimmy James

Robbie is still a great story teller, love it.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 18:55:28 CET 2012 from (91.52.117.29)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: the story behind the big pink basement rug

check the link


Entered at Thu Mar 1 18:44:43 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "Willin'"

sadavid: So maybe the six-days business was due to some combination of weed, whites, wine and the need to stick to backroads? Wouldn't want to get weighed, eh? Weight - there's that word again!


Entered at Thu Mar 1 18:27:38 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: not Tupelo, honey

. . . and no doubt it was Tuscumbia which inspired the choice of Tucson, Tucumcari, Tehachapi and Tonapah . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 1 18:11:25 CET 2012 from (24.67.209.191)

Posted by:

Kristie

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

That is a great observation. Very funny, if he was in fact making a bit of fun.

I have a question for you guys: Would anyone like to share a favorite song of the Band that you think features Robbie's best guitar work?

The Link is for the Staple Singer's version of "Samson and Delilah." One of my new favorite songs.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 18:08:20 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the road: a god-damn impossible way of life ...

David: I know they're not next door, but six days from Pittsburgh to Tuscmbia? Maybe they couldn't find the latter in their gazeteer?

Anyway, Pittsburgh comes up a couple time in songs on just the one basement tape disk I listened to. And I'm pretty sure that Bob was heading out from there in one of them.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 17:56:01 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Herb Lovelle played on Bob Dylan's first "electric" sessions with a band in 1962, when he recorded "Corrina, Corrina", "Mixed Up Confusion" and "That's All Right Mama".

Earl Green and Carl Montgomery memorialized another Pennsylvania town in their classic "Six Days On The Road", a hit first for Dave Dudley in 1963.

"Well, I pulled out of Pittsburgh...", although they were originally headed for Tuscmbia, Alabama, not Nazareth, when they wrote the song.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 17:00:16 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Basement Tapes

Great discovery on Lo and Behold, Bill! Never noticed that about the opening lines before. It does seem to fit Dylan's sense of humor (esp. at that time) that he would parody/riff off of a more 'serious' song of Robbie's.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 15:55:58 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: misc., including Basement Tapes

Re Herb Lovelle, while it was Levon who drummed on the awesome title track, it was Herb Lovelle on the rest of John and Beverly Martin's "Stormbringer" album.

Little Caesar and the Consuls' only hit in the US was their cover of the Vibrations' "My Girl Sloopy" in '65. It was pretty faithful to the doo-woppish original, so didn't do nearly as well as the McCoys' snappy rearrangement. The Consuls' most famous alumnus was Robbie Robertson, who did six months before three fifths of the group left to form the Suedes. Little Caesar and the Consuls are still a going concern, 55 years after their founding, and one of the founders, saxman Norm Sherrat, didn't hang up his skates until last year. There's still a remaining link with the old days, in that drummer Sonny Milne was the guy who replaced Levon when our guys left Hawkins.

Sadavid et al: I was listening once again to some of the basement tapes stuff (not the '75 commercial release) and was struck by a couple things - which is not to say that the rest of you haven't already pawed over these issues already. First, there's "Lo And Behold", which opens with the following lines: "I pulled out for San Antone / I never felt so good" - the zack opposite of "I pulled in to Nazareth / I was feeling about half-past dead". Either Robbie was inspired by Bob, or Bob was having a bit of fun by spoofing Robbie's lines. I think the latter, because the very next song (and I believe this stuff was arranged more or less chronologically), "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere (1)", includes the following Knut Rockne / gipperish words:

"Look here, you bunch of basement noise
"You ain't no punching bag
I see you going out there
and you’re the one to do it
Pick up your nose you Canary

A couple verses later you find, "Now look here you pile of money .." - meaning that Bob knows the end of the clubhouse is nigh, as his Canadian songbirds have their deal and advance money and are getting ready to go off on their own. (It's a wonder he didn't break out into a Lightfoot song: "The way I feel / is like a robin / whose babes have flown / to come no more".) And since they got their money on the back of their demo, and their demo included "The Weight", "The Weight" must predate YAGN1, if not the composition of the 'true' song, which comes down to us as YAGN2. By the way, another bit of coachishness on the part of Dylan comes in another song (can't recall which) where he encourages the drummer (i.e., Richard) to stop hiding behind the bottle. I suspect that this reflects an awareness that Levon's on his way back to the fold, meaning that Richard's going to be upfront and unable to hide so much.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 15:31:09 CET 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties
Web: My link

Subject: Speakin' of 60's....and 50's...

With the 'way-back' machine up and running running the last couple of days, a sad article in this morning's New York Times: Ronnie I's in Clifton, NJ is closing.

For a New York City kid in the 50's, Doo Wop on WMCA and other AM stations was a early, pre-Band staple of late night radio, and we'd hide our AM radios under our pillows before mom tucked us in.

Ronnie's opened about the time that our local record shops stopped selling the early records: I know that myself and many of my former Deadhead pals knew the directions to Ronnies, and just where to park, a skill we later used in the vicinity of 2nd Avenue and 6th Street.

Sad that this closing may signal the end of an entire musical genre.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 15:22:20 CET 2012 from (89.241.0.217)

Posted by:

Mark

Web: My link

Subject: The Man Outside

I think every Band fan should watch this film at least once in your lifetime. I did it and may have wasted 90 mins of my life last night. However, I still have those images of The Band all together in the same film and that makes it worth the effort for a Band freak.


Entered at Thu Mar 1 09:44:34 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 60s stuff

I mentioned this last week. Highly recommend the new Ace CD “Smash Boom Bang:” in their writer / producer series, this time featuring the songs and productions of Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer, which include Let’s Stomp, My Boyfriend’s Back, Hang on Sloopy, I Want Candy. The three writers were also The Strangeloves, and the superb liner notes finally unravelled Hang on Sloopy for me.

It was a rewrite, or rather a version, of My Girl Sloopy by The Vibrations. The Strangeloves were touring behind I Want Candy, and Dave Clark announced he intended to cover their version of Hang on Sloopy after they’d supported the Dave Clark Five. They were devastated, knowing they couldn’t release it under their own name just days after I Want Candy was released in the UK (later than in the USA), and determined to find a band to record it. They hit upon Rick & The Raiders, fronted by Rick Derringer, and changed their name to The McCoys (because there were internal feuds, like The Hatfields and McCoys of hillbilly legend). The performance is the original Strangeloves instrumental backing track, with added vocal by The McCoys, and an inserted Rick Derringer guitar solo. The drums and bass are a hallmark of Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer productions for Bang records and listening through, you sense the same rhythm section on many tracks regardless of the artist listed.

Back in 1965, an organist I knew kept playing Hang on Sloopy to me and raving about how good the drumming was. The notes reveal that Herb LaVelle (aka Herb Lovelle) was their session drummer of choice, as he was on early Neil Diamond (who grew up with Feldman, Goldstein and Neil Sedaka).


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