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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, March 2014


Entered at Mon Mar 31 22:02:54 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Van's favorite saxophone player interviewed Van for Dutch TV "Candy meets", this is the best interview I've ever seen of Van he is very relaxed and frank, Candy is not only talented and beautiful but very smart as well. This is the complete interview joined together as it was broken up by Dutch narration. *Note: Dutch sub-titled. Candy has played with Van at a lot of concerts both in the US and Europe. She plays on his double live cd "A night in San Francisco". She has also released a lot of albums with her band Funky Stuff and she is regarded as one of the best saxophonists in Europe, the US and Asia!"


Entered at Mon Mar 31 21:54:47 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: Nice job on the John Hammond at Toppermost - complete with references to our guys. (Good for you too, Peter V, re Forever More, even though there's no mention of "She's Good To Me".)


Entered at Mon Mar 31 21:40:07 CEST 2014 from (58.104.19.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I was watching this yesterday. Maybe the technical competence isn't all that high but I thought it was great. Young folk putting something together which tied them in with a musical tradition.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 21:29:56 CEST 2014 from (58.104.19.114)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Jed

I think the 80/90s Band played great music and provided great entertainment for people. My comments were harsh. The problem is that having set the standard so high with the OQ it was always going to be hard to maintain the same standard. I guess I am just disappointed that such talented people chose to stick with doing what they had already done rather than branching out in a new direction. I know that Richard expressed some frustration with this situation in an interview reprinted on this site. I think that Levon said many times that he was happy living as a musician that entertained people. That's fine but for me I like music that tries to go beyond that.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 21:11:00 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: 80's/90's Band

I recall many a fine evening in the lone star cafe listening to all combinations of Band members and their friends.Everyone I know who went to all those many shows,whether in nyc,Woodstock or kingston,ny recall having a great time,often in intimate or smaller settings,and mostly we remember how incredibly awesome the music was.True,it was not The Band as I saw them in the 70's but nonetheless the talent spoke for itself.Off shows,yes,but in general,all quite excellent.Things in life change and if you move with them sometimes you find the light-if you look at it right!


Entered at Mon Mar 31 21:01:05 CEST 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Layla Album

Without Duane Allman,according to many of the participants,this album might not have been created.If you want an interesting description of the happenings back then you might want to check out Please Be With Me by Duane's daughter and One Way Out by Al Paul.Or,many copies of the Allman's Hittin The Note magazine can catch you up on the intricate details of EC/Duane and the process of the album.The Tom Dowd movie also has great insight.Easily one of the greatest albums ever!


Entered at Mon Mar 31 20:39:10 CEST 2014 from (94.70.75.239)

Posted by:

Chris

Location: Paleohora, Crete, Greece

Wow, nice to see this page is still here... I used to post here occasionally back in the early days, but I don't think I've done so since Rick Danko died. I'm glad the guestbook is keepin' on keepin' on :-)


Entered at Mon Mar 31 20:03:59 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Re the "Layla" rearrangement, agreed with an asterisk (*).

* Assuming that the rock and roll run-through of "Forever Young" on "Planet Waves" was the first attempt at the song; if it wasn't, and the guys saw it as improvement on the 'classic' version, "Layla" redux is left in the shade.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 20:00:55 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunno. "crap" works reasonably well in the one about the constipated grizzly bear after six months in hibernation.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 19:34:51 CEST 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Layla is one of only a few of the truly classic FM radio rock songs that I still turn up and enjoy…… “Can’t You See” by the Marshall Tucker Band is another though it never did get played to death the way some did............most comedians know that ‘crap” is a word that never reads well and never works from the stage……I actually cringe whenever I hear it………..but that MTV unplugged Layla is just awful….not sure that there is another case ever of a rearrangement being so off putting.

This weekend in sports was most enjoyable…….The Habs keep winning, The Leafs keep losing, Glad All Over Crystal Palace beat Chelsea and Liverpool provided me with 2 hours of bliss yesterday………….Wonder where Simon is.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 19:30:43 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Johnny Cash

Picked up "Out Among The Stars" today, the lost Columbia album from 1984. They polished quite a bit judging by the "Additional Recording" list … though Marty Stuart was on the 1984 sessions and the additions. The instant stand out was She Used To Love Me A Lot, which is in the basic version, then "reprocessed" by Elvis Costello in 2013. I can't get the point of the Elvis Costello one, which is like Eno adding ambient stuff at the start, then swamping it in modern drums 'n' bass stuff. To me the "EC" mix is awful and terminally misguided, though The Attractions backed Johnny Cash in the 80s, so maybe he has an inside track. Maybe it'll grow, but it's JOHNNY CASH! It's like deciding to add some photo-collage to the Mona Lisa with superglue.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 19:29:19 CEST 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Layla and Other Assorted Comments

Pat and I have disagreed about many things over the years, but it seems that we both share an appreciation for Derek & The Dominos.

I was going to stay away from the Layla discussion, but my initial reaction to the Layla coda would be more on the side of “majestic” rather than “crap.” We need to remember that this is 1970’s era rock….it’s not Mendelssohn, and it should be evaluated it in its own context.

A basic function of good music is the creating and resolving of tension. The first part of Layla is all about creating tension, and had it ended there, it would have been unsatisfying. The piano coda resolves that tension and provides some balance to the passion laid bare in the first half. And slide guitar sounding like birds singing is a wonderful thing in the hands of SkyDog.

My father encouraged me to buy the Layla album. I was about 14 years old at the time, and probably wouldn’t have purchased a double album, with a painting on the cover, named ‘Layla and other assorted Love songs’ without some urging. I had no idea at the time that it was one of Clapton’s finest albums, and contained much of the blues and rock that I enjoyed.

After the first listen, I remember saying to my Dad, that these songs didn’t sound to me like “love songs”. I was confused about the title. (My idea of a love song at that time would probably sound like a Paul McCartney song). My father said something to the effect that love songs can take on many different forms. I remember that being an eye opening moment for me, and taught me not to approach music with too many preconceived notions of what I thought it should be. Realizing that blues or rock could also be love songs, propelled me beyond simply listening to the form and waiting for the guitar solo, to approaching it with an open mind and heart. My listening experiences prior to that (in retrospect) had been more mechanical and somewhat detached experiences.

The funny thing is that Layla is not even my particularly favorite song on the album, but it is the foundation of the entire album….coda and all. It was an important part of my musical awakening, and emotional maturity.

I wonder what 14-year-old kids are listening to these days……


Entered at Mon Mar 31 18:22:25 CEST 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm listening for those Grade 2 arpeggios in Layla 2 and I can't hear any.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 17:06:08 CEST 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

You're always welcome Bill M. It's nice that you thank me but you don't have to as I know you're probably the biggest Hawk fan here...You're a Hawkian as opposed to a Hawkette.

Yiiiikes Ben! You're going to....I forgot that I also have all the other Band members solo work except I don't have Levon's Electric Dirt but I did download via iTunes the four songs I really liked. And.......all the solo Reformed Band recordings but they never cross my mind as the songs aren't there.....You need writers who can craft a song. Just one brown eyed girl's opinion and I don't mean any disrespect but you can't continue the Band magic when one member wasn't present and then two were gone. And Richard...at one time had so much potential for writing songs and that voice......brought pure soul to The Band. Would you believe I still haven't returned to Stratford, Ontario since I saw a Shakespearean play in high-school? Uggggh......


Entered at Mon Mar 31 15:58:28 CEST 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the link to the Jerry / Gerry Penfound article, though it's on the lazy side. Penfound told me he and Rick Danko joined the Hawks at about the same time, replacing Stan Szelest and Rebel Payne (and joining Levon and Robbie). Among other things, this meant he was the piano player until Richard Manuel joined. He said he left the post-Hawkins sextet because a group that large was uneconomic, which is no doubt true. Other musicians who knew him have mentioned that he had reasons to avoid the US at the time - an unattractive characteristic to five other guys looking to make their mark in NYC. Instead he joined Garth's old group, the Capers, and did an LP with them (on which he sang "Route 66"). Then he did an album with a long-running lounge band called the Quorum. Then he left performing and became an engineer at Eastern Sound. Somehow he got roped into doing some session work for the band Shooter, which led to him joining them for what I think was their final 45, a cover of Springsteen's "Cherokee Queen" that went nowhere. I believe he was still doing just engineering when he got up to play with Hawkins, Levon and the RCO guys in Toronto in '77.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 15:29:16 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...and Ms. Lauryn Hill today. I'm a huuuuge fan of hers....formerly of the Fugees.

Click on Final Hour to see her perform under photos and videos. I'm always in awe on how rappers can remember and say the words so quickly. Lauryn attended Columbia U at one point....She's heavy and relevant.....She can be sensual without being trashy.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 15:19:08 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those of you who don't know....Lauryn Hill now has six children and five were with her long-time X Rohan Marley...yes.....one of Bob's many children.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 15:11:33 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Although I have an eclectic music collection; the following artists would be the ones I have all or mostly all of their major releases and maybe a few of them I have boots as well. Btw, in no particular order as I'm a huuuuge fan of all.

Bob Marley and The Wailers
Solo Robbie
The Band...and boots
Van Morrison...and boots
Garland Jeffreys
Louuuu Reed...one boot
Bob Dylan...stopped being interested when song "Mississippi" came out which I really enjoy but not the recording it was on
Mink DeVille

It was great to hear that Lauryn Hill has been performing more since she was released from prison for tax evasion......Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!
Kate Bush will be on tour.
Christine McVie will be joining Fleetwood Mac on tour this time....I love how in one interview you see Stevie Nicks saying to Lindsay Buckingham about her writing that if she were Bob Dylan for instance that he wouldn't be telling her to change some words in her song. Unfortunately strong women pay a price for their independence and strong will in their personal lives but then again....not the right man for that person as he'd have to be just as secure in his own self.
Girl Power all the way!


Entered at Mon Mar 31 14:44:12 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

MY LONDON: Penfound a man of mystery
JAMES REANEY, THE LONDON FREE PRESS

"London music fans who have never heard of Penfound may not realize how the famous five members of The Band were a sextet -- as the Hawks -- into late 1964.

The Band's chief historian Rob Bowman, a York University professor, writes: "Jerry Penfound was eased out of the group by the end of the year." Penfound's fellow Londoner, keyboard genius Garth Hudson, was a master of the sax parts, too, Bowman suggests, perhaps leaving Penfound the odd man out late in '64. (Penfound seems to have been Gerry to many friends in London, and Jerry in Band and Hawks lore and on other occasions.)

A couple of tracks recorded in Toronto in October or November 1964, have Penfound alongside Hudson, Robbie Robertson, Levon Helm, Rick Danko and Richard Manuel. He's in top form -- playing flute -- on Robertson's Robbie's Blues. Bowman points to U.S. jazz icon Roland Kirk as an influence on Penfound's huge, huffing flute notes."

Youtube dates are misleading as sometimes videos have been reposted.

I do like Miley Cyrus' "Wrecking Ball".....lyrics and vocals. Her Godmother is Dolly Parton.....She does a "killer" version as some of you would say.

Simple can sometimes actually be quite profound. What really matters is whether the lyrics or music move you in any way.....connecting between artist and the listener. I noticed for instance that those of you who shared your favouite Layla songs didn't connect with many of the love torn songs. I did because I've always struggled in that area. They're not my favourite songs in general, but I did list the songs that resonated the most. The first time I saw Eric in the mid-seventies at Maple Leaf Gardens he was so wasted that there was rumour after his show that at one point they had to put his recorded music on to deal with the situation. The last time was when he was on the same bill as Bonnie Raitt. Although Eric has been clean for many years.....I'm sure you can guess which song the fans loved and sang along to......even though he was covering someone else's song. The song Layla itself is absolutely massive for sure.......played on the radio all the time.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 12:46:25 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: RR at Agrigento

Many thanks for the link … as it had 8 views when I looked this must be just up on YouTube. I had a VHS copy (and a CD) from a broadcast, but this looks better. I have to do some work today so only had time to watch Ghost Dance. It makes you wonder why this never went on the road as a show. A great performance and Robbie knew how to perform his lyric and surround his voice with lovely female backing vocals, just as Leonard Cohen does. The stage production, lighting, band … it's all excellent.

Any chance of a DVD official release, Sebastian?


Entered at Mon Mar 31 12:35:46 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It wouldn't be the GB if there were no asides on ice hockey or rounders, so we should celebrate the Premier League table in this morning's paper with Liverpool FC back in their rightful place on top. I have to say I feel a guilty sense of pleasure whenever Manchester United or Chelsea get stuffed. And Bournemouth have scored four goals twice in a week too. Could it get any better? Were you there, Roger?


Entered at Mon Mar 31 11:36:45 CEST 2014 from (58.104.23.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Not sure if this has been posted before.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 10:38:04 CEST 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Voice-A-Graph recording booths?

This is Neil Young performing Bert Jansch’s “Needle of Death” in an old self-recording booth now owned by Jack White. It appeared as an insert to a Bert Jansch tribute concert last December, which was shown on BBC TV recently. I saw Jansch (and his various cohorts) lots of times in my youth but found the concert less of a celebration than I had expected – in fact, rather dispiriting.

I write, though, about the recording booth. As you can see, the person placing this clip on YouTube has called it a Voice-A-Graph machine and says it is from 1947. I’ve never seen one before. Was this machine common in North America in, say, the 1940s and 1950s?


Entered at Mon Mar 31 09:56:47 CEST 2014 from (124.25.166.8)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Well, I didn't mean anti-climactic because it's simpler or quieter, I meant because it goes from making a very purposeful musical statement (to say nothing of the lyrics) to making no statement at all, just some waffle.

And yes, similar things could be said about the 80's Band. Same competence, but less and less overall character (as Robbie and then Richard were replaced), and less interesting material or musical statements.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 09:17:47 CEST 2014 from (58.104.23.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Rather than saying the second half of Layla is crap I would say it was just trying to take you to a place that you didn't want to to go (and that's OK because we all have our preferences as to where we want to go). You described it before as being anti-climatic musically but I think that was the whole point - there is this intense piece of music and then it goes quiet and simple. The players were trying to communicate something by doing that - the song would just have being saying something else without the coda . I don't just say this to be argumentative and if you don't like the second half that's fine with me. I never had the ability to make it as a musician but I have always been interested in how music works. I agree with you that probably few non-musicians are interested in the technical ability of players. I think that is because music has a social aspect to it which is probably more important than the technical. That is why I am not so dismissive of Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus, sure we may think the music is crap, but it serves a certain social function for the people that listen to it. I think the music of the OQ was incredible but I can barely listen to the reformed-Band. It isn't because Robbie the guitar player wasn't there it was because I couldn't understand why they were doing what they were doing. I just couldn't see where they were trying to take the music. Technically the music wasn't all that different from the OQ but just all the meaning had gone out of it.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 08:37:34 CEST 2014 from (124.25.166.8)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Wallsend, I was going to argue with you but in some ways we're on the same page. I think good music needn't be clever, but should have some reason to exist. An original angle, an attitude, a personality. Although competence is a target that most musicians put most of their effort towards, in reality no audience is interested in competence if there's nothing else on offer to colour it. It's boring, which is worse than bad. There are thousands of superior players around who will never go anywhere. Some singers or players reek so much character that, with or without competence or interesting material, their records and performances thrill millions. Unfortunately sometimes this character is 100% artificial, and young audiences in particular haven't learned to spot the difference. You can point to Miley Cyrus or Justin Beiber, but this has been going on throughout the history of pop.

The Band, of course, had genuine character oozing from all five members, plus interesting material (initially), and competence. And the second half of Layla was crap.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 05:13:31 CEST 2014 from (58.104.23.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Are their objective standards by which you can say whether music is good or bad? I say no. Just because music is simple doesn't make it bad. Music is a form of communication so the key issue is whether there are two people who want to communicate ie. a musician and an audience. It doesn't matter how brilliant a piece of music may be, if no one wants to listen to it, you have a problem.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 04:17:06 CEST 2014 from (124.25.166.8)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Layla Pt II

I don't think "crap" is an odd appraisal of the piano section, but I acknowledge it's not very specific. "Anti-climactic" is a fair word, after such an effective song and such high recommendations. Some grade 2 piano arpeggios and some meandering solos, highlighted by Duane's profound - but out of tune - slide playing.


Entered at Mon Mar 31 00:37:52 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I know people talk about how your little girl ran away
How she went to the big city where she did stay
I hope you don't think it was something you done
Cause I had it better than anyone
You gave me this guitar and you gave me this heart*
But if I'd stayed in that town I would have lost all I've got

I want you to realize there's no where I'd rather be
Than sitting in the kitchen drinking boxed wine
Bob Dylan singing "I shall be free"
And I've got this debt that I can never repay
But I can promise you I'll make sure that we're okay

I watched you work away your entire life
But you said we had the music so we'd all right
You're always so hard on yourself
But you did the best with what you were dealt
You filled the house with stories and you filled the house with love*
Any good in me I got from what you've done*

Roseann Fino...Boxed Wine

Your eyes are saying we should get out to
Buy a house and put down some roots
You tell me I'm just like the rest
But as long as I'm singing I haven't given up yet*

Roseann Fino...You and I


Entered at Mon Mar 31 00:21:11 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Favourites from Layla and other assorted love songs...Derek and The Dominos:

I Looked Away
Bell Bottom Blues
Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out
Tell The Truth
Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad
Have You Ever Loved A Woman
Little Wing
Layla

RoseAnn Fino-I Lost It (Lucinda Williams' Cover)

Hi Bob F...Yup, I already checked out her lyrics and still...."Boxed Wine" is good musically and lyrically. I could bring myself back to her age and remember the same thoughts and feelings. Bruce Springsteen did the same in "Independence Day".....She's a cool and courageous young person to follow her passion. I respect so much that she's able to write her own lyrics. I wish I could have been fearless at her age. I wish her only the best of everything. If I was in NY area I would definitely check her out. :-D


Entered at Sun Mar 30 23:59:54 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, slow brain tonight. I just realized the Rolling Stone journalism competition entry. You get so used to it!


Entered at Sun Mar 30 23:58:19 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, Kate O'Mara was in the news tonight. RIP. I did meet her very briefly once when she was in the TV series "Howards Way" which a friend directed.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 23:47:24 CEST 2014 from (58.104.23.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Peter, this is something I saw in the Mirror after reading the Mirror: Dynasty star Kate O'Mara has died at the age of 74 after battling a short illness after a short illness.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 23:17:55 CEST 2014 from (58.104.23.60)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just wondering what people make of the Band's performance at Woodstock. Just came across a version that claims to be more complete than the others and it certainly seems to be clearer. I read that Levon blocked the inclusion of any of the songs in the big anniversary Woodstock release because he didn't like their performance. Any thoughts? It sounds fine to me. Not their best performance but certainly worth listening to.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 22:23:38 CEST 2014 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, Ny
Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino, Woodstock Records

Thank you to everyone who took the time to give RoseAnn's record a listen and your kind words.

BEG, we're encouraged by the fact that people seem to like different songs on the record. We're hoping that's a good sign. Link is to the lyric sheet on Woodstock Records web site.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 20:20:03 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pat

Agreed, but it does have a sensible refrain that goes major, and (ahem) "rocks".


Entered at Sun Mar 30 19:47:09 CEST 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

By second half of Layla do you mean the piano section? Total crap? Odd appraisal.

Whippin Post is a pretty good minor key swing thing.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 18:02:54 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Really? I would have thought you'd have much preferred Bell Bottom Blues, I Looked Away, It's Too Late etc, as I do - they were, for me, the evidence of EC having learned something from MFBP.

Agree broadly on Van's original Moondance vs awful covers, but still have a distrust of minor key songs with a swing feel. Springsteen's The Fever as done definitively by SSJ is a notable exception.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 17:56:13 CEST 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Roseann Fino!...Boxed Wine


Entered at Sun Mar 30 17:53:33 CEST 2014 from (124.25.166.8)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Layla

As a teenager my brother and I phoned our local rock station to request Layla, and were intrigued by the DJ's remark: "if you like the first half, wait 'til you hear the second half - it's even better!". We duly saved our pennies and bought the LP, and of course the second section of Layla is total crap. I did like Bell Bottom Blues and I Looked Away, though.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 17:44:51 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'll believe you on "All of Us" - I just have the singles.

The title track of Moondance has been ruined by so many dull jazzy versions. It's always a surprise to hear Van live though, because it gets good again.

Layla is the best track on that double album for me.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 17:35:13 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Second albums / a similar thing to try

Peter, I own a copy of ".......All Of Us" by Nirvana and must say that is a very patchy record, so neither that or "Nevermind" need be included.

How about "Great albums if you ignore the title track". This'll get a few going. I'll kick off with Moondance and Layla + other assorted Love Songs.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 16:15:02 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Mothering Sunday

I don't blame anybody for forgetting it.

TWO HOURS it took to get from Hillingdon back to Kingston just now...


Entered at Sun Mar 30 14:57:58 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Crabby and I were in the front row in NYC to see the Blood On The Tracks Tribute and this was one of the highlights....as well as meeting Buddy Cage and his partner who was wearing a Bob Marley jacket from Jamaica.

You're A Big Girl Now...Ollabelle


Entered at Sun Mar 30 14:40:16 CEST 2014 from (24.252.154.5)

Posted by:

Calvin

Peter, I've never heard anyone even mention Mothering Sunday over here.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 14:21:13 CEST 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For all the Mother's out there.......


Entered at Sun Mar 30 13:26:49 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mother's Day

It is Mother's Day in Britain, which we celebrate on the 4th Sunday in Lent, which is a church festival "Mothering Sunday" which goes back to late Roman times. The two are on the same day here.

I know North America celebrates the second Sunday in May (and has since 1908), but is "Mothering Sunday" i.e, today ignored? (A question from Mrs V)


Entered at Sun Mar 30 11:44:13 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Strolling Bone Rock Journalism Contest

Here's my entry, avoiding clichés as well as things that are said too often:

The band's second album as a group was their eponymous sophomore LP which they named after themselves. It failed to trouble the chart compilers and didn't enter the Top 100. The organist Bert Bloggs, had played Hammond on their first debut record, a disc which was to become a 45 rpm single when it was pressed. The vocalist Terry Tubbs sang lead vocal on that premier initial venture which they attempted first. When they arrived at the TV studios for what was to be their first TV show, they finally found themselves on television at last. It was after the TV recording was made on video tape, that the altercation between Bert and Terry became an argument. This quarrel lasted for many years from 1971 until the present decade, the second such block of ten years in the 21st century, in 2014, this year. It seems that apparently there was an alleged allegation by Terry that they had co-written the composition Greensleeves together. A version of this disputed song, which was the centre of the argument that led to the dispute, was done in a different way than it had been before. It appeared on that eponymous sophomore album, in the LP release. The composer royalties for writing were Trad.Arranged Bloggs. These were paid only to Bert at regular intervals annually, based on sales, of which he received a percentage, and when these annual payments arrived once a year, Bert became both rich and wealthy. Terry, the singer, who had sung it in his own voice himself, was still living in a small flat, where he resided. This was in an apartment block of similar tiny studios which were all the same size.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 10:19:09 CEST 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Journalistic standards at Rolling Stone are diving. Any decent rock magazine has their computer set to eradicate 'sophomore,' 'eponymous' and 'syllogism.' All over-used words.

Yes, if you count "Blowin' Your Mind' for Van, then you have to count the Them albums. Just checked Rogan & Heylin and Blowin' Your Mind was officially released in the US and UK first, but the sessions were regarded as sabotaging Bert Berns. It sold so few in the UK that an original copy is worth £150 if on London-American. Unfortunately, 99.99% of copies around are on one of a dozen different ultra-budget labels.

If there's a point about second albums being better than firsts, I reckon you start with The Band, then Freewheeling. Jefferson Airplane and Traffic have to go in.

And surely Nirvana's second album was one of the longest ever titles: "The Existence of Chance Is Everything and Nothing While the Greatest Achievement Is the Living of Life, and so Say All of Us" (Island, 1968). By that I mean the Nirvana worth listening to. (see link).


Entered at Sun Mar 30 04:00:05 CEST 2014 from (24.114.58.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

........and "Abraxas" is a glaring omission.


Entered at Sun Mar 30 03:34:35 CEST 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Rolling Stone 2nd Albums

Pleased to see The Wild, The Innocent & the E Street Shuffle there, and Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. Was Astral Weeks officially Van's second, or his first? I thought the Bert Berns sessions weren't actually regarded as an "album" as such, but have just appeared in countless guises.

Could add Traffic, definitely Jefferson Airplane and also Big Brother & the Holding a Company to that list...


Entered at Sat Mar 29 23:18:06 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bob F, you should be very proud. A great effort.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 20:59:49 CET 2014 from (108.217.93.87)

Posted by:

Glenn T

Web: My link

Subject: Rolling Stone list: 20 best second albums

The Band at the #4 spot for their sophomore effort!


Entered at Sat Mar 29 18:21:10 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Bill M

A bit deurmekaar or not, this oke's my china. A few years down the line he'll end up scratching his head and thinking: "Hmmm, NWC was right, if not immediately relevant."


Entered at Sat Mar 29 16:49:10 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Thanks Bill M

I changed language preferences to South African English. Hope it resolved our communication problems.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 14:50:44 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Kevin J...I also watch "George Gentley".

Bill M...Ha, ha. Btw, I walk past the bar you mentioned the other day on Queen East every time I go to work. I have never been inside. I only go into bars to see bands so if I don't know them or the person I'm with.....no reason to go inside. Btw, the restaurant Joy further east is a great spot for very good and tasty food and wait staff who know what they're promoting.

Bob FFFFFFFF...Congrats to your daughter!! How cool is that that she has those musicians on her first recording? I saw them perform with Garth Hudson and it was on the rare occasion that I let loose and had a few and yeah......so much fun that night as everyone seemed to be having a great time with the audience who was up on their feet a lot and just movin' and groovin'. I think JD and Blind Willie were also there that night.

On quick listen last night when I came home from a work/dinner meeting that seemed to last for hours....."Boxed Wine" and "Murder"seemed to resonate the most.....I found in general once she changed up the tempo at times I paid more attention and you should know by now how I'm always drawn to a singer-songwriter....It's always the song for me.....and then Peter V took the time to write a review for her.....Wow! She should post it on her website. She also wore my fave black/red combo btw. You must be sooooo proud of her Bob F.......I'm glad that her recording brought you back here.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 14:04:23 CET 2014 from (124.25.166.8)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Pat B

Pat, that Dylan article was tremendous - thanks for the link.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 12:04:57 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John Platania is wonderful on those Chip Taylor albums. For The Band, I can see his presence inspiring them to try abandoned songs like King Harvest, though it's hard to see it without Richard's voice. But Jim Weider was the perfect choice.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 12:02:52 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Link to my review of RoseAnne Fino's album … which I linked a few weeks ago. John Platania fans will be thrilled. Great album.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 06:30:41 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: MICHAEL JACKSON

GREAT READ ON HOW HE WORKED.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 05:08:46 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.146)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: RTO

I was thinking more of the 1980s when I think they lost their way. John would have added something that could have taken things in a slightly different direction. His playing would have fitted in without it being an attempt to replicate Robbie.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 04:43:29 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: RoseAnn Fino at Fontana's.

Unless there is some severe weather in St. Louis or somewhere interesting that gets me out of NYC beforehand,I'm planning on attending RoseAnn's show. So anyone who wants to hear what promises to be an excellent show of original material,and meet two Gbers, save the date. April 25 at 7:30pm. Just outside Chinatown. You can hit Wo Hops(Downstairs) after.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 03:21:00 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Wallsend - re: John Platania

Oooh, I don't know about that Wallsend - Jim Weider is a pretty special guitarist, he got just the right blend of a flavour of RRs original parts and his own immaculate phrasing in, too.

If ever I listen to the reformed Band his guitar playing is a highlight for me, and if you listen to the stuff he did with the Jimmy Vivino/Garth/Randy C "Songs of The Band" project, you get to hear his take on songs the reformed Band never attempted and he's fantastic on those too!


Entered at Sat Mar 29 02:31:39 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: roseann fino

Hey Bob.

I like what I'm hearing. Damn right you're proud.


Entered at Sat Mar 29 00:24:22 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.146)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Great to see the name John Platania. I think when the Band reformed they should have got him on guitar! BTW, I really like it when people with something to promote are up front about who they are and make it clear that they have a vested interest. That's one thing I liked about when Sebastion posted, he said up front who he was. I wish everyone would do that.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 22:19:19 CET 2014 from (121.211.87.72)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Location: Movie casting..

Jarred Leto: Richard?


Entered at Fri Mar 28 21:39:57 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.111)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Wonderful to see your name here.....Its been too long.....The very best to your daughter .

brown eyed girl : To name just a few ......."Justified" all four seasons great wih season 3 being particularily strong........"Game of Thrones" especially season 1, "George Gentley", HBO's Sherlock Holmes - season 1 & 2 only as season 3 is the perfect example of a writers room having too much fun....anyhow, 1&2 are great.......not Jeremey Brett great but very enjoyable...


Entered at Fri Mar 28 20:58:28 CET 2014 from (68.198.160.198)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino, Woodstock Records

Jon and everyone else in the New York City area, my daughter recently released her first full length cd on Woodstock Records. The cd was produced by Professor Louie. The Crowmatix with John Platania play on the record. RoseAnn is playing Fontana's on April 25 at 7:30pm with her band. The link is to the band camp version of RoseAnn's cd. If you have the time, please give it a listen.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 19:35:44 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: I watch this space. Isn't that enough?

Our Fennoscandian chum chooses to post his tales here on the internet - so it must be true whatever it means.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 18:56:42 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I sometimes watch this show and caught Dylan on it - Pawn Stars.avi

What other shows do all of you watch? I'm watching:
Bates Motel
Homeland
Breaking Bad was great....binged as I hadn't seen it from the beginning.

Looks like April showers are going to bring us May flowers. Have a great weekend everyone!


Entered at Fri Mar 28 18:50:01 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I used to have Encounters With Bob Dylan by Tracy Johnson.

"Fifty first-person accounts of fans who have had a close encounter (usually face-to-face) with Bob Dylan, one our most enigmatic and reclusive public figures and the 20th Century's most influential songwriter. The contributors come from around the world, and some even have recognizable names, such as mandolinist David Grisman, journalist Nat Hentoff, the late Hall-of-Fame pitcher Jim "Catfish" Hunter, rapper Kurtis Blow, and noted groupie/author Pamela Des Barres. Collectively, their stories provide compelling, sometimes amusing, insight into Dylan and his long and complicated relationship with his legion of devoted admirers."


Entered at Fri Mar 28 16:34:02 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Perhaps the best picture of Dylan ever. Also a mention of RR.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 16:07:32 CET 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Covers

Danny Whitten's Original of "I Don't Want to Talk About It" vs Rod Stewarts cover is almost the same comparison as a cover of TNTDODD by JB.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 14:52:08 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Another piece of American mythology

Thanks 'brown eyed girl' for these excerpts on relation between myth and reality. My professor in culture anthropology used to say the same thing in these words: "Myth is more _real_ than reality. And the form the storyteller uses tells more about the myth than the myth itself." Got it?


Entered at Fri Mar 28 14:35:00 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

......BAM Magazine continued.

Chris Willman: You talk of enjoying being the storyteller, but "Testimony" seems like it might be a song where you finally step into the frame to tell about yourself, then, instead of telling it from outside.

Robbie Robertson: I don't feel like I tell the story from another point of view. If "Johnny B. Goode" is Chuck Berry's story, it's the same kind of thing. I just prefer not to write songs in a me, me, me fashion. I feel more comfortable when I can talk about my own experiences throught these eyes, and that I can look back and tell the story, and I don't have to feel that I'm being so specific about it tht it makes me uncomfortable.

Chris Willman: The one song that stands out here as being a more specific lyrical song than the others - In that you're talking about Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Elvis Presley, real people we all know - is "American Roulette." Is there a way you see that tying in with the thread of album even though it's such a different kind of song?

Robbie Robertson: It's another piece of American mythology. I'm intrigued by this phenomenon. I don't feel a separation in it at all. I feel that it's still this myth-making, but dealing with real people, and what becomes of those people when they can't tell the myth from the real...

Link is to Pat B's buddy Steve Earle...."Got a boss. Get a union."

Levon Helm and Friends with Steve Earle performing 'The Mountain' at The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles on August 15, 2010.

Steve Earle wrote "The Mountain". Listening to him perform it today and thinking of how Levon covered this song with such power and empathy in his voice......and knowing that he couldn't sing it anymore......His voice was his everything.....once that was gone....yes it came back for awhile.....He really got serious about his drumming.....a chiropractor's drunkard dream for sure.....but his smile and joy of performing.....sang out instead.....I got very choked up this morning......


Entered at Fri Mar 28 14:27:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Delaney & friends

I p;iced up an odd LP this morning, "Class Reunion" by Delaney & Friends 1977, with a picture of Delaney and cut out blanks outside the Hollywood High School. I noticed it because it's on Prodigal, i.e. Motown. It has the longest list of "thanks to friends" I've ever seen … three columns of tight-packed tiny text mentioning everyone you've ever heard of … but none of The Band. The list is so long running from Bob Dylan to Billy Preston to Earl Palmer to Taj Mahal, Seals & Croft and Joan Baez that they're noticeable by their absence!


Entered at Fri Mar 28 14:06:53 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....more excerpts from Robbie in BAM magazie.

Chris Willman: Do you feel like you're trying to break down the line between slice-o'-life reality and mythology?

Robbie Robertson: See, I think American mythology is true. Our country, it's only been around a couple hundred years; we don't have this thing to call upon that they do in Europe. So we don't have the mythology that took place before us in the heavens in the same kind of way. Nobody here is gonna write like Dante and Beatrice, successfully, because we don't have the goods to write about that. What we can write about, here, is somewhere out there in this country, in this place, we know there's a place like "Somewhere Down The Crazy River." We may never have been there ourselves, but we know it's out there somewhere. I'll know it when I smell it. I'll know it when I feel the air rub against me. That's what I'm talking about.

So it does mix real life with the myths, and what's happened are sometimes so unbelievable...The reality is so unbelievable that it gets caught up in this big swarm of smoke that, when it comes out the other end, they're mixed together. You can't separate - "Oh, this is what we do day by day, and this is what we do in our dreams." They mix together, and these true tales somehow seem valid in this country.

It's just something I love being a part of. And it makes it possible to play the part of the storyteller, in that your imagination doesn't have to be caged in the way that you're only dealing with the facts...I don't know what the facts are. I don't know what the dreams are. In Americana, the dreams and the facts seem to be all the same to me.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 14:05:47 CET 2014 from (24.199.71.83)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Dixie

I've seen Joan Baez live 4 or 5 times, and always love her rendition of Dixie with the crowd singing along. And it was a special thrill to hear Amy Helm and friends perform Dixie live two weeks ago. (Other than Joan's concerts, I believe it's the only time I'd EVER heard the song live... which, given that I've been a Band fan/NYC-based-live-music-buff for 20+ years now, is quite remarkable.)


Entered at Fri Mar 28 10:19:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can almost see a wry smile on Garth's face when he said that about Dixie. Joan Baez's version had been around since 1971 and a huge hit, and It never stopped them between 1971 and 1976.

The best attitude to take to covers you dislike is the one P.P. Arnold takes doing "First Cut is the Deepest" live … "I've got a message for Sheryl Crowe … the First "Cut" IS the deepest … and I want to tell Rod Stewart, the First "Cut" IS the Deepest … then she goes on to wipe the floor with any other version of the song.

I'd guess (though i should stop guessing about Levon … I don't want another horse's head) that Levon's attitude to Joan's cover would be the same. Listen … this is how it's done! Though I said the other day, I was thrilled to hear Joan Baez do it a couple of years ago with the audience all singing the chorus.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 09:15:48 CET 2014 from (58.104.23.187)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

This article quotes Garth as saying Levon stopped singing Dixie because he hated Joan Baez's version.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 09:06:58 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The new BTs

a local FM station had this to say about it today: "Marcus Mumford is recording an album of some unfinished Bob Dylan songs". Made me spit.


Entered at Fri Mar 28 03:29:41 CET 2014 from (58.104.23.187)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Peter V's Medical Advisor

Good to hear that Peter is recovering. Given the presence of a medical man on the GB, I should have perhaps been more circumspect in my previous post. When I wrote that Garth was playing the squeeze box in a 'demented' manner, I was not suggesting that he suffered from any specific medical condition nor was I suggesting that I was qualified to make such a diagnosis. I should have more accurately said he was 'playing with great exuberance'.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 23:54:58 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V's medical advisor

Thanks Wallsend. He was seriously perturbed by the horse's head in his bed, but has stopped shaking now and is beginning to speak. Apparently it was the head of Shergar and he thinks he can get a book out of it.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 20:56:36 CET 2014 from (58.104.11.246)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I am glad you are OK Peter. After the most recent spat I thought you might have woken up to find a horse's head in your bed or all you Leonard Cohen cds scratched. Things seem to have gone a bit quite here. Can I interest anybody in a debate about the respective merits of Rock of Ages and Its Too Late to Stop Now? I always thought Van's band from that period most closely resembled the Band of anything I have heard. BTW, I am just listening to Mr Tambourine Man from the 74 Tour with some demented squeeze box playing from Garth. I always really liked the 74 tour material although I know a lot of people don't.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 20:16:43 CET 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Subject: Re: New Music Project From Ollabelle

Great!


Entered at Thu Mar 27 18:54:53 CET 2014 from (199.233.179.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: New Music Project From Ollabelle

Passing along an announcement from a band that may be of interest to those on Band GB:

Well, it has been a long time coming but we are in the early days of trying to organize the creation of a new Ollabelle record. Hopefully we can record in the late fall.

Please spread the word. We rely on people actually purchasing music. We are going to invest ourselves to the fullest to give you another honest, personal Ollabelle record.

More music can never be a bad thing!!!

Let's roll.

-Glenn Patscha


Entered at Thu Mar 27 17:30:16 CET 2014 from (12.27.2.2)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mivk Ronson

The Payolas are remembered fondly by me for the great single "Eyes of the Stanger" produced by the late great Mick Ronson..........also noteworthy, the band included a member that went on to become one of the wealthiest and celebrated producers in rock music - Bob Rock.......points with Metalica will buy you some planes and autos to be sure.

Todd.......not far off...ha! Any more Bangles though and I might just get blasted again....


Entered at Thu Mar 27 15:54:21 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Re the Payolas, lead singer Paul Hyde appeared on "Tears Are Not Enough" as did Richard Manuel


Entered at Thu Mar 27 15:07:07 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Todd...I used to watch Elvis Costello's Spectacle every week as he'd have great performers on and then he'd interview them. I saw the show that you attended......lucky you!!!!!

Elvis Costello & the Imposters are joined by Ray LaMontagne, Levon Helm, Nick Lowe, Richard Thompson, Larry Campbell and Allen Toussaint for The Band's "The Weight" Dec 2009.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 14:24:35 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For all the sensitive male Band fans out there.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 14:18:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Todd....I did like this one song by the Bangles.
Apparently the other "girl" group the Go-Gos were at the Police Picnic I attended....but can't remember them at all.
I also can't remember the Canadian Payola$ either. lol
I would say at our Heatwave Concert.....Elvis Costello and The Attractions, The Pretenders with all their original members.....and the fun group the B-52's stood out for me.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 13:56:23 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Covering themselves

On Tears of Rage, I Shall Be Released (and TWOF) I meant "they're not basement tapes but slightly subsequent studio versions without Mr Dylan singing lead."


Entered at Thu Mar 27 13:30:14 CET 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: PV and Covers??

The Band Tears of Rage and I Shall Be Released Covers? Really Peter??


Entered at Thu Mar 27 13:28:46 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Animal

Mick Fleetwood -- note the open-mouthed mugging & exaggerated body language.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 12:53:22 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rod

Very grateful to you for the link to Rick's concert!


Entered at Thu Mar 27 11:34:24 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Muppets

He wasn't sending up. just playing drums because that's what the lead singer on the song, Levon, played when they did it.

I thought Animal was based on Keith Moon but looked like Ginger Baker.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 11:29:00 CET 2014 from (58.104.7.93)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

An interesting perspective from the Arkansas Times. I always assumed Animal was based on Ginger Baker.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 11:28:24 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Spectacle

Todd - by coincidence I watched that episode of Spectacle last night. You were lucky. I think Elvis Costello is rarely at ease as a host on those shows but the guests usually make it work smoothly. What a collection of guests he had that night - all with honourable Band connections and all rock aristocracy. I noticed Steve Buscemi was in the audience.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 09:18:28 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Basement Tapes

The Basement Tapes project: I agree with Mike that the charm of the originals is the raw nature. If you want good covers you can compile your own. I did it on open reel, then cassette, then CDR and now on iTunes. Julie Driscoll This Wheel’s On Fire, Manfred Mann’s Mighty Quinn, Fairport’s Million Dollar Bash, The Band Tears of Rage and I Shall Be Released, The Byrds Nothing Is Delivered, Peter, Paul & Mary’s Too Much of Nothing, Coulson, Dean etc’s Sign on The Cross and Tiny Montgomery, The Roches Clothes Line Saga, 90s Band live Don’t Tell Henry etc etc.

But T-Bone Burnett? Listening to “Inside Llewyn Davis” and thinking back to “O, Brother Where Art Thou” I wonder if he’ll go for re-enactments with original instrumentation and arrangement or close to it rather than re-imaginings? He’s extremely good at doing that.


Entered at Thu Mar 27 08:42:32 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko 77

this has also just appeared on YT


Entered at Wed Mar 26 22:05:22 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

BEG, I noticed that you posted about Amy Helm a while back. I really enjoy her current show that she's touring with, and I'm planning on seeing her perform this weekend. It's been a while, so I'm quite looking forward to it.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:44:11 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

I saw Toussaint a few years back and will be doing so again on 14th April. Oozes class, that man.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:41:00 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Yes indeed, Steve Nieve was fantastic! Everyone was on their game that night. The personal highlight for me was seeing Allen Toussaint, which was my first time. So much talent, and a real gracious soul. To see him share the stage with Levon, and the others was pretty cool.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:34:34 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Todd

That was a magical episode of Spectacle; I thought Steve Nieve played some of the nicest accompaniment organ I've ever heard.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:29:29 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Cinnamon Girl

OK, Last one....I promise.

Pretty nice cover of Neil Young's 'Cinnamon Girl' by Matthew Sweet and the lovely Susanna Hoffs on the Tonight Show from a few years ago. It's not quite Neil intensity, but Matthew gets a pretty nice vocal sound, and their band is cookin' pretty good for a TV talk show appearance.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:20:12 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Pushin' Too Hard

At the link above is an early Bangles performance from 1982. It's their cover of The Seeds 'Pushin' Too Hard'. They rocked pretty hard before they got all sweet and sugary. OK, I promise I'll get back on track now that I got the Bangles out of my system.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 21:01:15 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Make it sound like a dinosaur eating cars

The quote above was the sonic direction that Nick Lowe gave while producing Elvis Costello and the Attractions back in the day.

A few years back, I was at the Elvis Costello Spectacle Show taping at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Lovely night that included Nick Lowe, Levon, Richard Thompson Allen Toussaint, and Ray Lamontagne. Everyone there was thrilled to be on stage with Levon, and talked about their connection to The Band and Levon.

Nick mentioned that The Band used some of the Brinsley Schwarz instruments and practice space to rehearse for a tour back in the 1970’s. Nick marveled that their equipment never sounded quite as good as when the Band was using it.

Northwestcoaster, I checked out some clips of Sahara Hotnights. Fun stuff with a bit of an attitude. Reminded me a little of Elastica. I liked it, but the thing that was missing for me, as compared to the “Ultra Cool” Bangles was the vocal harmonies.

Kevin J., I must admit, for a moment last night, I thought that you’d been sampling some of RTO’s magical late night posting fluid.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 19:57:14 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG

No, Nick doesn't get all the credit. Elvis has done far better out of being a Nick Lowe (for a time) than Nick Lowe has! But WSF'BPL&U is a Nick song, fair and square.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 18:43:30 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bring something lethal , don't bring me emptiness......

.....and don't ever bring ice cream........that said, please excuse a few silly words and thoughts by me last night......not sure anything was helped or added by re-printing the Elvis C comments or by the language I used....

Now back to watching what feels like a Christmas present.........The Band show...........Richard was rough but everyone else is in tip top shape......loving it! Is is just me or is the YouTube less crisp than the Wolfgang one........When Adam had alerted us to that months back, I only watched a few songs at the time but they seemed cleaner - perhaps not - but seemed like that.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 18:23:35 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bring me water, bring me cocaine
Bring me something lethal, something that leaves a stain
But please don't make me feel that emptiness again
Feel the emptyness again

Yes RTO.....I was thinking about the time I saw Elvis Costello with Nick Lowe and Dave Edmunds and.........one of my all time faves......Mink DeVille on the same bill at our Massey Hall. Nick Lowe doesn't get all the credit does he? More people are aware of Elvis Costello's work......I think it was the year that Dylan's Slow Train Coming came out that I was also listening to Graham Parker non-stop. He knows how to craft a song....his lyrics always resonated.......He's able to snarl and bite away at his lyrics.....He was open to ska and reggae.....You didn't feel as alienated when you would connect with his music.......great performer.....never get tired of watching him perform! Passion is no ordinary word.....

GRAHAM PARKER....from Garland Jeffreys' site Collide The Generations

February 24, 2014
Graham Parker is a British singer-songwriter, who is best known as the leader of Graham Parker & The Rumour.

"My daughter Natalie was about 11 when the Spice Girls hit with "Wannabe," and naturally, with other kids her age falling prey to their dulcet tones - or perhaps more importantly - their awesome stage names, she was not immune to the charms of this fluffy piece of pop.

Then she heard the Beatles. Or rather, saw them on TV. The combination of old Beatles footage and those timeless songs had her in thrall, and even when she found out that one member was dead and the rest were older than her parents and that they had not even been the Beatles since 1970, it didn't dent her enjoyment one bit.

I tried but failed to turn her on to the Stones, though. She found Jagger absurd and just laughed at the very idea. How about some Beefheart? I thought. Well, as any young man in 1971 found out to his chagrin, if you asked a girl "So...do you wanna come back to my place and listen to some Beefheart?" you would find yourself going home alone that night. The Captain didn't impress any better in the 90's either, and my daughter - after suffering half a side of "Safe As Milk" - cracked up laughing and told me that in her mind she pictured Beefheart and his musicians as a bunch of really old men, dressed in overalls and straw hats, and performing on a porch like something out of a black and white western.

Amazingly, by the time she was 17 she was at a Stones concert with her mom digging every song and buying a T-shirt. Like everyone with any sense, she grew to realize that pretty much any act from the 60's and 70's were infinitely better than anything you'd hear from about 1980 onwards. But of course, she never "got" Captain Beefheart. That sound, unfortunately, remains a mystery to every female on the planet earth."


Entered at Wed Mar 26 17:57:25 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Freudian slip

BEG, I trust you were having a giggle earlier, but...

NICK LOWE wrote What's So Funny 'Bout Peace Love and Understanding, back in the days when Elvis was an avid Brinsley Schwarz gig goer.

Elvis idolised Nick; some of us still maintain "and quite right too"...


Entered at Wed Mar 26 17:50:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

You might be the sweetest little girl in your heart
But still the world ignores that and tears you apart
You think of the parties you'll never attend
You dream of someone who's more than a friend

Love doesn't jump out of a magazine
You mustn't always believe what you see

And baby, you need temporary beauty
And hope to God that it doesn't rain
You need temporary beauty
Even though it might be love
Even though it might be love
Even though it might be love in vain, vain, vain, vain
Vain, vain, vain, vain

Life does get better....Thank you Graham Parker!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 17:39:11 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Don't Ask Me Questions

I stand up for liberty
but I cannot liberate

Long Live Graham Parker!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 17:09:43 CET 2014 from (108.192.65.60)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Hey Luke my friend, Thanks for the info about the left handed drumming. Also nice to know more about the reason that Levon switched to the matched grip, so that's helpful too.

I want to clarify a point about the first Ramble that I mentioned earlier. The Ramble that I attended was the first public Ramble in January 2004. There was a Ramble (called Uncle Remus and the Whole Show) that occurred a couple of weeks earlier on January 10th, 2004 that was more of a private affair to get the ball rolling.....a friends and family sort of thing. I wasn't at that one. In either case, both events, which were sort of precursors to the later Rambles, happened in January 2004, and not in September 2003, which was the date reported in the Elmore article

Northwestcoaster, thanks for the tip on the Swedish girl group. I'll check that out, and let you know what I think.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 17:02:56 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sorry, having trouble with my previous link.
Here's another article from Robbie's former home in Woodstock.

Peace, love and rejuvenation in Woodstock

Maybe Elvis Costello wrote Peace, Love, and Understanding after his Freudian slip?

Pizza.....Crabby took me to a pizza joint by one of Dylan's former homes in Greenwich Village.....Thin crust with two ingredients.....yum! I then took him to one of Dylan's other homes in Greenwich Village as I had the info from the many books I've read on Dylan. I was wearing my Band t-shirt but realized when looking at photos that Crabby took that it was too big for me so I gave it to imagezulu. He didn't really want it as he's not a Band fan....but I asked him to wear it to Rick Danko's Tribute in Simcoe....I then gave it to my older brother. He's not a fan either but he liked Dylan's painting. He's told me that every time he wears it that someone comes up to him to talk about the Band. I'm not sure what my brother says then.....but he has seen Robbie in one of our better restaurants as my brother was working there as a sommelier.....and he didn't alert me!!!!!!

I told him now that I've seen Jeff Beck perform at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival....Yesssss......He's a technical wizard for sure......but I'll take Robbie's emotional guitar playing any day and any time because his playing moves me....it touches my heart and soul......Jeff's guitar playing is brilliant.....but it just doesn't turn me on......now.....his guitar playing on "People Get Ready".....now he's got me hooked and paying attention. :-D Or.....Listen to Jeff's cover of "Amazing Grace" and Robbie's cover of "Amazing Grace" and maybe you'll feeeeel the difference. Viva la difference!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 16:28:28 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

In Woodstock, N.Y., taking a load off at a former Band crash pad

Hey Wallsend...Many thanks for posting the entire concert!
Btw, just as I encouraged you to return to the GB....It was BWNWITENN who encouraged me.
It can be brutal here, but on the upside.......I've shared tons of music with the boyzzz here so I have more boots and they have music that they didn't have in their collection or I'd send them a brown eyed girl mix....and I mean mix....many genres all mixed together 'cause that's how I like it.....I've also met many people from this site from both Canada and USA and one from Ireland! I became friends with one former poster's partner in life and have visited them for weekends and we continue to see bands together and just blah, blah, blah, blah about anything and everything as we have a lot in common. Other people I've met, we didn't have enough in common to continue a friendship but I did enjoy the time we shared together. I also think that if all of us met at the Celebration of this Band site and JH's birthday party....We'd all have a big laugh....at least I'd hope so.....

Long Live The Band!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 16:13:15 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Funny, when I think of the Dylan BT, I think of five guys in a cool basement during a warm summer.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 15:47:37 CET 2014 from (74.176.226.132)

Posted by:

Mike C

Subject: Cleaning Out the Basement

The Basement Tapes project is intriguing, but seems somewhat at odds with the spirit of the original idea. One of the many charms of TBT is its rough raw sound. Elvis comments that these songs will be recorded in a state of the art studio, but personally I'd rather hear that they were searching for a suitable cellar...or maybe setting up shop in an vacant pool house.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 15:39:39 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Todd / girl groups

Todd should check Swedish girl group 'Sahara Hotnights': indie, punk-pop, garage revival (whatever that is). Despite their warming name they are very cool. Band took the name after Sahara Hotnights which was a racing horse... there goes excitement.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 14:19:30 CET 2014 from (76.99.127.111)

Posted by:

Luke from PA

Subject: Left handed drumming

I'm a lefthanded drummer. A left handed drummer has to completely reverse the kit, since we use our right hand for the back beat and left foot for the down beat. Levon's left hand was very busy (and great) when he played unmatched. He switched to a matched grip his last few years because he thought his left hand was too busy, which can result in a muddy back beat. He's still the best drummer I ever heard.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 14:01:37 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Peter V: How would you feel about adopting the term 'brown-eyed' instead? Bonnie Bramlett is called a "blue-eyed soul singer" not because she has blue eyes (does she?) but for another reason. Ditto Mitch Ryder, the Righteous Brothers, surely Richard Manuel at times ...

Speaking of Bonnie Bramlett, she appeared at a big "Festival Express" movie-release party in Toronto some years ago, replacing Janis Joplin at the helm of a partial reformation of Full Tilt (Richard Bell, John Till, Brad Campbell). Garth appeared too, with Maud singing "It Makes No Difference". And Bernie Leadon, and Sylvia Tyson, and surely others I can't recall offhand. John D - can you think of anyone else?


Entered at Wed Mar 26 12:58:44 CET 2014 from (125.3.85.19)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Web: My link

For those who haven't seen it, or haven't seen it enough, the Asbury Park 1976 video is now on YT.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 11:24:18 CET 2014 from (110.32.177.226)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across the online edition of the magazine Elmore that the Susan Cadgene article came from. It is really nice with a picture of Levon on the front cover and a really good lay out with photos (none that we haven't seen before).


Entered at Wed Mar 26 11:16:05 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There are some odd things about the Costello altercation which we’ve discussed before. Sorry about going into it but I’m genuinely interested in the language issue. He has subsequently apologized profusely. It was the punk era and he was desperately trying to be as offensive as he possibly could but he was in an altercation which had become stupid with equally drunk people. He mentions that as a newcomer to the USA he had heard African-Americans using the N-word peer-to-peer and was not fully aware of the different import when used by a white person. Dunno. It was offensive as long as I remember, though Ten Green Bottles used to be Ten Little N-word, and the children’s rhyme Eeny-Meeny-Myny –Mo certainly included the N-word when I was a child. Now it’s “pixie.”

Chiwetel Ejiofor was talking about 12 Years A Slave recently, and said that being British, he found it incredibly hard to have the word used to him in the film, and even harder to say it himself to other people. It was never used peer-to-peer when he was growing up in Britain (but I think he’s quite posh). He also said that when they got to the beating of the overseer he was so immersed in the role that he genuinely beat the his fellow actor.

The shifting of terms is continual. In the “Oxford American” Tennessee Music Issue last year, there’s an article on how they started a “race” radio station in Memphis in 1947, and at that time “black” was hugely offensive, which it’s not in the UK, and they used negro. Just yesterday I picked up an EP by The Deep River Boys for 50p entitled Negro Spirituals. We use Afro-Caribbean but like African-American it’s a limited term, as Melanesians, Australian Aborigines, Sri-Lankans and other dark-skinned people whose ancestors have never been near Africa would point out. The rule used to be mention ethnicity in description, never colour. Then on the BBC the other night, a South-Asian Indian who I would describe as lightly-suntanned at most was saying, “As a black person …” The complexity is shown by recent bans on the term “African” in some British schools, as it is being used as an abusive term towards African-born kids and used by British-born Afro-Caribbean kids.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 10:50:14 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The New Basement Tapes

I sort of wonder what the point is. The Basement Tapes were built around a sense of community. 6 guys who had been on the road for ages just mucking around, having fun and making music - in a fairly rudimentary setting.Every time I listen to the BTs it's with that in mind and I have all these images of leafy autumn Woodstock. This new project sounds a bit contrived. Mermaid Ave from Billy Bragg and Wilco was a similar project but it didn't pretend to be anything other than what it was.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 10:43:13 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Thanks for the article, Peter. I think Elvis has said he was very drunk and going out of his way to wind someone up. And who hasn't done that. Seem to recall Clapton made some comments in the 70's that didn't age very well.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 10:39:45 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Elvis Costello

I'm not the biggest Elvis Costello fan. I'll take Graham Parker over both Elvis and Joe Jackson in the Angry young men of Brtiish rock sweepstakes. But, I don't question his love of the Band. He featured Levon on his show and has spoken many times about his admiration of The Band. The racist comnents were an isolated, drunken incident from 35 years ago. He apologised profusely for them. He's hardly Mel Gibson or even Lemmy for that matter. If either of them were involved in the project, I would mount a protest, but Elvis C. His involvement is kosher in my book.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 09:47:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Days of 79

Link to the original Costello v Bramlett for those too young to remember or too old to remember.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 06:28:01 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Elvis What !

In the spirit of hoping things here don't get worse, let's pray the shuffle kneed racist Elvis Costello is not allowed within 1000 miles of anything Band related......this is after all a man that called Ray Charles “a blind ignorant nigger” and James Brown “a jive-ass nigger”........for the record, Bonnie Bramlett on hearing these comments didn't cry and threaten to leave the bar......she punched him out.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 06:05:22 CET 2014 from (98.87.143.75)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

To be fair, Elvis Costello will probably do a decent job. And perhaps Jim James. As much as a song called "Hi-De-Ho" might be improved upon, anyway. ("Hi-De-Ho and Hi-De-He/Were throwing knives into a tree"?)


Entered at Wed Mar 26 05:58:18 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd the Plod

Location: Studville
Web: My link

Subject: Guilty Pleasures

At the risk of losing any lingering street cred that I might still have.

Over the last week or two, I’ve been listening to a lot of “girl groups”. I don’t really like to categorize music this way, but these are the labels that we have been given. The Bangles were fairly popular back in the 1980’s and while I was never a huge fan, they had a catchy sound, and it seemed as though they had some of the same influences that I enjoyed. They themselves name check groups like The Beatles, The Byrds, and Buffalo Springfield in interviews. And to be perfectly frank, I dig girls with guitars.

I’m not suggesting that they are equals of these groups, but they seem to have a sincerity and foundation that seems to be lacking from much of what passes for pop music these days. And apparently George Harrison was a fan.

The YouTube link above is a live performance from 1986, of the Bangles doing the Alex Chilton/Big Star tune ‘September Gurls’.

Not too much of a Band connection, but the show is from the Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh, and the (right handed) drummer (who does some singing) seems to be wearing gloves.

P.S. - I'm not planning on leaving, but I may have to after this Bangles post.....(ducks and runs for cover)!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 05:57:18 CET 2014 from (98.87.143.75)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Web: My link

Subject: The New Basement Tapes

Don't know if anybody has posted about this "New Basement Tapes" project T-Bone Burnett is currently captaining through the waters of the north Atlantic. Perhaps not, out of respect, or avoidance.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 05:50:47 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Blah....blah......blah.....blah

My God...has there ever been more nonsense written in this GB than over these last few hours.........SIDES......what the moth*r F**king F**k........I heard ROA in the late 70's and it changed and elevated my musical self....I loved Levon.....I loved Robbie.....I loved Garth......I loved Richard......and I loved Rick...........left handed may have been seen as sort of right handed because right handed can look sort of left handed if you are eating ice cream in Italy that otherwise would and should have been eaten right handed in England.

Levon cutting off Elliot Landy is news.......worthy of comment at a Band website......the rest of this nonsense is not.......and note to all GB posters.......if you are going to leave....just leave.......there is a dignity at all levels of life, business and recreation in just walking away ......and there is a beauty too in just gliding back in......often not enough people recognize just what is what but so what!..............enough people do....and that should be enough to feed the soul.....


Entered at Wed Mar 26 05:03:26 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Left Handed Drumming

Apparently there's a quote from Levon where he mentions watching and studying the drummer from F.S. Walcott who was a left handed drummer.

Levon's quote from his book This Wheel's on Fire:
"I'm naturally right-handed, but people have always told me that I play left-handed. If I have any technique at all, that's where it comes from."

So I suppose it could be said that Levon was inspired by a left handed drummer, and figured out a way to convert that into playing it as a right handed drummer. People may have told him he plays that way, but it's not quite the same as being a left handed drummer.

It would be interesting to hear from other drummers what their take on this is.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 05:01:19 CET 2014 from (24.252.154.5)

Posted by:

Calvin

I just got back from the Cleveland International Film Festival (Which is actually a pretty big deal on the Film Festival Circuit) And saw only the 2cd public showing of The Winding Steam, somewhat of a documentary of the Carter-Cash Family. I say somewhat is it is very heave on musical performances.

The director Beth Harrington sort of fell into the project as Roseanne Cash, who narrated her 2003 film Welcome to the Club: The Women of Rockabilly, invited her to interview Johnny on film right before he died.

But its an amazing piece of work, all sort of footage Ive never seen of the Carter Family, Chet Atkins, Hank Williams, as well as new performances by the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Joe Ely, Sheryl Crow, just tons of people.

But some of that old footage is amazing-Young Chet Atkins as the Mother Maybelle and the Carter Girls young hotshot guitarist-who when the Grand Ole Opry signed the Carters the Opry suggested maybe they get leave Atkins as his playing was too newfangled for the Opry. The Carters said everyone on no one. Hank Williams singing with them. Mother Maybelle singing in front of Woodstock like crowds (people in the audience wise) Old interviews with Maybelle and Sara. Great Stuff.

Seems certain members of the Carter Family, mostly from the A.P. line, have been doing a show where it all began every Saturday night since 1979. Long before anyone heard of the Ramble-I thought that was pretty cool.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 04:43:41 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Lefty

Thanks for confirming that Kerrin. I'm not a drummer, but have been around enough of them over the years. Plus both of my parents are left handed, and I have a knack for spotting other left handed people pretty easily.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 04:37:52 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

No, Levon was not a left handed drummer. Didn't set his kit up left handed, didn't hold his sticks left handed, didn't play his fills left handed. I wondered if they may have been making an obscure appraisal of his rhythmnic style, but if it's a literal remark then it's wrong.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 04:12:29 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Fact Check 101

The Susan Cadgene's article from Elmore magazine that was linked recently, was interesting, but there were a few things that I noticed that didn’t seem accurate.

The article mentions that Levon was a left-handed drummer. At the very first Ramble that I attended, the opening group was a local Woodstock group named the Apple Pickers Union. The Apple pickers Union drummer is a left-handed drummer. They used Levon’s Red Yamaha drum kit for their set. When Levon sat down at the drums to begin his set, he had to move the snare drum and hi-hat to the opposite side, which he played as a right-handed drummer. If he was left handed, he could have simply left the set-up as is.

Also mentioned is a Free Fall Ramble on his property. All of the Free Fall Rambles, that I know of, which occurred at least 4 or 5 years in a row, were held at Gill’s Farm in nearby Hurley, NY. This is the same location where the cover art for Levon’s Dirt Farmer album was photographed. It was Levon’s way of giving back, and helping his friend John Gill drum up a little business.

The article also mentions that the first Ramble performance was in September 2003. I was at the first Ramble, and it was held in January 2004. The next Ramble after that was in September 2004. I think the next one after that was in November. The Rambles as a regular event didn’t really kick in until the following year. Jimmy Vivino was involved a great deal at some point, but the very first Ramble had Levon, Johnnie Johnson, Sax player Jon Smith, Amy Helm, Sean Costello on guitar, Andrew Shober on bass and Julia Smith on backing vocals. Dr. John showed up, and sat in on guitar for a couple of tunes.

Now these may not considered to be major errors, but they jumped out at me on my first read through of the article. The article seemed to be well written, but any of the mistakes that I listed above could have been fact checked. There is other information in the article that was new to me. I suppose that I have to assume that it’s correct, but the presence of the other errors of information that I know to be incorrect from direct knowledge leads to some skepticism on my part.

I guess the lesson according to Ben Franklin is to “believe none of what you hear, and half of what you read.”


Entered at Wed Mar 26 03:59:18 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

RTO, recommend the Danko bass video as a Band curiosity, but secrets to Rick's style are thin on the ground. It's very Rick - he seems very enthusiastic but underprepared, and plays a short scale Gibson a la Jack Bruce, which I've not seen him with onstage. He teaches how to play a scale and some other things that you could get from anyone.

Key points - I do remember him going through King Harvest, and even when he plays the C major lick in the chorus at half speed it still took me ages to work it out, as he plays the bottom string with his thumb and it's all a blur. He talks about, and demonstrates "leaving the backbeat open", and that was great. Basically you can play as much as you like, but leave a hole for the snare to fall into. That worked for me, that is a lot of the Danko sound. He even gets the old Ampeg out for a bit, but clearly hasn't played fretless in a good while. Nice to see it, though.

In the end, transcribing We Can Talk will probably teach you more. Do buy the DVD, though.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 03:28:13 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Quite right, Robert. Some of us seek solace in music to get away from politics and religion...

At some point I must pick up Danko's bass tuition DVD as I've always meant to. You can't go through life being as root and fifth as I am, especially when you own a Jack Casady model bass!


Entered at Wed Mar 26 03:05:01 CET 2014 from (68.83.145.149)

Posted by:

Robert

Location: Philadelphia

Let's not take "sides." Few of us have any real stake in the discussion beyond our love of the Band's music, and fewer still actually know anything relevant. Overheating of discussion is one of the downsides of internet communication. Is it "Godwin's Law" that says that within three or four turns in an internet conversation, someone will accuse someone else of being a Nazi?

It's normal to be interested in biographical details about the lives of great artists -- and more than one of these boys has "dined out" on his (past?) reputation for wild living -- but let's resist the urge to "take sides" in an argument that is long over, and was really never any of our business anyway.

Not when we could be talking about the way Rick Danko "learns" (constructs) the bass part to "I'm not there" right before our very ears: You just know they were sitting there, knee to knee, in the Basement, and you can practically feel Rick watching Bob Dylan's fingers. In 1967. That was an interesting conversation.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 02:14:46 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Wallsend

Well put there, and I must add to my post to Ben just now that shifting my opinion over the years doesn't mean I'm on Robbie's "side" now either! But there, must get on with devising the Lowrey manual quiz. There will be a Harry Stoneham album as the prize...


Entered at Wed Mar 26 02:01:30 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I always thought Robbie was the most talented but I loved all the guys. I was never on Robbie's 'side', I never even knew we were supposed to take sides until I came to this site.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 01:33:26 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

Indeed, Bill - you'll find that the greatest rag and bone men DO gravitate towards ice cream within the first few minutes of the attached clip.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 01:04:29 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I like trifle, but for the last 30 years what comes to mind is Basil Fawlty digging in with his hands in a fruitless search for duck.

sadavid: I believe that 'spumoni' is the Italian word for 'dregs' - in other words, recycled ice-cream. So again very fitting for rag-and-bone men and others in like trades.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 00:56:49 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Ben

Thanks for your vote of confidence. I'm little better than a lurker myself - I'll disappear when I realise I'm spending too long waffling on the net and getting nothing else done - but it seems that others pop up from time to time, make trouble, and then are thankfully gone again.

I used to side with the Levon fraternity broadly as I thought it was a shame given his immense talent and loveable straight talking that he was in the position he was towards the end. But as time goes on, I've shifted my view somewhat and genuinely believe that Robbie's songs made a huge difference and are probably the reason we are all still here picking over the spoils. Being an organist, I of course idolise Garth Hudson, and the two Lowreys in my house are evidence of this. I play bass as as a second instrument so if course appreciate Rick Danko, who really threw the rule book away, without being flashy. And Richard Manuel? There's my hero. The best voice in rock and roll, and "We Can Talk" is my favourite song by The Band.

Frank Zappa replaced parts wholesale on certain albums when they went to CD. He himself took that decision to "improve" them. As a result, you couldn't actually get a "proper" CD release of some of his catalogue. The fact that Hot Rats is one of the most popular made it worse.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 00:42:58 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: what I'd like to see released

Here's a list of what I would like to see released. 1. Complete Basement tapes. 2.From Bacon fat to judgement day. 3. Demos and outtakes from the 80's/90's-see Peter viney's article on 'Band demos' in the library. 4. an assortment of live shows spanning the entire history of The Band from 1969 to 1999.


Entered at Wed Mar 26 00:29:28 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: RTO

RTO, I'm glad you came back. You asked a few days ago if Ryko was the label that released some butchered Zappa album. They released a good part of his catalog in the 80's/90's. And I think some of the cd's may have been remixed or overdubbed. I recall reading something about this, but I don't follow Zappa that closely.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 23:49:00 CET 2014 from (81.133.97.240)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Peter

I'll scan one over and then you host it somewhere!


Entered at Tue Mar 25 23:31:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It might be time for a Lowrey organ manual quiz. Seven days to study it, then twenty questions.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 23:28:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Shit! The Zuppa Inglese feud is starting. I'm coming out squarely for Zuppa Inglese on this one too, though a home made sherry trifle has its virtues.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 22:34:14 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M

I'm with you there on pistachio vs chocolate. But there - Zuppa Inglese is supposed to be an Italian take on English trifle. It certainly isn't, but I know what I prefer and have a bottle of the red liqueur colouring always on the go at home.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 22:08:55 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the Gelati files

What the hell's the story on spumoni?


Entered at Tue Mar 25 21:59:22 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed….it’s the one where you hear him putting the ashtray down on top of the piano….but singing quite strongly…..the singing softly story was at the time TNTDODD was being composed and his daughter Alexandra was just a new born.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 21:54:43 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Kevin/twilight

I wasn't able to see the you tube.Is this the demo with RR on piano singing softly,I believe,he said since a baby was sleeping in the other room? The cut on A Musical History?


Entered at Tue Mar 25 21:44:09 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: LINK: Demo of "Twilight"

Link to RR's demo of "Twilight" that Cheryl Pawelski found in a box..........this is a rare example of a song that the boys in the Band did not improve. It was perfect just the way it was presented and now is the only version I listen to.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 21:24:49 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I like pistachio ice-cream as much as the next person, but the thought of it being part of the holy Neapolitan trinity of my childhood is nuts. Thanks to Todd for doing the research - brown chocolate standing in for black. Come to think of it, black could be licorice - even better.

At times like this I wish Robbie's grandfather had been a Dickie Dee vendor rather than a rag-and-bone man. That way nobody here'd complain that I've veered severely off topic.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 21:15:52 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

There is a reconciliation scene at the end of the Muscle Shoals documentary I just watched………and at the end of “Ain't in It for My Health” there can be one that might be interpreted as one with Amy and some from Levon Helm’s management singing one of Robbie’s most beautiful songs “Twilight”……………..I just keep wishing that there would be peace in the valley……as Amy’s mother Libby Tutus Fagen had said to MOJO so well just after his passing:

"The story of Robbie and Levon is much more complex than the bloggers and the press understand. I can tell you that for the years I was with Levon, from 1968 to 1974, they each shared a part of the other’s soul...............When I called Robbie to say Levon was dying, he was stunned, shattered—he thought Levon had beaten the cancer. Robbie flew to New York to say goodbye. Amy, Donald and I were in the waiting room, and I don’t know what Robbie said to Levon for the long time he spent by his bedside. All I know is that there’s a side to this life-and-death song no one has heard. Levon wouldn’t want this bitterness to ramble on any longer." AMEN

Bill M: Wonderful observation about snow……and yes, I listen to the Garth celebration album often….his contributions are lovely throughout and I maintain that there is not another case in rock/pop where a song was so perfectly rescued as Raine Maida does with “The Moon Struck One”……..and the out of this world beautiful take by Mary Margret O'Hara on “Out Of The Blue” just screams for Robbie to do an album of his solo work with guest singers……Amy Helm would be a dream on a couple from HTBC.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:58:30 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Neapolitan

Peter, you would be happy with New Haven apizza. Many of the immigrants to New Haven, who helped introduce pizza to America, came from the Amalfi coast just south of Naples. I’ve not been to Naples, but I would imagine the pizza is a similar style. It was a great place to grow up as a pizza lover.

I never knew that it was anything special until I went away to college, a mere 50 miles away and couldn’t find good pizza anywhere. Apparently my college town was primarily Greek and Polish immigrants. Great food on it’s own, but it wasn’t Neapolitan pizza.

The problem with ice hockey, as that by the end of your career, you’re reduced to eating soft food such as ice cream. Even the thin crust pizza requires some teeth to get the job done.

RTO, I had some beer the other night, inspired by your pre-posting shenanigans. I was planning to post something inspired, but had three bottles of ale, and then fell asleep. It ain’t like it used to be.

I had to Google the Italian flag. Apparently the flag of Naples for a brief period in the early 1800’s was red, white and black. I suppose that’s where the chocolate may have come from in the Neapolitan ice cream.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:54:58 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

I'll scan you a PDF! Yes, I came back just after that fracas so missed it, but even today there is unpleasantness. These Levon or Robbie camps are just like certain religions: everybody not in one thinks that folks who are are entitled to their views, but this isn't generally reciprocated within them, where they are right and that's that! When I last looked it was a five piece band I liked. Not one singled out for being the guardian angel of it after the event.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:32:12 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

After what happened last week, I seriously thought about not posting any more. I came back because of what BEG wrote but also because if all the sane people stop posting, that is only going to leave the crazy people. Now where can I get one of these Lowrey manuals of which you speak?


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:16:19 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kerrin

Kerrin, let's get the Lowrey service manuals out and debate them word by word. Wallsend wants to talk about bloody sport.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:02:32 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.195)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I suggest we get back to the ice hockey pizza is way to controversial.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 20:02:08 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Italian flag

Is it my imagination, or outside of Italy itself, does the red portion of the Italian flag get distinctly "oranged"? I go every year to Italy, and bright and strong Torino/Ferrari - or for us Brits, "Post box" - red, white and green are proudly used in corporate colour schemes, branding all that kind of thing.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:53:16 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: You can blame Peter for not being shot of me.

Peter, you are right. The good outweighs the bad. I vote for the pizza debate returning. At least folk spoke of what they actually knew in that debate, and anybody who thinks deep dish rather than thin is talking bollocks, pure and simple.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:50:56 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Neapolitan ice-cream always used to be strawberry, vanilla and pistachio, but now they sell strawberry, vanilla and chocolate as Neapolitan. Have they never seen an Italian flag?

I meant pizza though.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:43:08 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Neapolitan - ice cream on a pizza? As for 'rounders', that's what I've seen both Robbie and Garth call bar-room characters from their Yonge Street days.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:27:23 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Location: Whose business

One of us said maybe even music writers read the page.They do Sometime ago I had posted an item in which i said I grew up with Elliot Mazer and his sister and our families vacationed together. An interviewer said to him "I read a poster on. some one named Joan said she knew you." Glad I didn't say any thing bsd


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:21:38 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, and then you go and mention a professional "rounders" team in the same breath.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:18:45 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, I was with you there until the last couple of lines. Don't you remember the great pizza debate in the GB? That caused far more fury than the feud. I hope you're not trying to stir up the deep dish v thin base debate again.

New Haven? Jeez! Chicago? And then Jeff's going to come in with some deli in New York serving mackerel pizza or whatever.

Well. everyone knows my position this from last time. I'm a Neapolitan.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:09:15 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

I think you had 5 men who all had their own personalities with all the baggage that accompanies them I love Rick, but you can't say he wasn't over indulgent,but I still love his voice and did buy any bootlegs, and if these concerts were put together in a nice package with photos , I would buy it

My husband and I have a running joke. "He will say 'in my opinion... and my reply is "If I want your opinion I will give it to you," I guess what I'm saying is everyone is entitled to their opinion,but try to be kind

BEG Thanks for all the great links


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:08:28 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Susan Cadgene's Article

Peter, I posted at the same time as you.
I have some comments to make about Susan Cadgene's article, but I don't have time at the moment. There are a few errors that I noticed that should have been caught by simple fact checking before publication. That doesn't mean that the entire article is faulty, but it shakes my confidence somewhat regarding attention to detail.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:02:17 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

It's been a few days since I've checked in here, so I'm not completely up to speed on all the latest drama. Reading back now, it looks to me like some of it stems from some of the long held preferences some people have for Levon or Robbie. By and large most of the time things stay pretty respectful here, especially as compared to the rest of the Wild West of the internet which includes YouTube etc.

I think the reason that things can sting more here, is that this has been the core gathering point for Band fans for 20 years now. People close to The Band read and and/or post here, and probably care about it more than a random YouTube visitor. I wouldn't be surprised if music journalists also visit this site when they are doing research. So things said here can potentially have a lot of influence.

One obvious thing that is different now, is that Levon has passed away after a long struggle with a dreadful disease. That's still a relatively recent event. He's not here to defend himself, and to speak ill of him can be seen as disrespectful.

Now I don't think that means that every song he ever performed has to be loved by everyone, or that his work is above criticism. Just like I don't feel that people who may not prefer Robbie's singing voice should be labeled as a hater, which has happened here too. I think there is plenty of room for solid critical analysis of the music all of these men performed together and apart. But there's a line that gets crossed when it turns personal. It's not always clear where that line is, but once it gets crossed, it fairly evident in hindsight.

Yes, we should be able to debate and analyze, and even push our preferences. Doing it respectfully doesn't mean that all discussion has to stop. It just means that we should be doing what we should already be doing, which is treating each other, and our topics with respect. I'll be the first to admit that I haven't always hit that mark, and I've wished sometimes that I could take things back, or reword them. But I'm still a work in progress.

And just to show that I still have opinions, I'd like to remind everyone that New Haven, CT has the best pizza. The New York Yankees are the best baseball team. Our National leaders are doing a horrendous job of improving our economy, and our debt is going to crush us.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 19:01:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I guess we're saying we don't want to return to the bad-old days of name-calling between factions. I certainly don't.

Susan Cadgene's article is out there online. Are we supposed to say "It doesn't exist." She quotes a lot of people … Barbara O'Brien, Aaron Hurwitz, Eliot Landy, Jim Weider. Perhaps she found them secondhand. But she found them. I consider it legitimate to comment on what she said in her well-written, informative article which had specific detailed facts which were new to me.

However much some would like a sanitized officially-approved (by them) version of these musicians and their lives, the genii was long ago out of the bottle.

The music should unite us, but there is a small group of people who feel that information and opinion should be controlled. Being British, and unable to resist levity in a serious discussion, I'll say perhaps it's because they're a touch paranoid. Without saying why that might be :-)


Entered at Tue Mar 25 18:52:45 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Your positive words on Garth Canadian Celebration album caused me to play it through for the first time in some months. And as always, new bits get noticed - this time that Garth's closing notes on "Acadian Driftwood", a sound that is there to represent snow, I believe, were also used to represent snow by synthesizer pioneer John Mills-Cockell in his gorgeous contributions to the already gorgeous "Half Closed Eyes" by Kensington Market (from '69 - see link).


Entered at Tue Mar 25 18:35:09 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

I saw the Cates with Levon (Ron Eoff and Terry Cagle) at the Le Coq D'Or in maybe '79. They were superb - way better than disappointing first album that I dutifully bought when it came out (and which was more enjoyable than the second). The link posted earlier today didn't do anything to change my mind.

Here's a link to a Cropper production that I much prefer - Eric Mercury with Smitty on organ. Mercury would surely have sung with our guys on Yonge Street, whether guesting with Hawkins or appearing after hours at the Bluenote.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 18:34:08 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……and I have just heard from Mother Theresa’s people……they want an explanation NOW from Calvin……..if not I shall be calling up Ray and Dave to see that Calvin's beloved Kinks card is pulled immediately.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 18:13:42 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Sorry Tony, you said people close to Levon had emailed you with concerns. I was directing my comment at them. Their friends or family are public figures. Anything said here has generally been discussed with far less sensitivity in the music press already, and with even less sensitivity and usually downright ignorance on the internet at large. For decades. For a comment here to spark a flurry of emails seems strange to me, but maybe I'll have to get used to it!

Absolutely concur with you on what this site meant to Band fans, and therefore The Band, in the 90's.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:51:34 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ahhhhhhhhh!!!! Also, with Aretha Franklin and Ray Charles.....
Bernard Purdie on drums, Gerald Jemmott on bass, Billy Preston on organ, King Curtis on the sax, Cornell Dupree on guitar...

Amen!
We could all use some spirit in the dark about now!

Listen again and really feeeeeeeeeeeel it! :-D


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:39:24 CET 2014 from (96.57.36.93)

Posted by:

Tony

Kerrin, Iv'e never viewed this site as anything other than great fun and good people. It's NEVER been the enemy to me, that's for sure. As i told Jan many times if it wasn't for this site i don't think The Band of the 90's would have done as well. This is where i came to get the info back then. All i did was ask a question about, in my opinion, an uncalled for comment.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:38:38 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry. Another error. I said "I don't mean you, Tony." Let's change that to "I mean you too, Tony."


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:36:55 CET 2014 from (171.159.194.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: live Band shows

There are plenty of high quality shows from the 80's and 90's. Many were broadcast on the radio. The Chicago show in '83, The westwood one show from Las Vegas in '96, a couple of Mountain stage performances. The Band also did several shows opening for The Dead including the final show, so I'm sure there are quality copies floating around of those as well.

I'm not suggesting that everyone is interested in this. Many people aren't, but I think this is the great undocumented period of The Band's career and it would be nice if some of these performances were officallly released so those who were interested could buy them and some royalties could go to the musician's families. It seems strange that a small label in the UK released a series of Danko live cd's, while no live Band cd's have been released. There is defiently soome demand for unrelease Band material as there are quite a few bootlegs availble mostly from Japan. Some recent boots incluse a 4 cd set of the two Roosevelt satdium shows. There's a 3 cd set from 1969 shows,a 2 cd set from Japn in '87 and several others. These sets are silver pressed cd's that sell for around $25 a disc.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:27:50 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Happy Birthday to the Queen of Soul!

Fillmore West (San Francisco, CA)
Mar 6, 1971
with special guest!
Thanks to imagezulu who alerted me and of course had to remind me that he's seen her perform and I haven't. :-(((


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:18:35 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Peter V/Ben

That's right Peter, but Ben was recommending shows from 1983 and 1986 for "official" release, and my point was that there is no official source for that era. We would be paying for a bootleg we already had, plus some EQ, reverb and liner notes.

To echo RTO, whilst I understand that people close to Band members living and dead may read this forum, they should be mindful that this is not a tabloid rag. Discussions here are between fans with the utmost respect for The Band and its members, and who honour their memories by posting here, and listening to their music, to say nothing of purchasing it in the first place. We are not the enemy.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 17:15:32 CET 2014 from (96.57.36.93)

Posted by:

Tony

Peter, I got it. You can say whatever you want and if it's questioned it's feuding. It in the interest of harmony, i wish that you wouldn't make statements like that.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:56:56 CET 2014 from (99.52.71.217)

Posted by:

Calvin

I bought all the Live Rick CDs that came out, I bought all the Midnight Ramble stuff, if it's gone into official release I have it. I also have about 400 CDs worth of boot stuff both OQ/Reformed/Solo, and there is more than enough to come up with a compilation of never done live or never released period from Soundboard sources to release a CD or two.

But is anyone really clamoring for a copy of. Rick covering Lionel Ritchie, even if it's a good SB recording? I'd by it out of moral obligation as if I have the free copy I feel I should buy it when the artist releases it. But worthwhile for a label?

And seriously folks Rick and Richard had drug/alcohol problems, Robbie certainly seems on the pretentious self absorbed side, and Levon s eems difficult to deal with unless you were %100 with him. At least if anecdotes about them are to be believed. Can we not act like any suggestion about their lack of saintly gifts is akin to claiming Mother Theresa used her vacation time to follow her hobby of clubbing baby seals.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:40:22 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RTO, there are people who only visit when they sense an argument brewing. I don't mean you, Tony. But there are others.

Ignore them, mate. The discussion you've been having this week is what it's all about.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:37:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On live tapes, by the 90s a lot of bands were running DATs off the soundboard as a matter of course, rather than cassettes. You can compile a pretty great selection of Band "non-album" tracks off various sources and there must be better sources available.

Briefly you could get Bo Diddley (with Ronnie), Driftin' Away off the 1993 radio show, Deep Feeling and Many Rivers to Cross, then Kingfish and Blue River from Tokyo, One More Shot, Willie & The Hand Jive.

It's surely something LH Studios could do mail order?


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:33:42 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Well, it's nice to have been back for a week but I'm bailing out. It would appear you can't give an opinion without somebody reaching for a kitchen knife, and when you refrain from pursuing the line of opinion publicly to avoid getting others in a hissy fit, you get lambasted for speaking off the record too.

You apparently cannot offer any kind of criticism on Levon Helm without being painted out as one of Robbie Robertson's pets. This effectively rules out holding a balanced view that each had their strengths, and each have held some odd beliefs. That's not healthy at all.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:31:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That's fine, Tony. You e-mail. I'll expand. You can show it to whoever is interested, by e-mail, but the last while, I feel we've been so well into the music here, thanks to articulate and interesting new posters, and usually away from the feuding, that it's a shame to go back there on this space. We've had more music and less personality discussion than in years. If I'd had the key, I'd have removed my post after an hour thinking about it in the interests of harmony. Though from people I know, I stand by the basic point. But I think it was insensitive to make it.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:28:08 CET 2014 from (96.57.36.93)

Posted by:

Tony

Web: My link

Subject: Jim Weider's new band "The Weight"

Here's video of Jim Weider's new band, "The Weight". Lot of fun, hope you enjoy it. More to follow...


Entered at Tue Mar 25 16:05:37 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Ben, don't take this as a criticism of your views, but there's a reality to be considered here. Who is going to release those 80's shows you mentioned? The Band were not signed (or only intermittently) to a record label in the 80's, so there are no professionally recorded copies of the concerts stashed in a vault somewhere, only the bootlegs already freely circulated among those who care to look for them. Professionally mastering these can make the sound more palatable, but will never turn a cassette source into a ROA product. Without a label to distribute it the release would have to be an independent one - and I know you're thinking the Levon Helm website. But at the end of all this they would be in the dubious position of trying to sell - no doubt for a respectable sum - a bootleg that you, and most other Band collectors, have access to for free.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 15:56:26 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....nope the Cutting Room is on 32nd Street.
The same venue where you can catch:

The 5TH Annual "Songs of Love" Benefit Concert
Levon Helm's MIdnight Ramble Band
The Cutting Room - NYC -
April 24, 2014
Tickets 125.00

The Songs of Love Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing personalized songs for children and teens currently facing tough medical, physical or emotional challenges, free of charge.

AIN'T IN IT FOR MY HEALTH: A Film About Levon Helm


Entered at Tue Mar 25 15:47:32 CET 2014 from (96.57.36.93)

Posted by:

Tony

That's fine Peter, but you had no problem posting it publicly for all to read. Now you want to go behind closed doors for a reply while your post remains. The people emailing me were very close to Levon and they would like to understand too.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 15:15:32 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tony I know from a couple of e-mails that I upset people with what I said, which was not my intention. Let's not take it any further publicly, but I am happy to expound further by e-mail, peter followed by the usual symbol followed by viney stop uk stop com on what I meant.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 14:26:13 CET 2014 from (96.57.36.93)

Posted by:

Tony

Subject: Peter V

Peter, are you suggesting the Levon was paranoid and that's why there were disputes with people he dealt with?? Or am i misunderstanding you??


Entered at Tue Mar 25 11:38:40 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....no wait! I think I was actually older (early twenties) when I saw Marley perform at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto. I was living across the street at the time. I hate when I mess up! ;-D

Hey Ben. As you know by now I'm not a huge fan of the Reformed Band's recordings. I do have all of them in my collection so I can share that opinion.

However, I would have loved to have seen them live as in this video with the late Richard Bell. I've seen Richard peform with Levon at Jeff Healey's Club, Rick Danko Tribute at the Horseshoe Tavern with Blackie and the Rodeo Kings (mostly all male audience) and with Blackie and The Rodeo Kings at the Horseshoe. Yes, I've seen a lot of shows over the years so I do have strong opinions because I have a lot of music and bootlegs and I know what I like and what I don't like.....I just can't always articulate very well......why or speak in technical terms. I basically have to feeeeel it...lyrically and musically. Also, some bands like Blackie and the Rodeo Kings are fantastic live.....but I'm not a huge fan just sitting at home listening to their music......same as the Reformed Band. I can never call them The Band......The Band were Rick, Richard, Levon, Garth.......and Robbie.....all magical ingredients with no expiry date until one of them left.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 11:26:11 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....oops! I should have said that Garland Jeffreys and Ben Harper sing in the spirit of Bob Marley and roots reggae.
Ben Harper.....another one who is carrying the torch and is sooooo underrated. I think he has said he saw Bob Marley perform at the age of 12......for me it was when I was 19/20.

Short clip of a rare time I've seen Bob Dylan break a smile with The Band....Leon Russell joins in too.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 11:10:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cate Bros

I have three Cate Bros LPs - I agree they're fantastic. it's just that there were too many people on stage with The Band.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 11:02:36 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Stories about how music gets passed down the line, whether parents talking about sharing music with their kids or young musicians talking about the older performers who inspired them.

Essays will be posted on a regular basis. We want to hear from you. Email us at garlandjeffreysmanagement@gmail.com

Click here for a free Download of Collide the Generations mp3 file.

I met Savannah at Garland's 60th birthday party at Joe's Pub in NYC. She was only eight years old then but she had that passion and drive and star quality already in her eyes. She sang with her dad as song by Joni Mitchell....I think it was "Both Sides Now".....I should have emailed Garland to be sure....

Her dad Garland Jeffreys is one of the most underrated musicians of all time. You want to talk about singing?......He's a gifted singer with skill and passion and commitment. Hardly anyone comes close....His tone, falsetto and now he's 70 and still....sings like when I first heard him on the radio singing, "Wild In The Streets". He usually includes at least one reggae inspired song on his recordings. For me....only Garland and Ben Harper are carrying the torch of roots reggae. He writes songs that mean something and connect with the human spirit. He doesn't shy away from commenting on social injustices in the world....He's lived it.....He's felt it.

Btw, he throws great parties with great food and after a regular show he'll continue to sing at his parties. He really knows how to connect with his passionate fans. One of the best parties was at a club in NYC for New Year's Eve....Hmmm....The one on 23rd street? The Cutting Room? The owners are/were Matt Dillon and Chris Nott who were there that night. I still remember the dirty look I gave Matt when he was blah, blah, blahing while Garland was performing with his whole band......sometimes with Willy Nile....sometimes with Mick Jones from Foreigner. I was at this show with friends from New Jersey and somehow we were seated right at the front. I just really dig this guy.....He's the real deal......absolute amazing performer....He inspires you to be a better person....and he has the personality to connect with you as if you were the only one in the room.....He leaves you with memories forever. The last thing I said to him was that he really doesn't know how great he actually is....Long live Garland Jeffreys!!!!!!!!

Looks like Savannah Jeffreys will be following in her father's musical footsteps as a singer-songwriter.

SAVANNAH JEFFREYS February 24, 2014
"Savannah Jeffreys, Garland's 18-year-old daughter, has been singing and songwriting from a young age, following in her father's footsteps." “Take me away, no looking back, in your broken-down white Pontiac”—this was the first song lyric I ever wrote. Eight years old, sitting comfortably in the backseat of our car on a drive to the beach with my parents, there was nothing that would have made me yearn to be taken away. I was just fooling around with melody and rhyme, and observing that our car was in fact a rusty and ramshackle Pontiac Deville.

My father is a songwriter. He worked on his songs in the living room as if it were the most ordinary thing in the world, making it seem like something I could do, too. As I got older, writing songs became my way of processing experiences and emotions, and when I needed to make sense of things, I’d sit down at my upright Baldwin piano and reach for the Moleskine notebook I kept on the ledge. I’d write about “you,” most often the boy of the moment or the best friend I was fighting with. Songwriting was private, something I did alone in my room until my family and friends began to tell me I was a natural. At twelve, longing to be famous and with fantasies of becoming the next Taylor Swift, I started posting videos of my songs on YouTube and performing whenever I could. I was accepted into prestigious songwriting workshops, hoping to improve my writing and see what the music industry was all about, but to my surprise instead of other hopefuls with dreams of seeing their name on Billboard’s Hot 100, I met adults who spent their time creating works of art inspired by their lives. They did it for themselves. They didn’t need the world to reaffirm their talents, and that resonated with what I’d been doing all along, and what I was truly comfortable with. The intimacy and the craft of the songwriting process are what I love most.

My most recent song began in the middle of the night after hours of tossing and turning in bed. I’d developed feelings for a friend and was compelled to tell him, so in my pitch-black room at one in the morning I whipped out a flashlight and scrawled these lyrics under my covers: "I was curious about you in the fall/You had never looked so good to me/I was curious about you in the fall/But now I’m falling for you in the Spring." In each of my songs, I imagine I’m singing directly to the person I’m writing about. I want them to feel what I’m feeling, and one of the ways to achieve this is by playing with words and phrasing, using the same tricks and schemes that a prose writer or poet might use. Repetition in the first verse emphasizes how curious I am about the potential relationship and using “fall” as a noun and “falling” as a verb evokes both the season and my emotions. The arpeggiated major chords that accompany the lyrics are light and airy, making the song even more romantic. That’s the most exciting part of all—setting lyrics against a melody that supports them.

"In the Fall" came fairly easily, but not every song does. Phrases or a few bars might pop into my head, but I can’t depend on spontaneity; I have to shape the verse, chorus, bridge, and hook. Are the rhymes too elementary, is the chord progression too generic? There are pages in my Moleskines that have been entirely scratched out, and numerous recordings of the same songs clogging up my laptop. I don’t stop writing until I’m satisfied with both the quality of the song and the state of my own emotional clarity. Now, at seventeen, I do yearn to be taken away, not by an old Deville, but by the transporting process of songwriting."


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:52:42 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

BEG's link illustrates something it took me years to realise - that the Cate Bros are a fantastic band, much better without Levon, Rick, Richard and Garth. Likewise, The Band should've hired Jim W from the start. Not so much Fred Carter Jnr - he's on the 1987 Japan tour (with Jim) and was a bit of a fumbler. Whatever he had in the 60's and 70's had clearly faded by then, and Jim Weider was the business.

Rod mentioned Jawbone and it reminded me of something. One of only two songs on the Brown Album never performed (along with Whispering Pines), it is very conspicuously absent from the Classic Albums TV doco. Conspicuous to me because it's an all time favourite. What's to bet the taped interviews discussed it but the track was cut for time limitations? I can't imagine that they planned to skip only that one from the start. Levon comments about Dixie in this program. Although he says nothing negative, I thought he chose his words carefully when he says "WE wanted to get a song like that, that kind of addressed that particular corner".

I read a quote somewhere from Dr John. Thanks to TLW, Such a Night is his most widely known and most frequently requested track. Although he does feel obliged to play it from time to time, he grumbled "Personably, I hate the song". Maybe it was that simple with Dixie.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:52:28 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Like Van with "Caravan", deaf ears were turned to years of requests for Dixie. Someone (Pat?) mentioned it was particularly hard to sing, but it never got played.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:40:48 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band live setlists

I think the reformed Band's setlists in the 80's were a logical mix of material from the original quartet and songs from solo projects and covers. I agree that the Cate Brothers weren't the ideal choice. The show from U. of Chicago in '83 that was a broadcast on the radio is a pretty strong performance and is worthy of official release.

In general, I prefer the shows after the Cates left and Jim Weider joined. The second disc of 'The Last moving shadows' boot from 2/28/86 at the lonestar café is a tremendous performance. This is one that I really hope is released someday. The Band were firing on all cylinders at this show. The sound is good, he guitar is low in the mix, but the performances are fiery and well worth a listen for any fan of the Band.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:34:13 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.182)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I don't recall Levon saying anything in his book about Dixie being an insult to the south. I think I would have remembered that. Did he say it in an interview somewhere? Peter, I am not sure I go along with your theory that they stopped doing it because they nailed it in the TLW. After all, they nailed every song in the TLW. You would have thought after they reformed that they would have wanted to try and re-establish their credibility as The Band. What better way to do it than with Dixie, a song so closely associated with Levon. I didn't follow the career of the reformed Band all that closely so I wasn't aware that they stopped doing it but you would have thought fans would have made an issue of it.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:23:52 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

From Garland Jeffreys' site Collide The Generations...Former poster and writer.......Has anyone else submitted a brief story as to how they've passed on the beauty of music to their children?

"Kay Cordtz is a journalist, currently writing about science by day and music by night. After spending half her life in New Mexico, she now lives in Port Jefferson on Long Island."

"Music has dominated my life ever since I started watching American Bandstand every day in second grade. I saw (and heard!) the Beatles in Paris before they ever came to the US. In college, I was chummy with The Band. So despite my marriage to a man from a different cultural background with divergent musical tastes, it was inevitable that my children would be music people. When they were still too young to drive, I took them to concerts in Albuquerque (No Doubt, the Pointers Sisters, Coolio, Aerosmith) and when we visited New York, there were multiple nights of Bruce, Bruce, Bruce. But I still have some difficulty charting how my son Pablo progressed from an early infatuation with Michael Jackson to the heavy metal songs he writes and plays today in his band, Savage Wizdom.

He still listens to some rock and roll like John Mellencamp and still goes to those Springsteen shows if they are fairly close to home, but will travel around the country to see multiple performances by Motley Crue, Dokken and especially Iron Maiden. He even convinced one of his metal heroes to sing on a track of his new CD. Pablo is a good guitar player, and I once hoped that he would get interested in the blues but it never happened. Jimmy Vivino once told me that young men need to play heavy metal for a time, maybe get it out of their system. But now that Pablo is past 30 and still devoted to metal, I have come to accept that it’s where his heart lies.

Maybe since he heard blues, rock and roll and jazz at my knee, and mariachi, Tex-Mex and country at his father’s, there was little room left for him to carve out his own space. There wasn’t much reggae in New Mexico. So although I don’t pretend to “get” metal music (I’m probably the wrong age and the wrong gender) I will always be proud to have birthed a musician."


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:09:28 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We played the "cast a movie about The Band" game a few times here. Inside Llewyn Davis was interesting because they went for actors, never lookalikes, which I've suggested is the right way. But if we play the cast the Band movie again, looking for actors who look late 20s (so we can take them from 16 to 30), I think Oscar Isaac just got the Richard Manuel part.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 10:04:59 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

One song I did download by The Cate Brothers from the In One Eye And Out The Other
Album Produced by Steve Cropper


Entered at Tue Mar 25 09:56:51 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Correct me if I'm wrong, but in his book, he never mentions thinking Dixie an insult to the South. Without pulling it off the shelf, he just says he drove Robbie to the library so it would have all due respect. You know, once you've done it full on like TLW, it's hard to do a lesser version.

Funny, for years I railed against the Joan Baez version with its mangled lyrics, but when I saw her in 2012 (Review is linked) I was so thrilled to actually hear someone doing Dixie live.

The Cate Bros tour, much as I liked it when I got the video, is the classic To many cooks spoil the broth (or as we used to say as lads, too many cocks spoil the brothel), an issue which resurfaces on Jubilation.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 09:36:28 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

and while we're dreaming ... The Cate Brothers wouldn't have been there. Jim or Fred Carter would have.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 09:26:48 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Non RR set list

Kerrin, I've often thought that as well. There were a couple of songs they couldn't avoid doing (The Weight, Cripple Creek) but they could have made a good concert out of:

This Wheels on Fire, We Can Talk, Long Black Veil, Tears of Rage, I Shall Be Released, Jemima Surrender, Strawberry Wine, Mystery Train (Levon on lead), Back To Memphis, Chest Fever,Street Walker, Life is a Carnival, Home Cooking, Blues For Breakfast, Just Another Whistle Stop, Jawbone The Promised Land (and various Moondog Stuff). Possibly throw in a few "solo" tunes - Java BLues, New Mexocoe, Milk Cow Boogies - NOT Hand Jive).

The obvious problems are that it's not what the casual fan wants to hear, Levon is under utilized and Richard has a heavier than usual work load. But it would have been a great gig.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 09:11:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've often done the same with set lists, and always bring up This Wheel's on Fire. But King Harvest and The Rumour went with Richard basically. We Can Talk was an example of great songs that apparently got shelved after their 1972 Gap Year. There's quiet a list of those. Part of it is surely the increasing unreliability of Richard?

Every performer has the issue of what to cut to make way for new stuff. Some get over it by shifting their set radically from night to night, but The Band never did that.

But on Dixie, apart from the Astral Weeks shows, Van almost never revisits Madame George or Cypress Avenue, and though every South Coast show I have seen has the same guys shouting for 'Radio!' By which they mean 'Caravan' But I don't think I ever saw him do it. Maybe that TLW version was the perfect moment and it would be forever after unable to match it. How about thinking of Dixie the same way?


Entered at Tue Mar 25 08:47:28 CET 2014 from (125.2.192.209)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Out of curiosity I had a browse through many of the reformed Band's setlists to see what was and wasn't carried over from the OQ days. We know that, for whatever reason, TNTDODD was never revived, but as someone pointed out recently seemingly obvious choices such as Wheels On Fire were rare inclusions.

THE EIGHTIES:

In the 80's some interesting stuff was included in duo gigs - Just Another Whistle Stop, Endless Highway, Georgia on my Mind, Twilight, The Rumour, Caledonia Mission, When you Awake and Unfaithful Servant were all performed at some point by Rick or Richard but not reintroduced to full Band gigs. If I count only material recorded or performed between 1968 - 76, the songs performed by The Band during this phase were:

Levon
Ophelia, The Weight, Cripple Creek, WS Walcott, Rag Mama Rag, Chest Fever, Evangeline, Don't ya tell Henry, plus a few old rockers - Ain't got no Home, Rock n Roll shoes, and Back to Memphis

Richard
He got by with only King Harvest, Shape I'm In, I Shall be Released (alternating this ballad with You Don't Know Me) for the first couple of years, then added Across the Great Divide and Share your Love

Rick
Not many - Mystery train, Stage Fright, IMND, Long Black Veil, and after Richard's death, Shape I'm In.

THE NINETIES:

Levon
Not much change, add Life is a Carnival and Don't Do It, subtract Ain't Got No Home and Back to Memphis

Rick
Add I Shall Be Released, and one-tour-only versions of Twilight, Unfaithful Servant, Wheels On Fire, Caledonia Mission

So what's missing? The following songs were commonplace inclusions in the original Band's concerts for years:

Dixie, Time to Kill, We Can Talk, Tears of Rage, The Rumour, When You Awake, Forbidden Fruit, and the covers Ain't No More Cane, Loving You is Sweeter…, Slipping & Sliding
When I Paint My Masterpiece was worked up for the Dylan Anniversary, they don't seem to have made use of it after that.
The songs Levon could absolutely claim to have written - Jemima and Strawberry Wine - would have fitted in with the other R&R/country blues he enjoyed playing, one would think, but not a whisper of these. Manuel's In a Station, would have been on my wishlist, and maybe the Danko/Clapton All Our Past Times. I can't really understand why, during a time when they were struggling to produce new material, and possibly harboring some resentment against lining Robbie's pockets further, the guys didn't revisit their own back catalogues. But oh well...


Entered at Tue Mar 25 06:34:49 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.182)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Not sure if this has been posted before.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 04:42:01 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Live Derek & The Dominoes, including extra-rare Keep On Growing and Bell Bottom Blues.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 02:09:58 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Dave Edmunds - Again

RTO - Here you go -


Entered at Tue Mar 25 01:08:06 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Inside Llewyn Davis

I was really late getting round to seeing this one, but review added at last. See link.


Entered at Tue Mar 25 00:14:59 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Rod, I agree it isn't just musicians (although no pay rise in 20 years isn't that common among the general world economical slump!). I just think that "do a cassette copy for a mate" era got out of hand a bit! I was pleased to hear that quite a few businesses in the USA have in the last couple of years reacted to Chinese labour rates going up by rationalising that a lot of it, by the time you've paid duty, shipping and increased cost per unit, could be brought back home and the "made 100% in the USA" sticker more than mitigates a slight hike in retail price for a given object. Bravo.

I agree on diversity of material. As a Hot Tuna fan, I really don't need Keep Your Lamps Trimmed & Burning, Hesitation Blues, etc any more times either! The Band should maybe take a leaf out of the book of the Grateful Dead who on Europe 72 Volume 2 ensured that there was no content overlap with either the original vinyl set, or any of the handful of so of other documents from that tour. Of course, they also made a hideously expensive 72 CD set of every night of the tour available, but that's the Dead for you!


Entered at Mon Mar 24 22:23:13 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Band albums

no worries RTO. The point I was trying to make is that we already have 3 live Band albums. ROA, BTF and TLW - all from a 4 to five year period. Now we also have Live at the Academy and even the Self portrait re-release (not to forget the box sets tracks). Won't mention the post TLW live vids/ DVDs. I have bought them all (except Self Portrait) - some many times on different formats (especially TLW). I also have one of the Roosevelt boots. It's interesting but I don't listen to it that much.

I don't need to hear The Shape I'm In or Cripple Creek live again. If I were to hear another concert from 76 I might think "that's a cool part from Garth" or "the bass and drums work nicely there" but I'm only going to listen to it a hand full of times at the most. If a live version of Popote Rouge or Knockin Lost John was found I'd be the first to buy it.

The fact is we have the internet and boots have been around along time. I fully understand the impact on artists incomes and that can be seen in the fact that a lot of bands are just releasing albums every 2 to 3 years now - and probably as a reason to get people along to their shows. Bands like Wilco have a huge amount of live stuff on YouTube. I'm not sure if they approve but they also have a great commercially released live DVD (Ashes of American Flags). Ive watched most of them but I always go back to the commercially released version as it's the best quality and performance. I would buy American Flags 2 if it had a substantially different set list.

The internet (and globalisation) are squeezing lots of different people. I'm thinking of IT jobs outsourced to India and manufacturing being relocated to China. It's not just musicians.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 22:14:30 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.176)

Posted by:

Dave H

As far as I know, the (tremendous) performance at the Last Waltz was the last time Levon sang "Dixie" in public. He sometimes said that he had decided the song was offensive to the South; on at least one other occasion he said that he stopped playing it because it was too difficult to sing. Either way, it was a significant omission from the repertoire of the reunited Band of the '80s/'90s.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 22:11:30 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.182)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Oops, just came across Peter V's page on this site devoted to the song. Still doesn't seem to explain why the reformed Band never performed it though.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 22:02:03 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.182)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Just to go back to an issue that came out of the Susan Cadgene article. I had a quick flick through the set lists for the 1980s/90s Band that is on the site and I could not find any instance of them performing TNTDODD. Since this is either their best known or second best known song, this seems strange. Does anybody have any explanation other than the one put forward by Cadgene?


Entered at Mon Mar 24 20:40:56 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kerrin

I'd go further than you on stadiums. I don't think they have ever brought out anything good in ANY act. As for live albums, a really nice official box of Syria Mosque on CDs and DVD would have me down the cashpoint for £100...


Entered at Mon Mar 24 20:32:19 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Let’s also remember a very important point………it took 35 years for “Music From Big Pink” to go Gold – to sell 500,000 copies…………..At their peak, Led Zeppelin sold this number in a week!!! Ditto for other monster rock acts….The Band really did not sell that many records………..for anyone to complain about spending $100 to get something like “Live at the Academy” seems ludicrous to me….the price of a good golf shirt……two nights at the pub for RTO…………….4 or 5 nights at the cinema watching movies that are instantly forgettable………………we are blessed – really blessed to love a band that has people like Robbie and Sebastian and Garth ( his “Celebration of The Band” by the best of the Canadian rock scene of a few years back is one of my favorite albums of the last ½ decade ) willing to give of their time for very little payback other than the preservation of a legacy.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 20:29:27 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Wallsend

I don't mind some bits of classical music. Namely: the beginning of Dave Edmunds doing "Sabre Dance", the middle section, and the last bit...ha ha ha. ;-)


Entered at Mon Mar 24 20:19:02 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.182)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I think it is amazing that so much of the 60/70s music has actually stood the test of time. I could never have imagined back then that people would be picking over it forty years later. I like live recordings even if they are rough. I like the spontaneity. That is why, in the final analysis, I like rock or jazz over classical music. Brilliant as much classical music is I feel the way it is performed just sucks all the joy out of it. BTW, I doubt there is much in the way of studio material that hasn't been released. They weren't a 'jam' Band and I thought some of the outtakes on the reissues a few years back were weak. Presumably they put the best stuff they had on the reissues.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 20:11:41 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Rod

Rod, sorry if that last one appeared to be jumping down your throat, but I hear this kind of thing all the time and yours was the straw on the camel's back as it were.

I'm not a professional musician myself, I have a day job. I'm okay whatever happens to the music industry, but plenty of people I work with are pro, and they are getting squeezed in all directions.

In the UK, I don't recall the money for an ordinary bar band gig going up in the last 20 years. 20 years!

So a band tries harder to sell CDs and can't because even relatively unknown acts will have their music put up somewhere on the net.

Hence my rant, Rod. It isn't just stadium bands that the current "music isn't actually something you pay for" ethos is hitting, and showing no signs of disappearing either.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 19:50:32 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: I'll try and keep this civil...

No Rod, we don't need another official live album when there are bootlegs available and we can download stuff for free.

What do you do for a living? I shall make sure I see if there is a black market version of it, or a web based rendition of it, rather than paying a skilled person a fair price in future.

It's precisely because of the proliferation of freebie download sites and black market bootlegs that official live albums DO cost so much these days....


Entered at Mon Mar 24 19:34:20 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Muscle Shoals

Ahh…..but hitting keys is what RTO does…….perhaps everyone here should take a few nips as well and loosen up a little!

A few thoughts on the tapes/boots discussion …..live music is imperfect……you smile and move on….the problem with boots is how things can get distorted………….I saw Rick Danko live several times and every show I enjoyed thoroughly….tapes would no doubt point to all kinds of little issues – not the least the part that drove the listeners of the boots crazy was the sing-alongs as all those who saw Rick would remember a habit of his to say….”well, when Levon’s not with me, I like to let the crowd join in on this one…….”The Weight” would become a bit of a pub thing and no doubt for those not there and listening to a boot in the comfort of home it would sound like he was treating the song with less respect than it deserved……………..BUT BUT BUT…..when you were in the club and looking through people literally dancing on tables and you caught a glance of that pure pure smile absolutely glowing from Rick as he was as close to a state of levitation as any performer ever could be – the night was perfect and the memories of those shows will stay with me forever……..easy and wrong for someone to listen to a tape and say “ah, that was shit”……no, it definitely was not.

Muscle Shoals: Watched the documentary called `Muscle Shoals`` on the weekend and was quite disappointed…….some bits of the great music but not enough and some talking heads like Jagger and Richards add nothing………way way too little from the band – Spooner Oldham adds some but should have been so much more…..the great Wilson Pickett adds some flare and is the best part of it ( especially a story from Roger Hawkins as to the relief of getting Pickett`s approval as apparently Pickett had the reputation of punching out drummers that he deemed not cutting it…)……..I would certainly recommend seeing it but this story deserved a much better treatment.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 17:33:56 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: You amaze me. First, I likely wouldn't survive 5 pints, never mind additional bottles if I somehow managed to stumble home. And if I did, and it was 2:40 AM, I certainly wouldn't come here! And if I did, I certainly couldn't have managed to hit all those stupid little keys as accurately - not to mention cogently - as you have.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 16:29:44 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Studio outtakes

I'm with Carmen on this one. Unreleased material from the studio or from small clubs (L&TH) would be of interest. Any takes of any songs pre final product.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 13:47:51 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Project Percolator featuring Garth Hudson LIVE at the Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, Connecticut. Brought to you by Orr Media Company.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 13:46:25 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"MiZ ripping an electric version of "Heels of the Day" with very special guest Garth Hudson on keys! This was the MiZ cd release concert at River Street Jazz Cafe."


Entered at Mon Mar 24 13:34:54 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Black Prairie Beautifully Remember “Richard Manuel”


Entered at Mon Mar 24 13:34:23 CET 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: BAND

I woiuld be more interested in unreleased studio stuff rather than more live releases. Both BAND and Individual. Especially interested in anything that RR would have done with Neil and Eric Clapton or if there is any other RR Richard songs out there. More earlier Rick would be cool too


Entered at Mon Mar 24 11:50:15 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

I think, as Peter remarked, we're very lucky to have the Academy set. It's a beautiful thing, having the genuine New Year's show in the ultimate bootleg form, and unusual for a major label release to take historical significance that seriously. Robbie probably had to call in some favours to get the go ahead on that, knowing that the remastered version wasn't ancient history. I get the feeling that, although he will no doubt make money from it, he's at least partly keen to see some of this archival stuff done while he is in a position to supervise it, i.e. alive! I'm certain he would like to ensure The Band is remembered for what they were capable at their peak. And still, look at the reviews for it. If you're not a dedicated fan then yes, how many versions of the same song do you need? How many times will you pay for the same album every time they expand it? Why is it so expensive when my Beatles/Led Zep/Who box set cost $35? Because the ROA market is relatively tiny, that's why. But it doesn't bode well for future release if the CD buying public (what's left of it) feels that way. As Adam said, some people are hard on the standard of the 73/74 shows, well I'll put my hand up there. The problem was that, like Robbie's account of the final disbandment, they took a hiatus after three years of solid touring and recording, then everyone was supposed to come back. In 1973 they did come back, but perhaps not emotionally speaking. Everybody had families, houses, famous friends, and terrible chemical distractions which meant things were never really the same.

I also feel that stadiums brought out the worst in The Band. All the detail evident in their earlier shows evaporated in those big summer festivals. To give an extreme example, muso's on this site will agree (back me up, guys!) that if you play in a small club for 50 people, and they hang on your every note and clap in the right places, it's quite nerve-wracking - but you play your absolute best. I can't speak about playing stadiums but I know that as the scale of everything increases, that hear-a-pin-drop focus isn't there, and it's easy to find yourself just bashing through the setlist. For this reason Robbie, in particular, reverted to being a great, but far less interesting or unique, blues rock guitar hero. Those three 1973 shows, then the Dylan and the CSN&Y tours, probably earned them more money than everything they had done up to that point, but musically it's not the best.

Many of my favourite Band recordings give the impression of a utopian drunken jam; they sound like they could disintegrate at any second, but are perfect from start to finish. Strawberry Wine, Yazoo St Scandal, Jemima Surrender, Don't Ya Tell Henry. The shows we are discussing have their own kind of appeal, I guess, but they are a very different kind of drunken jam. I would absolutely compare (sorry JT) releasing the genuine WG to EP Enterprises releasing Elvis In Concert.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 10:43:41 CET 2014 from (110.32.176.35)

Posted by:

Wallsend

When all the music started getting spread over the internet I thought all my Christmases had come at once. Not talking about pirated copies of commercially available stuff but just all the soundboard recordings etc. The price tag of Live at the Academy was pretty steep. I wonder if the costs involved really justify that price. I know it is a luxury item and I don't have to buy but still, pretty expensive.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 10:33:46 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Live albums

Lots of interesting comments. Peter, what you're describing with a small label release seems to be the what occurred with the Danko live albums that came out a few years ago.\Kerrin, I don't understand how the release of any of these shows would harm the Band's reputation. We're not talking about an 'Elvis in Concert' performance with the king stumbling around the stage, flubbing lyrics and being obviously wiped out on prescription drugs. The video of that show has been kept in the vaults by the Elvis estate for nearly 40 years.

The market for the release of a live concert is the avid fan base, not the casual fan who is happy with a greatest hits set. I made some comments last week about the number of Graham Parker live albums that have been released. If his small fan base can support over a dozen live albums, I'm confident that The Band fan base can support several more.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 10:00:19 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live albums

Live at the Academy was such a treat that I'd hope for more, mainly a really good pre-TLW 1976 show, without the horns for contrast.

Thinking about it, such is unlikely precisely because they were on Capitol at the time. It's not feasible for a major label to do it with releases with a minority appeal, though some of those new small labels archiving British psych bands of the 60s and 70s would find it viable at 1000 copies, basically because compiling it would be a labour of love, the sleeve notes would be comprehensive and probably done free, and the size of the operation means that a profit of £3000 to £4000 on a print run of 1000 would be worth them doing. I suspect most hope to do just a little better than breaking even and fantasize about suddenly hitting Eva Cassidy sales levels with something (her hit album was issued by a guy working out of his home in Brighton), but really they know it's not going to happen.

A major label just has too many overheads to cost in to contemplate that sort of release. For a smaller scale operation, amazon and a website shop would be the distribution. I guess one of the small ones could license it … but then the royalty to the major would reduce their take.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 09:15:29 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Live Band recordings

Yeah. I don't think the world needs another live Band album. There is so much available on the internet now (and boot legs) and a lot of it is for historical interest only. Plus their set lists didn't change that much it the 70s. Their best live periods (71ish and 76) are already well documented. A decent concert video (from one or more tours) would be a different kettle of fish.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 08:23:03 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I saw that Toppermost just rebuilt the Home Page. Instead of the long list, you can now click to view Chronology, which has the posts in order, and also adds the author, so you can find our guys like Dunc,, Dlew, RTO, Roger W, Calvin, JT and follow their articles.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 08:16:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Everly Brothers was Toppermost #1, and recently I did Phil Everly. Check the Music Bank on the Home Page. #1 is a very short article because at that point I think they thought it would just be a list plus discussion. For the same reason The Band one is very short. Do comment on posts over there, because there are a lot of non-Band site readers who would be interested too.

For example you could add a comment on The Everly Brothers page at any time with additional ideas. It would appear in the list of recent comments and then people often click in to discuss the comment.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 05:19:41 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Adam, I imagine the "tape flaws" in the WG masters are a diplomatic industry code for "too shambolic for mass release". As for the August 1st concert, The Band certainly stretched out, not that all players expected to! There are likely some nice takes that would polish up well but as anything approaching a complete concert, no. Levon, Robbie and Garth are quite consistent as usual, but Richard sounds like he's struggling to play or sing well. Worse than that, he sounds like he KNOWS he can't get it together and isn't enjoying being there. Sadly, this is the impression Richard gave me from 1973 until TLW. Rick is most definitely enjoying himself, sounding like cocaine personified, barely doing the job on bass and singing at his most herniated. Having played very little bass over The Band's 18 month layoff his fretless playing is also pretty out of tune. After The Band took a similar break in 1975/76 he not surprisingly switched to a fretted Gibson.

I also enjoy hearing some of these shows, warts and all, and there are nice soundboard and audience tapes of both Roosevelt shows out there (I actually prefer the audience one), but I wouldn't play them to non-Band fans. I am realistic about the 73/74 tapes - they were a wasted band playing for wasted audiences would be my overgeneralisation - and I don't see Capitol putting money into effectively smudging The Band's reputation by issuing them. Marketing them to hardcore Band fans is also questionable, when Capitol know those Roosevelt shows have been widely circulated in passable quality since...well, probably since the week after the shows! The 1976 tour was much more together, at least Rick sounded like he'd come back to earth, although we know he probably hadn't. I really enjoy any tapes I can get from that period. Whether there is commercial justification for releasing them is another matter.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 04:13:55 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Spirits

My last post was in response to Rob. I had one tall can tonight, my first beer in a week and a half. Over this kinda cold winter - had my share of Drambuie. Neat.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 03:44:44 CET 2014 from (99.141.58.9)

Posted by:

Adam

Didn't mean to sound derogatory to the Allman Brothers or Grateful Dead, by the way. Huge fan of both. I also finished "One Way Out" and really loved it. Of note to me was the story of how bassist Berry Oakley took "Whipping Post" home for a night, came back and played the intro in a new arrangement and totally changed the feel of the song. But, he does not have a writing credit.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 03:43:05 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Everly Brothers - Toppermost

Hi PV - Do you see the EBs anytime soon?


Entered at Mon Mar 24 03:40:40 CET 2014 from (99.141.58.9)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Roosevelt Stadium 1973

These are great performances and recordings. The first night is pretty bad, as noted. Just avoid it. However, "Saved" from that show is terrific. The loose swagger works well there. But the August 1 show is inspired. I think some are too harsh on this period. Only 3 shows were played in '73! Watkins Glen had the biggest air and energy and event status, and the performance is actually quite brilliant. Listen to the recently unearthed audience tape from 2009 or so. But I think logic would say the final show of that short run, August 1, was the best performance because they were warmed up and fell into place. This was a super unique series of shows for The Band. Playing on the bills with the Allman Brothers and Grateful Dead, they stretched out quite a bit more than usual and added instrumental passages unique to these shows. It's really cool to hear them adjust their approach and demonstrate their particular way of improvising together. Rather than aimlessly jamming, they add pre-meditated sections as springboards for improvisation.

The Roosevelt Stadium recordings weren't radio broadcasts, but recorded from the Grateful Dead's crew supposedly. The Band were playing on the early version of the Dead's "Wall of Sound" system, as seen in that Roosevelt Stadium photo. As usual, the best source for the recording is the fan compiled, remastered/speed pitch corrected "Prof. Goody" edition from superb reels.

In the instance of 1973 live shows, there's something to consider. August 1 is a terrific show, but we already have it there. I have to believe that whatever tape flaws in Watkins Glen are a bit overly stated, and that by this date in time most of them could be digitally repaired. I'd love to have Watkins Glen officially. That's nonsense that it was a terrible performance!


Entered at Mon Mar 24 02:59:29 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A

5 Pints and a couple of bottles - sheesh, the last time i got near to that was one night not long after after Johnnie Johnson died. ....9 years ago soon now.. I even stayed sober. .... But other than that, i'd say it's near to twenty years since i could even consider that...... big difference when your doing hard labor all day and not- today, i tried that you couldn't resusitate me...


Entered at Mon Mar 24 02:42:45 CET 2014 from (65.93.218.89)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

JT: As you say on Toppermost, Richard Bell's first recording seems to have been "That's Alright" by Richie Knight and the Midknights - and of course it's b-side, "Work Song". Here's the latter; Richard's more clearly on "That's Alright", but it's not on YouTube. "Mary Jane" by Ronnie Hawkins is also on YouTube; listen especially for the zany harp and guitar duo (King Biscuit Boy and John Till).


Entered at Mon Mar 24 02:40:31 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Ryko

Ben, Ryko were shocking if I remember correctly. Typical reissue label that spread into unreleased archive stuff and build up trust from legitimate reissues that make you think live archive stuff is worth the money. I believe they were in cahoots with Zappa when he was replacing parts wholesale for CD releases. Hot Rats didn't even sound like the LP. Apologies to Ryko if I'm thinking of the wrong people. I had five pints down the pub and a couple of bottles at home as a nightcap.


Entered at Mon Mar 24 00:29:00 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

John D posted those interview quotes with Cheryl. Perhaps they announced WG then found the tapes much worse than they had expected. I'n 1995 the GB was a year old. Stuff didn't get scrutinised and checked on the web and discussed. As in the previous 40 years of pop music you could get away with saying something was live and be believed. There are so many examples. It is way harder now because there is an instant forum. Not then, nor when a dozen so-called live things were done.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 23:28:17 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, I know when WG was released. However my understanding is that it was created quite a while earlier, well before CD's became the rage. I could be wrong.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 22:27:23 CET 2014 from (58.104.22.127)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The link is to the comments section on a review on Amazon. One of the comments is published under the name Sandra Helm. I wonder if other people think this is genuine - it seems a strange place for Levon's wife to express an opinion.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 21:32:17 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just to check, Toppermost is not "me" though it is run by an old friend. I am merely a contributor, along with RTO, JT and Calvin.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 21:12:49 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Sound quality of live shows

I'm not a musician or an audio engineer. So, I can't weigh in on the source for some of these bootlegged shows. All I can say is that the Deep Six 'Roosevelt Stadium' bootleg sounds might good to me. I think it could be easily 'sweetened' to bring it up to the standards for a major label release.

A series of King Biscuit shows were released on cd, back in this period. I have a good David Crosby show from this series, it wasn't released on Capital. I think it was BMG. It's unfortunate that the Band show wasn't included in that series.

Pat, I respectfully disagree with you regarding the abbreviated running time for the Watkins Glen release. The album was released in 1995, which was firmly in the cd era. Archival releases were expected to take advantage of the extended playing time that cd's offered. I remember the PR surrounding the Jimi Hendrix 'Live at Winterland' cd that Ryko released in the late 80's taking advantage of the 70+ minute capacity of the cd. 'Live at Winterland' was a good release. But, in my oprion the ultimate live Hendrix release remains 'Hendrix in the West'. One thing that release has in common with 'Watkins Glen' is that several of the tracks were intentionally mis-identified.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 19:25:40 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Al re: Stage Fright

Good work Al, and hello old mucker.

Brinsley indeed it was that first stated SF as a favourite and cited "far less instantly familiar and welcoming, but ultimately a more rewarding listen" or similar. I get that - there's no Rag Mama Rag or Weight - and also find as a musician the instrumental content is quite fascinating.

Robbie and Garth are generally more to the fore, and instrumental parts are beautifully colouring the tunes more rather than being just part of the accompaniment behind the vocals.

In many ways it isn't a surprise Brins came to love it as it is a great guitarists album, much more to get into there than on the previous two. Great tones - I spent years trying to work out what the effect was at the start of Time To Kill, and on All La Glory, as it is a lovely vibrato; I've got it down to either a Magnatone amp like Lonnie Mack used, or a "blonde" Fender with harmonic tremolo - and cranked up on The Rumor (where did you think they got the name of the combo that GP joined?!!!) in the middle it shimmers gloriously.

Garth used his TSO-25 "Lincolnwood" for the first time on an album, despite using it live since summer 1969. A transistor organ, it has a subtly different sound, more able to cut through but still relatively warm toned. I still nick the opening syncopated bars of The Shape I'm In solo for any uptempo songs in G!

Wasn't it the first album with Rick's fretless Ampeg bass, too? Lots of instrumental changes in terms of equipment on that record, new toys etc.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 18:59:41 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Woodstock

Woodstock was filmed for the movie and recorded for the album, just not used at the time. IIRC The Weight, Tears of Rage, Ain't No More Cane and Henry have been released on various compilations and box sets over the years. The other 7 tracks are only available unofficially...


Entered at Sun Mar 23 18:46:39 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kerrin

Don't Ya Tell Henry was old as Woodstock? So there's a much nicer quality recording of Woodstock knocking about, then?


Entered at Sun Mar 23 18:45:53 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Band - the core issues

I'll definitely be attempting to convey my take on it all Pete. Then again, I've been meaning to do a few pieces for your Toppermost site so I guess I need to get my head out of me arse.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 18:40:44 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: DP

David - Just got the heads up re your absence. I guessed from references something was wrong but didn't know what it was.

David, this GB without your shafts of insight is like The Band without Robbie. Also you're the only other big fan of REM. Get yourself back on here mate. Sometimes wires get crossed and innocent comments posted with earnest and genuine intent can get caught up in a wider cull.

Of course, it can work similarly with humorous stuff too. I remember once many moons ago in my infancy on here and Jan was compelled to threaten me with a ban because he thought a post I'd put up was me using the GB to tout for a transvestite partner to join me in some fun and games. Luckily he didn't ban me - and Fred and myself have never looked back!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 23 17:50:46 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

More please, Al. I get your point about the coherence of the Brown Album, which is undeniable. Stage Fright is more clearly a collection of tracks, of similar standard, but not forming a whole in the same way. But that's even more so with MFBP. I've often said that tracks 1-8 cohere, but 9-11 (Lonesome Suzie, This Wheel's On Fire, I Shall Be Release) don't stick to the rest in the same way … not a jot of criticism of the songs, just that stylistically there seems a tiny shift.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 17:43:20 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Watkins Glen

Sure, RTO. Tracks with no source are presumed ROA outtakes:

Introduction (authentic WG)

Back to Memphis (studio outtake)

Endless Highway (studio outtake)

I Shall Be Released

Loving You Is Sweeter

Too Wet to Work (WG tape, very edited and with bogus thunder)

Don't Ya Tell Henry (Woodstock 69 version)

The Rumor

Time To Kill

Jam (WG tape, edited for release)

Up On Cripple Creek


Entered at Sun Mar 23 17:28:07 CET 2014 from (31.101.152.191)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Sigh...

Can somebody remind me exactly what the Watkins Glen CD did contain? I'm losing it!


Entered at Sun Mar 23 17:20:31 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Roosevelt 2

Hmmm...so it's war! But seriously, I enjoy that show, I agree there's a lot more spirit and less train wrecks than the July 31st set, but it is still pretty messy by pre-1972 standards, and I doubt Capitol would knowingly put out questionable work when the future marketability of The Band depends on maintaining the illusion that they were a bastion of good taste and craftsmanship onstage. A "good quality" bootleg soundboard doth not an official release make (although it has been done), but who knows, maybe Capitol did send the recording truck out to Roosevelt Stadium, too. Should the appropriate tapes exist it would be cool to hear that show cleaned up, but the market would be pretty miniscule I'm guessing. But not as small as live 80's or 90's albums - luckily the quality and quantity of available tapes is there for those interested, as Ben mentioned.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 17:06:29 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

As it was a radio broadcast, the Roosevelt Stadium mixes were substandard. The first day's performance was horrid, the seccond was pretty good but didn't come anywhere near the pre-RoA tours.

The actual WG album was produced back in the day for vinyl release--hence, the relative shortness--but never was.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 16:46:43 CET 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

BEG and Bob W, thanks so much for the answers to my question.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 16:46:32 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Roosevelt 2

I'm with Ben on the second Roosevelt Stadium show. The first night is really rough as a performance, but by the second night they had got it together. The bootleg CD is superb sound quality too. I think it's a strong candidate for release.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 16:40:15 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Roosevelt stadium

Kerrin, I completely disagree with you. The second Roosevelt stadium show is a tremendous performance. The Deep Six bootleg is the recording that I'm speaking of. It's a very good quality recording. The Band played with a lot of passion. Is there missed note or flub. Absolutely. It's a live performance, I don't expect "perfection" I expect passion, intensity, emotion, interplay between the players. it's there in spades on the Roosevelt stadium boot. This is the show that should have been released. And if they wanted to label it Watkins Glen, I wouldn't bitch too much about it as it was only a few days apart. The Watkins Glen cd that Capital released is a fraudulent hatchet job,


Entered at Sun Mar 23 16:25:10 CET 2014 from (64.114.196.114)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Chelsea Hotel

We saw 'Chelsea Hotel' last evening at the Firehall Theatre in Vancouver BC. It is a performance piece with song and dance and minimal dialogue and presents many of the songs by Leonard Cohen. Conceived and directed by Tracey Powers, with musical direction by Steven Charles, there are 6 performers and they are multi-instrumentalists and very good singers. Some of arrangements were so 'original' that you had to wait for familiar lyrics to identify the song. Guitars, drums, cello, basses, harmonica and even kazoos make their appearances with wonderful results. Set in a room in the Chelsea hotel, complete with piles of discarded crumpled paper piles of failed lyrics, a bed, and a bottle of the hard stuff, the set provides the performers with a realistic setting in which to portray the trials and tribulations of a sometimes tortured songwriter. The joys of the success and the pain of failed love manifest eloquently in this excellent production. They have 'toured' this production in Canada and I'm not certain it will go anywhere else on the planet but if it does, it should definitely be seen and heard.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 16:09:21 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

But Ben, the Roosevelt shows were also crap, fraught with all the same gremlins as WG, and we don't know that they were even recorded officially. And Capitol couldn't release the Palladium or King Biscuit concerts either. Firstly, without being associated with something like "the largest rock concert in history", it wasn't worth their trouble. Secondly, these were live radio broadcasts, which is why we have decent recordings in circulation, but Capitol probably never had tapes. Master copies would be held by the station that did the live transmission, but it's a safe bet that these tapes were only in 2-track stereo. So, third point, for a mass-market, CD quality release, Capitol would have needed proper multi-track tapes to work with, and chances are these never existed.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:53:42 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Cheryl Pawelski Interview Watkins Glen

This is regarding the Watkins Glen "fake album.". I've posted this a couple of times; but just for the record one more time. Some don't seem to believe the following; but she worked with Robbie on the box set.

"Is it true that when you went looking for the Band’s tapes in Capitol’s vault that you discovered their catalog was in disarray.

That’s very common. But I don’t know if it was in disarray as it was just that being able to identify what we needed. I think we probably listened to every last inch of tape that exists on the Band that we were able to find. “The Brown Album” masters are still missing. [“The Band,” the eponymous second studio album released in 1969.] The tape boxes are missing. I’m not sure where they are. But you know, when you get down to session reels, sometimes there are no track sheets. There might be a phone number of a girl friend or the pizza guy and that’s all you get. So you listen to it. I don’t know if was necessarily any worse or any better than any other collection of tapes. The “Live at Watkins Glen” thing (album) was just wrong. That was a fake record.

Studio outtakes with fake crowd noises?

Yeah, it was a fake record because the actual Watkins Glen tape aren’t useable. They had a lot of line and mike problems."


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:48:17 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Watkins Glen cd

Peter, I'm well aware of the "sweetening" done to most live cd's before they're released. But, I think Watkins Glen is an entirely different beast. It's a fraud. This cd is the quintessential example of why I seek out bootlegs. It seems very bizarre that this bastardized cd would be released with such an abbreviated running time and the absence of such key tracks as The weight, The night they drove old Dixie down, Stage fright, the shape I'm in, and so on.

Kerrin, you make some interesting points. In the mid 90's, The Band was at a higher profile then they'd been at in many years. Capital should shave just released the KIng biscuit or Palladium show from '76. If Capital's market research found that a Watkins Glen release would be more marketable than those other shows, they would have been much before off taking the second Roosevelt stadium show from a few days later, grafting the Bill Graham intro on to it and passing that off as Watkins glen.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:42:50 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kerrin, funnily enough I'm looking at Martha Reeves for a future one, and dug out the 1974 MCA album yesterday, produced by Richard Perry (apparently one of the most expensive albums made at that time), and James Jamerson's name leaps out of the credits, as it should. Why don't you suggest a JJ one to Toppermost?


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:41:08 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: that last post

Should of course have been Rick Levon and Richard not Rick Levon and Rick.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:11:09 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Band - the core issues

Have only had time to look in briefly at what's been posted recently but I've seen enough to compel me to re-post something I wrote some years ago concerning just what the first two albums actually represent in terms of the broader musical landscape and why we're all here. The piece compares The Brown album with Stagefright but its underlying theme links with the current dialogue comparing all incarnations - both solo and collective.

I'm definitely going to follow up on this 'comparison' stuff when I get the chance but for now this will remind those who know me and alert those who don't as to where I stand on this thing.

THE SUM OF THE PARTS

Have to admit Rob’s mention of his mate – the one and only Brinsley Schwarz no less – opting for Stagefright over the first two albums and Rob’s own inclination not to disagree with that view has had me feverishly playing all three albums and reassessing my own Band yardsticks this past week or so.

Now I’ve always had a fixed mindset on this – namely the precedence of the first two albums – but I know Pete Viney to name but one highly respected time-served GBer has often maintained Stagefright as the equal of the other two. So I felt this latest judgement of such a legendary Band aficionado as Brinsley more or less coinciding with PV’s view surely demanded at the very least some considered reflection on my own take.

Having had quite a lengthy hiatus from any Band listening whatsoever – possibly extending [cue entirely justified disparaging grimaces all round] for more than a year – I was quietly enthralled at the task in hand and pleased to think I’d be able to approach it with real objectivity. I opted to begin my contemplation in reverse order with back-to-back plays of the Stagefright album before proceeding in the same reverse order with the Brown album and Big Pink. I felt that way I could avoid any possible clouded judgement of Stagefright arising from saturation with the first two albums.

Possibly due to not having listened to it for so long – and ironically in spite of my long love affair with it – I was caught entirely off guard by the awesome quality of Stagefright. The opening bars of Levon’s Strawberry Wine were a real adrenaline rush. Boy did it sound good. Mindful of Adam’s recently espoused ‘heroin’ take I even determined to listen more intently to its lyrics than ever before. Such intent lasted all of 20 seconds. So implanted in my brain is the child-like defiance of those opening Strawberry lyrics that any notion of the song not being a drunkard’s rejection of attempts to deny him his precious barley wine swiftly dissipated. Perhaps there is an altogether more sinister slant on it but for now I’m lumbered with the plain-as-the-nose-on-your-face plonkie interpretation.

And so, as Side One played on and the Strawberry Wine revelry melted first into Richard’s exquisite yearning for tranquil escape, then into his and Rick’s paean to domestic bliss, then Richard’s frantic railing at life per se before drifting into the sweetest lullaby since Brahms, so wonderful did it all seem that it was hard to resist the inclination that perhaps this was the time to re-adjust my long held stance as to where this wonderful record stands in The Band’s pantheon – and for that matter the pantheon of popular music per se.

And, of course, as we all know Side Two is simply so good it was only ever going to reaffirm such an inclination, to the extent that by the time Rick in that amazing backwoods drawl of his was telling me he’d “rather die happy than not die at all” [cue moistened eyes] I was sold. Mind made up. This was music that simply could not be bettered. And the quality of the three final cuts only served to seal the deal. “Open up your arms and feel the good…it’s a coming a brand new day”. Richard’s clincher, the album’s climax invoking more eye moistening this time of pure joy lending testimony to the sheer magnificence on offer.

Next stop, The Band.

To quote John Winston, I should have known better.

Across the Great Divide isn’t so much a song as a time machine to an era five or six generations distant. If the song’s title alone isn’t enough to stir latent 19th century pioneering instincts then its opening refrains are akin to Charlie Worcester’s chuck wagon rolling up outside your front door and Ward Bond motioning you to go and calm the stand-off between the gun-toting Molly and her frantic misunderstood spouse so the trek west can begin.

And once, Rags, the 4-19 iron horse is scratching your back at the side of the railroad track with dear old Charlie and WB jigging wildly to its infectious swing in the distance you are no longer in the seedy comfort of your own armchair enjoying a fine musical listening experience. No sir. For something rather special is taking place. The creators of this particular audio spectacular had something in mind a little bit different from the norm. This deal demands you to be there with them down in that special tract of America termed ‘the south’. Well virtually any rate. A bit like Arnie Schwarzeneger’s virtual vacation on Mars, minus the little green men.

So by the time Vergil Cain has laid down his particular weary tune at your feet, you find yourself surveying a smouldering Virginian landscape. It’s 1865. You’re in the early stages of a journey that will take in as many aspects of rustic bygone America – the charms, joys and pain of it and its denizens – as even Charlie Worcester cares to imagine. Rolling mud and tolling bells ominously announcing the South’s demise, the reassuring wisdom of Holie and a loving grandpa coupled with the rather more earthy comforts of dear Bessie. The heart rending emptiness of a mist shrouded house . Foghorns calling out to sea for the return of lost love. The images are endless. A chancer’s insistent craving for a night of joyous passion with the luscious Jemima. Old sailors pining for their Virginny homes and rockin chair comforts, thieves and vagabonds, twisters both human and meteorological; disgraced servants from a country home. The journey culminates in the bleak rural desperation of failed crops, magnolia trees, worn out shoes and an old horse, the aptly named Jethro, going loco.

All told it represents an enthralling listening experience. Probably a unique one. Viewed in the context of its ultimate success in realizing the magical tapestry it sets out to weave, the album has to be seen as music unsurpassed. And, somewhat perversely I guess, it is via a reassessment of Stagefright itself, the same artists’ ensuing album, which provides us with the requisite testimony to support the legitimacy of a claim of such boldness.

The thing is, in terms of much of its core essence Stagefright may well be said to emulate its predecessor. Wonderful songs with ensemble singing, playing and arrangements transcending even the highest standards to attain levels few, if any, before and since have achieved. Four Canadians and an Arkansian somehow aspiring –and managing – to fuse into a single seamless entity. So tight, so fluid, so intricate, so complementary, so in touch with their roots and yet at the same time so able to take the heritage plucked from those roots to a new high water mark of musical accomplishment.

Yet the stakes of judgement are also at their highest here. They have to be if that judgement is to be worthy of the subject matter it is judging. And so, in this regard, we do have to ask ourselves the question – most especially those of us who hold The Band so dear –as to where Stagefright as an entity actually takes the listener?

Sure, it is manifestly cut from the same cloth as the Brown album and many of its individual tracks certainly conjure up similar powerful imagery of their own. As an entire piece, however, Stagefright simply does not work on or at the same level as the Brown album. Whilst its majesty is unquestionable, that majesty lies in other areas. In contrast, what can only be termed the high art of the Brown album is that not only does it provide songs of supreme quality, arranged, played and sung with matching quality and not only is that standard maintained across every track on the album but each of those tracks also gloriously complement each other to provide a cohesive entity equating to that of the singers/musicians performing it. And all of it wrapped for the most part in a 150 years old southern USA landscape that is as tangible as any such vicarious experience can ever be.

Moreover, so real and so convincing is it that there can be no question of it not having been the intended objective of all parties involved in the project to aspire to creating it. It didn’t simply happen like that. It was planned. Crafted. A unique amalgam of inspiration, perspiration and incredible innate ability saw to that. And all done in such a subtle fashion that the listener is left with the impression that they are simply eavesdropping upon a group of musicians from the era itself just there to play for themselves or, more likely perhaps, for kith and kinfolk. Crucially those musicians also seem part of what they are singing about.

Stagefright, in contrast, is without question the work of a band reacquainted with and re-attuned to the modern era flexing its considerable collective muscle to show just how damnwell fine and accomplished it is. And whilst its members manage to demonstrate that more than capably, never do we get the sense they are still part of any of the things about which they are singing. Rather the songs provide us with what amount to their own personal commentaries about what is happening to them and their ways of dealing in many instances with the very disconnection they have experienced or are still experiencing.

One simple analysis illustrates this disconnection and some of those subtle distinctions between the respective albums. Taking what most regard as Stagefright’s cornerstone song – The Rumor, we find a truly mighty track by any criterion. Within its majesty we find its protagonists the butt of the rumour mongering about which they sing. Initially disconsolate, then philosophical, they ultimately become defiant and fired with the conviction of a brand new dawn awaiting them.

On the one hand, it is wonderful life-affirming music, its vocal performances interchanged between Rick, Levon and Rick particularly stunning. And yet on reflection the song itself has little if any connection with anything preceding it on the album. It speaks, isolated, only for those singing it or for those few of like experience. That is not to detract from the undeniable top quality of the song in itself. It is merely to make the observation that the limited degree of its interface with and connection to the rest of the album tracks – and theirs with it and each other – inevitably results in an album whose overall quality is forced to depend upon the quality of its individual parts rather than any cohesive amalgam. In the ultimate analysis the ensuing whole is only equal to the sum of the parts. Such disconnection is a world away from how the music of the Brown album was envisaged, forged and linked so seamlessly making its whole nigh immeasurable in quality.

Sticking with Stagefright’s party piece, there is a further closely associated distinction worth noting here. If we were to speculate as to how a song dealing with the concept of rumours would have featured on the Brown album or even more so on Big Pink with its more emphatic underpinning sense of community, it would seem fairly evident how with hindsight it might have turned out. The singers as part of the community wherein the rumours germinated would more than likely have been part of the rumour mongering rather than the targets for it. However unsavoury or unpalatable it might have seemed – being as most people would like to think that they would view rumour mongers as the bad guys – it would simply have been the way such things work. The brutal reality is most folk love a bit of gossip. Art imitating life, as it were.

So, taken in the splendour of their own isolation, The Rumor and its fellow Stagefright tracks may all work magnificently, yet together they fail to emulate the Brown album’s seamless artistic integrity and completeness. That meshing together so pivotal in creating the wonder of the Brown album is absent. As such Stagefright – albeit fairly typical in its ‘unmeshed’ sense to most albums – has to be viewed as having fallen somewhat short of the high water mark of its forerunner.

Some may regard the need to apply such fastidious criteria as I have done as nitpicking. And perhaps in one sense it may well be. Yet the piece I’ve written speaks for itself in this regard. It has not been formulated to decry Stagefright in any way. Rather to help ensure the Brown album remains elevated – even if only within the stronghold of The Band’s own community – at the unique niche its uniqueness merits.

In the final analysis, whilst many of the points made are certainly fine and marginal ones, if they can provide even a modicum of insight as to why my own instincts arrived at the conclusion that one album is simply a wonderful one whilst the other has entered artistic territory trodden by few, then as far as I am concerned the effort will have been more than worthwhile. Individual musical tastes can lead each of us down different paths, yet I do still believe there are occasionally certain absolutes that call for us to defy charges of mere favouritism and attempt to provide a rationale. Surely, it is especially encumbent upon diehards such as those of us who inhabit the GB to explore any such subtle distinctions and fine margins when evaluating the music we love. Hopefully, my own little soul search has gone some way to doing just that.

Of course, there is clearly also a parallel objective which I guess is a craving on my own part to understand the real depth of attachment I retain to these amazing albums I first heard 40 plus years ago. It is an attachment – and at this juncture I would also bring in my own equally strong attachment to Big Pink – which despite literally hundreds of searches for similar Holy Grails has only ever found any sort of corresponding parallel in the ephemeral Belfast childhood reminiscences of Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:16:30 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Peter V

From memory - because we're living overseas for a while - my recording of that show was a pretty decent audience tape. Maybe my standards are lower! Yes, all live stuff gets patched, I'm probably being unfair picking on BTF for that reason alone. Even ROA was not without help, as good as the raw material was. As for TLW, I've never understood how indignant some people got over the massaging that received, but that subject is another can of worms, so maybe some other day...


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:08:24 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

JT, Peter V, and John D, very nice comments and links about Richard Bell. If Toppermost is doing sidemen now...James Jamerson comes to mind, but there's a million of 'em.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 15:02:56 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Watkins Glen

Very few live albums don't get a degree of post-production. The Watkins Glen CD is an enjoyable enough sequence, but as we now know, it's mainly a fake. I have the tape of the show, and the recording quality is poor. I've mentioned before that I saw a 2 LP bootleg (must have had some other stuff on it) in Virgin in Oxford Street a few weeks after the show and basically couldn't afford it … it was a ridiculous price. I still wish I'd bought it though … who knows, it might have been a better quality recording. I've never seen a CD boot of it.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 14:48:58 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Bob, that's right, almost no-one uses those gloves. I suspect Zildjian gave Levon a bunch of freebies including those gloves, and although there may be some advantages in comfort and security of grip, he probably just thought it looked cool. I play trad grip and if I'm out of practice my ring finger will blister up first gig out. However, for anyone playing mallet-style I would think only the most sweaty and agressive would benefit from the gloves (and then primarily on the right hand, as the left is relatively immobile).

RTO, thanks for the details, will be in touch.

Ben, Watkins Glen wasn't filmed that we know of, but it was recorded. The jam, the John Scher/Bill Graham introduction, and Too Wet to Work (heavily edited) are from the actual show.

I think Capitol had a quandary over that one. By the mid-90's The Band had managed a bit of a comeback, which was only partly their doing. Two books, a respectable album, their best live shows since TLW, and being lauded as Gods of Americana before a new, young audience of musical hipsters and contributing writers for Mojo Magazine. For the first time in 20 years Capitol could see some real sales potential in their old chums, and a focus group was duly formed to decide how best to milk this happy new opportunity.

Having emerged from the vaults with a shopping trundler full of 2-inch tapes, they found a few gems that they had forgotten they had, including the four ROA nights and likely as not many complete shows spanning The Band's pre-Waltz career.

So, a live album seemed to be the obvious route, and selecting Watkins Glen was genius, because 600,000 people went to that festival. You could count on at least a percentage of them buying the CD as a (very delayed) souvenir, that's a bunch of CD's right there. Plus the show is also legendary amongst Deadheads and Allman's fans, a percentage of them would grab the CD out of speculation, all these sales before you even get to The Band's dedicated, but comparatively modest market.

It was a perfect plan until they spooled up the tapes and found…that they were terrible. No-one wants to hear me say that, but I've got the bootleg of that show and it's sadly typical of the performances The Band were capable of in '73-'74. I think they had a good time, the audience had a good time, but taken out of context by a new era of music buyers it wasn't going to cut it. Rick and Richard are the most obviously incapacitated, but there's mistakes, forgotten lyrics and missed cues all round, and certainly when compared to leftovers from ROA I think Capitol knew what had to be done. Although many react badly to being mislead over the origins of the tracks, at the time I really enjoyed the album. However it's presented, "new" unreleased material from that era will always be welcome in my collection.

Seeing as I'm going to get a rocket anyway, I always found the Tour '74 shows to be fairly dodgy too, in spite of the rave reviews by the many who experienced them firsthand. Not surprisingly, Before the Flood needed some post-production love prior to release.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:47:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Kevin from North East PA...and the healing has begun.
I would never pass up on an opportunity to see Amy Helm in town....Todd as well and JD too.
Music has the power to push away negative vibes too, creating positive vibrations.

9 or 10 January 1974 - Toronto (Maple Leaf Gardens)
With The Band
Knockin' On Heaven's Door

Ahhhhhhhhh.....I missed this show as I hadn't moved to TO at this time....by one year. :-(((
JT and JD were here.....as well as the first person I dated in Toronto. He took me to the Colonial Club to see the gospel group the Mighty Clouds of Joy.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:29:15 CET 2014 from (174.54.185.44)

Posted by:

Kevin from Northeast PA

Web: My link

Subject: Amy Helm

My wife and I caught Amy Helm at our local theater Friday night. Link is to the local newspaper review.

We were impressed with both the opening act (Connor Kennedy & Band) as well as Amy and her band. The theater is called the Kirby Center for the Performing Arts (Bob W. - you probably know this place). Instead of being in the main part of the theater (couple thousand seats) this was the first show of I hope many in the lobby under the Chandelier. Probably a couple hundred people. I think they have Joan Osborne and Alejandro Escovedo (separately - not together) scheduled within the next month.

My dad passed away recently and my wife's mom has been ill so this was just what the doctor ordered for us.

The reviewer mentions 2 of three songs that were sung in the middle of the audience. The 3rd song the reviewer did not know was a great version of 'Little Birds'.

Another highlight for me was when Byron Isaacs sang his song Calvary that Levon covered on Dirt Farmer.

Great stuff.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:27:40 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

And now we are going to suggest a diagnosis?

Have a wonderful Spring everyone. Be safe and well.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:24:27 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Good Morning John D. Here's my favourite with Richard Bell and Danny Brooks and The Rockin' Revelators......miracles for breakfast.
I saw Richard Bell with Michael Fonfara (best known to me with Louuuu's group and with Pentii Glan as well) in Port Credit. Bill M was there too. All those years ago, I had no idea that these musicians were home grown. :-D Btw, I think Richard Bell's father taught music at our Conservatory of Music.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:18:24 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Regarding my video link

Richard solos at 2:45 of the video.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:16:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Interview with Jamie Malanowski.....The Book Of Levon Helm.....really begins more around 17 minutes.

"Jamie Malanowski, former editor at Spy, Esquire and Time, has written an ebook, The Book of Levon: The Trials and Triumphs of Levon Helm, that catches us up on the post-Last Waltz life of Helm. It presents us with a profile of a man who, though often down on his luck, never let go of his musical gifts and always found a way to keep the world entertained.

Along the way, he engendered a tremendous amount of loyalty, too.

You can download The Book of Levon right now for as little as $2.99 from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble."


Entered at Sun Mar 23 13:13:19 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: JT & Richard Bell

Thank you Jerry for that wonderful article on Richard. I remember at Hawkins 60th birthday party at Massey Hall, Richard was band leader and the arranger of the horn section. This was January of 1995 and I watched something that was new to me. Richard realized the arrangements had been left at home. He turned on his Mac and dialed up his main computer at home and downloaded the arrangements. Like Garth he could have been dubbed "Professor" Bell.

Here is a link to his time with Danny Brooks. Richard is on organ and Michael Fonfara on piano. For those outside of Canada, Mike was best know an keyboardist for Rhinoceros. I went to Richard's final gig at Hugh's Room. He was in a brief state of remission. As I went to hug him, he said, "not too tight John; under these clothes I'm just skin and bones." Much like Levon; in his last years. Enjoy the link.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 10:57:09 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Susan Cadgene article

Re-read that Susan Cadgene article on Levon that Wallsend linked. I've re-linked it to save you scrolling back to find it. It’s fascinating, with a lot of new information, such as the (declined) Last Waltz re-release show, and the dispute with Elliot Landy over photos. There’s an interesting point that suggests he knew Stephen Davis was digging for dirt, but he needed the money (I’d work with Stalin). There’s also the aspect of perceived conspiracy. My mother had clinical paranoia in her last year and looking back, we could remember disputes with neighbours and family years earlier. I read a bit about paranoia, and if you do, you’ll very soon run into articles on the recent effects of “super weed” suggesting a causal connection. Read Susan’s article. And paranoia means you truly believe your closest friends were conspiring against you. My writing partner for many years was one of the most paranoid people I’ve met too (not that he indulged in such things), seeing convoluted plots and plans from our publishers to lighten their payments to us. Mind you, in retrospect, he was often right. But he was a Pisces and Mrs V just says “Pisces are paranoid.”

I also looked up my reviews of Vancouver and Cambridge after reading Jerry’s great piece on Richard Bell. I did find a quote, which I wrote down from “The Vancouver Sun” on the day of the Vancouver show in 1994. The torn out clipping has long gone, but it was an interview with Rick Danko. I have a feeling it was reprinted from an Edmonton or Calgary newspaper the day before. It’s double-edged … some will take it one way, others the opposite.

Rick: “Why The Band broke up? You can likely hear it in the later records. It wasn't really a Band project anymore. Kind of like Roger Waters and Pink Floyd.”


Entered at Sun Mar 23 10:28:01 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Richard Bell

Today's Toppermost is JT on Richard Bell … this week being particularly strong on Band connections with Ronnie Hawkins on Friday. Do add comments over there.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 03:26:39 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Last post

That name on the last post should be Ben, not The Band. will work on my proofreadinf before submitting


Entered at Sun Mar 23 03:21:48 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

The Band

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Youtube

I've just been looking up Band clips on Youtube. Found some interesting things that I hadn't seen before. I watched the 'Watkins Glen' piece. Very nice job, Pat. It's a damn shame that festival wasn't professionally filmed or recorded. I find it very bizarre that Capitol tried to pass off an album of mostly 'Rock of Ages' outtakes as The Band's performance from this festival. How could they have possibly though they could get away with such a blatant fraud.

I then came across performances of 'The Weight' by Rick, Robbie and Garth from the rock and roll hall of fame and the juno's. The rock and roll hall of fame clip was a mess. Levon was sorely missed. The only saving grace was seeing Eric Clapton get his chance to join the Band and take a verse. The juno version was far superior. Robbie and Rick were in firm command of the vocals. This is a joyous performance. Robbie really brought some passion to this, much more that to the rock hall of fame version. There's also a few seconds of them performing at he horseshoe tavern tacked on at the end. It's too bad that this brief reunion didn't inspire Robbie to perform live again. It looks to me like he's having the time of his life playing with Rick and Garth.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 02:59:00 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Kerrin, it is clear he was using it before he switched grips. On that point there's no dispute. But as a drummer I can tell you that a traditional grip drummer doesn't often use a glove. At least not the one's I've followed. Levon sure didn't.......for a very long time. In fact, in all the shows I've attended, Levon is one of the very few drummers I've seen wearing one, regardless of grip style.

I know he is on record saying he felt it more necessary when he played in a more aggressive blues style.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 02:12:19 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: bob w

Thank you for that link......I guess I have probably watched TLW 75-100 times......wasn't sure what that link would be and once realizing what it was STILL found myself sitting there watching the whole thing..........a glorious performance...............one take perfect!


Entered at Sun Mar 23 02:00:47 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Kerrin

Kerrin, we are even then, because I don't have an H25....but I do have a solid state Lincolnwood TSO! Does your FL self oscillate like mine? (see link). So we don't bore everybody "comparing our organs" feel free to say hi on (one word) rob millis 74 (then) at (and finally...) hot mail (dot com).


Entered at Sun Mar 23 01:18:07 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

BEG, thank you for your generosity as always, not sure my writing deserves it!

Levon wore a Zildjian Drummers Glove (he played Zildjian cymbals all his life and was probably and endorsed artist by the 90's) well before cancer or changing to matched grip. He talks about it in his drumming video, which dates from 91-92 I think. It is to help prevent blisters on sweaty hands. For traditional left hand grip it makes some sense, especially if you let your callouses fade away - I imagine Levon didn't always play drums between tours, more likely he sat around playing guitar. It seems unnecessary for matched grip but by the time he switched styles he was probably using it out of habit.

RTO, I'm jealous. I have an FL and an H25-3, but still jealous because they are half way around the world in a storage unit.

NorthWestCoaster, if anyone wants to analyse the music from a technical standpoint I would do that too! Did plenty of it in my youth trying to replicate something that can't be copied.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 01:10:26 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Frozen North

That was just alright Wallsend. Gospel according to Levon.


Entered at Sun Mar 23 00:32:26 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.142)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Then there is this - well known to us all I am sure. Levon should have put out a solo album of just himself singing and playing drums.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 23:32:16 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Leovn's best drumming

I recall how more fully impressed I was when I got to see Levon's drumming live and up close at a Ramble. The track I've been listening to recently which I think is demonstrative of his famous style is on False Hearted Lover Blues; I'm sure there's many more examples out there -


Entered at Sat Mar 22 23:17:42 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Right/Left/Right?

From the Elmore article ......"Cunningham, a drummer himself, said, “Levon is like an old fashioned clothespin. He puts in just enough energy.” Naturally right handed, Levon was a left-handed drummer because he learned from a lefty."

Confusing, as Levon always played his kit in a traditional right handed configuration.

He was a lot of things but, in my mind, he was simply a brilliant drummer, singer and performer. Link is to a beautifully written and magnificently performed piece of music. The Band's performance was magical and Levon's transcendent.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 23:02:14 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Kerrin

Just reading your overhauled piece on Garth's gear on the site. Very good indeed. Have a look at my link to see my own pride and joy...


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:58:12 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.142)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I thought the story about Levon writing 'F- You' is pretty funny. That would be an autographed book I would love to own. I can imagine being a well known person has its advantages but could also be very annoying at times. My favourite line from Dylan's book was when he said "The problem with privacy is that you can sell it but you can't buy it back". Did the reformed Band perform TNTDODD?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:34:00 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For Jed and RTO...

"Hired in 1968 by studio owner Rick Hall, who was blown away by the young guitarist's talent, Allman played with almost every soul legend who walked through those doors. His solo on Wilson Pickett's "Hey Jude" apparently first brought him to the attention of Eric Clapton. Allman not only knew how to play the guitar, but how to redefine its sound while also working seamlessly with the great tracks being recorded in the studio.

As for "The Weight," which The Band had recorded and released in 1968 before they even called themselves "The Band," this version hit No. 3 on the R&B charts in 1969 and No. 19 on the pop charts. Wexler, in retrospect, dismissed the song as a mistake.

"I was trying to make a bridge over to the 'flower children'; I bitterly regret having done 'The Weight' with her. The song is totally incomprehensible to her basic rhythm & blues constituency. Aretha cannot have a big hit unless it is also a hit with her black audience. It's got to be both, so this is where commercial stupidity and greed got the upper hand with me."

– From the liner notes to the CD's rerelease (thanks to the excellent Band fan site for unearthing this quote)

I beg to differ because, musically at least, I've always viewed this song as being a comfortable fit with classic R&B/gospel. So did director Martin Scorsese, whose relationship with Band guitarist and composer Robbie Robertson was documented in Sunday's post. After filming the final concert documented in The Last Waltz (1978), Scorsese decided that one genre of American music was missing from the film: Gospel. So he put together The Band in a film studio with The Staple Singers and they performed "The Weight" for what was one of this great film's true highlights.

What you might not realize is that, years before the movie, The Staples had recorded their own version of the song with Booker T and the MGs for the rare 1968 album, Soul Folk in Action. Once again, though the lyrics are a little on the hippie side, the music itself sure isn't."

Bonus again.....B.B. King, Van and Robbie's.......Between Trains from The King Of Comedy.

Hey Joan!! Hope you're doing ok. Keep feeelin' the music and then you'll be reminded that we're all in this together.....warts and beauty and everything in between.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:21:05 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The eff u.....anecdote in the Levon article is likely one of a few erroneous accounts - the other being his thinking that TNTDODD was too negative to the South......Levon was a bright guy and only a stupid person could think that......for me and millions of other people who heard that song.....it brought a whole new perspective on the Civil War.......quite an achievement and one of the reasons I rate it as top 2 or 3 best rock songs ever written..................The more lasting take-away from that article was unfortunate business with Elliot Landy........as Bob once said "money swears" and it has a way of getting in the way of friendships - seems RR was not the only one so pegged.

The other bit about The Allman Brothers and The Band openning for Ten Years After in the late 1980's.........stunning to even think of that mis-order...........as to chasing ladies nude......,,welcome to rock n roll kids !


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:17:07 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For all the new posters and lurkers.

Transcript from The Band Net Chat

"On Saturday August 15, 1998, at 5pm CST, The Band's Rick Danko, Levon Helm and Garth Hudson chatted with fans live on the net, from the In The Studio web site. Below is a transcript of the talk session, copied directly from In The Studio:"


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:07:06 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Lisa, I believe Levon started wearing the glove several years ago when he switched from a traditional grip to a matched grip which is commonly used in playing a more forceful blues style. The glove provides a surer grip on the stick and also cushions the hand that is landing those pronounced down beats. At least that is my understanding.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 22:01:53 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG/RTO-Tedeschi Trucks Trainwreck.

Mismatched parts.Songs that don't fit the players-they really don't need slide guitar or possibly any guitar beyond light rhythms behind this music.The horns,particularly if you compare them to Levon or Band level players,are third rate and poorly utilized.A Trainwreck I never listen to-and I tried over and over for awhile,but horrid!


Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:52:46 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: "Eff you-Levon Helm" quote

In over 36 years of part time residence in Woodstock and many times seeing Levon or talking to him,and despite his mood at a particular moment,I never found him rude or out of turn towards me or anyone I saw him encounter.In fact,as an example,before the Saugerties Flamingo show(he was great BTW),I saw him drinking alone at the bar,sat 2 seats away,and he turned,recognized me from around and said hi.We spoke a bit and I left him to his thoughts after a few moments.Saw him through the years all around the area-sometimes quiet,but always nice.Most often,very friendly.I'll never forget when he played a memorial day show at south street seaport,i believe in the early 90's(?), and Levon and Rick came to the stage and they stopped to play with and kiss my then 2 year old.But,all of of us have bad behaviors at times and Levon was very human.Overall,I prefer to remember the music and his tremendous spirit.As some around him have said,he was music,he breathed music and lived music like few have.Rick and Richard,I also remember the same-really gifted and original musicians who were,at least in my encounters over the years,very sweet,nice guys.And all 3 were very funny to see and be around.An honor to be a nobody lucky enough to live,on and off,near my favorite musicians.As for Garth,always polite and actually hung out and talked with him at a break in the Barnburners show.He sat in that night-saw him twice with Levon and Barnburners.He was nice-but Garth seems to live on Planet Garth.Not meant derogatorily,but more in a sense of the cosmos!Ha! Kind of like talking to Jaimoe of the Allmans-also a sweet guy who's mind lives in a different place-HA! A lucky and blessed honor to,over the years,meet many of my musical heros.But they're all human,coming with good and bad,as we all do,but we're all lucky to have had and have them.Was only up close to RR once at Rick's service,but never saw him otherwise and never had the honor.It sure would be special to meet him- and hear him play up close like I did the others.Love The Band.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:52:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For RTO and Lisa...Ginger Baker and Levon Helm

"Compare that with the Helm of this film. His voice is shot due to lung cancer and years of smoking. He wears a glove on one hand to help with his drumming. He's also switched from the traditional grip to the matched grip style."


Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:49:27 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For Lisa....

"Helm, now 71, has fought illness but was in good form driving the band through a two hour set. He wears a golf glove on his left hand to avoid wear and tear. Mostly he closes his eyes while playing as he feels the intensity of the music and concentrates on laying down a driving beat. The music they create is an eclectic mix of country, folk and rock with flourishes of brass and horns. It’s a big sound that is richly accented and evokes melancholic titubation."

Thank you Kerrin. You're one of our most articulate posters here....Jersey Girl would be your match. ;-D
I can't believe that I forgot....

Robbie Robertson...Ladder 49 (Soundtrack)
Shine Your Light (This was the song that helped me deal with grief when I lost my mom.)

Northwestcoaster....Your post was not lost in translation. :-D


Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:30:45 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Why are the Stones exempt? Ten good reasons:

I Just Want To Make Love To You

Honest I Do

I’m A King Bee

I Can’t Be Satisfied

Little Red Rooster

Look What You’ve Done

Love in Vain

I Got The Blues

Stop Breakin’ Down

Champagne & Reefer



Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:07:31 CET 2014 from (58.104.16.142)

Posted by:

Wallsend

If discussion of topics that have already been talked about is going to be discouraged here this site will die. Also, with all due respect to long term posters, I think it is a mistake to discourage new people from joining the conversation. It may be those people want to discuss well worn topics but why does it matter. Personally, I am not interested in talking about the writing credits issue. I have looked at all the evidence I could find and formed an opinion. If someone else has also looked at all the evidence and formed a different opinion, that is OK with me but unless new evidence comes to light (such as a document with hand written lyrics which is an early version of a song) I don't see much point in pursing it. I don't think this is the case with other areas which are more subjective and based on our interpretations. I am not a fan of the reformed Band but I am interested to read Ben's views because he is. People have been productively chewing over Shakespeare for 400 years. It is good to have a 20 year anniversary of this site but we still have a way to go to catch up.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 21:05:53 CET 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Location: Metro Van

Subject: Levon's glove

Wallsend, that article was extremely interesting and informative. It also mentioned in passing something I've always wondered about. In photos of concerts taken in Levon's last years he is wearing a glove. Does anyone know why? I don't remember it ever being mentioned here, and I thought it maybe had something to do with his treatments, but really have no idea. Does anybody know?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 20:37:21 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

I am amazed at the quantity (and quality) of the posts lately.I think many people came to The Band via The Last Waltz which gets a lot of plays on TV so it is a portal and a lot of rumors and garbage gets through along with the "the good stuff'

Thank you Wallsend, I had not seen that .Despite the years gone by they are still getting press and have a lot of people involved in posting


Entered at Sat Mar 22 19:26:05 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Peter, why are the Stones given special treatment?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 18:06:04 CET 2014 from (70.30.113.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Yeah . . . or, "Hey, Lee, what's Robbie up to these days?"


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:58:44 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Who did what.

On a serious side...

Get a musicologist. Analyze melodies, chords, instruments they play, harmonies, bridges, rhytm etc. Get a literature scientist. Analyze words, phrases, grammar, dialect, tradition, nursery rhymes, hymns etc. - They do it every day.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:54:36 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Plausable scenario.........

........"Hey Lee.......plodding, man, plodding .......excellent.......can I have your autograph ?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:44:41 CET 2014 from (70.30.113.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Elmore article

That was an interesting link from Wallsend. I'm trying to perceive what sort of fan might have provoked Levon into signing a "Fuck you — Levon Helm" autograph inscription. Plausible, I suppose, but I'm thankful I wasn't one of them.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:33:28 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, "stately" if we like it. Plodding if it's slightly boring. Turgid and lumpen if it's British and not The Rolling Stones.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:16:05 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, there is not the remotest link between RR's fulfillment of his songwriting potential and Richard's. RR wrote a boatload of songs that people found of the highest order and as moving as anything he wrote on the Big 3. You've seen many posters here list those songs and describe those feelings.

On the other hand, Richard stopped writing.

Just my opinion.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 17:10:53 CET 2014 from (213.205.241.240)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Plodding amnesty

Peter, I'll concede plodding in lieu of your U2 correction. For very workmanlike pub blues, though, I shall reserve the right to use "turgid" and "lumpen". I like "lumpen". A good, round "nutty" word.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 16:54:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If we call regular R&B "Stately" rather than "plodding" we may achieve peace and harmony. Anyway, I was just listening to "Carny" OST and "Rained Out" struck me. While written and produced by Robbie, he doesn't play guitar on it. It is a stately blues, but then listen to what happens to it in the last 30 seconds. Innovation on a well-known genre … that takes us to bits of much later work … and bits of the Alex North side of "Carny" point forward to RRs curated modern classical selections for Shutter Island.

Will there ever be a solo compilation of the soundtrack songs? There's plenty of it.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 16:31:57 CET 2014 from (213.205.241.240)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: NRBQ

Now, there's a feud we haven't exhausted. Anybody know what happened there? We don't get much news on Uncle Q this side of the puddle, but it seems that Joey S was reluctant to ditch the project he started during Terry's illness and recuperation, but is a little bit off at Terry using the name for his own unit. Any clarification out there?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 15:46:24 CET 2014 from (64.114.196.114)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Agree

I agree with Kerrin that the level of discussion in the past few days expressing opinions about songwriting and about individual albums has been in the main interesting and amicable. The contributions from most have been informative and enlightening. Its what I come here for. I learn more about music from the musicians here and music lovers at this site than I could ever learn from critics and books. What comes out of the mutual love and respect for The Band is a discussion of the currency of recent (last 40-50 years) music in terms of its relationship to the central theme (The Band) and that is vital to the continued success of this GB. We are getting back to where we used to be and moving forward from that. Jeff. I agree. If one senses that some want to reinvent that discussion, it harms this site and all who participate. But I think 'the feud' (if there ever was one - business is business, and sometimes it stinks. Most of us have been there in one form or another) is left behind for us and we should keep it there.(far behind). Lets keep discussing what we feel and how we hear it and enrich each other with those opinions. And again, repel the addiction of comparison if possible. (I know I'm repeating myself but this addiction is fatal to my sensibilities).


Entered at Sat Mar 22 15:19:58 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.235)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Great posts from RTO and BEG recently, great article link from Wallsend, too.

Jeff A., with all due respect the way I read things no-one was discussing "the feud", specifically the songwriting credits, until you suggested that we were. The conversation was generally about the consistency of Robbie's writing over time, and the state of the reunion Band's preferred setlists. Maybe I missed something. It was an amicable discussion which I enjoyed, but fair play to the senior posters here who have been through it all a hundred times before. I agree it's not a productive subject matter, but hey, this is a fan site for a long defunct band, I'm not sure what else we should be talking about. We can post about how great the Brown Album was, or how bad Islands was if you like, it still can't be called productive. We can also talk about the players as though they were geniuses without fault, that seems to be the least productive option of all.

It's a shame that the only truly "safe" territory here seems to be non-Band music, or, as someone said earlier: "back to the ice hockey!"


Entered at Sat Mar 22 14:34:16 CET 2014 from (213.205.241.240)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG re Tedeschi Trucks

Oh, thank heaven. I'm glad somebody else isn't feeling it there, especially when either of them are excellent without the other!

The TT Band is just too big and sprawling, isn't it? And too cluttered sounding for my ears.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 13:39:23 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Photo inside BAM magazine.

Wallsend....Not sure if that article has passed paths here, but a very telling one anyway. Thanks for bringing it here.

It's too bad the special that was aired on our BRAVO channel here wasn't shown in the US or Europe. When Levon talked about getting co-credit for the weed song....He basically said that Larry wrote it but he was given credit because.....Hmmmmm.....I need to see it again but I was told they don't know when they'll air it again. Oh well.......The drama lives on.

I was thinking about Bands I've never seen that mean something to me:

The Band
Toots and The Maytals
Patti Smith Group
CCR

Also, my partner and I really dig Motown.....so we meet there too.

RTO....I forgot to say that during my six day visit to NYC.....Besides the two night Eric Clapton Guitar Fest......I saw the Rascals!!!!!!!!!!! The other nights I saw the musical "Once" and a dance company.....My absolute fave is the Alvin Ailey Dance Company.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 13:32:06 CET 2014 from (92.18.160.142)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Bob Dylan & The Band "Before The Waves 1974" Artist Review

Taken from www.nodepression.com


Entered at Sat Mar 22 13:27:39 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Link is to cover of BAM magazine. I sent this scan to JH years ago.

RTO: Yes indeed I saw Gary Clark Jr.!! He has the IT factor and the dirty blues going on.....not hard on the eyes either. When I saw him perform....I think both nights....I kept thinking.....Ok, he's going to be the one who is going to bring the blues to a younger generation as Robert Cray brought it for me. Yes, I know.....very different artists for sure!

Ben...Yiiiiikes! I forgot my partner and I saw other musicians over the last decade but we didn't pay to see them as we'd sit outside the tent at Nathan Phillip's Square to listen to....Mavis Staples.....He digs her. Trucks/Tedeschi Band....He wanted to leave after a couple of songs. That night there was too much fusion stuff going on and even I wasn't feeeeelin' it, but I really enjoyed Derek on stage at Eric Clapton's Guitar Fest. We also saw Dr. John and we were very disappointed here too......My partner did turn me onto Roy Hargrove's trumpet playing.

The one reggae group that he's seen that I keep missing is Toots and The Maytals. He also likes South Side Johnny and the Asbury Jukes who I've seen as well in Toronto and New Jersey....Betty Lavette and he did stand in line to see Aretha Franklin in town for free again....lol....If you were very underemployed you'd understand. In general......I wish he would be a Band fan....too late for that. We respect our differences. I'm definitely the more flexible and open minded one when it comes to music. Ohhhhhh and I forgot again as this one was was quite the painful experience. We did go together for a weekend in Simcoe to Rick Danko's first Tribute. Luckily he didn't say a word as the concert was on with Terry Danko and others.....As soon as it was finished.......Let's just say he wasn't a happy camper. After that night I decided......He can stay at home. Luckily I'm independent enough that I can go alone or with friends but a lot of them even who can afford it don't want to pay a lot to see musicians....probably because they don't know the music as I do. If Northern Girl lived in town we'd be out all the time.

I will say Ben that the many times I did see Levon peform with the Barn Burners, Blues Cruise in NYC with Sumlin, Johansen......Jeff Healey, Garth Hudson and Ronnie Hawkins, Levon Helm Band...........ALL FANTASTIC SHOWS.....except.......I didn't have as a good a time with the Levon Helm Band.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 13:10:42 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Levon article

Wallsend, that was a very interesting article on Levon. I really don't understand the merchandiing strategy at Levon Helm studios. They have over 200,000 followers on facebook. I would imagine the could sell a hell of a lot more cd's, dvd's and downloads of concerts than pendants and t-shirts. And they have released things from earlier in Levon's career, The Rco All-stars live cd and they exclusively sold The Band three of a kind set, so theoretically they could release things from various eras of Levon's career. Unfortunately, you can't post a question on their website. They had a guestbook years ago, but I don't think it was very active. Nothing compared to this guestbook.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 11:08:50 CET 2014 from (213.205.241.240)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Reading the credits and trusting your ears

Pat/Todd: if you do both things you suggested, you get somewhere pretty close.

Whatever you make of it, over the last couple of days we've all pretty much agreed that Levon was happiest in a traditional R&B format. So read the credits to Jemima Surrender and Strawberry Wine, and you see Levon listed there. Now trust your ears, and sure enough there's a classic chugging rock and roll guitar underpinning both.

Now look at King Harvest. Totally unlike anything else that'd gone before. All the instruments play parts in the whole, but no more so than a great musician would bring to the table when playing on a record and wanting to do their own talents justice as well as the song they are playing.



Entered at Sat Mar 22 10:42:12 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: (Link is to David Crosby's Hero)

I hadn't seen that article, Wallsend, Some specifics there on money I'd never seen. I don't know about the "insult to the South."

Rob The Organ made a good point about 80s/90s production … if you never went there, you sound more contemporary now. But … we have the Sound of the 60s and The Sound of the 70s as popular radio shows here. TV does The Sound of the 70s. We all have nostalgia for the music of our teens, the first dance, the first date, the first gig. We all know that The Sound of the 80s is starting to get the nostalgia glow, and soon we'll be getting all those British weedy boys with weedy synths and big stereo drum tracks nonstop. Though I have said before, 1982 is one of those key years with a mountain of great songs. We could list some later. It goes into 1983. It's the birth of CD too.

So the sound of the 80s. Jupiter Hollow has the richly layered synths. But it was 1975 and Garth Hudson, so just ten years ahead of its time!

I was thinking about that 80s and 90s sound yesterday after a conversation. If I wanted to show the virtues, I'd play Fallen Angel and Somewhere Down The Crazy River, then follow the Peter Gabriel connection to Don't Give Up.

I'm in a "pre-Toppermost" phase of listening to David Crosby solo stuff. Yesterday I was listening to "Thousand Roads" and Hero from 1993 is an example. Six months after the record, Crosby re-did it live on "It's All Coming Back To Me Now." I was going back and forth between the two versions. The studio version is sung with Phil Collins, who produced it and played drums, percussion and keyboards with Pino Palladino on bass. The live version is the touring band, so loses that big early 90s production. Both are great. Try the studio one linked.

Phil Collins is due a bit of reappraisal too after years as the butt of musician putdowns. There was a point when I was doing a lot of travelling on Virgin Atlantic, and all you got before take off and after landing was an unceasing diet of Phil Collins, so I kind of associated him with sticky planes and cramped spaces and stress. He deserves a "listen without prejudice" session. Maybe tomorrow.

Oh, and I saw on Wiki that Phil Collins funded David Crosby's life-saving transplant in 1994.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 10:07:16 CET 2014 from (58.104.18.190)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I don't know if this article has been discussed here or not. I only saw it recently. Some interesting information eg. Levon would not sing Dixie after TLW because he said it insulted the South.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 08:57:19 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: songs post stage fright

I don't think Robbie's song writing dropped off after Stage Fright but I think the context changed. "The Band" was the pinnacle for sure as both the song writing and performances were top notch and more consistent than MFBP. (I've never been a huge fan of The Weight but the performance here was amazing as it was on TLW), Looking forward - the likes of Ophelia, Knockin Lost John, Acardian Driftwood, Life Is A Carnival , Thinking Out Loud or Evangeline would have fitted right in on "The Band" or "Stage Fright". As compositions they're maybe better than Look Out Cleveland or even Up On Cripple Creek. Other songs such as Right as Rain, It Makes No Difference wouldn't fit as they are different types of songs - but none the lesser for it. Even Pepote Rouge stands up pretty well - the lyrics are no weirder than those in The Weight - and the performance is pretty good to. I wonder if Rag Mama Rag would have been so wildly regarded if it appeared on Islands or as an out take.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 08:33:06 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great discussion last night while I was asleep! You know in the twenty years of the GB there has been a shift on the albums, because people used to quote the first TWO as perfect and I strove with others to add Stage Fright to the perfection list. Well, it made it. So we are moving in the right direction. THREE down, six to go, to misquote Jesse Winchester, a guy who made a perfect album himself. Produced by Robbie Robertson too., with Levon playing.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 06:35:22 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Strawberry Wine

I wish it were as simple as reading the credits, but even that can be a tricky thing sometimes.
Just as a quick example, the recent release of Live At The Academy of Music 1971 (which is excellent, and I’ve been enjoying very much) has a list of credits in the book which reads:

“All songs composed by Robbie Robertson except:”

It then goes on to list all of the songs that include other writers, and lists their names. The songs include:

‘This Wheel’s on Fire’
‘Life Is A Carnival’
‘Don’t Do It’
‘The Genetic Method’
‘(I Don’t Want To) Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes’
‘Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever’
‘I Shall Be Released’
‘Down In The Flood’
‘When I Paint My Masterpiece’
‘Don’t Ya Tell Henry’
‘Like A Rolling Stone’

Unfortunately ‘Strawberry Wine’ is not included in that list, which should have been another listed songwriting credit for Levon. I’m sure it was just an oversight…..mistakes happen, we’re all human. But this is supposed to be the definitive document of the event, and it’s the first time that ‘Strawberry Wine’ has been issued in connection with the Rock of Ages Concerts. Seems odd that it’s not included with the other song credits. It’s possible it’s listed somewhere, but I can’t find it.

From now on, I’m going to trust my ears, and that is my way of making peace with any feud related issues. But reading the credits can be helpful too…….some of the time.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 06:20:27 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Pat

Pat, you seem to have misinterpreted me once again. Here's the actual quote "People often commment about Richard not fulfilling his promise as a songwrite after the first couple of albums. Frankly, I think you can easily make the same point about Robbie after the third album."

The idea of Richard drying up as a songwriter has been mentioned many times on this guestbook. My quote doesn't take any position on that. It just refers to it. I stand by my quote about Robbie. I don't think he wrote anything after 'Stage Fright' that was at the same level. Did he write some good songs after that, yes. But in my view he never reached the peak of the first three albums. I'll re-state my contention that other songwriters produced work at the highest level over a far longer period. Dylan, Lou Reed, Richard Thompson, Ray Davies, Van Morrison and Leonard Cohen off the top of my head. That's a pretty elite group of songwriters, I think most would agree. Is that really a slam at Robbie. I don't think so. All of the above mentioned artists have much larger catalogs than Robbie and didn't take ten years off in their early 30's. That's simply a fact.

BEG, I enjoyed your post. My wife bought me tickets to see Levon two years in a row. Once in Atlantic city and once in Woodstock. Both shows ere amazing. Particularly, the show in Woodstock. I am very grateful to have made the pilgrimage up there. We got front row seats in front of Levon's drumkit which was pretty amazing.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 06:01:07 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yeah, Kevin, quit quoting people.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:52:23 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Peace In The Fucking Valley say I. Good night:-)


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:49:43 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin- i thought it was quite obvious- the only reason Friend0 came out to play was to try to avert what the fuck has been going on here and worse.. It worked quite nicely for a minute.

The bullshit can continue, people can pull out quotes to support any position with enough tunnel vision applied......

it's a fucking cancer and Banditis should be a passion for The Band's music. This disease has to be called something else. NonMelodic Chronic ReOcurring Feudal Fungus - fucked if i know yet, but there's some kind of name for this malarkey..

What was it that the doctor in that Tom Robbins book was using to cure cancer?


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:48:51 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, the answer is even simpler. Read the credits.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:43:05 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I will ......good to have you back, Jeff.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:39:00 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Organic Farming

I don't know what the agreements and deals were between the guys, but the way some people present it, it makes it sound like The Band was Robbie and four session guys who were just there to do their job.

Can't say that I'm on board with that. If that's the case, then It seems that the boys from U2 got more respect than the guys from the original Band. I'm not sure what the correct word to wrap around that would be, but insane has been tossed around, so let's go with that.

Personally, I don't think the answer can be found in a book, an interview, or in GB debates. The truth can be found within the grooves of the records and will reveal itself if listened to with the right kind of ears. They never would have achieved the previously heralded 3 album masterpiece status with a conventional songwriter session guy relationship. It had to have been more organic than that. Just listen to the records. It's all there.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:26:09 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff

Kevin- in 94 and 95 i was in a whirlwind with an Israeli woman who looked like a combo of Raquel and Sophia. Nuff said.

Come visit on one of your trips.....


Entered at Sat Mar 22 05:05:34 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"And if you are teaching the song to your cohorts- I THiNK IT IS SAfe to say that is not what happened in The Band" - Jeff A

Listen to the demo of "Twilight" or read these quotes from people who were there and who know, Jeff.......

“Robbie was the one who wrote the lyrics and wrote the music. Wrote the lyrics on legal paper, or whatever he wrote it one, and figured out the chords to the song and dictated the melody and the chords to the other players” – John Simon, The Producer on the first two Band albums and considered its “6th member”

“I don’t want to speak ill of the dead, but in the three critical years of The Band’s ascendance, I was there every day. Robbie worked writing at the piano or guitar every day. In the first couple of years Richard and Rick did some writing as well. By the third album, only Robbie was taking the time and effort to write. The boys showed up at the recording studio and learned the tunes.”- Jon Taplin – Manager of The Band 68-71

Btw, I missed and preferred PutEmUp(FriendO to Jeff A as the latter would never have posted about Raquel Welch )


Entered at Sat Mar 22 04:51:14 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

RTO - the discussion was there. Right where it is....And you certainly solidified it right where it is too. Denying it won't change it..

To your last statement- It's apparent that, for lots of reason, after the first couple records things took a drastic change in that regard.. I'm done with this discussion.

Sadavid- I;m sure it was quite frustrating when people you turned on to The Band declared their music country music. I've been in similar situations...


Entered at Sat Mar 22 04:39:04 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jeff

Jeff, my situation doesn't remotely compare artistically, operationally or commercially with The Band. That wasn't what I was saying at all. I was merely responding to Ben's assertion that we all praise Robbie and dish the dirt out to Levon, by way of commenting that the wind often blows the other way here too. I don't actually recall the old songwriting royalties argument being dragged out again at all until your post then - and in my earlier response to Ben I was outlining the size of the body of work RR had done not how much money he made from it, and having been in bands where I'm the only writer, I take my hat off to him for it, especially at that standard. In my own set up I generally give out demos of finished arrangements to learn as they are, so there's no grey areas on who wrote the song, at what point was it finished etc.

Now that you mention co-writing analogies, though, it does seem funny how all these ideas and styles that could be called co-writing by some never seemed to be forthcoming when Robbie wasn't there with a ready made lyric and rough outline. You'd have thought other writing partnerships would have sprung up with all those co-writers around the place, especially after the credits and money situation was apparent. Funny that.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 04:21:35 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, you wrote that Richard and Robbie had not lived up to their songwriting potential and inferred a degree of equality in the circumstances. I find that insane but it's only my opinion.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 04:06:01 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I've been studiously trying to avoid this and probably should stay the fuck out of it. but some of you guys are just plain old pushing it....RTO- as a songwriter - a songwriter should be able to see the difference between work for hire, arranging, and working up ones parts, and a group of guys who did all that, unpaid by the hour, song, or day- grew the songs together, and thought they were partners. Which was what Levon's story was how they expected songs to be copyrighted regarding the first couple records...Fine line, might come down to majority perception.... and if publishing was shared ONE COULD EASILY ARGUE SHARING THE PUBLISHING COVERED IT- BUT ONLY IF THAT WAS WHAT WAS AGREED TO . The issue is what was understood, or what was agreed to.... there's two sides to the bitch..... that's all i know, and that's how I think it has to be considered. Just my opinion, and i'm done. But RTO, if you are goign to look at it as a songwriter, that's the regard you shoudl be giving. And if you are teaching the song to your cohorts- I THiNK IT IS SAfe to say that is not what happened in The Band. i don't know your bandmates, but, unless your material is on a par, and unless you are dealing with guys on the level of Rick Richard, Garth, and Levon, what you are goign through would not be a fair comparison.

I've had a guitarist who is a big fan of my songwriting, someone i've worked with , a California guy, who has no affinity for RR and love for the others, tell me as a writer i should be on RR's side of the fence on this one. Guy then actually played Hound Dog 3 or 4 different ways, and said, hey- it's still the same song no matter how you play it..... i disagree with that statement cause it's not

i hope this discussion goes away cause it's really ridiculous at this point and how anyone sees the need to be dragging this old stuff out for a week again now is beyond me....

Maybe we need some good analogies again- what would you guys compare co writing to?

doubt Garth would ever say, but if the man would say what was understood or agreed to as to how songs were supposed to be copyrighted, that would be the answer.

Don't you people get tired of this....It;s all been argued endlessly so many times....


Entered at Sat Mar 22 04:03:09 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG re partner's musical taste

At least you got to Crossroads! Did you see Gary Clark Jr, I think some of his stuff is a real breath of fresh air to the blues guitar world. Loving that old school finger style approach allied to a mean, dirty electric tone.

Ten years since we got married, I suppose I should be grateful more than ever that I married a Springsteen fan really. It's not often an English chap meets a girl who's idea of a great night out is to catch a London date by Johnny and the Jukes...


Entered at Sat Mar 22 03:53:38 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band

RTO, I appreciate your post. I agree with much of it. I think your comments about the 8o's productions are insightful. Most of the greats did suffer through some badly over-produced studio albums at that time. Empire burlesque, Landing on water, Mistrial, Dog eat dog are a few that come readily to mind. Some artists like Van Morrison, Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon, Richard Thompson seem to escape the worst aspects of 80's production. But the terrible productions isn't the only issue I have with Robbie's debut. I just don't think the songs are very good.

Peter, I read your article about the Live at Lorelei dvd last weekend. Very interesting stuff. I find it hard to believe how badly that tour was mis-managed. If nothing else, what the Band needed at that time was strong management. Wasn't there some story floating around about Garth Brooks trying to get the Band signed to his management company during the 90's.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 03:53:35 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd the Plod

Location: Studville

Subject: Swimming Upstream

Ben, try not to take it too personally. It would be a boring world if everyone had the same opinion about something as subjective as music. Try not to get discouraged. Everyone who visits here has had some good times posting even if it gets bumpy at times.

GB Family at Large, One thing that I’ve noticed over the years, is that whenever anyone mentions that they enjoy a particular Band album from the reformed Band, or have enjoyed a particular live show, invariably someone else will say something like: “That’s great, I’m glad you had a good time, but you should know that no matter how good it was, it will never be as good as the first three albums or live shows from that era.”
That may very well be true, and probably is, but it’s a damn near impossible yardstick to measure up to for anybody, and in many ways should be irrelevant to the actual experience that was enjoyed in the present day.

But for better or worse, the first three-album era has become the benchmark. And if it has to be the benchmark for Levon, Rick, Richard and Garth, then it also has to be the benchmark for Robbie. Personally I feel they’ve all done some wonderful things post TLW, and I think that it would be nice to be able to enjoy those moments as they occur without the inevitable asterisk that invariably follows. Life didn’t end in 1976….it just transitioned into something else. We all have our personal leanings, tendencies, and biases, but I think that we all share a love of the group, as a whole, and I’m happy that they didn’t go into permanent retirement at the age of 35. When you have been blessed with a gift, you can’t keep it bottled up. We mere mortals have a hunger and a thirst.

Think of going out to dinner at one of your favorite restaurants. Sometimes the menu changes, sometimes the décor changes, sometimes there are staffing changes. But just because you had a great meal there in 1976, doesn’t mean that future meals can’t also be enjoyable. Yes, they may be different, but you’ll probably have a better time if you look for something that you like on the menu, rather than pointing out all the choices that you don’t like. Admittedly this is a clumsy analogy, but you get the idea.

In my opinion, Robbie has done some good stuff, and the others have done some good stuff, both individually and as a group. There’s no rule that says we have to like everything. But we should respect the fact that someone probably likes it. And there’s no rule that says we can’t like all of it. Can’t it be a win-win for everyone?

And I also would choose ‘Knockin Lost John’ from Islands as one of my favorite Band songs AND Robbie vocals. And I can’t even explain why. It just feels right.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 03:43:25 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Cahoots:

(Life Is A Carnival)...prefer Guru's live version
When I Paint My Masterpiece
4% Pantomime

Hi Ben. I really like how you're holding your own here. Although I don't agree with you re Robbie's solo work in general....I still dig how you're still willing to discuss your preferences. Remember the article I quoted Robbie where he used the example of comparing Louis Armstrong and Miles Davis. Robbie's response was that they're both amazing but the sound of Miles' trumpet resonated more with him. That's all that's happening here. I'm very comfortable in expressing what makes me pay attention and what doesn't. Even if this whole GB said I was nuts for digging Robbie's music....I'd just turn up the volume louder! ;-D Also, the list of songwriters you shared....including Louuuu....Van......Dylan, Joni, Neil Young....
Graham Parker...."I stand up for liberty, but I cannot liberate."
We're on the same page here musically.
My partner doesn't even like The Band and can't stand Levon's voice....so there ya go.....His heroes are Miles Davis and Muddy Waters....but he does dig Van's music and reggae. I think the only artists we've seen together are Buddy Guy, Third World, Donna The Buffalo, Blackie and The Rodeo Kings. At Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival he would have thoroughly enjoyed all the blues and jazz musicians.....but not the others.....so I went on my own.....very expensive but......no regrets.......none whatsoever. Anyway, no one's right or wrong.....We just have different musical sensibilties.

Kevin J and Peter...I just listened to U2 with Robbie. I don't take anything back. The songs stay on my list. I'm not even a fan of U2. I only have one of their recordings....Joshua Tree.....I don't like Shake This Town as I don't find it well crafted at all. I really enjoyed Straight Down The Line with the Roots band only. I think Robbie should take them on the road with him. Yes! They can play with him and take.....Robert Randolph!!!!! Robbie was in his element on Jimmy Fallon's show that night!!!!! Ohhhh, la, la! I would however add....Sonny Got Caught In The Spotlight with Rick however.

Wallsend...Here's what Robbie has to say in BAM re collaboration with U2 as musicians.

Chris Willman: "The way you trade off vocals with Bono on "Sweet Fire Of Love" is probably the closest comparison to the Band approach to handling vocals."

Robbie Robertson: "Yeah. Usually when people sing together it's a man and a woman; they do that Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell thing. When people who do it now, it's kind of gooey sounding. But the idea of two men squaring off on a song appealed to me, and it not only appealed to me in the vocal part of it, but to then take it to the guitar part of it, where at the end, Edge and I square off...I don't mean in a duel sense; I mean back to back.

It was really a great musical experience, mixing these worlds together and just seeing what the hell will this be? The idea of experimenting was very exciting for us. They rose to the occasion and gave it just everything they could. It was just wonderful working with them. There was no weirdness, like "What are we doing this for?" - nothing. Nobody held back a drop."

"But everything you leave behind
Catches up in another time"


Entered at Sat Mar 22 03:36:59 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Ben

Actually Ben, it wasn't that long ago that if you dared to knock any of the boys you were gone from this sight. There was a lot of downright rude and ignorant comments made about some of the boys and it was wrong. That's not what this site is about. I think that people have learned that there is a way to criticize fairly and keep the conversation flowing in a civil manner. It seems to me that this is happening now. Last week Jan deleted some posts that he felt were going in the wrong direction and before they got out of hand he stopped it. After 20 years he knows when things are about to go south! I think it's called flaming. That stuff has no point here. If anyone wants to stand up and scream at another poster 'yeah but he did this and he did that' just take it private and vent in an e-mail to that poster. Most here are willing to give up their e-mail. Some of the shit that's gone down here over the years has been downright rude and we've all paid for it in one way or another such as people leaving the site and never coming back. Every one must remember that we all look at things differently and you can't just jam your own personal thoughts down others throats. Thank god that Robbie's son has a thick skin and realizes this because if any one has a reason to say 'Fuck You' to this site. It's him. And Ben my friend, this is not aimed at you. It's for all of us. Respect, Carl


Entered at Sat Mar 22 03:03:29 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Diff'rent strokes

Ben, I think Peter nailed a lot in his "times they are a changing" vibe earlier. I've got your back covered on not being hugely into NLSC, and if necessarily I'll stand alone with you on it. But hear this one out. Production is like make up and hairdo. You can show a 1985 picture of your pick of the world's most beautiful actresses, and go "Christ, she looks awful!". And it isn't the actress, who is stunning. It's the bubble perm, eye-liner and shoulder pads that look awful. Such is the case with much 80s production work on records. Time has not been kind to it, but at the time the warm sound of a (say) Small Faces single would have been old hat, and those electronic drums, oodles of digital stadium reverb and punchy synths in lieu of horns were quite the kiddie.

You can rake this over all day, I know, and I've not remotely done anything but state the obvious here. But I think there's a lot of this given that the band we all talk about split up in the latter half of the seventies, and the "evil eighties" was when a lot of the solo albums were made.

The Stones were making records like Dirty Work. The Grateful Dead were making records like Shakedown Street and Go To Heaven. The atrocities committed by an aggregate that loosely could once have been called Jefferson Airplane don't even bear thinking about.

Somebody yesterday (Todd, I think) pointed out that in these times it wasn't easy for the rootsy end of successful musicians, and I think it can be equally said that those who at least maintained a fairly senior profile were up against the fashion of the times in the gloss that was layered on albums. I'm sure some of Robbie's work falls into that camp. Levon, of course, had it easier because of his bluesy nature. You don't smother a blues album in studio trickery, you mic everybody up, tidy it up and keep it "real". We've discussed the merits of bluesy music, whether it is less demanding to rehearse and play etc but one thing you can generally say is that there were less subsequently unfashionable production techniques on blues records. That's a huge advantage in retrospect, and I bet the sound of the RCO album, far less fatiguing to listen to, is part of what draws you to it vs Storyville, for instance.

A mate once said that everything wrong about the eighties was the way you'd start off with a half decent song, give it to a manufactured combo (he used Bucks Fizz as an example) and suck the joy out of it, apply a load of synths and click tracks and suck the groove out if it, and so on until nothing was left except a "product". He then added that "if you'd have written Making Your Mind Up, then given it to a nice Tex Mex combo with accordion and twangy guitar, or a band like NRBQ, or the Fabulous Thunderbirds, it would have been a killer...". He's not wrong. There's an awful lot of great songs from that era smothered by the fashion of the times. The opposite applies: I heard Shakin' Stevens "This Ole House" on the jukebox down the pub tonight and thought what a fantastic sounding record it was, because it wasn't typical of the era.

And the first few Band albums never had this problem of fashionable production, did they? They took a sound appropriate to the songs, a very natural sound, which wasn't the fashion - think of all the stereo trickery and wah wah guitars on a Hendrix record. But think of the way the music business changed throughout the seventies into a cash cow, you got far less artistic freedom by the eighties, or in the case of acts that'd been going 15 years or so, they often welcomed a chance to sound contemporary rather than old hat. Who'd have guessed that the J. Geils Band would ever have a hit, some ten years after they started making album market records?

Ben, I understand and respect your points - I think NLSC is a little over-produced and in itself suffers from the kind of issues that so badly marr the albums of an era slightly later - and it isn't one I play very often - but there's some great songs on it. I think you also have to remember that after Cahoots was a disappointment to many, for whatever reason, then a live album of old songs and a new album of covers followed, people were so pleased to actually see a new Band studio LP at all, let alone one with songs like It Makes No Difference and Ophelia thereupon.

I share your pain though. I'm a Deadhead who doesn't much care for anything after Pigpen died. Boy, that's earned me some flak over the years! As for canonising Robbie, but dishing out criticism to Levon, trust me it's often been the other way around here. I was a serious "pink scarf abuse" advocate, used to say it all went wrong when Robbie got a posh haircut and started playing fancy Strats with a fuzz pedal....! I have shifted my position over the years, having started writing myself rather than just being a musician who plays what gets dished out to learn, and the job RR had on his hands was not enviable, once Richard - my absolute hero - stopped sharing the workload. I think Levon was a great musician and a guy you could sit with a beer and jaw with for years, but I'll bet he was a stubborn old so and so, and no less loveable for it.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 02:52:34 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I agree re comparisons. That's the point I was trying to make obliquely by asking a few days ago what's the best golf club. RtO: Good for you, defending ""Cahoots". A terrific album on its own terms.


Entered at Sat Mar 22 02:46:43 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Once And For All! ...Levon playing plodding blues- NEVER!!

Nodding blues, well, it happened....


Entered at Sat Mar 22 00:48:43 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

I consider The Band's first two albums just about perfect. Certainly two of the finest rock albums ever released. I consider Stage Fright to be very strong. Just a notch down from the brown album. But, Cahoots was a massive letdown to me. I've listened to it over and over through the years hoping that it would reveal itself, but it never has. 'Life is a carnival' is the one shining song on that album. But as a joint composition, I didn't include it among Robbie's songs. 'smoke signal' and 'the river hymn' pale next to anything from the first three albums in my opinion. 'Moondog Matinee' was a huge improvement over 'Cahoots' but it was a covers album. I don't share others love for 'Northern Lights-Southern Cross'. There are some good songs on it, Ophelia, It makes no difference, no question. It's certainly far better than 'Cahoots', but it's not consistent and not nearly as strong as the first three. I think it might have been overrated at the time of its release as a relief that it wasn't Cahoots revisited.

It does seem like there is a double standard in this guest book when it comers to criticizing Robbie. For some reason it's perfectly acceptable to rip apart Levon, for his bitterness or lack of rehearsing or musical laziness, but when someone dares to criticize Robbie, there's an immediate questioning of their sanity, thanks Pat B.

I don't find the fact That Robbie's solo works have so little of the beauty, warmth and feeling of The Band's works as a positive thing, no matter how people try to spin it. When I want a Band fix, I may well play something by Rick or Levon. If I want to listen to something that sounds nothing like The Band, I have lots of other artists to select besides Robbie.

Look, I was excited when his first album was released and enjoyed it at the time. I listed to it recently and found it a victim of horrible 80's over production and strained lead vocals with lost of guests trying to hold it together. I agree that 'Storyville' was a bit more coherent than the debut. I don't think any of his subsequent work was much better. There are many other songwriters who have maintained a high standard over a long period of time, Dylan, Paul Simon, Lou Reed, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Ray Davies, Pete Townshend, Leonard Cohen and yes Graham Parker. I don't see Robbie in this category. I think he had a brilliant burst of songs on the first 3 albums, but little since then has approached that peak. Once again, this is strictly my opinion. I realize that some people here have a differences of opinion, but I would appreciate not being attacked for expressing an honest opinion.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 23:52:11 CET 2014 from (217.137.6.242)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bono

Ha ha...


Entered at Fri Mar 21 23:36:58 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No problem, Rob … I'll take U2 out too. Can't stand them.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 22:39:53 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: sadavid

Beautiful post and an example of this GB at its finest.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 22:38:23 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Peter V

Sorry matey, I'm with Kevin on this one. U2 are quite convinced of their artistic worth already without somebody genuinely worthy like RR inflating this by asking them to appear.



Entered at Fri Mar 21 22:34:11 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Everything on BEG's list essential......

Except “Sweet Fire of Love”...... Good God....having U2 anywhere near the album still rankles!……………..I would also add “Sonny Got Caught By the Moonlight” from Album 1 and “Shake This Town” and” Night Parade” on album 2, and “Straight Down the Line” from HTBC...............other than that........well done brown eyed girl!


Entered at Fri Mar 21 22:04:30 CET 2014 from (99.108.40.237)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Location: Central Illinois

Subject: NL-SC

NL-SC positively a 5 star album with prolly the coolest front cover of all time.........talk about hipsters. Man, made me want to hop a freight train to Shangri-La. Jupiter Hollow was truly Garth's masterpiece and I still get goose bumps just thinkin bout Richard's Hobo Jungle.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 21:53:13 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

Without comparing it to anything else, I'll just say that this song moves me every time I hear it. It's very mysterious to me, and a little unnerving (my normal EKG, emotionally speaking, is pretty much flat-line).

I think it has a lot to do with what we might call the power of economy, where a handful of words opens up a whole world of Truth:

Try to raise a family
End up the enemy

That's craft, and art, and genius.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 21:44:41 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie solo

Everything on BEG's list is essential.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 21:30:00 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Islands:
Let The Night Fall
Right As Rain


Entered at Fri Mar 21 21:23:58 CET 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR SONGS

I always liked Knocking Lost John too.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 21:14:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

:-D Thanks so much Wallsend. What's great about new energy here is that there's more possibility for different things to come our way like today. Thank you!
Btw, the mag was free.....lol.....but I had to pay 12.00 on eBay. Article is around 12 pages.

If I want to hear music by The Band.....I don't want any bands who are wannabe bands who want to sound like.....The Band. The five musicians who made up the Band cannot be replaced or imitated. Jim Weider is a sweet guy. I briefly met him via hard core Levonistas in NYC at a Guru show. He cannot play like Robbie Robertson as no one can. They can all try and imitate but.......nooooo........

I'm very fortunate that I really dig Robbie's solo work.....Yes I do! Out of all the Band members.....It is his solo work that I am drawn to. The first time I met Robbie I think I told him that Contact From The Underworld Of Redboy is my favourite because it is the most rebellious work he's done. I really dig How To Become Clairvoyant as well, but for different reasons....Now we're getting to experience how Robbie really feeeeels about personal matters. Another reason I dig these recordings more than the usual ones most of you like is because........They do not sound like The Band! If I wanted his solo work or the other Band members' work to sound Band like.......Heck! Put on the music of The Band and enjoy the real ting mon! As my Rasta buddies would say, "It's so hard to reason wid you." ;-D

Faves from Robbie's solo work

Storyville:
Hold Back The Dawn
What About Now
Breakin' The Rules

Robbie Robertson:
Fallen Angel
Showdown At Big Sky
Broken Arrow
Sweet Fire Of Love
American Roulette
Somewhere Down The Craaaaazy River

Robbie Robertson and The Red Road Ensemble:
Ghost Dance
Golden Feather
Words Of Fire, Deeds Of Blood
Cherokee Morning Song (taught this one to the kidzz in a round)

Contact From The Underworld Of Redboy:
The Code Of Hansome Lake
MAKING A NOISE
Unbound
Sacrifice
In The Blood

How To Be Clairvoyant:
When The Night Was Young
He Don't Live Here No More
The Right Mistake
This Is Where I Get Offffffff
She's Not Mine
Won't Be Back

Scrooged (Soundtrack):
Christmas Must Be Tonight

Jimmy Hollywood (Soundtrack):
Bad Intentions
The Far Lonely Cry Of Trains

Any Given Sunday (Soundtrack):
Amazing Grace (Instrumental)
Out Of The Blue (Instrumental)
Carry Me

Phenomenon (Soundtrack):
Craaaaazy Love (Aaron Neville with one of Robbie's most beautiful and other worldly guitar playing of all time..harmonics and sheer beauty and love)

King Of Comedy:
Between Trains

Carny:
I am still waiting for two posters here to send me Robbie's songs.

"The more we take
The less we become"


Entered at Fri Mar 21 20:30:35 CET 2014 from (58.104.18.190)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Subject: BEG

Thanks BEG, this one is for you.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 20:09:19 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Comparison is problematic for me

I'm going to say something herein that I have said before, but perhaps in a more coherent fashion. We humans have an addiction which is problematic. It is the need to compare something to something else to establish its worth. To me, this is a concern. Music, like other art forms, should be judged on its own and not be placed next to some other piece to decide 'which is better'. This is a futile exercise and diminishes the individual. The piece stands on its own or falls on its own. If judged by this standard, the songs of RR stand up extremely well. What is the point of saying 'the others were so wonderful, these newer ones are not". I think that this is a failing on our part. The constructive critic should judge each artistic endeavour independently. Just my opinion, and I stand by it.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:46:22 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: RR songs

You tell 'em Sebastian!!! I've been saying this until I'm hoarse. They are great songs by anyone standards.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:41:34 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

DJ Windy

Dang, that's only a mile from my studio but I have a family thing tonight. That photo of CC in Brooklyn is beautiful.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:19:12 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

The link is to a photo of what used to be our house DJ here at this site, headlining a sold-out Williamsburg Music Hall in Brooklyn, New York City, this week. He still listens to The Band ("Up on Cripple Creek", actually) in the limo on his way to gigs... Note to DJ Windy: He is playing on your home turf tonight, at The Mid.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:17:57 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Studland

Link to Studland just in case you think I made it up. It was probably named after my male ancestors … or perhaps because there was a "stud" of rock standing out in the sea.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:14:17 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: NLSC

The Times They Were A Changing around 1975, which is why NLSC never received its due. A 5-star album by anyone's standards, and indeed the 90s Band always did Ophelia and It Makes No Difference. But add Acadian Driftwood (Barney Hoskyns chose it as his favorite Band track of all), Forbidden Fruit and the incredible Jupiter Hollow … I seem to be the only one who raves about that song. But there's not a dud track on NLSC. (Though personally, I'm not sure about Smoke Signal, to be honest, Sebastian!)


Entered at Fri Mar 21 19:04:41 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO again!

Subject: Ben

I think with Robbie's solo albums you have to figure upon him not producing something particularly Band like for several reasons. A clean start at his own thing is one good reason. To take a parallel, look how the Marshall stacks and Gibson guitars of Cream were ditched for small Fender amps and a Strat when EC went solo just to get away from the same old sound and forge a new identity. With EC known as a guitarist, this was his voice and he wanted his own sound to start afresh. Robbie (though a fine, fine guitarist as we know) was by the time of his solo career known as a songwriter and thus his arrangements were his sound.

Secondly, without three distinctive and great "character" singers, an in-the-pocket drummer and a one-man-movie soundtrack behind a Lowrey console, if he had tried to throw out arrangements akin to The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down and Stage Fright all over again, he may not have had the best vehicle to make them come alive.

Rick Danko had it deceptively easy. As one of the magical lead voices and with a throw-the-rulebook away school of bass guitar (definitely as much of the irresistible heartbeat and engine room as Levon) he was actually in a far better position to inherit the basic sound of the OQ if armed with some great players, and you stick a guitarist like Blondie Chaplin on stage with Danko - himself a great singer, bringing material like Sail On Sailor into a live repertoire - and add Danko's fine solo LP to the pot and you've a winner there.

It is specifically the RCO All-Stars LP that disappointed me when I bought it, given the stellar cast. I thought it was very lazy, an album of bog-standard R&B that far lesser musicians could have served up, and I think this work ethic spilled into the reformed Band. As I said, Larry Campbell and Co were the breath of fresh air Levon needed. Thank heaven the old trooper went out riding high once again.



Entered at Fri Mar 21 18:43:23 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Ben/BEG

The above link might work better if you are not a Facebook user.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 18:37:40 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Graham Parker (Ben & BEG)/"The Great Songs" (Sebastian)

BEG/Ben: Link is a pic of yours truly with Bob Andrews of the Rumour. A fine player and a personal favourite, it was a pleasure to help him out and lend him my trusty old A100 for a London date. The band that night were Bob, Brinsley, Martin Belmont, Steve Goulding and noted London bassist John McKenzie. A certain Graham Parker got up for a few, and I got up and played piano on my old Brinsley Schwarz favourite "Surrender To The Rhythm".

Sebastian: Quite so on the songs like Ophelia (now there was the standard of bluesy songs the reformed act should have adhered to; with all those lovely Bessie Smith style "vamp" voicings) and Life is a Carnival. I don't think it is a simple matter of all the great songs drying up after the first three LPs, more a case that they were such a great opening triumvirate to knock the world sideways. After that, you are screwed. Anybody is. You serve up more of the same and it appears to be treading old ground again, less the perception of being fresh, and people find it to be okay or ho-hum. You change direction completely and you lose friends too. I think the old man was in a no-win situation there, and in effect a victim of his own high standards. It didn't help that the rest of the OQ were starting to get a little "funky" as it were. A great band firing on all cylinders is the perfect catalyst to want to churn out classic after classic, but momentum must have slowed down with lifestyle and work ethic choices around Cahoots.

A HUGE obstacle after the first three albums must have been just how good they were - I believe to this day without equal, even among the likes of the usual names like Little Feat and Van Morrison - real game-changers. It took me years to consider Stage Fright the last one of the big three rather than the one after the big two, and now it is my favourite album. Those three releases were big, big statements and to even get three out like that is an incredible achievement - two more than most quality acts manage, and at least one more than incredibly skilled and lucky quality acts - hence the old industry phrase "difficult third album" which is the fourth in the case of Robbie. Whatever he did would have had detractors - "one trick pony" or "lost the plot" depending on how different it was. Add the increasingly fragile state of the others and he did very well to get Cahoots out at all.

I've said this before and I'll say it again - Cahoots with a different name on the cover would have been raved about, taken on own merit rather than an eagerly awaited, microscope-analysed release from The Band, who'd unleashed this trademark feel and sound of old time roots wrapped up in a dynamic that was something vibrant and new (I liked Pat's "implied genre" phrase earlier; that's perfect). Nobody's saying (well, I'm not, anyway) that the great songs stopped after the first three albums, but the odds against future releases being viewed in the same light were so highly stacked given the body of work that had gone before, all with the advantage of being genuinely new, which by definition a fourth album cannot benefit from and subsequent releases even less so.

Be proud.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 18:23:47 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben, I realize it's your opinion and all but it seems insane.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:57:59 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Mr. Plod

I assume a connection between Mr. P and Inspector Doppler -- played by the great Alec Cawthorne in the wonderful film _Sleuth_ (Laurence Olivier / Michael Caine).


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:47:50 CET 2014 from (23.241.252.59)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Dad's songwriting...

Even though I've heard it a thousand times I'm always shocked when people think the great songs all stopped after Stage Fright. How 'bout Life Is A Carnival, Ophelia, It Makes No Difference, Acadian Driftwood, The River Hymn, Smoke Signal.. Obviously I could go on and on. I'd say most Bands don't have this many memorable songs in their careers let alone after the "great" songs all stopped....


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:43:38 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Say What.......

"People often commment about Richard not fulfilling his promise as a songwrite after the first couple of albums. Frankly, I think you can easily make the same point about Robbie after the third album." - Ben

Let's see......"Acadian Driftwood", "It Makes No Difference", "Twilight", "Ophelia", "Between Trains", "Broken Arrow", "Evangeline".....,,should I go on? Absurd to suggest that this is not "fulfilling promise" as a songwriter.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:36:55 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Perhaps what your saying is that Robbie grew and developed rather than carried on repeating the same sort of stuff. Most of the great songwriters do that. Tut Tut. Try "Storyville" again … it's the most "Band-like" solo record.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:34:44 CET 2014 from (174.226.0.46)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: What's in a name

Thanks for that background Peter. Knowing that Mr. Plod was from a place called "Studland" definitely makes it sound cooler!

Levon gave a great Interview in TLW film explaining how The Band's music came from the melting pot which gave us Rock and Roll. He also referred to Muddy Waters as the "king of country music". Sounds good to me.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:31:50 CET 2014 from (171.161.160.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Lots of interesting discussion going on. That's really nice to see. I am a long time Graham Parker fan. My point about his catalog is that it's remarkable to me, that someone who's considered a 'cult artist' with a fairly small fanbase has released so many live albums. Along the same line of thought, I find it interesting at the number of Danko live albums that have been released. I can't imagine that there's more demand for solo Danko than Band concerts from this period (80's and 90's).

Regarding my affinity for the reformed Band. It partially stems from my avid interst in listening to live recordings. Just take a look at the tape archive and concert list on this website. There are far more shows from the 80's and 90's circulating (and generally in better quality) than shows from the original quartet.

Todd, I think you've made some really good points. I agree with most of what you've said, particularly about Rick's affinity for blues and work with Paul Butterfield. The Butterfield connections with the Band (group and solo) are very strong. He appeared on the MUddy Waters Woodstock album that Levon co-produced. He performed at The Last Waltz. He joined with Levon in the RCo All-stars and then he played often wiith Rick and sometimes Richard. It's a shame that the RCO All Stars was so short lived. The studio album and the live album are excellent. It's too bad, that they didn't last another year or two, maybe Danko could have joined at that point after his second album was aborted. That would have been a killer line-up.

BEG, I agree very much with your psot about Robbie's mastery of the interview. He has does a masterfull job of PR to promote his solo projects. Unfortunately, none of his solo work holds a candle to his work with The Band in my opinion. It almost seems like they are the product of entirely different people. That's something that I would never say about Levon and Rick's solo works. I find far more continuity with the Band in their solo work than Robbie's. Again, this is just my opinion. I know there are many people who disagree.

People often commment about Richard not fulfilling his promise as a songwrite after the first couple of albums. Frankly, I think you can easily make the same point about Robbie after the third album.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 17:29:33 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: tagging The Band

Jeff A.: Back in the day when I would try to impress friends & family with the genius of The Band, they'd usually say something about how they didn't really like country music.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 16:24:30 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I agree, the OQ was untaggable.

Sorta separately- people have always asked me- what kind of music is this? Long as i recall, started around 12 years old, relatives would ask me what kind of music Poco or Dylan, or The Band was, i;d say- it's music. they'd ask again, insisting it had to be soemthing. I;d say There's no one name to describe it, it's lots of kinds of music mixed together. OF course, noone was buying it, but, it was the gawdamn truth.. With The Band, it was even more so.. they were the most inventive yet not novelty music...not trying to trailblaze, like a YES, or a DEVO, Just making music that made sense to them and mattered to them. drawing on what they knew and loved.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 16:13:18 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

The OQ was smart enough not to use the blues form. That was part of the genius--to infer many forms without aping any.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 15:58:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In Enid Blyton's Noddy series, Mr Plod was the village policeman. Apparently it was based on the real policeman in the seaside village of Studland, on the coast a few miles from me.

Venues, yes, 500 seems the viable size. Judy Collins filled the 500 seater. Sold out. It felt great. But take say 600 people in the 1200 seater down the road, and it feels disappointing. When Steve Cropper played The Tivoli in Wimborne (withThe Animals) he made a speech from the stage saying it was one of the nicest places he'd played in a long career. He then said they were trying to buy a digital cinema projector (so they can show those live theatre and opera transmissions) and would have collecting buckets outside. And he told us that if we put £1 a head in the bucket, that was only right. When I went to the cinema there the next week, a volunteer told me Steve Cropper was the nicest man they'd ever had performing there, and they had collected a lot of money that night.

The Unthanks said similar about The Point in Eastleigh, a new conversion of the old Town Hall rather than a cinema. These places staffed by volunteers might not take out the brown M&Ms for you, but they will make you a fresh pot of tea with biscuits, and they're giving their time free … and most artists appreciate that. Also people get into the habit of going to a lot of shows, because it's local, prices are more around £15 than the £60 to £80 in the big halls, and the shows are good. This month and next Wimborne have John Renbourn, Toyah, Albert Lee, Jim Cregan & Co, Kimmie Rhodes, Curved Air, The Fureys …


Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:54:19 CET 2014 from (174.226.0.46)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Understood Peter. Perhaps I'm sensitive to the word Plod since it rhymes with my name. A name like Rod the Mod sounds kind of cool. Todd the Plod......not so much!


Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:51:36 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.224)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Performed by geniuses,with enthusiasm and musical guts, even one chord blues need not plod.



Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:38:59 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: venues

Peter V: interesting discussion. There's no comparison of there to here in Winterpeg -- with a total 'metropolitan area' population of maybe 700K (and otherwise in the middle of nowhere at all), the market is pretty limited.

Yesterday's paper noted that management of the downtown Burton Cummings Theatre for the Performing Arts is being taken over (from a charitable group with 2 employees) by the entertainment juggernaut that owns and operates the new local hockey barn / big show arena. Because the juggernaut, unlike the amateurs, can manage and spread the risk involved in booking shows. The risk is considerable with "the Burt." It's a 1907-vintage, 2-balcony, 1600-soft-seat building of great historical interest. In terms of operations, as a going concern, a complete white elephant.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:18:58 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mr Plod

Apologies Todd, no you didn’t say “plodding blues” but the songs were the ones I and RTO were thinking of when we mentioned “plodding blues” earlier.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:15:36 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lazy is the wrong word, I think. Go back to that Richard Manuel quote “Some of us don’t like to rehearse …’ I think everyone works out that was Levon & Rick. Now some people are gifted to the degree that they can play anything in their head whenever they want. Apparently both Van Morrison and Bob Dylan expect their bands to be able to do that. Tom Petty quoted an Australian show where Dylan just started singing and they sort of joined in wondering what the song was. It turned out to be Da Doo Ron Ron, never mentioned, never called. He just started it and assumed they could play it even though it took several bars for them to recognize what it was.

The guys who can do that find it irritating to a degree to be with the people who need to think through the chords, and work it out. And some well-known major musicians prefer to do that. A friend called it the “Tie A Yellow Ribbon” test … if you shout Tie A Yellow Ribbon! and start, he reckoned some professional musicians could make a reasonable job of playing it. The others would want a couple of minutes at least to think. He included session musicians.

I’d guess all five of The Band had the ability to just play it. But then you get the question of dynamics and arrangement. To take a far-out example, no group of musicians could sit down and jam 21st Century Schizoid Man successfully straight off without rehearsal, or at least discussion,, because there are dynamic stops and starts. I don’t imagine laziness so much as impatience with hanging around working on the dynamics (and to be honest, bass and drums can “pick up” more easily). And you can do it with 12 bars.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 14:05:09 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Enjoying The Band

Peter V, I’d like to make it clear that I never referred to what Rick did as “Plodding Blues”. I doubt that I’ve ever even used the word plodding. My point was that Rick chose a few blues based songs for his set list, probably because he enjoyed playing them. And the fact that he partnered with blues harmonica players much of the time, reinforces that it was a choice he made of his own free will, rather than something he was stuck with.

I may be more partial than others to enjoying blues, as the first instrument that I ever played was, in fact, blues harmonica (blues harp for the purists). And I actually enjoyed playing it and listening to others. It wasn’t a lazy choice, or a last resort. But I understand that it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. Blues can be easy to dismiss because on the surface the form itself is simple. So is a one chord droning Raga. So is three-chord country music. But done well it can be a thing of beauty. Easy to play…..difficult to master.

I do love what The Band achieved in their peak years in addition to the blues influenced or R&B based songs that they occasionally did. But I came in through the blues door via my enjoyment of Eric Clapton at the time, so perhaps I’m not inclined to be critical of that aspect of their repertoire.

Some may say that reformed The Band never lived up to the majesty that they achieved on the first three albums. You could even say that about The Band themselves from 1971 – 1976. The bar was set very high. I love Richard as a singer, and ‘Tears of Rage’ is one of the first things that I connected with hearing The Band in my early listening days. However, ‘I Shall Be Released’ doesn’t hold my interest as much. I actually prefer Dylan’s take on it, but I don’t feel the need to criticize The Band’s version. Aside from the "sacrilege" of doing so, there are plenty of other things that I enjoy, so it’s not a problem for me. There are plenty of things that Robbie did in his post Band career that I never connected with. There were a few things on his first solo album that I liked, notably ‘Broken Arrow’ and ‘Fallen Angel’. Then it wasn’t until the Clairvoyant album that I had any kind of emotional or visceral reaction to his work with songs like ‘She’s Not Mine’ and ‘Won’t Be Back’ which I really connected with. But I don’t see the point in highlighting the things about his work that fall flat for me. But I may just be a glass half full rather than half empty type of guy.

All that being said, as someone who was too young to see The Band in the Brown album era, I’m very happy that I got a chance to get even a taste of it, as a fan in the 1980’s and 1990’s. And to ultimately get a chance to enjoy them in various configurations, meet some of them a few times, and sit less than 10 feet from Levon in his home studio at the Rambles on many occasions, is something that I never even dreamed as a 4 year old kid in 1970.

Jeff, thanks for outlining some of the compensation issues for session musicians. I suppose part of the challenge is never knowing up front, what is going to sell or become highly successful.



Entered at Fri Mar 21 13:58:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie and Rick. It was this song that helped a friend get through surgery. So yeah....Music via words, instruments used and played and feeeel......resonate for some but not necessarily for others.

Rick's first solo CD...in Canada we had to buy it as an import. I bought mine at HMV for around 26.00. I also had to buy Levon's "American Son" as an import. I can't remember if the price was similar or more. I really only listen to "Violet Eyes" and "Blue House of Broken Hearts" and maybe "China Girl". As for RCO Allstars.....I only listen to one song.....You Got Me.

For me the difference with Graham Parker and The Rumour and the Reformed Band is that Graham could write songs and could sing with an attitude. I'm so glad I was able to see this band in a small venue....Masonic Temple at Bloor/Yonge? I always saw him as the Dylan of England.

When I think about it......Robbie was always very clever......He didn't play much live but when he did......more people saw him play than all the gigs of the Reformed Band. Yes he had the luxury to live his life this way. It's true that if you wrote the songs the money continues to come to you. Is the world fair, no. He was fortunate that he was able to craft songs and even if you....didn't enjoy his singing as I do.......others would cover his songs and then more income would arrive. The times Robbie performed on TV for various specials......The whole world saw him, not just a small group in a bar or small club. Also, he was very aware of keeping his "brand" alive by doing sooooo many interviews and he didn't seem to show that he was annoyed at being asked the same questions over and over again. He knew how to play the game and did it well......He could hustle.....life skill. There are people in my life who are so intelligent and creative......but.....because they don't know or don't want to hustle......are not able to realize their real purpose in life. We also can't forget about connections......Robbie again.....was sooooo lucky that Marty Scorsese really was a fan of the Band and that both of them really connected as friends.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 13:50:35 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Correction

Oops.Wrote that Warren was first guitarist to merit playing alongside Betts-I meant since Duane Allmans passing!


Entered at Fri Mar 21 13:46:04 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RTO-Warren Haynes

Never do underestimate the impact of Warren Haynes on the history of the Allmans.In 1989 he was key to the comeback-the first guitarist with the Allmans with both the musical chops and skill level that playing alongside the great Dickey Betts needed.Warren and Dickey pushed one another and lets not forget the powerhouse Alan Woody was on bass.But then Warren returned again to rescue the Brothers after Dickey was faxed his firing note.His playing,singing,band leading,etc. through these years have kept the shows fresh and relevant.While Derek and Warren are 2 of the most skilled players around their sound too often became bombastic guitar duels with lots of shredding and crazy climaxes.After 2009(particularly as greggs health declined)the music suffered and the covers became tiresome and the dueling was repititive.Last year things picked up a bit as Gregg's health and vocal skills magically returned.This year the Allmans have been great-few covers,few guests and more twin guitars and way less bombastic playing.Softer and generally more melodic.But,I'd never minimize the huge role Warren plays in keeping that band afloat.Also he must be the hardest man working in show business as a member of the various Dead projects,his work with the Allmans and Mule,his Jerry Garcia symphonic project and his many sit ins with other musicians-the man never stops working,able to play in a wide range of styles and genres.A magnificent singer despite my preferring they stay away from covering The Band.Finally,pick up Dose for " earlier" Mule and Life Before Insanity,a "later" Mule album.Very different music than the Allmans.Or,the Mule website offers live MuleTracks or go to Mule Army and a whole bunch of streaming Mule,solo Haynes,(yes,he does some great solo acoustic work) and Allmans concerts.If interested I can tell you,as you look through the shows,what might be considered the best shows.Enjoy!


Entered at Fri Mar 21 12:08:50 CET 2014 from (125.2.202.21)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Ben, I know you particularly enjoy the direction (or lack of it) that The Band took later, so I promise I don't mean to irritate you on deliberately! But, we are talking at cross purposes in certain areas. The laziness I referred to was a musical one. It's my own opinion, but having depended on music as my sole income for many years I learnt to recognise the signs. I wasn't suggesting they couldn't be bothered performing, just that the creative energy needed for writing, arranging and rehearsing, much harder to come by, was rarely there. No inspiration, I guess. Not surprising, when Ringo Starr commented in "The Authorized Biography" video something along the lines of:

At first you are trying to get a gig, then you get a gig and you're trying to get a record deal, then you get a record deal and you get to play halls, so soon you want to play stadiums, then you play stadiums...and after a while it's just playing.

Well, The Band had done it all, and now they were just playing. If there's no forward momentum, commercially or creatively, it's almost impossible to stay inspired. Think how many acts have great first or second albums and then lose the plot. That's because it's easy to be creative hanging out with mates, having a play, and writing songs to impress your girlfriend. Two albums later, you're writing locked in a motel room between shows with a deadline to meet and many, many people depending on you to make them wealthy.

I don't blame the guys for ending up on a treadmill, but I don't blame Robbie for getting off it. Robbie can't be called lazy just because he chose to work out of the public eye and play only when he felt inspired to do so. An artists dream! In spite of his royalty income, I doubt he spent any more days on the couch with the remote than the others, but he was interested a broadening range of music, film, technology and art in general, not sitting on a tour bus with a hangover. He was able to stay occupied without necessarily working on his own projects, which doesn't make him lazy. And although I'm not a big fan his solo stuff, the musician in me knows the amount of focus, discipline, vision and time that goes into it.

I agree it would be nice to see more material released, a la the live RCO CD, but I guess it comes down to who owns the original recordings. They are probably not the property of the Levon Helm Estate to decide what to do with. Live 90's Band, well the NOJF DVD from '94 is probably the peak of their powers and a great set list. Releasing more would be only for a small market of die-hards like us. As Peter V said, it's surprising the Loreley show was released, but it comes down to who stands to make a quick buck off it.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 11:57:16 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Graham Parker & The Rumour

Ben, the link is to RTO's Toppermost article on Graham Parker. I love the new one "Three Chords Good" but honestly as far as fan base and profile goes he's nowhere near The Band in the UK in recognition terms, nor status terms. A good record store like FOPP in Covent Garden will have at least six Band albums, and multiple copies. I had to order "Three Chords Good" online.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 10:51:26 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

There've lots of interesting comments here recently. I don't really get the bad rap that Levon gets for being 'lazy'. Maybe his southern accent and style of drumming makes his performances seem effortless at times, but I wouldn't describe his musical contributions as lazy. Frankly, the only member of the Band whose musical contributions I would possibly describe as 'lazy' is Robbie, who retired at 33 and has released 5 albums in the last 38 years and never toured.

Rick and Levon began their solo careers during the post-production for the Last Waltz, unfortunately their solo albums sold poorly. Maybe if their albums had been more commercially successful, the Band wouldn't have reformed in '83.

I'm a big Graham Parker fan, I have most of his catalog and am amazed at the number of live albums he's released. He must have a dozen or more by now, including some self released 'bootlegs' sold through his website. I can't imagine that his fan base is any larger than The Band's. I would guess it's on par with The Band, but he has done a great service to his fans by sanctioning so many live shows documenting his entire career. I wish that Levon Helm studios would take a look at GP's site and stop pushing pendants and t-shirts and open up the vaults.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 09:02:49 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost Ronnie Hawkins

At last Toppermost does Ronnie (see link). I was trepidatious about doing this one because a lot of you know more than I do. Do please comment … on Toppermost, not here. Remember it's moderated, so there's not an instant post … but it is quick.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 08:50:52 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: venues

Excellent summary, Kerrin.

On gigs and venues, in many ways things have improved in twenty years (and it is 19 years since the Band played Cambridge UK). There are a lot of funded venues, and usually the smaller towns benefit more than the larger ones.

There are two main types, first the old town centre cinema converted to multi purpose with 400-500 seats. We have two near us, both in outlying towns. There is a pattern, often films for three days, then at least two music or comedy shows sometimes three. They’re run by the community and staffed by volunteers. OK, one of the music things will be a tribute band, but the other not. I’ve seen The Manfreds, Judy Collins, Steeleye Span, The Searchers in this sort of venue.

The other is the brand-new venue in a smaller town, local government funded. Happy if they don’t lose too much. Thrilled if they break even. Excellent small multi-purpose auditorium, usually a pleasant café, lots of clean toilets. Again 300-500 seats. Great for folk, acoustic, smaller jazz.

The small towns benefit because the venues in the large towns are now too big for a lot of the tours. Around me Bournemouth has a 3000 seater and a 1250 seater. Poole has a 800 seater (but that’s a theatre) and a 1500 seater and a 120 seat “studio”. So move ten miles from the town centre, and the “satellite” communities have the 300-500 seat venue which is “the right size” for most modern tours. Bands can expect to fill them. It’s different. You won’t get Pink Floyd or Paul Simon there, but good bands at the folkier end or revival end suit them.

I can remember the mid-60s where friends in a semi-pro soul band would have been deeply disappointed at playing to fewer than 500 on a Friday or Saturday night. Semi-pro bands regularly filled the two support slots at the 1200 - 1500 capacity dance hall.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 08:29:06 CET 2014 from (125.2.202.21)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Mr Plod

Well, probably the "plodding" bit was harsh, certainly if you've heard tapes of the original Hawks there was very little plodding going on. But, in broader terms Levon did favour easygoing country blues, and if no-one else had any better suggestions then that was what he would play. A cynic, and maybe I'm one of them, would also say that type of material demands minimal practice or maintenance, especially compared to the large repertoire they abandoned post-Waltz. And I doubt Levon held Rick back, I think general laziness held them both back. Plus, when you are using various "guest" players, Crazy Mama is much easier to busk than Wheels on Fire.I also have a sneaking suspicion that Rick wasn't very discerning, he just liked everything and would happily play whatever was going. Those closer to him would know if he ever moaned about having to play certain songs. I frankly wonder how Garth stayed interested in playing that stuff night after night, but I think the short answer, if you consider his half hearted solos and repetitive Genetic Methods in the 90's, is that he did not.

To be fair, though, Levon was only sticking to the type of music that had attracted him as a teenager. Nothing really changed for him throughout his career, and his knowledge and feel for those styles certainly helped make The Band what it was, and gave it much of it's sense of authority. It's just that at one time his input was counterbalanced by so many other things - Richard's white soul, Rick's sense of harmony and raw enthusiasm for anything musical, Robbie's earnest ambitions as a writer, and Garth's broad-as-the-horizon sonic spread - and later there was little to offset it.

Funnily, my favourite Band solo album is perhaps the RCO Allstars one. This is pure Levon, done beautifully with a wish-list of muso's and friends. Later records seem to be more of the same, yet somehow less...until Larry Campbell.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 07:48:49 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Todd, you're right. Rick did do a lot of plodding blues on solo shows too … though Levon sang them with he Band. Dare I say they're all undemanding to play? I could see it with one guitar in a bar. Given the full wealth of talent in the 90s Band on stage though, I think they had better material.

I've linked my review of the "Live at Loreley" DVD from 1996. I'd forgotten about it, but it does describe the later days of the 90s Band, and it was all up on screen. I'm surprised in retrospect they ever released it.

That Rick Danko solo album (1977) came out on CD three times in Britain, on Edsel, One Way and Demon. (Edsel was a Demon label). They must have been short deals, and on those sort of deals the aim is selling the print run. Probably no reprint commissioned because they assumed the first run had hoovered up demand with back catalogue. It deserves the remastering job and decent release.

On dull British bands, I found an old diary note on the drummer less John Mayall band, who were really good, and I saw that band twice. The first time I noted that it was my third time seeing John Mayall and "not boring this time." It makes me wonder who was with him the two earlier times when I found him boring. No memory. No notes. Whatever, the guitarist and rhythm section would be well-known! Another British band who were interesting in their blues phase around the first album period were Jethro Tull. I saw the first version a couple of times, but it was obvious that the addition of Martin Barre lifted them to a different level. The first version were still excellent.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 05:13:53 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

RTO, nobody is going to miss Warren in the ABros, as Gregg--once he heard Warren and Derek were quitting--is putting the band to sleep. They won't be playing that much this year as it is.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 04:46:28 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Calvin

Calvin, I got me a new one ripped when I dared to admit not liking Steely Dan. We should have seen if two new ones ripped at the same time would have been cheaper.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 04:41:31 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Glad you looked up some Stooges BEG. And No offense but Scott Asheton was a lot more than one of Iggy's drummers. The Asheton Brothers, and to some extent James Williamson, were as much the Stooges as Iggy. In fact Scott is the only member of the Stooges other than Iggy to appear on every Stooges album. And he has co-songwriting credit on about 30 Stooges songs. So yeah, I know you didnt mean anything by it but he is a lot more than one of Iggy's drummers.

Funny thing, earlier there was a short discussion about headlining acts doing covers. A year or so back I was at an Alejandro Escovedo show (And for those who dont know he started out with a Punk group called the Nuns-and opened for the Pistols their last US tour and was living at the Chelsea Hotel when the whole Sid/Nancy thing went down). Anyway Cheetah Chrome shows up, it was planned of course, but still cool. Cheetah was the Lead Guitarist for Rocket from the Tombs and the Deadboys.

Well in the middle of Alejandro's show they ripped off a set of Stooges cover. Ferocious as hell. So yeah, I don't mind some covers.

My entrance to the GB happened sometime in 2000. I offhandedly said I like the fact Robbie and Garth still push themselves to try new stuff and while I like the music I wish Levon would try and do something other than covering songs he liked from 1960. Yeah, I got me a knew one ripped.

But I get what those who found Levon's pre Larry Campbell work plodding blues. Good for the genre, but a little stale as genre's go.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 04:38:09 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: BEG

That Allmans clip just reminds us what a sad year it is given that Warren Haynes is retiring from the ABB. People can rave about Derek Trucks as much as they like - and a fine player he is, too - but the fact is that Haynes was the revitalising ingredient in that band when he joined, now so long ago, and he is likely to be missed.

Although I said to Bill M earlier that I generally like guitarists to be concise and song-led, there's a certain breed that can do that "jam band" thing so well, you could listen to them wail away all night, just like you could Jerry Garcia or Duane Allman. Warren Haynes is your man these days, for sure. I must check out Gov't Mule: if anybody can suggest a good first listen I'd be delighted.

I really like the stuff Haynes did with The Dead too. One look at a Grateful Dead chatboard generally shows a surprising lack of enthusiasm for that combination, and instead they prefer the current guy who'd been a Jerry-a-like in a tribute band. Aw, come on.....


Entered at Fri Mar 21 04:03:35 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pat and Ben

Pat: Understood here my end, mate - think we are on the same page re: OQ material being "the thing".

Ben: I didn't even know the RD album was out of print, mainly because I've got a vinyl copy and tend to keep it for nights where I crank the old school gear in our lounge over a cold bottle or two. That you can't buy a CD of it is every bit as scandalous as Ampeg not offering a limited reissue of the "scroll head" bass guitar...


Entered at Fri Mar 21 04:00:41 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie and The Allman Brothers Band


Entered at Fri Mar 21 03:44:53 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

RTO, I wasn't quoting you.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 03:17:08 CET 2014 from (67.84.78.221)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Todd,first, let me say this is an exceptionally complicated subject. There is no one right way to do things. Each case rests on it's own merits and agreements need to be made up front and in writing. I can't give the time to make a good statement on this now, probably never will want to even.But, what i thought was unique about the circumstances was that these guys sometimes spent a whole day on one song for getting paid for one song. That is rough. The norm in Nashville for a while has been three hours, three hundred. Three hour blocks. that doesn't mean guys don't work for less or more. Anyone can do what they want.

Consider this, in todays, 2013, 2014, music economy.Say you choose your players for feel and get and pay the right A+ list players a hundred an hour , or a hundred a song, and go in with your charts, knock out 6 songs in 7 hours,keep two players around for another few hours for additional parts, and get great performances , and everything else rests upon you. You have A+ list players, amazing performances, get unreal vocal performances from a variety of vocalists but by the time you get a 6 song EP done half a year to a year goes by, you've spent 50k out of your or a labels pocket , cash money, and then the record still has to get promoted and where the hell can it go today?... Do the session players deserve points? they're working, they're playing in a few bands a piece, and making a living. You got to have the music but there is so much more to it....

So, see,. this is where Reggie Young's attitude was mature and etc. The thing is, time. Get paid by the hour for your feel sure. You can spend a day on a song. Get paid by the song for your feel, hell no. Unless your getting major major money per song, and getting points per song. Back in those days, the money was there though, and it would have been nice for session men who were major contributors to have been in position to negotiate for points.

Now, i know a drummer still alive, you all heard of, who tries to get 4k a day for session work. Sometimes he does. I bet sometimes he drums for a grand a day, sometimes for less too.

Points- can points be appropriate? sure as hell they can. but it got to be discussed and agreed to up front. n but as far a s business model for today- there is no business so a model- what the hell would it do? Today, it's does something make sense for someone.... It's a shame, there is so much great music that could get made that doesn't and so much dreck that does.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 02:43:18 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: RTO

RTO, I agree with your comments about Rick, his album is one of my favorites. I don't know why the cd is out of print. It would be nice if it was re-issued with something like the Roxy concert as a bonus disc. Rick's solo career has been well documented, with 'Times like these''Cryin heart blues', 'One more shot' and the series of live cd's released over the last few years. I wish The reformed Band's career was documented as well. Peter Viney wrote a great article about the unreleased recordings of the reformed Band. Hopefully, some day this material will be released.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 01:48:01 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....more excerpts from BAM magazine for Wallsend.

Chris Willman: "Sweet Fire Of Love" is listed as a co-writing credit with U2, whereas "Testimony" isn't, I assume because that one came more off of a previously existing Gill Evans horn chart you had."

Robbie Robertson: "Yeah. When I went to Ireland, I didn't know what we were going to do. Finally I came up with a couple of lines and a couple of ideas when I was over there at the beginning of "The Sweet Fire Of Love". But as we worked on it, they were right there in the trenches, and because they gave it 150 percent, I told Bono, "I want to say that we wrote this together"...And we did write it together. I mean, I came with the thing and all of that and wrote most of the lyrics, but it wouldn't have existed without their effort."

Chris Willman: "And you feel a lot freer to do that now than in the past? This seems like a far, far far bigger step in that direction than your Band songwriting?"

Robbie Robertson:"When you're talking on behalf of a group, on behalf of the Band, you have to take that into consideration. It was never comfortable for me just to say, "Ok, boys, I'm on this trip now, this is where we're going today." That wasn't right for me. In their faces and character and their eyes, that's what needed to be projected as well. I just did the best I could telling my story with their story through us all. Now I don't have to talk on behalf of anybody else. And so if these things are coming to the surface more clearly or blatantly, it's because of that."

Levon Helm & Rick Danko - Evangeline, Down South in New Orleans 1983

I guess this show was similar to the one I can't remember.....musically.....1983 Toronto at the Pearcy House with Rick and Levon.
I'm thankful for this recording since I have no memory. As I've said before.....I do remember vividly meeting Pentii Glan from Louuu's band and thinking it's a good thing I'm not drawn to certain substances....and a bouncer my friend knew had put something in my hand when we met...It was a small venue.....but I just can't remember their performance. :-((


Entered at Fri Mar 21 01:29:45 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Todd

I'm not sure what was said before I came back in like a bull at a gate, but hadn't thought of Levon holding Rick back in any way. I do believe, however, that Rick's debut LP is one of the most inspired solo releases by any Band member - certainly my favourite - and it wasn't until Dirt Farmer that I thought Levon made anything memorable.

If you watch that Danko TV special, my money would have been on him to "carry the baton" as it were. I think Java Blues, What A Town, all those are great songs, far more in keeping with the OQ than the majority of the efforts of Levon - OR Robbie for that matter.

Rick must have had all those songs building up like George H did with the material on All Things Must Pass.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 01:11:29 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Music by Robbie Robertson, "Sacrifice" (dedicated to L. Peltier)

Leonard Peltier - paintings


Entered at Fri Mar 21 01:01:10 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Good Rocking Tonight

Peter V, Yes I think that's a good solution for the car listening. I just never got around to getting the hookup for my car stereo (which has fantastic sound - Monsoon system in a VW Passat). I think the next car that I get will probably already have the connectivity sorted out.

Levon seems to be the one who gets “credited” with The Band in the 1980’s & 1990’s leaning towards more of a blues and R&B flavor for some of their set, and I sense that some here feel that he was holding Rick back in some way from doing more of a variety of songs? I’m not sure that I agree with that assessment.

It’s my understanding that Randy C. and Jim Weider were doing the set-list much of the time for The Band gigs, and it’s pretty well established that Rick did many “blues based” songs in his solo shows, where he would conceivably have free reign to choose whatever material he liked. A quick look at the tape archive shows that some of the following songs appeared frequently in many of his solo gigs: Just Your Fool, Poor Boy Blues, Mystery Train, Walking Blues, Java Blues, Crying Heart Blues, CC Rider, Crazy Mama, Big Boss Man etc.

It seems to me that Rick may have actually enjoyed performing many of these songs, and did them willingly. He was the rare type of performer who could do many types of music, including blues styled numbers. The other interesting thing to think about, is that when he wasn’t performing with Levon, or The Band, he gravitated towards folks like Paul Butterfield, and other harp players like Sredni to partner up with. Yes, it seems that Rick may have actually liked Blues, in addition to other things.

Rick and Levon, in the post TLW Band also seem to get criticized for playing “bar band” type music. Some of that may be due to the fact that they were quite often playing in real life actual bars.
The 1980’s era Nu-Wave music was a TOUGH time for American / Roots based music. Quite a bleak time for performers whose glory years were in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It would have been nice to get more gigs in all of the nice and larger halls consistently, but at some point, the market dictates what the reality is. And sometimes people in bars are going to get music that fits that type of venue. The soft subtle stuff doesn’t always cut through the haze, and quite often, “bar” patrons like to get up and shake a tail feather. ‘Whispering Pines’ and ‘I Shall Be Released’ isn’t always going to get the job done in those situations.

Fortunately these days there are more options for performers in places that are made for listening to music, and more esoteric material can be chosen….. But in the mid 1980’s, you needed to be able to put a little boogie into the set list.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 00:36:50 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pat and Peter

Pat, there it is, well said. Yes, it IS crazy to say that the OQ never relied solely on their own songs. I quoted Ben directly, but applied a caveat of only counting the covers to fill out a concert set, which when you've only got one album out, you of course rely upon covers. But I agree - the whole point of the OQ was those magical songs: so new and original but at the same time so comfortable like an old spiritual or show tune. It certainly wasn't about Stuff You Gotta Watch or Blind Willie McTell.

Peter, that's a good analysis of British blues and even though I have far more time for the American counterpart white boy blues - when the eternal Clapton vs Green argument comes up again, I always say Bloomfield and take my leave - there is still no TNTDODD from that stable, creativity-wise.

It's all about the songs, people. A great song to start with, arranged to suit three magnificent voices and a one man cinematic soundscape orchestra behind the Lowrey, throwing out little sonic vignettes like Billy-o.



Entered at Fri Mar 21 00:25:45 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, I have an iPod permanently connected in the car so as to have a huge library at hand, but mainly I slot in single CDs. Best of both worlds. Even though all the tunes are in Apple Lossless, a straight comparison shows the. CD is better, but I am told that is a better D/A converter in the CD player.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 00:12:48 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Beatles etc.

RTO, funny that you should mention feeding the Beatles through a reverb pedal to customize the amount of desired reverb drenching on the new Capitol CD’s. The other day I was thinking about a similar thing, but instead using the reverb that’s built into my Roland Super Cube 60 amp (I didn't actually do it). I used to run my vocal mike through that back in the day when I was making my own reverb soaked (to mask my vocal deficiencies) demos on a 4 track Tascam. I suppose the other option would be to run everything through software, which is probably how it would be done these days.

At the end of the day, I’ve decided that I quite like the sound on the bulk of the recent Capitol releases. Just having the sequencing and artwork is enough to provide that blast from the past experience. And where possible, they seem to have preserved some of the unique edits, timing, and extras that George Martin may have made for the US market back in the day. I’m sure there are some exceptions where they may have missed the mark, but by and large it’s only the real Beatle wonks that will notice.

As far as historical accuracy is concerned with respect to the Capitol releases, there are the first 8 albums released in 2004 and 2006 that mirror the originals quite closely….tape hiss and all, for those who like that sort of thing. That may only leave Yesterday and Today, and Revolver that may leave the hard-core collectors a bit ruffled.

BEG, for some reason, I never bought an iPod. I may be the only one! It’s kind of odd, since I seem to have every other device that Apple has made since 1998 including a swell iPhone. Most of my commuting time is spent in the car, so CD’s tend to work out pretty well for me. If I took a lot of public transit, or did a lot of walking as you do, I’d probably seriously consider the more portable option. I do use iTunes with a lot of stuff loaded up onto my laptop computer, which I do bring on the job, for those moments when music is appropriate.

JeffO, interesting clip from that documentary. It’s too bad there isn’t a better business model for compensation for the musicians who contribute a great deal of creativity with original ideas that help to make the song. Some people might say they are just “doing their jobs”, but at a certain level, there should be better compensation for the people who contribute mightily to efforts that succeed, in large part due to their efforts. Management probably looks at it as though the musicians/arrangers are lucky to even get the opportunity to do this kind of work, but ultimately it’s not just the songwriter or singing stars who have bills to pay. Last time I checked, everyone pays the same price for that gallon of milk at the grocery store.


Entered at Fri Mar 21 00:06:05 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We could make a list of most boring bands we've seen, and I'm afraid the British would take the first ten places for me. I saw them all. Keef Hartley Band was dull and abysmal. The Groundhogs were dull. Savoy Brown (early on) were dull. Fleetwood Mac (early on) were dull. Chicken Shack were dull. Blodwyn Pig were incredibly dull. Colosseum were dull. Graham Bond's Magik weren't dull, but they were incredibly incompetent. I think the trouble is for British listeners, we had such a major overdose of plodding blues that we react instantly and badly to it And that spills over to any Willie Dixon song done by a white band, except The Rolling Stones. America had dull stuff too but I reckon you had less overkill.

I've had my say many times on those blues standards, and Crazy Mama too. There are fabulous versions of all of them by the 90s Band (though Stuff You Gotta Watch was its very best on the bootlegged pre-Jericho sessions) , but there were also dull versions of all of them, and three in an act were two too many. They weren't ever doing Springsteen-length shows after all. We could all name twenty Band songs, and past-Band covers more interesting than Stuff You Gotta Watch.

Funny I was going to reply earlier but got caught up in the wonderful TV drama "Turks & Caicos." And I was going to say "Why didn't they do Jemima Surrender and Strawberry Wine instead?" I always thought 'Why is Rick plowing manfully through Crazy Mama when he could be doing Blue River? Or This Wheel's On Fire? Or if you want a straightforward relentless tune, Java Blues?" .


Entered at Thu Mar 20 23:37:53 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

The OQ "never relied solely on their own songs"? That's crazy.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 23:01:57 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Calling all fellow Brits

Anybody else going? I've got tickets for the Monday show. Can't wait.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 22:44:25 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Ben re: Levon

Maybe plodding was a little unfair, but Levon always did seem to default to a more basic R&B style, and indeed even within The Band he would always steer them back to it. Look at Jemima Surrender and Strawberry Wine; two great songs, yes, but far more "bar band" than the bulk of the material on the first three albums.

I disagree wholesale on the matter of original material. They may not have relied solely upon their own songs in concert, but the reputation they have is not based upon their ability to perform a Willie Dixon song well. Had they not churned out three perfect albums of great new American influenced music (Long Black Veil was a cover, yes, but not a bar room boogie or bluesy song, and a great choice alongside their own efforts) that made everybody - even the best of their contemporaries - roll over and sing Sweet Sue, we'd not be sat here chatting electronically today. My home county was the hotbed of reasonably successful electric blues bands in the late 60s over here and there is no "Keef Hartley Band Guestbook".

Your point about including 1971-74 is very valid in terms of quality and I wouldn't necessarily disagree, although a live album of largely their own compositions with Allen Toussaint arrangements and a fourth studio album that is let down purely by being "more of the same but not as good" isn't the same thing as defaulting to blues standards. It's not necessarily about doing covers either, and I agree this can be a blessing if well chosen. Even Moondog Matinee, a covers album and proud, showed a fascinating selection with the Third Man Theme, a great version of Holy Cow (not unlike their always enjoyable romps through Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever) and - on the extended CD - that lovely take on the spiritual "Didn't It Rain" all excelled. I actually listen to MM far more than NLSC.

I guess what I was trying to say is that left to Levon, they'd always have stayed an R&B band. They broke away from The Hawk (under Levon's nominal leadership) because of his reluctance to be bluesier, they were initially sceptical of getting involved with Dylan for the same reasons. However you view the situation post TLW - and I'm no fan at all if him as a bloke in recent years, he has said some extraordinary things - Robbie Robertson is for many of us unmatched as a songwriter, and the lack of a figure like him in the reformed Band was a big hole left unfilled. Look at their treatment of Atlantic City - great, has all the flavour they'd put into songs before, but it took a Springsteen tune for them to get their teeth into, just like they'd done with Robbie's songs, and with Long Black Veil and with Don't Ya Tell Henry.

I bought two tickets for a Midnight Ramble a few years back. Mrs RTO and I were all set to fly over, all of that, but three or four independent voices said "Are you sure? Can you not save yourself the cost of two return airline tickets and find a band in London that will serve up endless 12 bars and way too many harp solos?". If this was bad advice, then I missed out but I doubt it was far off the mark.

For the record, I'm not surprised Remedy was thrown back in response to my comments earlier, and I too love that song - it has that real Band swagger like The Shape I'm In, Don't Do it, or Forbidden Fruit. It was well placed as the opener, though - there wasn't much more like it.

I also agree with PV that the reformed Band was much better without the confusion of the Cate Brothers in favour of a more settled combo. I also think Jim Weider is one of the finest guitarists to ever walk the earth, and I mean that.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 22:15:58 CET 2014 from (99.249.67.189)

Posted by:

GregD

Bill M- the purchase of the Guess Who publishing by Burton Cummings has long been a sore point between Bachman and Cummings. Apparently Cummings was in Toronto filming (the forgettable) movie Melanie at the time that Jack Richardson was selling his interests in Nimbus 9 Studios, including the publishing rights to the Guess Who songs. Cummings had his lawyer contact Richardson's rep, and the deal was made. Supposedly the purchase price was somewhere north of $30,000, which doesn't seem excessive. Bachman was of course not happy that Cummings didn't attempt to contact him first. Cummings' side of the story was that he didn't have time to contact Bachman, as he was afraid someone else would act quickly to scoop up the publishing rights to their songs. I agree that Bachman would no doubt have done the same thing at the time.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 18:58:47 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...some more footage of the Heatwave Concert. I can't believe that I didn't remember a group I really liked at the time.....Talking Heads!


Entered at Thu Mar 20 18:50:11 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

I have a cabin in Finland only twenty miles from Russian border. Jargon in these woods is sometimes unpleasant. A local guy said to me: "What's your problem? Your idols are either Jews or homos lesbians and commies." I answered: "No, no. That is not true! Dubliners are alcoholics."


Entered at Thu Mar 20 18:42:26 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Terronto

BEG: My last visit to Massey Hall - last year? - was to see Molly Johnson, backed by pianist Robbie Botos. Fabulous show. Tonight I'm off to the Dominion on Queen (East near River St) to see R&B singer/pianist Curley Bridges play. He was much younger than his current 80 years when he arrived here in 1955, when his ancient band, Frank Motley and the Motley Crew, was booked into the Holiday Tavern by future Hawks agent Harold Kudlets.

Come to think of it, the Holiday is where Dianne Brooks first played in Toronto in the very early '60s, fronting a touring R&B band led by Dionne Warwick's first husband, Bill Elliott. And it's the last bar I saw Colin Linden play before he went upmarket with Bruce Cockburn and then BARK. John Whynot on keyboards, just like now, I believe.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 18:23:49 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Ben

Agree Levon pre Larry was way more than plodding blues.Saw him do some great R&B shows,Band song shows,straight up Chicago blues(not plodding!) etc. through the 80's & 90's.Songs like Remedy,Atlantic City...not plodding.Solo albums as well.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 18:18:22 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Calvin...I've seen Iggy Pop at our Police Picnic in Oakville, Ontario. When you posted about one of his drummers who recently passed, I had to check to see if he was performing with Iggy that day in the early eighties, but noooo....Sorry, I wasn't a Stooges fan so don't know his work.....

However, thank you anyway, in that when I found this video of this show......Yikes.....It reminded me of also seeing.....The Police...I had previously missed them performing at a very small venue called Edgerton's....or was it called The Edge by then?......ska group......The Specials!! Btw, Iggy is an amazing performer even though he was quite wasted....I've never seen that kind of energy on stage.....He was movin' and dancin' all around the stage like he was possessed.

I guess it was previous to this show that I was at our Heat Wave/New Wave outdoor concert in Bowmanville, Ontario as well where I saw The Pretenders, B52's, Elvis Costello.......So much fun in my life in those carefree days! I remember that we were going to get checked for alcohol and drugs.....One of my friends said no problem, we'll mix the gin with lemonade and we'll be fine. I rarely drank, so it wasn't a problem and none of them were into catching a fire so I was as straight as can be and still enjoyed myself thoroughly. lol

I had to look up who else was there.....
Vladymir Rogov (opening artist) with his band ARKITEX (not on poster)
Teenage Head (not on poster)
BB Gabor (not on poster)
Holly and the Italians (not on the poster)
Rockpile featuring Dave Edmunds and Nick Lowe
The Rumour without Graham Parker (just after he'd gone solo) (not on poster)
The B-52's
Talking Heads (at sundown)
The Pretenders
Elvis Costello and the Attractions
The Kings

Bill M...Favourite Buffy song is "Fallen Angels".

JT...I have one song of Molly Johnson's...Ooh Child/Redemption Child...The same one she performed at the Benefit.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 17:54:51 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bill M...Here is info about the benefit show I attended. I was sitting right up in the front as I knew my Union rep and was given tickets. Yes, sometimes I'm a lucky brown eyed girl! It was also the first time I saw Derek Miller perform who was in Robbie's doc Going Home as they're from the same community. Derek performed in your hood in the summer.

His Spirit Lives On - A Tribute to Dudley George
by www.ett.on.ca » Sun Oct 05, 2003 5:21 pm

Benefit concert builds pressure for immediate public inquiry into death of Dudley George

Elementary Teachers of Toronto and George family launch Aboriginal Youth Education Fund

Toronto,
Oct. 7, 2003


Entered at Thu Mar 20 17:32:40 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

BEG: I've never seen Buffy perform, but I did see her receive an award at the same Aboriginal Awards show that Robbie performed at. She wore such a tight dress that she could step up to the podium and had to be picked up and installed in place by the co-hosts.

JT: David Clayton-Thomas's brilliant "Brainwashed" (at link) came out in '66 and was by his group after the Shays, the Bossmen, formed from shards of Just Us and the legendary Stormy Clovers. The record was produced by our guys' first post-Hawkins producer, Duff Roman. Also, it's unsurprising that your #2 and #3 Concord groups both have close Hawks ties: David Clayton was actually part of the Hawks (with our guys) for a time ca '64, and Jon and Lee were regular guest vocalists. More significantly, the Hawks made an active attempt to recruit Jon as their frontman after leaving Hawkins; he tells the story in the "Yonge Street Rock and Roll Stories" documentary, and is also shown singing "Please Please Please" over the unfinished Hawks backing tracks produced by Duff Roman in '64.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 17:26:30 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Molly Johnson

BEG: No list can be complete without Molly Johnson. Yet another fabulous singer who doesn't get the attention she deserves. A constant on the local scene for us, I saw her at an outdoor venue a few years ago during a street festival in Toronto. My favourites: along with Molly: Madeleine Peyreux (she is the embodiment of Billie), Marissa Nadler, Eve Cassidy (too soon), Loreena McKenitt, K.D. Lang (what a voice!), Emily Haynes (Metric), Laura Marling. I cannot forget Judy Collins and Joni Mitchell. There are others.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 17:19:38 CET 2014 from (99.52.71.217)

Posted by:

Calvin

I think it can be fun when an established act throws in a cover now and again. Alejandro Escovedo almost always does a cover during his encore. Among those who chooses from is It Makes No Difference.

It you didn't catch it Joe Lala passed away from Lung Cancer.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 17:16:13 CET 2014 from (171.159.64.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Reformed Band

RTO, Welcome back. I disagree with your comments about the reformed Band lacking drive and quality original material. Following that logic, you could say the smae thing about the original quartet between 1971-1974. The Band have always played and recorded covers(long black veil, loving you is sweeter than ever, don't do it,etc.) and collaborations with outside artists (I shall be released, this wheel's on fire, Tears of rage, 4% pantomime). They never relied soley on their own songs. I find that to be a strength, not a liability. When The Band reformed in the 80's they brought songs from solo albums and projects, 'Java blues', 'Milk cow Boogie', 'One more shot', etc. And to describe Levon's post TLW career simply as 'plodding blues' until Amy and Lary Campbell intervened is way off the mark in my view.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:34:11 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Complete doc about Buffy. She begins with Cripple Creek.....I saw her once at Massey Hall with many other musicians such as Molly Johnson. Buffy evinces strength, passion and compassion....pretty good qualities I'd say.

"Buffy Sainte-Marie is an amazing talent. She is a singer-songwriter, musician, composer, visual artist, writer, educator and social activist. She is one of the most influential Aboriginal figures in recent times. She is an intensely creative woman. She started her career in 1962 and is still going strong. Her songs have been covered by Donovan, Elvis Presley, Janis Joplin, Chet Atkins, Dean Wareham & Britta Phillips, Joe Cocker, Cher, Bobby Darin, Tracy Chapman, Neko Case, Gram Parsons, Neil Diamond and Courtney Love among many others. She has two degrees (including a PhD in Fine Art), she has won an Oscar, she was a regular on Sesame Street for five years, she has received two medals from Queen Elizabeth and she founded the Cradleboard Teaching Project, an educational curriculum devoted to better understanding Native Americans. And this only skims the surface of her remarkable achievements.

This is documentary which traces Buffy's fascinating path from her birth on a Cree reservation in Saskatchewan to her early success in the Greenwich Village folk scene, her subsequent musical and political activism, which earned her a spot on the government's blacklist, and to her current role as artist, educator, unstinting activist and timeless musician. It includes interviews with Robbie Robertson, Joni Mitchell, Taj Mahal and Bill Cosby. It was released with her fifteenth album, the excellent RUNNING FOR THE DRUM. This wonderful documentary is directed by Joan Prowse."


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:31:30 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Schwarz and friends

Bill M: RtO might have a better example, but try this one on for great guitar-driven (rhythm AND lead) pop . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:25:26 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Kevin-Allmans

The IMND the Allmans did 2 nights ago was very good.In general,I'm not fond of the Allmans covering The Band.I'd rather they stick to their own music.The band has been particularly tight this year although I remain a fan primarily of the original Allman lineup with Duane,Dickey,and Berry.Second favorite era was with Chuck Leavell/Lamar Williams/Dickey Betts.Third was Dickey/Warren/Alan Woody.This current group is excellent musically but a bit further from the original intent.Over the years they began to get guest heavy and played way too many covers by contemporaries.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:11:58 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"An excerpt from the 2006 documentary "Buffy Sainte-Marie: A Multimedia Life." A portrait of Native American singer/songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie. Mixes current and archival performance footage. Interviews include Joni Mitchell, Robbie Robertson, John Kay (of Steppenwolf), and Eric Andersen.

Buffy was instrumental in introducing Joni's music to a wider audience. Along with Ian & Sylvia and Tom Rush, Buffy was one of the first singers to record Joni's songs, bringing her first songwriter royalties and publishing profits. While Buffy, heard singing "Circle Game" in the background, reveals the influence Joni's music had on her and originally played Joni's tapes for Joel Dean and Elliot Roberts. It was Buffy who suggested that they go to Café Au Go Go (New York) to check Joni out. After hearing her perform (October 26, 1967), Elliot immediately expressed an interest in managing her career. And the rest is history."

For those of you who haven't seen the Allman Brothers.....you have to! They played with such discipline and conviction. I'm not even really a fan but when I saw them at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival with Derek Trucks as well......Wow....bring it on! "Whippin' Post" and "Statesborough Blues" were the only songs I knew and they did not.......disappoint. Thank you!


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:09:16 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The performers who I saw at Concord Tavern

The performers I saw at the Concord Tavern who impressed me most:

1. Levon and the Hawks

2. David Clayton Thomas and the Shays

3. Jon and Lee and The Checkmates


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:05:41 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Concord was a stepping stone

In those days, DCT was with the Shays if I recall. I did see them at the Concord. They were a class act!. "Brainwashed' had just come out. Clearly, this was well before BST.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:04:28 CET 2014 from (86.161.195.1)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M: Guitarists

"How do out get a guitarist to turn his amp down?"
"Put some sheet music in front of him."

Bill, Brinsley is one of those old-school guitar players who treats soloing as an extension of a song, not a song as something to hang off of a solo. See also JR2, George Harrison, Steve Cropper, Larry Campbell, G.E. Smith, Cliff Gallup, Scotty Moore...it's always a pleasure to share a stage with that kind of guitarist.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:02:30 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Its the musicians...

Kevin and others: Acknowledging the musicians who contribute to this site... Thank you for writing and giving us your incites into all aspects of our mutual interests. Those of us who are on the outside looking in have no idea of how tough it is (we may know a little from the grapevine - often full of inaccuracies anyway) but the business of music is a matter that is hard to know unless you are there or have been there doing it. To have you contributing makes this site relevant to all of us who want to understand. From the instruments to the interactions between musicians and business people to the final product and how it comes about whether in the recording studio or on stage, we all benefit from your input. Your writings give us a fuller picture of what music in the 20th/21st century was/is all about. So again, thank you.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 16:01:31 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: No a specific reference to The Concord, but....

From a Craig Harris interview with Rick Danko:

During this time, the group backed up many well known vocalists. "From the Friday night parties, we'd be too hung-over to sing on Saturday," Danko reflects. "David Clayton-Thomas (of Blood, Sweat And Tears) used to get up (and sing), people from Toronto, John Kay from Steppenwolf. There were a lot of those people. That's how we met John Hammond. He came up and sang and played harmonica. We did some recording with him."


Entered at Thu Mar 20 15:38:57 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John Hammond at the Concord: Did he join L&TH there (ever?)

Wow Bill! I had never seen that comment from John Hammond. I am not aware of any instance where John Hammond played at the Concord with L&TH.

Maybe John or his people can communicate with either of us (maybe someone is reading this site who is 'connected') regarding this history. It would be great to know what, if anything, he did with them at the Concord or anywhere in Toronto in those years.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 15:31:19 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Fred....Some more Italian connections and this time with Robbie.

Jazz Chromatic Ensemble - Moosonee Shout of Rage (feat. Robbie Robertson)

Composed and arranged by Angiolo Tarocchi
Track recorded on CD 'Skydreams' in 1995

dlew919...When my computer was hacked I did lose a lot of email addresses. If you get through to Serenity, please give her my best. I know at times she was busy with other sites. And other times she didn't like how some posters didn't appreciate her lists and told her so. There is always the scroll feature for all of us.
Btw, you're one of the most pleasant people to engage with on this site. You're not mean spirited or sexist. Thank you! Your students are lucky to be in your company.

Former Cabbagetown Boy...Your kindness is appreciated very much. I post because I have to......It's all play for me finding info on The Band or sharing anything music related or not.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 15:10:06 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: an interesting quote from John Hammond Jr

"The first band I worked with was in 1964. I had been playing a lot of gigs in Toronto, and I met a group called Levon and the Hawks. They were Ronnie Hawkins' band, and they left Ronnie. They were happening in Toronto at the Concord Tavern. I used to go between my shows to go hear them. We became real good friends, and we recorded an album called 'So Many Roads'. And from then, all my other recordings with bands all kind of stemmed from my experience of recording with Levon and Robbie and those guys, who are so good, so professional." ("Blues Scene Quarterly", Fall 1998)

JT: Do you recall Hammond ever sitting in with our guys at the Concord? Certainly sounds like he played with them as a group at some point.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 14:48:26 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: However, Jack Richardson, whose name is attached to the awards, must have made a lot of money, if from no other source than the Guess Who publishing, of which his company owned 100%. A recent Toronto Star story had Randy Bachman whining about how an opportunistic Burton Cummings bought it all when Richardson retired, leaving Randy bereft. Sad for Randy, I guess, but no doubt he'd have done the same had the shoe been on the other foot.

Of course I must add the factoid that another, though negligible, source of income was the, let's say, $75 that Richardson got for playing bass while Robbie Robertson played guitar on Dianne Brooks' "Orbiteer Twist" from the early '60s.

RtO: I thought you'd given up playing with guitarists, what with their soloing and all. BTW, I succeeded in turning a colleague on to Jerome K's 3MiaB. She's a dedicated Mary Margaret O'Hara fan too, but didn't know MMOH's cover of "Out Of The Blue"; now she does, and even made a successful foray to her local record store to procure a copy. Missions accomplished.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 14:18:55 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: career advice

From Jan's "What's New" page / 'new Garth / Sister Maud gigs':

"April 12, Saturday. 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Free. Jack Richardson Music Awards. Music career seminar, GARTH HUDSON will participate on panel. Aeolian Hall, 795 Dundas Street, London, Ontario, Canada."

Imagine a roomful of pimply 15-year-olds looking up at Santa in a black gunslinger's hat: "Well, son, you won't make much money . . . ."


Entered at Thu Mar 20 14:17:42 CET 2014 from (86.161.195.1)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Kevin

Sadly there is no convenient JR2ism to describe my album tardiness better than the mundanity of other musical endeavours and licensing red tape over the last year, Kevin. But there: gigging as a hired hand earns me money; wrapping up the album means spending it.

If only I had a pink scarf... That said, I did have a serious highlight last year when thanks to becoming acquainted on a certain social networking site, I was able to lend my Hammond to Bob Andrews of Brinsley Schwarz/Graham Parker when he came over, and as a result did get asked up to play with Bob at his Putney date, with my dear old pal Brins on guitar. That was a treat.



Entered at Thu Mar 20 06:51:09 CET 2014 from (24.114.66.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed: Really glad you are back........Both you and Pat have been impressed with the ABB shows in NYC......my concern would have been the state of Gregg A's voice......is is even close to the wonderful instrument it once was ? Also, your post prompted me to look at a YouTube of 2012 ABB take on IMND - which screamed as being 1000 miles from Rick Danko beauty......I trust time has brought with it a bit more feel.

RTO's return: For the uninitiated - fasten your seatbelts - a whole lotta fun and musiicality is on its way! Though, I must say, as RTO is the rare man that shares a similar self confidence to that of JR2, his explanation on the album delay was disappointing.........think pause to "shuffle the deck" and planned delays to allow the industry to catch back up to you.......that's the ticket......none of this administrative nitter natter of song permissions, etc.....................


Entered at Thu Mar 20 05:15:27 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Hey Bill (Re; CD project)

Not a sore point at all, just got dragged back into playing the organ for a band I used to play in, as well as other stuff that took me away from the studio (its only two rooms away from the lounge and one from the kitchen, but might as well be in Switzerland) so have lost about a year, but its been such a long winded project, what's a year? Ha ha.

By and large it is ready to go; just sorting out the less fun details like how to register the songs, pay Nick Lowe and Robbie R for the use of theirs and then the final thing of working out how many to press - and can I afford it?


Entered at Thu Mar 20 03:58:04 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: BEG

Gotta tell you girl. You are one good person! Keep on keep'in on! (Especially your posts.)


Entered at Thu Mar 20 03:19:19 CET 2014 from (220.233.229.98)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: BEG! Hey!

Too long between virtual drinks, milady. I must say, I'm a little worried about Serenity: i haven't heard from her in a long while...


Entered at Thu Mar 20 03:14:26 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B / BEG: I believe that the Italian and Spanish versions of "Groovin'" came out on either side of a 45. The Spanish one was also on the Mexican pressing of the "Groovin'" LP, which was otherwise in English. I was disappointed when my Mexican pressing of Big Brown was all in English, except for the song titles on the jacket.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 02:58:35 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: nice to see you posting again. If it's not a sore point, what's with the CD project?

Italian singers: I'm with Fred re Lucio Dalla and BEG's student re Eros Ramazotti.

Women: Fairuz and whoever sings lead on ""Stomp" on Robbie's "Redboy".


Entered at Thu Mar 20 02:57:06 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Published on Mar 17, 2014
Robbie Robertson, Marty Scorsese Interviews,"Revisiting The Last Waltz"

Featurette 2002.("The Last Waltz" Movie Promotion.)

Pat BBBBBBBB!!!!! Felix singing in Italian.......If you have the song on your iTunes; could you send it to me? I'll gladly send something back.......Your fave Louuu song maybe? lol

Hey Todd...I guess I'm different here as I usually listen to my songs on my Nano while walking around the city or taking the public transit with songs on shuffle. It's like listening to my own personal radio with different genres of music, and ya just don't know what will come on next. Of course there are times I'm obsessed with one particular song and I listen over and over.....like The Waterboys' cover of Dylan's "Girl From The North Country"......soooo good, sooooo good......I've got Mike Scott!

Fred...Would you believe when I worked in one record department and someone called up and asked me if Bruce Springsteen was Jewish. I said no he wasn't. I knew from reading books on him that one side was Irish/Dutch and the other Italian. She just wouldn't believe me and kept pronouncing his name like Springstein.....finally.....I just hung up the phone. Needless to say I was never promoted as I would demonstrate acts of rebellion as the store was very conservative and I had to play certain records over and over to sell product. One time I played a Marley recording just to hold onto my sanity, knowing that if anyone asked for the recording there was only one copy......Well, I did what I had to do to survive.

Where are all the other female posters who can write so well about anything....like Jersey Girl, Claire, Deb, Bama Belle, Amy, Nancy, Kentucky Girl, Serenity, Roz, Amanda.....Very lonely sometimes. I don't post on any other music or Band related site. I only occasionally check Robbie's site or Levon's. Although there was too much drama before, I do miss all of us together...Most of us stood for something even though we didn't see eye to eye....I can take it with stride now whereas before I was just too thin skinned....I must be getting old..... ;-D


Entered at Thu Mar 20 02:00:07 CET 2014 from (67.84.78.5)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Clips from "Session Men." American Sound Studios, Memphis

I found this you tube video interesting. While they are all exceptionally proud of their work, individually and as a band, some of these guys have some bitterness Reggie Young has an interesting perspective and apparently no bitterness. I've not read the subject matter, or seen the whole documentary, but, from what I heard or read in this video, apparently they were getting paid per track. Which is one way to do it, but it sounds like they were getting paid per track and really crafting the songs without getting paid for arranging or points. From what one of the guys said, they often spent a whole day on one song.


Entered at Thu Mar 20 01:07:30 CET 2014 from (82.41.77.75)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Todd

Todd, go down your local guitar store and pickup:

1) A small notebook sized mixer of at least two channels

2) An Electro Harmonix "Holy Grail" reverb pedal.

3) Some patch cables

Route your CD player into a pair of mono inputs panned centrally and attach the Aux send output of the mixer to the input of the reverb pedal, and the output of the pedal back into the mixer via the Aux return. Route the main L/R outputs of your mixer to your hi fi amplifier.

Voila! Summed mono playback of the UK remastered stereo Beatles tracks, with as much extra reverb as you fancy.



Entered at Thu Mar 20 00:18:35 CET 2014 from (217.137.6.242)

Posted by:

RTO

Location: Surrey, UK

Subject: The Band reunion and feud

Well, there I was going to check in and say hi after catching up with Peter V on Saturday and I backtracked a bit to catch the thread, as it were. Why can't you all play nicely when I'm away?

Reformed band: I think it's fair to say that without JR2, the band lacked drive and certainly quality original material. I think we saw straight away the same pattern after the TLW split that we saw with Levon leaving the Dylan-era Hawks: In 1965/66 it wasn't plodding and bluesy enough for his taste, in 1977 he set about assembling an all-star cast to make plodding, bluesy recordings, and right up to the end - until the likes of Amy and Larry Campbell came along and cast an eye over things - Levon's rambles were a very nicely presented evening of plodding blues. Portions of the 80s and 90s Band weren't 100% free of that.

That said, I couldn't help but laugh at JR2s TV interview where he said post TLW that the idea was they'd take some time off and come back, but nobody came back. I did look to see if tongue would meet cheek, or a wry smile would appear, but no. Anyway it would have cracked his make up.

Congrats and hi to the new guys already causing trouble. Just what the doctor ordered. Don't stay up too late now, playmates.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 22:07:38 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Heavy Rotation

I don’t generally do a lot of shuffle play, but here are some current favorites that are currently getting a lot of spin time on CD.

The Ladies:
‘Out On The Road’ – Norah Jones
‘He’s A Rebel’ – The Crystals (Darlene Love)
‘September Gurls’ – The Bangles (one of my guilty pleasures)
‘Desperado’ – Linda Ronstadt

The Boys:
‘All I’ve Got To Do’ – The Beatles
‘I’ll Be Back’ – The Beatles
‘I’ve Just Seen A Face’ – The Beatles
‘Another Girl’ – The Beatles
‘Paperback Writer’ The Beatles

From The Band, I’ve really been enjoying a lot of the performances on the Academy of Music Soundboard Mix. In particular, Rick’s vocals on ‘Caledonia Mission’. He really stretches the timing in a way that, to my ears, is reminiscent of the way Richard stretches the timing on ‘Tears of Rage’ from MFBP. It just struck me as very soulful and quite different from the previous ‘Caledonia Mission’ performance (which is also excellent) on the original Rock of Ages release. This may be diving into minutiae, but it’s details like this that amaze me.

The first moment that really caught my ear from the Soundboard version starts at about 1 minute and goes to about the 1:20 mark with the lines:
“I can't get to you from your garden gate
You know it's always locked by the magistrate”.

And then again from approximately 2:00 – 2:20 with the lines:
“You know I do believe in your hexagram
But can you tell me how they all knew the plan?”

The way Rick extracts every sense of meaning from the word “believe” is sheer artistry, and the horns in particular weave in and around Rick’s vocal in such a sympathetic call and response manner that makes this performance very compelling.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 20:19:09 CET 2014 from (108.199.115.229)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Beatles

Peter V. Thanks for your thoughts last week on the Beatles releases that I was inquiring about. Your summary matches up fairly closely with my basic understanding of how the releases have been presented, and the differences between the original Parlophone vs. the US Capitol releases.

The releases that I've been listening to most often during the past few years, have been from the 2009 Mono Box. Listening to the mono mixes on CD really gave me a new appreciation for the sound the Beatles produced, especially on the early to mid 1960's albums. The drums and bass seem to be much more prominent now, which to my ears, leads to a fuller and more balanced sound. In other words, "It Rocks!"

Additionally, I ended up buying most of the recent (2014) US Capitol releases individually rather than the complete new boxed set. I didn't feel as though I needed the Beatles story on CD, another booklet, or another box, but I did want to fill out my collection with the US releases, as those are the ones that I grew up listening to. The purist in me respects that the UK releases were what The Beatles and George Martin intended, and I have all of those and enjoy them. However the young fan that lives deep in my subconscious is hardwired to hear some of the albums with the sequences as Capitol presented them and are the versions I was more familiar with. It's difficult sometime to lose a first impression, and nostalgia certainly plays a role.

The other reason that I chose to buy them individually, is that I picked them up over a period of several weeks, which was kind of exciting, and gave me something to look forward to each week, rather than plunking down, all at once, for the big box. I also tend to grab a few of them when I'm heading out for a drive. I love boxed sets in general, but sometimes I have a tendency to leave the box on the shelf, and not listen to it as much as the individual albums.

There have been some Beatles fans upset with the fact that the 2009 UK remasters, have been used as the basis for the US Capitol release. As many people know, the original US Capitol releases in the 1960's had a variety of differences from their UK counterparts including extra reverb and echo, fake stereo created from mono, and in some cases, mono created from stereo fold-downs. All of this resulted in a distinctly different sound for the US market. The 4 disc Capitol releases that came out in 2004 and 2006 used these original mixes and were faithful to that sound. The downside of those releases, is that in many cases, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generation tapes were used, which don't hold up as well to modern standards.

At first, I was against the idea of making this new 2014 release by using the tracks from the 2009 remasters rather than the Capitol mixes from the 1960's. However, now that I've heard this "new" Capitol release, I think that the right choice was made in most cases. The sound is fantastic, and ultimately, I bought these to listen to. If I really want the "authentic" Capitol sound from the 1960's, I'll pull out my well-worn vinyl, and enjoy it that way. It's also kind of nice to have to the hit singles from the era included on the albums. From a cost perspective, that may not present as much of a value as keeping the singles and albums separate, but I like it. Also, It's nice to hear Rubber Soul presented with 'I've Just Seen A Face' as the lead-off track. I realize it's not as the Beatles intended it, but I think it makes for a better album.



Entered at Wed Mar 19 20:02:45 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: And/Band Voices

Should have said thank you BEG,Peter,Kevin-your kind words are deeply appreciated. Who's the best singer in The Band? Was that question asked?Either way,imagine a song sung by Richard being covered by Levon,or a Levon song done by Rick.Imagine all the combinations for switching things up.During the 80's & 90's into the next century we heard some of that happen as members passed.But,then compare the replacement singer to the original.Who's better? Can't really say.To me it seems the best singer was singing at the moment he sang and if someone else came in that was the best singer for the song at that moment.(Be here now!)The Band arranged voices I believe,in the same way they arranged their instrumentation.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 19:48:40 CET 2014 from (67.84.78.5)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Stop That Train

I don;t think this is what Peter Tosh had in mind when he wrote Stop That Train. See the link.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 19:09:34 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Opera/Hoops/Allmans

My favorite opera singer would have been my late dad who was invited to sing in the metropolitan opera here in nyc.He turned it down and despite great vocal and musical abilities decided to follow an academic path eventually writing a bunch of books on musicology related topics.His voice,despite my disdain for operatic music(!),was incredible.My late mom would have been my favorite female opera singer-she had a regular radio show in the 40's I believe.I'm a huge basketball fan-long suffering Knicks fan who was overjoyed to see the great Phil Jackson(a former woodstock resident,Band fan)return to ny to become prez of the Knicks.I also read the Allmans book by Al Paul-loved the approach-no authors subjective comments-lets the players,contradictions and all,tell their own story.The Allmans are retiring this current band at the end of 2014 and this may be the last ever beacon theater run ever.It's going quite well-the music has been excellent and the band is thankfully sticking to its own material for the most part-although thy covered IMND nicely last night.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 18:00:59 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The greatest Italian non opera song ever.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 17:48:06 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Italian

Fred san, sorry for being besserwisser but there is not such a thing as "Italian music which is not opera". I learned at least this truth when I planned a Toppermost list on FRANCO BATTIATO from Sicilia. I realized soon that I got above myself.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 15:24:24 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

I used to have Zucchero (w/Paul Young) on cassette.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 15:22:45 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Italian music that's not opera

Let's see (off the top of my head....I'll have to check the iPod & CD collection later):

Lucio Dalla

Francesco De Gregori

Skiantos

Paolo Conte

Premiata Forneria Marconi

Edoardo Bennato

Giorgio Gaber

Enzo Jannacci

and ......Bruce Springsteen (Sicilian on his mother's side) : )


Entered at Wed Mar 19 15:15:40 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Correction....Judy Mowat was mentioned on previous link but not highlighted as were her other two sisters in the I Threes. I've seen all of them with Bob Marley and The Wailers and only Judy Mowat solo at our Harbourfront. I guess that's why it bugged me that she wasn't shown with photo and given praises.

Ok, in the past lists would bring out more posters.....I guess things ain't what they used to be. ;-D


Entered at Wed Mar 19 15:04:19 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Fred. I knew because his father coached in Italy as well. So which Italian musicians (who sing in Italian) do you (or anyone else) have in your collection? A former student teacher made a cassette with various artists but I no longer have that one but I stlll have in my music collection:

Andrea Bocelli
Umberto Tozzi
Eros Ramazotti
Zuccherro with Paul Young

Nomadic Mike...I'm not familiar with your fave girlz....
Btw, tres cool that you've actually seen The Hawks!!!!!

Mothers and Sisters of Reggae/Dancehall link....Begins with photo of I Threes and yet site omits acknowledging Judy Mowat as they did with Marcia and Rita. Not cool at all!


Entered at Wed Mar 19 14:17:59 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: late great

"Down In The Flood" - Fairport Convention
Evanston, Illinois 5 Sep 75
Sandy Denny, Jerry Donahue, Trevor Lucas, Dave Pegg, Bruce Rowland, Dave Swarbrick


Entered at Wed Mar 19 14:15:15 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Scout's Honour (oh wait I was never a Boy Scout)

Angelina: Nope & (sort of) Yep.

Nope: I knew that because when his father coached in Japan a few years ago, it was mentioned during an interview.

(sort of)Yep: after I posted, I had a moment of self-doubt, so I searched to make sure I had the correct player. I did! Phew! : )

I liked Dr. J, and for the past several years Steve Nash (although I don't watch as much NBA as I did once upon a time)


Entered at Wed Mar 19 13:41:41 CET 2014 from (70.30.113.76)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Fave girlz

Kris Delmhorst, Jenny Lewis . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 19 12:43:05 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Correction: Levon Helm and Garth Hudson with Michelle Shocked....not with Rick Danko. I think because I saw Levon and Rick perform in TO I made the mistake. To tell the truth, when I bought this recording I wasn't even aware they collaborated with her as she's a great artist in her own right.

Glenn T...I have Bonnie Raitt in my music collection, as well as Grace Slick with Jefferson Airplane, but at the moment not on my computer or Nano.
I still don't get why she wasn't on stage at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival as I've seen them both on the same bill....They did perform one song together. Also, Susan Tedeschi was at the Festival as back up singer to.......but didn't play guitar!!!!!!!!! Huh??????


Entered at Wed Mar 19 12:33:36 CET 2014 from (108.217.93.87)

Posted by:

Glenn T

Subject: Female singers on mp3...

Here are a few I've been listening to: Eva Cassidy, Bonnie Raitt, Patti Scialfa


Entered at Wed Mar 19 12:32:03 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Fred...Alright, alright, alright. Tell the truth....Did you have to look it up? It's so cool to hear him speak Italian.....
My fave players were Kareem Abdul Jabbar and Reggie Miller. :-D

Peter....????? I have no idea who you are listening to. I do however have one song....by Doris Duke...Divorce Decree

The other female artists who are on my computer but not on my Nano due to lack of space are (some artists I might only have one song downloaded in my music collection) are:

Julie Miller with Buddy Miller
Julie Miller solo
Victoria Williams with Louuu
Lucinda Williams
Joni Mitchell
Anouk (Thanks to Norbert)
Aretha Franklin
Kate and Anna McGarrigle
Joan Baez
Joan Armatrading
Libby Titus
Sheryl Crow with Kid Rock
Sheryl Crow solo
Stevie Nicks
TLC
Tracy Chapman
Yolanda Adams
Kim Burrell
Linda Ronstadt
Maria McKee with Lone Justice
Maria McKee solo
Macy Gray
Madonna
Marianne Faithfull with Garth Hudson
Mary Chapin Carpenter
Michelle Shocked with Levon and Rick
Molly Johnson
Norah Jones
Amy Helm with Ollabelle
Patsy Cline
Patti Smith
Sarah Harmer
Sarah Brightman with Andrea Bocelli


Entered at Wed Mar 19 11:40:44 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Forming my answer as a question

Angelina: Who is Kobe Bryant?


Entered at Wed Mar 19 11:29:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Female vocals …

Six out of my ten … but apart from the ten, I've been listening to two revived albums in Swamp Dogg's Soul & Blues series. I'm A loser by Doris Duke, and Too Many People in One Bed by Sandra Phillips. They both did a couple of the same songs, and Sandra Phillips used to perform as Doris Duke sometimes … the story's in the notes.

I've dug Nina Simone off the dustier shelves this week too.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 10:57:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Alright, alright, alright Peter (I only have David Crosby with Crosby, Stills and Nash), Solomon (I have one song by Greg Brown...Real Good Friend) and Fred (I only have by Elton John...Your Song). Everyone had artists on their lists that I didn't know their music. I only have a Nano so I can't download as much music as on an iPod.

So today I checked to see which female musicians I chose at one time to download and here they are on random shuffle as in the Rick Danko shuffle:

1.Celine Dion with Zachary Richard...Acadian Driftwood
2.Jennifer Lopez...Starting Over
3.Nicki Minaj...Fly
4.Ani DiFranco...Fuel
5.Mavis Staples with The Staple Singers...Touch A Hand (Make A Friend)
6.Mavis Staples with The Staple Singers...Let's Do It Again
7.Nicki Minaj...Last Chance
8.Mavis Staples with The Staple Singers...The Weight
9.Amy Winehouse...You Know I'm No Good
10.Etta James...I'd Rather Go Blind

Other songs by female artists on random shuffle would be:

Emmylouuuu Harris
Annie Lennox
Jackie DeShannon
Natalie Merchant
Whitney Houston
Jesse J
Michelle Chamuel
10,000 Maniacs with Natalie Merchant
Eurthymics with Annie Lennox
Katy Perry
Adele
Carly Simon
Rhianna
Monica
Alison Moyet
Crash Vegas with Michelle McAdorey, (she's the one in Blue Rodeo's video Try and the late Bob McAdorey was her Uncle)
Holly McNarland (Robbie should have promoted her instead of hmmmm....former model who I saw with him at Indigo Bookstore)
Kendra Smith with Mazzy Star
Mariah Carey
Margo Timmins with Cowboy Junkies
Ariana Grande
Tara Nevins with Donna The Buffalo (Peter M...You'd most likely appreciate them because of Zydeco influences)
Sporty Spice with Bryan Adams
Mary Margaret O'Hara
Melanie Martinez
Sinead O'Connor
Kate Bush
Sarah McLachlan
K.D. Lang
Jann Arden with Jackson Browne
Dolly Parton with Kenny Rogers
Emeli Sandi
Terri Ellis
Cree Summer
Jennifer Lopez with Marc Anthony
Sade
Diana Ross with The Supremes
Joy Williams with Civil Wars

What other female artists are all of you listening to ony your iPod/Computer/Phone?

Hey Fred...Which NBA basketball player speaks fluent Italian and he's not Italian? Always good to "see" you here btw.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 09:21:40 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Is it randomly shuffling or shuffling randomly?

I rarely hit the shuffle on my iPod, but today I did and here are the first 5:

Cut Me Loose Charly - Bobby Timmons

The Bright Mississippi - Allen Toussaint

Another Tricky Day - The Who

Philadelphia Freedom - Elton John

Roll 'Em Pete - Big Joe Turner & Count Basie


Entered at Wed Mar 19 03:42:01 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

RIP.....Joe Lala. Great percussionist.


Entered at Wed Mar 19 00:14:27 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Sharon Jones & The DapKings

Peter V: I was delighted to note that you are listening to Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings. They are the resurrection of soul/R&B. We are excited to be seeing them in a small venue in Victoria BC on 4 April. For anyone who hasn't discovered Sharon Jones and her gang you are in for a treat.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 19:42:34 CET 2014 from (92.18.194.195)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Listening on Last.fm

The Band – Sleeping, Greg Brown – Blue Car, Totta Näslund – Between Trains, Greg Brown – Lullaby, Taj Mahal – Zanzibar, Nick Drake – Pink Moon, Dick Gaughan – When I'm Gone, The Staple Singers – If You're Ready (Come Go With Me)


Entered at Tue Mar 18 19:00:53 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie photo

Not sure if this will work but you should see a photo of Robbie and others (including Bono) in Studio B of The Village Recording facility in West LA:

https://foursquare.com/villagestudios/photos

If it just shows a page of thumbnails, you'll have to find the photo and click on it.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 18:48:08 CET 2014 from (24.161.13.96)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties

Back in 1994, while working for Not Fade Away Graphics, the merch-guys for The Band, I recall receiving a phone call one morning from Lee Gabites in Manchester, informing us of this new thing called a web site that was dedicated to The Band. It wasn't too long before we were in touch with Jan, who we helped with up to date news, tour info, hooking him up with George L. for pictures, etc.

And it was funny for the next year or so out on the road: everywhere we went to do shows, Seattle, Memphis, Philly or Chicago, we put up a sign explaining the new site and giving the address (to ping?), but all of the American fans said, "No way, no web addresses end with a '.no'.

Little did they imagine they'd still be 'pinging' this site 20 years later!

Hey, this site's older than Google!

Congratulation, Jan from this 20 year fan!


Entered at Tue Mar 18 17:23:53 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: October Band Fest

I'll try!


Entered at Tue Mar 18 17:17:44 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Peter. No, my list was which songs are on your random playlist right now, not which ones are on heavy rotation....different list for sure.

Heavy Rotation:
1.Sign Language...Eric Clapton
2.I'm Into You...Jennifer Lopez (featuring Lil Wayne)
3.Go On and Cry...Mynah Byrds
4.The Pan Within (live)...The Waterboys...Mike Scott just has to begin with whoooh! and I'm with him all the way.
5.Any Rain...Garland Jeffreys

Btw, I forgot to say that if we have a lot of notice, big travellers like yourself would be able to fly out to Woodstock or Toronto, right? ;-D

For those of you who haven't been here long......Only JH one year posted Happy International Women's Day in the What's New section and it was very much appreciated.

Five more songs that just played on my Nano on shuffle:
1. Crazy Love...Ray and Van
2.If Not For You...Bryan Ferry
3.I Call Your Name...Mink DeVille
4.If I Wanted Someone...Dawes
5.Miracle...The Waterboys


Entered at Tue Mar 18 16:24:40 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Regional charts

I checked in to post this, saw BEG's post and got sidetracked.

Regional charts were not a feature in the UK. In the mid-60s “POP Weekly” had a “Top 30 South” and a “Top 30 North” but I’ve looked at them, and the difference is less than 10% and I’ve no idea how they compiled them. Sometimes a local paper had a local shop, or small chain, do their charts. I’m sure the local paper did that in Bournemouth for a while, and that would have meant lots of Zoot Money and Manfred Mann and other South Coast favourites.

But looking at record shops with secondhand vinyl, I can see there were strong regional patterns even in Britain. In the early days of Island, Chris Blackwell delivered the ska records in his Mini, and only did shops in London and Birmingham. Today you’ll find reggae at low prices where I live on the South Coast, but much higher prices in London. You find more heavy metal in the Midlands, Wales and Yorkshire and holding better prices. We talk about “Northern Soul” but the best places to find early soul discs (pre-dating the phenomenon) is along the South Coast, because the holiday resorts were quick into discos. and had the tourist trade to keep them busy. There’s a lot of psych as you move east. West Dorset and Somerset are particularly good for folk. Ireland is strong on both folk and Country & Western


Entered at Tue Mar 18 16:22:39 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent post from BEG, both on Robbie's Vault and on the call to "come back."

Heaviest listening this month? We should all do a list. These are my tracks.

1) Dangerous Night- David Crosby

2) Labour She Calls Home - Seth Lakeman

3) Wrecking Ball - Hard Working Americans

4) King of Mexico - Bap Kennedy

5) Long Time, Wrong Time - Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

6) Moneyball - Jennifer Nettles

7) Business - Chloe Charles

8) White Rabbit - Mayssa Karaa (American Hustle OST)

9) Holy City - Joan As Policewoman

10) Driva Man - The Alabama Shakes (12 Years A Slave OST)

Hmm. The girls win. 6 out of 10.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 16:06:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Top 10: Robbie Robertson's Vault Favorites

By: Concert Vault
10 SONGS / 51:03

1 Alabama Shakes / Be Mine 04:09
2 Gary Clark Jr. / Bright Lights 07:13...saw him at Eric Clapton's Guitar Fest and I dig him...He has that "IT" factor and skills to back it up.
3 Band of Skulls / I Know What I Am 03:23
4 Bon Iver / Flume 04:39
5 Michael Kiwanuka / Rest 03:47
6 Van Morrison / Tupelo Honey 07:24....absolute fave video performance is when Toni Marcus is on violin....She's transported somewhere else here.
7 Charles Mingus / Goodbye Pork Pie Hat 07:57
8 Sly & the Family Stone / Life 03:04
9 Prince & the New Power Generation / What Is Hip? 05:25
10 Bonnie Raitt / Angel From Montgomery

So what is on everyone's iPod/Phone/Computer at the moment? Here are my last five plays on shuffle....

1.Fistful Of Mercy...With Whom You Belong
2.Phosphorescent Muchacho...Song For Zula
3.The Waterboys...The Whole Of The Moon
4.The Dixie Hummingbirds...When I Go Away
5.Billy Bragg...To Have And Not To Have

The Band Website/Birthday for JH Celebration...I remember years ago that Bashful Bill and Bama Belle wanted to organize a get together. How about Woodstock/Toronto...Home of The Hawks and Robbie Robertson, JD, JT, Bill M, Kevin J and moi. Also, Nomadic Mike, Northern Boy and Northern Girl can make special trip as they're only few hours away. Maybe The Weber Brothers can hang with us.

;-D Ilkka...How are you doing? You don't blah, blah, blah about Dylan like you used to. Where is Norbert and Kalervo hiding these days?

Jed...I miss your vibe here.

Wallsend...Do I have to post more of Robbie's interview with BAM for you to return?

David P...It's understandable how you felt and responded. Apologies were offered. A lot of us right now are dealing with loved ones with cancer.....Yes, I understand only too well. I know you'll be baaaaaack because it's in your blood to blah, blah, blah about music too. :-D


Entered at Tue Mar 18 12:21:41 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Agreed on the PONO, hard to say until I hear it but it sounds so promising.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 11:02:18 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: PONO

Joan, I am curious about Neil Young's PONO project. I have read conflicting reports about the sound quality and the science behind it. I would like to give it a listen.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 03:56:23 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: She will break your heart.

Re: Soul Set Robbie song: This Band site agrees with you, Bill. Unfortunately, since I'd love to hear other versions of STIT. I did not know about the Australian one.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 01:32:42 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

It just struck me that the Soul Set record may have been "He Don't Love You" not TSIT. Sorry if so.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 00:35:35 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Don't know what happened there

Sometimes, I write a message, post it to this site but it never appears. This time, a version of my message has appeared before I've actually finished it. Ah well.


Entered at Tue Mar 18 00:32:21 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Richard Avedon photos of The Band

You will all be familiar with the Richard Avedon photo of The Band on CAHOOTS. There is another of his photos of The Band in his book entitled THE SIXTIES.

The one on this site showing The Band and Taplin have sandwiches and Coke appears to be from the same photo session.

Apart from that, I don't recall any more, so my question is: have any other of Avedon's photos of The Band been published?


Entered at Tue Mar 18 00:28:22 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Richard Avedon photos of The Band

You will all be familiar with the Richard Avedon photo of The Band on CAHOOTS. There is another of his photos of The Band in his book entitled THE SIXTIES.

I don't recall any others, so my question is: have any other of Avedon's photos of The Band been published?


Entered at Tue Mar 18 00:05:35 CET 2014 from (69.112.187.245)

Posted by:

Rick S.

Location: Suffern, NY

Subject: Band Website Anniversary

Hi Jan, how about celebrating the anniversary at the Bethel Woods Center Events Gallery (next to the Woodstock Museum). This is on the site of the 1969 Woodstock Festival.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 20:41:13 CET 2014 from (24.105.254.235)

Posted by:

Lil

Subject: Party!!!!

I think the long-suffering editor and site developer should throw a huge 20th anniversary (and 55th birthday) bash at Levon's barn! Oh.. and he needs to bring Aquavit :-)


Entered at Mon Mar 17 20:22:10 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.176)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Back issues of Billboard magazine are now largely archived via Google Book Search (link above; specify Billboard as title). I don't know if it's all in there, and the search function is not 100% reliable, but I've found some interesting stuff poking around, especially in trying to ascertain release dates for old albums from the 1960s.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 20:15:06 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: PONO Music

I would love to hear some opinions on the PONO music systems, Elliot Mazer said he thought it was very cool


Entered at Mon Mar 17 19:55:00 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Hm. The Band web site went on-line in October 1994, exact date uncertain. So: The decision has been made to celebrate our 20th anniversary on the the 55th birthday of your long-suffering editor and site developer: October 12th 2014. Suggestions on how to mark the event welcome.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 17:40:10 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cashbox

Didn't Cashbox do regional charts as well? They never cashed in on their charts, unlike Billboard. It would be fascinating to be able to access them … Tommy James says a lot about regional hits in his book.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 17:37:58 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wild Thing

The Troggs were from Andover in Hampshire. When I was there last week, they joked that Andover was "Hand over" with an 'Ampshire dropped H. If Hedgehopper's Anonymous had had a Jonathan King production on a version of Wild Thing, I suspect it would have lost the power that Reg Presley's voice gave it.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 17:31:11 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Interesting to read that the Hedgehoppers Anonymous turned down Wild Thing to their everlasting regret.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 17:20:07 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Back in the day, Top 40 lists could be quite parochial. A hit in LA may not be a hit in NY. Good News Week got a lot of play here in Chicago and my brother bought the single.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 16:37:19 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: be careful 'bout "The Stones I Throw"

JT: The Soul Set released "The Stones I Throw" on a 45 circa '66, b/w a retitled instrumental version of the same. I think they were from NJ or some place like that. On the BB label, I believe.

Also, Ocean included their version of the song on their first LP, "Put Your Hand In The Hand" (from 1970), named, of course, after their huge hit, which was written by a former bandmate of Robbie Robertson, Gene MacLellan (ex-Consuls, ex-Suedes).

Presumably the Soul Set caught our guys at Tony Mart's, while Ocean's leader Greg Brown had been part of the sub-Hawks musical world around his hometown of London, Ontario.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 15:08:32 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The critic was in POP Weekly, a teen mag. I found three years worth (incomplete) and got the lot. I'm slowly plowing through them.

Yesterday's other favorite was "Substitute" which they complain doesn't sound like The Who at all. It sounds very much like The Who to me!


Entered at Mon Mar 17 15:08:20 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Criticism of lyrics of 'edge'oppers A.

Thank you Peter. I'll read subsequent posts more carefully from now on.

Where did the criticism come from?


Entered at Mon Mar 17 15:02:12 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Absolutely correct. As my home town was in 'Ampshire when I was born (it became Dorset in 1971), not putting Edge Opper means I lose my "Ampshire Og" status.

Researching rock is irritating. In Britain, you could buy a Guinness Book with the Record Retailer chart for every week, and I also have a 1970s New Musical Express book with their chart for every week. The Record Retailer chart became the BBC chart, but back in the 1960s, we were all more interested in the NME chart which was definitely less middle of the road (probably due to chart rigging, but never mind).

Billboard don't seem to have published that … they list records that hit the Top 40 alphabetically, or do books of Number Ones and Million sellers, but for social history, being able to access the Top 30 for a particular week is fascinating. it's great for writing fiction … you can more or less playlist the appropriate chart for the week you're writing about.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 14:52:12 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'ells Bells'

Wouldn't it be 'Edge'oppers'? Please correct me if I'm wrong.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 14:49:31 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Chart position USA

The chart clue indeed 'threw me off'.

“It’s Good News Week” peaks at UK #5 and also reaches #48 in the US Billboard chart".

I believe it did better in Canada. I certainly knew it and remember it got a lot of airplay

I'm still not certain where the criticism of that song (and subsequent records seemingly) comes from. Of course, one can see how it would be a natural for a news report station or such.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 14:19:46 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: I missed it

I missed: " Al is correct". That song got play in Canada for weeks. I guess not in USA?


Entered at Mon Mar 17 13:43:54 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Love the first two and a half minutes here....
"Born in England and raised in Ireland, Lynott always considered himself to be Irish. His friend and Thin Lizzy bandmate Scott Gorham said in 2013: "Phil was so proud of being Irish. No matter where he went in the world, if we were talking to a journalist and they got something wrong about Ireland, he'd give the guy a history lesson. It meant a lot to him."

Think I'll just fall to pieces
If I don't find something else to do
This sadness never ceases
I'm still in love with you


Entered at Mon Mar 17 13:15:32 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Happy St. PATRICK'S Day!


Entered at Mon Mar 17 12:48:46 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Nice Cover Al, Thanks.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 11:27:32 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: For Calvin - a fine cover of one of Gene's gems

Just in case you haven't seen it before. I think they really do it justice.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 10:43:33 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band on Youtube

I recently upgraded my internet connection from dsl to fios and spent some quality time on youtube . I was pleasantly surprised at how much Band (solo and group) footage is out there. Some of the more interesting clips were 'This country's Rockin' with The Band and Ronnie Hawkins at the Pontiac silverdome in the late 80's. A Danko/Butterfield concert from '79, a bearded Danko singing 'The weight' with John Dawson from '97, several Band shows from the 90's that I hadn't seen before. I found an clip of Levon playing 'short fat fanny' on Conan in '93 and in the interview segment, Levon talk about seeing Elvis with and without a drummer and says that he doesn't consider really himself a vocalist. If someone had carte blanche to pick and choose through this material, they could compile a Band anthology that would be truly amazing.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 10:28:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Indeed, in Southampton, or anywhere in 'Ampshire, they would be 'Edgehoppers Anonymous.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 09:18:11 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Edge hoppers annonymous

Yeah needless to say I did see your Soton response P. And Pat's too.

It just tickled me that Rog and the others were still at it half a day later

:-0


Entered at Mon Mar 17 08:50:29 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hmm. I did post "Al is correct" with a link to the song. It was #5 in the UK, but the theme to an Australian TV show more recently. It wasn't Top 40 in Billboard, the main reference I have. US charts are not as well documented as UK ones in print. I noticed most British music papers used Cashbox charts, but only Billboard have produced the chart books. Also, I can't see much record of the strong regional charts difference in print. So I may have misled you all there.

Hedgehoppers Anonymous were produced by the dreaded Jonathan King:

It's good news week, someone dropped a bomb somewhere …


Entered at Mon Mar 17 08:27:09 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Doctor, doctor, people keep ignoring me....

...next please

:-0)


Entered at Mon Mar 17 07:12:59 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: "The Stones I Throw"

Entry to this GB site April 1997; Sun Apr 27 05:29:33 MET DST 1997 Rod Prowse From: Wellington, New Zealand I have found some sheet music for "The Stones I Throw". It was recorded by some one called Normie Rowe on Sunshine Records. He looks like a clean cut kid in a woollen jumper.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 06:56:40 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Normie Rowe and the Playboys

Peter V: Known well in Australia: Possibly charted in UK. We never heard of them in North America. ... I am guessing Normie Rowe and the Playboys (Que Sera Sera/ b side Shaking All Over.

I did not know anyone else recorded "The Stones That I Throw". ( a b side the following year).

However, I may be totally off course here. Who described lyrics in this way? That somehow does not fit with my guess. So we may have to press on, but I'm lost if this is not the answer. (Seekers and Bee Gees don't fit: they had USA hits).


Entered at Mon Mar 17 03:28:02 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

Scott Asheton, the Drummer for the Stooges, just past away at the age of 64. Meaning that Iggy Pop at 68 is the only living original Stooge.

Cant say I ever saw that coming.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 02:16:52 CET 2014 from (125.2.202.21)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Peter V

I don't know the answer to your quiz, but can't resist a few guesses:

Eve of Destruction - Barry McGuire

Game of Love - Wayne Fontana & the Mindbenders

Get Off My Cloud or Satisfaction - Stones

We Gotta Get Out of this Place - Animals

In the Ghetto was later, 1969 from memory, big comeback year.


Entered at Mon Mar 17 01:24:49 CET 2014 from (82.132.247.113)

Posted by:

LG

Location: UK

Subject: Levon

Been listening to Levon's solo albums for a few hours....I really love Sweet Peach Georgia Wine from American Son. Fred Carter produced. Drinking red wine listening to Electric Dirt raising a glass. God bless you Levon x


Entered at Sun Mar 16 22:53:05 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: BEG BAND BOOK LINK

Beg thanks for the tip. Interesting. I can send away to a book store I use and get a hand signed John Grisham book for $27.00. $44.00 for yet another music book is too much. Your tip BEG was worth it.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 21:29:22 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Al E, Good News Week was big in America.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 20:55:08 CET 2014 from (148.122.163.70)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham (but right now in Norway - yay!)

Subject: Not a King fan, but...

In The Ghetto? Or is '65 too early?


Entered at Sun Mar 16 20:52:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Al: Second in the Premiership? If Southampton can move that one place to go above Man. U, happiness will be complete.

And Al is correct. link to Good News Week.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 19:47:08 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The F factor - Fred and Francoise

Not necessarily in that order

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 16 19:44:25 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hmmm

Prompted by our amazing destruction of Man U I'm going for Hedgehoppers Annonymous It's Good News Week.

Come on you mighty reds.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 16 18:46:42 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I love reading old reviews in pop magazines, which I pick up when I see them. Just read an October 1964 review of "Ain't That Lovin' You Baby" by Elvis Presley. The reviewer says that Elvis fans will love it. But, he continues, what about those people who don't like Elvis? There's nothing here to change their minds, he concludes.

Right. That would be because they don't like Elvis, wouldn't it?

And which hit from September 1965 is described here?

"I'm not particularly squeamish and I do believe in facing up fairly and squarely to the starker facts of life - but I consider it is in extremely bad taste to write such lyrics in the cause of popular commercialism … as each disc arrives on the scene the lyrics get sicker and sicker … However as far as the performance of this offering is concerned, the group do very well; they give it an attractive rhythm, and the vocal is easily acceptable - but it strikes that the vocal lacks sincerity which makes the lyric sound even worse."

It was not a hit in the USA, but is well known in Britain and better known in Australia.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 16:15:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, I just pre-ordered from amazon.co.uk for £24.95 … not that different but the shipping difference will be huge.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 14:46:36 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

If you want to preorder, you don't need to pay 40.00 plus shipping from drumawaytheblues.com as posted in What's New?

The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music [Hardcover]
Craig Harris (Author)
List Price: CDN$ 44.00
Price: CDN$ 26.33 & FREE Shipping


Entered at Sun Mar 16 14:39:10 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: For John D & Al E


Entered at Sun Mar 16 13:40:33 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

2013..."For this hour-long special, The Band co-founder and songwriter Robbie Robertson sits down with host Mike Etchart for a candid, insightful and revealing conversation on the behind-the-scenes history and dynamics of the group, and the inspiration and stories of some of their best known songs, like "The Weight", "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and many others that are interspersed throughout the program. Robbie also discusses the original influences of The Band and their music, and why their sound continues to influence contemporary groups like The Lumineers and Mumford & Sons.

Before there was "Americana".......there was The Band."

Timing and Cues
Segment 1 (12:29)

0:00-2:37 Show open, Robbie interview
2:37-3:00 “Like A Rolling Stone”-Bob Dylan (1966 live version)
3:00-3:36 Commentary, Robbie interview
3:37-4:16 “Open The Door, Homer” Bob Dylan and The Band
4:17-7:12 Commentary, Robbie Interview
7:13-11:35 “The Weight” The Band
11:36-12:29 Robbie interview, segment outro

End Segment 1

Segment 2 (18:59)

0:00-3:37 Segment open, Robbie Interview
3:38-8:02 “Up on Cripple Creek” The Band
8:03-10:01 Commentary, Robbie interview
10:02-13:29 “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” The Band
13:30-17:15 Commentary, Robbie interview
17:16-18:20 “The Shape I’m In” (live from Academy of Music) The Band
18:21-18:59 Segment outro

End of Segment 2

Segment 3 (22:29)

0:00-4:24 Segment open, Robbie interview
4:37-8:19 “Life Is A Carnival” (live from Academy of Music) The Band
8:20-15:05 Commentary, Robbie interview
15:06-16:35 “Like A Rolling Stone” (live from Academy of Music) The Band with Bob Dylan
16:36-17:19 Robbie interview
17:20-17:47 “The Weight” (Live from Academy of Music) The Band (partial)
17:48-18:45 Credits
19:00-22:16 “The Weight” (Live from Academy of Music) The Band (last part)
22:17-22:29 Outro

End of Segment 3


Entered at Sun Mar 16 13:05:00 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: ...sigh...swoon

Pete - it's sunday morning for god's sake. I was raised a clean living catholic altar boy...I shouldn't be tempted with these sort of mucky thoughts. The voice I can just about handle but the picture....

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 16 13:00:41 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

The link is to the EP sleeve of 'l'amitie'. Al. This may be the one you want.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 12:52:21 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm Marker, Turkey Scratch, Lee County, AR

"I am so glad they put this up. Levon Helm began his musical journey around the sounds of the blues and country music in this corner of the Delta before leaving for Canada, where he played with fellow Arkansan Ronnie Hawkins and eventually formed the Band. Levon was the sole American in the legendary rock group, where his Delta roots had a massive influence that continued with his remarkable later career."


Entered at Sun Mar 16 12:40:12 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Peter...Thanks for reminding me about Uncut's special issue on Louuu. I bought it for half price yesterday at World's Biggest Bookstore which is closing next weekend. Everything in the store is half price. I also bought:
Legends, Icons and Rebels
The Story of Bob Marley's Wailers
Impressionist Paris City of Light

I couldn't find this article on this site.
Q&A WITH ROBBIE ROBERTSON : Reflections on the Age of a 'Real' Rock Band
January 19, 1994
ROBERT HILBURN
TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC

Q: Let's talk about Hall of Fame caliber musicians. As a guitarist, who is the best guitarist you ever heard?

A: I always think of it in terms of styles, rather than technique. For instance, you could ask, "Who is a better trumpet player, Dizzy Gillespie or Miles Davis?" Well, I don't think one's better than the other, but I might say that I like Miles' sound more. It does more for me personally.

And in that sense, I could point to when I first heard Muddy Waters play bottleneck guitar. It had an influence on me that I still feel. I was doing some music for Barry Levinson's new movie, "Jimmy Hollywood," and I realized I was doing this guitar thing that goes back to when I was 15 and I heard Muddy Waters do it.

Q: What about the greatest singer? A: There are so many, but I have to go back to the ones who first impressed me, and you have to say Elvis Presley. When you hear him sing something like "Blue Moon," there's a sound in his voice that is unparalleled. Yet I liked the sound of Howlin' Wolf just as much.

Q: What about songs or songwriter?

A: If we are talking about the very beginning, there were things of Hank Williams' that hooked me . . . that made me think I'd like to make up something as strong as that.

I think "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" was probably the Williams song that had the biggest impact. It brought out a feeling in me that I didn't even know music could bring out, because most of the music I had heard on the radio before that was such happy-go-lucky stuff. . . . "How Much Is That Doggie in the Window" and things like that. Hank Williams was from another place, and that's where I wanted to go."


Entered at Sun Mar 16 12:31:38 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Francoise

Good stuff. Been on a Gene binge since Calvin's Toppermost article but I think Francoise will now take over the mantle.

As for the original vinyl stuff, I'll have to have a dig round to see what Mag had. I know there was an LP with her picture on the front at which I'd stare longingly.... sigh.

:-0)

Just to focus a bit more - my personal faves which no doubt accord with most fans like John and Pete...Comme, L' Amitié, La Nuit Est Sur la Ville, Rendez-Vous d'Automne,Il Se Fait Tard et [naturellement :-0)] Dans le Monde Entier

Just playing them all now it's so intoxicating listening to them it makes me wonder how come I don't play them all day every day. That voice...Jeez.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 16 12:14:22 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: "Loving"

John D: see link to Discogs.com. They have four vendors selling the "Loving" LP in the USA, starting at $14.95, though I thought the "Near Mint" one at $24.95 a safer bet for a 1968 LP. They only have one with the more interesting "En Anglais" sleeve, and that's a German copy on Disques Vogue (as I said it was UA in Britain) and that's SIXTY-FIVE euros!


Entered at Sun Mar 16 12:07:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Françoise Hardy

John, "Loving" was her second LP in English, and its British title was ironically: "En Anglais" and it was on United Artists in Britain in 1968. NOT to be confused with the earlier "Sings in English" which was 1966 and Disques Vogue. The earlier "Sings In English" is easily available, though an expensive import. As you say, "En Anglais" though listed on amazon as a vinyl LP is "unavailable" and I didn't see any secondhand ones. It has however gone on my mental radar and I'll keep an eye out as I spend so much of my time in secondhand vinyl shops.

On Jane Birkin, I have an article on"Je t'aime" in my work in preparation on record collecting, because it's one of the most covered songs, and one of the most parodied songs. Yesterday, I found the sheet music in a record shop for £2 and bought it to use the illustration. Earlier in the week I found Françoise Hardy's "Catch A Falling Star" single!


Entered at Sun Mar 16 11:55:35 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Françoise Hardy

It’s a French thing. Being different. So Citroen and Renault looked at cars and noted the gearstick could either be on the floor, or on the steering wheel. They shook their heads, and decided to place their gearsticks coming straight out of the dashboard. So with records. Until 1967, the dominant medium for popular music in France was the 4-track EP, not the single. I hadn’t realized this until a recent Record Collector article on French Motown EPs.

The Françoise Hardy discs spinning on the Edge’s Dansette were likely to have been EPs. She had a series on Pye, who licensed Disques Vogue in Britain, then mainly because of her popularity, Pye gave Disques Vogue its own British imprint. ‘Just Call and I’ll Be There’ in English was its first release, and a single, not an EP. Françoise Hardy EPs were imported from France too, and in surprisingly large numbers … they turn up a lot secondhand.

I am delighted to find two other guys who like Françoise Hardy, because most of the EPs that turn up have girls names written on them. She was hugely popular with girls who liked French lessons at school. My sister brought some back from a trip to Paris. I recall publicity calling her 'the French Bob Dylan' which shows how different the French are. She's much better looking and more elegant than Bob Dylan for a start, though I suppose being female accounts for that. I think really they meant she wrote a lot of her own songs and could play guitar.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 04:04:23 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Which is the best club in your golf bag?


Entered at Sun Mar 16 03:38:56 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Al. The album was called Loving............NOT Loving You. I've searched for that album. Her first in English and impossible to find. I don't believe it ever made it to CD. Released on Reprise over here.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 03:02:27 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al

Ahh you're so right Al. Those pouty lips. Long lovely hair...........and those eyes. Her first English album, "Loving You" is what originally caught my attention.

I went to Google Images tonight and saw her as she is today. It's always a wee bit of a shock to see someone whom you've only seen in their youth. However........no surprise. She is a very beautiful; but mature Francoise.


Entered at Sun Mar 16 02:41:08 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: So JD - seems like I have competition in my quest to woo Francoise

:-0)

As you clearly are aware, she is and will always remain the proverbial mutt's nuts John. Shy and understated, divinely beautiful and talented.

My good lady was a huge fan and before my dogged perseverence finally won the day with The Band, Procul Harum and the Moody Blues the delightful music of the wonderful Francoise would share equal billing on our Dansette as we snuggled away our courting years.

In the years since she's done lots of more ambitious stuff and some of it is really good but for me nothing beats those early Vogue 2 minute recordings. Melancholy by the bucket load.

But JD, last time I looked Liverpool was a darn sight nearer to Paris than Toronto so I guess you might just be fated to lose out on this one.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Mar 16 01:28:39 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Couldn't resist sharing this

"When Mick Jagger describes you as his ‘ideal woman’ while Bob Dylan is writing poetry for you and Salvador Dali demands you to be by his side at his latest gallery opening – wearing custom Paco Rabanne no less – it must be the je ne sais quoi. Musician, model and muse, no one epitomized Sixties Parisian chic like Françoise Hardy. Guitar in hand, Hardy wooed all of Europe with her girl next door charm juxtaposed with an utterly enigmatic French siren style."


Entered at Sun Mar 16 01:25:43 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

OK boys. Anyone remember one of my passions........Francois Hardy?


Entered at Sun Mar 16 01:24:52 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

As "Future Beavis" said to "Future Butthead", while sitting on the park bench, "We're SOoo...old!".


Entered at Sun Mar 16 01:22:09 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Everything old is new again

As I was thinking yesterday about the ridiculousness of "Who is the best singer in The Band?, and comparing it to the 1960's teenage girls' "Who is your favorite (or cutest) Beatle?", the boys' similiar question came to mind... It was the same one posted by Jeff... "Sophia Loren, Raquel Welch or Brigitte Bardot?". Of course, I'd only heard Jane Birkin at the time. After I'd actually SEEN her photos, it became a four way contest.


Entered at Sat Mar 15 19:48:42 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John (Paul) Hammond

Recommendation: I highly recommend John Hammond's new release - live- 'Timeless' if you are a blues fan. He is consistently at the top of his game. It's the music! Always the music.


Entered at Sat Mar 15 16:49:18 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: New The Band book

Craig Harris' new book "The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music" can now be pre-ordered from the author's website (link above).


Entered at Sat Mar 15 14:49:54 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dirt Farmer Band

I envy you Jon. From NYC to Upper NYS. What a place to be!


Entered at Sat Mar 15 09:27:32 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.121)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Talk about holding a note!

Anyone have a good vocal analogy for that kinda gravity defying......



Entered at Sat Mar 15 08:58:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Can I have Jennifer Lawrence (as in American Hustle) as one of the three goddesses?


Entered at Sat Mar 15 08:57:32 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Serious question, Jeff. I'm torn between Brigitte Bardot and Sophia Loren. Will have to send half an hour withGoogle Image before deciding. I'm leaning towards Sophia Loren, but that may be a preference for Italian over French, and I'm trying to dispel pictures of Bardot in her dogs sanctuary in her dotage.

But Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourgh's Je t'aime is sexier than the one he cut earlier with Bardot and which wasn't released for thirty years (desperately trying to get my mind back on music.)


Entered at Sat Mar 15 08:24:11 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.121)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Forgive me. Sports Illustrated Models were a poor analogy. Let's go with Sophia Loren, Raquel Welch, and Brigitte Bardot. Well now,i don't know. Maybe, Pam Grier, Stephanie Seymour, Halle Berry.....Gawd Damn, David P., Jed, look what you guys started........


Entered at Sat Mar 15 08:17:32 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Many thanks for the review and set list, Jon. It sounds an incredible evening. Set lists are great and one of the joys of Wavelength, the Van Morrison magazine was that they published a set list for every gig.

Jeff, is Sports Illustrated what Barry McKenzie in the Private Eye cartoons called a 'hygiene publication?" In my teens Health And Efficiency was a nudist hygiene publication much read by non nudists, especially teen aged boys. However, from memory the breasts were nondescript compared to the third page of every British tabloid newspaper.

A more elegant way of making an interesting comparison with the three voices would be the choice of Paris, offering an apple to three perfect goddesses.


Entered at Sat Mar 15 08:01:34 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.121)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Controversy. ......Put it All In Perspective.

Asking who is or was the best singer in The Band is kinda like a bunch of guys discussing which beautiful woman in a group of Sports Illustrated Models has the best pair of breasts. There's lot to consider, it's very different from considering which woman has the biggest pair. And in the end, great is great. How do ya judge which are best? David, Jed, whadya think?

There ya go. I been in and out of here, have no clue what the hell the controversy is about, but, one paragraph from Friend0 should redirect the heat off of everyone else.


Entered at Sat Mar 15 04:00:55 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Barney Hoskyns

I've been re-reading sections of the Hoskyns book for the last several days. It is a good read, but I forgot how negative he is towards everything after The Last Waltz. He is an equal opportunity snark, heavily criticsing the solo works of Robbie, Rick, Levon and the reformed Band.

Hopefully the new book on the Band coming out next month will be more balanced. From the blurbs on Amazon and Facebook, it looks promising.


Entered at Sat Mar 15 03:54:25 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Subject: The Dirt Farmer Band

Last night I enjoyed a wonderful performance by The Dirt Farmer Band (Amy Helm, Larry Campbell, Teresa Williams, Byron Isaacs, Justin Guip) at NYC’s City Winery. Loved every minute of the 2-hour show. A spicy, eclectic setlist and a raw, intimate, never-too-busy sound from them that IMO does have echoes of The Band in the way voices and instruments listen to each other, and harmonies overlap. Lots of highlights throughout, but of course the Levon/Band numbers, most with lead vocals by Amy, were a special treat, and the arrangements were fresh and inventive (Atlantic City strong and funky, Dixie pared-down and soulful, Ophelia sweet and a bit slower than usual, led by guitar and mandolin). More, please!

Setlist (from memory, missing a few numbers) with lead singers noted:

Single Girl, Married Girl - group
Atlantic City - Amy
Me and My Chauffeur Blues - Teresa
Caledonia Mission - Byron
Hills of Home – Amy
Sweat of My Brow - Teresa
She’s Gone - Larry
Ain’t That Good News - Amy
I’m Losing You - Byron
Attics of My Life – Larry/Teresa/Amy
The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down - Amy
You’ll Never Again Be Mine - Teresa
Ophelia - Amy
Mystery Train - group
Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning - Teresa

(encores)
Gloryland - group
Deep Elem Blues – Larry


Entered at Fri Mar 14 23:17:23 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: '..depend on the kindness of strangers'

With the recent controversy that has temporarily surfaced here has come comments reflecting directed kindness and consideration. This is a good thing and bodes well for the future of this site. As others have said, at times there will be disagreement and even negative comments. But apology and understanding seem to have overcome any negative issues in the past 36-48 hours here. Its the music, boss, its the music!


Entered at Fri Mar 14 19:28:56 CET 2014 from (24.105.254.235)

Posted by:

Lil

David P: I missed whatever went on, but I did see your post and wanted to send my condolences on the loss of your friend.

Keeping Mike Hayward, his wife Kim, and their son Garrett in my thoughts here.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 18:44:52 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……On the voice question…..it may well be that the qualifier of “quintessential” takes opinion out of it……but for every love interest of mine that I have ever introduced The Band to starting back in the 1970’s through the many years that followed…..it was always two Rick Danko ones – “Stage Freight” and “It Makes No Difference” that women connected to immediately and in very strong and lasting ways……..I once cued up “The Weight” for a women I had just met and she exclaimed “Gee Kevin, I never took you for a Country music fan” or something to that effect. She was French Canadian and lovely and smart - just not Band aware.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 18:37:34 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: posting

I hope we can clear this hurdle I don't post much but I a always here. kerrain, Jed, and Wallsend Forgive me for my bad manners Welcome. As you have already seen it can get a bit rough here, but it means no harm. I hope you all will continue posting. You will find out very quickly the limits

David all the above to you. I really would midss your posts


Entered at Fri Mar 14 18:21:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jed, I think you've been around longer than the other two! Of course you were included in the sentiment.

It's nothing to do with me, but from other times and other sites I do understand that you can get a sequence that is problematic overall. You can't pick and choose which bits you eradicate because that's taking sides. So you eradicate the sequence. Maybe there's too much to trawl back and take out the original spark. I've had posts eradicated in such an edit. There was an overall picture.

I'm sure David P has been here long enough to know how highly respected he is. We all lose posts on this sort of thing.

The answer is: No praise. No blame. No grudges. Back to the music (or indeed ice hockey).


Entered at Fri Mar 14 17:51:15 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed……If I had known you were considering leaving , I certainly would have mentioned you by name…….Many who mentioned David have known him here for 15 years or more…..not a case of preference and besides I am not sure anyone thought that you were involved in the skirmish in the first place………………We have all at various times been caught in crossfires…………Your focus on music and guitar in particular ( like David’s ) is very welcomed by me and others – all others – I am sure.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 17:36:22 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

I've read the comments, and if I'm getting it there seems to be interest in GB posters returning,all mentioned by name. Perhaps I'm being over sensitive but I sense that I remain unwelcome,again apologize and while I will continue enjoying reading the GB it's probably best I stay away.It's been a pleasure and I thank all here for allowing me to participate and I wish all here only good in life.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 15:41:10 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania NorthWest

Subject: Censorship

Calm down. I have been censored by Jan for a few times, too, and as a part of larger conversation like David P.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 15:16:40 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Here's the deal -- I posted a response to some insensitive comments about Levon's battle with cancer. I was not advocating censorship, but rather stating my personal feelings that such remarks were unnecessary & hurtful. The right to free speech is not an excuse for bad manners. As a result, I was the one who was censored, as our host deleted my post and, as I gather, some other subsequent ones I did not see before they were deleted. However, the original comments that I objected to still remain for y'all to savor. Carry on and enjoy yourselves.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 15:14:05 CET 2014 from (125.2.202.21)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Thanks to Peter V, BEG and others for their posts, in a roundabout way welcoming the new boys. I hope Wallsend is around to see them, too. I was enjoying the banter; I thought we were all being very grown up and was surprised at the edit, but then as I've said, this is a new toy for me.

I think Celtic Bhoy's original question about the "quintessential voice of The Band" leaves little room for personal opinion, it's Levon. All The Band's hits, such as they were, were his work. The image music fans at large have of The Band is most likely Levon in TLW, belting out Ophelia, Cripple Creek, or Dixie. His voice is also one of the most distinctive and uncompromised in rock, and the easiest to pick out on Band records. Rod mentioned consistency a little earlier, and there I agree wholeheartedly, too. Especially during the shambolic 73-74 live shows, it became apparent that perhaps Levon and Robbie were the only truly dependable performers left in the post Rock of Ages Band.

Quintessential aside, though, my weakness was always for Richard in his prime, and my favourite songs are his lead: Ruben Remus, Jawbone, Katie's Been Gone, Baby Lou, Orange Juice Blues...


Entered at Fri Mar 14 15:09:35 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: David P. leaving?

David, I still remember what happened for over ten years ago. I got tired on bullying here and stopped posting for a while. When I came back you posted "good to have you back" It made my day! You have probably forgotten it but somewhere in another part of the world someone still remembers it. A reason to stay if any...


Entered at Fri Mar 14 14:18:22 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for the explanation.

Ben: While I strongly agree with the no-best-voice camp, I agree that Levon is the 'voice of the Band' for the wider world, i.e., not us here but those who would really have to stretch to identify anything at all beyond TNTDODD, UoCC and that one about Nazareth. Let's take the Way-Back Machine to '67 when our guys were contestants on the original pilot of "The Voice". Proto-Blake: "Hot damn, boy, where y'all from? Arkansas - that's right next to Texas. I can work with you." Proto-Blake: "Hot damn, boy, I love Lefty Frizzell - Another Texan! That's my music and it's clearly yours. We belong together!" Proto-Shakira: "That deep voice, that soul - and now those eyes. I'm a melting pat of butter. Please take me, I mean pick me." Proto-Adam: "Great choice of songs, but your voice is a little thin and your control needs work. But you do some work on that and come back here and you can win this thing." Proto-Usher: "'Even If It's A Pig' - that's the only song you sing?"


Entered at Fri Mar 14 11:04:33 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Your favourite Beatle

Favourite Beatle: they sold more Ringo dolls in the USA than any other. At that point, ‘Who is your favourite Beatle?’ was a useful question in assessing new acquaintances. John was always the favoured reply, and remains the Rock Snob reply to this day. What we were talking about was the 2D cartoon persona they each projected. As Paul repeatedly points out in his authorized biography, he was the one listening to avant-garde music, making little films, hanging out in art galleries while John was in domestic bliss at home in front of the telly much of the time. But Paul was cheerful, friendly, unthreatening in the 2D cartoon, which said something about the confidence of those choosing him. George was the quiet mysterious loner for those who liked that sort of thing and the second Rock Snob choice, and Ringo the cuddly teddy bear. None of it “true.”

My current choice would be Paul.

Are the 2D images “true” about the Band?


Entered at Fri Mar 14 09:48:00 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On the GB and posters, I really hope no one packs up and goes away. The GB has been enriched of late by new posters like Kerrin and Wallsend. There was an inadvertent remark, which was apologized for, but as it was potentially upsetting for family members who might read it, our host took out the remark and subsequent references to it.

It’s happened before when stuff has been taken out and then the deletion has taken out subsequent stuff that mentioned it, which has included my comments. That’s the easiest way to do it. You also can’t take out a comment, and leave another post commenting on the deleted bit, however pleasant or erudite it might be.

So back to the conversation. I think it’s been conducted much more pleasantly than in the past. As well as being aware of sensitivities, let us also not be too quick to try and censor others’ legitimate and sincere views when we disagree with them.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 09:39:55 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Like Peter M, it took me years to work out who was singing what, apart from Levon. In those days, I think Wembley 74 cleared it up! Richard had lost it to quite a degree after Stage Fright, while Rick had some of his best performances in front of him. In the 90s, it had to be Rick and Levon together. They were both doing other stuff, and that was great, but unless you had both, it wasn’t ‘The Band’. The loss of Richard’s voice narrowed the repertoire, but certainly didn’t end it. And Rick could take over songs perfectly … though they avoided most Richard leads, which again thinned the set list. But that thinning had happened to a degree before the 76 tour.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 08:48:25 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: band voices

Based on consistency Levon 1st (and best performer along with Garth). Richard 2nd and Rick 3rd. At their individual bests they were all #1. For me Rick peaked around 76 on TLW and Islands. Richard faded after Moondog - but he trumps the others on the 2 live 83 videos.


Entered at Fri Mar 14 08:33:11 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: best voice

When I was in high school in the late 60's I'd often try to identify the singer on each of The Band's songs. I'd listen to a cassette tape or reel-to-reel tape of Music From Big Pink or "the Brown Album" with only rudimentary knowledge of which member played which instrument(s), knowing that there were four guys who sang. I eventually gave up, admitting to myself that whoever was singing on each song, or part of a song, was the best one for that particular piece. 45 years later, I still feel the same. Trying to pick the best singer in The Band, seems to me today as silly as listening to the girls back in those days debating "Who's your favorite Beatle?".


Entered at Fri Mar 14 04:22:04 CET 2014 from (101.119.15.170)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: What?

David p. I hope I'm jumping to conclusions and getting things wrong. Don't stop posting! That goes for all the regulars.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 20:16:22 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, Larry Campbell has subbed in Little Feat.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 20:14:47 CET 2014 from (68.3.40.120)

Posted by:

ToneLoc

Take a load off, Fanny! Keep up the great work here. The strangest part of this was when suddenly I found my hand immersed in a bowl of jello.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 18:06:01 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: posts

I have lost 2 posts already I'll keep this one short. David P I hope you won't stop posting. I value all of your posts and info

Best singer, I would have to go with Pat B and Carmen I can't pick


Entered at Thu Mar 13 17:51:49 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm with Carmen on the voice thing.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 16:48:56 CET 2014 from (171.159.192.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band voices and various thoughts

All three voices of the Band were outstanding. But If I had to pick one, it would be Levon. He was the southern voice. Without Levon, there was no Virgil Cane or Up on cripple creek or w.s walcott medicine show. There's no mistaking Levon's voice. Truly one of the greatest voices in popular music.

I agree with some of the recent posts regarding Larry Campbell's contribtions to Levon's last albums and midnight rambles. I was fortunate enrough to see two Midinbight rambles and was very impressed with Larry Campbell in his role as m.c. and multi-instrumentalist. I hope that the 'Midnight ramble, vol 3' that was annoucned a few years ago is re-scheduled and released at some point.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 16:44:19 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

So I finished two books in the last few days: the new Allman's bio and Ben Fong Torres' bio of Little Feat called Willin'. Now, Almost Famous has foreveer altered my peerception of BFT and this book does nothing to change it. The narrative style is weird and often confusing. He repeats at least two stories verbatim and has trouble using two conflicting sources for the same story--something the ABB bio did quite well.

Here's the backbreaker. He says that Feat pianist Bill Payne bought Richard Manuel's Steinway which had been in Shangli La Studios. The author then goes way out of his way to wonder how the piano ended up in Malibu, evidently unaware that the Band owned the studio and that the group lived there. Weird coming from a Rolling Stone editor.

I suppose the book is worthwhile but to me it is a real opportunity wasted.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 15:45:04 CET 2014 from (162.213.113.107)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Band Voices

To me it is impossible to rate the 3 Band voices against each other. Each one is so powerful in a unique way. All 3 could be considered top 10 in Rock and Roll history IMHO.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 10:44:02 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan introductions - again

I mentioned before that the spoken introduction used at Dylan concerts for some years was taken from a newspaper article. Since then and by chance, I came to another article on Dylan that happened to link to the text of that article, wherein you can find the said quote:

http://www.oocities.org/dragonraid/dylan/essay/hamburg.html http://www.oocities.org/dragonraid/dylan/essay/hamburg.html


Entered at Thu Mar 13 07:29:34 CET 2014 from (24.114.74.199)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"Sometimes I thought you felt too much" and "I don't believe it's all for nothing" are lines that stay with me as is the wonderfully honest and sometimes troubling "And the Dawn don't rescue me no more".............these are in some ways genius because they can reflect the way we all feel about others and ourselves at times...........we can all get upset at life or about others - even others here at this GB when they seem indifferent in matters of common courtesies like saying Thank You for certain postings..........But really......hang on tight to yourself and to those that really matter.......keep in perspective the slights or thoughts of those that don't.......and rock n roll with everything else......especially this place..........come on back David.....talk music.......and God Bless to Mike H.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 02:41:12 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thinking of Mike Hayward tonight......and the terrible ordeal his family is going through. You are all in our thoughts and prayers.


Entered at Thu Mar 13 01:42:38 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Review: Spiers & Boden

Review added (see link). A fantastic show demonstrating what you can do with fiddle, melodeon and traditional English songs. A great night!


Entered at Thu Mar 13 00:59:15 CET 2014 from (2.126.1.252)

Posted by:

Celtic Bhoy

Location: Scotland

Subject: Richard, in our thoughts.

If we ran a poll, asking "who is the quintessential voice of The Band", what would be the running order? I'd have to say Levon first, Richard second & Rick third. Any thoughts?


Entered at Thu Mar 13 00:54:19 CET 2014 from (2.126.1.252)

Posted by:

Jim Taheny

Location: Glasgow

Subject: Forgiveness!

WE forgive you Ged, it's what The Band family do!


Entered at Wed Mar 12 23:59:36 CET 2014 from (89.134.234.64)

Posted by:

Dany

Web: My link

I love your music guys ! :)


Entered at Wed Mar 12 22:59:07 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Great photo, John. And a well deserved award.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 21:41:08 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I think David P made a legit point but got caught in the crossfire. I'm hoping to exchange some Abros info with him as I just finished the new bio. Very insightful and wide-ranging, both he and the book.

The show last Friday at the Beacon was excellent, a real musical highlight of my life given all the implications of the run.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 21:25:26 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 30th Anniversary Dylan 1992

John D: I have watched to previous release and listened to the material many times and in general I have liked it.

I read your review with interest. I just bought it yesterday and have not had time to watch yet or to listen. When I do, I will of course put in my 2 cents.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 20:49:59 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Thank you very much for your kind comments. Very much appreciated. By the way Jerry what's your review on the Dylan 30th Anniversary DVD? Didn't get much ink on these pages. No where as much as Another Self Portrait

Pat. Montreal Canadians all the way. Not easy in a Leafs town. On a personal note, I hope David P comes back. I don't think he was out of place yesterday. My personal opinion.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 20:23:43 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Apologies/test-am I banned?

Testing if I've been banned. I might deserve to be.My deepest apologies to Jan and everyone here.I was out of line yesterday.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 19:38:41 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, what's your favorite hockey team?


Entered at Wed Mar 12 19:35:44 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John D: Radio at its finest

Kevin J: Thanks for posting that photo of John D for all to see. It is special!.

For any of you who have never had the privilege of listening to John D. on radio, you are missing something special. I have grown up with him through all of his stations and have had the opportunity to hear the best of what radio has offered us. My high opinion of radio at its best is based upon a few people and John D is foremost among them.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 19:15:16 CET 2014 from (24.114.74.199)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: A GB member is given an award from The Band in 1978 ! I came across this while looking for another photo.......pretty special John.............Bill M had gotten me so worked up thinking that Charlebois might have been wearing a Leaf's sweater that I went looking for evidence....to no avail...but came across this one.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 17:50:32 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan as a performer and painter

Dylan will perform here in Scania Northwest in July. Tickets will cost appr. 100 US dollars. (We have discussed this before.) - He will show some of the portraits he has painted in Frederiksborg Castle in Denmark as well. I promise not to miss the _portraits_. Music is another thing.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 12:55:00 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jan

Thank you Jan for the tribute videos to Richard and The Band. I realized that in two of the videos, I was seeing the early Band; with King Harvest and then the end of the Original 5 at The Last Waltz.

The memories and the reasons I fell in love with this group all flowed back. How blessed we've all been to live in these times.

Thank you Richard, Rick, Levon, Robbie and Garth.


Entered at Wed Mar 12 08:03:41 CET 2014 from (74.13.126.11)

Posted by:

Paulie

Web: My link

In memory of Richard Manuel.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 20:35:36 CET 2014 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for the Charlebois. BEG referred to the Band at Varsity Stadium way back when. Possibly the same festival that Charlebois appeared at - and came away with the most positive review by, I think it was, Richard Goldstein. Something about being truly fresh thing he heard all day. I'm pretty sure the photo that ran in the newspaper shows him wearing a hockey sweater - which indicated a level of discernment far above that displayed by, say, Roch Carrier's mother.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 19:37:03 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Levon does China Girl Live

Sissy Spacek on Gong. Bev D'angelo on background vocals. I believe Fred Carter on Mandolin. Sweet!


Entered at Tue Mar 11 19:18:48 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Shake This Town

LINK: "Shake This Town" from the very fine 2nd solo album and a wonderful Letterman appearance..........Ah.....how this might well have been another truly great album from The Band !


Entered at Tue Mar 11 17:09:23 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, David P, I'm reading the new ABros bio. After seeing them at the Beacon, I thought a refresher course was in order.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 17:07:48 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, I must pay more attention. Yes used to enter the stage to the last movement of Firebird, and Green Day uses Bohemian Rhapsody. Dylan had one of his bands play the Marine Corps Theme as he bounded onstate.

The L in ELP, Greg Lake, opened for The Band when he was a member of King Crimson.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 17:06:16 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Shine On!!!

Anyone who has quit smoking knows how the voice can recover…….interesting that Robbie was singing better on HTBC than on his debut one…………………………..also dig the interval bit after David Letterman does his Dick Clark and the Band with Robbie (?) goes into “The Weight”………………….This brought back memories of Levon’s last appearance on Letterman when Levon and the house band did “Dixie” at a commercial break.

Bill M: I liked your observation of the Robert Charlebois and the memories it conjured up. LINK: Charlebois with Louise Forestier on one of the all-time great Canadian songs. I recall this being a favorite of the late Steve as well.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 16:34:20 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Jerry Corbitt

Jerry Corbitt, a founding member of the Youngbloods, passed away Saturday at his home in Smiley, Texas. Born in the south Georgia town of Tifton, Mr. Corbitt, along with Jesse Colin Young, Lowell "Banana" Levinger and Joe Bauer, was an original member of the group before leaving for a solo career as a performer and producer.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 16:15:07 CET 2014 from (96.236.55.116)

Posted by:

goober

Location: up state new york

Subject: paul g

hey BEG thanks for mentioning Paul G. Yes he was a class quy with alot of information


Entered at Tue Mar 11 16:01:10 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Ugggggggh!!!!!!!!
Sincerest apologies to Juliet Roberts who was singing with Papa Wemba.
Posting too much today.
Good bye. Good day.
Sun is shining.....


Entered at Tue Mar 11 15:52:27 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's one of the artists one of my African students exposed me to.
Here's Papa Wemba covering Otis.
I bet you'll be groovin' in your chair or you'll be up and dancin'.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 15:29:01 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie naked on David Letterman's show.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 15:25:13 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Yes Jed!!!!!!!! Yeah!!!! Someone understands me!!!!!
;-D

....continued from BAM magazine

Wheel Of Fortune
Robbie Robertson Wins At American Roulette
by Chris Willman
pages 16-28

Chris Willman: "Was this really the first time since the end of the Band that you'd actually sat down with the intention of writing an album? There are no uncompleted projects in your closet?

Robbie Robertson: No. I didn't have the desire to do it. After I did The Last Waltz, I thought, "That ends that book. I'd like to write a new book, something else." It was just depression, that thing about "OK, it's time to write a record now, get in there, write some songs, and maybe you'll come up with something. You finish the songs, you've made the record, now get on the bus." I just didn't want to live that way anymore. So I deliberately didn't write any songs. I played all the time. I'd sit down at the piano or the guitar and fool around with things, but not to write songs - just to fool around, keep in shape.

Chris Willman: I was reading through some old interviews of yours. In one, from The King Of Comedy period (1983), you were talking about the Band split, and at the time you said it had to do with breaking the cycle of boredom - recording, touring, etc. Then, in a recent Musician article, you say that it was to avoid cycles of danger - self-destructive tendencies and so on...

Robbie Robertson: We talked about that in The Last Waltz, too, talking about the road. It's not a real safe place to be. And it's a lifestyle. Coming out of this generation and everything, we know all the people who bit the dust. And it's a lifestyle. And it had something to do with that, definitely - thinking "God, I just don't want to float out to sea one day, and if I can avoid that, I'd like to" - just trying to learn from a lot of other people who have.
It comes up here and there on this album, with "American Roulette" and "Fallen Angel," the verse has this idea of "I don't believe it's all for nothing." It's really saying, these martyrs are trying to tell us something, they're trying to pass something on. If we don't learn from this, we're not paying attention very well.

Chris Willman: Is there a song or even a moment that you think is more revealing of yourself than any other here? Obviously you're not the most strictly autobiographical writer in the world, but you make it sound like this record is closer than the Band records in terms of revealing what strictly your own interests are.

Robbie Robertson: Well, a lot of it's personal..."Fallen Angel" is a very, very personal song to me and was very hard for me to work on emotionally. But probably the most autobiographical thing that I've ever done in my life is "Testimony," just from my point of view. I feel more naked singing that song than any of them."


Entered at Tue Mar 11 15:00:43 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG/pics

Great great pics-thanks so much,BEG! Look how Levon holds the racquet-only a drummer might do that!HA!


Entered at Tue Mar 11 14:57:33 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Wallsend/BEG/Silence

BEG is right on Wallsend! Though I strongly differ with you,I welcome you.Debate/argument is not necessarily an evil.In fact,it's often how I change my thinking or learn how to think.BEG,thanks for the reminder that its ok to differ but not reject or alienate others.At least that's what I took from your words.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 14:07:44 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beatles US albums

The complete set of US albums was an odd release, though I suspect it's the fruit of the break-up of EMI. Universal bought EMI, but were forced by the European Monopolies Commission to break it up, which they did by selling off Parlophone (to Warner). However, before selling Parlophone, they shifted the complete Beatles library to Capitol (who had theoretically simply licensed it for North America). Now the whole catalogue is fully Capitol and I assume Universal are cashing in on that. I was kind of interested, but they released the first eight US albums several years ago as "The Capitol Albums 1" and "The Capitol Albums 2." That got as far as Rubber Soul, and they were all stereo and mono too.

By the time we get to Sgt Pepper, we're at more or less equivalence … Magical Mystery Tour was a double EP in Britain, and the Hey Jude LP wasn't released here, though Magical Mystery Tour (US version) was issued in the UK in the 70s. So you don't get a lot by buying all the Capitol albums in the new set if you already have the first eight.

Stereo for the early stuff is a curiosity, basically "Isn't this really bad?" because neither George Martin nor The Beatles had any involvement in stereo mixes (Britain's stereo market for rock was tiny early on). The consensus for everything up to and including Sgt Pepper is that the mono versions are way superior.

Of course the original Parlophone track selections are superior too, chosen by the band, while the Capitol releases were bent on squeezing out extra albums by adding singles, B-sides and EP tracks. All great material, but not part of the albums as conceived.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 13:54:06 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm, right, playing before 42,000 fans at Toronto's Varsity Stadium in 1974.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 13:31:46 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For Jed. Bob Dylan and Levon photo as well as others from 1974 tour.

Wallsend...Sorry, I forgot to say you're welcome for the interviews....It was a lot of typing after all. I must have been in a manic state. lol
Btw, most of us who are more controversial here received similar welcomes when we first posted. I wasn't on anyone's side when I first discovered this site many years ago. I was simply.....a Band fan. I was shocked..........to discover a Guest Book and to read post after post bashing Robbie in particular as there were different posters then and some have returned. I posted that Robbie's music was timesless like Armani's designs and that Levon at the time was not changing things up and........not only male but female posters came out....One in particular said that my post was one of the meanest posts ever! Don't let anyone silence you. Whether I agree with you or not.......no one should be silenced or else the rules should change here and every post that is negative to any Band member should be removed. I noticed in Levon's Guest Book that if any negative posts surfaced that they were immediately removed. I remember once even Paul Godfrey called me and said that I shouldn't post anything negative about Richard (I was sharing info Robbie told Pamela Wallin in a taped interview I had.). He said some posters who knew Richard didn't want to remember Richard or be reminded of Richard's disease of alcoholism or the times he crashed cars, etc. Yes, I understood......only too well......However, Robbie had a strong perspective too......

I don't believe it's all for nothing
It's not just written in the sand
Sometimes I thought you felt too much
And you crossed into the shadowland


Entered at Tue Mar 11 13:07:33 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Tura Lura

Thanks Jon for the reminder. It's been a while since I've listened to that one, but it's performances like that one that really showcased Richard's (& Van's) talent. Very tasteful musicianship too. I love the way it builds as the horns come in.

On the subject of the Beatles, has anyone picked up any of the Beatles U.S. album Capitol re-releases which just came out recently. My guess is that John D. may be interested. I'm curious to know if the U.S versions are the same ones that would have been released in Canada upon original release in the 1960's. Or if the Candian releases were the same as the U.K. versions as far as album track listings and mixes.

I picked up the 2009 Mono Boxed Set a few years ago, as well as some of the individual stereo releases that came out around the same time to fill out the collection.

I know that the Capitol 2014 releases share some of the same mixes from 2009, but an interesting thing this time is that they included mono and stereo mixes on each CD.

So far, I seem to prefer the Mono versions, especially for the early albums. It's amazing how much punchier the bass and drums are, and it's nice not to have the lead vocal panned all the way over to one side.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 08:49:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Pictures of ice hockey at an exhibition

No, Pat, the ELP discussion started a few days ago and Ian mentioned their version of Fanfare for the Common Man in the context of Dylan opening music

BTW, we also talked about Also Sprach Zarathustra, and I had forgotten it was Elvis who used it, well, I saw the trailer for the new Elton John worldwide cinem concert, and Elton is the other with the nerve to use it as an overture. I have seen that trailer about four times which is what confused me.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 04:45:40 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Ice Hockey?

I recall Levon enjoying some hoops,table tennis and tennis.At least I saw 3 pictures that showed him playing those games. Maybe I'm wrong-my memory is unclear.Dylan may have been in one or more of those pics.Were they wearing sneakers or boots?Definetly no gym clothing.Long Sleeves? Backstage possibly?These are the important things about The Band.Or not.Whatever.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 04:45:11 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe Bill M just made the the GB's first ELP reference.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 03:08:06 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J / Landmark: I'm in Ottawa for the evening and noticed a big poster on the wall of the NAC announcing that Robert Charlebois is playing there in a few days. For some reason that made what was already a pretty good day; AND, Louise Forestier will be joining him. Talk about nos glorieux!

I've seen just two shows at the NAC:
- two years ago a performance piece based on the life and songs of Joni Mitchell, which I attended because a good friend from Saskatoon (and a crony of Bonk's from 40+ years ago) was playing bass
- 40+ years ago to see ELP on their Tarkus tour, with Mylon and his Holy Smoke Doo Dah Band opening.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 02:54:13 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Third clip down in the Richard Manuel article on the What's New page (hat tip to Jan) -- Richard, Van Morrison and The Band doing Tura Lura Lural (Irish Lullaby) at The Last Waltz. Video quality not so hot but boy, give it a listen.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 02:09:38 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Wallsend and Todd

Rockin Chair is the real deal! Sort of a legend up here. Good guy and he never bullshits. Well maybe just a little when it comes to retirement! HaHa


Entered at Tue Mar 11 01:09:36 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Only an infidel would call it "ice" hockey ; )

Levon: an Atlanta Flames fan. No?

NHK Satellite Broadcast Channel 3 will be showing the Dylan tribute concert this coming Sunday evening. The commerical said "Part 1", no mention about a "Part 2" though.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 00:54:24 CET 2014 from (174.254.165.17)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Papal Visit

I know that I'm just getting back into the swing of things here, but did I miss a Papal Visit?!

That all sounds fine and dandy....just don't tell Sinead. She gets a little tweaky when the big guy is in town.

Wallsend, I'm pretty sure that Rockin' Chair actually does pilot a tug. Ya just can't fake that salty language that he's so fond of. The big lie that he tells is that he "retired" so he can spend his time relaxing. That's a whopper!

And he doesn't like to talk about the feud, although he does like to talk about the food.


Entered at Tue Mar 11 00:08:16 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.176)

Posted by:

Dave H

Don't know whether Levon was a hockey guy, but the man was a natural talent with a stick--or two--in his hands.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 23:41:38 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Hole truth and nuttin but the trut

I'm being picked on..tell 'im Jerry.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 23:40:37 CET 2014 from (24.114.74.199)

Posted by:

Kevin J

BIll M: Answer is easy, as the most decorated member of The Band.....a natural alliance for Levon would have been hockey's most decorated franchise - Nos Glorieux- the Montreal Canadiens.

JT: tsk,tsk.........you risk getting your citizen card pulled...........in Canada, it is hockey not ice hockey........just as it is sweater not jersey....and dressing room not locker room.

Norm: safe travels.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 23:32:13 CET 2014 from (58.104.12.251)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Rockin Chair

I think you were exposed a couple of weeks back. We know that all this talk of tug boats is just a cover.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 23:11:06 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bill M..........AGAIN!

Quotes from Della & the Dealer Bill......I played that song with Hoyt.

Point taken Jerry....and well put.....in laymans terms so that even an ignorant dumb ass old.....over the hill, no good lowdown tug boat sailor like me can understand. Without having to research it too much either

I'm just goofing off. I'm leavin tomarraw to go back to my ship and further adventures on the briney sea. NOW HERE THIS....shit I forgot what I was going to say.......


Entered at Mon Mar 10 23:10:30 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Flexibility

By the way, for those who don't know, you should know that graphite hockey sticks 'explode' at the slightest provocation. But they also have great flexibility and can serve the player with a good wrist shot very well.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 22:34:44 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Future

Thank you for putting those of us who like ice hockey in our place. As we can see from this site, the 'pen' (in this case, the 'post') is indeed mightier than 'the sword' (in this case, a 'graphite hockey stick'). In both arenas, both here, and on the skating rink, the violence must be curtailed. I enjoy apologies when appropriate. We should get more of those. As for papacy, it has its ups and downs. Extremist approaches in all forms must be curtailed. Sensitivity to human experience must be front and centre. Extremist thinking augurs poorly for the future and is bad for the present. The 'feud' is only in the minds of those who want it to exist. It is certainly not in mine. Healthy discourse on topics is a good thing but mean spirited animosity has no place here. The tone is improving here. That's a good thing.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 22:19:57 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: they were talking hockey, and the cat was talking back ...

Wallsend: Good suggestion - back to hockey it is, though I don't think it's fair to exclude field hockey a priori. I'd peg Robbie as a Leafs fan - the hometown, the sweater he chose to wear on "Islands", the reference in "Raised On Robbery". The Black Hawks for Rick - largely on the spurious grounds that Vasko and Danko seem made for each other. Garth, a sometime Windsorite - the Redwings. Richard - the party-animal Sanderson-era Bruins, plus he had family roots in Oshawa (home of Boston's Jr A farm team). Levon?


Entered at Mon Mar 10 21:06:41 CET 2014 from (58.104.12.251)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Rockin Chair

Surprisingly my students are very happy (at least as measured by independent surveys) but then again they have open minds, are interested in drawing on their own experience to engage with texts and like to construct logical essays based on evidence.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 20:47:00 CET 2014 from (58.104.12.251)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Jed

I couldn't find my original post that Bob w. took offence at but I seem to recall saying something like 'surely no fan could be happy with the way things worked out for the reformed Band with Richard dying, Rick putting on so much weight because of his health issues and Levon ...'. Instead of saying 'looking so terribly ill' as I should have, I used a more colourful expression. What I wrote was no doubt insensitive especially for people who actually knew the man so I withdrew the comment. To suggest, that there was some kind of ill will behind my comments is not correct. With that qualification, I will let you regulars get back to your discussion of the ice hockey while I go and listen to Live at the Academy again.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 20:49:49 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Trace Bundy

Not sure if any of you have seen this......one of my favourites. Ever see some one play guitar using 4 capos at once?

As we were saying back to the music...........


Entered at Mon Mar 10 19:42:57 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.121)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Joan and Henry Gross

Joan- i couldn't recall your email address.Henry Gross is performing at the Port Washington Library this week. I think Thursday or Friday..


Entered at Mon Mar 10 18:50:01 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: music for seniors' moments

BEG's comment on womyn of music reminded me of this one -- a smoking track, and a lyric that expresses really well a particular emotion that comes with growing older . . . .


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:46:20 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Pat

I never said Sebastian's comments were"papal" and clearly welcomed comments from all family members of The Band.The only distinction made was dead or alive.And yes,Levon said the feud affected the music and as Larry said,that was Levon's "blind spot". We all have faults and blind spots.Why emphasize the negative attribute of people-even famous musicians? And,the ugly comment about Levon and his illness is ALWAYS out of order.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:40:50 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The terminology

Pat, my only question is, when one guy is pissed at another over whatever issue, is it right to call it a feud?


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:28:35 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Many genres of music
Unique musicians
Started playing professionally with The Hawk
Intrigued Other Musicians
Called themselves The Band

Are any of you going to contribute to Garland Jeffreys' site? I see the very cool Graham Parker shared his story of how he's sharing his love of music with his children.

One day I ran into a young man with his son. He said, "Hi Ms. M". I didn't know who he was because he told me that he was 30 now, so I said that I only needed his name and it would all come back. The name didn't register....Finally he said, "I was in the class down the hall from you. I was in your Music Appreciation Club."

For years I exposed everyone to many genres of music as in Robbie's latest book. I had them respond tothe music by just listening, drawing, writing, moving as a movement machine, dancing, etc. I tried to share that you have to sometimes be quiet to really feeeeel the words and music and other times your body will just naturally move to the music and the words will trigger thoughts and feelings. Needless to say many will especially know the music of Marley, Dylan, The Band and Robbie's solo, (too young for Louuu), various artists who are mostly rock, pop, reggae, soul, socca, calypso, country, country and western, blues, jazz, classical, hip hop, rap (no rap is not crap), Motown, etc. They also shared artists from their various ethnic backgrounds as I shared mine. Sometimes they'd make tapes for me. One of them exposed me to Papa Wembe.

"When you feel the music, you feel no pain." Marley


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:12:48 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Levon's very point was that the fued impacted the music, which is why the fued is still discussed.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:11:23 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

It's hard to imagine that reaction to Sebastian is put down as "papal" yet reactions from other kids should be welcomed. Shouldn't they all be welcomed equally?


Entered at Mon Mar 10 17:04:14 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

jed

Subject: Wallsend

The comments about Levon were mean spirited.And,if you want to explore where the music comes from,perhaps spending more time with the music rather then tabloid nonsense might be worth a go! I just don't get how a discussion of the feud impacts the majesty of the songs.And,I agree with the statement that comments from others in the camp of the late,Richard,Rick & Levon as well as from those close to Robbie and Garth would be most welcome.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 16:16:40 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The music!

That's it Peter V. The music! the music!


Entered at Mon Mar 10 16:13:26 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Once upon a time

Write the jingle...it would be more productive. Man if that is what you teach at a University I feel for any students. I couldn't believe what you were saying. Kicking some one when they are down? Have you experienced personally watching some one goes through the end of terminal cancer. How it changes their appearance, their thinking, their attitude? I'm experiencing that right now. Did you think about the people who really are close to and love the man when you wrote that?

Sure Peter, we've rehashed the same songs, points of view over and over here for years. Very often some thing fresh comes from that and productive. Sharing and understanding and respecting the point of view of others is a tolerance we all need to observe. However some of this is like writing the same sentence over and over. It makes no sense.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 15:47:50 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Two drummers made sense in the 90s … it freed Levon up to play mandolin, harmonica and bass as well as drums, plus Randy was a useful extra voice in the choruses and especially in Chest Fever. Randy was replacing the possibility they'd previously had of Richard playing drums while Levon did something else.

Richard Bell was important for many reasons, but could play organ as well as piano, giving Garth more choice. Jim was and is a great guitarist, and Many Rivers To Cross was a treasured live moment.

Autocorrection fun: I typed "giving Garth more choice" but it changed it to "giving Garth more chic.' A bizarre auto correct!


Entered at Mon Mar 10 15:10:16 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

To quote Bob Dylan.....

"Businessmen, they drink my wine, plowmen dig my earth. None of them along the line know what any of it is worth."


Entered at Mon Mar 10 14:42:57 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Here's a question: If Robbie and Garth were to get together to pedal through "the same old songs", would we be offended if they called themseves (and whoever) The Band?


Entered at Mon Mar 10 13:44:55 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Band

Thanks PSB for pointing out the name on the spine of the LP. My copy has it too, and I figured when I posted that I'd be found out! I'll admit to be somewhat facetious with that post, but my attempt was to diffuse some of the drama over the name, and provide a viewpoint that what they created, both pre & post Last Waltz, was about more than simply a name of a group.

The guys got together first, spent many years paying their dues, created their sound, and the name followed, almost by default, as Richard illustrates in the money losing celluloid adventure known as The Last Waltz.

When I went to Band shows in the 1990's, I knew that it wasn't the "original" unadulterated line-up, and I was acutely aware of what Robbie (and John Simon, and The Hawk etc.) had provided to the trajectory and lineage. But I never had the feeling that I wasn't seeing The Band.

On occasion, at Bob Dylan concerts, I've had the feeling that I wasn't actually seeing "Bob Dylan", but he still used his name. You can call him Bobby or you can call him Zimmy (OK, I'm being silly again).

There may always be people who think that Robbie is "evil" and then others who place him on the same level as Mother Teresa. My opinion is that both those extremes, are inaccurate, and the reality of any man's life, work, and relationships, is much more complex than a label. Other people may prefer a more polarizing perspective.

Wallsend, I think that it's completely OK to be as critical of anyone or anything thing that you like. But it's also fair to expect blow-back occasionally. That's the price of free speech. Especially when discussing someone's fatal illness. You kind of made it seem like cancer is something that was invented as a marketing device. But what really happened is that Levon got lemons, and decided to make lemonade. He could have simply given up in the face of adversity, and the fact that he didn't give up, is what should be applauded. I feel badly that you had a difficult time with his appearance, but the light that was shining from within as he persevered is where the focus should be. (in my humble opinion).


Entered at Mon Mar 10 13:28:58 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Days Gone By....Late Paul Godfrey with Levon and Robbie.

I "met" him on this site when I posted about Toronto's Rick Danko Tribute at the Horseshoe. We used to have to leave our email addresses back in the day so he emailed me. I was fortunate to have had a few conversations with him. He sent one of the books on The Hawk and our boyzzz (as Bill M likes to say). I eventually found my own copy. I sent back a brown eyed girl mix. He was such a gentle person. He admired and respected Robbie but felt close to Levon. He said they both grew up dirt poor. He always said that we should have lunch with JD one day...not to be.....Meeting Paul on this site was an absolute pleasure and will always be treasured. Thank you for the time we shared together.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 12:37:34 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Great post, Kerrin.

Speaking of Larry Campbell, I have tickets to see The Dirt Farmer Band later this week (Larry, Teresa, Amy Helm and friends). It will be the first time I've seen them live since Levon's passing... I've missed their voices and playing, as they were an integral part of his great comeback these past years, and very much look forward to seeing what they bring to the table.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 12:31:47 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Thank you Joan Jett, Joni Mithchell, Sade, Ani DiFranco, Patti Smith, Tina Weymouth, Bonnie Raitt, Janis Joplin, Annie Lennox, Billie Holiday, Aretha Franklin, Grace Slick, Mama Cass...............and others who made their own music and who didn't just want to be the women of other musicians.

From Joan Jett's fansite:
"This text is a simple but honest tribute to the women of our lives. Happy International Women’s Day, a date to celebrate all women who struggle every day against cowardice, bullying and discrimination and still make all our lives with all Their love, care and compassion. Anyway, every day is women’s day, so, keep rockin ‘women of rock.

Happy women’s day to all warries who wake up early and go fight for everyday living. To the ones who Believes in Their dreams and do something to realize it. But today is not the only women’s day, it is everyday. ☻

I've had to deal with cyber bullying on this site. It only made me stronger as my shield was always my love for music. It was a constant in my life from probably as early as eight years old. I guess I was listening first to the Beatles, Motown, The Beach Boys.....high school was Louuuu and Bob Dylan....University was Marley and The Band, as well as Punk/New Wave was my time.

You're welcome Kevin J. I might post some more quotes from the BAM mag later as well.

Sorry Jed. I didn't know that you also saw the Allman Brothers. I'm so glad, I'm glad, I'm glad, I'm glad......that you enjoyed yourself once again!!


Entered at Mon Mar 10 11:57:02 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Well Ben, I'm not one who thinks The Band shouldn't have reformed. Although they were not able to achieve the same sense of unity and artistic ambition as in the early days, I never got tired of seeing Garth play, dwarfed by a growing tower of rack gear at his side, or hearing Rick sing IMND possibly better than ever by the 90's. Jim, Randy and Richard were always "the new boys" to me, and I admit to not comprehending why Levon should need a second drummer, or why Richard should take over Garth's piano licks in The Weight, but I do agree that following the release of Jericho, The Band seemed to have a new lease on life, with a stable lineup and some well rehearsed shows. However, at the heart of most fans affection for The Band is the work from their original configuration, be it TLW or MFBP. That is, at least partly, why the Academy box set is big news. You can say Levon's solo releases didn't get much traction here, well if a new Robbie solo project came out, would it get much more attention, Sebastian or not? I doubt it, because it's not everyone's cup of meat. But things like Live at the Academy of Music on the other hand are what most of us are here for. More unreleased outtakes from the original five at their peak? Shit yes.

Yes, Robbie was replaced, but to claim that by definition he must have been replaceable is an untruth, because they replaced him with hired guns who gave them no artistic direction or focus, which is vital to any band looking to move forward. By your definition, Richard Manuel was also replaceable, because he was in fact replaced. Try finding support for that logic.

To further support my convictions about having some form of musical vision in order to make something truly special, Levon's Grammy Award winning CD's are a great example. I attribute their excellence not just to Levon's innate greatness, maybe a bit of publicity from his temporary recovery and the rambles, but to having Larry Campbell overseeing every part of the process with friendship, musical empathy, and experience. Not a moment too soon, the ship had a captain once more.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 11:15:59 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Neil Young's Pono Music set for launch.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 10:52:57 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band

Look, I love the music of The Band. They are unquestionably my favorite. I have a 6 disc changer in my car, which currently has 5 live concerts circa 1983-94 and 'Dirt Farmer' in rotation. I clearly have an affinity for the later versions of The Band. I'm 45 and never saw the original lineup. But, was fortunate to see The Band 3 times in the 90's and was very impressed with them. When I mention taking sides, I'm not talking about songwriting credits, the feud, etc. I'm really talking about The Band ending with Robbie's retirement in 1976 and the Band reforming in 1983 and continuing until 1998/99. There are plenty of people here who take shots at the reformed Band being sacriligous, being an oldies act, that Robbie was irreplacable, so on and so forth. I strongly disagree with those sentiments. Clearly, Robbie was replaced when The Band reformed, first by Earl Cate and later by Jim Weider. Those are simply facts. For some reason, I've been criticized for bringing this up. And to blame Richard's death on touring with the Band is in my view, the height of absurdity and pure speculation. Richard's suicide was tragic, but it's quite possible it would have happened years earlier if the Band had not reformed and resumed touring. I stand by my comments regarding a shift in tone here. there have been several Levon related releases over the last year, 'Love for levon' and 'Ain't in it for my health' which have not gotten much traction on this guestbook, while when Sebastian posted on here to plug the Academy of music set, people went nuts. It was like a papal visit. I would love if Amy Helm or Richard's children posted here with information about some upcoming box set of 80's and 90's era live recordings. I doubt that will ever happen, but you never know.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 08:49:13 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Twenty years into this GB, we are still here and discussing The Band. We deviate less into other matters outside music now, but that was what kept it going for years when there wasn’t a huge amount to discuss. And I was a prime diverter into other areas myself and enjoyed it.

Yes, the same stuff is repeated. I don’t mind. We’re inexorably reaching the day (God forbid!) when The Weight comes on the radio, and we say ‘Great tune! Where have I heard that before?. Though hopefully that’s a fair way away, but like old anecdotes, we’re happy to repeat the same arguments, as we only half recall our previous comments, and I think we argue in a far more balanced and mellow way than we used to. Lurkers who have come forward like Kerrin and Wallsend have given us new life, I think.

Personally I’ve bought and listened to everything by every one of them. Yes, I subscribe to the Robbie auteur theory over a lot of the material, though that should not undervalue the stuff everyone else brought to the table.. I don’t think Robbie ever displayed resentment to the other guys going on the road.

Looking back, the 90s Band was a lot better than the 80s Band, so they survived the loss of both the main songwriters as a touring band. The Cate Bros, much as I loved it when I got the videos, were three cooks too many spoiling the broth … a problem with “Jubilation” too. Tapes of the 80s Band, with and without Richard, are weak compared to 91-96.

Were they a great band without Robbie on stage? Yes, as a live act, especially 1992-1996. They played too many easy rolling covers though. Reading between the lines, that’s down to Levon's choice. Rick seemed to keep his more interesting stuff for DFA and solo. That's a great pity. They still had a songwriter on board and didn't utilize him.

I loved it that Dirt Farmer, Electric Dirt & Ramble at the Ryman brought Levon the acclaim and wider respect he deserved. BUT … Was he a bitter man over money issues? Is the Pope Catholic?

An alternative reality, which failed because of the bitterness AFTER 1983 as Pat points out, was The Beach Boys when Brian Wilson initially gave up touring. They produced Pet Sounds and the bits of SmIle in that period. A perfect world would have seen Robbie still contributing the songs while the other guys toured. Storyville would have been the perfect reunion album, without Robbie feeling constrained to tour with the guys playing it. But that never happened.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 06:25:33 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Wallsend, well put.

If there has been a shift towards "pro-Robbie" posts in the last year or so, I doubt it's because Sebastian occasionally posts, I think it's because with Levon's passing the anti-Robbie machine shifted into high gear. The main reason I may have taken a "pro-Robbie" tone, and others may have done likewise, is in reaction to the avalanche of ignorance and vitriol directed at him on YT and almost any other public forum where the topic of The Band comes up - but rarely on this site as I've noted. Taking Levon's side re songwriting, and ridiculing Robbie's singing, well that's one thing. But to suggest that Robbie wrote a few okay songs and played shitty guitar is going too far, Levon himself certainly stopped well short of that. There was a comment here about Robbie being "replaceable" that, unless I completely misunderstood its intention, smacked of the one-eyed, one-sided viewpoint that we have to tolerate elsewhere, so I thought it warranted a response which by necessity was "pro-Robbie". Balance is all I'm looking for, too. I just think it's a bit absurd to suggest that the most perfect band in rock had any members that were less valuable than others. I don't think Robbie deserves more credit than the others, but neither do I think he should get less.

Just FYI, I've been checking in on Jan's amazing website daily for 15 years, but never spent any time on the guestbook. Whenever I glanced at it all I saw was lots of non-Band posts, even lots of non-music posts, and in-jokes between regulars. Until recently, when I saw subjects that (I felt) I had some knowledge of being discussed with respect and with an absence of malice to both specific Band members and other posters. So refreshing after the YT comments section! So, apologies to the long term contributors who see this all as dredging up tired old debates, because this place is a new toy for me! The Band is dead, long live The Band...


Entered at Mon Mar 10 04:37:36 CET 2014 from (58.104.21.57)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Rockin Chair, you may think this is all crap but I make a good living teaching this kind of crap at a university (although, based on what I've read recently, I think I will try and write a good jingle instead).

I am one of the people who raises issues associated with the 'feud' but I don't believe there ever was a a feud and I certainly don't think this concept should be allowed to define the discourse associated with the Band. I have no ill will towards any of them, I just like talking about this stuff because I think their music was the best, it was magical and I would like to know where that magic came from.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 04:19:23 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

I'm a bit confused about wanting "Balance" to return to the GB. Frankly that seems to be an encouragement to take sides, which is the last thing any of us want. Even those, and yes it is the majority here, who think RR wrote the songs regardless of the way Levon felt still have nothing but positive feeling for Levon and bought everything he put out and celebrated his late success.

So if were all comfortable being all about both Robbie and Levon, why is that a bad thing? Why should we take sides? Silly argument really.

And for the record I think one's bias dictates how you read things. The quote in question where RR in my mind defends the guys from people who think they shouldnt have reformed-I took it at face value-RR was actually defending them from the folks (and there are a lot) Who when they see a band reform and hit the oldies circuit shake their heads and are a bit judgmental. The line about staying up late-I took that as a joke about none of us are as young as we once were.

I personally comfortable think RR wrote the songs while buying all of Levon's Solo work and being elated when he won his grammys. No need for balance here. Frankly I think there are a few people who consistently make inflammatory posts just for the sake of being inflammatory, and then need to cut it out. Were all too old for that shit.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 04:03:44 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: If only...what if

Jesus.....some of you guys must really be short of something to do. Wallsend has to make some chicken shit remark about Levon. Ben has to continue like a dog with a bone......nawing on the same crap.

So what if Levon had been the first to leave the band, for what ever reason....or Rick. What then? So the band ended when Rick died. That is probably the stupidest comment I've heard yet...from the prophets here who are all knowing.

The BAND...ended when Robbie Roberston left...for what ever reason. You can speculate and make up all the dumb fuck excuse you want. What is done....is done.

With a warm heart to remember the wonderful music we all were blessed to share is what "most of us here" carry the torch for and love to remember and enjoy.

This barbaric attitude to try and act like some meeting of psyco analists is so gawd damn stupid I think some of you REALLY need to spend more time with your shrinks! Oh and I spelt a lot of it wrong...but you get the gist so....who gives a fuck!


Entered at Mon Mar 10 04:01:38 CET 2014 from (58.104.28.226)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I was more than happy to withdraw the comments that Bob.w took exception to but I don't really agree with what Kevin J says about these things being 'personal'. If there was a private individual who was sick and someone made negative comments about their physical appearance, that would be a terrible thing to do. However, if someone is a performer, someone who makes a living by being a public figure, and they make their illness part of their professional persona, then that seems to me to be completely different. Levon gave many interviews about his cancer and he even allowed a movie to be made about it. He didn't keep private things private but made it part of his public narrative. I don't think you can do that and then say 'no one is allowed to comment about this'. The same with Sinead O'Connor. You cannot stick your political opinions in the midlde of your performance and then complain when people respond to it.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 03:51:22 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yes, we really need more evil Robertson posts. Btw, AMH came out nine years ago.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 02:47:57 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ben: C'mon.........in short order last week or so, you made the claims - all based on personal opinion without a shred of evidence - that Robbie had conspired with major label record executives to deprive his friends and former bandmates of the representation they deserved........you also made disparaging comments about his drug use and have been harping nonstop in just about every post you make about how mean and condescending he was in the comments he made about the reformed band......Those may be your feelings but there is no evidence at all - quite the opposite in fact - that they were Robbie's feelings ...........Why stay on this, why try so hard to find evidence of how upset he was - to what end ? Does the comment about his hoping the boys didn't "stay up too late" really bother you?.....you seem to take pleasure that by reforming and playing together they "proved him wrong" as to his comments about the road being a "goddamn impossible way of life"........do you need reminding that Robbie's great friend Richard Manuel after having gotten sober and cleaned up just a short while before returning to the road hanged himself from a shower rod after having "stayed up too late" one night after playing a glorified shithole bar......Do you really think anyone laughed and thought they had really proved Robbie wrong that night?

I have no problems with the "balance" here. I have never taken any shots at any Band member ever. While defending Robbie on forums outside this GB, I have directly objected to and taken on anyone who made derogatory personal comments of Levon and others - every time......At this site, I would expect the conversation to be mainly about the music and for all the members to be treated with respect........imagine going to a Led Zep GB and being concerned that things had been tilted to much toward Jimmy Page.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 01:57:56 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Kevin J

Kevin J , I don't see how I've taken silly and personal shots at Robbie. I've quoted his own comments and made some observations and comments just like most people do who post here.

I will say this, I've seen a real shift in tone on this guestbook over the last several months. Since last fall, with the pr push surrounding the release of the Musical History box set and the occasional postings of Sebastian Robertson, I think the tone here has really shifted towards a very pro-Robbie perspective. I would like at some point to see more balance return to the guestbook.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 01:39:34 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Robbie's comments about the Band

Robbie has given a lot of interviews over the years, generally when he has a Band re-issue, box set or infrequent solo project to promote. In some interviews, he has come across as generous and understanding towards the others reforming, in others he has made sarcastic and annoyed comments. I don't see how anyone can interpret the word "horrible" or the comment about them not staying up too late in any positive way. I don't see it as any stretch to conclude that he was unhappy that the Band reformed. The reforming of The Band goes directly against his pronouncements about the road being an impossible way of life. Clearly, Levon and Rick felt very differently as they released albums and resumed performing before "the Last Waltz" was even released. And regarding the question of which member of The Band was irreplaceable, I guess the clear answer is Rick, as The Band ended when he died.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 01:33:51 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bonk my friend.......what the hell....

Hold on.......I think any reasonable and mature person can enjoy honest and vigorous debate - don't like a performance or a book or an album - say so and do it with some punch and attitude - but Bob W is spot on to call out things when they cross the line and become personal....as comments about physical appearance associated with illnesses certainly are.......not sure anyone could enjoy that................and while on the general subject of personal comment.....perhaps Ben might take a break here from taking personal and plain silly shots at Robbie Robertson seemingly every time he posts. Let it go.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 00:43:25 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Cabbagetown/Saltspring Island

Subject: WALLSEND

Good for you to apologize for something that some folks don't like. BUT! We all have a different way of looking at things and I, for one, enjoy what you have to say. The goddam truth hurts sometime but there it is.


Entered at Mon Mar 10 00:39:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Rodriguez

Just back from seeing Rodriguez live in Bournemouth. Set-list and review at the link. Touch of the Chuck Berry … under-rehearsed, not very good backing band unfortunately plus bizarre setlist.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 22:48:04 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.56)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Bob.w

I am always happy to apologise if anything I write upsets people. I withdraw the comments.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 20:16:50 CET 2014 from (58.104.9.56)

Posted by:

Wallsend

BEG, thanks for the RR interviews. Two of the most informative ones I have encountered. Even though we keep ploughing the same field here these interviews show that new material does come to light. How can Robbie's attitude towards the reformed Band not be a legitimate topic of discussion on this forum? As for people getting offended because I called Levon bitter, the evidence for that statement is fairly well documented. People take these discussions here way to seriously. Everyday in the world terrible things happen, little children starve to death, people die in car crashes, people are killed in terrorist attacks. Those things are tragedies that are worth getting upset about, not the stuff we write about here.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 19:30:30 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Allman Brothere

BEG-I know you didn't ask me but ,what the heck! The Allmans were excellent finally focusing on the many songs from their own catalouge rather than becoming too guest/cover songs heavy,This is the last time this band plays together at the Beacon and I've been there for so so many shows since the beginning.What a pleasure!


Entered at Sun Mar 9 19:08:57 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

brown eyed girl: Thank you for the BAM interview......And the 2005 one - neither of which I had seen and both shining examples of generosity of spirit.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 18:08:40 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

COLLIDE THE GENERATIONS

Photo by Anton Corbijn (Robbie knows him too.)

"This all started when our daughter was born almost 18 years ago. From the very beginning I sang to her and she would sing back to me. Sharing music together has been one of the best parts of being a father and it inspired the song "Collide the Generations" which is also partly about the feeling I think all parents have about their kids passing them by at the speed of light. That got me thinking about how over the years just about everyone I know gets excited when they talk about sharing their favorite music with their kids and that younger musicians talking about older musicians influencing them is pretty interesting too. So here's a place for all of that stuff." — Garland


Entered at Sun Mar 9 18:03:55 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: War?.....smell the flowers Ferdinand..listen to the music

Here!here!.....Jerry. Night before last I lay in my bunk in my tug. Some years back that gawd damn Steve, (and my Susan) got me listening to CBC, particularly for the news.

I got tired of listening to constant talk of The Russian lunatic, the Ukraine and Crimea. Every time some super power idiot starts flexing their muscles, it always brings me back to the music that has been written because of this.

War, Buffy St. Marie's Universal Soldier, and my favourite I have linked here, Bobby Darin singing his, "Simple Song of Freedom". I missed Bobby Darin greatly, one of my heroes when I was young. Good looking young guy and so talented. I remember reading one time, he was the first in the USA to have open heart surgery, or at least one of the first.

Well I was tired of that crap and needed a lift. I put a DVD in my player, "Blazing Saddles". Now I don't know how many of you have ever watched the "Special Features" on the 30th Anniversary DVD. This is significant to me, and I hope you can understand the relationship that I see.

Mel Brooks narrates and explains his concept of that film and I have always, "got it". The interviews of the actors involved is great. First, Richard Prior was to be cast for the sheriff, but he was too wild and unreliable then. Mel Brooks wanted to cast John Wayne for the "Waco Kid". Wayne read the script and was horrified. He told Mel, I can't do that it's too dirty, (but I'll be the first to come and watch it). Gig Young was cast as the Waco Kid, but he had his own drinking demons then. The scene where he is hanging upside down in the jail cell was the first they tried. Gig spewed green bile all over the cell and they had to take him away in an ambulance.

As Gene Wilder was a great friend of Mel and really wanted the part, (Mel had thought him too young for the part). Gene won the part.

In this interview, Gene Wilder said the most profound statement about this (to me). In discussing all the dialogue. Chink, nigger jew, etc ,etc. Gene said this film smashes racism in the face, and it's nose is bleeding.

To me the whole point is to show people how shameful racism is. I think some of these people in those middle east countries and Russians need to see it. Putin particularly needs to see Dom Deluise and all the homosexuals in Tuxedos dancing. Every time I think of it I almost bust a gut.

Come on people now smile on your brother everybody get together, try to love one another right now.

We need more Richard Priors and Gene Wilders. In the film, "Hear no Evil See no Evil" Richard Prior is sitting on a bus with his sister, trying to pretend he's not blind, reading a newspaper. His sister says, you are an idiot pretending to read that paper. You think people can't see you are blind? You may as well try and pretend you are white! Prior looks horrified, grabs his face and says, "You mean I'm not white? Does Dad know?"


Entered at Sun Mar 9 17:39:46 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

JD

Here Here JT!


Entered at Sun Mar 9 16:40:28 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson Interview 2005

Robbie praises the Band members, shares he's picky and a perfectionist...

Hi Pat. How were the Allman Brother's? I was never a fan but....when they did perform the two songs I knew at Eric Clapton's Guitar Festival.........thoroughly enjoyed myself!! I guess some of us have felt like whippin' posts, eh?

Btw, the article I shared from BAM was from my own copy that I bought on eBAy. This site didn't have it in the articles section so I only typed out some of the interview. It's one of Robbie's longest printed interviews.....He also discusses why U2 received co-write credits as well.

Hope the few women left who still lurk were honoured in some way for INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 15:33:01 CET 2014 from (100.33.95.254)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Obsession

Obsession with these financial and personal issues between Band members is a thing of the past and only results in people hurling bad vibes at both the living and the dead.The "feud" is over,the people are mostly gone and the music remains.Calling Levon bitter when he's passed is simply distasteful.We have the music.I hope the focus is on that music,not the tabloid talk.Just one man's opinion!


Entered at Sun Mar 9 14:13:43 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: If music be the food of life, play on.

I'd like to remind all that the performances of the 80s-90s reformed Band were highly regarded by those who went and saw them. The albums were very good. You don't get Blonde on Blonde or Music from Big Pink every day.

I read the conversation here with interest but somehow can't get too hot and bothered about anything personal. I don't know these people. I wasn't there. I find it uncomfortable personally to surmise anything about anyone who I don't know. My interest is the music, the art. And at that, these 5 individuals were among the best we have had. Enough said. I'll keep reading but I must tell you, it leaves a bad taste sometimes.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 13:13:45 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: This Band, that band, whatever

This band surely refers to This Band Music - the publishing company which is acknowledged on just some tracks on Jericho (Remedy, Caves, Too Soon Gone and Move To Japan) and High on the Hog (The High Price of Love and Ramble Jungle). I didn't see this publisher named on Jubilation.

Ben - Robbie may be a control freak - I have no idea but wouldn't be at all surprised (though it's hardly a technical description). How can you jump to the next step - it seeming perfectly natural that he would not be pleased about the others reforming as The Band?

As to the 'sanctified genius' status - I'd say you were half right there. But there are no saints. I'd never say a bad word about anyone without a heck of a lot more evidence than I've got about Rick, Levon, Robbie, Richard and Garth.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 12:51:28 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: The Band?

This happened... errr... for a long time ago. I saw an ad of Roskilde Festival which is the biggest event here in Scandinavia. THE BAND will perform. WOOOOWWW! Then somehow I got information that JRR will not be there. I _cancelled_ the trip to Denmark. I was really upset! How can they (miss)use the name this way? I felt it was like Rolling Stones without Jagger or Guestbook without Peter V or Bill without Hillary. - I posted this just to describe a reaction of an ordinary fan in another part of the world. I would have felt same way if _anyone_ had been missing. Why not use another name, "Big Pink" for instance - or "The Boos"?


Entered at Sun Mar 9 11:12:07 CET 2014 from (121.211.87.72)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Lucrative songs...

A guy I vaguely know wrote a very famous jingle in Australia, which went world wide: he took a licensing deal. Now every day, he gets 2000 AUD. (Paid three monthly, of course...)


Entered at Sun Mar 9 09:52:14 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I assume The Band was a registered trade name and legal entity. Look at the small print on 90s CDs and it is This Band, not The Band,

In all the talk about the names on the centre label of Big Pink, I think PSB is the first to point out the simple fact of the label on the spine!

Robbie lists the Touchstone movies logo music and the Whooping Goldberg Theme among his credits. I read that in the UK, just about the best things to have written are the themes to the soap Coronation Street, played at least 4 times a week on prime time TV for 55 years, and the title music to the BBC News.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 09:45:56 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

It would be interesting to know when Shangri la was sold. That would be a good indication of when they though that The Band was no longer a going concern.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 08:40:40 CET 2014 from (72.78.48.226)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Re: The name game

Todd, right next to me is my original vinyl copy of Music From Big Pink that I got when it was released, and right there on the spine of the cover is printed: The Band.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 06:22:41 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

On page 374 of the Hoskyns book, Robbie is quoted 'I'd made a movie and three-album set about the fact that The Band was over,' he said in 1987. 'To come out a few years later and say, "Just kidding"...I mean that's my idea of horrible.'


Entered at Sun Mar 9 05:29:45 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Chris Willman
LA's Music Magazine BAM
January 15, 1988
Issue No. 274

Chris Willman: "Your sense of finality about the end of the Band always seemed fairly consistent, even after the other members were getting back together after all and touring together without you. This may seem like a stupid question, but did you ever have any fleeting second thoughts at all - especially in the days after Richard Manuel died - that maybe you should have gotten together with them at least one more time while all the members were still alive?"

Robbie Robertson: "No, I really felt loyal to that. After a while, when the other guys in the Band reunited...which I totally understood. If someone says, "Listen, this is in my blood, I can't help it, I've gotta do this, I've gotta go up and play in front of people, that's a big part of my life," I understood that, Or "I've got to make a living." I understand that very well. But it wasn't that way for me. I thought that this idea was on behalf of the Band, but apparently it was more idea of what...

See, the idea was really like, "Let's stop this. Let's get off the buses and the planes. Let's work in a way where we're thinking, 'Ok, we've done this. What's our next musical evolution? Where can we go from here? What is gonna keep us on the edge, and make it exciting for us and make us do real good things?" That was the idea.

After we did TLW, someone had an idea they'd want to try something, someone else wanted to try something, and I was going off to act in a movie and Levon was going off to act in some other movie...And that, I thought, was great. I thought, "Aha, now we're stretching, now everybody's spoke wheels are spreading out further, and I like that," But what it did was it just made everybody kind of drift, and then the idea of getting back together and working on these ideas became more and more remote all the time.

Then when they decided they were going to get together and go out and play, I never had anything to do with that. Because I thought, "God, I just made a movie and a three-record set about this! And then I just come out and say, 'I've changed my mind?' I couldn't do that. I felt loyal to the idea. I'm not saying that they were disloyal to it, but I'm saying, I guess I was just talking more on behalf of what my idea was, speaking for everybody."

Chris Willman: You think they had a different sense of what the finality of the whole thing was, or they just changed their minds?

Robbie Robertson: Yeah. That's what it was. They changed their minds because they missed it so much. And they thought, "Well, we've got this thing, what are we supposed to do, are we supposed to let it just melt away?" I think they just missed it.

Chris Willman: Some of them went out on the road individually and with other outfits in the interim, but apparently it wasn't just the road they missed, but the whole sense of being the Band?

Robbie Robertson: I think that's just what they had to go on. That's what worked the best, I guess, I'm not really positive of this, either. I'm kind of guessing, because I never sat down and said to them, "Why are you doing this?" I never did that.

We would talk about it, and I would just say, "You've got my blessings. I hope that it works really well for you." I never, ever wanted to try and get in the way or prevent it. They'd say "Well listen, can we use the name and everything?" I thought "Of course." It's more up to the sudience to figure out, to put a make on that, how they feel about it."

Chris Willman: Why do you think it's been so easy for you not to want to go back, whereas for others it wasn't?

Robbie Robertson: I've always been much more attached to taking something out of the air that doesn't exist and making it exist. And in performance, what you're doing is you're repeating something that you've done, or a variation of it. And it's exciting and creative on some level, but it's not the same thing to me. The most exciting thing to me is discovering something and finding a story that I want to tell or sounds and and an ambience that express my emotions without words. That creative process to me is the most important."


Entered at Sun Mar 9 05:14:29 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Name Game

I'm still not sure that "The Band" was even their name! Their first amazing album, simply listed their names, and I'm pretty sure that I've heard that their original contract had them named as "The Crackers".

I don't really see the possibility of Robbie stopping them from using the name, unless it specified in their contracts that "The Band" could only be used if it was exclusively all 5 original members.

When Levon left the Dylan tour, it doesn't seem like he made any effort to stop the others from using the name "The Hawks", so there was already a precedent of benevolence established from the early days. I may be mistaken, but just going from memory, I recall seeing them listed as "This Band" in the album credits of one of their 1990's albums.

Regardless, I think that having 4 out of the 5 original members certainly enables a justified use of the name. The Rolling Stones did it after Brian Jones was no longer available to perform with the boys. And he was an original founding member and guiding light of their early rise to fame.

If The Band was some sort of business entity, and it had to be put to a vote, I think that 4 out of 5 would be a fairly strong majority. That said, I wouldn't be surprised if they wanted Robbie's blessing anyway.....ya know, to keep things righteous. Cause that's the kind of guys they were.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 04:35:20 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Really. Like RR stopped working after 1976 and lived off his royalties. Right.

And Levon got mad about four months into 1983. And the other four members of the group made a lot of money from their Band interests well into the 90's. Those are facts.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 01:59:35 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.121)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Good Santana News. the Doobie news, well, country

See the link. Santana Band with Greg Rolie, Michael Shrieve, Neal Schon reuniting and touring, Michael McDonald with the Doobies,,,


Entered at Sun Mar 9 01:17:44 CET 2014 from (72.78.48.226)

Posted by:

PSB

Dave H, Robbie probably made a lot of money from doing soundtracks for Scorsese. And probably his biggest royalties actually came from covers of his songs by Aretha, Joan Baez and Three Dog Night. According to someone who once worked with the group, the remaining Band members were making six figures annually on royalties from the albums until the '90s. Maybe they got a little too used to certain expensive indulgences of the rock star lifestyle.


Entered at Sun Mar 9 00:19:17 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Wallsend, this place would be better served without the constant shots at Levon. Let it be.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 23:44:44 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I never saw it as condescending or patronizing. Just "you go your way and I'll go mine." A fair adult attitude.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 23:30:50 CET 2014 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

PS--And if RR had tried to sue or otherwise stop the other 4 from reuniting as "The Band" in the '80s, or even had he criticized them publicly for reforming without him, it would have been especially cruel on his part given the need for those guys to make a living. I think he handled it the right way.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 23:27:46 CET 2014 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

This is a delicate issue, and it's not my intent to get into the merits of the various disputes over songwriting credit, but the fact is that RR's composition royalties (and, perhaps, conservative management of his '60s and '70s earnings) left him in a position, and continue to leave him in a position, where he could live comfortably without playing gigs (or even recording frequently, for that matter). Obviously the other 4 were not in the same boat, and it's hard to escape the conclusion that one of the main factors prompting the '80s reunion was financial. Neither Rick's album nor any of Levon's solo records were especially successful, Richard and Garth weren't up to all that much between '77 and '83, and the back catalog of the Band wouldn't have been selling well enough in the late '70s and '80s to provide a strong source of income. Note that it's around this time that Levon starts to grouse about the royalties being unequal; it may not have been nearly as apparent when the original group was still together, but by the '80s it was very clear to him that RR had made a lot more money from the Band than he or the others had.

While RR might have been a little condescending with the "hope they don't stay out too late" line (though it's *very* revealing about what prompted his own departure from the group, no?), he was certainly diplomatic in spinning the reformed Band's return to the road as something that was in their blood--rather than mentioning the financial considerations that may have been closer to the truth. Not that this was wholly altruistic on RR's part--an acknowledgement that only he had been left with substantial wealth from the Band's original career would have been at best unseemly and at worst would have raised the questions about "credit" and "fairness" that have dogged the issue ever since, as all of us are wearily aware.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 23:22:30 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: River Song.

Townes. Not the lyrics with which I'm familiar but I'm sure there's as many variations as there are rivers in Texas.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 22:21:31 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Staying up too late

I don't see any way to interpret Robbie's comments as anything but sarcastic and condescending. From most accounts over the years, Robbie is a bit of a control freak. So, it seems perfectly natural that he would not be pleased about the others reforming as The Band. It seems that there are many people here who see Robbie as some sanctified genius who never uttered a bad word about anyone. And these same people will say malicious things about Levon, Rick and Richard. I just don't get it. The fact is if I was Robbie and had orchestrated a movie and three record set about retiring from the evils of the road, and the others decided to reform a few years later, I would be pissed off. It's a perfectly normal reaction from his perspective. I really think that he believed that he was irreplaceable and that there was no way that the others would reform as 'The Band'. Whether he had any legal way to stop them, I don't know.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 22:19:58 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: At least Waters got the inflatable Pigs in his lawsuit !

...On the subject of - ah - replaceable songwriting guitar players...wonder if John would have allowed Paul to take George and Ringo on the road and into the studio as The Beatles.........or Townsend been fine with Daltry, Moon and Entwisle carrying on as The Who without him..........Would Keith Richard have given his blessing to Jagger, Watts and Wyman being billed The Rolling Stones without him ?

I guess the better way of expressing those earlier thoughts would have been to say that I wish the the oldies/reunion tours as The Band had never happenned or that the O4 had chosen a different name or just billed their own names as they often did while working alone or with just two members of the original band......


Entered at Sat Mar 8 21:38:39 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

MARCH 8

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY!!


Entered at Sat Mar 8 21:24:04 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.220)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I am really glad Robbie never tried to stop them using the name The Band nor did anything to stop them performing his songs. One bitter ex-member was more than enough!


Entered at Sat Mar 8 21:15:41 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....overlapped....lesson:...don't take phone calls while in the "sign-in" section.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 21:12:31 CET 2014 from (24.114.52.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Below is the first time I recall ever reading RR's comments on the "reunion" of The Band from the late great Musician magazine. His comments are matter of fact and consistent with everything he has ever said.......For him, it would have been a lie, for the others not the case....Good luck to them...............I still feel strongly that he should never have allowed the use of The Band name to be used without him.

"Robertson wasn't offended by the various combinations of his ex-partners who billed themselves as "Band Reunions." "That's when I realized it was in some people's blood," he says. "They couldn't say goodbye. It was too much a part of their past. I didn't feel strange about it, but it wasn't anything I related closely to. I didn't feel like, 'This is a big lie for you guys to do this.' I just felt like if I did it, it would be a big lie. "


Entered at Sat Mar 8 20:50:27 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.220)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

The quote I was looking for was from the article above:

Robertson wasn't offended by the various combinations of his ex-partners who billed themselves as "Band Reunions." "That's when I realized it was in some people's blood," he says. "They couldn't say goodbye. It was too much a part of their past. I didn't feel strange about it, but it wasn't anything I related closely to. I didn't feel like, 'This is a big lie for you guys to do this.' I just felt like if I did it, it would be a big lie. "


Entered at Sat Mar 8 20:19:18 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.220)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Interesting how people read (or hear) the same thing and take away completely different impressions. I don't think Robbie's comment about the reformed Band contained any ill will. I was reading another article (I think it was on this site but I cannot find it now) where he said reforming the Band would be a terrible thing for him to participate in because he still had the same feelings he expressed in the TLW but it was OK for the other guys because they didn't feel that way. The reason I bought the Hoskyns book was because I wanted to find out when exactly the bad feeling between Levon and Robbie started. He quotes someone as saying by about 1982 Levon had the feeling that Robbie had ripped him off in some way. Artie Traum seems to have been someone with a fair bit of knowledge about this situation. BTW, I thought the only really weak song on Cahoots was Volcano. I don't understand why they would leave Endless Highway or Get Up Jake off and put that one on.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 19:57:38 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: CK Retro review of Cahoots. Almost spot on.........especially ranking of "Masterpiece" as I was thinking while watching Bobfest last night that what made The Band's performance stand out at MSG that evening was they were effectively doing their song..........as Clapton made "Don't Think Twice" that night his song.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 18:35:52 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Intros

For years Rod Stewart used to begin shows with The Stripper instrumental.........Perfect.

LINK: The great Rod and The Faces in all their perfect glory. Enjoy.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 15:48:27 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Peter, Paul & Mary

BTW, today's Toppermost is Roger on another Grossman client, Peter, Paul & Mary. See link.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 15:23:43 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK
Web: My link

Subject: Staying up late Ben

Ben, I remember that quote or a version of it. I didn't take it to be condescending, rather as a good natured, ironic comment. I can see how it could be taken as a snide comment but nothing I've read from Robbie elsewhere in any way demeans his former Band compadres. Try rereading it - I detect no evidence of bad feeling on his part.

before the internet there was little one could discover about The Band beyond the occasional article in the music press which largely ignored them following The Last Waltz. When Across The Great Divide came out I fell on it, and while not unaware of the limitations, as a compilation of what had been written over the years it was a must for Band fans. I agree he was far too negative about Robbie's first solo album.

Barney Hoskyns published a useful article in Mojo in January 1994. I think that was Mojo's 3rd issue which reveals something about the esteem The Band are held in. That's on the site somewhere. last week Mojo's website featured a piece on Richard in the 'Clip Of The Day' series - try the link above for the wonderful snip of King Harvest.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 14:40:31 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

ELVIS! How did that not come to me? Yes, but it works with a large band, The Blossoms and a blue sequinned jump suit. An ageing bloke shuffling on with four guys doesn’t have the necessary impact.

It’s pretty clear that Hoskyns investigations in Woodstock initially prompted Levon’s book, and it was out nearly a year earlier. A couple of points for me involve writing as if you were at an event when you’ve only heard a bootleg tape, but yes, it’s a fine book, as are his other books on music. That really pissed me off because I was four chapters into doing one. Then Levon's came out. End of project.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 14:27:59 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Band books

I've read and enjoyed both the Hoskyns and Helm books. I don't recall Hoskyns being particularly negative about the reformed Band. From my recollection, he was far more negative towards Robbie's first solo album and post Last Waltz endeavors. The quote from Robbie about the reformed Band having a good time and not staying up too late is very condescending and while not directly related to the "feud", this shows that there were bad feelings on both sides. I recall another interview where Robbie said he thought it was terrible that the others reformed The Band a few years after the Last waltz.

Besides these books, another good book on the recording history of the Band is Greil Marcus's 'Mystery train'. This book was published in the 70's, but has been revised several times with the discography getting larger and larger. The most recent edition covers the Band and solo work up to Dirt Farmer and the Midnight rambles. I don't agree with Marcus on everything, but it is definetly worth reading.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 13:10:35 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Barney Hoskyns

Peter, Also Sprach Zarathustra was Elvis Presley's opener from 1971 until his death. You'd need to be a fairly kingly performer to live up to that introduction.

Although I haven't read it for a while, I was given the Barney Hoskyns book when it first came out. I was a devoted fan, but in that pre-internet age I hadn't even heard about it, so it was a very pleasant surprise. Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it back then and have occasionally re-read bits since. I never detected negativity, only objectivity. Credit where credit is due, it was written at a time when almost nothing about The Band had been in print, apart from reviews and the same rehashed press bios. It was impossible, it seemed, to find out how Richard had died, and I don't think I even knew The Band were still active until Jericho came out. Hoskyns wrote, for the time at least, a definitive and unbiased book, and he wrote it the best way he could, traveling to the US and interviewing as many principal figures as would talk to him.

Unfortunately this did not include Garth, Rick and Levon, who had been warned off the project as Levon's own autobiography was then in the works. Although this did include contributions from Rick and Garth, it also contains far more historical inaccuracies and did more damage to The Band's identity and legacy (not just to Robbie's) than I am comfortable with.

I think Hoskyns' representation of Stage Fright, Cahoots, and the reunited Band, to be fair, would have been garnered from period reviews as much as anything, as I think music critics became less and less enamoured of The Band with each release. If Hoskyns had talked to all members the impression may have been the same; although we think of 1970-71 as prime-era Band, Levon wrote something to the effect that the issues that led to TLW began around the time of Stage Fright. Robbie has always blamed the darker nature of the songs on that album on everyone's disenchantment with success, and comments like that would be hard for any decent biographer to ignore.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 09:13:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You’re right, Ian. Fanfare is about 3m 16 seconds (depending on how fast you play it), though I noticed a YouTube classical one at 6m 20s. The ELP is about 9m. With Dylan, it felt like 15 minutes, but then they put the lights down and we stood and jostled for 20 minutes in the dark before Fanfare came on. It is pushing your luck though … Also Sprach Zarathustra would be worse and I have heard that used before a show. Bowie? Someone!

The last twice I’ve seen Fanfare For The Common Man live I’ve really enjoyed it … once was a classical concert in the park with fireworks, and the other was Asia … Carl Palmer does it as his featured piece (they each do one from previous bands), and it was one of the two or three drum solos I’ve ever enjoyed … strong sense of humour too, like Mick Fleetwood’s drum solo with electric drum pads tied to him as a suit.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 09:02:06 CET 2014 from (58.104.10.23)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Hoskyns is really negative about the reformed Band. I kind of think that way to but if I was writing a book I would try and be a bit more objective. He is fairly negative about Stage Fright and Cahoots as well. I don't think anybody thinks those albums are as strong as the first two but they aren't all that bad.

George was a greater performer. The concert for Bangladesh is my second favourite rock movie. George at his best, Dylan at his best, Eric completely wasted but still great. The only performance I didn't really care for was Leon Russell's, not because it wasn't good but the sexual content seemed out of place at that kind of charity event.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 08:40:41 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: The Prowse Brothers

a bit of self promotion. Sort of Bandish.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 08:07:13 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: PBS Broadcast of Bobfest 30 Friday

A few things:

* Just watched a recording of a PBS highlight show on Bobfest 30 broadcast Friday evening.............much as I remembered it but somehow I had forgotten just how strong Eric Clapton was on this night......he was in truly great form - on his featured song as well as with the ensemble.....beautiful playing actually......The Band were as great as remembered ( interesting that the shouts from the crowd as they walked on stage were "Danko, Danko, Danko" .......at that stage of things he was the guy the folks were feeling most strongly for) and weirdly, Neil Young, so impressive in my memory, was really just ok...........finally, I actually felt a little emotional seeing my favorite Beatle......George was not the natural commanding performer that Paul is (far from it actually) but there was a sincerity to him that I loved and he did well on this night......bless his soul.

* Wallsend: Barney Hoskyns............a book I probably should re-read but my memory when finishing with it many years ago was......"ok, that is about what I expected of The Band".......I do not recall a tremendous amount of negativity......as was the case with Levon's book where he ( or more accuratley fiction writer Stephen Davis ) went out of his way to tarnish the legacy of bandmates and The Band's legacy. I stand to be corrected but what was it in the book that stood out as being overly or unfairly negative.


Entered at Sat Mar 8 04:56:07 CET 2014 from (58.104.10.23)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I finally got around to reading the Barney Hoskyns book on the Band. It didn't contain much that I didn't already know but it was much more negative than I had anticipated. I know it is all familiar ground to the lags who post here but I liked Robbie's quote about when the Band reformed:

"People say they might blemish what the Band has done as a group even that it is sacrilegious. I don't think people should write about it that way. I mean, we are not talking about Matthew, Mark, Luke and John here. These are just some guys in a rock 'n' roll band who miss it, y'know? I hope they have a real good time and dont stay up to late.?"


Entered at Sat Mar 8 04:47:06 CET 2014 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

It's clear from a comparison of the CD with the original live footage that the CD version of "My Back Pages" from Bobfest features a re-recorded Dylan vocal (also the ending of the song was reedited to clean it up).


Entered at Sat Mar 8 01:50:01 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Dylan's introductions

My memory is that "Fanfare for the Common Man" was fairly short at the Dylan shows; it was the Emerson, Lake and Palmer adaptation that went on and on, wasn't it?

The spoken Dylan introduction was a done live each night, as I understood, by the tour manager Al Santos, though there might have been the occasional guest speaker, I suppose. The words came from a local newspaper article about Dylan published during one of his tours. It took his fancy and it got read out(tongue in cheek) from then on. Of course, it was done for far too long a period. I say "of course" because I imagine Dylan asked for it to be done each night before the show and they just carried on doing it until told to stop.

There was a Dylan tour, in the 1980s I think, where the walk-in tape consisted of old blues and country recordings - and very good it was, too. Some people tried to compile the tracks for themselves. I can recall getting a cassette of it through the post once.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 23:44:54 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: This band needs no introduction

To this day, and forever, I have not liked the 'shoulder to shoulder' shows. I went to Kool Haus inToronto to see Dylan perhaps just over a decade ago and it was not cool. I like seats. At the Masonic Temple, we sat on the floor in what turned out to be a fairly intimate show. As for 'Fanfare', its a little much but it beats the dribble of that little deficient speech by a mile. What's wrong with: "Ladies and gentlemen; Bob Dylan with his Band".


Entered at Fri Mar 7 23:25:13 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Dylan introduction that pissed me off was standing up, packed shoulder to shoulder in darkness for the entire length of "Fanfare for the Common Man."

Plus if you're going to do that, you're setting up the audience for something along the lines of "Robbie picking rhythm & Jesus picking lead" (in the words of Ronnie Hawkins). Which is not what you got.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 21:59:21 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The voice of the counterculture indeed

By the way, Kevin. I always hated that introduction. It was too cute by a half!. I found it hard to believe that it was every approved by anyone. There is inaccuracy (never the voice of the counterculture and never wanted to be) and a sense of irresponsibility. it is lame. I only ever liked the positive stuff at the end and there is precious little of that. I would have started the shows with: "Here he is: Bob Dylan: Only a song and dance man!"


Entered at Fri Mar 7 21:52:51 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

JT: and is was read with a nod and a twinkle....indeed the Fog I am referring to and which all who saw him live during this period had to endure was roughly 1990-1993 and it would be much more attributed to alcohol than - ah "substances"...... Some good stuff was happening in the writers room at the time and there were some good nights but mostly way too many cringe worthy live performances.

I was also a bit off in remembering the prime-time Letterman appearance .......all I said was true except the back-up singers were not Cash, Carpenter and Colvin but rather Mavis Staples,Emmylou Harris, R. Cash and Michele Shocked......their look of a parent willing with all their heart that their child gets the school play reading right is as I remembered it.

LINK: The Grammy Lifetime Award - and a performance ( 6 minute mark ) to end all performances during the Fog years.......stick with this all the way through as Bob's acceptance speech helps save the day and is thought to be the moment he realized he was in a place that needed repair. George Harrison is reputed to have watched this speech on tape hundreds of times he was so knocked out by it.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 21:05:58 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Not quite...

Not quite, Kevin.

'Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the poet laureate of rock 'n' roll. The voice of the promise of the 60s counterculture. The guy who forced folk into bed with rock. Who donned makeup in the 70s and disappeared into a haze of substance abuse. Who emerged to find Jesus. Who was written off as a has-been by the end of the '80s, and who suddenly shifted gears releasing some of the strongest music of his career beginning in the late '90s. Ladies and gentlemen — Columbia recording artist Bob Dylan!"

The reference suggests a 70s haze. We're talking late 80s early 90s, (a slight refrain?).


Entered at Fri Mar 7 20:52:23 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: You might recall that Dylan concerts for a certain period of time early 2000’s ( if memory serves ) would have a taped introduction that opened the shows and made reference to all sorts of things including ( though not in these exact words ) a lost and foggy period that he managed to climb out of……..What caused the fog, you ask? Alcohol and drugs were a large part of it…….as noted, to his great credit, he managed to get himself back in shape.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 20:40:43 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Bobby Charles

I haven't heard it yet, but I noticed the other day at my local record store that the Light in the Attic label has released a new vinyl reissue of Bobby Charles' eponymous 1972 Bearsville album.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 20:22:50 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Downtown Toronto Dylan

I forgot the residence at the O'Keefe Centre in the early 90s when he did 'Father of Night' on night and when Ronnie Hawkins joined him. Those were great shows and showed that Mr. Dylan 'still had it'.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 20:14:50 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Fog

Kevin J: Assuming there was a Dylan 'fog' (as you describe it), one must ask why? Everyone goes through peaks and valleys but when you look at the depth and breadth of 50 years of Dylan, this certainly qualifies as the least appealing period. But why did this happen? I don't know. The work with Grateful Dead was crucified by some, but I like it. I think he was reaching and trying to rediscover some of what drove him and rekindle the spark. From "Hearts of Fire" to those later 80s albums this is a period when great creativity was not forthcoming.

I think the Traveling Wilburys was very good and it is beloved and may have been somewhat 'lifesaving'. ('Tweeter' showed that the spark was still there). There must have been a great letdown when this experience was over and there was little to replace it. Clearly the creative juices were not flowing. Toad's I think was attempt to get things going again. The covers (Good As I Been To You, World Gone Wrong) were very good for what they were and whispered that maybe things were going to start up again. When I saw him at Canada's Wonderland with Paul James coming up for a guest shot, it was OK but not outstanding. When I saw him in Toronto in the 90s on Yonge at Davenport (old Masonic Temple) that was a very good show and clearly MTV unplugged signalled the return to form. He hasn't stopped since then.

I was very concerned in the late 80s that it might be over. I should have known better!


Entered at Fri Mar 7 19:34:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, I nearly posted yesterday that I'd always felt most of the participants did Dylan better than Bob did on the night.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 18:37:20 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thoughts on Bobfest: I have only seen the show once – live that night on tv – and while impressed by a few performances ( The Band, Roger M. , Colvin, Cash and Carpenter, and Neil Young ) I distinctly remember coming away from it depressed largely because of the very wobbly performance of Bob Dylan………… This was one of many prominent appearances that took place during Bob’s 3 year “fog” (others included a dreadfull romp through of LARS on a special prime-time David Letterman show where Colvin, Cash and Carpenter were with him and you could actually see on their faces great concern, bewilderment and a sort of parental hope that he could get through the song – and of course the legendary Grammy night mumble job on Masters of War)……..To Bob Dylan’s great credit, he pulled himself out this fog and by late 1994 was back in excellent form. The MTV unplugged is evidence of this and I just wish the 30th could have been delayed to the 35th…..Heck, Bob was in infinitely better shape at his 50th anniversary than at the 30th………………………Another major complaint was way too many performers and seemingly zero time or effort put into the planning of song selection……This was supposed to be a celebration of 30 years!!!!! – not Bob’s first 5 or 6 years…………. At least Lou Reed tried to demonstrate the great man had written something worthy in the 1980’s. There should have been an equal representation of songs from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s…..and anyone who does not think that was reasonable does not really know Bob Dylan’s career.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 18:32:38 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Going to see the Allmans at the Beacon tonight.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 17:02:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, John. I got the CD set because HMV didn't have the DVD or Blu-ray ("we can order them …" and they wonder why they're in trouble). If it's early HD and stereo, I'm thinking I needn't pay the extra for the Blu-ray. Anyone any opinions?


Entered at Fri Mar 7 16:56:29 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John Hammond Jr. at 'Bobfest'.

John D: John Hammond Jr was definitely there. He sang "See That My Grave Is Kept Clean". There is a DVD floating around somewhere with his performance apparently included. It was apparently an early performance (before the pay-per-view came on). I have never heard that performance by John Hammond Jr. If anyone has it, I'd love to hear it.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 16:47:03 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Hammond Jr.

JT made a point awhile back that John Hammond Jr. is not in the film. I'll be honest I didn't know he was even there. Well when I watched them all gather for Knockin' On Heaven's Door for the big wrap up the other night.....there's John Hammond!


Entered at Fri Mar 7 16:31:07 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan 30th Tribute

Apparently, Sophie B. Hawkins' performance of "I Want You" and George Harrison's "If Not For You," included in the original broadcast, (for whatever reasons) are not featured on the new DVD. :-(


Entered at Fri Mar 7 16:17:53 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Yes Thanks David P....I knew about Shawn's Cover of Robbie's Twilight but.....I didn't know that she spent some of her youth in London, Ontarioooooo??

Kevin J....I like Sophie's hair that day.

I can't believe that I I was at MSG and saw Booker T at Eric Clapton's Guitar Fest!!!!!!!!!!
I did see GE Smith with Dylan but that night was so lackluster. The Hawk was there too but sitting in better section of Performing Arts Centre.
For me the real let down of this celebration was....Bob's singing himself....Yeah, that's how I felt then and now.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 16:06:04 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sophie B Hawkins: like a good many performers that night, she was not in the greatest of forms but Sophie B. Hawkins take on "I Want You" remains one of my all time favorite Dylan covers......


Entered at Fri Mar 7 15:55:32 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Thanks John D for your insightful review of the Dylan 30th Anniversary DVD.

For BEG -- link above to Shawn Colvin's cover of "Twilight."


Entered at Fri Mar 7 15:41:46 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

First time I saw Shawn Colvin.....during performance with Mary Chapin Carpenter and Roseanne Cash at Bob Fest.....all beautiful singer-songwriters....favourite female performance of the night back in 1992 and today.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 15:28:30 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

My favourite thrasher...pure Canadian grunge. I felt Neil's cover of JLTTB dragged along.....but.........All Along The Watchtower......"This one's for you Bob"......pure passion and totally in his zone. I watched earlier the rehearsals for My Back Pages with all the boyzzzz.....and Neil just matter of factly tells GE Smith.....love him btw.....which verse he wants to sing and of course.....Neil gets his way and does it his way.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 15:11:01 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sinead O'Connor's interview and rehearsal of IBIY.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 14:45:51 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Anniversary DVD a Very Personal Review

Why the title, "Personal Review?" Because it's kind of a review for people who have seen the original version. I want to make it clear that if you did not see this film originally; or own a VHS copy (which I do) the film is great!

First the sound. It is in PCM stereo. Believe me you do not miss 5.1 not being there whatsoever. Great sound! A quote about the release.

"There's been talk of re-releasing the show for years. "We were just able to locate the high definition footage," says a source close to the Bob Dylan camp. "It had been sitting in Japan at NHK. Japan was an early adopter in HD and they had HD cameras at the event. What you're seeing now is their cut of the show, which nobody had ever seen before." Their cut of the show is important to remember.

The show is in HD; therefore 16x9 as stated. Early days of HD; so it's not going to be quite as sharp. Almost like looking through a soft lens at times. I said this was really a personal review because, there are things missing that I guess I just expected to see. Get to that in a moment. There are many close-ups; which I don't remember. The camera stays with the principal artist. In "Like A Rolling Stone" it's like they don't know who Al Kooper is. In the original version they had shots behind and beside Kooper showing his finger work. In Ron Wood's 7 days, Booker T does a great solo. The camera never goes there. There were more shots of Kelnter; in the original. Not here.

Look these are all minor things; but I missed certain shots that I remember. A note to Wallsend. Please see this film; because what's bothered me won't affect anyone who hasn't seen it. Neil Young once again reminds all of us that a senior musician lifts the bar for everyone. He will spark your interest. His two performances are worth the price of admission. The Band's performance is stellar. There's sadness knowing that Richard Bell, Rick Danko & Levon are gone.

Dave H pointed outsome songs were not shot in HD. Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat is a bonus video; because of that. We still get a 16x9 screen; but of course it looks stretched. Again no shots of Kooper. In Summary. I would indeed go out and buy it. It's a piece of history. Don't let my comparison's bother you; unless like Peter and I, you are big Kooper fans. I don't want to talk about Sinead O'Connor. It's been discussed many times here. I will only say that at the time, I couldn't figure out why she was the only one not performing a Dylan song; which is what this concert is all about. Then again I remember thinking if your going to do that; what a better place to do it; but at a Bob Dylan tribute; where Dylan himself changed things up so many times. So many outstanding artists. 4 out of 5 stars.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 12:33:37 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Studio gear

This has nothing to do with The Band or Bob Dylan but relates to the studio gear used by Mark Knopfler. I thought it might be of interest to some you folks, though:

http://guyfletcher.co.uk/index.php/2014mkrecording/2014StudioDiary1

To me, it seems strange that Bobby Colomby's drumkit would turn up at a studio in London but there it is.

British Grove is the name of the street in which the studio is located. It is in West London and, if you have ever travelled into London by road from Heathrow Airport, you have been within a few yards of it.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 10:27:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sony's "legacy"

“Sony Legacy” indeed. The CD menu to the Bob Dylan 30th Anniversary Concert is a shoddy piece of work. When inserted in the computer on CD2, most tracks have [Remastered] in brackets after the title. However Track 6 is apparently titled “The Band” by The Band, and track 10 is apparently called “Roger McGuinn” by Roger McGuinn. Actually they’re When I Paint My Masterpiece and Mr Tambourine Man.

On CD1 Track 7 is “Tracy Chapman” by Tracy Chapman rather than The Times They Are A’Changing. Track 3 is Show Introduction [Remastered] but Track 16 is “Introduction” and apparently they didn’t remaster the 25 seconds of Johnny Cash.

Someone would have been paid for the simple task of doing this. It just shows what standards of care and checking are applied by a major label to an archival release.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 08:35:39 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Bob Fest

Haven't seen BobFest since it's original broadcast, but the performances that stand out in my mind are: Lou Reed's 'Foot of Pride', Ronnie Wood's excellent choice of 'Seven Days', and Johnny Winter's 'Highway 61'. The Clancy Brothers rendition of 'When the Ship Comes In' was lovely too.

I was stoked that the Band was at the concert, but I'm not sure that the staging worked out best for them. I think it might have been better if they had been standing, rather than in rows of chairs.

Also enjoyed Clapton's bit as well as George Harrison on 'Sweet Marie'.

While I don't disagree with Sinead O'Conner's motive, I think that she ended up making it about her, rather than her cause. I love her music, I love her passion, and I love her voice, but ultimately, I think she made a mistake, and overestimated the fickle nature of fame, and how quickly the public can turn on you.

I have been a fan of her since the days of 'The Lion and the Cobra', which came out when I was in college. I still have a vivid memory of being in a basement bar which was underneath an all night diner on Farmington Ave. in Hartford, CT, just a stone's throw away from Mark Twain's house.

The details of that night are still a little foggy, but I have a fairly clear memory of Sinead's song, 'I Want Your Hands on Me' playing very very loudly, and I was dancing up a storm (very uncharacteristic of me) with some lovely gal's who professed to be lesbians, I'm quite sure that they were better dancers than I, but it was quite a nIght.

I've kept up with buying most of Ms. O'Connor's albums over the years, and I feel that she has gotten even better, and more focused as a singer as she has matured.

It's too bad that she never made it to a Midnight Ramble at Levon's in Woodstock. That would have been a interesting night. I think she's a good soul who has been through some difficult times.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 04:00:10 CET 2014 from (68.106.148.9)

Posted by:

Calvin

So I picked up the 45rpm of the Au Go-Go Singers today. The 45 from their only album in 1964. Can you pick out the voices of Young Mr. Richie Furay and Mr. Stephen Stills? Not a chance, but at least I now have it.

At a small little Blues bar not for from me that has Blues Jam Nights on Wednesday, and where my Assistant frequently sits in on drums, Muddy Waters Jr. Showed up last night.

Been a good week.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 03:44:41 CET 2014 from (58.104.18.92)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Sinead

Booing someone because you don't like their music is one thing, booing them because they have the courage to speak out against child sex abuse is a totally different matter. As to whether it was disrespectful to Bob, well, as the man himself might have put it: "How much arse-kissing does a man really need, before you say its too much".


Entered at Fri Mar 7 03:19:10 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks Kevin but I'm baaaack from my trip.

He had me as soon as I heard Mark's guitar.....The lyrics were icing on the gluten-free cake! Unfortunately now I have a sensitivity to rice as well. Uhhh....Has anyone tried a guinoa cake? lol

Sinead....Yes, I remember what happened very well....I can't imagine how she felt when she was boooooooooooed at MSG. You can see how upset she is when everyone's on stage for the finale....KOHD and she's not smiling at all.....but I loooooved how with anger she changed it up a bit.....with her.....Hey, Hey, Hey.......Kris was an angel for her and every woman who witnessed her shaming as she was trying to do the same to the Church. Bob I'm sure could relate at some level although the night was supposed to be about honouring Bob.....but she had guts......strength to draw on Bob Marley's WAR......speech by Selassie....

"On the question of racial discrimination, the Addis Ababa Conference taught, to those who will learn, this further lesson:

"That until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned: That until there are no longer first-class and second class citizens of any nation; That until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes; That until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race; That until that day, the dream of lasting peace and world citizenship and the rule of international morality will remain but a fleeting illusion, to be pursued but never attained; And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique and in South Africa in subhuman bondage have been toppled and destroyed; Until bigotry and prejudice and malicious and inhuman self-interest have been replaced by understanding and tolerance and good-will; Until all Africans stand and speak as free beings, equal in the eyes of all men, as they are in the eyes of Heaven; Until that day, the African continent will not know peace. We Africans will fight, if necessary, and we know that we shall win, as we are confident in the victory of good over evil."


Entered at Fri Mar 7 01:14:33 CET 2014 from (24.114.75.87)

Posted by:

Kevin J

BEG: I agree completely on Precious Angel......a lovely song. The "wow" was for it's inclusion in Pat's set...a congratulatory wow it was ! Travel well and have fun.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 01:11:53 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I know some guys who played against Chelios in youth leagues in the Chicago area but didn't really know him as he was a south sider. He left Chicago for California when he was in high school and eventually moved to Canada.


Entered at Fri Mar 7 00:50:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Before you all rush in, I think it was "clap so hard."


Entered at Fri Mar 7 00:48:40 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I imagine Sinead is a difficult person to deal with … she has mentioned bipolarity, then more recently that she’s not bipolar. I also recall the “Father Ted” spoof episode based on her, but I think Jon sums it up. What better place than a Bob Dylan concert to stand your ground on a cause? And the image I took was of one lone young woman on a big stage with a crowd baying at her. Manchester 1966? I recall the singer NOT getting on with the song at all, but muttering quietly until the audience finally stopped yelling and booing to listen, then saying (without checking) … “If you just wouldn’t clap so loud.” And, as ever, all credit to Kris for standing up to be counted. I wonder of Bob was offended? Probably not, I'd guess..

And the rehearsal “Don’t think Twice” from Eric is one of his greatest moments!


Entered at Fri Mar 7 00:24:08 CET 2014 from (108.24.39.214)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Band without Rick

I saw one of the Band shows while Rick was in Japan. The show was at the Monmouth County fair in 1997. From what I remember, Prof. Louie and several of the Cromatix augmented the Danko-less Band. I'd love to hear a recording of this show, as this was a unique line-up.

On a side note, I've been recently listening to a copy of disc 2 of 'The Last moving Shadows' bootleg which was recorded in early '86 at the Lonestar Café. This was one of Richard's last shows, and he shines. He does a tremendous 'Share your love'. This is a thoroughly enjoyable recording that should be released officially.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 23:52:04 CET 2014 from (70.29.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Kevin J...The groove, the imagery, the lyrics and Bob's idiosyncratic approach to his art...I love STC and PA especially..Precious angel

Precious angel
Under the sun
How was I to know
You'd be the one

To show me I was blinded
To show me I was gone
How weak was the foundation
I was standing upon?

Your the queen of my flesh, girl
You're my woman, you're my delight
You're the lamp of my soul, girl
And you torch up the night

Whew Pat B! I knew Chris Chelios wouldn't allow terrible food to be made under his name. Btw, did you know that he would come up to Ontario in the early days to develop his hockey skills? And sorry....I guessed I missed your performance by three days or I would have rebooked my flight. Ahhhh....So close and yet so far away. :-(

I watched twice Bob's Anniversary special down in Gulf Shores, Bama recently as it was playing on their PBS channel? Anyway, not only did they not show the complete show which I saw when we had to pay to see it live on our tv sets in 1993..........but.........Louuuu wasn't even on!! And here Ratso goes on about how Louuu was on tour and he was listening to FOP over and over and decided to perform a more obscure song of Bob's. He also shared how when Dylan couldn't get first class seats on a flight during his Rolling Thunder Tour (I saw this one in Niagara Falls, NY and Toronto!!!!), that a woman who was sitting beside him kept saying every thirty minutes that she couldn't believe that she was sitting beside your bobness during the flight. Dylan, apparently didn't say boooo....until at the end of the flight....Bob just said....Pinch yourself!


Entered at Thu Mar 6 23:41:37 CET 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Sinead at Bobfest

Perhaps Sinead thought: what more appropriate place than a Bob Dylan tribute concert to stand your ground for a cause. (Think Bob live 1966, Bob live 1979 etc etc.)


Entered at Thu Mar 6 23:08:42 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Peter: I have not seen the movie. I also have no doubts about the shameful behaviour of many in the church that ruined so many lives. Power indeed to all who stood up to expose this – Sinead included……….BUT……you missed my point which was about her selfish and inappropriate behaviour at the tribute concert for Bob Dylan……..she knew exactly what she was doing…..why else stand centre stage for what seemed liked minutes ( hell, Rick Danko himself might have been jeered had be pulled such a stunt ! ) if she was not planning this encore protest to the SNL stunt…………………in a The Band tie-in, note that she also “acted up” by being uncooperative with the filmmakers for The Wall –Live in Berlin show and refused to help with touch-ups required for The Band/Sinead performance of “Mother”……thankfully rehearsal footage was used and Rick, Levon and Garth got to be in the movie release at the end of the day – a nice boost for them at that stage of their careers as it turned out.......


Entered at Thu Mar 6 21:04:22 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sinead O'Connor

Kevin, have you seen "Philomena"? Just interested. While Sinead may not have been the first to point the finger at the perverts in dog collars (James Joyce did), she was still early on. Have you ever walked around St. Peter's courtyard on a Sunday afternoon? You wouldn't be left in much doubt about priestly preferences.

All power to Sinead. Her bonus "I Believe In You" on the new set is fabulous. No wonder the piano player wanted to play it having rehearsed it.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 20:44:44 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Emmett Miller & His Georgia Crackers

If you look closely at the photo of Richard in the studio in the link that BEG Angelina posted you can see a can of Hires root beer perched atop his keyboards. The Nick Tosches quote his from his book "Where Dead Voices Gather," which is about the black-face minstrel singer Emmett Miller from Macon, Georgia. A mysterious, little known figure today, his falsetto, yodeling style influenced such notable singers as Hank Williams, Jimmie Rogers, Tommy Duncan, Bob Wills, Lefty Frizzell and Merle Haggard. Mr. Tosches, in his his description of Mr. Miller's link to the evolution of American music, pointed out that his "startling and mesmerizing music seemed to be a Rosetta Stone to the understanding of the mixed and mongrel bloodlines of country and blues, of jazz and pop, of all that we know as American music."

Emmett Miller recorded with a group of musicians known as His Georgia Crackers, which at one time included Tommy & Jimmy Dorsey, Jack Teagarden, Gene Krupa and Eddie Lang.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 20:34:38 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Pat B: Thank you for set-list choices….. “Precious Angel” – wow. I’ve been listening Slow Train Coming and Street Legal in the car for a few days now. “Where Are You Tonight” has got to be in my list of top 10 Dylan songs. A quirky thing about Dylan is the power of the last song on so many of his albums…………..”Sara” on Desire, “Where Are You Tonight” on Street Legal, “Sad Eyed Lady” on BOB and “Don’t Fall Apart on Me Tonight” on Infidels….just to name a few off the top of my head.

Ignatius: Good to see you here again…….and a by the way, I will admit to never having known that video of King Harvest was shot in Robbie’s house rather than the Sammy Davis pool house.

BobFest 30th: I was going to let this go but my pal Bill M’s post on top of two or three others here in praise of Sinead O’Connor is a bit much to take……”she was surprised” Was she Bill? Please!………..Sinead O’Connor was selfish looney tune at the time……. she was not “ahead of her time” in bringing the issue of abuse to the mainstream – it was already a well-known and universally condemned problem within many areas of society including the Catholic church at the time of her episodes………… remember that a week or so before Bobfest she had gone on the most popular late night television show in the nation ( USA ) shot in New York and tore up a picture of the Pope……… although I am a Catholic, her actions on SNL did not bother me as she was the star of that show that week and she made a decision on how to use her time…perfectly fine……..however, a week or two later she finds herself part of a tribute show to Bob Dylan in the same city that has a sizable Catholic population and instead of accepting what comes with the role of provocateur which she had chosen ( read: a few boos – hardly surprising ) she acts like a wounded child, too inexperienced a performer to just get on with it and honour the reason she was there on this particular night in the first place............no one was booing the booers Bill. Some were boing the perceived rudeness of the actions of a week or so earlier, the later louder boos were mostly for the ATTITUDE of not going with Booker T and MG’s that had counted in twice trying to rescue the situation…….


Entered at Thu Mar 6 20:34:41 CET 2014 from (74.176.226.132)

Posted by:

Mike C

That's a good catch there, Adam. Levon would be likely be electric for JS.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 20:21:56 CET 2014 from (50.198.58.41)

Posted by:

Adam

Mike C - incredible pic, thanks! Look closely... Levon has an acoustic guitar, Richard on drums, Garth on piano. Live lineup for "Caledonia Mission" in 1969!


Entered at Thu Mar 6 20:16:57 CET 2014 from (74.176.226.132)

Posted by:

Mike C

Web: My link

Subject: Autumn 1969 Tour

A shot of the boys performing at Constitution Hall in D.C. on October 26, 1969. Levon on guitar, so "Jemima Surrender" may be the tune. Photo by my buddy Denis James.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 18:46:29 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Naw, BEG, that was Cheli's and I don't think it was ever franchised.

Thanks for all the great links.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 17:31:23 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"In a 1978 Playboy interview with Ron Rosenbaum, Dylan asserted, “The closest I ever got to the sound I hear in my mind was on individual bands in the Blonde On Blonde album. It’s that thin, that wild mercury sound. It’s metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up. That’s my particular sound.” Bob Johnston, on the other hand, states: “What I wanted was that mercury sound on Highway 61 and the mountain sound on Blonde On Blonde, and that’s what I got. I wanted people to centre on him. I didn’t want them to centre on Kooper’s organ playing or Robbie Robertson’s lead guitar part. I wanted to centre on Dylan first, and I wanted people to hear what he had to say. From Highway 61 up until we stopped working together, I don’t think I ever missed.”

Recording Sand & Glue Dylan’s voice, described by David Bowie as being like “sand and glue”, changed with each album, ranging from the husky intonations of his earliest records and the affected slur of Blonde On Blonde to the country croon of Nashville Skyline. Yet, Bob Johnston asserts that, on the albums he produced, this was due purely to the singer, not the techniques employed to record him. “What I used on his vocals — and what I used on Johnny Cash, Patti Paige, Marty Robbins and many others — was a [Neumann] U47 microphone with a power pack,” Johnston explains. “It was the old one and nothing was better. I put a baffle over the top of Dylan’s guitar so he could play while he sang, and I also used some EQ on his voice, but I never tried to change his sound. All I did was change sounds in terms of the mechanics. Whatever Dylan did — from Highway 61 through Blonde On Blonde, John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline, Self Portrait and New Morning — happened because he himself had changed. I never knew what he was going to sound like and I never cared. He was growing.”

Hey Pat B...So I'm sitting in the O'Hare Airport and walk by Chili's. Is that the chain that began with Chris Chelios from the Hawks?


Entered at Thu Mar 6 17:19:19 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Interviewer: Margaret Steen
Interview Date: November 15 or 16, 1965 Publication: The Toronto Star Weekly
Publication Date: January 29, 1966

"He picks up a Toronto Daily Star folded to a review of his Massey Hall concert the night before. He doesn't usually read much that's written about him, but one of the fellows in the band showed him this one line that really got him; The reviewer said Bob Dylan who once prefaced a song with the announcement that it "wasn't written in Tin Pan Alley, where most of the folk songs come from these days - it was written down in the United States," now belongs to Tin Pan Alley.

"Tin Pan Alley! I know that scene. Fat guys chewing cigars and carrying around gold records, and selling songs, selling talent, selling an image. I never hung out there'neither did anyone else who is big now. The singers 10 years ago were kids but the old guys ran things; now the people actually in control are younger - the managers, the record company-bosses, kids, in their 20's. Man, these old guys have no idea, they've been left behind and by the time they figure it out they'll be so old it won't matter. Then the pace was slower, you could sell a 'talent'; now you can't do that, the industry is too big, exposure too great, you can't manufacture an image because sooner or later that image is gonna have to talk"


Entered at Thu Mar 6 17:14:52 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: from the passenger seat

Autry DeWalt Mixon, Jr. got pretty excited about the whole thing . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 6 17:05:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Front passenger seats

There is a much told tale (so probably untrue) that after WW2 the USA and Britain were competing for the Saudi oil contracts. The USA presented the king with a Cadillac (or Lincoln), the British sent a Roll-Royce worth vastly more and a far better car. The Americans got the contract. The Rolls had no front passenger seat, being designed for British royalty who sit in the back. The king was vastly insulted as in his culture, the most important person sat next to the driver.

Thus Mickey Jones, as the best paid, would have got the front passenger seat.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 16:36:47 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Triumvirate of TW, CL and SF are all present and accounted for at Toppermost

Bill M: Thanks. Wilson's been done. A week or 2 ago) It is there. Check it out.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:48:18 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Suzette Green
Sep 29, 2013 at 21:13

"Richard, a.k.a. “Beak”, was a close friend in the Woodstock days. He had a wonderful sense of humor, was sensitive to all around him, and was a deep thinker. We would talk for hours on end, unfortunately we went in different directions, so I was unable to see him often. By 1976, his hair had turned totally grey, and we talked until dawn about his “adventure” in rehab. SInce then I have known several persons who committed suicide – it is not so much “shame” as FEAR that drives people over the edge. Sadly, it is no one’s fault when another takes their life – ultimately, they have made the decision. May we wish them peace, and the same for ourselves. Surround everyone you know with love, and let it be."


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:45:21 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"This one has recently made some rounds online. Elliott Landy's '68 photo of Rick Danko, 1st wife Grace Seldner & their dog Goober.

The inset photo is a more recent one of Grace (photographer unknown)."


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:34:12 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Nortwest

Subject: Front seat

I have planned this for years: to post something Peter V probably does not know, or even think. It comes now so Peter, fasten your collar.

"When Dylan and the boys drove from the airport to Hotel Flamingo in Stockholm in 1966 Mickey Jones sat on passenger's seat."


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:32:21 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm Band – 04/11/2008 – Live Oak, FL

Levon Helm Band - 4/26/2008 - MerleFest, NC


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:26:17 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Richard Manuel in the Studio.

"And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gat


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:21:48 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Thanks for another terrific Topppermost - Colin Linden this time. I detect a trend - Wilson to come?

Thanks also to Solomon and sadavid for the Sinead links. Like Wallsend, I knew nothing about any of this, and wouldn't have given anything to do with Dylan at the time a passing thought. Listening to Solomon's link, I think the secondary booers were booing the primary booers - let's call them the Pescites - rather than Sinead. Good for her; she was surprise and upset, but kept her cool, held her ground and left behind a riveting performance of a point that bears repeating.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:21:20 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Your Band has a frontman?

That's Cute


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:06:51 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The Band in Japan

Thanks, Peter. I found what I was looking for. There are two (what appear to be) handbills.

The first is double-sided and covers shows on 29 April and 1 May. It has a different photo of The Band on each side. Both photos are in B&W. It also lists, in small print, the musicians on the "Jericho" album, should you ever wish to know the musicians' names in Japanese.

The other is single-sided and covers shows on 4,5 and 6 May at "The Radio". It has one B&W photo which is the same as one of the photos on the other handbill but in much better quality (and much less dark). It also uses headshots from the main photo to name each of the musicians and the headshots are in colour, so the original photo was obviously in colour, even though shown in B&W on the handbill.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 15:01:54 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Actually The Band remained a 4 piece for some time after Richard died. In a phase reminiscent of the Grateful Dead's keyboardist bodycount, Richard's chair was finally taken by Stan Szelest in early 1990. Stan died during a rehearsal in January '91 and was replaced by Billy Preston from March-August 1991, until Billy fell afoul of the law. Richard Bell joined in early '92. Fred Carter Jnr did tour with the 4 piece lineup here and there, but I don't think he was ever a formal member, just part of the roll call of guests who orbited The Band in those days.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 14:20:46 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1994 Japan

The Band were in Japan in late April 1994, doing at least Osaka and Tokyo - the Quattro Club tape from Tokyo is a great show. Rick's problems were 1997, solo.

On the 30th Anniversary cover … sorry, I bought it just 45 this morning and have just started listening … I think Al Kooper should be listed on the main track lists for Like A Rolling Stone, as should Pat Peterson on vocals.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 14:12:55 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You're right about the centering of THE BAND, so it's late 80s or early 90s Sony era … but no Billy Preston, Stan Szelest, Fred Carter Jnr? Hard to date it. I would still guess the paper cut was done at the time of the Rick Japan bust … maybe it was a case of finding an existing photo where the arrangement allowed a cut.

30th Anniversary, inside sleeve has an IN Memoriam list that is telling … Johnny Cash, June Carter Cash, Bobby, Liam & Paddy Clancy. Rick Danko, Don Devito, Duck Dunn, Howie Epstein, George Harrison, Richie Havens, Levon Helm, Tommy Makem & Lou Reed. Phew!


Entered at Thu Mar 6 13:16:34 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Ignatius

Indeed, that fantastic clip of King Harvest was filmed in Robbie's art studio, I believe in September '69. They had returned from the Isle of Wight and were rehearsing for their first tour proper, beginning in October and culminating in Florida at the end of December, with an appearance on Ed Sullivan in the middle of it all. The only other song I've seen from this venue is Cripple Creek, so I don't know if any more were filmed or if this was it.

I agree, it's wonderful footage that epitomises, I guess, the way most of us like to envision The Band. Not the all-star-best-rock-movie-ever extrovertedness of TLW, but five guys in a room, getting down to business with the most modest of equipment, during a period when they were all still inspired by the freshness and uniqueness of their own work.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 12:59:45 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

OK, that makes sense Kerrin. I was thinking it was a photo from one of the Jericho shoots since Elliot Landy took it. Maybe it was just a one-off shot from the in-between years.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 12:48:12 CET 2014 from (124.25.160.117)

Posted by:

Kerrin

I think Ian is on the right track. This looks like a late 80's photo, so there would have been no Ciarlante and Bell in it. Only Rick has been cropped. The picture may have still been in use many years later but that doesn't seem likely as the 90's lineup had mountains of promotional material done for Jericho etc., so promoters would have easily laid their hands on a more current snap. There must have been another reason Rick was not appearing with them as the Japan bust was much, much later.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 12:25:00 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

The (ahem) episode Peter refers to was the summer of 1997...Rick was detained by the authorities while on a solo tour in Japan, and Levon and the guys had to play some scheduled US dates as The Band without him. That was my first thought when I saw the photo too.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 11:40:21 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Band publicity photo

You may be right, Peter, but I assumed, in the part below the photo, that "The Band" was printed in the centre and that the individual names below "The Band" would be in a line that was also centred. If so, there would be only one name missing. I just assumed that name would be Rick Danko.

Can you letter me know the year and month that the particular formation of The Band that you mention, Peter, were in Japan, as I seem to recall a publicity photo from that era in a Japanese magazine.


Entered at Thu Mar 6 11:22:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Colin Linden

Today's Toppermost is Colin Linden by JT - follow link. Lots of Band connections here.

Just got tickets for Emmylou Harris for Brighton in May!


Entered at Thu Mar 6 10:58:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

They could have cut all three … Bell, Ciarlante, Danko … and maintained alphabetical order … as the subtitle still works. Would this be from Rick's Japan episode? Didn't they do a couple of shows without him?


Entered at Thu Mar 6 03:00:45 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: Later Band publicity photo

This publicity photo is rather sad, in that it only shows three members of "The Band":

http://history.caffelena.org/files/original/9ce3554610ea8fe03aa87a7a90e6db06.pdf

As you can see, it comes from an archive of Caffe Lena, a longstanding Saratoga Springs NY coffeehouse. I know you guys will know much more than me about this but it looks as though their management has just cut Rick's image and name from their publicity photo and sent it off like that. Does that sound righ to you?


Entered at Wed Mar 5 21:51:51 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

THE PHILIP COHEN COLLECTION: DYLAN AND THE HAWKS, 1965

FYI: Legends, Icons and Rebels is available for half price at Toronto's World Biggest Bookstore which will be closing March 23.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 21:41:34 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

'Bob Dylan in concert @ the Berkeley Community Center, Berkeley, CA December 4th, 1965.
One of the first shows with the Hawks as the backing band. The Hawks later became known as The Band. Here is Bob in all of his controversial electric."


Entered at Wed Mar 5 20:59:58 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dave H

You beat me to it Dave. Just found this partial review.

"John (Cougar) Mellencamp opens the show with “Like a Rolling Stone”, the quintessential Dylan rock song. His second song is the classic “Leopard-skin Pill Box Hat” which is shown out of sequence on this release, compared with the LaserDisc. They could not get a HD copy of the performance."

Interesting. Thanks Dave.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 20:17:31 CET 2014 from (136.167.102.112)

Posted by:

Dave H

John D: My understanding is that the new Bob Dylan anniversary DVD and Blu-Ray sets are sourced from a Japanese feed of the broadcast that was, unlike the standard North American broadcast, filmed in high-definition (1992 was obviously the infancy of high-def). But not all of the songs were filmed in HD--or they were, but the footage was lost, etc.--so the "bonus tracks" on the set are those for which only standard definition footage exists. Hence their inclusion as bonus cuts rather than within the main sequence of the show. As for the exclusion of some performances even on the CD--leaving S. O'Connor off is understandable, but where are Carolyn Hester, Sophie B. Hawkins, etc.?--that is sort of mysterious.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 19:36:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

This is exactly the sort of thing that gets me hot under the collar too, John D! I was intending to go down to HMV to get a copy today, but an isolation valve on the central heating sprang a leak … the second one to do so in six weeks, all installed three years ago, so I spent the afternoon waiting for the engineer instead. I look forward to hearing what you think.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 19:29:55 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, I'm afraid most things are treated more as product than history.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 18:18:49 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: When you have a little time to think it over......

I just re-read my post and although it's accurate, I may have been a little over the top about it; but seriously; when you release History, I just want it the way I remember it. I know it will be well worth the watch and the listen.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 18:13:20 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John Donabie

Subject: Bob Dylan's 30th Anniversary Concert....1st Observation....Sequencing???

OK. I just picked up my DVD and double CD of the Anniversary Concert. I promised my son I wouldn't pop the shrink rap on the DVD. I did; however on the double CD. Important to note is that I have not listened or viewed it as yet. This is just about the surprises I found reading the credits on both of them.

First the DVD. If you saw the concert that night; on Pay Per View via Direct TV, you will remember the sequencing. When the VHS and Double CD followed they kept things in the same order. Now it's 2014. The first thing I notice is that Mellencamp and Al Kooper kick it off; with Like A Rolling Stone. Great, we're off and running. Hey? Why does it jump to Stevie Wonder and Blowing In The Wind? Where's Mellencamp's second song, Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat. Oh, here it is down on the bottom right of the package. It's listed as a "Bonus Track." NO it wasn't. It was the second song in. I continue to look down the credits for side 1. What happened to Carolyn Hester and Nancy Griffith? Oh here it is. Down on the bottom right hand side of the package, listed as a "Bonus Track." No it wasn't. I see Sinead O'Conner it credited with War on side one. The only true bonus track is Booker T & The MG's doing Gotta Serve Somebody. There is a 39 minute Bonus Feature called "Behind The Scenes"; which I seem to remember ran at the beginning of the concert

Now I jump to the double CD. Everything begins in sequence. I notice an afternoon rehearsal track of Clapton doing Don't Think Twice. That is indeed a Bonus Track. What's missing? A key track. A highlight for me. Love Minus Zero. The other Bonus Track listed is Sinead O'Connor doing I Believe In You; from the afternoon rehearsals.

Tonight. Watch the DVD; with my son whose pretty excited about it. So am I; but I want to appear cool.

OK So I just cracked open the double CD. Love Minus Zero is missing; but the O'Jays are there. Huh? Nancy Griffith and Carolyn Hester are missing from the CD as well. Sorry I'm just a stickler for History; especially if your old enough to remember that night. I'm sure I will enjoy it all. This is what happens when you post; after just coming through the door and you want to get it off your mind. Enjoy! I just figured; after waiting 20 years they could sequence it properly. Tonight I may forget all of this; if the quality is as good as they say. You can't help but remember how many people have passed on. I'll post tomorrow; about the concert itself. They say it is filmed in HD and is in PCM Stereo sound. Remember this is from the Japanese print.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 18:06:45 CET 2014 from (199.233.179.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Wonderful video make in Woodstock, not LA

The very gracious article about Richard cited on the "What's New?" page describes the King Harvest film as taking place at Sammy Davis's pool house during the recording of the Brown Album. I know you all know that it was taken in Woodstock at Robbie's studio. I only bring it up to renew a wish that all the film from that session somehow become available. Or if it is - does anyone know where or in what form? It appears to have been filmed carefully using multiple camera techniques. The color saturation dates it, but it is really wonderful. First saw it on the DVD of the Musical History. It is the next best thing to being in the Pool House in LA, no doubt.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 09:24:05 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

sorry about the bad link - meant to put Richard in the subject.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 09:22:02 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

I still remember hearing about Richard's death. It was on a local TV music show. The presenter only mentioned in briefly after playing a Bob Dylan clip. Something like "..and Dylan must be mourning the death of Richard Manuel who committed suicide ..". THat was about it. No Band follow up or anything. This was long before the internet when it took a month or two for the rock mags to make it out to NZ so I had no idea of what happened. I knew that the Band had reformed but there was very little written about it. Eventually Rolling Stone and the like started publishing tributes but it wasn't until the internet and this excellent site that I really knew much about Richard and his life.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 04:02:36 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Richard R.I.P.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 02:04:53 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: 30th Anniversary

Since I've been the one to constantly ask; over the years; when this concert was to be released on DVD, I really look forward to tomorrow's release. I've always had a lot of interest; in the quality of the musicians and their contributions to that night. Seeing Levon, Rick and Richard Bell again will be wonderful. Neil Young proves once again that he knows how to raise the bar.


Entered at Wed Mar 5 02:03:45 CET 2014 from (64.134.237.225)

Posted by:

Raincheck

Location: The great southwest

Subject: Richard

Richard was such a great talent. Of course, the great talent died in 1970 or so, and while we still got great things here and there (Share Your Love!), whenever I think of the tragedy of Richard Manual, it is not just a life ended too soon but a creative life so sadly truncated. No other voice can tug at me like Richard's. I loved his songwriting. His immediately recognizable drumming. I wish I could have more. Selfish of course. But I also wish he could have had more.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 23:55:01 CET 2014 from (173.3.254.192)

Posted by:

Ari

Been 28 years since Richard passed on. Glad he left us so many gifts.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:49:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I try not to repeat odd messages circulating on the web, but I just got this one. It's labelled:

To Mr Putin

" It's only when you see a mosquito landing on your testicles that you realize that there is always a way to solve problems without using violence.”


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:47:28 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Not that all this talk about Sinead O'Connor isn't great, but there are these.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:45:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the Sinead link. I hadn't seen it for a while. Kris K comes out of it really well, as I thought last time. You Tube has the SNL bit that caused the row in the first place. OK, watch "Philomena." Sinead's justification is there.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:42:45 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Ms. O'Connor's diatribe

Ras Tafari's original - the familiar bit begins around 9:10.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:33:24 CET 2014 from (58.104.20.222)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Sinead O'connor

The whole Sinead O'connor controversy completely passed me by. I don't know anything about her and I thought the Bobfest thing was just self indulgent so I never took much interest. The fact that people in the audience booed just showed what Dylan had become by the 1990s, the protagonist in Ballad of a Thin Man.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 22:25:35 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Notwithstanding

Bill M: Notwithstanding, simply put, without meandering, means "in spite of."


Entered at Tue Mar 4 21:43:42 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Sinead O'Connor at the 30 Year Tribute

I wrote extensively about the Dylan event at the time and a good chunk of it was about Sinead O'Connor's contribution. I agree with Solomon. I wrote that, apart from those who just sat and waited, about half booed and half clapped but, the more she waited, the clapping subsided and the booing predominated. Although you can hear the interchange between her and KK on the soundtrack, you couldn't hear it in the hall. I also wrote that, while she had the right to express her views, especially in the USA and especially at a Bob Dylan event, she basically blew the chance to sing "I believe In You", some of the words of which would have been approriate to her situation:

"they'd like to drive me from this town / they don't want me around // they show me to the door / say don't come back no more"

And she had two chances to sing it but cut the band off both times.

At the time, I felt she had a Joan of Arc syndrome and, a few days later, she cited Joan of Arc as a role model in an interview.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 21:34:14 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: You'd be the guy to ask, What on earth does 'notwithstanding' mean anywhere - here, there, everywhere ...?


Entered at Tue Mar 4 21:10:18 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 161 Years Later A Slave's Name Corrected

On the heels on Sunday night's Academy Awards the following correction was published today in The New York Times:

"An article on Jan. 20, 1853, recounting the story of Solomon Northup, whose memoir '12 Years a Slave' became a movie 160 years later that won the best picture Oscar at the 86th Academy Awards on Sunday, misspelled his surname as Northrop. And the headline misspelled it as Northrup. The errors came to light on Monday after a Twitter user pointed out the article in The Times archives. (The errors nothwithstanding, The Times described the article as 'a more complete and authentic record than has yet appeared.')"

I'm no Twitter user, but after a close read of that last, parenthetical sentence, I would point out that perhaps The Times would want to reword it to read: "The errors nothwithstanding, The Times, in the 1853 article, described Mr. Northup's memoir as 'a more complete and authentic record than has yet appeared.'"


Entered at Tue Mar 4 20:00:44 CET 2014 from (92.18.204.206)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan 30th Anniversary Concert

When Sinead O'Connor came on it sounded to me like fifty percent of the audience were booing and the other fifty were applauding. I think because she paused and just stood at the mic for a few secs the others just decided to boo her as well. It has to be the best line up at any concert and a lot of the rehearsals were filmed.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 19:56:32 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Music from Dark Big Pink

Bill M: Thanks for posting that John Till interview excerpt. Interesting that Grossman initially didn't want to release Music From Big Pink until pressured by Robbie. That brings to mind something that engineer/producer Elliot Mazer once mentioned in an interview about his participation in the recording of The Last Waltz:

"I had worked with The Band previously and had known them from Woodstock and Albert Grossman's office. I helped them with 'Music From Big Pink,' mostly around mastering time. They had mixed it, and Robbie [Robertson] was concerned about how dull and dark it was. We listened in my apartment and in the studio, A&R Studios, the old Columbia studios on 7th Avenue. Turns out that it sounded dark and it sounded great. They had not planned it that way, but the engineers that worked on it were very conservative about EQ. A lot of it was done live in the studio, and the 8-track multi-track tapes were worn. All of which can make a project sound dull."


Entered at Tue Mar 4 19:36:54 CET 2014 from (92.18.204.206)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Water Street Films & The Richard Documentary

Does anyone remember the Richard Manuel documentary ? It's a shame it went pear-shaped back in 2010. The guys had interviewed some good people well connected with The Band - Garth, John Simon, Ronnie, Jonathan Taplin and Richard's Son. I think they had also interviewed Robbie or were about to interview him. I guess it was all down to money? It's a shame it didn't get finnished or released.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 19:32:13 CET 2014 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: your TV guide

Bob Dylan: The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration on PBS -- check local listings for air dates in March 2014 (e.g. today!).

"Great Performances presents a special encore of highlights from the star-studded concert tribute to Bob Dylan in 1992 . . . . The Band, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Roseanne Cash, Eric Clapton, Shawn Colvin, George Harrison, Richie Havens, Roger McGuinn, John Mellencamp, Tom Petty, Stevie Wonder, Eddie Vedder, Ron Wood, Neil Young, and more—pay homage to Dylan and the songs that made him a legend."


Entered at Tue Mar 4 19:27:36 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT T

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'Streetsville'

Norm: The term' Streetsville' is not used anymore in Toronto. it is an old term for an area and you don't hear it anymore.

As for John Till, he was in the early 70s Janis Joplin band as were some other Canadians. I am in the process of doing a Toppermost entry for one of Canada's foremost musicians, Richard Bell, who all of us know from the reformed Band, but who had an illustrious career with many artists and was highly regarded by his colleagues

Norm, thanks for reminding me about Streetsville. I'm not sure what club John Till was referring to. Maybe Bill M or someone else can tell us. He knows stuff I will never know.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 18:43:45 CET 2014 from (2.139.242.183)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

"The Genius Of The Band’s Richard Manuel -- On the anniversary of his death, we look back at The Band’s wounded soul on film"


Entered at Tue Mar 4 18:20:42 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: JT: note Streetsville 1969

digging through the clippings, photocopies, etc., as I said yesterday Nothing earth-shattering here, just an interesting couple sentences from Robert Shelton's "No Direction Home":

"The Band soon aped Dylan's petulance to the press. In 1968, Robbie was delegated to halt the puerile publicity campaign Capitol Records planned to launch for the Band's first album. Capitol wanted to unleash a clattering 'Big Pink think Campaign,' with a contest to name Dylan's album-cover drawing ..."

And from a 1992 interview with John Till that appeared in "Spotlight":

"Richard Manuel, who lived near me in Stratford, was really into music. We formed a band in 1957 called The Revols. Richard also went to school with me. He was really into R&B and was always sending away for records he'd hear on the American radios stations that catered to the Black audiences. ... [We played] rockin' blues. Jimmy Reed, Fats Domino, chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. Richard same about 50%, mainly the uptempo stuff, and Doug Rhodes sang the slower stuff. ... [The Hawks when I joined were] me on guitar, Kenny Kalmusky on bass, Sandy Konikoff on drums, Eugene Smith on vocals and Gord Fleming on organ and piano. ...[I got into Janis Joplin's group because] Rick Danko from The Band told me about the opening in the band. ... Remember 'Music From Big Pink'? Well, Grossman didn't want to release it, and it got to the point where Robbie Robertson had to threaten to sue him before he would o.k. its release. ... [How The Band knew of me was that] after The Band became big they would still come and watch Ronnie Hawkins play whenever they were in Canada or whenever he was in the States. Therefore, there was a lot of communication between the past and the present Hawks. I got the job with Janis Joplin as a result of a jam session between The Band and Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks in a club in Streetsville in 1969. Grossman was there on the road with The Band and I must have impressed him because when I went for the job later I got it."


Entered at Tue Mar 4 16:56:17 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Nice one David.

I also like the one at the link above. 'Rocking Chair' from Festival Express.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 16:44:12 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Richard

This video clip captures Richard & the rest of the guys at their best.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 16:39:32 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Richard

Hard to believe that it's been 28 years now since Richard left us. It just wouldn't have been the same without him. Can you imagine Music From Big Pink without hearing Richard's voice on 'Tears of Rage'? And that was just the beginning.


Entered at Tue Mar 4 07:24:13 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.134)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Richard Manuel

Thinking of Richard today/tonight as the date reads March 4.......I loved how band mate and friend Robbie Ribertson described Richard a few years back.......a few words that describe a human being so beautifully:

"First met Richard when I was 17. This was months before he joined The Hawks. He liked to laugh more than anyone I knew. He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve... and could sing like Bobby Blue Bland. How can ya beat that? Love him and miss him." - Robbie Robertson 2011


Entered at Tue Mar 4 05:59:12 CET 2014 from (108.199.112.174)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Catching Up

I've been swamped the past month or so with many things and have not been able to check in here very much. I've been scrolling back trying to get a feel for what I have missed.

First of all, I wanted to say thanks to Calvin for putting the Kinks Toppermost list together. Nicely done, and sorry that I couldn't help out with it. I like the perspective that you offered, and although I'm a big fan of the Kinks, my knowledge of them is limited to particular slices here and there. Thanks also to Peter V. for the suggestion, and I'm glad that Calvin took you up on the offer.

The other thing that I wanted to comment on, is a perspective that was shared a few weeks ago, that Robbie was on a higher intellectual level, and that what he was doing was "over the heads" of the other Band members. Regardless of how one feels about the songwriting credits issue, I think it's woefully inaccurate to portray the dynamic of the Band in this way. These guys, all five of them, were incredibly sharp. I think the word genius gets overused, so I won't go there, but anyone who can cook up a gumbo like they did together (and make it look easy) is tapping into a creativity that is quite sophisticated. The beauty of it is that it doesn't necessarily always sound that way. That's where the gift comes into play, and they all had it.

To portray the dynamic as Robbie being "over the heads" of the other guys is insulting not only to them, but also to Robbie. Does anyone really think he would have partnered with these guys for as long as he did, if he didn't feel they were equals? He would probably be the first to admit that the songs they created (regardless of who wrote them), would not have reached the creative peaks that they did, without the high level creativity and talent (which takes a mind that can function at a high level). It should not be taken for granted, or minimized, just because the vibe they gave off was low key, laid back, and folksy. These were sharp dudes….all of them.

Did they like to party, and did they over-do it at times? Well, yes, and that probably got in the way more than would be ideal. But don't let the "good times roll / good old boy" image fool you. These were NOT simpletons. I also don't think that painting Robbie as a "babysitter" is very fair. If the goal is to portray Robbie as the "auteur" of the Band, there are more legitimate ways to do that.

I realize that these discussions happened a few weeks ago, and I'm not interested in rehashing "The Feud", or dredging up old business, but I feel that the comments I was responding to, are an unbalanced portrayal of The Band's achievements, and I needed to put my 5 cents in.

Selah


Entered at Mon Mar 3 23:48:04 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Simone Felice

Simone Felice - new album in March and a tour to go with it. See you in Bristol Peter (he's also on in Birmingham but I'll probably go to Bristol).


Entered at Mon Mar 3 22:20:08 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

I will gladly second Pat regarding Robbie Fulks. He's been on the radar here for many years as he was born in my home state of Pennsylvania. He's a great musical talent with a wonderful sense of humor as well. His work will make a fine addition to your collection.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 21:52:32 CET 2014 from (24.124.96.66)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Amos Lee interview mentioning Levon

Link above is to a Kansas City interview with Amos Lee. He mentioned playing at a Ramble, and his reverence for Levon.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 20:02:58 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, I should state publicly that Robbie Fulks is a genius and his new album is a real must for anyone here.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 20:01:15 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, it went quite well. 22 songs all told including I Got A Pony from Peter V.'s well loved Street Legal, Precious Angel from Slow Train, Standing in the Doorway from TOOM, The Man in Me from New Morning, You Angel You from Planet Waves, Ring Them Bells from OM, and Tweeter and the Monkeyman from the Wilburys.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 19:33:49 CET 2014 from (174.117.105.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'think alike... seldom differ'

Great minds... fools....


Entered at Mon Mar 3 19:29:27 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Too much JT….I had actually written something on "Wiggle Wiggle" in the previous post but nixed it……….I’ve always loved “Under a Red Sky” and once had a cat that seemed to dance every time “2 x 2” was played.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 19:11:53 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'The Genetic Method"

Gordon and Paul are getting excellent reviews, Kevin. They were loved in Montreal and did well in TO. I guess everyone has a clinker in them by someone's account. I can find something in 'Wiggle Wiggle' (would be in those songs never picked for a best of Zimmerman list) and didn't mind 'Russians' (the sentiment and the Prokofiev rif is nice) but clearly from reading lists and comments, my views are not shared by all. 'She Loves You" used to bug me but I have mellowed with time. Must be a function of 'The Genetic Method" as our switches go on and off over a lifetime.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 18:29:25 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: The Zimmermen

LINK: The Zimmermen - which one is Pat ? Just kidding, hope that the show went well.......always interested in the set-lists for these things as no other artist has a catalogue as deep where playing obscure ones would make so many in the crowd as happy...........game to play: pick any famous rock act ( think Stones, Who, Kinks, Band, Zep, Queen, etc. - eliminate 15 of their most famous songs and then try and play a bar and keep the crowd happy ) - Doing Dylan, it is possible.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 18:02:12 CET 2014 from (70.53.46.21)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: My Memory Palace exists but does have some important “barriers to recall” built-in…………………….prominent among these barriers are – “Bad Songs from the 1980’s” ( try not to gag when listening to the 6 hour man’s lyric “What might save us, me, and you/Is if the Russians love their children too” ) and “My Bad Haircuts 1978-1981”.

I enjoyed the bob w link – especially for the camera shots from the stage.


Entered at Mon Mar 3 15:35:22 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Thanks to the brothers W for their posts / links.

Bob: Interesting to see Bruuce excavate his inner Burden, though he couldn't possibly combine an English accent with a drawl to rhyme "long-haired" with "over-fed" as successfully as the great Eric did on the original version.

Coincidentally, I was doing some excavation myself, leafing through a box of old clippings and posters and stuff. More to come on that, but since we're on the subject of War, there was a story on Lee Oskar's jewelry-making brother that referred to the Denmark-born / Toronto-raised siblings' earlier days busking in Yorkville.

Ian: Interesting that Bill King mentioned Eric Clapton, Eric Mercury and Stu Woods in the early going of his very interesting article as all three appeared (along with a very diverse set of others) on an odd recording project (double LP also divided into single LPs) called something like "Summer Summit".


Entered at Mon Mar 3 12:53:11 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The heart-stopping, pants-dropping, house-rocking, earth-quaking, booty-shaking, Viagra-taking, love-making –Legendary Eeeee –Street – Baaaaaaaaaaand

Cheers Mister Wigo sir. Boy did I need that fix.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Mar 3 07:16:40 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: saw Buckwheat twice tonight

Tonight after seeing Buckwheat Zydeco play live in Sellersville Pa, I had to get a little more. I came home and cued up Jimmy Fallon playing out his last night at the old show with Buckwheat, followed by the most joyous tribute to The Last Waltz. All the musical (and then some) Muppets singing "The Weight" with a perfectly shoulder dropping Levon portrayed by Jimmy. Kermit & Ms Piggy singing the most perfect lines and Levon/Jimmy sharing the drums with Animal! Heavenly. And, for anybody who misses the Sesame Street Muppets performing, there's a clip on YouTube of Jimmy, The Roots, Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Elmo, Snuffleupagus, and GROVER (my favorite) doing the Sesame Street theme song.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 23:52:34 CET 2014 from (108.16.59.176)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

This one's for Al Edge.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 23:52:28 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: the fairer sex

Maybe this is part of what its all about. Oh wait, something about ethnicity and trade and promises and a naval base and .....

"Well the Ukraine girls really knock me out

They leave the West behind

And Moscow girls make me sing and shout

That Georgia's always on m-m-my mind

Oh, come on"


Entered at Sun Mar 2 22:41:04 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Songs of love and hate

... or was it consciousness....


Entered at Sun Mar 2 22:34:18 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Brain palace (attic)

Kevin: I know that you store everything in your 'brain palace or attic" (depends who you read) and so you had that song ready for action on recall and front and centre if needed. So, I wasn't worried at all that you would be in any way surprised to see it. It limped into your conscience before I ever wrote. I have complete confidence.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 21:49:25 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rod, no worries, on past experience, your guy is likely to win.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 21:44:13 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.216)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: An article you might like

If this has been posted before, I apologise. If not, you might care to read it:

http://cashboxcanada.ca/4831/levon-helm-music-big-pink


Entered at Sun Mar 2 20:13:00 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Pat B, our soldier is ready and waiting.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 19:55:57 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Guest book summit meeting...

The whole gawd damn works of youze guys are crazy.....although Pat Brennan without a doubt is the craziest.....I laughed so hard I blew a tonsil.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 19:28:28 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I mean, if one of us knew, we'd answer. I'm simply saying that I don't think the regulars are rudely ignoring the fact a question has been asked!

Like most English towns, we have a Crimea Road and a Sebastopol Road.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 19:23:51 CET 2014 from (24.114.58.134)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Oh my......I would have been happy to never be reminded of that lame song and without a doubt one of the lamest lyrics ever........."De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da" was poetry by comparison.

Norm: What is next ? In about a month, the leader of the invading country stands on the deck of a war ship with a massive banner which reads "Mission Accomplished"

Between Trains: Mark.....Not sure how Peter knows that nobody knows but like you I was hoping that Sebastian would at least address the question as others here regularly take time to address his questions........In fairness, he has been very courteous and mostly complete in his answers to previous questions, so maybe nobody does know but one would think Robbie would have some idea as to what the status of the song is - either in his control or with the older record label.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 19:16:14 CET 2014 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

GW Bush is preparing to respond to Russia's incursion by calling for the invasion of New Zealand.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 18:15:24 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Children

Gordon Sumner implored: "I hope the Russians love their children too".


Entered at Sun Mar 2 16:44:55 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacifc Northwest

Subject: The Weight!

Do you all realize that in very short order we may all well be at war with Russia? Very obviously Vladimir Putin is one of the craziest son of a bitches in power.

Summit meetings in Sochi will not be attended now by most of the western world as Putin has sent 150,000 troops into the Ukraine and seized a large area where the Russian troops have told Ukraine troops to lay down their arms. This is an act of war. What the fuck is next........


Entered at Sun Mar 2 16:29:59 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"To get back to Miss Piggy, you know she's the only one" is brilliant. I thought Animal's interjections were great. Best version of The Weight by anyone outside The Band!

No one ever answers the Between trains question because no one knows the answer.


Entered at Sun Mar 2 06:08:52 CET 2014 from (99.233.208.199)

Posted by:

Mark from Toronto

Web: My link

The Muppets doing "The Weight". The question never gets answered. When are we gonna be able to buy a digital version of Between Trains?


Entered at Sat Mar 1 20:50:49 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Tonight at 9pm, at FitzGerald's in Chicago: "The Zimmermen Do Dylan", featuring our very own Pat Brennan -- not to be missed!!


Entered at Sat Mar 1 20:41:00 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

"Garth Hudson, keyboardist with The Band and pianist John Noubarian going into London Music Hall of Fame"


Entered at Sat Mar 1 20:10:27 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.174)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Subject: Movie profits

Just came across this article which I thought was interesting. Seemingly this is common knowledge to people in the business but I knew nothing about it. Now I understand how the TLW never made a profit!


Entered at Sat Mar 1 13:42:33 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: re: Toppermost

There are a number of musicians who have been documented at this GB site who have made significant contributions and should probably be discussed and showcased in the Toppermost site. One is able to give a slightly different perspective with the options available there. Richard Bell heads my list but there are others as well. Some fine work has been done by Peter V regarding Richard Bell here. (discography). Clearly, the role of' sideman' is vital to the success of any band. Of course, there are many other musicians to whom to give due attention.


Entered at Sat Mar 1 10:01:40 CET 2014 from (92.54.156.156)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gene Clark

Check out Toppermost … Calvin has a first-rate article on Gene Clark today.


Entered at Sat Mar 1 08:05:42 CET 2014 from (74.101.59.125)

Posted by:

John W.

In the current news: There's a flood out in California, and up North it's freezing cold. LOL


Entered at Sat Mar 1 02:56:45 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joj e

Web: My link

Subject: douhhobors

Was in Baltimore.


Entered at Sat Mar 1 02:27:32 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: whoo

Never heard Mingus' 'Oh Yeah' before tonight. Whoo.


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