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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, July 2012


Entered at Tue Jul 31 22:25:07 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Let us not overlook Mitzi's fine harmony work on Richard Manuel's posthumous solo CD, or the role of Chester the Rack-Fixer's dog Jack in "The Weight". I'm pretty sure that's the same dog as was immortalised by John Simon: "My name is Jack and I live in the back of the Greta Garbo home, with friends I will remember wherever I may roam". I'm thinking beagle.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 21:48:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: I'd say the Rivieras improved on Joe Jones's version of "California Sun". Given the Glover involvement, it's odd in a way that it turned up here on the Delta label - as Delta mostly distributed King's R&B stuff, and Glover was a house producer at King for a time. An amazing career in any case, and full of connections to our guys.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 21:40:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I despise the "Disneyfication" of animals myself. Dogs don't talk. Or philosophize, though Gromit gets near.

BUT I'm very interested in your link to the new Ry Cooder.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 21:21:34 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: dog's life

Browsing thru the Levon Helm Studios site, I noticed that Muddy was on the 'Meet the Staff' board -- Captain, no less, of Team Levon. That's righteous. Although I hasten to depose that I hold no brief for dogs, myself.

Then, on a tip from Brad Wheeler in the _Globe_, the flip side of how to treat a dog: Ry Cooder's "Mutt Romney Blues" from the upcoming album _Election Special_ (see [My link]).

It's a one-note joke, but Ry has a genius for finding its sweet spot; somehow it gets funnier. And listen to the percussion. And the backup singers. And Ry's terrific lead vocal, complete with growls and yips . . . .


Entered at Tue Jul 31 20:00:50 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

My understanding is that the Rivieras (From South Bend, Indiana) heard the original version of California Sun by Joe Jones (written and produced by Henry Glover), worked up their version, came up to Chicago and recorded it with little help at CBS. They released it on the Riviera Label. Keyboards, btw, by one of the great names in rock history, Otto Nuss.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 19:22:37 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Thanks for mentioning Delta; you can hardly go wrong in picking up anything on that label. Mostly what you see in record bins is James Brown 45s from the '60s, but occasionally other King releases and stuff from other US labels turns up. I'm pretty sure that one was "California Sun" by the Rivieras - written and produced by Hawks / Band associate, Henry Glover.

The head of Regency / Phonodisc in the late '50s and early '60s (Newman's predecessor, I guess), Don McKim, was responsible for releasing several key '50s rockers from the local guys who were Ronnie Hawkins' 'competition' when he moved north - Buddy Burke and the Canadian Meteors, Andy Wilson and the Cosmos, the Blue-Tones, Eddy Clermont.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 16:59:09 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Billy Stewart / Bill M

No Bill, it was on CHESS here; distributed by Phonodisc at Eglinton & Warden. The same people who distributed Motown here in Canada. They also distributed James Brown; on the delta label. Garry Newman's(former President of Warner Music here) Father, the legendary Ron Newman ran Phonodisc.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 16:42:58 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: Your're right - I wonder what I was thinking. Anyway, googling Billy Stewart turned up this link to an obit for songwriter-producer Billy Davis, who not only produced Stewart on Chess, he also produced Garth Hudson!

That is, he ran Chess's Check-Mate subsidiary, produced all the records and wrote most of the songs, including those recorded by Paul London and the Kapers with Garth on piano and sax. See the link I posted yesterday.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 16:30:50 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

A favorite of mine is Billy Stewart's "Sitting in the Park", which later became a staple in NRBQ's live performances featuring Big Al Anderson on lead vocal.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 16:02:38 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Summertime

Billy Stewarts' original vocal group back in Washington DC consisted of Billy Stewart with Marvin Gaye and Don Covay. That's a lot of talent in a trio. I'd be surprised if the original Canadian release was Motown, Bill … it's a Chess classic.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 15:49:38 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Billy Stewart's "Summertime" is a truly thrilling performance. I believe it was on the Tamla Motown label here. Stewart was a cousin of Washington singer Calvin Ruffin, I believe. Frank Motley and the Motley Crew backed Ruffin on a record or two in the fifties, around the time when they relocated from DC to Toronto. They also recorded behind Stewart's some-time group, the Rainbows.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 15:45:45 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dunc / Ronnie Lane

So Dunc you made my weekend busy. I watched the "Passing Show" film; on Ronnie Lane. I had no idea really of what his life was like; after the Faces. His relationship with Clapton etc. and what Clapton had to say about him. Pete Townsend as well. Although I bought Rough Mix on vinyl; when it came out.

I ended up ordering a double album of his Slim Chance period and also the album How Come; which was released last year. Went back and found my one Ronnie Lane piece of vinyl on A&M. I enjoyed his You Never Can Tell live; on youtube; better that the studio version. Slim Chance was indeed very Bandish at times.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 10:28:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Betty Wright

Just in case anyone hasn't heard Betty Wright's Shoo-Rah Shoo-Rah, there's a link above. It's 1975, but it sounds earlier. You could put it in a playlist with classic 60s soul and it fits.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 09:24:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Billy Stewart

It’s really odd what passes you by. A couple of years ago I discovered Betty Wright’s Shoo-Rah Shoo-Rah and was saying to everyone, “You have to hear this, it’s amazing” and they all already knew it.

Things skip by … but Billy Stewart is a real surprise, Jeff, as he was Chess’s “other piano player” arriving in 1956 aged 19 and accompanying early Bo Diddley, so closely connected to the guy playing with Chuck Berry in another studio, who you worked with!

Summertime was a Top 10 US hit, both pop and R&B, and even charted in the UK (only #39). It comes from that 1965 / 1966 era when Chess converted to producing superb soul: Tony Clarke “The entertainer”, Little Milton “Who’s Cheating Who”, Fontella Bass “Rescue Me” and Ramsey Lewis’s “Hard Day’s Night.” Billy Stewart’s other soul classic that year was “Sitting In The Park.” If you get a Chess 12 song CD compilation, chances are Summertime will be on there.

To my ear’s the DJ connection would be putting on Richard Groove Holmes version of “Misty” followed by Billy Stewart’s “Summertime.” Both were around heavily in 1966. Stewart was killed in a car crash in 1970.


Entered at Tue Jul 31 04:33:10 CEST 2012 from (31.193.140.161)

Posted by:

belstaffjackets

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: http://www.belstaffjacket-s.org

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Entered at Tue Jul 31 03:50:55 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Billy Stewart. Summertime .A must listen.

See the link above. I'd imagine both Van The Man and Rick Danko were listening to this guy.

I had never heard of him or his version of this till today.StLouis has great radio (KDHX) and today one of the DJs drug this out.It sounded so fucking good it had to be vinyl.

Here is another link to a live version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8OD56xaY_Y&feature=related


Entered at Mon Jul 30 23:24:18 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: French Bliss

And that unique pairing of chansons tristes on that French single highlights both Richard's singing and songwriting skills.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 22:48:36 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Those French love those sad songs.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 22:12:32 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, I'm shocked. You didn't have a copy?


Entered at Mon Jul 30 22:09:36 CEST 2012 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Bold move to release a single with two ballads on it...


Entered at Mon Jul 30 19:30:23 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Just checked What's New. Belated applause for our guys' French label for having the intelligence and good taste to release "Whispering Pines" / "Lonesome Suzie" as a 45 in 1970.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 18:04:16 CEST 2012 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Web: My link

Alabama Shakes lead singer Brittany Howard joins My Morning Jacket to sing "It Makes No Difference" at Newport. Not a bad version at all, not that anyone can touch the original. The video is the full MMJ set with this song starting around 47 minutes in.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 17:00:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronna
Web: My link

On Friday we hooked up with an out-of-town friend (Bonk: Denny N from Bo B Jackson and the Corporation). We chose a jazz club so that the friend could say hello to an old friend of his, drummer Frank DeFelice. Since Frank was the drummer in the early '70s, Bearsville-label group Jericho, I finally had a chance to ask of Garth played on their album in addition to lending the group his leslie and clavinette (as acknowledged in the liner notes - see link). He didn't, meaning that all the brilliant keyboard work was by Gord Fleming, also a former Hawk. Frank did say that the Band guys were in and out of the studio all day, saying hello and checking things out. As were Paul Butterfield and Van Morrison.

On Saturday afternoon we stopped for a coffee in suburban Port Creidt and stayed to watch two singer-guitarists go through their reportoire of ye olde rock and roll - Beatles, Animals, Tom Petty ,etc. Exceptional harmonies, which made me think that they book themselves out as Phil and John as a nod to the Everlys. Anyway, they invited local Virgil Scott up for a number, he led them - and the audience, many of whom sang along as requested - through "The Weight". In the late '60s, Virgil led a happenin' little band that included Terry Draper (later of mystery band Klaatu) and Hendrik Rijk and James Bridgeman (who went on to co-found Mary Margaret O'Hara's great club band, Songship; Rijk is also the bassist on Mary Margaret's "Miss America" album).


Entered at Mon Jul 30 15:13:14 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Hudson Weider Interview

Link


Entered at Mon Jul 30 09:54:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Levon tributes

Charlie, many thanks for that. I don't think you'll find any contemporary performer able to do "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" better than Bruce Hornsby on that show. A fantastic rendition … I think he's in the "blood beneath my feet" camp.

While watching that on YouTube, the sidebar took me to Simone Felice (a Woodstock native) giving a heartfelt tribute to Levon in his introduction to "Radio Song" in Ireland (see link). He also gives a little more information than we knew.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 08:59:56 CEST 2012 from (139.190.207.69)

Posted by:

Banner Design

Web: My link

Subject: Thanks

Really nice design and superb subject material , nothing at all else we want : D.


Entered at Mon Jul 30 04:20:52 CEST 2012 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce Hornsby Pays Tribute to Levon

Here's a link to a performance of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" by Bruce Hornsby at a festival in Florida this spring. He pays tribute to Levon in his introduction as he did last night before performing "Mystery Train" here in Virginia.

It's nice to see a lot of the old familiar names here after a long time away. I don't come around much since I became a Facebook addict. All the best to you all.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 15:03:20 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Bruce

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN made a touching appearance at UTÖYA MEMORIAL (one year after massacre of social-democratic youth) in Oslo Norway. He sang "We Shall Overcome" acoustically. - He performed even in front of 66.000 people in Gothenburg in Sweden.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 08:24:05 CEST 2012 from (124.171.28.130)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: More junk to scroll by: A review of Martin Power's life of Jeff Beck

hope you enjoy...


Entered at Sun Jul 29 05:41:22 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Teronno

Dunc: Sonic Boom, which recently moved around the corner, is huge, but it is all CDs. Fascinating Rhythm in Nanaimo has CDs too, but is mostly vinyl. Well organisedy vinyl too. A record store's record store.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 04:02:35 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Landy- schmaltz herring is wonderful, and sometimes herring in tomato sauce from a tin is too. Vita herring is awful , has been quite a while, but there is a brand of wild caught Canadian herring that I've been buying in Whole Foods lately that is quite good. I get the regular, forgo the cream style. Never had smoked mackerel with tomato sauce but eat it plain occasionaly. Brisket- the best publicly available brisket in st louis is made by a guy from hendersonville , tennessee. I left NY a year ago tomorrow. I left my palette there. Though to be honest, food in NY is no where near as good as it used to be.


Entered at Sun Jul 29 00:58:21 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

rosalind

Wow .. 39 years.. exactly.. how deep IS that barrel anyway?


Entered at Sat Jul 28 22:41:07 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Almost exactly thirty nine years ago right now, the Band took the stage at Watkins Glen.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 22:32:19 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Almost exactly 39 years ago right now, the Band was taking the stage at Watkins Glen.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 18:37:09 CEST 2012 from (75.34.49.213)

Posted by:

Adam

Typo: January 2012 concert.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 16:54:26 CEST 2012 from (75.34.49.213)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Garth Hudson

Hello everyone. I've been very busy, but I hope to have a new article for you all very soon. A concert review, interview, and article on the legendary Garth Hudson. I'm finished with it, and just waiting for Mr. Hudson's approval of the interview content. It shouldn't be too much longer, hopefully. Garth is playing the Ramble once again, August 10. The last one he did was the historic, legendary January 12 concert... his final performance with Levon. The article I wrote for that event is linked above. To my surprise, I couldn't pass up buying tickets to this upcoming Ramble. I suppose there is more of the story still waiting to be written...


Entered at Sat Jul 28 15:54:10 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Another delicacy/horror show my father enjoyed was eating smoked mackerel slathered in a tomato sauce that came in a big tin. Of course to continue this thread as well as educate Northwestcoaster further in Jewish deli faves, he would buy shmaltz herring in a jar. While we all thought that pickled herring in a jar was revolting, there was something about the pickled onions that came in it that were quite tasty.

These days my fave rave about food is the pot roast sandwich that they began selling at Saratoga Race Course this year. Quite delectable and spring for the bake bean and cole slaw side for an extra $3.00.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 15:33:14 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Sardines (Peter V's never-ending thread)

There IS a Band connection, after all. The members looked like sardines in their period of heroin abuse.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 15:20:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sardines

My 1970s sardines were in a tin with a key thing that you rolled the lid open with. But in 2012, the UK food depts of Marks & Spencer sell "fresh Cornish sardines" (double the size of the tinned ones or more) in packs of six at the fish section. They're still cheap too. They don't always have them. I read that "Cornish sardine" is a protected description in Europe.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 13:54:06 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countres

Subject: Jewish gb posters, on serious side.

I know a few communists, muslims, buddhists, atheists, capitalists, arabs, central asians, chinese, but I do not know any Jew personally. That is why this gb is my source to intellectually balanced Jewish culture. I appreciate your integrity. Keep it that way.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 13:32:47 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic countries

Subject: Do not dream of a Desert Islands (a true story continued)

This happened to me in my island near the Russian border. 1. Mosquitoes 2. Snakes climbing in the trees and 3. Hunters burning down your cottage. I would like to add the following 4. Desperados like to shoot themselvess dead in a desert island. And they will be MORE. You have to do the cleaning. 5. When you are lying in your canoe peacefully playing your harmonica you will be awakened by the police. IDENTIFY YOURSELF. YOUR FAMILY HAS REPORTED YOU AS DISSAPPIERED. Then they throw you back to the so called civilization............. You have been warned, dear gbers.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 11:15:27 CEST 2012 from (86.151.78.224)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

Bill M:the biggest previously owned CD shop I have been in is the one up at The Annexe. How bigger is the one up at Nanaimo?

I'm away CD collecting In Glasgow today. I'll go to three shops HMV, FOPP and an independent.

I've been making an effort in becoming complete in certain artists.


Entered at Sat Jul 28 11:13:17 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Coountries

Subject: Great Britain

MANDY SMITH (13, dating Bill Wyman, 47) was introduced in a Swedish show:

"Mandy, a great Britton!!!!"

Mandy Smith: "...but I'm not Great Britain ?!"


Entered at Fri Jul 27 21:33:59 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JQ: Remember, Garth was once a Caper - always fresh, never pickled. As evidenced in the link above.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 19:26:41 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: warning: music discussed below in second paragraph

Landmark: Sounds like jumbo canapes to me. A bit gassy with the eggs, I suspect - maybe even cannonading?

In more musical news, I just stuck on disc 3 of the 4-CD "Sue Records Story", which I purchased second hand a few weeks ago at Fascinating Rhythm in Nanaimo, by far the best record store I've encountered this millenium. I really bought it for the two Jackie Shane cuts, but am enjoying most of it, including the opening cut on disc 3, "Mockingbird" by the Foxxes. The bad news is that it lacks Robbie Robertson's guitar; the good news is that it lacks James Taylor's voice. Two instrumental reasons for Hawks fans to check out at least disc 2: Jimmy McGriff's organic version of "I've Got A Woman", which has the rhythm and pretty much the bass line of Ronnie Hawkins' "Who Do You Love", and "Prancing" by Ike Turner and his Kings of Rhythm, with the great Mickey Baker playing terrific Robbie-ish guitar. See link for the latter.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 19:23:14 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: "fresh" sardines

PV - When you say "fresh" do you mean that the sardine can was just opened or that you went out and caught the little fellers.

I've never seen a fresh sardine. Or a fresh caper either -


Entered at Fri Jul 27 19:15:25 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: This scepter'd Isle

Thank you Peter for the explanation. I take it to mean just Britain according to this description.

A couple of dinner companions: Eleanore Roosevelt, I've always admired her. F Scott Fitzgerald and Scott Adams(the creator of Dilbert.) And I might add in John Stewart


Entered at Fri Jul 27 19:10:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: sardines

In the 70s, we used to eat sardines a lot due to poverty caused by the government. Mrs V read that sardines, brown rice, and a green vegetable was a perfect nutritional balance. We used to coat them in English mustard, grill them and put them on the brown rice. This is years before the benefits of oily fish were known. Nothing beats fresh sardines and a salad on a sunny evening by the sea.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 18:48:27 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Peter, if you keep this up, we'll end having as many stipulation related lists as we have the top ten lists we do every now and again. Besides I should be exempt for giving you the Welsh Rarebit story.

Don't knock sardines. My father's favourite meal when my mother was away, was sardines on rye toast, with sliced onions, tomatoes, and if he felt like it, sliced hard boiled eggs. It was the Monday night event when my mom was away.

When he passed away a couple of months ago, in his honour, we ate them. Though I love them, others in my family were not as enthused but ate them just the same.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 18:39:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

None of you are following the girl / boy / girl / boy seating plan here. Still, can I swap my Alain de Botton for a Leonard Cohen? Then you get philosophy and poetry and good humour in one package. If you won't swop Alain,. I'll swop Robbie.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 18:05:43 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Landmark: Brilliant. I can't imagine any of those guys minding sardine sandwiches and a bottle of Pennsylvania's finest. But can't we please replace a Coen with Jesus? Imagine what Mel would have to say to a real 2000-year-old man? ("Such a nice boy. Used to come into the store. Never bought anything.")


Entered at Fri Jul 27 17:22:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, I have the feeling that the Nazareth Chardonnay might suffer from "overcooking". It's too hot to produce a decent wine. But if you're producing it in a miraculous way, why should you stick with local? A nice Muscadet perhaps, or a Pouilly Fuisse.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 17:06:41 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: If it's going to be sardine sandwiches, but you're looking at a rather elevated roster of guests (as opposed to, say, the Trailer Park Boys), then you'd better make sure that they're cut daintily and can be passed off as seafood canapes. And don't get your hopes up that the wine would be drinkable; Pat B would likely have views on this.

Re the guest list, if Jesus, then it might be nice to invite Lord Buckley as well so's he'd finally be able to meet 'the Nazz'. Todd Rundgren would be a nice bridge between the Nazz and Robbie, who would surely be open to comparing the architecture of the Palestinian and Pennsylvanian Nazareths. Prince Charles would be an interesting wild card: he has strong views on architecture and is in line to be the titular head of the English branch of the church built in Jesus's name.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 16:54:50 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

The Coen brothers, Mel Brooks, Christopher Guest, Carl Reiner and Eugene Levy. We can laugh ourselves silly during supper and write a blockbuster comedy for dessert.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 16:46:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wish I'd thought of Jesus of Nazareth. It cuts down on the catering. We'll only need a couple of loaves, a few sardines and a pitcher of water.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 16:45:10 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Worst dinner party...

Lou reed. Van Morrison (in bad mode). Philip Roth. Yoko Ono. Snooki from jersey shore. Dlew919.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 16:37:44 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Quick, before Dunc notices, change your sentence to "James VI of Scotland became James I of the newly united kingdom of England and Scotland in 1603." You can safely ignore Wales, I'm sure.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 16:31:22 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

There is an extent that England & Wales were united before James VI of Scotland became James I of England in 1603, so we also talk about "England & Wales" in a group.

The link is to Daniel Hannan defending the Anglo-Saxon thing. An important point is the recent discovery that English DNA is largely the same as Scottish and Irish meaning the Anglo-Saxons were less important than was once thought. They pointed out that DNA in the South-West of England differed little from the west of Ireland or north of Scotland, meaning genetically the "British" footprint is stronger than the Anglo-Saxon one. The same batch of stuff a few years ago also found that while there were Celtic languages, there wasn't really a "Celtic race."


Entered at Fri Jul 27 15:52:07 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thank you Dunc for that pick, I have it already, I'm happy to say.

6 dinners guests, hmmm. This is goodie to ponder.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 15:48:26 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

A couple of recent posts reminded me of Basil Fawlty's wonderful retort when the visiting American complained about the narrow roads: "Ah. Well, I think you'll find that British cars come equipped with steering wheels."

Peter V: I thought that "England and Wales" is the subnational unit. Nothing that would please the Welsh, but then the English don't like to admit that England isn't really a country either - just a province (and with Wales at that?) and a state of mind. Except when it comes to a small number of Englishy sports.

I think that Romney's aide meant "Anglo Saxon" to be taken not in the technically correct sense but as it seems most commonly used these days: "White, but not those ones from the Mediterranean, or the Slavs". "Teutonic" would have been used in similar circumstances in previous decades.

JT: You're looking for conversation or soap opera. JFK and Marilyn undressing each other with their eyes, while Cohen unleashes romantic profundities that he hopes will pry her away. And Jesus and Mary - are they even still together? Could be rocky. And then you have a conflicted Dylan, wanting to talk Christianity with Jesus but smart enough to know that Jesus remained Jewish to the end and wouldn't have had a chance to read the Gospels unless there's a copy in Heaven's Library. And of course Cohen would likely take a run at Mary too.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 15:18:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Do Re Mi

Following the discussion on accordion, check out Ry Cooder doing Do Re Mi (this time without Bob) in the 1970s.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 15:05:47 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.79)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan doing Do Re Mi

Great link on Expecting Rain this morning,


Entered at Fri Jul 27 15:02:18 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The following evenings, leftovers...

The following evening, with the magnificent leftovers rewarmed, we would welcome Jesus of Nazareth and Mary Magdalene, Moses, Rabbi Gunther Plaut, Emily Haynes and Donald Fagen. That might make for some interesting conversation.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:44:49 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dinner

Resurrection permitted and with the knowledge that your heroes might you disappoint you in the end, we would have Albert Einstein, Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Marilyn Monroe (it would be great to hear what she'd have to say today), John F. Kennedy and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. What a hoot that would be!


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:27:13 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Six dinner guests

I really have to stop posting today … it's because I'm doing humdrum stuff and the computer is a distraction..

Robbie Robertson, but I hope he doesn’t roll out the same anecdotes. I might have to warn him that “they booed us everywhere we went” was off limits to either me or Joan. The others might not have heard it.

Emily Blunt. Most interesting British actress of recent years. Best not to seat her next to Robbie. I’m afraid we’re all going to be a bit old for her, but being a good actor she’ll be able to look interested.

Alain de Botton. I saw him speak at a literary festival. Good to have a philsopher.

Joan Baez (or Judy Collins): I want a female musician, and interesting conversation is more important than being young. Both are marvellous conversationalists. Joan because I can listen in if she and Robbie start bitchin’ about Bob.

David Bowie. Not because I’m a great fan, but because I’ve now read two journalists saying he’s the most likeable and friendly rock star they’ve ever interviewed. The fact that he’s never crossed musical paths with the other two makes it interesting.

J.K. Rowling. Not that I’ve read Harry Potter or managed a whole movie, but I want a sixth woman, and I want a writer. She used to teach ELT in Portugal, so we’d have something in common before I asked for career advice, getting an agent and stuff.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:19:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It's so great to be in your wonderful city …

That's pretty bad, Dunc, but the fault doubles when the band leader says "Hello Glasgow, it's great to be back in England" in Edinburgh or Aberdeen.

Local reference works a treat with any crowd. Jackson Browne got massive applause in Bournemouth by mentioning a local shop he'd been in and a restaurant he'd enjoyed a great meal in. Paul Simon intriguingly mentioned playing Bournemouth in 1965.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:10:15 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: JT

What you never do if you're a band leader, JT, and I've written about this before because it happens, say:

'Hello Glasgow! It's great to be back in England again.'


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:03:35 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: VIctoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: GREAT

Peter V: That was a great lesson for me, the ignorant north American, who now knows about Great Britain from someone who is obviously a great teacher. They were lucky to have you. It was rhetorical and kind of tongue-in-cheek but I'm glad you wrote.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 14:02:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Something for the weekend …

The Band’s final album “Islands” may have explained everything.

I still wax lyrical about seeing Bill Clinton power-walking through London’s St James’ area about a year after he left office. He was walking well-ahead of his minders, and everyone stopped in their tracks and applauded as he walked by. The man radiated charisma in quite a strange way. You could feel it thirty yards away. I don’t think that’s even a political statement. Few rock stars even have it at that level. Mr Romney doesn’t.

But on to a happier less political theme. In a review I read this morning, someone quoted Harry Belafonte as the ideal dinner guest (having just seen him speaking). This makes a change from the desert island. So which six people would you most like to share a dinner party with? You don’t have to cook it yourself.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 13:51:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In the words of the Daily Mail "Romney's visit was a car crash."


Entered at Fri Jul 27 13:39:43 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Romney

Romney's visit has united us. British moans about the Olympics have subsided - people don't want to be associated with an incompetent American moaner. All shades of the political spectrum seem to have the same viewpoint.

The visit has now got a name - 'Romneyshambles'.

In the words of moderate right wing journalist, Andrew Neil, 'Romney visit to London must be the worst of any presidential candidate in living memory.' or

In the words of the moderate left Guardian writer John Berry - 'This trip was meant to make him look presidential...it made him look like Mr Bean.'


Entered at Fri Jul 27 12:54:48 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don’t know if it was a rhetorical question, but having had to do this one in hundreds of lessons for ELT / ESL students I’ll do it again.

The British Isles is a geographical unit, consisting of many islands, including the Isle of Man, Jersey, Skye, Anglesey and the Isle of Wight (though Lars lays claim to the last as he bought it from a man in London once). The two biggest islands in this lot are Ireland and Great Britain, again these are geographical units. So it’s “Great Britain” because it’s the largest British island, not because it’s inherently “great”. Within that largest island, there are three political and cultural entities: England, Scotland, Wales. All of these also include some outlying islands: Skye is in Scotland, Angelsey is in Wales and the Isle of Wight is in England. If you take these three political entities which comprise Great Britain, and combine them as a political unit with Northern Ireland you have the United Kingdom (of Great Britain and Northern Ireland). The Republic of Ireland is part of the “British Isles” but not the UK.

Here endeth the lesson.

There is a furore in today’s papers about “Team GB” the cobbled together Olympic team … we have never before played football as “Britain”. Apparently two Welsh players didn’t sing the National Anthem and only managed a draw with Senegal, a mighty footballing nation if ever there was one. According to the tabloids they “refused” to sing, though maybe it was simply “didn’t sing”. As they say, David Beckham, who was not selected would certainly have sung it with gusto. There is a minor issue in that the “England” team plays to the National (British) Anthem, while Wales and Scotland have their own anthems. It has been said for years that perhaps England should select a specifically “English” anthem for sports (like “Land of Hope & Glory” or “Jerusalem”) rather than using the “British” one.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 12:31:28 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Romney

I'm not going to go into what he said other than how ignorant he seemed. Sarah Palin worried me.

But Peter is VERY CORRECT about one thing. As soon as Romney says England there's millions of Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish who are angry. Another American parading his ignorance.

I'm proud of being a Scot and proud of being British and that's a very political statement as we go towards a referendum. And the only thing I ever agreed with Rupert Murdoch on is that Alex Salmond is the outstanding politician in this country.

But I feel ashamed that it's like we're back in the fifties with the posh boys running us. We've got a chancellor who's never worked apart from a holiday job in Selfridges. And I feel even more ashamed that we've got a House of Lords.

I'll stop on the politics now as I know Jan doesn't like it.

But remember Britain or UK will do.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 12:09:54 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Thanks John and Bob. Gallagher playing the accordian. Great album.

Here's a great track from Transatlantic sessions. Alison Krauss, Jerry Douglas, great Scottish musicians including an accordian player and a Bob Dylan song. I'm going to collect all The Trans Atlantic sessions.

Landmark:I would recommend a track from Curtis Mayfield's 'New World Order'. This is I think the last album after Curtis's accident. I was reading that Curtis had to be in some sort of brace to allow him to stand upright to allow him to sing while recording the album. Perhaps David P could confirm this. I really like the album.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 10:21:17 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Romney...

I honestly believe the right has gone insane. The lunatic right, always courted for votes, but never listened to has courted enough support to run the shop. Mr Cameron, as a 'wet' has failed, mostly because he has not the support of the right wing populists who dilute debate, stop objective argument and reduce discussion to ad hominem abuse. The right was always better than that. In The US, the best the right can come up with after the destruction of the republicans by the bush cartel was Romney. In Australia, we have tony Abbott. In the wings lay reason, but the vested invests who control this stuff don't want the more nuanced and reasonable candidates.

Lest you think me biased, the left is senile. It has forgotten why it exists. It's courted too many who it should have crushed.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 09:53:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A diversion into politics (first for a LONG time)

Maybe it's better to avoid it. Never mind. Here goes. In memory of Steve!

To be fair to Romney, the quote led into a paragraph on how extensive the British Empire was two generations ago.

Nevertheless, he managed to Dubya his way through London. Meeting the most tainted bankers for fundraising. Dissing Olympic preparations. Apparently forgetting The Ed Miller Band’s name and addressing him as “Mr Leader.” Discussing security meetings with MI6 (never to be mentioned). Talking about the “backside of 10 Downing Street” (i.e., in British, the buttocks). When London Mayor Boris Johnson tells you off to applause, you know you’re in trouble. Personally though, I wouldn’t trust Boris to organize a piss-up in a brewery.

But as the political classes instinctively do, he managed to sideswipe Obama on the way, by reviving the Churchill bust story (Obama had it removed from the Oval office, then dispatched to the British Embassy, just to make sure we had noticed). This has led the media to revive the “Is Obama anti-British?” discussion.

It’s a week in which neither of them have done well in the media here. Britain has small roads etc, and do you know, you can’t even find a decent weapons store to equip yourself with an assault rifle with a 100 bullet magazine, nor 6000 rounds of ammunition. Shocking. And you can’t get as many varieties of Cheerios.

It’s also noticed that Romney made the crass statement that “killing people is already against the law” and while Obama said the 2nd Amendment never foresaw AK47s, and mentioned the daily death toll is cumulatively the same as Aurora, he’s singularly failed to suggest he might do anything about it. Like repeal it. As the 21st amendment did to the 18th.

I would note that I think all three of our party leaders are useless too, and I know no one is going to talk intelligently about gun laws in election year.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 03:36:21 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dunc

Loved that video Dunc. Was that not Gallagher & Lyle in the band as well.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 03:17:53 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I am slowly crawling into the 21st century. I received for my birthday, an Ipod Touch and am going mental (quite happily I might add) getting music for it. First tune, "Move On Up" by Curtis Mayfield. Perfect for dragging my ass onto the elliptical machine. Have the feeling I'll be at this for awhile. Any and all suggestions are welcome.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 00:58:50 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Great Britain?

Peter: Is that why they call it 'Great Britain'?


Entered at Fri Jul 27 00:27:52 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The funniest part is that 'England' is not even an island, as it has land borders with both Scotland and Wales.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 00:16:58 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pat: I assume Milt Romney was bemoaning Hitler’s lack of success? I’ll bet a bottle of Glenfiddich and a Twinings tea bag against a Range Rover a Mini and an Airbus engine that in six months time, we’ll all be saying Milt who? In fact in Europe, we’re saying Milt who? already.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 00:11:56 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Ronnie Lane

Dunc, I loved that Ronnie Lane video. He is really missed.


Entered at Fri Jul 27 00:07:37 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Professor Louie

A great accordian player with major Band connections is Professor Louie(Aaron Hurwitz). Louie along with Miss Marie and the Crowmatix have a fine new record out called 'Wings on Fire'.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 23:00:45 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie Lane and the accordion

I still play this regularly. Great Scottish rock accordion playing.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 22:47:29 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I was impressed with Mitt Romney's take on Great Britain: "England is just a small island. Its roads and houses are small. With few exceptions, it doesn't make things that people in the rest of the world want to buy. And if it hadn't been separated from the continent by water, it almost certainly would have been lost to Hitler's ambitions."

Can our British friends clear this up? I thought Beatles albums tended to be in high demand.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 22:00:22 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Smart move to leave the health books behind. I seem to have at least half of the symptoms of most of the maladies I read about. Too much of a downer - but then, isn't Leonard Cohen? Who needs to carry depressing stuff to the island when NwC is just an email away? And yes, the shiny side of the "Fish Called Wanda" DVD would be a useful mirror if you needed to flag down some passing plane.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 19:31:47 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Desert Island distractions

I will have to have a generator or chronically functional battery support in order to a) view - A Fish Called Wanda, The Big Lebowski, As Good As It Gets, Deerhunter, Fargo, Heaven's Gate (yes, Heaven's Gate!) and a few others. b) listen to - Dylan's best (you know what they are); The Band (first 4 albums at least; Steely Dan's box set (to keep me sane, a sometimes difficult endeavour at best); Leonard Cohen (for those difficult days) and countless others to numerous to mention c) I like biographies and can read them over and over (if time passes, as it will, since rescue can be variable when you are on a desert island- could take a long time; who knows?) No health related books though. I'll keep Tarantula tucked away and take out only if the sun is too strong. I'm sure there are some works of fiction. I do like Doctorow (a subject of current discussion) and I am partial to those pulp fiction books relating to the law, if well written (early Grishom, Turow and others). So there you have it. I just remembered. I am on an island but so far it is not deserted. Peter, so are you!


Entered at Thu Jul 26 18:38:53 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Desert island - another pessimistic post

Did I see "desert island" here somewhere? STOP!!! I happened to own a desert island once. Not in an ocean but in a lake near Russian border. Mosquitoes were driving me crazy, snakes were climbing in the trees, hunters burned down our cottage. - Don't EVER dream of desert island!


Entered at Thu Jul 26 18:05:58 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: You're welcome. Turns out it's Johnnie not Johnny. Here's a link.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 17:34:19 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Bill M and Nux.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 15:56:50 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like that desert island ending. Perhaps the luxury should be a shovel.

On Doctorow, I started reading "The March" as a result of our discussion. Two chapters in only, but it's looking good. Very The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 14:32:29 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: To tied together a couple of topics, Wilentz's 'Dylan and the Sacred Harp' chapter includes a discussion of songs sung from the point of view of a dead guy. (One is "Long Black Veil", though he scrupulously avoids mentioning the Band.) Any talk about writing from that PoV brings to mind a send-up of the whole desert-island genre by humourist Stephen Leacock. After building, making and doing this and that while existing on sand and gravel, the castaway reports in his diary, "I died. I buried myself."

A musical footnote: Leacock's most successful book, "Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town", revolved around the doings of residents of the town of Mariposa, which was really his hometown of Orillia Ontario. When the Great Folk Music Scare of the 1960s spread north, and people decided to stage a folk festival in Orillia, they called it the Mariposa Festival, which runs annually to this day.


Entered at Thu Jul 26 00:46:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Easybeats

Not sure that "She's So Fine" works as a title Bill. I was thinking something like "I Don't Like Fridays" or "Robertson Cruiser"


Entered at Wed Jul 25 22:44:54 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Ah, an Easybeats fan! Anyway, what desert island discs and records do you think this chap would bring to the communal collection. "I Think We're Alone Now"? ""Message In A Bottle"? "Our House" (with two cats on the fire / life used to look so dire)?


Entered at Wed Jul 25 20:23:39 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Crying

Joan: I hope your not crying too hard. (I hate when that happens. Typos are embarrassing)


Entered at Wed Jul 25 19:14:24 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Should be Books

I just got a new keyboard and I'm frying to get used to it.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 19:12:15 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Boks

2 I would want are "To Kill A Mocking Bird" and "Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me"


Entered at Wed Jul 25 18:54:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If limited to one instead of eight, I like Brien's idea way the best. Lots of paper and pens, as it'll be more fun to write one *, except after many years of keyboarding my writing's shot away.

* Can't think of a title but it's about this guy who gets castaway by his shipmates, and is alone with a goat, until one Friday he finds a footprint, and meets a man, a native of the island.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 17:14:25 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Desert Island Books...

If limited to one, Arthur Conan Doyle, the complete sherlock holmes with annotations by W S Baring Gould... or, in a pinch, annotations by Leslie Klinger...


Entered at Wed Jul 25 15:55:21 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P reminds me

Back to the Accordion for a moment. One of the best accordion breaks in a rock song was on "Razor Face"; from Madman Across The Water; by Elton John. Jack Emblow on accordion.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 10:22:12 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Web: My link

Subject: Boere Musiek

Dunc,this one is for you.Some Boere Musiek.Despite apartheid and our dark history there is a definite link between this music and traditional Maskanda (Zulu folk).Somehow the Boere and the Zulus must have influenced each other,the rhythms and melodies are often quite similar.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 05:27:52 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Apparently Larry Hoppen of Orleans has died. Larry was a young guy. This really bites.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 05:13:39 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Garth aside, my favourite example of accordion in rock and roll is Johnny Allen's version of "Promised Land". I'm not doing well with details today, so stand by for corrections. Otherwise, Clifton Chenier's first couple of Arhoolie LPs are wonderful - and doubtless Band-influencing.


Entered at Wed Jul 25 00:19:53 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Drove him to the library? I thought researching it on the internet was Pete's style.

I'd say it was a provocative quote, rather than an attack on Springsteen. I knew little about Seeger till I dissed him in this very forum, and was sent researching his history. To Bruce, "Seeger" rang as positive (IWW, Woody Guthrie, Hollywood trials), whereas in the UK, ignorant of his political courage, and role as a mentor, we only saw the surface, and he seemed like a deranged boy scoutmaster with a fixed rictus grin forcing us to sing Kumbaya one more time. That's the mindset Pete was coming from.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 23:02:58 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks JQ. I will look into this.

Paul Simon took me into Los Lobos, Rockin Dopsie and Stimela all of whom I still play.

I got nowhere searching for Accordion Township Jive recordings at the time of Graceland's release.

I always hoped that Garth would do an accordion lead album with good backing musicians.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 23:00:12 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Umm, maybe Pete drove him to the library?


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:54:49 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, you know I love you, but Fiddle About was written by John Entwhistle.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:36:00 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'd say that the "Hillbilly on the Hudson" line is nothing more than a press-friendly quote. Muswell Hillbilly would be the English equivalent, I guess. Townshend frowns on songwriters writing about stuff they imagine? Well, might explain Uncle Ernie.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:16:10 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Box

Dunc - Flaco Jimenez and other players steeped in a Norteno style will play a lead accordion and, especially Flaco, moved easily into country & more rockin' stuff. See Ry Cooder's late 70's outfit and the Texas Tornedos. Lots of great clips of Flaco on YouTube of Flaco with those guys.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:09:42 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Pete Townsend and "hillbilly on the Hudson" music.

That was quite a statement from him. Did he think his recent take on "Corrina, Corrina" was anything more than but rootsy simplicity? Sophisticated pop music listeners can get on too high of a high horse and consider music that follows a blues or early rock and roll/rockabilly structure to be too easy, boring and repetitive. (see some of the opinions here about Mystery Train).

To give Pete his due, I think that the Who sometimes broke with those earlier strictures and produced some stuff that was mostly original. Like "My Generation" and "Substitute" which, back then, sorta broke out but were still very easy to like, and still rocked.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:09:23 CEST 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

More important than books, for me at least, would be the need of reams and reams of paper to write on and obviously the pens/pencils to go with it. Very few books I'd be willing to read again and again. And certainly not Shakespere...but that's me.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 22:08:04 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Bill M:I think the likeness is very good and I think I know the era it comes from.

Roger:I took Tinker, Taylor, Soldier, Spy on holiday making it the only book I've read three times. I'll think about my top eight.

John D:I love the accordion in music. Think how great it is on Graceland which took me into Rockin Dopsie. Also,Los Lobos, Gallacher and Lyle and of course Garth on BARK and I have him playing on the excellent Swedish band, The Willy Clay Band's album. In fact is there a book on the accordion in Rock music?


Entered at Tue Jul 24 21:26:12 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Finnegan's Wake

Lost forever on a desert island - maybe. Except for a few excerpts, I've never even tried. To give it a go would be a leap of faith, a nod to the literary elitists I think; particularly given that his wife described it as nothing but "chop suey". And I recall he didn't disagree with her!


Entered at Tue Jul 24 20:53:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Desert Island Books

Desert Island books? On the radio show you get The Complete Works of Shakespeare and The Bible. I hope the Shakespeare is in nice individual volumes, not one you have to read with a magnifying glass. I don’t want The Bible on my desert island, though one past participant in the show thought it would provide rolling papers for his luxury item. This is irresistible. I’ve done the records too many times … we did this before too.

On the show you have 8 records, so 8 books

The Deptford Trilogy (Robertson Davies), but if it’s out of stock at Desert Island Libraries, I’ll take The Cornish Trilogy instead.

The Magus: I would definitely have put it there in the 70s, but it’s such a long time since I read it … it could be a disappointment. I’ll risk it.

Catch 22 (I suspect that makes three of us, Roger)

Gravity’s Rainbow – Thomas Pynchon

The Lord of The Rings … I guess you have to take it, but there’s an awful lot you have to skip.

Ferney- James Long

The Sot-Weed Factor- John Barth

“William and ARP” by Richmal Crompton for the warm glow of nostalgia.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 19:46:18 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Sorry for a pessimistic post, JOHN D and BRIEN SZ

It is never too late to stop learning something new.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 18:36:55 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Thanks PSB for the correction. Link above to more detail on the Nick Lucas model.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 17:45:10 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Then there are the two songs by Elton John & Bernie Taupin: "Daniel" and "Levon".


Entered at Tue Jul 24 17:41:08 CEST 2012 from (72.78.45.190)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan's 66 acoustic

David, I'm shocked! :) Your posts are usually dead on. Dylan did not favor Martins at the time (1966). He'd been playing Gibsons for years, though sometimes Martins (probably borrowed) in the studio. In pictures of sessions for "Freewheelin'" and "The Times They Are A Changin'," he is playing a Martin D-28. But in concert at first he played the Gibson J-50 that's on the cover of his first album. Then sometime in 1963, he bought a Nick Lucas Gibson built in the early '30s. However it was extremely modified. The story is he put harps on in while it was in the case. No picture of the original Nick Lucas in Dylan's hands has ever surfaced. Anyway, the body was not sunburst but blondish like a Martin, it had a Martin pick guard and a Guild bridge. Dylan played this guitar from '63 through '66. It was reported damaged in Australia on the '66 tour though obviously it was repaired and played afterwards. It is the guitar Robbie is playing in the "Eat The Document" scene you mention. Dylan used this guitar on every album from "Another Side" through "Blonde On Blonde," and it's possible it's on the later tracks on "Times" like Restless Farewell. In the scene you mentioned, I always figured the Fender acoustic was Robbie's and they just switched guitars, but I don't know for sure. The Nick Lucas vanished after 1966, and it was then that Dylan started using Martins often alternating with Gibsons. The guitar on "John Wesley Harding" sounds like a Martin. He's pretty much gone back and forth between Martins and Gibsons ever since (occasionally using other guitar like Washburns and Yamahas. On the "Never Ending Tour," he has mostly alternated between Gibson J-45s and Martin D-28s, but always returned to using the J-45. While he hasn't touched on acoustic onstage in years, in the most recent photo of him playing an acoustic a couple of years ago, it was a J-45. More info in the link.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 17:36:36 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Roger: Thanks. I'll take Joyce Cary's "The Horse's Mouth" (and its trilogy partners "Herself Surprised" and "To Be a Pilgrim"), Mordecai Richler's "Solomon Gursky was Here" and Anthony Burgess's "The End of the World News". I'd be open to trading if our islands were in proximity and rescue wasn't forthcoming.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 17:13:54 CEST 2012 from (136.148.180.229)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The magus and desert islands

Funny thing taste isn't it. I'd count The Magus as a desert island book (gave up early on Daniel Martin). It would be in my bag with Huckleberry Finn,

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Catch 22

Couples

A Christmas Carol

Lord of the Rings

and lately - though I've only read it once, Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall.

Apart from the latter and Couples, all have mixed film attempts - but I liked The Magus....


Entered at Tue Jul 24 16:23:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Book of Daniel

I only read it once, Bill, and that was in the 70s. Unlike Welcome To Hard Times (aka Bad Man from Brodie) and Ragtime, no bells ring when I looked at it just now. But E.L. Doctorow is on my automatic buy list when I see a new one. Don't think I've read a bad one.

The Magus … the film was universally panned, but I liked it and would like to see it again. I liked the book too, and re-read it when he did a "revised version" incorporating new ideas he'd got while scripting the film.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 15:53:07 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: What Brien sez is good advice - it's never too late to start. But by the same token, keeping Peter V's and my experience with "Daniel Martin" in mind, a sign of maturity is knowing when to stop.

Sticking with John Fowles' books, I was younger and clearly immature when I read "The Magus" all the way through, waiting for something to happen, just like the protagonist - but it never does, not for the protagonist and not for the reader. At the time I kept on thinking, why does the guy keep letting himself get conned by the magus character?; but now I wonder, why did I keep letting myself get conned by the author into reading on? Was it all a good Fowles joke, or was it truly a bad Fowles book?

Peter V: I liked "Ragtime" a lot. Is "The Book of Daniel" worth a read?


Entered at Tue Jul 24 14:09:47 CEST 2012 from (24.44.101.8)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

John - it's never too late to do anything. In fact doing and learning new things is the best thing for your mind and body. I just started learning how to play guitar. About 6 weeks ago I got a Yamaha acoustic and have been practricing between 15 and 45 minutes a day, 4-6 days a week. I've embarked on concentrating on learning My Sweet Lord and Daughters by John Mayer. YOuTube is a great source for tutorials.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 07:25:04 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Years ago I remember discussing E.L. Doctorow's Welcome to Hard Times here. If you want to read a similar funny literary western, try The Sisters Brothers by Patrick Dewitt, set in Gold Rush California.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 07:18:22 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Book of Daniel is by E.L. Doctorow. I gave up on Daniel Martin too. I think the well ran dry for Fowles after three first rate books in a row.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 04:06:14 CEST 2012 from (184.66.96.46)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: John D, Joan, Jan and everybody else.

In the 8 or 9 years I've been coming on this site, I've learned more about Music than I ever could from any of the hundreds of books that I've read. Not to mention politics, wars, hockey, farming, how to fix a wood stove, home remedies, etc, etc. Thanks Jan for staying the course. Oh yeah. John D. The greatest rendition I've ever heard of Can't find my way Home and Wish you were here, was done on an Accordian. Cheers.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 03:38:22 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: Thanks - you're right. I wonder if that Fowles book mentions the biblical Book of Daniel, or if there is another book of that name by someone else? I couldn't stand that particular Fowles book in any case and gave up early on.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 03:30:28 CEST 2012 from (184.66.96.46)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: John D

Hey John. It's never too late. I took up the drums two years ago and can now play with just about any 8, 10, 12 bars blues number. This past May I got to play with the great bass player Russell Jackson at the Hornby Island Blues Camp and our groove and backbeat was just about perfect. (At least his was!) After the gig he told me I wasn't fancy, but in perfect time and that I had a lot of balls taking up the drums at 58. Go for it man. Try to get some lessons from Gary Kendall.


Entered at Tue Jul 24 01:25:17 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Confession. The Bass? The Accordion?

Well I will fess up. I always wanted to be the Bass player in a or The band. I have always been in awe of great bass players. Not playing the melody; but along with the drummer keeping the beat & the groove goin' on. I never learnt to play the bass; but I did play the Accordion in my youth. Also played in an all Accordion band in the 60's.

I have heard all of the jokes. It wasn't until Garth Hudson came along that I began to have pride in the instrument I once played. Then came the late John Cascella of John Mellencamps band. I appreciate Art Van Damme very much; but Garth and John did it for me. Listen to Rave On by Mellencamp on the Cocktail soundtrack; or Garth taking us through the land of Coca-Cola. Woooo. However I never learned to play the Bass. I guess there's still time


Entered at Mon Jul 23 22:55:58 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Fowles

Wouldn't that be 'Daniel Martin', Bill, or is it a different novel entirely?


Entered at Mon Jul 23 22:24:18 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Fantasy... fueled by desire

Joan: It is just because of posts like yours that I keep coming back to this site. I truly hope the people behind 'Bacon Fat' or whatever it will ultimately be called realize the vital importance of making this music available for the public as a record of the evolution of a remarkable group of musicians. Robbie and Garth are historically aware and even though the present is the time we live in, we can continue to learn from the past. The past counts big time for an effective present and a provocative future. I hope the powers that be recognize this. A good example is the Dylan 'Bootleg Series' wherein perspective continues to evolve even at this time of his career.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 21:26:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JH: Thanks for the assurance (and of course everything else).

Peter V: I have to confess that I never followed all that sacred-harp / shape-note stuff until I read Wilentz, who goes into it in considerable detail - without managing to mention our guys and their famous song! "The Sacred Harp" being passed from father unto son seems a lot more natural to me as a book than as an instrument. Maybe Robbie started out writing the song with Daniel and his book in mind, but found the Robert Johnson / Roy Buchanan train of thought to be a more productive. Novelist John Fowles went to some lengths in "Mantissa" and "The Maggot" to make the point that novels have a habit of following their own paths far away from the writer's original intention. Oddly enough, Fowles is also the author of "The Book of Daniel".


Entered at Mon Jul 23 21:26:46 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Link is to a review of the Dirt Farmer Band Ramble with guest Phil Lesh that took place over the weekend. There's a partial setlist at the end of the article. A rare live outing of Just Another Whistle Stop!

Thanks as ever, Jan.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 21:04:24 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: GB

This site and its guestbook will continue to be maintained. There'll even be updates and additions every now and then, like today (check link above). Don't expect any major changes or redesign, though. This is now an archive/museum that will be here as long as the server and our web master are operational and compatible.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 21:03:10 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I like the colours, but doesn't Dylan look more like a cross between the young John Lennon and the Highway-61 era Mike Bloomfield?

Speaking of non-realism and instrumentation, who is who on the cover of Big Pink, and is there a larger version with more characters? Presumably those shown are all from the Bengali Bauls (five guys) and the Hawks (four guys, unless Levon returned to the fold before the Bauls left town). Is the bassist with the feather supposed to be Robbie the Mohawk? Is the sitarist supposed to be a pothead? What's going on with the organist? Who is on drums? Or are the six intended to be Bob and the entire Band, with the elephant and the pot in the picture to say that with sufficient coaching by the Bauls, and a bit of fuel to wash away inhibitions, anyone can pick up the sitar?


Entered at Mon Jul 23 20:55:09 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Guestbook

I would be very upset if the guestbook just faded away. I don't post that much but read the new entries every morning. I have learned so much from all the incredibly knowledgeable people who post here. Thanks John D for confirming Jan's intent to keep this alive.

As young people become aware of The Band,,mostly through The Last Waltz, This site gets new blood..

Sad that we will probably never see the 8 disc set, but I think it was always a bit of fantasy fueled by desire.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 20:18:15 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Bob playing bass

Here is a painting of Bob playing bass by one of Scotland's leading surreal painters - a great Bob Dylan fan.

I feel lucky to own an etching by him which focuses on the faces of the audience when Bob went electric in Edinburgh.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 20:08:11 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: I sing the Fender body electric...

At the time he "went electric" Dylan was also photographed playing Fender Jazzmaster, XII (electric 12-string), and Jaguar models, in addition to the Jazz bass (see link). The photo of Dylan, cigarette in hand, with the Jaguar was also used on the cover of Sean Wilentz's "Dylan in America".


Entered at Mon Jul 23 20:00:14 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Elvis The Bassman

Apparently there's at least one recording where Elvis plays bass. "“You’re So Square (Baby, I Don’t Care)”".

Here's a recollection from George Klein:

"Klein said, “On 'Baby I Don't Care' , the Fender electric bass had just come out at that time and Bill Black was using the upright bass. In live concerts, you really couldn't hear the upright, they couldn't ‘mike it up’ well cause the sound systems in those days weren't very good. So it was really just for effect. When the Fender bass came out, it was electrified. And Elvis loved it because it'd be great in concert. It gave him a bass sound behind him. So when it first came out, Bill Black had to learn how to play it and he was having a little trouble. On the 'Jailhouse Rock' session when they got to 'Baby I Don't Care' and the intro that's on there, Bill couldn't get it down like Elvis wanted it. So Elvis played it. He recorded it and then he sang over it."

See link above for more info as well of a photo of Elvis with a bass. The Youtube link in the article doesn't work, but can be found with a search.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 19:17:41 CEST 2012 from (108.200.223.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Big Bobby's Bass

The first time I recall seeing Dylan with the bass was in the Bootleg Series Vol 1-3 photos.

I read somewhere that it was Harvey Brooks bass and the photos were taken as promo's during the Highway 61 sessions.

Interesting that Danko was a guitar player and then became the Hawk's bass player, and that Robbie first played bass with the Hawk's before becomming the Hawk's guitarist. Levon was a guitarist before becoming the Hawk's drummer (and occasionally played bass with the Band).

Bob started on piano, then played guitar, and eventually posed while holding a bass.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 19:11:36 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Where have you gone Joe Dimaggio and Leo Fender?

As Yankee fans know, George Steinbrenner & a group of investors bought the team from CBS in 1973 for the bargain price of $8.8 million.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:46:41 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: I'll bring over my Fender and play the IPO Blues...

CBS purchased Fender in early 1965 for $13 million. A year before they bought 80% of the New York Yankees for $11.2 million. Unfortunately, the quality of both enterprises declined under the new ownership. CBS sold Fender in 1985.

In business news last Friday, Fender Musical Instruments announced that they were suspending plans for an Initial Public Offering of stock shares citing "current market conditions and Europe's ongoing economic woes."

After the expiration of the duration of his not-compete clause, Leo Fender founded Music Man in 1975. Around that time Robbie began using Music Man amps, which can be seen onstage at TLW.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:36:44 CEST 2012 from (166.147.89.145)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: A Poseur

A glance into my photo file uncovered that I was one of those crappy players that posed to look like a real musician - although the pained, intense facial contortion was real - given I could only hold that position for a split-second.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:22:49 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

This is what the photo in the folio looked like.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:20:20 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Only a guess, but I think Dylan was playful/perverse enough to pose with an instrument he didn't play. I've never heard of him playing bass on anything.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 18:11:20 CEST 2012 from (166.147.89.144)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: I Wanna Be A Bassman Too

Pat B - Do you think those shots could have been more a matter of picking up the nearest prop for the photo?

I've noticed sometimes that when a guitar player poses with his instrument that he will assume a very difficult fingering pose.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 17:29:38 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But did he ever play bass on anything? I mean, he'd be able to, but I just wonder if he did. When The Beatles met Elvis, it seems Elvis was playing bass, and liked to at home. Again, no record ever on stage or on disc.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 17:27:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Pat. It's clear the artist used these to reference the guitar and fingers, but he's wearing the thinly striped jacket and has a Fender amp next to him., so she (I think it's she) created a new image. Hmm. Will look again.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 17:11:54 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Here are a few of the shots. Scroll through.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 17:09:57 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I have a "Fender Artists" folio from the Sixties that has Bob playing the bass. I've noticed a few other shots of him from the shoot which looks like it's in Columbia Studios in NY.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 16:44:46 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

What was the first name of this Peterson woman? Maybe Levon and Robbie's "Jemimah Surrender" is about the time Dylan tried to say thanks to an associate:

"Hey Jemimah, I have something for you." (He reaches down.)
"No, please Bob, I couldn't. Not here, not now."
"Not that. I'm just pulling out my Fender, as a gift."
"That's very sweet of you, Bob, but the answer's still no."
"You have to, after all you've done for me and the guys."
"No, no, no! I only play acoustics, and I don't like the colour of that one anyway."
"Jemimah! Surrender! I'm gonna give it to you!"


Entered at Mon Jul 23 16:41:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Those familiar with the 1966 tour film "Eat the Document" will recall the scene in the hotel where Dylan & Robbie are fooling around with a new song "On a Rainy Afternoon/I Can't Leave Her Behind". Dylan was playing a Fender King acoustic guitar, with the distinctively shaped peghead like that of the Stratocaster. This was not a guitar Dylan typically used onstage, as he favored Martins at the time. He probably just had a few of these acoustics on hand that Fender had given him and was just trying them out.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 16:17:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'll bring over my (sponsored) Fender

I think David has just hit on why no one noticed the Strat was gone in 1965 or took the trouble to get it back. It's obvious … Dylan would not have had to buy his guitar or amps then. I assume Fender would have rained instruments on him. Most musicians at that level get sponsored instruments if they want them. It's only the guys who are into the rare, antique or arcane who would buy them.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 16:08:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan with Jazz bass

That's three times in a week! A week ago on Saturday, I saw a great B&W drawing limited edition print of Dylan in 1965 clothes. I was about to buy it, but then noticed that the Fender amp was lovingly drawn, but that he was holding a bass, with fingers in a bass players finger style position (no pick). I tutted in annoyance, and said what a shame the artist hadn't researched it properly … it looked like a Strat with four strings and a PB bridge plate in fact, but I now realise it was meant to be a jazz bass.

I mentioned it elsewhere and someone pointed out that it was in fact based on a photo of Dylan with bass in the studio.

BUT I think it was proportioned too small for a bass in the drawing (or Dylan was too big!)


Entered at Mon Jul 23 15:44:36 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Playboy Strat

One of the first musicians to use a Fender Stratocaster was Eldin Shamblin, who played with Bob Wills' Texas Playboys. His 1954 Strat (serial #0569 with chicken-head selector knobs) was a demo model given to him personally by Leo Fender, and was one of the first to feature a custom color scheme. It is now on display in the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame (see link).

Peter: I wasn't inferring that the CBS purchase influenced Dylan's choice of guitars, but merely pointing out the connection and the publicity benefit. A photo of Dylan with a Jazz bass was used in Fender promotional material around that time and was he probably provided with all the Fender instruments & amps he needed when he went on tour with the Hawks.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 15:39:27 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

It seemed to me that traffic here was dwindling for quite some time before Levon's passing, though that sad event really took the air out of our tires. Sure didn't seem like the time to post a chirpy note about this or that bit of externalia. But, as has been pointed out, we still have Garth and Robbie, both active and both involved in or plotting future projects. A book from Robbie would be a wonderful thing, especially if he or his researchers seek out the old-time group-mates to check his own recollections of early events - e.g., Scott Cushnie, John Rutter, Peter Traynor, Pete Deremigis, Bruce Morshead, Norm Sherrat, Moe Prieur, Bruce Bruno, John Finley, David Clayton Thomas, Eugene Smith, Tommy Graham, Brian Massey ...


Entered at Mon Jul 23 14:41:20 CEST 2012 from (66.87.105.148)

Posted by:

hank schiff

Location: vienna va

Subject: sandra

Sandra long time see


Entered at Mon Jul 23 14:12:04 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Tony Leone remembers Levon.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 13:32:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Looks good. I like the name "The Dirt Farmer Band" which is a nice tie-in, but not like (say) The Glenn Miller Orchestra who are still being advertised on tour in Britain this August, a mere 67 years after their leader died.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 13:26:15 CEST 2012 from (208.120.38.3)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Again, nice to see -- Levon's band continues the concerts at his barn, with a series of dates now scheduled through August. (Includes Lucinda Williams on 8/11!)


Entered at Mon Jul 23 11:21:44 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Northwestcoaster. I don't know Ian Pearson, but the setting for the concert seems great.

One of the best concerts I saw was John Fogerty in a museum courtyard in Zurich - a great evening for guitars. I was on holiday and got the last couple of tickets.

I think the issue of The Hawks set won't happen. There would have to be a demand from Canada. And if the prices of the rock n'roll artistes' records are going down because of the lack of demand, what chance of a release? Or am I wrong?

I would be sorry to see the GB dwindle. I see it as my Melody Maker and I have learned a lot. Always played music, but I read about it more than ever now. Just finished 'Some People Are Crazy' the John Martyn biography, and am now beginning 'The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones'.

I thought a home for some of your articles, Peter, in Britain might be Kindle. I bought an article on John Martyn for a coupleof quid recently.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 10:13:25 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Do you really think Robbie will put out a real book? I thought you had to usually pry the truth out of that guy with a crow bar since he's so prone to secrecy and has such an imaginative memory. We'll get a story alright. Just that too. A Story. All ribbons and bows and pretty clean paper with a bunch of extras like tarot cards and cds of rarities and gloss paper and a box for your book with embossed writing on the front and a $250.00 price tag.


Entered at Mon Jul 23 08:03:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I was talking about lack of traffic and the need to keep things going. Few sites have daily traffic like this, and I feared a slow dissolution in that there is not a lot of Band news, but as mentioned, Robbie is talking about a book, Garth is playing and there was mention of a third Midnight Rambles set. Let's be optimistic.

But I assume that long promised 8 CD Hawks set is not going to happen. any news?


Entered at Mon Jul 23 06:43:14 CEST 2012 from (67.238.17.208)

Posted by:

Rosalind

Geez, I'll be sad to see the guestbook fold. I got a lot of good links from you guys here.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 22:29:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Little Boxes

Just heard "Little Boxes" … whistling with synth backing … on an O2 mobile phone advert. Not one you'd expect to be sold for advertising.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 19:58:40 CEST 2012 from (71.34.44.191)

Posted by:

Jerry

Hope this place doesn't die..Although I do my share of scrolling by subjects that do not intrest me the ones that catch my eye I learn something from. I've been peeking into this place for over 12 years now and it remains an interesting stop for me. I always wondered if the passing of more Band members would have an effect to the participation in here and that would seem to be the case. My thanks to Jan for creating this place and to many of the posters who keep it interesting to this day...


Entered at Sun Jul 22 17:53:29 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Delays in gb downloading

1.) Move to Scandinavia 2.) Use Linux. - I get the site in 0.1 seconds and gb in 1.3 seconds.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 17:14:49 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: gb

I see this gb as a Norwegian peace project, not a goddamn digital mini-China like Fakebook.


Entered at Sun Jul 22 11:35:06 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I've just read Peter's comment about the guestbook winding down. I'm sure that once Robbie's book surfaces there'll be plenty of material to keep us busy for a while (hopefully).


Entered at Sun Jul 22 04:22:10 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Yes,I have had the delay for quite some time.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 23:18:06 CEST 2012 from (90.184.123.228)

Posted by:

James

Location: Ioha
Web: My link

Hey this is an awesome site :) thanks for sharing those goldcoins ;) Check this piece of art out, Bob "the Master" Dylan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk3mAX5xdxo


Entered at Sat Jul 21 20:16:41 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: guitars

I've been finding the GB slow to load early morning recently, but not later.

I expect Pete Townsend saw the same Pete Seeger rendition of “Little Boxes” on Sunday Night at the London Paladium that I did. But that was about 1962. There’s a statute of limitations on grudges, surely? I mean I’ve decided to stop hating The Doors in 2017.

I agree, Todd. Buddy Holly is the template for the lead (white) singer with an electric guitar … a sunburst Strat too. If you wanted a picture of “electric guitar” for a picture dictionary, you’d illustrate a Strat, with a Precision Bass for bass guitar. They’re the “default guitars.” The R&B guys often had Gibsons or Epiphones … semi acoustics, so Buddy Holly is a good call for Dylan’s model. Also, as Bob wanted to shock, or at least have instant visual impact in playing electric, a solid body it had to be.

I was surprised to see that Hank B. Marvin is rated as having the first Strat in the UK … as late as 1958 … and popularizing Fiesta Red as the favourite in the early 60s. In Britain we had far less choice. Fender didn’t import the whole range. The price difference between a Tele and Strat was small in percentage terms too. If you’d gone into one of the four local music shops we used to haunt as teens, and said “I need a professional quality electric guitar.” All of them would have picked up a Strat and said, ‘Yes, sir. Fiesta red, sonic blue or sunburst?’

Also all the cheap British guitars like Watkins Rapiers tried hard to look like Strats … um, festival red, ice blue or sunshades, perhaps. I don’t recall many Teles. Andy Sommers played a 61 Tele, and it may be false memory, but I think that goes back to Zoot Money days, but it was an unusual choice. My peer group were all teenagers, so in salivating at guitars, it seemed to us then that three pickups had to be better than two. Also Fender always used the line that the Strat was a carefully researched “improvement” on the Tele then. I suspect that the economies of importing in those days meant that you imported your pricier guitars … transport costs were the same, so why focus on a less expensive model?

I suspect the USA had a lot more choice in guitars then (as in everything from breakfast cereal to cars). Often British musicians picked up more exotic American guitars (like Rickenbackers) on the German circuit. I guess they came in with the American forces in Germany.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 19:40:14 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Guestbook Updates

Sometimes the Guestbook doesn't update for several hours or more. I've been assuming it had to do with controlling the spam. Lately I've been wondering if it isn't my connection. Does everyone have the delay?


Entered at Sat Jul 21 19:24:54 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Tangled Up In Blue

"The only thing I knew how to do Was to keep on keepin’ on like a bird that flew Tangled up in blue" - Bob Dylan


Entered at Sat Jul 21 15:49:52 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce and The Seeger Sessions

John W, was that a recent quote from Old Pete? It's hard to understand why he would be talking about the Seeger Sessions now. Especially when Springsteen has just released one of his all time great records 'Wrecking Ball'. I loved the Seeger Session shows I saw. Also, The Seeger Session shows were more popular in Europe then in America so I don't know what Pete is talking about. Springsteen did a version of 'How Can A Poor Man' at the first New Orleans Jazz Festival after the hurricane that was as relevant as anything he has done in his career. I couldn't find that version on youtube but the one I linked is also great.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 08:10:58 CEST 2012 from (68.199.198.175)

Posted by:

John W.

Location: NYC

OK this might start a debate here, anybody seen Pete Townshend's remark regarding Bruce Springsteen specifically related to the Seeger Sessions? "when you look at other artists, as a Bruce Springsteen fan from the start, I want to hear him within the framework of what I believe to be great Bruce Springsteen. I don't want him playing that hillbilly music, all that he-haw on the Hudson River nonsense" To which one Springsteen fan snarkily commented "Has the book come out yet?" But seriously I wonder if Pete is still holding a grudge against Pete Seeger and that whole old rockers-vs.-folkies thing from the 60's? At any rate I don't mind him bashing the he-haw aspect, he's entitled to his opinion, but leave the Hudson River out of it!


Entered at Sat Jul 21 06:55:13 CEST 2012 from (108.204.14.241)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

I've fallen WAY behind on posting....here, there & everywhere.
Was really busy with work.....then was on vacation (where I generally observe a no computer rule), now busy again to get to all the work that didn't get done while I was away.

Haven't yet caught up on all the back posts, but I wonder if Dylan's choice of Stratocaster (aside from the 50-50 toss-up between Gibson & Fender) wasn't in some way influenced by the fact that Buddy Holly played a Strat. Ya never know.

Spent some time in Washington DC last week. One of the items that I enjoyed seeing at the Smithsonian was Dylan's leather jacket from 1965. Quite an assortment of artifacts down there...Lincoln's Top Hat from the night he was assassinated, Judy Garland's ruby slippers from the Wizard of Oz, and one of Tom Edison's first incandescent light bulbs.....something interesting around every corner.


Entered at Sat Jul 21 01:16:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No problem. Let's all keep on keeping on (in the words of Paul Simon).


Entered at Fri Jul 20 22:13:05 CEST 2012 from (58.104.11.205)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Apology to Peter V

Sorry if what I posted upset you Peter, it wasn't intended as a serious comment or an attempt to demean you or your contribution. Just a flippant response to your Fender story. You seem to be the main person keeping this excellent discussion board going. I would hate to think that a foolish comment on my part had hurt someone else's feelings. I will be more circumspect in what I write in future - obviously my attempts at humour don't come out well on the internet.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 21:42:15 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Not to mention Robbie and thee 'Oo via the latter's new Entwistle, Pino Palladino.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 21:22:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D, I love "The Band & Music 101" because there are so many links. I have a favourite playlist before drifting off to sleep which combines Garth Hudson, Weather Report, Gato Barbieri and Abdullah Ibrahim, Or you can link to Rick Danko, Lefty Frizell, Sam Cooke and Lionel Richie. Or Richard Manuel and Ray Charles and Van Morrison. Or Robbie Robertson and Manu Katche, The Blue Nile, Peter Gabriel and The Dawes. Or Levon and Bob Dylan and Muddy Waters. Isn't that the power of The Band?


Entered at Fri Jul 20 20:42:12 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Guest Book

I hope I'm not stealing Jan's thunder; but I asked about the future of the guesbook; after Levon's passing and Jan's visit to Woodstock. He informed me everything would remain the same. I have thought for some time it might be time to rename it. Like....The Band & Music 101. Half kidding; but 90% is not Band related. I don't mind that however; being a music geek.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 20:13:42 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Before I went off on holiday I was reading Sean Wilentz's excellent "Bob Dylan in America". And while I was on holiday, having finished the book I'd taken (adventures of Precious Ramotswe), I bought a falling-apart copy of "The Rolling Stone Interviews". I started with Dylan's, which has some interesting aspects for the Band fan. We have Bob saying (in '69 or '70) that he and the Band still get together to chat and compare songs, that there's nobody else that he can see touring with, and that they are in fact talking about touring together. Wouldn't it be nice to know which Band songs Dylan may have had a chance to listen to and comment on before they were completed and recorded, and of course which Dylan songs our guys got to vet?

And as admirable as Wilentz is in so many ways, one thing he fails to do is consider how Bob and Robbie's close relationship and common interests may have had a bearing on each other's music. Since Bob had a longstanding and deep interest in the US civil war, wouldn't Robbie have borrowed a few books from the Dylan bookshelves when preparing to write TNTDODD? Both of them were fascinated by carnivals, circuses and old minstrel shows. Bob was interested in cowboys, Robbie had to have been interested in 'Indians'. Robbie was open to learning about beat poetry, something that Bob know a lot about early on. Both of them worked with the other Indians, the Bengali Bauls (a couple of whom are in the Cowboys and Indians cover on "John Wesley Harding" and who are represented, along with some of our guys, in Dylan's cover-painting on Big Pink. Bob doesn't seem to have needed accolytes, so surely the ideas discussed in their many conversations between '65 and '70+ included some of Robbie's. But which, and where did they show up?


Entered at Fri Jul 20 19:09:15 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "Everything"

Peter V: "Everything dies, baby, that's a fact: And everything that dies someday comes back". There is always something to talk about and most of the time it is music-related. I agree that the posts seem to be dwindling and that maybe this is destined to 'die'. However, I for one would perceive this as a loss. I enjoy the input from the 'regulars' and I hope that this will continue. I have been here reading for a long time and for the most part it has been civil and often informative. Let's 'keep it up' for as long as we can. Keep the music coming.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 18:28:30 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Thanks for bringing this up Bill. Was out of town.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 17:41:06 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: More junk to scroll past

A blog entry...


Entered at Fri Jul 20 17:21:56 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NortWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Don't pick Peter V, Graham

VLADIMIR ILJITCH LENIN and MARTIN LUTHER wouldn't have called _me_ a working man.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 17:08:56 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Investing in GB / Peter V's recent "rock bottom" post

As a private investor I would put my money on Hoiberg's gb AT THIS VERY MOMENTUM (if it was in "bourse", that is :-)


Entered at Fri Jul 20 16:58:27 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: A fantastic Scottish violinist

DUNC, in this part of the world Medieval churches are arraging concerts with high value. Just saw a Scottish electric violin player (Ian Pearson, together with only 13 people). He played J.S. Bach and the bues and Bazilian samba LIVE all mixed LIVE with a Mac computer. WHAT A MIX!!! As a schoolboy band bassplayer I asked him how he could get the deep bass tones in playing J.S. Bach. He answered: "I only put on this button and it goes one or two octaves lower."

Sure! I had to practice for years.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 16:36:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

General guest book stuff. I guess in many ways we’re winding down, with Levon’s passing accelerating a natural process of entropy. However, a lot of us value this quirky community which has survived seventeen years.

I consciously try to keep the conversation going. Sometimes there’s not a lot to say, but I appreciate the banter and humour when we get going. Then a topic more worthy of serious discussion appears and more join in. It’ll be sad when it gets down to a couple of posts a day, then keels over, as one day it must.

I usually wake about an hour before the rest of the family, and often put something on my iPad at that time. I also make myself write at least some fiction every day, especially now I’m embroiled in a large factual project. That’s when you get the stories or weak efforts at humour here. That’s why I’m going to comment on Graham’s post that “I have too much free time on my hands.” There’s a scroll bar for posts you don’t like, and I’ll add that judgemental comments like that are exactly what stop people posting.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 16:13:57 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

UK … The Beatles LP series, then the Classic Albums LP series. The trouble was a tendency not to get to where posted but get purloined on the way because of details like the curve of the record sticking out of the sleeve. The rule used to be that no living person could share a stamp with the Queen, but The Beatles blew that (though they claimed they were honouring the sleeve art , not The Beatles). Then when they did the albums, they carefully chose ones with graphic covers, but forgot that's David Bowie standing by the stage door on Ziggy Stardust.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 16:09:13 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: postage included

Bob Dylan on a stamp from Gambia. Rory Gallagher on a stamp from Ireland. And there are others. Most are from USA and Canada, including, as you know, the RR Canada 2011 issue.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 16:03:01 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I knew you were kidding; I even got the stamp pun! You'll know the answer to this for sure: have countries other than Canada and the US issued stamps honouring popular musicians? (I'm not counting countries that may have honoured classical guys like Sibelius - sorry NwC.) Moving to numismatics, I suspect that even fewer countries have issued coins honouring musicians. I'm sure that Nero was on some Roman coins, but is the fiddle even a musical instrument?


Entered at Fri Jul 20 15:38:24 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Attempt at humour

Bill M: I never thought it was offensive. That was my rather weak attempt at humour. I'll stick to music and abandon comedy from here on in.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 15:03:11 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

JT: No offence intended.

John D: Was disappointed not to have seen you at Hugh's for Danny Brooks on Wednesday. A rare group show that reunited the lineup he left behind when he moved to Texas - Dennis Pinhorn on bass, Bucky Berger on drums and John King on guitar. All, including Danny, came loaded for bear. Very very powerful show! Opening act was Mitchell Wilson, apparently the son of Tom of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. (Colin Linden's brother was in the audience, but he lives nearby so that may have been a coincidence.) In any case, Mitchell sang mostly cover tunes, including something about the devil and the deep blue sea, something by Townes Van Zandt, the Band's arrangement of "Ain't No Cane" and "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down".


Entered at Fri Jul 20 10:54:53 CEST 2012 from (86.130.197.255)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Back from the annual holiday... in Italy this year. In Verona, you can still buy Big Pink and the Brown album.

Good Band related snippets in the Scottish press. Ruthie Foster, who I don't know, plays Perth Festival this year. She spent some time talking about how good a song 'It Makes No Difference' is and praising Rick's performance and has recorded the song on her new album,'Let It Burn'.

Another article in The Independent discussed Hendrix's album collection in light of an upcoming exhibition in London and there were Band albums in his collection before he passed away.

Michael Marra has a good song related to how you split up the record collection when a relationship breaks up.

It's a long time I've been posting now. I was thinking of Knocking Lost John.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 09:07:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: For the guitar fans

Link to the Hank Marvin Burns guitar … still on sale, too. I always thought the tuning heads spectacularly ugly, and they looked too thick and bulky compared to Fender equivalents.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 00:25:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fender bender

David, I would take the use of a Fender to be unconnected with CBS acquiring the company. I mean, most rock bands used a Fender or a Gibson. It's a toss up. I would have said Fender were well ahead in 1965 … certainly in the UK. The penchant for Les Pauls, SGs and 335s came a little later here. I thought it was a legacy of instrumental groups who were fond of matching Fenders, and that's where most people started out. I recall the shock when The Shadows took sponsorship from Burns and switched to matching Burns. I also wonder whether Dylan's choice of guitar would have been that significant to Fender's natural audience. I mean, those who were into Dylan circa 1965 would have been seeking acoustics. Dylan was never rated as an electric soloist. People likely to be in the market for electric guitars would have been more interested in what Robbie was using.

There is a story somewhere (Robbie?) about Robbie meeting Dylan before Forest Hills even and helping him to choose electric guitars.

The auto-correction nowadays is driving me mad … it changed Les Pauls to Less Pauls twice.


Entered at Fri Jul 20 00:13:50 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Stamp of approval

Bill M: Don't knock philately. Both it and the GB have the JT 'official stamp of approval'.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 22:50:30 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Graham: you mean there's a better hobby than the GB? Philately? - gets you nowhere.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 22:00:53 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Where The Guitar No So Gently Weeps Into That Good Night

Whatever Stratocaster Dylan actually played that evening at Newport, the mere fact that he appeared with any electric guitar was a significant event. That he chose that particular Fender model no doubt gave that company, which at the time had recently been acquired by CBS, the parent of Dylan's record label, a publicity boost.

While Dylan, the hipster rebel in a leather sport coat, strummed on his Strat at Newport, the guitar that made the most agressive statement that night was the Fender Telecaster in the hands of Mike Bloomfield (see link). On the surface, it was Dylan's Strat that became a symbol of defiance in the eyes of many die-hard folkies at Newport, but it was the biting-edge tones of Mr. Bloomfield's Tele that rang loudly in their ears, burning & raving at the close of that day. Shortly thereafter Dylan would embark on a world tour, where another young man with a Tele would add that edge to the thin wild mercury sound for many nights to come.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 21:34:59 CEST 2012 from (58.104.8.132)

Posted by:

Graham

Peter V: I think you need to get your self a good hobby. You have too much free time on your hands.

Serenity: Bobby Rydell, that is a name I haven't heard in a good many years. My sister used to be a fan in what must have been the early or mid sixties.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 21:04:49 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Next you'll be telling us that the bus driver was Johnny Johnson, who later shook down Chuck Berry for co-credit on (your!!) "Nadine". I think that these days some guys are even claiming credit for driving the songwriter to the library, so there's no telling who a driver like that might go after next.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 20:47:24 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bobby Rydell and Glen Campbell

Hope these 2 will be OK soon!! Wish them both well with your prayers..

60s singer Bobby Rydell gets double organ transplant, set to be released from Pa. hospital

PHILADELPHIA - Sixties teen idol Bobby Rydell has undergone a liver and kidney transplant in Philadelphia.

The 70-year-old singer of hits including "Wild One" and "Volare" had surgery last week. He tells KYW-AM (http://cbsloc.al/Oa0Brx ) that his doctor didn't expect him to live much longer without the double organ transplant.

Doctors at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital say they were able to use part of the donor liver to help Rydell and the other part to help a child.

Rydell says he now wants to help raise awareness about organ donation. He expects to be released from the hospital Wednesday.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Country legend Glen Campbell cancels Australia and NZ tour due to health concerns...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Country Music Hall of Fame performer Glen Campbell is cancelling his tour of Australia and New Zealand with Kenny Rogers next month for health reasons. A spokeswoman says Campbell is not up for "the very long flight that it would require." The 76-year-old is battling Alzheimer's disease.

It would have been Campbell's last international stop on his "Goodbye Tour."

Rogers is continuing the month-long tour, kicking off Aug. 10 in Christchurch, New Zealand. Australian country artists will fill in as special guests. Campbell was also scheduled to do a solo show in Brisbane, Australia. Campbell received the Recording Academy's Lifetime Achievement Award this year. He is known for dozens of hits such as "Gentle On My Mind," ''Wichita Lineman," and "Rhinestone Cowboy."

__+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

UNTIL NEXT TIME LOVE AND PEACE XOXOXXO


Entered at Thu Jul 19 18:29:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: That guitar

I can’t tell you how much it means to be supported by a man of the cloth, Dr Hargis. I assume this pilot “Petersen” is not related to your associate Bishop Pedersen by any chance? You know, the one who stamps the Doctor of Divinity certificates. I have one hanging on my wall.

Her Majesty informs me that Prince Philip will reply in what she calls “suitably nautical language.” I’m not sure what that means.

By the way the guitar had F-E-N-D-E-R on the head, not Nadine. Though she did have a small butterfly inscribed on her left buttock (not that I saw more than a photograph), a chain tattoed round her ankle and KISS ME QUICK on her forearm next to an anchor.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 17:32:36 CEST 2012 from (72.78.45.190)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: that guitar

I think there's no doubt the guitar is Dylan's guitar. Whether it's the "Newport" guitar is another story. Now if the plane belonged to Peter, Paul & Mary as Jon Taplin claims or if it belonged to Grossman or Dylan, then the guy stole it off the plane and should have left it there. The daughter claims he tried to contact Dylan. Well, what? One one call. They lived evidently in New Jersey. No part of New Jersey is all that far from NYC. Other than that, Dylan was seen playing a whole bunch of Fenders that year including a sunburst Strat much later in the fall.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 16:08:14 CEST 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

The Right Rev Dr Billy Sol Hargis, Esq.

Location: Law & Fertilizer Div of the Discount House of Worship

Subject: Nolo contendere

MR VINEY- You have a solid case and I can help. Send money (two or three hundred dollars) to my Del Rio, TX address.

Do you know if the Queen received my telegram RE: my lien on all of Dorset's natural resources?


Entered at Thu Jul 19 08:58:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I need a lawyer …

Peterson! Why didn’t some one tell me. I thought it was Patterson. Now it all comes back … 1964. I was on a no. 3 bus coming back home from Bournemouth town centre, and I was sitting next to this American guy. It was awkward because I had my new sunburst Stratocaster in a case and there wasn’t much room. I’d bought it with the hard-earned pennies from selling ice cream on the beach. I’d only had it six weeks, but had nearly mastered the beginning riff of “Walk Don’t Run.” I thought he was a bullshitter, boasting that he flew Chuck Berry and Bob Dylan. I asked where he flew Dylan, and he said for instance he’d be flying him to Newport the next year.

Newport, Isle of Wight? I asked. He laughed, ‘I can’t imagine Bob Dylan would ever play in the Isle of Wight,’ he said, ‘no, Newport Folk Festival in the USA.’

‘So why does Dylan need a plane, with only one acoustic guitar and a harmonica?’ I asked.

‘I’ve wondered that,’ he said.

‘You should tell him to get an electric guitar,’ I said, ‘Something like a Stratocaster.’ I patted the case.

Just then the bus slowed before a traffic light. I looked out of the window. To my horror, I saw my girlfriend, Nadine, right outside the window. She was walking into the pawnbroker’s shop and in her hand she was clutching my copy of The Rolling Stones #2.

I shouted to the driver, ‘Hey, conductor you must! Slow down I think I see her, please let me off this bus! Nadine! Honey, is that you?’

I leapt off the bus forgetting all about my guitar, and raced after her. The bus pulled away and I never saw that Stratocaster nor Nadine again. But I’d know it anywhere, as it had the letters F-E-N-D-E-R inscribed on the head. There can’t be many like that.

So … I need a lawyer. I think there are four aspects here. First the return of the guitar. Second, this Peterson obviously told Chuck Berry the story, so I want a share of the publishing on the song he then wrote. Third, is loss of earnings. The loss of my guitar so depressed me after all the work I’d put into learning Walk Don’t Run (beginning) that I never played again, and so lost the opportunity to join The Rolling Stones a few years later when Brian Jones got replaced. Lastly, there's a fee for my advice to Bob Dylan (via Mr Peterson) to go electric.


Entered at Thu Jul 19 01:50:08 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: The Who...

Can't keep a good band from performing..{Or what's left of them!!]

The lineup for the Who's upcoming tour includes Daltrey and Townshend backed by Zak Starkey (drums), Pino Palladino (bass), Simon Townshend (guitar/backing vocals) and Chris Stainton, Loren Gold and Frank Simes (keyboards).

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Jul 18 19:49:27 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: hey, I've got an idea!

Why doesn't Peterson pass it along to one of those Dinkytown people whose records the Bobster is said to have borrowed but not returned? Maybe that'd move him to check all his closets and storage lockers?


Entered at Wed Jul 18 19:01:25 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Happy b'day to Tony Leone.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 18:47:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: She Belongs To Me

John D: I think Ms. Peterson may have opened up a legal can of worms by going public with her find, forcing Dylan's lawyers to assert that the guitar & lyric sheets rightfully belong to their client. Rather than have to produce another one of Dylan's Strats for inspection, all they have to do is challenge her claim of ownership to the guitar her father "found".


Entered at Wed Jul 18 18:33:56 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think the guitar's Bob's, but given they seem to have made genuine efforts to contact him over the years, I reckon the fairest way is sell it and split the proceeds 50/50. Lyrics? Another matter. I would have thought they'd be useful artwork for his biography volume two. Years ago, my sister lost a purse with about £50 in, and someone brought it back, so she gave them £10 for their trouble. Seems fair.

On the other hand we found a wallet with £400 in it in the street, and took it to the police and never heard a thing again.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 18:08:06 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Strat

So. What do you think? Watched the show. Found out they are probably Bob's lyrics and guitar. There didn't seem to be an ending to the segment; unless Bob's lawyers don't want anything to do with it. The daughter says her dad tried to reach them; over the years; but no one would get back to him. Guitar could be worth up to a half million dollars? I think it would be simple enough to have Bob's people get back to her and wrap it up. I find waiting 40 years a little weird.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 16:28:35 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Mystery Strat

Fender was using alder wood for the Stratocaster bodies in 1964.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 15:30:35 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Andy Wilson and the Cosmos

Following up on my earlier note to poster Allen Mulhall, here is the song written and played on by his father back in '58, "Worry Worry" by Andy Wilson and the Cosmos. Wilson became chums with Ronnie Hawkins back in those days, and no doubt did his Little Richard thing as a guest artist on Hawkins' stage more than once. He subsequently became chums with our guys in his days as utility fielder with Larry Lee and the Leesure ca '61-'62.


Entered at Wed Jul 18 04:24:20 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: PBS tonight

I hope you guys watched the show I posted below? If not, the guitar this woman had of Bob Dylan's IS the real thing. They went through all the details leading up to it.From May 1964.. It was very interesting. THE BAND was mentioned also. Jonathan Taplan was on too. The manuscripts of his lyrics are worth $50,000..Said "no 2 guitars have the sames grain of wood".

Beatles' autographs worth 3-500,000.

Frank Zappa had his wife on. She explained how he wrote his songs.

Go to: pbs,org/historydetectives You may find out more there.

The segment on The Beatles and Frank Zappa were very interesting too.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 17 22:02:20 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: SORRY!!

That should be 9PM on PBS. xooxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 17 21:58:51 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: PBS/Bob Dylan,etc...

Just a reminder to watch PBS' "History Detective" tonight at 10PM. Sounds like a program on music. Bob Dylan's guitar, Beatles & Frank Zappa featured too.

CYA soon. xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 17 19:56:35 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Music and the neighbors

A few years ago, my sister in law was involved in Brazilian music. She arranged for a concert outdoors in Lincoln Centers Damrosch Park. It was a terrific Batucada (drum) group from Salvador.

As the concert wound down they walked out into the audience, and in Brazilian style had a lot of the audience following them. The parade went out onto tenth avenue and everyone was all set to March down 10th with the band leading the audience. Just as we got going the police came and broke it up. Curfew for those who live near the park.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 19:09:05 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bob Dylan

Follow up to BOB F's post:

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A new Bob Dylan studio album, "Tempest", will be released on September 11th to mark the 50th anniversary of the folk singer-songwriter's debut album, Columbia Records said on Tuesday.

The album will feature 10 new and original songs and is the 35th studio set from Dylan, whose last album in 2009, "Together Through Life," sold more than a million copies and debuted at No. 1 in both Britain and the United States.

The album comes during a period of critical acclaim and creativity for Dylan that has included four popular album releases, including "Time Out Of Mind" in 1997 that won a Grammy for album of the year and "Modern Times," released in 2006, earning Dylan two more Grammys.

The Minnesota-born Dylan, 71, this year received the Presidential Medal of Freedom and was awarded a special Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for his profound impact on popular music and American culture.

His first album, "Bob Dylan," which was released in March, 1962, initially did not sell well. His second album, "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan," released in 1963, established him as a poetic writer of protest songs and a raw, original new voice.

CYA soon


Entered at Tue Jul 17 19:02:24 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Jon Lord of Deep Purple dead at 71

Another musician has passed. RIP Jon Lord..

(CNN) -- Keyboard player Jon Lord, who fused classical and heavy metal to make Deep Purple one of the biggest rock bands in the world, died Monday after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 71.

Lord suffered a fatal pulmonary embolism, or a blockage of the lung artery, according to a statement posted on his website.

Born in Leicester, England, on June 9, 1941, Lord took classical music lessons as a child, and as a teen became enamored with the sound of the blues organ.

Later, he was among the first musicians to successfully and seamlessly blend the two influences using a Hammond C3 organ, distorting the sound, and routing it through amplifiers.

While best known for co-writing the Deep Purple hit, "Smoke on the Water," Lord never strayed far from his classical roots. The band's "Concerto for Group and Orchestra" in 1969 was one of its first chart successes.

Combining his dazzling virtuosity on the keyboard with the equally virtuosic Ritchie Blackmore on the guitar, the band left behind a string of rock classics that showcased their musicianship: "Space Truckin," "Highway Star," "Child in Time."

At its heyday in the 1970s, Deep Purple was as big as the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, selling more than 100 million albums.

"We're as valid as anything by Beethoven," Lord said in an interview with NME magazine in 1973.

He retired from the band in 2002, and spent the following years working on solo material and collaborating with others, including work last year on a single by the supergroup WhoCares, featuring Purple singer Ian Gillan, Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi, Iron Maiden drummer Nicko McBrain and former Metallica bassist Jason Newsted.

Last August, Lord posted a message to fans where he revealed he was fighting cancer and would be taking a break from performing.

"I shall of course be continuing to write music -- in my world it just has to be part of the therapy -- and I fully expect to be back in good shape next year," it said.

He canceled a July 6 show in Germany where he was scheduled to perform with the Hagen Philharmonic Orchestra, with his website attributing it to "a continuation of his regular treatment."

He died Monday at The London Clinic, surrounded by family members, the site said.

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 17 18:35:25 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Allen Mulhall: Good of you to check in. I spoke with your father in '94, and he gave me the lineups during his time with Hawkins. Bill Carter was the drummer. Keyboards was mostly Gord Fleming (with whom your father had been backing Terry Roberts at the Zanzibar prior to Hawkins hiring them both), and then Kenny Warren briefly.

This site lists just the guys who were in the Hawks at the same time as one or more of the five members of the Band - not all the guys (and gals) who, like your father, played in subsequent versions. The list as it stands is pretty good, though there are gaps - Jay Smith, David Clayton Thomas, Moe Prieur, Johnny Coy, Matt Lucas and likely others.

By the way, did he ever play you the Andy Wilson and the Cosmos 45? (He wrote the b-side.)


Entered at Tue Jul 17 17:07:07 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

The fund raising download tune "Drown In My Own Tears", made famous by Ray Charles, was written by Levon & The Band's old friend Henry Glover.

Link above to Deep Purple performing their hit cover of Joe South's "Hush" for Hugh Hefner & the bunnies on Playboy After Dark in 1968.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 13:33:09 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

Dlew191

Subject: The nimby brigade

Not in my backyard. Idiots buy in suburbs like Newtown (an inner city suburb with live music and restaurant in Sydney) or next to Luna Park, an amusement park which has been there since 1929 and whinge. Occasionally that complain to me. Move, I tell them. Apparently it's all right for me because I don't live there. Yes I say.. I choose to live elsewhere because it's much better to have these places. If you splash 1.5 million bucks on a place that isn't desirable after all, don't come crying to me. Idiots. Same with Hyde park.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 13:04:47 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: New Bob Dylan Record

New Bob Dylan record set for release on 9/11. If anyone is interested, Expecting Rain today has a couple of links to information about the record.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 09:17:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Springsteen / McCartney

The airwaves are still buzzing on Saturday's concert in Hyde Park where some jobsworth switched off the power on Bruce Springsteen who had been joined by Paul McCartney. They were in the middle of I Saw Her Standing There and had overrun the 10.30 curfew by ten minutes. As some fans pointed out, if they'd started on time rather than 30 minutes late in rock star style it wouldn't have happened. BUT the plug was pulled in the interests of "elf and safe tea" the British jobsworth mantra, and stopping such a mega event abruptly with 70,000 people milling around on the grass has to be exceedingly dangerous.

Yesterday every time I switched on the radio, people were phoning in about it. Any opinions? I repeat for the n'th time that theatre companies around the world … and vastly more elaborate productions with huge casts like Cirque du soleil … start exactly on time every night, six nights and two matinees a week.

But it's ludicrous to switch off … one phone-in guy pointed out that with today's technology they could have spoken directly to Springsteen through his earpiece and said "OK, ten minutes. No more.'

Local residents applaud the switch off, but my sympathy is limited. When my kids were young, we had constant trouble dropping them at school because neighbours to the school kept complaining about the cars, and we had an army of traffic wardens trying to ticket cars dopping off kids. I asked them to ticket me so I could go to court and test it … the Highway Code allows you to stop to set down or pick up passengers in a no parking area. They declined. All was explained one morning when a Police Inspector was seen delivering flowers to the house opposite the school gate and exclaiming "Happy birthday, mum!'

My point is that when you buy a house opposite a primary school gate, you do know that there will be heavy traffic at 9 pm and 3 pm on a daily basis, but it's only for around twenty minutes. The school was older than the houses. In this case, the people opposite (retired) tried to reverse their car out of the drive every afternoon at exactly school pick up time, then phoned the police to say it was difficult. And in these locations your house price reflects this minor inconvenience (in return you get totally silent neighbours at evenings and weekends). Same with a house facing Hyde Park, few of which will be the "only home" either. For the USA, compare apartments which have a view onto Central Park!


Entered at Tue Jul 17 08:52:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bap Kennedy

The Sailor's Revenge is still getting a lot of play … see my linked review of Bap's gig earlier this year, and also the comments below from people. I rate it with The Big Picture. Every Bap Kennedy album is essential.

My listening the last two or three weeks is sticking pretty close to Rumer though, plus Don't Stop Singing, where Thea Gilmore put music to Sandy Denny lyrics.

Last night we watched the Keira Knightley "Pride & Prejudice." I said, 'Hey! They've got Neil Young playing Mr Bennet!' Mrs V pointed out that it was Donald Sutherland (and added that Neil Young now looks older than Donald Sutherland). Easy mistake to make though.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 06:22:54 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The birth of a sound.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 06:21:25 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

I would have paid to see Babbitt, Lord, and Kitty Wells perform together.


Entered at Tue Jul 17 06:08:54 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bob Welch found dead in Nashville at age 65

Hi all! More sad news here. RIP, Bob Welch [a little old news, but I just came to see it],and Kitty Welles. Saw her live, and put on a great show. Her son Bobby was very good too..

Former Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Welch found dead in Nashville at age 65..

Founding member Bob Welch died in apparent suicide.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Bob Welch, a former member of Fleetwood Mac who went on to write songs and record several hits during a solo career, died Thursday of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said. He was 65.

Police spokesman Don Aaron said Welch's wife found him with a chest wound at their south Nashville home around 12:15 p.m.

Welch was a guitarist and vocalist for Fleetwood Mac from 1971 to 1974. He formed the British rock group Paris in 1976, and had hits including "Sentimental Lady" in 1977 and "Ebony Eyes" in 1978. Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham did backup vocals on "Sentimental Lady."

Aaron said Welch apparently had had health issues recently. He said a suicide note was left.

Fleetwood Mac's career took off in the mid-1970s after Welch left the band. "Dreams" was a No. 1 hit in 1977 and "Don't Stop" the same year. It later became the anthem for Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign. "Hold Me" was a hit in 1982 and "Little Lies" in 1987.

Welch, a native of Los Angeles, scored his biggest hit with "Sentimental Lady," which reached No. 8 on the Billboard chart. His other singles included "Precious Love" in 1979 and "Hot Love, Cold World" in 1978.

When Fleetwood Mac was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998, Welch was not included in the group. "It basically comes down to the fact that they don't like me anymore," he told The Plain Dealer of Cleveland at the time. "I guess they can do what they want. I could understand it if I had been a sideman for a year. But I was an integral part of that band ... I put more of myself into that band than anything else I've ever done."

Longtime Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks told The Associated Press that Welch's death hit her hard. "The death of Bob Welch is devastating ... I had many great times with him after Lindsey and I joined Fleetwood Mac. He was an amazing guitar player — he was funny, sweet — and he was smart. I am so very sorry for his family and for the family of Fleetwood Mac — so, so sad ..."

Founding member Mick Fleetwood did not immediately respond to emails for comment Thursday.

Fleetwood Mac, started in 1967 by two former members of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, became an enormously popular pop-oriented group in the late 1970s. Nicks' haunting vocals and Buckingham's distinctive guitar work helped propel the band's 1976 album "Rumours" to multiplatinum status.

Problems with alcohol and drugs, as well as well-publicized fights between band members, led to their breakup. Money and nostalgia helped bring the band back together, leading to successful reunion tours.

As a songwriter, Welch had his songs recorded by Kenny Rogers, Sammy Hagar, the Pointer Sisters and others. In 1999 he released a CD, "Bob Welch Looks at Bop," a salute to bebop music in the 1940s.

In an interview with The Tennessean in 2003, Welch said he never dreamed he'd be remembered for much.

"I just wanted to play guitar in a good band," he said. "I wanted to make the music I love. I wanted to travel the world and have adventures."

Welch also said "music is disposable now. It doesn't have the emotional impact anymore. That's sad."

He had lived in Nashville since the 1990s. Bart Herbison, executive director of the Nashville Songwriters Association, quoted his wife Wendy as saying Welch had spinal surgery three months ago and doctors told him he would not get better, and he did not want her to have to care for an invalid.

The couple had no children. Funeral arrangements were incomplete.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 17 05:15:50 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bap Kennedy - Sailor's Revenge

Peter V - Any thoughts on this one?


Entered at Tue Jul 17 01:00:35 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: shme about kitty wells. and bob babbitt

and to complete the trilogy, deep purple keyoardist Jon Lord died earlier todsy


Entered at Mon Jul 16 23:11:49 CEST 2012 from (172.130.111.8)

Posted by:

Allen Mulhall

Location: Toronto

Subject: Members of the Hawks

Back in 1965, at the same time that Jay Smith was singing with Ronnie, there was another vocalist named Bobby Ray (real name Brown), and Bill 'Wild Willie' Mulhall (my father) played tenor sax. There may have a fellow named Billy Carter on piano, but I'm not sure, as that was nearly 50 years ago and I was a wee lad of 7. I often see these omissions in listings of Hawks members.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 22:31:32 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Kitty Wells

More sad news -- country singer Kitty Wells passed away today in Nashville. Link above to Ms. Wells' cover version of "Forever Young".


Entered at Mon Jul 16 20:55:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

David P and others might enjoy the vintage and rare guitars shop in Bath, UK. Have a look at their site. The pale green 1961 Jazzmaster which says "enquire for prices" was in the window on Saturday. I may be wrong but I thought it was £2700 and something. Maybe I missed a zero. If not it could pay for your trip.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 20:37:33 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob Babbitt

Sad news about the death of Bob Babbitt today of brain cancer. The only other great bass man; within Motown; along with the legendary James Jamerson. I worked with the Funk Brothers once at Massey Hall. Mr. Babbitt was extraordinary.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:49:12 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Theme songs

For a Romney theme how about "Changes" because that's what he seems to do most


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:40:30 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Web: My link

The local female singer-songwriter photographed in our fishing village. Enjoy!


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:39:36 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Finders Keepers Losers Weepers is for kids. Doesn't work in the real world. If it is indeed his.....give it back!


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:30:05 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Time for a poll: Do any of you recall ever having an LP that you'd lent out returned to you? No, I thought not. (CDs don't count now that people can just burn and return.)


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:13:10 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Peter V wrote: the planet is on fire

You are wrong. (I happen to sit beside a person with a degree in physics.) There is not enough oxygen.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 19:06:28 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Mystery Strat

Even without a famous pedigree, a 1964 (pre-CBS) Stratocaster in good condition could easily fetch in the neighborhood of $20,000. One would imagine that a pilot or crew member would have no legal right to any items left on board a plane owned by their employer.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 18:48:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rolling Stones #2 with "14" sticker

Bill, I'm shocked to the core. 100% cretin is OK. I've been called worse. Tear stains (probably mine) are OK. But to think that I was once close to someone who would SCRAWL ON AN LP SLEEVE WITH A PEN is unthinkable. No, obviously the CD doesn't replace the vinyl original, but I'll have it anyway.

Interesting thought … the planet is on fire. Only one of those albums can be saved and transported to another galaxy. Which one? It's a choice between Dylan and Cochran, the Stones will have to fend for themselves … Eddie has Summertime Blues, C'mon Everybody, Somethin' Else AND Cut Across Shorty on that album. Four of the greatest rock songs of all time. On the other hand you get to save Eddie's pretty dire "Teresa' at the loss of Times They Are A-Changin. I suspect Bob would agree and grab the Cochran.

BTW, I only read it last week … Cut Across Shorty was planned to be the A-side, and Cochran's management announced the switch to the B-side, Three Steps To Heaven (also on there) while Eddie was in hospital dying … but not yet dead.


Entered at Mon Jul 16 18:11:19 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I lent someone my vinyl of RAH and never saw it again.

Stealin' is a good one.

"For The Love of Money"

"People Are Strange"


Entered at Mon Jul 16 17:08:23 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Stealin'

Peter, who cares? The whole generation is stealing music in the internet.

(BTW I wrote It Hurts Me Too.)


Entered at Mon Jul 16 17:06:05 CEST 2012 from (72.78.45.190)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: re: Stealin'

Peter,

Sometimes you have to follow the sheet music and if you were to find the sheet music for Self Portrait, it says adapted and arranged for "It Hurts Me Too."


Entered at Mon Jul 16 15:02:22 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I do recall seeing a Stones album of that description in a shop in London in the mid '80s. I don't recall the name of the person in question, but someone had scrawled, in a young woman's hand, "... is such a cretin. 100% true". Maybe it was yours? Tear-stained, if that's any consolation.

I am surprised, though, to learn that you see a cherished vinyl artifact as replaceable by a mere CD, however cleverly done. I will give you that tear-stains are no longer a problem with CDs; a single wipe and they're gone!


Entered at Mon Jul 16 09:48:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stealin'

Bob Dylan is a self-admitted album thief (from friends too) and is quite open in one of those early radio shows (now on CD) about taking tunes from other performers. This got as outrageous as claiming to have written It Hurts Me Too on Self Portrait. There is a degree of justification. Elmore James, often credited, certainly did not write it, and bluesologists argue over whether it was Big Bill Broonzy or Tampa Red. Whatever, it wasn’t Bob, and it was one of the more obvious ones.

Album thieves rankle with me, and Times They Are A-Changing, The Rolling Stones #2 and The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album are engraved on my heart and I can feel anger rising just typing that. All three disappeared with an ex-girlfriend in June 1966. I must have the date written down somewhere. Obviously I’ve bought them all again, twice even, but it took me years to find the Eddie Cochran one in good condition. It’s on a French CD in a cardboard facsimile sleeve too. The Cochran was the hardest to replace, though The Rolling Stones #2 in its British version has never been on an official CD, but you can recreate it from other albums.

BUT if I saw a copy of The Rolling Stones #2, vinyl first pressing with the Andrew Oldham rant about knocking a blind man on the head and stealing the money to buy it … which was removed after two weeks … I would look in detail. It’s rated at £130 mint, which is extraordinary. When I found one ten years ago, it was rated at £40 mint. Mine would be “excellent” when I last saw it. Anyway, my copy should have a little Woolworths sticker with “14” on the back. They came with Woolworth record racks and I have 13 and 15. So if I saw it on eBay, I would feel I had a claim. Though lots of people had Woolworth record racks, and there must be others with “14” stickers. I would feel it justified to claim it back.

That’s a long-winded way of saying, ‘Yes, it’s Bob’s guitar.’ The wood grain for provenance is a bit silly. His office would have insured their gear for transportation surely, and it used to be that all high value items (in 1965, that was probably “over $100”) had to have the serial number recorded. It went walkabout a year too early for European use, but in those days you had major hassle with guitars at customs in some countries, and bands were supposed to carry a manifest which had serial numbers on them. Belgium was especially weird about this, fearing import and sale. Somewhere there might be paperwork, but in the UK you only have to keep records for ten years, so stuff from pre-computer days probably got shredded.

Milt? “Money”


Entered at Mon Jul 16 08:12:27 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Songs in the Key of Mitt...

Taxman...


Entered at Mon Jul 16 06:33:17 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

In honor of Steve, I have to admit that watching a certain nominee for the US presidency this past week has been vastly entertaining. What should his campaign song be?


Entered at Mon Jul 16 04:33:37 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "Love and Theft"

Why do we buy bootlegs? Because we love the musicians? The Rock Bobster borrowed his album title from a book about the white minstrelsy singers who sang in blackface, supposedly because they had so much love for the African-American culture of the time. (I don't buy this but I happened to read it just yesterday in Sean Wilentz's fascinating Dylan book. More on this later,)


Entered at Mon Jul 16 04:15:55 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: all this reminds me of that original Beatles recording..

A few years back, one of the Quarrymen sold a tape of them singing to Paul McCArtney (McCartney, Lennon, Harrison and the other 2 or 3 pre-Sutcliffe Quarrymen were on it). Wwould you sell this to one of the other participants, though? (Maybe Paul offered to buy it... but still, I'd like to think I'd just pass it on to him... or at least let him copy it... or take a copy myself and pass it on...) Do rock stars forfeit ownership?


Entered at Sun Jul 15 18:16:24 CEST 2012 from (72.78.45.212)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Stratocaster silliness

David, Dylan bought a plane in I believe sometime in 1965. If my memory serves, I believe Izzy Young originally reported it in his (gossip) column Frets and Frails in Sing Out. While he doesn't always use it, apparently he has owned a plane ever since.

I just read a post from somebody apparently in the guitar business that said the claims about the grain are ridiculous because Fender would build several guitar bodies from the same piece of wood and that the real determining factor in guitar identification of Fenders is the serial number.


Entered at Sun Jul 15 16:13:17 CEST 2012 from (124.149.112.63)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: It's Dylan's guitar.

End of story. I don't think it was stolen. But to claim to have someone's property, when they haven't given it to you. The first thing Id do, should I end up with something like that is to get in touch with dylans people...


Entered at Sun Jul 15 13:04:19 CEST 2012 from (174.116.173.231)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ownership and what is right

We've been thinking about this guitar and manuscript issue. The focus has been on 'the law' but is that really the issue? Bob Dylan lost or misplaced his property at a point in time many years ago. Whether it was 'the guitar' is not the issue though it has relevance. Bob Dylan never gave away or sold his property. It was left behind. It exists and is in someone else's hands currently. The proper thing for that 'someone else' to do now is to return that property to its rightful owner. The owner has asked that it be returned. It should be returned. The PBS story has human interest and brings to the forefront a moral issue regarding 'do the right thing'. Does that exist in society today or are we as a western society abandoning our sense of 'right and wrong' in favour of avarice and greed. We are not naive. We understand the lure of the 'easy money' temptation especially when the potential for gain is so great. Like returning a painting that belonged to someone else before the second world war when one knows it belonged to that person, doing the right thing has its own reward.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 22:47:45 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: A lot of the legalities governing international air flights are unified under treaties, specifically the Warsaw Convention and various amendments.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 22:25:49 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

That would certainly be uncomfortable for the survivors.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 21:19:58 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: An old one …

A British plane is flying from France to Spain and crashes exactly on the border between the two. Where should the survivors be buried? Answers on the back of a beermat, please,


Entered at Fri Jul 13 21:14:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I suppose it all gets screwed up if the plane left US territorial limits during the flight? Does the US claim 3 miles or 12 miles? These tend to be the alternatives in Europe. So International Law would prevail. I guess it's unlikely it did, though planes flying up the east coast tend to stand offshore.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 19:54:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Ignatius: Since the premises involved was a plane, wouldn't the determining facts be dictated by whether the plane was specifically hired or actually owned by Dylan's management,. Groscourt?


Entered at Fri Jul 13 19:38:11 CEST 2012 from (199.233.179.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Mislaid Property

I am not a lawyer, but I have worked for them for a few decades. Wikipedia's weaknesses are well known, but this quote from its "Abandonement" entry suggests that common law rules about mislaid property should come into play.

Mislaid property

Property is generally deemed to have been mislaid or misplaced if it is found in a place where the true owner likely did intend to set it, but then simply forgot to pick it up again. For example, a wallet found in a shop lying on a counter near a cash register will likely be deemed misplaced rather than lost. Under common law principles, the finder of a misplaced object has a duty to turn it over to the owner of the premises, on the theory that the true owner is likely to return to that location to search for his misplaced item. If the true owner does not return within a reasonable time (which varies considerably depending on the circumstances), the property becomes that of the owner of the premises.[Citing McAvoy v. Medina, 93 Mass. (11 Allen) 548, (1866) which is really old state case law, but still sensible, and seems relevant to our present discussion.]


Entered at Fri Jul 13 19:28:31 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan's Strat

I would think that Dylan's Strat would be considered lost or mislaid, rather than abandoned, giving him a superior claim to the property. This claim might be strenghtened if the pilot was considered an employee of Dylan or his management at the time. Perhaps Ms. Peterson's best bet would be to try to negotiate a settlement to return the guitar to Dylan for a finder's fee. As Dylan, through his lawyers, has asserted ownership rights, any attempted sale to a third party would certainly result in costly litigation for Ms. Peterson. It's doubtful any auction house or guitar dealer would risk becoming involved in any sale.

In legal terms, spoliation generally refers to the destruction or alteration of evidence.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 15:18:53 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan's guitar

Facinating. Last year I was researching stuff on the Austrian WW1 artist Egon Schiele. They say many of his paintings are locked away because galleries fear to display them. Schiele's work is gaining in popularity (one went for $40 million last year), and during WW2, many paintings were looted by the Nazis, who liked the grotesque and erotic themes. Some that have been displayed have then been reclaimed by their rightful owners, or rather the relatives of the rightful owners, most of whom would have died in concentration camps. The one that set the art world on watch was 'Portrait of Wally' which got confiscated when the Leopold Museum in Vienna exhibited it in New York. That seems crystal clear. They were stolen. There is no limitation.

The Dylan guitars were "found" or were they? They knew full-well who the rightful owner was do the ancient "Finders Keepers" doesn't apply. It casts light on the absurd nature of collectability. I'd bet Dylan had more than one sunburst Strat for a tour and didn't know or care which one the roadie handed him on a particular night. I say that because they didn't notice some had gone. indicating that one was not an especially prized example.


Entered at Fri Jul 13 13:29:11 CEST 2012 from (174.116.173.231)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Subject: Internet 'law' regarding possession and ownership

Responding to my previous submission, LvdB found some internet sites which suggest 1) if someone is unlawfully deprived of possession, it is called 'spoliation'. 2) legal possession only occurs when a person INTENDS to transfer the property 3) the law says 'If the person who originally deprived the owner of their property, is no longer in possession of that property,(as in our now deceased pilot who obviously can not now possess this material), a court will not order a third party possessor (in this case, the daughter who likely was not even alive when the 'loss' occurred, since she is said to be 42 now) to return the property unless that third party (the daughter) was involved in the original spoliation (and for reasons given above, she likely was not involved).


Entered at Fri Jul 13 12:39:04 CEST 2012 from (174.116.173.231)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 3 guitars and a manuscript

The article in Rolling Stone (and other articles) on the issue of Dylan's Newport guitar raises the question of OWNERSHIP. The suggestion is that 3 guitars were left behind in an airplane and in a guitar case were manuscripts identified as early attempts at lyrics. Whether Dylan's camp returned calls from the pilot or not and whether the material sat in an attic or anywhere else or not, it sounds as if the current possessor of the guitar (s) and manuscripts acknowledges that these all at that time belonged to Bob Dylan. What law (and I am interested in what the law is) describes a change of absolute ownership of materials because someone left them somewhere and then they were found many years later. To my (admittedly legally untrained) view, these materials all STILL BELONG to Bob Dylan. He did not give them to the new holders of the materials. Does current holding of long lost materials suddenly somehow confer NEW OWNERSHIP? Maybe we can hear from someone who knows (legal).


Entered at Fri Jul 13 02:21:48 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan guitar..

Hi all. Nice to be here again. Good posts as usual, and the links are fantastic. Thanx sooo much for all..

My link to Bob Dylan's guitar. The show mentioned by PBS is "History Detectives" and will be seen; Tuesday, July 17th at 9PM EST. Should be worth a look-see.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Jul 13 00:23:55 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks. I don't know that he was on any records, but I'm pretty sure that Billy Mundi taped a number of episodes of "The Ian Tyson Show" in Toronto as a member of Great Speckled Bird. I believe he was also in Juke, a Woodstock group that included both Amos Garrett and his GSB replacement, David Wilcox.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 23:39:31 CEST 2012 from (99.132.232.12)

Posted by:

Adam

Perfect info, David P! Ben Keith also played with Levon, Rick, Garth and others at the Snack Benefit in 1975.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 16:21:09 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: You Better Watch It Ben, Some Day You're Gonna Run Out Of Gas

Both Ben Keith and Billy Mundi were living & working in Woodstock in the early '70s where they crossed paths with The Band. Both musicians appeared on Bobby Charles' eponymous 1972 album. After leaving the Mothers of Invention Mr. Mundi in 1970 played on Dylan's "New Morning" and John & Beverly Martyn's "Stormbringer" (also featuring Levon & John Simon). In 1972 he also played on Borderline's "Sweet Dreams and Quiet Desires", along with Richard & Garth. At the time, Mr. Mundi was also working with Geoff & Maria Muldaur and appeared on their 1972 record "Sweet Potatoes". Ben Keith was a member of the group Hungry Chuck, which evolved out of Ian & Sylvia Tyson's Great Speckled Bird band. Garth appeared on Hungry Chuck's self-titled 1972 Bearsville album. That same year Mr. Keith worked with Neil Young on his "Harvest" album and would become a member of Mr. Young's backup band known as the Stray Gators. A couple of years later Mr. Keith would cross paths with Levon & Rick playing on Mr. Young's "On The Beach" sessions.


Entered at Thu Jul 12 15:21:35 CEST 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Newport 65 Dylan guitar controversy; Interesting

The Newport 65 Dylan guitar controversy is of great interest to some. An expert on guitars describes his almost complete certainty that this is THE guitar. He looks at photos and analyzes the grain etc. to do this. Dylan's lawyer is said to have confirmed that Dylan has in his possession THAT PLAYED guitar. That there are lyrics in the case does NOT confirm that this is THE guitar in my view. Artists often travel with a number of guitars and if all these Stratocasters were made about the same time, would the grain etc not be similar or even identical? I am not certain that this is a resolvable issue unless there is something unique about the played guitar that can be confirmed. (Thanks to PSB for his input. I will follow this with interest. On TV PBS if you are interested - History Detectives season 10).


Entered at Thu Jul 12 14:38:32 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam: Thanks. Is that confirmed info or simply supposition? I'll have to dig out the email, but Mundi told me the songs he figured he was on. I've posted it before, and it may be where you got your list (in which cae it wouldn't be supposition).


Entered at Thu Jul 12 00:41:00 CEST 2012 from (99.132.232.12)

Posted by:

Adam

Bill - the late Ben Keith played steel guitar (with talkbox?) on The Promised Land. Billy Mundi played drums on Ain't Got No Home, The Promised Land, I'm Ready, and maybe others. I believe Mundi's role was to add percussion to The Band in the absence of Richard Manuel. I hear Levon on all the tracks, but Richard seems to be absent from a couple.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 19:32:45 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Whole lot of shakin' goin' on...

Having been one of the most famous survivors of the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Caruso might have brought back luck at TLW across town at Winterland.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 17:22:45 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Bill M / Peter V

Good laugh, Bill M, a good laugh :))))) (The thruth is that I understand less than "a pig understands of Northern Star" like old people used to say in my childhood.)

I have at least one thing in common with Peter V: we have been in Liverpool only once! These were the good news - the bad news are that grandson to the ugly rich guy from our fishing village was arrested for murder of his wife in London. The question from Old Testament remains: is this The God who is punishing 3rd and 4th generation? Has this ever been a relevant question to any rock historian?


Entered at Wed Jul 11 16:30:42 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: somewhere in heaven ...

"Hey Rick, nice toga."
"Ha. Nice harp, Beak."
"Holy shit, I mean, my my, what it that sound over there?"
"Oh, that's Freddy Mercury trying to teach Enrico Caruso the low parts of 'Bohemian Rhapsody'"
"Ach no! They'd work better together doing 'You've Lost That Loving Feeling'"
"You know, you're right - I'm in!"
"Me too. I'll go get Lee."


Entered at Wed Jul 11 16:22:33 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Louis Prima & the other Angelina

The soundtrack for Martin Scorsese's "Casino", produced by Robbie, included two great medleys performed by Louis Prima & the Witnesses--"Angelina/Zooma Zooma" and "Basin Street Blues/When It's Sleepy Time Down South".

"I eat antipasta twice just because she is so nice
Angelina, Angelina
The waitress at the pizzeria"


Entered at Wed Jul 11 15:52:04 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's a link to the best Louis Prima song that I've heard. I have it on the Rhino Blues Masters comp, "Volume 11: More Jump Blues", certainly one of the very best CDs I own. There's a great song by LaVern Baker, "Voodoo Voodoo", which I think moves us a bit closer to our guys, in that Richard's remake of her version of "Saved" is for me the centrepiece of "Moondog Matinee", which I've been listening to in the car for a few weeks.

On the subject of "Moondog Matinee", doesn't that long instrumental sequence (principally Garth and Robbie) that's tacked onto the end of "Mystery Train" sound as much like Kraftwerk's "Autobahn" as is imaginable given the players? Every time I listen to the album I think it's Garth and Robbie who shine - brilliantly on much of it. Does anybody know what it was that Bill (or was it Ben?) Keith contributed? Maybe bass on some songs, to go with his GSB group-mate Billy Mundi on the several songs that don't seem - to my ears - to involve Levon at all?

Bonk: Thanks for adding that personal vignette re Cherry Beach. The Canary closed a few years ago, but there was a story in the paper recently about the name being revived. I didn't read the article, but had the sense that the name will live on in that of the new neighbourhood that's replacing the old factories and warehouses.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 15:47:49 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Rambling On

Nice to see: Phil Lesh will be joining Levon's band for a Woodstock Ramble on July 21st.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 13:53:49 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friendo

Prima was alive.

Caruso might be performing with Rick,Levon, and Richard now, but I think it would be challenging.


Entered at Wed Jul 11 13:16:45 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Great Caruso

Had they the technology then, I'm sure they could have resurrected him for the evening. : )


Entered at Wed Jul 11 12:39:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought Enrico Caruso was a missed guest at TLW, but what with being dead and all, I guess it was hard :-)


Entered at Wed Jul 11 04:52:43 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Who really should have been at the Last Waltz

Louis Fucking Prima. As a matter of fact,The Band could have made a whole record with him. This guy could have kicked the Hollywoood right out of RR. Ate Neil Diamond's sequins for breakfast., Listen to this- "Louis Prima “Angelina / Zooma Zooma” from Capitol Collectors Series (CAPITOL 1991" one time and you'll agree, Prima and The Band was a match made in heaven. I heard this today in the car, and wondered why I never thought of this before. Musically, and personality or energy wise, it was a perfect match.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 19:13:15 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Wah-Wah JRR, RR & The Roots

As mentioned here before, Robbie's appearance last year on the Jimmy Fallon show, performing with The Roots and Robert Randolph, was quite good. Roots guitarist Cap'n Kirk and Mr. Randolph added some fine harmony vocals (link above).


Entered at Tue Jul 10 18:08:03 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe RR sings much better in more intimate surroundings. Shake This Town on Letterman is markedly better than this "new" one. In fact, I think when the Band started playing in bigger places (1973-76), they lost some of the magic.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 16:52:30 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Happy b'day to Mavis.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 14:45:37 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Robbie/Garth

Just a quick thought.With Richard,Rick,and Levon all too soon gone,I feel a particular sense of protectiveness and love for Robbie and Garth.They are cherished people.They are all that remains of The Band.They are what remains of some of the most profound and spiritual music ever created.May god bless them and grant them many more years of good life,health and inner peace and happiness.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 14:45:22 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTUll Fan

Thanks Ray. Glad to share a birthday with TWO cool people now!


Entered at Tue Jul 10 13:21:08 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Tue Jul 10 13:09:39 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Oooops! I forgot that "The Weight" was also performed as well in previous post.

Happy Belated birthday to Ray's son and the Doors' biggest fan. ;-D


Entered at Tue Jul 10 12:25:17 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I also previously posted "Go Back To Your Woods" and "What About Now" .


Entered at Tue Jul 10 12:19:19 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.136)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey there Pat B. I previously did post Robbie's "Shake This Town" but it was from Daily Motion as well as others found here.....such as a short but informative interview from CBC. I usually dig his singing but not here. Maybe he was still smoking at this time?

Thanks to Carol Caffin's site for acknowledging Robbie's 69th birthday. I found out this year that a former boyfriend had passed at 50 and the friend who introduced me to Pentii Glan's sister passed at 52....We also lost at least two posters here in their 50's......

Birthdays are special......I gave all of my students a card and a birthday balloon this year. I ran into a former student who was very challenging to say the least. I thought I'd better just keep walking but no....He crossed the street and walked with me to the subway. Out of the blue he told me that he still had the birthday card I gave him four years ago......I was shocked to say the least......He told me that he rarely received any cards. His mother also was difficult.....She tore into me one day because I gave my students a Kid Help Phone sticker so that if ever they needed to talk to someone about abuse, neglect......There would be help for them. In some ways I will miss being with the kidzzz this year off from work.....At our spring concert they sang a native lullaby in English and Iroquois. Robbie is always there somehow....


Entered at Tue Jul 10 11:51:51 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.154)

Posted by:

Graham

I really don't understand why Robbie feels the need to try and sing. He should just hire a good vocalist (of which there are many in the world) and let his guitar do the singing for him.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 11:49:05 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Great to see Robbie live.Hopefully there's more from that concert.

Did the Lost Waltz contain unused footage from the Movie or is it just the video feed? (Which is actually quite enjoyable). I loved seeing Robbie playing a Les Paul on Acardian Driftwood.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 09:41:11 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sevilla 1991

I taped this one off air when it was broadcast by the BBC in 1992. What a great band Robbie put together … Manu Katche on drums, Tony Levin on bass, Ivan Neville on keys, Bruce Hornsby on piano. There are four songs in fact. Sevilla shows that Robbie should have taken this show on the road.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 04:36:44 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I can't believe BEG didn't find this first.


Entered at Tue Jul 10 03:28:41 CEST 2012 from (184.66.96.46)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Cherry Beach Express!

It was the real deal! Only the boys in blue would say Yep. We took him for a ride along Commissioner Street and "tuned him up" Never got tuned up but a few of us had our winter boots taken from us and made to walk a couple of miles, in the middle of winter in sock feet, to the Canary Restaurant where our boots would be waiting for our frost bitten feet. Our crime. We were smoking cigarettes at 14. Ah, the old days.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 23:24:24 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: buffalo taxi / big yellow taxi / Cherry Beach express

A few weeks ago Nux and I posted back and forth about the Bandishness of a couple of Bob Marley classics, after which I noted the political oddness of Marley's "Buffalo Soldier" - which seems to credit the original 'buffalo soldiers' with fighting the good fight as opposed to fighting the oppressed on behalf of the oppressors.

As something of a follow-up to that, I'm here to say that I picked up a reggae-flavoured song by veteran Vancouver Island musician Monte Nordstrom, "Buffalo Taxi". A new term to me - and one that Monte may have picked up in Jamaica, which the liner notes say he'd visited - meaning 'police car'. The guy in the song gets taken away in one, just like Joni's old man in "Big Yellow Taxi", which also can mean 'police car'. And that reminded me of another police-car song, "Cherry Beach Express" by the Pukka Orchestra, a terrific band of the early and mid-'80s. Cherry Beach was where the Toronto police would take men and women that they'd decided to work over in decades past (we like to think); surely a concept that our guys would have been very well aware of during their days on Yonge Street. (The link is to an article about the song, which can be found on Youtube.)


Entered at Mon Jul 9 19:43:32 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Beach Boys 50 for 50

The Beach Boys' 50th anniversary tour hit Phoenix Saturday night where they went through a 50-song set list! The concert was filmed for an upcoming PBS fall special, no doubt to be aired during pledge week.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 19:29:26 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Last Waltz

Yes Pat that is the one I have . I also have the one done straight from the monitor/ It's kind of cool to have the color interspersed. I got this a circuitous route. I contacted a Japanese company and got a reply from someone in France saying he has it for $60. I was very wary,, so I asked how he got involved He said a friend in Japan passed along my request. He would take a check.. I figured the worst that could happen would be to lose $60 To my delight 3 discs arrived in about a week and one half. I get emails all the time from him with recent offerings. I don't usually deal in bootlegs, but there is no other way to get something... I bought my legit version of TLW in the store like everyone else.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 15:10:18 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Japanese Waltz

I am lucky enough to own the complete lost waltz from Japan.It is magnificent to have! Shot from very different angles and sound is real,mistakes and all.Best of all,there is plenty of Garth and Richatd to see and hear.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 13:44:11 CEST 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties
Web: My link

Subject: Last Waltz video

The entire show, in the raw, is available for your viewing pleasure over on Bill Grahm's wolfgangsvault.com.

We unhooked our computer display wire, then simply plugged that wire into the plug on our widescreen tv, and watched it on our own big screen.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 12:38:39 CEST 2012 from (58.104.1.9)

Posted by:

Graham

There seems to be a place in Japan selling the DVD under discussion. Putting aside the ethics of buying bootleg stuff, I would be a bit concerned about giving my credit card details to this kind of place although it looks legitimate.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 05:34:49 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

This might be what Joan is referencing. It was available as a download once upon a time.


Entered at Mon Jul 9 02:01:15 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joan

Wow Joan. Your a very fortunate person. Great way to look at the event.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 18:32:27 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: The Last Waltz

I have a version where someone spliced the parts of the monitor camera with the actual film so you see and hear the concert as it really happened It's pretty neat.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 16:45:19 CEST 2012 from (69.119.30.114)

Posted by:

Ray G

Subject: Birthdays...

Hey, JTull Fan - I was flipping through the GB and what do you know... my son shares the same birthday as you and RR, he is a July 5th baby too!


Entered at Sun Jul 8 13:09:26 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Time limits for espresso drinking

At the autostrada grill that would seem to be the norm--roughly 5 minutes. On the other hand if you're an Italian civil servant the de rigueur coffee break is around an hour, or an hour and a half depending on how busy things are back at the office : (


Entered at Sun Jul 8 12:06:50 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Express espresso

Ten minutes was too long, as Fred points out. Maybe five. The reason the British for years thought espresso was spelled "expresso" as in the Cliff Richard movie "Expresso Bongo" was the sped of consumption. Italian autostrada style is buy ticket. Hand to person behind bar. Get a tiny espresso. Stand. Drink it immediately, not waiting a second for it to cool. Back to car with a somewhat livelier step than you had going in.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 12:02:01 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Actually I overdid my ignorance (the reverse of my normal habit) I know northern England fine east of the Pennines, but for some reason life rarely took me west of them.

Birmingham bands: who can forget The Rockin' Berries? Plus it was Joe Boyd (I think) who said The Move, just before they were famous, were the best live band he'd ever seen. Since reading that, I keep finding other music business luminaries saying the same thing.

On a musical note, the link takes you to Randy Newman, in 2011, singing about the OTHER Birmingham.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 11:52:33 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Birmingham can't be all that bad, it is the birthplace of The Beat after all (or The English Beat depending on which side of the Atlantic one is standing on).


Entered at Sun Jul 8 11:49:06 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Only 10 minutes for coffee. tsk tsk tsk. : )


Entered at Sun Jul 8 10:24:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Birmingham Bull Ring

For those who don't know Birmingham, The Bull Ring is a shopping mall. I like to think that the decision to remove the 1960s concrete monstrosity and replace it with the current architecturally exciting building in 2003 is down to me. For thirty years, town planners gazed at their beloved roundabout, forever despoiled by my unfortunate vomiting incident. In spite of applications of bleach and disinfectant, the memory, if not the smell lingered, resulting in the demolition.

About five years ago I returned to Birmingham to give a talk at a conference, and was afflicted with one of the worst food poisoning incidents of my life. I blamed the seafood buffet at Jury's Hotel, but to be fair, my grandkids had had a similar attack the day before, so perhaps I imported the problem from Poole, as I had 42 years earlier from Stoke-on-Trent. Then two years later I had to attend the same conference, and thought I would find time at last to review the stunning architecture of the new Bull Ring. I was busy all day, but Mrs V kindly offered to brave the Bull Ring and explore the shopping area thoroughly for me. She reported it was quite safe, though she did have arm strain as a result of the large number of bags she was carrying by the end.

I contented myself with stopping at an excellent secondhand vinyl store on the way out (I still didn't have the courage to stay overnight, in spite of Mrs V's assurances that she had seen not one local vomiting).

I realised yesterday how little I know England north of Stratford-on-Avon. I've been on a lightning business trip to Italy, and had a two hour drive yesterday (after all it was only 260 kilometres) with an Italian. We discussed football obviously, and also where we had been in each other's countries. I realised I've only been in Liverpool once (liked it) and Manchester once (loathed it), yet I've been to Bologna about five times, and Rome and Milan more. You may ask why 260 kilometres took us a whole two hours, but we lost ten minutes when we stopped for coffee.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 06:08:56 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Someone has synced the audio from the remastered 4 disc set to the Wolfgang's Vault footage for RMR.

Jtull, I take your word and thanks. I have to say, Mike Love has been pretty cheesy his whole career--ugh, that white robe he wore in the early 70's was insane. I am surprised that Brian had bad things to say about Bruce Johnston, then again Bruce said some off field stuff about Brian. Brian certainly thought highly enough of him to make him part of the BB at a particularly creative time.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 05:39:12 CEST 2012 from (58.104.6.176)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Joe J

The whole Last Waltz can be viewed over at Wolfgang's Vault in case you didn't know.


Entered at Sun Jul 8 04:03:51 CEST 2012 from (71.62.78.178)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Mike Love

Pat, it's possible Mike Love just wants to give his version of the Beach Boys Band some paid work to keep them together for whenever Brian returns inevitably to his solo career. That's the benign excuse. In reality, having seen the 50th reunion tour and Brian's SMiLE tour, as well as the late 80's/early 90's lineup with Carl instead of Brian, I came away with the feeling that this current tour is really Brian, his band, + the surviving Beach Boys members along for the ride. That is of course why it is as good as it is. When the members were introduced, Brian received more applause from the audience than the others combined. I sat there wondering how Mike Love was taking this. Taking in Brian's pre-reunion statements how he didn't want to do it, didn't like Bruce Johnston etc, I think he was posturing to do it his way, fully in control. This includes the new album, which he produced, did not include songs written by and recorded by Johnston and Jardine, and limited Love's writing contributions as well. This is all for the better and a return to his pre-1967 role in the band. It's a triumph for Brian and I'm thrilled by that. But Mike Love must have heartburn!


Entered at Sun Jul 8 01:05:07 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joe j

Great, great clip! It would be nice and I think profitable if Scorcese put out another edition of the film with all these B&W and outtake clips. Anytime I can see Richard on drums it's a treat. Levon loved the manner in which Richard played. Amy has that going for her as well.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 23:23:52 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Last Waltz

Odd clip from Last Waltz. 'Rag Mama Rag' with Garth on piano, Rick on fiddle and Richard on drums.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 16:10:59 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Pirate Radio

I worked; with three former Pirates. Alan Slaight was Program Director there for a time. Keith Hampshire & Errol Bruce; who came back to Toronto; after there time there. Keith tells me "Pirate Radio" was nothing like the real thing.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 14:25:43 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Filling up "Välimuisti" with crab; on a serious side

To webmaster: It happens that I write a few lines without posting it at all. You complained for years ago that you had a lot of job in cleaning "välimuisti" (sorry, a Finnish term) in your server from crab. Is it better to post _something_ (like MERRY CHRISTMAS PETER V!) rather than leave any unfinished text in this box? - "Think before you type" is not an option.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 12:16:46 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: The Pits

Subject: Poor old Brum...

It's really too much... Al breaks his heart in Dudley (pronounced Dudlai) and Birmingham gets the blame; Peter vomits over our world heritage city centre and expects to be forgiven after only 42 years have passed.

1. These midlanders have got long memories;

2. Dudley is in the Black Country - may as well be in space to discriminating souls;

3. We've got the best auditorium in the UK - Symphony Hall

Meat pies all round...


Entered at Sat Jul 7 11:42:27 CEST 2012 from (87.30.240.41)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Pirate radio / the boat that rocked

One of several little wrong points. The D J s kept the 45s in the original paper company sleeves.it looked colorful, but didn't every radio station keep them in plain stiff card sleeves with plastic liners? That's how all the ex radio station stuff turns up here. Someone has to note this niggling stuff.


Entered at Sat Jul 7 02:07:47 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Mike Love has evidently pissed everyone off by booking his version of the Beach Boys in August.


Entered at Fri Jul 6 16:59:49 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Thanks for remembering I share a birthday with Robbie, BEG! I celebrated by taking my wife and kids to the Beach Boys at Virginia Beach. The show was incredible. I've seen the late 80's and early 90's version of the group, and Brian's SMiLE tour. This show combined the best (mostly from Brian and his band) of both. 50 songs, deep cuts to go along with the expected hits, and a great performance. Mike Love and his kitsch were well under control fortunately. It was essentially a Brian Wilson show with the rest of the remaining Beach Boys on supporting vocals. David Marks was a welcome addition (or return).


Entered at Fri Jul 6 16:26:05 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: RR

If my memory serves me well, I believe has has an uncle Robert who lives in Kingston ON. First name may be wrong; but I know his Father's (Robertson) brother lives in Kingston.


Entered at Fri Jul 6 00:53:52 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.47)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Fri Jul 6 00:54:07 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: North America

On the planet earth. Eh. Thanks, Mike. I needed a good laugh.


Entered at Fri Jul 6 00:15:21 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Sandy Konikoff's on "Motel Shot".


Entered at Thu Jul 5 22:41:09 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: JRR

Wasn't it Robbie's son Sebastian who clarified that his father's true middle name is Royal, not Robert?


Entered at Thu Jul 5 22:17:18 CEST 2012 from (70.53.115.22)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Toronto, Ontario, Canada. That's in North America somewhere, right?


Entered at Thu Jul 5 18:30:24 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Simon & Simon & Garfunkel

In addition to his "production assistance" on Simon & Garfunkel's "Bookends", John Simon also helped out on some unusual instruments. He played the powerful synthesized bass lines on "Save the Life of My Child". Inventor Bob Moog brought one of his large, early model Moog synthesizers to the session and helped set it up. John Simon also played toy piano on "Punky's Dilemma".


Entered at Thu Jul 5 15:30:24 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: JRR

Robbie Robertson was born Jaime Robert Klegerman in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on July 5, 1943. I cannot find much about those early years in Toronto. A biography written by Robbie would be welcomed. I don't know how much he remembers about those most early years. If I had to write about my first 8 years on the planet, I would have to rely upon what others have told me and some old photos that confirm where I was at any one time. Some tell me that they remember precisely and personally about their childhood even back to the earliest years. For artists, like Robbie Robertson, their personal memories and how they relate to their development towards their art is of great interest to those who admire their work. Such stories may seem trivial to the writer, but to those reading, they are relevant. Robbie Robertson was a performer relatively early on in his career. Like Dylan, about whom we have learned, biographic information from the performer (and friends who remember and were there in those early years) helps shape an understanding of how one of the great contemporary musicians evolved. I hope this can be delivered soon.


Entered at Thu Jul 5 13:31:42 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.103)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Real emotional guitar player
Obviously talented and gifted musician
Band original member
Birthday today!
Intelligent
Excellent storyteller and songwriter

Happy Birthday also to J Tull Fan, Back With Wit in Tenn and I think Peter V this week?


Entered at Thu Jul 5 11:06:37 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: RICHARD HASLOP REVIEW

DELANEY & BONNIE & FRIENDS On Tour With Eric Clapton By Richard Haslop

Displaying a degree of musical insight that has largely been lacking almost ever since, Eric Clapton apparently said, on first hearing The Band, that this was the group he really wanted to play with. Unfortunately the guitarist’s job was already taken, by the guy who wrote the songs, so the artist quite recently known as God, as he figured out a way to get all this blues stuff coursing through his fingers under control, continued up what was looking increasingly like a self-indulgent blind alley. Trading in Cream for Blind Faith didn’t help, except that it was a Blind Faith tour that introduced him to a support band recommended by George Harrison that he found he much preferred to his own, and with whom he started to sit in on stage.

American blue-eyed soul couple Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett, he a gruff country boy from Mississippi, she the first white member of Ike & Tina Turner’s wailing, testifying Ikettes, were in the throes of releasing their second album together, Accept No Substitute, when Clapton came calling. Soon Blind Faith was no more and Clapton was, albeit briefly, a fully paid up member of Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, on a good night one of the most searingly soulful aggregations rock had ever heard.

Replacing drummer Jim Keltner with then possibly even more renowned sessioneer, future matricide Jim Gordon, and adding a trio of rather famous English guitarists in Clapton, Harrison and Traffic’s Dave Mason to the gang, the group set out on a weeklong English tour in early December 1969 that culminated with two performances at Fairfield Hall in Croydon. As the resulting live album – released a few months later with Bob Dylan’s booted feet, photographed in 1966, sticking out of the window of his manager Albert Grossman’s car on the cover, and helpfully titled Delaney & Bonnie & Friends On Tour With Eric Clapton – demonstrates, they tore, to borrow a term from the lexicon of Parliamentary funk, the roof off the sucker. They probably peeled the paint from the walls as well, and pinned the audience to the back of its seats to boot.

This is one of rock’s great live records. Delaney & Bonnie’s studio releases have moments of high quality and even brilliance, with the loose and laid back acoustic Motel Shot – where the Friends include Duane Allman, Joe Cocker, John Hartford, Clarence White and Gram Parsons – arguably the pick, but the sheer unrestrained energy generated by On Tour simply buries them. It’s no surprise, on this evidence, that Bonnie, whose singing is orientated in soul rather than blues, was once considered a threat to Janis Joplin’s crown, while Delaney’s gritty downhome drawl is a superb harmonic foil. The band, with Jim Price and Bobby Keys blasting away on horns, is astonishing, the distinguished guitarists assuming the roles of hired hands, give or take a lick here or a biting fill over there, as if born to them. Although his name doesn’t appear on the original sleeve, it seems that Harrison, who did part of the tour, was on stage at Croydon, in his L’Angelo Misterioso disguise. It’s a measure of the musical democracy at work that it’s not obvious.

This particular version of Delaney & Bonnie & Friends couldn’t last, of course. By the end of the year there was a new D&B record out, along with solo albums by Clapton, Mason and Harrison that all featured the couple, or their band, or both, and Clapton had taken the core Friends, turned them into Derek & the Dominos and released Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs, a career peak that he surely never again attained as he gradually shook off the trappings of deity and turned into the patron saint of tastefully pleasant, well-meaning musical tepidity.



Entered at Thu Jul 5 00:01:28 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Here the movie was called Pirate Radio. The ending was lame but quite enjoyable none the less.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 22:39:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Caroline … No

Pirate Radio (like Radio Caroline) got squeezed out in autumn 67 when it was made illegal to sell them food or fuel. The BBC reorganised, employed all the pirate DJs, and called it Radio One. See :The Boat That Rocked" (but switch off before the last 15 minutes which are crap).


Entered at Wed Jul 4 21:42:18 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan, and you guys

Hi all!! PC out for awhile. Not a virus, just something I was doing wrong.

So nice to see all the great links, and posts. Thanx to all of you.....

Have a Happy 4th holiday all you wonderful Americans.

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Jul 4 20:27:28 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Band in to 60s here and there

We over here on this side of the Atlantic take a lot for granted. It is a reminder that the west is not homogeneous and that especially in the 60s, there was a difference. Communication technology has certainly changed that. We had radio stations over here that delivered the goods early on and often and with the FM advent, what was not Top 40 rotation became the norm by the later 60s. I thought you did get pirate radio from the offshore over on that side of the ocean and that those stations kept you current?


Entered at Wed Jul 4 19:36:10 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I sympathize, Al. Birmingham was a particularly unsuccessful city for me too. Spectacularly so. The Bull Ring? Just the word unmans me. Still, I had my own back after a motorway meat pie somewhere near Stoke at 3 a.m, (we used to call them afterbirth pies) I had to brake hard, stop, and puke comprehensively on the Bull Ring roundabout. Apologies to Roger … they'll have cleaned it up by now. It was forty two years ago.

I remember hearing Time To Kill followed immediately by Whistle Stop while sitting in a deck chair, middle of Saturday afternoon BEFORE Stage fright came out. It would have been Radio One. who would the DJ have been?

Terry Wogan used to play Rag Mama Rag a lot, surprisingly.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 19:18:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Band and Splendid Isolation

Couldn't let all this reflection and reminiscing on what we all know was simply the ultimate of all groups without me digging out those little snatches from years back of just how totally insular my own Band devotion was and just how hard I really did try to spread the word.

Incidentally, it might help with these reminiscences if our more - shall we say - 'fortunate' Canadian/American friends could appreciate the background to any singular Band devotion within the UK back in the sixties. Just how desolate it really was in those early days. I mean we Brits could not simply hop into Bruce Springsteen's Cadillac and whizz up to the Catskills at the drop of a hat to watch Garth preening his mighty organ. No sirree!

THE WATERLOO CONNECTION

Basically as far as I'm aware only one national British dj - Waterloo's own Kenny Everett [that's the Liverpool Waterloo btw :-0)] - ever played a song by the Band.

Other than that - a big fat Zilch.

"Rockin Chair" and "When you Awake" were the two songs in question played one momentous Saturday morning on Kenny's show as I lay soaking in the bath blissfully unaware of what was about to unfurl.

'Christ, The Band on the radio!!!!'

Overcome with the sheer exhilaration of the moment, I splashed about like a demented frog. I went bonkers and completely lost it. Certainly the last I remember of my faithful rubber duck was it flying south searching out calmer waters of Old Virginny.

SEVENTEEN AND IN LOVE?

I recall my first really serious relationship. The sheer physical and emotional intensity of it all. All that fevered moaning and groaning. No not what you're thinking. Merely her reaction as I'd take Big Pink out of its sleeve [if you'll pardon the expression] and stick it on the dansette for the umpteenth time that particular night. She was into Tom Jones at the time and could never really handle my unbridled enthusiasm for what she termed hillbillies.

Seem to remember we were once kissing and petting so passionately to the strains of Richard crooning - "...life seems so little to give" - wafting across the darkened room. Needless to say I broke off to ponder what Richard meant. She, meanwhile, went home. Maybe, on reflection that's what Richard did mean.

THE VICTORIA HOTEL, WATERLOO

In the ale house 1969. 'The Vic' where I'd heard the boys for the very first time on its life affirming juke box. That night the Juke box was bust. Groans from the patrons. Bright idea. Dash home and get my trusty dansette replete with both Band albums. All of a quivvvver as the anticipation of capturing an entire pubful of potential Band converts zings through my system.

Yes!! Too good to be true. I'm like some manic Jesuit encountering a tribe of manic headhunters. Missionary zeal I think they term it. Mission Impossible more like.

Ever wondered what's the quickest way to empty a Liverpool pub at nine o'clock at night?

Stick on 'Tears of Rage' at full blast and, man, just watch those headhunters disappear like they've just spotted 'Predator'.

"Er, we'll, er see yer tomorrow night Alan lad"

"But fellas, what about Kingdom Come?"

"Another friggin dirge like that last one pal and you'll be entering it tonight!"

Maybe I should have started with something a little lighter.

Lonesome Suzie, perhaps?

ME AND KATHERINE ROSS

That same year. Dudley College in Birmingham. Doing my Dustin Hoffman Graduate bit with the nearest I was ever to get to Katherine Ross. The lovely Marian from Consett, County Durham.

She had ditched me by letter that day and come hell or high water I was going to woo her back. Train to Dudley. Bus to her college. Stopped her in her tracks outside her dormitory. Into the Student's Union. It was going well. She was warming to my heartfelt pleas; seeking reassurances -

"...and you promise - no more of that blessed Band stuff?"

Sharp intake of breath - fingers, toes and small intestines crossed - "Yeah, I promise". The cock crows thrice [Thank God I never knew about Daniel and his Harp by then otherwise I might have disappeared without trace like a whippoorwill]

Just then, the juke box blares out. "When I get offa this mountAIN...".

Well, I'm up like a shot, arent I? Across to the juke box to embrace the guy who's just put it on. It was a beautiful communion. I mean, what else can a fella do in such circumstances? I guess so much desperation and isolation make you that way. So that was it. Bye bye Miss Katherine Ross.

Up Cripple Creek without a paddle!

"I'll try and intercept you at the church, Marian. Promise!"


Entered at Wed Jul 4 18:34:21 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Ontario, Canada

Subject: HAPPY 4th to ALL Americans...

FREEDOM IS NOT FREE

I watched the flag go by one day.

It fluttered in the breeze.

A young Marine saluted it, and then

He stood at ease.

I looked at him in uniform

So young, so tall, so proud,

With hair cut square and eyes alert,

He'd stand out in any crowd.

I thought of how many men like him

Had fallen through the years.

How many died on foreign soil?

How many mothers' tears?

How many pilots' planes shot down?

How many died at sea?

How many foxholes were soldiers' graves?

No, freedom is not free!

I heard the sound of "Taps" one night,

When everything was still.

I listened to the bugler play

And felt a sudden chill.

I wondered just how many times

That "Taps" had meant "Amen."

When a flag had draped a coffin

Of a brother or a friend.

I thought of all the children,

Of the mothers and the wives,

Of fathers, sons and husbands

With interrupted lives.

I thought about a graveyard

At the bottom of the sea

Of unmarked graves in Arlington.

No, freedom is not free!

KELLY STRONG

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Luvya all xoxoxo



Entered at Wed Jul 4 17:40:06 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.46)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Few photos of Garth and Deadman

Deadman with Garth Hudson: After playing A Tribute To The Band. Hats by Texas Hatters.

"Thanking Garth Hudson for the opportunity to play with him, for a great rehearsal and for all the music over the years. It was an honor to play with "The Master"."


Entered at Wed Jul 4 17:17:38 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.46)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garth and Maud Photos

Last Bird Home Sessions Levon Helms' Studio - Woodstock, NY Chris Castle & the Womack Family...


Entered at Wed Jul 4 17:06:00 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.46)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

GARTH HUDSON - LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

By Rock Solid Images (Tommy Alcatraz)

Taken at Wolf Performance Hall, Central Library

Hi John D. Uhhhh....We must have seen two different shows. LOL We left early as we didn't really like their show. Although I liked some songs but when I saw imagezulu in agony....He's as dramatic as I am....He said it was the worst show I took him to. I have to admit his journey into jazz didn't work...His other bandmates weren't impressive at all. "Even Doctor John was a bit better." He did like Betty Lavette and Roy Hargrove's shows. The other shows he really enjoyed in past years were reggae artists such as Toots and The Maytals and Third World. I would have liked to have seen Joan Osborne (saw her at a Tribute for Dylan's "Blood On The Tracks" with Ollabelle and Buddy Cage and many others in NYC with Crabby) again but I was out of town for the long weekend. We are going to see Donna The Buffalo in Rochester, New York next month. At least at this show I don't have to worry if he'll like the show or not. Hey Bashful Bill.....Rochester isn't too far from Syracuse.....

Ignatius: I totally agree with you...The Weber Brothers are an amazing live band. Even imagezulu digs them. Some of my friends and I would follow them around when they'd play Toronto. They'd always dedicate a song to me. I always loved when they'd rock out on "Don't Do It" and Sam would sing a song for me that I liked by BB King??? I would looooove to see them again!


Entered at Wed Jul 4 15:36:00 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Knocked Out

The albums which knocked me out over time (196os and 70s): Highway 61 Revisited: Blonde on Blonde: Revolver: Music From Big Pink: The Band (Brown Album);first Leonard Cohen; first Led Zeppelin album; Aja;Low: I saw Simon and Garfunkel at Massey Hall on one of their first tours but they never hit me hard at first. More like polite applause and 'That was a very enjoyable show'. I learned to appreciate them more long after and when I now listen to Paul Simon's work in sequence, it is truly impressive. I do think there is some great music being made now from 'indie' sources (I use that term cautiously). Listen to The National and Shins and a few others... early Dandy Warhols ( ... from urban Bohemia) ...this is not 'reality show singers' but creative songwriting.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 13:49:41 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I guess I was too young to totally appreciate it at the time it was released. Yet of all their songs, it built over time and is probably my favourite of theirs. It just takes things to a new and higher level. Most importantly, to my taste, it satisfies.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 12:28:56 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bookends

I'd totally forgotten the John Simon link! And Beverly Martyn was news to me … Stormbringer … Levon Helm on drums. There are more links than you think. I always thought "Fakin' It" one of their very best songs, and also wonder why Paul Simon never does it live … the tailor's shop bit, probably, but you could just skip it.

The other I loved at the time, which always gets ignored is "Save The Life Of My Child" æ that never gets done either.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 11:41:13 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

And the link of course is that "Bookends" was produced by John Simon. There is an oldies stream that plays where I work and I am happy to say that "Faking It" gets played once in a while. The female voice in the middle was Beverly Martyn, as one time I posed the question on John Simon's site.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 09:24:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bookends

The one I forgot in my highly-subjective appraisal of late 60s Brit listening was Bookends. That's out-of-place. The musicians group loved it. I had it with me one night while I was working on the summer shows … that would have been Tom Jones, I think. I knew the band - all top session guys working for the summer, and all four or five years older than my peer group of musicians. They borrowed my copy, and went straight out the next day and bought copies for themselves. Now none of these guys were Simon & Garfunkel's natural constituency. Bookends was hugely admired by pro-musicians, and being released in the UK just before BIg Pink, may have opened countrified doors to guys who wouldn't have normally listened to this sort of thing.

I can't think of any similarity really, except brilliant arrangements and lyrics. BUT the Next of Kin picture on Big Pink. All those early Robbie interviews castigating West Coast bands as unable to play. All that stuff in Rolling Stone about being interested in old people and old ways.

Old friends

Sat on their park bench like bookends …

How terribly strange to be seventy …

Was "Bookends" John the Baptist to Music From Big Pink?


Entered at Wed Jul 4 08:45:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Totally unscientific

Dlew started me thinking about who listened to The Band in my restricted British social circles late 68 to 71, and what else those people listened to.

My oldest and closest friends were starting out as musicians. Favourite listening would be Traffic, The Beatles, Chicago, Hendrix, Blossom Toes, The Band. Then the Zappa of Hot Rats, but NOT the Mothers of Invention. All highly proficient bands. Not much if any Dylan - The Band, but not Bob.Both Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane were dismissed as rubbish, and when they appeared in the Uk, they went and that confirmed their opinion.

My closest social circle at university were I guess "hippies" and they got me interested in Jefferson Airplane, later Byrds, Steve Miller Band, Mothers of Invention, The Grateful Dead, Velvet Underground. They liked Dylan and The Rolling Stones, which I did already. . They liked The Doors too, but there we parted company. Some liked The Band already. I introduced the others to The Band. The band were generally played and well liked by this group.

Then there were people I shared student accommodation with. A lot of scientists. They found The Moody Blues deeply meaningful and Pink Floyd. Some liked Brit Blues bands like early Fleetwood Mac. The Band were of no interest. Interestingly the hippie group and the musician group both loathed the Moody Blues and thought Pink Floyd fake, and both silly lyrically.

Then there were my fellow students of English and American Studies. Dylan, Beatles, Band, Beach Boys, in fact my top list too.

Then there were the girls I did drama with or who shared accommodation with my then girlfriend. Still heavily into soul as I was, plus folky stuff. Incredible String Band, early Leonard Cohen, Dylan, Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Joni. The dumber ones added Cat Stevens, or rather the younger ones. They would tolerate The Band, but I don't think many bought copies.

Just one view from a restricted point. But the hippie UK lot did like The Band and included them in their musical programming, as did all those keen on proficient musicianship.


Entered at Wed Jul 4 06:08:18 CEST 2012 from (58.165.8.152)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The BAnd and Psychedelia

The Band were, in a sense, a psychedelic band or at least had similarities to bands like The Dead, or the Jefferson Airplane (or Chocolate Overcoat... (obligatory TLW reference)). The musicologist, John Kovach, writes of a hippie aesthetic, which pervaded the music scene of hte 1960s, through to the mid 70s: the idea that music was crafted: although the acts were after money, the main focus was on a high level of instrumentality, quality songs, good recordings, et cetera. With the immense sales of 'Frampton Comes Alive', 'Rumours', record companies started being bought by companies who were more interested in the bottom line than the quality of the product. The Band fitted into this 'hippie aesthetic', which was very much a driving force of psychedelia as well. (And yes, I know, the band weren't hippies either...)

The big mistake with this type of analysis is that it denies the large quantity of great music that appeared (as well as the large amount of dross that appeared before, as well). Of course, this is a bit more 'despite' than 'because' of the new regime. It also led to punk...

I'll shut up now....


Entered at Tue Jul 3 23:44:25 CEST 2012 from (58.104.12.248)

Posted by:

Graham

When it comes to Christmas songs in the rock idiom I think the one John Lennon wrote is one of the best. Actually I was just listening to the Beatles and it got me to a thinking. The thing I don't like about the contemporary music scene is how music has been so thoroughly commercialised and is just treated as a commodity. I like a bit of rebellion with my rock music and all this stuff about people accepting awards and putting out Christmas albums just gives me the creeps. I think this is one reason why I have had reservations about someone like Bruce Springstein. Normally I would like that kind of music but he always struck me as an 'establishment' type of guy. From the point of view of music, it is a pity the anti-Wall street protests didn't gain more support and turn in to a broader social movement that generated its own music. I guess the young folk are too busy listening to the winner of the most recent singing competition on their i-pods to care about what happens in the world.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 22:38:27 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Subject: Happy 4th of July!

Video from 07/04/89 of Levon performing "Cripple Creek" live.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 19:39:32 CEST 2012 from (74.176.227.81)

Posted by:

Mike C

Web: My link

Joan - thanks for the 100 riffs link. Reminds me of the kind of thing Bill Kirchen has been doing with "Hot Rod Lincoln" for many years.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 19:11:20 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P.Andy Griffith

Andy Girffith, a true American icon, passed away this morning in North Carolina on the eve of Independence Day.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 19:09:58 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Xmas songs

I would have to put Christmas Must Be Tonight high on my list.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 17:04:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Christmas Albums

If you like this sort of thing, and wish to donate to charity, walk along to your local charity shop. Choose which one. I don't do animal charities, but prefer to give to children's or world poverty ones, but it's your choice. In the vinyl LP section in a cardboard box on the floor (be careful, other shoppers will tread on you while trying to get to the clothes racks), you can find Percy Faith, Ray Conniff, The Mike Sammes Singers, 101 Strings, James Last, Bert Kaempfert … all doing the lush Christmas album very well in hi-fi stereo (it often says that in large letters). 99p? 99 cents? All in good condition too, only ever played at Christmas. The bonus, and it's a big one, is you don't get Bob.

We should reserve a Christmas Top Ten for December. In my home, Greg Lake's I Believe In Father Christmas edges everything else, and we usually then switch to the "Classics at Christmas" CD and do Lieutenant Kije straight. It owes its place on all those Classic Christmas CDs to Greg Lake's version. But in England, Slade's Merry Xmas Everyone is an annual fixture.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 16:53:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

PSB's review is well-written and insightful as usual, and is very positive. I can't agree on Come All Ye Faithful which is horrendous. Beautiful settings don't count. Any multi-millionaire can get an arranger to replicate the lush arrangements of Percy Faith or Ray Conniff with a large and accomplished band, and a Mall Muzac backing choir, but it's what you put at the centre that counts. I love Self Portrait. I even love the Christmas Album video, which is very funny. I don't mind him taking the piss, but it's an extremely unpleasant listening experience overall because of his voice.

As to the money going to charity, fine, but I'll choose the charity for myself when I make my donation.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 16:49:02 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'and negativity ...you through'

Bob F: I agree. Read PSB on Christmas Dylan. He always tells it like it is and takes a step backwards and sees the whole picture. Take it for what it is. Too much 'negativity' is not healthy.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 16:49:08 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Bob's Xmas

Seriously, I have to defend the Christmas album. Comfortable as an old shoe, warm as a hot toddy, it's a holiday fixture in this household and will be the rest of the way.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 16:42:32 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: why would anybody pay money to listen to that!!! (Christmas In The Heart)

I payed money for Special Edition (De Luxe) with Christmas cards and all.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 15:52:20 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: PSB's Review of Bob Dylan's Christmas Record

If anyone hasn't heard Bob Dylan's Christmas record please see Peter Stone Brown's accurate review. For everyone who purchased the record and hates it, at least feel good that the money Dylan made off the record went to charity.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 15:46:26 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon and Bob Dylan

Cohen and Simon write exceptional contemporary lyrics and so the triumvirate continues to show the way. Morrow and Bejar and so many others continue the tradition.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 14:10:34 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Subject: Happy b'day to Randy Ciarlante.

Link provided by Lars.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 10:08:33 CEST 2012 from (58.104.11.130)

Posted by:

Graham

I just checked out Dylan's Christmas album. I didn't even know he had done one. I pretty much lost interest in Dylan after the Rolling Thunder Tour. I listened to snippets of the Christmas Album on Amazon. Wow, why would anybody pay money to listen to that!!!


Entered at Tue Jul 3 09:00:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: B.o.B

The last three or four days I've had e-mails fromTicketMaster telling me about B.o.B at the O2 in London. I'd been quite busy, but given our current discussion, I suddenly thought, 'What! B.o.B … Blonde on Blonde! Is Dylan doing what Van did with Astral Weeks, the complete album in concert!' Wow, I must break my vow never to see Dylan again. This is one I have to see!

So I clicked the link. Apparently B.o.B is a young black man in a baseball cap the wrong way round.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 08:28:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Old Ideas

I was listening to Leonard Cohen again last night. On ageing, his voice shows its years, but he makes such effective use of that. Like Dylan he would never have got a job singing harmony in the Beach Boys even in his younger days. On lifetime achievement, Bob Dylan still towers over all, the Shakespeare of our era, but in the last five years, Leonard is producing better work live, in the studio and in lyrics. For an old voice, and he is older than Bob, I don't think Dylan gets near him. And Bob's most recent studio work is the Christmas album. Nice sleeve, nice video which is fun, but overall it must be the worst piece of crap any major artist ever got released.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 03:08:11 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Affirmation

Its good to hear from all here that a) the voice is there to your ears on occasion b) you believe it can be delivered with the team working together technically if the will is there . It is there in the studio for all the recent albums at the same time as the live shows seem lacking at times. It shouldn't be that way. That the songs of the last 10 years are worthwhile (maybe not Blonde on Blonde or 1963-75) but timely and effective and better than a lot of what comes out now from many other contemporaries and even newer artists and certainly meaningful to those of us who deal with the issues of life and its trials and challenges). THe Obama delivery and at times other songs during any concert proves that it can happen.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 02:26:25 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Thank you David & Pat. That's what I was referring to. The fact that it was an intimate affair could have lessened the strain on his throat.


Entered at Tue Jul 3 01:53:24 CEST 2012 from (24.252.150.3)

Posted by:

Calvin

John D,

I'm with you, I think Bob can sing when he wants to. My reasoning on this is similar to him singing for the President. It was a couple days after Warren Zevon died, and I saw Bob on the Kent State Campus. Now he was going through his songs, and I was as usual trying to figure out what the song were. Then half way through the show he does a 4 song tribute to Zevon by playing some of his songs. And yeah, his voice mysteriously got much better, Then he went back to the current Bob voice for his songs/the rest of the show.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 23:32:33 CEST 2012 from (58.104.11.130)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Dylan

It makes me sad listening to contemporary Dylan. I know we are all growing old but he has simply lost his voice. I watched the White House Times are a Changing and if you compare how he is now with what he was back in the day it is just sad. A great song though. I don't know how many times I have heard that but it still moves me every time.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 22:34:49 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Bob Dylan's Later Years

As we go through the ageing years I find it amazing that someone wouldn't find comfort and wouldn't be able to relate to 'Not Dark Yet', 'Trying to Get to Heaven' or 'Highlands'. If you work for a living in this tough economy it's hard to believe someone wouldn't relate to 'Working Man's Blues #2'. I'm not going to even get into the sweeping beauty of 'Love and Theft'.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 21:55:11 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: 60 yrs of Rock in 100 guitar riffs

This is fun!


Entered at Mon Jul 2 21:43:57 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Times They Are A-Changing

I'm truly amazed. I think it's the intimate setting, and unlike live shows he isn't bellowing into the mic in a rasping croak. That's what they do with Leonard Cohen, amplify and keep it intimate so there's no need to push the singer's volume on the vocals. The sound crew do it for him. I really would never have believed him capable of singing that. I notice that like Len, he's singing into a wired mic. With wireless you always have more issues when you push up the volume.

Still, if he can do that for the President for free, why don't the 5000 paying punters at £85 a head get it?


Entered at Mon Jul 2 21:05:01 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Parrot Heads

I saw Jimmy Buffet at the old Academy of Music the winter of '74. It was freezing out and the heat was broken. The place was freezing. Jimmy and his guys came out in overcoats to perform. Quite the opposite of the video you poster Norm. Despite the conditions he put on a great show, Warmed the place up a bit.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 20:57:58 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dylan's Music

There is a program on TV that airs, I guess several times a week. I don't watch it much, but I enjoy it when I get a chance. The plots are very often interesting stories, but the music is great. "Cold Case Files" it is called. As the cases are often from long ago, there is usually some good back ground music from years ago.

Last night, the plot was set in early seventies I guess. About some hippies murdered for performing abortions I think. I kinda fell asleep, (can yuh believe that?) Anyway near the end as the conclusion developed, all of a sudden I realize....Joe Cocker is singing, "I shall be released". It sounded like it may have been from his show at Woodstock. Sure did fit what was happening at that part in the show. I really enjoy when they take those old songs and put them to good work in a show.

I remember long ago discussing with David Powell the sound track of Remember The Titans. Great movie and sound track.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 20:04:36 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

And here's what President Obama had to say about Dylan's appearance at the White House:

"Here's what I love about Dylan: He was exactly as you'd expect he would be. He wouldn't come to the rehearsal; usually, all these guys are practicing before the set in the evening. He didn't want to take a picture with me; usually all the talent is dying to take a picture with me and Michelle before the show, but he didn't show up for that. He came in and played 'The Times They Are A-Changin'. A beautiful rendition. The guy is so steeped in this stuff that he can just come up with some new arrangement, and the song sounds completely different. Finishes the song, steps off the stage...comes up, shakes my hand, sort of tips his head, gives me just a little grin, and then leaves...That was our only interaction with him. And I thought: That's how you want Bob Dylan, right? You don't want him to be all cheesin' and grinnin' with you. You want him to be a little skeptical about the whole enterprise."

When the performance first aired on tv, Dylan's brief interaction & handshake was shown immediately after he finished the song. I remember thinking at the time that the gesture seemed to add to the dramatic impact of the performance itself.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 19:37:56 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

John D, I think this might be whatcha lookin' fer.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 19:36:39 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Music from Big White House

John D: Here's the link to Dylan's performance at the White House.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 19:19:32 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob's voice.

I mentioned this once before and boy did it shock me. It was A 30 second clip of Bob singing for Obama; about a year ago. I couldn't believe it. It was the voice of years ago. The voice that any true Dylan fan would love. That told me he could do it; when he wanted to. We all know that Bob would make significant changes from time to time. Like JT said "that was always OK with me.". Remember Nashville Skyline and Self Portrait? Where did that voice come from? My opinion is that he CAN sing better; if he feels like it.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 19:06:46 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Follically Challenged????

I love that Peter. Gave me a good chuckle.

Now see here! You can't be critical pf Jimmy 'cause he's got a bald head, no hat, and his shirt is sweaty. It's hotter n hell where he was playing, so you can't wear a hat and put that energy into the music without sweating it up.

I'd go to any Buffet concert before anyone if I could. It's always a party with him. Look at a few more of his youtube stuff. Him and Alan Jackson doing, "It's 5 o'clock some where". Jimmy doing "Volcano." Raising money for those poor people on Monsarratt.

Of course I'm a beach bumb, and you Peter must be just too used to the mist and the "Tweed". :):)


Entered at Mon Jul 2 17:54:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sound

BTW, on sound, the last three times I heard Dylan, the mix / sound mixing were not in the same league as Paul Simon, James Taylor, Leonard Cohen or Jackson Browne's sound crews. But … when I saw the 90s Band, they weren't in that premier league for mixing / mics either. Paul Simon has every hall analysed in advance (they say) and the board programmed to it. The twice I've seen him in halls (as against outdoors) every nuance of every instrument was crystal clear. Leonard Cohen was at the same quality level and they got his mics so loud that every faintest whisper was audible in the 20,000 seat O2 arena. I never heard them do that magic with Bob, and if he was using that quality, and had been for twenty years, maybe his voice wouldn't be so shot.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 17:46:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Back on Highway 61

Subject: Bob's voice

The last twice I saw him I would really have liked my money back. If it hadn't been so expensive, and if I hadn't had to wait so long after the announced time for the start, I'd have left after 20 minutes. I think the fact I was stupid enough to actually buy the Christmas CD still hurts. But to be honest, if I were writing the "Fifty Essential Dylan Songs" article that the mags fill quiet months with, I reckon forty-five would be pre-1979. OK, this starts someone off on the list of great songs SINCE 1978, but I think every track on Blonde on Blonde would move effortlessly past all of them … well, maybe Blind Willie McTell (as performed by The Band, not by Bob) would be there.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 17:29:59 CEST 2012 from (209.17.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Shot' voice

Peter V: I do have concerns about this. I sometimes hear recently, in some songs, remnants of the singing voice that Bob Dylan had. I miss that. How a song is presented to the concert goer is important when both voice and instrument is considered. Subpar guitar from a superb guitarist is not acceptable if it is a usual occurrence. I believe that he CAN sing his songs with the likeable tonality that has become pleasing to his fan's ears (clearly not to all as noted over the decades). I accept the variation in arrangement and even lyrics, but I want to be able to listen to them with enjoyment. The microphones and the sound technicians at the soundboard can get Bob's voice out there into those large spaces. Let them do their magic so the NeverEnding Tour can continue to prosper for all of us who welcome it.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 16:53:14 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: BEG / Tedeschi - Trucks Band

BEG; what did you think of the show on Friday Night? I found the spotlight behind Susan Tedeschi; very irritating. It was so bright where I was sitting, it put her face in shadow for me and my family; throughout the performance. What a band though and what a show!!! A real family touring band. Their kids were there and his Mom & Dad; who travel on the road; with them; especially now that school is out. Derek Trucks journey deeper; into jazz really was apparent at this show.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 16:27:45 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

I also enjoy some "changing up" to be done within live shows-but yes, Dylan has taken it to the extreme for 20+ years. Its almost a game to guess what song he is playing at the moment.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 10:44:47 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And as an equally follicly-challenged person myself, I have to say Van's smart hat looks better than Buffet's bald head.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 10:42:34 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Brown Eyed Girl Jimmy Buffet

Thanks, Norm. Fabulous band and I don't think Van could fill a stadium that size. Wiggling backing singers help of course. I don't think shorts and a sweaty T-shirt suitable attire for a show of that size though. You'd think he could run to one of his own colourful shirts which used to be on sale all over Florida.

Actually, having seen Van do it live many many times, his band usually have a spritely spring that beats Buffet's band, though Van doesn't always have backing singers. When he does it soars. So I looked on YouTube for a Van live version. I didn't look for long, but most I could find were studio versions clipped on still photos or one over a non-synched live show, As Van must have been filmed doing it many times, I realise that he has better "take-down" people working on YouTube than most artists! Van was always the best at stopping bootleggers too.

BUT I did finally find one. Most Austin City Limits 2006 songs have been "removed by user" but Brown Eyed Girl is still up … see link. The backing singers aren't as fetching on the eye, but you do get the great David Hayes on bass.

The version Van did earlier this year jazzed it up and lost the spring and the edges of the melody, just what he did to Cleaning Windows.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 07:45:24 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Brown Eyed Girl

Some one Peter I think, was mentioning Van Morrison a short ways back. As I don't get around here much any more, it motivated me to share one of my favourite videos.

If Van the Man? wasn't such a sour prick, and shared his song in a forum like this, he'd probalby get a lot more mileage and response.......but of course he probably doesn't need it anyway.

The good thing is, it's such a good song even in this day, all these years later, when the song is done like this you can see the response even from these young folks.

Play the whole thing, and watch for the black man on the congo drums......WOW!!


Entered at Mon Jul 2 05:38:11 CEST 2012 from (76.15.57.245)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band/Psychedelics

My intent was not to suggest any association between the so called acid rock or psychedelic music and the music of The Band.Rather,I was interested in the impact ,if any,of Band members using psychedelics on the music and or lyrics.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 03:55:47 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Carlene Carter

David P, another Band/Carlene Carter connection is Levon's backgound vocals on Carlene's 'Me and The Wildwood Rose' off her 'I Fell in Love' record.


Entered at Mon Jul 2 03:48:07 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Jon Friedman

JT, I love the Dylan stuff this guy Jon Friedman is writing. He did a blog last week on what Derek Jeter and Bob Dylan have in common that was just great. I saw the New York shows in 1974 and I will always treasure them in my memory. To finally see Dylan and The Band after waiting so many years was mind blowing. Yeah Dylan's voice is no longer the thing of beauty it once was, but I still go see him every chance I get. He's the best there ever was and that's something I never take for granted.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 23:19:24 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

So if mid-period Beatles counts as "psychedelia," than I see an influence, at least on one song, but Hendrix/Doors/Grateful Dead-style psychedelia didn't seem to influence the Band much. Of course, by 1969-1970 it's the Beatles (and the Dead, for that matter) who are trying to sound more like the Band...


Entered at Sun Jul 1 22:53:08 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

I'm sure the Band heard psychedelic music--it was unavoidable from 1966 to 1968--but it doesn't seem to me that it influenced them at all, and Robbie Robertson was pretty explicitly dismissive of it in interviews of the era. The Band also didn't like the "don't trust anyone over 30" attitude that was associated with some elements of the counterculture, to which the "Next of Kin" photo on MFBP was supposedly a pointed response.

As for "In a Station," I guess I don't really hear the Doors' influence so much. To me, it's the Band tune that gets as close as the group ever got to ripping off the Beatles. Check out Garth's keyboard tone, Robbie's sighing electric guitar sound, and the counterpoint harmony vocals on the "Once upon a time" verse. Very Sgt. Pepper!


Entered at Sun Jul 1 22:30:03 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Billy Preston

I found a copy of Billy Preston's "In The Midnight Hour" in Capitol's Discotheque 66 series. The B-side is "Advice" written by Billy Preston-Sly Stone. It turns out to be a prototype version of Higher which Sly & The Family Stone recorded the next year, credited to Sly's writing name,. S. Stewart, and losing Billy Preston's credit altogether. Worth mentioning, as however briefly, Billy Preston was a member of The Band.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 17:58:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live In Concert

Very good talking point. I agree that you want to hear changes in concert. There are negatives. I hated what Van Morrison did to Cleaning Windows in recent years, and he’s in the process of doing much the same to Brown Eyed Girl. I liked Dylan At Budokan (though the Blackbushe live boot is better). The big but with Dylan is that he takes it to unrecognizable and craps all over the songs nowadays. But that’s because his voice is totally shot, and he doesn’t care.

In the early 70s The Band were criticized for not changing songs from show to show, and being too close to the studio version … I remember. Four or five years later Supertramp got the same sort of stick … they sounded exactly like the studio version on stage. In fact very, very few bands are adept enough to be able to do that. It takes meticulous planning and superb musicians. I suspect it’s an ability that gets knocked because so few have it.

The plus is Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen and James Taylor. They all sound different live to the record, but because all use really first rate bands in every department, they never sound rougher or less accomplished.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 17:04:01 CEST 2012 from (209.17.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 1974 and a Canada Day opinion

There is a discussion going on, initiated by Jon Friedman (new book on Dylan) about the greatest concert he ever saw. He calls 'The St. Valentine's Day Massacre' (14 Feb. 1974 evening LA) show the best. I saw Toronto Jan. 10, 1974, one week into the series of shows. This likely was the best show I ever saw with Dylan backed by any group of musicians and I have seen him with all his bands except the late 70's early 80s. Both vocals by all and the musicianmanship was top-notch and I for one loved the new arrangements. It kills me in retrospect that so many people who love and know bands and performers go to a concert and expect everything to remain 'the same as it ever was'. These are artists and as I have said here before, in my view, it is their prerogative to change, to add and shape and to evolve a piece of work... not to necessarily make it better but to see how it feels and evoke response. I suppose 'I don't like it. It's not the same. I want it like it was." is also an evoked response. As Dylan said years earlier, something like "It used to go like that; now it goes like this". I for one welcome the variations over the years, lyrics and arrangements alike. Its part of the reason I go. The same work is new work often and so it stays interesting, positive or negative. To me, however, panning an entire show without looking at its parts, is trivial. I get it that the audience pays and some argue therefore that they should get what they expect. That may be true with food but I don't think its so with concert art. Just my opinion and open to debate.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 14:03:31 CEST 2012 from (58.104.2.161)

Posted by:

Graham

Jed, what exactly are you referring to by the use of the word psychedelics? I associate the word with LSD but I never had the impression that was The Band's primary drug of choice. There was really a big shift in their music from when they were a rock and roll band to being The Band. I always put this down to their association with Dylan rather than their drug use. I think that is one reason why the Basement Tapes are so interesting.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 13:38:26 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Big pink/psychedelics

Anyone hear an influence of psychedelics in MFBP? Particulaly in Garth's playing and lyrically?


Entered at Sun Jul 1 10:24:40 CEST 2012 from (92.18.207.160)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: In a Station

I guess this is as close to The Doors as The Band got! I doubt The Band could have wrote this song without at least having heard some Psychedelic music of the time.


Entered at Sun Jul 1 05:17:44 CEST 2012 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Make that just 1970


Entered at Sun Jul 1 04:40:26 CEST 2012 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Little Richard and the James Gang 1970 or 1


Entered at Sun Jul 1 01:02:29 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Band and psychedelia

On the whole, I'd say not, but I'm not so sure about NLSC. Jupiter Hollow?


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