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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, October 2017


Entered at Tue Oct 31 23:52:00 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

We spent many happy hours trailing candle wax on Mateus and chianti bottles. It was so much the end of a meal that we bought different coloured candles to improve the drip effect.


Entered at Tue Oct 31 23:01:49 CET 2017 from (107.77.97.110)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Mateus versus Lancers

It seemed to be a toss up back then. Was Lancers carbonated? They both had futures as candle holders -


Entered at Tue Oct 31 22:56:27 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Birmingham 66 photo

Just looking at the Barry Feinstein "last supper" photo again. Garth & Bob are drinking white wine, Rick and Richard have bottles of Mateus Rose. A wine you saw everywhere in 1966. Portuguese & pink in a distinctive bottle. I bought some last year in a fit of nostalgia. it's sweet and horrible.


Entered at Tue Oct 31 12:50:56 CET 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

No Bill, I did not play anything; from it because I don't have a copy as yet. I'll have to buy this one; as well. Reading Reckless Daughter right now. Wow. what a read! Wonderful writer.


Entered at Tue Oct 31 10:25:01 CET 2017 from (86.166.233.45)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Really enjoyed that song, Bill M. Great. It took me through You Tube links to Jackie De Shannon and Love Affair hits. Great stuff.

I was reading in Barney Hoskyn's book last night about how difficult it was, back in the day, for Canadian bands to be accepted...even by young Canadians.

And I played the Brown album yesterday.

Back to reality.


Entered at Tue Oct 31 02:39:32 CET 2017 from (74.12.32.190)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

Subject: Jackie Shane / Amos Garrett

John D: Sorry I missed your show on Saturday (yet again). I was wondering if you'd be playing the new Jackie Shane retrospective that just came out. I bought my own copy over the weekend and it's fabulous. There are some amazing new tales and connections in the accompanying booklet, but also some clanging gaps / disconnects - though that's inevitable in a project of this nature. Did you ever catch Jackie's act in person back in the '60s? Anyone else here?/n The link is to Jackie's only hit, "Any Other Way", from '62/'63. The horn intro was borrowed for "Stanley Street", an instrumental on Amos Garrett's first solo LP, "Go Cat Go" from 1980. When I asked Amos about it, he said that Stanley Street was the location of the Esquire Show Bar in hometown Montreal, where he'd "spent many evenings propping up the bar watching Jackie perform" with Frank Motley and the Motley Crew.


Entered at Tue Oct 31 01:34:09 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.168)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Pink Water

Norm, i suspect that was a Roger Waters show that man went to...Not a Floyd show. But, Waters played Floyd songs. Waters tours with his own band, Floyd tours without Waters. There was a Fleud. Al Edge, the last word of the prior sentence was for you.


Entered at Mon Oct 30 22:27:19 CET 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pink Floyd

Coming home on the ferry from my brother's place yesterday I met a guy on the boat and he was telling me he was just on his way home from the Pink Floyd concert at Rogers Place in Vancouver. He said it was an amazing show. Probably Roger Waters last he figured.

I asked him how much of a crowd. He said it was sold out. That's about 25,000 people. I asked him if anyone was protesting or boycotting Roger Waters. He asks me "Why". I had to explain to him, he knew nothing about it.


Entered at Mon Oct 30 19:20:16 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.168)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

00Kevin. Watch out for Natasha. But you know that.


Entered at Mon Oct 30 18:13:51 CET 2017 from (118.143.21.8)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......and even DT's low-level Russian connection was heard screaming "ok, so that was another f*cking "o" and not an "i"......how was I to know"? Sat with a beautiful Russian lady today on a trip......couldn't help myself and asked what she thought of the Orange Clown.....she said that she wasn't sure but that his wife was beautiful...... I just smiled and said yes.


Entered at Mon Oct 30 18:14:15 CET 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Barry Feinstein

I found Barry Feinstein's "Real Moments" book of photos at £5 today secondhand, but as new. It's the 1966 and 1974 tours. One I've never seen before and can't find online is backstage at Birmingham UK in 1966, which he says is like the Last Supper. A long table with white tablecloth, and Garth, Bob Dylan, Rick and Richard (and a couple of empty seats). Beautiful moment in time.

Any one else got Margo Price's All American Made yet?


Entered at Mon Oct 30 17:57:57 CET 2017 from (118.143.21.8)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Beginning of the Beginning of the end of the Beginning........

George Papadopoulis.......oh yeah !


Entered at Sun Oct 29 18:34:09 CET 2017 from (24.184.50.168)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: John McEuen posted this on his FB page and wants it shared. So:

Dear Facebook Friends: please excuse republishing the other post wasn't sharing. Please feel free to re-share. Thanks.
For many reasons, from artistic to business to personal it is time for me to bid adieu to the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band stage , for 50 years I gave it my best.
It has been a great privilege, challenge, frustrating and rewarding overall. It comes down to differences of opinion, basically, on mostly everything. Yet, more experience than you can shake a pick at. WE made history - together.
When informed two years ago they’d long ago voted me out of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, INC., and I became ‘an employee’, I was no longer 'part' of this band. I was told “we think it’s better this way”. No longer a part of the corporation of which I was one of the founders, that was a bad day. But, because of the fans, for upcoming 50th year anniversary tour, I went ahead doing the shows while further developing my solo endeavors.
I’m excited about my upcoming touring with my Deering Banjos see tour schedule at johnmceuen.com. A lot of beautiful Performing Arts Centers and festivals are already booked! Many concerts will be multi-media shows - music and stories with historic footage from Will the Circle Be Unbroken. Joining me will be Les Thompson (an original founding NGDB member, John Cable (NGDB alumnus from the ‘70’s), and the incredible Matt Cartsonis. We feature some of the music from my new highly acclaimed Made in Brooklyn album (Stereophile Magazine Record of the Month!) – It is different every night. Some nights we will have special guests sitting in.
Thank you all for your years of support and I’ll see you down the road. I gotta get ready for #Plymouth, NH! @silver center for the Arts (603-535-2600 ), the FIRST post NGDB show, Nov. 3. Also, the first time in that city! Now that is really unusual and energizing. Spread the news…
John McEuen
Late October..
p.s.
I know what I can be for Halloween! I think I’ll go as a member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band! I have the clothes already.
********************************************************************************

Getting voted out of the corporation he was one of the founder of 48 years

prior- Can you imagine? But being asked to stay on as a employee.

It will be interesting to see if any of the other original members still in the band comment publicly.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 20:30:02 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Appears to have worked now. Woo-Hoo.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 18:42:09 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: OK I'll try again later

I was just trying to send a link to the pic in the middle. Unfortunately I linked the who page of photos. Sorry about that.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 18:40:03 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Testing

Testing New Link Option


Entered at Fri Oct 27 16:02:58 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Perfect Country Song

Bass Man! Thank you so much for that. That book is a must have. What a talent Steve was. I miss his smiling face and can only imagine how much John misses him.

Isn't it ironic how a man who knows he is dying makes so much of his life in a few short years with such a sense of humor. I got up this morning to your post and had to listen to souveniers again. I got to get my stuff loaded in my truck and get on the road to see my brother. Stay well.

The scandanavian underground translator is on the loose again. I've been sent a message in "code". Can't decipher a gawd damn word of it............I'm gone


Entered at Fri Oct 27 14:29:59 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Northwest

Subject: Rocking Chere and sending an email

My long time gb friend Rocking Chere posted: " I don't even know how to e mail Jan." Because Rocking Chere is such a fabulous guy I give him the answer. (No irony here. Sailing on Titanic I would have liked to share the lifeboat with him.)

You'll type jan.hoiberg (Danish pastry) and hiof dot no . For the first "jan" is the same as Johannes-Johan-John and "hoiberg" means "a high mountain or a hill" (like Holmenkollen) but it lacks lash (/) over the "o", mainly because the internet is invented by anglo-saxian people, not by the vikings. (The ancient Finns had their own internet already for 1.500 years ago.The epic stories can be found in the national epos called "Kalevala". Bill M can tell you more.)

Then we have this "hiof". It means University College in Ostfold. (lash again!). Ostfold is the dulliest region in Norway. Happily, there is 'Systembolaget' (Swedish alcohol monopoly) just across the border.

Then we have this "no". During your years as a rock musician you probably used this word many times when you answered to the invites of young sexy groupies but had only your wife in your mind. "No" doesn't always mean "no". Here it means Norway.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 13:47:55 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Web: My link

Subject: Oops

Try this link.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 13:46:03 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan Booleg Series Sampler

Yo! The sampler disk from Trouble No More – The Bootleg Series Vol. 13 / 1979-1981 is available (for a limited time) and NPR First Listen. With a review by Tom Moon, longtime music critic for both NPR and the Philly Inquirer. See link.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 13:03:12 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Web: My link

Subject: Steve Goodman

RC, I am also a huge Steve Goodman fan. What an amazing talent. There is an excellent and comprehensive biography of Steve Goodman written by Clay Eals (see link). I took it on a beach vacation and someone asked me, "why did you bring a textbook on vacation?". It sits at the left end of the musical bios bookcase and every time I come in the front door I see the smiling face of a young Mr. Goodman pictured on the back cover peeking through the slats.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 07:52:36 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It took me Years to get those Souveniers....

Just before I'm falling in the bunk, I was playing some of my favourites on youtube.

If you want a shot of nostaljia, search on youtube, John Prine and Steve Goodman playing "Souveniers". Even if you are not fans of these guys, this song will put your life in perspective in our later years.

It brought tears to my eyes. Steve Goodman is dead, from a terrible disease. John Prine has fought cancer and been ravaged by it. But a video of them when they were young and strong is wonderful. They look so good. Happy and healthy with the world at their feet. Steve does some great acoustic guitar picking in this song. It is obvious the great respect and friendship they share.

It reminds me how much I have treasured the years I have spent with my brother on stage at my side playing those great licks he does and feeling proud. Be thankful for these special times you have, they are too soon gone.


Entered at Fri Oct 27 04:43:03 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Why do the best things always disappear!

I'm going to play some music with my youngest brother Lorne to morrow and some other really important people. Our friend Kenny who has played steel guitar with us for over 35 years turns 65 on Saturday.

As I packed up guitars, cords etc, I had "The Last Waltz" playing. It has always been for me, (and long before the Last Waltz), Ophelia is the greatest song (for me).

When you watch the "Last Waltz", the way Levon sings that song, the dynamics of the horns behind it all, that certainly is, "The Last Waltz". I don't think there is any show, concert or any thing they do that compares to that. It always lifts me up, and then knowing that "That's It" is a downer!


Entered at Fri Oct 27 03:10:13 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Martha Redbone

You guys may or may not want to check out Martha Redbone's music....Particularly her most recent recording, produced by John McEuen.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 20:39:22 CEST 2017 from (1.42.8.31)

Posted by:

Wallsend

There is a new interview with Robbie on Youtube from 1988: Robbie Robertson - The New Music Interview, Toronto, 1988


Entered at Thu Oct 26 19:56:36 CEST 2017 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB, there may have been two shows at the Auditorium that night because they are wearing different clothes in the other photo on site from that date.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 18:43:22 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joni Mitchell

Currently reading the David Yaffe biography on Joni. It is an amazing read. Still on the very early years and the relationship between her and her parents is enlightening. It’s a part of Joni’s life that hasn’t really been documented this deeply.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 18:32:36 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Chicago pic

Jan, the Auditorium Theater in Chicago is listed twice in the list of shows Jerry Tennenbaum put together, but the year is 1969, not 70s, and considering the way they look in the photo along with Robbie playing a Tele, that would make sense.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 14:13:32 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.45)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I bought the tribute to Fats Domino album, 'Goin' Home' a few years ago. It's good and probably helped Fats financially.

Lot of good artists on it.

Robbie Robertson and Galactic do 'Going To The River' and it's different - a really great version.

A poignant post Rockin' Chair.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 13:28:10 CEST 2017 from (158.39.165.132)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Photo: Location and date?

Our friend Brennan sent us this photo, identified (by someone) as The Band in Chicago at the Auditorium Theater, early 70’s. That doesn’t match up to any show we are aware of. Other suggestions from the experts here?


Entered at Thu Oct 26 12:13:14 CEST 2017 from (208.124.139.211)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Al E: Glad you liked the Mood Jga Jga track. The guy who wrote and sang all the songs, Greg Leskiw, had been in the Guess Who, but only for a couple of albums immediately after "American Woman", which was sung by Burton Cummings - who sang basically everything. The Guess Who's guitarist on everything up to and including "American Woman" was Randy Bachman, who then left. Because Bachman was both a terrific riff-rocker AND a terrific jazz guitarist (having been schooled as a 14-15 year-old by his slightly older fellow Winnipegger, Lenny Breau) the Guess Who took on two guitarists to replace him. Greg Leskiw was the guy who could handle the jazz side.

The link is to a hit example of Bachman's jazzier side when with the Guess Who, "Undun".

I see there's still space, so I'll add that Lenny Breau also mentored a third notable Winnipeg guitarist of the day, Neil Young, which is why the big thank-yous on the back of the second Buffalo Springfield include nods to both Lenny Breau and Randy Bachman. Decades later, Young and Bachman got together for a contribution to a Shadows tribute project, because both had been serious fans o Hank Marvin.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 04:24:07 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Concerning Fats Domino & Levo as well

I'm sure I've told this story here before, but it is worth repeating. Back in the day, black men were not played on white radio stations. So Ricky Nelson had a huge hit with Fats Domino's song, "I'm Walkin". I watched Fats in an interview so long ago I can't remember where, with that huge smile of his he said, "I've got to get Ricky to record another song. I've got 9 kids and I need the money." I loved it.

I guess I'll have to contact Jan the web master and get the map to go thru' the enchanted forest to say something profound, and back it up!

The reason is, I just happened upon a vid of Levon singing "I'm Going Away". I'm sure some of you have seen this, it's great. My reason for mentioning it is a "comment" from a lady named "Karen can't say". This lady has put up a letter concerning the meaning of true love.

She had to take her husband off life support. His last wish was to hear Levon sing this song. She took him off life support, had the record put on, and laid down beside him while he died. I identified with this so much. One of my best friends died of cancer at 68. With his family around him, his oldest son was playing my CD for him. When he passed, his son phoned me right away to tell me. His Dad said, "Just play me Norm singing, "Old Dogs and Children and Water Mellon Wine" Once more. While it played Bill died. That has had some kind of a very humbling effect on me to bring comfort to a friend like that.

I also just found a black & white vid of Keith Richards, DJ Fontana, Scotty Moore and the Band. It is wonderful!


Entered at Thu Oct 26 03:55:09 CEST 2017 from (208.124.139.211)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

"Goin' To The River" by Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks (the immediately subsequent ones, that it - including Bobby Starr on lead guitar, Stan Szelest on piano, James Cotton on harmonica).


Entered at Thu Oct 26 03:30:33 CEST 2017 from (118.143.21.8)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Fats Domino

Robbie's thoughts on Fats:

"Before Chuck Berry, before Elvis, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and all..... there was “The Fat Man” the incredible Antoine "Fats" Domino. His voice, piano playing, songwriting and New Orleans style was one of the great origins of this music called Rock and Roll and Rhythm and Blues. I first saw Fats when I was 14 yrs. old on an Allan Freed RnR tour show. He wore a pink suit and had a smile as wide as his piano. When he kicked into “I’m Walkin” he set the place on fire and I couldn’t breathe. The sound, the groove, the power coming from this 5ft.5 bundle of rollicking New Orleans joy killed !!

On The Band’s album Moondog Matinee we covered “I'm Ready” in honor of Fats. I participated in a tribute record to him as well and cut “Going To The River”. With the help of Jann Wenner and the RnR Hall, I had the pleasure of putting together a summit of the remaining founding fathers of Rock And Roll. Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Fats Domino gathered in New Orleans. Hearing them tell stories and seeing them together was a tremendous joy that I will forever hold precious.

They all made an indelible mark on music history and we all had great admiration and respect for the phenomenal contributions of Mr. Fats Domino.

Blessing to his family, RR"


Entered at Thu Oct 26 03:29:26 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Passion Is No Ordinary Word

Even in Scouse.

Or would that properly be stated as Scousese?

Don't forget to hit the link.


Entered at Thu Oct 26 03:27:21 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: That warm feeling

See Al! Now you have learned what a sweetheart Lisa is. Always positive and never has a bad word to say about anyone or any thing. She always makes you feel good about yourself' It must be comfortable to live your life in such a positive way.

Me? I hate everything and every body!..........:-)


Entered at Thu Oct 26 01:04:23 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Passion

Ha ha - Thanks Lisa. Really kind of you to put that nice take on it. I've never really thought of it that way before.

Mind you, guess we're lucky that on here there's a fair few with the same sort of passion

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 25 20:16:56 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Al, may you never learn to temper your enthusiasm. Think of it this way: how many people your age still have that kind of passion in their lives? It's a gift, really.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 19:48:10 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Folks, Amazon advertises on Breitbart News. Are you sure that you want to patronize amazon?


Entered at Wed Oct 25 18:01:00 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RIP, Fats Domino. I guess the last of the original rock n rollers are now Jerry Lee Lewis & Little Richard … both a few years younger than Fats.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 17:17:04 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Fats

It's a sad day. I had the pleasure of meeting him at his home a few years ago. He was extremely kind and talkative. I also met Dave Bartholomew on that trip. This was the death that I have been dreading. I just loved the man; from my earliest years that I discovered Rock 'N' Roll.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 16:52:20 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Deirdre Dances …

Listening again after reading Clinton Heylin in Mojo on the Dylan gospel years … the mysteries of the way to salvation via the arms of a nubile backing singer.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 16:40:24 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, if you didn't spread your gospel you wouldn't be you. That's why i really ignored that section and as i wrote, had you not brought it up yourself i woulda not had mentioned it at all. I just considered it A minor infraction & easily forgettable in a history of great posting. I had immediately forgotten it but your reference to Norm to the beginning of your post made me look again. Now your additional discussion of it is a confessional. Sing three She Loves You Yeah Yeah yeah & you are forgiven.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 16:27:40 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Fat Man

Fats Domino died.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 16:11:12 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al. i thought it was obvious that when i typed that Deidre stands alone so far for me that it was in the listening to the limited tracks of his that i did. Which i had discussed.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 15:45:41 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Mood Jga Jga - Come and See Me Here My Friend

Bill - lovely track that. Very cool. Was he the 'American Woman' vocalist?

I did try a few of the other tracks on You Tube but they were more jazzy

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 25 15:37:59 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The naive trials of a genuine enthusiast

Jeff - the preamble wasn't aimed at yourself. Nor anyone else either on here or elsewhere. I can of course see why you might have felt it was and taken a slice of umbrage but rest assured there are no grounds for you doing so mate.

The simple fact of the matter is that music-wise if I feel something is really great and will likely appeal whether it be to my missus, my kids/grandkids, my friends or folks/cyber mates such as your goodself on these message boards then I do tend to try and bombard them with it in the hope that my own unbridled enthusiasm for it will be reciprocated and I can share in a wonderful communion of praise with them for the particular artist.

I'm sure many others have the same desire but perhaps don't cope with the ensuing usual feeling of rejection as well as I do and so refrain from entering into the sort of lengthy tracts of exultation that I do only to be metaphorically kicked in the bollocks by complete indifference or naysayers.

Because, in my experience, the sad fact is that such communions are extremely rare and have been throughout my whole naive existence albeit I've never once learnt how to temper my own enthusiasm, even despite my own chastening experiences of nigh 50 years ago when I got to learn very quickly that The Band simply were never going to be to everyone's liking despite me believing that such a perception was unthinkable. LOL.

Hopefully that reassures you that my preamble was merely me reflecting on how it is with these things and not a pot shot at yourself for making the obvious and completely understandable parallel with Brucie baby.

As for the Deidre Dances link. I hear what you say but cannot agree that it stands alone in his huge song catalogue by any means. I honestly only linked it because it happened to be playing as I was finishing the post and it occurred to me that it was indeed as you say such a wonderful song with very likely wide appeal that doesn't take much absorption to realise its quality. As such it seemed a good choice to link on here.

For my own part Jeff - I've currently narrowed down what I've downloaded of his stuff to 16 tracks on an 80 minute collection CD - including Deidre - and I have to say I cannot put a feeler guage between them for quality after many listens. My own acid test - which I'm sure others adopt too - is whether after getting to the end of the 16th track I genuinely want to have another listen to all the tracks again. And boy do I want to have another listen. And another.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 25 13:53:54 CEST 2017 from (47.20.223.209)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

AL, since you are discussing your opening, my reaction to your opening section of your Great McDermott post was to forgive you for it and ignore it and move on fast -that it was uncommon for you- because the only thing valid about it was the small refernce to your own reaction. . The possible or likely implication, what you described as your possible interpretation of other's reaction (as not yours) was unlike you & a poor one, you've really no idea why anyone else here might not have been instantly embracing him. For me, though i always strongly stated the positives, aside from borrowed knockoff power, every song i listened to on You Tube or pieces of that were available somewhere like ALLMusic was unremarkable on it's own, often very unremarkable with very common & very commonly stated sentiments & themes & reeked of Springsteen or Maybe Dylan- there was one that seemed like a imitation of Sprungsteen in one of his early Dylan imitator songs.... People are entitled their likes and dislikes especially when voiced rationally and respectfully.. This is a music forum after all... Is it only a praise forum?

Deirdre stands alone so far for me.

Thank you for the lyrics, i heard most of em, but seeing em is good, & I'll add the additional endless choruses ( opening section too ) at the end,and suss this out later.

Obviously the song fits in it's way, & it's arrangement, musically & lyrically is obviously what the writer wants to present, & has beautiful aural impact, yet I'd have to listen to it a lot in a sitting or three or four in a car i think to react in a real way....

That endless chorus ( chorus is likely the proper identifier) that is the opener might be or maybe isn't a peculiar attention gatherer to build a song around but it's his... and probably was the most pretty aural way he could present his thoughts.. His song. his call. Sounds great. Maybe Deidre is fine as a cameo. Maybe its the on;y way this works at all...certainly other arrangements would change the song totally.

His song, his call, some one likes it or not... I've only listened three or four times..it might be all, it might just be the first few..


Entered at Wed Oct 25 12:29:29 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Deidre's lyrics for Alexander - ha ha

Found them for you jeff. make of them what you will. Sorry i haven't the time to do the slash b. From what I can make out having read up about him I think the guy has definitely fallen by the wayside, discovered you can get back up and is caught between following god or shagging deidre.

:-0)

Whatever - the song is fucking awesome.

I no longer know what I want, I no longer know what I need
I no longer know what I’m doing here,
I no longer know what to believe

All I ever wanted was the water,
All I ever got was the land
All I want is to, fl y away with you
But these days, I can barely stand
I used to believe in the angels
I used to believe in she
There’s a dark rope, from which my love dangles
And she swings as a reminder for me

I no longer know what I want,
I no longer know what I need
I no longer know what I’m doing here,
I no longer know what to believe

Harboring thoughts, I should have long forgotten
Gazing at stars I thought once shined for me
Knowing the fruits of my youth, have turned rotten
Coz I don’t know who I’m supposed to be
Maybe I’m a hero, who’s been misdirected
Maybe I’m a knight who was born out of time
Maybe I’m an orphan, who’s just been rejected
Or just a prisoner, confronting his crime

Deirdre dances like beauty designed,
By the Gods that have never known man
To this idea, I am hereby resigned
That my God has some sort of plan….she moves like this
She can heal me…

You’re plowing your fields of desire
Well I got some fields of my own
But my land has been burned by the fi re
My maker wants me to atone
And I ask thee if I have offended
I ask thee what else could it be?
It’s just that I never expected
This kind of thing, to happen to me
And yet, Sunday is still no companion
I’m sorry I have strayed so far from thee

I no longer know what I want, I no longer know whatI need
I no longer know what I’m doing here, I no longer know what to believe
I no longer know what I want, I no longer know what I need
I’ll ride these mystical horses, to see where the day is going to lead
I no longer know what I want, I no longer know what to believe
But when Deirdre dances…


Entered at Wed Oct 25 12:15:27 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fuckin big werds

Ha ha - funny post Norm. Had me choking on me special K.

You're right too - that opening sentence reads like our dustman swallowed a dictionary and thought he was Auberon fucking Waugh.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 25 11:42:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One of things that keep you exploring music is discovering major talents who have slipped below your personal radar. Sometimes it’s a surprise that someone you thought was mildly obscure (apart from one major hit 40 years ago) and you go to see them and the place is packed to the doors with people mouthing along to every word of stuff you’ve barely heard before from a great swathe of albums … Ralph McTell last year.

Other times it’s someone who’s been quietly ploughing a lonely furrow for years and multiple albums with marvellous songs, without ever getting that major breakthrough … the late and wonderful Bap Kennedy, for example. You then find they have a small but dedicated following.

So to Michael McDermott. I’ve only heard “Willow Breaks” but will explore further. In one of those weird coincidences it arrived just as I was finishing a short story entitled “The Folk Singer” which involved a band called Willow … and it has the track Folksinger on it.

John Prine I guess falls into the “Ralph McTell” category neatly. One of my plays in recent months has been John Prine’s duets album, “In Spite of Ourselves.”


Entered at Wed Oct 25 03:07:07 CEST 2017 from (208.124.139.211)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: one good song deserves another ...
Web: My link

Al E: Thanks for the McDermott. Sweeter sounding that I was expecting from you - but in a good way. Here's a surprisingly sophisticated sound from far off '75 - Mood Jga Jga.


Entered at Wed Oct 25 02:12:26 CEST 2017 from (24.184.48.152)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lotta great born and raised in Chicago, Norm. For me, it'd be Jimmie Lee Robinson & Mike Bloomfield........i love John Prine's work too, Cant leave Steve Goodman outa the conversation.



Entered at Wed Oct 25 02:06:35 CEST 2017 from (24.184.48.152)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

A beautiful sounding song it is Edge. Maybe even a wonderful song. I need lyric sheets to decide my bent. Didn't find em...But i heard a good portion clearly. Haven;t yet decided if he's a little self indulgent, or a genuine tortured soul on this one. The rarely heard yet gorgeous Deidre Dances section has import, and is minimally in the song, but maybe that's the way it should be. but, "i no longer know what i want" over and over.......maybe it's much, maybe it works just right.but the song sounds beautiful and the guy can really sing .


Entered at Wed Oct 25 01:52:16 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hold - it , Hold-it.....HOLDIT!!!!

Gawd damn it Al. Have you been getting stout, with too much stout??? Using all these big words that I don't understand. You were going a hundred miles an hour. I got tired I can't read that fast.

Any way, Michael McDermott is great no doubt, but he is not the only talent Chicago has spawned. Much as I like his voice and his "stuff", the man for me from Chicago is "John Prine!"


Entered at Wed Oct 25 01:01:53 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Great Michael McDermott

Okay so I know there can often tend to be a kind of inbuilt passive resistance to embracing a hitherto unheralded artist whenever one is pushed forward. And there’s certainly nothing untoward with such an instinctively unreceptive approach. I’m guessing we’ve all adopted such a stance from time to time.

Thankfully when Bob Fino stated on here a month or so ago that he’d sooner go and watch Michael McDermott than Bruce Springsteen and followed it up with posting a glowing Stephen King eulogy of McDermott’s third album, my own antennae most definitely did not assume such a lukewarm mildly sceptical default position. Rather, the opposite was the case. Firstly because I knew the unassuming Bob would never make such a claim lightly since, like myself, he’s a huge Springsteen follower and secondly because, aside from Springsteen, Bob’s own musical taste does tend to accord pretty much with my own. I guess at source we wouldn’t be together on this Guest Book if it didn’t.

And so it has followed that since Bob’s recommendation I have embarked on a mini voyage of Michael McDermott discovery that is proving to be as rewarding musically as any I’ve made for some time.

After devouring a sizeable chunk of the guy and his music, I won’t go as far in regard to McDermott and his work as to reinforce Stephen King’s Jon Landau ‘future of rock ‘n’ roll’ claim. I mean let’s be disheartingly frank here. The sun set on that one some time ago and, sadly, popular music wise there really does seem to be nothing new under it.

That said, on the positive front, what a rapidly focussed absorption of six of his albums – his debut 620 West Surf, the self-titled Michael McDermott, Bourbon Blue, Ashes, Willow Springs and Six on The Out – has delivered is confirmation that in Michael McDermott, the city of Chicago has indeed spawned a truly astonishing musical talent; one regarding whom it would seem the vast majority of music fans are either blissfully unaware or bizarrely indifferent..

Clearly, at this early stage, plaudits – especially from mister enthusiast personified [moi] – have to be tempered as I do indeed have a track record of going somewhat overboard from time to time. Some, of course – and not without justification I might add – might wish that to be true literally. However, whatever the degree of my hyperbolic tendencies and their adverse impact upon otherwise unsuspecting sane folk, a month or so’s steeping in the music of this magnificent artist have certainly affirmed day by day, song by song, album by album, that Michael McDermott most certainly is worthy of having his name shouted from the rooftops.

So what is it with the guy?

Well, let’s start with the favourite clichéd downside that he’s a poor man’s Springsteen. And yes you sure can find Springsteen lurking within some of his work – occasionally to a disarming degree. One track – “We Belong” from his album Beneath the Ashes – is so Springsteen it’s impossible to believe it isn’t the man himself. But it isn’t and the song itself is simply so fucking good I’m pretty sure that whenever he listens to it – which I’m sure is often – Bruce bites the edge of his huge kitchen table in angst that he never penned it himself. Likewise vocal reminders of Dylan, Van Morrison, Bono and other giants permeate the McDermott’s extensive songbook. The track “Summer Days” from his self titled album actually has Don Henley on vocals except it doesn’t since it is in fact McDermott himself sounding as if he’d borrowed dear Don’s larynx for the day.

Of course, the reality is that by the time McDermott happened along, the sacred musical ground he treads had already been trodden by popular music’s pioneers. Which, of course, leaves only one option for any ensuing artist craving the artistic credibility to approach the level of the greats. Crucially, McDermott manages to pull off the trick bestowed upon so few of those who crave it. He treads the sacred path so respectfully, so deliciously, so assuredly, so fucking sensationally that any derivative misgivings that might otherwise cloud his music’s authenticity and challenge his artistic credibility are quite steadily rendered faintly ridiculous.

I’m still exploring and absorbing Michael McDermott’s offerings. But make no mistake this fellow has bequeathed and, moreover, is still bequeathing a musical legacy that takes the breath away with its broad range of styles and unerring quality. Without a moment’s hesitation I’d recommend him to anyone on this GB.

Many thanks once again Bob lad.

:-0)

PS – the link is “Deidre Dances” off his self titled album


Entered at Wed Oct 25 00:59:42 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Sir George harping on

Far be it from me to question the musical insight and authority of Sir George Martin but let's face it Georgie lad we all know you might have managed a few hits with the fab four and all that but before they came along to save your bacon you were stuck emphatically in Ying Tang Iddle I Po musical territory.

I happen to fuckingwell love the harp on 'She's Leaving Home' as it is part of the soundtrack of my personal teenage years so with the greatest respect Sir George kindly fucking do one. Posh bastard.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 25 00:47:13 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Larkin Poe

Fer god's sake Todd I'm still in therapy fro that last spate of videos!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 24 17:37:18 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd forgotten all about Larkin Poe! "Thick As thieves" is somewhere in my office under piles of stuff. I have to find it. I thought I'd ordered the new one, but it hasn't turned up from amazon. I'll have to check.

Magical Mystery Tour EP - it has the 6 titles from the film. The ones not on the singles side of the LP. The LP was only issued in the UK in 1976, though many people bought US imports. I did.


Entered at Tue Oct 24 07:52:05 CEST 2017 from (32.216.232.1)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

By the way, Peter V, did you get their newest album? You mentioned a while back, that you had ordered some of their CD's. I think the new one is called "Peach", but I don't have it yet.


Entered at Tue Oct 24 07:31:19 CEST 2017 from (32.216.232.1)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: More Larkin Poe - 'Mad As A Hatter'

Hey all. Been away for a while and can't even remember where I left off. But I was revisiting some Larkin Poe, and stumbled across this live performance / video, from a few years ago, of the ladies performing one of their originals called 'Mad As A Hatter'.

"Just like the father of my father, time stole his mind
and I can't forget that one fourth of his blood is mine
I try not to worry...."

Apparently their paternal grandfather suffered from schizophrenia, so some unfortunate family circumstances inspired this song. And there must be some degree of worry that it could be passed down.

I've tried make some space between my Larkin Poe postings, as I'm worried that poor Al Edge was getting too excited.....but as long as you've been taking your heart medication Al, I think it's safe to watch this one!

In all seriousness, i think one of the things that attracts me to Larkin Poe, is the total passion and commitment that they seem to give to each performance. They have a lot of respect for what they do, and the music that came before them, and I think that comes through in the music.


Entered at Tue Oct 24 01:57:43 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: OH SURE!!!!!!!!!

It's easy for you guys to say! What about old guys like Haso and I? I don't even know how to e mail Jan.

I figure I'll only get in trouble anyway :-) I just came home from working on my x fishboat that I'm refitting. I was up there working away and the wind started shrieking. I laughed myself silly.........I'm not out there any more. What a wonderful feeling.........


Entered at Tue Oct 24 01:39:15 CEST 2017 from (24.114.57.103)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I had no idea there was a double EP "Magical Mystery Tou" in the UK. What was on it? The north American one I kinda like - mor than "Revolver" and "Sgt Pepper".


Entered at Mon Oct 23 23:33:04 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It is easy and painless indeed. I then have two bookmarks: 1) Sign Band GB and 2) Sign Band GB with password. I use the latter if I'm going to add a link.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 22:30:58 CEST 2017 from (85.164.75.178)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: SPAM control

Dear friends and contributors,

Please send me an e-mail asking how to avoid the finger from Mr, Cash, and you may be granted access to a password-protected, unfiltered «secret entrance» where you also can post links. It is very easy and painless. Thanks.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 19:08:42 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Comparative Beatles

OK, another just unturned bit, then my surprising £300 value copy goes in my north facing bookshelf with museum glass next to a first edition “Man In The High Castle.”

“If The Beatles’ professional career were to be plotted on a graph, then Sgt Pepper would be the high point. Rubber Soul and Revolver were also peaks. Magical Mystery Tour was a definite dip. The Beatles (the so-called White Album) was a straight line on the graph, a plateau, extremely accomplished and different in its own way, but not as unified as the other albums in terms of overall sound. Let It Be was also a bit of a down slope on the graph, whereas Abbey Road was a lift, a great album, which I prefer to Sgt Pepper. Somehow, though, none of these other albums, great or good, has ever attained the status of Sgt Pepper.”

Well, Al and I will add Please Please Me as a peak … and I am sure Sir George was talking about the UK double EP “Magical Mystery Tour” rather than the American LP, which has that fantastic side of singles As and Bs … Strawberry Fields, Penny Lane, All You Need Is Love, Baby you’re A Rich Man and Hello Goodbye.

Another great two pages extol Ringo’s drumming to the highest. Noting a Tug of War session where Paul had both Ringo and Steve Gadd on drums.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 18:46:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: George Martin: Summer of Love

If you ask Jan, he'll give you a password and the means to post.

I just looked on ABE Books UK, and the cheapest is a paperback at £31.67, unless you can read in Italian where it drops to £3.50. Really weird, hardbacks £200 - £300. Yet I've seen it this year in The Works (UK remainder book store) for around £5 and nearly bought another copy as a present. There is one deluxe edition bound in pink Morocco leather (!) and signed for £1417.

Mine's a first edition and I was turning over pages to remember stuff! Just unturned them. Phew, I nearly used highlighter. Thank goodness I didn't. Just printed out the ABE book prices and slipped them inside so my heirs will know.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 17:01:19 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: HEY!!!!!! Whad-I-do????

Frustrating isn't it John. I'm sure we all understand Jan's reasons for doing this. That spam became unbearable at times.

However when you get arrested and thrown in jail by Johnny, it's hard to figure out what words you used to piss him off :-) (


Entered at Mon Oct 23 16:52:25 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: George Martin

Wow Peter, reading what you have said I decided to go to Amazon.ca and see about buying the book. The cheapest I could find was $198.40 Canadian. I had more to say but I got the finger. I'm getting a little tired of the constrictions here. Sorry Jan, I know it's your baby. Perhaps you should hand out subscriptions to this site and maybe it wouldn't be so hard; on the regulars.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 15:12:21 CEST 2017 from (24.114.66.201)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: who wants to arrange that minstrel boy a song?

Peter V: I'd say the main problem with "She's Leaving Home" is that it's on that album at all. (I wonder if the thought crossed George Martin's mind that in going to Mike Leander, Paul was in a sense leaving home.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 14:19:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: George Martin cont.

Another one. When Paul phoned and asked for instant orchestrations for She's Leaving Home, George Martin was in mid-session with Cilla Black. An impatient Paul called another arranger, Mike Leander, to come to his house immediately and write the arrangement, George was annoyed. He says:

"Mike Leander did a good workmanlike job on She's Leaving Home. Twenty-odd year of hindsight make me wish I'd been tougher on it though. At the risk of being accused of sour grapes, I find that on hearing it today, the harp part is too tinkly, the voicing of the strings a shade too lush. Could it have been a little more astringent? "

It keeps sending me back to the album!


Entered at Mon Oct 23 14:10:11 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Watkins Glen

haso, et. al.

Listening to the Watkins Glen stream mentioned, it seems to be maybe a mix of sound check and performance. The 'jam' bits I would think to be soundcheck. Recall that when Eric Clapton showed up in Woodstock and said "let's jam" he was told "we don't jam". Unlikely that these instrumental noodley bits (which often don't seem to have all the boys playing at once) would not have been from performance, but from sound check. Somewhere around 30 minutes in the Band is introduced, so this may be the beginning of actual performance.

Found my path to posting links. The video should come up, instead of watch batteries.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 10:12:41 CEST 2017 from (86.166.233.40)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Haso. MacNeils hail from a beautiful, remote area. Stunning castle. I thought Fidler was English.


Entered at Mon Oct 23 08:35:04 CEST 2017 from (210.86.90.198)

Posted by:

Rod

That George Martin book sounds fascinating. Must read it.been studying up on production stuff recently


Entered at Mon Oct 23 02:34:45 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.198)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

In my earlier post "tape mix" was meant to be "tape box". I can't imagine how i screwed that up...

Pete, i figure Martin's book gotta be a gem. thanks for mentioning it. 'll be checking every bookstore i have time to stop at when i pass em....hopefuly i get lucky and find it quickly.......mail order ain't my way unleSs thers'S no other way


Entered at Mon Oct 23 01:47:58 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: new you tube

No, I'll not give a link, quite illiterate on that methodology, although I think Jan has given me the ways to avoid being J. Cash-ed... but a new, to me anyway, you tube recently showed up that is apparently a full accounting, more or less, of the OQ at Watkins Glen. The sound's pretty decent after the 1st 7 or 8 minutes. It's almost 4 hours in duration. The you address is /watch?v=am4zJ-FgZEc&t=392s. Perhaps an audience recording but pretty close, but others will know more than me on that as well.

I've always wished I had lived in the East(ern U.S.) at that time... for my money nothing would have beat the Band, the Allbros and the Dead. Perhaps only Santana or Little Feat could have slid in front of the Dead ((no offense to you Heads out there on the gb).


Entered at Mon Oct 23 01:27:53 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.198)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

A good habit for engineers and producers is to take copius notes, and keep great records. We can bet Martin is accurate on everything he states,and that he kept great records.

One of the accompanying things i dislike about digital recording is that now engineers tend to make their notes on the digital file, as opposed to on sheets that go in the tape mix, or in a notebook......... With sight difficulties i can't read the damn notes on the screen with the digital files. It's driving me nuttier.


Entered at Sun Oct 22 18:30:41 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: George Martin

You'll love the technical detail, Jeff. He always says how much they speeded up the tape, or changed the frequency to change keys, or vocal pitch! e.g. (at random)

"The reduction was recorded at a lower speed than normal, forty eight and three quarter cycles as we were experimenting with tape speed again" (Lovely Rita)

It's very good … I read it a while ago, but dug it back out to accompany the remixed Sergeant Pepper box set.


Entered at Sun Oct 22 17:24:33 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.198)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, i'm gonna have to get that George Martin book.


Entered at Sun Oct 22 15:17:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

EMI rather than the BBC, Bill. I can't see any other references, though in stressing Paul & John's effect on each other's writing, George Martin says that without Paul, John would have ended up "as a sort of Lou Reed or Dylan figure writing protest songs of one sort or another", and that Paul (given a proper musical education in orchestration) would have created greater popular musicals than Andrew Lloyd Webber.


Entered at Sun Oct 22 14:26:06 CEST 2017 from (24.114.54.247)

Posted by:

Bill M

Interesting about McCartney, Martin and Lowry. Obviously the BBC had the Lowry pre-Garth, and Martin knew the Lowry pre-Garth, but still I wonder if there's any sign of our guys in the book? Even if just a reference to George Harrison's field trip to Woodstock.


Entered at Sun Oct 22 13:19:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lowry organs

Still reading George Martin on Sgt Pepper. He goes into detail for every track, and I keep seeing a Lowry organ, played by Paul McCartney. e.g. it was one of the first tracks on Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds. George Martin points out that Abbey Road had a Hammond and a Lowry.

GEORGE MARTIN: "The Hammond was the Rolls-Royce of the organ world then... Despite its huge flexibility, the Hammond could not produce that spring-clear but slightly quavering note - the unique watery clarity we were looking for. The Lowry was a much smaller and simpler instrument, with a series of pre-set stops that peeped out a more limited series of sounds. If anything, it was more like a modern day synthesiser than a conventional organ. The great thing about the Lowry was that, whereas with the Hammond it was almost impossible to get any decay, with the Lowry it was easy. As long as you held down a key on the Hammond, the sound did not die away. On the Lowry, the note would fade away quite happily."


Entered at Sat Oct 21 20:13:35 CEST 2017 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "certainly the best Springsteen knockoff I've heard"

Here's my reaction to Shadow In The Window. this was a interesting time ealier this year in the GB. Some of the civilized parts of the theme & subject matter reappeared recently.

"Entered at Mon May 15 20:51:32 CEST 2017 from (67.84.76.115)
Posted by:
Jeff A.
Fucking A right that musical taste is subjective, Pete. There's a lot of stuff people like on here that I do, & there's a lot of stuff on here that doesn't float my boat. But that's their right. That song Bob posted the other day, it's inoffensive enough, & the writer's (McDermott) emotions are certainly valid & well expressed. There's nothing wrong with the song, in fact, it's certainly the best Springsteen knock off I've heard. The chorus is powerful & anthemic, but To Me it's just another run of the mill non remarkable song. TO ME. If some one else wants to love it, hey, that's what makes horse races. I listened on a pair of real small beat to hell Harmon Kardon computer speakers but have the suspicion that within a modest budget it's a well recorded & produced track. And though he may not have done it intentionally, no one has ever sounded more like Springsteen.It don';t bother me one bit if some one loves that song, but my opinion is my opinion. Far as I'm concerned, anyone who enjoys a wide variety of music is very fortunate......... The Decemberists were here recently, i was offered a pair of freebies to see them at a new place titled Brooklyn Steel. i declined. Nothing of theirs has really gotten me going- well recorded, great players sure, but, nothing i heard really lit a fire under my ass & these days i save my energy for something i got a good shot at really digging. "


Entered at Sat Oct 21 20:00:09 CEST 2017 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, if you recall the first time Bob posted the song McDermott wrote about his father, maybe it was around Father's Day that Bob posted it, my reaction included that McDermott's song had some good merit, but the production and possibly the writing reminded me solidly of Springsteen. I'll see if i can find this.


Entered at Sat Oct 21 18:43:32 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Willow Springs

My copy of Willow Springs arrived today. I put it on just now for the first time and am on "Getaway Car." Mrs V just walked in and said, 'Oh, a new Bruce Springsteen record." She has a point, but I'm highly impressed so far.


Entered at Sat Oct 21 17:38:14 CEST 2017 from (24.184.50.96)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, back in 75, 76, 77 i used to see plenty of The Lost Gonzos at The Other End, from when i was 15 -16 on.... The Bitter End renamed itself The Other End for awhile. then changed back to Bitter End. I saw Jerry Jeff there too, with them also. Then when The Lone Star Cafe opened, they both over there.


Entered at Sat Oct 21 16:09:17 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: London Homesick Blues

Gawd damn Englishmen and Scots!:-) What yuh want to do is put up on Youtube, "London Homesick Blues" by Gary P Nunn. Real Texas redneck music.

He wrote the song sitting in a hotel in London.

I want to go home with the armadillo............


Entered at Sat Oct 21 14:54:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Brand New Day

If you want something to listen to, try The Turning Tide by P.P. Arnold. After Immediate folded, she set out to make an album produced by Robin Gibb & fellow Bee Gees. A single came out, Bury Me Down By The River, which I have, but the six tracks she finished have laid around since 1971. They’re on the new CD, plus three tracks of covers cut with Derek & The Dominoes, You Can’t Always Get What You Want, Medicated Goo and Brand New Day. The latter is a magnificent version of Van’s most Band like song with Eric Clapton’s guitar. There are also two songs she cut with Caleb Quaye. The BBC Player has Brand New Day currently.


Entered at Sat Oct 21 13:20:00 CEST 2017 from (24.114.77.223)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I'm with John too. It does seem a pretty stupid arrangement.


Entered at Sat Oct 21 11:08:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm re-reading George Martin's "The Making of Sergeant Pepper" and his mathematical knowledge of music is astonishing. I like the bit where he tells the baritone sax player to play C sharp, and John Lennon intervenes to say it's wrong. George Martin explains that C sharp on a baritone sax is the same as playing E on a guitar. "That's bloody stupid!" says John who had no concept that different instruments had different keys.

Well, I'll stand up with John … it boggles my mind too!


Entered at Sat Oct 21 05:00:22 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: pipers

Yeah, Dunc I too prefer the more traditional uses. Any Royal Scots Dragoon Band and the gathering of the clans all that sort of stuff is a-ok w/ me. On the upside, I found out recently from a cousin that I'm 3/8 Scottish, not the 1/4 I've always assumed. My paternal gramma came out of the MacNeil clan, but just found out after an uncle died that my grandad's mother was from north of the border as well. I believe the last name was Fidler, which is a surname I've mostly associated w/ some Irish ice hockey players I knew of from exurban Boston, Mass. Perhaps there are Scottish roots in that name, but it's not quite at the top of my list of "find-outs"

On the R.H.C.Pipers: they have often headlined a Highland Games here in NH that draws as many as 35 to 40k on Saturdays. Only Band related thing, might generate some comments from those, here, who know a lot more about music than me. I had some conversation w/ the bass player in a Vermont band at the same Games a few years back. ("Prydein", I believe they called themselves.) They were a more electrified outfit as well, covering of some rock tunes along w/ some originals w/ their 2 pipers/pennywhistle/chanter players mixed in. He was the guy to ask, I guess... high school music teacher in civilian life, but at any rate evidently a huge fan of our 5. He indicated that the way the Band played or the keys they usu played in were nigh impossible to work w/ as to how a bagpipe works. Sounded like he wished he could come up w/ a way to filter the Band through their sound, but I was too illiterate to continue the conversation.


Entered at Fri Oct 20 21:20:03 CEST 2017 from (67.80.25.72)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Hey Buckaroos,

I hope no one gotta die to get some conversation goin round here. I ain't volunteerin so you can talk about me. Tough noogies.

This newish act, Iron & Wine, has a familiar sounding new song getting lots of play. The Bitter Truth is the title..



Entered at Thu Oct 19 23:35:39 CEST 2017 from (86.167.173.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Mike. Good for Robbie. Well done. ,

Hi Haso. Sorry for late reply. Just noticed. Yes that's what the Red Hot Chilli pipers do. Popular at such events and before internationals etc.

I really like piping and it's seen as important here. In Highland areas, there are tutors in schools. I really like all pipes, but I like them used in folk songs. Peter has had me playing Maura O'Connell's version of 'Down Where The Drunkards Roll', where the piping adds a lot to the song. I don't know Richard Thompson's work after Fairport well, but I think this is a great song and I love the piping in Maura O'Connell's version. And in many songs. I'm not an expert, but I think the Chieftains did a lot for piping.

And I think the only original Band contribution I made was that I noticed Garth playing the chanter on Acadian Driftwood before anyone else. Brilliant. I love Northern Lights Southern Cross. And I love Garth on this album.


Entered at Thu Oct 19 20:09:25 CEST 2017 from (70.24.156.137)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Robbie back on the rez

In an article Monday, the Hamilton (Ont.) Spectator reported that Robbie Robertson was awarded a special lifetime achievement award last Saturday, with Robbie personally thanking the Haudenosaunee people for giving him the gift of music and storytelling. Robertson, whose Mohawk mother was born and raised on the southern Ontario reserve, was presented with the award and a handcrafted piece of pottery during a ceremony. He said it was where he first picked up a guitar while spending many of his boyhood summers with his mother's family. “It did seem to me that everybody there played music and I decided I needed to get in on this. So it wasn't long before my uncles and my cousins were showing me where to put my fingers on the neck of the guitar. That was the genesis of my whole music career. They started this and I didn't want to stop."


Entered at Thu Oct 19 04:18:19 CEST 2017 from (64.229.12.106)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Black Day in July / October

This is good, but not Gord Downie and the Tragically Hip's finest moment, but it's a decent Lightfoot cover and ties to a recent topic of discussion


Entered at Wed Oct 18 23:28:15 CEST 2017 from (24.114.64.177)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Gord Downie

Rockin C: Yes, very sad. As it says on the Globe and Mail's website, he certainly made his last year count. Amazingly so. I do hope they'll get Ry Cooder to sing his eulogy.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 19:34:20 CEST 2017 from (136.167.102.146)

Posted by:

Dave H

Peter: I have a subscription to Uncut here in the USA and sometimes pick up Mojo on the newsstand. Both come with the covermount discs. In fact, that's how I've discovered some great artists like First Aid Kit and EMA.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 19:15:16 CEST 2017 from (84.209.140.60)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Basement Tapes doc

Had forgotten this one. Can’t even remember having seen the basement footage of Richard with the «jazz»-beard and Rick looking so very, very young. And Richard singing «One Too Many Mornings»! Great stuff in good quality on YouTube.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 16:21:52 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A sad Day

Tragically Hip's Gord Downie has died. A man who was loved by many people. Cancer is so ugly to take so many good people.

Rest in Peace Gord............you are missed.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 12:05:18 CEST 2017 from (24.184.50.103)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Bill Graham kibbitzing with Albert King near the beginning.



Entered at Wed Oct 18 04:01:52 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.184)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso. Over a breakfast of sorts ( Levon, Big Joe and me, Levon just had tea or coffee and toast) in St Louis, Levon said to me, In the Band we were just trying to line the syllables up. Just a general statement, but for what it's worth, he said it. G'night folks.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 03:56:45 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: lee/gb; deities

Lee: double that on the kudos to Jan. JQ: for sure He/She knows good music. No offense to our NFL's favorite J. Bon Jovi (yow), but He/She no doubt agrees w/ Levon... Richard's the lead singer.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 03:46:47 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Subject: Viney repairs globe

Yeah, it's Pete to put the shattered globe back together. Weren't you like an all-time roadie, in your early days? I always thought those guys can fix everything, although I admit w/ what our doofus keeps doing here, it is a bit of a tall order.

I'm thinking TNTDODD could be the campaign theme music or like the baseball players have now: walk-up music. You're right, that should help w/ southern voters. As for anthem, I'd lean to Chest Fever; didn't Robbie always say that they were just looking for almost nonsense for lyrics? Seems kind of fitting for today's US of A.


Entered at Wed Oct 18 02:53:13 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.184)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Norm, here's the Travelin McCoury's with Andy Falco, He's the young whippersnapper( mid 40s now) flatpickin. A Long island native, heavily influenced by Mike Bloomfield and many others, Andy was on my Woodstock session of School For Fools back in 02. And he is a integral part of the 6 songs, session that i recorded for this upcoming project 4 years ago. Falco is amazing, a serious badass on electric or acoustic guitar, mandolin, dobro, , and pretty damn deadly on piano, and to b ereckoned with on bass & maybe drums too. i know he plays em, has a kit... And he's a great guy. i can' t say enough good things about him. He's a partner is self owned name jamgras band ( they have their own label, their own office, their own full time manager.... ), and plays with the McCoury's and Joss Stone when his schedule allows. Stone will certainly take him anytime he's free. He also pops up with Phil Lesh occasionally.

Back in spring 01 all of a sudden i had to hightail it back to St Louis for work but had three more songs i wanted to cut first. Just guitar and vocals. The guitarist i was using wasn't available. My singer had a relapse of lupus. She recco'd a girlfriend, and some one else recco'd Andy for the session. I scheduled two hours, it was all the studio had open taht day & i figured it would work... We all met for the first time at the studio for the session. Andy showed first. I gave him the songs by singign em poorly and giving him the lowdown...one song i said it's basically Geoff Muldaur doing Blind Lemon Jefferson on such and such songs.... he gave me the song exactly like Geoff playing Blind Lemon& how i heard it. This guy knows more music than most music libraries might hold...... the two hours was enough time to cut three tracks cold with strangers and have great takes, live. It'll be on a second project nout next year)


Entered at Wed Oct 18 02:14:49 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: For What It's Worth

I was just enjoying some of my favourite old songs on youtube. I find Del McCoury and whole herd of pickers, 2 banjos, 2 standup slap bass, mandolin, fiddle and all playing this old Buffalo Springfield song. It's wonderful!


Entered at Wed Oct 18 01:04:26 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.184)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ. I agree with your general assessment of the evangelical type in the U.S. and some other bible thumpers, of course, they have their match elsewhere in the world.: "Not that any of those god types give a shit about this spinning rock. " Of course, it extends to Islamic extremists and other extreme religious types too...but, i might point out that there must be some people who believe in a God,that do live in a earth and people friendly way, to the extent, or different extents, possible today....


Entered at Wed Oct 18 00:59:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fecking Spotchucker (Spellchecker). I typed "both" it changed to "boys."


Entered at Wed Oct 18 00:57:55 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncut v Mojo

I buy both. Will have to ponder the difference. I've given up on "Q". Boys Uncut & Mojo have great cover mount discs . Mojo may have a theme, while Uncut has 15 tracks of this month's releases. This is very useful in the UK with less radio promotion. UNCUT also has an Americana bias, so probably my choice BUT from memory, I don't think you get he covermount discs in North America. Has that changed? They really are a major part of the deal.


Entered at Tue Oct 17 23:10:56 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Uncut vs MOJO

PV - Did you not weigh in on which of these two is better? Or the fundamental difference between them. It’s a $90 cost here and I was just wondering.


Entered at Tue Oct 17 15:46:07 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.238)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Ragtime, you got to set your clock. Things have changed.(To a degree, we're too old to fight).


Entered at Tue Oct 17 13:03:19 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sheep

There can't be any Aussies about or there would be hell to pay. A sheep is a "Jumbuck". I tried to get some of those folks to tell me how in hell a pond became a "Billabong" I guess it must be an Aboriginal thing.

I met a little Aboriginal fella at "Eat Street" we were watching a regga band play. The drummer was his nephew. This little guy, whose name was "Jupe" played the didgeridoo. He played in a 28 piece orchestra and had played all over the world. He told me he had played in the Queen Elizabeth Theater in Vancouver. I should of asked him about a billabong.

Anyway on the net here is a cartoon to watch as Waltzing Matilda plays showing the action of the "Swagman".

Bill, you must know the history of the man who wrote the song. I have it here on a brochure I picked up on the train.


Entered at Tue Oct 17 07:27:48 CEST 2017 from (1.129.111.152)

Posted by:

Doug

Location: sydney

Subject: Waltzing M

Bill M. Waltzing Matilda is actually about a sheep thief who drowns himself in a pond("billabong")rather than be captured. I agree it would be a great national anthem for us.


Entered at Tue Oct 17 00:24:54 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.238)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Bob F. Dylan

Eight photos taken by Susan , wife of Bob F., were used in the new Bob Dylan boxed set ""Trouble No More, The Gospel Years ."


Entered at Tue Oct 17 00:22:08 CEST 2017 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: GB

Well well welll...

Oh well...

Nothing changed here


Entered at Tue Oct 17 00:14:57 CEST 2017 from (67.80.29.238)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ if God exists i dunno what it might be. I doubt an extra terrestrial. I'd think much more a spirit than anything else. And i shouldn't have indicated gender, but it's force of habit. There's something, calling it God is likely a severe misnomer , a error o sorts, but there's no way to really put a finger on it.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 21:18:49 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Thanks Bill. Much appreciated. Just bought the Joni Bio. Looking forward to it. Oh by the way. Griffin; whose on the radio before me stood in line to get her book signed by Robbie for four hours. Part of that of course was standing through Heather Reisman interviewing Robbie.

You've probably heard about this; but Rob Bowman is one of three writers doing the liner notes for the new Dylan Box. One of the writers? Penn of Penn and Teller.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 21:15:12 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: This place we call home

Just chiming in to thank Jan for this wonderful place where we can converse, hassle and chide each other and share our opinions and discoveries without having pop-up ads and gratuitous video blasted into our faces and trolls making the same mindless comments to everything. This was the type of place the Internet was invented for. Thank you, thank you, thank you Jan!


Entered at Mon Oct 16 19:11:52 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: We're not looking for signs of life out there, we're looking for signs of intelligent life - i.e., something capable of compensating for our own stupidity. The big question is, Are we smart enough to recognise it if we find it? Recent history is not encouraging.

Al E / NwC: "Waltzing Matilda" was written by Banjo Paterson - perhaps a Finn? In deciding not to name that song as their national anthem, I think the Australians missed a wonderful opportunity to lead the world in post-nationalism. The rest of us get to sing seriously about being beautiful and/or brave but they'd get to sing about leisure and dancing. Canada should go with "I'se The By", though I could see others pushing for "Farewell To Nova Scotia" ("Au revoir a l'Acadie" in French, linking to "Acadian Driftwood").

John D: Not sure if I said I liked your interview with Nick Jennings about his book "Lightfoot". Thanks for playing Bruce Cockburn's cover of "Ribbon Of Darkness" from the "Beautiful" tribute. I wish BaRK has stuck their version of "Summer Side of Life" on their Best of CD a couple years ago.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 18:20:10 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.121)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: God

Jeff - “if he exists”. God’s an ET, right? And don't a lot of of us believe in life out there somewhere? Not that any of those god types give a shit about this spinning rock.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 12:52:31 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: 1st Amendment

I got up for a leak...............look at this mess. I'm exercising my right to say what ever I want.......you are all fucking nuts!!!!!!!

Oh by the way Al, I certainly did read what Pat Brennan said. Good to see him drop by again. Pat is a guy you listen to with respect,

Back to listen to Susie snore........


Entered at Mon Oct 16 12:46:55 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

1) That was meant to be: Fred, you gotta lot of nerve talking politics.

2) Al, i hadn't previously encountered that concert.

3) Pete , after i posted the post you alluded to i realized i shoulda left off : At this stage....You are likely saner than the choices over here. You got my vote....

Whoa Whoa Whoa!I just remembered what a lousy moderator you were . You're fired :-) Fuck it, you've grown up some since then. I'd take a shot with ya.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 12:46:50 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Jeff: glad I could be of service.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 12:34:48 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Al, I'm still getting used to the club that that taped show was held in being named Ebbets Field. Though the last Dodgers game there was a year and a month before i was blown full of helium, i dunno about naming a club for that sacred place. It might be like naming a bordello The Sistine Chapel, or a casino The Temple.

I did listen to pieces of the first three songs. When i saw your post i was working on a video I'm making so i didn't give a listen till i was signing off the computer. I'll certainly listen here and there, hell i even listen to Tom Petty videos on occasion now.

Pete, you have my confidence. Either you or Al, I'm happy, but i can't tell if Al is going for sainthood or politics or bartender of the year :-). I'm in charge of The Inaugural Ball. Ro gets to perform with Springsteen, & Patti Smith. And co-front The HeartBreakers .... My act closes the show & I'm in charge of catering as well...

And to think, i woke up to take a leak & got into a political discussion. Fred, you got a lot of nerve.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 10:45:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Anthem

Al, you do President, I'll do Vice-President in charge of vices. if the anthem was The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, we'd pick up a lot of votes (a) in the south (b) from people who like music.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 10:36:52 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Either Al Edge or Peter V for President of the USofA --- Making America Great....Britain again. ; )


Entered at Mon Oct 16 10:22:34 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete for Prezzie

Pete: Before I consider taking up my offer of US citizenship to cast my vote for you can you confirm you'll be replacing Star Spangled Banner as national anthem with Rag Mama Rag

If not then I'm not bothering

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 16 10:03:00 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm trying to work out whether it's "I'd vote for Viney as President" (commendable and a wise move) or "I'd EVEN vote for Viney as president - compared to the present holder." But OK, I'll do it. I warn that gun control will be instant and wide-ranging, and a National Health Service will follow.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 09:38:34 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

What a fucking website this is!

Potential Pope.

Impending President of the USA and its acting Chief Rabbi!!

:-0)

BTW Jeff - you heard that Gene Clark show before?

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 16 02:28:48 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, are you running for Pope?

We need you for President over here.

At this stage, I'd vote for Viney for President.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 01:19:51 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, I'm certain God forgives you. If he exists.


Entered at Mon Oct 16 00:57:11 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Norm: delighted to read you love Michael McDermott. I've only just discovered him this past few weeks thanks to Bob Fino kindly pointing us in his direction. A great find for me. Did you read Pat Brennan's post that he assisted on his album - Last Chance Lounge?


Entered at Mon Oct 16 00:50:07 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gene Clark live - Corrected You Tube order

Apologies Jeff - Set You Free This Time comes after Daylight Line

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 16 00:20:00 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The one and only GENE

Fantastic Jeff. You are truly blessed to have seen him so much.

For me there is no other like Gene. I simply adore the fellow, his honesty, his openness, his vulnerability, his humility but above all of course the unique musical offerings he gave us. The link is a treasure for any Gene fan.

It's a recent You Tube of a 1975 concert recording for radio the first part of which [around an hour long] was released as the live Silverado CD some years ago.

Gene is accompanied by two terrific musicians - Duke Bardwell [Elvis] and Roger White - Gene gives us wonderful takes on so many of his own treasures including two of his classics from his time with The Byrds plus a few of his covers of other favourites.

Long Black Veil
Kansas City Southern
Spanish Guitar
Home Run King
Here Without You
No Other
Daylight Line
In The Pines
Train Leaves here this Morning
Silver Raven
Set You Free This Time

The second part of the You Tube is not so great but still well worth a listen as it has several songs not featured on the first part namely Life's Greatest Fool, Radio Song, What is meant Will Be, The Virgin and The True One.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 23:33:12 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, Pete, there really is a whole helluva lot of great beers popping up. To me,tHe IPAs are the best, some great, some poor. I'm not in favor of the citrus tinged ones at all, but they are the rage amongst many younger artsy or wealthy types... wtf do they know anyway? :-)

When i was younger, i was never much of a beer drinker. Then in my late twenties, and through my thirties, part of my forties, when i was swinging a hammer way too many hours most days, i was often able to drink it like water, without much effect. Other times, i went long periods without...

The last couple of years i have my periods where a couple of beers a day are something i look forward to often . A couple of good ice cold ones is often a exceptional respit from the urban jungle.

I have a couple of friends whose wives keep some serious plastic beer mugs icing in the freezer, and a couple of cases in the fridge... A drunkard's dream if i ever did see one. t


Entered at Sun Oct 15 20:39:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm not a beer drinker either, Norm. Belfast Black is one of the very few I can tolerate.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 20:31:27 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al , consciously I've loved Gene Clark's music since i was 13 or 14, and prior to that, loved his music, possibly knowing the names of all the Byrds, possibly not. but he really was their backbone, he was THE songwriter, early on..

No Other is a masterpiece, as White Light.

I've seen clark perform often, In McGuinn , Clark, & Hillman quite a few times, with Rick & Richard in FolK City a couple of times, with Blondie Chaplin, with Blondie and Rick and Richard, Folk city, and in the Lone star. Several times different ways in the Lone star, the 1985 shows he did where The Burritos Opened up, with sneaky Pete and Rick Roberts, then he did his Byrds plus more thing, with Rick, Richard, Blondie Chaplin, Jon York, Michael Clark with a broken leg or ankle if i recall correctly, and f course, Sneaky and Rick joined em after abit.. Craig Harris may have been in that Burritos opener too i don't recall, if he made it for that....

Clark was a raw boned Missouri boy, maybe originally from the Ozarks, part Native American. Missouri sure grew a lot of soul, blues, jazz and rock and roll performers...


Entered at Sun Oct 15 20:10:19 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Not "Stoute" enough

First of all, it's hard to imagine that Fred doesn't like Richard Thompsom. There's a video of him and Bonnie Raitt singing "Dimming of the Day", also his tribute to Joni Mitchell at the Kennedy Centre that are standouts to me. His singing and picking. There is a song of his that really puts me in mind of Lightfoot.

Michael McDermott is right up there with Billie Joel in my mind in every way. Great voice, good multi instrumentalist and great delivery.

I don't know Peter. Never been that much of a beer drinker. Drinking a bottle of stout is like having a meal in my gut. Never been too much of a beer drinker. Playing in bars 7 night a week for a lot of years, (in my winters ashore) and watching "people?" kinda puts you off.

I remember a night years ago, (I was out with a friend, and he inherited millions). He took me to a ritzy club in Vancouver called "Lulabell's". He ordered us "Black Velvets" which is "Mom's" champagne with about a quarter inch top of stout on top. It just sits up there. That's as much stout as I could handle.

It may be from my screwed up stomach. At age 22 I had a perforated ulcer. In fact I should be dead. In the little old hospital in Alert Bay, Dr. Jack Pickup sewed up the hole in my stomach. What the peritonitis did to me was unimaginable. I weigh 190, (how many stones is that?) in 11 days I weighed 139. The doctor said the only reason I survived is because I was in such good physical condition.

Four years later doctors performed a "vegatomy" operation on me and cut that nerve a move they now know they should never have done to many of us. It has caused me certain life long grief. They thought ulcers were caused by stress. A couple of doctors years ago, (you can find this on the net) in Australia were convinced ulcers were caused by a bacteria. Doctors thought they were crazy. One of them gave it to himself to prove it.

Now a day they give an internal exam to determine what is causing the ulcer. You get an antibiotic which cures it and it's gone. So goes medical progress


Entered at Sun Oct 15 19:41:38 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Pete: well me arl mate I did a search of GB archives for your 'Richard Thompson would be suitable songwriting/guitarist replacement for Robbie' post. Sadly all the scrolling was to no avail!! It looks like your collusion with Jan to remove all evidence of it has worked to perfection. Either that or my marbles have gone. Come to think of it the latter is far more likely!

:-0)

Fred: I'll deffo put your suggestion to Kloppie when we next meet for a bevvy. But surely it's far simpler for him to get our players to take off the fucking blindfolds which they appear to don whenever they get within shooting distance of the opposition goal.

Incidentally Fred - if you really are thinking seriously of venturing into new musical territory then, like I recently did myself, do please take the advice of dear duo Pat B and Bob F and get onto this Michael McDermott guy from Chicago. Having now downloaded 5 of his albums I can honestly say their advice is absolutely spot on. The guy is special - perhps not innovative but simply so fucking good. Of the stuff I've immersed myself in I'd have to recommend the self-titeled Michael McDermott album as the most easily accessible but perhaps the best starting point may be the Last Chance Lounge album which has many of the Michael McDermott tracks plus a batch of similar quality stuff - on which our own PAT B was involved I believe.

Hey Jeff - whilst scrolling through searching for evidence to nail slippery Pete :-0) I noticed some posts from yourself early days in conversation with myself [under the name of Joe [my middle name] I presume for some incognito reason which I can't now recall]. It seems like me and Calvin your a massive Gene Clark fan which clearly hadn't sunk into my beleagured bonce or else had seeped out. Nice one mate.

Bill M - ha ha - yeah - you got me to a tee mate re The Wurzels!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 15 17:37:49 CEST 2017 from (107.77.97.121)

Posted by:

JQ

Location: Richard Thompson

I’m a fan. Try his Austin City Limits performance. Early 00’s I think. He plays with the great Danny Thompson and LA drummer Michael Jerome.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 17:28:01 CEST 2017 from (67.80.26.254)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC, posting fuck off to Jan is unacceptable behavior, Especially quoting Serge. You could post fuck off to any other poster all day long, i could care less. But to post that to Jan speaks volumes about you.

You are GB criminal #1.

Go to GB Guantanamo.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 16:52:06 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stout

Norm, while Guinness is pretty good, you haven't tasted stout until you try Belfast Black.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 16:49:46 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Galway races

It is Galway Races... not Calway as I posted. Anyway this is a link to my youth in seventies. (Let's see if I can fool the webmaster.) You go to you and tube and then past this: /watch?v=r2ZQ9nIKUaw

If not, this is the story. I was a fan of the Finnish folk group Cumulus. Their lead singer called himself for Hector. My professor in information science at the university had the good taste to invite this man to our seminar and talk about media. I WAS THRILLED!!! Imagine Robertson or Helm to be invited. I learned this song. Galway Races, it goes like this: didle-didle-dum...


Entered at Sun Oct 15 16:15:44 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tom Petty Tribute

I meant to ask, I wonder how many have seen this? On youtube at a Florida Gators foot ball game, just before the 4th quarter starts the entire stadium is singing, "I won't back down" as on the big screen is shown Tom Petty. It is pretty over whelming. Tom Petty was a god in Florida.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 15:56:58 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whiskey in the Jar

As concerns traditional English Folk.....There are many young folks now recalling a lot of traditional folk and playing and singing it well. I am very much a fan of all this music. Whether it's from Ireland, Scotland, England, Australia or Jamaica man, I love all of it.

Once a jolly swagman, sat beside a Bill-a-bong,

Under the shade of a couliba tree,

And he laughed and he sang while waited 'till his billie boiled......

In Long Reach, Queensland, I had the pleasure of staying at the "Jumbuck" Motel. I played music in Brisbane with some pretty damn good pickers, singing, "The Wild Colonial Boy."

Our son in law's father's name is Norm also. I told him, you are nothing but a bunch of gawd damn criminals down here any way. He said, "I know."

A bottle of "stout" you say? Well who will you get to hold the gun on me to get me to drink that stuff?


Entered at Sun Oct 15 15:56:42 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

My old-time gb friend posted something like "some people never learn". I believe that - as a kind person who he is - he was pointing at me in third person (as the linguistics say). - So true: when I pick up my banjo I play "Calway Races" (trad. Irish) and "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" (Robertson, some say), on harmonica "Pontiac Blues" (trad, arr. Sonny Boy Williamson) and "Scarborough Fair" (trad. unshamesly stolen by P. Simon). On piano "I Dreamed I Saw Saint Augustine". (Bob Dylan)

I never learned new songs. Are there any in Americana/Irish/Scottish/African/Scandinavian/Celtic/British?


Entered at Sun Oct 15 15:28:33 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

I still listen to "Old Mountain Hymns" and "Old Time Gathering" in C-cassettes I found in High Sierra in Nevada/California in late eighties. It was _my_ American dream. Here in Europe we live in danger. On the other side globalist bankers and on the other side neo-nazists. There ought to be the third way in between. I react by posting in political sites, you react by posting here. PAT B, IAN W, BILL M, AL EDGE post really high class and enjoyable material. Pure music... I envy you. But I ride another train.

And ROCKIN' CHAIR. Go to a harbour cafe and order a stout. Say that NorthWestCoaster is paying. Good luck.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 14:24:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Richard Thompson 2017

Another You Tube clip - this is Richard in June 2017, solo acoustic doing "I Want to See The Bright Lights Tonight." It'll give you an idea of the solo guitar style … not remotely folky and remarkably "fierce" for solo acoustic. It's open air which affects the sound.

I don't think Richard would have worked in The Band. First, he's a "leader" and he has strong opinions. Second, that very English phrasing would contrast too much. I can't see a vocal blend. Three, some of his lyrics would work (I Want To See The Bright Lights for Levon, Just The Motion for Rick) but most wouldn't. Four, I fear Levon may have made adverse remarks about the beret as stage wear. Five, guitarists say he is incredible, but I can't see him imitating Robbie's lines. He'd have done something different. We want to hear the intro to The Weight as we know and love it.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 13:55:22 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

And Jeff, you posted "NWC has had a running battle against Jan for many years now." I don't see it as "running" and "battle". I assume Jan H sees it as such neither.

I would have wanted more active reactions against north-eastern posters with strong opinions who unfortunately succeeded to frighten many posters. I would also have wanted more personal reflections and own material from Jan H. As a long-time Linux fantast this means really nothing against this wonderful old-fashioned layout.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 13:05:03 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Jeff A, my gb friend

You posted these lines: "But today he's crossed a line and should now be hunted world wide, with a price on his head." I understand that youd didn't mean it literally. However, I have been a part of internet scouts who are fighting against internet criminals (trying to get young people to commit suicide to get their inner organs, just to mention the worst thinkable.) Had a good co'operations with police when the criminals losened the bolts in the tyres of my car. I could have killed someone!

Yes my friend Jeff, I have a price on my head, but stay out of this. Have a very good Sunday.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 12:26:07 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Re: Richard Thompson

Al& Peter: Thanks for the input/advice/links.

I shall give Mr. Thompson another try.

I think it may be his vocals which have tended to put me off listening with more gusto.

Yes, I could hear/see Levon singing "I Want to See The Bright Lights Tonight".

Al: After watching LFC's 0-0 draw with Jose's Red Devils, I believe something drastic needs to be done....you & some of your mates should install a wider goal to be "used" by the visitors who come to kick the ball about at Anfield...in order to ensure more scoring by Liverpool's finest(of course this would entail some deft slight of hand to switch things around for the second half). : )


Entered at Sun Oct 15 12:15:02 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Pete: I definitely remember you championing him as the songwriting guitarist The Band lacked after Robbie left. It actually compelled me to re-visit his stuff at the time but like Fred I still couldn't make it past the Englishness of his vocal style.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 15 11:13:27 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Joni Mitchell Tribute

This defines RT's style … his version of Woodstock at a Joni Mitchell Tribute. It has all the English folk style that I mentioned, applied to a very well-known song. Also listen to his guitar playing.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 11:07:39 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Fred, I wonder if it’s his voice rather than his music. I have a long held theory that English prog comes in a line from English folk … both tend to a long sustained note (or wail, according to Mrs V) at the end of verses. The classic prog / folk link is “John Barleycorn Must Die” LP by Traffic.

Richard Thompson isn’t folk but was so central to English folk (Dunc knows I differentiate English folk from Celtic … Irish and Scottish … folk) that people are disinclined to see him as a rock singer … which he is.

I’ve had problems liking his voice, which is why I’d say Richard & Linda Thompson songs are a better way to get into it, because then you have his melodies but her voice. My issue used to be his accent which I found fake. He comes from London, with a Scottish father. Wiki notes Joe Boyd on his guitar style which he says can evoke a Scots piper’s drone. His accent is “lightly rural” which was obligatory for English folk clubs in the 60s. Actors call it “Mummerset” … i.e. a mummer (actor)’s interpretation of Somerset accents from the West of England. But it’s not a West of England accent in songs, it has a touch of the East … whatever, it’s definitely neither London nor Scottish. So I thought it “put on.” Years in California have taken that “mock rural” edge away, and it no longer irritates me at all.

His songwriting and melodies place him in the Ray Davies level. Try out an album called “Beat The Retreat” which is a Various Artists tribute. It includes Los Lobos, David Byrne, June Tabor, REM, Bonnie Raitt, Maddy Prior, Beausoleil and Graham Parker playing Richard Thompson songs.

I can’t really imagine him with The Band, though it’s an often repeated story. Though I do think The Band could have done a fantastic version of “I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight.” Levon lead vocal.

Link is a rare 1981 reunion with Linda Thompson, Richard, Fairport and a full brass band.


Entered at Sun Oct 15 10:16:23 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dicky Thommo

Fred: I think a real appreciation of Richard Thompson demands a pre-requisite of a love for traditional English folk music and that style of vocal delivery. Not that I'm an expert or anything [clearly not] but it's something that has always struck me because I've tried more than a few times [I think I've got three of his albums from donkeys years ago] but I've never been able to get past the threshold you need to begin to develop any proper connection with his music. I'm sure Pete and Ian can shed more light on this. I know from reading stuff on here that Pete is a genuine disciple of the guy and felt the reformed Band could have made use of his undoubted huge talent.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 15 06:07:13 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

For some unexplicable reason that cannot be articulated properly, I have an intense dislike of Richard Thompson's music (although I do recognize his talent with the guitar).

Perhaps it is his singing that grates on me. Or maybe it was that beret he used to wear. Or something entirely else.

Hmm.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 21:54:23 CEST 2017 from (67.81.96.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Sounds like a great show Pete. I expect that it's very rare, if ever, that Thompson fails to deliver the goods.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 17:35:29 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: S W Scotland

I know southern Scotland reasonably well, having worked in Dumfriesshire, in the Borders and in Ayrshire for quite a number of years in the past and having lived in Ayrshire and less than 10 miles across the border in north Cumbria for roughly half my life. I've even been through Beeswing a few times. There is a group of Dylan fans who meet each month in Newcastle and have done for years. One of the group (or a close friend of one the group and also a Dylan fan) ran a pub-cum-hotel in Dalbeattie and they used to have an away-weekend there from time to time. I popped in to visit them on at least one occasion and that involved driving through Beeswing.

I have often thought Richard Thompson could well have got the name in the song from the village of Beeswing.

Beeswing also once formed the basis of a question on "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" that went something like: "In which country is the village of Beeswing located?". The choice of answers was: England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Beeswing does not really sound like a Scottish name and, if you didn't know, it's a tricky question.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 16:44:15 CEST 2017 from (24.114.54.39)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Time for a new spellchecker. It should know you well enough by now to have suggested 'dream' rather than 'rollercoaster'. Or it would have left things alone on the assumption that a drunkards roll was something that Richard Manuel would put cheese into and ironed after a spree.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 15:48:09 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Anderson East

Please go to YouTube and check out Anderson East Live from The Muscle Shoals Studios. Please please ...do yourself a favour. Feels like the original Fame Studio Sound. This guy just blows me away.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 14:52:31 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Another tale not in the review:

He mentioned Fairport's 50th anniversary this year, and that he'd left in 1970 after which they had their greatest success. He played their 50th anniversary gig this year.

He said something like: "It was so great to be there and see the faces of my old friends from the band. Wonderful. Then we rehearsed for three days … and I remembered why I left."


Entered at Sat Oct 14 14:46:22 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Fairport Dylan covers were where I started my "Dylan Covers" playlist. I love Si Tu Dois Partir, my favourite version of the song, but I think you have to be a girl to think singing in French is fun. I can't see Richard doing it.

After Fairport, I'd check out the Richard & Linda Thompson songs. Down Where The Drunkards Roll was excellent last night.

The autocorrect is in an aggressive mood today … it wants Jimmy Stands, Is Too Does Parter, Airport Convention and Down Where The Drunkards Rollercoaster.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 14:40:38 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I didn't put it in the review, because it's part of RT's stage chatter, and you don't want to kill it for the next audience … but on here, I guess few will catch the tour!

Before he did "Don't step on my Jimmy Shands' at the end he spoke about Jimmy Shands and his huge hit with Bluebell Polka in the 1950s. The song is about someone with a collection of Jimmy Shands,78s which he wants to keep away from dancing feet. Jimmy Shands was an accordionist. Anyway, he said Jimmy was a rare combination … an accordionist AND a man with a sense of humour. He recounted a guest house in Scotland at breakfast. (Imagine Richard doing a Scots accent here). Jimmy had toast on the table and called the owner over and said 'Could I have some honey for my toast?' He waited, and the owner came back with a tiny plastic individual portion of honey. Jimmy held it up and said, 'Ah. I see you keep a bee.'


Entered at Sat Oct 14 12:45:40 CEST 2017 from (86.167.173.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Beeswing is there, Ian. I thought Richard's dad was in the Met. Sandy Denny's gran was Scottish and her father played Scottish songs. Do you play the Dylan covers?


Entered at Sat Oct 14 12:37:36 CEST 2017 from (86.167.173.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bob Dylan, the Band, Sandy and Richard

Fairport Convention were influenced by the Band, but I would argue out of that influence a really original sound was created.

I think Fairport's and Sandy's covers of Dylan's songs are great. Many of them owe a lot to Richard Thompson's guitar and Sandy's voice complementing each other, but the entire band is great.

I spent part of last week listening to the Dylan songs. Great and original renditions of 'Down In The Flood', 'Si Tu Dois Partir', 'I'll Keep It With Mine', 'Percy's Song', 'Million Dollar Bash', 'Tomorrow Is A Long Time', and 'Dear Landlord'.

I think Dave Swarbrick deserves a special mention for fiddle on 'Si Tu Dois Partir' and mandolin on 'Million Dollar Bash'.

Not only did Sandy have a beautiful voice, but to quote Richard Thompson on Sandy's songwriting - 'some of the best songs written since the war'.

Give the Dylan songs a rendition, if you don't know them.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 12:16:15 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Richard Thompson - Beeswing - an aside

Just one of those vague connections, really.

Beeswing is the name of a wee village between Dumfries and Dalbeattie in southern Scotland. And (hoping my memory is right about this) wasn't Richard Thompson's father a policeman in Dumfries before moving to London. And didn't they take family holidays back in Dumfries or that part of south-west Scotland?



Entered at Sat Oct 14 11:36:43 CEST 2017 from (86.167.173.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Review of Richard Thompson

Thanks, Peter for review of Richard Thompson. Good review I would have liked to have been there. I went CD hunting yesterday and bought 'The North Star and the Grassman' - getting complete on Sandy now. Should I buy Fotheringay, which was criticised at the time - some filler was an accusation I remember at the time and the last Fairport album Sandy played on when she returned to Fairport? Rhetorical.

I would have liked to hear Reynardine, Fotheringay, Who Knows Where The Time Goes and Down Where the Drunkards Roll. I played Fotheringay (the song) five times in a row yesterday.

I think the Fairport version of Who Knows Where The Time Goes is brilliant and owes a lot to Richard's playing.

How was Down Where The Drunkards Roll? I think my Maura O'Connell version is great.

I don't know Richard Thompson's work after Fairport a;l that well. A lot of competition up here.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 11:03:45 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Richard Thompson review

My review of Richard Thompson's solo acoustic show at Poole Lighthouse is linked. Brilliant set. This is the guy who might have joined the 90s Band, after all!


Entered at Sat Oct 14 06:22:41 CEST 2017 from (67.81.96.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Rock & Roll

Little Isidore & the Inquisitors . A kick ass band.


Entered at Sat Oct 14 05:02:54 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I keep a close watch on this herd of mine....

Lord, lord, lord!! Johnny Cash is startin' to git a bad rap here......and he ain't even around to protect hissef.......

I never bothered to e mail to get a "buy" to post links here any more, because frankly......I just don't give a shit. You want a link go find it for yerself.

It's just gotten to be awaaaaay to much work for an illiterate old sailor. Yoho, yoho, yoho! Blow the man down boys..........


Entered at Sat Oct 14 01:17:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I get Johnny Cash too, if I spell out my name with a lower case V for example. I also find it funny and appropriate.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 22:41:36 CEST 2017 from (67.81.96.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill. Though i quickly gained the ability to post links, i still forget to use the correct entry form sometimes, so i still get the finger. I've always laughed at it.Its startling, but funny as hell. And Jan is aces, as you know. NWC has had a running battle against Jan for many years now.But today he's crossed a line and should now be hunted world wide, with a price on his head.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 17:48:58 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

NWC: We've all gotten the finger, some of us several times as humans are sometimes slow to learn. If you send an email to Jan, he may (as he did with me and others) send you an email with directions on how to post links.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 15:47:10 CEST 2017 from (83.250.90.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: This site

I was just about to post an Youtube music link, which I already posted to the political site in my own language. It is there I am fooling around nowadays ... ten thousands of daily visitors. However, I got "the international finger" from Mr. Hoiberg. Again! No wonder the late Mr. Serge Daniloff signed his last post with these unforgetable words. You don't remember??? These words were: "Au revoir and f''k off." ('' by NorthWestCoaster, though). -


Entered at Fri Oct 13 14:35:21 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Don't know if there were any changes made Bill. Usually I hear; from someone; when Robbie comes to town. I just learned about it that day.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 05:40:16 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.177)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: That reminds me of a mid-'80s 45 I used to have - "Hot Knives Boogie" by the massed forces of the Good Brothers and the Powder Blues Band - likely an end-of-the-night jam at the Commodore. Not an obvious pairing.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 01:33:59 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Goode Brothers

Bill, saw the Goode Brothers in Vancouver in '86. They were playing a club on Main Street called "Cowboys 2". We were playing about 2 blocks up the street at the American Hotel. Ours was a pub, so closed at 12:30

The club they were at stayed open until 2:00 am so we strolled up the street and came in. They were having a slow night, so we had a jam session.

Those were the days of the movie "Turban Cowboy", so everyone had to be a cowboy so in Vancouver it was the in thing for country music so we were busy.


Entered at Fri Oct 13 00:07:19 CEST 2017 from (24.114.78.205)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Thanks for your report. Any word on whether or not the paperback is includes any changes? I've never seen the Good Brothers, aside from the twins in the throng at the launch party for the "Festival Express" movie. As you know, the twins, as two thirds of James and the Good Brothers, were on the train with the Band, Janis Joplin, et al. As a result of frienships made, there was Grateful Dead involvement in the beautiful James and the Good Brothers album that appeared soon after.


Entered at Thu Oct 12 19:42:42 CEST 2017 from (67.81.96.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Cleaning Windows. A very clean recording, great live performance, super smooth and tight


Entered at Thu Oct 12 19:38:52 CEST 2017 from (67.81.96.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Cleaning Windows

A powerful version from 1982.


Entered at Thu Oct 12 15:49:12 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Gordon Lightfoot - Robbie Robertson

I was at a reception last night for Nicholas Jennings, author of Lightfoot. It was great to see Gord again and other old friends; including The Good Brothers. Meanwhile down the street at Indigo book store, Robbie Robertson was in town signing the paperback version of his book. Big night in Hogtown last night.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 21:12:06 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pater V / Al E: Said the Yetties to the Wurzels: "Wah - you 'ad an car! - looxury!!"


Entered at Wed Oct 11 19:40:56 CEST 2017 from (107.77.92.27)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Pat B! - The Hideout in Chicago

Hi Pat - Always good to get your POV here! Do you know much about The Hideout club in Chicago. I have no idea where it is - my cab driver got lost too! I saw Robbie Fulks and others do a mash up of Merle Travis and Miles Davis. Brilliant and funny and top flight musicianship. My understanding is that the place is renowned for that sort of quality.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 18:28:36 CEST 2017 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Al, good to see you too. I check in every now and then.

I've known Micheal for almost 30 years. I played with him when Last Chance Lounge was released and worked on his following album. We're doing a Last Waltz tribute in November where Michael is Van Morrison and his fabulous wife Heather is Neil Young. Needless to say, I admire him greatly.

Not sure if this is good or bad but Sammy Hagar is wearing a Last Waltz t-shirt for his latest promos for his AXS TV show.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 14:46:51 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

bill 'em

Subject: brand new combine harvester

Rockin C: I'm touched that you thought of me. And thanks for the nice image of you and Ron swapping war stories for hours on end like that.

Al E: Thanks for cover photo. Are you among those aged Wurzel-heads, driving your tractor from gig to gig up and down Albion? Frankly, I was surprised to learn they're from the west. Years ago, after a few days in London, I spent the better part of a day hiching from Stratford on Avon to Diss in Norfolk - necessarily tacking southeast and northeast to compensate for all roads leading to London. Anyway, the most impressive structure I encountered was a massive sugarbeet plant outside Bury St Edmunds (or maybe that WAS B-st-E?), and since it was October the roads were full of huge dumptrucks delivering loads of wurzels and the roadsides were littered with lucky individual wurzels that had hopped out of the open trucks. Alone they looked so much like horse turds that that's what I thought they were.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 14:46:07 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Stereo sampler LPs

Maybe it was one of those sampler LPs that I heard, Peter.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 13:49:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Some of the early stereo sampler LPs from major labels put the train on too.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 11:46:30 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Railway sounds on LP

I have this vague memory of going into one of those furniture shops that used to sell gramaphones where a member of staff was demonstrating new-fangled stereo. The demonstration LP had the sound of a railway engine passing by, initially only coming out of the left-hand speaker, getting louder and louder, then moving across the 'soundstage' through both speakers, ending up in the right-hand speaker, where it faded away into the "distance".


Entered at Wed Oct 11 11:19:25 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dorset is Beautiful

The Wurzels? What! They're Somerset! In Dorset we had The Yetties, whose best-known song is Dorset Is Beautiful. Unfortunately the online versions are covers by … The Wurzels. I don't know how to describe The Wurzels and The Yetties … novelty rustic rather than "folk." One or other of them appeared in a tent at any outdoor event in Somerset or Dorset for decades. The Yetties apparently made FORTY-TWO albums.

The Dorset Is Beautiful 45 is one of the few songs on the Argo label, generally known for spoken voice poetry and Shakespeare OR railway train sounds. They recorded many Railway sound EPs and LPs. Amazingly, the EPs often fetch £10 to £12 at toy fairs. Even £7 or £8 in record shops. They also did bus sounds and paddle steamer sounds. Other labels did racing car sounds. Weirdly they are all collectable. I guess people play them while fiddling around with model railways and Scalectric.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 05:09:41 CEST 2017 from (67.80.30.213)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, Al thinks he's from Loverpool. Let him keep thinking that, don't wake him up. It's a good dream :-)

On the way down from Woodstock just now a blistering version of A Woman in Love ( It's Not me) came on the radio. there was no audience noise to indicate that it was a live recording but it sure felt like a live recording. it certainly wasn't the first album presentation of it. Great performance.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 03:29:44 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In the Beginning......

Hey Billie bad ass Munson! I been meaning to tell you this story for a while. Just went over today to pay a bill and was reminded.

I have a friend in Port Hardy. A machinest, his name is Ron. He has fabricated a lot of pieces for my boats and barge for quite a few years. One day a while back I drove up to his shop and had a Band CD playing when I pulled up. Ron says playing the Band huh? I said yeah, are you a fan? Ron says hell, do you know "Festival Express"? I said of course. He says I was at the concert in Toronto. That's where I'm from. Well shit a lot of that day got wasted sitting on some old barrels at Ron's shop gabbing about old Band days.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 01:35:22 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M and the Werzils

Ha ha.

Got two copies of everything they did Bill. I listen to all their albums religiously each night before mowing the cornfield at the back of our house but can't find one album cover to match.

Oh ...hang on a minute... you don't mean this one do you Bill [link]

Great find mate

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 11 01:09:27 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PS Pat

Bob Fino has whetted my appetite with this Michael McDermott singer/songwriter from your neck of the woods. Initial impressions - based on three of his albums so far - bode very well. Have you got any more local insight?


Entered at Wed Oct 11 01:05:27 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pat Brennan

What a delight to see your name. Not to mention your expert insight. Long Time mate.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 11 00:53:42 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: the cover of the Spinners LP at your link seems familiar. I wonder if the Wurzels of a later decade were fans.


Entered at Wed Oct 11 00:37:58 CEST 2017 from (108.88.109.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

From Keyboard Magazine 1983: When you played the Lowrey with the Band, you often seemed to be using a theatre organ, tremulant-type vibrato. GH: Well, every maker - Thomas, Lowrey, Gulbransen, Baldwin - made some attempt to put in a moderately priced Doppler effect, which was a kind of Leslie sound that was similar to the wide vibrato of the tibias, but at that time I wasn't really looking for a theatre organ sound at all. There were other organs that got that sound - Gulbransen, I thought, did it very well. But the Lowrey had enough bite, and I could make it distort enough, to fit in with what we were doing. The early Lowries had a nice little growl. I began with a Lowrey Festival, which had something like ninety or a hundred tubes in it, and that gave it a great distorted sound when you turned everything up.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 23:56:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sometimes unbelievable things happen in this world. A `Hollywood producer and studio boss has been accused of sexual harassment and taking advantage of his position. This must be unprecedented in the history of film.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 19:29:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: His father's sword he has girded on …

I've always loved Minstrel Boy which takes me back to Dave Steele's Folk Club on Monday nights, incongruously at Le Disques AGoGo in Bournemouth. This is the club where Manfred Mann was a regular. The Who and The Soul Agents (with a young Rod Stewart) were other bands which played there. I was always there twice a week, once for the rock band and once for the folk club.

Sublime version by The Spinners. YouTube has a picture of the LP, which is on ultra-budget label Contour. It must have sold loads, because I've often seen copies but tended to ignore because Contour aren't great pressings. Next time, I'll pick it up.

Brilliant day at secondhand record store today. Found "Idle Race" - with Jeff Lynne, which I mentioned last week, plus a perfect Island copy of Jethro Tull's Stand Up with the pop up figures in as new condition. Also The Eyes of The Beacon Street Union, which I've never heard but is rare psyche (so I believe) … I haven't played it yet.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 17:28:40 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

Hey Norm - the day I lay off hugging and kissing will be the day I start pushing up dandelions. Life ain't about nowt else.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 10 16:52:03 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sumptuous Harmonica!

What the hell do you do? eat the gawd damn harmonica???? Al. You got to knock off all this hugging and kissing......yer giving me heart burn!!! :-)

.........I'm going to work on a boat.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 16:14:55 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Hey Pete/Ian - just found a beautiful Spinners link.

It's probably at the Phil and has the most sumptuous harmonica intro to the beautiful ancient Irish melody 'The Moreen' [Minstrel Boy - everyone will know the melody which is to die for - all too often literally] with the audience and the lads singing it so soft and sweetly. It's then followed with 'Leaving of Liverpool' with Tony teasing the audience with 'Don't you know it then' as if he was still a teacher with his class [a superb touch] and then the audience singing along with the boys. Brings back so many memories. Gorgeous.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 14:21:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Simone;s live double is excellent. He has his brothers with him as well as the lovely Anna Mitchell, who toured the UK with him. One of my most played albums of the last year. Genuinely "new light through old windows." New Ian Felice album, produced by Simone, is also recommended.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 13:43:13 CEST 2017 from (124.190.44.26)

Posted by:

John Stirrat

Location: Sydney

Subject: Simone Felice

I know there are a few admirers of Simone Felice on this Board, can anyone advise whether his double live album "FromThe Violent Banks of the Kaaterskill" is worth getting?


Entered at Tue Oct 10 11:38:00 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gulbranson organs

In all the years reading about The Band, I never heard of Gulbranson organs. I googled them and they look like cinema / organ recital stuff. The huge semi-circular ones have sliders and tabs, but the Hammond sized one just has tabs. Looks a bit too "pre-set" for Garth. We have often heard of his presence for Lowreys and seen photos. Unlike a piano, organs are pretty specific. I would have thought an unfamiliar one would have made it hard to find the range of sounds in a single show.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 11:21:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Spinners

Link is to the "Leaving of Liverpool" by The Spinners. I always loved this. We had a busker as a character in a comedy thriller video we did who performed this and Scarborough Fair. I remember putting this on CD and playing it in the car while the actor sat in the back learning it.

BTW, Al … 46 years. Snap!

Their name shifted a bit. On the Topic EP in 1962 they were The Liverpool Spinners. Then when they found greater success later they were The Spinners. In America The reverse happened, where The Spinners started out in the USA, but became The Motown Spinners and The Detroit Spinners lin the UK.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 10:54:58 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.167)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, al. Lindisfarne were good. I owned 'Fog on the Tyne'. I really liked the Rab Noakes' songs 'Turn A Deaf Ear' and 'Together Forever' on the first two albums. You can see Rab playing this with Lindisfarne at Lindisfarne's 25 year celebration concert on You Tube.

I saw Rod Clements play with Sid Griffin at a talk/show on 'The Basement Tapes' a few years ago. Really good show.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 10:45:09 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Spinners

The song I always associate with The Spinners is "Whip Jamboree", a shanty about sailors nearing home after a long voyage. This is the chorus as I recall it:

"Whip Jamboree, Whip Jamboree / Oh, your pig-tail sailor hanging down behind / Whip Jamboree, Whip Jamboree / Oh Jenny get your oat-cakes on"

As sung by the Spinners, the chorus was really rousing, the "whip" being more of a "whoop". It may even have been the very first song they sang that night - it certainly was a song to kick off an evening with a bang - as it were. My young mind interpreted the last line of the chorus rather basely, I'm afraid - the sailors calling on the ladies ashore - wives, girlfriends, lovers or whores - to get warmed up, ready for some 'rumpy-pumpy'. I've since read that it is nothing to do with this at all but I prefer my memory.



Entered at Tue Oct 10 01:34:36 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: The Spinners

Ian: Lovely bit of nostalgic reflection/insight. As I read your piece the image of them bounding on in their matching shirts - Tony, Mick, Cliff and Hughie was so vivid. A night at a Spinners show was very special. I'm by no means a huge folk person but being at one of their shows made you feel that somehow all was right with the world. Don't think the void they left has ever been filled. Nor could it I guess. They were surely pioneers of world music in that they invariably included folk songs from all around the globe in their shows.That said, my own favourite song of theirs was a local one - The Ballad of Seth Davy sung by Hughie. Can't find their version on You Tube so I've linked a version by another local folk group The Leesiders.

As you say Ian, there were indeed two Gregson Wells opposite each other at the junction of West Derby Road and Low Hill. Bit more personal nostalgia here. Both pubs are sadly well gone now but were located about 100 yards from where I met my lovely Mag at The Grafton Ballroom some 46 years ago and about 50 yards from Mill Road Maternity hozzie [again no longer with us] where our kids first saw my ugly mug.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Oct 10 00:37:15 CEST 2017 from (24.114.52.242)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks for the thanksgiving wishes. Ate a dead bird with cranberry sauce on each of the three days. The first was in a club where the group performed "Georgia", "Long Black Veil" and "The Weight", and that was just the first set.

Lisa: thanks again for in link and related info and insights.

Kevin J: Thanks very much for the Walter Rossi article. Walter and Bobo Island (really Bob Parkin) from Influence played on Buddy Miles' big song, "Them Changes". I saw Walter twice in Toronto - once as a member of Luke and the Apostles (with Jack Geisinger) in '70, once with his own group in '79. Very humble man.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 00:23:17 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Lisa's attachment

I liked the item about the reservation for 12 at 1:00am for Sinatra and band at an Italian restaurant and especially the added note that the Sinatra camp would pay up even if the group was a no-show ! The man did always roll in style.


Entered at Tue Oct 10 00:18:36 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Vancouver 1966 - again

Thanks, Lisa,for posting the article with the image of the (Garth Hudson) organ-hiring document included.

I note that this 'Famous Artists Limited' document is addressed to the 'Northwest Releasing Corp', with an address in Seattle. Is this where the Seattle reference that's in that other accounting document comes from, I wonder?


Entered at Mon Oct 9 21:46:47 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Ha - this is interesting. A new comment has appeared at the bottom of the article stating that Garth was "well-known" for using Gulbranson organs, which apparently Eatons did sell. In all the talk I've read about Garth and organs I don't remember ever running across this make of organ. Does anyone else know if this is true?


Entered at Mon Oct 9 21:29:01 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Here is the original article with mentions of the 1966 concert.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 21:03:03 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

For Bill M and other fans of a very underrated guitarist songwriter Walter Rossi......bits from an interview with Rossi with Classic Rock magazine:

CRR: Can you tell me how at only twenty yrs of age you came to be the guitarist in Wilson Pickett’s band?

Walter: I use to hang out at the Esquire Show Bar in Montreal back then, artists like King Curtis use to play there, what a sax player he was. One afternoon when I didn’t have much to do I popped in to see who was playing at the bar that week, it was a blues singer called TV Mamma. I had never heard of her but on my way out a big black man with a huge afro proceeded to talk to me, he said "Hey man, you look like a musician" to which I replied "Yes", he tells me his name is Buddy Miles and that he’s the drummer with TV Mamma so then he asks me what instrument do I play and I told him "Guitar" then he invites me to jam with him the next day at the Esquire during the afternoon when no one is there. I accepted his offer and we jammed non stop for 2-3 hours, we really got off both musically and personally. After his gig with TV Mamma ended that week Buddy decided to hang out in Montreal for a couple of weeks and we quickly became good and close friends. One day he gets a phone call from New York and to my amazement he was on the phone with Wilson Pickett which blew me away. Pickett was filling him in on the new schedule of his up coming US tour and he also told Buddy he was looking for a new guitar player, Buddy told him about me and 2 weeks later I was auditioning for Pickett's group at Massey Hall in Toronto where Wilson was doing a show. I used to know all of Pickett's songs inside out; he was one of my favorite R&B singers along with Otis Redding, James Brown, Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye. Anyways I took the bus to Toronto and arrived early for the audition at Massey Hall, Pickett's band was doing a sound check and Buddy was playing drums, I was pretty nervous Ryan. Pickett finally arrives and they started playing a song called ''99 & 1/2'', I noticed the guitar player on stage had it all wrong and Wilson started to give him shit, when their sound check was completed Buddy and Wilson got off the stage and they walked toward me and introductions were made, Pickett calls back the band to the stage and invites me up to play, he asked me if I knew ''99 & 1/2'' so I said "No problem", the song starts with a guitar intro, Pickett counts the song in and 8 bars later he stopped the band and tells me " Walter be in New York next week". That's it, that's all, that's how I got the gig. When I finally returned home to Montreal I was excited to tell the good news to my Father but his reaction was "Who is Wilson Pickett? You're wasting your time, get a job my son and don't forget to stir the tomato sauce".

CRR: Around this time you had also formed your own band called The Influence which got you some attention south of the border with a tour that saw you opening for The Doors and Steppenwolf. What do you remember about those shows and what happened to The Influence?

Walter: Influence was a rock satire progressive group, a little like Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention. Louis McKelvey and I shared the guitar work, Jack Geisinger played bass, Dave Wynne was on drums, Bobo Island did keyboards and vocals and Andrew Keiler sang. We were one of the first Canadian groups to get signed to an American Label which was ABC Records. We recorded at Bell Studios in New York and everywhere we played we got critical acclaim, musically as a group we were way ahead of our time. There was a lot of interest in us and eventually it landed us gigs with Procol Harum, Steppenwolf and The Doors but unfortunately due to management problems we split up after one album. What I remember about the shows is that it was a totally different type of audience compared to my days with Wilson Pickett. The late 60's were about anti- war demonstrations, anti-establishment, anti-racism and flower power, drugs, hippies; make love not war slogans, peace signs, the sex revolution and good music. It was all quite amusing. I had more freedom to express myself with Influence as a guitar player at a much greater volume, Louis McKelvey and I use to play Indian type scales in harmony, Influence was a cross between The Who and Frank Zappa. I miss them all very much.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 20:50:17 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Thanks Peter, very much!!


Entered at Mon Oct 9 19:29:47 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Happy Thanksgiving to the Canuckistani Contingent :-)

That includes you Frederic of Thunder Bay..


Entered at Mon Oct 9 18:53:52 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Liverpool Spinners

As Peter and Al say, the Liverpool Spinners were very big in their day. I had a few interchanges with Tony Davis a long time back (probably a couple of decades or more) and have some folk magazines from around the early 1960s.

They used to play every Friday night at Samson and Barlow's Grill on the London Road in Liverpool. They had started (late in 1958, I believe) in the basement there and, as the size of the audience grew, moved first to an upstairs room and then to the ballroom.

In the late summer or early autumn of 1962, they were given their marching orders and it was then they moved to Gregson's Well (described as "two bus stops down the road from S & Bs") in Brunswick Road, opposite the Hippodrome Cinema. Apparently, there were two pubs with the same name just yards apart! The Spinners' venue was "the Walkers home". The regular club night was still Friday, though very occasionally, it switched to a Thursday.

They also played St George's Hall from time to time, almost monthly at one stage, with audiences of 700. By 1963, they even played the Royal Albert Hall. They used to be on radio and TV quite a bit, too.

I still remember when I saw them live. The guest performer would usually stand quite close to the club organiser or resident singer while being introduced - not so The Spinners. During the normal build-up, they were nowhere to be seen. Then, as their name was announced, they suddenly burst into the room - bounced in, really - not a casual stroll but almost a jog. And they were dressed identically, in yellow shirts, and went straight into their first 'number' - no tuning up or preamble. This was an era when folk club performers were fairly casual in presentation and dress, which is probably why The Spinners’ entrance has stuck in my mind.



Entered at Mon Oct 9 18:47:04 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: THANKSGIVING ?!?!?!

Kevin!......Bah.....Humbug! Saturday I cooked a seafood chowder (we had friends over). It had in it prawns, Dungeness crab, clams, salmon, cod, and halibut.

Now today I got to cook a gawd damn turkey!


Entered at Mon Oct 9 17:45:53 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Peter, I was wondering if the organ possibly belonged to Eaton's for some sort of house events and was therefore available for rental? Does this sound plausible? Because even if they did sell instruments it doesn't seem likely they would rent out an organ which they would then sell as new ... as far as the piano goes, I rather think it was a straight rental (probably from some place like Tom Lee Music) as I'd be highly surprised if the Agrodome had a piano - it was (and still is) a venue for agricultural events, mainly horse shows. Any music you'd hear at their regular shows would have been recorded I should think. You have to visualize a huge oval show area filled with tanbark, seating in bleachers rising all around the oval. For the Dylan show, they put down some sort of flooring to cover the soft footing and set up all the seating, with the stage raised at the far end where the in doors are.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 17:25:24 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Out of Time Chris

John D: Chris Farlowe. He appeared with him on TV on Jools Holland too and often appears with Van live in the UK, also doing the support act.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 17:24:48 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Singing with Van

John D, Chris Farlowe


Entered at Mon Oct 9 17:18:57 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Ian, I wondered about exactly the same things, though I assumed R.T.McDougall was the Famous Artists's accountant. Too bad we don't have access some of Hugh Pickett's other millions of saved documents for comparison.

For everyone else, I have a request in to Jan to let me access posting links, so I'll post the whole article when I can. I tried to do this some time ago, but for some reason my computer wouldn't let me link to Jan's.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 16:18:08 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Fred: You sure know how to make a guy feel like an arl rooster... as distinct from a spring chicken [or willow even!!]

Pete: yeah The Spinners were very popular back then. They could fill the Phil with ease but still used to do their regular local pub stints at Gregsons Well. On the C&W circuit the big local names were Lee Brennan and The Hillsiders who had a huge local following

Dunc: Not sure exactly why but Deacon Blue were massive in Liverpool and I think still have a Christmas show in the city. I think two of the local Smith brothers [champion boxers] come out into the ring to Real Gone Kid which has to be right up there in the pantheon of great pop hits. Lindisfarne [from the North East] were another band who made the same bond with the city and also used to do an annual Christmas show down here.

Bob: Lovely article. The guy was clearly a real devotee somewhat similar to yourself. It sort of underscores what I was saying about me perhaps missing something! Rest assured he's next in line after Macca.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 9 16:11:05 CEST 2017 from (99.227.166.246)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V????

Who is that singing with Van Morrison;on the track Stormy Monday Blues - Lonely Avenue; from Roll with The Punches?


Entered at Mon Oct 9 12:46:01 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan & Hawks - Vancouver 1966

Thanks, Lisa, for posting the costs of putting on the Vancouver concert on 26 March 1966. As I said earlier, I found the details fascinating and I have a few comments and questions..

[1] I assume that "Posting .. 10.00" refers to the concert posters. If so, is this the cost of printing the posters or the cost of paying someone to stick them up over town. I ask because the original article had a photo with a caption that said that 200 posters were printed at a cost of 10 cents each. Obviously, that comes to more than $10.00.

[2] To what does "Duty .... 10.22" refer?

[3] The document is on "Famous Artists Limited" headed notepaper and was prepared by "R.T.MacDougall" of "Famous Artists". The heading is "Settlement" and, having shown the gross (from ticket sales, presumably) and listed all the costs and expenses of the show (including Dylan's fee), it then shows what I had assumed to be the promoter's profit, namely "884.10". However, against this figure, it says, "Our cheque herewith". To whom would the cheque be paid? Why would the promoter be paying what appears to be the profit to anyone else?

[4] At the very bottom of the document (and this separate from all the accounting figures) is a line that reads: "Seattle Paid Bills 471.33". What's that all about?

Any thoughts, anybody?


Entered at Mon Oct 9 12:07:11 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: sorry, but, nope. She's 24. Although I could swear that only 5 minutes ago she seemed much, much younger. Sigh.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 11:42:20 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred - 24 !!! Yikes

Stop teasing me.

She's still at school really isn't she?

Please!!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Oct 9 10:48:28 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fascinating, Lisa. Renting an organ … earlier a Hammond. It wouldn’t have happened a couple of years later, but I guess when travelling by air it makes sense. I wonder if Eatons had a separate rental department somewhere? I can’t see anyone renting out a new one from the shop floor. But amplifier and PA rental were common in the era, so maybe they had a place that did that.

The piano is “rental” and at $72 compared to the $100 for the Hammond, I’d assume that was a fee for using a piano that was already in the hall. It costs way more to shift a piano than an organ. When I worked at the Winter Gardens in Bournemouth they had two concert grand pianos, identical Steinways. One for classical. One for “popular.” My old piano tuner (deceased) used to do the symphony orchestra and explained that you tune very slightly “bright” for what he called “dance band music” and that the two were tuned differently. They were always tuned before a concert, which would be part of the fee.

Box office ; three free tickets (charged to the artist). Unusual. They usually hold five or six back free. The ushers are a high charge. We were paid very little, but then the hall would have profited on that.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 08:23:38 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

For Haso and Kevin and all the other trivia lovers, here is the expenses breakdown from the March/66 Dylan concert (it's pretty cool to read):

Rent, floor and stage setup - $1100.00

Ushers - $218.40

City licence - $25.00

Duty - $10.22

Posting - $10.00

Organ rental and transportation - $100.00

Piano rental - $72.75

Ticket printing - $137.53

Advertising: Pacific Press - $354.20

CJOR radio - $150.00

CFUN radio - $150.00

Police charges - $75.00

Spotlight rental and crew - $160.00

Famous Artists Limited box office charges - $384.68

Box office night of perf, 3 at 5.00 - $15.00

It's odd about renting Garth's organ from Eatons Department Store. Back then it was still in its original building and location on Hastings Street, and I sure don't remember them selling musical instruments, let alone organs ... but there it is in black and white, so I must be wrong.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 06:28:33 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Happy Thanksgiving !


Entered at Mon Oct 9 05:33:12 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso, around NYC it's soda. But we've had the go round three or four times here. i was just kibbitzin' with Norm. Norm's an old kibbitzer. Give him a couple of sodee pops, you can't shut him down. :-)


Entered at Mon Oct 9 02:53:30 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Everyone keeps getting older, except for me of course. ; )

Al: She's 24.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 02:08:52 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That's a well written & easy reading article about Petty, Bob.


Entered at Mon Oct 9 01:43:24 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: "LIke Sonny Listen" - An Appreciation Of Tom Petty

Al, when you have a moment, this tribute by Patterson Hood goes a long way to explaining Tom Petty. Maybe it's just the hillbilly's that get it. That's enough for me. That's where I live.

"And Tom Petty has passed away. I can’t really fathom living in a world without him, but I known for a fact that I’ll never really have to. He lived a full life, not long enough, but fuller than most ever dream. He was loved by millions and left us a legacy of music that will live on for decades, perhaps centuries. He touched our lives and made each day, even the darkest ones, a little brighter and better."


Entered at Mon Oct 9 01:36:30 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mind you, I'm not saying they are metal bands, or that they should even be grouped together, but some British rock or blues leaning bands that had a harder edge were Wishbone Ash, Humble Pie, Uriah Heep, Foghat, & the Climax Blues Band.

Though i haven't listened to any of em in ages, I do have Uriah Heep & Wishbone Ash lps, i may even have some Humble Pie. It's all stashed way in the back of a closet , in some super solid cabinets i built for my records back in 85. My KLH 5 speakers , reel to reel, and turntable are in my father's attic, my Pioneer 828 or 737 is a friend's house in Saugerties. I guess i should go gather up my stereo equipment and start listening to these records before i'm deaf or demented. Or both.

Ken Hensley, the organ player in Uriah Heep, ,marrved a gal from St Louis & ended up living there till they divorced i guess. Back in late 01 i did some vocal recording there on two tunes that we recorded in Brooklyn in April of that year. the vocalist is Victor "Big Daddy: Johnson, who sang the vocal on track 5, Better Sell My House, on the Johnie Johnson record. In any event, the songs are titled Love Snuck Up On Me, and Blue Woman Blues, and they're mixed and mastered quite a few years now, i just never released em.... they will go out next year, either as a single , or on a full recording, but not the project I;ve been working on these last several years. A separate one. Odds are 99% that after not putting anything out since 2005, I'll get two full length records out next yeat. And hopefully just keep going....


Entered at Mon Oct 9 00:19:51 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

That time of year again - for those that care, the 2018 Rock n Roll Hall of fame nominees are:

-Kate Bush.

-The Cars.

-Depeche Mode.

-Dire Straits.

-Eurythmics.

-J. Geils Band.

-Judas Priest.

-Bon Jovi

-Rage Against the Machine

-Radiohead

-Moody Blues

I would think Dire Straights, Moody Blues, Judas Priest and probably Kate Bush are locks. Bon Jovi shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a Hall of Fame. Radiohead are loved by the critics but I admit to only knowing one of their songs.

A tough Saturday night, Fred.....The Habs got hammered and I had hoped Ferrari would redeem my spirits a few hours later......things only got worse !


Entered at Sun Oct 8 23:25:37 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, I never noticed a particularly heavy metal tendency then. It's more where the secondhand vinyl turns up in quantity nowadays. I suppose Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath have a Midlands connection.

Al … of course, the Liverpool Spinners. Big in the early 60s.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 23:17:23 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bloodyhell Fred

Just saw in one of your posts re your daughter 4 years in uni!

Surely it's not that long ago when we wrote to each other. Please tell me they're so clever in Japan they start uni ten years earlier than anywhere else!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 8 22:56:47 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Subject: Dunc

D: separate topic. As a native-born (presumably), what's your take on the Red Hot Chilli Pipers. They draw huge crowds at Highland Games hereabouts. It never ceases to amaze me how many 75 year-old & better (probably even some Twitler voters) can't get enough of these guys filtering Hendrix, Deep Purple and such like through 3 electrified bagpipes w/ a r 'n' r backer band.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 22:44:55 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: pop

Back in the day, Jeff, folks in No. New England just called it "tonic". At an old school variety store you might get a 7up or a coke or even a Moxie (yow!) to go w/ your Italian (sandwich).


Entered at Sun Oct 8 22:37:04 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Lisa

Yeah, Lisa that accounting from the early days certainly stands in some contrast to today's big shows, especially the stadiums. That said w/ the general collapse of cd sales and the like, maybe it's the only way artists can make big $'s. Ignoring, of course, all the copyright/ethical/bricks vs virtual conversations (see:J. Taplin).

On BEG: ditto, ditto, ditto to your sensibilities.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 21:23:15 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.167)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Maybe, Peter , when you were doing your road manager, you noticed that music was heavier in the Birmingham area in the late sixties, early seventies? From early beginnings?

Nazareth (named after The Weight) from Dunfermline have sold over twenty million albums now.

I wonder if I was just too early for the golden age of Scottish bands - Deacon Blue, Teenage Fanclub, The Associates, Lloyd Cole (English, but Glasgow University), Orange Juice, Big Country, Hue and Cry.

And I'm proud of the Scottish links with the Beatles, Al. From 9 to 15, John always spent holidays with his cousin at a croft in Durness. There is a memorial garden in Durness to John.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 20:39:10 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha Gobsmacked

Jeff - you're a feckin hoot mon!!! Love it when you're buzzing.

Bruce/Tom Petty/Bob Seger/Allmans/Linnard Skinnard comparisons.

I can only really speak for Bruce and Bob both of whom I love to bits; both with incredible catalogues albeit Bruce's profundity and the sheer gravity of his music and writing in his top moments inevitably for me projects him to the forefront.

As for the comparison with Tom Petty. Well I've promised my big buddy Bob Fino that I'm gonna revisit Tom P simply because Bob F himself loves both artists in equal measures which speaks volumes for me.

I do love a bit of the other two but I can see they tend to attract the American 'love' more than they ever did the UK love.

Pete - I've always associated the Brummies with heavy metal. You seem to have found by closer analysis that it has always been the case. For the record, I think you'll also find that the Liverpool area was always big on C&W and folk, quite apart from the more predictable beat music.

Fred lad - great to see you mate. How's the family? How old is your daughter now.Surely she must be late teens now?

Dunc - I agree about Scotland. Some tremendous music from up there. You know my two faves. No, not wee Andy Stewart and Kenneth mcKellar. Gerry R, of course and Teenage Fanclub - one of Britain's most unsung great bands with two nigh perfect albums in Grand Prix and Songs from Northern Britain.

Isn't the GB great when there's so many contributing so many different strands of music!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Oct 8 18:58:15 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You see far more heavy metal in Wales and The Midlands than in the south or south-east. Hard to tell why. It may have something to do with available venues. As mentioned, the large south coast resorts were early into discotheques, and with hordes of summer visitors to consume music. Soul is especially big along the South coast. Reggae is easy to pin down … Afro-Caribbean populations. Prog sold better in university towns too. You do find more folk as you head west, but then Canterbury in Kent was always a folk centre, as was Cambridge. There is a book there somewhere.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 18:40:24 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.167)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I found it interesting, Peter, about different areas of England being interested in different types of music. I never knew that until your previous posts.

I asked why is the Midlands associated with heavy metal? But I think you were probably in Brooklyn at the time. Any thoughts?

As you know, I never realised about the role of Forever More in AWB. My daughter's neighbour, who was full time in bands for many years, showed me last summer an early picture of a band with Hamish Stuart, Onnie McIntyre, himsel and another guy. Interesting.

I play Family quite often, saw then only once. I also wish Family had done an acoustic album. I think the music is really good.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 16:52:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc is right about local competition. If you want a great rhythmic band with guitar solos, why listen to the Allmans when you can listen to (say) Free? (Let’s not spend days comparing Paul Kossoff and Duane Allman!)

Haso asked about blues and mentioned France. I’d say “Paris” rather than France. In the 1970s the best blues and jazz shops anywhere were in Paris. Howlin’ Wolf stayed in print in France when he was unobtainable here.

I recall that my first Allman Brothers LP was acquired in Frankfurt. Southern Germany was good for American bands, most often on original US discs via PX stores because the American army were there … and were half the audience at clubs.

CCR were massive in Britain, but then I feel at the heart of it John Fogerty was in a different league as a songwriter, and it fitted a soul groove … certain bands worked in soul clubs … Spencer Davis Group with Keep On Running, Chris Farlowe with Out of Time, The Small Faces with All or Nothing. CCR also worked with a soul audience.

An interesting thought about sections … on my shelves “Irish” has a section, but Scottish is combined with English, unless it’s folky enough for the “folk” section. AWB, Stealer’s Wheel, Forever More, Frankie Miller are in with the main rock section.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 11:38:44 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.167)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Haso

I wonder if it's just too much music. I'm different from Peter, Al and Roger because of my Scottishness. \So I see three strands to my music collection - Scottish, British and North American.

On my Scottish shelves there would be full collections of Average White Band, Stealers Wheel, Bert Jansch, John Martyn, Frankie Miller, Rab Noakes, Jock Tamson's Bairns and Michael Marra. All these artists are great. I especially feel Michael Marra should have had greater success. (I have got Roger into Michael Marra. Hi Roger.) I maybe have more catholic taste than most.

At some time all of these artists would have had to move to London, apart from Jock Tamson's Bairns. Also there were Scottish equivalents. At the time of Fairport Convention breaking, I would see bands like the JSD Band, Battlefield Band and Tannahill Weavers.

W all played a lot of blues at one time, but it was hard to see the original black artists up here. Good blues acts used to come up from London to play. It was considered a real treasure if you had the Cyril Davis EP.

And in addition to the big bands such as the Who, Beatles, Stones etc I spent a lot of time listening to British bands such as Fairport, Fleetwood Mac (Peter Green), Pentangle, Joe Cocker, Family, The Nice etc.

Also soul is important up here and there are fanatics up here, who collect singles. Groups of people still meet to dance to soul. One single I traced recently was made in Danville and had 500 copies produced and is considered a rare treasure in the UK.

And for many Scottish people, Elvis is still up there.

I think those bands you mention are not well enough known here because of a combination of little exposure here and competition from the music that is already here. But I'm not sure. I'm pruning the albums just now and thinking how has this come about! Thanks Haso.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 09:36:31 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: It all ties into baseball...

It's also Ichiro's surname. Suzuki, that is.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 08:53:25 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Al, Pete, Fred: Have you ever heard how many rings a bell tree has?

Timber!

Pete you must have something to say about this "person from Suzuka" nonsense. I ain't buying it There's got to be a term..

Furthermore,if Suzuki starts making guitars and pianos like Yamaha does (for the unaware Yamaha makes motorcycles), i will never visit Suzuka. Nor will i ever marry a Suzuki woman, whether she is a Suzukan or not,

Al, Pete, the wagons are circling and the chickens are coming home........it must be a Jewish holiday ( Sukkot). Get this: Looking up "term for a person from Suzuki , Japan)" and what do i find:

"The name Suzuki (鈴木) is a common Japanese surname meaning "bell wood", "bell tree" or "bud tree". As of 2008, it is the second most common, after Satō, surname in Japan, with 1.9 million people registered. It is also used for many businesses."

Al, worse yet for you, it's also called a bud tree, which could mean a catkin, which means a willow, which means Michael McDermott will be upon you soon. Songs From the Edge of Scouse could be his next album.

Then again, Scouser Springs.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 08:15:08 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The lesson for today...

Jeff: I think the correct term is: "Person from Suzuka". : )

Suzuki & Suzuka -- different ways of being written, different meanings.

I read somewhere that Suzuki is the most common surname in Japan. Don't know if that's still true or not.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 07:34:09 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Freddie San, would it be correct to refer to a person who lives in Suzuka as a Suzuki? Or is Suzukan possibly the correct term?


Entered at Sun Oct 8 06:21:49 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.183)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin: getting ready to watch the race. I don't live anywhere near Suzuka.

Up until 2 years ago one of my brothers-in-law did. Sadly he moved back to my---as if I own the country...I should, but I don't. ; )--- neck of the woods. (His hometown)

Sadly #2 we never visited him especially during this particular part of the year.

Sadly #3 my daugher spent 4 years of university close(ish) near Suzuka...we only visited her during summer break (twice).

I tell myself it's better to watch the race on TV than to be there---live---in order to stop the sadness. ; )


Entered at Sun Oct 8 05:58:33 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Japan

Fred.......Japan Grand Prix today......hope you will be watching........I should be there next year so perhaps we could meet up if you are anywhere near Suzuka in early October........Fred and Jeff actually kept this GB going for what seemed liked months in the bleakest/darkest days not that long ago when almost no one was posting and they were just talking to each other ! ..............brown eyed girl has taken long breaks away from the GB for as long as I have been around here ( almost 15 years )...she will be back, I hope..... After all, her beloved Maple Leafs will win a Cup soon.....very hard to take as a Habs fan.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 03:02:16 CEST 2017 from (24.114.67.145)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Love those stories, Norm. And Lisa, likewise - I really enjoy that type of trivia. Bob Dylan was in Peter Grant/Led Zep territory in terms of his percentage of the gross. I still remember back to 1984 when the rock world - led by Mick Jagger I recall - went bananas over the Jackson 5 reunion and their decision to price tickets at a level that was unheard of at the time. I believe it was $35.

Testimony Vol 2 1977-2018 release date December 2020. My prediction and hope.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 02:34:43 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Wilf Carter

Hi Bill, you are right Wilf was born in Nova Scotia and was friends with Hank Snow. They did shows together. How I got Alberta, I just read his history on the net here. He had some dispute with his father who was a minister and left. He ended up in Calgary where he first worked as a cowboy, which is where I remember him from in my life.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 02:14:29 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norm: Nice to read about your connections with Wilf Carter, who I thought was from Nova Scotia like Hank Snow. The very first album I ever owned (as a little boy) was his "Christmas Time In Canada". The only songs I recall are the title song and "Punkinhead".


Entered at Sun Oct 8 01:19:27 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

God damn Norm, how many times do i have to tell ya, it's "pop" dammit. Any one who would call it anything else gotta be addled.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 01:06:13 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Gregg Allman

And,some solo Gregg material will be put out as well.I'm hoping for some more live/studio Laid Back years.Shows in the 90 's with Pearson and Robin Trower,from the 80's at the Ritz (with Dickey's band then together to close)in NYC,and a rare performance on organ with Rick-not great,on you tube,a rare and important collaboration-would be most welcome.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 00:59:32 CEST 2017 from (100.33.245.182)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Allmans

Gregg's manager said that the Allmans will be releasing some interesting material soon.The Allmans organization was never well organized sufficiently to release some historic music.For example,I have the Love Valley video-only a partial available-there should be more?Hendrix's Atlanta International Pop Festival is out,but the Allmans only put out the audio-where's the video?Some of us are super eager for any Duane video out there.They are said to be considering releasing some '73 stuff,a historical year for the second incarnation,some 91-92 blistering comeback years and some '98 stuff with the incredible Jack Pearson.The 2009 beacon shows with all the awesome guests,I'd hope would be on the list as well.


Entered at Sun Oct 8 00:32:37 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Wilf Carter

Haso, you should google Wilf Carter and read all about him. He was a very famous man for several reasons. Too much to set out here. In the states he was known as "Montana Slim".


Entered at Sun Oct 8 00:26:08 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cow Pokes!

Haso, yes Wilf Carter was Canadian. I think he was from Alberta, I'd have to look him up again on line.

First time I saw Wilf Carter was in 1950 in my home town here of Courtenay. (I was born in Comox here on our island.) My mum was friends with him, so she took my two older brothers and I to see him at the "Elks" hall. You should see this old building. They just refurbished it a few years back. It is a log building with the logs vertical. A real cool looking place. Anyway, when he took a break, Wilf came and visited with mum, and bought us all a bottle of soda, pop, what ever you want to call it :-). Wilf's second daughter Carol's birthday is the same day as mine. We are the same age, although haven't seen them in about 60 years. Wilf of course is dead.

Another interesting thing. Wilf's drummer at that show was a fellow named "Taller O'sheah". In the mid seventies I played music with him in a town called Sechelt at the Legion. I lived there many years. When I first met up with him again, I told him of being at that show in Courtenay. He of course didn't remember me but he remembered that show.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 23:50:29 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan and the Hawks in Vancouver in 1966

Yes, I'm here, Lisa. For me, fascinating stuff. If you could keep the article, it would be appreciated.

I've seen similar information for a solo Dylan show at the end of 1964. The promoter incurred costs for advertising, printing tickets, hiring a follow-on spotlight and operator, a sound system, security and so on. Dylan's fee was US$1500 guarantee plus 50% of any gross over $4000; Dylan only got his US$1500. The promoter made a bit under US$550.

In respect of his Can$5700 fee in Vancouver, I presume that Dylan would have had to pay the wages of the Hawks, the drummer, their accommodation, the costs of the Lockheed Lodestar to get them there and back, the wages and costs of the crew and the truck for the sound equipment - and Al Grossman would have got his cut, possibly off the top.

Not the most profitable trip all round, really - except for Al, perhaps.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 21:22:58 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: BEG

I couldn't say for sure why BEG left, but I think she got discouraged by the lack of discussion and variety of reaction to things in general. There wasn't a big blow-up or anything that I can recall and I for one really miss her - as a researcher she had no equal, and she contributed enormously. She wrote with passion and conviction about the music she loved and her own life, which was brave of her.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 20:00:55 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Bruce, etc.

Jeff: no doubt, I'll always need the Allbros, especially the original 6. One Way, Les Brers, the original Fillmore releases of Stormy Monday, Eliz Reed & You Don't Love Me ("play all night"), those are the soundtrack to my existence. But the last iteration was pretty top notch too, w/ the 3rd drummer and Butch's nephew Derek channeling Duane. I'm looking forward to Tedeschi-Trucks in concert in early December. Never saw Skynyrd, nice pun though. Was on my way down old U.S. route 67 to St.L. for tickets to see them when the radio said that Freebird was not flying anymore. They weren't/aren't the same w/out Ronnie Van Sant.

Clearly I need to re-visit Seger. I think I always passed him off as too popular/too much FM airplay and cover bands at a bowling alley lounge. No doubt Jeff's right about his street cred; if memory serves, it was quite enlightening to read Bruce's autobiog and see how late in life that he learned to drive. Thunder Road may be more in imagination than we may have then thought.

Much good history here from Peter, Norm, Lisa, etc. So Garth didn't always play the Lowery. I was thinking recently how varied he was on sax from the solo in TLW (IMND) to the tenor piece at Wembley to his duet w/ John Simon on the BBC dvd. And it wasn't even his primary instrument! That Wembley piece, he could be going down 'n' dirty at a Dew Drop Inn sort of place but he's there in front of 90k.

Norm: any of those country singers from north of the border other than Hank Snow?

What's become of our old friend Angelina/BEG? Had to think of her during the recent Ken Burns/ Lynn Novak film on Vietnam w/ a clip of Dylan singing Farewell on the soundtrack.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 18:12:44 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, Leadon, born in Minneapolis , was living in San Diego, California,& was already in the Scotchville Squirrel Barkers at 16 in 1963 when his family moved to Florida. Apparently he left Florida to return California when he was ready to leave home & stay left.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 17:51:26 CEST 2017 from (96.49.94.173)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Dylan/1966

This morning's newspaper has an article about the late Vancouver impresario Hugh Pickett and the extremely extensive archive he amassed over the years on everybody he ever dealt with - kept all the memorabilia, everyone from Sinatra to Rudolph Nureyev to Marlene Dietrich. Friends are holding a fundraiser to finance an on-line archive, which would be incredible. (Ian, I hope you're reading this.)

Here's what the article says about the 1966 Dylan/Hawks concert, the one I saw as a teenager:

"When Bob Dylan came to Vancouver on March 26, 1966, his keyboard player Garth Hudson needed a Hammond organ. So promoter Hugh Pickett rented one from Eaton's for $100. How do we know? Because Pickett kept an invoice in a Bob Dylan file, which he had stashed away for decades in the basement of his home in Kerrisdale."

And further: "Some files are a bit arcane, but others will be a gold mine to music and theatre fans. The gross for the 1966 Dylan show at the Agrodome was $9,617, for example. Expenses were $8,732, including $5,700 for Dylan, and $72.75 to rent a piano for his other keyboard player, Richard Manuel. This left a profit of $884.10."

$884.10??? Times have changed!


Entered at Sat Oct 7 17:20:39 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Leadon & Felder

Bernie Leadon did move to California. That's how Felder ended up in the Eagles. Bernie and Don, as I said played together from the age of 14 or 15. Don's band was first called the Continentals, (I had to look it up.) Bernie took the place of Stephen Stills. The band name was changed to "Maundy Quintet."

I don't know who all here knows the story of "Hotel California". The way Don Felder told the story, (I believe he was 22). He was sitting on a beach in California playing and writing music in his head. His cord progression came to him and then he worked on his licks. He said he went home and put it all down on an old reel to reel he had. Later on he gave the music along with other music he had to the Eagles. Don Henley came up with the concept of the lyric. I remember watching a clip long ago where Henley explained how he came up with the idea because he liked Don's music so much. They then worked out the lyrics and came up with (arguably) the best song ever recorded.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 16:52:28 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Scotchville Squirrel Barkers.

Norm i coulda sworn Bernie Leadon went to high school in Southern California, & that he & Chris Hillman were teenagers in the Scotchville Squirrel Barkers.Maybe Leadon's family moved , but i recall knowing this as a fact as far back as the early 70s.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 16:31:56 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Birth of the Blues

Hi Haso! Up in our country some of the history in my life came from my father and some of his mates who played music with him. My father played a J50 Gibson guitar. My father's hero whose music he played a lot was old Jimmy Rogers, "Mississippi Delta Blues". Hank Williams, Hank Snow, Wilf Carter. Many old country artists. If you listen to Van Morrison's album, "Pay the Devil" you will hear a lot of the songs I sang when I was 10 years old and younger.

We lived on a small island when I was 5 - 6 years old. No electricity, we had a wind up "Gramaphone" with old 78 speed records. I remember playing the 4 or 5 records over and over and singing with them.

Try searching an old black blues man named "Mississippi Fred MacDowell" for some real blues. All the blues and country was prevalent in the Vancouver BC area, at least from the beginning of the 20th century.

I started singing rock and roll in the early 50's. My oldest brother began on accordion but soon took up guitar. His pals and him played together always and got me to sing. They all liked my singing and I knew more words than any of them.

As regards Tom Petty. He and Don Felder and Bernie Leadon all went to school together in Gainsville, Florida. Don and Bernie had a band in high school as did Tom. Tom's band was the "Epics". I forget the name of Don and Bernie's band.

Felder worked in a music store where he taught a lot of these guys guitar. However Duane Allman taught Don Felder slide on electric guitar which Don had never seen before.

I've been watching quite a few youtube vids of Tom's live shows. They are really great performances and his band is hot! and the sound is great. If y'all haven't seen it, one I think is really good is Tom singing with his long time friend Stevie Nicks, "Learnin' to Fly."


Entered at Sat Oct 7 16:17:25 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso, like you, I like springsteen's music, sometimes i even love it. i was a big fan in my mid teens, before & when he was breaking . I saw some great shows in smaller venues. But, the spell wore off. he's great, the band's great , & when i hear most of his stuff I really dig it. But-..............i agree with you...Gimme Skynyrd & The Allman's any day.

(Al, did you catch the Skynyrd pun?

Norm, if you didn't catch it I'm embarassed for you. Scrub 500 barnacles if ya missed it!)


Entered at Sat Oct 7 16:04:57 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Seriously, Al

Was Jimmy Springwillow a Native American? (Jimmy Spring Willow).


Entered at Sat Oct 7 15:26:41 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Haso, I loved Skynyrd from hearing em after their second release. I saw em twice before they broke really big.. once in 74, another time on Valentine's Day 75. a girlfriend's older brother who had been living in St Louis returned and hipped me to them in 74. The Allmans, that band was as good as it gets.....Facts are indisputable & obvious. Google increases their obviousness. Gregg was 69 going on 70. As discussed be before, Seger is 72, in the older crowd, & had received regional & some limited beyond regional notoriety while in his teens. By 23 he was on a major label receiving support. Though he broke big the same period as Bruce. I put Seger in a different class.... maybe it's his more straight forward lyrical approach. And I do think Seger paid more dues & lived a harder life than either Petty or Springsteen ( Freehold & Detroit are & were two different worlds). Possibly false impressions, but I'd want Seger on my side in real everyday life.... he's a street guy.... Petty & springsteen might be too, but seger has a strong realness.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 09:37:50 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Haso. Good question. Apart from a short late 70s / early 80s period, the UK had one 45s chart. No division into genres. As far as I can see, with a much smaller ethnic population, “black” music was more mainstream here than in America. I spend much time in secondhand vinyl stores and speak to owners.

My travels are in the south of England, and within that there is regional variation … reggae sells better in Brighton than Bournemouth for example, Broadly though the stuff from the late 60s and 70s that sells is British prog, Tamla, Atlantic, soul, punk. If the first King Crimson LP is on the wall of a shop, it’ll be £40 to £50 even if in only “very good” condition. Free will be valuable. Led Zep very valuable. A mint Allman Brothers? £5 to £10. The first Santana is the most valuable of theirs, but that’s because it connects to Woodstock and psych. The GD have a strong specialist following, but virtually no mainstream impact. Early LPs would be priced high. From Europe 72 on, no.

There is a big Country music festival every year but it’s a niche area. Apparently the East Midlands and Yorkshire were big on C&W. Mostly, it’s Jim Reeves LPs you see. At 50p.

I can buy very good country and Americana at under £10 here. Allmans, Lynyrd … not collected. Not many about. Good soul is valuable. Early 60s blues is very valuable.

Yes, Chuck Berry had jukebox hits. Several of them.

Off to the theatre. More to follow!


Entered at Sat Oct 7 09:16:52 CEST 2017 from (210.86.90.198)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Tom petty

I liked Tom Petty. Never a huge fan but he had some good/popular songs. I see him more as an inheritor rather than a ground breaker.A bit like The Eagles in that respect.


Entered at Sat Oct 7 06:13:41 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: TP/Bruce, the new world/the Isles

Jeff: I didn't mean to be quite so obvious on age conversations. Jed could speak to the actual ages; I believe Duane died at 23 on 10.29.1971 and that Gregg was born more like 1950, but don't quote me.

I think your analysis of TP is right on. No doubt the OQ, the Fab 4, Dylan, C,S,N, Neil, Joni and many others were a different generation in the recorded music ages than TP, Bruce or Seger. And the level of play, writing, musicality, also may not match up. It is, as many have said, sometimes about popularity; however that is defined. Yeah, you don't need to be an arborist as well. I guess I'm like lee: Bruce is fine but the Allmans, even Skynyrd spoke more to this, sometimes "cranky Yankee".

It's curious, the whole radio/accessibility thing reminds me of taking music in to a music appreciation prof after hours to discuss. He, as is typical I suppose, was mostly about classical music and some jazz, but he would call out parts of the Beatles, the Stones, Van and a few others to make points during class. I'd take in the Band, Butterfield, B.B.; he was most put off by the lack of adventure in rhythm, harmony etc in much popular music. I was really gratified by his positive response to (as I recall 40 years on) Stage Fright and Life is a Carnival. The TP discussion reminds me of where this gentleman came down on Jackson Browne. At the time, it might have been just before the Running on Empty album, I just recall him being bored out of his skull.

So I'm curious, from Peter, Al, Dunc, how some stuff that resonates w/ us "United Stations" or, to include Norm and others to the north, never made much of a dent over there. Like the Allmans, the Dead, CCR, perhaps Southern Rock in general; Santana. Or is that just my assumption? And how much did the blues get played on your jukeboxes? I mean, obviously, it was a particular influence to EC, the Stones and Led Zep. But did you in the Isles give it as much notice as on the continent? Some of the music press here always has the sense that the continental folks appreciate our blues, jazz maybe r&b more than we ourselves did. I believe I'd understand a lack of connection to say very Americanized stuff, like say Arlo Guthrie or to go to more of the basic level... any # of "country" artists (Waylon, Willie, Merle Haggard/or Travis, Loretta, et.al.) And then what about bluegrass? So much coming out of the Scots/Irish traditions?


Entered at Fri Oct 6 23:51:11 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Nice to see you haven't lost your edge , Al :-).

It might take more, & more coincidence of fortune, to prompt your desire these days, but that's across the board for us. I never doubted you still got the goods.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 23:11:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Nearly all true, Al, except it was "Fuck me pink!" rather than "Fuck me sideways!"


Entered at Fri Oct 6 21:48:09 CEST 2017 from (86.156.250.41)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Willow Spring

Okay, okay, O fucking Kay you two! I'll come clean about McDemott.

The album Willow Spring concerns McDermott's own demons; demons that have haunted him throughout his entire life. But it centres around one demon in particular that was the cause of him perpetrating a truly terrible double deed.

It was as a young boy in school that McDermott was to first come face to face with this demon. And it was to wrack him to his very core for the rest of his days on this pitiful coil.

Bad puns are water off a duck's back for most ordinary folks. To Michael, however, they were destined to unleash such savage rage within him, an ire of such intensity that it compelled him to enact hideous revenge on the very worst perpetrators of the bad pun.

At school, any such revenge was curtailed because Michael was shit scared of his gym teacher Jimmy Springwillow who was one dirty big tough arl bastard.

Outside of school confines, however, it was a different matter entirely. Anyone implementing unbearably awful puns was fair game for Michael's ire.

And so it came to pass that two perpetrators of such heinous punditry - one a peaceful law abiding once hirsute but now entirely shiny headed resident of a quaint village in Southern England and the other a compulsive Blues wailing shit stirring denizen of the Brooklyn district of New York City - were to pay the price for their wanton punning indulgence with the written word.

Catching a Greyhound from Cheecago, Michael alighted at two hundred and fifty nine thousand two hundred and forty second street on West East South North Broadway Times two Squared in the very heart of Brooklyn before tearing up a very conveniently sited weeping willow and proceeding to ram its blunt end complete with roots down the throat of the poor unsuspecting Noo Yorker before carrying him and the willow to the nearest shoreline and paddling with both tree and the by this time exceedingly blue bluesman across the pond to the gentile southern Poole coast of England where he promptly located the remaining punny mad Englishman and promptly shoved the pretty top end of the willow up the haemorrhoid pitted arsehole of the man from Poole.

As the last vestiges of the weeping arbor disappeared up the Englishmans lower orifice, the poor soul was heard to gasp in his finest Dorset drawl “fuck me sideways, from whence did that fucking Willow Spring?”

Whereupon, Michael McDermott smiled a sinister smile, immediately composed 12 amazing songs and decided there and then to become a great rock star with his sole problem being what to name his new album.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Oct 6 20:26:03 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, regardless of who has been in the Heartbreakers, they are all always great players. Departures never hurt the music. It's always been a great band. ... I did not imply a competition, i referred to your taste. It's significant that you are a Northern Boy relating to or appreciating Petty more than Bruce.

Interesting question you pointed out Lee: Who is the workingman in the U.S.A or for that matter anywhere these days?


Entered at Fri Oct 6 20:24:04 CEST 2017 from (142.112.159.84)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Free Girl Now

After what seemed like years of seeing too much Tom Petty on TV and videos of a string of songs that didn't do anything for me at all - I remember catching TP on David letterman one night and was knocked out by his performance of a new song called "A Room at the Top".......I immediately went out and purchased the album/cd "Echo" and really liked it.......standouts were "Room at the Top", "Swingin" and the great "Free Girl Now".....there was also a song about Billy the Kid that I liked.

Funny, I never thought of a comparison of Tom Petty and Springsteen but in the late 70's there were definitely Bob Seger and Bruce Springsteen camps. I far preferred Seger and loved his shows. What a band he had.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 20:10:29 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Tom vs. Bruce

Jeff, I don't think there is a competition there, just that when listening to Tom in live setting, I was struck that there was more showmanship (at least aurally) than I get from his studio works. Whether the "workingman" (whoever that is these days) identifies with one or the other is up for grabs. Bruce embraces the New Joisey attitude, persona and mythology, while Petty hewed more to the Florida/West Coast vibes and a dose of aw shucks humility. It is interesting that both have admitted to periods of depression, something we plebes might find odd for ones who have attained fame, riches and acclimation from millions. But take your muse from whence it comes, eh. (Not something that I am a stranger to. I was playing for a friend years ago who exclaimed, "Jesus, Lee! Don't you know any HAPPY songs? Um, no.) Just personally, I gravitate more to Tom than to Bruce.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 19:39:16 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, i meant to ask you: Dare you consider Tom Petty to be the actual Workingman's Boss? But I had a rocking chair moment. Now I'm stationary.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 19:23:24 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, dare you actually consider Tom Petty to be The Workingman's Springsteen?

Al Edge, are you gonna take that softly?


Entered at Fri Oct 6 18:19:32 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Tom Petty's Legacy

Just finished a two-day-span listen to Petty's Live Anthology (four disks). He was no lightweight. At times there is a very Springsteenesque quality...big band, big hooks, iconic images, but with a humility that IMO his Bruceness lacks (not a big fan of The Boss).

Some really great tunes, much more than American Girl. Here Comes My Girl, Even the Losers, Breakdown, Refugee, Louisiana Rain, A Woman In Love, It's Good to Be King, Mary Jane's Last Dance(*), Runnin' Down a Dream, Free Fallin', The Waiting, Century City and more.

(*) Blew up my cherished Gallien Kruger amp doing a high end double-stop on this song. Took the speaker out as well...or vice versa. Here one second, gone the next. Luckily it was a party and not a gig.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 11:22:50 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Willows

The bark is the source of Aspirin, and was chewed before aspirin was developed.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 09:47:57 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

To be complete Pete, to me it would seem the tree and wood are willow, but the type of willow is determined by the hanging willow, i guess the bud or catkin. Logically, it would appear the bud got to be the differentiation that cause the different name. By the way, the branches or stems the buds hang on are used for magician's wands. See the link, scroll down the alphabetized list to W.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 09:14:59 CEST 2017 from (24.184.49.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, am i supposed to be a sociologist, arborist. & linguist now too? I didn't even graduate college. If the bud ain't a willow, everything is fucked up. If the willow isn't what's hanging on a weeping willow tree, it makes no sense. If the willow isn't what is hanging on a pussy willow tree, or if the willow isn't what's s hanging on a goat willow tree, it makes no sense. Ain't the bud what differentiates the trees?

Al, this is your fault Bucko. Promoting records by title. Speaking of music, I just got back from an afternoon departure for Albany, driving a friend back & forth last minute for a hour visit with some one up there. Just about to pull into the Modena pit stop area , on the NY Thruway, south of New Paltz, King Harvest starts on KZE, with a little static. By the time i parked,the static ended thankfully,. and we sat in silence till it ended. My eyes were turning yellow, but..........

songs & music that bleeds.

i'm driving a Ford Flex with 7K on it for a bit. Got a cd player in it too. And it's comfortable. It might be what i buy when i do buy a car.the gas mileage sucks, it's sizeable and AWD. but , I'm thinking a 2WD version would give better mileage, and have a noticeably smoother riding suspension as well.


Entered at Fri Oct 6 08:49:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Willowing under fire

Jeff, is this a British / American English difference? The tree and wood are willows. Willows produce catkins and stems with buds. We don't call catkins 'willows.'


Entered at Fri Oct 6 00:07:32 CEST 2017 from (76.71.7.179)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Using an example of how a Mum might react is a kind way to end an argument, actually. My Mum used to say that very thing to me.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 17:17:58 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, that's the wood of the tree itself that is springy. Not the willow part.

The willows have names. Goat willow, pussy willow.......

What was McDermott writing about? Not the Willow Springs Raceway, I hope.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 16:47:07 CEST 2017 from (213.205.198.253)

Posted by:

Peter V

Springy willows. Jeff you clearly know little about cricket bats or longbows, both rely on the springiness of willows. Remember Agincourt!


Entered at Thu Oct 5 16:34:56 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Have you ever seen a willow spring?

Al, you are aware that unless motorized or in some other way propelled or stimulated, willows won't spring.. Now I'm curious what McDermott was writing about.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 12:44:06 CEST 2017 from (86.175.225.14)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hey Kev lad - Michael McDermott

I'm guessing you missed my post about the guy but you won't go wrong with Willow Springs - it's a very special album.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 5 12:40:17 CEST 2017 from (86.175.225.14)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha

Back to bed and no Maryland cookies for Kev!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Oct 5 12:20:28 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Girl From The North Country

"Girl From The North Country" will be transferring to the West End, to the Noel Coward Theatre to be precise, at the end of the year - previews from 29 December. It will run there until 31 March 2018.

There is no indication that I can see as to whether the cast will be the same but, if it does well in the West End, it is possible that it will transfer to Broadway in due course.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 11:40:33 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.167)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Catching up

Love the Beatles, every song, every album. 'A Hard Day's Night' is right up there for me.

Bob F. Thanks re Neil Young. I hate those Neil/Crazy Horse-going nowhere-long jams. But from Neil Young to Hawks and Doves is just a run of sheer brilliance. Not sure of Cow Palace. It irritates me at times, whereas the Performance series is again sheer brilliance.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 10:57:08 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: You know that can't be bad

Kevin, my mum would have told me to go back to bed and get out the right side.

Genius. We have one of those 99p music box mechanisms. It plays Fur Elise when you turn the handle. My grandson was playing Fur Elise on the piano last night for a long time. Phew! Kids can play it. How could Ludwig van Beethoven be a genius?

The link is to a long article on She Loves You from BeatlesBook. Very thorough it is too.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 08:34:38 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Yes, the downside of "Fan Pages" is that you have to deal with fan level commentary. Hilarious that anyone could think of "She Loves You" as musical genius !

Michael McDermott: Other than a taste, I don't like filling up on YouTube - but I did get enough of a feel based on the Bob F recommendations to want to download albums. Might be a few weeks but like Simon Felice and the mighty great Joe Ely - this guy does seem at first sample to be the real deal.

Jeff: Your thoughts on Tom Petty mirrored pretty much exactly how I felt. Not an easy thing to have described - especially since the quality of his band was involved.

John D: Thank you !


Entered at Thu Oct 5 04:35:09 CEST 2017 from (64.229.180.136)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "American Girl"

Kevin J: A nice succinct sentence, that second one of yours!


Entered at Thu Oct 5 02:52:24 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tom Petty amonga group

Not sure who knows this, it hasn't been mentioned. Tom Petty is among a group who were tutored on guitar by Don Felder, and as well some of his song writing skills rubbed off.

I read quite some time ago, and then watched a piece on youtube how Don Felder spent a lot of time making some income teaching guitar to many of the up and coming. Before Eagles.


Entered at Thu Oct 5 00:22:15 CEST 2017 from (86.175.225.14)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Beatle B sides

Funny you should mention From Me To You as your fave Pete. For whatever reason - maybe we were a few years younger than you and your mates - I can clearly recall that once one of us had got hold of the single and we all began to soak it up we all very quickly veered away from FMTY and homed in on the flip side. I can picture a gang of us walking along Church Road near where we lived singing it - word and aohh aohh perfect - you've been good to me you made laugh when I was blue and eternally I'll always be in love with you and all I gotta do is Thank You Girl, Thank You Girl, aohh, oahh - at the very top of our voices. Happy days indeed.

:-0)

The thing was it was an unprecedented and unstoppable tidal wave of sheer unbridled excitement with that initial clutch of singles. They simply tore down everything in their path as number one followed number one. Little else seemed to matter - and very possibly didn't. LOL

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 4 23:52:59 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: If There's anything That You want …

From Me To You sits in between Please Please Me and She Loves You and is my favourite of the three, but they're all total genius. As Al says, some nursery rhymes have survived for centuries. And B-sides … You Can't Do That? Better than most artists manage in a lifetime.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 23:44:41 CEST 2017 from (86.175.225.14)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Kev: Please Please me, She Loves You and I Wanna Hold You Hand stand collectively as unique landmarks in popular music history. Their sole link with nursery rhymes is that their unique genius and innovation will stand the same test of time.

I don't want to enter into the Tom Petty debate arena since suffice to say the guy's music was never going to cut it for me beyond the 'not three bad' level. But that ain't any adverse reflection on poor old Tom. It's merely different strokes etc I guess.

On a far more important level as far as I'm concerned with no disrespect to dear Tom P [god rest his soul], Bob Fino has alerted us all recently to an artist who from what I've been soaking up this past week or so since buying his latest album - Willow Springs - is right up there with anyone we care to name. Musically beautiful, vocally perfect and lyrically amazing, it seems to me that Michael McDermott is carrying the fucking torch for us all right now. Bloodyhell. What a fucking album.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Oct 4 22:58:32 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dylan was a phenomena at 22. Petty was 12 years old. A younger brother, likely music offspring, maybe a musical younger sibling....

When Harrison was 20 -21, he was world famous and a pretty well seasoned performer. Petty was 13- 14. A musical offspring, maybe a musical younger sibling...

Haso, Gregg Allman was just shy of 70 when he died. But, he was broke at a younger age than Petty.

In historical terms, i guess they were the same generation, as i pointed out, eligible to go to Vietnam and old enough to be at woodstock are qualifiers... musically, i;d say Petty was a child of, or a younger sibling. Arguments could be made both ways. but you can;t listen to Petty without hearing McGuinn & Dylan so many ways. And campbell's guitar has so many older players in it.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 21:55:17 CEST 2017 from (71.234.142.242)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: Petty, Musical history

On Petty: yeah, Jeff, your points make some sense and especially relative to the other comment about MTV. But was he really a lot younger? I mean RR's what, 73 or 4 (thankfully still going strong). What's EC, 72? Gregg was 67, I think and Butch Trucks, 69. I certainly always thought of them as contemporaries w/ the OQ. The pop part of it makes sense to me, but that said I did think him more than just American Girl. For my part, the hooks in Refugee are pretty sublime, especially for 80's and later RnR. Only saw him once; on tour w/ Dylan at an outdoor venue south of Boston ('85/6 or so). I thought him good live and definitely more musicality w/ the Heartbreakers than some of his solo/MTV stuff. Difficulty was taking my spouse; she was no TP fan and she was totally put off when Bob came out in a tight leather outfit, in retrospect almost like he wanted to 1up Van from TLW.

Paul: go find a good, independent "record" store. I didn't even get that box of AMH until perhaps 5 or 6 years ago. They had to order it for me, but I find that the way to go: TLW 40, Live at the Academy, Allbros 1971 Fillmore East Recordings (including the last night of the venue), RR's history of RnR for middle school kids... just of few of the acquisitions they can manage at an independent place (w/out buying into Ama-slavery). Only one I may have to go that route for is the out-of-print 1995 documentary on the OQ that you can only see part 4 of 6 on Youtube. Unless somebody here has an extra copy. ? Just asking.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 21:38:43 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wilburying

It's an interesting line of thought. Fellow Wilbury Jeff Lyne was born 30 December 1947, so again only a couple of years different to Tom Petty. Again, he was making records with The Idle Race in 1966, before joining The Move for their last two albums in 1970. Roy Wood is a month older than Jeff Lynne, but was enjoying major chart success with The Move in 1967.

I agree I think of both Petty & Bruce as a "later wave" too, but it's more opportunity than their age. Maybe with British drinking laws being set at 18, and entrance to pubs at 16, it was just easier to become a working musician younger here. Though Robbie obviously ties in with Winwood for being a working professional at age 15.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 21:31:40 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, Winwood would be the freak of having the notoriety at a young age & being counted in the same generation as Dylan etc. Thompson hasn't the same kind of notoriety. But can Petty or Spingsteen be grouped in generationally with Dylan, Orbison, ringo, George Harrison, McGuinn, etc? i want to say no way, that they are the musical kids of, maybe younger siblings in the sense they listened to some of the same influences...Those particular ten years, the only way i can think to almost describe it is a half generation. That they ain't their generation and they ain;t my generation- they straddle both

BUT IF I HAD to pick one, i'd give em the other generation, with Dylan etc. Petty was old enough to go to vietnam go to woodstock as an adult.... That is a big difference. So, maybe, MAYBE, you are correct :-)

I don't fucking know...what am I, a fucking sociologist?


Entered at Wed Oct 4 21:29:44 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

She Loves You is sheer genius. It doesn't have to be profound to work.

I still like Petty's story of the Dylan tour. They were given a sheet with 120 (or was it 140?) songs that Dylan might play. They got to Australia and he started a song, and they didn't have a clue what he was doing as it was off the list. Turned out to be Da Doo Ron Ron. I'm convinced that the Heartbreakers would only have needed a couple of bars to make a decent job of it.

Da Doo Ron Ron is also not profound, but has that glorious implication of the "unsaid" for teens … And when he walked me home … da doo ron ron ron. Da doo ron ron.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 20:36:18 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

yeah yeah yeah--- Petty probably took more education from the Byrds and Dylan than he did the Beatles.. But i was writing abut who bottled R& R first.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 20:33:22 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Referring back to past posts for some possible expansion.

Bob- i guess you didn't see all my posts on the subject or didn't think about what i wrote. When some one has a great talent or skill, it's not unusual to say, i wish i could bottle that. Or i wish i could bottle that and sell it. Writing Petty & the heartbreakers bottled Rock 7 roll was paying them a huge compliment.

It's more likely that the Beatles bottled it, and Petty bought stock options in the croporation, or something like that. I don't know the financial lingo. Maybe he inherited some kind of annuity...

Meanwhile,, if you go back you'll see that in my first Petty post i wrote:" And though i thought a lot of his songs a little light, I've always thought they were undeniably great songs, rock and a little pop, but still real rock....there was no denying their greatness or that Petty deserved his place with the big guns. When the old timers are going down like dominoes, it's a pity to see a young great go."

In the next i wrote:" At the same time, the royalty recognized something in Petty and his band that captures the bedrock of rock & roll. some of the essence of the raw feelings involved, and alot of the essence of the music - and they almost had it down to various musical formulas .... Forgive me for this. It's almost as if Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers bottled rock and roll. I do not intend it in a negative way, but they did. He did it with his writing, and they did as a band musically. They presented what Rock & Roll had meant to them. And yes, they are all great musicians."

Running Down a Dream is a great example of what i mean. It's a great song. The lyric is good, it contains almost all the elements of a classic old rock and roll lyric: Cars, the open road, gunning it, the unknown, music on the radio, escape, heading towards something better in the unknown, yearning, desire..... the only thing missing is girls and sex..... the music is great. Perfectly played basic rock and roll, driving, forceful, exciting. Yet, thsi is a song i can live with out. To me it's kinda meaningless..It's not raw, and it doesn;t bleed.

I can't live without Blue Sky or even Rock and roll Hoochie Koo. i can;t live without A Good Feelin To Know or Crazy Eyes. there's alot of JJ Cale records i can;t live with out. Magic Sam. Muddy Waters, Lonnie Johnson. Van Morrison. the Band. the Dead, Tommy Bankhead, Theme From An Imaginary Western, Dylan, There's music that is complete and total sustenance, to me, Petty ain't in there. Yet, i defintiley think he was a great songwriter, led a great band, has his deserved place in music, and was invaluable to the music of our times.

Petty is part of the soundtrack of the times. And part of the soundtrack to many people's lives & inner lives . Not necessarily everyone's but many people's.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 19:28:12 CEST 2017 from (107.211.249.207)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

I lost my copy of the box, A Musical History, for more than two years. It looks exactly like a book from the outside, and my wife put it on a bookshelf I never look at much. I noticed I couldn't find it, but assumed it was somewhere in the house and I'd stumble across it, but never did. Been driving around and listening to it for a couple days, and it's nice to hear it again. A few random observations: Katie's Been Gone is the kind of song I usually hate, the lyrics would seem sappy on the page, but this performance and recording I love. It's a shame Richard Manuel didn't write more songs than he did. Strawberry Wine is a great punch-out of a performance. I always wondered whether they'd performed this song live, turns out they did and it's as good as you'd hope for. Same story with Forbidden Fruit and Smoke Signal -- forgettable (at least to me) in the studio but great uptempo songs live. The Band did so many things so well, these are examples of why they were a great band for rocking out. Move Me is the same song as King Floyd's Groove Me, and it's hard to see how they released that as a Band copyright in the 21st century. Twilight is a rough recording, but gets to the heart of the song better than the studio version they eventually released. The best version of Slipping and Sliding is not this one, but the Kiel Auditorium recording from the Across the Great Divide compilation. Whispering Pines pins me to the wall every time I hear it. There's a couple more things I wish I could find, but my wife is fantastic, my home is clean and tidy, and it seems a small price to pay. ;)


Entered at Wed Oct 4 19:11:51 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Tom Petty and MTV

I get what’s being said about Tom Petty being a younger artist. One difference might be the impact MTV had on TP’s popularity. I suspect, culturally, that his presence there separated him from his mentors and peers and made him seem to be the younger guy, with a younger audience.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 19:03:14 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob. people relate differently. And that's how it should be. One of Petty's lines that I love is "Me & Del were singing."

I didn't see anyone write about American Girl as the peak of his career... I wrote it's the one song by Petty & the Heartbreakers that is an essential song for me. Sure they were a great band, but that doesn't mean their music resonates the same way for everyone. I think they're legit,NOT phoney music, & great players, it just don't hit me how it hits you. Obviously Dylan loves them....


Entered at Wed Oct 4 18:43:29 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: "She Loves You" is nursery rhyme level so yes The Beatles quite obviously ascended to master level pop/rock writing in later albums and songs. No one could argue the contrary. With Tom Petty, nothing I heard in all those years after first hearing "American Girl" came close to surpassing that 3 minutes of rock n roll brilliance.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 18:17:59 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Tom Petty was so much more then American Girl. Talking about that song like it's the peak of his career is like saying The Beatles never did more then She Loves You. It's like saying National Velvet was the height of Elizabeth Taylor's career. It's like saying Wayne Gretzky's rookie season was the highlight of his career. Damn The Torpedoes, Hard Promises, Southern Accents. Those records were loaded with songs that shook you to your very soul. He has so many songs where a single line brings you back to another place and time in your life. When I hear Southern Accents the song I always think of my Mom and she never traveled further south then Staten Island. Just those lines about his Mom, if you had a loving Mom, it has to bring you back home. He has so many songs that meant so much to so many people. You could write books on how much just I Won't Back Down means to people. When he did that song at the 911 Tribute the entire free world was singing and crying with him. It was an incredible beautiful moment.

The Heartbreakers, as far as I'm concerned are on a short list of greatest American Bands. The E Street Band, The Allman Brothers, The Dead and The Heartbreakers. These bands did it for decades.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 16:53:28 CEST 2017 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: "American Girl" has always bee my favourite Petty song, and one of the best of its ilk. I must say, though, that when I got around to reading the lyrics yesterday, I was surprised at how dark (and not just philosophical) it is. I was also reminded that bgv were supplied by Dwight Twilley and Phil Seymour of the Dwight Twilley band, whose "YOU We're So Warm" is an unjustly neglected slice of power-pop brilliance.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 16:46:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I know what you mean. But Bruce Springsteen (23 September 1949) is only a year older than Tom Petty (20 October 1950), but both “arrived” in the mid 70s rather than late 60s.

Steve Winwood (May 1948) is very close to them in time, but was a “star” a decade earlier in 1965-66. Richard Thompson (April 1949) is very close in age, but the first Fairport Convention album was 1967, so late 60s.

It's not so much a different "half-generation" of 10 years for Petty & Springsteen, but they didn't get the teenage breaks.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 13:16:01 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Rolling Stone 1966

I believe some people have done a close viewing of the 1966 footage to try to identify locations for all the concert film clips. Without trying to find that, I seem to recall that the principal footage was from the Newcastle show that year. Some of the cutaway shots are likely to be from elsewhere.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 07:29:59 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Flickering lights

And yes Kevin, he seemed so much younger than the old timers. But he was only a decade younger than some. A very significant decade mind you- a decade that made him one of their kids as much as a younger brother. i really thought Petty was just a few years older than me, but he was close to 8 years older. It's not that much, but i thought he was younger. 66 sounds older than he seemed. Then again, I'm turning 59, it's all fucking disappointing :-)


Entered at Wed Oct 4 07:14:24 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers Bottled Rock & Roll

Kev, yes, a lot about Petty and his place in all of this Rock and roll is sorta odd. For me, he's a great in a different way. He wrote alot of great songs i could completely live without, American Girl is the exception - as you stated, it is a perfect rock and roll song. To me his others, yeah, plenty of great songs, but nothing really fucking essential for me. i could take them or leave them. At the same time, the royalty recognized something in Petty and his band that captures the bedrock of rock & roll. some of the essence of the raw feelings involved, and alot of the essence of the music - and they almost had it down to various musical formulas that didn;t sound formulaic.

Forgive me for this.

It's almost as if Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers bottled rock and roll. I do not intend it in a negative way, but they did. He did it with his writing, and they did as a band musically. They presented what Rock & Roll had meant to them. And yes, they are all great musicians.

I mean nothing negative. I think Petty was great & his accomplishments amazing. And the royalty counting him as one, well that don;t happen by accident.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 06:59:06 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin j

Location: Tom Petty

"A young great" is a nice way of putting it, Jeff. Not the old royalty of McCartney, Jagger, Page, Davies, Townsend - Tom Petty seemed so much younger and it always seemed weird that he was included in the Wilbury crowd. "American Girl" is a perfect rock n roll song......


Entered at Wed Oct 4 05:54:57 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The first time I saw Danko as a solo artist with a back up band they opened for Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers. This was Petty & the Heartbreakers first headlining tour, promoting Breakdown. It was either late 77 or early 78, at UC Davis, the one year i went to college there. I'm thinking more likely late 77.

Danko had Blondie Chaplin in his band, i think his brother Terry on bass, and Butterfield came out and joined em for a while. i was there to see rick.Tthe heartbreakers were excellent, but as i recall. kinda pop for me at the time... for me, American Girl was the highlight of their set, but they did some hard blues too, King Bee ....

that might have been the only time i saw The Heartbreakers, then again, i tihnk i'm forgetting a show

Did see Petty at some bg shows, Mike Campbell too. and i tihnk there's one Campbell was part of without Petty that i saw.

At The big Dylan 30th anniversary show Petty was great. He was one of the few slightly younger guys to cross that line, into acccptance as one of the big boys , with Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison. McGuinn, etc etc.

And though i thought a lot of his songs a little light, I've always thought they were undeniably great songs, rock and a little pop, but still real rock....there was no denying their greatness or that Petty deserved his place with the big guns. When the old timers are going down like dominoes, it's a pity to see a young great go.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 04:28:58 CEST 2017 from (67.80.31.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norm, since Canada is a better country, & obviously so is England and the rest, so, why don't you guys just invade the U.S. already? Canada can try it alone, but really, all of you, just put your heads together and all your other countries should be able to conquer the U.S. and run it better. Obviously, running this country better shouldn't be that difficult. If you can improve things, why the fuck not? what are you waiting for anyway? We're running out of time.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 02:22:27 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The best and the worst

Thank you for the nod Bob. Glad you are enjoying Alan's work. I was going to mention Kendel she is a wonderfully talented young lady,

Hope some have tried listening to John Mayer's cover of "Free Fallin'". I like pretty much everything thing that young fellow does. I was particularly impressed with the laid back tasty work he and the two other fellows did on those acoustic guitars.

It amazes me, we have such good friends in the USA, this place of Jan's is a good example. But....the USA is so fucked up, (and has been for a long time). Besides the gun problem, do any or many of you know what the "Jones Act" is?

Over a hundred years now, the Jones Act was enacting stating, (and goods and services servicing and state or territory of the USA must be carried on ships built in the USA and manned with American sailors and personel. This has caused so much trouble for so long, (and particularly to the USA itself). Senator John McCain was set to abolish the act, (one of the biggest reasons he was never to become president). There are a few billionaires who control the shipping and wealth who keep this act in force.

When hurricane Harvey hit the Jones act was immediately rescinded to allow aid to get to the people in need. When hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico it took some time for the orange faced mellon head to get off his ass and give them a year so that they could get the aid they needed.

This is very difficult to watch down there what people are going thru' and how more and more every day the control of wealth and fuck every body else is confirmed. It hard to keep your faith in man kind.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 01:15:45 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Kendel Carson

Norm, I was watching some of those Alan Doyle videos, really good stuff. I noticed he has Kendel Carson playing with him. I think she's from up your way. Really great fiddle player. She played with Chip Taylor a few years ago. He wrote a song for her called Big Trucks that got some airplay.


Entered at Wed Oct 4 00:31:44 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Like A Rolling Stone

After an hour on YouTube with Tom Petty, we got to Bob Dylan. 1966. Nice pictures of The Hawks. NOT Manchester. Do you know where this is, Ian?


Entered at Tue Oct 3 23:18:35 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Petty Tribute

This tribute in Esquire is really great!


Entered at Tue Oct 3 22:47:30 CEST 2017 from (24.114.84.44)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Much more moronic is that in all the years since, not enough congressional votes have been musterable to overturn the amendment. And that the American people have not gotten sufficiently exercised to hold their politicians' feet the fire. As benighted as the signatories to the US constitution may have been on various issues, they did at least leave open the possibility of amendments (and amendments being amended).


Entered at Tue Oct 3 22:37:47 CEST 2017 from (24.114.84.44)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's a link to the excerpt from the new Lightfoot autobiography that Ian W mentioned the other day - about a Dylan/Lightfoot party post-Rolling Thunder show.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 22:12:22 CEST 2017 from (85.164.75.178)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Petty and Levon

Tom Petty paying tribute to Levon from stage, the day Levon Helm left us.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 21:45:25 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Second Amendment is moronic. 1791, drawn up by men (white men) who had never seen a water closet. These are guys who had never flushed, and you trust them? They had to wait until 1814 for even revolvers that worked most of the time/. 1860 for repeating rifles. The slaveholders who drew up the Bill of Rights envisaged single shot muskets in a militia.

As I've said before, does the 2nd Amendment allow you to have anti-aircraft missiles on your roof? No? So there's a line to be drawn. It has to be drawn a LONG way before automatic or semi-automatic weapons. Hey, try NO guns. Japan's statistics for gun deaths indicate that it's a policy that works.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 19:57:23 CEST 2017 from (107.77.92.28)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Gun rights

Listening to Rush Limbaugh just now (why do I do that to myself?) and he was going on about how automatic weapons are illegal and how that illegality didn't stop this guy. It makes me wonder, in terms of the 2nd amendment, if machine guns were currently legal would Rushand the NRA fight against their prohibition? Or if a tank in one's garage is protected under the 2nd amendment? My country is just so fucked up /


Entered at Tue Oct 3 19:13:21 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Tom Petty

Warren Zanes wrote a great biography on Tom Petty. Tom's daughters didn't have an easy childhood. Their mother suffered with mental illness and Petty was always on the road or making records. Their childhood home was burned down by an arsonist who was never caught . The older daughter practically raised her younger sister.

We can talk about Petty's songs all day. Very few songwriters have been able to write great songs for several decades. He's very near the top of the tower of song. However, he was even greater as a live performer. A natural showman, when he lifted his guitar and promenaded across the stage in those beautiful Beatle boots it took your breath away. Part Elvis, part Brian Jones, part Mark Twain and whole lot of incredible original talent. On top of everything he was the best dresser in rock and roll and the classiest guy. He tried to keep record prices down when everyone else was happy to see them go up and to the end his concert ticket prices were more then fair. It's really hard and sad to see him go.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 19:07:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mass murder off the scale, a president who declines to condemn gun laws, innocent people smashed about by uniformed government thugs in Catalonia. There are far far worse things happening today than a girl screaming out in pain because her dad was dying.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 17:42:19 CEST 2017 from (67.80.24.15)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

People do lash out. It's never necessary, often or usually is uncalled for, incorrect factually, irrational, and it is avoidable. Not everyone lashes out. Some people do contain themselves. Her choice of words were that of a low life. "You're dead" is not as bad. In NYC a lot of people say " You're dead to me".. when some one does something that does not meet with heir approval or massage their ego. It's a bullshit expression i never liked. Big fucking deal- t you're dead to me. Kiss my tucches i tell em. They think they're gangsters... but the phrase violette used is just plain old disgusting and lowlife.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 17:23:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm said it. People lash out in grief. While her point (I'll shit down your throat) was indeed vulgar, it was also technically nigh impossible, so not a real "threat" especially as magazines don't have throats. It's much the same with the Northern Irish "You're dead!" I've heard a motorist shout it at a slow pedestrian, and at a Van Morrison concert, the woman next to me claimed to be a friend of the singer, accused me of being a journalist and said "You're dead!" She obviously didn't actually mean that, nor was I worried that she did.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 17:23:37 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....and Jeff, you are right. Dignity is not related to social or financial standing.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 17:14:02 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Peter.....Don't be ridiculous. No one is "entitled" to threaten someone's family with the crudest of actions imaginable. Had she just stopped at "F*ck off, Rolling Stone", fine, but her rant was much more than that. Her Dad would have been highly embarrassed by this - I am sure.

RIP, Tom.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 16:21:16 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, yes we all have them. In Britain, Special Interest groups are known as ‘The Lobby’ because they ‘lobby parliament’ – theoretically stand in the lobby outside the chamber and persuade MPs. Much of the lobby is financial, hidden and devious in all our countries. The NRA is an overt lobby. Here, our equivalent overt lobby might be fox-hunters. Fox hunting was banned by Labour under pressure from the Animal Rights lobby. Teresa May was going to re-introduce it had she won a large majority because the Countryside Alliance (the pro-fox hunting lobby) has major influence on the Conservatives. She didn’t, so she didn’t.

So democracy. A lot of farmers would prefer to reintroduce hunting, and others say it’s “cleaner” than steel traps for foxes. The foxes probably get shot anyway.

But basically, a large majority find it a distasteful and cruel pursuit by the very rich, or as Oscar Wilde described it “the unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable.” So the lobby failed against the majority.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 16:01:46 CEST 2017 from (67.80.24.15)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, as you well know, the special interests or spin offs there of, that run many or all nations you mentioned, ran em in previous incarnations. OF ocurse Gun control is necessary here in the U.S.. I'm pointing out that unfortunately the whole world is mostly run by special interests. You Pete, as am I, are a hamster running in a wheel. Eat your lettuce everybody. You're gonna need your strength.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 15:53:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Is the USA “a young country”? Far from it. Surely the idea of the ‘nation state’ spread across Europe with The French Revolution and then Napoleon. The USA pre-dates that, just as it pre-dates Italy, Germany, Norway, Ireland, Greece, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and all of the Middle East and Africa, and most of Asia as modern nation states. It might be “young” compared to Britain or France, but on gun control it is certainly “old enough to know better” as my mum used to say to me.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 15:48:52 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Grief

In the hours of grief, many people "lash out" which is what I would say Tom's daughter was doing.

Free Fallin is of course Tom's song, however click the youtube vid of John Mayer singing his song with 3 acoustic guitars.....Amazing.

I mentioned this years ago. When you watch the video of "End of the Line" on the train, you will notice Roy Orbison's picture in a rockin chair that is rockin, and his guitar is there as he had resently died. All the guys are looking very sober.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 15:48:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To be fair, Tom Petty's daughter was in an extreme stress situation, and entitled to let off steam if it had been wrongly reported. Let him or her who has not effed and blinded under stress cast the first stone. I liked that her dad had taught her 96 Tears. I love ? & The Mysterians.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 15:13:29 CEST 2017 from (67.80.24.15)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, 1) While Petty's daughter may have grown up wealthy &spoiled, her behavior is an example of a crude, rude, nasty lowlife. It happens almost egually in every walk of life today. Fewer people care to express themselves thoughtfully all the time, and more increasingly lack the knowledge and ability to. Regardless of financial and possibly social status.

2) I doubt there are any or many national governments or societies that are not controlled by special interests. Obviously or not. In the case of the U.S. we are a young country. When the U.S. established and secured it's democracy, democracy was the prevailing special interest. As wealth was accrued and or protected, and industries developed, new special interests developed. Though the U.S. has led innovation in many fields, & has also excelled in developing the power of special interests, i don't know that it's been able to exceed the standards set in Europe, Africa, the Arabian nation , etc etc, many centuries before North America was colonized.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 10:45:07 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The End Of The Line

A little Travelin' Wilburys to start the day. I hadn't realised Tom Petty was playing bass guitar on the video. Perhaps the only one who could! Watch out for "Where somebody plays … Purple Haze."


Entered at Tue Oct 3 10:38:59 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On Sky News last night, the NRA spoke-slime said it was legal to carry guns in Nevada, and the problem was that the concert was a gun free zone. Had it not been gun free, people presumably could have returned fire? What? With handguns at a mirrored window 32 floors up? My mind is totally boggled. The man who throws the word “evil” around so freely declines to direct it at the right place, the NRA.

Also, how do you get 10 rifles and that much ammunition through a casino? My memory of Vegas hotels is that after checking in there is a deliberately planned long walk through the casino to the elevators. Casinos have lots of money lying about, but their security is that level. Unbelievable, In the theatre last weekend here every bag was checked (even women’s handbags, i.e. purses) going in, and again after the interval. Sad, but necessary. And no one minds, and they all thank the guy with the torch.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 10:31:35 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Free Fallin'

As one does, we had YouTube on the iPad over morning tea, and I found Best of Everything was not available. Mrs V said Free Fallin’ was her favourite Tom Petty song, and that was available. Fantastic video, which I hadn’t seen before (LINKED). She must be right because that’s the song BBC Radio 4 played with the announcement.

My other is The End of The Line, with George Harrison and Tom Petty taking the lead. I love the “Purple Haze” line.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 08:31:49 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.232)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: "Somebody Said Dignity Was The First To Leave" - B. Dylan

Just walked in the door from being away and shocked about the Tom Petty news. Greatly saddenned also about Las Vegas though never really shocked about these events in a country that allows itself to be held hostage by the NRA. 80% of Americans want a change to the guns laws and yet nothing gets done. Democracy isn't working. Special interest lobbying most definitely is, though.

Tom Petty's daughter: Sorry, but a perfect example of an entitled, spoiled person acting in a crude way that is oh so common these days. A very embarrassing response to a magazine that would have had no malice at all in reporting her father's death. And in fact, Rolling Stone magazine has done so much to help her father's career that a little understanding at this premature announcement should have been expected. As an aside, I was stuck in coach on the way home and my monitor wasn't working......no big deal, the flight attetendant tried her best and the benefit was that I listened to music for about 6 of the 8 hours back ( THANK YOU SIMON FELICE - thought of Stephen King's writing about Michel Murphey McDermott restoring his faith in R&R music.......I really feel the same way about Simon Felice ) I played Tom Petty's "American Girl" twice completely unaware of what had happened. Though I own 2 Petty albums, "American Girl" is the only song I have on the IPad.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 03:21:57 CEST 2017 from (24.184.51.36)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Petty's Daughter Ain't no shrinking "Violette" - one of her names

See The Link. She's got a way with words.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 02:04:06 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: not dead yet...

apparently the report of tom petty's demise is premature. prayers for him and his family at this tough time.


Entered at Tue Oct 3 01:37:55 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Deep Sadness

It's hard to come home and see these words and know that Tom Petty is gone.

I hope that he is "Free Fallin" to where ever he needs to be. God rest you and keep you Tom.


Entered at Mon Oct 2 23:13:09 CEST 2017 from (70.121.56.235)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: definitely too soon gone

RIP tom petty. this is a shocker. big loss. can't find the words right now.


Entered at Mon Oct 2 22:54:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Doom and gloom

Totally absorbed by news. 58 dead. 515 injured. I’m mindful that I’ve stayed at the Mandalay Bay. Watched a concert. And also have walked across Westminster Bridge many times, and been in Borough Market at 10 pm on several Friday nights. It’s all seeming too close.

The News here keeps contrasting two presidents. A sane compassionate human being commenting on Sandy Hook and Orlando. A total narrow-eyed nutcase talking about today. Number two is unbelievable, an NRA arse licker. So how do you have TEN assault rifles in a hotel room for three days? And no one comments. And they can get people … or rather “beings” from the NRA to stand in front of a TV camera and justify it?

And in Spain the dread bloody Ghost of General Franco stalks a referendum, smashing school windows to stop people voting. 893 injured. Women pulled by their hair in front of cameras. How inept can you get? If I were a Catalan who wanted to stay within Spain last week, I’d have changed my mind after Sunday. And the EU does absolutely fuck all about Franco’s old Guardia Civil smashing democracy.


Entered at Mon Oct 2 22:43:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A Southern Accent

Tom Petty, 66. Another sad element in a sadder day.


Entered at Mon Oct 2 22:24:12 CEST 2017 from (84.209.130.45)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Tom Petty

Playing "Best of Everything" tonight :-(


Entered at Mon Oct 2 13:22:40 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Girl From The North Country - CD

I don't think that I have posted what I am about to say here before but, if I have, I apologise in advance. As has been acknowledged, some of the plot lines of the play are a touch derivative and this has caused some critics to suggest that the play would not stand up without the songs and music. Some weeks ago, when news that there would, after all, be a 'soundtrack' CD, I suggested that the test would be whether the songs and music would stand up without the rest of the play.

Moving on, the 'real' test, I guess, is what someone who has not attended the play makes of the CD.

I agree, Peter, that, though it has different singers, it is not like the numerous 'Various Artists' Dylan compilations. By definition, they are made up of tracks recorded by different people at different times and in different places, with no connection one to one another, other than the songwriter. Some work better than others. I bought the recent Ace CD "Take What You Need - UK Covers of Bob Dylan Songs 1964-69". It was interesting largely because it contained covers with which I was not familiar and/or barely aware. Other than that, it just does not cohere for me. As I happens, I saw a number of the artists live in the 1964 - 1969 period (The Three City Four, Alex Campbell and Cliff Aungier come to mind) and it isn't a very accurate portrayal of what they were 'like' at that time. Individual tracks might appeal but the 'whole' is a let-down.

In some ways, the "Girl From The North Country" CD is nearer Dylan covers albums by one group or an individual singer. It has a more cohesive sound, as Peter says, which makes it a more satisfying 'listen'. What concerns me is that the context for the performance is missing. For example, it helps to know that the two characters singing "I Want You" are parting for the last time. Though in love, the girl has chosen to marry elsewhere - for what I might term 'practical' reasons. Though the actors' singing of the song goes a long way to portray that, I fear that the nuance of their performance will be largely lost if one had not first seen the play. The girl's decision has to be understood in terms of the economic circumstances in the mid-1930s.

For me, the use of "I Want You" in that context was fascinating, as I had never 'read' the song that way before. Perhaps I was influenced by Paul Nelson's notes in the BLONDE ON BLONDE songbook: "I Want you is bright, happy, copper-penny. All logic says no but 'I want you'. The openness of love wins out over stilted, tilted, and perverse 'reason'". The performance of "I Want You" in "Girl From The North Country" moved it into "Lady Jane" territory - interesting in itself given Dylan's "time was on his side" towards the end.

Am I reading too much into all this, I wonder?


Entered at Mon Oct 2 11:36:28 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Girl From The North Country

I've relinked Sheila Atim doing "Tight Connection To My Heart" from Girl From The North Country.

The album … does it make sense if you haven't seen the play? I think so. I'm an avid collector of Dylan covers albums and there are a lot of Various Artist ones and often it's a jolt from one song to the next. Although there are several different singers on the Soundtrack albuim, you have just one backing band, giving it a consistent feel, and there is often more than one singer on a song. They are actors first, singers second, but that also means clarity on the words. The feel is consistent too in that Conor McPherson declined any musical instruments not in use in the early 1930s when the play is set. The arrangements are good, and often unexpected.

I have a feeling Bob will like it.


Entered at Mon Oct 2 00:44:33 CEST 2017 from (80.3.75.140)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Various topics

GIRL FROM THE NORTH COUNTRY cast CD:\ My copy arrived last week (Friday perhaps) and I've listened only once so far and it came up to scratch. I'm not so sure what anyone who had not seen the play would make of it, however. Any thoughts on that aspect, Peter?

THE "INFAMOUS" BAND

I recently got an e-mail from 'eil', one of the second-hand record and music memorabilia dealers in the UK. I think I got on their list simply because I bought a couple of things there years back. Anyway, the e-mail listed some of their stock and I noted that, for one Band item, the description referred to the 'infamous' Band.

CHATEAU LABEL

Thanks for the link, Bill. 'YouTube' is a bit of a rabbit hole, isn't it? You get one thing, listen to it, something else comes along or an item catches your eye (ear?) on the right-hand side and, before your know it, you're disappearing down the proverbial burrow. Anyway, I heard some rockabilly that was new to me, not that I'm an expert but it was a lot of fun. Thanks again. I think, should I ever end up on radioland's "Desert Island Discs" programme and get asked what I'd like as my luxury, I might well suggest permanent access to YouTube.

GORDON LIGHTFOOT book

There was a Dylan-related excerpt in the TORONTO STAR recently - at least, in their on-line version.


Entered at Sun Oct 1 23:39:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Girl From The North Country

The original cast CD was released on Friday. Cover scans are at the bottom of my theatre review (LINKED). You really need to get this one!


Entered at Sun Oct 1 02:55:17 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: And!!

Just search on youtube.....Alan Doyle - "I've Seen a Little" with Colin James slide guitar...this is a kick ass song and as good as anything else you'll find now.


Entered at Sun Oct 1 02:09:51 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: What touches your heart

Some folks here lately have been posting of people close to them musically who they very much enjoy and admire. I have to add my feelings to this foraye.

Spending my morning listening to Alan Doyle's work it brought me to another great singer, song writer from Newfoundland, "Ron Tynes" who we sadly lost to cancer a couple of years ago. How can anyone forget Ron's song, "Sonny's Dream". It has been recorded by over 100 artists, including Emmylou Harris.

I guess my favourite cover of this song is from Valdy. Ron's recording is hard to compete with but the people who have covered it show their love for Ron.


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